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Sample records for spherical wedge geometry

  1. CYCLIC MAGNETIC ACTIVITY DUE TO TURBULENT CONVECTION IN SPHERICAL WEDGE GEOMETRY

    SciTech Connect

    Kaepylae, Petri J.; Mantere, Maarit J.; Brandenburg, Axel

    2012-08-10

    We report on simulations of turbulent, rotating, stratified, magnetohydrodynamic convection in spherical wedge geometry. An initially small-scale, random, weak-amplitude magnetic field is amplified by several orders of magnitude in the course of the simulation to form oscillatory large-scale fields in the saturated state of the dynamo. The differential rotation is solar-like (fast equator), but neither coherent meridional poleward circulation nor near-surface shear layer develop in these runs. In addition to a poleward branch of magnetic activity beyond 50 Degree-Sign latitude, we find for the first time a pronounced equatorward branch at around 20 Degree-Sign latitude, reminiscent of the solar cycle.

  2. Robustness of oscillatory α2 dynamos in spherical wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, E.; Brandenburg, A.; Käpylä, P. J.; Käpylä, M. J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Large-scale dynamo simulations are sometimes confined to spherical wedge geometries by imposing artificial boundary conditions at high latitudes. This may lead to spatio-temporal behaviours that are not representative of those in full spherical shells. Aims: We study the connection between spherical wedge and full spherical shell geometries using simple mean-field dynamos. Methods: We solve the equations for one-dimensional time-dependent α2 and α2Ω mean-field dynamos with only latitudinal extent to examine the effects of varying the polar angle θ0 between the latitudinal boundaries and the poles in spherical coordinates. Results: In the case of constant α and ηt profiles, we find oscillatory solutions only with the commonly used perfect conductor boundary condition in a wedge geometry, while for full spheres all boundary conditions produce stationary solutions, indicating that perfect conductor conditions lead to unphysical solutions in such a wedge setup. To search for configurations in which this problem can be alleviated we choose a profile of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity that decreases toward the poles, corresponding to high conductivity there. Oscillatory solutions are now achieved with models extending to the poles, but the magnetic field is strongly concentrated near the poles and the oscillation period is very long. By changing both the turbulent magnetic diffusivity and α profiles so that both effects are more concentrated toward the equator, we see oscillatory dynamos with equatorward drift, shorter cycles, and magnetic fields distributed over a wider range of latitudes. Those profiles thus remove the sensitive and unphysical dependence on θ0. When introducing radial shear, we again see oscillatory dynamos, and the direction of drift follows the Parker-Yoshimura rule. Conclusions: A reduced α effect near the poles with a turbulent diffusivity concentrated toward the equator yields oscillatory dynamos with equatorward migration and

  3. Characterizing Student Mathematics Teachers' Levels of Understanding in Spherical Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Bulent; Baki, Adnan

    2010-01-01

    This article presents an exploratory study aimed at the identification of students' levels of understanding in spherical geometry as van Hiele did for Euclidean geometry. To do this, we developed and implemented a spherical geometry course for student mathematics teachers. Six structured, "task-based interviews" were held with eight student…

  4. Dynamic fragmentation of powders in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, A. M.; Floyd, E.; Longbottom, A. W.; Taylor, P.

    2014-09-01

    Experimental evidence from a wide range of sources shows that the expanding cloud of explosively disseminated material comprises of "particles" or fragments which have different dimensions from those associated with the original material. Photographic evidence shows jets or fingers behind these expanding fragments. Powders and liquids have often been used to surround explosives to act as blast mitigants; this is the main driver for our research. Other examples of areas where these features are observed include fuel air explosives and enhanced blast explosives as well as quasi-static pressure mitigation systems. In this paper, we consider the processes occurring when an explosive interacts with a surrounding layer of powder in spherical geometry. Results from explosive experiments designed to investigate the effects of powder grain size and powder fill-to-burster charge mass ratio (/) are presented and compared with results from numerical modelling to explore what determines the primary fragment size distribution resulting from explosive dissemination of a layer of material and when this process begins. The evidence clearly shows that the process starts during the first wave transit period of the powder material and, despite the surrounding material initially being a loose powder, shows the characteristics of a brittle fracture mechanism. Later time video evidence shows the same number of jets or fingers as are identified by X-rays of the early, primary fragmentation process. The number of fragments is only a very weak function of the initial grain size of the powder.

  5. Students Discovering Spherical Geometry Using Dynamic Geometry Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guven, Bulent; Karatas, Ilhan

    2009-01-01

    Dynamic geometry software (DGS) such as Cabri and Geometers' Sketchpad has been regularly used worldwide for teaching and learning Euclidean geometry for a long time. The DGS with its inductive nature allows students to learn Euclidean geometry via explorations. However, with respect to non-Euclidean geometries, do we need to introduce them to…

  6. Spherical perfect lens: Solutions of Maxwell's equations for spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anantha Ramakrishna, S.; Pendry, J. B.

    2004-03-01

    It has been recently proved that a slab of negative refractive index material acts as a perfect lens in that it makes accessible the subwavelength image information contained in the evanescent modes of a source. Here we elaborate on perfect lens solutions to spherical shells of negative refractive material where magnification of the near-field images becomes possible. The negative refractive materials then need to be spatially dispersive with ɛ(r)˜1/r and μ(r)˜1/r. We concentrate on lenslike solutions for the extreme near-field limit. Then the conditions for the TM and TE polarized modes become independent of μ and ɛ, respectively.

  7. Space Radiation Detector with Spherical Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D. (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave C. (Inventor); Wrbanek, Susan Y. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A particle detector is provided, the particle detector including a spherical Cherenkov detector, and at least one pair of detector stacks. In an embodiment of the invention, the Cherenkov detector includes a sphere of ultraviolet transparent material, coated by an ultraviolet reflecting material that has at least one open port. The Cherenkov detector further includes at least one photodetector configured to detect ultraviolet light emitted from a particle within the sphere. In an embodiment of the invention, each detector stack includes one or more detectors configured to detect a particle traversing the sphere.

  8. Space Radiation Detector with Spherical Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wrbanek, John D. (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave C. (Inventor); Wrbanek, Susan Y. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A particle detector is provided, the particle detector including a spherical Cherenkov detector, and at least one pair of detector stacks. In an embodiment of the invention, the Cherenkov detector includes a sphere of ultraviolet transparent material, coated by an ultraviolet reflecting material that has at least one open port. The Cherenkov detector further includes at least one photodetector configured to detect ultraviolet light emitted from a particle within the sphere. In an embodiment of the invention, each detector stack includes one or more detectors configured to detect a particle traversing the sphere.

  9. Explosive fragmentation of liquids in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milne, A.; Longbottom, A.; Frost, D. L.; Loiseau, J.; Goroshin, S.; Petel, O.

    2016-07-01

    Rapid acceleration of a spherical shell of liquid following central detonation of a high explosive causes the liquid to form fine jets that are similar in appearance to the particle jets that are formed during explosive dispersal of a packed layer of solid particles. Of particular interest is determining the dependence of the scale of the jet-like structures on the physical parameters of the system, including the fluid properties (e.g., density, viscosity, and surface tension) and the ratio of the mass of the liquid to that of the explosive. The present paper presents computational results from a multi-material hydrocode describing the dynamics of the explosive dispersal process. The computations are used to track the overall features of the early stages of dispersal of the liquid layer, including the wave dynamics, and motion of the spall and accretion layers. The results are compared with new experimental results of spherical charges surrounded by a variety of different fluids, including water, glycerol, ethanol, and vegetable oil, which together encompass a significant range of fluid properties. The results show that the number of jet structures is not sensitive to the fluid properties, but primarily dependent on the mass ratio. Above a certain mass ratio of liquid fill-to-explosive burster (F / B), the number of jets is approximately constant and consistent with an empirical model based on the maximum thickness of the accretion layer. For small values of F / B, the number of liquid jets is reduced, in contrast with explosive powder dispersal, where small F / B yields a larger number of particle jets. A hypothetical explanation of these features based on the nucleation of cavitation is explored numerically.

  10. Viscous Rayleigh-Taylor instability in spherical geometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    2016-02-08

    We consider viscous fluids in spherical geometry, a lighter fluid supporting a heavier one. Chandrasekhar [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 8, 1 (1955)] analyzed this unstable configuration providing the equations needed to find, numerically, the exact growth rates for the ensuing Rayleigh-Taylor instability. He also derived an analytic but approximate solution. We point out a weakness in his approximate dispersion relation (DR) and offer one that is to some extent improved.

  11. Performance of an isolated two-dimensional variable-geometry wedge nozzle with translating shroud and collapsing wedge at speeds up to Mach 2.01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, D. L.

    1975-01-01

    A wind-tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the aeropropulsion performance (thrust-minus-drag) of a single-engine, variable-geometry, two-dimensional (2-D) wedge nozzle with simulated translating-shroud and collapsing-wedge mechanisms. The investigation was conducted statically and at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 2.01 at an angle of attack of 0 deg and at varied jet total-pressure ratios up to 21, depending on the Mach number. The results indicate that the isolated aeropropulsion performance of a variable-geometry two-dimensional wedge nozzle is competitive with axisymmetric nozzles at transonic and supersonic speeds, but the isolated performance is slightly inferior for static take-off and low subsonic speeds. With the use of a simple tertiary-air ejector, the static take-off performance was increased.

  12. Cellular dosimetry of diagnostic radionuclides for spherical and ellipsoidal geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nettleton, Jo S.; Lawson, Richard S.

    1996-09-01

    Radionuclides which emit Auger electrons are widely used in diagnostic nuclear medicine. Studies have shown possible uptake of these in developing germ cells within the testes. In addition, mature sperm within the reproductive tract may be subject to uptake of radionuclides from the circulating blood pool. Though much work has been carried out concerning cellular dosimetry applied to spherical sources, such an approach may lead to significant errors when considering spermatids and spermatozoa, which are almost ellipsoidal in shape (with the long axis twice the short). A numerical method for determining geometrical reduction factors has been developed and used in conjunction with experimentally determined range - energy relationships for electrons, to determine dose gradients and S factors for homogeneous distributions of four commonly used diagnostic radionuclides (, , and ) throughout source regions of both spherical and ellipsoidal geometry at typical cellular dimensions. The results indicate that assumption of spherical geometry is acceptable when determining S factors for late-type germ cells, but introduces error into calculations of dose distribution towards the edge of the cell.

  13. Viscous Rayleigh-Taylor instability in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikaelian, Karnig O.

    2016-02-01

    We consider viscous fluids in spherical geometry, a lighter fluid supporting a heavier one. Chandrasekhar [Q. J. Mech. Appl. Math. 8, 1 (1955), 10.1093/qjmam/8.1.1] analyzed this unstable configuration providing the equations needed to find, numerically, the exact growth rates for the ensuing Rayleigh-Taylor instability. He also derived an analytic but approximate solution. We point out a weakness in his approximate dispersion relation (DR) and offer a somewhat improved one. A third DR, based on transforming a planar DR into a spherical one, suffers no unphysical predictions and compares reasonably well with the exact work of Chandrasekhar and a more recent numerical analysis of the problem [Terrones and Carrara, Phys. Fluids 27, 054105 (2015), 10.1063/1.4921648].

  14. Room geometry inference based on spherical microphone array eigenbeam processing.

    PubMed

    Mabande, Edwin; Kowalczyk, Konrad; Sun, Haohai; Kellermann, Walter

    2013-10-01

    The knowledge of parameters characterizing an acoustic environment, such as the geometric information about a room, can be used to enhance the performance of several audio applications. In this paper, a novel method for three-dimensional room geometry inference based on robust and high-resolution beamforming techniques for spherical microphone arrays is presented. Unlike other approaches that are based on the measurement and processing of multiple room impulse responses, here, microphone array signal processing techniques for uncontrolled broadband acoustic signals are applied. First, the directions of arrival (DOAs) and time differences of arrival (TDOAs) of the direct signal and room reflections are estimated using high-resolution robust broadband beamforming techniques and cross-correlation analysis. In this context, the main challenges include the low reflected-signal to background-noise power ratio, the low energy of reflected signals relative to the direct signal, and their strong correlation with the direct signal and among each other. Second, the DOA and TDOA information is combined to infer the room geometry using geometric relations. The high accuracy of the proposed room geometry inference technique is confirmed by experimental evaluations based on both simulated and measured data for moderately reverberant rooms. PMID:24116416

  15. Technology in Spherical Geometry Investigations: Reflections on Spontaneous Use and Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinclair, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    Students in a graduate geometry class used items such as paper, ribbon, plastic spheres, cardboard tubes, and markers to carry out investigations in spherical geometry. The hands-on activities helped students develop a new appreciation of geometry as a study of shape and space; however, the difficulty of subduing wayward elastics and drawing lines…

  16. Ground Penetrating Radar Detection of Ice Wedge Geometry: Implications for Climate Change Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K. K.; Haltigin, T.; Pollard, W. H.

    2011-12-01

    Polygonal features in the Canadian High Arctic are found in many areas, have diverse appearances, and occur in a variety of surface materials. As part of a larger project using geophysical methods to study ice wedge depth, width, and thickness, ground penetrating radar (GPR) data were collected across polygonal surface features on Devon Island. As with polygonal features in other locations on Earth, not all of the features studied on Devon Island contain subsurface ice, however polygons with notable surface troughs did contain fairly large ice wedges. The polygons in this study were formed in fine sediments near Thomas Lee Inlet east of the Haughton impact crater, and GPR data were collected at 200 MHz and 400 MHz using the GSSI, Inc. SIR-3000 system. Although both GPR and capacity-coupled resistivity (CCR) data were collected, the CCR data may have been adversely affected by melt water at the base of the active layer. Conversely, the GPR data show the thickness of the active layer, the width of the top of the ice wedge, and other subsurface stratigraphic features very well. Locations and widths of wedge ice were confirmed by augering and trenching to the tops of the ice wedges. GPR data clearly delineate the edges of the tops of ice wedges. Interestingly, the GPR-determined edges correlate with surface tensional cracks that appear to be related to subsidence above the wedge. It is possible that this subsidence is caused by an increase in active layer thickness and downward melting of the ice wedge in response to increasing temperatures over several years or more. If this is the case, small amounts of surface subsidence above ice wedges could be a useful indicator of past and current climate change in Arctic regions. To address this possibility, a broader study is proposed.

  17. The solid angle (geometry factor) for a spherical surface source and an arbitrary detector aperture

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-13

    It is proven that the solid angle (or geometry factor, also called the geometrical efficiency) for a spherically symmetric outward-directed surface source with an arbitrary radius and polar angle distribution and an arbitrary detector aperture is equal to the solid angle for an isotropic point source located at the center of the spherical surface source and the same detector aperture.

  18. Weyl problem and Casimir effects in spherical shell geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolomeisky, Eugene B.; Zaidi, Hussain; Langsjoen, Luke; Straley, Joseph P.

    2013-04-01

    We compute the generic mode sum that quantifies the effect on the spectrum of a harmonic field when a spherical shell is inserted into vacuum. This encompasses a variety of problems including the Weyl spectral problem and the Casimir effect of quantum electrodynamics. This allows us to resolve several long-standing controversies regarding the question of universality of the Casimir self-energy; the resolution comes naturally through the connection to the Weyl problem. Specifically we demonstrate that in the case of a scalar field obeying Dirichlet or Neumann boundary conditions on the shell surface the Casimir self-energy is cutoff dependent while in the case of the electromagnetic field perturbed by a conductive shell the Casimir self-energy is universal. We additionally show that an analog nonrelativistic Casimir effect due to zero-point magnons takes place when a nonmagnetic spherical shell is inserted inside a bulk ferromagnet.

  19. Variation of Space Radiation Exposure inside Spherical and Hemispherical Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Baalla, Younes; Townsend, Lawrence

    2008-10-01

    We calculate the space radiation exposure to blood-forming organs everywhere inside a hemispherical dome that represents a lunar habitat. We derive the analytical path length distribution from any point inside a hemispherical or a spherical shell. Because the average path length increases with the distance from the center, the center of the hemispherical dome on the lunar surface has the largest radiation exposure while locations on the inner surface of the dome have the lowest exposure. This conclusion differs from an earlier study on a hemispherical dome but agrees with another earlier study on a spherical-shell shield. We also find that the reduction in the radiation exposure from the center to the inner edge of the dome can be as large as a factor of 3 or more for the radiation from solar particle events while being smaller for the radiation from galactic cosmic rays.

  20. Stationary premixed flames in spherical and cylindrical geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronney, P. D.; Whaling, K. N.; Abbud-Madrid, A.; Gatto, J. L.; Pisowiscz, V. L.

    1994-01-01

    Stationary source-free spherical flames ('flame balls') in premixed combustible gases were studied by employing low-gravity (micro-g) environments in a drop tower and an aircraft flying parabolic trajectories to diminish the impact of buoyancy-induced convective flow. Flame balls were found in all mixture families tested when: (1) the Lewis number Le of the deficient reactant was sufficiently low; and (2) the compositions were sufficiently close to the flammability limits. Probably as a consequence of the reduction in buoyant convection, the flammability limits at micro-g were significantly more dilute than those at Earth gravity; for example, 3.35% H2 vs 4.0% H2 in lean H2-air mixtures. By comparison with analytical and computational models, it is inferred that the phenomenon is probably related to diffusive-thermal effects in low-Le mixtures in conjunction with flame-front curvature and radiative heat losses from the combustion products. The chemical reaction mechanism appears to play no qualitative role. In the aircraft experiments, the gravity levels (approximately equal 10(exp -2)g(sub 0)) were found to cause noticeable motion of flame balls due to buoyancy, which in turn influenced the behavior of flame balls. At these g levels, a new type of transient, nearly cylindrical flame structure, termed 'flame strings,' was observed.

  1. Simulations of plasma dynamo in cylindrical and spherical geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalzov, Ivan; Forest, Cary; Schnack, Dalton; Ebrahimi, Fatima

    2010-11-01

    We have performed the numerical investigation of plasma flow and possibility of dynamo effect in Madison Plasma Couette Experiment (MPCX) and Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX), which are being installed at the University of Wisconsin- Madison. Using the extended MHD code, NIMROD, we have studied several types of plasma flows appropriate for dynamo excitation. Calculations are done for isothermal compressible plasma model including two-fluid effects (Hall term), which is beyond the standard incompressible MHD picture. It is found that for magnetic Reynolds numbers exceeding the critical one the counter-rotating Von Karman flow (in cylinder) and Dudley- James flow (in sphere) result in self-generation of magnetic field. Depending on geometry and plasma parameters this field can either saturate at certain amplitude corresponding to a new stable equilibrium (laminar dynamo) or lead to turbulent dynamo. It is shown that plasma compressibility results in increase of the critical magnetic Reynolds number while two- fluid effects change the level of saturated dynamo field. The work is supported by NSF.

  2. Spherical nanoparticle supported lipid bilayers for the structural study of membrane geometry-sensitive molecules.

    PubMed

    Fu, Riqiang; Gill, Richard L; Kim, Edward Y; Briley, Nicole E; Tyndall, Erin R; Xu, Jie; Li, Conggang; Ramamurthi, Kumaran S; Flanagan, John M; Tian, Fang

    2015-11-11

    Many essential cellular processes including endocytosis and vesicle trafficking require alteration of membrane geometry. These changes are usually mediated by proteins that can sense and/or induce membrane curvature. Using spherical nanoparticle supported lipid bilayers (SSLBs), we characterize how SpoVM, a bacterial development factor, interacts with differently curved membranes by magic angle spinning solid-state NMR. Our results demonstrate that SSLBs are an effective system for structural and topological studies of membrane geometry-sensitive molecules.

  3. Multigroup Time-Independent Neutron Transport Code System for Plane or Spherical Geometry.

    1986-12-01

    Version 00 PALLAS-PL/SP solves multigroup time-independent one-dimensional neutron transport problems in plane or spherical geometry. The problems solved are subject to a variety of boundary conditions or a distributed source. General anisotropic scattering problems are treated for solving deep-penetration problems in which angle-dependent neutron spectra are calculated in detail.

  4. Nematic liquid crystal in the wedge and edge geometry in the case of homeotropic alignment.

    PubMed

    Poniewierski, A

    2010-02-01

    Nematic liquid crystal confined to a wedge or edge is studied on the assumption that the confining surfaces provide strong and weak homeotropic anchorings, respectively. Both infinite and finite systems are considered. The model based on the Frank-Oseen and Rapini-Papoular formalisms predicts two textures of opposite rotations of the director as in the case of strong anchoring on both surfaces. However, the presence of weak anchoring results in a length scale lambda which characterizes the crossover between the regions close to the apex and far from it. The ratio lambda/b , where b is the extrapolation length, is a function of the opening angle alpha. Both stable and metastable textures are considered and the mechanism by which a texture loses its stability is found. It is related to the formation of a defect-like structure at the surface of weak anchoring whose distance from the apex is lambda(alpha) and the loss of stability is signalled by the divergence of lambda. Only in the limit alpha --> 2tau, the defect-like structure transforms into a defect of strength -1/2 located at a finite distance from the apex. PMID:20195687

  5. Ablation Front Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Experiments in Spherically Convergent Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Glendinning, S.G.; Cherfils, C.; Colvin, J.; Divol, L.; Galmiche, D.; Haan, S.; Marinak, M.M.; Remington, B.A.; Richard, A.L.; Wallace, R.

    1999-11-03

    Experiments were performed on the Nova laser, using indirectly driven capsules mounted in cylindrical gold hohlraums, to measure the Rayleigh-Taylor growth at the ablation front by time-resolved radiography. Modulations were preformed on the surface of Ge-doped plastic capsules. With initial modulations of 4 {micro}m, growth factors of about 6 in optical depth were seen, in agreement with simulations using the radiation hydrocode FCI2. With initial modulations of 1 {micro}m, growth factors of about 100-150 in optical depth were seen. The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability at the ablation front in an inertial confinement fusion capsule has been the subject of considerable investigation. Much of this research has been concentrated on planar experiments, in which RT growth is inferred from radiography. The evolution is somewhat different in a converging geometry; the spatial wavelength decreases (affecting the onset of nonlinear saturation), and the shell thickens and compresses rather than decompressing as in a planar geometry. In a cylindrically convergent geometry, the latter effect is proportional to the radius, while in spherically convergent geometry, the latter effect is proportional to the radius squared. Experiments were performed on the Nova and Omega lasers in cylindrical geometry (using both direct and indirect drive) and have been performed in spherical geometry using direct drive.

  6. Three-dimensional finite-element elastic analysis of a thermally cycled single-edge wedge geometry specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bizon, P. T.; Hill, R. J.; Guilliams, B. P.; Drake, S. K.; Kladden, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    An elastic stress analysis was performed on a wedge specimen (prismatic bar with single-wedge cross section) subjected to thermal cycles in fluidized beds. Seven different combinations consisting of three alloys (NASA TAZ-8A, 316 stainless steel, and A-286) and four thermal cycling conditions were analyzed. The analyses were performed as a joint effort of two laboratories using different models and computer programs (NASTRAN and ISO3DQ). Stress, strain, and temperature results are presented.

  7. Nonlocal Electrostatics in Spherical Geometries Using Eigenfunction Expansions of Boundary-Integral Operators

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P.; Knepley, Matthew G.; Brune, Peter

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present an exact, infinite-series solution to Lorentz nonlocal continuum electrostatics for an arbitrary charge distribution in a spherical solute. Our approach relies on two key steps: (1) re-formulating the PDE problem using boundary-integral equations, and (2) diagonalizing the boundary-integral operators using the fact that their eigenfunctions are the surface spherical harmonics. To introduce this uncommon approach for calculations in separable geometries, we first re-derive Kirkwood’s classic results for a protein surrounded concentrically by a pure-water ion-exclusion (Stern) layer and then a dilute electrolyte, which is modeled with the linearized Poisson–Boltzmann equation. The eigenfunction-expansion approach provides a computationally efficient way to test some implications of nonlocal models, including estimating the reasonable range of the nonlocal length-scale parameter λ. Our results suggest that nonlocal solvent response may help to reduce the need for very high dielectric constants in calculating pH-dependent protein behavior, though more sophisticated nonlocal models are needed to resolve this question in full. An open-source MATLAB implementation of our approach is freely available online. PMID:26273581

  8. A standard test set for numerical approximations to the shallow water equations in spherical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Williamson, D.L.; Hack, J.J.; Jakob, R.; Swarztrauber, P.N. ); Drake, J.B. )

    1991-08-01

    A suite of seven test cases is proposed for the evaluation of numerical methods intended for the solution of the shallow water equations in spherical geometry. The shallow water equations exhibit the major difficulties associated with the horizontal dynamical aspects of atmospheric modeling on the spherical earth. These cases are designed for use in the evaluation of numerical methods proposed for climate modeling and to identify the potential trade-offs which must always be made in numerical modeling. Before a proposed scheme is applied to a full baroclinic atmospheric model it must perform well on these problems in comparison with other currently accepted numerical methods. The cases are presented in order of complexity. They consist of advection across the poles, steady state geostrophically balanced flow of both global and local scales, forced nonlinear advection of an isolated low, zonal flow impinging on an isolated mountain, Rossby-Haurwitz waves and observed atmospheric states. One of the cases is also identified as a computer performance/algorithm efficiency benchmark for assessing the performance of algorithms adapted to massively parallel computers. 31 refs.

  9. Critical experiments on single-unit spherical plutonium geometries reflected and moderated by oil

    SciTech Connect

    Rothe, R.E.

    1997-05-01

    Experimental critical configurations are reported for several dozen spherical and hemispherical single-unit assemblies of plutonium metal. Most were solid but many were hollow-centered, thick, shell-like geometries. All were constructed of nested plutonium (mostly {sup 2139}Pu) metal hemispherical shells. Three kinds of critical configurations are reported. Two required interpolation and/or extrapolation of data to obtain the critical mass because reflector conditions were essentially infinite. The first finds the plutonium essentially fully reflected by a hydrogen-rich oil; the second is essentially unreflected. The third kind reports the critical oil reflector height above a large plutonium metal assembly of accurately known mass (no interpolation required) when that mass was too great to permit full oil reflection. Some configurations had thicknesses of mild steel just outside the plutonium metal, separating it from the oil. These experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory in the late 1960s. They have not been published in a form suitable for benchmark-quality comparisons against state-of-the-art computational techniques until this paper. The age of the data and other factors lead to some difficulty in reconstructing aspects of the program and may, in turn, decrease confidence in certain details. Whenever this is true, the point is acknowledged. The plutonium metal was alpha-phase {sup 239}Pu containing 5.9 wt-% {sup 240}Pu. All assemblies were formed by nesting 1.667-mm-thick (nominal) bare plutonium metal hemispherical shells, also called hemishells, until the desired configuration was achieved. Very small tolerance gaps machined into radial dimensions reduced the effective density a small amount in all cases. Steel components were also nested hemispherical shells; but these were nominally 3.333-mm thick. Oil was used as the reflector because of its chemical compatibility with plutonium metal.

  10. Rapid Optimal SPH Particle Distributions in Spherical Geometries for Creating Astrophysical Initial Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raskin, Cody; Owen, J. Michael

    2016-04-01

    Creating spherical initial conditions in smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations that are spherically conformal is a difficult task. Here, we describe two algorithmic methods for evenly distributing points on surfaces that when paired can be used to build three-dimensional spherical objects with optimal equipartition of volume between particles, commensurate with an arbitrary radial density function. We demonstrate the efficacy of our method against stretched lattice arrangements on the metrics of hydrodynamic stability, spherical conformity, and the harmonic power distribution of gravitational settling oscillations. We further demonstrate how our method is highly optimized for simulating multi-material spheres, such as planets with core-mantle boundaries.

  11. Capillary Rise in a Wedge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piva, M.

    2009-01-01

    In introductory-level physics courses, the concept of surface tension is often illustrated using the example of capillary rise in thin tubes. In this paper the author describes experiments conducted using a planar geometry created with two small plates forming a thin wedge. The distribution of the fluid entering the wedge can be studied as a…

  12. Landau level quantization for massless Dirac fermions in the spherical geometry: Graphene fractional quantum Hall effect on the Haldane sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arciniaga, Michael; Peterson, Michael R.

    2016-07-01

    We derive the single-particle eigenenergies and eigenfunctions for massless Dirac fermions confined to the surface of a sphere in the presence of a magnetic monopole, i.e., we solve the Landau level problem for electrons in graphene on the Haldane sphere. With the single-particle eigenfunctions and eigenenergies we calculate the Haldane pseudopotentials for the Coulomb interaction in the second Landau level and calculate the effective pseudopotentials characterizing an effective Landau level mixing Hamiltonian entirely in the spherical geometry to be used in theoretical studies of the fractional quantum Hall effect in graphene. Our treatment is analogous to the formalism in the planar geometry and reduces to the planar results in the thermodynamic limit.

  13. Numerical study of laminar plasma dynamo in cylindrical and spherical geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalzov, Ivan; Bayliss, Adam; Ebrahimi, Fatima; Forest, Cary; Schnack, Dalton

    2009-05-01

    We have performed the numerical investigation of possibility of laminar dynamo in two new experiments, Plasma Couette and Plasma Dynamo, which have been designed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. The plasma is confined by a strong multipole magnetic field localized at the boundary of cylindrical (Plasma Couette) or spherical (Plasma Dynamo) chamber. Electrodes positioned between the magnet rings can be biased with arbitrary potentials so that Lorenz force ExB drives any given toroidal velocity profile at the surface. Using the extended MHD code, NIMROD, we have modeled several types of plasma flows appropriate for dynamo excitation. It is found that for high magnetic Reynolds numbers the counter-rotating von Karman flow (in cylinder) and Dudley-James flow (in sphere) can lead to self-generation of non-axisymmetric magnetic field. This field saturates at certain amplitude corresponding to a new stable equilibrium. The structure of this equilibrium is considered.

  14. A parallel implementation of an MHD code for the simulation of mechanically driven, turbulent dynamos in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reuter, K.; Jenko, F.; Forest, C. B.; Bayliss, R. A.

    2008-08-01

    A parallel implementation of a nonlinear pseudo-spectral MHD code for the simulation of turbulent dynamos in spherical geometry is reported. It employs a dual domain decomposition technique in both real and spectral space. It is shown that this method shows nearly ideal scaling going up to 128 CPUs on Beowulf-type clusters with fast interconnect. Furthermore, the potential of exploiting single precision arithmetic on standard x86 processors is examined. It is pointed out that the MHD code thereby achieves a maximum speedup of 1.7, whereas the validity of the computations is still granted. The combination of both measures will allow for the direct numerical simulation of highly turbulent cases ( 1500

  15. Gravity, Topography, Magnetics: Geoscience Data Analysis in Spherical and Planar Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simons, F. J.; Harig, C.; Lewis, K. W.; Plattner, A.

    2015-12-01

    Data in the Earth and planetary sciences (as well as in astronomy and cosmology, medical imaging, auditory signal processing, and computer vision) often inherently have a sphere (or an ellipsoid) as their domain. However, frequently our goal is to study phenomena in a specific region of the globe. We might either have data that only cover parts of the sphere (e.g. ocean altimetry, Shuttle radar topography), or we may seek to extract a local signal from a global data set (e.g. the continental fraction of the lithospheric magnetic field, or the portion of the time-varying geopotential that is due to ice mass changes). Spectral content is always finite: all sampled data are band-limited. When the region under study is not the whole sphere, but not small enough to justify two-dimensional projection either, the question arises how to best represent the data to perform our analysis, whatever our field of interest. We present SLEPIAN, a software suite with a multitude of numerical and computational tools, and several plotting routines, to accomplish ``spatiospectral'' spherical analysis in the geosciences and beyond.

  16. Rethinking wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Cao, Long; Caldeira, Ken; Hoffert, Martin I.

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Stabilizing CO2 emissions at current levels for fifty years is not consistent with either an atmospheric CO2 concentration below 500 ppm or global temperature increases below 2 °C. Accepting these targets, solving the climate problem requires that emissions peak and decline in the next few decades, and ultimately fall to near zero. Phasing out emissions over 50 years could be achieved by deploying on the order of 19 'wedges', each of which ramps up linearly over a period of 50 years to ultimately avoid 1 GtC y-1 of CO2 emissions. But this level of mitigation will require affordable carbon-free energy systems to be deployed at the scale of tens of terawatts. Any hope for such fundamental and disruptive transformation of the global energy system depends upon coordinated efforts to innovate, plan, and deploy new transportation and energy systems that can provide affordable energy at this scale without emitting CO2 to the atmosphere. 1. Introduction In 2004, Pacala and Socolow published a study in Science arguing that '[h]umanity can solve the carbon and climate problem in the first half of this century simply by scaling up what we already know how to do' [1]. Specifically, they presented 15 options for 'stabilization wedges' that would grow linearly from zero to 1 Gt of carbon emissions avoided per year (GtC y-1 1 Gt = 1012 kg) over 50 years. The solution to the carbon and climate problem, they asserted, was 'to deploy the technologies and/or lifestyle changes necessary to fill all seven wedges of the stabilization triangle'. They claimed this would offset the growth of emissions and put us on a trajectory to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration at 500 ppm if emissions decreased sharply in the second half of the 21st century. The wedge concept has proven popular as an analytical tool for considering the potential of different technologies to reduce CO2 emissions. In the years since the paper was published, it has been cited more than 400 times, and

  17. Determination of projection geometry from quantitative assessment of the distortion of spherical references in single-view projection radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze, Ralf; Bruellmann, Dan Dominik; Roeder, Felix; D'Hoedt, Bernd

    2004-10-01

    A method is introduced, inferring the three-dimensional (3-D) location from the 2-D radiographic shadow of an opaque spherical reference body of known radius by considering its elliptical distortion, the 2-D shadow location and a known source-to-receptor distance. Three noncollinear spheres fixed to a rigid object constitute all possible degrees of freedom, i.e., the entire 3-D imaging geometry. The method may be used (a) to determine the 3-D imaging geometry from a single 2-D view and (b) to correct for foreshortening of object distances coplanar with the plane defined by the sphere triplet. Apart from the mathematical background the article describes a small feasibility experiment, performed with four different sphere diameters and a commercial dental ccd-receptor system (pixel length: 0.0195 mm). The mouse-cursor based image evaluation revealed an average underestimation of the critical depth- (x-) coordinate decreasing with increasing radius (-30.3% for r=0.5 mm to 2.8% for r=2.5 mm). Intraobserver reliability (the standard deviation between three single cursor-based assessments) ranged between 0% and 8% of the actual true depth. The main source of the input error is associated with the assessment of the amount of elliptical distortion, where subpixel accuracy is demanded. Consequently, software-based automated image evaluation is required using available methods for pattern recognition and point-spread correction. Provided sufficient accuracy, the method provides an important tool for foreshortening correction, depth assessment, motion analysis, and 3-D reconstruction from two or more 2-D views.

  18. Rethinking wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Steven J.; Cao, Long; Caldeira, Ken; Hoffert, Martin I.

    2013-03-01

    Abstract Stabilizing CO2 emissions at current levels for fifty years is not consistent with either an atmospheric CO2 concentration below 500 ppm or global temperature increases below 2 °C. Accepting these targets, solving the climate problem requires that emissions peak and decline in the next few decades, and ultimately fall to near zero. Phasing out emissions over 50 years could be achieved by deploying on the order of 19 'wedges', each of which ramps up linearly over a period of 50 years to ultimately avoid 1 GtC y-1 of CO2 emissions. But this level of mitigation will require affordable carbon-free energy systems to be deployed at the scale of tens of terawatts. Any hope for such fundamental and disruptive transformation of the global energy system depends upon coordinated efforts to innovate, plan, and deploy new transportation and energy systems that can provide affordable energy at this scale without emitting CO2 to the atmosphere. 1. Introduction In 2004, Pacala and Socolow published a study in Science arguing that '[h]umanity can solve the carbon and climate problem in the first half of this century simply by scaling up what we already know how to do' [1]. Specifically, they presented 15 options for 'stabilization wedges' that would grow linearly from zero to 1 Gt of carbon emissions avoided per year (GtC y-1 1 Gt = 1012 kg) over 50 years. The solution to the carbon and climate problem, they asserted, was 'to deploy the technologies and/or lifestyle changes necessary to fill all seven wedges of the stabilization triangle'. They claimed this would offset the growth of emissions and put us on a trajectory to stabilize atmospheric CO2 concentration at 500 ppm if emissions decreased sharply in the second half of the 21st century. The wedge concept has proven popular as an analytical tool for considering the potential of different technologies to reduce CO2 emissions. In the years since the paper was published, it has been cited more than 400 times, and

  19. Radial wedge flange clamp

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Karl H.

    2002-01-01

    A radial wedge flange clamp comprising a pair of flanges each comprising a plurality of peripheral flat wedge facets having flat wedge surfaces and opposed and mating flat surfaces attached to or otherwise engaged with two elements to be joined and including a series of generally U-shaped wedge clamps each having flat wedge interior surfaces and engaging one pair of said peripheral flat wedge facets. Each of said generally U-shaped wedge clamps has in its opposing extremities apertures for the tangential insertion of bolts to apply uniform radial force to said wedge clamps when assembled about said wedge segments.

  20. A comparison of angular difference schemes for one-dimensional spherical geometry S{sub N} equations

    SciTech Connect

    Lathrop, K.D.

    2000-03-01

    To investigate errors caused by angular differencing in approximating the streaming terms of the transport equation, five different approximations are evaluated for three test problems in one-dimensional spherical geometry. The following schemes are compared: diamond, special truncation error minimizing weighted diamond, linear continuous (the original S{sub N} scheme), linear discontinuous, and new quadratic continuous. To isolate errors caused by angular differencing, the approximations are derived from the transport equation without spatial differencing, and the resulting coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) are solved with an ODE solver. Results from the approximations are compared with analytic solutions derived for two-region purely absorbing spheres. Most of the approximations are derived by taking moments of the conservation form of the transport equation. The quadratic continuous approximation is derived taking the zeroth moment of both the transport equation and the first angular derivative of the transport equation. The advantages of this approach are described, In all of the approximations, the desirability is shown of using an initializing computation of the {mu} = {minus}1 angular flux to correctly compute the central flux and of having a difference approximation that ensures this central flux is the same for all directions. The behavior of the standard discrete ordinates equations in the diffusion limit is reviewed, and the linear and quadratic continuous approximations are shown to have the correct diffusion limit if an equal interval discrete quadrature is used. In all three test problems, the weighted diamond difference approximation has smaller maximum and average relative flux errors than the diamond or the linear continuous difference approximations. The quadratic continuous approximation and the linear discontinuous approximation are both more accurate than the other approximations, and the quadratic continuous approximation has a

  1. Diffuse light propagation in a turbid medium with varying refractive index: Monte Carlo modeling in a spherically symmetrical geometry.

    PubMed

    Shendeleva, Margarita L; Molloy, John A

    2006-09-20

    We report on the development of Monte Carlo software that can model media with spatially varying scattering coefficient, absorption, and refractive index. The varying refractive index is implemented by calculating curved photon paths in the medium. The results of the numerical simulations are compared with analytical solutions obtained using the diffusion approximation. The model under investigation is a scattering medium that contains a spherically symmetrical inclusion (inhomogeneity) created by variation in optical properties and having no sharp boundaries. The following steady-state cases are considered: (a) a nonabsorbing medium with a spherically symmetrical varying refractive index, (b) an inclusion with varying absorption and scattering coefficients and constant refractive index, and (c) an inclusion with varying absorption, scattering, and refractive index. In the latter case it is shown that the interplay between the absorption coefficient and the refractive index may create the effect of a hidden inclusion.

  2. Thermally actuated wedge block

    DOEpatents

    Queen, Jr., Charles C.

    1980-01-01

    This invention relates to an automatically-operating wedge block for maintaining intimate structural contact over wide temperature ranges, including cryogenic use. The wedging action depends on the relative thermal expansion of two materials having very different coefficients of thermal expansion. The wedge block expands in thickness when cooled to cryogenic temperatures and contracts in thickness when returned to room temperature.

  3. Wedge Joints for Trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Kenneth E.

    1987-01-01

    Structure assembled rapidly with simple hand tools. Proposed locking wedge joints enable rapid assembly of lightweight beams, towers, scaffolds, and other truss-type structures. Lightweight structure assembled from tubular struts joined at nodes by wedge pins fitting into mating slots. Joint assembled rapidly by seating wedge pin in V-shaped slots and deforming end of strut until primary pawl engages it.

  4. Calculation of absorption and secondary scattering of X-rays by spherical amorphous materials in an asymmetric transmission geometry.

    PubMed

    Bendert, J C; Blodgett, M E; Kelton, K F

    2013-03-01

    Expressions for absorption and the secondary scattering intensity ratio are presented for a small beam impinging off-center of a spherical amorphous sample. Large gradients in the absorption correction are observed from small offsets from the central axis. Additionally, the secondary scattering intensity ratio causes an intensity asymmetry in the detector image. The secondary scattering intensity ratio is presented in integral form and must be computed numerically. An analytic, small-angle, asymptotic series solution for the integral form of the absorption correction is also presented. PMID:23403964

  5. Electro-magneto-encephalography for the three-shell model: numerical implementation via splines for distributed current in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fokas, A. S.; Hauk, O.; Michel, V.

    2012-03-01

    The basic inverse problems for the functional imaging techniques of electroencephalography (EEG) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) consist in estimating the neuronal current in the brain from the measurement of the electric potential on the scalp and of the magnetic field outside the head. Here we present a rigorous derivation of the relevant formulae for a three-shell spherical model in the case of independent as well as simultaneous MEG and EEG measurements. Furthermore, we introduce an explicit and stable technique for the numerical implementation of these formulae via splines. Numerical examples are presented using the locations and the normal unit vectors of the real 102 magnetometers and 70 electrodes of the Elekta Neuromag (R) system. These results may have useful implications for the interpretation of the reconstructions obtained via the existing approaches.

  6. High-energy rate forgings of wedges :

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, Thomas Bither; Everhart, Wesley; Switzner, Nathan T; Balch, Dorian K.; San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2014-05-01

    The wedge geometry is a simple geometry for establishing a relatively constant gradient of strain in a forged part. The geometry is used to establish gradients in microstructure and strength as a function of strain, forging temperature, and quenching time after forging. This geometry has previously been used to benchmark predictions of strength and recrystallization using Sandias materials model for type 304L austenitic stainless steel. In this report, the processing conditions, in particular the times to forge and quench the forged parts, are summarized based on information recorded during forging on June 18, 2013 of the so-called wedge geometry from type 316L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn austenitic stainless steels.

  7. Coupled wedge waves.

    PubMed

    Abell, Bradley C; Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J

    2013-11-01

    The interface between two wedges can be treated as a displacement discontinuity characterized by elastic stiffnesses. By representing the boundary between the two quarter-spaces as a displacement discontinuity, coupled wedge waves were determined theoretically to be dispersive and to depend on the specific stiffness of the non-welded contact between the two wedges. Laboratory experiments on isotropic and anisotropic aluminum confirmed the theoretical prediction that the velocity of coupled wedge waves, for a non-welded interface, ranged continuously from the single wedge wave velocity at low stress to the Rayleigh velocity as the load applied normal to the interface was increased. Elastic waves propagating along the coupled wedges of two quarter-spaces in non-welded contact are found to exist theoretically even when the material properties of the two quarter-spaces are the same.

  8. Long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonglai; Wang, Jian

    2014-11-03

    We design a novel long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic (LRHWP) waveguide composed of two identical dielectric nanowires symmetrically placed on two opposed wedges of a diamond shaped metal wire. With strong coupling between the dielectric nanowire mode and long-range surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode, both deep subwavelength mode confinement and low propagation loss are achieved. On one hand, when compared to the previous long-range hybrid SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can achieve smaller mode size with similar propagation length; on the other hand, when compared to the previous hybrid wedge SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can provide an order of magnitude longer propagation length with similar level of mode confinement. The designed LRHWP waveguide also features an overall advantage of one-order improvement of Figure of Merit. We further evaluate in detail the impacts of possible practical fabrication imperfections on the mode properties. The obtained results of mode properties show that the proposed LRHWP waveguide with an optimized wedge tip angle of 140 degree is fairly tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, asymmetry in the vertical direction, variation of wedge tip angle, tilt or rotation of metal wire, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius.

  9. Long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonglai; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    We design a novel long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic (LRHWP) waveguide composed of two identical dielectric nanowires symmetrically placed on two opposed wedges of a diamond shaped metal wire. With strong coupling between the dielectric nanowire mode and long-range surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode, both deep subwavelength mode confinement and low propagation loss are achieved. On one hand, when compared to the previous long-range hybrid SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can achieve smaller mode size with similar propagation length; on the other hand, when compared to the previous hybrid wedge SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can provide an order of magnitude longer propagation length with similar level of mode confinement. The designed LRHWP waveguide also features an overall advantage of one-order improvement of Figure of Merit. We further evaluate in detail the impacts of possible practical fabrication imperfections on the mode properties. The obtained results of mode properties show that the proposed LRHWP waveguide with an optimized wedge tip angle of 140 degree is fairly tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, asymmetry in the vertical direction, variation of wedge tip angle, tilt or rotation of metal wire, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius. PMID:25362900

  10. Long polymers near wedges and cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2015-12-01

    We perform a Monte Carlo study of N -step self-avoiding walks, attached to the corner of an impenetrable wedge in two dimensions (d =2 ), or the tip of an impenetrable cone in d =3 , of sizes ranging up to N =106 steps. We find that the critical exponent γα, which determines the dependence of the number of available conformations on N for a cone or wedge with opening angle α , is in good agreement with the theory for d =2 . We study the end-point distribution of the walks in the allowed space and find similarities to the known behavior of random walks (ideal polymers) in the same geometry. For example, the ratio between the mean square end-to-end distances of a polymer near the cone or wedge and a polymer in free space depends linearly on γα, as is known for ideal polymers. We show that the end-point distribution of polymers attached to a wedge does not separate into a product of angular and radial functions, as it does for ideal polymers in the same geometry. The angular dependence of the end position of polymers near the wedge differs from theoretical predictions.

  11. Long polymers near wedges and cones.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2015-12-01

    We perform a Monte Carlo study of N-step self-avoiding walks, attached to the corner of an impenetrable wedge in two dimensions (d=2), or the tip of an impenetrable cone in d=3, of sizes ranging up to N=10(6) steps. We find that the critical exponent γ(α), which determines the dependence of the number of available conformations on N for a cone or wedge with opening angle α, is in good agreement with the theory for d=2. We study the end-point distribution of the walks in the allowed space and find similarities to the known behavior of random walks (ideal polymers) in the same geometry. For example, the ratio between the mean square end-to-end distances of a polymer near the cone or wedge and a polymer in free space depends linearly on γ(α), as is known for ideal polymers. We show that the end-point distribution of polymers attached to a wedge does not separate into a product of angular and radial functions, as it does for ideal polymers in the same geometry. The angular dependence of the end position of polymers near the wedge differs from theoretical predictions. PMID:26764719

  12. Odd gravitational harmonics of Jupiter: Effects of spherical versus nonspherical geometry and mathematical smoothing of the equatorially antisymmetric zonal winds across the equatorial plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Dali; Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    2016-10-01

    Unlike the even gravitational coefficients of Jupiter that are caused by both the rotational distortion and the equatorially symmetric zonal winds, the odd jovian gravitational coefficients are directly linked to the depth of the equatorially antisymmetric zonal winds. Accurate estimation of the wind-induced odd coefficients and comparison with measurements of those coefficients would be key to understanding the structure of the zonal winds in the deep interior of Jupiter. We consider two problems in connection with the jovian odd gravitational coefficients. In the first problem, we show, by solving the governing equations for the northern hemisphere of Jupiter subject to an appropriate condition at the equatorial plane, that the effect of non-spherical geometry makes an insignificant contribution to the lowermost-order odd gravitational coefficients. In the second problem, we investigate the effect of the equatorial smoothing used to avoid the discontinuity in the winds across the equatorial plane when the thermal wind equation is adopted to compute the odd gravitational coefficients. We reveal that, because of the dominant effect of the equatorial smoothing, the odd gravitational coefficients so obtained for deep zonal winds do not reflect physically realistic dynamics taking place in the deep interior of Jupiter.

  13. Micromachine Wedge Stepping Motor

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.J.; Schriner, H.K.

    1998-11-04

    A wedge stepping motor, which will index a mechanism, has been designed and fabricated in the surface rnicromachine SUMMiT process. This device has demonstrated the ability to index one gear tooth at a time with speeds up to 205 teeth/see. The wedge stepper motor has the following features, whi:h will be useful in a number of applications. o The ability to precisely position mechanical components. . Simple pulse signals can be used for operation. o Only 2 drive signals are requixed for operation. o Torque and precision capabilities increase with device size . The device to be indexed is restrained at all times by the wedge shaped tooth that is used for actuation. This paper will discuss the theory of operation and desi=m of the wedge stepping motor. The fabrication and testing of I he device will also be presented.

  14. Wedges for ultrasonic inspection

    DOEpatents

    Gavin, Donald A.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer device is provided which is used in ultrasonic inspection of the material surrounding a threaded hole and which comprises a wedge of plastic or the like including a curved threaded surface adapted to be screwed into the threaded hole and a generally planar surface on which a conventional ultrasonic transducer is mounted. The plastic wedge can be rotated within the threaded hole to inspect for flaws in the material surrounding the threaded hole.

  15. The Cosmonaut Sea Wedge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Solli, K.; Kuvaas, B.; Kristoffersen, Y.; Leitchenkov, G.; Guseva, J.; Gandyukhin, V.

    2007-01-01

    A set of multi-channel seismic profiles (~15000 km) acquired by Russia, Norway and Australia has been used to investigate the depositional evolution of the Cosmonaut Sea margin of East Antarctica. We recognize a regional sediment wedge below the upper part of the continental rise. The wedge, herein termed the Cosmonaut Sea Wedge, is positioned stratigraphically underneath the inferred glaciomarine section and extends for at least 1200 km along the continental margin and from 80 to about 250 km seaward or to the north. Lateral variations in the growth pattern of the wedge indicate several overlapping depocentres, which at their distal northern end are flanked by elongated mounded drifts and contourite sheets. The internal stratification of the mounded drift deposits suggests that westward flowing bottom currents reworked the marginal deposits. The action of these currents together with sea-level changes is considered to have controlled the growth of the wedge. We interpret the Cosmonaut Sea Wedge as a composite feature comprising several bottom current reworked fan systems.

  16. Mechanics of injection wedges in collision orogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, A. B.; Schulmann, K.

    2003-04-01

    Instantaneously juxtaposed lithospheric sections, marked by different geothermal gradient and lithological make-up, are examined to identify zones of highly contrasting strength in adjacent transposed crust and lithospheric mantle. Three types of geotherms and four reference lithospheric segments: thin crust/hot geotherm (rift), thin crust/mean geotherm (relaxed rift), standard crust/hot geotherm (arc), standard crust/mean geotherm (normal crust), are compared with variable permutations of cratonic, standard and rifted lithosphere thicknesses. This permits identification of strong brittle-elastic or plastic mantle, lower and upper crust juxtaposed against plastic rocks of a weak adjacent lithosphere. Vertical positions of shallow dipping detachment zones thus delineate possible areas of hot or cold injection wedges which include: (i) Single shallow wedge (or Flake), (ii) Double shallow and deep wedge, (iii) Deep lithospheric crocodile, (iv) Crustal thickening due to shallow strength differences, (v) Mantle Lithosphere thickening, or wedging, due to deep mantle strength differences and (vii) Exchange tectonics as an extreme wedging process, in which horizontal mass exchange is approximately equal. Rheological calculations are compared to a database of seismic profiles in which the geometry of detachment zones and proposed thermal conditions and lithological make-ups have been presented.

  17. Two dimensional wedge/translating shroud nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, D. L. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A jet propulsion exhaust nozzle is reported for multi-engine installations which produces high internal/external, thrust-minus-drag, performance for transonic cruise or transonic acceleration as well as improved performance at subsonic and supersonic speeds. A two dimensional wedge/translating shroud provides the variable nozzle exit geometry needed to achieve high engine performance over a wide range of throttle power settings.

  18. The role of pore fluid overpressure in the substrates of advancing salt sheets, ice glaciers, and critical-state wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Gang; Flemings, Peter B.; Hudec, Michael R.; Nikolinakou, Maria A.

    2015-01-01

    Critical-state wedges, ice glaciers, and salt sheets have many geometric and mechanical similarities. Each has a tapering geometry and moves along a basal detachment. Their motions result from the combined effects of internal deformation and basal sliding. Wedge deformation and geometry, basal conditions, and overpressure (pore fluid pressure less hydrostatic pore fluid pressure) development within the substrate interact with each other in this mechanically coupled system. However, the nature of this interaction is poorly understood. In order to investigate this coupled system, we have developed two-dimensional poromechanical finite-element models with porous fluid flow in sediments. We have simulated the advance of a salt sheet wedge across poroelastic sediments in this study. We emphasize that our results have applications beyond salt wedges to both critical-state wedges and ice glaciers. Overpressure develops within the substrate over time during the advance of the wedge. The magnitude of the overpressure influences the wedge geometry and the wedge advance rate. Lower overpressure results in a thicker and steeper wedge geometry, and a slower advance rate, while higher overpressure favors a thinner, wider, and more flattened wedge geometry and a faster advance rate. This study provides key insights into the links between wedge geometry, basal shear stress, and overpressure in substrates.

  19. Europa Wedge Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image shows an area of crustal separation on Jupiter's moon, Europa. Lower resolution pictures taken earlier in the tour of NASA's Galileo spacecraft revealed that dark wedge-shaped bands in this region are areas where the icy crust has completely pulled apart. Dark material has filled up from below and filled the void created by this separation.

    In the lower left corner of this image, taken by Galileo's onboard camera on December 16, 1997, a portion of one dark wedge area is visible, revealing a linear texture along the trend of the wedge. The lines of the texture change orientation slightly and reflect the fact that we are looking at a bend in the wedge. The older, bright background, visible on the right half of the image, is criss-crossed with ridges. A large, bright ridge runs east-west through the upper part of the image, cutting across both the older background plains and the wedge. This ridge is rough in texture, with numerous small terraces and troughs containing dark material.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the northwest. This image, centered at approximately 16.5 degrees south latitude and 196.5 degrees west longitude, covers an area approximately 10 kilometers square (about 6.5 miles square). The resolution of this image is about 26 meters per picture element. This image was taken by the solid state imaging system from a distance of 1250 kilometers (750 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  20. Wedge Waveguides and Resonators for Quantum Plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic structures can provide deep-subwavelength electromagnetic fields that are useful for enhancing light–matter interactions. However, because these localized modes are also dissipative, structures that offer the best compromise between field confinement and loss have been sought. Metallic wedge waveguides were initially identified as an ideal candidate but have been largely abandoned because to date their experimental performance has been limited. We combine state-of-the-art metallic wedges with integrated reflectors and precisely placed colloidal quantum dots (down to the single-emitter level) and demonstrate quantum-plasmonic waveguides and resonators with performance approaching theoretical limits. By exploiting a nearly 10-fold improvement in wedge-plasmon propagation (19 μm at a vacuum wavelength, λvac, of 630 nm), efficient reflectors (93%), and effective coupling (estimated to be >70%) to highly emissive (∼90%) quantum dots, we obtain Ag plasmonic resonators at visible wavelengths with quality factors approaching 200 (3.3 nm line widths). As our structures offer modal volumes down to ∼0.004λvac3 in an exposed single-mode waveguide–resonator geometry, they provide advantages over both traditional photonic microcavities and localized-plasmonic resonators for enhancing light–matter interactions. Our results confirm the promise of wedges for creating plasmonic devices and for studying coherent quantum-plasmonic effects such as long-distance plasmon-mediated entanglement and strong plasmon–matter coupling. PMID:26284499

  1. Wedge Waveguides and Resonators for Quantum Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Kress, Stephan J P; Antolinez, Felipe V; Richner, Patrizia; Jayanti, Sriharsha V; Kim, David K; Prins, Ferry; Riedinger, Andreas; Fischer, Maximilian P C; Meyer, Stefan; McPeak, Kevin M; Poulikakos, Dimos; Norris, David J

    2015-09-01

    Plasmonic structures can provide deep-subwavelength electromagnetic fields that are useful for enhancing light-matter interactions. However, because these localized modes are also dissipative, structures that offer the best compromise between field confinement and loss have been sought. Metallic wedge waveguides were initially identified as an ideal candidate but have been largely abandoned because to date their experimental performance has been limited. We combine state-of-the-art metallic wedges with integrated reflectors and precisely placed colloidal quantum dots (down to the single-emitter level) and demonstrate quantum-plasmonic waveguides and resonators with performance approaching theoretical limits. By exploiting a nearly 10-fold improvement in wedge-plasmon propagation (19 μm at a vacuum wavelength, λvac, of 630 nm), efficient reflectors (93%), and effective coupling (estimated to be >70%) to highly emissive (~90%) quantum dots, we obtain Ag plasmonic resonators at visible wavelengths with quality factors approaching 200 (3.3 nm line widths). As our structures offer modal volumes down to ~0.004λvac(3) in an exposed single-mode waveguide-resonator geometry, they provide advantages over both traditional photonic microcavities and localized-plasmonic resonators for enhancing light-matter interactions. Our results confirm the promise of wedges for creating plasmonic devices and for studying coherent quantum-plasmonic effects such as long-distance plasmon-mediated entanglement and strong plasmon-matter coupling.

  2. Vickers microhardness of K2Co(SO4)2 · 6H2O single crystals and fracture geometry around impressions of vickers, knoop, and spherical indenters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sizova, N. L.; Novikova, N. E.; Manomenova, V. L.; Rudneva, E. B.; Voloshin, A. E.

    2016-05-01

    The microhardness on the (010) and (001) planes in K2Co(SO4)2 · 6H2O crystal has been measured by the Vickers indentation method. Its values are, respectively, 11500 and 1300 MPa. No microhardness anisotropy of the first kind is revealed on either plane. The fracture geometry under indentation by a spherical indenter and Vickers and Knoop indenters is studied. The crystal has lower brittleness than the isomorphic Cs2Ni(SO4)2 · 6H2O crystal.

  3. Casimir effect for a semitransparent wedge and an annular piston

    SciTech Connect

    Milton, Kimball A.; Wagner, Jef; Kirsten, Klaus

    2009-12-15

    We consider the Casimir energy due to a massless scalar field in a geometry of an infinite wedge closed by a Dirichlet circular cylinder, where the wedge is formed by {delta}-function potentials, so-called semitransparent boundaries. A finite expression for the Casimir energy corresponding to the arc and the presence of both semitransparent potentials is obtained, from which the torque on the sidewalls can be derived. The most interesting part of the calculation is the nontrivial nature of the angular mode functions. Numerical results are obtained which are closely analogous to those recently found for a magnetodielectric wedge, with the same speed of light on both sides of the wedge boundaries. Alternative methods are developed for annular regions with radial semitransparent potentials, based on reduced Green's functions for the angular dependence, which allows calculations using the multiple-scattering formalism. Numerical results corresponding to the torque on the radial plates are likewise computed, which generalize those for the wedge geometry. Generally useful formulas for calculating Casimir energies in separable geometries are derived.

  4. Casimir effect for a semitransparent wedge and an annular piston

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milton, Kimball A.; Wagner, Jef; Kirsten, Klaus

    2009-12-01

    We consider the Casimir energy due to a massless scalar field in a geometry of an infinite wedge closed by a Dirichlet circular cylinder, where the wedge is formed by δ-function potentials, so-called semitransparent boundaries. A finite expression for the Casimir energy corresponding to the arc and the presence of both semitransparent potentials is obtained, from which the torque on the sidewalls can be derived. The most interesting part of the calculation is the nontrivial nature of the angular mode functions. Numerical results are obtained which are closely analogous to those recently found for a magnetodielectric wedge, with the same speed of light on both sides of the wedge boundaries. Alternative methods are developed for annular regions with radial semitransparent potentials, based on reduced Green’s functions for the angular dependence, which allows calculations using the multiple-scattering formalism. Numerical results corresponding to the torque on the radial plates are likewise computed, which generalize those for the wedge geometry. Generally useful formulas for calculating Casimir energies in separable geometries are derived.

