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Sample records for sphingomyelins

  1. Regulation of sphingomyelin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bienias, Kamil; Fiedorowicz, Anna; Sadowska, Anna; Prokopiuk, Sławomir; Car, Halina

    2016-06-01

    Sphingolipids (SFs) represent a large class of lipids playing diverse functions in a vast number of physiological and pathological processes. Sphingomyelin (SM) is the most abundant SF in the cell, with ubiquitous distribution within mammalian tissues, and particularly high levels in the Central Nervous System (CNS). SM is an essential element of plasma membrane (PM) and its levels are crucial for the cell function. SM content in a cell is strictly regulated by the enzymes of SM metabolic pathways, which activities create a balance between SM synthesis and degradation. The de novo synthesis via SM synthases (SMSs) in the last step of the multi-stage process is the most important pathway of SM formation in a cell. The SM hydrolysis by sphingomyelinases (SMases) increases the concentration of ceramide (Cer), a bioactive molecule, which is involved in cellular proliferation, growth and apoptosis. By controlling the levels of SM and Cer, SMSs and SMases maintain cellular homeostasis. Enzymes of SM cycle exhibit unique properties and diverse tissue distribution. Disturbances in their activities were observed in many CNS pathologies. This review characterizes the physiological roles of SM and enzymes controlling SM levels as well as their involvement in selected pathologies of the Central Nervous System, such as ischemia/hypoxia, Alzheimer disease (AD), Parkinson disease (PD), depression, schizophrenia and Niemann Pick disease (NPD). PMID:26940196

  2. Biological functions of sphingomyelins.

    PubMed

    Slotte, J Peter

    2013-10-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM) is a dominant sphingolipid in membranes of mammalian cells and this lipid class is specifically enriched in the plasma membrane, the endocytic recycling compartment, and the trans Golgi network. The distribution of SM and cholesterol among cellular compartments correlate. Sphingolipids have extensive hydrogen-bonding capabilities which together with their saturated nature facilitate the formation of sphingolipid and SM-enriched lateral domains in membranes. Cholesterol prefers to interact with SMs and this interaction has many important functional consequences. In this review, the synthesis, regulation, and intracellular distribution of SMs are discussed. The many direct roles played by membrane SM in various cellular functions and processes will also be discussed. These include involvement in the regulation of endocytosis and receptor-mediated ligand uptake, in ion channel and G-protein coupled receptor function, in protein sorting, and functioning as receptor molecules for various bacterial toxins, and for non-bacterial pore-forming toxins. SM is also an important constituent of the eye lens membrane, and is believed to participate in the regulation of various nuclear functions. SM is an independent risk factor in the development of cardiovascular disease, and new studies have shed light on possible mechanism behind its role in atherogenesis. PMID:23684760

  3. Sphingomyelin is synthesized in the cis Golgi.

    PubMed

    Jeckel, D; Karrenbauer, A; Birk, R; Schmidt, R R; Wieland, F

    1990-02-12

    We have employed in vitro a truncated ceramide analogue with 8 carbon atoms in the sphingosine and the fatty acyl residue, each, to investigate the activity of various membrane fractions to synthesize truncated sphingomyelin. This shortened ceramide readily diffuses through membranes and therefore can easily find access to the lumina of intact organelles. Sphingomyelin synthase activity resides in the Golgi apparatus, and after sucrose density gradient centrifugation of Golgi-enriched fractions sphingomyelin synthesis follows a cis Golgi marker enzyme. PMID:2155131

  4. 21 CFR 862.1455 - Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid. Lecithin and sphingomyelin are phospholipids (fats or fat-like substances containing phosphorus). Measurements of the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1455 - Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid. Lecithin and sphingomyelin are phospholipids (fats or fat-like substances containing phosphorus). Measurements of the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1455 - Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid. Lecithin and sphingomyelin are phospholipids (fats or fat-like substances containing phosphorus). Measurements of the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in...

  7. Detection of Sphingomyelin Clusters by Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shirota, Koichiro; Yagi, Kiyoshi; Inaba, Takehiko; Li, Pai-Chi; Murata, Michio; Sugita, Yuji; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2016-09-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM) is a major sphingolipid in mammalian cells that forms specific lipid domains in combination with cholesterol (Chol). Using molecular-dynamics simulation and density functional theory calculation, we identified a characteristic Raman band of SM at ∼1643 cm(-1) as amide I of the SM cluster. Experimental results indicate that this band is sensitive to the hydration of SM and the presence of Chol. We showed that this amide I Raman band can be utilized to examine the membrane distribution of SM. Similarly to SM, ceramide phosphoethanolamine (CerPE) exhibited an amide I Raman band in almost the same region, although CerPE lacks three methyl groups in the phosphocholine moiety of SM. In contrast to SM, the amide I band of CerPE was not affected by Chol, suggesting the importance of the methyl groups of SM in the SM-Chol interaction. PMID:27602727

  8. Inhibition of endothelial lipase activity by sphingomyelin in the lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Belikova, Natalia A; Billheimer, Jeff; Rader, Daniel J; Hill, John S; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2014-10-01

    Endothelial lipase (EL) is a major determinant of plasma HDL concentration, its activity being inversely proportional to HDL levels. Although it is known that it preferentially acts on HDL compared to LDL and VLDL, the basis for this specificity is not known. Here we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin, a major phospholipid in lipoproteins is a physiological inhibitor of EL, and that the preference of the enzyme for HDL may be due to low sphingomyelin/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) ratio in HDL, compared to other lipoproteins. Using recombinant human EL, we showed that sphingomyelin inhibits the hydrolysis of PtdCho in the liposomes in a concentration-dependent manner. While the enzyme showed lower hydrolysis of LDL PtdCho, compared to HDL PtdCho, this difference disappeared after the degradation of lipoprotein sphingomyelin by bacterial sphingomyelinase. Analysis of molecular species of PtdCho hydrolyzed by EL in the lipoproteins showed that the enzyme preferentially hydrolyzed PtdCho containing polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as 22:6, 20:5, 20:4 at the sn-2 position, generating the corresponding PUFA-lyso PtdCho. This specificity for PUFA-PtdCho species was not observed after depletion of sphingomyelin by sphingomyelinase. These results show that sphingomyelin not only plays a role in regulating EL activity, but also influences its specificity towards PtdCho species. PMID:25167836

  9. The role of sphingomyelin and sphingomyelin synthases in cell death, proliferation and migration-from cell and animal models to human disorders.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Makoto; Okazaki, Toshiro

    2014-05-01

    Sphingomyelin constitutes membrane microdomains such as lipid raft, caveolae, and clathrin-coated pits and implicates in the regulation of trans-membrane signaling. On the other hand, sphingomyelin emerges as an important molecule to generate bioactive sphingolipids through ceramide. Sphingomyelin synthase is an enzyme that generates sphingomyelin and diacylglycerol from phosphatidylcholine and ceramide. Although ceramide has a well-known role as a lipid mediator to regulate cell death and survival, the only known biological role of sphingomyelin regulated by sphingomyelin synthases was limited to being a source of bioactive lipids. Here, we describe the basic characters of sphingomyelin synthases and discuss additional roles for sphingomyelin and sphingomyelin synthase in biological functions including cell migration, apoptosis, autophagy, and cell survival/proliferation as well as in human disorders such as cancer and cardiovascular disorders. It is expected that a better understanding of the role of sphingomyelin regulated by sphingomyelin synthase will shed light on new mechanisms in cell biology, physiology and pathology. In the future, novel therapeutic procedures for currently incurable diseases could be developed through modifying the function of not only sphingolipids, such as sphingomyelin and ceramide, but also of their regulatory enzymes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled New Frontiers in Sphingolipid Biology.

  10. Excess sphingomyelin disturbs ATG9A trafficking and autophagosome closure.

    PubMed

    Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth; Vindeløv, Signe Diness; Hämälistö, Saara; Mograbi, Baharia; Keldsbo, Anne; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Favaro, Elena; Adam, Dieter; Szyniarowski, Piotr; Hofman, Paul; Krautwald, Stefan; Farkas, Thomas; Petersen, Nikolaj H T; Rohde, Mikkel; Linkermann, Andreas; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-05-01

    Sphingomyelin is an essential cellular lipid that traffics between plasma membrane and intracellular organelles until directed to lysosomes for SMPD1 (sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1)-mediated degradation. Inactivating mutations in the SMPD1 gene result in Niemann-Pick diseases type A and B characterized by sphingomyelin accumulation and severely disturbed tissue homeostasis. Here, we report that sphingomyelin overload disturbs the maturation and closure of autophagic membranes. Niemann-Pick type A patient fibroblasts and SMPD1-depleted cancer cells accumulate elongated and unclosed autophagic membranes as well as abnormally swollen autophagosomes in the absence of normal autophagosomes and autolysosomes. The immature autophagic membranes are rich in WIPI2, ATG16L1 and MAP1LC3B but display reduced association with ATG9A. Contrary to its normal trafficking between plasma membrane, intracellular organelles and autophagic membranes, ATG9A concentrates in transferrin receptor-positive juxtanuclear recycling endosomes in SMPD1-deficient cells. Supporting a causative role for ATG9A mistrafficking in the autophagy defect observed in SMPD1-deficient cells, ectopic ATG9A effectively reverts this phenotype. Exogenous C12-sphingomyelin induces a similar juxtanuclear accumulation of ATG9A and subsequent defect in the maturation of autophagic membranes in healthy cells while the main sphingomyelin metabolite, ceramide, fails to revert the autophagy defective phenotype in SMPD1-deficient cells. Juxtanuclear accumulation of ATG9A and defective autophagy are also evident in tissues of smpd1-deficient mice with a subsequent inability to cope with kidney ischemia-reperfusion stress. These data reveal sphingomyelin as an important regulator of ATG9A trafficking and maturation of early autophagic membranes. PMID:27070082

  11. Excess sphingomyelin disturbs ATG9A trafficking and autophagosome closure

    PubMed Central

    Corcelle-Termeau, Elisabeth; Vindeløv, Signe Diness; Hämälistö, Saara; Mograbi, Baharia; Keldsbo, Anne; Bräsen, Jan Hinrich; Favaro, Elena; Adam, Dieter; Szyniarowski, Piotr; Hofman, Paul; Krautwald, Stefan; Farkas, Thomas; Petersen, Nikolaj H.T.; Rohde, Mikkel; Linkermann, Andreas; Jäättelä, Marja

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sphingomyelin is an essential cellular lipid that traffics between plasma membrane and intracellular organelles until directed to lysosomes for SMPD1 (sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1)-mediated degradation. Inactivating mutations in the SMPD1 gene result in Niemann-Pick diseases type A and B characterized by sphingomyelin accumulation and severely disturbed tissue homeostasis. Here, we report that sphingomyelin overload disturbs the maturation and closure of autophagic membranes. Niemann-Pick type A patient fibroblasts and SMPD1-depleted cancer cells accumulate elongated and unclosed autophagic membranes as well as abnormally swollen autophagosomes in the absence of normal autophagosomes and autolysosomes. The immature autophagic membranes are rich in WIPI2, ATG16L1 and MAP1LC3B but display reduced association with ATG9A. Contrary to its normal trafficking between plasma membrane, intracellular organelles and autophagic membranes, ATG9A concentrates in transferrin receptor-positive juxtanuclear recycling endosomes in SMPD1-deficient cells. Supporting a causative role for ATG9A mistrafficking in the autophagy defect observed in SMPD1-deficient cells, ectopic ATG9A effectively reverts this phenotype. Exogenous C12-sphingomyelin induces a similar juxtanuclear accumulation of ATG9A and subsequent defect in the maturation of autophagic membranes in healthy cells while the main sphingomyelin metabolite, ceramide, fails to revert the autophagy defective phenotype in SMPD1-deficient cells. Juxtanuclear accumulation of ATG9A and defective autophagy are also evident in tissues of smpd1-deficient mice with a subsequent inability to cope with kidney ischemia-reperfusion stress. These data reveal sphingomyelin as an important regulator of ATG9A trafficking and maturation of early autophagic membranes. PMID:27070082

  12. Factors affecting longitudinal trajectories of plasma sphingomyelins: the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging

    PubMed Central

    Mielke, Michelle M; Bandaru, Veera Venkata Ratnam; Han, Dingfen; An, Yang; Resnick, Susan M; Ferrucci, Luigi; Haughey, Norman J

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomyelin metabolism has been linked to several diseases and to longevity. However, few epidemiological studies have quantified individual plasma sphingomyelin species (identified by acyl-chain length and saturation) or their relationship between demographic factors and disease processes. In this study, we determined plasma concentrations of distinct sphingomyelin species in 992 individuals, aged 55 and older, enrolled in the Baltimore Longitudinal Study of Aging. Participants were followed, with serial measures, up to 6 visits and 38 years (3972 total samples). Quantitative analyses were performed on a high-performance liquid chromatography-coupled electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometer. Linear mixed models were used to assess variation in specific sphingomyelin species and associations with demographics, diseases, medications or lifestyle factors, and plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. We found that most sphingomyelin species increased with age. Women had higher plasma levels of all sphingomyelin species and showed steeper trajectories of age-related increases compared to men. African Americans also showed higher circulating sphingomyelin concentrations compared to Caucasians. Diabetes, smoking, and plasma triglycerides were associated with lower levels of many sphingomyelins and dihydrosphingomyelins. Notably, these associations showed specificity to sphingomyelin acyl-chain length and saturation. These results demonstrate that longitudinal changes in circulating sphingomyelin levels are influenced by age, sex, race, lifestyle factors, and diseases. It will be important to further establish the intra-individual age- and sex-specific changes in each sphingomyelin species in relation to disease onset and progression. PMID:25345489

  13. Sphingomyelin Synthase 1 Is Essential for Male Fertility in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Scherthan, Harry; Horsch, Marion; Beckers, Johannes; Fuchs, Helmut; Gailus-Durner, Valerie; Hrabě de Angelis, Martin; Ford, Steven J.; Burton, Neal C.; Razansky, Daniel; Trümbach, Dietrich; Aichler, Michaela; Walch, Axel Karl; Calzada-Wack, Julia; Neff, Frauke; Wurst, Wolfgang; Hartmann, Tobias; Floss, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids and the derived gangliosides have critical functions in spermatogenesis, thus mutations in genes involved in sphingolipid biogenesis are often associated with male infertility. We have generated a transgenic mouse line carrying an insertion in the sphingomyelin synthase gene Sms1, the enzyme which generates sphingomyelin species in the Golgi apparatus. We describe the spermatogenesis defect of Sms1-/- mice, which is characterized by sloughing of spermatocytes and spermatids, causing progressive infertility of male homozygotes. Lipid profiling revealed a reduction in several long chain unsaturated phosphatidylcholins, lysophosphatidylcholins and sphingolipids in the testes of mutants. Multi-Spectral Optoacoustic Tomography indicated blood-testis barrier dysfunction. A supplementary diet of the essential omega-3 docosahexaenoic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid diminished germ cell sloughing from the seminiferous epithelium and restored spermatogenesis and fertility in 50% of previously infertile mutants. Our findings indicate that SMS1 has a wider than anticipated role in testis polyunsaturated fatty acid homeostasis and for male fertility. PMID:27788151

  14. Comparison of the biophysical properties of racemic and d-erythro-N-acyl sphingomyelins.

    PubMed Central

    Ramstedt, B; Slotte, J P

    1999-01-01

    In this study stereochemically pure d-erythro-sphingomyelins (SMs) with either 16:0 or 18:1(cisDelta9) as the N-linked acyl-chain were synthesized. Our purpose was to examine the properties of these sphingomyelins and acyl-chain matched racemic (d-erythro/l-threo) sphingomyelins in model membranes. Liquid-expanded d-erythro-N-16:0-SM in monolayers was observed to pack more densely than the corresponding racemic sphingomyelin. Cholesterol desorption to beta-cyclodextrin was significantly slower from d-erythro-N-16:0-SM monolayers than from racemic N-16:0-SM monolayers. Significantly more condensed domains were seen in cholesterol/d-erythro-N-16:0-SM monolayers than in the corresponding racemic mixed monolayers, when [7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazol-4-yl]phosphatidylcholine was used as a probe in monolayer fluorescence microscopy. With monolayers of N-18:1-SMs, both the lateral packing densities (sphingomyelin monolayers) and the rates of cholesterol desorption (mixed cholesterol/sphingomyelin monolayers) was found to be similar for d-erythro and racemic sphingomyelins. The phase transition temperature and enthalpy of d-erythro-N-16:0-SM in bilayer membranes were slightly higher compared with the corresponding racemic sphingomyelin (41.1 degrees C and 8.4 +/- 0.4 kJ/mol, and 39.9 degrees C and 7.2 +/- 0.2 kJ/mol, respectively). Finally, d-erythro-sphingomyelins in monolayers (both N-16:0 and N-18:1 species) were not as easily degraded at 37 degrees C by sphingomyelinase (Staphylococcus aureus) as the corresponding racemic sphingomyelins. We conclude that racemic sphingomyelins differ significantly in their biophysical properties from the physiologically relevant d-erythro sphingomyelins. PMID:10465760

  15. Detectors for evaluating the cellular landscape of sphingomyelin- and cholesterol-rich membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Takuma; Ishitsuka, Reiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2016-08-01

    Although sphingomyelin and cholesterol are major lipids of mammalian cells, the detailed distribution of these lipids in cellular membranes remains still obscure. However, the recent development of protein probes that specifically bind sphingomyelin and/or cholesterol provides new information about the landscape of the lipid domains that are enriched with sphingomyelin or cholesterol or both. Here, we critically summarize the tools to study distribution and dynamics of sphingomyelin and cholesterol. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon.

  16. Consumption of olive oil has opposite effects on plasma total cholesterol and sphingomyelin concentrations in rats.

    PubMed

    Geelen, M J; Beynen, A C

    2000-05-01

    The hypothesis that olive-oil consumption alters plasma sphingomyelin concentrations and hepatic sphingomyelin metabolism was tested. Rats were fed on purified, high-cholesterol diets with either coconut fat or olive-oil (180 g/kg). In accordance with previous work, olive-oil v. coconut-fat consumption significantly elevated hepatic and total plasma cholesterol concentrations. During the course of the experiment, the concentration of plasma sphingomyelin rose in the coconut-fat group and remained constant in the olive-oil group. When compared with the coconut-fat-fed group, the plasma sphingomyelin levels were significantly lower in the olive-oil-fed group after 14 and 21 d of treatment. Dietary olive oil raised the amounts of cholesterol and sphingomyelin in the VLDL density region, and this change was associated with a reduction in the cholesterol and sphingomyelin contents of the LDL and HDL density ranges. Olive-oil consumption reduced the activity of serine palmitoyltransferase, while the activities of phosphatidylcholine:ceramide cholinephosphotransferase and phosphatidylethanolamine:ceramide ethanolaminephosphotransferase were left unchanged. Dietary olive oil also enhanced the activity of acidic sphingomyelinase, but not that of neutral sphingomyelinase. The present data indicate that dietary olive oil v. coconut fat has opposite effects on total plasma cholesterol and sphingomyelin concentrations. The lower plasma sphingomyelin levels observed in olive-oil-fed, as compared with coconut-fat-fed rats, may be explained by a simultaneous elevation and reduction in sphingomyelin catabolism and synthesis respectively, as based on the measured enzyme activities.