  5. Euclidean, Spherical, and Hyperbolic Shadows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoban, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Many classical problems in elementary calculus use Euclidean geometry. This article takes such a problem and solves it in hyperbolic and in spherical geometry instead. The solution requires only the ability to compute distances and intersections of points in these geometries. The dramatically different results we obtain illustrate the effect…

  6. Analysis of Oblique Wedges Using Analog and Numerical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haq, S. S.; Koster, K.; Martin, R. S.; Flesch, L. M.

    2010-12-01

    Oblique plate motion is understood to be a primary factor in determining the style and location of deformation at many convergent margins. These margins are frequently characterized by a dominant strike-slip fault parallel to the margin, which accommodates margin-parallel motion and shear and is adjacent to partitioned and near margin-normal thrusting. We have performed a series of analog experiment in which we have simulated oblique wedges with frictional and layered, friction over viscous, rheologies. Using the detailed analysis of topography and strain from these analog models we have compared them to geometrically similar 2D and 3D numerical models. While our pure frictional analog wedges are characterized by numerous discrete thrust faults in the pro-wedge and a zone of shear between the pro-wedge and the retro-wedges, our layered wedges have a dominate shear zone that is long-lived. In all models the highest rate of contractional deformation is at the thrust front, while the highest rate of shear is isolated in a relatively narrow zone at the back of the pro-wedge. Because the layered analog wedge is better able isolate shear behind the pro-wedge it can better partition strain into dip-slip thrusting normal to the margin. Our numerical simulations support the assertion that a relatively small amount of extensional stress is needed to play a significant role in the structural evolution of convergent systems. However, the manner in which this stress is localized on discrete structures, and in particular, how the style of strain (extension or contraction) will evolve, is a strong function of rheology and its strength at depth for a given initial geometry.

  7. Sojourner, Wedge, & Shark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) image taken near the end of daytime operations on Sol 50 shows the Sojourner rover between the rocks 'Wedge' (foreground) and 'Shark' (behind rover). The rover successfully deployed its Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer on Shark on Sol 52.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  8. A Potential Field Model for Spherical Sub-domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, George H.; Bercik, David; Welsch, Brian; Kazachenko, Maria D.; CGEM Team

    2016-05-01

    Potential field models are used widely in Solar Physics to estimate coronal magnetic field geometry and connectivity, to provide lower limits on magnetic energies, and to provide initial configurations for time-dependent models of magnetic fields in the solar atmosphere. Potential field models in a spherical geometry can be global, covering the entire Sun, or confined to localized sub-volumes of the sphere. Here, we focus on the latter case.We describe an efficient potential field model for localized spherical sub-volumes (wedges consisting of upper and lower limits of radius, co-latitude, and longitude), employing a finite-difference approach for the solution. The solution is derived in terms of a "poloidal" potential, which can then be used to find either the scalar potential or the vector potential for the magnetic field (if desired), as well as all three magnetic field components. The magnetic field components are computed on the faces of spherical voxels, and the finite difference grid is consistent with the well-known "Yee" grid. The inner spherical boundary is defined by radial magnetic field measurements, and at the outer radius a source-surface boundary condition is imposed.Potential field solutions on active region scales, at full HMI resolution, and with the source surface located a solar radius above the photosphere, can be obtained on a laptop computer in just a few minutes. The three-dimensional finite difference equations are solved using NCAR's FISHPACK elliptic equation solver.The potential field model was developed by the Coronal Global Evolutionary Model (CGEM) project, funded by the NASA and NSF Strategic Capabilities program. The potential field model described here was motivated by CGEM's need for such a model. The model will be released as open-source code when the model details are published.

  9. An analysis of scattering from a reentrant wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, Ambika

    In this thesis the scattering of acoustic pressure from a rigid wedge is examined. The wedges having re-entrant geometry are of particular interest. The incident field is considered from a time harmonic point source. The solution for the scattered pressure field is obtained by modal, image and asymptotic analysis. It is numerically shown that the exact modal solution and image based solution for different incident frequencies and source positions are the same. It is also shown that the asymptotic solution obtained matches with the image based solution.

  10. Wedge and Flat Top

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Flat Top, the rectangular rock at right, is part of a stretch of rocky terrain in this image, taken by the deployed Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) on Sol 3. Dust has accumulated on the top of Flat Top, but is not present on the sides due to the steep angles of the rock. This dust may have been placed by dust storms moving across the Martian surface. The rock dubbed 'Wedge' is at left. The objects have been studied using several different color filters on the IMP camera.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  11. Method for characterization of a spherically bent crystal for K.alpha. X-ray imaging of laser plasmas using a focusing monochromator geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kugland, Nathan; Doeppner, Tilo; Glenzer, Siegfried; Constantin, Carmen; Niemann, Chris; Neumayer, Paul

    2015-04-07

    A method is provided for characterizing spectrometric properties (e.g., peak reflectivity, reflection curve width, and Bragg angle offset) of the K.alpha. emission line reflected narrowly off angle of the direct reflection of a bent crystal and in particular of a spherically bent quartz 200 crystal by analyzing the off-angle x-ray emission from a stronger emission line reflected at angles far from normal incidence. The bent quartz crystal can therefore accurately image argon K.alpha. x-rays at near-normal incidence (Bragg angle of approximately 81 degrees). The method is useful for in-situ calibration of instruments employing the crystal as a grating by first operating the crystal as a high throughput focusing monochromator on the Rowland circle at angles far from normal incidence (Bragg angle approximately 68 degrees) to make a reflection curve with the He-like x-rays such as the He-.alpha. emission line observed from a laser-excited plasma.

  12. Experimental and numerical investigations on melamine wedges.

    PubMed

    Schneider, S

    2008-09-01

    Melamine wedges are often used as acoustic lining material for anechoic chambers. It was proposed here to study the effects of the mounting conditions on the acoustic properties of the melamine wedges used in the large anechoic chamber at the LMA. The results of the impedance tube measurements carried out show that the mounting conditions must be taken into account when assessing the quality of an acoustic lining. As it can be difficult to simulate these mounting conditions in impedance tube experiments, a numerical method was developed, which can be used to complete the experiments or for parametric studies. By combining the finite and the boundary element method, it is possible to investigate acoustic linings with almost no restrictions as to the geometry, material behavior, or mounting conditions. The numerical method presented here was used to study the acoustic properties of the acoustic lining installed in the anechoic chamber at the LMA. Further experiments showed that the behavior of the melamine foam is anisotropic. Numerical simulations showed that this anisotropy can be used to advantage when designing an acoustic lining.

  13. Mechanics of fold-and-thrust belts and accretionary wedges Cohesive Coulomb theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dahlen, F. A.; Suppe, J.; Davis, D.

    1984-01-01

    A self-consistent theory for the mechanics of thin-skinned accretionary Coulomb wedges is developed and applied to the active fold-and-thrust belt of western Taiwan. The state of stress everywhere within a critical wedge is determined by solving the static equilibrium equations subject to the appropriate boundary conditions. The influence of wedge cohesion, which gives rise to a concave curvature of the critical topographic surface and affects the orientation of the principal stresses and Coulomb fracture within the wedge, is considered. The shape of the topographic surface and the angles at which thrust faults step up from the basal decollement in the Taiwanese belt is analyzed taking into account the extensive structural and fluid-pressure data available there. It is concluded that the gross geometry and structure of the Taiwan wedge are consistent with normal laboratory frictional and fracture strengths of sedimentary rocks.

  14. Ultrasonic fluid densitometer having liquid/wedge and gas/wedge interfaces

    DOEpatents

    Greenwood, Margaret S.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an ultrasonic liquid densitometer that uses a material wedge having two sections, one with a liquid/wedge interface and another with a gas/wedge interface. It is preferred that the wedge have an acoustic impedance that is near the acoustic impedance of the liquid, specifically less than a factor of 11 greater than the acoustic impedance of the liquid. Ultrasonic signals are internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a liquid is determined by immersing the wedge into the liquid and measuring reflections of ultrasound at the liquid/wedge interface and at the gas/wedge interface.

  15. Dynamo-driven plasmoid ejections above a spherical surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnecke, J.; Brandenburg, A.; Mitra, D.

    2011-10-01

    Aims: We extend earlier models of turbulent dynamos with an upper, nearly force-free exterior to spherical geometry, and study how flux emerges from lower layers to the upper ones without being driven by magnetic buoyancy. We also study how this affects the possibility of plasmoid ejection. Methods: A spherical wedge is used that includes northern and southern hemispheres up to mid-latitudes and a certain range in longitude of the Sun. In radius, we cover both the region that corresponds to the convection zone in the Sun and the immediate exterior up to twice the radius of the Sun. Turbulence is driven with a helical forcing function in the interior, where the sign changes at the equator between the two hemispheres. Results: An oscillatory large-scale dynamo with equatorward migration is found to operate in the turbulence zone. Plasmoid ejections occur in regular intervals, similar to what is seen in earlier Cartesian models. These plasmoid ejections are tentatively associated with coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The magnetic helicity is found to change sign outside the turbulence zone, which is in agreement with recent findings for the solar wind. Movie is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. Revisit the classical Newmark displacement method for earthquake-induced wedge slide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Che-Ming; Cheng, Hui-Yun; Wu, Wen-Jie; Hsu, Chang-Hsuan; Dong, Jia-Jyun; Lee, Chyi-Tyi

    2016-04-01

    Newmark displacement method has been widely used to study the earthquake-induced landslides and adopted to explore the initiation and kinematics of catastrophic planar failure in recent years. However, surprisingly few researchers utilize the Newmark displacement method to study the earthquake-induced wedge slide. The classical Newmark displacement method for earthquake-induced wedge sliding assumed the wedge is rigid and the vertical acceleration, as well as the horizontal acceleration perpendicular to the sliding direction, is neglected. Moreover, the friction coefficients on the weak planes are assumed as unchanged during sliding. The purpose of this study is to test the reasonableness of the aforementioned assumptions. This study uses Newmark displacement method incorporating the rigid wedge method (RWM) and maximum shear stress method (MSSM) to evaluate the influence of wedge deformation. We design the geometry of the wedge and input the synthetic seismicity to trigger the wedge slide. The influence for neglecting the vertical and horizontal (perpendicular to the sliding direction) accelerations is also assessed. Besides, this research incorporates the velocity-displacement dependent friction law in the analysis to evaluate the influence of constant friction coefficient assumption. Result of this study illustrated that the aforementioned assumptions have significant effects on the calculated permeant displacement, moving speed, and failure initiation. To conclude, this study provides new insights on the initiation and kinematics of an earthquake induced wedge slide.

  17. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, R.P.; Feldman, M.

    1992-12-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10[sup 8]. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing. 7 figs.

  18. Wavelength meter having elliptical wedge

    DOEpatents

    Hackel, Richard P.; Feldman, Mark

    1992-01-01

    A wavelength meter is disclosed which can determine the wavelength of a laser beam from a laser source within an accuracy range of two parts in 10.sup.8. The wavelength meter has wedge having an elliptically shaped face to the optical path of the laser source and includes interferometer plates which form a vacuum housing.

  19. Wedge immersed thermistor bolometer measures infrared radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreyfus, M. G.

    1965-01-01

    Wedge immersed-thermistor bolometer measures infrared radiation in the atmosphere. The thermistor flakes are immersed by optical contact on a wedge-shaped germanium lens whose narrow dimension is clamped between two complementary wedge-shaped germanium blocks bonded with a suitable adhesive.

  20. Self-similar flows in spherical geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerin-Roze, Jean

    2007-06-01

    If we are looking at the implosion of a sphere starting with a strong shock, the study of self-similar flows is a classical problem. We will assume that: - The sphere contains a perfect gas with a polytropic coefficient γ=5/3. - The shock follows the equation: rc=A(-t)^α with t0

  1. Critical taper wedge strength varies with structural style: results from distinct-element models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strayer, L. M.; Suppe, J.

    2015-12-01

    Critical-taper theory has given diverse insight into kinematics, roles of erosion and sedimentation, and the morphology of compressive mountain belts. We have made progress by recasting the parameter-rich mathematics into a simpler form that describes a linear, co-varying relationship between surface slope and detachment dip (α, β), and internal- and basal-sliding strengths (W, F). Using distinct-element models, we tested this simpler theory over a range of wedge strengths and structural styles. We also obtained W & F from observations of surface slope α and detachment dip β in active natural systems, all of which including the numerical models, show wedges are strong but detachments are weak, with F/W=0.1 or less. Model-derived W & F vary about a mean that matches geometry-derived values. Time- and spatially-averaged dynamical F & W are observed to be equal to wedge-derived results. Critical taper reflects the dynamical strengths during wedge growth and is controlled dynamically as base friction varies between an assigned quasi-static value and lower values during slip events. In the wedge, W varies more than F, which may also be true for natural systems. Detachments have frictional stick/slip behavior on a basal wall, but the wedge has more going on within it. Tandem faulting & folding serve to simultaneously weaken and strengthen the wedge, and may occur anywhere: structural style appears to be important to wedge strength evolution. The dynamics of deformation within the wedge and slip upon the base control the finite wedge geometry: static strengths drop to dynamic levels during seismicity, resulting in materials and faults that are weaker than prescribed in models or determined by testing. Relationships between α and W & F are complex. All sudden, stepwise changes in α, W & F with time coincide with seismicity spikes in the models. Large events trigger or are triggered by large changes in F and W. We examine the complex details of dynamically driven

  2. Dual Double-Wedge Pseudo-Depolarizer with Anamorphic PSF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Peter; Thompson, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    A polarized scene, which may occur at oblique illumination angles, creates a radiometric signal that varies as a function of viewing angle. One common optical component that is used to minimize such an effect is a polarization scrambler or depolarizer. As part of the CLARREO mission, the SOLARIS instrument project at Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a new class of polarization scramblers using a dual double-wedge pseudo-depolarizer that produces an anamorphic point spread function (PSF). The SOLARIS instrument uses two Wollaston type scramblers in series, each with a distinct wedge angle, to image a pseudo-depolarized scene that is free of eigenstates. Since each wedge is distinct, the scrambler is able to produce an anamorphic PSF that maintains high spatial resolution in one dimension by sacrificing the spatial resolution in the other dimension. This scrambler geometry is ideal for 1-D imagers, such as pushbroom slit spectrometers, which require high spectral resolution, high spatial resolution, and low sensitivity to polarized light. Moreover, the geometry is applicable to a wide range of scientific instruments that require both high SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) and low sensitivity to polarized scenes

  3. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, T.P.

    1991-11-26

    A process is disclosed for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry. 3 figures.

  4. Hollow spherical shell manufacture

    DOEpatents

    O'Holleran, Thomas P.

    1991-01-01

    A process for making a hollow spherical shell of silicate glass composition in which an aqueous suspension of silicate glass particles and an immiscible liquid blowing agent is placed within the hollow spherical cavity of a porous mold. The mold is spun to reduce effective gravity to zero and to center the blowing agent, while being heated so as to vaporize the immiscible liquid and urge the water carrier of the aqueous suspension to migrate into the body of the mold, leaving a green shell compact deposited around the mold cavity. The green shell compact is then removed from the cavity, and is sintered for a time and a temperature sufficient to form a silicate glass shell of substantially homogeneous composition and uniform geometry.

  5. A Study in Wedge Waves with Applications in Acoustic Delay- line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Po-Hsien; Wang, Wen-Chi; Yang, Che-Hua

    The acoustic delay line is usually used to supply protection from dangerous environment, to enhance signal intensity by fit geometry of analyte, or to achieve specific angle/focusing by Snell's law, but rarely to avoid noise from coupling agent and to raise spatial resolution by reducing contact area. This study is focused on wedge waves with applications in delay-line to solve the knot of traditionally transducer measurement. Wedge waves are guided acoustic waves propagating along the tip of a wedge. The advantages of wedge being used in acoustic delay line are wedge waves has large motion amplitude of anti-symmetric flexural (ASF) mode, low energy attenuation and the velocity of ASF more is regular weather frequency varied or not. According the characteristic of wedge wave and vibration direction of particle, the acoustical wedge delay line with high signal- noise-ratio, approximate point-like contact area, without coupling agent and in/out vibration measurement by specific experimental setup is developed.

  6. Measurements of dose from secondary radiation outside a treatment field: effects of wedges and blocks

    SciTech Connect

    Sherazi, S.; Kase, K.R.

    1985-12-01

    Radiation dose outside the radiotherapy treatment field can be significant and therefore is of clinical interest in estimating organ doses. In a previous paper we reported the results of measurements made using unmodified radiation fields. We have extended this study to include the effects of wedge filters and blocks. For a given dose on the central axis of a radiation field, wedges can cause a factor of 2 to 4 increase in dose at any point outside the field compared with the dose when no wedge is used. Adding blocks to a treatment field can cause an increase in dose at points outside the field, but the effect is much smaller than the effect of a wedge, and generally less than a factor of 2. From the results of these measurements, doses to selected organs outside the field for specified treatment geometries were estimated, and the potential for reducing these organ doses by additional shielding was assessed.

  7. The wedge bias in reionization 21-cm power spectrum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Hannes; Majumdar, Suman; Mellema, Garrelt; Lidz, Adam; Iliev, Ilian T.; Dixon, Keri L.

    2016-02-01

    A proposed method for dealing with foreground emission in upcoming 21-cm observations from the epoch of reionization is to limit observations to an uncontaminated window in Fourier space. Foreground emission can be avoided in this way, since it is limited to a wedge-shaped region in k∥, k⊥ space. However, the power spectrum is anisotropic owing to redshift-space distortions from peculiar velocities. Consequently, the 21-cm power spectrum measured in the foreground avoidance window - which samples only a limited range of angles close to the line-of-sight direction - differs from the full redshift-space spherically averaged power spectrum which requires an average over all angles. In this paper, we calculate the magnitude of this `wedge bias' for the first time. We find that the bias amplifies the difference between the real-space and redshift-space power spectra. The bias is strongest at high redshifts, where measurements using foreground avoidance will overestimate the redshift-space power spectrum by around 100 per cent, possibly obscuring the distinctive rise and fall signature that is anticipated for the spherically averaged 21-cm power spectrum. In the later stages of reionization, the bias becomes negative, and smaller in magnitude (≲20 per cent).

  8. Transport of barrel and spherical shaped colloids in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Knappenberger, Thorsten; Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Model colloids are usually spherical, but natural colloids have irregular geometries. Transport experiments of spherical colloids may not reflect the transport characteristics of natural colloids in porous media. We investigated saturated and unsaturated transport of colloids with spherical and angular shapes under steady-state, flow conditions. A pulse of negatively-charged colloids was introduced into a silica sand column at three different effective water saturations (Se = 0.31, 0.45, and 1.0). Colloids were introduced under high ionic strength of [106]mM to cause attachment to the secondary energy minimum and later released by changing the pore water to low ionic strength. After the experiment, sand was sampled from different depths (0, -4, and -11 cm) for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and colloid extraction. Water saturation affected colloid transport with more retention under low than under high saturation. Colloids were retained and released from a secondary energy minimum with more angular-shaped colloids being retained and released. Colloids extracted from the sand revealed highest colloid deposition in the top layer and decreasing deposition with depth. Pore straining and grain-grain wedging dominated colloid retention.

  9. Transport of barrel and spherical shaped colloids in unsaturated porous media.

    PubMed

    Knappenberger, Thorsten; Aramrak, Surachet; Flury, Markus

    2015-09-01

    Model colloids are usually spherical, but natural colloids have irregular geometries. Transport experiments of spherical colloids may not reflect the transport characteristics of natural colloids in porous media. We investigated saturated and unsaturated transport of colloids with spherical and angular shapes under steady-state, flow conditions. A pulse of negatively-charged colloids was introduced into a silica sand column at three different effective water saturations (Se = 0.31, 0.45, and 1.0). Colloids were introduced under high ionic strength of [106]mM to cause attachment to the secondary energy minimum and later released by changing the pore water to low ionic strength. After the experiment, sand was sampled from different depths (0, -4, and -11 cm) for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis and colloid extraction. Water saturation affected colloid transport with more retention under low than under high saturation. Colloids were retained and released from a secondary energy minimum with more angular-shaped colloids being retained and released. Colloids extracted from the sand revealed highest colloid deposition in the top layer and decreasing deposition with depth. Pore straining and grain-grain wedging dominated colloid retention. PMID:26275396

  10. Spherical colloidal photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuanjin; Shang, Luoran; Cheng, Yao; Gu, Zhongze

    2014-12-16

    generated by evaporation-induced nanoparticle crystallization or polymerization of ordered nanoparticle crystallization arrays. In particular, because microfluidics was used for the generation of the droplet templates, the development of spherical colloidal PhCs has progressed significantly. These new strategies not only ensure monodispersity, but also increase the structural and functional diversity of the PhC beads, paving the way for the development of advanced optoelectronic devices. In this Account, we present the research progress on spherical colloidal PhCs, including their design, preparation, and potential applications. We outline various types of spherical colloidal PhCs, such as close-packed, non-close-packed, inverse opal, biphasic or multiphasic Janus structured, and core-shell structured geometries. Based on their unique optical properties, applications of the spherical colloidal PhCs for displays, sensors, barcodes, and cell culture microcarriers are presented. Future developments of the spherical colloidal PhC materials are also envisioned. PMID:25393430

  11. Application of the critical Coulomb wedge theory to hyper-extended, magma-poor rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirrengarten, M.; Manatschal, G.; Yuan, X. P.; Kusznir, N. J.; Maillot, B.

    2016-05-01

    The Critical Coulomb Wedge Theory (CCWT) has been extensively used in compressional tectonics to resolve the shape of orogenic or accretionary prisms, while it is less applied to extensional and gravitational wedges despite the fact that it can be described by the same equation. In particular, the hyper-extended domain at magma-poor rifted margins, forming the oceanward termination of extended continental crust, satisfies the three main requirements of the CCWT: 1) it presents a wedge shape, 2) the rocks forming the wedge are completely brittle (frictional), and 3) the base of the wedge corresponds to a low friction décollement. However hyper-extended margins present a fully frictional behaviour only for a very thin crust; therefore this study is limited to the termination of hyper-extended continental crust which deforms in the latest stage of continental rifting. In this paper we define a method to measure the surface slope and the basal deep of this wedge that we apply to 17 hyper-extended, magma-poor rifted margins in order to compare the results to the values predicted by the CCWT. Because conjugate pairs of hyper-extended, magma-poor rifted margins are commonly asymmetric, due to detachment faulting, the wedges in the upper and lower plate margins corresponding respectively to the hanging wall and footwall of the detachment system are different. While the stress field in the upper plate wedge corresponds to a tectonic extensional wedge, the one in the lower plate matches that of a gravity extensional wedge. Using typical frictional properties of phyllosilicates (e.g. clays and serpentine), the shape of the hyper-extended wedges can be resolved by the CCWT using consistent fluid overpressures. Our results show that all lower plate margins are gravitationally stable and therefore have a close to critical shape whereas the tectonic extensional wedges at upper plate margins are critical, sub or sup critical due to the detachment initial angle and the duration of

  12. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Iyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0 deg, 30 deg, 45 deg, and 60 deg. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  13. Ice Particle Impacts on a Moving Wedge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas, Mario; Struk, Peter M.; Kreeger, Richard E.; Palacios, Jose; Lyer, Kaushik A.; Gold, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the results of an experimental study of ice particle impacts on a moving wedge. The experiment was conducted in the Adverse Environment Rotor Test Stand (AERTS) facility located at Penn State University. The wedge was placed at the tip of a rotating blade. Ice particles shot from a pressure gun intercepted the moving wedge and impacted it at a location along its circular path. The upward velocity of the ice particles varied from 7 to 12 meters per second. Wedge velocities were varied from 0 to 120 meters per second. Wedge angles tested were 0, 30, 45, and 60. High speed imaging combined with backlighting captured the impact allowing observation of the effect of velocity and wedge angle on the impact and the post-impact fragment behavior. It was found that the pressure gun and the rotating wedge could be synchronized to consistently obtain ice particle impacts on the target wedge. It was observed that the number of fragments increase with the normal component of the impact velocity. Particle fragments ejected immediately after impact showed velocities higher than the impact velocity. The results followed the major qualitative features observed by other researchers for hailstone impacts, even though the reduced scale size of the particles used in the present experiment as compared to hailstones was 4:1.

  14. Wedged Fibers Suppress Feedback of Laser Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.

    1986-01-01

    When injected laser is coupled into optical fiber, emission instabilities arise because of optical feedback losses from fiber into laser. Coupling efficiencies as high as 80 percent, however, obtained by shaping end of multimode fiber into obtuse-angled wedge. Because slanted sides eliminate back reflection, such wedged fiber achieves high coupling efficiency.

  15. Spherical Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Developed largely through a Small Business Innovation Research contract through Langley Research Center, Interactive Picture Corporation's IPIX technology provides spherical photography, a panoramic 360-degrees. NASA found the technology appropriate for use in guiding space robots, in the space shuttle and space station programs, as well as research in cryogenic wind tunnels and for remote docking of spacecraft. Images of any location are captured in their entirety in a 360-degree immersive digital representation. The viewer can navigate to any desired direction within the image. Several car manufacturers already use IPIX to give viewers a look at their latest line-up of automobiles. Another application is for non-invasive surgeries. By using OmniScope, surgeons can look more closely at various parts of an organ with medical viewing instruments now in use. Potential applications of IPIX technology include viewing of homes for sale, hotel accommodations, museum sites, news events, and sports stadiums.

  16. BIPOLAR MAGNETIC SPOTS FROM DYNAMOS IN STRATIFIED SPHERICAL SHELL TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Jabbari, Sarah; Brandenburg, Axel; Kleeorin, Nathan; Mitra, Dhrubaditya; Rogachevskii, Igor

    2015-06-01

    Recent work by Mitra et al. (2014) has shown that in strongly stratified forced two-layer turbulence with helicity and corresponding large-scale dynamo action in the lower layer, and nonhelical turbulence in the upper, a magnetic field occurs in the upper layer in the form of sharply bounded bipolar magnetic spots. Here we extend this model to spherical wedge geometry covering the northern hemisphere up to 75° latitude and an azimuthal extent of 180°. The kinetic helicity and therefore also the large-scale magnetic field are strongest at low latitudes. For moderately strong stratification, several bipolar spots form that eventually fill the full longitudinal extent. At early times, the polarity of spots reflects the orientation of the underlying azimuthal field, as expected from Parker’s Ω-shaped flux loops. At late times their tilt changes such that there is a radial field of opposite orientation at different latitudes separated by about 10°. Our model demonstrates the spontaneous formation of spots of sizes much larger than the pressure scale height. Their tendency to produce filling factors close to unity is argued to be reminiscent of highly active stars. We confirm that strong stratification and strong scale separation are essential ingredients behind magnetic spot formation, which appears to be associated with downflows at larger depths.

  17. An Experimental and Theoretical Approach on the Modeling of Sliding Response of Rock Wedges under Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydan, Ömer; Kumsar, Halil

    2010-11-01

    The stability of rock slopes under dynamic loading in mining and civil engineering depends upon the slope geometry, mechanical properties of rock mass and discontinuities, and the characteristics of dynamic loads with time. The wedge failure is one of the common forms of slope failures. The authors presented some stability conditions for rock wedges under dynamic loading and they confirmed their validity through the laboratory experimental studies in a previous paper in 2000, which is often quoted by others to validate their softwares, including some commercial software. In this study, the authors investigate the sliding responses of rock wedges under dynamic loads rather than the initiation of wedge sliding. First, some laboratory model tests are described. On the basis of these model tests on rock wedges, the theoretical model proposed previously is extended to compute the sliding responses of rock wedges in time domain. The proposed theoretical model is applied to simulate the sliding responses of rock wedge model tests and its validity is discussed. In the final part, the method proposed is applied to actual wedge failures observed in 1995 Dinar earthquake and 2005 Pakistan-Kashmir earthquake, and the results are discussed.

  18. The effect of a dynamic wedge in the medial tangential field upon the contralateral breast dose

    SciTech Connect

    McParland, B.J. )

    1990-12-01

    The elevated incidence of breast cancer following irradiation of breast tissue has led to concern over the magnitude of the scattered radiation received by the uninvolved contralateral breast during radiation therapy for a primary breast lesion and the risk of an induced contralateral breast cancer. Some linear accelerators use a single dynamic (or universal) wedge that is mounted within the treatment head at an extended distance from the patient. Because of the combined effects of distance and shielding, the contralateral breast dose due to a medial tangent containing a dynamic wedge is expected to be less than that containing a conventional wedge. This paper presents contralateral breast dose (CBD) measurements performed on an anthropomorphic phantom with breast prostheses irradiated with 6 MV X rays from a linear accelerator equipped with a dynamic wedge. Doses were measured at 15 points within the contralateral breast prosthesis with thermoluminescent dosimeters. It was found that the contralateral breast dose per unit target breast dose decreases with the perpendicular distance from the posterior edge of the medial tangent to the dose measurement point and increases with effective wedge angle by factors ranging up to 2.8, in agreement with data presented earlier for a water phantom geometry. This dose elevation showed no statistically significant dependence (p less than 0.05) upon the perpendicular distance from the beam edge. Comparisons with data in the literature show that the contralateral breast dose increase by a dynamic wedge is typically only about half of that reported for a conventional wedge for the same wedge angle and distance from the beam.

  19. Capillarity driven motion of solid film wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, H.; Miksis, M.J.; Voorhees, P.W.; Davis, S.H.

    1997-06-01

    A solid film freshly deposited on a substrate may form a non-equilibrium contact angle with the substrate, and will evolve. This morphological evolution near the contact line is investigated by studying the motion of a solid wedge on a substrate. The contact angle of the wedge changes at time t = 0 from the wedge angle {alpha} to the equilibrium contact angle {beta}, and its effects spread into the wedge via capillarity-driven surface diffusion. The film profiles at different times are found to be self-similar, with the length scale increasing as t{sup 1 4}. The self-similar film profile is determined numerically by a shooting method for {alpha} and {beta} between 0 and 180. In general, the authors find that the film remains a wedge when {alpha} = {beta}. For {alpha} < {beta}, the film retracts, whereas for {alpha} > {beta}, the film extends. For {alpha} = 90{degree}, the results describe the growth of grain-boundary grooves for arbitrary dihedral angles. For {beta} = 90{degree}, the solution also applies to a free-standing wedge, and the thin-wedge profiles agree qualitatively with those observed in transmission electron microscope specimens.

  20. Ultrasonic transducer with laminated coupling wedge

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.

    1976-08-03

    An ultrasonic transducer capable of use in a high-temperature environment incorporates a laminated metal coupling wedge including a reflecting edge shaped as a double sloping roof and a transducer crystal backed by a laminated metal sound absorber disposed so as to direct sound waves through the coupling wedge and into a work piece, reflections from the interface between the coupling wedge and the work piece passing to the reflecting edge. Preferably the angle of inclination of the two halves of the reflecting edge are different.

  1. Pressure Distributions About Finite Wedges in Bounded and Unbounded Subsonic Streams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoughe, Patrick L; Prasse, Ernst I

    1953-01-01

    An analytical investigation of incompressible flow about wedges was made to determine effects of tunnel-wedge ratio and wedge angle on the wedge pressure distributions. The region of applicability of infinite wedge-type velocity distribution was examined for finite wedges. Theoretical and experimental pressure coefficients for various tunnel-wedge ratios, wedge angles, and subsonic Mach numbers were compared.

  2. Latest Pleistocene Sediment Wedge on the New Jersey Outer Continental Shelf - Forced Regressive Paleo-Hudson Delta?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, M.; Goff, J. A.; Steel, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    several prograding and offlapping deltaic clinothems. The geometry of these clinothems indicates that they are truncated at the top, particularly in the proximal part of the wedge. The clinoform height systematically increases seaward as they gradually approach the Pleistocene shelf edge. These observations lead to the interpretation that the offlapping sediment wedge represents the strike-elongate lobes of a falling-stage, wave-influenced delta system fed by pre-LGM paleo-Hudson River Channel(s) that probably reached the late Pleistocene shelf-edge off New Jersey.

  3. Wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide with long propagation length and ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode area

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Chengcheng; Wang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    We present a novel design of wedge hybrid plasmonic terahertz (THz) waveguide consisting of a silicon (Si) nanowire cylinder above a triangular gold wedge with surrounded high-density polyethylene as cladding. It features long propagation length and ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode confinement. The mode properties of wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide are comprehensively characterized in terms of propagation length (L), normalized mode area (Aeff /A0), figure of merit (FoM), and chromatic dispersion (D). The designed wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide enables an ultra-small deep-subwavelength mode area which is more than one-order of magnitude smaller compared to previous rectangular one. When choosing the diameter of Si nanowire cylinder, a smaller diameter (e.g. 10 μm) is preferred to achieve longer L and higher FoM, while a larger diameter (e.g. 60 μm) is favorable to obtain smaller Aeff /A0 and higher FoM. We further study the impacts of possible practical fabrication errors on the mode properties. The simulated results of propagation length and normalized mode area show that the proposed wedge hybrid plasmonic THz waveguide is tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, variation of wedge tip angle, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius. PMID:26155782

  4. Structure of turbulent wedges created by isolated surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuester, Matthew S.; White, Edward B.

    2016-04-01

    Isolated surface roughness in a laminar boundary layer can create a wedge of turbulence that spreads laterally into the surrounding laminar flow. Some recent studies have identified high- and low-speed streaks along the exterior of turbulent wedges. In this experiment, developing turbulent wedges are measured to observe the creation of these streaks. Naphthalene shear stress surface visualization and hotwire measurements are utilized to investigate the details of turbulent wedges created by cylinders in a laminar flat-plate boundary layer. Both the surface visualization and the hotwire measurements show high- and low-speed streaks in the wake of the cylinder that devolve into a turbulent wedge. The turbulent wedge spreading is associated with the emergence of these high- and low-speed streaks along the outside of the wedge. As the wedge evolves in the streamwise direction, these streaks persist inside of the core of the wedge, while new, lower amplitude streaks form along the outside of the wedge. Adding asymmetry to the cylinder moved the virtual origin closer to the roughness and increased the vortex shedding frequency, while adding small-scale roughness features did not strongly affect turbulent wedge development. Intermittency calculations additionally show the origin of the turbulent core inside of the wedge. The structure and spacing of the high-speed streaks along the extremities of the turbulent wedge give insight into the spreading angle of the turbulent wedge.

  5. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy with birefringent wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Réhault, Julien; Maiuri, Margherita; Oriana, Aurelio; Cerullo, Giulio

    2014-12-15

    We present a simple experimental setup for performing two-dimensional (2D) electronic spectroscopy in the partially collinear pump-probe geometry. The setup uses a sequence of birefringent wedges to create and delay a pair of phase-locked, collinear pump pulses, with extremely high phase stability and reproducibility. Continuous delay scanning is possible without any active stabilization or position tracking, and allows to record rapidly and easily 2D spectra. The setup works over a broad spectral range from the ultraviolet to the near-IR, it is compatible with few-optical-cycle pulses and can be easily reconfigured to two-colour operation. A simple method for scattering suppression is also introduced. As a proof of principle, we present degenerate and two-color 2D spectra of the light-harvesting complex 1 of purple bacteria.

  6. Wedge indentation of an elastoviscoplastic material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhihong; Lucas, Margaret; Adams, Michael J.

    2002-05-01

    This paper describes the modeling of the indentation of an elasto-viscoplastic material. The finite element code ABAQUS was used to study the bulk mechanical, thermal and interface frictional characteristics for rigid wedge indenters. A series of simulations has been performed at a constant velocity to prescribed depths of penetration for a range of wedge surface temperatures and semi-included angles. Selected experimental data are provided as a basis for validating the numerical simulation. In the simulations, the constitutive behavior of the model material Plasticine is treated as non-linear elasto-viscoplastic, in which the stress scales linearly with the elastic strain and non-linearly with the plastic strain rate. The result demonstrate that the FE simulations agree well with the experimental dat of displacement, strain and stress for all the range of wedge angles and temperatures examined.

  7. A review of dynamics modelling of friction wedge suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Qing; Cole, Colin; Spiryagin, Maksym; Sun, Yan Quan

    2014-11-01

    Three-piece bogies with friction wedge suspensions are the most widely used bogies in heavy haul trains. Fiction wedge suspensions play a key role in these wagon systems. This article reviews current techniques in dynamic modelling of friction wedge suspension with various motivations: to improve dynamic models of friction wedge suspensions so as to improve general wagon dynamics simulations; to seek better friction wedge suspension models for wagon stability assessments in complex train systems; to improve the modelling of other friction devices, such as friction draft gear. Relevant theories and friction wedge suspension models developed by using commercial simulation packages and in-house simulation packages are reviewed.

  8. Radiative transfer in spherical atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkofen, W.; Wehrse, R.

    A method for defining spherical model atmospheres in radiative/convective and hydrostatic equilibrium is presented. A finite difference form is found for the transfer equation and a matrix operator is developed as the discrete space analog (in curvilinear coordinates) of a formal integral in plane geometry. Pressure is treated as a function of temperature. Flux conservation is maintained within the energy equation, although the correct luminosity transport must be assigned for any given level of the atmosphere. A perturbed integral operator is used in a complete linearization of the transfer and constraint equations. Finally, techniques for generating stable solutions in economical computer time are discussed.

  9. Relativistic spherical plasma waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulanov, S. S.; Maksimchuk, A.; Schroeder, C. B.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.

    2012-02-01

    Tightly focused laser pulses that diverge or converge in underdense plasma can generate wake waves, having local structures that are spherical waves. Here we study theoretically and numerically relativistic spherical wake waves and their properties, including wave breaking.

  10. The shape effects of nanoparticles suspended in HFE-7100 over wedge with entropy generation and mixed convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellahi, R.; Hassan, M.; Zeeshan, A.; Khan, Ambreen A.

    2016-06-01

    The flow of mixed convection nanofluid over wedge under the effects of porous medium is investigated. The HFE-7100 Engineered Fluid having Nimonic 80a metal nanoparticles of spherical and non-spherical shapes with different sizes is used. The particle shape effects on Bejan number and entropy generation are taken into account. The system of partial differential equations is first written in terms of ordinary differential equations using adequate similarity transformations and then solved analytically. Analytical solutions of the resulting equations are obtained for the velocity and temperature profiles. Simultaneous effects of porous medium, particle volume friction, mixed convection parameter, and angle of wedge in the presence of different shapes nanoparticles are demonstrated graphically. Effects of particle concentrations, sizes on wall stress, heat transfer coefficient of Skin friction, and Nusselt are discussed in the form of tables.

  11. Modes in Lined Wedge-Shaped Ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechel, F. P.

    1998-10-01

    The computation of sound fields in wedge-shaped spaces with an absorbing boundary (the seabed) is a classical problem of underwater acoustics, covered by a large number of publications. All known solutions are approximations which are restricted to very small wedge angles θ0, typically less than 3°. In underwater acoustics it is further assumed thatk0r≫1. The background of the present paper is the performance of lined conical duct sections in silencers. There the wedge angle can attain values around 45°, and the assumptionk0r≫1 cannot be made. The absorber of the lined boundary here is supposed to be locally reacting (for reasons of simplicity); it can be characterized by a normalized surface admittanceG0. The problems of the analysis arise from the fact, that the fundamental field solutions (modes) can no longer be separated in the cylindrical co-ordinatesr, θ if a boundary is absorbing. This paper describes analytical solutions for the construction of modes in lined wedge-shaped ducts; they can be applied for wedge angles up to about 15° (a subsequent paper will describe a method for angles up to about 45° but only moderatek0rvalues). In the solutions, use is made of “fictitious modes”, which satisfy the boundary conditions and solve a part of the wave equation. They must be completed by a “modal rest” to satisfy approximately the full wave equation. In the first solution, the rest is synthesized by fictitious modes; in the second solution, a separate function is introduced for the rest. Modes for typical underwater acoustics conditions will arise as side products.

  12. 21 CFR 884.5200 - Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. 884.5200... Devices § 884.5200 Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. (a) Identification. A hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge provides mechanical support to the perianal region during the labor and delivery...

  13. 21 CFR 884.5200 - Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. 884.5200... Devices § 884.5200 Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. (a) Identification. A hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge provides mechanical support to the perianal region during the labor and delivery...

  14. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  15. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  16. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  17. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  18. 49 CFR 215.113 - Defective plain bearing wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Defective plain bearing wedge. 215.113 Section 215... Suspension System § 215.113 Defective plain bearing wedge. A railroad may not place or continue in service a car, if a plain bearing wedge on that car is— (a) Missing; (b) Cracked; (c) Broken; or (d) Not...

  19. Arc-parallel flow in the mantle wedge beneath Costa Rica and Nicaragua.

    PubMed

    Hoernle, Kaj; Abt, David L; Fischer, Karen M; Nichols, Holly; Hauff, Folkmar; Abers, Geoffrey A; van den Bogaard, Paul; Heydolph, Ken; Alvarado, Guillermo; Protti, Marino; Strauch, Wilfried

    2008-02-28

    Resolving flow geometry in the mantle wedge is central to understanding the thermal and chemical structure of subduction zones, subducting plate dehydration, and melting that leads to arc volcanism, which can threaten large populations and alter climate through gas and particle emission. Here we show that isotope geochemistry and seismic velocity anisotropy provide strong evidence for trench-parallel flow in the mantle wedge beneath Costa Rica and Nicaragua. This finding contradicts classical models, which predict trench-normal flow owing to the overlying wedge mantle being dragged downwards by the subducting plate. The isotopic signature of central Costa Rican volcanic rocks is not consistent with its derivation from the mantle wedge or eroded fore-arc complexes but instead from seamounts of the Galapagos hotspot track on the subducting Cocos plate. This isotopic signature decreases continuously from central Costa Rica to northwestern Nicaragua. As the age of the isotopic signature beneath Costa Rica can be constrained and its transport distance is known, minimum northwestward flow rates can be estimated (63-190 mm yr(-1)) and are comparable to the magnitude of subducting Cocos plate motion (approximately 85 mm yr(-1)). Trench-parallel flow needs to be taken into account in models evaluating thermal and chemical structure and melt generation in subduction zones.

  20. Experimental study on the water impact of a symmetrical wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yettou, El-Mahdi; Desrochers, Alain; Champoux, Yvan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we report the results of our experimental investigation of the pressure distribution on a free-falling wedge upon entering water. Parameters such as the drop height, the deadrise angle and the mass of the wedge are related to the water pressure on the wedge and its dynamic behavior. Existing models that assumed a constant water-entry velocity of the wedge are compared with experimental data. In order to take into account the inherent variation in the velocity of a free-falling wedge, a combination of two models are proposed. This method gives an adequate approximation of the maximum pressures measured.

  1. Life at the wedge: the activity and diversity of arctic ice wedge microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Roland C; Radtke, Kristin J; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Greer, Charles W; Whyte, Lyle G

    2012-04-01

    The discovery of polygonal terrain on Mars underlain by ice heightens interest in the possibility that this water-bearing habitat may be, or may have been, a suitable habitat for extant life. The possibility is supported by the recurring detection of terrestrial microorganisms in subsurface ice environments, such as ice wedges found beneath tundra polygon features. A characterization of the microbial community of ice wedges from the high Arctic was performed to determine whether this ice environment can sustain actively respiring microorganisms and to assess the ecology of this extreme niche. We found that ice wedge samples contained a relatively abundant number of culturable cells compared to other ice habitats (∼10(5) CFU·mL(-1)). Respiration assays in which radio-labeled acetate and in situ measurement of CO(2) flux were used suggested low levels of microbial activity, though more sensitive techniques are required to confirm these findings. Based on 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, bacterial and archaeal ice wedge communities appeared to reflect surrounding soil communities. Two Pseudomonas sp. were the most abundant taxa in the ice wedge bacterial library (∼50%), while taxa related to ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota occupied 90% of the archaeal library. The tolerance of a variety of isolates to salinity and temperature revealed characteristics of a psychrotolerant, halotolerant community. Our findings support the hypothesis that ice wedges are capable of sustaining a diverse, plausibly active microbial community. As such, ice wedges, compared to other forms of less habitable ground ice, could serve as a reservoir for life on permanently cold, water-scarce, ice-rich extraterrestrial bodies and are therefore of interest to astrobiologists and ecologists alike. .

  2. Life at the wedge: the activity and diversity of arctic ice wedge microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Roland C; Radtke, Kristin J; Mykytczuk, Nadia C S; Greer, Charles W; Whyte, Lyle G

    2012-04-01

    The discovery of polygonal terrain on Mars underlain by ice heightens interest in the possibility that this water-bearing habitat may be, or may have been, a suitable habitat for extant life. The possibility is supported by the recurring detection of terrestrial microorganisms in subsurface ice environments, such as ice wedges found beneath tundra polygon features. A characterization of the microbial community of ice wedges from the high Arctic was performed to determine whether this ice environment can sustain actively respiring microorganisms and to assess the ecology of this extreme niche. We found that ice wedge samples contained a relatively abundant number of culturable cells compared to other ice habitats (∼10(5) CFU·mL(-1)). Respiration assays in which radio-labeled acetate and in situ measurement of CO(2) flux were used suggested low levels of microbial activity, though more sensitive techniques are required to confirm these findings. Based on 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing, bacterial and archaeal ice wedge communities appeared to reflect surrounding soil communities. Two Pseudomonas sp. were the most abundant taxa in the ice wedge bacterial library (∼50%), while taxa related to ammonia-oxidizing Thaumarchaeota occupied 90% of the archaeal library. The tolerance of a variety of isolates to salinity and temperature revealed characteristics of a psychrotolerant, halotolerant community. Our findings support the hypothesis that ice wedges are capable of sustaining a diverse, plausibly active microbial community. As such, ice wedges, compared to other forms of less habitable ground ice, could serve as a reservoir for life on permanently cold, water-scarce, ice-rich extraterrestrial bodies and are therefore of interest to astrobiologists and ecologists alike. . PMID:22519974

  3. Radiation pressure on a dielectric wedge.

    PubMed

    Mansuripur, Masud; Zakharian, Armis; Moloney, Jerome

    2005-03-21

    The force of electromagnetic radiation on a dielectric medium may be derived by a direct application of the Lorentz law of classical electrodynamics. While the light's electric field acts upon the (induced) bound charges in the medium, its magnetic field exerts a force on the bound currents. We use the example of a wedge-shaped solid dielectric, immersed in a transparent liquid and illuminated at Brewster's angle, to demonstrate that the linear momentum of the electromagnetic field within dielectrics has neither the Minkowski nor the Abraham form; rather, the correct expression for momentum density has equal contributions from both. The time rate of change of the incident momentum thus expressed is equal to the force exerted on the wedge plus that experienced by the surrounding liquid.

  4. Wedge assembly for electrical transformer component spacing

    DOEpatents

    Baggett, Franklin E.; Cage, W. Franklin

    1991-01-01

    A wedge assembly that is easily inserted between two surfaces to be supported thereby, and thereafter expanded to produce a selected spacing between those surfaces. This wedge assembly has two outer members that are substantially identical except that they are mirror images of each other. Oppositely directed faces of these of these outer members are substantially parallel for the purpose of contacting the surfaces to be separated. The outer faces of these outer members that are directed toward each other are tapered so as to contact a center member having complementary tapers on both faces. A washer member is provided to contact a common end of the outer members, and a bolt member penetrates this washer and is threadably received in a receptor of the center member. As the bolt member is threaded into the center member, the center member is drawn further into the gap between the outer members and thereby separates these outer members to contact the surfaces to be separated. In the preferred embodiment, the contacting surfaces of the outer member and the center member are provided with guide elements. The wedge assembly is described for use in separating the secondary windings from the laminations of an electrical power transformer.

  5. Interior impedance wedge diffraction with surface waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balanis, Constantine A.; Griesser, Timothy

    1988-01-01

    The exact impedance wedge solution is evaluated asymptotically using the method of steepest descents for plane wave illumination at normal incidence. Uniform but different impedances on each face are considered for both soft and hard polarizations. The asymptotic solution isolates the incident, singly reflected, multiply reflected, diffracted, and surface wave fields. Multiply reflected fields of any order are permitted. The multiply reflected fields from the exact solution are written as ratios of auxiliary Maliuzhinets functions, whereas a geometrical analysis gives the reflected fields as products of reflection coefficients. These two representations are shown to be identical in magnitude, phase and the angular range over which they exist. The diffracted field includes four Fresnel transition functions as in the perfect conductor case, and the expressions for the appropriate discontinuities at the shadow boundaries are presented. The surface wave exists over a finite angular range and only for certain surface impedances. A surface wave transition field is included to retain continuity. Computations are presented for interior wedge diffractions although the formulation is valid for both exterior and interior wedges.

  6. Spatial symmetry breaking in rapidly rotating convective spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Keke; Schubert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Many problems in geophysical and astrophysical convection systems are characterized by fast rotation and spherical shell geometry. The combined effects of Coriolis forces and spherical shell geometry produce a unique spatial symmetry for the convection pattern in a rapidly rotating spherical shell. In this paper, we first discuss the general spatial symmetries for rotating spherical shell convection. A special model, a spherical shell heated from below, is then used to illustrate how and when the spatial symmetries are broken. Symmetry breaking occurs via a sequence of spatial transitions from the primary conducting state to the complex multiple-layered columnar structure. It is argued that, because of the dominant effects of rotation, the sequence of spatial transitions identified from this particular model is likely to be generally valid. Applications of the spatial symmetry breaking to planetary convection problems are also discussed.

  7. Spherical quartz crystals investigated with synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, N. R.; Macrander, A. T.; Hill, K. W.; Baronova, E. O.; George, K. M.; Kotick, J.

    2015-10-15

    The quality of x-ray spectra and images obtained from plasmas with spherically bent crystals depends in part on the crystal’s x-ray diffraction across the entire crystal surface. We employ the energy selectivity and high intensity of synchrotron radiation to examine typical spherical crystals from alpha-quartz for their diffraction quality, in a perpendicular geometry that is particularly convenient to examine sagittal focusing. The crystal’s local diffraction is not ideal: the most noticeable problems come from isolated regions that so far have failed to correlate with visible imperfections. Excluding diffraction from such problem spots has little effect on the focus beyond a decrease in background.

  8. Complex interactions between diapirs and 4-D subduction driven mantle wedge circulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, R. T.; Kincaid, C. R.

    2015-12-01

    Analogue laboratory experiments generate 4-D flow of mantle wedge fluid and capture the evolution of buoyant mesoscale diapirs. The mantle is modeled with viscous glucose syrup with an Arrhenius type temperature dependent viscosity. To characterize diapir evolution we experiment with a variety of fluids injected from multiple point sources. Diapirs interact with kinematically induced flow fields forced by subducting plate motions replicating a range of styles observed in dynamic subduction models (e.g., rollback, steepening, gaps). Data is collected using high definition timelapse photography and quantified using image velocimetry techniques. While many studies assume direct vertical connections between the volcanic arc and the deeper mantle source region, our experiments demonstrate the difficulty of creating near vertical conduits. Results highlight extreme curvature of diapir rise paths. Trench-normal deflection occurs as diapirs are advected downward away from the trench before ascending into wedge apex directed return flow. Trench parallel deflections up to 75% of trench length are seen in all cases, exacerbated by complex geometry and rollback motion. Interdiapir interaction is also important; upwellings with similar trajectory coalesce and rapidly accelerate. Moreover, we observe a new mode of interaction whereby recycled diapir material is drawn down along the slab surface and then initiates rapid fluid migration updip along the slab-wedge interface. Variability in trajectory and residence time leads to complex petrologic inferences. Material from disparate source regions can surface at the same location, mix in the wedge, or become fully entrained in creeping flow adding heterogeneity to the mantle. Active diapirism or any other vertical fluid flux mechanism employing rheological weakening lowers viscosity in the recycling mantle wedge affecting both solid and fluid flow characteristics. Many interesting and insightful results have been presented based

  9. Wightman function and scalar Casimir densities for a wedge with two cylindrical boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Saharian, A.A. Tarloyan, A.S.

    2008-07-15

    Wightman function, the vacuum expectation values of the field square and the energy-momentum tensor are investigated for a massive scalar field with general curvature coupling parameter inside a wedge with two coaxial cylindrical boundaries. It is assumed that the field obeys Dirichlet boundary condition on bounding surfaces. The application of a variant of the generalized Abel-Plana formula enables to extract from the expectation values the contribution corresponding to the geometry of a wedge with a single shell and to present the interference part in terms of exponentially convergent integrals. The local properties of the vacuum are investigated in various asymptotic regions of the parameters. The vacuum forces acting on the boundaries are presented as the sum of self-action and interaction terms. It is shown that the interaction forces between the separate parts of the boundary are always attractive. The generalization to the case of a scalar field with Neumann boundary condition is discussed.

  10. Stress intensity factors in a cracked infinite elastic wedge loaded by a rigid punch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Civelek, M. B.

    1978-01-01

    A plane elastic wedge-shaped solid was split through the application of a rigid punch. It was assumed that the coefficient of friction on the the contact area was constant, and the problem had a plane of symmetry with respect to loading and geometry, with the crack in the plane of symmetry. The problem was formulated in terms of a system of integral equations with the contact stress and the derivative of the crack surface displacement as the unknown functions. The solution was obtained for an internal crack and for an edge crack. The results include primarily the stress intensity factors at the crack tips, and the measure of the stress singularity at the wedge apex, and at the end points of the contact area.

  11. Ellipsoidal geometry in asteroid thermal models - The standard radiometric model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The major consequences of ellipsoidal geometry in an othewise standard radiometric model for asteroids are explored. It is shown that for small deviations from spherical shape a spherical model of the same projected area gives a reasonable aproximation to the thermal flux from an ellipsoidal body. It is suggested that large departures from spherical shape require that some correction be made for geometry. Systematic differences in the radii of asteroids derived radiometrically at 10 and 20 microns may result partly from nonspherical geometry. It is also suggested that extrapolations of the rotational variation of thermal flux from a nonspherical body based solely on the change in cross-sectional area are in error.

  12. Spherical neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2006-11-21

    A spherical neutron generator is formed with a small spherical target and a spherical shell RF-driven plasma ion source surrounding the target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) ion plasma is produced by RF excitation in the plasma ion source using an RF antenna. The plasma generation region is a spherical shell between an outer chamber and an inner extraction electrode. A spherical neutron generating target is at the center of the chamber and is biased negatively with respect to the extraction electrode which contains many holes. Ions passing through the holes in the extraction electrode are focused onto the target which produces neutrons by D-D or D-T reactions.

  13. Molecular Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Desseyn, H. O.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Compares linear-nonlinear and planar-nonplanar geometry through the valence-shell electron pairs repulsion (V.S.E.P.R.), Mulliken-Walsh, and electrostatic force theories. Indicates that although the V.S.E.P.R. theory has more advantages for elementary courses, an explanation of the best features of the different theories offers students a better…

  14. Stability of spherical converging shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, M.; Sanz, J.; Iwamoto, Y.

    2015-07-01

    Based on Guderley's self-similar solution, stability of spherical converging shock wave is studied. A rigorous linear perturbation theory is developed, in which the growth rate of perturbation is given as a function of the spherical harmonic number ℓ and the specific heats ratio γ. Numerical calculation reveals the existence of a γ-dependent cut-off mode number ℓc, such that all the eigenmode perturbations for ℓ > ℓc are smeared out as the shock wave converges at the center. The analysis is applied to partially spherical geometries to give significant implication for different ignition schemes of inertial confinement fusion. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed to verify the theory.

  15. Stability of spherical converging shock wave

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Sanz, J.; Iwamoto, Y.

    2015-07-15

    Based on Guderley's self-similar solution, stability of spherical converging shock wave is studied. A rigorous linear perturbation theory is developed, in which the growth rate of perturbation is given as a function of the spherical harmonic number ℓ and the specific heats ratio γ. Numerical calculation reveals the existence of a γ-dependent cut-off mode number ℓ{sub c}, such that all the eigenmode perturbations for ℓ > ℓ{sub c} are smeared out as the shock wave converges at the center. The analysis is applied to partially spherical geometries to give significant implication for different ignition schemes of inertial confinement fusion. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations are performed to verify the theory.

  16. Knee abduction angular impulses during prolonged running with wedged insoles.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Ryan T; Worobets, Jay T; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2013-07-01

    Wedged insoles may produce immediate effects on knee abduction angular impulses during running; however, it is currently not known whether these knee abduction angular impulse magnitudes are maintained throughout a run when fatigue sets in. If changes occur, this could affect the clinical utility of wedged insoles in treating conditions such as patellofemoral pain. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine whether knee abduction angular impulses are altered during a prolonged run with wedged insoles. It was hypothesized that knee abduction angular impulses would be reduced following a prolonged run with wedged insoles. Nine healthy runners participated. Runners were randomly assigned to either a 6-mm medial wedge condition or a 6-mm lateral wedge condition and then ran continuously overground for 30 min. Knee abduction angular impulses were quantified at 0 and 30 min using a gait analysis procedure. After 2 days, participants returned to perform the same test but with the other wedge type. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used to evaluate main effects of wedge condition and time and interactions between wedge condition and time (α = 0.05). Paired t-tests were used for post hoc analysis (α = 0.01). No interaction effects (p = 0.958) were found, and knee abduction angular impulses were not significantly different over time (p = 0.384). Lateral wedge conditions produced lesser knee abduction angular impulses than medial conditions at 0 min (difference of 2.79 N m s, p = 0.006) and at 30 min (difference of 2.76 N m s, p < 0.001). It is concluded that significant knee abduction angular impulse changes within wedge conditions do not occur during a 30-min run. Additionally, knee abduction angular impulse differences between wedge conditions are maintained during a 30-min run.

  17. Transition induced by fixed and freely convecting spherical particles in laminar boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, H. L.; Morris, P. J.; Bajwa, A. R.; Vincent, D. C.

    1993-08-01

    An experimental and analytical study of aspects of transition induced by disturbances from spherical particles in laminar boundary layers is discussed. The generation of turbulent wedges by fixed spherical particles in a laminar boundary layer on or near the surface of a flat plate is considered experimentally using flow visualization with fluorescent dye and laser Doppler velocimetry. Turbulent spots generated by freely convecting spherical particles that are released in the freestream to fall into a flat plate laminar boundary layer and impact the plate are also discussed. A combination of dye flow visualization and a video based particle tracking technique was used to study the convecting particle problem. Although the Reynolds number at the critical condition for turbulent wedge generation by fixed particles and turbulent spot generation by convecting particles are similar, transition in these two situations appears to be fundamentally different. The development of a turbulent wedge near the critical condition is a relatively gradual process. In contrast, turbulent spots form relatively quickly after the convecting particles enter the boundary layer and impact the plate. Turbulent wedge formation downstream of a fixed particle results from the destabilization of the near wall flow by the vortical structures shed into particle wake. This shedding process is dominated by periodically shed loop shaped hairpin vortices. Observation of subharmonic oscillations at 1/2 and 1/4 of this shedding frequency suggest that a chaotic route to turbulence by a series of period doubling bifurcations is possible.

  18. Programmable shape transformation of elastic spherical domes.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Arif M; Braun, Paul V; Hsia, K Jimmy

    2016-07-20

    We investigate mismatch strain driven programmable shape transformation of spherical domes and report the effects of different geometric and structural characteristics on dome behavior in response to applied mismatch strain. We envision a bilayer dome design where the differential swelling of the inner layer with respect to the passive outer layer in response to changes in dome surroundings (such as the introduction of an organic solvent) introduces mismatch strain within the bilayer system and causes dome shape transformation. Finite element analysis reveals that, in addition to snap-through, spherical domes undergo bifurcation buckling and eventually gradual bending to morph into cylinders with increasing mismatch strain. Besides demonstrating how the snap-through energy barrier depends on the spherical dome shape, our analysis identifies three distinct groups of dome geometries based on their mismatch strain-transformed configuration relationships. Our experiments with polymer-based elastic bilayer domes that exhibit differential swelling in organic solvents qualitatively confirm the finite element predictions. We establish that, in addition to externally applied stimuli (mismatch strain), bilayer spherical dome morphing can be tuned and hence programmed through its geometry and structural characteristics. Incorporation of an elastic instability mechanism such as snap-through within the framework of stimuli-responsive functional devices can improve their response time which is otherwise controlled by diffusion. Hence, our proposed design guidelines can be used to realize deployable, multi-functional, reconfigurable, and therefore, adaptive structures responsive to a diverse set of stimuli across multiple length scales.

  19. Opening wedge osteotomies for correction of hallux valgus: a review of wedge plate fixation.

    PubMed

    Smith, W Bret; Hyer, Christopher F; DeCarbo, William T; Berlet, Gregory C; Lee, Thomas H

    2009-12-01

    Osteotomy of the proximal metatarsal for the correction of moderate to severe hallux valgus deformity is commonly performed. The purpose of this study is to review the early results of a technique for the correction of hallux valgus, an opening wedge osteotomy of the proximal first metatarsal with opening wedge plate fixation. A review was performed of the results of 47 patients (49 feet) who underwent correction of hallux valgus with proximal metatarsal opening wedge osteotomy. All osteotomies were secured with plate fixation on the medial side. Evaluation consisted of preoperative and postoperative radiographic as well as clinical evaluations. Mean corrections of 7 degrees were achieved for the 1-2 intermetatarsal angles. Fourteen complications occurred, 6 of which involved mild hardware irritation and did not affect outcome. Four nonunions or delayed unions were identified. The authors find the opening wedge osteotomy of the proximal first metatarsal to be a technically straightforward procedure for correcting moderate to severe hallux valgus. The correction obtained is comparable to other described techniques. PMID:20400425

  20. Impingement of water droplets on wedges and double-wedge airfoils at supersonic speeds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, John S

    1954-01-01

    An analytical solution has been obtained for the equations of motion of water droplets impinging on a wedge in a two-dimensional supersonic flow field with a shock wave attached to the wedge. The closed-form solution yields analytical expressions for the equation of the droplet trajectory, the local rate of impingement and the impingement velocity at any point on the wedge surface, and the total rate of impingement. The analytical expressions are utilized to determine the impingement on the forward surfaces of diamond airfoils in supersonic flow fields with attached shock waves. The results presented include the following conditions: droplet diameters from 2 to 100 microns, pressure altitudes from sea level to 30,000 feet, free-stream static temperatures from 420 degrees r, free stream Mach numbers from 1.1 to 2.0, semiapex angles for the wedge from 1.14 degrees to 7.97 degrees, thickness-to-chord ratios for the diamond airfoil from 0.02 to 0.14, chord lengths from 1 to 20 feet, and angles of attack from zero to the inverse tangent of the airfoil thickness-to-chord ratio.

  1. Wide scanning spherical antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Bing (Inventor); Stutzman, Warren L. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for calculating the surface shapes for subreflectors in a suboptic assembly of a tri-reflector spherical antenna system is introduced, modeled from a generalization of Galindo-Israel's method of solving partial differential equations to correct for spherical aberration and provide uniform feed to aperture mapping. In a first embodiment, the suboptic assembly moves as a single unit to achieve scan while the main reflector remains stationary. A feed horn is tilted during scan to maintain the illuminated area on the main spherical reflector fixed throughout the scan thereby eliminating the need to oversize the main spherical reflector. In an alternate embodiment, both the main spherical reflector and the suboptic assembly are fixed. A flat mirror is used to create a virtual image of the suboptic assembly. Scan is achieved by rotating the mirror about the spherical center of the main reflector. The feed horn is tilted during scan to maintain the illuminated area on the main spherical reflector fixed throughout the scan.

  2. Molecular depth profiling by wedged crater beveling.

    PubMed

    Mao, Dan; Lu, Caiyan; Winograd, Nicholas; Wucher, Andreas

    2011-08-15

    Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy are employed to characterize a wedge-shaped crater eroded by a 40-keV C(60)(+) cluster ion beam on an organic film of Irganox 1010 doped with Irganox 3114 delta layers. From an examination of the resulting surface, the information about depth resolution, topography, and erosion rate can be obtained as a function of crater depth for every depth in a single experiment. It is shown that when measurements are performed at liquid nitrogen temperature, a constant erosion rate and reduced bombardment induced surface roughness is observed. At room temperature, however, the erosion rate drops by ∼(1)/(3) during the removal of the 400 nm Irganox film and the roughness gradually increased to from 1 nm to ∼4 nm. From SIMS lateral images of the beveled crater and AFM topography results, depth resolution was further improved by employing glancing angles of incidence and lower primary ion beam energy. Sub-10 nm depth resolution was observed under the optimized conditions on a routine basis. In general, we show that the wedge-crater beveling is an important tool for elucidating the factors that are important for molecular depth profiling experiments.

  3. Mid-Calcaneal Length After Evans Calcaneal Osteotomy: A Retrospective Comparison of Wedge Locking Plates and Tricortical Allograft Wedges.

    PubMed

    Protzman, Nicole M; Wobst, Garrett M; Storts, Eric C; Mulhern, Jennifer L; McCarroll, Raymond E; Brigido, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Evans calcaneal osteotomy remains a cornerstone in the correction of the flexible flatfoot. Although multiple techniques have been used to maintain the length of the lateral column, a low profile wedge locking plate was recently introduced as an alternative to the traditional tricortical allograft wedge. We hypothesized that the wedge locking plate would better maintain the mid-calcaneal length compared with the tricortical allograft wedge. To test this hypothesis, after Evans osteotomy, the mid-calcaneal length was measured in the immediate postoperative period and again at 3 and 6 months. A total of 24 patients met the inclusion criteria. The mean patient age was 48.1 years (range 11 to 66). Of the 24 patients, 9 (37.5%) were treated with a tricortical allograft wedge and 15 (62.5%) with a wedge locking plate. At 3 months postoperatively, the mean decrease in mid-calcaneal length was similar for the tricortical allograft wedge group (1.3 ± 1.9 mm) and the wedge locking plate group (0.5 ± 0.9 mm, p = .275). At 6 months postoperatively, however, the mean decrease in mid-calcaneal length was greater for the tricortical allograft wedge group (2.8 ± 1.7 mm) than for the wedge locking plate group (0.6 ± 0.7 mm, p = .004). The 2 groups demonstrated a similar incidence of dorsally displaced distal calcaneal fragments throughout the study endpoint (p ≥ .052). These results suggest that the wedge locking plate better maintains the mid-calcaneal length over time compared with the tricortical allograft wedge.

  4. CHIRP seismic reflection study of falling-stage (forced regressive) sediment wedges on the New Jersey outer continental shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, M.; Goff, J.; Ron, S.; Austin, J.

    2007-12-01

    High-resolution (1-12 kHz), deep-towed and hull-mounted CHIRP seismic data were collected on the New Jersey outer shelf in 2001, 2002 and 2006 as part of Office of Naval Research-funded projects. These data have imaged two well-developed, offlapping sedimentary wedges (named outer-shelf wedge and deep-shelf wedge) that are now postulated to have developed on the falling-stage limb of the last glacial cycle, during some time prior to the Last Glacial Maximum (20-22 kyrs BP). These wedges formed atop the high-amplitude, regional R horizon, a complex erosional unconformity that formed about 40,000 years ago. The outer shelf wedge is also characterized in part by an enigmatic, erose boundary separating layered horizons below from a mostly transparent section above. New Jersey shelf wedges appear analogous to forced-regressive units imaged on the Rhone shelf edge, as well as Eocene sections documented from seismic-scale outcrops on Spitsbergen Island. These examples can reach thicknesses up to 100 m on the shelf edge and uppermost slope, but usually thin rapidly downslope. Such wedges represent one of two documented mechanisms involving sand transport across a shelf margin into deeper water settings, the other being a canyonized shelf-edge. Our study will includes analysis of the CHIRP data and, if available, additional ground truth provided by short cores collected in summer 2007 at numerous intra-wedge stratigraphic horizons. Our goals are to understand the external and internal geometry of the wedges and sediment pathways across the paleo-shelf. These data should allow us to characterize margin segments that build during sea-level fall by slope-apron accretion rather than by the formation of channel-levee complexes. The literature is heavily weighted by the latter and their associated canyon systems, but information on shelf-edge attached slope aprons and how they contribute to deep-water sedimentation, and in particular the delivery of clean sands to slope settings

  5. Recent Progress on Spherical Torus Research

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Masayuki; Kaita, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The spherical torus or spherical tokamak (ST) is a member of the tokamak family with its aspect ratio (A = R0/a) reduced to A ~ 1.5, well below the normal tokamak operating range of A ≥ 2.5. As the aspect ratio is reduced, the ideal tokamak beta β (radio of plasma to magnetic pressure) stability limit increases rapidly, approximately as β ~ 1/A. The plasma current it can sustain for a given edge safety factor q-95 also increases rapidly. Because of the above, as well as the natural elongation κ, which makes its plasma shape appear spherical, the ST configuration can yield exceptionally high tokamak performance in a compact geometry. Due to its compactness and high performance, the ST configuration has various near term applications, including a compact fusion neutron source with low tritium consumption, in addition to its longer term goal of attractive fusion energy power source. Since the start of the two megaampere class ST facilities in 2000, National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) in the US and Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) in UK, active ST research has been conducted worldwide. More than sixteen ST research facilities operating during this period have achieved remarkable advances in all of fusion science areas, involving fundamental fusion energy science as well as innovation. These results suggest exciting future prospects for ST research both near term and longer term. The present paper reviews the scientific progress made by the worldwide ST research community during this new mega-ampere-ST era.

  6. Large displacement spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2002-01-01

    A new class of spherical joints has a very large accessible full cone angle, a property which is beneficial for a wide range of applications. Despite the large cone angles, these joints move freely without singularities.

  7. Viscid-inviscid interaction associated with incompressible flow past wedges at high Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warpinski, N. R.; Chow, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical method is suggested for the study of the viscid inviscid interaction associated with incompressible flow past wedges with arbitrary angles. It is shown that the determination of the nearly constant pressure (base pressure) prevailing within the near wake is really the heart of the problem, and the pressure can only be established from these interactive considerations. The basic free streamline flow field is established through two discrete parameters which adequately describe the inviscid flow around the body and the wake. The viscous flow processes such as the boundary layer buildup, turbulent jet mixing, and recompression are individually analyzed and attached to the inviscid flow in the sense of the boundary layer concept. The interaction between the viscous and inviscid streams is properly displayed by the fact that the aforementioned discrete parameters needed for the inviscid flow are determined by the viscous flow condition at the point of reattachment. It is found that the reattachment point behaves as a saddle point singularity for the system of equations describing the recompressive viscous flow processes, and this behavior is exploited for the establishment of the overall flow field. Detailed results such as the base pressure, pressure distributions on the wedge, and the geometry of the wake are determined as functions of the wedge angle.

  8. Formation of metamorphic core complex in inherited wedges: A thermomechanical modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huet, B.; Le Pourhiet, L.; Labrousse, L.; Burov, E. B.; Jolivet, L.

    2011-09-01

    Metamorphic Core Complexes (MCCs) form when a thickened domain with a low-strength lower crust is submitted to extension. These structures are characteristic of post-orogenic extension, and field observations suggest that several MCCs rework a crustal nappe-stack emplaced before extension begins. These MCCs therefore develop within heterogeneous crusts that contain pre-existing dipping heterogeneities, such as thrust faults and dipping nappes in a crustal wedge. Although very common, this first order structural inheritance has never been considered in studies modelling MCCs. Our contribution therefore investigates the effect of an inherited crustal wedge structure on the dynamics and kinematics of formation of the MCCs, using fully coupled thermomechanical modelling. The wealth of petrological, structural and time informations available in the Cycladic MCCs (Aegean domain) allows setting up more realistic initial conditions for the experiments than usual flat-lying setups. It also allows the results of the numerical computation to be directly validated with final geometries, P-T paths and exhumation rates. The experiments using dipping heterogeneities are characterised by a much more complex evolution and final structure than their flat-lying layered equivalents. Dipping heterogeneities drive lateral strength contrasts and help to re-localise the deformation on successive detachments. The dip of the inherited wedge structures imposes kinematic constraints on the flow, which provides a model that explains the regional scale asymmetry of the Cycladic MCCs. The P-T paths, the exhumation rates and the final crustal structure that come out of an initial shallow-dipping wedge model provide a much more realistic comparison with their natural counter-parts than common flat-lying models. Other parameters, like crustal-scale density inversion, thermal structure and creep law parameters are of second order when compared to the initial wedge structure. Being little dependent

  9. Laboratory experiments on liquid metal spherical-Couette flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres Triana, Santiago; Lathrop, Daniel

    2005-11-01

    We present experimental observations on liquid sodium flow in a spherical-Couette geometry. By applying an external magnetic field we are able to clearly identify at least two induced magnetic field modes with different poloidal patterns as well as different azimuthal wave numbers. The origin of many of these induced field oscillations appears to be related to inertial wave oscillations propagating in the spherical annulus. Possible implications for dynamo action and to the magneto-rotational instability will also be discussed.

  10. Evolution of Strain in Obliquely Convergent Analog Doubly-Vergent Wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, D. M.; Haq, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    We have conducted a range of analog experiments across the parameter space from 0° to 70°, in which we have tracked the evolution of the model geometries and strain fields. Surface deformation is monitored by photographic analysis of the experiment and a plane laser is used to obtain precise topography of the developing pro and retro-wedges normal to strike At both high and low obliquities, our results are broadly consistent with theoretical expectations. At obliquities ranging from 0° to close to 60°, doubly-vergent wedges with the same combination of a broad, minimum taper pro-wedge and a narrower, maximum-taper double retro-wedge found in normal convergence at obliquities up to close to 60°. Above about 60° obliquity, though, the orogen continues to grow with a much greater degree of symmetry; it never develops the broad prowedge that characterizes the orogens at low to moderately high obliquities. This result is entirely consistent with the rotation of stresses and reversal in principal stress order associated with the transition from an essentially convergent orogen with some margin-parallel shear to transpression with dominant strike-slip, as described by various authors. This marked change in tectonic style and orogen shape at about 60° obliquity is accompanied by a change in the distribution of shear within the model. In normal convergence, there is no margin-parallel shear to be accommodated, so it is everywhere equal to zero. Margin-normal shortening is accommodated across the orogen, but, as taper is maintained, it occurs most rapidly near the deformation front (at left). In no case is there extension in these purely frictional models, unlike the case with a ductile layer at depth. At non-zero obliquities, there is also margin-parallel shear to be distributed across the margin. In addition to a broad zone centered on the topographic high (over the tip of the backstop), that shear is distributed across the prowedge, where it is accommodated in the

  11. 28. REPRESENTATIVE CENTER WEDGE. BALANCE WHEELS ON TRACK, WITH RACK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. REPRESENTATIVE CENTER WEDGE. BALANCE WHEELS ON TRACK, WITH RACK TO OUTSIDE, SHOWN TO RIGHT OF THE WEDGE. PHOTO TAKEN AT SOUTH SWING SPAN. - George P. Coleman Memorial Bridge, Spanning York River at U.S. Route 17, Yorktown, York County, VA

  12. Computing pressure distributions in wedges and pinch-outs

    SciTech Connect

    Chih-Cheng Chen; Raghaven, R.

    1995-12-31

    A solution for wedge-type systems in terms of the Laplace transformation is derived. Characteristics of responses are discussed and computational issues are addressed. The algorithm given here is a practical tool for analyzing flows in wedge-type systems and may be incorporated immediately into existing software packages. Existing solutions are a subset of the solution given here.

  13. Magneto-optical and photoemission studies of ultrathin wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, S.D.; Li, Dongqi

    1995-12-01

    Magnetic phase transitions of Fe wedges grown epitaxially on Cu(100) are detected via the surface magneto-optical Kerr effect and used to construct a phase diagram for face centered Fe. Also, the confinement of Cu sp- and d-quantum-well states is studied for Cu/Co(wedge)/Cu(100) utilizing undulator-based photoemission experiments.

  14. 21 CFR 884.5200 - Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. 884.5200... Devices § 884.5200 Hemorrhoid prevention pressure wedge. (a) Identification. A hemorrhoid prevention... hemorrhoids associated with vaginal childbirth. (b) Classification. Class II (special controls). The...

  15. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and...

  16. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and...

  17. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and...

  18. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and...

  19. 49 CFR 230.104 - Driving box shoes and wedges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Driving box shoes and wedges. 230.104 Section 230.104 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD... Locomotives and Tenders Running Gear § 230.104 Driving box shoes and wedges. Driving box shoes and...

  20. Geomorphology, kinematic history, and earthquake behavior of the active Kuwana wedge thrust anticline, central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Mueller, Karl; Togo, Masami; Okada, Atsumasa; Takemura, Keiji

    2004-12-01

    We combine surface mapping of fault and fold scarps that deform late Quaternary alluvial strata with interpretation of a high-resolution seismic reflection profile to develop a kinematic model and determine fault slip rates for an active blind wedge thrust system that underlies Kuwana anticline in central Japan. Surface fold scarps on Kuwana anticline are closely correlated with narrow fold limbs and angular hinges on the seismic profile that suggest at least ˜1.3 km of fault slip completely consumed by folding in the upper 4 km of the crust. The close coincidence and kinematic link between folded terraces and the underlying thrust geometry indicate that Kuwana anticline has accommodated slip at an average rate of 2.2 ± 0.5 mm/yr on a 27°, west dipping thrust fault since early-middle Pleistocene time. In contrast to classical fault bend folds the fault slip budget in the stacked wedge thrusts also indicates that (1) the fault tip propagated upward at a low rate relative to the accrual of fault slip and (2) fault slip is partly absorbed by numerous bedding plane flexural-slip faults above the tips of wedge thrusts. An historic earthquake that occurred on the Kuwana blind thrust system possibly in A.D. 1586 is shown to have produced coseismic surface deformation above the doubly vergent wedge tip. Structural analyses of Kuwana anticline coupled with tectonic geomorphology at 103-105 years timescales illustrate the significance of active folds as indicators of slip on underlying blind thrust faults and thus their otherwise inaccessible seismic hazards.

  1. Characterizing human retinotopic mapping with conformal geometry: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ta, Duyan; Shi, Jie; Barton, Brian; Brewer, Alyssa; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Wang, Yalin

    2014-03-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been widely used to measure the retinotopic organization of early visual cortex in the human brain. Previous studies have identified multiple visual field maps (VFMs) based on statistical analysis of fMRI signals, but the resulting geometry has not been fully characterized with mathematical models. Here we test whether VFMs V1 and V2 obey the least restrictive of all geometric mappings; that is, whether they are anglepreserving and therefore maintain conformal mapping. We measured retinotopic organization in individual subjects using standard traveling-wave fMRI methods. Visual stimuli consisted of black and white, drifting checkerboards comprising rotating wedges and expanding rings to measure the cortical representations of polar angle and eccentricity, respectively. These representations were then projected onto a 3D cortical mesh of each hemisphere. By generating a mapped unit disk that is conformal of the VFMs using spherical stereographic projection and computing the parameterized coordinates of the eccentricity and polar angle gradients, we computed Beltrami coefficients to check whether the mapping from the visual field to the V1 and V2 cortical representations is conformal. We find that V1 and V2 exhibit local conformality. Our analysis of the Beltrami coefficient shows that selected regions of V1 and V2 that contain reasonably smooth eccentricity and polar angle gradients do show significant local conformality, warranting further investigation of this approach for analysis of early and higher visual cortex. These results suggest that such a mathematical model can be used to characterize the early VFMs in human visual cortex.

  2. Transmission of a Gaussian beam by a Fizeau interferential wedge.

    PubMed

    Stoykova, Elena

    2005-12-01

    Analysis of transmission of a finite-diameter Gaussian beam by a Fizeau interferential wedge is presented. The fringe calculation is based on angular spectrum expansion of the complex amplitude of the incident wave field. The developed approach is applicable to any beam diameter and wedge thickness at any distance from the wedge and yields as a boundary case the fringes at plane-wave illumination. The spatial region of resonant transmission on the wedge surface is given by the width of the transmitted peak for plane-wave illumination. At higher coating reflectivity, the direction of the transmitted beam is deviated with respect to that of the incident beam. Evaluation of the spectral response based on the spectral width of the transmitted power curve is introduced as more realistic for a correct description of the application of a Fizeau wedge as an interferential selector in laser resonators. PMID:16396037

  3. Effect of friction in wedging of elastic solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Arin, K.

    1976-01-01

    In this paper the contact problem for an elastic wedge of arbitrary angle is considered. It is assumed that the external load is applied to the medium through a rigid wedge and the coefficient of friction between the loading wedge and the elastic solid is constant. The problem is reduced to a singular integral equation of the second kind with the contact pressure as the unknown function. An effective numerical solution of the integral equation is described and the results of three examples are presented. The comparison of these results with those obtained from the frictionless wedge problem indicates that generally friction has the tendency of reducing the peak values of the stress intensity factors calculated at the wedge apex and at the end points of the contact area.

  4. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack.more » This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.« less

  5. Fabrication of wedged multilayer Laue lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Prasciolu, M.; Leontowich, A. F. G.; Krzywinski, J.; Andrejczuk, A.; Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new method to fabricate wedged multilayer Laue lenses, in which the angle of diffracting layers smoothly varies in the lens to achieve optimum diffracting efficiency across the entire pupil of the lens. This was achieved by depositing a multilayer onto a flat substrate placed in the penumbra of a straight-edge mask. The distance between the mask and the substrate was calibrated and the multilayer Laue lens was cut in a position where the varying layer thickness and the varying layer tilt simultaneously satisfy the Fresnel zone plate condition and Bragg’s law for all layers in the stack. This method can be used to extend the achievable numerical aperture of multilayer Laue lenses to reach considerably smaller focal spot sizes than achievable with lenses composed of parallel layers.

  6. Characterization of CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A fringe detection and measurement system was constructed for use with the CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner, consisting of three circuit boards. The first board is a standard Reticon RC-100 B motherboard which is used to provide the timing, video processing, and housekeeping functions required by the Reticon RL-512 G photodiode array used in the system. The sampled and held video signal from the motherboard is processed by a second, custom fabricated circuit board which contains a high speed fringe detection and locating circuit. This board includes a dc level discriminator type fringe detector, a counter circuit to determine fringe center, a pulsed laser triggering circuit, and a control circuit to operate the shutter for the He-Ne reference laser beam. The fringe center information is supplied to the third board, a commercial single board computer, which governs the data collection process and interprets the results.

  7. Cesarean section in a wedged head.

    PubMed

    Khosla, A H; Dahiya, K; Sangwan, K

    2003-05-01

    Cesarean section many a times, has to be done late in labour when the head is deeply wedged in the pelvis. The techniques described in standard text books, usually result in extension of the incision either laterally into the broad ligament or vertically upwards into the upper segment or downwards posterior to the bladder from the centre of the incision line. In this study we have reviewed the Patwardhan's technique for the extraction of baby and fetomaternal outcome was compared with cases where this technique was not used. There was no extension of the incision either laterally into broad ligament or upwards or downwards. Haemorrhage due to extension of incision requiring blood transfusion occurred in 24% of patients in group II as compared to nil in group I. PMID:14514249

  8. Characterization of CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    A fringe detection and measurement system was constructed for use with the CNRS Fizeau wedge laser tuner, consisting of three circuit boards. The first board is a standard Reticon RC-100 B motherboard which is used to provide the timing, video processing, and housekeeping functions required by the Reticon RL-512 G photodiode array used in the system. The sampled and held video signal from the motherboard is processed by a second, custom fabricated circuit board which contains a high speed fringe detection and locating circuit. This board includes a dc level discriminator type fringe detector, a counter circuit to determine fringe center, a pulsed laser triggering circuit, and a control circuit to operate the shutter for the He-Ne reference laser beam. The fringe center information is supplied to the third board, a commercial single board computer, which governs the data collection process and interprets the results.

  9. Configuration and Generation of Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Xiangning

    The substorm current wedge (SCW), a core element of substorm dynamics coupling the magnetotail to the ionosphere, is crucial in understanding substorms. It has been suggested that the field-aligned currents (FACs) in the SCW are caused by either pressure gradients or flow vortices, or both. Our understanding of FAC generations is based predominately on numerical simulations, because it has not been possible to organize spacecraft observations in a coordinate system determined by the SCW. This dissertation develops an empirical inversion model of the current wedge and inverts midlatitude magnetometer data to obtain the parameters of the current wedge for three solar cycles. This database enables statistical data analysis of spacecraft plasma and magnetic field observations relative to the SCW coordinate. In chapter 2, a new midlatitude positive bay (MPB) index is developed and calculated for three solar cycles of data. The MPB index is processed to determine the substorm onset time, which is shown to correspond to the auroral breakup onset with at most 1-2 minutes difference. Substorm occurrence rate is found to depend on solar wind speed while substorm duration is rather constant, suggesting that substorm process has an intrinsic pattern independent of external driving. In chapter 3, an SCW inversion technique is developed to determine the strength and locations of the FACs in an SCW. The inversion parameters for FAC strength and location, and ring current strength are validated by comparison with other measurements. In chapter 4, the connection between earthward flows and auroral poleward expansion is examined using improved mapping, obtained from a newly-developed dynamic magnetospheric model by superimposing a standard magnetospheric field model with substorm current wedge obtained from the inversion technique. It is shown that the ionospheric projection of flows observed at a fixed point in the equatorial plane map to the bright aurora as it expands poleward

  10. The matching of wedge transmission factors across six multi-energy linear accelerators.

    PubMed

    Weston, S J; Thompson, R C A; Morgan, A M

    2007-01-01

    Elekta Precise linear accelerators create a wedged isodose distribution using a single, fixed, motorized wedge with a nominal wedge angle of 60 degrees. Wedge angles of less than 60 degrees can be produced by varying the proportion of open and wedge monitor units for a given exposure. The fixed wedge can be replaced with a mobile wedge, the position of which can be moved in order to adjust the wedge transmission factor (WTF). Using the original fixed wedges installed in our fleet of six Elekta accelerators, we found a range of 4% in measured wedge transmission factor for 6 MV beams. Results are presented which demonstrate that by using the mobile wedge it is possible to match the wedge transmission factors to within 1% for the six linear accelerators over three energies. PMID:17267473

  11. Development of high-order PN models for radiative heat transfer in special geometries and boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Wenjun; Modest, Michael F.; Roy, Somesh P.

    2016-03-01

    The high-order spherical harmonics (PN) method for 2-D Cartesian domains is extracted from the 3-D formulation. The number of equations and intensity coefficients reduces to (N + 1)2 / 4 in the 2-D Cartesian formulation compared with N(N + 1) / 2 for the general 3-D PN formulation. The Marshak boundary conditions are extended to solve problems with nonblack and mixed diffuse-specular surfaces. Additional boundary conditions for specified radiative wall flux, for symmetry/specular reflection boundaries have also been developed. The mathematical details of the formulations and their implementation in the OpenFOAM finite volume based CFD software platform are presented. The accuracy and computational cost of the 2-D Cartesian PN are compared with that of the 3-D PN solver and a Photon Monte Carlo solver for a square enclosure, as well as a 45° wedge geometry with variable radiative properties. The new boundary conditions have been applied for both test cases, and the boundary condition for mixed diffuse-specular surfaces is further illustrated by numerical examples of a rectangular geometry enclosed by walls with different surface characteristics.

  12. Applications of Differential Geometry to Cartography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benitez, Julio; Thome, Nestor

    2004-01-01

    This work introduces an application of differential geometry to cartography. The mathematical aspects of some geographical projections of Earth surface are revealed together with some of its more important properties. An important problem since the discovery of the 'spherical' form of the Earth is how to compose a reliable map of the surface of…

  13. The effect of a compliant accretionary wedge on earthquake rupture and tsunamigenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotto, Gabriel; Jeppson, Tamara; Dunham, Eric; Tobin, Harold

    2016-04-01

    The 11 March 2011 Tohoku megathrust earthquake ruptured through the shallowest part of the subduction zone boundary, resulting in tens of meters of displacement at the seafloor. This extreme shallow slip generated a devastating tsunami. The elastic properties of off-fault materials have an important role in determining slip along a fault. Laboratory ultrasonic velocity measurements performed on samples of rock obtained from the area surrounding the Tohoku earthquake principal fault zone during the Japan Trench Fast Drilling Project (JFAST) have shown that shallow off-fault materials are extremely compliant - P-wave velocities of 2.0-2.4 km/s, S-wave velocities of 0.7-1.0 km/s, and shear moduli ranging from 1.0-2.2 GPa. Seismic imaging around the JFAST drill site corroborates the presence of a compliant, low-velocity frontal prism at the toe of the hanging wall. This compliant wedge is likely a fairly robust feature across the horizontal extent of the Japan Trench and may have contributed to the large amount of displacement recorded. In order to investigate the impact of compliant off fault materials on earthquake rupture and tsunamigenesis, we employ a 2-D finite difference method that models the full seismic and tsunami wavefield associated with dynamic rupture on a dipping fault in a heterogeneous medium. Our numerical method rigorously couples the elastodynamic response of the solid Earth to that of a compressible ocean in the presence of gravity. Idealized models of subduction zone earthquakes show that the presence of a compliant wedge leads to increased slip, greater seafloor displacement, and a larger tsunami. However, preliminary results for a representative Tohoku geometry were not so simple; the compliant wedge enhanced slip and seafloor deformation but only in a localized zone, and tsunami height was not significantly affected. This surprising result indicates that the details of geometry and material structure we observe in real subduction zones are

  14. Random walks, diffusion limited aggregation in a wedge, and average conformal maps.

    PubMed

    Sander, Leonard M; Somfai, Ellák

    2005-06-01

    We investigate diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) in a wedge geometry. Arneodo and collaborators have suggested that the ensemble average of DLA cluster density should be close to the noise-free selected Saffman-Taylor finger. We show that a different, but related, ensemble average, that of the conformal maps associated with random clusters, yields a nontrivial shape which is also not far from the Saffman-Taylor finger. However, we have previously demonstrated that the same average of DLA in a channel geometry is not the Saffman-Taylor finger. This casts doubt on the idea that the average of noisy diffusion-limited growth is governed by a simple transcription of noise-free results. PMID:16035911

  15. Spherical geodesic mesh generation

    SciTech Connect

    Fung, Jimmy; Kenamond, Mark Andrew; Burton, Donald E.; Shashkov, Mikhail Jurievich

    2015-02-27

    In ALE simulations with moving meshes, mesh topology has a direct influence on feature representation and code robustness. In three-dimensional simulations, modeling spherical volumes and features is particularly challenging for a hydrodynamics code. Calculations on traditional spherical meshes (such as spin meshes) often lead to errors and symmetry breaking. Although the underlying differencing scheme may be modified to rectify this, the differencing scheme may not be accessible. This work documents the use of spherical geodesic meshes to mitigate solution-mesh coupling. These meshes are generated notionally by connecting geodesic surface meshes to produce triangular-prismatic volume meshes. This mesh topology is fundamentally different from traditional mesh topologies and displays superior qualities such as topological symmetry. This work describes the geodesic mesh topology as well as motivating demonstrations with the FLAG hydrocode.

  16. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, J.P.; Sawvel, R.M.; Draggoo, V.G.

    1994-06-28

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior. 8 figures.

  17. Recirculating wedges for metal-vapor plasma tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hall, Jerome P.; Sawvel, Robert M.; Draggoo, Vaughn G.

    1994-01-01

    A metal vapor laser is disclosed that recycles condensed metal located at the terminal ends of a plasma tube back toward the center of the tube. A pair of arcuate wedges are incorporated on the bottom of the plasma tube near the terminal ends. The wedges slope downward toward the center so that condensed metal may be transported under the force of gravity away from the terminal ends. The wedges are curved to fit the plasma tube to thereby avoid forming any gaps within the tube interior.

  18. Octave spanning wedge dispersive mirrors with low dispersion oscillations.

    PubMed

    Habel, Florian; Shirvanyan, Vage; Trubetskov, Michael; Burger, Christian; Sommer, Annkatrin; Kling, Matthias F; Schultze, Martin; Pervak, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    A novel concept for octave spanning dispersive mirrors with low spectral dispersion oscillations is presented. The key element of the so-called wedge dispersive mirror is a slightly wedged layer which is coated on a specially optimized dispersive multilayer stack by a common sputter coating process. The group delay dispersion (GDD) of a pulse reflected on a wedge dispersive mirror is nearly free of oscillations. Fabricated mirrors with negative GDD demonstrate the compression of a pulse down to 3.8 fs as good as double angled mirrors optimized for the same bandwidth.

  19. Ancient Yedoma carbon loss: primed by ice wedge thaw?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdy, K. L.; Vonk, J. E.; Mann, P. J.; Zimov, N.; Bulygina, E. B.; Davydova, A.; Spencer, R. G.; Holmes, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    Northeast Siberian permafrost is dominated by frozen Yedoma deposits containing ca. 500 Gt of carbon, nearly a quarter of northern permafrost organic carbon (OC). Yedoma deposits are Pleistocene-age alluvial and/or aeolian accumulations characterized by high ice wedge content (~50%), making them particularly vulnerable to a warming climate and to surface collapse upon thaw. Dissolved OC in streams originating primarily from Yedoma has been shown to be highly biolabile, relative to waters containing more modern OC. The cause of this biolability, however, remains speculative. Here we investigate the influence of ice wedge input upon the bioavailability of Yedoma within streams from as a potential cause of Yedoma carbon biolability upon release into the Kolyma River from the thaw-eroding river exposures of Duvannyi Yar, NE Siberia. We measured biolability on (1) ice wedge, Kolyma, and Yedoma leachate controls; (2) ice wedge and Kolyma plus Yedoma OC (8 g/L); and (3) varying ratios of ice wedge water to Kolyma river water. Biolability assays were conducted using both 5-day BOD (biological oxygen demand) and 11-day BDOC (biodegradable dissolved organic carbon) incubations. We found that ancient DOC in Yedoma soil leachate alone was highly biolabile with losses of 52±0.1% C over a 5-day BOD incubation. Similarly, DOC contained in pure ice wedge water was found to be biolabile, losing 21±0% C during a 5-day BOD incubation. Increased ice wedge contributions led to higher overall C losses in identical Yedoma soil leachates, with 8.9±0.6% losses of Yedoma C with 100% ice wedge water, 7.1±1% (50% ice wedge/ 50% Kolyma) and 5±0.3% with 100% Kolyma River water. We discuss potential mechanisms for the increased loss of ancient C using associated measurements of nutrient availability, carbon quality (CDOM/FDOM) and extracellular enzyme activity rates. Our initial results indicate that ice wedge meltwater forming Yedoma streams makes Yedoma OC more bioavailable than it would

  20. Spherical mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Jay L. (Inventor); Messick, Glenn C. (Inventor); Nardell, Carl A. (Inventor); Hendlin, Martin J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A spherical mounting assembly for mounting an optical element allows for rotational motion of an optical surface of the optical element only. In that regard, an optical surface of the optical element does not translate in any of the three perpendicular translational axes. More importantly, the assembly provides adjustment that may be independently controlled for each of the three mutually perpendicular rotational axes.

  1. Retroreflector spherical satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akentyev, A. S.; Vasiliev, V. P.; Sadovnikov, M. A.; Sokolov, A. L.; Shargorodskiy, V. D.

    2015-10-01

    Specific features of spherical retroreflector arrays for high-precision laser ranging are considered, and errors in distance measurements are analyzed. A version of a glass retroreflector satellite with a submillimeter "target error" is proposed. Its corner cube reflectors are located in depressions to reduce the working angular aperture, and their faces have a dielectric interference coating.

  2. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-28

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets.

  3. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets.

  4. Close packing of rods on spherical surfaces.

    PubMed

    Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-04-28

    We study the optimal packing of short, hard spherocylinders confined to lie tangential to a spherical surface, using simulated annealing and molecular dynamics simulations. For clusters of up to twelve particles, we map out the changes in the geometry of the closest-packed configuration as a function of the aspect ratio L/D, where L is the cylinder length and D the diameter of the rods. We find a rich variety of cluster structures. For larger clusters, we find that the best-packed configurations up to around 100 particles are highly dependent on the exact number of particles and aspect ratio. For even larger clusters, we find largely disordered clusters for very short rods (L/D = 0.25), while slightly longer rods (L/D = 0.5 or 1) prefer a global baseball-like geometry of smectic-like domains, similar to the behavior of large-scale nematic shells. Intriguingly, we observe that when compared to their optimal flat-plane packing, short rods adapt to the spherical geometry more efficiently than both spheres and longer rods. Our results provide predictions for experimentally realizable systems of colloidal rods trapped at the interface of emulsion droplets. PMID:27131565

  5. Crack problems in cylindrical and spherical shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.

    1976-01-01

    Standard plate or shell theories were used as a starting point to study the fracture problems in thin-walled cylindrical and spherical shells, assuming that the plane of the crack is perpendicular to the surface of the sheet. Since recent studies have shown that local shell curvatures may have a rather considerable effect on the stress intensity factor, the crack problem was considered in conjunction with a shell rather than a plate theory. The material was assumed to be isotropic and homogeneous, so that approximate solutions may be obtained by approximating the local shell crack geometry with an ideal shell which has a solution, namely a spherical shell with a meridional crack, a cylindrical shell with a circumferential crack, or a cylindrical shell with an axial crack. A method of solution for the specially orthotropic shells containing a crack was described; symmetric and skew-symmetric problems are considered in cylindrical shells with an axial crack.

  6. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S; Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter. PMID:27561545

  7. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-01-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter. PMID:27561545

  8. Spherical Target Temperature by Extended CFAST Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, C W

    2009-05-05

    The purpose of this calculation is to evaluate the temperature at the surface of a spherical target made of polyethylene during a room fire. The current calculation is separated into 2 steps: (1) CFAST code calculation--Calculate the air temperature; radiation flux to the target from the fire, surrounding air, and walls; convection flux; and target temperature. (2) Extended model calculation--Calculate the temperature of the target sphere taking into account the density, heat capacity, heat conductivity, and the spherical geometry of the target by solving the coupled finite difference equations. The second step calculation utilizes the air temperature and radiation flux determined by the CFAST code calculation in the first step.

  9. Colloidal cholesteric liquid crystal in spherical confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunfeng; Jun-Yan Suen, Jeffrey; Prince, Elisabeth; Larin, Egor M.; Klinkova, Anna; Thérien-Aubin, Héloïse; Zhu, Shoujun; Yang, Bai; Helmy, Amr S.; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Kumacheva, Eugenia

    2016-08-01

    The organization of nanoparticles in constrained geometries is an area of fundamental and practical importance. Spherical confinement of nanocolloids leads to new modes of packing, self-assembly, phase separation and relaxation of colloidal liquids; however, it remains an unexplored area of research for colloidal liquid crystals. Here we report the organization of cholesteric liquid crystal formed by nanorods in spherical droplets. For cholesteric suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals, with progressive confinement, we observe phase separation into a micrometer-size isotropic droplet core and a cholesteric shell formed by concentric nanocrystal layers. Further confinement results in a transition to a bipolar planar cholesteric morphology. The distribution of polymer, metal, carbon or metal oxide nanoparticles in the droplets is governed by the nanoparticle size and yields cholesteric droplets exhibiting fluorescence, plasmonic properties and magnetic actuation. This work advances our understanding of how the interplay of order, confinement and topological defects affects the morphology of soft matter.

  10. Structural evolution of a three-dimensional, finite-width crustal wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Jean; Yamato, Philippe

    2010-03-01

    We present the results of three-dimensional numerical experiments designed to study the response of a layer of crustal material subjected to convergence through an imposed basal velocity discontinuity and to surface processes (erosion/sedimentation). We focus on the three-dimensional response of the system arising from the finite width of the imposed velocity discontinuity. In particular, we describe the complex structures that develop around the wedge and their interactions with the loading/unloading produced by the surface processes. We show that the pro- and retro-shear zones that develop in a doubly-vergent two-dimensional wedge curve around the end of the velocity line-discontinuity to merge into the strike-slip structure that naturally develop, i.e. as a consequence of the imposed boundary conditions, along the edge of the wedge. Along the retro-shear zone the stress orientation rotates along a vertical axis, which implies that the retro-shear zone is a pure thrust along all of its curved length, whereas, along the pro-shear zone stresses rotate along a horizontal axis, which, in turn, implies that the pro-shear zone progressively evolves towards an oblique thrust in its curved section. Furthermore, the outward motion (i.e. perpendicular to the direction of imposed shortening) along the curved section of the retro-shear zone is accommodated by oblique extension along a secondary, kinked structure antithetic to the retro-shear zone. We also show the complex evolution of the wedge when ductile flow and ductile strain softening is activated by increasing the imposed basal temperature. In this situation, the wedge is broader as structures develop at finite distances on either side of the line-discontinuity and its dynamics resembles more that of a 'vise-like' orogen. At the surface, a flat plateau forms that accumulates sediment from the surrounding actively deforming mountain ranges until a channel breaks through one of the sides and flushes the inward

  11. Geometry of area without length

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Pei-Ming; Inami, Takeo

    2016-01-01

    To define a free string by the Nambu-Goto action, all we need is the notion of area, and mathematically the area can be defined directly in the absence of a metric. Motivated by the possibility that string theory admits backgrounds where the notion of length is not well defined but a definition of area is given, we study space-time geometries based on the generalization of a metric to an area metric. In analogy with Riemannian geometry, we define the analogues of connections, curvatures, and Einstein tensor. We propose a formulation generalizing Einstein's theory that will be useful if at a certain stage or a certain scale the metric is ill defined and the space-time is better characterized by the notion of area. Static spherical solutions are found for the generalized Einstein equation in vacuum, including the Schwarzschild solution as a special case.

  12. VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN NORTHERN QUARRY AREA, FACING NORTH - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  13. VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF LINE OF DRILL HOLES WITH METAL WEDGES, IN NORTHERN QUARRY AREA, FACING SOUTHEAST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 2, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  14. DETAIL VIEW OF THREEPART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THREE-PART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF QUARRY WALL, FACING NORTHWEST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 3, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  15. DETAIL VIEW OF THREEPART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF THREE-PART METAL WEDGE EMBEDDED IN EDGE OF QUARRY WALL, FACING EAST - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 3, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  16. Single-photon cooling in a wedge billiard

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, S.; Sundaram, B.; Raizen, M. G.

    2010-09-15

    Single-photon cooling (SPC), noted for its potential as a versatile method for cooling a variety of atomic species, has recently been demonstrated experimentally. In this paper, we study possible ways to improve the performance of SPC by applying it to atoms trapped inside a wedge billiard. The main feature of the wedge billiard for atoms, also experimentally realized recently, is that the nature of atomic trajectories within it changes from stable periodic orbit to random chaotic motion with the change in wedge angle. We find that a high cooling efficiency is possible in this system with a relatively weak dependence on the wedge angle and that chaotic dynamics, rather than a regular orbit, is more desirable for enhancing the performance of SPC.

  17. Structure and Kinematics of the Indo-Burmese Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurin, T.; Rangin, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Burma subduction trench and the associated Indo Burmese wedge mark the present eastern boundary of the Indian plate in the northern Bengal area. The initiation, duration and history of the Bengal crust subduction beneath Burma is still debated. The aim of this paper is to provide a structural and kinematic analysis of the Indo- Burmese wedge in order to better constraints the Bengal crust subduction history beneath Burma. On the basis of field observations, seismic reflection data interpretation and well logs data we present a structural analysis of the Outer Indo-Burmese Wedge. We also constrain the onset of this Outer Wedge to be younger than 2Ma, implying a recent and fast westward growth (~10cm/yr) since Late Pliocene in close relationship with the onset of the Shillong plateau. Restoration process of a synthetic cross section through the Outer Wedge allowed us to estimate the amount of EW shortening accommodated in the Outer Wedge to be 5.1mm/yr since 2Ma. These results combined with previous available GPS data from central Myanmar suggest strain partitioning at wedge scale. The core of the wedge is affected by shear deformation and acts as a buttress for a frontal wedge that accommodates a more compressive strain component. Finally we propose that the main characteristic of the Indo-Burmese wedge growth mechanism is the progressive incorporation of the most internal part of the wedge, formerly affected by transpressive thin-skinned tectonics, to the buttress where they are subsequently affected by shear deformation. The crustal structure boarding the newly formed buttress seems to be guided by the subducting crust fabrics. We are in favour of a very recent (Late Miocene) onset of the present Indian crust subduction beneath Burma coeval with the global plate kinematics reorganisation related to the Indian/Australian plate spliting. This subduction postdates the Indo Burmese range onset that must have started in early Miocene. This range first began to

  18. Structure and Kinematics of the Indo-Burmese Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurin, T.; Rangin, C.

    2004-12-01

    The Burma subduction trench and the associated Indo Burmese wedge mark the present eastern boundary of the Indian plate in the northern Bengal area. The initiation, duration and history of the Bengal crust subduction beneath Burma is still debated. The aim of this paper is to provide a structural and kinematic analysis of the Indo- Burmese wedge in order to better constraints the Bengal crust subduction history beneath Burma. On the basis of field observations, seismic reflection data interpretation and well logs data we present a structural analysis of the Outer Indo-Burmese Wedge. We also constrain the onset of this Outer Wedge to be younger than 2Ma, implying a recent and fast westward growth (~10cm/yr) since Late Pliocene in close relationship with the onset of the Shillong plateau. Restoration process of a synthetic cross section through the Outer Wedge allowed us to estimate the amount of EW shortening accommodated in the Outer Wedge to be 5.1mm/yr since 2Ma. These results combined with previous available GPS data from central Myanmar suggest strain partitioning at wedge scale. The core of the wedge is affected by shear deformation and acts as a buttress for a frontal wedge that accommodates a more compressive strain component. Finally we propose that the main characteristic of the Indo-Burmese wedge growth mechanism is the progressive incorporation of the most internal part of the wedge, formerly affected by transpressive thin-skinned tectonics, to the buttress where they are subsequently affected by shear deformation. The crustal structure boarding the newly formed buttress seems to be guided by the subducting crust fabrics. We are in favour of a very recent (Late Miocene) onset of the present Indian crust subduction beneath Burma coeval with the global plate kinematics reorganisation related to the Indian/Australian plate spliting. This subduction postdates the Indo Burmese range onset that must have started in early Miocene. This range first began to

  19. The statics of the wedge-shaped jar opener

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donolato, C.

    2015-11-01

    This paper analyzes the static equilibrium of a simple jar opener on the basis of rigid-body mechanics with friction. The opener-lid system is described as a disk lying inside a wedge, where only one side has friction; the disk is assumed to be acted upon by a wedging force and a torque. The resulting equilibrium equations have an exact solution that yields the non-sliding conditions for the disk as functions of applied forces and system parameters.

  20. Multipulse Thomson scattering system for the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.; Bretz, N.; LeBlanc, B.; Palladino, R.; Long, D.; Parsells, R.

    1999-01-01

    A design using a backscattering geometry is presented, which emphasizes high sensitivity and high spatial resolution at the outer edge of the National Spherical Torus Experiment, while providing full profile capability with a moderate number of channels. The design is based on Nd:YAG lasers and avalanche photodiode detectors to allow for high repetition rate measurements. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Modeling Structural and Mechanical Responses to Localized Erosional Processes on a Bivergent Orogenic Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzen, R.; Morgan, J. K.

    2014-12-01

    Critical Coulomb wedge theory established that orogenic and accretionary wedges should develop self-similarly and maintain a critical taper that reflects the balance of strength of the wedge material and a basal décollement. However, a variety of geological processes can perturb that balance, forcing readjustment of the wedge. For example, glacial erosion and landsliding can concentrate erosion on a localized portion of the wedge slope, leaving that portion of the wedge with an out-of-equilibrium slope that would need to re-develop for the wedge to resume self-similar growth. We use the discrete element method to analyze how growing bivergent wedges with different cohesive strengths respond structurally and mechanically to erosional events localized along upper, middle, and lower segments of the pro-wedge. Mechanically, pro-wedge erosion results in a sudden decrease followed by a quick recovery of the mean stress and maximum shear stress throughout the pro-wedge. However, when erosion is localized in the mid- to lower portions of the pro-wedge, a zone of increased mean stress develops where the wedge is concentrating deformation to recover its taper. In contrast, when erosion is localized in the upper axial zone, there is almost no recovery of the wedge taper, reflecting the fact that the material at the top of the wedge is being carried passively in a transition zone between the pro-wedge and retro-wedge. Structurally, wedges composed of lower cohesion material recover their critical taper almost immediately through distributed deformation, while wedges of higher-cohesion material recover more slowly, and incompletely, by concentrating deformation along existing fault surfaces. As a result, localized erosional episodes can have a lasting effect on the wedge morphology when the wedge is composed of higher cohesion material.

  2. Intrinsic versus extrinsic variability of analogue sand-box experiments - Insights from statistical analysis of repeated accretionary sand wedge experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santimano, Tasca; Rosenau, Matthias; Oncken, Onno

    2015-06-01

    Analogue models are not perfectly reproducible even under controlled boundary conditions which make their interpretation and application not always straight forward. As any scientific experiment they include some random component which can be influenced both by intrinsic (inherent processes) and extrinsic (boundary conditions, material properties) sources. In order to help in the assessment of analogue model results, we discriminate and quantify the intrinsic versus extrinsic variability of results from "sandbox" models of accretionary wedges that were repeated in a controlled environment. The extrinsic source of variability, i.e. the parameter varied is the nature of the décollement (material, friction and thickness). Experiment observables include geometric properties of the faults (lifetime, spacing, dip) as well as wedge geometry (height, slope, length). For each variable we calculated the coefficient of variance (CV) and quantified the variability as a symmetric distribution (Normal, Laplacian) or asymmetric distribution (Gamma) using a Chi squared test (χ2). Observables like fault dip/back thrust dip (CV = 0.6-0.7/0.2-0.6) are less variable and decrease in magnitude with decreasing basal friction. Variables that are time dependent like fault lifetime (CV = 0.19-0.56) and fault spacing (CV = 0.12 - 0.36) have a higher CV consequently affecting the variability of wedge slope (CV = 0.12-0.33). These observables also increase in magnitude with increasing basal friction. As the mechanical complexity of the evolving wedge increases over time so does the CV and asymmetry of the distribution. In addition, we confirm the repeatability of experiments using an ANOVA test. Through the statistical analysis of results from repeated experiments we present a tool to quantify variability and an alternative method to gaining better insights into the dynamic mechanics of deformation in analogue sand wedges.

  3. Sensational spherical shells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, M.C.; Kendall, J.M.,JR.; Bahrami, P.A.; Wang, T.G.

    1986-01-01

    Fluid-dynamic and capillary forces can be used to form nearly perfect, very small spherical shells when a liquid that can solidify is passed through an annular die to form an annular jet. Gravity and certain properties of even the most ideal materials, however, can cause slight asymmetries. The primary objective of the present work is the control of this shell formation process in earth laboratories rather than space microgravity, through the development of facilities and methods that minimize the deleterious effects of gravity, aerodynamic drag, and uncontrolled cooling. The spherical shells thus produced can be used in insulation, recyclable filter materials, fire retardants, explosives, heat transport slurries, shock-absorbing armor, and solid rocket motors.

  4. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M.

    1989-04-04

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  5. Spherical torus fusion reactor

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Yueng-Kay M.

    1989-01-01

    A fusion reactor is provided having a near spherical-shaped plasma with a modest central opening through which straight segments of toroidal field coils extend that carry electrical current for generating a toroidal magnet plasma confinement fields. By retaining only the indispensable components inboard of the plasma torus, principally the cooled toroidal field conductors and in some cases a vacuum containment vessel wall, the fusion reactor features an exceptionally small aspect ratio (typically about 1.5), a naturally elongated plasma cross section without extensive field shaping, requires low strength magnetic containment fields, small size and high beta. These features combine to produce a spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost.

  6. Spherical torus experiment (STX)

    SciTech Connect

    McManamy, T.J.; Lazarus, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    The principal engineering features of the proposed Spherical Torus Experiment (STX) are described. Design is dominated by the small bore available for the ohmic heating (OH) solenoid and structural considerations for a situation in which B/sub p/ is approximately equal to B/sub t/. Unique features of a spherical torus plasma include large elongations without shaping fields; an exceptionally high ratio of plasma current to toroidal field, giving the potential for stability at very high beta; strong paramagnetism; and a variety of configurations, ranging from tokamak (q/sub a/) to revised-field pinch (RFP) (q/sub a/ < 1). Access to this regime requires aspect ratios less than 2. A feasibility study has been done for a beam-heated device with A = 1.67, R0 = 0.45, and K = 2. 3 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Recent progress on spherical torus research

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Masayuki; Kaita, Robert

    2015-04-15

    The spherical torus or spherical tokamak (ST) is a member of the tokamak family with its aspect ratio (A = R{sub 0}/a) reduced to A ∼ 1.5, well below the normal tokamak operating range of A ≥ 2.5. As the aspect ratio is reduced, the ideal tokamak beta β (radio of plasma to magnetic pressure) stability limit increases rapidly, approximately as β ∼ 1/A. The plasma current it can sustain for a given edge safety factor q-95 also increases rapidly. Because of the above, as well as the natural elongation κ, which makes its plasma shape appear spherical, the ST configuration can yield exceptionally high tokamak performance in a compact geometry. Due to its compactness and high performance, the ST configuration has various near term applications, including a compact fusion neutron source with low tritium consumption, in addition to its longer term goal of an attractive fusion energy power source. Since the start of the two mega-ampere class ST facilities in 2000, the National Spherical Torus Experiment in the United States and Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak in UK, active ST research has been conducted worldwide. More than 16 ST research facilities operating during this period have achieved remarkable advances in all fusion science areas, involving fundamental fusion energy science as well as innovation. These results suggest exciting future prospects for ST research both near term and longer term. The present paper reviews the scientific progress made by the worldwide ST research community during this new mega-ampere-ST era.

  8. Spherical nitroguanidine process

    DOEpatents

    Sanchez, John A.; Roemer, Edward L.; Stretz, Lawrence A.

    1990-01-01

    A process of preparing spherical high bulk density nitroguanidine by dissing low bulk density nitroguanidine in N-methyl pyrrolidone at elevated temperatures and then cooling the solution to lower temperatures as a liquid characterized as a nonsolvent for the nitroguanidine is provided. The process is enhanced by inclusion in the solution of from about 1 ppm up to about 250 ppm of a metal salt such as nickel nitrate, zinc nitrate or chromium nitrate, preferably from about 20 to about 50 ppm.

  9. Predicting orogenic wedge styles as a function of analogue erosion law and material softening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mary, Baptiste C. L.; Maillot, Bertrand; Leroy, Yves M.

    2013-10-01

    The evolution of a compressive frictional wedge on a weak, frictional and planar décollement, subjected to frontal accretion, is predicted with a two step method called sequential limit analysis. The first step consists in finding, with the kinematic approach of limit analysis, the length of the active décollement and the dips of the emerging ramp and of the conjugate shear plane composing the emerging thrust fold. The second step leads to a modification of the geometry, first, because of the thrust fold development due to compression and, second, because of erosion. Erosion consists in removing periodically any material above a fictitious line at a selected slope, as done in analogue experiments. This application of sequential limit analysis generalizes the critical Coulomb wedge theory since it follows the internal deformation development. With constant frictional properties, the deformation is mostly diffuse, a succession of thrust folds being activated so that the topographic slope reaches exactly the theoretical, critical value. Frictional weakening on the ramps results in a deformation style composed of thrust sheets and horses. Applying an erosion slope at the critical topographic value leads to exhumation in the frontal, central, or rear region of the wedge depending on the erosion period and the weakening. Erosion at slopes slightly above or below the critical value results in exhumation toward the foreland or the hinterland, respectively, regardless of the erosion period. Exhumation is associated with duplexes, imbricate fans, antiformal stacks, and major backthrusting. Comparisons with sandbox experiments confirm that the thickness, dips, vergence, and exhumation of thrust sheets can be reproduced with friction and erosion parameters within realistic ranges of values.

  10. Groundwater flow within a sub-aerial orogenic wedge subject to depth-dependent permeability structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollyea, R.; Van Dusen, E.; Fischer, M. P.

    2014-12-01

    In recent years, investigators have revisited the problem of basin-scale fluid flow with an emphasis on depth-dependent permeability, which is a frequently observed geological phenomenon that is seldom accounted for in basin-scale flow models. These recent investigations have shown that depth-dependent permeability at the basin scale strongly influences the relationship between sub-basin and regional-scale flow paths. Here, we revisit topography driven fluid flow within a foreland basin using a numerical modeling experiment designed to assess first-order fluid system behavior when permeability decreases systematically with depth. Critical taper theory is invoked to define two-dimensional basin geometry, and three sub-aerially exposed orogenic wedge models are presented with critical taper angles of 2°, 4°, and 10°. To assess the combined influence of topographic slope and depth-dependent permeability, a constant rate infiltration is applied at the wedge surface and a transient simulation is performed within each model for 500,000 years. Our results suggest that fluid system structure within the narrowly tapering orogenic wedge (2°) is explained by recent investigations applying depth-decaying permeability to the classic Tóth basin; however, increasing topographic slope beyond 3° results in a fundamentally different fluid system architecture. As topographic slope increases, fluid system structure is characterized by (1) dominant regional flow paths and little, if any, sub-basin scale fluid circulation, (2) shallow meteoric water penetration, (3) a stratified distribution of groundwater residence time without pronounced stagnation points. Moreover, for a given detachment slope, these effects become more pronounced as topographic gradient increases.

  11. Using cyclic steps on drift wedges to amend established models of carbonate platform slopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betzler, Christian; Lindhorst, Sebastian; Eberli, Gregor; Reijmer, John; Lüdmann, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Hydroacoustic and sedimentological data of the western flank of Great Bahama Bank and Cay Sal Bank document how the interplay of offbank sediment export, along-slope transport, and erosion together shape facies and thickness distribution of slope deposits. The integrated data set depicts the combined product of these processes and allows formulating a comprehensive model of a periplatform drift that significantly amends established models of carbonate platform slope facies distribution and geometry. The basinward thinning wedge of the periplatform drift at the foot of the escarpment of Great Bahama Bank displays along- and down-slope variations in sedimentary architecture. Sediments consist of periplatform ooze, i.e. carbonate mud and muddy carbonate sand, coarsening basinward. In zones of lower contour current speed, depth related facies belts develop. In the upper part of the periplatform drift wedge in a water depth of 180 to 300 m and slope angles of 6° - 9° the seafloor displays a smooth surface. Parasound data indicate that this facies is characterized by a parallel layering. Basinward, the slope shows a distinct break at which the seafloor inclination diminishes to 1° to 2°. Downslope of this break, the drift wedge has a 3 - 4 km wide pervasive cover of bedforms down to a water depth of around 500 m. The steep flanks and internal stratification of the wavy bedforms face upslope, indicating upstream migration; the bedforms therefore share all the characteristics of cyclic step sedimentation. This is the first description of cyclic step sedimentation patterns in carbonate slope depositional systems. This new slope sedimentation model aids in understanding the complexity of carbonate slope sedimentation models with facies belts perpendicular and parallel to the platform margin. The new model sharply contrasts with existing slope facies models in which facies belts are solely positioned parallel to the platform margin.

  12. Hinterland-vergent tectonic wedge below the Riwat thrust, Himalayan foreland, Pakistan: Implications for hydrocarbon exploration

    SciTech Connect

    Jadoon, I.A.K.; Frisch, W.

    1997-03-01

    The Riwat thrust, with a surface trace of over 50 km, is one of the major faults in the footwall of the main boundary thrust in the Himalayan foreland of Pakistan. Surface geology shows that the Riwat thrust is a foreland-vergent thrust along which lower to middle Siwalik molasse strata are thrust southward over upper Siwalik strata. Seismic reflection interpretation shows that the Riwat thrust developed as a roof thrust of a hinterland-vergent tectonic wedge (triangle zone) underlain by evaporites. The Riwat thrust propagates upsection from depth of about 4 km at the base of the Siwalik Group. At this depth, it merges into a hinterland-vergent blind thrust that propagates upsection as a ramp from Eocambrian evaporites covering the basement at a depth of about 6 km. Bounded between this set of conjugate faults, a tectonic wedge of Eocambrian (evaporites) to Neogene strata is thrust toward the hinterland to form a triangle zone. The roof thrusts of triangles zones have been widely mapped as backthrusts in deformed mountain fronts. Hinterland motion of tectonic wedges as in the Riwat thrust triangle zone may be a feature of the fold-and-thrust belts underlain by evaporites acting as an extremely weak decollement layer. Their recognition, with a trap-forming geometry below a thrust, is important for interpreting particular fold belts and for hydrocarbon exploration. These structures could be predicted by the surface geology data where hinterland vergence of a fold below a thrust is apparent; however, seismic reflection data appear to be critical in recognizing these structures.