  17. Detectors for evaluating the cellular landscape of sphingomyelin- and cholesterol-rich membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Takuma; Ishitsuka, Reiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2016-08-01

    Although sphingomyelin and cholesterol are major lipids of mammalian cells, the detailed distribution of these lipids in cellular membranes remains still obscure. However, the recent development of protein probes that specifically bind sphingomyelin and/or cholesterol provides new information about the landscape of the lipid domains that are enriched with sphingomyelin or cholesterol or both. Here, we critically summarize the tools to study distribution and dynamics of sphingomyelin and cholesterol. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: The cellular lipid landscape edited by Tim P. Levine and Anant K. Menon. PMID:26993577

  18. Alpha Particles Induce Apoptosis through the Sphingomyelin Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Seideman, Jonathan H.; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Howell, Roger W.; Kolesnick, Richard N.; Scheinberg, David A.

    2011-01-01

    The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) γ radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET a particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with a particles emitted by the 225Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on α-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated a particles using a planar 241Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five α-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that a particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis. PMID:21631289

  19. Alpha particles induce apoptosis through the sphingomyelin pathway.

    PubMed

    Seideman, Jonathan H; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A; McDevitt, Michael R; Howell, Roger W; Kolesnick, Richard N; Scheinberg, David A

    2011-10-01

    The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) γ radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET α particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with α particles emitted by the ²²⁵Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on α-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated α particles using a planar ²⁴¹Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five α-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that α particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis.

  20. Alpha particles induce apoptosis through the sphingomyelin pathway.

    PubMed

    Seideman, Jonathan H; Stancevic, Branka; Rotolo, Jimmy A; McDevitt, Michael R; Howell, Roger W; Kolesnick, Richard N; Scheinberg, David A

    2011-10-01

    The sphingomyelin pathway involves the enzymatic cleavage of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide, a second messenger that serves as a key mediator in the rapid apoptotic response to various cell stressors. Low-linear energy transfer (LET) γ radiation can initiate this pathway, independent of DNA damage, via the cell membrane. Whether short-ranged, high-LET α particles, which are of interest as potent environmental carcinogens, radiotherapies and potential components of dirty bombs, can act through this mechanism to signal apoptosis is unknown. Here we show that irradiation of Jurkat cells with α particles emitted by the ²²⁵Ac-DOTA-anti-CD3 IgG antibody construct results in dose-dependent apoptosis. This apoptosis was significantly reduced by pretreating cells with cholesterol-depleting nystatin, a reagent known to inhibit ceramide signaling by interfering with membrane raft coalescence and ceramide-rich platform generation. The effects of nystatin on α-particle-induced apoptosis were related to disruption of the ceramide pathway and not to microdosimetry alterations, because similar results were obtained after external irradiation of the cells with a broad beam of collimated α particles using a planar ²⁴¹Am source. External irradiation allowed for more precise control of the dosimetry and geometry of the irradiation, independent of antibody binding or cell internalization kinetics. Mechanistically consistent with these findings, Jurkat cells rapidly increased membrane concentrations of ceramide after external irradiation with an average of five α-particle traversals per cell. These data indicate that α particles can activate the sphingomyelin pathway to induce apoptosis. PMID:21631289

  1. Raft coalescence and FcγRIIA activation upon sphingomyelin clustering induced by lysenin.

    PubMed

    Kulma, Magdalena; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna; Sobota, Andrzej

    2012-08-01

    Activation of immunoreceptor FcγRIIA by cross-linking with antibodies is accompanied by coalescence of sphingolipid/cholesterol-rich membrane rafts leading to the formation of signaling platforms of the receptor. In this report we examined whether clustering of the raft lipid sphingomyelin can reciprocally induce partition of FcγRIIA to rafts. To induce sphingomyelin clustering, cells were exposed to non-lytic concentrations of GST-lysenin which specifically recognizes sphingomyelin. The lysenin/sphingomyelin complexes formed microscale assemblies composed of GST-lysenin oligomers engaging sphingomyelin of rafts. Upon sphingomyelin clustering, non-cross-linked FcγRIIA associated with raft-derived detergent-resistant membrane fractions as revealed by density gradient centrifugation. Pretreatment of cells with GST-lysenin also increased the size of detergent-insoluble molecular complexes of activated FcγRIIA. Sphingomyelin clustering triggered tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor and its accompanying proteins, Cbl and NTAL, in the absence of receptor ligands and enhanced phosphorylation of these proteins in the ligand presence. These data indicate that clustering of plasma membrane sphingomyelin induces coalescence of rafts and triggers signaling events analogous to those caused by FcγRIIA activation.

  2. 21 CFR 862.1455 - Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... fluid are used in evaluating fetal maturity. (b) Classification. Class II. ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid... Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1455 Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system....

  3. 21 CFR 862.1455 - Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... fluid are used in evaluating fetal maturity. (b) Classification. Class II. ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid... Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862.1455 Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid test system....

  4. The importance of hydrogen bonding in sphingomyelin's membrane interactions with co-lipids.

    PubMed

    Slotte, J Peter

    2016-02-01

    Sphingomyelin is an important constituent of mammalian cell membranes. Its molecular structure is N-acyl-D-erythro-sphingosylphosphorylcholine. The N-acyls in sphingomyelin often contain 16-24 carbons that are mostly saturated chains; however, the monounsaturated 24:1(Δ15c) acyl chain is also common. In addition to the more saturated nature of sphingomyelins, compared to physiologically relevant glycerophospholipids, also their hydrogen bonding properties are very different from the glycerophospholipids. Sphingomyelins form extensive intramolecular hydrogen bonds (from the 3OH of the long-chain base to phosphate oxygens of the head group), but also intermolecular hydrogen bonding involving the NH of the long-chain base are important for sphingomyelin (and sphingolipid) properties in membrane environments. Hydrogen bonding involving sphingomyelin has been shown to markedly stabilize interactions with both cholesterol and ceramide in fully hydrated bilayers. Such interactions contribute to the propensity of saturated sphingomyelin to form a liquid-ordered phase together with cholesterol, or a gel phase with saturated ceramides. The purpose of this review is to present recent experimental and computational evidence in support of the importance of hydrogen bonding for the interaction of sphingomyelin with other membrane lipids.

  5. Reversible effects of sphingomyelin degradation on cholesterol distribution and metabolism in fibroblasts and transformed neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Pörn, M I; Slotte, J P

    1990-10-01

    Plasma-membrane sphingomyelin appears to be one of the major determinants of the preferential allocation of cell cholesterol into the plasma-membrane compartment, since removal of sphingomyelin leads to a dramatic redistribution of cholesterol within the cell [Slotte & Bierman (1988) Biochem. J. 250, 653-658]. In the present study we examined the long-term effects of sphingomyelin degradation on cholesterol redistribution in cells and determined the reversibility of the process. In a human lung fibroblast-cell line, removal of 80% of the sphingomyelin led to a rapid and transient up-regulation (3-fold) of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity, and also, within 30 h, to the translocation of about 50% of the cell non-esterified cholesterol from a cholesterol oxidase-susceptible compartment (i.e. the cell surface) to oxidase-resistant compartments. At 49 h after the initial sphingomyelin degradation, the cell sphingomyelin level was back to 45% of the control level, and the direction of cell cholesterol flow was toward the cell surface, although the original distribution was not achieved. In a transformed neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y), the depletion of sphingomyelin led to a similarly rapid and transient up-regulation of ACAT activity, and to the translocation of about 25% of cell-surface cholesterol into internal membranes (within 3 h). The flow of cholesterol back to the cholesterol oxidase-susceptible pool was rapid, and a pretreatment cholesterol distribution was reached within 20-49 h. Also, the resynthesis of sphingomyelin was faster in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and reached control levels within 24 h. The findings of the present study show that the cellular redistribution of cholesterol, as induced by sphingomyelin degradation, is reversible and suggest that the normalization of cellular cholesterol distribution is linked to the re-synthesis of sphingomyelin.

  6. Local regulation of tooth mineralization by sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3.

    PubMed

    Khavandgar, Z; Alebrahim, S; Eimar, H; Tamimi, F; McKee, M D; Murshed, M

    2013-04-01

    Sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (Smpd3) encodes a membrane-bound enzyme that cleaves sphingomyelin to generate several bioactive metabolites. A recessive mutation called fragilitas ossium (fro) in the Smpd3 gene leads to impaired mineralization of bone and tooth extracellular matrix (ECM) in fro/fro mice. In teeth from fro/fro mice at various neonatal ages, radiography and light and electron microscopy showed delayed mantle dentin mineralization and a consequent delay in enamel formation as compared with that in control +/fro mice. These tooth abnormalities progressively improved with time. Immunohistochemistry showed expression of SMPD3 by dentin-forming odontoblasts. SMPD3 deficiency, however, did not affect the differentiation of these cells, as shown by osterix and dentin sialophosphoprotein expression. Using a transgenic mouse rescue model (fro/fro; Col1a1-Smpd3) in which Smpd3 expression is driven by a murine Col1a1 promoter fragment active in osteoblasts and odontoblasts, we demonstrate a complete correction of the tooth mineralization delays. In conclusion, analysis of these data demonstrates that Smpd3 expression in odontoblasts is required for tooth mineralization.

  7. Structure of sphingomyelin bilayers and complexes with cholesterol forming membrane rafts.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Peter J

    2013-07-30

    Sphingomyelin and cholesterol are of interest to biologists because they interact to form condensed structures said to be responsible for a variety of functions that membranes perform. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction methods have been used to investigate the structure of bilayers of D-erythro palmitoyl-sphingomyelin and complexes formed by palmitoyl- and egg-sphingomyelin with cholesterol in aqueous multibilayer dispersions. D-erythro palmitoyl sphingomyelin bilayers exist in two conformers that are distinguished by their lamellar repeat spacing, bilayer thickness, and polar group hydration. The distinction is attributed to hydrogen bonding to water or to intermolecular hydrogen bonds that are disrupted by the formation of ripple structure. The coexisting bilayer structures of pure palmitoyl sphingomyelin are observed in the presence of cholesterol-rich bilayers that are characterized by different bilayer parameters. The presence of cholesterol preferentially affects the conformer of D-erythro sphingomyelin with thicker, more hydrated bilayers. Coexisting bilayers of sphingomyelin and complexes with cholesterol are in register and remain coupled at temperatures at least up to 50 °C. Cholesterol forms a complex of 1.8 mols of sphingomyelin per cholesterol at 37 °C that coexists with bilayers of pure sphingomyelin up to 50 °C. Redistribution of the two lipids takes place on cooling below the fluid- to gel-phase transition temperature, resulting in the withdrawal of sphingomyelin into gel phase and the formation of coexisting bilayers of equimolar proportions of the two lipids. Cholesterol-rich bilayers fit a stripe model at temperatures less than 37 °C characterized by alternating rows of sphingomyelin and cholesterol molecules. A quasicrystalline array models the arrangement at higher temperatures in which each cholesterol molecule is surrounded by seven hydrocarbon chains, each of which is in contact with two cholesterol molecules. The thickness of bilayer

  8. A lipid analogue that inhibits sphingomyelin hydrolysis and synthesis, increases ceramide, and leads to cell death.

    PubMed

    Darroch, Peter I; Dagan, Arie; Granot, Tami; He, Xingxuan; Gatt, Shimon; Schuchman, Edward H

    2005-11-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of a novel thiourea derivative of sphingomyelin (AD2765). In vitro assays using pure enzyme and/or cell extracts revealed that this compound inhibited the hydrolysis of BODIPY-conjugated or 14C-labeled sphingomyelin by acid sphingomyelinase and Mg2+-dependent neutral sphingomyelinase. Studies in normal human skin fibroblasts further revealed that AD2765 was taken up by cells and inhibited the hydrolysis of BODIPY-conjugated sphingomyelin in situ. In situ and in vitro studies also showed that this compound inhibited the synthesis of sphingomyelin from BODIPY-conjugated ceramide. The specificity of AD2765 for enzymes involved in sphingomyelin metabolism was demonstrated by the fact that it had no effect on the hydrolysis of BODIPY-conjugated ceramide by acid ceramidase or on the synthesis of BODIPY-conjugated glucosylceramide from BODIPY-conjugated ceramide. The overall effect of AD2765 on sphingomyelin metabolism was concentration-dependent, and treatment of normal human skin fibroblasts or cancer cells with this compound at concentrations > 10 microM led to an increase in cellular ceramide and cell death. Thus, AD2765 might be used to manipulate sphingomyelin metabolism in various ways, potentially to reduce substrate accumulation in cells from types A and B Niemann-Pick disease patients, and/or to affect the growth of human cancer cells.

  9. Sphingomyelin-rich domains are sites of lysenin oligomerization: implications for raft studies.

    PubMed

    Kulma, Magdalena; Hereć, Monika; Grudziński, Wojciech; Anderluh, Gregor; Gruszecki, Wiesław I; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna; Sobota, Andrzej

    2010-03-01

    Lysenin is a self-assembling, pore-forming toxin which specifically recognizes sphingomyelin. Mutation of tryptophan 20 abolishes lysenin oligomerization and cytolytic activity. We studied the interaction of lysenin WT and W20A with sphingomyelin in membranes of various lipid compositions which, according to atomic force microscopy studies, generated either homo- or heterogeneous sphingomyelin distribution. Liposomes composed of SM/DOPC, SM/DOPC/cholesterol and SM/DPPC/cholesterol could bind the highest amounts of GST-lysenin WT, as shown by surface plasmon resonance analysis. These lipid compositions enhanced the release of carboxyfluorescein from liposomes induced by lysenin WT, pointing to the importance of heterogeneous sphingomyelin distribution for lysenin WT binding and oligomerization. Lysenin W20A bound more weakly to sphingomyelin-containing liposomes than did lysenin WT. The same amounts of lysenin W20A bound to sphingomyelin mixed with either DOPC or DPPC, indicating that the binding was not affected by sphingomyelin distribution in the membranes. The mutant lysenin had a limited ability to penetrate hydrophobic region of the membrane as indicated by measurements of surface pressure changes. When applied to detect sphingomyelin on the cell surface, lysenin W20A formed large conglomerates on the membrane, different from small and regular clusters of lysenin WT. Only lysenin WT recognized sphingomyelin pool affected by formation of raft-based signaling platforms. During fractionation of Triton X-100 cell lysates, SDS-resistant oligomers of lysenin WT associated with membrane fragments insoluble in Triton X-100 while monomers of lysenin W20A partitioned to Triton X-100-soluble membrane fractions. Altogether, the data suggest that oligomerization of lysenin WT is a prerequisite for its docking in raft-related domains.

  10. Resynthesis of sphingomyelin from plasma-membrane phosphatidylcholine in BHK cells treated with Staphylococcus aureus sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed Central

    Allan, D; Quinn, P

    1988-01-01

    About 60-65% of the total sphingomyelin in intact BHK cells is in a readily accessible pool which is rapidly degraded by Staphylococcus aureus sphingomyelinase. No more sphingomyelin is broken down in cells which have been fixed with glutaraldehyde or lysed with streptolysin O, suggesting that all the sphingomyelin which is available to the enzyme is on the cell surface. The inaccessible pool of sphingomyelin does not equilibrate with the plasma-membrane pool, even after prolonged incubation. Experiments using [3H]-choline show that much more phosphocholine is released from the intact cells treated with sphingomyelinase than can be accounted for by breakdown of the original cell-surface pool of sphingomyelin; the excess appears to be a consequence of the breakdown of sphingomyelin newly resynthesized at the expense of a pool of phosphatidylcholine which represents about 8% of total cell phosphatidylcholine and may reside in the plasma membrane. This would be consistent with resynthesis of cell-surface sphingomyelin by the phosphatidylcholine: ceramide phosphocholinetransferase pathway, which has previously been shown to be localized in the plasma membrane. However, in [3H]palmitate-labelled cells there appeared to be no accumulation of the diacylglycerol expected to be produced by this reaction, and no enhanced synthesis of phosphatidate or phosphatidylinositol; instead there was an increased synthesis of triacylglycerol. A similar increase in labelling of triacylglycerol was seen in enzyme-treated cells where the sphingomyelinase was subsequently removed, allowing resynthesis of sphingomyelin which occurred at a rate of about 25% of total sphingomyelin/h. Treatment of BHK cells with sphingomyelinase caused no change in the rates of fluid-phase endocytosis or exocytosis as measured with [3H]inulin. PMID:2848498

  11. Sphingomyelin Synthase 2, but Not Sphingomyelin Synthase 1, Is Involved in HIV-1 Envelope-mediated Membrane Fusion*

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Yasuhiro; Nemoto-Sasaki, Yoko; Tanikawa, Takashi; Oka, Saori; Tsuchiya, Kiyoto; Zama, Kouta; Mitsutake, Susumu; Sugiura, Takayuki; Yamashita, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Membrane fusion between the viral envelope and plasma membranes of target cells has previously been correlated with HIV-1 infection. Lipids in the plasma membrane, including sphingomyelin, may be crucially involved in HIV-1 infection; however, the role of lipid-metabolic enzymes in membrane fusion remains unclear. In this study, we examined the roles of sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) in HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion using a cell-cell fusion assay with HIV-1 mimetics and their target cells. We employed reconstituted cells as target cells that stably express Sms1 or Sms2 in Sms-deficient cells. Fusion susceptibility was ∼5-fold higher in Sms2-expressing cells (not in Sms1-expressing cells) than in Sms-deficient cells. The enhancement of fusion susceptibility observed in Sms2-expressing cells was reversed and reduced by Sms2 knockdown. We also found that catalytically nonactive Sms2 promoted membrane fusion susceptibility. Moreover, SMS2 co-localized and was constitutively associated with the HIV receptor·co-receptor complex in the plasma membrane. In addition, HIV-1 Env treatment resulted in a transient increase in nonreceptor tyrosine kinase (Pyk2) phosphorylation in Sms2-expressing and catalytically nonactive Sms2-expressing cells. We observed that F-actin polymerization in the region of membrane fusion was more prominent in Sms2-expressing cells than Sms-deficient cells. Taken together, our research provides insight into a novel function of SMS2 which is the regulation of HIV-1 Env-mediated membrane fusion via actin rearrangement. PMID:25231990

  12. Effects of brefeldin A on sphingomyelin transport and lipid synthesis in BHK21 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kallen, K J; Quinn, P; Allan, D

    1993-01-01

    1. Addition of brefeldin A (BFA) to BHK cells incubated for 4 h with [3H]acetate led to a 3-4-fold increase in incorporation of label into sphingomyelin, monoglucosylceramide and cholesterol ester compared with untreated controls. There was a similar increase in incorporation of [3H]choline into sphingomyelin. The level of cholesterol ester increased 3-fold when BFA was added to cells labelled to equilibrium with [3H]acetate, but no statistically significant changes in the levels of other lipids were seen. 2. BFA appeared to act by diverting incorporation of acetate into sphingolipids and cholesterol ester at the expense of phosphatidylcholine (decreased by up to 15%), cholesterol (decreased by 30-40%) and triacylglycerol (decreased by 35-50%). 3. Forskolin (100 microM) prevented the changes in labelling induced by 0.25 micrograms of BFA/ml, but in the presence of 1 micrograms of BFA/ml it had no effect on sphingomyelin and triacylglycerol labelling and only partly blocked the effects of BFA on labelling of cholesterol and cholesterol ester. 4. None of the labelled sphingomyelin was degraded in BFA-treated cells which were subsequently exposed to an extracellular sphingomyelinase, showing that all the newly synthesized sphingomyelin remained inside the cells. Determinations of phospholipid phosphorus in unlabelled cells confirmed that, in the presence of BFA, no newly synthesized sphingomyelin was able to reach the cell surface, supporting the idea that sphingomyelin normally depends on vesicular transport for its passage to the plasma membrane. 5. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that cholesterol synthesis and esterification processes in BHK cells are sensitive to the plasma-membrane deficit of sphingomyelin caused by BFA. PMID:8424768

  13. Effects of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine degradation on cyclodextrin-mediated cholesterol efflux in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ohvo, H; Olsio, C; Slotte, J P

    1997-11-15

    The hydrolysis of plasma membrane sphingomyelin is known to dramatically alter cellular cholesterol homeostasis in different ways, whereas the degradation of plasma membrane phosphatidylcholine has much less or no effects on cell cholesterol homeostasis [Pörn, Ares, Slotte, J. Lipid Res. 34 (1993) 1385-1392]. In this study, we used an efficient extracellular cholesterol acceptor (cyclodextrin) and determined the extent of cholesterol efflux from cultured fibroblasts in which plasma membrane sphingomyelin or phosphatidylcholine was degraded. Treatment of cells with sphingomyelinase reduced the cell sphingomyelin content by about 76% (about 13 nmol SM degraded), and dramatically increased the desorption of [3H]cholesterol from the plasma membrane to 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin. The corresponding hydrolysis of cell surface phosphatidylcholine (about 12% reduction of the cellular phosphatidylcholine content, corresponding to about 12 nmol degraded PC) had almost no effect on cell [3H]cholesterol efflux. The stimulatory effect of sphingomyelin degradation on cell [3H]cholesterol efflux was reversible, since rates of [3H]cholesterol efflux dropped back to control levels when cells (in this case baby hamster kidney cells) were allowed to restore their sphingomyelin content by re-synthesis in the absence of sphingomyelinase. The findings of this study clearly demonstrate that plasma membrane sphingomyelin markedly affected the rate of cholesterol transfer between cells and an extracellular acceptor (i.e., cyclodextrin), whereas the effect of phosphatidylcholine on cholesterol efflux was much smaller.