  13. Long-term outcomes of wedge resection at the limbus for high irregular corneal astigmatism after repaired corneal laceration

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jun; Zheng, Guang-Ying; Wen, Cheng-Lin; Zhang, Xiao-Fang; Zhu, Yu

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the clinical value of wedge resection at corneal limbus in patients with traumatic corneal scarring and high irregular astigmatism. METHODS Patients with traumatic corneal astigmatism received wedge resection at least 6mo after suture removal from corneal wound. The uncorrected distance visual acuities (UCVA) and best corrected distance visual acuities (BCVA), pre- and post-operation astigmatism, spherical equivalent (SE), safety and complications were evaluated. RESULTS Ten eyes (10 patients) were enrolled in this study. Mean follow-up time after wedge resection was 37.8±15.4mo (range, 20-61mo). The mean UCVA improved from +1.07±0.55 logMAR to +0.43±0.22 logMAR (P=0.000) and the mean BCVA from +0.50±0.30 logMAR to +0.15±0.17 logMAR (P=0.000). The mean astigmatism power measured by retinoscopy was -2.03±2.27 D postoperatively and -2.83±4.52 D preoperatively (P=0.310). The mean SE was -0.74±1.61 D postoperatively and -0.64±1.89 D preoperatively (P=0.601). Two cases developed mild pannus near the sutures. No corneal perforation, infectious keratitis or wound gape occurred. CONCLUSION Corneal-scleral limbal wedge resection with compression suture is a safe, effective treatment for poor patients with high irregular corneal astigmatism after corneal-scleral penetrating injury. Retinoscopy can prove particularly useful for high irregular corneal astigmatism when other measurements are not amenable. PMID:27366685

  14. Aligning Optical Fibers by Means of Actuated MEMS Wedges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Brian; Ghodssi, Reza

    2007-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) of a proposed type would be designed and fabricated to effect lateral and vertical alignment of optical fibers with respect to optical, electro-optical, optoelectronic, and/or photonic devices on integrated circuit chips and similar monolithic device structures. A MEMS device of this type would consist of a pair of oppositely sloped alignment wedges attached to linear actuators that would translate the wedges in the plane of a substrate, causing an optical fiber in contact with the sloping wedge surfaces to undergo various displacements parallel and perpendicular to the plane. In making it possible to accurately align optical fibers individually during the packaging stages of fabrication of the affected devices, this MEMS device would also make it possible to relax tolerances in other stages of fabrication, thereby potentially reducing costs and increasing yields. In a typical system according to the proposal (see Figure 1), one or more pair(s) of alignment wedges would be positioned to create a V groove in which an optical fiber would rest. The fiber would be clamped at a suitable distance from the wedges to create a cantilever with a slight bend to push the free end of the fiber gently to the bottom of the V groove. The wedges would be translated in the substrate plane by amounts Dx1 and Dx2, respectively, which would be chosen to move the fiber parallel to the plane by a desired amount Dx and perpendicular to the plane by a desired amount Dy. The actuators used to translate the wedges could be variants of electrostatic or thermal actuators that are common in MEMS.

  15. Kinematic evolution of thrusts wedge and erratic line length balancing: insights from deformed sandbox models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Mohammad Irfan; Dubey, A. K.; Toscani, Giovanni; Bonini, Lorenzo; Seno, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Kinematic evolution of fold-thrust structures has been investigated by analogue models that include syntectonic sedimentation. Different decollement dips and basement thicknesses produced different wedge geometries and propagating characteristics. A model with one decollement level was characterized by a closely spaced thrust system during early stages of shortening as compared to the late stages. The frequency of fault nucleation was rapid during the early stages of deformation. Conversely, the frequency of fault nucleation was low and thrust spacing was significantly wider in a model with two decollement levels. Individual faults became locked at steep dips and deformation stepped forward as a new fault nucleated in-sequence in front of the older locked structure. Once the thrust system was established up to 27 % overall shortening, an overlying bed was introduced to simulate syntectonic deformation. Model sand wedge did not grow self similarly but rather its length and height increased episodically with deformation. Restoration of deformed models show that layer parallel shortening accommodated for approximately half of the total model shortening across the multilayers. Calculated error in apparent layer shortening from the restored layers revealed a direct relation with depth of the layers in the models. The experimental results are comparable to a natural example from the Northern Apennines fold-and-thrust belts.

  16. Simulation of arrested salt wedges with a multi-layer Shallow Water Lattice Boltzmann model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prestininzi, P.; Montessori, A.; La Rocca, M.; Sciortino, G.

    2016-10-01

    The ability to accurately and efficiently model the intrusion of salt wedges into river beds is crucial to assay its interaction with human activities and the natural environment. We present a 2D multi-layer Shallow Water Lattice Boltzmann (SWLB) model able to predict the salt wedge intrusion in river estuaries. The formulation usually employed for the simulation of gravity currents is here equipped with proper boundary conditions to handle both the downstream seaside outlet and the upstream river inlet. Firstly, the model is validated against highly accurate semi-analytical solutions of the steady state 1D two-layer Shallow Water model. Secondly, the model is applied to a more complex, fully 3D geometry, to assess its capability to handle realistic cases. The simple formulation proposed for the shear interlayer stress is proven to be consistent with the general 3D viscous solution. In addition to the accuracy, the model inherits the efficiency of the Lattice Boltzmann approach to fluid dynamics problems.

  17. Spherical long spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiev, G. H.; Dinkova, C. L.

    2013-10-01

    Long spirals in the Euclidean plane have been introduced by A. Kurnosenko five years ago. Using a natural map of the shape sphere into the extended Gaussian plane we study spherical curves that are pre-images of plane long spirals. Loxodromes and spherical spiral antennas are typical examples of such spherical long spirals. The set of all planar spirals leaves invariant under an arbitrary similarity transformation. This set is divided in two disjoint classes by A. Kirnosenko. The first class is consist of the so-called short spirals which are widely used in geometric modeling. The second class of planar long spirals contains well-known logarithmic spiral and Archimedean spirals which have many applications in mathematics, astrophysics and industry. The notion of simplicial shape space is due to D. Kendall. The most popular simplicial shape space of order (2,3) is the set of equivalence classes of similar triangles in the plane. The sphere of radius 1/2 centered at the origin can be considered as a model of this quotient space, so-called the shape sphere. F. Bookstein and J. Lester showed that the one-point extension of the Euclidean plane, so-called the extended Gaussian plane, is another model of the same simplicial shape space. The present paper gives a description of long spirals on the shape sphere by the use a natural conformal mapping between two models. First, we examine long spirals in the extended Gaussian plane. After that, we describe some differential geometric properties of the shape sphere. Finally, we discuss parameterizations of long spirals on the shape sphere.

  18. Five questions to consider before conducting a stepped wedge trial.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, James R; Copas, Andrew J; Beard, Emma; Osrin, David; Lewis, James J; Davey, Calum; Thompson, Jennifer A; Baio, Gianluca; Fielding, Katherine L; Prost, Audrey

    2015-08-17

    Researchers should consider five questions before starting a stepped wedge trial. Why are you planning one? Researchers sometimes think that stepped wedge trials are useful when there is little doubt about the benefit of the intervention being tested. However, if the primary reason for an intervention is to measure its effect, without equipoise there is no ethical justification for delaying implementation in some clusters. By contrast, if you are undertaking pragmatic research, where the primary reason for rolling out the intervention is for it to exert its benefits, and if phased implementation is inevitable, a stepped wedge trial is a valid option and provides better evidence than most non-randomized evaluations. What design will you use? Two common stepped wedge designs are based on the recruitment of a closed or open cohort. In both, individuals may experience both control and intervention conditions and you should be concerned about carry-over effects. In a third, continuous-recruitment, short-exposure design, individuals are recruited as they become eligible and experience either control or intervention condition, but not both. How will you conduct the primary analysis? In stepped wedge trials, control of confounding factors through secular variation is essential. 'Vertical' approaches preserve randomization and compare outcomes between randomized groups within periods. 'Horizontal' approaches compare outcomes before and after crossover to the intervention condition. Most analysis models used in practice combine both types of comparison. The appropriate analytic strategy should be considered on a case-by-case basis. How large will your trial be? Standard sample size calculations for cluster randomized trials do not accommodate the specific features of stepped wedge trials. Methods exist for many stepped wedge designs, but simulation-based calculations provide the greatest flexibility. In some scenarios, such as when the intracluster correlation coefficient is

  19. Empirical evidence for two nightside current wedges during substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, R. A.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    We present results from a comprehensive statistical study of the ionospheric current system and its coupling to the magnetosphere during classical bulge type substorms. We identified 116 substorms and determined the global ionospheric current system before and during the substorm using the SuperMAG initiative and global auroral images obtained by the Polar VIS Earth camera. The westward electrojet (WEJ) display a distinct latitudinal shift between the pre- and post-midnight region and we find evidence that the two WEJ regions are disconnected. This, and other observational facts, led us to propose a new 3D current system configuration that consists of 2 wedge type systems: a current wedge in the pre-midnight region (substorm current wedge), and another current wedge system in the post-midnight region (oval current wedge). There is some local time overlap between the two systems. The former maps to the region inside the near Earth neutral line and is associated with structured BPS type electron precipitation. The latter maps to the inner magnetosphere and is associated with diffuse electron precipitation. We present results of the statistical study, show typical events, results from Biot-Savart simulations, and discuss the implications for our understanding of the 3D current system associated with substorms.

  20. Diffusion induced flow on a wedge-shaped obstacle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagumennyi, Ia V.; Dimitrieva, N. F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper the problem of evolution of diffusion induced flow on a wedge-shaped obstacle is analyzed numerically. The governing set of fundamental equations is solved using original solvers from the open source OpenFOAM package on supercomputer facilities. Due to breaking of naturally existing diffusion flux of a stratifying agent by the impermeable surface of the wedge a complex multi-level vortex system of compensatory fluid motions is formed around the obstacle. Sharp edges of the obstacle generate extended high-gradient horizontal interfaces which are clearly observed in laboratory experiments by high-resolution Schlieren visualization. Formation of an intensive pressure depression zone in front of the leading vertex of the wedge is responsible for generation of propulsive force resulting in a self-displacement of the obstacle along the neutral buoyancy horizon in a stably stratified environment. The size of the pressure deficiency area near the sharp vertex of a concave wedge is about twice that for a convex one. This demonstrates a more intensive propulsion mechanism in case of the concave wedge and, accordingly, a higher velocity of its self-movement in a continuously stratified medium.

  1. Wedge-and-strip anodes for centroid-finding position-sensitive photon and particle detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, C.; Jelinsky, P.; Lampton, M.; Malina, R. F.

    1981-01-01

    The paper examines geometries employing position-dependent charge partitioning to obtain a two-dimensional position signal from each detected photon or particle. Requiring three or four anode electrodes and signal paths, images have little distortion and resolution is not limited by thermal noise. An analysis of the geometrical image nonlinearity between event centroid location and the charge partition ratios is presented. In addition, fabrication and testing of two wedge-and-strip anode systems are discussed. Images obtained with EUV radiation and microchannel plates verify the predicted performance, with further resolution improvements achieved by adopting low noise signal circuitry. Also discussed are the designs of practical X-ray, EUV, and charged particle image systems.

  2. Reverse wedge osteotomy of the distal radius in Madelung's deformity.

    PubMed

    Mallard, F; Jeudy, J; Rabarin, F; Raimbeau, G; Fouque, P-A; Cesari, B; Bizot, P; Saint-Cast, Y

    2013-06-01

    Madelung's deformity results from a growth defect in the palmar and ulnar region of the distal radius. It presents as an excessively inclined radial joint surface, inducing "spontaneous progressive palmar subluxation of the wrist". The principle of reverse wedge osteotomy (RWO) consists in the reorientation of the radial joint surface by taking a circumferential bone wedge, the base of which is harvested from the excess of the radial and dorsal cortical bone of the distal radius, then turning it over and putting back this reverse wedge into the osteotomy so as to obtain closure on the excess and opening on the deficient cortical bone. RWO corrects the palmar subluxation of the carpus and improves distal radio-ulnar alignment. All five bilaterally operated patients were satisfied, esthetically and functionally. Its corrective power gives RWO a place apart among the surgical techniques currently available in Madelung's deformity.

  3. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, E.S.

    1980-05-09

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  4. Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, Edward S.

    1982-01-01

    An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

  5. Geometry and groups for cosmic topology

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Peter

    2011-03-21

    The Cosmic Microwave Background is measured by satellite observation with great precision. It offers insight into its origin in early states of the universe. Unexpected low multipole amplitudes of the incoming CMB radiation may be due to a multiply connected topology of cosmic 3-space. We present and analyze the geometry and homotopy for the family of Platonic spherical 3-manifolds, provide their harmonic analysis, and formulate topological selection rules.

  6. Geometry of Discrete-Time Spin Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLachlan, Robert I.; Modin, Klas; Verdier, Olivier

    2016-10-01

    Classical Hamiltonian spin systems are continuous dynamical systems on the symplectic phase space (S^2)^n. In this paper, we investigate the underlying geometry of a time discretization scheme for classical Hamiltonian spin systems called the spherical midpoint method. As it turns out, this method displays a range of interesting geometrical features that yield insights and sets out general strategies for geometric time discretizations of Hamiltonian systems on non-canonical symplectic manifolds. In particular, our study provides two new, completely geometric proofs that the discrete-time spin systems obtained by the spherical midpoint method preserve symplecticity. The study follows two paths. First, we introduce an extended version of the Hopf fibration to show that the spherical midpoint method can be seen as originating from the classical midpoint method on T^*{R}^{2n} for a collective Hamiltonian. Symplecticity is then a direct, geometric consequence. Second, we propose a new discretization scheme on Riemannian manifolds called the Riemannian midpoint method. We determine its properties with respect to isometries and Riemannian submersions, and, as a special case, we show that the spherical midpoint method is of this type for a non-Euclidean metric. In combination with Kähler geometry, this provides another geometric proof of symplecticity.

  7. Strongly Localized Image States of Spherical Graphitic Particles

    PubMed Central

    Gumbs, Godfrey

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the localization of charged particles by the image potential of spherical shells, such as fullerene buckyballs. These spherical image states exist within surface potentials formed by the competition between the attractive image potential and the repulsive centripetal force arising from the angular motion. The image potential has a power law rather than a logarithmic behavior. This leads to fundamental differences in the nature of the effective potential for the two geometries. Our calculations have shown that the captured charge is more strongly localized closest to the surface for fullerenes than for cylindrical nanotube. PMID:24587747

  8. Spherical harmonic expansion of the Levitus Sea surface topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engelis, Theodossios

    1987-01-01

    Prior information for the stationary sea surface topography (SST) may be needed in altimetric solutions that intend to simultaneously improve the gravity field and determine the SST. For this purpose the oceanographically derived SST estimates are represented by a spherical harmonic expansion. The spherical harmonic coefficients are computed from a least squares adjustment of the data covering the majority of the oceanic regions of the world. Several tests are made to determine the optimum maximum degree of solution and the best configuration of the geometry of the data in order to obtain a solution that fits the data and also provides a good spectral representation of the SST.

  9. Strongly localized image states of spherical graphitic particles.

    PubMed

    Gumbs, Godfrey; Balassis, Antonios; Iurov, Andrii; Fekete, Paula

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the localization of charged particles by the image potential of spherical shells, such as fullerene buckyballs. These spherical image states exist within surface potentials formed by the competition between the attractive image potential and the repulsive centripetal force arising from the angular motion. The image potential has a power law rather than a logarithmic behavior. This leads to fundamental differences in the nature of the effective potential for the two geometries. Our calculations have shown that the captured charge is more strongly localized closest to the surface for fullerenes than for cylindrical nanotube. PMID:24587747

  10. Geometry in Medias Res

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukier, Mimi; Asdourian, Tony; Thakker, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Geometry provides a natural window into what it is like to do mathematics. In the world of geometry, playful experimentation is often more fruitful than following a procedure, and logic plus a few axioms can open new worlds. Nonetheless, teaching a geometry course in a way that combines both rigor and play can be difficult. Many geometry courses…

  11. Upper crustal mechanical stratigraphy and the evolution of thrust wedges: insights from sandbox analogue experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milazzo, Flavio; Storti, Fabrizio; Nestola, Yago; Cavozzi, Cristian; Magistroni, Corrado; Meda, Marco; Salvi, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Crustal mechanical stratigraphy i.e. alternating mechanically weaker and stronger layers within the crust, plays a key role in determining how contractional deformations are accommodated at convergent plate boundaries. In the upper crust, evaporites typically provide preferential décollement layers for fault localization and foreland ward propagation, thus significantly influencing evolution of thrust-fold belts in terms of mechanical balance, geometries, and chronological sequences of faulting. Evaporites occur at the base of many passive margin successions that underwent positive inversion within orogenic systems. They typically produce salient geometries in deformation fronts, as in the Jura in the Northern Alps, the Salakh Arch in the Oman Mountains, or the Ainsa oblique thrust-fold belt in the Spanish Pyrenees. Evaporites frequently occur also in foredeep deposits, as in the Apennines, the Pyrenees, the Zagros etc. causing development of additional structural complexity. Low-friction décollement layers also occur within sedimentary successions involved in thrust-fold belts and they contribute to the development of staircase fault trajectories. The role of décollement layers in thrust wedge evolution has been investigated in many experimental works, particularly by sandbox analogue experiments that have demonstrated the impact of basal weak layers on many first order features of thrust wedges, including the dominant fold vergence, the timing of fault activity, and the critical taper. Some experiments also investigated on the effects of weak layers within accreting sedimentary successions, showing how this triggers kinematic decoupling of the stratigraphy above and below the décollements, thus enhancing disharmonic deformation. However, at present a systematic experimental study of the deformation modes of an upper crustal mechanical stratigraphy consisting of both low-friction and viscous décollement layers is still missing in the specific literature. In

  12. Thrust fault growth within accretionary wedges: New Insights from 3D seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, H.; Bell, R. E.; Jackson, C. A. L.

    2015-12-01

    The shallow parts of subduction megathrust faults are typically thought to be aseismic and incapable of propagating seismic rupture. The 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, however, ruptured all the way to the trench, proving that in some locations rupture can propagate through the accretionary wedge. An improved understanding of the structural character and physical properties of accretionary wedges is therefore crucial to begin to assess why such anomalously shallow seismic rupture occurs. Despite its importance, we know surprisingly little regarding the 3D geometry and kinematics of thrust network development in accretionary prisms, largely due to a lack of 3D seismic reflection data providing high-resolution, 3D images of entire networks. Thus our current understanding is largely underpinned by observations from analogue and numerical modelling, with limited observational data from natural examples. In this contribution we use PSDM, 3D seismic reflection data from the Nankai margin (3D Muroto dataset, available from the UTIG Academic Seismic Portal, Marine Geoscience Data System) to examine how imbricate thrust fault networks evolve during accretionary wedge growth. Previous studies have reported en-echelon thrust fault geometries from the NW part of the dataset, and have related this complex structure to seamount subduction. We unravel the evolution of faults within the protothrust and imbricate thrust zones by interpreting multiple horizons across faults and measuring fault displacement and fold amplitude along-strike; by doing this, we are able to investigate the three dimensional accrual of strain. We document a number of local displacement minima along-strike of faults, suggesting that, the protothrust and imbricate thrusts developed from the linkage of smaller, previously isolated fault segments. We also demonstrate that the majority of faults grew upward from the décollement, although there is some evidence for downward fault propagation. Our observations

  13. Spherical grating spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoghue, Darragh; Clemens, J. Christopher

    2014-07-01

    We describe designs for spectrometers employing convex dispersers. The Offner spectrometer was the first such instrument; it has almost exclusively been employed on satellite platforms, and has had little impact on ground-based instruments. We have learned how to fabricate curved Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings and, in contrast to the planar gratings of traditional spectrometers, describe how such devices can be used in optical/infrared spectrometers designed specifically for curved diffraction gratings. Volume Phase Holographic gratings are highly efficient compared to conventional surface relief gratings; they have become the disperser of choice in optical / NIR spectrometers. The advantage of spectrometers with curved VPH dispersers is the very small number of optical elements used (the simplest comprising a grating and a spherical mirror), as well as illumination of mirrors off axis, resulting in greater efficiency and reduction in size. We describe a "Half Offner" spectrometer, an even simpler version of the Offner spectrometer. We present an entirely novel design, the Spherical Transmission Grating Spectrometer (STGS), and discuss exemplary applications, including a design for a double-beam spectrometer without any requirement for a dichroic. This paradigm change in spectrometer design offers an alternative to all-refractive astronomical spectrometer designs, using expensive, fragile lens elements fabricated from CaF2 or even more exotic materials. The unobscured mirror layout avoids a major drawback of the previous generation of catadioptric spectrometer designs. We describe laboratory measurements of the efficiency and image quality of a curved VPH grating in a STGS design, demonstrating, simultaneously, efficiency comparable to planar VPH gratings along with good image quality. The stage is now set for construction of a prototype instrument with impressive performance.

  14. Megathrust propagation and accretionary wedge development at the front of a sediment-rich subduction system, central Hikurangi Margin, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, P.; Ghisetti, F.; Ellis, S. M.; Barker, D. H. N.; Henrys, F.; Henrys, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The central Hikurangi margin imbricated wedge is characteristic of wide (>100 km), low taper (4-5°) accretionary thrust systems associated with a relatively smooth subducting plate, thick input sedimentary sequence (~4 km in the trench), moderate convergence rate (~ 40 mm/yr), and a relatively weak interplate fault. The >65 km-wide frontal part of the wedge comprises late Cenozoic accreted turbidites and the upper pelagic sequence of the subducting Hikurangi Plateau. Whilst the deeper (10-30 km) part of the subduction interface beneath land is interseismically strongly coupled (with slow slip events reported beneath the adjacent continental shelf), the style of megathrust slip beneath the outer accretionary wedge is unknown. To support numerical forward modelling of interplate rheological and frictional properties, in a related study, we use 2D seismic reflection profiles to define the geometry of the shallow portion of the interplate megathrust, frontal wedge, and a spectacular protothrust zone outboard of the stepped frontal thrust. We reconstruct the evolution of the frontal wedge and the trench-ward propagation of the megathrust fault through progressive restoration, decompaction, and back-stripping of depth-converted seismic sections, in four stages (~0.6, 1.0, 2.0, and ≥3.5 Ma old. Folding in the fault hanging wall sequences is restored by mechanisms of fault-propagation folding and trishear. Whilst protothrusts develop as conjugate arrays with up-dip and down-dip propagation, back-thrusting on major thrust faults is relatively minor. Our preliminary results indicate spatial variations in finite shortening (~15-30%) and timing of megathrust propagation, with occurrence of out-of-sequence thrusting. Megathrust propagation may have occurred earlier than suggested in previous interpretations, with the highest shortening rates in the interval ~ 1-2 Ma. Estimated shortening rate is <10 mm/yr across the outer wedge, representing ~10-30% of total convergence.

  15. Rivers, re-entrants, and 3D variations in orogenic wedge development: a case study of the NW Indian Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, A. G.; Yu, H.; Hendershott, Z.

    2010-12-01

    Orogenic wedges are standard elements of collisional plate tectonics, from accretionary prisms to retro-arc basins. Recent study of orogenic wedge development has focused on links between mechanisms of internal deformation and surface processes. Models of orogenic wedges are commonly presented in the cross-section plane, which is generally effective as wedges largely develop via plane strain. The 3rd dimension can be utilized to explore effects of differences in controlling parameters on wedge evolution. We are investigating a stretch of the western Himalayan orogenic wedge that has two prominent changes in along-strike morphology: (1) a tectonic window (the Kullu Window) that appears to be strongly influenced by erosion along the 3rd largest river in the Himalayan system, the Sutlej River and (2) the Kangra Re-entrant, the largest re-entrant along the Himalayan arc. In addition to the along-strike heterogeneity, a key advantage of the proposed study area is its rich stratigraphy, with the most known diversity in the Himalayan arc. The stratigraphic wealth, combined with the along-strike heterogeneity in exposure level, offers a high resolution view of regional structural geometry. Our preliminary reconstructions suggest that the Sutlej River erosion increases the exposure depth and shortening budget across a narrow segment of the orogen, strongly warping the Kullu Window. Previous models have suggested that the out-of-sequence Munsiari thrust is the main structure associated with Kullu window formation, while our work suggests that most of this uplift and warping is accomplished by antiformal stacking of basement thrust horses. Late Miocene ages (U-Pb ages of zircons and Th-Pb ages of monazites) from a leucogranite in the core of the Kullu Window along the Sutlej River further suggests that this segment of the orogen represents a middle ground between plane strain orogenic wedge development and a tectonic aneurysm model. We have constructed a palinspastic

  16. Pseudo-ice-wedge casts of Connecticut, northeastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, Robert F.

    1983-07-01

    Since 1965, ice-wedge casts have been reported in deposits of sand and gravel in Connecticut. These are wedge forms up to 1.1 m wide and many meters high. Most are single forms, not in polygonal array. They are found in adjoining states as well. Their distribution, dimensions, structure, and fabric and an assessment of the former physical environment preclude their origin as permafrost features. They appear to be tension fractures produced by the loading of coarse clastics on fine clastics near and below the water table where sediments creep toward a stream or depression. Locally movement started with kettle formation during deglaciation. However, some wedges cut horizontal layers of iron-coated sand and gravel and must be younger than those distinctly postglacial phenomena. Moreover, modern B horizons of the overlying soil have moved down into some wedges more than 2 m, indicating that fracturing is still active today. Complex fracture fillings in bedrock also have been attributed to a permafrost origin, but this too seems unlikely.

  17. Flowfield Establishment and Unsteadiness in Hypervelocity Double Wedge Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swantek, A. B.; Knisely, A. M.; Austin, J. M.

    Significant discrepancies between experiments and simulations have been reported in the normalized establishment times for hypervelocity double wedge and double cone flows. Experimental results for flow establishment times based on heat transfer measurements have been reported by Holden and Mallinson, Gai, and Mudford [1, 2].

  18. Magnetic and structural instabilities of ultrathin Fe(100) wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, S.D.; Li, Dongqi; Qiu, Z.Q.

    1994-05-01

    An overview is provided of recent efforts to explore magnetic and related structural issues for ultrathin Fe films grown epitaxially as wedge structures onto Ag(100) and Cu(100). Experiments were carried out utilizing the surface magneto-optic Kerr effect (SMOKE). Ordinary bcc Fe is lattice-matched to the primitive unit cell of the Ag(100) surface. Fe wedges on Ag(100) can be fabricated whose thick end has in-plane magnetic easy axes due to the shape anisotropy, and whose thin end has perpendicular easy axes due to the surface magnetic anisotrophy. A spin-reorientation transition can thus be studied in the center of the wedge where the competing anisotropies cancel. The goal is to test the Mermin-Wagner theorem which states that long-range order is lost at finite temperatures in an isotropic two-dimensional Heisenberg system. Fe wedges on Cu(100) can be studied in like manner, but the lattice matching permits fcc and tetragonally-distorted fcc phases to provide structural complexity in addition to the interplay of competing magnetic anisotropies. The results of these studies are new phase identifications that help both to put previous work into perspective and to define issues to pursue in the future.

  19. Thrusting and wedge growth, Southern Alps of Lombardia (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roeder, Dietrich

    1992-06-01

    A south-vergent fold-thrust belt of Miocene-Recent age accompanies the south slope of the Lombardian Alps and is partly buried beneath Plio-Pleistocene Po Valley basin fill. The belt is probably detached along a trans-crustal thrust, named Main South Alpine Thrust (MSAT), with an estimated dip slip of 70-100 km. Transport on this thrust piggybacks the Adamello pluton of Late Eocene age, pre-Adamello folds, and Oligocene-Miocene Insubric strike-slip structures, by ramping up through 12-15 km of Austro-Alpine (Adria) crust and through 8-10 km of Triassic to Eocene sediments. Folds in the Front Ranges are ascribed to MSAT ramping, not to pre-Adamello compression. The MSAT soles upward in a blind thrust beneath 3-4 km of Oligocene-Pliocene foredeep fill. Initial regional failure along the MSAT implies substantial and pre-existing topographic relief near the Insubric line. An average of 25% wedge thickening during MSAT transport is consistent with the requirement of Coulomb critical taper. Progression of the south-Alpine detachment from the MSAT to the base of the foreland sediments has added a thickness of 6-12 km in footwall imbrications to the base and the toe of the thrust wedge. This addition in wedge volume is consistent with wedge dynamics only if a mid-Miocene or younger spike of excess Alpine topography is admitted.

  20. Double slotted socket spherical joint

    DOEpatents

    Bieg, Lothar F.; Benavides, Gilbert L.

    2001-05-22

    A new class of spherical joints is disclosed. These spherical joints are capable of extremely large angular displacements (full cone angles in excess of 270.degree.), while exhibiting no singularities or dead spots in their range of motion. These joints can improve or simplify a wide range of mechanical devices.

  1. Spherical Torus Center Stack Design

    SciTech Connect

    C. Neumeyer; P. Heitzenroeder; C. Kessel; M. Ono; M. Peng; J. Schmidt; R. Woolley; I. Zatz

    2002-01-18

    The low aspect ratio spherical torus (ST) configuration requires that the center stack design be optimized within a limited available space, using materials within their established allowables. This paper presents center stack design methods developed by the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) Project Team during the initial design of NSTX, and more recently for studies of a possible next-step ST (NSST) device.

  2. Features of spherical torus plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Strickler, D.J.

    1985-12-01

    The spherical torus is a very small aspect ratio (A < 2) confinement concept obtained by retaining only the indispensable components inboard to the plasma torus. MHD equilibrium calculations show that spherical torus plasmas with safety factor q > 2 are characterized by high toroidal beta (..beta../sub t/ > 0.2), low poloidal beta (..beta../sub p/ < 0.3), naturally large elongation (kappa greater than or equal to 2), large plasma current with I/sub p//(aB/sub t0/) up to about 7 MA/mT, strong paramagnetism (B/sub t//B/sub t0/ > 1.5), and strong plasma helicity (F comparable to THETA). A large near-omnigeneous region is seen at the large-major-radius, bad-curvature region of the plasma in comparison with the conventional tokamaks. These features combine to engender the spherical torus plasma in a unique physics regime which permits compact fusion at low field and modest cost. Because of its strong paramagnetism and helicity, the spherical torus plasma shares some of the desirable features of spheromak and reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas, but with tokamak-like confinement and safety factor q. The general class of spherical tori, which includes the spherical tokamak (q > 1), the spherical pinch (1 > q > O), and the spherical RFP (q < O), have magnetic field configurations unique in comparison with conventional tokamaks and RFPs. 22 refs., 12 figs.

  3. How important is randomisation in a stepped wedge trial?

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, James R; Prost, Audrey; Fielding, Katherine L; Copas, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    In cluster randomised trials, randomisation increases internal study validity. If enough clusters are randomised, an unadjusted analysis should be unbiased. If a smaller number of clusters are included, stratified or matched randomisation can increase comparability between trial arms. In addition, an adjusted analysis may be required; nevertheless, randomisation removes the possibility for systematically biased allocation and increases transparency. In stepped wedge trials, clusters are randomised to receive an intervention at different start times ('steps'), and all clusters eventually receive it. In a recent study protocol for a 'modified stepped wedge trial', the investigators considered randomisation of the clusters (hospital wards), but decided against it for ethical and logistical reasons, and under the assumption that it would not add much to the rigour of the evaluation. We show that the benefits of randomisation for cluster randomised trials also apply to stepped wedge trials. The biggest additional issue for stepped wedge trials in relation to parallel cluster randomised trials is the need to control for secular trends in the outcome. Analysis of stepped wedge trials can in theory be based on 'horizontal' or 'vertical' comparisons. Horizontal comparisons are based on measurements taken before and after the intervention is introduced in each cluster, and are unbiased if there are no secular trends. Vertical comparisons are based on outcome measurements from clusters that have switched to the intervention condition and those from clusters that have yet to switch, and are unbiased under randomisation since at any time point, which clusters are in intervention and control conditions will have been determined at random. Secular outcome trends are a possibility in many settings. Many stepped wedge trials are analysed with a mixed model, including a random effect for cluster and fixed effects for time period to account for secular trends, thereby combining both

  4. Computation of the seismic stability of rock wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Haupt, W.

    1989-04-01

    Newmark's concept of computing the permanent displacement under seismic loads has been combined with the conventional limit equilibrium analysis to compute the displacements of a rock wedge. The rock wedge formed by the intersecting planes may or may not have a tension crack in the upper slope surface. As the static analysis of a rock wedge is available from the literature, only the seismic problem is treated theoretically in more details. A computer program has been developed to compute the displacements from the digitised input data of the acceleration-time-history. The program can take into account the water pressure on the intersecting planes and on the planes of the tension crack. The effect of rock anchors if present is also taken care of in addition to static surcharge loads. The program calculates the conventional static factor of safety, remaining resistance against sliding, the critical acceleration, exciting force, relative velocity with time and the cumulative displacements. Two model examples are presented: one with simple sinusoidal acceleration and the other one with actual earthquake data considering the different systems of forces acting on the wedge. The results are critically discussed with respect to the different parameters e. g. anchor forces, water pressure and cohesion influencing the magnitude of displacements under seismic loads. It is shown that the critical acceleration is a better index for the seismic stability than the conventional factor of safety. The critical acceleration presented in this paper serves as a very handy tool for a site engineer to get the first hand information about the stability of the wedge for a given acceleration-time-history without going into the details of dynamic analysis.

  5. The role of aerothermochemistry in double cone and double wedge flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swantek, Andrew

    In this work, hypervelocity flows over double cone and double wedge geometries are studied. The flow configurations established over the double cone/double wedge models are extremely sensitive to thermochemistry, and thus serve as ideal benchmarks for validating chemical models. The goals of this research are: i) to investigate the coupling between the fluid mechanics and thermochemistry in these flow fields by varying freestream flow composition and enthalpy, ii) to implement a diagnostic suite for time-resolved surface and freestream measurements, iii) to investigate the nature of flow field unsteadiness across various test conditions, and lastly iv) to extend the experimental database for shock wave boundary/layer interactions. An expansion tube is used to generate flows with enthalpies ranging from 2.2-8.0 MJ/kg (2-4 km/s) and Mach numbers from 4-7. The expansion tube is a novel impulse facility for accelerating a test gas to these velocities, while maintaining a minimally dissociated freestream. Additionally, the facility allows variation of the freestream composition (between nitrogen and air), while maintaining freestream test parameters (Mach number, density, enthalpy) to within 0.5%. Two models are used: a 25-55 degree double cone model and a 30-55 degree double wedge. There are four diagnostic components to this research which aim to enable a better understanding of these canonical flow fields. Single frame, high resolution schlieren photography is used to visualize various flow features including: the separation zone formed in the corner, the triple point interaction, and a supersonic shear layer. From these images, a separation zone length scaling parameter is determined. This parameter, derived for wedge geometries, is successfully applied to conical geometries by using a judicious choice of flow properties for scaling. In the wedge image series, nitrogen test conditions exhibit a distinct increase in bow shock standoff distance. Additionally, aft

  6. Low torque hydrodynamic lip geometry for rotary seals

    DOEpatents

    Dietle, Lannie L.; Schroeder, John E.

    2015-07-21

    A hydrodynamically lubricating geometry for the generally circular dynamic sealing lip of rotary seals that are employed to partition a lubricant from an environment. The dynamic sealing lip is provided for establishing compressed sealing engagement with a relatively rotatable surface, and for wedging a film of lubricating fluid into the interface between the dynamic sealing lip and the relatively rotatable surface in response to relative rotation that may occur in the clockwise or the counter-clockwise direction. A wave form incorporating an elongated dimple provides the gradual convergence, efficient impingement angle, and gradual interfacial contact pressure rise that are conducive to efficient hydrodynamic wedging. Skewed elevated contact pressure zones produced by compression edge effects provide for controlled lubricant movement within the dynamic sealing interface between the seal and the relatively rotatable surface, producing enhanced lubrication and low running torque.

  7. Unsteady Spherical Diffusion Flames in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atreya, Arvind; Berhan, S.; Chernovsky, M.; Sacksteder, Kurt R.

    2001-01-01

    The absence of buoyancy-induced flows in microgravity (mu-g) and the resulting increase in the reactant residence time significantly alters the fundamentals of many combustion processes. Substantial differences between normal gravity (ng) and (mu-g) flames have been reported in experiments on candle flames, flame spread over solids, droplet combustion, and others. These differences are more basic than just in the visible flame shape. Longer residence times and higher concentration of combustion products in the flame zone create a thermochemical environment that changes the flame chemistry and the heat and mass transfer processes. Processes such as flame radiation, that are often ignored in ng, become very important and sometimes even controlling. Furthermore, microgravity conditions considerably enhance flame radiation by: (i) the build-up of combustion products in the high-temperature reaction zone which increases the gas radiation, and (ii) longer residence times make conditions appropriate for substantial amounts of soot to form which is also responsible for radiative heat loss. Thus, it is anticipated that radiative heat loss may eventually extinguish the "weak" (low burning rate per unit flame area) mu-g diffusion flame. Yet, space shuttle experiments on candle flames show that in an infinite ambient atmosphere, the hemispherical candle flame in mu-g will burn indefinitely. This may be because of the coupling between the fuel production rate and the flame via the heat-feedback mechanism for candle flames, flames over solids and fuel droplet flames. Thus, to focus only on the gas-phase phenomena leading to radiative extinction, aerodynamically stabilized gaseous diffusion flames are examined. This enables independent control of the fuel flow rate to help identify conditions under which radiative extinction occurs. Also, spherical geometry is chosen for the mu-g experiments and modeling because: (i) It reduces the complexity by making the problem one

  8. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F; Chernyak, Natalia; Mader, Christopher C; Nallagatla, Subbarao; Kang, Richard S; Hao, Liangliang; Walker, David A; Halo, Tiffany L; Merkel, Timothy J; Rische, Clayton H; Anantatmula, Sagar; Burkhart, Merideth; Mirkin, Chad A; Gryaznov, Sergei M

    2015-03-31

    Immunomodulatory nucleic acids have extraordinary promise for treating disease, yet clinical progress has been limited by a lack of tools to safely increase activity in patients. Immunomodulatory nucleic acids act by agonizing or antagonizing endosomal toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8, and TLR9), proteins involved in innate immune signaling. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) that stimulate (immunostimulatory, IS-SNA) or regulate (immunoregulatory, IR-SNA) immunity by engaging TLRs have been designed, synthesized, and characterized. Compared with free oligonucleotides, IS-SNAs exhibit up to 80-fold increases in potency, 700-fold higher antibody titers, 400-fold higher cellular responses to a model antigen, and improved treatment of mice with lymphomas. IR-SNAs exhibit up to eightfold increases in potency and 30% greater reduction in fibrosis score in mice with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Given the clinical potential of SNAs due to their potency, defined chemical nature, and good tolerability, SNAs are attractive new modalities for developing immunotherapies.

  9. Buckling of spherical capsules.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Sebastian; Kierfeld, Jan

    2011-10-01

    We investigate buckling of soft elastic capsules under negative pressure or for reduced capsule volume. Based on nonlinear shell theory and the assumption of a hyperelastic capsule membrane, shape equations for axisymmetric and initially spherical capsules are derived and solved numerically. A rich bifurcation behavior is found, which is presented in terms of bifurcation diagrams. The energetically preferred stable configuration is deduced from a least-energy principle both for prescribed volume and prescribed pressure. We find that buckled shapes are energetically favorable already at smaller negative pressures and larger critical volumes than predicted by the classical buckling instability. By preventing self-intersection for strongly reduced volume, we obtain a complete picture of the buckling process and can follow the shape from the initial undeformed state through the buckling instability into the fully collapsed state. Interestingly, the sequences of bifurcations and stable capsule shapes differ for prescribed volume and prescribed pressure. In the buckled state, we find a relation between curvatures at the indentation rim and the bending modulus, which can be used to determine elastic moduli from experimental shape analysis. PMID:22181297

  10. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids

    PubMed Central

    Radovic-Moreno, Aleksandar F.; Chernyak, Natalia; Mader, Christopher C.; Nallagatla, Subbarao; Kang, Richard S.; Hao, Liangliang; Walker, David A.; Halo, Tiffany L.; Merkel, Timothy J.; Rische, Clayton H.; Anantatmula, Sagar; Burkhart, Merideth; Mirkin, Chad A.; Gryaznov, Sergei M.

    2015-01-01

    Immunomodulatory nucleic acids have extraordinary promise for treating disease, yet clinical progress has been limited by a lack of tools to safely increase activity in patients. Immunomodulatory nucleic acids act by agonizing or antagonizing endosomal toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8, and TLR9), proteins involved in innate immune signaling. Immunomodulatory spherical nucleic acids (SNAs) that stimulate (immunostimulatory, IS-SNA) or regulate (immunoregulatory, IR-SNA) immunity by engaging TLRs have been designed, synthesized, and characterized. Compared with free oligonucleotides, IS-SNAs exhibit up to 80-fold increases in potency, 700-fold higher antibody titers, 400-fold higher cellular responses to a model antigen, and improved treatment of mice with lymphomas. IR-SNAs exhibit up to eightfold increases in potency and 30% greater reduction in fibrosis score in mice with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Given the clinical potential of SNAs due to their potency, defined chemical nature, and good tolerability, SNAs are attractive new modalities for developing immunotherapies. PMID:25775582

  11. Vertebral Osteotomies in Ankylosing Spondylitis-Comparison of Outcomes Following Closing Wedge Osteotomy versus Opening Wedge Osteotomy: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ravinsky, Robert A; Ouellet, Jean-Albert; Brodt, Erika D; Dettori, Joseph R

    2013-04-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Study Rationale To seek out and assess the best quality evidence available comparing opening wedge osteotomy (OWO) and closing wedge osteotomy (CWO) in patients with ankylosing spondylitis to determine whether their results differ with regard to several different subjective and objective outcome measures. Objective The aim of this study is to determine whether there is a difference in subjective and objective outcomes when comparing CWO and OWO in patients with ankylosing spondylitis suffering from clinically significant thoracolumbar kyphosis with respect to quality-of-life assessments, complication risks, and the amount of correction of the spine achieved at follow-up. Methods A systematic review was undertaken of articles published up to July 2012. Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched to identify studies comparing effectiveness and safety outcomes between adult patients with ankylosing spondylitis who received closing wedge versus opening wedge osteotomies. Studies that included pediatric patients, polysegmental osteotomies, or revision procedures were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed the strength of evidence using the GRADE criteria and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results From a total of 67 possible citations, 4 retrospective cohorts (class of evidence III) met our inclusion criteria and form the basis for this report. No differences in Oswestry Disability Index, visual analog scale for pain, Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-24 score, SRS-22 score, and patient satisfaction were reported between the closing and opening wedge groups across two studies. Regarding radiological outcomes following closing versus opening osteotomies, mean change in sagittal vertical axis ranged from 8.9 to 10.8 cm and 8.0 to 10.9 cm, respectively, across three studies; mean change in lumbar lordosis ranged from 36 to 47 degrees and 19 to 41 degrees across four studies; and mean change

  12. 3DHZETRN: Shielded ICRU spherical phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, John W.; Slaba, Tony C.; Badavi, Francis F.; Reddell, Brandon D.; Bahadori, Amir A.

    2015-01-01

    A computationally efficient 3DHZETRN code capable of simulating High (H) Charge (Z) and Energy (HZE) and light ions (including neutrons) under space-like boundary conditions with enhanced neutron and light ion propagation was recently developed for a simple homogeneous shield object. Monte Carlo benchmarks were used to verify the methodology in slab and spherical geometry, and the 3D corrections were shown to provide significant improvement over the straight-ahead approximation in some cases. In the present report, the new algorithms with well-defined convergence criteria are extended to inhomogeneous media within a shielded tissue slab and a shielded tissue sphere and tested against Monte Carlo simulation to verify the solution methods. The 3D corrections are again found to more accurately describe the neutron and light ion fluence spectra as compared to the straight-ahead approximation. These computationally efficient methods provide a basis for software capable of space shield analysis and optimization.

  13. Plasma viscosity in spherical ICF implosion simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vold, E.; Joglekar, A.; Ortega, M.; Moll, R.; Fenn, D.; Molvig, K.

    2016-05-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hydrodynamic codes often ignore the effects of viscosity though recent research indicates plasma viscosity and mixing by classical transport processes may have a substantial impact on implosion dynamics. A Lagrangian hydrodynamic code in one-dimensional spherical geometry with plasma viscosity and mass transport, and including a three temperature model for ions, electrons, and radiation treated in a gray radiation diffusion approximation, is used to study differences between ICF implosions with and without plasma viscosity and to examine the role of artificial viscosity in a Lagrangian implosion simulation. It was found that plasma viscosity has substantial impacts on ICF shock dynamics characterized by shock burn timing, maximum burn temperatures, fuel compression, and time history of neutron production rates. Plasma viscosity reduces the need for artificial viscosity to maintain numerical stability in the Lagrangian formulation and this study suggests that artificial viscosity may provide an unphysical stability in implosion simulations.

  14. Combinatorial Geometry Printer Plotting.

    1987-01-05

    Picture generates plots of two-dimensional slices through the three-dimensional geometry described by the combinatorial geometry (CG) package used in such codes as MORSE and QAD-CG. These plots are printed on a standard line printer.

  15. Spherical Model for Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Chung-Yu.

    A new set of models for homogeneous, isotropic turbulence is considered in which the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluid flow are generalized to a set of N coupled equations in N velocity fields. It is argued that in order to be useful these models must embody a new group of symmetries, and a general formalism is laid out for their construction. The work is motivated by similar techniques that have had extraordinary success in improving the theoretical understanding of equilibrium phase transitions in condensed matter systems. The key result is that these models simplify when N is large. The so-called spherical limit, N to infty, can be solved exactly, yielding a closed pair of nonlinear integral equations for the response and correlation functions. These equations, known as Kraichnan's Direct Interaction Approximation (DIA) equations, are, for the first time, solved fully in the scale-invariant turbulent regime, and the implications of these solutions for real turbulence (N = 1) are discussed. In particular, it is argued that previously applied renormalization group techniques, based on an expansion in the exponent, y, that characterizes the driving spectrum, are incorrect, and that the Kolmogorov exponent zeta has a nontrivial dependence on N, with zeta(N toinfty) = {3over2}. This value is remarkably close to the experimental result, zeta~{5over3}, which must therefore result from higher order corrections in powers of {1over N}. Prospects for calculating these corrections are briefly discussed: though daunting, such a calculations would, for the first time, provide a controlled perturbation expansion for the Kolmogorov, and other, exponents. Our techniques may also be applied to other nonequilibrium dynamical problems, such as the KPZ equation for interface growth, and perhaps to turbulence in nonlinear wave systems.

  16. Spherical model for turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Chung-Yu

    A new set of models for homogeneous, isotropic turbulence is considered in which the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible fluid flow are generalized to a set of N coupled equations in N velocity fields. It is argued that in order to be useful these models must embody a new group of symmetries, and a general formalism is laid out for their construction. The work is motivated by similar techniques that have had extraordinary success in improving the theoretical understanding of equilibrium phase transitions in condensed matter systems. The key result is that these models simplify when N is large. The so-called spherical limit, N approaches infinity, can be solved exactly, yielding a closed pair of nonlinear integral equations for the response and correlation functions. These equations, known as Kraichnan's Direct Interaction Approximation (DIA) equations, are, for the first time, solved fully in the scale-invariant turbulent regime, and the implications of these solutions for real turbulence (N = 1) are discussed. In particular, it is argued that previously applied renormalization group techniques, based on an expansion in the exponent, y, that characterizes the driving spectrum, are incorrect, and that the Kolmogorov exponent zeta has a nontrivial dependence on N, with zeta(N approaches infinity) = 3/2. This value is remarkably close to the experimental result, zeta approximately equals 5/3, which must therefore result from higher order corrections in powers of 1/N. Prospects for calculating these corrections are briefly discussed: though daunting, such a calculation would, for the first time, provide a controlled perturbation expansion for the Kolmogorov, and other exponents. Our techniques may also be applied to other nonequilibrium dynamical problems, such as the KPZ equation for interface growth, and perhaps to turbulence in nonlinear wave systems.

  17. Spherical Strong-Shock Inferences on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nora, R.; Lafon, M.; Betti, R.; Theobald, W.; Seka, W.; Delettrez, J. A.

    2014-10-01

    A milestone for shock ignition is to experimentally verify the generation of several hundred Mbar shocks at shock-ignition-relevant laser intensities. This paper presents the first experimental evidence of strong shocks generated in a spherical geometry. Using the temporal delay between the launch of the strong shock at the outer surface of the spherical target and the time when the shock converges at the center, the shock properties can be inferred using radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. Peak ablation pressures exceeding 200 Mbar are inferred at laser intensities of ~ 3 ×1015 W/cm2. The shock strength is significantly enhanced by the coupling of copius amounts of hot electrons, up to 2 kJ with Thot ~ 50 to 100 keV. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944 and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Number DE-FG02-04ER54786.

  18. Active shortening within the Himalayan orogenic wedge implied by the 2015 Gorkha earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipple, Kelin X.; Shirzaei, Manoochehr; Hodges, Kip V.; Ramon Arrowsmith, J.

    2016-09-01

    Models of Himalayan neotectonics generally attribute active mountain building to slip on the Himalayan Sole Thrust, also termed the Main Himalayan Thrust, which accommodates underthrusting of the Indian Plate beneath Tibet. However, the geometry of the Himalayan Sole Thrust and thus how slip along it causes uplift of the High Himalaya are unclear. We show that the geodetic record of the 2015 Gorkha earthquake sequence significantly clarifies the architecture of the Himalayan Sole Thrust and suggests the need for revision of the canonical view of how the Himalaya grow. Inversion of Gorkha surface deformation reveals that the Himalayan Sole Thrust extends as a planar gently dipping fault surface at least 20-30 km north of the topographic front of the High Himalaya. This geometry implies that building of the high range cannot be attributed solely to slip along the Himalayan Sole Thrust over a steep ramp; instead, shortening within the Himalayan wedge is required to support the topography and maintain rapid rock uplift. Indeed, the earthquake sequence may have included a moderate rupture (Mw 6.9) on an out-of-sequence thrust fault at the foot of the High Himalaya. Such internal deformation is an expected response to sustained, focused rapid erosion, and may be common to most compressional orogens.

  19. Geometry and Erdkinder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Nathaniel J.

    2001-01-01

    Chronicles a teacher's first year teaching geometry at the Hershey Montessori Farm School in Huntsburg, Ohio. Instructional methods relied on Euclid primary readings and combined pure abstract logic with practical applications of geometry on the land. The course included geometry background imparted by Montessori elementary materials as well as…

  20. Experimental investigation of sound absorption of acoustic wedges for anechoic chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, I. V.; Golubev, A. Yu.; Zverev, A. Ya.; Makashov, S. Yu.; Palchikovskiy, V. V.; Sobolev, A. F.; Chernykh, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    The results of measuring the sound absorption by acoustic wedges, which were performed in AC-3 and AC-11 reverberation chambers at the Central Aerohydrodynamic Institute (TsAGI), are presented. Wedges of different densities manufactured from superfine basaltic and thin mineral fibers were investigated. The results of tests of these wedges were compared to the sound absorption of wedges of the operating AC-2 anechoic facility at TsAGI. It is shown that basaltic-fiber wedges have better sound-absorption characteristics than the investigated analogs and can be recommended for facing anechoic facilities under construction.

  1. Spherical stellarator with plasma current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, Paul E.

    1996-08-01

    Recently proposed novel concept of a spherical stellarator (P. E. Moroz, ``Spherical stellarator configuration,'' to appear in Phys. Rev. Lett) is enhanced by adding the plasma current to the otherwise pure stellarator system. The coil configuration of this ultra low aspect ratio system differs from that of a spherical tokamak by inclination of external parts of the toroidal field coils. It is shown that the configuration considered possesses many attractive properties, including: wide flexibility of operating regimes, compact design and coil simplicity, good access to the plasma, closed vacuum flux surfaces with large enclosed volume, significant external rotational transform, strong magnetic well, and a high plasma β [β(0) in excess of 30%] equilibrium. It is shown that the bootstrap effect in a spherical stellarator, in principle, can supply the full plasma current required for the high-β equilibrium.

  2. Late brittle deformation in a caledonian ductile thrust wedge: new evidence for gravitational collapse in the Moine Thrust sheet, Sutherland, Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, Robert E.

    1989-12-01

    In the ductile regions of orogenic wedges, late "brittle" structures formed at shallow crustal depths have received little attention. However, they are important as they of ten record the final stages in deformational history during uplift and erosion of the orogen. In the Moine rocks of Sutherland, late Caledonian brittle folds and low-angle faults post-date ductile structures formed during WNW-NW-directed thrust movements earlier in the same orogenic event. In the western Moine Nappe, the late structures display geometries which indicate that they formed during regionally ESE-directed extensional movements, down the dip of the pre-existing regional foliation. These late structures are correlated with similar, WNW-directed extensional low-angle faults recognised in the Moine Thrust Zone south of the Assynt culmination. Both are thought to have formed in response to late Caledonian gravity-induced thinning of the Moine Thrust wedge, and both pre-date Devonian extension associated with the formation of the West Orkney Basin. Along-strike changes in the location and sense of extensional movements, north and south of the Assynt culmination, are explained by changes in the pre-existing structural geometry of the Caledonian ductile thrust nappes within the Moine. Hence, earlier deformation patterns are thought to exert important controls over later events in an evolving orogenic wedge.

  3. Toroidal equilibria in spherical coordinates

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, K. H.

    2008-11-15

    The standard Grad-Shafranov equation for axisymmetric toroidal plasma equilibrium is customary expressed in cylindrical coordinates with toroidal contours, and through which benchmark equilibria are solved. An alternative approach to cast the Grad-Shafranov equation in spherical coordinates is presented. This equation, in spherical coordinates, is examined for toroidal solutions to describe low {beta} Solovev and high {beta} plasma equilibria in terms of elementary functions.

  4. [Sensitometry of Mammographic Screen-film System Using Bootstrap Aluminum Step-Wedge.].

    PubMed

    Abe, Shinji; Imada, Ryou; Terauchi, Takashi; Fujisaki, Tatsuya; Monma, Masahiko; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Mochizuki, Yasuo

    2005-01-01

    Recently, a few types of step-wedges for bootstrap sensitometry with a mammographic screen-film system have been proposed. In this study, the bootstrap sensitometry with the mammographic screen-film system was studied for two types of aluminum step-wedges. Characteristic X-ray energy curves were determined using mammographic and general radiographic aluminum step-wedges devised to prevent scattered X-rays generated from one step penetrating into the region of another one, and dependence of the characteristic curves on the wedges was also discussed. No difference was found in the characteristic curves due to the difference in the step-wedges for mammography and general radiography although there was a slight difference in shape at the shoulder portion for the two types of step-wedges. Therefore, it was concluded that aluminum step-wedges for mammography and general radiography could be employed in bootstrap sensitometry with the mammographic screen-film system. PMID:16479054

  5. Self-assembling supramolecular systems of different symmetry formed by wedged macromolecular dendrons

    SciTech Connect

    Shcherbina, M. A. Bakirov, A. V.; Yakunin, A. N.; Percec, V.; Beginn, U.; Moeller, M.; Chvalun, S. N.

    2012-03-15

    The main stages of the self-assembling of supramolecular ensembles have been revealed by studying different functional wedged macromolecules: polymethacrylates with tapered side chains based on gallic acid, their macromonomers, and salts of 2,3,4- and 3,4,5-tris(dodecyloxy)benzenesulphonic acid. The first stage is the formation of individual supramolecular aggregates (long cylinders or spherical micelles) due to the weak noncovalent interactions of mesogenic groups and the subsequent ordering in these aggregates, which is accompanied by a decrease in the free energy of the system. Supramolecular aggregates, in turn, form 2D or 3D lattices. The shape of supramolecular aggregates and its change with temperature are delicate functions of the mesogen chemical structure; this circumstance makes it possible to rationally design complex self-assembling systems with the ability to respond smartly to external stimuli. X-ray diffraction analysis allows one to study the structure of supramolecular systems with different degrees of order, determine the type of mesophases formed by these systems, and reveal the phase behavior of the material. Particular attention has been paid to the method for reconstruction of electron density distribution from the relative reflection intensity. The application of a suite of experimental methods, including wide- and small-angle X-ray diffraction, molecular modeling, differential scanning calorimetry, and polarization optical microscopy, allows one to establish the relationship between the shape of the structural unit (molecule or molecular aggregate), the nature of the interaction, and the phase behavior of the material.

  6. Self-assembling supramolecular systems of different symmetry formed by wedged macromolecular dendrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbina, M. A.; Bakirov, A. V.; Yakunin, A. N.; Percec, V.; Beginn, U.; Möller, M.; Chvalun, S. N.

    2012-03-01

    The main stages of the self-assembling of supramolecular ensembles have been revealed by studying different functional wedged macromolecules: polymethacrylates with tapered side chains based on gallic acid, their macromonomers, and salts of 2,3,4- and 3,4,5-tris(dodecyloxy)benzenesulphonic acid. The first stage is the formation of individual supramolecular aggregates (long cylinders or spherical micelles) due to the weak noncovalent interactions of mesogenic groups and the subsequent ordering in these aggregates, which is accompanied by a decrease in the free energy of the system. Supramolecular aggregates, in turn, form 2D or 3D lattices. The shape of supramolecular aggregates and its change with temperature are delicate functions of the mesogen chemical structure; this circumstance makes it possible to rationally design complex self-assembling systems with the ability to respond smartly to external stimuli. X-ray diffraction analysis allows one to study the structure of supramolecular systems with different degrees of order, determine the type of mesophases formed by these systems, and reveal the phase behavior of the material. Particular attention has been paid to the method for reconstruction of electron density distribution from the relative reflection intensity. The application of a suite of experimental methods, including wide- and small-angle X-ray diffraction, molecular modeling, differential scanning calorimetry, and polarization optical microscopy, allows one to establish the relationship between the shape of the structural unit (molecule or molecular aggregate), the nature of the interaction, and the phase behavior of the material.

  7. Mechanism of Hot Finger Formation in Mantle Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, M. Y.; Tamura, Y.; Sakaguchi, H.

    2013-12-01

    Processes of mantle melting and volcanic eruptions along subduction zones are often illustrated by the use of two-dimensional cross-section models of convergent margins. However, Quaternary volcanoes in the NE Japan arc could be grouped into ten volcano clusters striking transverse to the arc; these have an average width of ~ 50 km, and are separated by parallel gaps 30-75 km wide (Tamura et al., 2002). Moreover, the structure of the mantle wedge and arc crust beneath the NE Japan arc and the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc, respectively, suggest that the third dimension, lying along the strike of the arc, is necessary to understand the actual production of magmas in subduction zones (e.g., Nakajima et al., 2001; Hasegawa & Nakajima, 2004; Kodaira et al., 2007; Kodaira et al., 2008). Common periodic structural variations, having wavelengths of 80-100 km, can be observed in both areas. This grouping of volcanoes and the structural variations may be related to locally developed hot regions within the mantle wedge that have the form of inclined, 50 km-wide fingers (hot fingers). The 'hot fingers' models (Tamura et al., 2002) may play an important role in linking the 3D structures within the mantle wedge and overlying arc crust to volcanic eruptions at the surface. To explore a physical and mathematical mechanism to produce a hot finger pattern, we develop a hydrodynamic model of mantle convection in mantle wedge. A hypothesis incorporated in our model is a double diffusive mechanism of mantle materials; diffusion of composition of mantle materials is much weaker than temperature diffusion. We show that our model shows a spatiotemporal pattern in a mantle material composition, temperature, and velocity that are similar to the spatiotemporal patterns observed in the NE Japan arc.

  8. Modal Analysis in Lined Wedge-Shaped Ducts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mechel, F. P.

    1998-10-01

    It has been suggested to describe the sound field in a wedge-shaped duct in a cylindrical co-ordinate system in which the boundaries of the wedge lie in a co-ordinate surface. This suggestion was developed in a companion paper [1]. The wave equation can be separated only if the boundaries are ideally reflecting (rigid or soft). Two solutions were proposed in reference [1] for absorbing boundaries. In the first solution the sound field is composed of “ideal modes” (modes in a wedge with ideally reflecting boundaries); the boundary condition at the absorbing boundary then leads to a system of equations for the mode amplitudes. The problem with this method lies in the fact that there is no radial orthogonality of the ideal modes so that the precision of the field synthesis by ideal modes is doubtful. In the second method in reference [1] one defines “fictitious modes” which satisfy the boundary conditions at the flanks exactly and which are based on hypergeometric functions as radial functions, but which produce a “rest” in the wave equation. It was described how this rest can be minimized; this procedure leads to slow numerical integrations. In the present paper, the wedge is subdivided into duct sections with parallel walls (the boundary is stepped); the fields in the sections are composed of duct modes (modes in a straight lined duct); the mode amplitudes are determined from the boundary conditions at the section limits. The advantages of the present method are (analytically) the duct modes are orthogonal across the sections, so the mode amplitudes can be determined with the usual precision of a modal analysis, and (numerically) no numerical integrations are needed.

  9. On the acoustic wedge design and simulation of anechoic chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Changyong; Zhang, Shangyu; Huang, Lixi

    2016-10-01

    This study proposes an alternative to the classic wedge design for anechoic chambers, which is the uniform-then-gradient, flat-wall (UGFW) structure. The working mechanisms of the proposed structure and the traditional wedge are analyzed. It is found that their absorption patterns are different. The parameters of both structures are optimized for achieving minimum absorber depth, under the condition of absorbing 99% of normal incident sound energy. It is found that, the UGFW structure achieves a smaller total depth for the cut-off frequencies ranging from 100 Hz to 250 Hz. This paper also proposes a modification for the complex source image (CSI) model for the empirical simulation of anechoic chambers, originally proposed by Bonfiglio et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134 (1), 285-291 (2013)]. The modified CSI model considers the non-locally reactive effect of absorbers at oblique incidence, and the improvement is verified by a full, finite-element simulation of a small chamber. With the modified CSI model, the performance of both decorations with the optimized parameters in a large chamber is simulated. The simulation results are analyzed and checked against the tolerance of 1.5 dB deviation from the inverse square law, stipulated in the ISO standard 3745(2003). In terms of the total decoration depth and anechoic chamber performance, the UGFW structure is better than the classic wedge design.

  10. Shock interaction mechanisms on a double wedge at Mach 7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durna, Ahmet Selim; El Hajj Ali Barada, Mohamad; Celik, Bayram

    2016-09-01

    Present computational study investigates formation and interaction mechanisms of shocks and boundary layer for low enthalpy Mach 7 flows of nitrogen over double wedges, which have fixed fore and various aft angles of 30° and 45°-60°, respectively. We use a density based finite-volume Navier-Stokes solver to simulate low enthalpy Mach 7 flows of nitrogen over double wedges. The solver is first and second order accurate in time and space, respectively. The meshes used in simulations of two-dimensional laminar flows consist of multiple blocks of structured mesh. Depending on the intensity, impingement angle, and impingement location of transmitted shock wave, the resulting adverse pressure gradient related disturbances on the wedge surface can trigger complex flow physics both in subsonic and supersonic regions. We observe a strong interaction between the deformation of the boundary layer and the bow shock as well as the transmitted shock for high aft angles. Comparison of the obtained results in terms of general flow physics shows that there exists an aft angle threshold value for such interaction which is in the range of 45°-50°.

  11. Reflection of cylindrical converging shock wave over a plane wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fu; Si, Ting; Zhai, Zhigang; Luo, Xisheng; Yang, Jiming; Lu, Xiyun

    2016-08-01

    The cylindrical converging shock reflection over a plane wedge is investigated experimentally and numerically in a specially designed shock tube which converts a planar shock into a cylindrical one. When the converging shock is moving along the wedge, both the shock strength and the incident angle are changing, which provides the possibility for the wave transition. The results show that both regular reflection (RR) and Mach reflection (MR) are found on the wedge with different initial incident angles. The wave transitions from direct Mach reflection (DiMR) to inverse Mach reflection (InMR) and further to transitioned regular reflection (TRR) are observed with appropriate initial incident angles. The instability development in the shear layer and strong vortices formation near the wall are evident, which are ascribed not only to the interaction of two shear layers but also to the shock impact and the shock converging effect. Because of the flow unsteadiness after the converging shock, the detachment criterion provides a good estimation for the RR → MR transition, but fails to predict the DiMR → InMR transition, and MR is found to persist slightly below the mechanical equilibrium condition. A hysteresis process is found in the MR → TRR transition and becomes more apparent as the increase of the initial incident angle due to the shock converging effect.

  12. The wedge hot-film anemometer in supersonic flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiner, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    A commercial wedge hot-film probe is studied to determine its heat transfer response in transonic to low supersonic flows of high unit Reynolds number. The results of this study show that its response in this flow regime differs from the response of cylindrical type sensors. Whereas the cylindrical sensor has the same sensitivity to velocity as to density for free-stream Mach numbers exceeding 1.3, the wedge probe sensitivity to velocity is always greater than its sensitivity to density over the entire flow regime. This property requires determination of three fluctuation components due to density, velocity, and temperature, in a transonic or supersonic turbulent flow. Sensitivity equations are derived based on the observed behavior of the wedge probe. Both the durability and the frequency response of the probe are excellent, the square wave insertion test indicating frequency response near 130 kHz. The directional response of the probe at sonic speed is poor and requires further examination before Reynolds stress measurements are attempted with dual sensor probes.

  13. Geomorphological-thermo-mechanical modeling: Application to orogenic wedge dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, K.; Willett, S. D.; Gerya, T.; Ruh, J.

    2015-09-01

    Coupled geomorphological-thermo-mechanical modeling is presented in a new implementation that combines two established thermo-mechanical and landscape evolution models. A finite-difference marker-in-cell technique is used to solve for the thermo-mechanical problem including complex visco-plastic rheologies in high resolution. Each timestep is synchronously solved with a fluvial landscape evolution model that includes numerical solution of fluvial incision and analytical hillslope processes for both diffusive and slope-limited processes on an adaptive grid. The implementation is successful in modeling large deformation at different scales. We demonstrate high degrees of coupling through processes such as exhumation of rocks with different erodibilities. Sensitivity of the coupled system evolution to surface parameters, and mechanical parameters, is explored for the established case of development of compressive wedges. The evolution of wedge models proves to be primarily sensitive to erodibility and the degree of river network integration. Relief follows deformation in propagating forward with wedge growth. We apply the method to a large-scale model of continental collision, in which a close relationship between deep tectonics, fluvial network evolution, and uplift and erosion can be demonstrated.

  14. Missing wedge computed tomography by iterative algorithm DIRECTT.

    PubMed

    Kupsch, Andreas; Lange, Axel; Hentschel, Manfred P; Lück, Sebastian; Schmidt, Volker; Grothausmann, Roman; Hilger, André; Manke, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    A strategy to mitigate typical reconstruction artefacts in missing wedge computed tomography is presented. These artefacts appear as elongations of reconstructed details along the mean direction (i.e. the symmetry centre of the projections). Although absent in standard computed tomography applications, they are most prominent in advanced electron tomography and also in special topics of X-ray and neutron tomography under restricted geometric boundary conditions. We investigate the performance of the DIRECTT (Direct Iterative Reconstruction of Computed Tomography Trajectories) algorithm to reduce the directional artefacts in standard procedures. In order to be sensitive to the anisotropic nature of missing wedge artefacts, we investigate isotropic substructures of metal foam as well as circular disc models. Comparison is drawn to filtered backprojection and algebraic techniques. Reference is made to reconstructions of complete data sets. For the purpose of assessing the reconstruction quality, Fourier transforms are employed to visualize the missing wedge directly. Deficient reconstructions of disc models are evaluated by a length-weighted kernel density estimation, which yields the probabilities of boundary orientations. The DIRECTT results are assessed at different signal-to-noise ratios by means of local and integral evaluation parameters. PMID:26367127

  15. Washing wedges: a capillary instability in a gradient of confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiser, Ludovic; Herbaut, Remy; Bico, Jose; Reyssat, Etienne

    2015-11-01

    When a drop of oil is introduced into a gradient of confinement (two glass plates forming a sharp wedge) capillary forces drive it toward the most confined regions, where the solid-fluid contact area is maximal. A surfactant solution subsequently introduced into the wedge undergoes the same movement until it reaches the oil previously added. If the aqueous phase wets the solid better than the oil, a complex exchange process between both phases occurs. The water-oil interface destabilizes, oil fingers grow in the water phase, pinch-off and lead to the formation of droplets that migrate away from the tip of the wedge. The whole oil phase is eventually extracted. A linear stability analysis of the interface is presented and captures the size of the oil droplets. The dynamics of the system is however not perfectly explained by a simple Poiseuille flow. Indeed, more refined models should account for the dissipation in meniscii and lubrication films. Finally, we suggest that our model experiment may constitute a useful tool to select optimal systems for oil recovery processes.

  16. Integrated waste management as a climate change stabilization wedge.

    PubMed

    Bahor, Brian; Van Brunt, Michael; Stovall, Jeff; Blue, Katherine

    2009-11-01

    Anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gas emissions are known to contribute to global increases in greenhouse gas concentrations and are widely believed to contribute to climate change. A reference carbon dioxide concentration of 383 ppm for 2007 is projected to increase to a nominal 500 ppm in less than 50 years according to business as usual models. This concentration change is equivalent to an increase of 7 billion tonnes of carbon per year (7 Gt C year(-1)). The concept of a stabilization wedge was introduced by Pacala and Socolow (Science, 305, 968-972, 2004) to break the 7 Gt C year(- 1) into more manageable 1 Gt C year(- 1) reductions that would be achievable with current technology. A total of fifteen possible 'wedges' were identified; however, an integrated municipal solid waste (MSW) management system based on the European Union's waste management hierarchy was not evaluated as a wedge. This analysis demonstrates that if the tonnage of MSW is allocated to recycling, waste to energy and landfilling in descending order in lieu of existing 'business-as-usual' practices with each option using modern technology and best practices, the system would reduce greenhouse gas emissions by more than 1 Gt C year( -1). This integrated waste management system reduces CO(2) by displacing fossil electrical generation and avoiding manufacturing energy consumption and methane emissions from landfills.

  17. Macromolecule loading into spherical, elliptical, star-like and cubic calcium carbonate carriers.

    PubMed

    Parakhonskiy, Bogdan V; Yashchenok, Alexey M; Donatan, Senem; Volodkin, Dmitry V; Tessarolo, Francesco; Antolini, Renzo; Möhwald, Helmuth; Skirtach, Andre G

    2014-09-15

    We fabricated calcium carbonate particles with spherical, elliptical, star-like and cubical morphologies by varying relative salt concentrations and adding ethylene glycol as a solvent to slow down the rate of particle formation. The loading capacity of particles of different isotropic (spherical and cubical) and anisotropic (elliptical and star-like) geometries is investigated, and the surface area of such carriers is analysed. Potential applications of such drug delivery carriers are highlighted.

  18. Milking the spherical cow - on aspherical dynamics in spherical coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pontzen, Andrew; Read, Justin I.; Teyssier, Romain; Governato, Fabio; Gualandris, Alessia; Roth, Nina; Devriendt, Julien

    2015-08-01

    Galaxies and the dark matter haloes that host them are not spherically symmetric, yet spherical symmetry is a helpful simplifying approximation for idealized calculations and analysis of observational data. The assumption leads to an exact conservation of angular momentum for every particle, making the dynamics unrealistic. But how much does that inaccuracy matter in practice for analyses of stellar distribution functions, collisionless relaxation, or dark matter core-creation? We provide a general answer to this question for a wide class of aspherical systems; specifically, we consider distribution functions that are `maximally stable', i.e. that do not evolve at first order when external potentials (which arise from baryons, large-scale tidal fields or infalling substructure) are applied. We show that a spherically symmetric analysis of such systems gives rise to the false conclusion that the density of particles in phase space is ergodic (a function of energy alone). Using this idea we are able to demonstrate that: (a) observational analyses that falsely assume spherical symmetry are made more accurate by imposing a strong prior preference for near-isotropic velocity dispersions in the centre of spheroids; (b) numerical simulations that use an idealized spherically symmetric setup can yield misleading results and should be avoided where possible; and (c) triaxial dark matter haloes (formed in collisionless cosmological simulations) nearly attain our maximally stable limit, but their evolution freezes out before reaching it.

  19. Absorption and Ablation for Non-Planar Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Benjamin; Sinko, John

    2011-04-01

    The Bouguer-Lambert-Beer absorption law is a critical component of analytical laser ablation models. This law has been found to be useful for planar applications but it can also have significance in non-planar geometries. To be accurate, these applications must take into consideration the precise physical setup. Certain geometries offer special properties that may be beneficial to laser propulsion methods, specifically those of uniform ablation using focusing nozzles. This paper investigates the special circumstances using modified forms of the absorption law that apply to the considered parabolic, conical and spherical non-planar geometries.

  20. Evaluation of the HULL and SHARC hydrocodes in simulating the reflection of Mach 2.12 non-decaying shock on wedges of various angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lottero, Richard E.; Wortman, John D.

    1990-09-01

    Hydrodynamic computer code simulations of the interaction of a non-decaying Mach 2.12 shock wave with wedges of various angles are presented. Techniques for simulating this interaction with the HULL and SHARC hydrocodes are evaluated by running the codes in various geometric configurations commonly used to simulate Mach reflection. Fluid dynamics aspects of each geometry are evaluated and discussed. The codes are also run with systematic variations in differencing method and artificial viscosity options. Most of these variations done in the SHARC also includes the option of using half hydrodynamic and half rigid flow field cells to simulate a smooth wedge surface in a rectangular finite difference grid. These computations are based on experimental and computational work performed at the Ernst Mach Institute, Freiburg, Federal Republic of Germany.

  1. Subduction zone evolution and low viscosity wedges and channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, Vlad; Gurnis, Michael

    2007-12-01

    Dehydration of subducting lithosphere likely transports fluid into the mantle wedge where the viscosity is decreased. Such a decrease in viscosity could form a low viscosity wedge (LVW) or a low viscosity channel (LVC) on top of the subducting slab. Using numerical models, we investigate the influence of low viscosity wedges and channels on subduction zone structure. Slab dip changes substantially with the viscosity reduction within the LVWs and LVCs. For models with or without trench rollback, overthickening of slabs is greatly reduced by LVWs or LVCs. Two divergent evolutionary pathways have been found depending on the maximum depth extent of the LVW and wedge viscosity. Assuming a viscosity contrast of 0.1 with background asthenosphere, models with a LVW that extends down to 400 km depth show a steeply dipping slab, while models with an LVW that extends to much shallower depth, such as 200 km, can produce slabs that are flat lying beneath the overriding plate. There is a narrow range of mantle viscosities that produces flat slabs (5 to10 × 10 19 Pa s) and the slab flattening process is enhanced by trench rollback. Slab can be decoupled from the overriding plate with a LVC if the thickness is at least a few 10 s of km, the viscosity reduction is at least a factor of two and the depth extent of the LVC is several hundred km. These models have important implications for the geochemical and spatial evolution of volcanic arcs and the state of stress within the overriding plate. The models explain the poor correlation between traditional geodynamic controls, subducting plate age and convergence rates, on slab dip. We predict that when volcanic arcs change their distance from the trench, they could be preceded by changes in arc chemistry. We predict that there could be a larger volatile input into the wedge when arcs migrate toward the trench and visa-versa. The transition of a subduction zone into the flat-lying regime could be preceded by changes in the volatile

  2. Diffraction-geometry refinement in the DIALS framework.

    PubMed

    Waterman, David G; Winter, Graeme; Gildea, Richard J; Parkhurst, James M; Brewster, Aaron S; Sauter, Nicholas K; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2016-04-01

    Rapid data collection and modern computing resources provide the opportunity to revisit the task of optimizing the model of diffraction geometry prior to integration. A comprehensive description is given of new software that builds upon established methods by performing a single global refinement procedure, utilizing a smoothly varying model of the crystal lattice where appropriate. This global refinement technique extends to multiple data sets, providing useful constraints to handle the problem of correlated parameters, particularly for small wedges of data. Examples of advanced uses of the software are given and the design is explained in detail, with particular emphasis on the flexibility and extensibility it entails. PMID:27050135

  3. Diffraction-geometry refinement in the DIALS framework

    PubMed Central

    Waterman, David G.; Winter, Graeme; Gildea, Richard J.; Parkhurst, James M.; Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Evans, Gwyndaf

    2016-01-01

    Rapid data collection and modern computing resources provide the opportunity to revisit the task of optimizing the model of diffraction geometry prior to integration. A comprehensive description is given of new software that builds upon established methods by performing a single global refinement procedure, utilizing a smoothly varying model of the crystal lattice where appropriate. This global refinement technique extends to multiple data sets, providing useful constraints to handle the problem of correlated parameters, particularly for small wedges of data. Examples of advanced uses of the software are given and the design is explained in detail, with particular emphasis on the flexibility and extensibility it entails. PMID:27050135

  4. Liquid bridges in complex geometries: Equilibrium shape metamorphosis using electrowetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baratian, Davood; Cavalli, Andrea; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2015-11-01

    The equilibrium morphology of liquid drops exposed to geometric constraints can be rather complex. Even for simple geometries, analytical solutions are scarce. We investigate the equilibrium shape and position of liquid drops confined in the wedge between two solid surfaces. Using electrowetting, we control the contact angle and thereby manipulate the shape and the equilibrium position of aqueous drops in ambient oil. In the absence of contact angle hysteresis and buoyancy, we find that the equilibrium shape is given by a truncated sphere, prior to filling the wedge corner, at a position that is determined by the drop volume and the contact angle. At this position, the net force between drop and the surfaces vanishes. The effect of buoyancy gives rise to substantial deviations from this equilibrium configuration which we discuss it as well. We elegantly show how the geometric constraint and electrowetting can be used to position droplets inside a wedge in a controlled way, without mechanical actuation. The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO).

  5. Cylindrical and spherical electron acoustic solitary waves with nonextensive hot electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Pakzad, Hamid Reza

    2011-08-15

    Nonlinear propagation of cylindrical and spherical electron-acoustic solitons in an unmagnetized plasma consisting cold electron fluid, hot electrons obeying a nonextensive distribution and stationary ions, are investigated. For this purpose, the standard reductive perturbation method is employed to derive the cylindrical/spherical Korteweg-de-Vries equation, which governs the dynamics of electron-acoustic solitons. The effects of nonplanar geometry and nonextensive hot electrons on the behavior of cylindrical and spherical electron acoustic solitons are also studied by numerical simulations.

  6. Dipole emission in stratified media with multiple spherical scatterers: Enhanced outcoupling from OLEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egel, Amos; Lemmer, Uli

    2014-11-01

    Scattering particles find application in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) for an enhanced outcoupling of the generated light. This paper presents a computational scheme to exactly model the electromagnetic fields and the power outcoupling efficiency of a typical OLED geometry, comprising a thin film system with spherical scattering particles inside. The model is based on the expansion of the fields in plane and spherical vector wave functions, as well as the scattering matrix formalism for the layer system reflections. In a numerical application example, the effect of 1000 spherical high index scattering particles on the internal outcoupling from a realistic OLED structure is discussed.

  7. Study of stress distribution of forming slandering of automobile semi-axes with multi-wedge cross wedge rolling by FEM simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Shu, Xuedao; Hu, Zhenghuan

    2005-12-01

    Cross wedge rolling with multi-wedge (MCWR) is a new advanced technology of forming the slandering of automobile semi-axes. However, restriction relationship between main wedges and side wedges is complex, there is not almost theory forming automobile axes at inland or overseas. According to the characteristics of forming slandering of automobile semi-axes by MCWR, three-dimensional parameterized model of the MCWR and corresponding program of finite element simulation is worked out. Adopting FEM analysis technology, rules of stress distribution in work piece at main stages, such as knifing zone, stretching zone in main wedges was investigated. The results indicate that forming automobile semi-axes by MCWR is feasible. It provides reliable theory foundation for designing mould of rolling automobile axes by MCWR and choosing technology parameters.

  8. Study of the impact of truncations on wedge waves by using the laser ultrasound technique.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jing; Shen, Zhonghua; Sun, KaiHua

    2015-08-20

    This research focuses on measuring the impact of truncations on the dispersion characteristics of wedge waves propagating along the wedge tip by using the laser-generated ultrasound. First, the finite element method was used to simulate laser-induced wedge waves and the dispersion curves were obtained by using the 2D Fourier transformation method. Pulsed laser excitation and laser-based wedge wave detection were also utilized to investigate these characteristics experimentally. For the 20° and 60° line wedges, both experimental and numerical results indicated that a nonideal wedge tip had great impact on the wedge waves. The modes of the 20° line wedge with truncations presented anomalous dispersion, low mode closed to high mode in high frequency, and the characteristics of antisymmetric Lamb waves as truncation increased. Meanwhile, the modes of the 60° line wedge with truncations showed the characteristics of antisymmetric Lamb waves, and the A1 mode was also observed clearly. The findings of this study can be used to evaluate and detect wedge structure.

  9. Spherical harmonics in texture analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeben, Helmut; van den Boogaart, K. Gerald

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this contribution is to emphasize the fundamental role of spherical harmonics in constructive approximation on the sphere in general and in texture analysis in particular. The specific purpose is to present some methods of texture analysis and pole-to-orientation probability density inversion in a unifying approach, i.e. to show that the classic harmonic method, the pole density component fit method initially introduced as a distinct alternative, and the spherical wavelet method for high-resolution texture analysis share a common mathematical basis provided by spherical harmonics. Since pole probability density functions and orientation probability density functions are probability density functions defined on the sphere Ω3⊂ R3 or hypersphere Ω4⊂ R4, respectively, they belong at least to the space of measurable and integrable functions L1( Ωd), d=3, 4, respectively. Therefore, first a basic and simplified method to derive real symmetrized spherical harmonics with the mathematical property of providing a representation of rotations or orientations, respectively, is presented. Then, standard orientation or pole probability density functions, respectively, are introduced by summation processes of harmonic series expansions of L1( Ωd) functions, thus avoiding resorting to intuition and heuristics. Eventually, it is shown how a rearrangement of the harmonics leads quite canonically to spherical wavelets, which provide a method for high-resolution texture analysis. This unified point of view clarifies how these methods, e.g. standard functions, apply to texture analysis of EBSD orientation measurements.

  10. Geometry-induced protein pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Thalmeier, Dominik; Halatek, Jacob; Frey, Erwin

    2016-01-19

    Protein patterns are known to adapt to cell shape and serve as spatial templates that choreograph downstream processes like cell polarity or cell division. However, how can pattern-forming proteins sense and respond to the geometry of a cell, and what mechanistic principles underlie pattern formation? Current models invoke mechanisms based on dynamic instabilities arising from nonlinear interactions between proteins but neglect the influence of the spatial geometry itself. Here, we show that patterns can emerge as a direct result of adaptation to cell geometry, in the absence of dynamical instability. We present a generic reaction module that allows protein densities robustly to adapt to the symmetry of the spatial geometry. The key component is an NTPase protein that cycles between nucleotide-dependent membrane-bound and cytosolic states. For elongated cells, we find that the protein dynamics generically leads to a bipolar pattern, which vanishes as the geometry becomes spherically symmetrical. We show that such a reaction module facilitates universal adaptation to cell geometry by sensing the local ratio of membrane area to cytosolic volume. This sensing mechanism is controlled by the membrane affinities of the different states. We apply the theory to explain AtMinD bipolar patterns in [Formula: see text] EcMinDE Escherichia coli. Due to its generic nature, the mechanism could also serve as a hitherto-unrecognized spatial template in many other bacterial systems. Moreover, the robustness of the mechanism enables self-organized optimization of protein patterns by evolutionary processes. Finally, the proposed module can be used to establish geometry-sensitive protein gradients in synthetic biological systems.

  11. Bivergent thrust wedges surrounding island arcs: Insights from observations and sandbox models of the northeastern Caribbean plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Brink, U. S.; Marshak, S.; Granja Bruna, J.

    2008-12-01

    Thrust belts develop on both sides of island arcs at several localities around the world, such as southern Indonesia, Vanuatu, Panama, and the northeastern Caribbean. In all cases, the overall vergence of the backarc thrust belt is opposite to that of the forearc thrust belt. For example, in the northeastern Caribbean, an inactive arc (Hispaniola and Puerto Rico) is bordered by a north-verging accretionary prism and the Puerto Rico trench on the north, and by the south-verging Muertos thrust belt and the Muertos trough on the south. There are three models to explain such bivergent thrusting: (1) Bivergent thrusting develops where a reversal of the polarity of subduction is underway and the backarc thrust system overlies an incipient subduction zone; (2) Compression of the backarc region due to trenchward traction, applied at the base of the overriding plate by the subduction process; and (3) The arc and both thrust systems constitute a bivergent thrust wedge, whose development is driven entirely by crustal-level forces applied at a single subduction zone. The third model implies that island arc bivergent thrusting is analogous to that which develops during continent-continent collisions. Observations of deformational features from the Muertos thrust belt together with inferences from regional geometry of island arcs and simple sandbox kinematic models, lead to the conclusion that such island arcs are best explained as crustal bivergent thrust wedges. Modeling suggests, in particular, that an imbricate thrust wedge in the backarc region develops only if the arc behaves as a relatively rigid block that can transmit compressive stresses to the backarc region. In such circumstances, the strike-slip component of oblique convergence is accommodated entirely in the forearc and arc, and the backarc is a frontal (dip-slip) thrust system. The rigid block behavior of the arc may be explained by its mafic composition.

  12. Thrust fault segmentation and downward fault propagation in accretionary wedges: New Insights from 3D seismic reflection data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orme, Haydn; Bell, Rebecca; Jackson, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    The shallow parts of subduction megathrust faults are typically thought to be aseismic and incapable of propagating seismic rupture. The 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake, however, ruptured all the way to the trench, proving that in some locations rupture can propagate through the accretionary wedge. An improved understanding of the structural character and physical properties of accretionary wedges is therefore crucial to begin to assess why such anomalously shallow seismic rupture occurs. Despite its importance, we know surprisingly little regarding the 3D geometry and kinematics of thrust network development in accretionary prisms, largely due to a lack of 3D seismic reflection data providing high-resolution, 3D images of entire networks. Thus our current understanding is largely underpinned by observations from analogue and numerical modelling, with limited observational data from natural examples. In this contribution we use PSDM, 3D seismic reflection data from the Nankai margin (3D Muroto dataset, available from the UTIG Academic Seismic Portal, Marine Geoscience Data System) to examine how imbricate thrust fault networks evolve during accretionary wedge growth. We unravel the evolution of faults within the protothrust and imbricate thrust zones by interpreting multiple horizons across faults and measuring fault displacement and fold amplitude along-strike; by doing this, we are able to investigate the three dimensional accrual of strain. We document a number of local displacement minima along-strike of faults, suggesting that, the protothrust and imbricate thrusts developed from the linkage of smaller, previously isolated fault segments. Although we often assume imbricate faults are likely to have propagated upwards from the décollement we show strong evidence for fault nucleation at shallow depths and downward propagation to intersect the décollement. The complex fault interactions documented here have implications for hydraulic compartmentalisation and pore

  13. The impact of slab dip variations, gaps and rollback on mantle wedge flow: insights from fluids experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDougall, Julia G.; Kincaid, Chris; Szwaja, Sara; Fischer, Karen M.

    2014-05-01

    Observed seismic anisotropy and geochemical anomalies indicate the presence of 3-D flow around and above subducting slabs. To investigate how slab geometry and velocity affect mantle flow, we conducted a set of experiments using a subduction apparatus in a fluid-filled tank. Our models comprise two independently adjustable, continuous belts to represent discrete sections of subducting slabs that kinematically drive flow in the surrounding glucose syrup that represents the upper mantle. We analyse how slab dip (ranging from 30° to 80°), slab dip difference between slab segments (ranging from 20° to 50°), rates of subduction (4-8 cm yr-1) and slab/trench rollback (0-3 cm yr-1) affect mantle flow. Whiskers were used to approximate mineral alignment induced by the flow, as well as to predict directions of seismic anisotropy. We find that dip variations between slab segments generate 3-D flow in the mantle wedge, where the path lines of trenchward moving mantle material above the slab are deflected towards the slab segment with the shallower dip. The degree of path line deflection increases as the difference in slab dip between the segments increases, and, for a fixed dip difference, as slab dip decreases. In cases of slab rollback and large slab dip differences, we observe intrusion of subslab material through the gap and into the wedge. Flow through the gap remains largely horizontal before eventual downward entrainment. Whisker alignment in the wedge flow is largely trench-normal, except near the lateral edges of the slab where toroidal flow dominates. In addition, whisker azimuths located above the slab gap deviate most strongly from trench-normal orientations when slab rollback does not occur. Such flow field complexities are likely sufficient to affect deep melt production and shallow melt delivery. However, none of the experiments produced flow fields that explain the trench-parallel shear wave splitting fast directions observed over broad arc and backarc

  14. Compressible inviscid instability of rapidly expanding spherical material interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mankbadi, Mina R.; Balachandar, S.

    2012-03-01

    A high-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme is employed to investigate the stability of a rapidly expanding material interface produced by a spherical shock tube. The flow structure is characterized by a forward moving primary shock, a backward moving secondary shock, and a spherical contact interface in-between. We consider herein the linear inviscid regime and focus on the development of the three-dimensional perturbations around the contact interface by solving a one-dimensional system of partial differential equations. Numerical simulations are performed to illustrate the effects of the contact interface's density discontinuity on the growth of the disturbances for various spherical wave numbers. In a spherical shock tube the instability is influenced by various mechanisms which include classical Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) effects, Bell-Plesset or geometry/curvature effects, the effects of impulsively accelerating the interface, and compressibility effects. Henceforth, the present instability will be referred to as non-classical RT instability to distinguish it from classical RT instability. For an extended intermediate time period, it can be shown that the small disturbances grow exponentially as in the classical RT instability. During this stage, the exponential growth rate increases with the spherical wave number, until it saturates for very large wave numbers due to the finite thickness limitation of the numerical representation of the contact interface. The results compare favorably with previous theoretical models; but indicate that in addition to compressibility, the space-time evolution of the contact interface's thickness plays a significant role. A parametric study is performed that varies the pressure and density ratios of the initial spherical container. The characteristics of the contact interface and the applicability of various instability theories is investigated for these regimes. Furthermore, varying the pressure and density ratios aids

  15. Basketballs as spherical acoustic cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    The sound field resulting from striking a basketball is found to be rich in frequency content, with over 50 partials in the frequency range of 0-12 kHz. The frequencies are found to closely match theoretical expectations for standing wave patterns inside a spherical cavity. Because of the degenerate nature of the mode shapes, explicit identification of the modes is not possible without internal investigation with a microphone probe. A basketball proves to be an interesting application of a boundary value problem involving spherical coordinates.

  16. Collective neutrino oscillations in nonspherical geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Dasgupta, Basudeb; Dighe, Amol; Mirizzi, Alessandro; Raffelt, Georg

    2008-08-01

    The rich phenomenology of collective neutrino oscillations has been studied only in one-dimensional or spherically symmetric systems. Motivated by the nonspherical example of coalescing neutron stars, presumably the central engines of short gamma-ray bursts, we use the Liouville equation to formulate the problem for general source geometries. Assuming the neutrino ensemble displays self-maintained coherence, the problem once more becomes effectively one-dimensional along the streamlines of the overall neutrino flux. This approach for the first time provides a formal definition of the 'single-angle approximation' frequently used for supernova neutrinos and allows for a natural generalization to nonspherical geometries. We study the explicit example of a disk-shaped source as a proxy for coalescing neutron stars.

  17. Geometry + Technology = Proof

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyublinskaya, Irina; Funsch, Dan

    2012-01-01

    Several interactive geometry software packages are available today to secondary school teachers. An example is The Geometer's Sketchpad[R] (GSP), also known as Dynamic Geometry[R] software, developed by Key Curriculum Press. This numeric based technology has been widely adopted in the last twenty years, and a vast amount of creativity has been…

  18. Euclidean Geometry via Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filimonov, Rossen; Kreith, Kurt

    1992-01-01

    Describes the Plane Geometry System computer software developed at the Educational Computer Systems laboratory in Sofia, Bulgaria. The system enables students to use the concept of "algorithm" to correspond to the process of "deductive proof" in the development of plane geometry. Provides an example of the software's capability and compares it to…

  19. Gap test modeling to predict wedge tests initiation of PBXN-103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Clinton T.

    1998-07-01

    The experimental initiation of PBXN-103 by the standard wedge test has been modeled by using the HVRB initiation and growth model in the CTH code. The P-081 plane wave lens was used as initiator in these experiments. The wedge test was converted to a gap test by replacing the PBXN-103 wedge by a PBXN-103 cylinder. By modeling this gap test, shock initiation in PBXN-103 was calculated. The results of these calculations are in agreement with the data of the wedge test experiments. Comparison of the CTH code calculations with the wedge test data was accomplished by using an auxiliary program called the BCAT code. In particular, it computes the "pop plot" and compares it to the wedge test data. Shock initiation of PBX-9404 was also calculated by the HVRB model and the results compared to the initiation of PBX-9404 using the Lee-Tarver model. The two calculations from both of the models are very compatible.

  20. Medial Closing-Wedge Distal Femoral Osteotomy: Fixation With Proximal Tibial Locking Plate

    PubMed Central

    Tírico, Luís Eduardo Passarelli; Demange, Marco Kawamura; Bonadio, Marcelo Batista; Helito, Camilo Partezani; Gobbi, Riccardo Gomes; Pécora, José Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Distal femoral varus osteotomy is a well-established procedure for the treatment of lateral compartment cartilage lesions and degenerative disease, correcting limb alignment and decreasing the progression of the pathology. Surgical techniques can be performed with a lateral opening-wedge or medial closing-wedge correction of the deformity. Fixation methods for lateral opening-wedge osteotomies are widely available, and there are various types of implants that can be used for fixation. However, there are currently only a few options of implants for fixation of a medial closing-wedge osteotomy on the market. This report describes a medial, supracondylar, V-shaped, closing-wedge distal femoral osteotomy using a locked anterolateral proximal tibial locking plate that fits anatomically to the medial side of the distal femur. This is a great option as a stable implant for a medial closing-wedge distal femoral osteotomy. PMID:26870647

  1. Dosimetric Characteristics of 6 MV Modified Beams by Physical Wedges of a Siemens Linear Accelerator.

    PubMed

    Zabihzadeh, Mansour; Birgani, Mohammad Javad Tahmasebi; Hoseini-Ghahfarokhi, Mojtaba; Arvandi, Sholeh; Hoseini, Seyed Mohammad; Fadaei, Mahbube

    2016-01-01

    Physical wedges still can be used as missing tissue compensators or filters to alter the shape of isodose curves in a target volume to reach an optimal radiotherapy plan without creating a hotspot. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties of physical wedges filters such as off-axis photon fluence, photon spectrum, output factor and half value layer. The photon beam quality of a 6 MV Primus Siemens modified by 150 and 450 physical wedges was studied with BEAMnrc Monte Carlo (MC) code. The calculated present depth dose and dose profile curves for open and wedged photon beam were in good agreement with the measurements. Increase of wedge angle increased the beam hardening and this effect was more pronounced at the heal region. Using such an accurate MC model to determine of wedge factors and implementation of it as a calculation algorithm in the future treatment planning systems is recommended. PMID:27221838

  2. Modes of continental extension in a crustal wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guangliang; Lavier, Luc L.; Choi, Eunseo

    2015-07-01

    We ran numerical experiments of the extension of a crustal wedge as an approximation to extension in an orogenic belt or a continental margin. We study the effects of the strength of the lower crust and of a weak mid-crustal shear zone on the resulting extension styles. A weak mid-crustal shear zone effectively decouples upper crustal extension from lower crustal flow. Without the mid-crustal shear zone, the degree of coupling between the upper and the lower crust increases and extension of the whole crust tends to focus on the thickest part of the wedge. We identify three distinct modes of extension determined by the strength of the lower crust, which are characterized by 1) localized, asymmetric crustal exhumation in a single massif when the lower crust is weak, 2) the formation of rolling-hinge normal faults and the exhumation of lower crust in multiple core complexes with an intermediate strength lower crust, and 3) distributed domino faulting over the weak mid-crustal shear zone when the lower crust is strong. A frictionally stronger mid-crustal shear zone does not change the overall model behaviors but extension occurred over multiple rolling-hinges. The 3 modes of extension share characteristics similar to geological models proposed to explain the formation of metamorphic core complexes: 1) the crustal flow model for the weak lower crust, 2) the rolling-hinge and crustal flow models when the lower crust is intermediate and 3) the flexural uplift model when the lower crust is strong. Finally we show that the intensity of decoupling between the far field extension and lower crustal flow driven by the regional pressure gradient in the wedge control the overall style of extension in the models.

  3. Geometry of membrane fission.

    PubMed

    Frolov, Vadim A; Escalada, Artur; Akimov, Sergey A; Shnyrova, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    Cellular membranes define the functional geometry of intracellular space. Formation of new membrane compartments and maintenance of complex organelles require division and disconnection of cellular membranes, a process termed membrane fission. Peripheral membrane proteins generally control membrane remodeling during fission. Local membrane stresses, reflecting molecular geometry of membrane-interacting parts of these proteins, sum up to produce the key membrane geometries of fission: the saddle-shaped neck and hour-glass hemifission intermediate. Here, we review the fundamental principles behind the translation of molecular geometry into membrane shape and topology during fission. We emphasize the central role the membrane insertion of specialized protein domains plays in orchestrating fission in vitro and in cells. We further compare individual to synergistic action of the membrane insertion during fission mediated by individual protein species, proteins complexes or membrane domains. Finally, we describe how local geometry of fission intermediates defines the functional design of the protein complexes catalyzing fission of cellular membranes. PMID:25062896

  4. Spherical microwave confinement and ball lightning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, William Richard

    This dissertation presents the results of research done on unconventional energy technologies from 1995 to 2009. The present civilization depends on an infrastructure that was constructed and is maintained almost entirely using concentrated fuels and ores, both of which will run out. Diffuse renewable energy sources rely on this same infrastructure, and hence face the same limitations. I first examined sonoluminescence directed toward fusion, but demonstrated theoretically that this is impossible. I next studied Low Energy Nuclear Reactions and developed methods for improving results, although these have not been implemented. In 2000, I began Spherical Microwave Confinement (SMC), which confines and heats plasma with microwaves in a spherical chamber. The reactor was designed and built to provide the data needed to investigate the possibility of achieving fusion conditions with microwave confinement. A second objective was to attempt to create ball lightning (BL). The reactor featured 20 magnetrons, which were driven by a capacitor bank and operated in a 0.2 s pulse mode at 2.45 GHz. These provided 20 kW to an icosahedral array of 20 antennas. Video of plasmas led to a redesign of the antennas to provide better coupling of the microwaves to the plasma. A second improvement was a grid at the base of the antennas, which provided corona electrons and an electric field to aid quick formation of plasmas. Although fusion conditions were never achieved and ball lightning not observed, experience gained from operating this basic, affordable system has been incorporated in a more sophisticated reactor design intended for future research. This would use magnets that were originally planned. The cusp geometry of the magnetic fields is suitable for electron cyclotron resonance in the same type of closed surface that in existing reactors has generated high-temperature plasmas. Should ball lightning be created, it could be a practical power source with nearly ideal

  5. Inverted-wedge silica resonators for controlled and stable coupling.

    PubMed

    Bo, Fang; Huang, Steven He; Özdemir, Sahin Kaya; Zhang, Guoquan; Xu, Jingjun; Yang, Lan

    2014-04-01

    Silica microresonators with an inverted-wedge shape were fabricated using conventional semiconductor fabrication methods. The measured quality factors of the resonators were greater than 10(6) in 1550 nm band. Controllable coupling from undercoupling to the overcoupling regime through the critical coupling point was demonstrated by horizontally moving a fiber taper while in touch with the top surface of the resonator. The thin outer ring of the resonator provided a support for the fiber taper leading to robust stable coupling. PMID:24686619

  6. The Newton two-knife experiment: Intricacies of wedge diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverman, M. P.; Strange, Wayne

    1996-06-01

    About a century before Young's celebrated two-slit experiment, Isaac Newton quantitatively investigated the diffraction of light from a wedge aperture, but failed to understand the implications of his findings. We have reexamined this unusual system theoretically within the framework of the Fresnel-Kirchhoff scalar diffraction theory, and experimentally using a laser light source with pinhole spatial filter and CCD camera. Both the far-field shadow region and near-field directly illuminated region reveal aesthetically striking images that are deducible from the mathematical analysis, but whose interpretation is subtle and best elucidated by an alternative and less widely known perspective of diffraction.

  7. Hexahedron, wedge, tetrahedron, and pyramid diffusion operator discretization

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, R.M.

    1996-08-06

    The diffusion equation, {phi}({rvec x}), is solved by finding the extrema of the functional, {Gamma}[{phi}] = {integral}({1/2}D{rvec {nabla}}{phi}{center_dot}{rvec {nabla}}{phi} + {1/2}{sigma}{sub a}{phi}{sup 2} - {ital Q}{phi}){ital d}{sup 3}{ital x}. A matrix is derived that is investigated for hexahedron, wedge, tetrahedron, and pyramid cells. The first term of the diffusion integration was concentrated and the others dropped; these dropped terms are also considered. Results are presented for hexahedral meshes and three weighting methods.

  8. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: From cluster integrals to thermodynamic properties referred to different regions.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2015-06-28

    Recently, new insights into the relation between the geometry of the vessel that confines a fluid and its thermodynamic properties were traced through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids. In this work, I analyze the thermodynamic properties of fluids confined in wedges or by edges, emphasizing on the question of the region to which these properties refer. In this context, the relations between the line-thermodynamic properties referred to different regions are derived as analytic functions of the dihedral angle α, for 0 < α < 2π, which enables a unified approach to both edges and wedges. As a simple application of these results, I analyze the properties of the confined gas in the low-density regime. Finally, using recent analytic results for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere fluid, the low density behavior of the line thermodynamic properties is analytically studied up to order two in the density for 0 < α < 2π and by adopting different reference regions.

  9. On sound scattering by rigid edges and wedges in a flow, with applications to high-lift device aeroacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roger, Michel; Moreau, Stéphane; Kucukcoskun, Korcan

    2016-02-01

    Exact analytical solutions for the scattering of sound by the edge of a rigid half-plane and by a rigid corner in the presence of a uniform flow are considered in this work, for arbitrary source and observer locations. Exact Green's functions for the Helmholtz equation are first reviewed and implemented in a quiescent propagation space from reference expressions of the literature. The effect of uniform fluid motion is introduced in a second step and the properties of the field are discussed for point dipoles and quadrupoles. The asymptotic regime of a source close to the scattering edge/wedge and of an observer far from it in terms of acoustic wavelengths is derived in both cases. Its validity limits are assessed by comparing with the exact solutions. Typically the asymptotic directivity is imposed by Green's function but not by the source itself. This behaviour is associated with a strong enhancement of the radiation with respect to what the source would produce in free field. The amplification depends on the geometry, on the source type and on the source distance to the edge/wedge. Various applications in aeroacoustics of wall-bounded flows are addressed, more specifically dealing with high-lift device noise mechanisms, such as trailing-edge or flap side-edge noise. The asymptotic developments are used to highlight trends that are believed to play a role in airframe noise.

  10. Fluids confined in wedges and by edges: From cluster integrals to thermodynamic properties referred to different regions

    SciTech Connect

    Urrutia, Ignacio

    2015-06-28

    Recently, new insights into the relation between the geometry of the vessel that confines a fluid and its thermodynamic properties were traced through the study of cluster integrals for inhomogeneous fluids. In this work, I analyze the thermodynamic properties of fluids confined in wedges or by edges, emphasizing on the question of the region to which these properties refer. In this context, the relations between the line-thermodynamic properties referred to different regions are derived as analytic functions of the dihedral angle α, for 0 < α < 2π, which enables a unified approach to both edges and wedges. As a simple application of these results, I analyze the properties of the confined gas in the low-density regime. Finally, using recent analytic results for the second cluster integral of the confined hard sphere fluid, the low density behavior of the line thermodynamic properties is analytically studied up to order two in the density for 0 < α < 2π and by adopting different reference regions.

  11. Demonstration of Color Separation with 2ω KDP Wedge in High Power Laser Facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Li, Fu-Quan; Han, Wei; Feng, Bin; Zhou, Li-Dan; Jia, Huai-Ting; Cao, Hua-Bao

    2014-01-01

    A 2ω wedge design is proposed with KDP crystal to disperse the unconverted light away from the target in a high power laser facility for inertial confinement fusion. The ultraviolet B-integral problem is released, and about 1.2 times in color separation angle is achieved according to both theoretical and experimental investigations when compared with conventional 3ω wedge. The frequency conversion efficiency is unaffected when the wedge is along the non-sensitive axis of the tripler.

  12. The method of planes pressure tensor for a spherical subvolume

    SciTech Connect

    Heyes, D. M. Smith, E. R. Dini, D. Zaki, T. A.

    2014-02-07

    Various formulas for the local pressure tensor based on a spherical subvolume of radius, R, are considered. An extension of the Method of Planes (MOP) formula of Todd et al. [Phys. Rev. E 52, 1627 (1995)] for a spherical geometry is derived using the recently proposed Control Volume formulation [E. R. Smith, D. M. Heyes, D. Dini, and T. A. Zaki, Phys. Rev. E 85, 056705 (2012)]. The MOP formula for the purely radial component of the pressure tensor is shown to be mathematically identical to the Radial Irving-Kirkwood formula. Novel offdiagonal elements which are important for momentum conservation emerge naturally from this treatment. The local pressure tensor formulas for a plane are shown to be the large radius limits of those for spherical surfaces. The radial-dependence of the pressure tensor computed by Molecular Dynamics simulation is reported for virtual spheres in a model bulk liquid where the sphere is positioned randomly or whose center is also that of a molecule in the liquid. The probability distributions of angles relating to pairs of atoms which cross the surface of the sphere, and the center of the sphere, are presented as a function of R. The variance in the shear stress calculated from the spherical Volume Averaging method is shown to converge slowly to the limiting values with increasing radius, and to be a strong function of the number of molecules in the simulation cell.

  13. Photoelectric sheath formation around small spherical objects in space

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Shikha Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.

    2015-04-15

    The formation of a photoelectron sheath around positively charged small (∼cm) spherical objects roaming in near earth space due to the solar radiation (with continuous spectrum) and the solar wind plasma has been investigated. The sheath structure has been derived, taking into account anisotropic photoelectron flux with the Poisson equation, spherical geometry of the object, and half Fermi Dirac distribution of photoelectron velocities. Two cases, viz., when the object is illuminated by (i) isotropic or (ii) unidirectional (parallel beam) radiation, have been analyzed. The analysis predicts a spherically symmetric sheath in case of isotropic illumination, while a symmetry in sheath about a θ=π/4 is seen in case of parallel beam illumination; θ is the angle of incidence which is the angle made by the normal to a surface element with the direction of incidence of solar radiation. The radial and angular profiles of the electric potential and electron density in the photoelectron sheath have been evaluated and illustrated graphically; the dependence of the sheath structure on the solar wind plasma parameters, material properties of the spherical object, and its size have been discussed.

  14. Analytical solution of the simplified spherical harmonics equations in spherical turbid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edjlali, Ehsan; Bérubé-Lauzière, Yves

    2016-10-01

    We present for the first time an analytical solution for the simplified spherical harmonics equations (so-called SPN equations) in the case of a steady-state isotropic point source inside a spherical homogeneous absorbing and scattering medium. The SPN equations provide a reliable approximation to the radiative transfer equation for describing light transport inside turbid media. The SPN equations consist of a set of coupled partial differential equations and the eigen method is used to obtain a set of decoupled equations, each resembling the heat equation in the Laplace domain. The equations are solved for the realistic partial reflection boundary conditions accounting for the difference in refractive indices between the turbid medium and its environment (air) as occurs in practical cases of interest in biomedical optics. Specifically, we provide the complete solution methodology for the SP3, which is readily applicable to higher orders as well, and also give results for the SP5. This computationally easy to obtain solution is investigated for different optical properties of the turbid medium. For validation, the solution is also compared to the analytical solution of the diffusion equation and to gold standard Monte Carlo simulation results. The SP3 and SP5 analytical solutions prove to be in good agreement with the Monte Carlo results. This work provides an additional tool for validating numerical solutions of the SPN equations for curved geometries.

  15. Trapped surfaces in spherical stars

    SciTech Connect

    Bizon, P.; Malec, E.; O'Murchadha, N.

    1988-09-05

    We give necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of trapped surfaces in spherically symmetric spacetimes. These conditions show that the formation of trapped surfaces depends on both the degree of concentration and the average flow of the matter. The result can be considered as a partial validation of the cosmic-censorship hypothesis.

  16. A depth dependence determination of the wedge transmission factor for 4-10 MV photon beams.

    PubMed

    McCullough, E C; Gortney, J; Blackwell, C R

    1988-01-01

    The depth dependence (up to 25 cm) of the in-phantom wedge transmission factor (WTF) has been determined for three medical linear accelerator x-ray beams with energies of 4, 6, and 10 MV containing 15 degrees-60 degrees (nominal) brass wedges. All measurements were made with a cylindrical ionization chamber in water, for a field size of 10 X 10 cm2 with a source-skin distance of 80 or 100 cm. We conclude that, for the accelerators studied, the WTF factor at depth is less than 2% different from that determined at dmax (for the nominal wedge angles and photon energies studied) unless the depth of interest is greater than 10 cm. Up to the maximum depth studied (25 cm) the relative wedge factor--that is, wedge factor at depth compared to that determined at dmax--was about equal to or less than 1.02 for the 15 degrees and 30 degrees wedges and any of the photon beam energies studied. For the seldom utilized combination of a nominal wedge angle in excess of 45 degrees with a depth greater than 10 cm, the WTF at depth can differ from the WTF determined at dmax, by up to 5%. Since the wedge transmission factor is reflective of relative percent dose data, our results also indicate that it is in error to use open field percent depth doses for certain combinations of wedge angle, photon energy, and depth. PMID:3211057

  17. Is the Mexican Fold-and-Thrust Belt a (Heterogeneous) Frictional and Erosive Coulomb Wedge?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, L.; Fitz, E.; Hudleston, P. J.

    2011-12-01

    Crustal heterogeneities and surface processes are controlling factors in the evolution of fold-and-thrust belts (FTB). Variations of these parameters affect the internal and external characteristics of FTB (i.e. structural style, orogenic width, topography, and total shortening). In this contribution, we use numerical simulations, based on the Gale numerical code, to quantify the effect of spatial variations on the internal friction and topographic erodibility (K) in the evolution and structural style of FTB. In these models, surfaces are eroded according to a rule in which mass removal is limited by the rate of fluvial bedrock incision. We also model the evolution of the MFTB (Mexican fold-and-thrust belt) where crustal heterogeneities and the structure of the fold-and-thrust belt are well constrained based on field and laboratory data. Increasing internal friction facilitates basal sliding of relatively coherent blocks, producing an increase in fold amplitude. In contrast, areas with low internal friction deform throughout the wedge and along its base. Erosion enhances the deformation style leading to both localized and distributed deformation depending on the initial style, and may change it when low-friction units are close to the backstop. Additionally, erosion increases the total shortening and decreases the width of the orogen. The evolution of the MFTB requires a rheologically heterogeneous crust but only limited erosion to explain the geometries and total shortening constrained by field observations and interpretations.

  18. Seismic evidence for flow in the hydrated mantle wedge of the Ryukyu subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Walker, Andrew M.; Wookey, James; Wallis, Simon R.; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Kendall, J.-Michael

    2016-07-01

    It is widely accepted that water-rich serpentinite domains are commonly present in the mantle above shallow subducting slabs and play key roles in controlling the geochemical cycling and physical properties of subduction zones. Thermal and petrological models show the dominant serpentine mineral is antigorite. However, there is no good consensus on the amount, distribution and alignment of this mineral. Seismic velocities are commonly used to identify antigorite-rich domains, but antigorite is highly-anisotropic and depending on the seismic ray path, its properties can be very difficult to distinguish from non-hydrated olivine-rich mantle. Here, we utilize this anisotropy and show how an analysis of seismic anisotropy that incorporates measured ray path geometries in the Ryukyu arc can constrain the distribution, orientation and amount of antigorite. We find more than 54% of the wedge must consist of antigorite and the alignment must change from vertically aligned to parallel to the slab. This orientation change suggests convective flow in the hydrated forearc mantle. Shear wave splitting analysis in other subduction zones indicates large-scale serpentinization and forearc mantle convection are likely to be more widespread than generally recognized. The view that the forearc mantle of cold subduction zones is dry needs to be reassessed.

  19. Thermodynamic and fracture mechanical processes in the context of frost wedging in ice shelves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plate, Carolin; Müller, Ralf; Humbert, Angelika; Gross, Dietmar

    2015-04-01

    Ice shelves, the link between ice shields or glaciers and the ocean are sensitive elements of the polar environment. The ongoing break up and disintegration of huge ice shelf parts or entire ice shelf demands for an explication of the underlying processes. The first analyses of crack growth and break up events in ice shelves date back to more than half a century. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that trigger and influence the collapse of whole ice shelf parts are not yet fully understood. Popular presumptions link ice shelf disintegration to surface meltwater and hydro fracturing, explaining break up events in warm polar seasons. Fracture events during colder seasons are possibly triggered by more complex mechanisms. A well-documented break up event at the Wilkins Ice Shelf bridge inspires the possibility of frost wedging as disintegration cause. The present study shows a two-dimensional thermo-dynamical model simulating the growth of an ice lid in a water-filled crevasse for measured surface temperatures. The influence of the crevasse geometry and the ice shelf temperature are shown. The resulting lid thickness is then used for the linear elastic fracture mechanical analysis. The maximum crack depth is estimated by comparing the computed stress intensity factors to critical values KIc obtained from literature. The thermodynamic as well as the fracture mechanical simulation are performed using the commercial finite element code COMSOL. The computation of KI follows in post processing routines in MATLAB exploiting the benefits of the concept of configurational forces.

  20. Nano Conductive Ceramic Wedged Graphene Composites as Highly Efficient Metal Supports for Oxygen Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Peng; Lv, Haifeng; Peng, Tao; He, Daping; Mu, Shichun

    2014-01-01

    A novel conductive ceramic/graphene nanocomposite is prepared to prohibit the re-stacking of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) by wedging zirconium diboride (ZrB2) nanoparticles (NPs) into multiple layer nanosheets using a simple solvothermal method. Surprisingly, the RGO/ZrB2 nanocomposite supported Pt NPs shows very excellent catalytic activity. Its electrochemical surface area (ECSA) is up to 148 m2g−1 (very approaches the geometry surface area of 155 m2g−1), much greater than that of the previous report (usually less than 100 m2g−1). The mass activity is as high as 16.8 A/g−1, which is almost 2 times and 5 times that of Pt/RGO (8.6 A/g−1) and Pt/C (3.2 A/g−1), respectively, as benchmarks. Moreover, after 4000 cycles the catalyst shows only 61% of ECSA loss, meaning a predominantly electrochemical stability. The remarkably improved electrochemical properties with much high Pt utilization of the new catalyst show a promising application in low temperature fuel cells and broader fields. PMID:24495943

  1. Seismic evidence for flow in the hydrated mantle wedge of the Ryukyu subduction zone.

    PubMed

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Walker, Andrew M; Wookey, James; Wallis, Simon R; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Kendall, J-Michael

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that water-rich serpentinite domains are commonly present in the mantle above shallow subducting slabs and play key roles in controlling the geochemical cycling and physical properties of subduction zones. Thermal and petrological models show the dominant serpentine mineral is antigorite. However, there is no good consensus on the amount, distribution and alignment of this mineral. Seismic velocities are commonly used to identify antigorite-rich domains, but antigorite is highly-anisotropic and depending on the seismic ray path, its properties can be very difficult to distinguish from non-hydrated olivine-rich mantle. Here, we utilize this anisotropy and show how an analysis of seismic anisotropy that incorporates measured ray path geometries in the Ryukyu arc can constrain the distribution, orientation and amount of antigorite. We find more than 54% of the wedge must consist of antigorite and the alignment must change from vertically aligned to parallel to the slab. This orientation change suggests convective flow in the hydrated forearc mantle. Shear wave splitting analysis in other subduction zones indicates large-scale serpentinization and forearc mantle convection are likely to be more widespread than generally recognized. The view that the forearc mantle of cold subduction zones is dry needs to be reassessed. PMID:27436676

  2. Seismic evidence for flow in the hydrated mantle wedge of the Ryukyu subduction zone

    PubMed Central

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Walker, Andrew M.; Wookey, James; Wallis, Simon R.; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Kendall, J. -Michael

    2016-01-01

    It is widely accepted that water-rich serpentinite domains are commonly present in the mantle above shallow subducting slabs and play key roles in controlling the geochemical cycling and physical properties of subduction zones. Thermal and petrological models show the dominant serpentine mineral is antigorite. However, there is no good consensus on the amount, distribution and alignment of this mineral. Seismic velocities are commonly used to identify antigorite-rich domains, but antigorite is highly-anisotropic and depending on the seismic ray path, its properties can be very difficult to distinguish from non-hydrated olivine-rich mantle. Here, we utilize this anisotropy and show how an analysis of seismic anisotropy that incorporates measured ray path geometries in the Ryukyu arc can constrain the distribution, orientation and amount of antigorite. We find more than 54% of the wedge must consist of antigorite and the alignment must change from vertically aligned to parallel to the slab. This orientation change suggests convective flow in the hydrated forearc mantle. Shear wave splitting analysis in other subduction zones indicates large-scale serpentinization and forearc mantle convection are likely to be more widespread than generally recognized. The view that the forearc mantle of cold subduction zones is dry needs to be reassessed. PMID:27436676

  3. Seismic evidence for flow in the hydrated mantle wedge of the Ryukyu subduction zone.

    PubMed

    Nagaya, Takayoshi; Walker, Andrew M; Wookey, James; Wallis, Simon R; Ishii, Kazuhiko; Kendall, J-Michael

    2016-07-20

    It is widely accepted that water-rich serpentinite domains are commonly present in the mantle above shallow subducting slabs and play key roles in controlling the geochemical cycling and physical properties of subduction zones. Thermal and petrological models show the dominant serpentine mineral is antigorite. However, there is no good consensus on the amount, distribution and alignment of this mineral. Seismic velocities are commonly used to identify antigorite-rich domains, but antigorite is highly-anisotropic and depending on the seismic ray path, its properties can be very difficult to distinguish from non-hydrated olivine-rich mantle. Here, we utilize this anisotropy and show how an analysis of seismic anisotropy that incorporates measured ray path geometries in the Ryukyu arc can constrain the distribution, orientation and amount of antigorite. We find more than 54% of the wedge must consist of antigorite and the alignment must change from vertically aligned to parallel to the slab. This orientation change suggests convective flow in the hydrated forearc mantle. Shear wave splitting analysis in other subduction zones indicates large-scale serpentinization and forearc mantle convection are likely to be more widespread than generally recognized. The view that the forearc mantle of cold subduction zones is dry needs to be reassessed.

  4. Extending standard mask lithography exposure technique to spherical surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stumpf, Daniela; Zeitner, Uwe D.