  14. Optimization of a histopathological biomarker for sphingomyelin accumulation in acid sphingomyelinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Taksir, Tatyana V; Johnson, Jennifer; Maloney, Colleen L; Yandl, Emily; Griffiths, Denise; Thurberg, Beth L; Ryan, Susan

    2012-08-01

    Niemann-Pick disease (types A and B), or acid sphingomyelinase deficiency, is an inherited deficiency of acid sphingomyelinase, resulting in intralysosomal accumulation of sphingomyelin in cells throughout the body, particularly within those of the reticuloendothelial system. These cellular changes result in hepatosplenomegaly and pulmonary infiltrates in humans. A knockout mouse model mimics many elements of human ASMD and is useful for studying disease histopathology. However, traditional formalin-fixation and paraffin embedding of ASMD tissues dissolves sphingomyelin, resulting in tissues with a foamy cell appearance, making quantitative analysis of the substrate difficult. To optimize substrate fixation and staining, a modified osmium tetroxide and potassium dichromate postfixation method was developed to preserve sphingomyelin in epon-araldite embedded tissue and pulmonary cytology specimens. After processing, semi-thin sections were incubated with tannic acid solution followed by staining with toluidine blue/borax. This modified method provides excellent preservation and staining contrast of sphingomyelin with other cell structures. The resulting high-resolution light microscopy sections permit digital quantification of sphingomyelin in light microscopic fields. A lysenin affinity stain for sphingomyelin was also developed for use on these semi-thin epon sections. Finally, ultrathin serial sections can be cut from these same tissue blocks and stained for ultrastructural examination by electron microscopy. PMID:22614361

  15. Optimization of a histopathological biomarker for sphingomyelin accumulation in acid sphingomyelinase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Taksir, Tatyana V; Johnson, Jennifer; Maloney, Colleen L; Yandl, Emily; Griffiths, Denise; Thurberg, Beth L; Ryan, Susan

    2012-08-01

    Niemann-Pick disease (types A and B), or acid sphingomyelinase deficiency, is an inherited deficiency of acid sphingomyelinase, resulting in intralysosomal accumulation of sphingomyelin in cells throughout the body, particularly within those of the reticuloendothelial system. These cellular changes result in hepatosplenomegaly and pulmonary infiltrates in humans. A knockout mouse model mimics many elements of human ASMD and is useful for studying disease histopathology. However, traditional formalin-fixation and paraffin embedding of ASMD tissues dissolves sphingomyelin, resulting in tissues with a foamy cell appearance, making quantitative analysis of the substrate difficult. To optimize substrate fixation and staining, a modified osmium tetroxide and potassium dichromate postfixation method was developed to preserve sphingomyelin in epon-araldite embedded tissue and pulmonary cytology specimens. After processing, semi-thin sections were incubated with tannic acid solution followed by staining with toluidine blue/borax. This modified method provides excellent preservation and staining contrast of sphingomyelin with other cell structures. The resulting high-resolution light microscopy sections permit digital quantification of sphingomyelin in light microscopic fields. A lysenin affinity stain for sphingomyelin was also developed for use on these semi-thin epon sections. Finally, ultrathin serial sections can be cut from these same tissue blocks and stained for ultrastructural examination by electron microscopy.

  16. Effects of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine degradation on cyclodextrin-mediated cholesterol efflux in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ohvo, H; Olsio, C; Slotte, J P

    1997-11-15

    The hydrolysis of plasma membrane sphingomyelin is known to dramatically alter cellular cholesterol homeostasis in different ways, whereas the degradation of plasma membrane phosphatidylcholine has much less or no effects on cell cholesterol homeostasis [Pörn, Ares, Slotte, J. Lipid Res. 34 (1993) 1385-1392]. In this study, we used an efficient extracellular cholesterol acceptor (cyclodextrin) and determined the extent of cholesterol efflux from cultured fibroblasts in which plasma membrane sphingomyelin or phosphatidylcholine was degraded. Treatment of cells with sphingomyelinase reduced the cell sphingomyelin content by about 76% (about 13 nmol SM degraded), and dramatically increased the desorption of [3H]cholesterol from the plasma membrane to 2-hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin. The corresponding hydrolysis of cell surface phosphatidylcholine (about 12% reduction of the cellular phosphatidylcholine content, corresponding to about 12 nmol degraded PC) had almost no effect on cell [3H]cholesterol efflux. The stimulatory effect of sphingomyelin degradation on cell [3H]cholesterol efflux was reversible, since rates of [3H]cholesterol efflux dropped back to control levels when cells (in this case baby hamster kidney cells) were allowed to restore their sphingomyelin content by re-synthesis in the absence of sphingomyelinase. The findings of this study clearly demonstrate that plasma membrane sphingomyelin markedly affected the rate of cholesterol transfer between cells and an extracellular acceptor (i.e., cyclodextrin), whereas the effect of phosphatidylcholine on cholesterol efflux was much smaller. PMID:9421186

  17. Regulation of hepatic lipase activity by sphingomyelin in plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) is an important enzyme in the clearance of triacylglycerol (TAG) from the circulation, and has been proposed to have pro-atherogenic as well as anti-atherogenic properties. It hydrolyzes both phospholipids and TAG of lipoproteins, and its activity is negatively correlated with HDL levels. Although it is known that HL acts preferentially on HDL lipids, the basis for this specificity is not known, since it does not require any specific apoprotein for activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin (SM), whose concentration is much higher in VLDL and LDL compared to HDL, is an inhibitor of HL, and that this could explain the lipoprotein specificity of the enzyme. The results presented show that the depletion of SM from normal lipoproteins activated the HL roughly in proportion to their SM content. SM depletion stimulated the hydrolysis of both phosphatidylcholine (PC) and TAG, although the PC hydrolysis was stimulated more. In the native lipoproteins, HL showed specificity for PC species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids at sn-2 position, and produced more unsaturated lyso PC species. The enzyme also showed preferential hydrolysis of certain TAG species over others. SM depletion affected the specificity of the enzyme towards PC and TAG species modestly. These results show that SM is a physiological inhibitor of HL activity in lipoproteins and that the specificity of the enzyme towards HDL is at least partly due to its low SM content. PMID:26193433

  18. Regulation of hepatic lipase activity by sphingomyelin in plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Subbaiah, Papasani V

    2015-10-01

    Hepatic lipase (HL) is an important enzyme in the clearance of triacylglycerol (TAG) from the circulation, and has been proposed to have pro-atherogenic as well as anti-atherogenic properties. It hydrolyzes both phospholipids and TAG of lipoproteins, and its activity is negatively correlated with HDL levels. Although it is known that HL acts preferentially on HDL lipids, the basis for this specificity is not known, since it does not require any specific apoprotein for activity. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that sphingomyelin (SM), whose concentration is much higher in VLDL and LDL compared to HDL, is an inhibitor of HL, and that this could explain the lipoprotein specificity of the enzyme. The results presented show that the depletion of SM from normal lipoproteins activated the HL roughly in proportion to their SM content. SM depletion stimulated the hydrolysis of both phosphatidylcholine (PC) and TAG, although the PC hydrolysis was stimulated more. In the native lipoproteins, HL showed specificity for PC species containing polyunsaturated fatty acids at sn-2 position, and produced more unsaturated lyso PC species. The enzyme also showed preferential hydrolysis of certain TAG species over others. SM depletion affected the specificity of the enzyme towards PC and TAG species modestly. These results show that SM is a physiological inhibitor of HL activity in lipoproteins and that the specificity of the enzyme towards HDL is at least partly due to its low SM content.

  19. Interaction of Egg-Sphingomyelin with DOPC in Langmuir Monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Chang-chun; Sun, Run-guang; Zhang, Jing

    2012-12-01

    Lipid rafts are a dynamic microdomain structure found in recent years, enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol and particular proteins. The change of structure and function of lipid rafts could result in many diseases. In this work, the monolayer miscibility behavior of mixed systems of Egg-Sphingomyelin (ESM) 1 with 2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine was investigated in terms of mean surface area per molecule and excess molecular area ΔAex at certain surface pressure, surface pressure and excess surface pressure Δπex at certain mean molecular area. The stability and compressibility of the mixed monolayers was assessed by the parameters of surface excess Gibbs free energy ΔGex, excess Helmholtz energy ΔHex and elasticity. Thermodynamic analysis indicates ΔAex and Δπex in the binary systems with positive deviations from the ideal behavior, suggesting repulsive interaction. The maximum of ΔGex and ΔHex was at the molar fraction of ESM of 0.6, demonstrating the mixed monolayer was more unstable. The repulsive interaction induced phase separation in the monolayer.

  20. Sphingomyelin Depletion Impairs Anionic Phospholipid Inward Translocation and Induces Cholesterol Efflux*

    PubMed Central

    Gulshan, Kailash; Brubaker, Gregory; Wang, Shuhui; Hazen, Stanley L.; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    The phosphatidylserine (PS) floppase activity (outward translocation) of ABCA1 leads to plasma membrane remodeling that plays a role in lipid efflux to apolipoprotein A-I (apoAI) generating nascent high density lipoprotein. The Tangier disease W590S ABCA1 mutation has defective PS floppase activity and diminished cholesterol efflux activity. Here, we report that depletion of sphingomyelin by inhibitors or sphingomyelinase caused plasma membrane remodeling, leading to defective flip (inward translocation) of PS, higher PS exposure, and higher cholesterol efflux from cells by both ABCA1-dependent and ABCA1-independent mechanisms. Mechanistically, sphingomyelin was connected to PS translocation in cell-free liposome studies that showed that sphingomyelin increased the rate of spontaneous PS flipping. Depletion of sphingomyelin in stably transfected HEK293 cells expressing the Tangier disease W590S mutant ABCA1 isoform rescued the defect in PS exposure and restored cholesterol efflux to apoAI. Liposome studies showed that PS directly increased cholesterol accessibility to extraction by cyclodextrin, providing the mechanistic link between cell surface PS and cholesterol efflux. We conclude that altered plasma membrane environment conferred by depleting sphingomyelin impairs PS flip and promotes cholesterol efflux in ABCA1-dependent and -independent manners. PMID:24220029

  1. Solid Character of Membrane Ceramides: A Surface Rheology Study of Their Mixtures with Sphingomyelin

    PubMed Central

    Catapano, Elisa R.; Arriaga, Laura R.; Espinosa, Gabriel; Monroy, Francisco; Langevin, Dominique; López-Montero, Iván

    2011-01-01

    The compression and shear viscoelasticities of egg-ceramide and its mixtures with sphingomyelin were investigated using oscillatory surface rheology performed on Langmuir monolayers. We found high values for the compression and shear moduli for ceramide, compatible with a solid-state membrane, and extremely high surface viscosities when compared to typical fluid lipids. A fluidlike rheological behavior was found for sphingomyelin. Lateral mobilities, measured from particle tracking experiments, were correlated with the monolayer viscosities through the usual hydrodynamic relationships. In conclusion, ceramide increases the solid character of sphingomyelin-based membranes and decreases their fluidity, thus drastically decreasing the lateral mobilities of embedded objects. This mechanical behavior may involve important physiological consequences in biological membranes containing ceramides. PMID:22261061

  2. Surface hydrolysis of sphingomyelin by the outer membrane protein Rv0888 supports replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Speer, Alexander; Sun, Jim; Danilchanka, Olga; Meikle, Virginia; Rowland, Jennifer L.; Walter, Kerstin; Buck, Bradford R.; Pavlenok, Mikhail; Hölscher, Christoph; Ehrt, Sabine; Niederweis, Michael

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Sphingomyelinases secreted by pathogenic bacteria play important roles in host-pathogen interactions ranging from interfering with phagocytosis and oxidative burst to iron acquisition. This study shows that the Mtb protein Rv0888 possesses potent sphingomyelinase activity cleaving sphingomyelin, a major lipid in eukaryotic cells, into ceramide and phosphocholine which are then utilized by Mtb as carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus sources, respectively. An Mtb rv0888 deletion mutant did not grow on sphingomyelin as a sole carbon source anymore and replicated poorly in macrophages indicating that Mtb utilizes sphingomyelin during infection. Rv0888 is an unusual membrane protein with a surface-exposed C-terminal sphingomyelinase domain and a putative N-terminal channel domain that mediated glucose and phosphocholine uptake across the outer membrane in an M. smegmatis porin mutant. Hence, we propose to name Rv0888 as SpmT (sphingomyelinase of M. tuberculosis). Erythrocyte membranes contain up to 27% sphingomyelin. The finding that Rv0888 accounts for half of Mtb’s hemolysis is consistent with its sphingomyelinase activity and the observation that Rv0888 levels are increased in the presence of erythrocytes and sphingomyelin by 5- and 100-fold, respectively. Thus, Rv0888 is a novel outer membrane protein that enables Mtb to utilize sphingomyelin as a source of several essential nutrients during intracellular growth. PMID:26036301

  3. Trifluoperazine stimulates the coordinate degradation of sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine in GH3 pituitary cells.

    PubMed

    Kolesnick, R N; Hemer, M R

    1989-08-25

    Prior studies demonstrated that 1,2-diacylglycerols stimulated degradation of the choline-containing phospholipids, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin, in GH3 pituitary cells by a phospholipase A2 and a sphingomyelinase, respectively (Kolesnick, R. N. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 16759-16762). The present studies demonstrate that the phenothiazine trifluoperazine also stimulates degradation of these phospholipids. Trifluoperazine (25 microM) reduced phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin levels to 81 and 58% of control, respectively, after 30 min in cells labeled for 48 h with [3H] choline. Choline-containing metabolites were released specifically into the cytosolic fraction. The level of cytosolic phosphocholine, but not choline or CDP-choline, increased to 150% of control. These events were not mediated by inhibition of phosphatidylcholine synthesis. The level of 1,2-diacylglycerols, but not lysophosphatidylcholine or glycerol-3-phosphocholine, also increased. These data are most consistent with phosphatidylcholine degradation via a phospholipase C. Trifluoperazine-stimulated sphingomyelin degradation was accompanied by quantitative generation of ceramides consistent with activation of a sphingomyelinase. In contrast to trifluoperazine, choline-containing metabolites were released into the medium during stimulation by the 1,2-diacylglycerol 1,2-dioctanoyl-glycerol. Although both trifluoperazine and 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol increased ceramide levels, only 1,2-dioctanoylglycerol increased the sphingoid base level from 24 to 43 pmol/10(6) cells. Hence, trifluoperazine appears to deplete an intracellular pool of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin by a different mechanism than 1,2-diacylglycerols. This is the first report of phenothiazine-induced degradation of choline-containing phospholipids.

  4. Sphingomyelin derivatives increase the frequency of microvesicle and granule fusion in chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    García-Martínez, V; Montes, M A; Villanueva, J; Gimenez-Molina, Y; de Toledo, G A; Gutiérrez, L M

    2015-06-01

    Sphingomyelin derivatives like sphingosine have been shown to enhance secretion in a variety of systems, including neuroendocrine and neuronal cells. By studying the mechanisms underlying this effect, we demonstrate here that sphingomyelin rafts co-localize strongly with synaptosomal-associated protein of 25Kda (SNAP-25) clusters in cultured bovine chromaffin cells and that they appear to be linked in a dynamic manner. In functional terms, when cultured rat chromaffin cells are treated with sphingomyelinase (SMase), producing sphingomyelin derivatives, the secretion elicited by repetitive depolarizations is enhanced. This increase was independent of cell size and it was significant 15min after initiating stimulation. Interestingly, by evaluating the membrane capacitance we found that the events in control untreated cells corresponded to two populations of microvesicles and granules, and the fusion of both these populations is clearly enhanced after treatment with SMase. Furthermore, SMase does not increase the size of chromaffin granules. Together, these results strongly suggest that SNARE-mediated exocytosis is enhanced by the generation of SMase derivatives, reflecting an increase in the frequency of fusion of both microvesicles and chromaffin granules rather than an increase in the size of these vesicles.

  5. Rapid turn-over of plasma membrane sphingomyelin and cholesterol in baby hamster kidney cells after exposure to sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Slotte, J P; Härmälä, A S; Jansson, C; Pörn, M I

    1990-12-14

    Plasma membrane sphingomyelin in baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells was hydrolyzed with sphingomyelinase (Staphylococcus aureus) and the effects on membrane cholesterol translocation and the properties of membrane bound adenylate cyclase and Na+/K(+)-ATPase were determined. Exposure of confluent BHK-21 cells to 0.1 U/ml of sphingomyelinase led to the degradation (at 37 degrees C) of about 60% of cell sphingomyelin. No simultaneous hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine occurred. The hydrolysis of sphingomyelin subsequently led to the translocation (within 40 min) of about 50-60% of cell [3H]cholesterol from a cholesterol oxidase susceptible pool to an oxidase resistant compartment. The translocation of [3H]cholesterol from the cell surface to intracellular membranes was accompanied by a paralleled increase in [3H]cholesterol ester formation. When cells were first exposed to sphingomyelinase (to degrade sphingomyelin) and then incubated without the enzyme in serum-free media, the mass of cell sphingomyelin decreased initially (by 60%), but then began to increase and reached control levels within 3-4 h. The rapid re-synthesis of sphingomyelin was accompanied by an equally rapid normalization of cell [3H]cholesterol distribution. The re-formation of cell sphingomyelin also led to a decreased content of cellular [3H]cholesterol esters, indicating that unesterified [3H]cholesterol was pulled out of the cholesterol ester cycle and transported to the cell surface. Exposure of BHK-21 cells to sphingomyelinase further led to a dramatically decreased activity of ouabain-sensitive Na+/K(+)-ATPase, whereas forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was not affected. The activity of Na+/K(+)-ATPase returned to normal in parallel with the normalization of cell sphingomyelin mass and cholesterol distribution. We conclude that sphingomyelin has profound effects on the steady-state distribution of cell cholesterol, and that manipulations of cell sphingomyelin levels directly and

  6. Rapid turn-over of plasma membrane sphingomyelin and cholesterol in baby hamster kidney cells after exposure to sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Slotte, J P; Härmälä, A S; Jansson, C; Pörn, M I

    1990-12-14

    Plasma membrane sphingomyelin in baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells was hydrolyzed with sphingomyelinase (Staphylococcus aureus) and the effects on membrane cholesterol translocation and the properties of membrane bound adenylate cyclase and Na+/K(+)-ATPase were determined. Exposure of confluent BHK-21 cells to 0.1 U/ml of sphingomyelinase led to the degradation (at 37 degrees C) of about 60% of cell sphingomyelin. No simultaneous hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine occurred. The hydrolysis of sphingomyelin subsequently led to the translocation (within 40 min) of about 50-60% of cell [3H]cholesterol from a cholesterol oxidase susceptible pool to an oxidase resistant compartment. The translocation of [3H]cholesterol from the cell surface to intracellular membranes was accompanied by a paralleled increase in [3H]cholesterol ester formation. When cells were first exposed to sphingomyelinase (to degrade sphingomyelin) and then incubated without the enzyme in serum-free media, the mass of cell sphingomyelin decreased initially (by 60%), but then began to increase and reached control levels within 3-4 h. The rapid re-synthesis of sphingomyelin was accompanied by an equally rapid normalization of cell [3H]cholesterol distribution. The re-formation of cell sphingomyelin also led to a decreased content of cellular [3H]cholesterol esters, indicating that unesterified [3H]cholesterol was pulled out of the cholesterol ester cycle and transported to the cell surface. Exposure of BHK-21 cells to sphingomyelinase further led to a dramatically decreased activity of ouabain-sensitive Na+/K(+)-ATPase, whereas forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was not affected. The activity of Na+/K(+)-ATPase returned to normal in parallel with the normalization of cell sphingomyelin mass and cholesterol distribution. We conclude that sphingomyelin has profound effects on the steady-state distribution of cell cholesterol, and that manipulations of cell sphingomyelin levels directly and

  7. Reverse cholesterol transport is regulated by varying fatty acyl chain saturation and sphingomyelin content in reconstituted high density lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Marmillot, Philippe; Patel, Sanket; Lakshman, M. Raj

    2007-01-01

    Because phospholipid composition of HDL plays a vital role in its reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) function, we studied RCT in vitro (uptake and efflux) with reconstituted HDLs (rHDLs) containing phosphatidylcholine with fatty acids of increasing saturation levels (stearic, oleic, linoleic, linolenic), and without or with sphingomyelin. Uptake significantly increased from basal value when phosphatidylcholine component included up to 50% (%mol) of oleic or linolenic acid, but did not change with linoleic acid. Increasing oleic and linoleic acids to 100% (%mol) significantly decreased uptake, but increasing linolenic acid to the same value did not affect it. Sphingomyelin in rHDL significantly decreased uptake, but only with phosphatidylcholine containing unsaturated fatty acids, and not with saturated fatty acid. Efflux was not affected in a dose-dependent manner when oleic or linoleic acid content was increased, but was significantly increased with levels of linolenic acid up to 25% (%mol) in phosphatidylcholine, and was dramatically lowered with higher levels. Sphingomyelin in rHDL (phosphatidylcholine:sphingomyelin, 20:80, mol:mol) significantly increased efflux only with oleic or linoleic acid-containing rHDLs, compared to efflux without sphingomyelin. In conclusion, enrichment of phosphatidylcholine component up to 25% (%mol) as linolenic acid has a beneficial effect on RCT, while a higher percentage of it or other unsaturated fatty acids seems to be detrimental. Also, high sphingomyelin content decreases uptake with rHDL containing unsaturated fatty acids, whereas it increases efflux for rHDL containing oleic or linoleic acid. These results show for the first time the importance of sphingomyelin in RCT in a well-defined in vitro system. PMID:17224341

  8. Cholesterol and Sphingomyelin-Containing Model Condensed Lipid Monolayers: Heterogeneities Involving Ordered Microdomains Assessed by Two Cholesterol Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Lecompte, Marie-France; Gaibelet, Gérald; Lebrun, Chantal; Tercé, François; Collet, Xavier; Orlowski, Stéphane

    2015-11-01

    Lipid monolayers are often considered as model membranes, but they are also the physiologic lipid part of the peripheral envelope of lipoproteins and cytosolic lipid bodies. However, their structural organization is still rather elusive, in particular when both cholesterol and sphingomyelin are present. To investigate such structural organization of hemimembranes, we measured, using alternative current voltammetry, the differential capacitance of condensed phosphatidylcholine-based monolayers as a function of applied potential, which is sensitive to their lipid composition and molecular arrangement. Especially, monolayers containing both sphingomyelin and cholesterol, at 15% w/w, presented specific characteristics of the differential capacitance versus potential curves recorded, which was indicative of specific interactions between these two lipid components. We then compared the behavior of two cholesterol derivatives (at 15% w/w), 21-methylpyrenyl-cholesterol (Pyr-met-Chol) and 22-nitrobenzoxadiazole-cholesterol (NBD-Chol), with that of cholesterol when present in model monolayers. Indeed, these two probes were chosen because of previous findings reporting opposite behaviors within bilayer membranes regarding their interaction with ordered lipids, with only Pyr-met-Chol mimicking cholesterol well. Remarkably, in monolayers containing sphingomyelin or not, Pyr-met-Chol and NBD-Chol presented contrasting behaviors, and Pyr-met-Chol mimicked cholesterol only in the presence of sphingomyelin. These two observations (i.e., optimal amounts of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, and the ability to discriminate between Pyr-met-Chol and NBD-Chol) can be interpreted by the existence of heterogeneities including ordered patches in sphingomyelin- and cholesterol-containing monolayers. Since such monolayer lipid arrangement shares some properties with the raft-type lipid microdomains well-described in sphingomyelin- and cholesterol-containing bilayer membranes, our data thus

  9. Lecithin:sphingomyelin ratio in the amniotic fluid of male and female fetuses.

    PubMed

    Zachman, R D; Morrison, J C; Curet, L B; Gustafson, N

    1989-03-01

    The effect of fetal sex on the amniotic fluid lecithin:sphingomyelin (L:S) ratio was determined with a prospective, randomized, double-blind study designed to evaluate the effect of antenatal steroid administration on the incidence of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome. The immature L:S ratios of 183 single births to nondiabetic women were analyzed. L:S ratios increased with increasing gestational age. Regression lines of L:S versus gestational age suggested that male infants' L:S ratios were lower than females', although the differences were not statistically significant. PMID:2724233

  10. Effects of sphingomyelin degradation on cholesterol mobilization and efflux to high-density lipoproteins in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Slotte, J P; Tenhunen, J; Pörn, I

    1990-06-27

    The hydrolysis of sphingomyelin from cellular plasma membranes imposes many consequences on cellular cholesterol homeostasis by causing a rapid and dramatic redistribution of plasma membrane cholesterol within the cells (Slotte, J.P. and Bierman, E.L. (1988) Biochem. J. 250, 653-658). The objective of this study was to examine the effects of an extracellular cholesterol acceptor on the directions of the sphingomyelinase-induced cholesterol flow in cultured fibroblasts. We have used HDL3 as a physiological acceptor for cholesterol, and measured the effects of sphingomyelin hydrolysis on efflux and endogenous esterification of cellular [3H]cholesterol. Treatment of cells with sphingomyelinase did induce a dramatically increased esterification of plasma-membrane-derived [3H]cholesterol. The presence of HDL3 in the medium (100 micrograms/ml) did not prevent or reduce the extent of the sphingomyelinase-induced cellular esterification of [3H]cholesterol. Degradation of cellular sphingomyelin (75% hydrolysis) also did not enhance the rate of [3H]cholesterol efflux from the plasma membranes to HDL3. In addition, we also observed that the degradation of sphingomyelin in the HDL3 particles (complete degradation) did not change the apparent rate of [3H]cholesterol transfer from HDL3 to the cells. These findings together indicate that hydrolysis of sphingomyelin did not markedly affect the rates of cholesterol surface transfer between HDL3 and cells. By whatever mechanism cholesterol is forced to be translocated from the plasma membranes subsequent to the degradation of sphingomyelin, it appears that the sterol flow is specifically directed towards the interior of the cells.

  11. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Reveals Acyl-Chain- and Region-Specific Sphingolipid Metabolism in the Kidneys of Sphingomyelin Synthase 2-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Masayuki; Wakabayashi, Masato; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Okuda, Tomohiko; Zhao, Songji; Sakai, Shota; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Obesity was reported to cause kidney injury by excessive accumulation of sphingolipids such as sphingomyelin and ceramide. Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2) is an important enzyme for hepatic sphingolipid homeostasis and its dysfunction is considered to result in fatty liver disease. The expression of SMS2 is also high in the kidneys. However, the contribution of SMS2 on renal sphingolipid metabolism remains unclear. Imaging mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to visualize the distribution and provide quantitative data on lipids in tissue sections. Thus, in this study, we analyzed the effects of SMS2 deficiency on the distribution and concentration of sphingomyelins in the liver and kidneys of mice fed with a normal-diet or a high-fat-diet using imaging mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. Our study revealed that high-fat-diet increased C18–C22 sphingomyelins, but decreased C24-sphingomyelins, in the liver and kidneys of wild-type mice. By contrast, SMS2 deficiency decreased C18–C24 sphingomyelins in the liver. Although a similar trend was observed in the whole-kidneys, the effects were minor. Interestingly, imaging mass spectrometry revealed that sphingomyelin localization was specific to each acyl-chain length in the kidneys. Further, SMS2 deficiency mainly decreased C22-sphingomyelin in the renal medulla and C24-sphingomyelins in the renal cortex. Thus, imaging mass spectrometry can provide visual assessment of the contribution of SMS2 on acyl-chain- and region-specific sphingomyelin metabolism in the kidneys. PMID:27010944

  12. Regulation of membrane KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel density by sphingomyelin synthase 1.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meikui; Takemoto, Makoto; Taniguchi, Makoto; Takumi, Toru; Okazaki, Toshiro; Song, Wen-Jie

    2016-07-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) catalyzes the conversion of phosphatidylcholine and ceramide to sphingomyelin and diacylglycerol. We previously showed that SMS1 deficiency leads to a reduction in expression of the K(+) channel KCNQ1 in the inner ear (Lu MH, Takemoto M, Watanabe K, Luo H, Nishimura M, Yano M, Tomimoto H, Okazaki T, Oike Y, and Song WJ. J Physiol 590: 4029-4044, 2012), causing hearing loss. However, it remains unknown whether this change in expression is attributable to a cellular process or a systemic effect in the knockout animal. Here, we examined whether manipulation of SMS1 activity affects KCNQ1/KCNE1 currents in individual cells. To this end, we expressed the KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel in human embryonic kidney 293T cells and evaluated the effect of SMS1 manipulations on the channel using whole cell recording. Application of tricyclodecan-9-yl-xanthogenate, a nonspecific inhibitor of SMSs, significantly reduced current density and altered channel voltage dependence. Knockdown of SMS1 by a short hairpin RNA, however, reduced current density alone. Consistent with this, overexpression of SMS1 increased the current density without changing channel properties. Furthermore, application of protein kinase D inhibitors also suppressed current density without changing channel properties; this effect was nonadditive with that of SMS1 short hairpin RNA. These results suggest that SMS1 positively regulates KCNQ1/KCNE1 channel density in a protein kinase D-dependent manner.

  13. Role of Sphingomyelin Synthase in Controlling the Antimicrobial Activity of Neutrophils against Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Grey, Angus; Schey, Kevin; Del Poeta, Maurizio; Luberto, Chiara

    2010-01-01

    The key host cellular pathway(s) necessary to control the infection caused by inhalation of the environmental fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans are still largely unknown. Here we have identified that the sphingolipid pathway in neutrophils is required for them to exert their killing activity on the fungus. In particular, using both pharmacological and genetic approaches, we show that inhibition of sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) activity profoundly impairs the killing ability of neutrophils by preventing the extracellular release of an antifungal factor(s). We next found that inhibition of protein kinase D (PKD), which controls vesicular sorting and secretion and is regulated by diacylglycerol (DAG) produced by SMS, totally blocks the extracellular killing activity of neutrophils against C. neoformans. The expression of SMS genes, SMS activity and the levels of the lipids regulated by SMS (namely sphingomyelin (SM) and DAG) are up-regulated during neutrophil differentiation. Finally, tissue imaging of lungs infected with C. neoformans using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS), revealed that specific SM species are associated with neutrophil infiltration at the site of the infection. This study establishes a key role for SMS in the regulation of the killing activity of neutrophils against C. neoformans through a DAG-PKD dependent mechanism, and provides, for the first time, new insights into the protective role of host sphingolipids against a fungal infection. PMID:21203393

  14. Increased Oxidative Stress Impairs Adipose Tissue Function in Sphingomyelin Synthase 1 Null Mice

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Naotaka; Gotoh, Tomomi; Watanabe, Ken; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Garan, Yohei; Taguchi, Ryo; Node, Koichi; Okazaki, Toshiro; Oike, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase 1 (SMS1) catalyzes the conversion of ceramide to sphingomyelin. Here, we found that SMS1 null mice showed lipodystrophic phenotype. Mutant mice showed up-regulation of plasma triglyceride concentrations accompanied by reduction of white adipose tissue (WAT) as they aged. Lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity was severely reduced in mutant mice. In vivo analysis indicated that fatty acid uptake in WAT but not in liver decreased in SMS1 null compared to wild-type mice. In vitro analysis using cultured cell revealed that SMS1 depletion reduced fatty acid uptake. Proteins extracted from WAT of mutant mice were severely modified by oxidative stress, and up-regulation of mRNAs related to apoptosis, redox adjustment, mitochondrial stress response and mitochondrial biogenesis was observed. ATP content of WAT was reduced in SMS1 null mice. Blue native gel analysis indicated that accumulation of mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes was reduced. These results suggest that WAT of SMS1 null mice is severely damaged by oxidative stress and barely functional. Indeed, mutant mice treated with the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) showed partial recovery of lipodystrophic phenotypes together with normalized plasma triglyceride concentrations. Altogether, our data suggest that SMS1 is crucial to control oxidative stress in order to maintain WAT function. PMID:23593476

  15. Self-consistent mean-field model for palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine-palmitoyl sphingomyelin-cholesterol lipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumaneng, Paul W.; Pandit, Sagar A.; Zhao, Guijun; Scott, H. L.

    2011-03-01

    The connection between membrane inhomogeneity and the structural basis of lipid rafts has sparked interest in the lateral organization of model lipid bilayers of two and three components. In an effort to investigate anisotropic lipid distribution in mixed bilayers, a self-consistent mean-field theoretical model is applied to palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)-palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM)-cholesterol mixtures. The compositional dependence of lateral organization in these mixtures is mapped onto a ternary plot. The model utilizes molecular dynamics simulations to estimate interaction parameters and to construct chain conformation libraries. We find that at some concentration ratios the bilayers separate spatially into regions of higher and lower chain order coinciding with areas enriched with PSM and POPC, respectively. To examine the effect of the asymmetric chain structure of POPC on bilayer lateral inhomogeneity, we consider POPC-lipid interactions with and without angular dependence. Results are compared with experimental data and with results from a similar model for mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, steroyl sphingomyelin, and cholesterol.