    2014-06-01

    Similar to planar lithography, the use of a mask to produce multiple copies of a binary master sample is also possible in the case of spherical surfaces. Evidently, the spherical mask needs to have the opposite radius of curvature of the desired substrate, and additional problems arising from the curved geometry have to be taken into consideration. Inhomogeneities of the illumination impinging on the resist-coated surface negatively influence the exposure result. Ways of overcoming these difficulties to obtain satisfactory results for the implementation of the exposure in a conventional mask aligner are shown. Despite a lowered contrast due to back reflections and a varying distance between mask and substrate, exposure results of sufficient quality are achieved with the help of an adapted aperture and the use of water as an immersion fluid.

  5. Predicting Run Distances for a Modified Wedge Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorgan, Robert J.; Lee, Richard; Sutherland, Gerrit

    2012-03-01

    Simulations were used to aid in the development of a modified wedge test (MWT). This explosive sensitivity experiment allows the shockwave curvature to be defined in order to investigate the effect of combined shock-shear loading on sensitivity. Various widths of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with a linewave generator and a Detasheet booster, and the shock wave was attenuated using a slab of PMMA. In developing simulations for these three material experiments, calibrations of the PBXN-110 ignition and growth model and of the PMMA constitutive model were investigated in order to choose between several models found in the literature. A calibration shot from the MWT was also used to demonstrate the appropriateness of the models selected. Experimental results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distances predicted in CTH for the thicker donor slab compare very favorably with the actual experiments; however, for thinner donor slabs, the actual experimental results seem to suggest a more sensitive behavior than the simulations are able to capture.

  6. Predicting Run Distances for a Modified Wedge Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorgan, Robert; Lee, Richard; Sutherland, Gerrit

    2011-06-01

    Simulations were used to aid in the development of a modified wedge test (MWT). This explosive sensitivity experiment allows the shockwave curvature to be defined in order to investigate the effect of combined shock-shear loading on sensitivity. Various widths of PBXN-110 donor slabs were used to define the shockwave curvature introduced to wedge samples of the same explosive. The donor slabs were initiated with a linewave generator and a Detasheet booster, and the shock wave was attenuated using a slab of PMMA. In developing simulations for these three material experiments, calibrations of the PBXN-110 ignition and growth model and of the PMMA constitutive model were investigated in order to choose between several models found in the literature. A calibration shot from the MWT was also used to demonstrate the appropriateness of the models selected. Experimental results were compared to CTH calculations to indicate if there were effects associated with highly curved shock fronts that could not be adequately predicted. The run distances predicted in CTH for the thicker donor slab compare very favorably with the actual experiments; however, for thinner donor slabs, the actual experimental results seem to suggest a more sensitive behavior than the simulations are able to capture. DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release, distribution unlimited. (96ABW-2011-0053)

  7. An automated optical wedge calibrator for Dobson ozone spectrophotometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. D.; Komhyr, W. D.; Grass, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The Dobson ozone spectrophotometer measures the difference of intensity between selected wavelengths in the ultraviolet. The method uses an optical attenuator (the 'Wedge') in this measurement. The knowledge of the relationship of the wedge position to the attenuation is critical to the correct calculation of ozone from the measurement. The procedure to determine this relationship is time-consuming, and requires a highly skilled person to perform it correctly. The relationship has been found to change with time. For reliable ozone values, the procedure should be done on a Dobson instrument at regular intervals. Due to the skill and time necessary to perform this procedure, many instruments have gone as long as 15 years between procedures. This article describes an apparatus that performs the procedure under computer control, and is adaptable to the majority of existing Dobson instruments. Part of the apparatus is usable for normal operation of the Dobson instrument, and would allow computer collection of the data and real-time ozone measurements.

  8. Dying Flow Bursts as Generators of the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, G.

    2015-12-01

    Many theories or conjectures exist on the driver of the substorm current wedge, e.g. rerouting of the tail current, current disruption, flow braking, vortex formation, and current sheet collapse. Magnitude, spatial scale, and temporal development of the related magnetic perturbations suggest that the generator is related to the interaction of the flow bursts with the dipolar magnetosphere after onset of reconnection in the near-Earth tail. The question remains whether it is the flow energy that feeds the wedge current or the internal energy of the arriving plasma. In this presentation I argue for the latter. The current generation is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the preceding layer of high-beta plasma after flow braking. The generator current is the grad-B current at the outer boundary of the compressed high-beta plasma layers. It needs the sequential arrival of several flow bursts to account for duration and magnitude of the ionospheric closure current.

  9. Dying Flow Bursts as Generators of the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2016-07-01

    Many theories or conjectures exist on the driver of the substorm current wedge, e.g. rerouting of the tail current, current disruption, flow braking, vortex formation, and current sheet collapse. Magnitude, spatial scale, and temporal development of the related magnetic perturbations suggest that the generator is related to the interaction of the flow bursts with the dipolar magnetosphere after onset of reconnection in the near-Earth tail. The question remains whether it is the flow energy that feeds the wedge current or the internal energy of the arriving plasma. In this presentation I argue for the latter. The current generation is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the preceding layer of high-beta plasma after flow braking. The generator current is the grad-B current at the outer boundary of the compressed high-beta plasma layers. It needs the sequential arrival of several flow bursts to account for duration and magnitude of the ionospheric closure current.

  10. Mass stranding of wedge-tailed shearwater chicks in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Rameyer, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    Unusual numbers of wedge-tailed shearwater (Puffinus pacificus) chicks stranded on Oahu (Hawaii, USA) in 1994. Compared to healthy wedge-tailed shearwater (WTSW) chicks, stranded chicks were underweight, dehydrated, leukopenic, lymphopenic, eosinopenic, and heterophilic; some birds were toxemic and septic. Stranded chicks also were hypoglycemic and had elevated aspartate amino transferase levels. Most chicks apparently died from emaciation, dehydration, or bacteremia. Because many birds with bacteremia also had severe necrosis of the gastrointestinal (GI) mucosa associated with bacteria, we suspect the GI tract to be the source of disseminated bacterial infection. The identity of the bacteria was not confirmed. The daily number of chicks stranded was significantly related to average wind speeds, and the mortality coincided with the fledging period for WTSW. Strong southeasterly winds were a distinguishing meteorologic factor in 1994 and contributed to the distribution of stranded chicks on Oahu. More objective data on WTSW demographics would enhance future efforts to determine predisposing causes of WTSW wrecks and their effects on seabird colonies.

  11. Noncommutative Geometry and Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Connes, Alain

    2006-11-03

    In this very short essay we shall describe a 'spectral' point of view on geometry which allows to start taking into account the lessons from both renormalization and of general relativity. We shall first do that for renormalization and explain in rough outline the content of our recent collaborations with Dirk Kreimer and Matilde Marcolli leading to the universal Galois symmetry of renormalizable quantum field theories provided by the renormalization group in its cosmic Galois group incarnation. As far as general relativity is concerned, since the functional integral cannot be treated in the traditional perturbative manner, it relies heavily as a 'sum over geometries' on the chosen paradigm of geometric space. This will give us the occasion to discuss, in the light of noncommutative geometry, the issue of 'observables' in gravity and our joint work with Ali Chamseddine on the spectral action, with a first attempt to write down a functional integral on the space of noncommutative geometries.

  12. What Is Geometry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chern, Shiing-Shen

    1990-01-01

    Discussed are the major historical developments of geometry. Euclid, Descartes, Klein's Erlanger Program, Gaus and Riemann, globalization, topology, Elie Cartan, and an application to molecular biology are included as topics. (KR)

  13. Proof in Transformation Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, A. W.

    1971-01-01

    The first of three articles showing how inductively-obtained results in transformation geometry may be organized into a deductive system. This article discusses two approaches to enlargement (dilatation), one using coordinates and the other using synthetic methods. (MM)

  14. Gingerbread-House Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emenaker, Charles E.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a sixth-grade interdisciplinary geometry unit based on Charles Dickens's "A Christmas Carol". Focuses on finding area, volume, and perimeter, and working with estimation, decimals, and fractions in the context of making gingerbread houses. (ASK)

  15. Laboratory and numerical investigation of transport processes occurring above and within a saltwater wedge.

    PubMed

    Chang, Sun Woo; Clement, T Prabhakar

    2013-04-01

    Salt wedges divide coastal groundwater flow regime into two distinct regions that include a freshwater region above the saltwater-freshwater interface and a saltwater region below the interface. Several recent studies have investigated saltwater transport in coastal aquifers and the associated flow and mixing processes. Most of these studies, however, have either focused on studying the movement of salt wedge itself or on studying contaminant transport processes occurring above the wedge. As per our knowledge, so far no one has completed laboratory experiments to study contaminant transport processes occurring within a saltwater wedge. In this study, we completed laboratory experiments to understand contaminant transport dynamics occurring within a saltwater wedge. We used a novel experimental approach that employed multiple neutral-density tracers to map and compare the mixing and transport processes occurring above and within a saltwater wedge. The experimental data were simulated using SEAWAT, and the model was used to further investigate the saltwater flow and transport dynamics within a wedge. The laboratory data show that the transport rates active within the wedge are almost two orders of magnitude slower than the transport rates active above the wedge for the small-scale experimental system which is characterized by very low level of mixing. The numerical results, however, postulate that for large-scale systems involving higher levels of mixing (or dispersion) the transport rate active within the wedge could be comparable or even higher than the rates active above the wedge. More field or laboratory studies completed under high dispersion conditions are needed to further test this hypothesis.

  16. Wedge and spring assembly for securing coils in electromagnets and dynamoelectric machines

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, M.; Cottingham, J.G.

    1994-12-31

    A wedge and spring assembly for use in electromagnets or dynamoelectric machines having a housing with an axis therethrough and a plurality of coils supported on salient poles that extend radially inward from the housing toward the housing axis to define a plurality of interpole spaces, respectively between the housing and adjacent coils, the interpole spaces each extending in a direction generally parallel to the housing axis. The wedge and spring assembly includes a nonmagnetic retainer spring and a nonmagnetic wedge. The retainer spring is formed to fit into one of the interpole spaces, and has juxtaposed ends defining between them a slit extending in a direction generally parallel to the housing axis. The wedge for insertion into the slit provides an outwardly directed force on respective portions of the juxtaposed ends defining the slit to expand the slit so that respective portions of the retainer spring engage areas of the coils adjacent thereto, thereby resiliently holding the coils against their respective salient poles. Preferably, the spring retainer and wedge are self-locking wherein wedge is fabricated from a material softer than a material the retainer spring is fabricated from, so that the wedge is securely retained in the slit. The retainer spring is generally triangular shaped to fit within the interpole space and fabricated from berryllium-copper alloy, and the wedge is generally T-shaped and fabricated from aluminum. Alternatively, a wedge and spring assembly includes a wedge having divergent sloped surfaces in which each surface and the respective juxtaposed ends of the retainer spring are angled relative to one another so that the wedge is securely retained in the slit by friction existing between its sloped surfaces and the juxtaposed ends of the retaining spring.

  17. Induced geometry from disformal transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang-Fang; Huang, Peng

    2015-05-01

    In this note, we use the disformal transformation to induce a geometry from the manifold which is originally Riemannian. The new geometry obtained here can be considered as a generalization of Weyl integrable geometry. Based on these results, we further propose a geometry which is naturally a generalization of Weyl geometry.

  18. Comparison of weak-shock reflection factors for wedges, cylinders and blast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H.; Kuhl, A.L.

    1992-07-01

    Ernst Mach (1838--1916) was the first to discover an irregular reflection phenomenon of shock waves, as is well known in our community. In fact, this occurred in 1875 -- three years earlier than usually assumed in the literature. A facsimile of the paper in which he mentioned a special shock wave behavior is shown in a figure. However, it is correct that Mach gave the physical interpretation of this phenomenon in 1878. Since Mach`s discovery of an irregular shock reflection pattern 117 years ago, new shock configurations have been discovered -- one of the most recent examples is the so-called {open_quotes}von Neumann reflection{close_quotes} for weak shocks as reported by Colella and Henderson in 1990. Due to active research efforts related to shock reflection, especially in the last two decades, we now have a relatively detailed understanding of reflection phenomena and of transition conditions from one reflection configuration to another. The purpose of this paper is to compare reflection factors for weak shocks from various surfaces, and to focus attention on some unsolved questions. Three different cases are considered: (1) square-wave planar shock reflection from wedges, (2) square-wave planar shock reflection from cylinders and (3) spherical blast wave reflection from a planar surface. The authors restrict themselves to weak shocks. Following Henderson`s definition, shocks with a Mach number of M{sub 0} < 1.56 in air or with an overpressure of {Delta}p{sub I} < 25 psi (1.66 bar) under normal ambient conditions are called weak.

  19. Comparison of weak-shock reflection factors for wedges, cylinders and blast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Reichenbach, H. , Freiburg im Breisgau ); Kuhl, A.L. )

    1992-07-01

    Ernst Mach (1838--1916) was the first to discover an irregular reflection phenomenon of shock waves, as is well known in our community. In fact, this occurred in 1875 -- three years earlier than usually assumed in the literature. A facsimile of the paper in which he mentioned a special shock wave behavior is shown in a figure. However, it is correct that Mach gave the physical interpretation of this phenomenon in 1878. Since Mach's discovery of an irregular shock reflection pattern 117 years ago, new shock configurations have been discovered -- one of the most recent examples is the so-called [open quotes]von Neumann reflection[close quotes] for weak shocks as reported by Colella and Henderson in 1990. Due to active research efforts related to shock reflection, especially in the last two decades, we now have a relatively detailed understanding of reflection phenomena and of transition conditions from one reflection configuration to another. The purpose of this paper is to compare reflection factors for weak shocks from various surfaces, and to focus attention on some unsolved questions. Three different cases are considered: (1) square-wave planar shock reflection from wedges, (2) square-wave planar shock reflection from cylinders and (3) spherical blast wave reflection from a planar surface. The authors restrict themselves to weak shocks. Following Henderson's definition, shocks with a Mach number of M[sub 0] < 1.56 in air or with an overpressure of [Delta]p[sub I] < 25 psi (1.66 bar) under normal ambient conditions are called weak.

  20. Software Geometry in Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alion, Tyler; Viren, Brett; Junk, Tom

    2015-04-01

    The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) involves many detectors. The experiment's near detector (ND) facility, may ultimately involve several detectors. The far detector (FD) will be significantly larger than any other Liquid Argon (LAr) detector yet constructed; many prototype detectors are being constructed and studied to motivate a plethora of proposed FD designs. Whether it be a constructed prototype or a proposed ND/FD design, every design must be simulated and analyzed. This presents a considerable challenge to LBNE software experts; each detector geometry must be described to the simulation software in an efficient way which allows for multiple authors to easily collaborate. Furthermore, different geometry versions must be tracked throughout their use. We present a framework called General Geometry Description (GGD), written and developed by LBNE software collaborators for managing software to generate geometries. Though GGD is flexible enough to be used by any experiment working with detectors, we present it's first use in generating Geometry Description Markup Language (GDML) files to interface with LArSoft, a framework of detector simulations, event reconstruction, and data analyses written for all LAr technology users at Fermilab. Brett is the other of the framework discussed here, the General Geometry Description (GGD).

  1. Common Geometry Module

    2005-01-01

    The Common Geometry Module (CGM) is a code library which provides geometry functionality used for mesh generation and other applications. This functionality includes that commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry creation, query and modification; CGM also includes capabilities not commonly found in solid modeling engines, like geometry decomposition tools and support for shared material interfaces. CGM is built upon the ACIS solid modeling engine, but also includes geometry capability developed beside and onmore » top of ACIS. CGM can be used as-is to provide geometry functionality for codes needing this capability. However, CGM can also be extended using derived classes in C++, allowing the geometric model to serve as the basis for other applications, for example mesh generation. CGM is supported on Sun Solaris, SGI, HP, IBM, DEC, Linux and Windows NT platforms. CGM also indudes support for loading ACIS models on parallel computers, using MPI-based communication. Future plans for CGM are to port it to different solid modeling engines, including Pro/Engineer or SolidWorks. CGM is being released into the public domain under an LGPL license; the ACIS-based engine is available to ACIS licensees on request.« less

  2. Erosional Control of Orogenesis: Approximate Analytical Solution for a Two-Sided, Frictional Orogenic Wedge at Steady State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whipple, K.; Meade, B.

    2002-12-01

    The recognition of a dynamic coupling among climate, erosion and tectonics is arguably one of the most exciting discoveries in the last 20 years. Numerical simulations using coupled thermo-mechanical and surface process models have been most influential. However, analyses to date leave the strength of the coupling between climate and tectonics uncertain. Can an intensification of erosion induce a sufficiently strong increase in rock uplift rate that steady-state relief is increased rather than reduced? In addition, it has remained unclear whether the details of the erosion processes are important to the geodynamic evolution of the orogen, and if so, how they come into play. We present an approximate analytical solution for two-sided orogenic wedges obeying a frictional rheology, and in a condition of flux steady state, that makes explicit the nature and sensitivity of the coupling between climate and rock uplift rate. A closed-form solution for the inter-relations among steady-state orogen width, rock uplift rate, patterns of internal deformation, and climate is found by combining (1) a statement of mass balance, (2) the geometry dictated by critical taper theory for a frictional wedge, (3) relations for equilibrium topography consistent with both the tapered wedge geometry and with erosion rates necessary to satisfy the mass balance condition, and (4) a kinematic solution for internal deformation. An approximate relation for the timescale of adjustment to a new steady state following a step-function change in climatic or tectonic conditions is also found. We make the simplifying assumption that the topographic taper is invariant with orogen width, tectonic influx rate, climate, and time. Erosion rates are assumed to be dictated by the bedrock channel network and are described by the stream-power model of bedrock channel incision. Erosional efficiency (and its spatial distribution) is shown to control steady-state orogen width, crest elevation, crustal thickness

  3. Spherically Symmetric Solutions of Light Galileon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, D.; Houndjo, M. J. S.; Güdekli, E.; Rodrigues, M. E.; Alvarenga, F. G.; Myrzakulov, R.

    2016-02-01

    We have been studied the model of light Galileon with translational shift symmetry ϕ → ϕ + c. The matter Lagrangian is presented in the form {L}_{φ }= -η (partial φ )2+β G^{μ ν }partial _{μ }φ partial _{ν }φ . We have been addressed two issues: the first is that, we have been proven that, this type of Galileons belong to the modified matter-curvature models of gravity in type of f(R,R^{μ ν }T_{μ ν }m). Secondly, we have been investigated exact solution for spherically symmetric geometries in this model. We have been found an exact solution with singularity at r = 0 in null coordinates. We have been proven that the solution has also a non-divergence current vector norm. This solution can be considered as an special solution which has been investigated in literature before, in which the Galileon's field is non-static (time dependence). Our scalar-shift symmetrized Galileon has the simple form of ϕ = t, which it is remembered by us dilaton field.

  4. Modal testing variability of spherical marine floats.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, A. N.; Hemez, F. M.; Salazar, I. F.; Duffey, T. A.

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the variability in modal data obtained from testing a set of hollow, almost spherical marine floats. Four sources of variability are investigated: unit-to -unit variability, operator-to-operator variability, test repetition, and accelerometer placement. Because moving the accelerometers implies a test setup reconfiguration, it is expected that variability due to accelerometer placement should encompass variability due to test repetition. Similarly, the unit-to-unit variability should encompass both accelerometer placement variability and test-to -test variability. Impulse and frequency response functions are estimated from the measured excitation and response of the marine floats. A series of techniques are then used to assess the variation of the modal properties between each test, including: a measure of the spread of the frequency response functions in each test group; the variation of the temporal moments, spectral moments, and principal components; and the variability of resonant frequencies and modal damping ratios extracted from the data. The effects of mass and geometry on variability are also investigated. A strong correlation between the frequency and mass is found for the fundamental mode only. The main conclusion is that the majority of analysis techniques find the unit-to-unit variability to be the largest by a significant margin. The second largest is the variability caused by accelerometer placement. Next are the operator-to-operator variability and test-to -test variability.

  5. Modeling of non-spherical droplet dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zheng-Tao; Liaw, Goang-Shin; Chou, Lynn C.

    1993-07-01

    A two-dimensional time-dependent computer code based on the modified Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) technique, has been developed to simulate non-spherical droplet dynamics and evaporation under convective flows at real rocket combustion chamber conditions. The equations of mass, momentum, energy and species are simultaneously solved for both liquid and gas phases with an accurate dynamic interface tracking. The jump boundary conditions across the deforming droplet surface are obtained by applying the integral forms of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. At each time step, the interface geometry and flow properties at the droplet surface are implicitly solved by satisfying the interface boundary conditions. A Lagrangian technique was developed to track the arbitrarily moving interface between the liquid droplet and the external gas. An elliptic grid generator is adopted to dynamically reconstruct grids both inside and outside the droplet surface. This code has been used to study droplet oscillation, droplet deformation/breakup, nonspherical droplet evaporation in both low and high pressure convective flows. This presentation briefly describes the numerical algorithm for modeling of the nonspherical droplet dynamics and demonstrates the representative simulation results of nonspherical droplet evaporation at low and high pressure convective flows. Potential applications of this code to rocket combustor design and performance predictions are discussed.

  6. Tritanium acetabular wedge augments: short-term results

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Camilo; Heller, Snir

    2016-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of acetabular defects in total hip arthroplasty (THA) presents a great challenge to orthopaedic surgeons. Previous studies have reported on the use and outcomes of trabecular metal acetabular augments for the reconstruction of acetabular defects. However, no study has been conducted evaluating the short-term results of tritanium acetabular wedge augments for the reconstruction of acetabular defects in THA. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using a prospective database at a single institution including primary and revision THA patients from January 2013 to December 2014. Patients were included if they received a tritanium acetabular wedge augment system and had a minimum of 2-year follow-up (average 2.2 years ±0.3, range, 2–2.6 years). Demographic data and outcomes data [Harris Hip Score—HHS and Short Form (SF)-36] was collected. Radiographic data was also collected on THA revision cases (Paprosky classification), developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH) cases (Crowe classification), and radiographic follow-up using DeLee and Charnley’s classification system. Results There were 4 revision THA patients, 3 DDH patients, and 1 patient with posttraumatic arthritis. At the latest radiographic follow-up, there were no lucent lines in DeLee and Charnley Zones I, II or III. During the follow-up period, there was no open revision surgery. The SF-36 physical score significantly improved from preoperative measurement (29.6±2.2) to postoperative measurement (52.2±8.7, P=0.003), and the SF-36 mental score also significantly improved from preoperative assessment (34.5±4.5) to postoperative assessment (52.2±7.5, P=0.003). Total HHS scores also significantly improved postoperatively (P=0.02), with significant improvements in both the pain score (P=0.01) and function score (P=0.02). Conclusions Tritanium acetabular wedge augments in this short follow-up case series exhibit high clinical outcome scores, no radiographic lucency, and no

  7. Immediate and 1 week effects of laterally wedge insoles on gait biomechanics in healthy females.

    PubMed

    Weinhandl, Joshua T; Sudheimer, Sarah E; Van Lunen, Bonnie L; Stewart, Kimberly; Hoch, Matthew C

    2016-03-01

    It is estimated that approximately 45% of the U.S. population will develop knee osteoarthritis, a disease that creates significant economic burdens in both direct and indirect costs. Laterally wedged insoles have been frequently recommended to reduce knee abduction moments and to manage knee osteoarthritis. However, it remains unknown whether the lateral wedge will reduce knee abduction moments over a prolonged period of time. Thus, the purposes of this study were to (1) examine the immediate effects of a laterally wedged insole in individuals normally aligned knees and (2) determine prolonged effects after the insole was worn for 1 week. Gait analysis was performed on ten women with and without a laterally wedged insole. After participants wore the wedges for a week, a second gait analysis was performed with and without the insole. The wedged insole did not affect peak knee abduction moment, although there was a significant increase in knee abduction angular impulse after wearing the insoles for 1 week. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in vertical ground reaction force at the instance of peak knee abduction moment with the wedges. While the laterally wedged insole used in the current study did not alter knee abduction moments as expected, other studies have shown alterations. Future studies should also examine a longer acclimation period, the influence of gait speed, and the effect of different shoe types with the insole.

  8. Preliminary analysis of coil wedge dimensional variation in SSC Prototype Dipole Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, D.; Brown, G.; Dwyer, S.; Gattu, R.; Warner, D.

    1993-05-01

    The wedges used in SSC Prototype Dipole Magnets determine the relative position of conductor blocks within magnet coils. They serve to compensate partially for the less than full keystoning of the superconductor cable and to adjust current distribution with azimuth to determine the magnetic field shape. The ability to control the size and uniformity of wedges therefore is an important factor influencing magnet quality. This paper presents preliminary results of a Statistical Quality Control study of wedge dimensional variation and predicted field quality. Dimensions of samples from outer wedges for magnet DCA102 have been measured using a programmable optical comparator. The data is used to evaluate wedge manufacturing process capability, wedge uniformity, and to predict changes in conductor block position due to wedge deviation. Expected multipole variation attributable to observed wedge variation is discussed. This work focuses on a Prototype Dipole Magnet being built at the SSCL Magnet Development Laboratory (SSCL MDL) in Waxahachie, Texas. The magnet is of the same design as the DCA3xx series magnets built at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in 1991--92 and later used in the 1992 Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST).

  9. Enhancement of linear and second-order hyperpolarizabilities in wedge-shaped nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayabalan, J.; Singh, Manoranjan P.; Rustagi, K. C.

    2003-08-01

    Analytical solutions for the wave functions for free electrons inside a wedge-shaped quantum dot are reported. For silver wedge-shaped quantum dots, linear and second-order hyperpolarizabilities are calculated for various apex angles. It is found that linear and nonlinear hyperpolarizabilities both increase with decreasing apex angle.

  10. Pan-Arctic ice-wedge degradation in warming permafrost and its influence on tundra hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liljedahl, Anna K.; Boike, Julia; Daanen, Ronald P.; Fedorov, Alexander N.; Frost, Gerald V.; Grosse, Guido; Hinzman, Larry D.; Iijma, Yoshihiro; Jorgenson, Janet C.; Matveyeva, Nadya; Necsoiu, Marius; Raynolds, Martha K.; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.; Schulla, Jörg; Tape, Ken D.; Walker, Donald A.; Wilson, Cathy J.; Yabuki, Hironori; Zona, Donatella

    2016-04-01

    Ice wedges are common features of the subsurface in permafrost regions. They develop by repeated frost cracking and ice vein growth over hundreds to thousands of years. Ice-wedge formation causes the archetypal polygonal patterns seen in tundra across the Arctic landscape. Here we use field and remote sensing observations to document polygon succession due to ice-wedge degradation and trough development in ten Arctic localities over sub-decadal timescales. Initial thaw drains polygon centres and forms disconnected troughs that hold isolated ponds. Continued ice-wedge melting leads to increased trough connectivity and an overall draining of the landscape. We find that melting at the tops of ice wedges over recent decades and subsequent decimetre-scale ground subsidence is a widespread Arctic phenomenon. Although permafrost temperatures have been increasing gradually, we find that ice-wedge degradation is occurring on sub-decadal timescales. Our hydrological model simulations show that advanced ice-wedge degradation can significantly alter the water balance of lowland tundra by reducing inundation and increasing runoff, in particular due to changes in snow distribution as troughs form. We predict that ice-wedge degradation and the hydrological changes associated with the resulting differential ground subsidence will expand and amplify in rapidly warming permafrost regions.

  11. Performance of an isolated two-dimensional wedge nozzle with fixed cowl and variable wedge centerbody at Mach numbers up to 2.01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maiden, D. L.

    1976-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation has been conducted to determine the aeropropulsion performance (thrust minus drag) of an isolated, two-dimensional wedge nozzle with a simulated variable-wedge mechanism and a fixed cowl. The investigation was conducted statically and at Mach numbers from 0.60 to 1.20 in the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel and at a Mach number of 2.01 in the Langley 4-foot supersonic pressure tunnel. The ratio of exhaust jet total pressure to free-stream static pressure was varied up to 27 depending on free-stream Mach number. The results indicate that the aeropropulsion performance of the two-dimensional fixed-cowl variable-wedge nozzle is slightly lower (0.7 to 1.4 percent of ideal thrust) than that achieved for a two-dimensional wedge nozzle with a translating shroud, although part of the difference in performance is attributed to internal-performance differences. The effects of cowl boattail angle, internal expansion area ratio, and wedge half-angle on the performance of the two-dimensional wedge nozzle are discussed.

  12. Bidirectional slapper detonators in spherical explosion systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Ernest C.

    1990-11-01

    A bidirectional slapper detonator has been proven effective for producing a spherically expanding shock wave. Two bridge foils are used to propel flyers in opposite directions, thereby initiating two explosive pellets, each embedded in one hemisphere of a spherical system. This detonation system produces a nearly perfect spherically expanding detonation front.

  13. Theoretical Study of a Spherical Plasma Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ay, Yasar

    A theoretical model is developed for two concentric electrodes spherical plasma focus device in order to investigate the plasma sheath dynamics, radiative emission, and the ion properties. The work focuses on the model development of the plasma sheath dynamics and its validation, followed by studying of the radiation effects and the beam-ion properties in such unique geometry as a pulsed source for neutrons, soft and hard x-rays, and electron and ion beams. Chapter 1 is an introduction on fusion systems including plasma focus. Chapter 2 is an extensive literature survey on plasma focus modeling and experiments including the various radiations and their mechanism. Chapter 3 details modeling and validation of the plasma sheath dynamics model with comparison between hydrogen, deuterium, tritium and deuterium-tritium mixture for the production of pulsed neutrons. Chapter 4 is a study of the radiative phase, in which neutron yield is investigated, as well as the predicted beam-ion properties. Chapter 5 summarizes and discusses the results. Chapter 6 provides concluding remarks and proposed future works. The phases of the developed model are the rundown phase I, rundown phase II, the reflected phase and a radiative phase. The rundown phase I starts immediately after the completion of the gas breakdown and ends when the current sheath reaches the equator point of the spherical shape. Then immediately followed by rundown phase II to start and it ends when the shock front hits the axis, which is the beginning of the reflected shock phase. Reflected shock front moves towards the incoming current sheath and meets it which is both the end of the reflected shock phase and the beginning of the radiative phase. After the reflected shock front and the current sheath meet, the current sheath continues to move radially inward by compressing the produced plasma column until it reaches the axis. Since the discharge current contains important information about the plasma dynamic

  14. Hydrodynamic interactions of cilia on a spherical body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasouri, Babak; Elfring, Gwynn J.

    2016-03-01

    Microorganisms develop coordinated beating patterns on surfaces lined with cilia known as metachronal waves. For a chain of cilia attached to a flat ciliate, it has been shown that hydrodynamic interactions alone can lead the system to synchronize. However, several microorganisms possess a curve-shaped ciliate body and so to understand the effect of this geometry on the formation of metachronal waves, we evaluate the hydrodynamic interactions of cilia near a large spherical body. Using a minimal model, we show that for a chain of cilia around the sphere, the natural periodicity in the geometry leads the system to synchronize. We also report an emergent wavelike behavior when an asymmetry is introduced to the system.

  15. Hydrodynamic interactions of cilia on a spherical body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasouri, Babak; Elfring, Gwynn J.

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of metachronal waves in ciliated microorganisms can arise solely from the hydrodynamic interactions between the cilia. For a chain of cilia attached to a flat ciliate, it was observed that fluid forces can lead the system to form a metachronal wave. However, several microorganisms such as paramecium and volvox possess a curved shaped ciliate body. To understand the effect of this geometry on the formation of metachronal waves, we evaluate the hydrodynamic interactions of cilia near a large spherical body. Using a minimal model, we show that for a chain of cilia around the sphere, the embedded periodicity in the geometry leads the system to synchronize. We also report an emergent wave-like behavior when an asymmetry is introduced to the system.

  16. Non-spherical particles for optical trap assisted nanopatterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Y.-C.; Fardel, R.; Panczyk, M. M.; Furst, E. M.; Arnold, C. B.

    2013-09-01

    Optical trap assisted nanopatterning is a laser direct-write technique that uses an optically trapped microsphere as a near-field objective. The type of feature that one can create with this technique depends on several factors, one of which is the shape of the microbead. In this paper, we examine how the geometry of the bead affects the focus of the light through a combination of experiments and simulations. We realize nanopatterning using non-spherical dielectric particles to shape the light-material interaction. We model the resulting nanoscale features with a finite difference time domain simulation and obtain very good agreement with the experiments. This work opens the way to systematic engineering of the microparticle geometry in order to tailor the near-field focus to specific nanopatterning applications.

  17. Van der waals-like isotherms in a confined electrolyte by spherical and cylindrical nanopores.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Pineda, Gabriel E; Jiménez-Angeles, Felipe; Yu, Jiang; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2007-03-01

    Electrolytes confined by spherical, cylindrical, and slit-like charged nanopores are studied. Results for ionic distribution profiles, pressures of the confined fluid, and absorption isotherms are obtained through the hypernetted chain/mean spherical approximation (HNC/MSA) integral equations theory. In spherical and cylindrical geometries, an inward, non-monotonic behavior of the pressure is found as confinement increases, implying a negative compressibility. The pressure vs volume isotherms resemble liquid-vapor van der Waals-like phase transition diagrams. This effect is correlated with a charge separation inside a spherical pore previously reported (Phys. Rev. Lett., 79, 3656, 1997). Here, the mechanism of charge separation and negative compressibility are explored in detail. When compared with the slit-like pore pressure, important qualitative differences are found.

  18. Comparison of the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges. [Subjects and Methods] Nine females participated in this study. Surface electrodes measurements were taken over the hamstring and quadriceps under 3 squat exercise conditions, and the hamstring/quadriceps ratio was calculated. [Results] The hamstring/quadriceps ratio was significantly increased during squat exercise in inclined wedge condition (7.4 ± 1.8), compared to the declined wedge condition (5.3 ± 2.2) and no wedge condition (6.4 ± 3.2). [Conclusion] This study suggests that squat exercise in the inclined wedge condition may be effective for increasing the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females. PMID:27630437

  19. Periodic nanostructures from self assembled wedge-type block-copolymers

    DOEpatents

    Xia, Yan; Sveinbjornsson, Benjamin R.; Grubbs, Robert H.; Weitekamp, Raymond; Miyake, Garret M.; Piunova, Victoria; Daeffler, Christopher Scot

    2015-06-02

    The invention provides a class of wedge-type block copolymers having a plurality of chemically different blocks, at least a portion of which incorporates a wedge group-containing block providing useful properties. For example, use of one or more wedge group-containing blocks in some block copolymers of the invention significantly inhibits chain entanglement and, thus, the present block copolymers materials provide a class of polymer materials capable of efficient molecular self-assembly to generate a range of structures, such as periodic nanostructures and microstructures. Materials of the present invention include copolymers having one or more wedge group-containing blocks, and optionally for some applications copolymers also incorporating one or more polymer side group-containing blocks. The present invention also provides useful methods of making and using wedge-type block copolymers.

  20. Wedge and spring assembly for securing coils in electromagnets and dynamoelectric machines

    DOEpatents

    Lindner, Melvin; Cottingham, James G.

    1996-03-12

    A wedge and spring assembly for use in electromagnets or dynamoelectric machines having a housing with an axis therethrough and a plurality of coils supported on salient poles that extend radially inward from the housing toward the housing axis to define a plurality of interpole spaces. The wedge and spring assembly includes a nonmagnetic retainer spring and a nonmagnetic wedge. The retainer spring is formed to fit into one of the interpole spaces, and has juxtaposed ends defining between them a slit extending in a direction generally parallel to the housing axis. The wedge for insertion into the slit provides an outwardly directed force on respective portions of the juxtaposed ends to expand the slit so that respective portions of the retainer spring engage areas of the coils adjacent thereto, thereby resiliently holding the coils against their respective salient poles. The retainer spring is generally triangular shaped to fit within the interpole space, and the wedge is generally T-shaped.

  1. Comparison of the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges. [Subjects and Methods] Nine females participated in this study. Surface electrodes measurements were taken over the hamstring and quadriceps under 3 squat exercise conditions, and the hamstring/quadriceps ratio was calculated. [Results] The hamstring/quadriceps ratio was significantly increased during squat exercise in inclined wedge condition (7.4 ± 1.8), compared to the declined wedge condition (5.3 ± 2.2) and no wedge condition (6.4 ± 3.2). [Conclusion] This study suggests that squat exercise in the inclined wedge condition may be effective for increasing the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females.

  2. Comparison of the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females during squat exercise using various foot wedges. [Subjects and Methods] Nine females participated in this study. Surface electrodes measurements were taken over the hamstring and quadriceps under 3 squat exercise conditions, and the hamstring/quadriceps ratio was calculated. [Results] The hamstring/quadriceps ratio was significantly increased during squat exercise in inclined wedge condition (7.4 ± 1.8), compared to the declined wedge condition (5.3 ± 2.2) and no wedge condition (6.4 ± 3.2). [Conclusion] This study suggests that squat exercise in the inclined wedge condition may be effective for increasing the hamstring/quadriceps ratio in females. PMID:27630437

  3. The Cimmerian accretionary wedge of Anarak, Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, Andrea; Malaspina, Nadia; Zanchetta, Stefano; Berra, Fabrizio; Benciolini, Luca; Bergomi, Maria; Cavallo, Alessandro; Javadi, Hamid Reza; Kouhpeyma, Meyssam

    2015-04-01

    The occurrence in Iran of several ophiolite belts dating between Late Palaeozoic to Triassic poses several questions on the possible existence of various sutures marking the closure of the Palaeotethys ocean between Eurasia and this Gondwana-derived microplate. In this scenario, the Anarak region in Central Iran still represents a conundrum. Contrasting geochronological, paleontological, paleomagnetic data and reported field evidence suggest different origins for the Anarak Metamorphic Complex (AMC). The AMC is either interpreted, as: (1) relict of an accretionary wedge developed at the Eurasia margin during the Palaeotethys subduction as part of the Cimmerian suture zone of NE Iran, displaced to Central Iran by a large counter-clockwise rotation of the central Iranian blocks; (2) autochthonous unit forming a secondary branch of the main suture zone. Our structural, petrographic and geochemical data indicate that the AMC consists of several metamorphic units also including dismembered "ophiolites" which display different tectono-metamorphic evolutions. Three main ductile deformational events can be distinguished in the AMC. The Morghab and Chah Gorbeh complexes preserve a different M1 metamorphism, characterized by blueschist relics in the S1 foliation of the former unit, and greenschist assemblages in the latter. They share a subsequent similar D2 deformational and M2 metamorphic history, showing a prograde metamorphism with syn- to post-deformation growth of blueschist facies mineral assemblages on pre-existing greenschist facies associations. High pressure, low temperature (HP/LT) metamorphism responsible for the growth of sodic amphibole has been recognized also within marble lenses at the contact between the Chah Gorbeh Complex and serpentinites. Evidence of HP/LT metamorphism also occurs in glaucophane-bearing meta-pillow lavas and serpentinites, which contain antigorite and form most of the "ophiolites" within the AMC. Structural relationships show that the

  4. Magnetic quantum well states in ultrathin film and wedge structures

    SciTech Connect

    Li, D.; Bader, S.D.

    1996-04-01

    Magnetic quantum-well (QW) states are probed with angle- and spin-resolved photoemission to address critical issues pertaining to the origin of the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) optimization and oscillatory coupling of magnetic multilayers. Two epitaxial systems are highlighted: Cu/Co(wedge)/Cu(100) and Cr/Fe(100)-whisker. The confinement of Cu sp-QW states by a Co barrier requires a characteristic Co thickness of 2.2 {+-} 0.6 {angstrom}, which is consistent with the interfacial Co thickness reported to optimize the GMR of permalloy-Cu structures. The controversial k-space origin of the 18-{angstrom} long period oscillation in Fe/Cr multilayers is identified by the vector that spans the d-derived lens feature of the Cr Fermi surface, based on the emergence of QW states with 17 {+-} 2 {angstrom} periodicity in this region.

  5. Anterolateral Biplanar Proximal Tibial Opening-Wedge Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Dean, Chase S; Chahla, Jorge; Moulton, Samuel G; Nitri, Marco; Serra Cruz, Raphael; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Proximal tibial anterolateral opening-wedge osteotomies have been reported to achieve successful biplanar lower-extremity realignment. Indications for a proximal tibial anterolateral osteotomy include symptomatic genu recurvatum with genu valgus alignment, usually in patients with a flat sagittal-plane tibial slope. The biplanar approach is able to simultaneously address both components of a patient's malalignment with a single procedure. The correction amount is verified with spacers and intraoperative imaging, while correction of the patient's heel height is simultaneously measured. A plate is secured into the osteotomy site, and the site is filled with bone allograft. The anterolateral tibial osteotomy has been reported to be an effective surgical procedure for correcting concomitant genu recurvatum and genu valgus malalignment. PMID:27656374

  6. Numerical investigation of shedding partial cavities over a sharp wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budich, B.; Neuner, S.; Schmidt, S. J.; Adams, N. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this contribution, we examine transient dynamics and cavitation patterns of periodically shedding partial cavities by numerical simulations. The investigation reproduces reference experiments of the cavitating flow over a sharp wedge. Utilizing a homogeneous mixture model, full compressibility of the two-phase flow of water and water vapor is taken into account by the numerical method. We focus on inertia-dominated mechanisms, thus modeling the flow as inviscid. Based on the assumptions of thermodynamic equilibrium and barotropic flow, the thermodynamic properties are computed from closed-form analytical relations. Emphasis is put on a validation of the employed numerical approach. We demonstrate that computed shedding dynamics are in agreement with the references. Complex flow features observed in the experiments, including cavitating hairpin and horse-shoe vortices, are also predicted by the simulations. Furthermore, a condensation discontinuity occurring during the collapse phase at the trailing portion of the partial cavity is equally obtained.

  7. Landward thrusting in accretionary wedges: evidence for seafloor rupture?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubas, N.; Souloumiac, P.

    2015-12-01

    The 2004 Sumatra and 2011 Japan earthquakes took the community by surprise because they ruptured frontal sections of megathrust thought to slip aseismically. Studying the deformation of accretionary prisms can help in characterizing the specific structures associated to frontal propagation and determining the mechanical properties leading to this behavior. Recent observations suggest a correlation between landward faults and frontal propagation of earthquakes along the Sumatra subduction zone. Large sections of landward thrusts are also observed along Cascadia known to have ruptured in 1700 with a M~9 generating a large tsunami. In this study, we propose to investigate if specific frictional properties could lead to a landward sequence of thrusting with the limit analysis approach. We first show that such sequence requires very low effective friction along the megathrust with a rather high internal effective friction. We also show that landward sequence appears close to the extensional critical limit. We retrieve the megathrust effective friction for three wedges with different sediment incomes. For Cascadia, we find a maximal effective friction of 0.032. For northern and southern Sumatra, we find μ≤0.02 and μ≤ 0.08 respectively. This very low effective friction is probably due to lithostatic pore pressure. This high pore pressure could either be a long-term property or due to dynamic effects such as thermal pressurization. The fact that landward vergence appears far from the compressional critical limit favors a dynamic effect. Indeed, a wedge would move away from this limit if material is added synchronously to the deformation or if it is suddenly submitted to a lower effective friction. In addition, the long-term high pore pressure could be due to a low permeability enhancing thermal pressurization and co-seismic slip along the frontal part of the megathrust.

  8. Distribution of strain rates in the Taiwan orogenic wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouthereau, F.; Fillon, C.; Ma, K.-F.

    2009-07-01

    To constrain the way Eurasian crust is accreted to the Taiwan orogenic wedge we investigate the present-day 3D seismogenic deformation field using the summation of 1129 seismic moment tensors of events ( Mw > 4) covering a period of 11 years (1995 to 2005). Based on the analysis of the principal strain-rate field, including dilatation and maximum shear rates, we distinguish four domains. Domain I comprises the Coastal Plain and the Western Foothills. It is mainly contractional in both the horizontal plane and in cross-section. Domain II comprises the eastern Western Foothills, the Hsuehshan Range and the Backbone Range. It is characterized by the highest contraction rates of 10 - 6 yr - 1 in association with area expansion in cross-section and area contraction in the horizontal plane. Domain III corresponds to the Central Range. It is characterized by area contraction in cross-section and area expansion in the horizontal plane. The maximum contractional axis is typically low and plunges ~ 30°E. Extension is larger, horizontal and strikes parallel to the axis of the mountain range. Domain IV corresponding to the Coastal Range and offshore Luzon Arc shows deformation patterns similar to domain II. This seismogenic strain-rate field, which is found in good agreement with the main features of the geodetic field, supports shortening within a thick wedge whose basal décollement is relatively flat and located in the middle-to-lower crust > 20 km. The east plunges of maximum strain-rate axes below the Central Range argue for the development of top-to-the-east transport of rocks resulting from the extrusion of the whole crust along west-dipping crustal-scale shear zones. The study of seismogenic strain rates argues that the initiation of subduction reversal has already started in the Taiwan collision domain.

  9. The Substorm Current Wedge: Further Insights from MHD Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.; Hesse, M.

    2015-01-01

    Using a recent magnetohydrodynamic simulation of magnetotail dynamics, we further investigate the buildup and evolution of the substorm current wedge (SCW), resulting from flow bursts generated by near-tail reconnection. Each flow burst generates an individual current wedge, which includes the reduction of cross-tail current and the diversion to region 1 (R1)-type field-aligned currents (earthward on the dawn and tailward on the duskside), connecting the tail with the ionosphere. Multiple flow bursts generate initially multiple SCW patterns, which at later times combine to a wider single SCW pattern. The standard SCWmodel is modified by the addition of several current loops, related to particular magnetic field changes: the increase of Bz in a local equatorial region (dipolarization), the decrease of |Bx| away from the equator (current disruption), and increases in |By| resulting from azimuthally deflected flows. The associated loop currents are found to be of similar magnitude, 0.1-0.3 MA. The combined effect requires the addition of region 2 (R2)-type currents closing in the near tail through dawnward currents but also connecting radially with the R1 currents. The current closure at the inner boundary, taken as a crude proxy of an idealized ionosphere, demonstrates westward currents as postulated in the original SCW picture as well as North-South currents connecting R1- and R2-type currents, which were larger than the westward currents by a factor of almost 2. However, this result should be applied with caution to the ionosphere because of our neglect of finite resistance and Hall effects.

  10. Isolating active orogenic wedge deformation in the southern Subandes of Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Jonathan R.; Brooks, Benjamin A.; Foster, James H.; Bevis, Michael; Echalar, Arturo; Caccamise, Dana; Heck, Jacob; Kendrick, Eric; Ahlgren, Kevin; Raleigh, David; Smalley, Robert; Vergani, Gustavo

    2016-08-01

    A new GPS-derived surface velocity field for the central Andean backarc permits an assessment of orogenic wedge deformation across the southern Subandes of Bolivia, where recent studies suggest that great earthquakes (>Mw 8) are possible. We find that the backarc is not isolated from the main plate boundary seismic cycle. Rather, signals from subduction zone earthquakes contaminate the velocity field at distances greater than 800 km from the Chile trench. Two new wedge-crossing velocity profiles, corrected for seasonal and earthquake affects, reveal distinct regions that reflect (1) locking of the main plate boundary across the high Andes, (2) the location of and loading rate at the back of orogenic wedge, and (3) an east flank velocity gradient indicative of décollement locking beneath the Subandes. Modeling of the Subandean portions of the profiles indicates along-strike variations in the décollement locked width (WL) and wedge loading rate; the northern wedge décollement has a WL of ~100 km while accumulating slip at a rate of ~14 mm/yr, whereas the southern wedge has a WL of ~61 km and a slip rate of ~7 mm/yr. When compared to Quaternary estimates of geologic shortening and evidence for Holocene internal wedge deformation, the new GPS-derived wedge loading rates may indicate that the southern wedge is experiencing a phase of thickening via reactivation of preexisting internal structures. In contrast, we suspect that the northern wedge is undergoing an accretion or widening phase primarily via slip on relatively young thrust-front faults.

  11. Polymeric carriers: role of geometry in drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Simone, Eric A; Dziubla, Thomas D; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2009-01-01

    The unique properties of synthetic nanostructures promise a diverse set of applications as carriers for drug delivery, which are advantageous in terms of biocompatibility, pharmacokinetics, targeting and controlled drug release. Historically, more traditional drug delivery systems have focused on spherical carriers. However, there is a growing interest in pursuing non-spherical carriers, such as elongated or filamentous morphologies, now available due to novel formulation strategies. Unique physiochemical properties of these supramolecular structures offer distinct advantages as drug delivery systems. In particular, results of recent studies in cell cultures and lab animals indicate that rational design of carriers of a given geometry (size and shape) offers an unprecedented control of their longevity in circulation and targeting to selected cellular and subcellular locations. This article reviews drug delivery aspects of non-spherical drug delivery systems, including material selection and formulation, drug loading and release, biocompatibility, circulation behavior, targeting and subcellular addressing. PMID:19040392

  12. Exact Relativistic Newtonian Representation of Gravitational static Spacetime Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Shubhrangshu; Sarkar, Tamal; Bhadra, Arunava

    2016-09-01

    We construct a self-consistent relativistic Newtonian analogue corresponding to gravitational static spherical symmetric spacetime geometries, starting directly from a generalized scalar relativistic gravitational action in a Newtonian framework, which gives geodesic equations of motion identical to those of the parent metric. Consequently, the derived velocity-dependent relativistic scalar potential, which is a relativistic generalization of the Newtonian gravitational potential, exactly reproduces the relativistic gravitational features corresponding to any static spherical symmetric spacetime geometry in its entirety, including all the experimentally tested gravitational effects in the weak field up to the present. This relativistic analogous potential is expected to be quite useful in studying a wide range of astrophysical phenomena, especially in strong field gravity.

  13. On the Explosion Geometry of Red Supergiant Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Douglas Christopher; Dessart, Luc; Pignata, Giuliano; Hillier, D. John; Williams, George Grant; Smith, Paul S.; Khandrika, Harish; Bilinski, Christopher; Duong, Nhieu; Flatland, Kelsi; Gonzalez, Luis; Hoffman, Jennifer L.; Horst, Chuck; Huk, Leah; Milne, Peter; Rachubo, Alisa A.; Smith, Nathan

    2015-08-01

    From progenitor studies, type II-Plateau supernovae (SNe II-P) have been decisively and uniquely determined to arise from isolated red supergiant (RSG) stars with initial masses ranging from 8 to 16 solar masses (Smartt 2009), establishing the most homogeneous -- and well understood -- progenitor class of any type of core-collapse supernova. However, we must admit a fundamental truth: We do not know how these stars explode. A basic discriminant among proposed explosion models is explosion geometry, since some models predict severe distortions from spherical symmetry. A primary method to gain such geometric information is through spectropolarimetry of the expanding (but, unresolved) atmosphere, with higher degrees of linear polarization generally demanding larger departures from spherical symmetry. Initially, as a class, SNe II-P were found to be only weakly polarized at the early epochs observed, suggesting a nearly spherical explosion for RSG stars. However, late-time observations of SN 2004dj captured a dramatic spike in polarization at just the moment the "inner core" of the ejecta was first revealed in this SN II-P (i.e., at the "drop" off of the photometric plateau; Leonard et al. 2006). This raised the possibility that the explosion of RSGs might be driven by a strongly non-spherical mechanism, with the evidence for the asphericity cloaked at early times by the massive, opaque, quasi-spherical hydrogen envelope. In this presentation we shall describe the continuing work on the explosion geometry of RSGs being carried out by the SuperNova SpectroPOLarimetry project (SNSPOL), with a particular focus on SN 2013ej -- an SN II-P that exhibited remarkably high polarization just days after the explosion (Leonard et al. 2013), and for which twelve epochs of spectropolarimetry trace an intriguing tale about its geometry deep into the nebular phase. We acknowledge support from NSF grants AST-1009571 and AST-1210311, under which part of this research was carried out.

  14. Gravito-inertial waves in a differentially rotating spherical shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirouh, G. M.; Baruteau, C.; Rieutord, M.; Ballot, J.

    2016-08-01

    The gravito-inertial waves propagating over a shellular baroclinic flow inside a rotating spherical shell are analysed using the Boussinesq approximation. The wave properties are examined by computing paths of characteristics in the non-dissipative limit, and by solving the full dissipative eigenvalue problem using a high-resolution spectral method. Gravito-inertial waves are found to obey a mixed-type second-order operator and to be often focused around short-period attractors of characteristics or trapped in a wedge formed by turning surfaces and boundaries. We also find eigenmodes that show a weak dependence with respect to viscosity and heat diffusion just like truly regular modes. Some axisymmetric modes are found unstable and likely destabilized by baroclinic instabilities. Similarly, some non-axisymmetric modes that meet a critical layer (or corotation resonance) can turn unstable at sufficiently low diffusivities. In all cases, the instability is driven by the differential rotation. For many modes of the spectrum, neat power laws are found for the dependence of the damping rates with diffusion coefficients, but the theoretical explanation for the exponent values remains elusive in general. The eigenvalue spectrum turns out to be very rich and complex, which lets us suppose an even richer and more complex spectrum for rotating stars or planets that own a differential rotation driven by baroclinicity.

  15. Ultrasonic analysis of Kevlar-epoxy filament wound spherical test specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Brosey, W.D.

    1984-12-06

    Increased use of composite materials in enclosed geometries such as cylindrical, spherical, or conical shapes has led to the desire to transfer and further develop the most promising nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques used on nonenclosed geometries to enclosed geometries. Known defects were placed within spherical Kevlar-epoxy filament wound test specimens to determine the extent to which they could be detected. These defects included Teflon shim-simulated delaminations, macrosphere-simulated voids, dry-band sets, variable tension, Kevlar 29 fiber, and an alternate high void content winding pattern. Ultrasonic C-scan analysis of Kevlar-epoxy filament wound spheres was performed to determine detectability of normal winding patterns and implanted flaw conditions in the composite using this technique. Ultrasonic waveform analysis was performed in both the time and frequency domains to determine the detectability and locatability of structural flaws within the composite.

  16. Geometry and Cloaking Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, T.; Nacher, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    Recently, the application of geometry and conformal mappings to artificial materials (metamaterials) has attracted the attention in various research communities. These materials, characterized by a unique man-made structure, have unusual optical properties, which materials found in nature do not exhibit. By applying the geometry and conformal mappings theory to metamaterial science, it may be possible to realize so-called "Harry Potter cloaking device". Although such a device is still in the science fiction realm, several works have shown that by using such metamaterials it may be possible to control the direction of the electromagnetic field at will. We could then make an object hidden inside of a cloaking device. Here, we will explain how to design invisibility device using differential geometry and conformal mappings.

  17. Origins of cellular geometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cells are highly complex and orderly machines, with defined shapes and a startling variety of internal organizations. Complex geometry is a feature of both free-living unicellular organisms and cells inside multicellular animals. Where does the geometry of a cell come from? Many of the same questions that arise in developmental biology can also be asked of cells, but in most cases we do not know the answers. How much of cellular organization is dictated by global cell polarity cues as opposed to local interactions between cellular components? Does cellular structure persist across cell generations? What is the relationship between cell geometry and tissue organization? What ensures that intracellular structures are scaled to the overall size of the cell? Cell biology is only now beginning to come to grips with these questions. PMID:21880160

  18. SAR imagery in non-Cartesian geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dendal, Didier

    1995-11-01

    The subject of the reported work is the improvement of geometrical models for a SAR scanning in pushbroom, spotlight, scansar or bistatic imaging modes. This research has been motivated by the planetary cornerstone mission of ESA's long term program for European Space Science ('rendezvous' with a comet, and fly-bys of asteroids). In this specific context, the synthetic aperture radar is destined for an important role, but the rules and standard backgrounds of the Cartesian geometry are no longer justified. Several new techniques are proposed to handle with an optimal precision the data relative to celestial bodies with a complex geometry (coherent and non-coherent imagery). On the basis of a mathematical rigor (singleness of solutions, convergence of processes, biunivocity of transformations and generalizations), a lot of scenarios are discussed with key relations established (plane and spherical models, bodies with a symmetry of revolution and general bodies, specific sensor(s) trajectories as fly-bys or flight into orbit with the possibility of an approaching probe). The four methods developed are the tomographic analogy of radar principles (only known, previously, in the usual case of a straight line flight at constant altitude over a plane surface) and Hilbertian techniques for a direct adaptation to the scanned surface geometry, an automated autofocusing which enhances the contrast resulting from a Cartesian reconstruction and the coordinates transformation where the real space is converted into a fictitious space where Cartesian algorithms are fully rigorous. Beyond the fact that an interpolation step is often unavoidable, the major conclusion of the research is that all the prospected techniques are complementary and that the choice between the methods has to be made according to geometry, objectives and time requirements (reconstruction on board or not). In particular, coordinates transformation techniques are worthy of commendation in the case of plane

  19. Vertebral body or intervertebral disc wedging: which contributes more to thoracolumbar kyphosis in ankylosing spondylitis patients?

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hao; Qian, Bang-Ping; Qiu, Yong; Wang, Yan; Wang, Bin; Yu, Yang; Zhu, Ze-Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Both vertebral body wedging and disc wedging are found in ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients with thoracolumbar kyphosis. However, their relative contribution to thoracolumbar kyphosis is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to compare different contributions of vertebral and disc wedging to the thoracolumbar kyphosis in AS patients, and to analyze the relationship between the apical vertebral wedging angle and thoracolumbar kyphosis. From October 2009 to October 2013, a total of 59 consecutive AS patients with thoracolumbar kyphosis with a mean age of 38.1 years were recruited in this study. Based on global kyphosis (GK), 26 patients with GK < 70° were assigned to group A, and the other 33 patients with GK ≥ 70° were included in group B. Each GK was divided into disc wedge angles and vertebral wedge angles. The wedging angle of each disc and vertebra comprising the thoracolumbar kyphosis was measured, and the proportion of the wedging angle to the GK was calculated accordingly. Intergroup and intragroup comparisons were subsequently performed to investigate the different contributions of disc and vertebra to the GK. The correlation between the apical vertebral wedging angle and GK was calculated by Pearson correlation analysis. The duration of disease and sex were also recorded in this study. With respect to the mean disease duration, significant difference was observed between the two groups (P < 0.01). The wedging angle and wedging percentage of discs were significantly higher than those of vertebrae in group A (34.8° ± 2.5° vs 26.7° ± 2.7°, P < 0.01 and 56.6% vs 43.4%, P < 0.01), whereas disc wedging and disc wedging percentage were significantly lower than vertebrae in group B (37.6° ± 7.0° vs 50.1° ± 5.1°, P < 0.01 and 42.7% vs 57.3%, P < 0.01). The wedging of vertebrae was significantly higher in group B than in group A (50.1° ± 5.1° vs 26.7° ± 2.7°, P < 0

  20. Computational synthetic geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sturmfels, B. )

    1988-01-01

    This book deals with methods for realizing abstract geometric objects in concrete vector spaces. It considers a large class of problems from convexity and discrete geometry including constructing convex polytopes from simplicial complexes, vector geometries from incidence structures and hyperplane arrangements from oriented matroids. It appears that algorithms for these constructions exist if and only if arbitrary polynomial equations are decidable with respect to the underlying field. Besides such complexity theorems, a variety of symbolic algorithms are discussed, and the methods are applied to obtain mathematical results on convex polytopes, projective configurations and the combinatories of Grassmann varieties.

  1. Ice-wedge based permafrost chronologies and stable-water isotope records from Arctic Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetterich, Sebastian; Opel, Thomas; Meyer, Hanno; Schwamborn, Georg; Schirrmeister, Lutz; Dereviagin, Alexander Yu.

    2016-04-01

    Late Quaternary permafrost of northern latitudes contains large proportions of ground ice, including pore ice, segregation ice, massive ice, buried glacier ice and in particular ice wedges. Fossil ice-wedges are remnants of polygonal patterned ground in former tundra areas, which evolved over several tens of thousands of years in non-glaciated Beringia. Ice wedges originate from repeated frost cracking of the ground in winter and subsequent crack filling by snowmelt and re-freezing in the ground in spring. Hence, the stable water isotope composition (δ18O, δD, d excess) of wedge ice derives from winter precipitation and is commonly interpreted as wintertime climate proxy. Paleoclimate studies based on ice-wedge isotope data cover different timescales and periods of the late Quaternary. (MIS 6 to MIS 1). In the long-term scale the temporal resolution is rather low and corresponds to mid- and late Pleistocene and Holocene stratigraphic units. Recent progress has been made in developing centennial Late Glacial and Holocene time series of ice-wedge stable isotopes by applying radiocarbon dating of organic remains in ice samples. Ice wedges exposed at both coasts of the Dmitry Laptev Strait (East Siberian Sea) were studied to deduce winter climate conditions since about 200 kyr. Ice wedges aligned to distinct late Quaternary permafrost strata were studied for their isotopic composition and dated by radiocarbon ages of organic matter within the wedge ice or by cosmogenic nuclide ratios (36Cl/Cl-) of the ice. The paleoclimate interpretation is furthermore based on geocryological and paleoecological proxy data and geochronological information (radiocarbon, luminescence, radioisotope disequilibria 230Th/U) from ice-wedge embedding frozen deposits. Coldest winter conditions are mirrored by most negative δ18O mean values of -37 ‰ and δD mean values of -290 ‰ from ice wedges of the Last Glacial Maximum (26 to 22 kyr BP) while late Holocene (since about 4 kyr BP) and in

  2. Hyper-extended continental crust deformation in the light of Coulomb critical wedge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirrengarten, Michael; Manatschal, Gianreto; Yuan, Xiaoping; Kusznir, Nick; Maillot, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    The rocks forming the wedge shape termination of hyper-extended continental crust are deformed in the frictional field during the last stage of continental rifting due to cooling and hydration. Seismic interpretation and field evidence show that the basal boundary of the wedge is a low frictional décollement level. The wedge shape, the frictional deformation and the basal décollement correspond to the requirements of the critical Coulomb wedge (CCW) theory which describes the stability limit of a frictional wedge over a décollement. In a simple shear separation model the upper-plate margin (in the hangingwall of the detachment fault) corresponds to a tectonic extensional wedge whereas the lower plate (in the footwall of the detachment fault) is a gravitational wedge. This major difference causes the asymmetry of conjugate hyper-extended rifted margins. We measure a dataset of upper and lower hyper-extended wedge and compare it to the stability envelope of the CCW theory for serpentine and clay friction. We find a good fit by adjusting fluid pressure. The main results of our analysis are that the crustal wedges of lower plate margins are close to the critical shape, which explains their low variability whereas upper plate wedges can be critical, sub- or sup- critical due to the detachment evolution during rifting. On the upper plate side, according to the Coulomb tectonic extensional wedge, faults should be oriented toward the continent. Observations showed some continentward faults in the termination of the continental crust but there are also oceanward faults. This can be explained by two processes, first continentward faults are created only over the detachment, therefore if part of the hyper-extended upper plate crust is not directly over the detachment it will not be part of the wedge. Secondly the tip block of the wedge can be detached creating an extensional allochthon induced by the flattening of the detachment near the surface, therefore continentward

  3. A comparison of specularly reflective boundary conditions and rotationally invariant formulations for Discrete Ordinate Methods in axisymmetric geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jian; Roy, Somesh; Modest, Michael F.

    2016-10-01

    In simulations of periodic or symmetric geometries, computational domains are reduced by imaginary boundaries that exploit the symmetry conditions. Two boundary conditions are proposed for Discrete Ordinate Methods to solve axisymmetric radiation problems. Firstly, a specularly reflective boundary condition similar to that is used in Photon Monte Carlo methods is developed for Discrete Ordinate Methods. Secondly, the rotational invariant formulation is revisited for axisymmetric wedge geometries. Correspondingly, a new rotationally invariant boundary condition specially designed for axisymmetric problems on wedge shape is proposed to enforce the rotational invariance properties possessed by the radiative transfer equation (RTE) but violated by three-dimensional conventional Discrete Ordinate Methods. Both boundary conditions have the advantage that the discretization and linear equation solution procedures of conventional three-dimensional DOM are not affected by changing to a reduced geometry. Consistency, accuracy and efficiency of the new boundary conditions are demonstrated by multiple numerical examples involving periodic symmetry and axisymmetry. A comparison between specularly reflective boundary conditions and the rotationally invariant formulation shows that the latter offers several advantages for wedge geometries. In other symmetry conditions, when the rotational invariant formulation is not applicable, specular reflective boundary conditions are still effective.

  4. A Spherical Aerial Terrestrial Robot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, Christopher J.

    This thesis focuses on the design of a novel, ultra-lightweight spherical aerial terrestrial robot (ATR). The ATR has the ability to fly through the air or roll on the ground, for applications that include search and rescue, mapping, surveillance, environmental sensing, and entertainment. The design centers around a micro-quadcopter encased in a lightweight spherical exoskeleton that can rotate about the quadcopter. The spherical exoskeleton offers agile ground locomotion while maintaining characteristics of a basic aerial robot in flying mode. A model of the system dynamics for both modes of locomotion is presented and utilized in simulations to generate potential trajectories for aerial and terrestrial locomotion. Details of the quadcopter and exoskeleton design and fabrication are discussed, including the robot's turning characteristic over ground and the spring-steel exoskeleton with carbon fiber axle. The capabilities of the ATR are experimentally tested and are in good agreement with model-simulated performance. An energy analysis is presented to validate the overall efficiency of the robot in both modes of locomotion. Experimentally-supported estimates show that the ATR can roll along the ground for over 12 minutes and cover the distance of 1.7 km, or it can fly for 4.82 minutes and travel 469 m, on a single 350 mAh battery. Compared to a traditional flying-only robot, the ATR traveling over the same distance in rolling mode is 2.63-times more efficient, and in flying mode the system is only 39 percent less efficient. Experimental results also demonstrate the ATR's transition from rolling to flying mode.

  5. Physics of Spherical Torus Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    2000-01-01

    Broad and important progress in plasma tests, theory, new experiments, and future visions of the spherical torus (ST, or very low aspect ratio tokamaks) have recently emerged. These have substantially improved our understanding of the potential properties of the ST plasmas, since the preliminary calculation of the ST magnetohydrodynamic equilibria more than a decade ago. Exciting data have been obtained from concept exploration level ST experiments of modest capabilities (with major radii up to 35 cm), making important scientific contributions to toroidal confinement in general. The results have helped approval and construction of new and/or more powerful ST experiments, and stimulated an increasing number of theoretical calculations of interest to magnetic fusion energy. Utilizing the broad knowledge base from the successful tokamak and advanced tokamak research, a wide range of new ST physics features has been suggested. These properties of the ST plasma will be tested at the 1 MA level with major radius up to similar to 80 cm in the new proof of principle devices National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX, U.S.) [M. Peng , European Conf. Abst. 22C, 451 (1998); S. M. Kaye , Fusion Technol. 36, 16 (1999); M. Ono , "Exploration of Spherical Torus Physics in the NSTX Device," 17th IAEA Fusion Energy Conf., paper IAEA-CN-69/ICP/01 (R), Yokohama, Japan (1998)], Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST, U.K.) [A. C. Darke , Fusion Technol. 1, 799 (1995); Q. W. Morris , Proc. Int. Workshop on ST (Ioffe Inst., St. Petersburg, 1997), Vol. 1, p. 290], and Globus-M (R.F.) [V. K. Gusev , European Conf. Abst. 22C, 576 (1998)], which have just started full experimental operation. New concept exploration experiments, such as Pegasus (University of Wisconsin) [R. Fonck and the PEGASUS Team, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 267 (1999)], Helicity Injected Tokamak-II (HIT-II, University of Washington) [T. R. Jarboe , Phys. Plasmas 5, 1807 (1998)], and Current Drive Experiment-Upgrade (CDX

  6. APPARATUS FOR GRINDING SPHERICAL BODIES

    DOEpatents

    Burch, R.F. Jr.

    1963-09-24

    A relatively inexpensive device is described for grinding rough ceramic bodies into accurate spherical shapes using a conventional drill press and a belt sander. A horizontal disk with an abrasive-surfaced recess in its lower face is mounted eccentrically on a vertical shaft which is forced downward against a stop by a spring. Bodies to be ground are placed in the recess and are subjected to the abrasive action of the belt sander as the disk is rotated by the drill press. (AEC)

  7. Electronic switching spherical array antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stockton, R.

    1978-01-01

    This work was conducted to demonstrate the performance levels attainable with an ESSA (Electronic Switching Spherical Array) antenna by designing and testing an engineering model. The antenna was designed to satisfy general spacecraft environmental requirements and built to provide electronically commandable beam pointing capability throughout a hemisphere. Constant gain and beam shape throughout large volumetric coverage regions are the principle characteristics. The model is intended to be a prototype of a standard communications and data handling antenna for user scientific spacecraft with the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). Some additional testing was conducted to determine the feasibility of an integrated TDRSS and GPS (Global Positioning System) antenna system.

  8. Advanced geometries and regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Bulanov, S. S.; Bulanov, S. V.; Turchetti, G.; Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J.; Margarone, D.; Korn, G.

    2013-07-26

    We review and discuss different schemes of laser ion acceleration as well as advanced target geometries in connection with the development of the laser-driven proton source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases, which is a part of the ELIMED project.

  9. Spacetime and Euclidean geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brill, Dieter; Jacobson, Ted

    2006-04-01

    Using only the principle of relativity and Euclidean geometry we show in this pedagogical article that the square of proper time or length in a two-dimensional spacetime diagram is proportional to the Euclidean area of the corresponding causal domain. We use this relation to derive the Minkowski line element by two geometric proofs of the spacetime Pythagoras theorem.

  10. Listening to Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Brett D.; Barger, Rita

    2009-01-01

    The many connections between music and mathematics are well known. The length of a plucked string determines its tone, the time signature of a piece of music is a ratio, and note durations are measured in fractions. One connection commonly overlooked is that between music and geometry--specifically, geometric transformations, including…

  11. Making Solid Geometry Solid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartz, Viggo

    1981-01-01

    Allowing students to use a polystyrene cutter to fashion their own three-dimensional models is suggested as a means of allowing individuals to experience problems and develop ideas related to solid geometry. A list of ideas that can lead to mathematical discovery is provided. (MP)

  12. Teaching Geometry with Tangrams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Dorothy S.; Bologna, Elaine M.

    1982-01-01

    Geometry is viewed as the most neglected area of the elementary school mathematics curriculum. Tangram activities provide numerous worthwhile mathematical experiences for children. A method of constructing tangrams through paper folding is followed by suggested spatial visualization, measurement, and additional activities. (MP)

  13. Sliding vane geometry turbines

    DOEpatents

    Sun, Harold Huimin; Zhang, Jizhong; Hu, Liangjun; Hanna, Dave R

    2014-12-30

    Various systems and methods are described for a variable geometry turbine. In one example, a turbine nozzle comprises a central axis and a nozzle vane. The nozzle vane includes a stationary vane and a sliding vane. The sliding vane is positioned to slide in a direction substantially tangent to an inner circumference of the turbine nozzle and in contact with the stationary vane.

  14. Gravity is Geometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKeown, P. K.

    1984-01-01

    Clarifies two concepts of gravity--those of a fictitious force and those of how space and time may have geometry. Reviews the position of Newton's theory of gravity in the context of special relativity and considers why gravity (as distinct from electromagnetics) lends itself to Einstein's revolutionary interpretation. (JN)

  15. The Helen of Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, John

    2010-01-01

    The cycloid has been called the Helen of Geometry, not only because of its beautiful properties but also because of the quarrels it provoked between famous mathematicians of the 17th century. This article surveys the history of the cycloid and its importance in the development of the calculus.

  16. Geometry and physics

    PubMed Central

    Atiyah, Michael; Dijkgraaf, Robbert; Hitchin, Nigel

    2010-01-01

    We review the remarkably fruitful interactions between mathematics and quantum physics in the past decades, pointing out some general trends and highlighting several examples, such as the counting of curves in algebraic geometry, invariants of knots and four-dimensional topology. PMID:20123740

  17. The Geometry of Viruses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Case, Christine L.

    1991-01-01

    Presented is an activity in which students make models of viruses, which allows them to visualize the shape of these microorganisms. Included are some background on viruses, the biology and geometry of viruses, directions for building viruses, a comparison of cells and viruses, and questions for students. (KR)

  18. GEOMETRY, TENTATIVE GUIDES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KLIER, KATHERINE M.

    PRESENTED IS A FUSED COURSE IN PLANE, SOLID, AND COORDINATE GEOMETRY. ELEMENTARY SET THEORY, LOGIC, AND THE PRINCIPLE OF SEPARATION PROVIDE UNIFYING THREADS THROUGHOUT THE TEXT. THE TWO CURRICULUM GUIDES HAVE BEEN PREPARED FOR USE WITH TWO DIFFERENT TEXTS. EITHER CURRICULUM GUIDE MAY BE USED DEPENDING UPON THE CHOICE OF THE TEACHER AND THE NEEDS…

  19. Geometry of PDE's. IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prástaro, Agostino

    2008-02-01

    Following our previous results on this subject [R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(I): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. The general theory, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 239-266; R.P. Agarwal, A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. III(II): Webs on PDE's and integral bordism groups. Applications to Riemannian geometry PDE's, Adv. Math. Sci. Appl. 17 (2007) 267-285; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's and Mechanics, World Scientific, Singapore, 1996; A. Prástaro, Quantum and integral (co)bordism in partial differential equations, Acta Appl. Math. (5) (3) (1998) 243-302; A. Prástaro, (Co)bordism groups in PDE's, Acta Appl. Math. 59 (2) (1999) 111-201; A. Prástaro, Quantized Partial Differential Equations, World Scientific Publishing Co, Singapore, 2004, 500 pp.; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. I: Integral bordism groups in PDE's, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 319 (2006) 547-566; A. Prástaro, Geometry of PDE's. II: Variational PDE's and integral bordism groups, J. Math. Anal. Appl. 321 (2006) 930-948; A. Prástaro, Th.M. Rassias, Ulam stability in geometry of PDE's, Nonlinear Funct. Anal. Appl. 8 (2) (2003) 259-278; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, I, The MacMillan Company, New York, 1967; I. Stakgold, Boundary Value Problems of Mathematical Physics, II, Collier-MacMillan, Canada, Ltd, Toronto, Ontario, 1968], integral bordism groups of the Navier-Stokes equation are calculated for smooth, singular and weak solutions, respectively. Then a characterization of global solutions is made on this ground. Enough conditions to assure existence of global smooth solutions are given and related to nullity of integral characteristic numbers of the boundaries. Stability of global solutions are related to some characteristic numbers of the space-like Cauchy dataE Global solutions of variational problems constrained by (NS) are classified by means of suitable integral bordism groups too.

  20. Biomechanical effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles on unilateral weight bearing

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Tomonori; Kito, Nobuhiro; Yukimune, Masaki; Tokuda, Kazuki; Tanimoto, Kenji; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral wedge insoles reduce the peak external knee adduction moment and are advocated for patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, some patients demonstrate adverse biomechanical effects with treatment. In this study, we examined the immediate effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles under unilateral weight bearing. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy young adults participated in this study. The subjects were assessed by using the foot posture index, and were divided into three groups: normal foot, pronated foot, and supinated foot groups. The knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm under the studied conditions were measured by using a three-dimensional motion capture system and force plates. [Results] In the normal and pronated groups, the change in knee adduction moment significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition compared with the medial wedge insole condition. In the normal group, the change in the knee-ground reaction force lever arm also significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition than under the medial wedge insole condition. [Conclusion] Lateral wedge insoles significantly reduced the knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm during unilateral weight bearing in subjects with normal feet, and the biomechanical effects varied according to individual foot alignment. PMID:26957775

  1. Biomechanical effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles on unilateral weight bearing.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Tomonori; Kito, Nobuhiro; Yukimune, Masaki; Tokuda, Kazuki; Tanimoto, Kenji; Anan, Masaya; Takahashi, Makoto; Shinkoda, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral wedge insoles reduce the peak external knee adduction moment and are advocated for patients with knee osteoarthritis. However, some patients demonstrate adverse biomechanical effects with treatment. In this study, we examined the immediate effects of lateral and medial wedge insoles under unilateral weight bearing. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty healthy young adults participated in this study. The subjects were assessed by using the foot posture index, and were divided into three groups: normal foot, pronated foot, and supinated foot groups. The knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm under the studied conditions were measured by using a three-dimensional motion capture system and force plates. [Results] In the normal and pronated groups, the change in knee adduction moment significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition compared with the medial wedge insole condition. In the normal group, the change in the knee-ground reaction force lever arm also significantly decreased under the lateral wedge insole condition than under the medial wedge insole condition. [Conclusion] Lateral wedge insoles significantly reduced the knee adduction moment and knee-ground reaction force lever arm during unilateral weight bearing in subjects with normal feet, and the biomechanical effects varied according to individual foot alignment.

  2. Inferring the spatial variation of the wedge strength based on a modified critical taper model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, C.; Liu, H.; Hsieh, Y.; Dong, J.

    2013-12-01

    Critical taper wedge theory has been widely applied to evaluate the strength of the detachment fault and the wedge by measuring taper angle. Traditional taper model, which incorporated constant cohesion and friction angle, fails to explain the lateral variation of the taper angle. A modified critical taper model adopting nonlinear Hoek-Brown failure criterion is proposed accordingly. The fold-and-thrust belt of central Taiwan was studied. Based on the field works and laboratory tests, the geological strength index (GSI) and the uniaxial compressive strength were obtained and the wedge strength can be estimated accordingly. The GSI values from investigation are decreased from the west to the east along the cross section due to the wedge strength heterogeneity. The uniaxial compressive strength of intact rock varies from the age of formation and lithology. The estimated wedge strength exhibits a strong spatial variation. The strength of the detachment fault was derived from rotary shear tests using fault gouge materials under different velocities and normal stresses. General speaking, the steady-state friction coefficient are about 0.29-0.46 when the shear velocity less than 0.1 m/s. The friction coefficient is not sensitive to the normal stress. Consequently, the lateral variation of the taper angle, which calculated by modified critical taper model, is mainly dominated by the wedge strength heterogeneity and the thickening of the wedge from the west to the east.

  3. Gap Test Modeling to Predict Wedge Tests Initiation of PBXN-103

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richmond, Clinton Thomas

    1997-07-01

    The experimental Initiation of PBXN-103 by the standard wedge test has been modeled by using the HVRB initiation and growth model in the CTH code. The P-081 plane wave lens was used as initiator in these experiments. The wedge test was converted to a gap test by replacing the PBXN-103 wedge by a PBXN-103 cylinder. By modeling this gap test, shock initiation in the PBXN-103 was calculated. The results of these calculations are in agreement with the experimental results of the wedge tests. Comparison of the CTH code calculations with the wedge test data was accomplished by using an auxiliary program to the CTH code called the BCAT code. In particular, it computes the ``pop plot'' and compares it to the wedge test data. It also predicts other fundamental results of the wedge test. Shock initiation of PBX-9404 was also calculated by the HVRB model and compared to the same calculation using the Lee-Tarver model. Comparison of the two calculations indicate that the HVRB model is apparently as good as the Lee-Tarver model.

  4. Semi-analytical solutions of groundwater flow in multi-zone (patchy) wedge-shaped aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samani, Nozar; Sedghi, Mohammad M.

    2015-03-01

    Alluvial fans are potential sites of potable groundwater in many parts of the world. Characteristics of alluvial fans sediments are changed radially from high energy coarse-grained deposition near the apex to low energy fine-grained deposition downstream so that patchy wedge-shaped aquifers with radial heterogeneity are formed. The hydraulic parameters of the aquifers (e.g. hydraulic conductivity and specific storage) change in the same fashion. Analytical or semi-analytical solutions of the flow in wedge-shaped aquifers are available for homogeneous cases. In this paper we derive semi-analytical solutions of groundwater flow to a well in multi-zone wedge-shaped aquifers. Solutions are provided for three wedge boundary configurations namely: constant head-constant head wedge, constant head-barrier wedge and barrier-barrier wedge. Derivation involves the use of integral transforms methods. The effect of heterogeneity ratios of zones on the response of the aquifer is examined. The results are presented in form of drawdown and drawdown derivative type curves. Heterogeneity has a significant effect on over all response of the pumped aquifer. Solutions help understanding the behavior of heterogeneous multi-zone aquifers for sustainable development of the groundwater resources in alluvial fans.

  5. Diffuse holographic interferometric observation of shock wave reflection from a skewed wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Numata, D.; Ohtani, K.; Takayama, K.

    2009-06-01

    The pattern of shock wave reflection over a wedge is, in general, either a regular reflection or a Mach reflection, depending on wedge angles, shock wave Mach numbers, and specific heat ratios of gases. However, regular and Mach reflections can coexist, in particular, over a three-dimensional wedge surface, whose inclination angles locally vary normal to the direction of shock propagation. This paper reports a result of diffuse double exposure holographic interferometric observations of shock wave reflections over a skewed wedge surface placed in a 100 × 180 mm shock tube. The wedge consists of a straight generating line whose local inclination angle varies continuously from 30° to 60°. Painting its surface with fluorescent spray paint and irradiating its surface with a collimated object beam at a time interval of a few microseconds, we succeeded in visualizing three-dimensional shock reflection over the skewed wedge surface. Experiments were performed at shock Mach numbers, 1.55, 2.02, and 2.53 in air. From reconstructed holographic images, we estimated critical transition angles at these shock wave Mach numbers and found that these were very close to those over straight wedges. This is attributable to the flow three-dimensionality.

  6. A feasibility study for the spherical torus experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, E; Peng, Yueng Kay Martin

    1985-10-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) proposes to build the Spherical Torus Experiment (STX), a very low aspect ratio toroidal confinement device. This proposal concentrates on tokamak operation of the experiment; however, it can in principle be operated as a pinch or reversed-field pinch as well. As a tokamak, the spherical torus confines a plasma that is characterized by high toroidal beta, low poloidal beta, large natural elongation, high plasma current for a given edge q, and strong paramagnetism. These features combine to offer the possibility of a compact, low-field fusion device. The figure below shows that when compared to a conventional tokamak the spherical torus represents a major change in geometry. The primary goals of the experiment will be to demonstrate a capability for high beta (20%) in the first stability regime, to extend our knowledge of tokamak confinement scaling, and to test oscillating-field current drive. The experiment will operate in the high-beta, collisionless regime, which is achieved in STX at low temperatures because of the geometry. At a minimum, operation of STX will help to resolve fundamental questions regarding the scaling of beta and confinement in tokamaks. Complete success in this program would have a significant impact on toroidal fusion research in that it would demonstrate solutions to the problems of beta and steady-state operation in the tokamak. The proposed device has a major radius of 0.45 m, a toroidai field of 0.5 T, a plasma current of 900 kA, and heating by neutral beam injection. We estimate 30 months for design, construction, and assembly. The budget estimate, including contingency and escalation, is $6.8 million.

  7. Role of Hydrogen in stagnant slabs and big mantle wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohtani, E.; Zhao, D.

    2008-12-01

    Recent seismic tomography data imply that subducting slabs are stagnant at some regions such as beneath Japan and Northeast China [1, 2]. The stagnant slab can have an important effect on the overlying transition zone and upper mantle. A big mantle wedge (BMW) model has been proposed by Zhao [2], in which the stagnant slab in the transition zone could play an essential role in the intra-plate volcanic activities overlying the slab. Water released by the stagnant slab could be important for such igneous activities, such as Mt. Changbai in Northeast China. In cold subducting slabs, several hydrous minerals together with nominally anhydrous minerals accommodate OH and transport water into the transition zone [3]. The effect of dehydration of the stagnant slab has been analyzed by Richard et al. [4]. They argued that warming of the stagnant slab due to heat conduction could play an important role for the slab dehydration, and local oversaturation could be achieved due to decrease of the water solubility in minerals with temperature, and fluid can be formed in the overlying transition zone. We determined the hydrogen diffusion in wadsleyite and ringwoodite under the transition zone conditions in order to clarify the deep processes of the stagnant slabs, and found that diffusion rates of hydrogen are comparable with that of olivine [5]. We also determined the dihedral angle of aqueous fluid between wadsleyite grains and majorite grains under the transition zone conditions. The dihedral angles are very small, around 20-40 degrees, indicating that the oversaturated fluids can move rapidly by the percolation mechanism in the transition zone. The fluids moved to the top of the 410 km discontinuity can generate heavy hydrous melts due to a larger depression of the wet solidus at the base of the upper mantle [6]. Gravitationally stable hydrous melts can be formed at the base of the upper mantle, which is consistent with seismological observations of the low velocity beneath

  8. Transonic Aerodynamic Characteristics of Two Wedge Airfoil Sections Including Unsteady Flow Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Patrick J.

    1959-01-01

    A two-dimensional wind-tunnel investigation has been conducted on a 20-percent-thick single-wedge airfoil section. Steady-state forces and moments were determined from pressure measurements at Mach numbers from 0.70 to about 1.25. Additional information on the flows about the single wedge is provided by means of instantaneous pressure measurements at Mach numbers up to unity. Pressure distributions were also obtained on a symmetrical double-wedge or diamond-shaped profile which had the same leading-edge included angle as the single-wedge airfoil. A comparison of the data on the two profiles to provide information on the effects of the afterbody showed that with the exception of drag, the single-wedge profile proved to be aerodynamically superior to the diamond profile in all respects. The lift effectiveness of the single-wedge airfoil section far exceeded that of conventional thin airfoil sections over the speed range of the investigation. Pitching-moment irregularities, caused by negative loadings near the trailing edge, generally associated with conventional airfoils of equivalent thicknesses were not exhibited by the single-wedge profile. Moderately high pulsating pressures existing over the base of the single-wedge airfoil section were significantly reduced as the Mach number was increased beyond 0.92 and the boundaries of the dead airspace at the base of the model converged to eliminate the vortex street in the wake. Increasing the leading-edge radius from 0 to 1 percent of the chord had a minor effect on the steady-state forces and generally raised the level of pressure pulsations over the forward part of the single-wedge profile.

  9. Depth dependence determination of the wedge transmission factor for 4--10 MV photon beams

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, E.C.; Gortney, J.; Blackwell, C.R.

    1988-07-01

    The depth dependence (up to 25 cm) of the in-phantom wedge transmission factor (WTF) has been determined for three medical linear accelerator x-ray beams with energies of 4, 6, and 10 MV containing 15/sup 0/--60/sup 0/ (nominal) brass wedges. All measurements were made with a cylindrical ionization chamber in water, for a field size of 10 x 10 cm/sup 2/ with a source--skin distance of 80 or 100 cm. We conclude that, for the accelerators studied, the WTF factor at depth is less than 2% different from that determined at d/sub max/ (for the nominal wedge angles and photon energies studied) unless the depth of interest is greater than 10 cm. Up to the maximum depth studied (25 cm) the relative wedge factor: that is, wedge factor at depth compared to that determined at d/sub max/ : was about equal to or less than 1.02 for the 15/sup 0/ and 30/sup 0/ wedges and any of the photon beam energies studied. For the seldom utilized combination of a nominal wedge angle in excess of 45/sup 0/ with a depth greater than 10 cm, the WTF at depth can differ from the WTF determined at d/sub max/, by up to 5%. Since the wedge transmission factor is reflective of relative percent dose data, our results also indicate that it is in error to use open field percent depth doses for certain combinations of wedge angle, photon energy, and depth.

  10. Axi-symmetric patterns of active polar filaments on spherical and composite surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Pragya; Rao, Madan

    2014-03-01

    Experiments performed on Fission Yeast cells of cylindrical and spherical shapes, rod-shaped bacteria and reconstituted cylindrical liposomes suggest the influence of cell geometry on patterning of cortical actin. A theoretical model based on active hydrodynamic description of cortical actin that includes curvature-orientation coupling predicts spontaneous formation of acto-myosin rings, cables and nodes on cylindrical and spherical geometries [P. Srivastava et al, PRL 110, 168104(2013)]. Stability and dynamics of these patterns is also affected by the cellular shape and has been observed in experiments performed on Fission Yeast cells of spherical shape. Motivated by this, we study the stability and dynamics of axi-symmetric patterns of active polar filaments on the surfaces of spherical, saddle shaped and conical geometry and classify the stable steady state patterns on these surfaces. Based on the analysis of the fluorescence images of Myosin-II during ring slippage we propose a simple mechanical model for ring-sliding based on force balance and make quantitative comparison with the experiments performed on Fission Yeast cells. NSF Grant DMR-1004789 and Syracuse Soft Matter Program.

  11. An introduction to Minkowski geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnsworth, David L.

    2016-07-01

    The fundamental ideas of Minkowski geometries are presented. Learning about Minkowski geometries can sharpen our students' understanding of concepts such as distance measurement. Many of its ideas are important and accessible to undergraduate students. Following a brief overview, distance and orthogonality in Minkowski geometries are thoroughly discussed and many illustrative examples and applications are supplied. Suggestions for further study of these geometries are given. Indeed, Minkowski geometries are an excellent source of topics for undergraduate research and independent study.

  12. Alpine tectonic wedging and crustal delamination in the Cantabrian Mountains (NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallastegui, Jorge; Pulgar, Javier A.; Gallart, Josep

    2016-07-01

    The Cantabrian Mountains have been interpreted as a Paleozoic basement block uplifted during an Alpine deformation event that led to the partial closure of the Bay of Biscay and the building of the Pyrenean range in the Cenozoic. A detailed interpretation of deep seismic reflection profile ESCIN-2 and the two-dimensional seismic modelling of the data allowed us to construct a N-S geological cross section along the southern border of the Cantabrian Mountains and the transition to the Duero Cenozoic foreland basin, highlighting the Alpine structure. The proposed geological cross section has been constrained by all geophysical data available, including a 2-D gravity model constructed for this study as well as refraction and magnetotelluric models from previous studies. A set of south-vergent thrusts dipping 30 to 36° to the north, cut the upper crust with a ramp geometry and sole in the boundary with the middle crust. These thrusts are responsible for the uplift and the main Alpine deformation in the Cantabrian Mountains. A conspicuous reflective Moho shows that the crust thickens northwards from the Duero basin, where subhorizontal Moho is 32 km deep, to 47 km in the northernmost end of ESCIN-2, where Moho dips to the north beneath the Cantabrian Mountains. Further north, out of the profile, Moho reaches a maximum depth of 55 km, according to wide-angle/refraction data. ESCIN-2 indicates the presence of a tectonic wedge of the crust of the Cantabrian margin beneath the Cantabrian Mountains, which is indented from north to south into the delaminated Iberian crust, forcing its northward subduction.

  13. Experimental Investigation of Shock-Shock Interactions Over a 2-D Wedge at M=6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of fin-leading-edge radius and sweep angle on peak heating rates due to shock-shock interactions were investigated in the NASA Langley Research Center 20-inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. The fin model leading edges, which represent cylindrical leading edges or struts on hypersonic vehicles, were varied from 0.25 inches to 0.75 inches in radius. A 9deg wedge generated a planar oblique shock at 16.7deg to the flow that intersected the fin bow shock, producing a shock-shock interaction that impinged on the fin leading edge. The fin angle of attack was varied from 0deg (normal to the free-stream) to 15deg and 25deg swept forward. Global temperature data was obtained from the surface of the fused silica fins through phosphor thermography. Metal oil flow models with the same geometries as the fused silica models were used to visualize the streamline patterns for each angle of attack. High-speed zoom-schlieren videos were recorded to show the features and temporal unsteadiness of the shock-shock interactions. The temperature data were analyzed using one-dimensional semi-infinite as well as one- and two-dimensional finite-volume methods to determine the proper heat transfer analysis approach to minimize errors from lateral heat conduction due to the presence of strong surface temperature gradients induced by the shock interactions. The general trends in the leading-edge heat transfer behavior were similar for the three shock-shock interactions, respectively, between the test articles with varying leading-edge radius. The dimensional peak heat transfer coefficient augmentation increased with decreasing leading-edge radius. The dimensional peak heat transfer output from the two-dimensional code was about 20% higher than the value from a standard, semi-infinite one-dimensional method.

  14. Three-dimensional ray tracing in spherical and elliptical generalized Luneburg lenses for application in the human eye lens.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Correa, J E; Coello, V; Garza-Rivera, A; Puente, N P; Chávez-Cerda, S

    2016-03-10

    Ray tracing in spherical Luneburg lenses has always been represented in 2D. All propagation planes in a 3D spherical Luneburg lens generate the same ray tracing, due to its radial symmetry. A geometry without radial symmetry generates a different ray tracing. For this reason, a new ray tracing method in 3D through spherical and elliptical Luneburg lenses using 2D methods is proposed. The physics of the propagation is shown here, which allows us to make a ray tracing associated with a vortex beam. A 3D ray tracing in a composite modified Luneburg lens that represents the human eye lens is also presented.

  15. Three-dimensional ray tracing in spherical and elliptical generalized Luneburg lenses for application in the human eye lens.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Correa, J E; Coello, V; Garza-Rivera, A; Puente, N P; Chávez-Cerda, S

    2016-03-10

    Ray tracing in spherical Luneburg lenses has always been represented in 2D. All propagation planes in a 3D spherical Luneburg lens generate the same ray tracing, due to its radial symmetry. A geometry without radial symmetry generates a different ray tracing. For this reason, a new ray tracing method in 3D through spherical and elliptical Luneburg lenses using 2D methods is proposed. The physics of the propagation is shown here, which allows us to make a ray tracing associated with a vortex beam. A 3D ray tracing in a composite modified Luneburg lens that represents the human eye lens is also presented. PMID:26974795

  16. Metastable olivine wedge beneath northeast China and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, G.; Zhao, D.; Zhang, G.

    2013-12-01

    When the Pacific slab subducted into the mantle transition zone, there might exist a metastable olivine wedge (MOW) inside the slab due to the phase transition. Lots of researchers have adopted such various methods to detect the characteristics of this MOW as the forward modeling of travel times, shear wave amplitude patterns, teleseismic P wave coda, receiver function imaging, thermodynamic simulation and so on. Almost all results could be more or less affected by the source, the receiver and/or the velocity model passed through by the seismic rays. In this study, we have used 21 deep earthquakes, greater than 400 km and locating beneath northeast China, to study the velocity within the MOW. For more precisions, we have done further modifications in two ways based on our previous studies. (1) Double-difference location method is used to relocate all events with an error of 1-2 km with the data recorded by stations both at northeast China and at Japan. All relocated events locate in a zone about 30 km away from the upper boundary of Pacific slab. (2) Double residual travel times, generated by an event-pair at a common station at only Japan, are used to constrain the velocity anomaly rather than the residuals themselves. As a result, we have found that an ultra-lower velocity zone (ULVZ), averagely -7% relative to the iasp91 model, exists within the subducted Pacific slab around the deep earthquakes, which might be represented as the metastable olivine wedge. Because of the lower-velocity corresponding to the lower-density, the MOW would provide upward buoyancy forces which might prevent the slab from free subduction into the mantle transition zone. This feed-back mechanism of MOW to the slab is called ';parachute-effect', which is characterized by other researchers. In addition, the existence of the ULVZ or the MOW in the slab may supply a possible mechanism for triggering deep earthquakes, called ';phase transformation faulting', which was already proposed few

  17. Links Between Displacement Rates and Erosion in Experimental Tectonic Wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, L.; Hilley, G.; Take, A.

    2008-12-01

    Erosional redistribution of mass along Earth's surface modifies the near-surface lithostatic stresses, altering displacement rates and the kinematics within orogens. In this study we use analogue experiments of a deforming sand wedge to systematically examine the impact that erosion may have had on the kinematics of the Argentine Precordilleran fold-and-thrust belt at ~32.5°S. Here, the history of deformation has been superbly documented by others, and that work resolves changes in shortening rates over time throughout the range. Specifically, total shortening rates across the fold-and-thrust belt may have changed over time, and out-of-sequence thrusting may have played an important role accommodating deformation at various times in the history of the fold-and-thrust belt. We hypothesize that such changes may be the response of the fold-and-thrust belt to changing erosion of these ranges. To this end, we have constructed an analogue sandbox experiments whose specific layered rheology is akin to that documented in the Precordillera fold-and-thrust belt in central Argentina. Our contractional experimental apparatus (sandbox) includes a servo-controlled feedback system that allows for a variety of boundary conditions to be applied to the moving wall, including constant displacement rate, time-varying displacement rate, constant loading, and time-varying loading. The application of a loading rate allows us to explicitly investigate feedbacks between topographic construction, erosion, strain softening within the dry sand, and temporal changes in total shortening rates that would be difficult to examine using the constant velocity conditions that are usually applied to the analogue models. We also apply Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) techniques to digital images from the experimental model to derive high-resolution kinematics and calculate strain, uplift and exhumation rates. Preliminary results indicate that changes in the erosional efficiency in the experimental

  18. Line-shape flattening resulting from hypersonic nozzle wedge flow in low-pressure chemical lasers.

    PubMed

    Livingston, P M; Bullock, D L

    1980-07-01

    The new hypersonic wedge nozzle (HYWN) supersonic wedge nozzle design produces a significant component of directed gas flow along the optical axis of a laser cavity comparable to thermal speeds. The gain-line-shape function is broadened and the refractive-index line shape is also spread as a function of wedge-flow half-angle. An analytical treatment as well as a numerical study is presented that evaluates the Doppler-directed-flow impact on the number of longitudinal modes and their frequencies as well as on gain and refractive-index saturation of those that lase in a Fabry-Perot cavity.

  19. Sol-gel based anti-reflection coatings on wedged laser rods using a spin coater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pareek, R.; Joshi, A. S.; Gupta, P. D.; Biswas, P. K.; Das, S.

    2005-07-01

    Anti-reflection (AR) sol-gel coatings are deposited on wedge glass optics for high-power lasers using spin coating technique. Characterization of these coatings on BK-7 glass substrates is carried out in terms of thickness profile across the surface, thickness variation w.r.t. wedge angle, and its effect on AR coating reflectivity, at different wedge angles from 1° to 7°. Results of the study are used to deposit AR coatings on inclined end faces of Nd:phosphate glass laser rods.

  20. Plasma instability in fast spherical discharge induced by a preionization

    SciTech Connect

    Antsiferov, P. S.; Dorokhin, L. A.

    2015-04-07

    As it was shown earlier, fast discharge (dI/dt ∼ 10{sup 12 }A/s and I{sub max} ≈ 40 kA) in a spherical cavity (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, inner diameter 11 mm, 4 mm apertures for the current supply) filled with working gas (Ar and Xe, pressure 80 Pa), results in the formation of a plasma with the form close to spherical. The physical mechanism can be the cumulation of a convergent shock wave, which was originated near the inner surface of the discharge cavity. It was also shown for the cylindrical fast discharge that the preionization influences the dynamics of the cylindrical convergent shock wave, its evolutions becomes faster. The present work is devoted to the study of the influence of the preionization on the plasma formation in the fast discharge with spherical geometry (Ar, 80 Pa). The inductive storage with plasma erosion opening switch was used as a current driver. The spatial structure of the discharge plasma was studied by means of a pin-hole camera with the microchannel plate (MCP) detector with time gate of 5 ns. The extreme ultra violet spectra were studied by means of the grazing incidence spectrometer with the same MCP detector with time gate of 20 ns. Beside the expected effects (reduction of the spherical plasma formation time and some increase of the electron temperature), the preionization of the discharge by the current 500 A results also in the development of the plasma instabilities and destruction of the compact plasma ball in several tens of nanoseconds. Possible mechanism of the instability is discussed.

  1. How should spin-weighted spherical functions be defined?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Spin-weighted spherical functions provide a useful tool for analyzing tensor-valued functions on the sphere. A tensor field can be decomposed into complex-valued functions by taking contractions with tangent vectors on the sphere and the normal to the sphere. These component functions are usually presented as functions on the sphere itself, but this requires an implicit choice of distinguished tangent vectors with which to contract. Thus, we may more accurately say that spin-weighted spherical functions are functions of both a point on the sphere and a choice of frame in the tangent space at that point. The distinction becomes extremely important when transforming the coordinates in which these functions are expressed, because the implicit choice of frame will also transform. Here, it is proposed that spin-weighted spherical functions should be treated as functions on the spin or rotation groups, which simultaneously tracks the point on the sphere and the choice of tangent frame by rotating elements of an orthonormal basis. In practice, the functions simply take a quaternion argument and produce a complex value. This approach more cleanly reflects the geometry involved, and allows for a more elegant description of the behavior of spin-weighted functions. In this form, the spin-weighted spherical harmonics have simple expressions as elements of the Wigner 𝔇 representations, and transformations under rotation are simple. Two variants of the angular-momentum operator are defined directly in terms of the spin group; one is the standard angular-momentum operator L, while the other is shown to be related to the spin-raising operator ð.

  2. VACUUM calculation in azimuthally symmetric geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Chance, M.S.

    1996-11-01

    A robustly accurate and effective method is presented to solve Laplace`s equation in general azimuthally symmetric geometry for the magnetic scalar potential in the region surrounding a plasma discharge which may or may not contain external conducting shells. These shells can be topologically toroidal or spherical, and may have toroidal gaps in them. The solution is incorporated into the various MHD stability codes either through the volume integrated perturbed magnetic energy in the vacuum region or through the continuity requirements for the normal component of the perturbed magnetic field and the total perturbed pressure across the unperturbed plasma-vacuum boundary. The method is based upon using Green`s second identity and the method of collocation. As useful byproducts, the eddy currents and the simulation of Mirnov loop measurements are calculated.

  3. Geometry and mechanics of thin growing bilayers.

    PubMed

    Pezzulla, Matteo; Smith, Gabriel P; Nardinocchi, Paola; Holmes, Douglas P

    2016-05-11

    We investigate how thin sheets of arbitrary shapes morph under the isotropic in-plane expansion of their top surface, which may represent several stimuli such as nonuniform heating, local swelling and differential growth. Inspired by geometry, an analytical model is presented that rationalizes how the shape of the disk influences morphing, from the initial spherical bending to the final isometric limit. We introduce a new measure of slenderness that describes a sheet in terms of both thickness and plate shape. We find that the mean curvature of the isometric state is three fourths the natural curvature, which we verify by numerics and experiments. We finally investigate the emergence of a preferred direction of bending in the isometric state, guided by numerical analyses. The scalability of our model suggests that it is suitable to describe the morphing of sheets spanning several orders of magnitude.

  4. Geometry and mechanics of thin growing bilayers.

    PubMed

    Pezzulla, Matteo; Smith, Gabriel P; Nardinocchi, Paola; Holmes, Douglas P

    2016-05-11

    We investigate how thin sheets of arbitrary shapes morph under the isotropic in-plane expansion of their top surface, which may represent several stimuli such as nonuniform heating, local swelling and differential growth. Inspired by geometry, an analytical model is presented that rationalizes how the shape of the disk influences morphing, from the initial spherical bending to the final isometric limit. We introduce a new measure of slenderness that describes a sheet in terms of both thickness and plate shape. We find that the mean curvature of the isometric state is three fourths the natural curvature, which we verify by numerics and experiments. We finally investigate the emergence of a preferred direction of bending in the isometric state, guided by numerical analyses. The scalability of our model suggests that it is suitable to describe the morphing of sheets spanning several orders of magnitude. PMID:27098344

  5. Dose distribution analysis of physical and dynamic wedges by using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy MatriXX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hae-Kag; Cho, Jae-Hwan; Cho, Dae-chul

    2013-05-01

    This study investigated differences between the physical wedge and the dynamic wedge distributions of radiation by using an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ImRT) MatriXX. The linear accelerator used X-rays with energy levels of 6 MV and 10 MV to adjust the collimator by motoring the independent jaws (X1, X2, Y1, Y2) for setting wedge angles of 15, 30, 45, and 60 degrees. The collimator field size was set as 10 × 10 cm2 or 20 × 20 cm2 at the maximum dose point. The dose distribution for each wedge had ±5% and ±11% errors for field sizes of 10 × 10 cm2 and 20 × 20 cm2, respectively. The error was greatest at a wedge angle of 45 degrees and was pronounced at the end of the dynamic wedge where Y1 and Y2 met. Consequently, concluded that the dose distributions were similar for both wedges for the field size of a small beam profile. The beam dose was greatly increased at the end of the dynamic wedge. A more precise estimate of the therapeutic dose of radiation for a dynamic wedge that nearly matches that of the physical wedge can be achieved by correcting of the increasing part of the beam dose. The findings imply that a heavy wedge filter should not be used when calculating the isodose distribution and the therapeutic dose.

  6. Geometry definition with MAZE

    SciTech Connect

    Nebeck, H.E.

    1986-08-01

    The MAZE mesh generator represents an arbitrary two dimensional region of space as an ordered collection of quadrilateral elements. Each element is defined by its four corner points (nodes) and an integer material number. Models are created by subdividing the region(s) of interest into one or more PARTS and specifying the element distribution in each part. Then, parts can be merged together to form the meshed representation of the entire region. Applying boundary conditions and describing material properties completes the model construction process. This activity takes place in three distinct phases: phase I-define geometry, subdivide regions into elements; phase II-refine geometry, establish interface and boundary conditions; phase III-describe material properties. This work presents explanations and examples of the phase I commands, along with an overview of the MAZE mesh generation process.

  7. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    DOEpatents

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  8. Influence of intermolecular forces at critical-point wedge filling.

    PubMed

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Parry, Andrew O

    2016-04-01

    We use microscopic density functional theory to study filling transitions in systems with long-ranged wall-fluid and short-ranged fluid-fluid forces occurring in a right-angle wedge. By changing the strength of the wall-fluid interaction we can induce both wetting and filling transitions over a wide range of temperatures and study the order of these transitions. At low temperatures we find that both wetting and filling transitions are first order in keeping with predictions of simple local effective Hamiltonian models. However close to the bulk critical point the filling transition is observed to be continuous even though the wetting transition remains first order and the wetting binding potential still exhibits a small activation barrier. The critical singularities for adsorption for the continuous filling transitions depend on whether retarded or nonretarded wall-fluid forces are present and are in excellent agreement with predictions of effective Hamiltonian theory even though the change in the order of the transition was not anticipated.

  9. Transonic flow past a wedge profile with detached bow wave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincenti, Walter G; Wagoner, Cleo B

    1952-01-01

    A theoretical study has been made of the aerodynamic characteristics at zero angle of attack of a thin, doubly symmetrical double-wedge profile in the range of supersonic flight speed in which the bow wave is detached. The analysis utilizes the equations of the transonic small-disturbance theory and involves no assumptions beyond those implicit in this theory. The mixed flow about the front half of the profile is calculated by relaxation solution of boundary conditions along the shock polar and sonic line. The purely subsonic flow about the rear of the profile is found by means of the method of characteristics specialized to the transonic small-disturbance theory. Complete calculations were made for four values of the transonic similarity parameter. These were found sufficient to bridge the gap between the previous results of Guderley and Yoshihara at a Mach number of 1 and the results which are readily obtained when the bow wave is attached and the flow is completely supersonic.

  10. Hydrodynamics of superfluids confined in blocked rings and wedges.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Chandan; Valls, Oriol T

    2009-01-01

    Motivated by many recent experimental studies of nonclassical rotational inertia (NCRI) in superfluid and supersolid samples, we present a study of the hydrodynamics of a superfluid confined in the two-dimensional region (equivalent to a long cylinder) between two concentric arcs of radii b and a (bwedges (b=0) with beta>pi , we find an unexpected divergence of the velocity at the origin, which implies the presence of either a region of normal fluid or a vortex for any nonzero value of the angular velocity. Implications of our results for experiments on "supersolid" behavior in solid 4He are discussed. A number of mathematical issues are pointed out and resolved. PMID:19257135

  11. Measuring Spherical Harmonic Coefficients on a Sphere

    SciTech Connect

    Pollaine, S; Haan, S W

    2003-05-16

    The eigenfunctions of Rayleigh-Taylor modes on a spherical capsule are the spherical harmonics Y{sub l,m} These can be measured by measuring the surface perturbations along great circles and fitting them to the first few modes by a procedure described in this article. For higher mode numbers, it is more convenient to average the Fourier power spectra along the great circles, and then transform them to spherical harmonic modes by an algorithm derived here.

  12. MUSCLE: MUltiscale Spherical-ColLapse Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyrinck, Mark C.

    2016-05-01

    MUSCLE (MUltiscale Spherical ColLapse Evolution) produces low-redshift approximate N-body realizations accurate to few-Megaparsec scales. It applies a spherical-collapse prescription on multiple Gaussian-smoothed scales. It achieves higher accuracy than perturbative schemes (Zel'dovich and second-order Lagrangian perturbation theory - 2LPT), and by including the void-in-cloud process (voids in large-scale collapsing regions), solves problems with a single-scale spherical-collapse scheme.

  13. Archimedes' floating bodies on a spherical Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rorres, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Archimedes was the first to systematically find the centers of gravity of various solid bodies and to apply this concept in determining stable configurations of floating bodies. In this paper, we discuss an error in a proof developed by Archimedes that involves determining whether a uniform, spherical cap will float stably with its base horizontal in a liquid on a spherical Earth. We present a simpler, corrected proof and discuss aspects of his proof regarding a spherical cap that is not uniform.

  14. Inflation from quantum geometry.

    PubMed

    Bojowald, Martin

    2002-12-23

    Quantum geometry predicts that a universe evolves through an inflationary phase at small volume before exiting gracefully into a standard Friedmann phase. This does not require the introduction of additional matter fields with ad hoc potentials; rather, it occurs because of a quantum gravity modification of the kinetic part of ordinary matter Hamiltonians. An application of the same mechanism can explain why the present day cosmological acceleration is so tiny.

  15. Geometry of Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2007-12-01

    Preface; 1. Convexity, colours and statistics; 2. Geometry of probability distributions; 3. Much ado about spheres; 4. Complex projective spaces; 5. Outline of quantum mechanics; 6. Coherent states and group actions; 7. The stellar representation; 8. The space of density matrices; 9. Purification of mixed quantum states; 10. Quantum operations; 11. Duality: maps versus states; 12. Density matrices and entropies; 13. Distinguishability measures; 14. Monotone metrics and measures; 15. Quantum entanglement; Epilogue; Appendices; References; Index.

  16. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  17. Integral geometry and holography

    SciTech Connect

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulk curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.

  18. Integral geometry and holography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Czech, Bartlomiej; Lamprou, Lampros; McCandlish, Samuel; Sully, James

    2015-10-27

    We present a mathematical framework which underlies the connection between information theory and the bulk spacetime in the AdS3/CFT2 correspondence. A key concept is kinematic space: an auxiliary Lorentzian geometry whose metric is defined in terms of conditional mutual informations and which organizes the entanglement pattern of a CFT state. When the field theory has a holographic dual obeying the Ryu-Takayanagi proposal, kinematic space has a direct geometric meaning: it is the space of bulk geodesics studied in integral geometry. Lengths of bulk curves are computed by kinematic volumes, giving a precise entropic interpretation of the length of any bulkmore » curve. We explain how basic geometric concepts -- points, distances and angles -- are reflected in kinematic space, allowing one to reconstruct a large class of spatial bulk geometries from boundary entanglement entropies. In this way, kinematic space translates between information theoretic and geometric descriptions of a CFT state. As an example, we discuss in detail the static slice of AdS3 whose kinematic space is two-dimensional de Sitter space.« less

  19. Emergent Complex Network Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhihao; Menichetti, Giulia; Rahmede, Christoph; Bianconi, Ginestra

    2015-05-01

    Networks are mathematical structures that are universally used to describe a large variety of complex systems such as the brain or the Internet. Characterizing the geometrical properties of these networks has become increasingly relevant for routing problems, inference and data mining. In real growing networks, topological, structural and geometrical properties emerge spontaneously from their dynamical rules. Nevertheless we still miss a model in which networks develop an emergent complex geometry. Here we show that a single two parameter network model, the growing geometrical network, can generate complex network geometries with non-trivial distribution of curvatures, combining exponential growth and small-world properties with finite spectral dimensionality. In one limit, the non-equilibrium dynamical rules of these networks can generate scale-free networks with clustering and communities, in another limit planar random geometries with non-trivial modularity. Finally we find that these properties of the geometrical growing networks are present in a large set of real networks describing biological, social and technological systems.

  20. Low torque hydrodynamic lip geometry for bi-directional rotation seals

    DOEpatents

    Dietle, Lannie L.; Schroeder, John E.

    2011-11-15

    A hydrodynamically lubricating geometry for the generally circular dynamic sealing lip of rotary seals that are employed to partition a lubricant from an environment. The dynamic sealing lip is provided for establishing compressed sealing engagement with a relatively rotatable surface, and for wedging a film of lubricating fluid into the interface between the dynamic sealing lip and the relatively rotatable surface in response to relative rotation that may occur in the clockwise or the counter-clockwise direction. A wave form incorporating an elongated dimple provides the gradual convergence, efficient impingement angle, and gradual interfacial contact pressure rise that are conducive to efficient hydrodynamic wedging. Skewed elevated contact pressure zones produced by compression edge effects provide for controlled lubricant movement within the dynamic sealing interface between the seal and the relatively rotatable surface, producing enhanced lubrication and low running torque.

  1. Low torque hydrodynamic lip geometry for bi-directional rotation seals

    DOEpatents

    Dietle, Lannie L.; Schroeder, John E.

    2009-07-21

    A hydrodynamically lubricating geometry for the generally circular dynamic sealing lip of rotary seals that are employed to partition a lubricant from an environment. The dynamic sealing lip is provided for establishing compressed sealing engagement with a relatively rotatable surface, and for wedging a film of lubricating fluid into the interface between the dynamic sealing lip and the relatively rotatable surface in response to relative rotation that may occur in the clockwise or the counter-clockwise direction. A wave form incorporating an elongated dimple provides the gradual convergence, efficient impingement angle, and gradual interfacial contact pressure rise that are conducive to efficient hydrodynamic wedging. Skewed elevated contact pressure zones produced by compression edge effects provide for controlled lubricant movement within the dynamic sealing interface between the seal and the relatively rotatable surface, producing enhanced lubrication and low running torque.

  2. A Hybrid Nodal Method for Time-Dependent Incompressible Flow in Two-Dimensional Arbitrary Geometries

    SciTech Connect

    Toreja, A J; Uddin, R

    2002-10-21

    A hybrid nodal-integral/finite-analytic method (NI-FAM) is developed for time-dependent, incompressible flow in two-dimensional arbitrary geometries. In this hybrid approach, the computational domain is divided into parallelepiped and wedge-shaped space-time nodes (cells). The conventional nodal integral method (NIM) is applied to the interfaces between adjacent parallelepiped nodes (cells), while a finite analytic approach is applied to the interfaces between parallelepiped and wedge-shaped nodes (cells). In this paper, the hybrid method is formally developed and an application of the NI-FAM to fluid flow in an enclosed cavity is presented. Results are compared with those obtained using a commercial computational fluid dynamics code.

  3. Wormhole dynamics in spherical symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Hayward, Sean A.

    2009-06-15

    A dynamical theory of traversable wormholes is detailed in spherical symmetry. Generically a wormhole consists of a tunnel of trapped surfaces between two mouths, defined as temporal outer trapping horizons with opposite senses, in mutual causal contact. In static cases, the mouths coincide as the throat of a Morris-Thorne wormhole, with surface gravity providing an invariant measure of the radial curvature or ''flaring-out''. The null energy condition must be violated at a wormhole mouth. Zeroth, first, and second laws are derived for the mouths, as for black holes. Dynamic processes involving wormholes are reviewed, including enlargement or reduction, and interconversion with black holes. A new area of wormhole thermodynamics is suggested.

  4. Nonadiabatic charged spherical gravitational collapse

    SciTech Connect

    Di Prisco, A.; Herrera, L.; Le Denmat, G.; MacCallum, M. A. H.; Santos, N. O.

    2007-09-15

    We present a complete set of the equations and matching conditions required for the description of physically meaningful charged, dissipative, spherically symmetric gravitational collapse with shear. Dissipation is described with both free-streaming and diffusion approximations. The effects of viscosity are also taken into account. The roles of different terms in the dynamical equation are analyzed in detail. The dynamical equation is coupled to a causal transport equation in the context of Israel-Stewart theory. The decrease of the inertial mass density of the fluid, by a factor which depends on its internal thermodynamic state, is reobtained, with the viscosity terms included. In accordance with the equivalence principle, the same decrease factor is obtained for the gravitational force term. The effect of the electric charge on the relation between the Weyl tensor and the inhomogeneity of the energy density is discussed.

  5. Testing the critical Coulomb wedge theory on hyper-extended rifted margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nirrengarten, Michael; Manatschal, Gianreto; Kusznir, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Deformation of hyper-extended continental crust and its relationship with the underlying mantle is a key process in the evolution of rifted margins. Recent studies have focused on hyper-extension in rifted margins using different approaches such as numerical modelling, seismic interpretation, potential field methods and field observations. However many fundamental questions about the observed structures and their evolution during the formation of hyper-extended margins are still debated. In this study an observation driven approach has been used to characterise geometrical and physical attributes of the continental crust termination, considered as a hyper-extended wedge, in order to test the applicability of critical Coulomb wedge theory to hyper-extended margins. The Coulomb wedge theory was first developed on accretionary prisms and on fold and thrust belts, but it has also been applied in extensional settings. Coulomb wedge theory explains the evolution of the critical aperture angle of the wedge as a function of basal sliding without deformation in the overlying wedge. This critical angle depends on the frictional parameters of the material, the basal friction, the surface slope, the basal dip and the fluid pressure. If the evolution of hyper-extended wedges could be described by the critical Coulomb wedge theory, it would have a major impact in the understanding of the structural and physical evolution of rifted domains during the hyper-extension processes. On seismic reflection lines imaging magma-poor hyper-extended margins, the continental crust termination is often shown to form a hyper-extended wedge. ODP Sites 1067, 900 and 1068 on the Iberian margin as well as field observations in the Alps give direct access to the rocks forming the hyper-extended wedge, which are typically composed of highly deformed and hydrated continental rocks underlain by serpentinised mantle. The boundary between the hydrated continental and mantle rocks corresponds to a

  6. Crustal wedge deformation in an internally-driven, numerical subduction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dinther, Ylona; Morra, Gabriele; Funiciello, Francesca; Rossetti, Federico; Faccenna, Claudio

    2010-05-01

    The Earth's active convergent margins are characterized by dynamic feedback mechanisms that interact to form an intricate system in which a crustal wedge is shaped and metamorphosed at the will of two large, converging plates. This framework is accompanied by complicated processes, such as seismogenesis and the exhumation of high pressure rocks. To honor the dynamic interaction between different entities and advance on these persisting issues, we model the interaction between the subducting and overriding lithospheres, the mantle and the crustal wedge explicitly, and observe how a crustal wedge evolves in detail within a set of rigid, internally-driven boundary conditions. We model crustal wedge evolution in an intra-oceanic subduction setting by using a plane-strain implicit solid-mechanical Finite Element Model, in which the mechanical conservation equations are solved using the software package ABAQUS. The crustal wedge is modeled as a thick-skinned accretionary wedge of inter-mediate thickness with a linear visco-elastic bulk rheology. The dynamic interaction between the subducting plate, the overriding plate, and crustal wedge is implemented using a Coulomb frictional algorithm. The interaction with the mantle is incorporated using a computationally favorable mantle drag formulation that simulates induced three-dimensional mantle flow. This results in a quasi-static framework with a freely moving slab, trench, and fault, where a weaker wedge deforms in response to self-regulating, rigid boundary conditions formed by single, frictional bounding faults. The self-regulating evolution of crustal wedge architecture follows three phases; 1) initial vertical growth, 2) coeval compression and extension leading to internal corner flow, and 3) a steady-state taper with continuous corner flow. Particle trajectories show that, as shortening continues throughout the second phase, wedge material is constantly forced upward against the backstop, while extension and ocean

  7. Study on Mach stems induced by interaction of planar shock waves on two intersecting wedges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Gaoxiang; Wang, Chun; Teng, Honghui; Yang, Yang; Jiang, Zonglin

    2016-06-01

    The properties of Mach stems in hypersonic corner flow induced by Mach interaction over 3D intersecting wedges were studied theoretically and numerically. A new method called "spatial dimension reduction" was used to analyze theoretically the location and Mach number behind Mach stems. By using this approach, the problem of 3D steady shock/shock interaction over 3D intersecting wedges was transformed into a 2D moving one on cross sections, which can be solved by shock-polar theory and shock dynamics theory. The properties of Mach interaction over 3D intersecting wedges can be analyzed with the new method, including pressure, temperature, density in the vicinity of triple points, location, and Mach number behind Mach stems. Theoretical results were compared with numerical results, and good agreement was obtained. Also, the influence of Mach number and wedge angle on the properties of a 3D Mach stem was studied.