  16. All members in the sphingomyelin synthase gene family have ceramide phosphoethanolamine synthase activity[S

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Tingbo; Kabir, Inamul; Li, Yue; Lou, Caixia; Yazdanyar, Amirfarbod; Xu, Jiachen; Dong, Jibin; Zhou, Hongwen; Park, Taesik; Boutjdir, Mohamed; Li, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase-related protein (SMSr) synthesizes the sphingomyelin analog ceramide phosphoethanolamine (CPE) in cells. Previous cell studies indicated that SMSr is involved in ceramide homeostasis and is crucial for cell function. To further examine SMSr function in vivo, we generated Smsr KO mice that were fertile and had no obvious phenotypic alterations. Quantitative MS analyses of plasma, liver, and macrophages from the KO mice revealed only marginal changes in CPE and ceramide as well as other sphingolipid levels. Because SMS2 also has CPE synthase activity, we prepared Smsr/Sms2 double KO mice. We found that CPE levels were not significantly changed in macrophages, suggesting that CPE levels are not exclusively dependent on SMSr and SMS2 activities. We then measured CPE levels in Sms1 KO mice and found that Sms1 deficiency also reduced plasma CPE levels. Importantly, we found that expression of Sms1 or Sms2 in SF9 insect cells significantly increased not only SM but also CPE formation, indicating that SMS1 also has CPE synthase activity. Moreover, we measured CPE synthase Km and Vmax for SMS1, SMS2, and SMSr using different NBD ceramides. Our study reveals that all mouse SMS family members (SMSr, SMS1, and SMS2) have CPE synthase activity. However, neither CPE nor SMSr appears to be a critical regulator of ceramide levels in vivo. PMID:25605874

  17. Differential regulation of sphingomyelin synthesis and catabolism in oligodendrocytes and neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kilkus, John P.; Goswami, Rajendra; Dawson, Sylvia A.; Testai, Fernando D.; Berdyshev, Eugeny V.; Han, Xianlin; Dawson, Glyn

    2008-01-01

    Neurons (both primary cultures of 3-day rat hippocampal neurons and embryonic chick neurons) rapidly converted exogenous NBD-sphingomyelin (SM) to NBD-Cer but only slowly converted NBD-Cer to NBD-SM. This was confirmed by demonstrating low in vitro sphingomyelin synthase (SMS) and high sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity in neurons. Similar results were observed in a human neuroblastoma cell line (LA-N-5). In contrast, primary cultures of 3-day-old rat oligodendrocytes only slowly converted NBD-SM to NBD-Cer but rapidly converted NBD-Cer to NBD-SM. This difference was confirmed by high in vitro SMS and low SMase activity in neonatal rat oligodendrocytes. Similar results were observed in a human oligodendroglioma cell line. Mass-Spectrometric analyses confirmed that neurons had a low SM/Cer ratio of (1.5 : 1) whereas oligodendroglia had a high SM/Cer ratio (9 : 1). Differences were also confirmed by [3H]palmitate-labeling of ceramide, which was higher in neurons compared with oligodendrocytes. Stable transfection of human oligodendroglioma cells with neutral SMase, which enhanced the conversion of NBD-SM to NBD-Cer and increased cell death, whereas transfection with SMS1 or SMS2 enhanced conversion of NBD-Cer to NBD-SM and was somewhat protective against cell death. Thus, SMS rather than SMases may be more important for sphingolipid homeostasis in oligodendrocytes, whereas the reverse may be true for neurons. PMID:18489714

  18. Detection of lipid phase coexistence and lipid interactions in sphingomyelin/cholesterol membranes by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran; Quaroni, Luca

    2008-04-01

    The phase behavior of binary mixtures of egg sphingomyelin and cholesterol has been inspected by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy in the amide I' band region of the spectrum. Because cholesterol does not have any major absorption bands in this region, effects seen in the spectra of mixtures of sphingomyelin and cholesterol can be attributed to the change in the lipid phase and to the interaction with cholesterol. It is shown that the temperature dependence of the overall bandwidth of the amide I' band displays a phase-specific behavior. In addition, it is observed that the amide I' band for a sample exhibiting phase coexistence can be described by a linear combination of the spectra of the individual lipid phases. Description of changes in the amide I' band shape and by that the study of possible hydrogen bonding interactions of sphingomyelin with cholesterol was assisted by the use of curve fitting. It turns out that the presence of hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl group of cholesterol and carbonyl group of sphingomyelin is obscured by the complexity of different possible hydrogen bonding and coupling between the N-H (N-D) and the CO group vibrations. PMID:18191633

  19. Interaction between sphingomyelin and oxysterols contributes to atherosclerosis and sudden death

    PubMed Central

    Kummerow, Fred A

    2013-01-01

    Despite major public health efforts, coronary heart disease continues to be the leading cause of death in the United States. Oxidized lipids contribute to heart disease both by increasing deposition of calcium on the arterial wall, a major hallmark of atherosclerosis, and by interrupting blood flow, a major contributor to heart attack and sudden death. Oxidized cholesterol (oxysterols) enhances the production of sphingomyelin, a phospholipid found in the cellular membranes of the coronary artery. This increases the sphingomyelin content in the cell membrane, which in turn enhances the interaction between the membrane and ionic calcium (Ca2+), thereby increasing the risk of arterial calcification. Patients undergoing bypass surgery had greater concentrations of oxysterols in their plasma than cardiac catheterized controls with no stenosis, and had five times more sphingomyelin in their arteries than in the artery of the placenta of a newborn. The oxysterols found in the plasma of these patients were also found in the plasma of rabbits that had been fed oxidized cholesterol and in frying fats and powdered egg yolk intended for human consumption. Together these findings suggest that oxysterols found in the diet are absorbed and contribute to arterial calcification. Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL) further contributes to heart disease by increasing the synthesis of thromboxane in platelets, which increases blood clotting. Cigarette smoke and trans fatty acids, found in partially hydrogenated soybean oil, both inhibit the synthesis of prostacyclin, which inhibits blood clotting. By increasing the ratio of thromboxane to prostacyclin, these factors interact to interrupt blood flow, thereby contributing to heart attack and sudden death. Levels of oxysterols and OxLDL increase primarily as a result of three diet or lifestyle factors: the consumption of oxysterols from commercially fried foods such as fried chicken, fish, and french fries; oxidation of cholesterol

  20. Increased steroid hormone secretion in mouse Leydig tumor cells after induction of cholesterol translocation by sphingomyelin degradation.

    PubMed

    Pörn, M I; Tenhunen, J; Slotte, J P

    1991-06-01

    The effects of sphingomyelin degradation on [3H]cholesterol transfer from the cell surface to mitochondria were examined in mouse Leydig tumor cells. These cells were used since they utilize cholesterol for steroid hormone synthesis in the mitochondria, and also possess acyl-CoA: cholesterol acyl transferase (ACAT) activity in the endoplasmic reticulum. Exposure of glutaraldehyde-fixed mouse Leydig tumor cells to sphingomyelinase (50 mU/ml, 60 min) resulted in the degradation of about 50% of cell sphingomyelin, suggesting that only half of the sphingomyelin mass in these cells was located in the exoleaflet of the plasma membrane. The partial sphingomyelin degradation resulted in the translocation of cellular unesterified [3H]cholesterol from plasma membranes (cholesterol oxidase-susceptible) to intracellular compartments (oxidase-resistant). The fraction of [3H]cholesterol that was translocated, i.e., between 20 and 50%, varied with different [3H]cholesterol-labeling methods. Cholesterol translocation induced by sphingomyelin degradation subsequently led to the stimulation of ACAT activity, suggesting that a fraction of cell surface cholesterol was transported to the endoplasmic reticulum. The sphingomyelinase-induced [3H]cholesterol flow from the cell surface to the cell interior was also in part directed to the mitochondria, as evidenced by the increased secretion of [3H]steroid hormones. In addition, the cyclic AMP-induced activation of steroidogenesis was further enhanced by the sphingomyelinase-induced cholesterol translocation. Based on the current results, it seems evident that a significant portion of the translocated [3H]cholesterol made its way from plasma membranes into the mitochondria for steroidogenesis.

  1. Improved sensitivity of an acid sphingomyelinase activity assay using a C6:0 sphingomyelin substrate.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wei-Lien; Pacheco, Joshua; Cooper, Samantha; Kingsbury, Jonathan S; Hinds, John; Wolf, Pavlina; Oliva, Petra; Keutzer, Joan; Cox, Gerald F; Zhang, Kate

    2015-06-01

    Short-chain C6-sphingomyelin is an artificial substrate that was used in an acid sphingomyelinase activity assay for a pilot screening study of patients with Niemann-Pick disease types A and B. Using previously published multiplex and single assay conditions, normal acid sphingomyelinase activity levels (i.e. false negative results) were observed in two sisters with Niemann-Pick B who were compound heterozygotes for two missense mutations, p.C92W and p.P184L, in the SMPD1 gene. Increasing the sodium taurocholate detergent concentration in the assay buffer lowered the activity levels of these two patients into the range observed with other patients with clear separation from normal controls. PMID:26937397

  2. Effect of diabetes mellitus on amniotic fluid lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio and respiratory distress syndrome.

    PubMed

    Curet, L B; Olson, R W; Schneider, J M; Zachman, R D

    1979-09-01

    Ninety-eight insulin-dependent diabetic patients were cared for during 108 pregnancies following an ambulatory program aimed at close control of blood sugar levels. The incidence of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in these patients was not different from that in nondiabetic patients. Fetal pulmonary maturity seemed to progress at a normal rate as evidenced by an equal incidence of mature lecithin/sphingomyelin (L/S) ratios at various stages of gestation in diabetic and nondiabetic patients. There was no evidence that Class B and C diabetic patients have delayed fetal lung maturation or that Class E, F, and R patients have accelerated maturation. It is concluded that careful metabolic control of the pregnant diabetic patient results in a normal process of fetal pulmonary maturation without increased risk of RDS. PMID:474639

  3. Sphingomyelin lipidosis (Niemann-Pick disease) in a juvenile raccoon (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    Vapniarsky, N; Wenger, D A; Scheenstra, D; Mete, A

    2013-01-01

    A wild caught juvenile male raccoon with neurological disease was humanely destroyed due to poor prognosis. Necropsy examination revealed hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and multicentric lymphadenomegaly with diffuse hepatic pallor and pulmonary consolidation with pinpoint pale subpleural foci. Microscopically, there was marked pale cytoplasmic swelling of the central and peripheral neurons as well as the glial cells in the brain, accompanied by multiorgan infiltration by abundant foamy macrophages. Ultrastructural investigation revealed accumulation of concentrically arranged lamellar material within lysosomes of the affected neurons, macrophages and endothelial cells. Biochemical enzymatic analysis detected sphingomyelinase deficiency and lysosomal storage disease consistent with sphingomyelin lipidosis (Niemann-Pick disease [NPD]) was diagnosed. This is the first report of NPD in a raccoon.

  4. Isolated guinea pig gastric chief cells express tumour necrosis factor receptors coupled with the sphingomyelin pathway.

    PubMed

    Fiorucci, S; Santucci, L; Migliorati, G; Riccardi, C; Amorosi, A; Mancini, A; Roberti, R; Morelli, A

    1996-02-01

    The tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF), has been implicated in the pathogenesis of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) induced gastropathy and Helicobacter pylori induced gastritis. Both conditions are characterised by high plasma pepsinogen concentrations, which are thought to reflect an increased rate of enzyme release by the pepsinogen secreting (chief) cells. The mechanisms responsible for this cell dysfunction are unknown. This study investigates whether chief cells express TNF receptors and, if so, whether their activation results in cell death. Immunohistochemical studies conducted with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against two TNF receptor associated proteins of 55 kDa (TNF-R1) and 75 kDa (TNF-R2) showed that TNF binding sites were expressed in approximately 100% gastric chief cells. Western blot analysis of whole chief cell lysates probed with the TNF-R1 and TNF-R2 mAbs gave two distinct bands of 55 and 75 kDa in the immunoprecipitate. Incubating chief cells with TNF caused concentration and time dependent cell death, which was prevented by pretreating the cells with anti-TNF receptor mAbs. Exposing the cells to TNF reduced sphingomyelin content by 25%. Sphingomyelinase (10(-6) to 10(-2) IU/ml) mimicked the effect of TNF in that it provoked a concentration and time dependent reduction in chief cell viability and increased pepsinogen release. In conclusion, gastric chief cells express two TNF receptors partially linked to the sphingomyelin pathway. TNF induced chief cell dysfunction might be responsible for the high plasma pepsinogen concentrations seen in patients with NSAID gastropathy or H pylori induced gastritis.

  5. Resistance to alkyl-lysophospholipid-induced apoptosis due to downregulated sphingomyelin synthase 1 expression with consequent sphingomyelin- and cholesterol-deficiency in lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Van der Luit, Arnold H.; Budde, Marianne; Zerp, Shuraila; Caan, Wendy; Klarenbeek, Jeffrey B.; Verheij, Marcel; van Blitterswijk, Wim J.

    2006-01-01

    The ALP (alkyl-lysophospholipid) edelfosine (1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine; Et-18-OCH3) induces apoptosis in S49 mouse lymphoma cells. To this end, ALP is internalized by lipid raft-dependent endocytosis and inhibits phosphatidylcholine synthesis. A variant cell-line, S49AR, which is resistant to ALP, was shown previously to be unable to internalize ALP via this lipid raft pathway. The reason for this uptake failure is not understood. In the present study, we show that S49AR cells are unable to synthesize SM (sphingomyelin) due to down-regulated SMS1 (SM synthase 1) expression. In parental S49 cells, resistance to ALP could be mimicked by small interfering RNA-induced SMS1 suppression, resulting in SM deficiency and blockage of raft-dependent internalization of ALP and induction of apoptosis. Similar results were obtained by treatment of the cells with myriocin/ISP-1, an inhibitor of general sphingolipid synthesis, or with U18666A, a cholesterol homoeostasis perturbing agent. U18666A is known to inhibit Niemann–Pick C1 protein-dependent vesicular transport of cholesterol from endosomal compartments to the trans-Golgi network and the plasma membrane. U18666A reduced cholesterol partitioning in detergent-resistant lipid rafts and inhibited SM synthesis in S49 cells, causing ALP resistance similar to that observed in S49AR cells. The results are explained by the strong physical interaction between (newly synthesized) SM and available cholesterol at the Golgi, where they facilitate lipid raft formation. We propose that ALP internalization by lipid-raft-dependent endocytosis represents the retrograde route of a constitutive SMS1- and lipid-raft-dependent membrane vesicular recycling process. PMID:17049047

  6. Directed evolution of a sphingomyelin flippase reveals mechanism of substrate backbone discrimination by a P4-ATPase.

    PubMed

    Roland, Bartholomew P; Graham, Todd R

    2016-08-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase (P4-ATPases) family establish membrane asymmetry and play critical roles in vesicular transport, cell polarity, signal transduction, and neurologic development. All characterized P4-ATPases flip glycerophospholipids across the bilayer to the cytosolic leaflet of the membrane, but how these enzymes distinguish glycerophospholipids from sphingolipids is not known. We used a directed evolution approach to examine the molecular mechanisms through which P4-ATPases discriminate substrate backbone. A mutagenesis screen in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has identified several gain-of-function mutations in the P4-ATPase Dnf1 that facilitate the transport of a novel lipid substrate, sphingomyelin. We found that a highly conserved asparagine (N220) in the first transmembrane segment is a key enforcer of glycerophospholipid selection, and specific substitutions at this site allow transport of sphingomyelin. PMID:27432949

  7. A deletion in the gene encoding sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (Smpd3) results in osteogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Aubin, Isabelle; Adams, Carolyn P; Opsahl, Sibylle; Septier, Dominique; Bishop, Colin E; Auge, Nathalie; Salvayre, Robert; Negre-Salvayre, Anne; Goldberg, Michel; Guénet, Jean-Louis; Poirier, Christophe

    2005-08-01

    The mouse mutation fragilitas ossium (fro) leads to a syndrome of severe osteogenesis and dentinogenesis imperfecta with no detectable collagen defect. Positional cloning of the locus identified a deletion in the gene encoding neutral sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (Smpd3) that led to complete loss of enzymatic activity. Our knowledge of SMPD3 function is consistent with the pathology observed in mutant mice and provides new insight into human pathologies.

  8. Miscibility behavior of sphingomyelin with phytosterol derivatives by a Langmuir monolayer approach.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Seiichi; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Shibata, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    The miscibility behavior of palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM) with phytosterol derivatives of β-sitosterol (SITO), β-sitosteryl glucoside (SG), and β-sitosteryl glucoside palmitate (SGP) was systematically investigated using Langmuir monolayers. The surface pressure (π)-molecular area (A) and surface potential (ΔV)-A isotherms for binary PSM/SITO, PSM/SG, and PSM/SGP systems on 0.02 M Tris buffer with 0.13 M NaCl (pH 7.4) were measured as a function of the molar fraction of PSM (X(PSM)). The surface potentials (ΔV) of the pure components were analyzed using the three-layer model proposed by Demchak and Fort [J. Colloid Interface Sci. 46 (1974) 191-203]. The contributions of the hydrophilic D-glucose moiety, hydrophobic palmitoyl group, and sphingomyelin group to the vertical component of the dipole moment (μ(⊥)) were evaluated. The thermodynamic quantities, based on the π-A isotherms, revealed that PSM interacts attractively with all three phytosterol derivatives in the following order: SITO > SGP > SG. In addition, the two-dimensional phase diagram constructed based on the phase transition pressure (π(eq)), from a liquid-expanded to liquid-condensed state, and collapse (π(c)) pressure shows that the two-component systems are all miscible with each other. The manner of miscibility between PSM/SG and PSM/SGP systems is found to be opposite in the large X(PSM) region. The interaction between the same molecules (PSM-PSM or SG-SG) is stronger than that of the different molecules (PSM-SG) in the PSM/SG system, and vice versa in the PSM/SGP system. These results suggest that the incorporation of a D-glucose and palmitoyl group to a SITO molecule dramatically changes the miscibility behavior with PSM. Observations using fluorescence microscopy imaging also provide insights into miscibility behavior in the monolayer state.

  9. Circular RNA of the human sphingomyelin synthase 1 gene: Multiple splice variants, evolutionary conservatism and expression in different tissues

    PubMed Central

    Filippenkov, Ivan B; Sudarkina, Olga Yu; Limborska, Svetlana A; Dergunova, Lyudmila V

    2015-01-01

    The human sphingomyelin synthase 1 gene (SGMS1) encodes an essential enzyme that is involved in the synthesis of sphingomyelin and diacylglycerol from phosphatidylcholine and ceramide. Among the products of SGMS1, we found new transcripts, circular RNAs (circRNAs), that contain sequences of the gene's 5′ untranslated region (5′UTR). Some of them include the gene's coding region and fragments of introns. An analysis of the abundance of circRNAs in human tissues showed that the largest transcripts were predominantly found in different parts of the brain. circRNAs of rat and mouse sphingomyelin synthase 1 orthologous genes were detected and are highly similar to the human SGMS1 gene transcripts. A quantitative analysis of the abundance of such transcripts also revealed their elevated amount in the brain. A computational analysis of sequences of human circRNAs showed their high potential of binding microRNAs (miRNAs), including the miRNAs that form complexes with Ago proteins and the mRNA of SGMS1. We assume that the circRNAs identified here participate in the regulation of the function of the SGMS1 gene in the brain. PMID:26274505

  10. Inhibition of sphingomyelin synthase 1 affects ceramide accumulation and hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis in Neuro-2a cells.

    PubMed

    Tu, Ranran; Yang, Wei; Hu, Zhiping

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress plays a key role in brain injury after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion, which contributes toward excessive apoptosis of nerve cells. Therefore, it would be beneficial to identify a therapy that could interfere with the progression of apoptosis and protect the brain from ischemia-reperfusion injury. As ceramide, a well-known second messenger of apoptosis, can be metabolized by sphingomyelin synthase 1 (SMS1), recent research has focused on the link between SMS1 and apoptosis in different cells. To investigate whether SMS1 is involved in the process of oxidative stress-induced apoptosis in neurons and to explore the possible underlying mechanism, we treated mouse neuroblastoma Neuro-2A (N2a) cells with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Incubation with H2O2 significantly upregulated the expression of SMS1, increased the intracellular levels of ceramide and sphingomyelin synthase activity, and induced apoptosis. Moreover, pretreatment of N2a cells with D609, an sphingomyelin synthase inhibitor, or SMS1-silencing RNA (siRNA) further increased ceramide and potentiated H2O2-induced apoptosis which could be reversed by SB203580 (a p38 inhibitor). Thus, our study has shown that SMS1 regulates ceramide levels in N2a cells and plays a potent protective role in this oxidative stress-induced apoptosis partly through the p38 pathway.