  8. Plane-wave diffraction by a wedge: A spectral domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarkowski, A.; Mittra, R.

    1981-11-01

    In this paper we investigate the canonical problem of plane wave diffraction by a wedge in the context of the spectral domain approach which exploits the relationship between the induced current on a scatterer and its far field. We show how the Sommerfeld solution to the wedge diffraction problem can be manipulated in a form which enables one to interpret the far scattered field as the Fourier transform of the physical optics current on the two faces of the wedge, augmented by the fringe current near the tip of the wedge. We also show that the uniform asymptotic expansion derived by Lee and Deschamps on the basis of the Lewis, Ahluwalia and Boersma ansatz can be rigorously obtained using the approach presented in this paper.

  9. Plane-wave diffraction by a wedge - A spectral domain approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarkowski, A.; Boersma, J.; Mittra, R.

    1984-01-01

    The canonical problem of plane wave diffraction by a wedge in the context of the spectral domain approach which exploits the relationship between the induced current on a scatterer and its far field is investigated. It is shown how the exact solution to the wedge diffraction problem can be manipulated in a form which enables one to interpret the far scattered field as the Fourier transform of the physical optics (PO) current on the two faces of the wedge augmented by the fringe current near the tip of the wedge. A uniform asymptotic expansion for the total field which slightly modifies the Ansatz in the uniform asymptotic theory of electromagnetic edge diffraction is constructed.

  10. Salt-wedge propagation in a Mediterranean micro-tidal river mouth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haralambidou, Kiriaki; Sylaios, Georgios; Tsihrintzis, Vassilios A.

    2010-12-01

    The dynamics of a seasonally formed salt-wedge propagating along the micro-tidal channel of Strymon River estuary, Northern Greece, and its consequences on river water quality, are thoroughly studied through intensive sampling campaigns. The wedge is developed at the downstream river part, under the summer limited freshwater discharge conditions ( Q < 30 m 3/s). The geometric features of the wedge (length and thickness) appeared directly related to Strymon River discharge. A maximum intrusion length of 4.7 km along Strymon River estuary was observed under minimum river discharge of almost 6 m 3/s. Relations produced from in situ data illustrate that limited river flow expands the wedge horizontally, reducing its vertical dimension, while higher flows lead to increased wedge thickness. Estuarine flushing time ranges between 0.2 and 1.5 days, exponentially dependent on Strymon River discharge. Wedge velocities depicted tidal asymmetry between tidal phases, with consistent inward motion, even under the ebb tidal stage. Strong vertical stratification prevails throughout the tidal cycle, proving the limited vertical mixing between the two layers, although higher interfacial stresses are produced in ebb. Bottom topography plays an interesting role in wedge propagation, as the presence of an underwater sill either prevents saline intrusion during flood or isolates the front of the wedge from its core at the ebb. Ecological consequences of salt-wedge propagation in Strymon River estuary are the frequent evidence of bottom hypoxic conditions and the increased TSS levels, leading to the occurrence of a turbidity maximum at the tip of the salt-wedge. Higher BOD and ammonium levels were mostly observed at the river end, associated to point and non-point pollution sources. Nitrates and silicates were found associated with freshwater fluxes, while ammonia levels were related to saline intrusions. The reduced phosphorus freshwater fluxes, resulting from phosphorus uptake at the

  11. Stress and displacement fields in the outer wedge induced by megathrust earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukao, Yoshio; Hori, Takane; Kodaira, Shuichi

    2014-05-01

    We model plate boundary slip at the outer (oceanward) segment of the megathrust wedge as slip at the base of a two-dimensional elastic wedge, subject to gravity force, with a sloping seafloor at the top, and drag at the bottom from a rigid plate in frictional contact. The stress and displacement fields in the wedge are given analytically as functions of basal frictional coefficient μe. Unlike either conventional dislocation models (constant slip) or crack models (constant stress drop), our wedge model (constant μe drop) does not show a stress singularity at the updip toe of the plate boundary. The slip increases, but the stress drop decreases updip along the fault toward the trench axis. There is a minimum stress difference state in the wedge when μe is varied. By referring to this state (μe = μec), the stress state is separated into a horizontally tensile regime (μe < μec) and a horizontally compressional regime (μe > μec). Slip associated with a μe drop in the range μe ≤ μec occurs toward increasing horizontal tension and shear energy. Such earthquakes include tsunami earthquakes occurring in the outer segment and the 2011 great Tohoku-Oki earthquake, which involved both the outer and inner segments, with much larger slip in the outer segment. These earthquakes are characterized by an almost complete drop of basal stress, which brings the wedge into the maximum tensile state, leading to the rare occurrence of thrust aftershocks at the base of the wedge and frequent occurrence of normal fault aftershocks within the wedge.

  12. Assessment of a multibeam Fizeau wedge interferometer for Doppler wind lidar.

    PubMed

    McKay, Jack A

    2002-03-20

    The Fabry-Perot interferometer is the standard instrument for the direct detection Doppler lidar measurement of atmospheric wind speeds. The multibeam Fizeau wedge has some practical advantages over the Fabry-Perot, such as the linear fringe pattern, and is evaluated for this application. The optimal Fizeau must have a resolving power of 10(6) or more. As the multibeam Fizeau wedge is pushed to such high resolving power, the interference fringes of the device become complicated by asymmetry and secondary maxima. A simple condition for the interferometer plate reflectance, optical gap, and wedge angle reveals whether a set of parameters will yield simple, Airy-like fringes or complex Fizeau fringes. Tilting of the Fizeau wedge improves the fringe shape and permits an extension of the regime of Airy-like fringes to higher resolving power. Sufficient resolving power for the wind lidar application is shown to be possible with a large-gap, low-finesse multibeam Fizeau wedge. Liabilities of the multibeam Fizeau wedge in the wind lidar application include a smaller acceptance solid angle and calibration sensitivity to localized deviations of the plates from the ideal. PMID:11921807

  13. Improve the transconductance of a graphene field-effect transistor by folding graphene into a wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guiming; Liu, Weihua; Cao, Meng; Li, Xin; Zhang, Anping; Wang, Xiaoli; Chen, Bangdao

    2016-07-01

    The transport property of a graphene wedge channel is studied theoretically and its leakage current through field emission is estimated when considering the effect of the internal electric field. The transconductance of the graphene transistor is improved from 0.016 to 0.321 μS μm‑1 when the graphene is folded into a wedge (with angle of wedge π/6 and radius curvature 2.7 nm at the tip), while the wedge height is much smaller than the space between the top-gate and the channel. The improved transconductance is due to the locally enhanced electric field, which results in a potential well and causes electron accumulation at the wedge tip. The leakage current through field emission J FE shows a super-linear increase with the channel conductive current J DS, where overall the electron supply for the field emission at the wedge tip is improved by the channel bias voltage V DS.

  14. Assessment of a multibeam Fizeau wedge interferometer for Doppler wind lidar.

    PubMed

    McKay, Jack A

    2002-03-20

    The Fabry-Perot interferometer is the standard instrument for the direct detection Doppler lidar measurement of atmospheric wind speeds. The multibeam Fizeau wedge has some practical advantages over the Fabry-Perot, such as the linear fringe pattern, and is evaluated for this application. The optimal Fizeau must have a resolving power of 10(6) or more. As the multibeam Fizeau wedge is pushed to such high resolving power, the interference fringes of the device become complicated by asymmetry and secondary maxima. A simple condition for the interferometer plate reflectance, optical gap, and wedge angle reveals whether a set of parameters will yield simple, Airy-like fringes or complex Fizeau fringes. Tilting of the Fizeau wedge improves the fringe shape and permits an extension of the regime of Airy-like fringes to higher resolving power. Sufficient resolving power for the wind lidar application is shown to be possible with a large-gap, low-finesse multibeam Fizeau wedge. Liabilities of the multibeam Fizeau wedge in the wind lidar application include a smaller acceptance solid angle and calibration sensitivity to localized deviations of the plates from the ideal.

  15. Improve the transconductance of a graphene field-effect transistor by folding graphene into a wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Guiming; Liu, Weihua; Cao, Meng; Li, Xin; Zhang, Anping; Wang, Xiaoli; Chen, Bangdao

    2016-07-01

    The transport property of a graphene wedge channel is studied theoretically and its leakage current through field emission is estimated when considering the effect of the internal electric field. The transconductance of the graphene transistor is improved from 0.016 to 0.321 μS μm-1 when the graphene is folded into a wedge (with angle of wedge π/6 and radius curvature 2.7 nm at the tip), while the wedge height is much smaller than the space between the top-gate and the channel. The improved transconductance is due to the locally enhanced electric field, which results in a potential well and causes electron accumulation at the wedge tip. The leakage current through field emission J FE shows a super-linear increase with the channel conductive current J DS, where overall the electron supply for the field emission at the wedge tip is improved by the channel bias voltage V DS.

  16. The Effects of a Lateral Wedge Insole on Knee and Ankle Joints During Slope Walking.

    PubMed

    Uto, Yuki; Maeda, Tetsuo; Kiyama, Ryoji; Kawada, Masayuki; Tokunaga, Ken; Ohwatashi, Akihiko; Fukudome, Kiyohiro; Ohshige, Tadasu; Yoshimoto, Yoichi; Yone, Kazunori

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a lateral wedge insole reduces the external knee adduction moment during slope walking. Twenty young, healthy subjects participated in this study. Subjects walked up and down a slope using 2 different insoles: a control flat insole and a 7° lateral wedge insole. A three-dimensional motion analysis system and force plate were used to examine the knee adduction moment, the ankle valgus moment, and the moment arm of the ground reaction force to the knee joint center in the frontal plane. The lateral wedge insole significantly decreased the moment arm of the ground reaction force, resulting in a reduction of the knee adduction moment during slope walking, similar to level walking. The reduction ratio of knee adduction moment by the lateral wedge insole during the early stance of up-slope walking was larger than that of level walking. Conversely, the lateral wedge insole increased the ankle valgus moment during slope walking, especially during the early stance phase of up-slope walking. Clinicians should examine the utilization of a lateral wedge insole for knee osteoarthritis patients who perform inclined walking during daily activity, in consideration of the load on the ankle joint. PMID:26252560

  17. Field observation of low-to-mid-frequency acoustic propagation characteristics of an estuarine salt wedge.

    PubMed

    Reeder, D Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The estuarine environment often hosts a salt wedge, the stratification of which is a function of the tide's range and speed of advance, river discharge volumetric flow rate, and river mouth morphology. Competing effects of temperature and salinity on sound speed in this stratified environment control the degree of acoustic refraction occurring along an acoustic path. A field experiment was carried out in the Columbia River Estuary to test the hypothesis: the estuarine salt wedge is acoustically observable in terms of low-to-mid-frequency acoustic propagation. Linear frequency-modulated acoustic signals in the 500-2000 Hz band were transmitted during the advance and retreat of the salt wedge during May 27-29, 2013. Results demonstrate that the salt wedge front is the dominant physical mechanism controlling acoustic propagation in this environment: received signal energy is relatively stable before and after the passage of the salt wedge front when the acoustic path consists of a single medium (either entirely fresh water or entirely salt water), and suffers a 10-15 dB loss and increased variability during salt wedge front passage. Physical parameters and acoustic propagation modeling corroborate and inform the acoustic observations. PMID:26827001

  18. Non-Euclidean geometry of twisted filament bundle packing

    PubMed Central

    Bruss, Isaac R.; Grason, Gregory M.

    2012-01-01

    Densely packed and twisted assemblies of filaments are crucial structural motifs in macroscopic materials (cables, ropes, and textiles) as well as synthetic and biological nanomaterials (fibrous proteins). We study the unique and nontrivial packing geometry of this universal material design from two perspectives. First, we show that the problem of twisted bundle packing can be mapped exactly onto the problem of disc packing on a curved surface, the geometry of which has a positive, spherical curvature close to the center of rotation and approaches the intrinsically flat geometry of a cylinder far from the bundle center. From this mapping, we find the packing of any twisted bundle is geometrically frustrated, as it makes the sixfold geometry of filament close packing impossible at the core of the fiber. This geometrical equivalence leads to a spectrum of close-packed fiber geometries, whose low symmetry (five-, four-, three-, and twofold) reflect non-Euclidean packing constraints at the bundle core. Second, we explore the ground-state structure of twisted filament assemblies formed under the influence of adhesive interactions by a computational model. Here, we find that the underlying non-Euclidean geometry of twisted fiber packing disrupts the regular lattice packing of filaments above a critical radius, proportional to the helical pitch. Above this critical radius, the ground-state packing includes the presence of between one and six excess fivefold disclinations in the cross-sectional order. PMID:22711799

  19. Geometry for the Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moalem, D.

    1977-01-01

    A sequential but non-axiomatic high school geometry course which includes Euclidean, transformation, and analytic geometry and vectors and matrices, and emphasizes the invariance property of transformations, is outlined. Sample problems, solutions, and comments are included. (MN)

  20. Investigation of Acoustical Shielding by a Wedge-Shaped Airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Clark, Lorenzo R.; Dunn, Mark H.; Tweed, John

    2004-01-01

    Experiments on a scale model of an advanced unconventional subsonic transport concept, the Blended Wing Body (BWB), have demonstrated significant shielding of inlet-radiated noise. A computational model of the shielding mechanism has been developed using a combination of boundary integral equation method (BIEM) and equivalent source method (ESM). The computation models the incident sound from a point source in a nacelle and determines the scattered sound field. In this way the sound fields with and without the airfoil can be estimated for comparison to experiment. An experimental test bed using a simplified wedge-shape airfoil and a broadband point noise source in a simulated nacelle has been developed for the purposes of verifying the analytical model and also to study the effect of engine nacelle placement on shielding. The experimental study is conducted in the Anechoic Noise Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The analytic and experimental results are compared at 6300 and 8000 Hz. These frequencies correspond to approximately 150 Hz on the full scale aircraft. Comparison between the experimental and analytic results is quite good, not only for the noise scattering by the airframe, but also for the total sound pressure in the far field. Many of the details of the sound field that the analytic model predicts are seen or indicated in the experiment, within the spatial resolution limitations of the experiment. Changing nacelle location produces comparable changes in noise shielding contours evaluated analytically and experimentally. Future work in the project will be enhancement of the analytic model to extend the analysis to higher frequencies corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the high bypass ratio ducted fan engines that are expected to power the BWB.

  1. Modes of continental extension in a lithospheric wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, G.; Lavier, L. L.; Choi, E.

    2014-12-01

    We studied extension of a lithospheric wedge as an approximation to an orogenic belt or a continental margin. We ran a series of numerical models to quantify the effects of the strength of the lower crust and a mid-crustal shear zone (MCSZ) on the extension processes. When the MCSZ is present, we found that the regional lower crustal flow plays a critical role in controlling the modes of extension. The compensation is long-wavelength when the lower crust flows from the highest to the lowest elevation in order to compensate upper crustal thinning. In response to this motion, the mantle flows towards the highest elevation in order to balance for the lower crust leaving the area under the highest topography. For weak (wet quartz regime with partial melting) or intermediate (wet quartz regime), or strong (dry quartz regime) lower crust, we recognized three predominantly decoupled modes of extension characterized by 1) significant lower crustal exhumation exemplified as a large massif, 2) formation of core complexes and detachment faults, and 3) distributive domino faulting, respectively. Without the MCSZ, however, the lower crustal flow is essentially subdued with predominantly coupled extension. For weak or intermediate, or strong lower crust, we recognized three coupled modes characterized by 1) localized generally symmetric crustal exhumation, 2) distributed grabens and narrow rifts, and 3) wide continental margins, respectively. The MCSZ controls the degree of decoupling of the lower crustal flow such that a frictionally stronger MCSZ does not change the behaviors of the models but results in a more distributed extension. Due to the long-wavelength compensation, subhorizontal Moho is achieved where intensive extension occurred for all the decoupled models with a MCSZ. Natural counterparts for each mode may be easily identified, for instance, in the Basin and Range or the Aegean.

  2. Grounding zone wedges, Kveithola Trough (NW Barents Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebesco, Michele; Urgeles, Roger; Özmaral, Asli; Hanebuth, Till; Caburlotto, Andrea; Hörner, Tanja; Lantzsch, Hendrik; LLopart, Juame; Lucchi, Renata; Skøtt Nicolaisen, Line; Giacomo, Osti; Sabbatini, Anna; Camerlenghi, Angelo

    2014-05-01

    Swath bathymetry within Kveithola Trough (NW Barents Sea) shows a seafloor characterized by E-W trending megascale glacial lineations (MSGLs) overprinted by transverse Grounding Zone Wedges (GZWs), which give the trough a stair profile (Rebesco et al., 2011). GZWs are formed by deposition of subglacial till at temporarily stable ice-stream fronts in between successive episodic retreats (Rüther et al., 2012; Bjarnadóttir et al., 2012). Sub-bottom data show that present-day morphology is largely inherited from palaeo-seafloor topography of GZWs, which is draped by a deglacial to early Holocene glaciomarine sediments (about 15 m thick). The ice stream that produced such subglacial morphology was flowing from East to West inside Kveithola Trough during Last Glacial Maximum. Its rapid retreat was likely associated with progressive lift-offs, and successive rapid melting of the grounded ice, induced by the eustatic sea-level rise (Lucchi et al., 2013). References: Bjarnadóttir, L.R., Rüther, D.C., Winsborrow, M.C.M., Andreassen, K., 2012. Grounding-line dynamics during the last deglaciation of Kveithola, W Barents Sea, as revealed by seabed geomorphology and shallow seismic stratigraphy. Boreas, 42, 84-107. Lucchi R.G., et al. 2013. Postglacial sedimentary processes on the Storfjorden and Kveithola TMFs: impact of extreme glacimarine sedimentation. Global and Planetary Change, 111, 309-326. Rebesco, M., et al. 2011. Deglaciation of the Barents Sea Ice Sheet - a swath bathymetric and subbottom seismic study from the Kveitehola Trough. Marine Geology, 279, 141-14. Rüther, D.C., Bjarnadóttir, L.R., Junttila, J., Husum, K., Rasmussen, T.L., Lucchi, R.G., Andreassen, K., 2012. Pattern and timing of the north-western Barents Sea Ice Sheet deglaciation and indications of episodic Holocene deposition. Boreas 41, 494-512.

  3. Saline Fluids in Subduction Channels and Mantle Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, T.; Hertwig, A.; Schertl, H. P.; Maresch, W. V.; Shigeno, M.; Mori, Y.; Nishiyama, T.

    2015-12-01

    Saline fluids can transport large-ion-lithophile elements and carbonate. Subduction-zone fluids contain salts with various amounts of NaCl equivalent similar to that of the present and/or Phanerozoic seawater (about 3.5 wt% NaCl). The salinity of aqueous fluids in the mantle wedge decreases from trench side to back-arc side, although available data have been limited. Such saline fluids from mantle peridotite underneath Pinatubo, a frontal volcano of the Luzon arc, contain 5.1 wt% NaCl equivalent and CO2 [Kawamoto et al., 2013 Proc Natl Acad Sci USA] and in Ichinomegeta, a rear-arc volcano of the Northeast Japan arc, contain 3.7 wt% NaCl equivalent and CO2 [Kumagai et al., Contrib Mineral Petrol 2014]. Abundances of chlorine and H2O in olivine-hosted melt inclusions also suggest that aqueous fluids to produce frontal basalts have higher salinity than rear-arc basalts in Guatemala arc [Walker et al., Contrib Mineral Petrol 2003]. In addition to these data, quartz-free jadeitites contain fluid inclusions composed of aqueous fluids with 7 wt% NaCl equivalent and quartz-bearing jadeitite with 4.6 wt% NaCl equivalent in supra-subduction zones in Southwest Japan [Mori et al., 2015, International Eclogite Conference] and quartz-bearing jadeitite and jadeite-rich rocks contain fluid inclusions composed of aqueous fluids with 4.2 wt% NaCl equivalent in Rio San Juan Complex, Dominica Republic [Kawamoto et al., 2015, Goldschmidt Conference]. Aqueous fluids generated at pressures lower than conditions for albite=jadeite+quartz occurring at 1.5 GPa, 500 °C may contain aqueous fluids with higher salinity than at higher pressures.

  4. Investigation of Acoustical Shielding by a Wedge-Shaped Airframe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Clark, Lorenzo R.; Dunn, Mark H.; Tweed, John

    2006-01-01

    Experiments on a scale model of an advanced unconventional subsonic transport concept, the Blended Wing Body (BWB), have demonstrated significant shielding of inlet-radiated noise. A computational model of the shielding mechanism has been developed using a combination of boundary integral equation method (BIEM) and equivalent source method (ESM). The computation models the incident sound from a point source in a nacelle and determines the scattered sound field. In this way the sound fields with and without the airfoil can be estimated for comparison to experiment. An experimental test bed using a simplified wedge-shape airfoil and a broadband point noise source in a simulated nacelle has been developed for the purposes of verifying the analytical model and also to study the effect of engine nacelle placement on shielding. The experimental study is conducted in the Anechoic Noise Research Facility at NASA Langley Research Center. The analytic and experimental results are compared at 6300 and 8000 Hz. These frequencies correspond to approximately 150 Hz on the full scale aircraft. Comparison between the experimental and analytic results is quite good, not only for the noise scattering by the airframe, but also for the total sound pressure in the far field. Many of the details of the sound field that the analytic model predicts are seen or indicated in the experiment, within the spatial resolution limitations of the experiment. Changing nacelle location produces comparable changes in noise shielding contours evaluated analytically and experimentally. Future work in the project will be enhancement of the analytic model to extend the analysis to higher frequencies corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the high bypass ratio ducted fan engines that are expected to power the BWB.

  5. Flow Pattern relative to the Substorm Current Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, X.; McPherron, R. L.; Hsu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetospheric substorms play a key role in the coupling of the solar wind and the magnetosphere. The Substorm Current Wedge (SCW) is a key element in the present physical model of substorms. It is widely accepted that the SCW is created by earthward busty flows, but the generation mechanism is still unknown. Previous studies suggest pressure gradients and magnetic vortices are possible candidates. Due to the sparse coverage of satellites in space, these studies were strongly dependent on the assumption that the satellites were in the generation region of the field-aligned currents (FAC) forming the SCW. In this work, we take advantage of an inversion technique that determines the parameters describing the SCW and perform a statistical study on the plasma and magnetic field parameters of the flow pattern relative to the SCW. The inversion technique finds the location and the intensity of the SCW from midlatitude magnetic data. The technique has been validated using auroral observations, Equivalent Ionospheric Currents (EIC), SYM-H index from SuperMAG, and magnetic perturbations at geosynchronous orbit by the GOES satellite. A database of substorm events has been created using midlatitude positive bays, which are the ground signature of the SCW at lower latitudes. The inversion technique is applied to each event in the database to determine the location of the origin of the SCW. The inversion results are also used to find conjunction events with space observations from VAP (RBSP), THEMIS and GOES. The plasma and magnetic field parameters such as the pressure gradient and magnetic vorticity are then categorized as a function of their location relative to the origin of the SCW. How the distribution/pattern of the pressure gradient and vorticity are related to the properties of the SCW (locations and intensity of the FAC), and flows (entropy, velocity and density) will be determined.

  6. Flow bursts, breakup arc, and substorm current wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Energy liberated by the reconnection process in the near-Earth tail is transported via flow bursts toward the dipolar magnetosphere during substorms. The breakup arc is a manifestation of the arrival of the bursts under flow braking and energy deposition. Its structure and behavior is analyzed on the basis of five striking spatial, temporal, and energetic properties, qualitatively and in part also quantitatively. A key element is the formation of stop layers. They are thin layers, of the width of an ion gyro radius, in which the magnetic field makes a transition from tail to near-dipolar magnetosphere configurations and in which the kinetic energy of fast flows is converted into electromagnetic energy of kinetic Alfvén waves. The flows arise from the relaxation of the strong magnetic shear stresses in the leading part of the flow bursts. The bright narrow arcs of less than 10 km width inside the broad poleward expanding breakup arc, Alfvénic in nature and visually characterized by erratic short-lived rays, are seen as traces of the stop layers. The gaps between two narrow and highly structured arcs are filled with more diffuse emissions. They are attributed to the relaxation of the less strained magnetic field of the flow bursts. Eastward flows along the arcs are linked to the shrinking gaps between two successive arcs and the entry of auroral streamers into the dipolar magnetosphere in the midnight sector. Flow braking in the stop layers forms multiple pairs of narrow balanced currents and cannot be behind the formation of the substorm current wedge. Instead, its origin is attributed to the force exerted by the dipolarized magnetic field of the flow bursts on the high-beta plasma, after the high magnetic shears have relaxed and the fast flows and stop layer process have subsided, in other words, to the "dying flow bursts."

  7. Discrete dislocation plasticity analysis of the wedge indentation of films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balint, D. S.; Deshpande, V. S.; Needleman, A.; Van der Giessen, E.

    2006-11-01

    The plane strain indentation of single crystal films on a rigid substrate by a rigid wedge indenter is analyzed using discrete dislocation plasticity. The crystals have three slip systems at ±35.3∘ and 90∘ with respect to the indentation direction. The analyses are carried out for three values of the film thickness, 2, 10 and 50 μm, and with the dislocations all of edge character modeled as line singularities in a linear elastic material. The lattice resistance to dislocation motion, dislocation nucleation, dislocation interaction with obstacles and dislocation annihilation are incorporated through a set of constitutive rules. Over the range of indentation depths considered, the indentation pressure for the 10 and 50 μm thick films decreases with increasing contact size and attains a contact size-independent value for contact lengths A>4 μm. On the other hand, for the 2 μm films, the indentation pressure first decreases with increasing contact size and subsequently increases as the plastic zone reaches the rigid substrate. For the 10 and 50 μm thick films sink-in occurs around the indenter, while pile-up occurs in the 2 μm film when the plastic zone reaches the substrate. Comparisons are made with predictions obtained from other formulations: (i) the contact size-independent indentation pressure is compared with that given by continuum crystal plasticity; (ii) the scaling of the indentation pressure with indentation depth is compared with the relation proposed by Nix and Gao [1998. Indentation size effects in crystalline materials: a law for strain gradient plasticity. J. Mech. Phys. Solids 43, 411-423]; and (iii) the computed contact area is compared with that obtained from the estimation procedure of Oliver and Pharr [1992. An improved technique for determining hardness and elastic-modulus using load and displacement sensing indentation experiments, J. Mater. Res. 7, 1564-1583].

  8. Instability of spherically imploding shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Hilko, B.; Zhang, L.; Panarella, E.

    1995-12-31

    The importance of spherically imploding shock waves has increased recently due to their particular applications in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the Spherical Pinch (SP). In particular, the stability of spherically imploding shock waves plays a critical role in the ultimate success of ICF and SP. The instability of spherically imploding shock waves is now systematically investigated. The basic state is Guderley and Landau`s unsteady self-similar solution of the implosion of a spherical shock wave. The stability analysis is conducted by combining Chandresakhar`s approach to the stability of spherical flames together. The governing equations for disturbances are derived and they use the condition that perturbed gas flow is potential. The three dimensional perturbation velocity profile and a shock front perturbation are solved by using the kinematic and dynamic boundary conditions in the shock front. The time-dependent amplitudes of the perturbations are obtained by solving the system of ordinary differential equations. This enables them to study the time history of the spherically imploding shock wave subject to perturbations. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations decides the stability/instability of the spherical imploding shock waves. Preliminary results are presented.

  9. Onthe static and spherically symmetric gravitational field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlieb, Ioan; Maftei, Gheorghe; Mociutchi, Cleopatra

    Starting from a generalization of Einstein 's theory of gravitation, proposed by one of the authors (Cleopatra Mociutchi), the authors study a particular spherical symmetric case. Among other one obtain the compatibility conditions for the existence of the static and spherically symmetruic gravitational filed in the case of extended Einstein equation.

  10. Three-point spherical mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1990-01-01

    A three-point spherical mirror mount for use with lasers is disclosed. The improved mirror mount is adapted to provide a pivot ring having an outer surface with at least three spaced apart mating points to engage an inner spherical surface of a support housing.

  11. How Spherical Is a Cube (Gravitationally)?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanny, Jeff; Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    An important concept that is presented in the discussion of Newton's law of universal gravitation is that the gravitational effect external to a spherically symmetric mass distribution is the same as if all of the mass of the distribution were concentrated at the center. By integrating over ring elements of a spherical shell, we show that the…

  12. Three-point spherical mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, R.W.

    1984-01-23

    A three-point spherical mirror mount for use with lasers is disclosed. The improved mirror mount is adapted to provide a pivot ring having an outer surface with at least three spaced apart mating points to engage an inner spherical surface of a support housing.

  13. Multigroup Complex Geometry Neutron Diffusion Code System.

    2002-12-18

    Version 01 SNAP-3D is based on SNAP2 and is a one- two- or three-dimensional multigroup diffusion code system. It is primarily intended for neutron diffusion calculations, but it can also carry out gamma-ray calculations if the diffusion approximation is accurate enough. It is suitable for fast and thermal reactor core calculations and for shield calculations. SNAP-3D can solve the multi-group neutron diffusion equations using finite difference methods in (x,y,z), (r,theta,z), (TRI,z), (HEX,z) or (spherical) coordinates.more » The one-dimensional slab and cylindrical geometries and the two-dimensional (x,y), (r,z), (r,theta), (HEX) and (TRI) are all treated as simple special cases of three-dimensional geometries. Numerous reflective and periodic symmetry options are available and may be used to reduce the number of mesh points necessary to represent the system. Extrapolation lengths can be specified at internal and external boundaries. The problem classes are: 1) eigenvalue search for critical k-effective, 2) eigenvalue search for critical buckling, 3) eigenvalue search for critical time-constant, 4) fixed source problems in which the sources are functions of regions, 5) fixed source problems in which the sources are provided, on disc, for every mesh point and group.« less

  14. Multigroup Complex Geometry Neutron Diffusion Code System.

    SciTech Connect

    MCCALLIEN, C. W.J.

    2002-12-18

    Version 01 SNAP-3D is based on SNAP2 and is a one- two- or three-dimensional multigroup diffusion code system. It is primarily intended for neutron diffusion calculations, but it can also carry out gamma-ray calculations if the diffusion approximation is accurate enough. It is suitable for fast and thermal reactor core calculations and for shield calculations. SNAP-3D can solve the multi-group neutron diffusion equations using finite difference methods in (x,y,z), (r,theta,z), (TRI,z), (HEX,z) or (spherical) coordinates. The one-dimensional slab and cylindrical geometries and the two-dimensional (x,y), (r,z), (r,theta), (HEX) and (TRI) are all treated as simple special cases of three-dimensional geometries. Numerous reflective and periodic symmetry options are available and may be used to reduce the number of mesh points necessary to represent the system. Extrapolation lengths can be specified at internal and external boundaries. The problem classes are: 1) eigenvalue search for critical k-effective, 2) eigenvalue search for critical buckling, 3) eigenvalue search for critical time-constant, 4) fixed source problems in which the sources are functions of regions, 5) fixed source problems in which the sources are provided, on disc, for every mesh point and group.

  15. Computer-Aided Geometry Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shoosmith, J. N. (Compiler); Fulton, R. E. (Compiler)

    1984-01-01

    Techniques in computer-aided geometry modeling and their application are addressed. Mathematical modeling, solid geometry models, management of geometric data, development of geometry standards, and interactive and graphic procedures are discussed. The applications include aeronautical and aerospace structures design, fluid flow modeling, and gas turbine design.

  16. Teaching of Geometry in Bulgaria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bankov, Kiril

    2013-01-01

    Geometry plays an important role in the school mathematics curriculum all around the world. Teaching of geometry varies a lot (Hoyls, Foxman, & Kuchemann, 2001). Many countries revise the objectives, the content, and the approaches to the geometry in school. Studies of the processes show that there are not common trends of these changes…

  17. Spherical combustion clouds in explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhl, A. L.; Bell, J. B.; Beckner, V. E.; Balakrishnan, K.; Aspden, A. J.

    2013-05-01

    This study explores the properties of spherical combustion clouds in explosions. Two cases are investigated: (1) detonation of a TNT charge and combustion of its detonation products with air, and (2) shock dispersion of aluminum powder and its combustion with air. The evolution of the blast wave and ensuing combustion cloud dynamics are studied via numerical simulations with our adaptive mesh refinement combustion code. The code solves the multi-phase conservation laws for a dilute heterogeneous continuum as formulated by Nigmatulin. Single-phase combustion (e.g., TNT with air) is modeled in the fast-chemistry limit. Two-phase combustion (e.g., Al powder with air) uses an induction time model based on Arrhenius fits to Boiko's shock tube data, along with an ignition temperature criterion based on fits to Gurevich's data, and an ignition probability model that accounts for multi-particle effects on cloud ignition. Equations of state are based on polynomial fits to thermodynamic calculations with the Cheetah code, assuming frozen reactants and equilibrium products. Adaptive mesh refinement is used to resolve thin reaction zones and capture the energy-bearing scales of turbulence on the computational mesh (ILES approach). Taking advantage of the symmetry of the problem, azimuthal averaging was used to extract the mean and rms fluctuations from the numerical solution, including: thermodynamic profiles, kinematic profiles, and reaction-zone profiles across the combustion cloud. Fuel consumption was limited to ˜ 60-70 %, due to the limited amount of air a spherical combustion cloud can entrain before the turbulent velocity field decays away. Turbulent kinetic energy spectra of the solution were found to have both rotational and dilatational components, due to compressibility effects. The dilatational component was typically about 1 % of the rotational component; both seemed to preserve their spectra as they decayed. Kinetic energy of the blast wave decayed due to the

  18. Stability of imploding spherical shock waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H. B.; Zhang, L.; Panarella, E.

    1995-12-01

    The stability of spherically imploding shock waves is systematically investigated in this letter. The basic state is Guderley and Landau's unsteady self-similar solution of the implosion of a spherical shock wave. The stability analysis is conducted by combining Chandrasekhar's approach to the stability of a viscous liquid drop with Zel'dovich's approach to the stability of spherical flames. The time-dependent amplitudes of the perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations decides the stability/instability of the spherical imploding shock waves. It is found that the growth rate of perturbations is not in exponential form and near the collapse phase of the shocks, the spherically imploding shock waves are relatively stable.

  19. Stability of imploding spherical shock waves

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.B.; Zhang, L.; Panarella, E.

    1995-12-01

    The stability of spherically imploding shock waves is systematically investigated in this letter. The basic state is Guderley and Landau`s unsteady self-similar solution of the implosion of a spherical shock wave. The stability analysis is conducted by combining Chandrasekhar`s approach to the stability of a viscous liquid drop with Zel`dovich`s approach to the stability of spherical flames. The time-dependent amplitudes of the perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations are obtained analytically by using perturbation method. The relative amplification and decay of the amplitudes of perturbations decides the stability/instability of the spherical imploding shock waves. It is found that the growth rate of perturbations is not in exponential form and near the collapse phase of the shocks, the spherically imploding shock waves are relatively stable. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Three-Dimensional Vertebral Wedging in Mild and Moderate Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Scherrer, Sophie-Anne; Begon, Mickaël; Leardini, Alberto; Coillard, Christine; Rivard, Charles-Hilaire; Allard, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Background Vertebral wedging is associated with spinal deformity progression in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Reporting frontal and sagittal wedging separately could be misleading since these are projected values of a single three-dimensional deformation of the vertebral body. The objectives of this study were to determine if three-dimensional vertebral body wedging is present in mild scoliosis and if there are a preferential vertebral level, position and plane of deformation with increasing scoliotic severity. Methodology Twenty-seven adolescent idiopathic scoliotic girls with mild to moderate Cobb angles (10° to 50°) participated in this study. All subjects had at least one set of bi-planar radiographs taken with the EOS® X-ray imaging system prior to any treatment. Subjects were divided into two groups, separating the mild (under 20°) from the moderate (20° and over) spinal scoliotic deformities. Wedging was calculated in three different geometric planes with respect to the smallest edge of the vertebral body. Results Factorial analyses of variance revealed a main effect for the scoliosis severity but no main effect of vertebral Levels (apex and each of the three vertebrae above and below it) (F = 1.78, p = 0.101). Main effects of vertebral Positions (apex and above or below it) (F = 4.20, p = 0.015) and wedging Planes (F = 34.36, p<0.001) were also noted. Post-hoc analysis demonstrated a greater wedging in the inferior group of vertebrae (3.6°) than the superior group (2.9°, p = 0.019) and a significantly greater wedging (p≤0.03) along the sagittal plane (4.3°). Conclusions Vertebral wedging was present in mild scoliosis and increased as the scoliosis progressed. The greater wedging of the inferior group of vertebrae could be important in estimating the most distal vertebral segment to be restrained by bracing or to be fused in surgery. Largest vertebral body wedging values obtained in the sagittal plane support the claim

  1. Geometry of Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bengtsson, Ingemar; Zyczkowski, Karol

    2006-05-01

    Quantum information theory is at the frontiers of physics, mathematics and information science, offering a variety of solutions that are impossible using classical theory. This book provides an introduction to the key concepts used in processing quantum information and reveals that quantum mechanics is a generalisation of classical probability theory. After a gentle introduction to the necessary mathematics the authors describe the geometry of quantum state spaces. Focusing on finite dimensional Hilbert spaces, they discuss the statistical distance measures and entropies used in quantum theory. The final part of the book is devoted to quantum entanglement - a non-intuitive phenomenon discovered by Schrödinger, which has become a key resource for quantum computation. This richly-illustrated book is useful to a broad audience of graduates and researchers interested in quantum information theory. Exercises follow each chapter, with hints and answers supplied. The first book to focus on the geometry of quantum states Stresses the similarities and differences between classical and quantum theory Uses a non-technical style and numerous figures to make the book accessible to non-specialists

  2. Fast calculation of spherical computer generated hologram using spherical wave spectrum method.

    PubMed

    Jackin, Boaz Jessie; Yatagai, Toyohiko

    2013-01-14

    A fast calculation method for computer generation of spherical holograms in proposed. This method is based on wave propagation defined in spectral domain and in spherical coordinates. The spherical wave spectrum and transfer function were derived from boundary value solutions to the scalar wave equation. It is a spectral propagation formula analogous to angular spectrum formula in cartesian coordinates. A numerical method to evaluate the derived formula is suggested, which uses only N(logN)2 operations for calculations on N sampling points. Simulation results are presented to verify the correctness of the proposed method. A spherical hologram for a spherical object was generated and reconstructed successfully using the proposed method.

  3. Raga: Monte Carlo simulations of gravitational dynamics of non-spherical stellar systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasiliev, Eugene

    2014-11-01

    Raga (Relaxation in Any Geometry) is a Monte Carlo simulation method for gravitational dynamics of non-spherical stellar systems. It is based on the SMILE software (ascl:1308.001) for orbit analysis. It can simulate stellar systems with a much smaller number of particles N than the number of stars in the actual system, represent an arbitrary non-spherical potential with a basis-set or spline spherical-harmonic expansion with the coefficients of expansion computed from particle trajectories, and compute particle trajectories independently and in parallel using a high-accuracy adaptive-timestep integrator. Raga can also model two-body relaxation by local (position-dependent) velocity diffusion coefficients (as in Spitzer's Monte Carlo formulation) and adjust the magnitude of relaxation to the actual number of stars in the target system, and model the effect of a central massive black hole.

  4. A study of the collapse loading of spherical shells.

    SciTech Connect

    Pepin, J. E.; Thacker, B. H.; Riha, D. S.; McKeighan, P. C.

    2004-01-01

    Current arms control agreements have provided the impetus for national directives to cease production of new strategic weapons and to end nuclear testing. This has placed a tremendous burden on the national laboratories for assuring stockpile certification. The Stockpile Stewardship Program's fundamental objective within the Department of Energy (DOE) is to maintain a high confidence in the safety, reliability, and performance of the existing U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile. As such, enhanced evaluation capabilities are needed to quantify the effect of possible anomalies that may arise in a weapon (e.g., due to aging mechanisms), and assess its performance, safety and overall reliability. Validated numerical methods must be employed in determining the reliability of specific weapon components, including the overall weapon system. The validated numerical models must, however, be based on accurate information of each component's geometry and material properties in an aged condition. Once these variables are known, extrapolation of potential lifetime of the weapon can be determined with some level of confidence. The goal is to develop an engineering capability that provides a reliability-based structural evaluation technique for performing weapon reliability assessments. To enhance the analyst's confidence with these new methods, an integrated experiment and analysis project has been developed. The focus of this project is to generate accurate probabilistic structural response simulations using numerical models of commercially available, stainless steel spherical marine floats, under collapse loads, and compare with experimental results. The spherical marine float geometry was chosen because of its simple shape, yet highly complex nonlinear deformation behavior, leading to complex states-of-stress. There is also a variability associated with geometry and mechanical properties of commercially available (i.e., off-the-shelf) marine floats. The variability is not uncommon

  5. Mass inflation and curvature divergence near the central singularity in spherical collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jun-Qi; Joshi, Pankaj S.; Galvez Ghersi, José T.

    2015-11-01

    We study spherical scalar collapse toward a black hole formation and examine the asymptotic dynamics near the central singularity of the formed black hole. It is found that, in the vicinity of the singularity, due to the strong backreaction of a scalar field on the geometry, the mass function inflates and the Kretschmann scalar grows faster than in the Schwarzschild geometry. In collapse, the Misner-Sharp mass is a locally conserved quantity, not providing information on the black hole mass that is measured at asymptotically flat regions.

  6. Spherical accretion and AGN feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nulsen, Paul

    2014-06-01

    For a supermassive black hole accreting from a hot, quasi-spherical atmosphere, it is almost inevitable that the fluid approximation fails inside some point within the Bondi radius, but well outside the black hole event horizon. Within the region where the particle mean free paths exceed the radius, the flow must be modeled in terms of the Fokker-Planck equation. In the absence of magnetic fields, it is analogous to the "loss cone" problem for consumption of stars by a black hole. The accretion rate is suppressed well below the Bondi accretion rate and a significant power must be conveyed outward for the flow to proceed. This situation is complicated significantly by the presence of a magnetic field, but I will argue that the main outcomes are similar. I will also argue that the power emerging from such a flow, although generally far too little to suppress cooling on large scales, is an important ingredient of the AGN feedback cycle on scales comparable to the Bondi radius.

  7. Generalized spherical and simplicial coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Wolf-Dieter

    2007-12-01

    Elementary trigonometric quantities are defined in l2,p analogously to that in l2,2, the sine and cosine functions are generalized for each p>0 as functions sinp and cosp such that they satisfy the basic equation cosp([phi])p+sinp([phi])p=1. The p-generalized radius coordinate of a point [xi][set membership, variant]Rn is defined for each p>0 as . On combining these quantities, ln,p-spherical coordinates are defined. It is shown that these coordinates are nearly related to ln,p-simplicial coordinates. The Jacobians of these generalized coordinate transformations are derived. Applications and interpretations from analysis deal especially with the definition of a generalized surface content on ln,p-spheres which is nearly related to a modified co-area formula and an extension of Cavalieri's and Torricelli's indivisibeln method, and with differential equations. Applications from probability theory deal especially with a geometric interpretation of the uniform probability distribution on the ln,p-sphere and with the derivation of certain generalized statistical distributions.

  8. Plasma Effects in Spherical Implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellei, Claudio; Amendt, Peter; Wilks, Scott

    2011-10-01

    A remarkable self-similar solution to the problem of a spherically converging shock was published by Guderley in 1942. Being applicable to an ideal gas, this solution neglects viscosity, thermal conduction and radiation losses and presents singularities when the shock reaches the origin. Radiation hydrodynamic codes include the effects of non-ideality (with artificial viscosity in place of real viscosity), ensuring that the solution is well-behaved at all times. However during an ICF implosion, separation of the electron and ion species occurs at the shock front. For the high Mach number (M > 10) incoming (coalesced) shock that is typical of ICF scenarios, the width of the plasma shock front is comparable to the ion-ion mean-free-path λii ~ 1 μ m and much larger than the shock front width in an unionized gas at the same density (~10-2 μ m). Ahead of the plasma shock front, electrons pre-heat the inner gas over distances λei ~(mi /me) 1 / 2λii ~ 70 μ m. This decreases the strength of the incoming shock and lowers the temperature behind the rebound shock, a phenomenon analogous to the non-ideal gas effects found in hydro-codes. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Ribozyme-Spherical Nucleic Acids

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Liangliang; Kouri, Fotini M.; Briley, William E.; Stegh, Alexander H.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2015-01-01

    Ribozymes are highly structured RNA sequences that can be tailored to recognize and cleave specific stretches of mRNA. Their current therapeutic efficacy remains low due to their large size and structural instability compared to shorter therapeutically relevant RNA such as small interfering RNA (siRNA) and microRNA (miRNA). Herein, a synthetic strategy that makes use of the spherical nucleic acid (SNA) architecture to stabilize ribozymes and transfect them into live cells is reported. The properties of this novel ribozyme SNA are characterized in the context of the targeted knockdown of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair protein involved in chemotherapeutic resistance of solid tumors, foremost glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Data showing the direct cleavage of full-length MGMT mRNA, knockdown of MGMT protein, and increased sensitization of GBM cells to therapy-mediated apoptosis, independent of transfection agents, provide compelling evidence for the promising properties of this new chemical architecture. PMID:26271335

  10. Osmotic buckling of spherical capsules.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Sebastian; Kierfeld, Jan

    2014-11-01

    We study the buckling of elastic spherical shells under osmotic pressure with the osmolyte concentration of the exterior solution as a control parameter. We compare our results for the bifurcation behavior with results for buckling under mechanical pressure control, that is, with an empty capsule interior. We find striking differences for the buckling states between osmotic and mechanical buckling. Mechanical pressure control always leads to fully collapsed states with opposite sides in contact, whereas uncollapsed states with a single finite dimple are generic for osmotic pressure control. For sufficiently large interior osmolyte concentrations, osmotic pressure control is qualitatively similar to buckling under volume control with the volume prescribed by the osmolyte concentrations inside and outside the shell. We present a quantitative theory which also captures the influence of shell elasticity on the relationship between osmotic pressure and volume. These findings are relevant for the control of buckled shapes in applications. We show how the osmolyte concentration can be used to control the volume of buckled shells. An accurate analytical formula is derived for the relationship between the osmotic pressure, the elastic moduli and the volume of buckled capsules. This also allows use of elastic capsules as osmotic pressure sensors or deduction of elastic properties and the internal osmolyte concentration from shape changes in response to osmotic pressure changes. We apply our findings to published experimental data on polyelectrolyte capsules. PMID:25209240

  11. Oncologic Safety of Laparoscopic Wedge Resection with Gastrotomy for Gastric Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor: Comparison with Conventional Laparoscopic Wedge Resection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sejin; Kim, You Na; Kim, Hyoung-Il; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Hyung, Woo Jin; Noh, Sung Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Various laparoscopic wedge resection (LWR) techniques requiring gastrotomy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) of the stomach have been applied to facilitate tumor resection and preserve the remnant gastric volume. However, there is the possibility of cancer cell dissemination during these procedures. The aim of this study was to assess the oncologic safety of LWR with gastrotomy (LWR-G) compared to LWR without luminal exposure. Materials and Methods Clinicopathologic and operative results of 193 patients who underwent LWR for gastric GIST were retrospectively analyzed from 2003 to 2013. We stratified the patients into two groups: LWR-G and LWR without gastrotomy (LWR-C). Clinicopathologic features, short-term outcomes, and long-term outcomes were compared. Results A total of 26 patients underwent LWR-G, and 167 patients underwent LWR-C. The LWR-G group showed significantly more anterior wall-located (n=10, 38.5%), intraluminal (n=20, 76.9%), and ulcerative (n=13, 50.0%) tumors than the LWR-C group (n=33, 19.8%; n=96, 57.5%; n=46, 27.5%, respectively). Postoperative short-term outcomes did not differ between the two groups. When tumor staging was compared, no statistical difference was noted. There was no recurrence in the LWR-G group, while 2 patients in the LWR-C group experienced recurrence. The two recurrences in the LWR-C group were found in the liver and in the remnant stomach at 63 and 12 months after the operation, respectively. No gastric GIST-related death was recorded in any group during the study period. Conclusions LWR-G for gastric GIST is an oncologically safe procedure even for masses with ulcerations. PMID:26819802

  12. Process Based Explanations for Correlations Between the Structural and Seismic Segmentation of the Cascadia Subduction Wedge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuller, C. W.; Brandon, M. T.; Willett, S. D.

    2006-12-01

    Variations in the geological and geophysical characteristics of the Cascadia subduction wedge, the region between the trench and arc, result in along-strike wedge segmentation. We focus on explaining the large-scale structural segmentation and how processes causing this segmentation influence segmentation with respect to the seismic behavior of the wedge and subduction thrust. The relationships we develop illustrate the fundamental interplay of processes controlling long-term structure and short-term seismic behavior. Our conclusions are based on the results of numerical models designed to simulate the growth and evolution of the Cascadia subduction wedge through the accretion of a thin layer of sediment to the basaltic Coast Range Terrane (CRT) of the Cascadia margin. Two aspects of wedge structural segmentation are of interest: (1) segmentation with respect to the location or absence of large, continental shelf, forearc basins, and (2) segmentation with respect to the Coastal Range (CR) structural high. Our models illustrate that the form of the submarine portion of the Cascadia wedge, including the basins or lack thereof, is a consequence of the frictional behavior of this region of wedge, subduction thrust strength, wedge strength, and dip thrust. We propose that basin segments have stronger wedge material, a weaker thrust, or a steeper thrust than basin free segments. The presence of basins is significant because they stabilize the margin and prevent subduction and accretion related deformation. This stabilization allows the thrust to preferentially support thermally induced, fluid overpressures and undergo fault healing thus increasing the likelihood of large coseismic slip within basin segments. While no historical earthquake data supporting this argument exists for Cascadia, such behavior has been observed in many margins (Song and Simons, 2003; Wells et al., 2003). It is reasonable to assume that large earthquakes in Cascadia will have the same association

  13. Equivalence of the Path Integral for Fermions in Cartesian and Spherical Coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Andrew; Camblong, Horacio E.; Ordóñez, Carlos R.

    2013-06-01

    The path integral calculation for the free energy of a spin-1/2 Dirac-fermion gas is performed in spherical polar coordinates for a flat space-time geometry. Its equivalence with the Cartesian-coordinate representation is explicitly established. This evaluation involves a relevant limiting case of the fermionic path integral in a Schwarzschild background, whose near-horizon limit has been shown to be related to black hole thermodynamics.

  14. Effect of Laterally Wedged Insoles on the External Knee Adduction Moment across Different Reference Frames

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Kitamura, Masako; Ushikubo, Tomohiro; Murata, Atsushi; Akagi, Ryuichiro; Sasho, Takahisa

    2015-01-01

    Objective Biomechanical effects of laterally wedged insoles are assessed by reduction in the knee adduction moment. However, the degree of reduction may vary depending on the reference frame with which it is calculated. The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of reference frame on the reduction in the knee adduction moment by laterally wedged insoles. Methods Twenty-nine healthy participants performed gait trials with a laterally wedged insole and with a flat insole as a control. The knee adduction moment, including the first and second peaks and the angular impulse, were calculated using four different reference frames: the femoral frame, tibial frame, laboratory frame and the Joint Coordinate System. Results There were significant effects of reference frame on the knee adduction moment first and second peaks (P < 0.001 for both variables), while the effect was not significant for the angular impulse (P = 0.84). No significant interaction between the gait condition and reference frame was found in either of the knee adduction moment variables (P = 0.99 for all variables), indicating that the effects of laterally wedged insole on the knee adduction moments were similar across the four reference frames. On the other hand, the average percent changes ranged from 9% to 16% for the first peak, from 16% to 18% for the second peak and from 17% to 21% for the angular impulse when using the different reference frames. Conclusion The effects of laterally wedged insole on the reduction in the knee adduction moment were similar across the reference frames. On the other hand, Researchers need to recognize that when the percent change was used as the parameter of the efficacy of laterally wedged insole, the choice of reference frame may influence the interpretation of how laterally wedged insoles affect the knee adduction moment. PMID:26397375

  15. Climate adaptation wedges: a case study of premium wine in the western United States

    SciTech Connect

    Diffenbaugh, Noah; White, Michael A; Jones, Gregory V; Ashfaq, Moetasim

    2011-01-01

    Design and implementation of effective climate change adaptation activities requires quantitative assessment of the impacts that are likely to occur without adaptation, as well as the fraction of impact that can be avoided through each activity. Here we present a quantitative framework inspired by the greenhouse gas stabilization wedges of Pacala and Socolow. In our proposed framework, the damage avoided by each adaptation activity creates an 'adaptation wedge' relative to the loss that would occur without that adaptation activity. We use premium winegrape suitability in the western United States as an illustrative case study, focusing on the near-term period that covers the years 2000 39. We find that the projected warming over this period results in the loss of suitable winegrape area throughout much of California, including most counties in the high-value North Coast and Central Coast regions. However, in quantifying adaptation wedges for individual high-value counties, we find that a large adaptation wedge can be captured by increasing the severe heat tolerance, including elimination of the 50% loss projected by the end of the 2030 9 period in the North Coast region, and reduction of the projected loss in the Central Coast region from 30% to less than 15%. Increased severe heat tolerance can capture an even larger adaptation wedge in the Pacific Northwest, including conversion of a projected loss of more than 30% in the Columbia Valley region of Washington to a projected gain of more than 150%. We also find that warming projected over the near-term decades has the potential to alter the quality of winegrapes produced in the western US, and we discuss potential actions that could create adaptation wedges given these potential changes in quality. While the present effort represents an initial exploration of one aspect of one industry, the climate adaptation wedge framework could be used to quantitatively evaluate the opportunities and limits of climate adaptation

  16. Rainfall induced groundwater mound in wedge-shaped promontories: The Strack-Chernyshov model revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacimov, A. R.; Kayumov, I. R.; Al-Maktoumi, A.

    2016-11-01

    An analytical solution to the Poisson equation governing Strack's discharge potential (squared thickness of a saturated zone in an unconfined aquifer) is obtained in a wedge-shaped domain with given head boundary conditions on the wedge sides (specified water level in an open water body around a porous promontory). The discharge vector components, maximum elevation of the water table in promontory vertical cross-sections, quantity of groundwater seeping through segments of the wedge sides, the volume of fresh groundwater in the mound are found. For acute angles, the solution to the problem is non-unique and specification of the behaviour at infinity is needed. A "basic" solution is distinguished, which minimizes the water table height above a horizontal bedrock. MODFLOW simulations are carried out in a finite triangular island and compare solutions with a constant-head, no-flow and "basic" boundary condition on one side of the triangle. Far from the tip of an infinite-size promontory one has to be cautious with truncation of the simulated flow domains and imposing corresponding boundary conditions. For a right and obtuse wedge angles, there are no positive solutions for the case of constant accretion on the water table. In a particular case of a confined rigid wedge-shaped aquifer and incompressible fluid, from an explicit solution to the Laplace equation for the hydraulic head with arbitrary time-space varying boundary conditions along the promontory rays, essentially 2-D transient Darcian flows within the wedge are computed. They illustrate that surface water waves on the promontory boundaries can generate strong Darcian waves inside the porous wedge. Evaporation from the water table and sea-water intruded interface (rather than a horizontal bed) are straightforward generalizations for the Poissonian Strack potential.

  17. Measured Hydrologic Storage Characteristics of Three Major Ice Wedge Polygon Types, Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlain, A. J.; Liljedahl, A.; Wilson, C. J.; Cable, W.; Romanovsky, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    Model simulations have suggested that the hydrologic fluxes and stores of Arctic wetlands are constrained by the micro-topographical features of ice wedge polygons, which are abundant in lowland tundra landscapes. Recently observed changes in ice wedge polygon landscapes - in particular, ice wedge degradation and trough formation - emphasize the need to better understand how differing ice wedge polygon morphologies affect the larger hydrologic system. Here we present three seasons of measured end-of-winter snow accumulation, continuous soil moisture and water table elevations, and repeated frost table mapping. Together, these describe the hydrologic characteristics of three main ice wedge polygon types: low centered polygons with limited trough development (representative of a ~500 year old vegetated drained thaw lake basin), and low- and high-centered polygons with well-defined troughs. Dramatic spatiotemporal variability exists both between polygon types and between the features of an individual polygon (e.g. troughs, centers, rims). Landscape-scale end-of-winter snow water equivalent is similar between polygon types, while the sub-polygon scale distribution of the surface water differs, both as snow and as ponded water. Some sub-polygon features appear buffered against large variations in water levels, while others display periods of prolonged recessions and large responses to rain events. Frost table elevations in general mimic the ground surface topography, but with spatiotemporal variability in thaw rate. The studied thaw seasons represented above long-term average rainfall, and in 2014, record high June precipitation. Differing ice wedge polygon types express dramatically different local hydrology, despite nearly identical climate forcing and landscape-scale snow accumulation, making ice wedge polygons an important component when describing the Arctic water, nutrient and energy system.

  18. Analysis and implementation of a space resolving spherical crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, E. C.; Ao, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G.; Sinars, D. B.; Geissel, M.; Rochau, G. A.; Smith, I. C.

    2015-04-15

    The application of a space-resolving spectrometer to X-ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) experiments has the potential to advance the study of warm dense matter. This has motivated the design of a spherical crystal spectrometer, which is a doubly focusing geometry with an overall high sensitivity and the capability of providing high-resolution, space-resolved spectra. A detailed analysis of the image fluence and crystal throughput in this geometry is carried out and analytical estimates of these quantities are presented. This analysis informed the design of a new spectrometer intended for future XRTS experiments on the Z-machine. The new spectrometer collects 6 keV x-rays with a spherically bent Ge (422) crystal and focuses the collected x-rays onto the Rowland circle. The spectrometer was built and then tested with a foam target. The resulting high-quality spectra prove that a spherical spectrometer is a viable diagnostic for XRTS experiments.

  19. Analysis and implementation of a space resolving spherical crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering experiments.

    PubMed

    Harding, E C; Ao, T; Bailey, J E; Loisel, G; Sinars, D B; Geissel, M; Rochau, G A; Smith, I C

    2015-04-01

    The application of a space-resolving spectrometer to X-ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) experiments has the potential to advance the study of warm dense matter. This has motivated the design of a spherical crystal spectrometer, which is a doubly focusing geometry with an overall high sensitivity and the capability of providing high-resolution, space-resolved spectra. A detailed analysis of the image fluence and crystal throughput in this geometry is carried out and analytical estimates of these quantities are presented. This analysis informed the design of a new spectrometer intended for future XRTS experiments on the Z-machine. The new spectrometer collects 6 keV x-rays with a spherically bent Ge (422) crystal and focuses the collected x-rays onto the Rowland circle. The spectrometer was built and then tested with a foam target. The resulting high-quality spectra prove that a spherical spectrometer is a viable diagnostic for XRTS experiments.

  20. Analysis and implementation of a space resolving spherical crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, E. C.; Ao, T.; Bailey, J. E.; Loisel, G.; Sinars, D. B.; Geissel, M.; Rochau, G. A.; Smith, I. C.

    2015-04-01

    The application of a space-resolving spectrometer to X-ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) experiments has the potential to advance the study of warm dense matter. This has motivated the design of a spherical crystal spectrometer, which is a doubly focusing geometry with an overall high sensitivity and the capability of providing high-resolution, space-resolved spectra. A detailed analysis of the image fluence and crystal throughput in this geometry is carried out and analytical estimates of these quantities are presented. This analysis informed the design of a new spectrometer intended for future XRTS experiments on the Z-machine. The new spectrometer collects 6 keV x-rays with a spherically bent Ge (422) crystal and focuses the collected x-rays onto the Rowland circle. The spectrometer was built and then tested with a foam target. The resulting high-quality spectra prove that a spherical spectrometer is a viable diagnostic for XRTS experiments.