  11. Sphingomyelin distribution in lipid rafts of artificial monolayer membranes visualized by Raman microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Jun; Kinoshita, Masanao; Cui, Jin; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Fujita, Katsumasa; Murata, Michio; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (chol)-rich domains in cell membranes, called lipid rafts, are thought to have important biological functions related to membrane signaling and protein trafficking. To visualize the distribution of SM in lipid rafts by means of Raman microscopy, we designed and synthesized an SM analog tagged with a Raman-active diyne moiety (diyne-SM). Diyne-SM showed a strong peak in a Raman silent region that is free of interference from intrinsic vibrational modes of lipids and did not appear to alter the properties of SM-containing monolayers. Therefore, we used Raman microscopy to directly visualize the distribution of diyne-SM in raft-mimicking domains formed in SM/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/chol ternary monolayers. Raman images visualized a heterogeneous distribution of diyne-SM, which showed marked variation, even within a single ordered domain. Specifically, diyne-SM was enriched in the central area of raft domains compared with the peripheral area. These results seem incompatible with the generally accepted raft model, in which the raft and nonraft phases show a clear biphasic separation. One of the possible reasons is that gradual changes of SM concentration occur between SM-rich and -poor regions to minimize hydrophobic mismatch. We believe that our technique of hyperspectral Raman imaging of a single lipid monolayer opens the door to quantitative analysis of lipid membranes by providing both chemical information and spatial distribution with high (diffraction-limited) spatial resolution. PMID:25825736

  12. The Chlamydial Inclusion Preferentially Intercepts Basolaterally Directed Sphingomyelin-Containing Exocytic Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Elizabeth R.; Fischer, Elizabeth R.; Mead, David J.; Hackstadt, Ted

    2010-01-01

    Chlamydiae replicate intracellularly within a unique vacuole termed the inclusion. The inclusion circumvents classical endosomal/lysosomal pathways but actively intercepts a subset of Golgi-derived exocytic vesicles containing sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol. To further examine this interaction, we developed a polarized epithelial cell model to study vectoral trafficking of lipids and proteins to the inclusion. We examined seven epithelial cell lines for their ability to form single monolayers of polarized cells and support chlamydial development. Of these cell lines, polarized colonic mucosal C2BBe1 cells were readily infected with Chlamydia trachomatis and remained polarized throughout infection. Trafficking of (6-((N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1, 3-diazol-4-yl) amino)hexanoyl)sphingosine) (NBD-C6-ceramide) and its metabolic derivatives, NBD-glucosylceramide (GlcCer) and NBD-SM, was analyzed. SM was retained within L2-infected cells relative to mock-infected cells, correlating with a disruption of basolateral SM trafficking. There was no net retention of GlcCer within L2-infected cells and purification of C. trachomatis elementary bodies from polarized C2BBe1 cells confirmed that bacteria retained only SM. The chlamydial inclusion thus appears to preferentially intercept basolaterally-directed SM-containing exocytic vesicles, suggesting a divergence in SM and GlcCer trafficking. The observed changes in lipid trafficking were a chlamydia-specific effect because Coxiella burnetii-infected cells revealed no changes in GlcCer or SM polarized trafficking. PMID:18778406

  13. Detailed Comparison of Deuterium Quadrupole Profiles between Sphingomyelin and Phosphatidylcholine Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Tomokazu; Kinoshita, Masanao; Murata, Michio; Matsumori, Nobuaki

    2014-01-01

    Lipid rafts are microdomains rich in sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (Chol). The essential question is why natural lipid rafts prefer SM rather than saturated diacyl glycerophosphocholine, although both form ordered membranes with Chol in model systems. Hence in this study, we synthesized site-specifically deuterated 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines that match the acyl chain length of stearoyl-SM (SSM), and compared their deuterium quadrupole coupling profiles in detail. The results suggest a deeper distribution of Chol in the SSM membranes, a lower entropic penalty upon accommodation of Chol in SSM membranes, and a higher thermal stability of acyl-chain orders in the SSM-Chol bilayers than in the 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine-Chol system at various Chol concentrations. The entropy effect and thermal stability should render SM a more preferred raft constituent than saturated diacyl glycerophosphocholine. Our data also demonstrate that the selective and comprehensive deuteration strategy is indispensable for accurate comparison of order profiles. PMID:24507603

  14. Chronic ethanol consumption profoundly alters regional brain ceramide and sphingomyelin content in rodents.

    PubMed

    Roux, Aurelie; Muller, Ludovic; Jackson, Shelley N; Baldwin, Katherine; Womack, Virginia; Pagiazitis, John G; O'Rourke, Joseph R; Thanos, Panayotis K; Balaban, Carey; Schultz, J Albert; Volkow, Nora D; Woods, Amina S

    2015-02-18

    Ceramides (CER) are involved in alcohol-induced neuroinflammation. In a mouse model of chronic alcohol exposure, 16 CER and 18 sphingomyelin (SM) concentrations from whole brain lipid extracts were measured using electrospray mass spectrometry. All 18 CER concentrations in alcohol exposed adults increased significantly (range: 25-607%); in juveniles, 6 CER decreased (range: -9 to -37%). In contrast, only three SM decreased in adult and one increased significantly in juvenile. Next, regional identification at 50 μm spatial resolution from coronal sections was obtained with matrix implanted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MILDI-MSI) by implanting silver nanoparticulate matrices followed by focused laser desorption. Most of the CER and SM quantified in whole brain extracts were detected in MILDI images. Coronal sections from three brain levels show qualitative regional changes in CER-SM ion intensities, as a function of group and brain region, in cortex, striatum, accumbens, habenula, and hippocampus. Highly correlated changes in certain white matter CER-SM pairs occur in regions across all groups, including the hippocampus and the lateral (but not medial) cerebellar cortex of adult mice. Our data provide the first microscale MS evidence of regional lipid intensity variations induced by alcohol.

  15. Phosphatidylglycerol, lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio and respiratory distress syndrome in diabetic and non-diabetic pregnancies.

    PubMed

    Curet, L B; Tsao, F H; Zachman, R D; Olson, R W; Henderson, P A

    1989-10-01

    Samples of amniotic fluid from 514 non-diabetic and 69 diabetic patients were analyzed for phospholipid content. Results were correlated with incidence of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in the neonate. The incidence of RDS was 4.5% among diabetics and 5.3% among non-diabetics. In the presence of phosphatidylglycerol (PG), no infant developed RDS while in the absence of PG the incidence of RDS was 16.7% and 14.4%, respectively. In the presence of a mature lecithin/sphingomyelin (L/S) ratio the respective incidence of RDS was 1.6 and 1.8, while with an immature L/S ratio the incidence of RDS was 28.6% and 29%. The incidence of RDS after 37 weeks gestation was 0% among diabetics and 0.6% among non-diabetics. We conclude that amniotic fluid phospholipids are equally predictive of risk for RDS in diabetics as among non-diabetic patients. We suggest that in patients with accurate gestational dating, amniotic fluid analysis for phospholipids might not be necessary to establish fetal lung maturity. PMID:2572479

  16. Detailed comparison of deuterium quadrupole profiles between sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine bilayers.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Tomokazu; Kinoshita, Masanao; Murata, Michio; Matsumori, Nobuaki

    2014-02-01

    Lipid rafts are microdomains rich in sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (Chol). The essential question is why natural lipid rafts prefer SM rather than saturated diacyl glycerophosphocholine, although both form ordered membranes with Chol in model systems. Hence in this study, we synthesized site-specifically deuterated 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholines that match the acyl chain length of stearoyl-SM (SSM), and compared their deuterium quadrupole coupling profiles in detail. The results suggest a deeper distribution of Chol in the SSM membranes, a lower entropic penalty upon accommodation of Chol in SSM membranes, and a higher thermal stability of acyl-chain orders in the SSM-Chol bilayers than in the 1-palmitoyl-2-stearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine-Chol system at various Chol concentrations. The entropy effect and thermal stability should render SM a more preferred raft constituent than saturated diacyl glycerophosphocholine. Our data also demonstrate that the selective and comprehensive deuteration strategy is indispensable for accurate comparison of order profiles. PMID:24507603

  17. Sphingomyelin in High-Density Lipoproteins: Structural Role and Biological Function

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Beamonte, Roberto; Lou-Bonafonte, Jose M.; Martínez-Gracia, María V.; Osada, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels are an inverse risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, and sphingomyelin (SM) is the second most abundant phospholipid component and the major sphingolipid in HDL. Considering the marked presence of SM, the present review has focused on the current knowledge about this phospholipid by addressing its variable distribution among HDL lipoparticles, how they acquire this phospholipid, and the important role that SM plays in regulating their fluidity and cholesterol efflux from different cells. In addition, plasma enzymes involved in HDL metabolism such as lecithin–cholesterol acyltransferase or phospholipid transfer protein are inhibited by HDL SM content. Likewise, HDL SM levels are influenced by dietary maneuvers (source of protein or fat), drugs (statins or diuretics) and modified in diseases such as diabetes, renal failure or Niemann–Pick disease. Furthermore, increased levels of HDL SM have been shown to be an inverse risk factor for coronary heart disease. The complexity of SM species, described using new lipidomic methodologies, and their distribution in different HDL particles under many experimental conditions are promising avenues for further research in the future. PMID:23571495

  18. Endogenous sphingomyelin segregates into submicrometric domains in the living erythrocyte membrane[S

    PubMed Central

    Carquin, Mélanie; Pollet, Hélène; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Cominelli, Antoine; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; N’kuli, Francisca; Emonard, Hervé; Henriet, Patrick; Mizuno, Hideaki; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported that trace insertion of exogenous fluorescent (green BODIPY) analogs of sphingomyelin (SM) into living red blood cells (RBCs), partially spread onto coverslips, labels submicrometric domains, visible by confocal microscopy. We here extend this feature to endogenous SM, upon binding of a SM-specific nontoxic (NT) fragment of the earthworm toxin, lysenin, fused to the red monomeric fluorescent protein, mCherry [construct named His-mCherry-NT-lysenin (lysenin*)]. Specificity of lysenin* binding was verified with composition-defined liposomes and by loss of 125I-lysenin* binding to erythrocytes upon SM depletion by SMase. The 125I-lysenin* binding isotherm indicated saturation at 3.5 × 106 molecules/RBC, i.e., ∼3% of SM coverage. Nonsaturating lysenin* concentration also labeled sub­micrometric domains on the plasma membrane of partially spread erythrocytes, colocalizing with inserted green BODIPY-SM, and abrogated by SMase. Lysenin*-labeled domains were stable in time and space and were regulated by temperature and cholesterol. The abundance, size, positioning, and segregation of lysenin*-labeled domains from other lipids (BODIPY-phosphatidylcholine or -glycosphingolipids) depended on membrane tension. Similar lysenin*-labeled domains were evidenced in RBCs gently suspended in 3D-gel. Taken together, these data demonstrate submicrometric compartmentation of endogenous SM at the membrane of a living cell in vitro, and suggest it may be a genuine feature of erythrocytes in vivo. PMID:24826836

  19. Endogenous sphingomyelin segregates into submicrometric domains in the living erythrocyte membrane.

    PubMed

    Carquin, Mélanie; Pollet, Hélène; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Cominelli, Antoine; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; N'kuli, Francisca; Emonard, Hervé; Henriet, Patrick; Mizuno, Hideaki; Courtoy, Pierre J; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2014-07-01

    We recently reported that trace insertion of exogenous fluorescent (green BODIPY) analogs of sphingomyelin (SM) into living red blood cells (RBCs), partially spread onto coverslips, labels submicrometric domains, visible by confocal microscopy. We here extend this feature to endogenous SM, upon binding of a SM-specific nontoxic (NT) fragment of the earthworm toxin, lysenin, fused to the red monomeric fluorescent protein, mCherry [construct named His-mCherry-NT-lysenin (lysenin*)]. Specificity of lysenin* binding was verified with composition-defined liposomes and by loss of (125)I-lysenin* binding to erythrocytes upon SM depletion by SMase. The (125)I-lysenin* binding isotherm indicated saturation at 3.5 × 10(6) molecules/RBC, i.e., ∼3% of SM coverage. Nonsaturating lysenin* concentration also labeled sub-micrometric domains on the plasma membrane of partially spread erythrocytes, colocalizing with inserted green BODIPY-SM, and abrogated by SMase. Lysenin*-labeled domains were stable in time and space and were regulated by temperature and cholesterol. The abundance, size, positioning, and segregation of lysenin*-labeled domains from other lipids (BODIPY-phosphatidylcholine or -glycosphingolipids) depended on membrane tension. Similar lysenin*-labeled domains were evidenced in RBCs gently suspended in 3D-gel. Taken together, these data demonstrate submicrometric compartmentation of endogenous SM at the membrane of a living cell in vitro, and suggest it may be a genuine feature of erythrocytes in vivo. PMID:24826836

  20. An enzyme combination assay for serum sphingomyelin: Improved specificity through avoiding the interference with lysophosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Takehide; Kuwata, Hideyuki; Miyauchi, Kazuhito; Katayama, Yuki; Kayahara, Norihiko; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Matsushima, Kazumi; Kondo, Yuki; Ishitsuka, Yoichi; Irikura, Mitsuru; Irie, Tetsumi

    2016-04-01

    Serum sphingomyelin (SM) has predictive value in the development of atherosclerosis. Furthermore, SM plays important roles in cell membrane structure, signal transduction pathways, and lipid raft formation. A convenient enzymatic method for SM is available for routine laboratory practice, but the enzyme specificity is not sufficient because of nonspecific reactions with lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC). Based on the differential specificity of selected enzymes toward choline-containing phospholipids, a two-step assay for measuring SM was constructed and its performance was evaluated using sera from healthy individuals on a Hitachi 7170 autoanalyzer. Results from this assay were highly correlated with theoretical serum SM concentrations estimated by subtracting phosphatidylcholine (PC) and LPC concentrations from that of total phospholipids determined using previously established methods. There was a good correlation between the results of SM assayed by the proposed method and the existing enzymatic method in sera from healthy individuals. Moreover, the proposed method was superior to the existing method in preventing nonspecific reactions with LPC present in sera. The proposed method does not require any pretreatment, uses 2.5 μl of serum samples, and requires only 10 min on an autoanalyzer. This high-throughput method can measure serum SM with sufficient specificity for clinical purposes and is applicable in routine laboratory practice. PMID:26792376

  1. Hexagonal Substructure and Hydrogen Bonding in Liquid-Ordered Phases Containing Palmitoyl Sphingomyelin.

    PubMed

    Sodt, Alexander J; Pastor, Richard W; Lyman, Edward

    2015-09-01

    All-atom simulation data are presented for ternary mixtures of palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM), cholesterol, and either palmitoyl oleoyl phosphatidyl choline or dioleoyl phosphatidyl choline (DOPC). For comparison, data for a mixture of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl choline (DPPC), cholesterol, and DOPC are also presented. Compositions corresponding to the liquid-ordered phase, the liquid-disordered phase, and coexistence of the two phases are simulated for each mixture. Within the liquid-ordered phase, cholesterol is preferentially solvated by DOPC if it is available, but if DOPC is replaced by POPC, cholesterol is preferentially solvated by PSM. In the DPPC mixtures, cholesterol interacts preferentially with the saturated chains via its smooth face, whereas in the PSM mixtures, cholesterol interacts preferentially with PSM via its rough face. Interactions between cholesterol and PSM have a very particular character: hydrogen bonding between cholesterol and the amide of PSM rotates the tilt of the amide plane, which primes it for more robust hydrogen bonding with other PSM. Cholesterol-PSM hydrogen bonding also locally modifies the hexagonal packing of hydrocarbon chains in the liquid-ordered phase of PSM mixtures.

  2. Sphingomyelin distribution in lipid rafts of artificial monolayer membranes visualized by Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ando, Jun; Kinoshita, Masanao; Cui, Jin; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Fujita, Katsumasa; Murata, Michio; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-04-14

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (chol)-rich domains in cell membranes, called lipid rafts, are thought to have important biological functions related to membrane signaling and protein trafficking. To visualize the distribution of SM in lipid rafts by means of Raman microscopy, we designed and synthesized an SM analog tagged with a Raman-active diyne moiety (diyne-SM). Diyne-SM showed a strong peak in a Raman silent region that is free of interference from intrinsic vibrational modes of lipids and did not appear to alter the properties of SM-containing monolayers. Therefore, we used Raman microscopy to directly visualize the distribution of diyne-SM in raft-mimicking domains formed in SM/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/chol ternary monolayers. Raman images visualized a heterogeneous distribution of diyne-SM, which showed marked variation, even within a single ordered domain. Specifically, diyne-SM was enriched in the central area of raft domains compared with the peripheral area. These results seem incompatible with the generally accepted raft model, in which the raft and nonraft phases show a clear biphasic separation. One of the possible reasons is that gradual changes of SM concentration occur between SM-rich and -poor regions to minimize hydrophobic mismatch. We believe that our technique of hyperspectral Raman imaging of a single lipid monolayer opens the door to quantitative analysis of lipid membranes by providing both chemical information and spatial distribution with high (diffraction-limited) spatial resolution.

  3. Mass spectrometry images acylcarnitines, phosphatidylcholines, and sphingomyelin in MDA-MB-231 breast tumor models.

    PubMed

    Chughtai, Kamila; Jiang, Lu; Greenwood, Tiffany R; Glunde, Kristine; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-02-01

    The lipid compositions of different breast tumor microenvironments are largely unknown due to limitations in lipid imaging techniques. Imaging lipid distributions would enhance our understanding of processes occurring inside growing tumors, such as cancer cell proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Recent developments in MALDI mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) enable rapid and specific detection of lipids directly from thin tissue sections. In this study, we performed multimodal imaging of acylcarnitines, phosphatidylcholines (PC), a lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC), and a sphingomyelin (SM) from different microenvironments of breast tumor xenograft models, which carried tdTomato red fluorescent protein as a hypoxia-response element-driven reporter gene. The MSI molecular lipid images revealed spatially heterogeneous lipid distributions within tumor tissue. Four of the most-abundant lipid species, namely PC(16:0/16:0), PC(16:0/18:1), PC(18:1/18:1), and PC(18:0/18:1), were localized in viable tumor regions, whereas LPC(16:0/0:0) was detected in necrotic tumor regions. We identified a heterogeneous distribution of palmitoylcarnitine, stearoylcarnitine, PC(16:0/22:1), and SM(d18:1/16:0) sodium adduct, which colocalized primarily with hypoxic tumor regions. For the first time, we have applied a multimodal imaging approach that has combined optical imaging and MALDI-MSI with ion mobility separation to spatially localize and structurally identify acylcarnitines and a variety of lipid species present in breast tumor xenograft models. PMID:22930811

  4. Endocytosis and intracellular processing of BODIPY-sphingomyelin by murine CATH.a neurons☆

    PubMed Central

    Nusshold, Christoph; Uellen, Andreas; Bernhart, Eva; Hammer, Astrid; Damm, Sabine; Wintersperger, Andrea; Reicher, Helga; Hermetter, Albin; Malle, Ernst; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal sphingolipids (SL) play important roles during axonal extension, neurotrophic receptor signaling and neurotransmitter release. Many of these signaling pathways depend on the presence of specialized membrane microdomains termed lipid rafts. Sphingomyelin (SM), one of the main raft constituents, can be formed de novo or supplied from exogenous sources. The present study aimed to characterize fluorescently-labeled SL turnover in a murine neuronal cell line (CATH.a). Our results demonstrate that at 4 °C exogenously added BODIPY-SM accumulates exclusively at the plasma membrane. Treatment of cells with bacterial sphingomyelinase (SMase) and back-exchange experiments revealed that 55–67% of BODIPY-SM resides in the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. Endocytosis of BODIPY-SM occurs via caveolae with part of internalized BODIPY-fluorescence ending up in the Golgi and the ER. Following endocytosis BODIPY-SM undergoes hydrolysis, a reaction substantially faster than BODIPY-SM synthesis from BODIPY-ceramide. RNAi demonstrated that both, acid (a)SMase and neutral (n)SMases contribute to BODIPY-SM hydrolysis. Finally, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-associated BODIPY-SM was efficiently taken up by CATH.a cells. Our findings indicate that endocytosis of exogenous SM occurs almost exclusively via caveolin-dependent pathways, that both, a- and nSMases equally contribute to neuronal SM turnover and that HDL-like particles might represent physiological SM carriers/donors in the brain. PMID:23973266

  5. Uptake and metabolism of radioactively labeled sphingomyelin in cultured skin fibroblasts from controls and patients with Niemann-Pick disease and other lysosomal storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Kudoh, T; Velkoff, M A; Wenger, D A

    1983-11-01

    The metabolism of [stearoyl-1-14C]- and [choline-methyl-14C]sphingomyelin, [stearoyl-1-14C]ceramide-1-phospho-N,N-dimethylethanolamine (demethylsphingomyelin) and [choline-methyl-14C]phosphatidylcholine was measured 1, 3 and 5 days after uptake from the media of cultured skin fibroblasts. This was done to measure the relative contributions of lysosomal sphingomyelinase and plasma membrane phosphocholine transferase on the metabolism of sphingomyelin, a component of all cell membranes. By using cell lines from controls and from patients with Niemann-Pick disease and other lysosomal storage diseases, it was concluded that a significant portion (10-15%) of the observed degradation of sphingomyelin is due to exchange of the phosphocholine moiety producing phosphatidylcholine. Although cell lines from type A and B Niemann-Pick disease have only 0-2% of lysosomal sphingomyelinase activity measured in vitro, three cell lines from type B Niemann-Pick disease could metabolize 54.4% of the labeled sphingomyelin by day 3 while cell lines from type A Niemann-Pick disease could only metabolize 18.5% by day 3. This compares to 86.7% metabolized in control cells by day 3. Cells from one patient with juvenile Niemann-Pick disease and one with type D Niemann-Pick disease metabolized sphingomyelin normally while cells from two other patients with juvenile or type C Niemann-Pick disease could only metabolize 58.2% by day 3. Cells from patients with I-cell disease and 'lactosylceramidosis' also demonstrated decreased metabolism of sphingomyelin (55.1 and 54.9% by day 3, respectively). Cells from the patient with Farber disease accumulated [14C]stearic acid-labeled ceramide produced from [14C]sphingomyelin. Studies with choline-labeled sphingomyelin and phosphatidylcholine demonstrated that phosphocholine exchange takes place in either direction in the cells, and this is normal in Niemann-Pick disease. Studies in cells from patients with all clinical types of sphingomyelinase

  6. Toxin-induced pore formation is hindered by intermolecular hydrogen bonding in sphingomyelin bilayers.

    PubMed

    García-Linares, Sara; Palacios-Ortega, Juan; Yasuda, Tomokazu; Åstrand, Mia; Gavilanes, José G; Martínez-del-Pozo, Álvaro; Slotte, J Peter

    2016-06-01

    Sticholysin I and II (StnI and StnII) are pore-forming toxins that use sphingomyelin (SM) for membrane binding. We examined how hydrogen bonding among membrane SMs affected the StnI- and StnII-induced pore formation process, resulting in bilayer permeabilization. We compared toxin-induced permeabilization in bilayers containing either SM or dihydro-SM (lacking the trans Δ(4) double bond of the long-chain base), since their hydrogen-bonding properties are known to differ greatly. We observed that whereas both StnI and StnII formed pores in unilamellar vesicles containing palmitoyl-SM or oleoyl-SM, the toxins failed to similarly form pores in vesicles prepared from dihydro-PSM or dihydro-OSM. In supported bilayers containing OSM, StnII bound efficiently, as determined by surface plasmon resonance. However, StnII binding to supported bilayers prepared from dihydro-OSM was very low under similar experimental conditions. The association of the positively charged StnII (at pH7.0) with unilamellar vesicles prepared from OSM led to a concentration-dependent increase in vesicle charge, as determined from zeta-potential measurements. With dihydro-OSM vesicles, a similar response was not observed. Benzyl alcohol, which is a small hydrogen-bonding compound with affinity to lipid bilayer interfaces, strongly facilitated StnII-induced pore formation in dihydro-OSM bilayers, suggesting that hydrogen bonding in the interfacial region originally prevented StnII from membrane binding and pore formation. We conclude that interfacial hydrogen bonding was able to affect the membrane association of StnI- and StnII, and hence their pore forming capacity. Our results suggest that other types of protein interactions in bilayers may also be affected by hydrogen-bonding origination from SMs. PMID:26975250

  7. Phase Behavior and Domain Size in Sphingomyelin-Containing Lipid Bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Petruzielo, Robin S; Heberle, Frederick A; Drazba, Paul; Katsaras, John; Feigenson, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Membrane raft size measurements are crucial to understanding the stability and functionality of rafts in cells. The challenge of accurately measuring raft size is evidenced by the disparate reports of domain sizes, which range from nanometers to microns for the ternary model membrane system sphingomyelin (SM)/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC)/cholesterol (Chol). Using F rster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), we established phase diagrams for porcine brain SM (bSM)/dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC)/Chol and bSM/POPC/Chol at 15 and 25 C. By combining two techniqueswith different spatial sensitivities, namely FRET and small-angle neutron scattering (SANS),we have significantly narrowed the uncertainty in domain size estimates for bSM/POPC/Chol mixtures. Compositional trends in FRET data revealed coexisting domains at 15 and 25 C for bothmixtures, while SANS measurements detected no domain formation for bSM/POPC/Chol. Together these results indicate that liquid domains in bSM/POPC/Chol are between 2 and 7 nmin radius at 25 C: that is, domains must be on the order of the 2 6 nmF rster distance of the FRET probes, but smaller than the ~7 nm minimum cluster size detectable with SANS. However, for palmitoyl SM (PSM)/POPC/Chol at a similar composition, SANS detected coexisting liquid domains. This increase in domain size upon replacing the natural SMcomponent (which consists of amixture of chain lengths) with synthetic PSM, suggests a role for SM chain length in modulating raft size in vivo.

  8. Apolipophorin III interaction with model membranes composed of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin using differential scanning calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Michael H; Wan, Chung-Ping Leon; Weers, Paul M M; Prenner, Elmar J

    2009-10-01

    Apolipophorin III (apoLp-III) from Locusta migratoria was employed as a model apolipoprotein to gain insight into binding interactions with lipid vesicles. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was used to measure the binding interaction of apoLp-III with liposomes composed of mixtures of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and sphingomyelin (SM). Association of apoLp-III with multilamellar liposomes occurred over a temperature range around the liquid crystalline phase transition (L(alpha)). Qualitative and quantitative data were obtained from changes in the lipid phase transition upon addition of apoLp-III. Eleven ratios of DMPC and SM were tested from pure DMPC to pure SM. Broadness of the phase transition (T(1/2)), melting temperature of the phase transition (T(m)) and enthalpy were used to determine the relative binding affinity to the liposomes. Multilamellar vesicles composed of 40% DMPC and 60% SM showed the greatest interaction with apoLp-III, indicated by large T(1/2) values. Pure DMPC showed the weakest interaction and liposomes with lower percentage of DMPC retained domains of pure DMPC, even upon apoLp-III binding indicating demixing of liposome lipids. Addition of apoLp-III to rehydrated liposomes was compared to codissolved trials, in which lipids were rehydrated in the presence of protein, forcing the protein to interact with the lipid system. Similar trends between the codissolved and non-codissolved trials were observed, indicating a similar binding affinity except for pure DMPC. These results suggested that surface defects due to non-ideal packing that occur at the phase transition temperature of the lipid mixtures are responsible for apolipoprotein-lipid interaction in DMPC/SM liposomes. PMID:19647717

  9. Characterization of the ordered phase formed by sphingomyelin analogues and cholesterol binary mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Masanao; Goretta, Sarah; Tsuchikawa, Hiroshi; Matsumori, Nobuaki; Murata, Michio

    2013-01-01

    The influences of structural alterations of sphingomyelin (SM) on its interactions with cholesterol (chol) and on ordered phase formation were examined by density measurements and surface pressure vs. molecular area isotherm measurements. In addition, we quantitatively characterized the ordered phase formed in each SM and chol binary mixture on the basis of the molecular compressional modulus of SM ( Cmol−1). Density measurements demonstrated that the ordered phase formation in threo-SM (tSM)/chol and dihydrosphingomyelin (DHSM)/chol binary bilayers shows similar chol concentration-dependency to that of natural erythro-SM (eSM)/chol bilayers; the ordered phase formation was completed in the presence of 25 mol% chol. In contrast, SM bearing a triple bond in the place of a double bond (tripleSM) required a greater concentration of chol to completely transform the bilayer into the ordered phase (at 40 mol% chol). Surface pressure vs. molecular area isotherms showed that the DHSM molecule ( Cmol−1 = 290 mN/m) is more rigid than eSM ( Cmol−1 = 240 mN/m) above 30 mol% chol (in the ordered phase), although these values are similar (140–150 mN/m) in the absence of chol (liquid condensed phase). Most likely, the DHSM/chol mixture forms a more ordered membrane than the eSM/chol mixture does. Moreover, in the absence of chol, the rigidity of the tripleSM molecule ( Cmol−1 = 250 mN/m) is significantly higher as compared with that of the eSM molecule ( Cmol−1 = 150 mN/m), which is probably due to the presence of a triple bond. PMID:27493539

  10. Co-evolution of sphingomyelin and the ceramide transport protein CERT.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Kentaro

    2014-05-01

    Life creates many varieties of lipids. The choline-containing sphingophospholipid sphingomyelin (SM) exists ubiquitously or widely in vertebrates and lower animals, but is absent or rare in bacteria, fungi, protists, and plants. In the biosynthesis of SM, ceramide, which is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum, is transported to the Golgi region by the ceramide transport protein CERT, probably in a non-vesicular manner, and is then converted to SM by SM synthase, which catalyzes the reaction of phosphocholine transfer from phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) to ceramide. Recent advances in genomics and lipidomics indicate that the phylogenetic occurrence of CERT and its orthologs is nearly parallel to that of SM. Based on the chemistry of lipids together with evolutionary aspects of SM and CERT, several concepts are here proposed. SM may serve as a chemically inert and robust, but non-covalently interactive lipid class at the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane. The functional domains and peptidic motifs of CERT are separated by exon units, suggesting an exon-shuffling mechanism for the generation of an ancestral CERT gene. CERT may have co-evolved with SM to bypass a competing metabolic reaction at the bifurcated point in the anabolism of ceramide. Human CERT is identical to the splicing variant of human Goodpasture antigen-binding protein (GPBP) annotated as an extracellular non-canonical serine/threonine protein kinase. The relationship between CERT and GPBP has also been discussed from an evolutionary aspect. Moreover, using an analogy of "compatible (or osmoprotective) solutes" that can accumulate to very high concentrations in the cytosol without denaturing proteins, choline phospholipids such as PtdCho and SM may act as compatible phospholipids in biomembranes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled New Frontiers in Sphingolipid Biology.

  11. Ordered Raft Domains Induced by Outer Leaflet Sphingomyelin in Cholesterol-Rich Asymmetric Vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qingqing; London, Erwin

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipid- and cholesterol-rich liquid-ordered (Lo) lipid domains (rafts) are thought to be important organizing elements in eukaryotic plasma membranes. How they form in the sphingolipid-poor cytosolic (inner) membrane leaflet is unclear. Here, we characterize how outer-leaflet Lo domains induce inner-leaflet-ordered domains, i.e., interleaflet coupling. Asymmetric vesicles studied contained physiologically relevant cholesterol levels (∼37 mol %), a mixture of SM (sphingomyelin) and DOPC (dioleoylphosphatidylcholine) in their outer leaflets, and DOPC in their inner leaflets. Lo domains were observed in both leaflets, and were in register, indicative of coupling between SM-rich outer-leaflet-ordered domains and inner-leaflet-ordered domains. For asymmetric vesicles with outer-leaflet egg SM or milk SM, a fluorescent lipid with unsaturated acyl chains (NBD-DOPE) was depleted in both the outer- and inner-leaflet-ordered domains. This suggests the inner-leaflet-ordered domains were depleted in unsaturated lipid (i.e., DOPC) and thus rich in cholesterol. For asymmetric vesicles containing egg SM, outer-leaflet Lo domains were also depleted in a saturated fluorescent lipid (NBD-DPPE), while inner-leaflet Lo domains were not. This indicates that inner- and outer-leaflet Lo domains can have significantly different physical properties. In contrast, in asymmetric vesicles containing outer-leaflet milk SM, which has long acyl chains capable of interdigitating into the inner leaflet, both outer- and inner-leaflet Lo domains were depleted, to a similar extent, in NBD-DPPE. This is indicative of interdigitation-enhanced coupling resulting in inner- and outer-leaflet Lo domains with similar physical properties. PMID:25954879

  12. Characterization of cholesterol-sphingomyelin domains and their dynamics in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Samsonov, A V; Mihalyov, I; Cohen, F S

    2001-01-01

    Lipids segregate with each other into small domains in biological membranes, which can facilitate the associations of particular proteins. The segregation of cholesterol and sphingomyelin (SPM) into domains known as rafts is thought to be especially important. The formation of rafts was studied by using planar bilayer membranes that contained rhodamine-phosphatidylethanolamine (rho-DOPE) as a fluorescent probe, and wide-field fluorescence microscopy was used to detect phase separation of the probe. A fluorescently labeled GM(1), known to preferentially partition into rafts, verified that rho-DOPE faithfully reported the rafts. SPM-cholesterol domains did not form at high temperatures but spontaneously formed when temperature was lowered to below the melting temperature of the SPM. Saturated acyl chains on SPMs therefore promote the formation of rafts. The domains were circular (resolution > or = 0.5 microm), quickly reassumed their circular shape after they were deformed, and merged with each other to create larger domains, all phenomena consistent with liquid-ordered (l(o)) rather than solid-ordered (s(o)) domains. A saturated phosphatidylcholine (PC), disteoryl-PC, could substitute for SPM to complex with cholesterol into a l(o)-domain. But in the presence of cholesterol, a saturated phosphatidylethanolamine or phosphatidylserine yielded s(o)-domains of irregular shape. Lipids with saturated acyl chains can therefore pack well among each other and with cholesterol to form l(o)-domains, but domain formation is dependent on the polar headgroup of the lipid. An individual raft always extended through both monolayers. Degrading cholesterol in one monolayer with cholesterol oxidase first caused the boundary of the raft to become irregular; then the raft gradually disappeared. The fluid nature of rafts, demonstrated in this study, may be important for permitting dynamic interactions between proteins localized within rafts. PMID:11509362

  13. Sphingomyelin Functions as a Novel Receptor for Helicobacter pylori VacA

    PubMed Central

    Kostolansky, Sean S.; Ballivian, Roberto A.; Eichberg, Joseph; Blanke, Steven R.

    2008-01-01

    The vacuolating cytotoxin (VacA) of the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori binds and enters epithelial cells, ultimately resulting in cellular vacuolation. Several host factors have been reported to be important for VacA function, but none of these have been demonstrated to be essential for toxin binding to the plasma membrane. Thus, the identity of cell surface receptors critical for both toxin binding and function has remained elusive. Here, we identify VacA as the first bacterial virulence factor that exploits the important plasma membrane sphingolipid, sphingomyelin (SM), as a cellular receptor. Depletion of plasma membrane SM with sphingomyelinase inhibited VacA-mediated vacuolation and significantly reduced the sensitivity of HeLa cells, as well as several other cell lines, to VacA. Further analysis revealed that SM is critical for VacA interactions with the plasma membrane. Restoring plasma membrane SM in cells previously depleted of SM was sufficient to rescue both toxin vacuolation activity and plasma membrane binding. VacA association with detergent-resistant membranes was inhibited in cells pretreated with SMase C, indicating the importance of SM for VacA association with lipid raft microdomains. Finally, VacA bound to SM in an in vitro ELISA assay in a manner competitively inhibited by lysenin, a known SM-binding protein. Our results suggest a model where VacA may exploit the capacity of SM to preferentially partition into lipid rafts in order to access the raft-associated cellular machinery previously shown to be required for toxin entry into host cells. PMID:18497859

  14. beta-Sitosterol activates the sphingomyelin cycle and induces apoptosis in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    von Holtz, R L; Fink, C S; Awad, A B

    1998-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence has shown that men consuming a low-fat, high-fiber diet containing high amounts of plant products have a lower risk of prostate cancer than men consuming a Western diet. One of the main differences between these two diets is the type of dietary fat, including dietary sterols. This study was undertaken to compare the effect of two dietary sterols on prostate cancer cells in vitro. beta-Sitosterol (SIT), the most common plant sterol, and cholesterol, an animal sterol, were compared for effect on LNCaP cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and sphingomyelin cycle intermediates. Cells were treated for up to seven days with sterols delivered by a cyclodextrin vehicle. Compared with cholesterol, SIT (16 microM) decreased growth by 24% and induced apoptosis fourfold, which was accompanied by cell rounding and a 50% increase in ceramide production. No effect was observed on differentiation as measured by prostate-specific antigen and prostatic acid phosphatase, although total acid phosphatase increased with SIT treatment for up to seven days. The results suggest that the decrease in cell number and increase in apoptosis associated with SIT treatment are mediated by activating the sphingomyelin cycle.

  15. Effect of saturated and unsaturated fat diets on molecular species of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin of human plasma lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Myher, J J; Kuksis, A; Shepherd, J; Packard, C J; Morrisett, J D; Taunton, O D; Gotto, A M

    1981-10-23

    Four healthy 21-23-year-old males with normal lipoprotein patterns and plasma lipid concentrations were subjected voluntarily to two diets of 5 weeks duration each: I, highly saturated fat diet; II, highly polyunsaturated fat diet. The VLDL, LDL and HDL3 fractions were isolated by conventional ultracentrifugation from each subject on the high fat diets and the molecular species of the component phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins were identified and quantitated by GC-MS of the t-butyldimethylsilyl ethers of the corresponding diacylglycerols and ceramides. It was shown that the diet markedly and rather evenly affected the molecular species of the phosphatidylcholines of all lipoprotein classes. However, the changes in the corresponding major molecular species were reciprocal in nature and were consistent with a demonstrated relative resistance to alterations in surface fluidity. In contrast, the dietary fat had only a minor effect on the composition of the sphingomyelins, and did not alter the characteristic differential distribution of the molecular species among the low and high density lipoprotein classes. These results, which were free of the uncertainties introduced by analyses of derived fatty acid and which were obtained on samples isolated from the same subjects, clearly demonstrate that a complete equilibration of the molecular species of the phospholipids is not attained amont the plasma lipoprotein classes even in the fasting state. The possible physico-chemical and metabolic basis of these observations is briefly discussed.

  16. Suppression of intestinal inflammation and inflammation-driven colon cancer in mice by dietary sphingomyelin: importance of PPAR-γ expression

    PubMed Central

    Mazzei, Joseph C.; Zhou, Hui; Brayfield, Bradley; Hontecillas, Raquel; Bassaganya-Riera, Josep; Schmelz, Eva M.

    2010-01-01

    Inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract increases the risk of developing colon cancer especially in younger adults. Dietary compounds are not only associated with the etiology of inflammation and colon cancer, but also in their prevention. Sphingolipid metabolites have been shown to play a role in the initiation and perpetuation of inflammatory responses. In the present study, we investigated the suppression of dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitis and azoxymethane-induced colon cancer by dietary sphingomyelin in mice that lack functional PPAR-γ n intestinal epithelial and immune cells. Dietary sphingomyelin decreased disease activity and colonic inflammatory lesions in mice of both genotypes but more efficiently in mice expressing PPAR-γ. The increased survival and suppression of tumor formation in the sphingomyelin-fed mice appeared to be independent of PPAR-γ expression in immune and epithelial cells. Using a real-time PCR array, we detected an up-regulation in genes involved in Th1 (IFN-γ) and Th17 (IL-17 and IL-23) responses despite the reduced inflammation scores. However, the genes involved in Th2 (IL-4, IL-13 and IL-13ra2) and Treg (IL-10rb) anti-inflammatory responses were up-regulated in a PPAR-γ dependent manner. In line with the PPAR-γ dependency of our in vivo findings, treatment of RAW macrophages with sphingosine increased the PPAR-γ reporter activity. In conclusion, dietary sphingomyelin modulated inflammatory responses at early stages of disease by activating PPAR-γ, but its anti-carcinogenic effects followed a PPAR-γ-independent pattern. PMID:21295961

  17. Selective deuterium labeling of the sphingoid backbone: facile syntheses of 3,4, 5-trideuterio-d-erythro-sphingosine and 3-deuterio-d-erythro-sphingomyelin

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Hoe-Sup; Bittman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Deuteration at C-4 and C-5 of sphingosine was achieved via a hydrogen–deuterium exchange reaction of a β-ketophosphonate intermediate catalyzed by ND4Cl in D2O/tetrahydrofuran. To install deuterium at C-3 of sphingosine and sphingomyelin, sodium borodeuteride reduction/cerium(III) chloride reduction of an α,β-enone in perdeuteromethanol was used. PMID:20836998

  18. Cholesterol Decreases the Size and the Mechanical Resistance to Rupture of Sphingomyelin Rich Domains, in Lipid Bilayers Studied as a Model of the Milk Fat Globule Membrane.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Appala Venkata Ramana; Guyomarc'h, Fanny; Lopez, Christelle

    2016-07-01

    Sphingomyelin-rich microdomains have been observed in the biological membrane surrounding milk fat globules (MFGM). The role played by cholesterol in these domains and in the physical properties and functions of the MFGM remains poorly understood. The objective of this work was therefore to investigate the phase state, topography, and mechanical properties of MFGM polar lipid bilayers as a function of cholesterol concentration, by combining X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy imaging, and force spectroscopy. At room temperature, i.e. below the phase transition temperature of the MFGM polar lipids, the bilayers showed the formation of sphingomyelin-rich domains in the solid ordered (so) phase that protruded about 1 nm above the liquid disordered (ld) phase. These so phase domains have a higher mechanical resistance to rupture than the ld phase (30 nN versus 15 nN). Addition of cholesterol in the MFGM polar lipid bilayers (i) induced the formation of liquid ordered (lo) phase for up to 27 mol % in the bilayers, (ii) decreased the height difference between the thicker ordered domains and the surrounding ld phase, (iii) promoted the formation of small sized domains, and (iv) decreased the mechanical resistance to rupture of the sphingomyelin-rich domains down to ∼5 nN. The biological and functional relevance of the lo phase cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich domains in the membrane surrounding fat globules in milk remains to be elucidated. This study brought new insight about the functional role of cholesterol in milk polar lipid ingredients, which can be used in the preparation of food emulsions, e.g. infant milk formulas. PMID:27300157

  19. Golgi Fragmentation and Sphingomyelin Transport to Chlamydia trachomatis during Penicillin-Induced Persistence Do Not Depend on the Cytosolic Presence of the Chlamydial Protease CPAF

    PubMed Central

    Dille, Stephanie; Herbst, Katharina; Volceanov, Larisa; Nölke, Thilo; Kretz, Oliver; Häcker, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Chlamydia grows inside a cytosolic vacuole (the inclusion) that is supplied with nutrients by the host through vesicular and non-vesicular transport. It is unclear in many respects how Chlamydia organizes this transport. One model posits that the Chlamydia-induced fragmentation of the Golgi-apparatus is required for normal transport processes to the inclusion and for chlamydial development, and the chlamydial protease CPAF has been controversially implicated in Golgi-fragmentation. We here use a model of penicillin-induced persistence of infection with Chlamydia trachomatis to test this link. Under penicillin-treatment the inclusion grew in size for the first 24 h but after that growth was severely reduced. Penicillin did not reduce the number of infected cells with fragmented Golgi-apparatus, and normal Golgi-fragmentation was found in a CPAF-deficient mutant. Surprisingly, sphingomyelin transport into the inclusion and into the bacteria, as measured by fluorescence accumulation upon addition of labelled ceramide, was not reduced during penicillin-treatment. Thus, both Golgi-fragmentation and transport of sphingomyelin to C. trachomatis still occurred in this model of persistence. The portion of cells in which CPAF was detected in the cytosol, either by immunofluorescence or by immune-electron microscopy, was drastically reduced in cells cultured in the presence of penicillin. These data argue against an essential role of cytosolic CPAF for Golgi-fragmentation or for sphingomyelin transport in chlamydial infection. PMID:25068694

  20. Pharmacological reversion of sphingomyelin-induced dendritic spine anomalies in a Niemann Pick disease type A mouse model.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Ana I; Camoletto, Paola G; Morando, Laura; Sassoe-Pognetto, Marco; Giustetto, Maurizio; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Schuchman, Edward H; Ledesma, Maria D

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the role of lipids in synapses and the aberrant molecular mechanisms causing the cognitive deficits that characterize most lipidosis is necessary to develop therapies for these diseases. Here we describe sphingomyelin (SM) as a key modulator of the dendritic spine actin cytoskeleton. We show that increased SM levels in neurons of acid sphingomyelinase knock out mice (ASMko), which mimic Niemann Pick disease type A (NPA), result in reduced spine number and size and low levels of filamentous actin. Mechanistically, SM accumulation decreases the levels of metabotropic glutamate receptors type I (mGluR1/5) at the synaptic membrane impairing membrane attachment and activity of RhoA and its effectors ROCK and ProfilinIIa. Pharmacological enhancement of the neutral sphingomyelinase rescues the aberrant molecular and morphological phenotypes in vitro and in vivo and improves motor and memory deficits in ASMko mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate the influence of SM and its catabolic enzymes in dendritic spine physiology and contribute to our understanding of the cognitive deficits of NPA patients, opening new perspectives for therapeutic interventions.

  1. Modified low density lipoprotein delivers substrate for ceramide formation and stimulates the sphingomyelin-ceramide pathway in human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kinscherf, R; Claus, R; Deigner, H P; Nauen, O; Gehrke, C; Hermetter, A; Russwurm, S; Daniel, V; Hack, V; Metz, J

    1997-03-17

    Exposure of human blood monocytes derived macrophages to modified (oxidized or acetylated) LDL induced a approximately 40% elevation (60 pmol/10(6) cells) of the endogenous level of the sphingolipid ceramide. A rise of both neutral and acidic SMase activity was found after treatment with oxidized LDL (250 and 80%), while addition of acLDL stimulated only the neutral enzyme (280%). Sphingo(phospho)lipids from LDL were transferred to the cell membrane and distributed into intracellular compartments as observed with acLDL containing BODIPY-FL-C5-SM. Quantitation of ceramide after the addition of [3H-N-acetyl]- or BODIPY-FL-C5-SM-labeled modified LDL (27 microg/ml) to the cell culture medium indicated that approximately 210 pmol CA/10(6) cells was generated from exogenous (ox/acLDL) SM. These results demonstrate a stimulation of the sphingomyelin-ceramide pathway by modified LDL utilizing primarily exogenous (LDL-derived) substrate and suggest that the effects of modified LDL are at least partially due to an increased level of the messenger ceramide.

  2. Dietary Milk Sphingomyelin Prevents Disruption of Skin Barrier Function in Hairless Mice after UV-B Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Oba, Chisato; Morifuji, Masashi; Ichikawa, Satomi; Ito, Kyoko; Kawahata, Keiko; Yamaji, Taketo; Asami, Yukio; Itou, Hiroyuki; Sugawara, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation causes skin barrier defects. Based on earlier findings that milk phospholipids containing high amounts of sphingomyelin (SM) improved the water content of the stratum corneum (SC) in normal mice, here we investigated the effects of dietary milk SM on skin barrier defects induced by a single dose of UV-B irradiation in hairless mice. Nine week old hairless mice were orally administrated SM (146 mg/kg BW/day) for a total of ten days. After seven days of SM administration, the dorsal skin was exposed to a single dose of UV-B (20 mJ/cm2). Administration of SM significantly suppressed an increase in transepidermal water loss and a decrease in SC water content induced by UV-B irradiation. SM supplementation significantly maintained covalently-bound ω-hydroxy ceramide levels and down-regulated mRNA levels of acute inflammation-associated genes, including thymic stromal lymphopoietin, interleukin-1 beta, and interleukin-6. Furthermore, significantly higher levels of loricrin and transglutaminase-3 mRNA were observed in the SM group. Our study shows for the first time that dietary SM modulates epidermal structures, and can help prevent disruption of skin barrier function after UV-B irradiation. PMID:26302442

  3. Orientation and Order of the Amide Group of Sphingomyelin in Bilayers Determined by Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Matsumori, Nobuaki; Yamaguchi, Toshiyuki; Maeta, Yoshiko; Murata, Michio

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (Chol) are considered essential for the formation of lipid rafts; however, the types of molecular interactions involved in this process, such as intermolecular hydrogen bonding, are not well understood. Since, unlike other phospholipids, SM is characterized by the presence of an amide group, it is essential to determine the orientation of the amide and its order in the lipid bilayers to understand the nature of the hydrogen bonds in lipid rafts. For this study, 1′-13C-2-15N-labeled and 2′-13C-2-15N-labeled SMs were prepared, and the rotational-axis direction and order parameters of the SM amide in bilayers were determined based on 13C and 15N chemical-shift anisotropies and intramolecular 13C-15N dipole coupling constants. Results revealed that the amide orientation was minimally affected by Chol, whereas the order was enhanced significantly in its presence. Thus, Chol likely promotes the formation of an intermolecular hydrogen-bond network involving the SM amide without significantly changing its orientation, providing a higher order to the SM amide. To our knowledge, this study offers new insight into the significance of the SM amide orientation with regard to molecular recognition in lipid rafts, and therefore provides a deeper understanding of the mechanism of their formation. PMID:26083921

  4. Dietary Milk Sphingomyelin Prevents Disruption of Skin Barrier Function in Hairless Mice after UV-B Irradiation.

    PubMed

    Oba, Chisato; Morifuji, Masashi; Ichikawa, Satomi; Ito, Kyoko; Kawahata, Keiko; Yamaji, Taketo; Asami, Yukio; Itou, Hiroyuki; Sugawara, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) irradiation causes skin barrier defects. Based on earlier findings that milk phospholipids containing high amounts of sphingomyelin (SM) improved the water content of the stratum corneum (SC) in normal mice, here we investigated the effects of dietary milk SM on skin barrier defects induced by a single dose of UV-B irradiation in hairless mice. Nine week old hairless mice were orally administrated SM (146 mg/kg BW/day) for a total of ten days. After seven days of SM administration, the dorsal skin was exposed to a single dose of UV-B (20 mJ/cm2). Administration of SM significantly suppressed an increase in transepidermal water loss and a decrease in SC water content induced by UV-B irradiation. SM supplementation significantly maintained covalently-bound ω-hydroxy ceramide levels and down-regulated mRNA levels of acute inflammation-associated genes, including thymic stromal lymphopoietin, interleukin-1 beta, and interleukin-6. Furthermore, significantly higher levels of loricrin and transglutaminase-3 mRNA were observed in the SM group. Our study shows for the first time that dietary SM modulates epidermal structures, and can help prevent disruption of skin barrier function after UV-B irradiation. PMID:26302442

  5. The Human ABCG1 Transporter Mobilizes Plasma Membrane and Late Endosomal Non-Sphingomyelin-Associated-Cholesterol for Efflux and Esterification

    PubMed Central

    Neufeld, Edward B.; O’Brien, Katherine; Walts, Avram D.; Stonik, John A.; Malide, Daniela; Combs, Christian A.; Remaley, Alan T.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that GFP-tagged human ABCG1 on the plasma membrane (PM) and in late endosomes (LE) mobilizes sterol on both sides of the membrane lipid bilayer, thereby increasing cellular cholesterol efflux to lipid surfaces. In the present study, we examined ABCG1-induced changes in membrane cholesterol distribution, organization, and mobility. ABCG1-GFP expression increased the amount of mobile, non-sphingomyelin(SM)-associated cholesterol at the PM and LE, but not the amount of SM-associated-cholesterol or SM. ABCG1-mobilized non-SM-associated-cholesterol rapidly cycled between the PM and LE and effluxed from the PM to extracellular acceptors, or, relocated to intracellular sites of esterification. ABCG1 increased detergent-soluble pools of PM and LE cholesterol, generated detergent-resistant, non-SM-associated PM cholesterol, and increased resistance to both amphotericin B-induced (cholesterol-mediated) and lysenin-induced (SM-mediated) cytolysis, consistent with altered organization of both PM cholesterol and SM. ABCG1 itself resided in detergent-soluble membrane domains. We propose that PM and LE ABCG1 residing at the phase boundary between ordered (Lo) and disordered (Ld) membrane lipid domains alters SM and cholesterol organization thereby increasing cholesterol flux between Lo and Ld, and hence, the amount of cholesterol available for removal by acceptors on either side of the membrane bilayer for either efflux or esterification. PMID:25485894

  6. Viperin inhibits rabies virus replication via reduced cholesterol and sphingomyelin and is regulated upstream by TLR4.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hai-Bo; Lu, Zhuan-Ling; Wei, Xian-Kai; Zhong, Tao-Zhen; Zhong, Yi-Zhi; Ouyang, Ling-Xuan; Luo, Yang; Xing, Xing-Wei; Liao, Fang; Peng, Ke-Ke; Deng, Chao-Qian; Minamoto, Nobuyuki; Luo, Ting Rong

    2016-01-01

    Viperin (virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticulum-associated, IFN-inducible) is an interferon-inducible protein that mediates antiviral activity. Generally, rabies virus (RABV) multiplies extremely well in susceptible cells, leading to high virus titres. In this study, we found that viperin was significantly up-regulated in macrophage RAW264.7 cells but not in NA, BHK-21 or BSR cells. Transient viperin overexpression in BSR cells and stable expression in BHK-21 cells could inhibit RABV replication, including both attenuated and street RABV. Furthermore, the inhibitory function of viperin was related to reduce cholesterol/sphingomyelin on the membranes of RAW264.7 cells. We explored the up-stream regulation pathway of viperin in macrophage RAW264.7 cells in the context of RABV infection. An experiment confirmed that a specific Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) inhibitor, TAK-242, could inhibit viperin expression in RABV-infected RAW264.7 cells. These results support a regulatory role for TLR4. Geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) (by inhibiting heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) of the IRF3 phosphorylation chaperone), significantly delayed and reduced viperin expression, indicating that IRF3 is involved in viperin induction in RAW264.7 cells. Taken together, our data support the therapeutic potential for viperin to inhibit RABV replication, which appears to involve upstream regulation by TLR4. PMID:27456665

  7. Viperin inhibits rabies virus replication via reduced cholesterol and sphingomyelin and is regulated upstream by TLR4

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hai-Bo; Lu, Zhuan-Ling; Wei, Xian-Kai; Zhong, Tao-Zhen; Zhong, Yi-Zhi; Ouyang, Ling-Xuan; Luo, Yang; Xing, Xing-Wei; Liao, Fang; Peng, Ke-Ke; Deng, Chao-Qian; Minamoto, Nobuyuki; Luo, Ting Rong

    2016-01-01

    Viperin (virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticulum-associated, IFN-inducible) is an interferon-inducible protein that mediates antiviral activity. Generally, rabies virus (RABV) multiplies extremely well in susceptible cells, leading to high virus titres. In this study, we found that viperin was significantly up-regulated in macrophage RAW264.7 cells but not in NA, BHK-21 or BSR cells. Transient viperin overexpression in BSR cells and stable expression in BHK-21 cells could inhibit RABV replication, including both attenuated and street RABV. Furthermore, the inhibitory function of viperin was related to reduce cholesterol/sphingomyelin on the membranes of RAW264.7 cells. We explored the up-stream regulation pathway of viperin in macrophage RAW264.7 cells in the context of RABV infection. An experiment confirmed that a specific Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) inhibitor, TAK-242, could inhibit viperin expression in RABV-infected RAW264.7 cells. These results support a regulatory role for TLR4. Geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) (by inhibiting heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) of the IRF3 phosphorylation chaperone), significantly delayed and reduced viperin expression, indicating that IRF3 is involved in viperin induction in RAW264.7 cells. Taken together, our data support the therapeutic potential for viperin to inhibit RABV replication, which appears to involve upstream regulation by TLR4. PMID:27456665

  8. Pharmacological reversion of sphingomyelin-induced dendritic spine anomalies in a Niemann Pick disease type A mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Ana I; Camoletto, Paola G; Morando, Laura; Sassoe-Pognetto, Marco; Giustetto, Maurizio; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Schuchman, Edward H; Ledesma, Maria D

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the role of lipids in synapses and the aberrant molecular mechanisms causing the cognitive deficits that characterize most lipidosis is necessary to develop therapies for these diseases. Here we describe sphingomyelin (SM) as a key modulator of the dendritic spine actin cytoskeleton. We show that increased SM levels in neurons of acid sphingomyelinase knock out mice (ASMko), which mimic Niemann Pick disease type A (NPA), result in reduced spine number and size and low levels of filamentous actin. Mechanistically, SM accumulation decreases the levels of metabotropic glutamate receptors type I (mGluR1/5) at the synaptic membrane impairing membrane attachment and activity of RhoA and its effectors ROCK and ProfilinIIa. Pharmacological enhancement of the neutral sphingomyelinase rescues the aberrant molecular and morphological phenotypes in vitro and in vivo and improves motor and memory deficits in ASMko mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate the influence of SM and its catabolic enzymes in dendritic spine physiology and contribute to our understanding of the cognitive deficits of NPA patients, opening new perspectives for therapeutic interventions. Subject Categories Genetics, Gene Therapy & Genetic Disease; Neuroscience PMID:24448491

  9. Increase in ceramide level after application of various sizes of sphingomyelin liposomes to a cultured human skin model.

    PubMed

    Tokudome, Y; Jinno, M; Todo, H; Kon, T; Sugibayashi, K; Hashimoto, F

    2011-01-01

    Sphingomyelin-based liposomes (SPM-L) that were sized (or not) by extrusion through a filter with pores of 100, 200, or 400 nm were applied to a three-dimensional cultured human skin model in order to evaluate which size of SPM-L was most effective at increasing its ceramide level. The diameters of the SPM-L in PBS were 102.7, 181.0, 224.0, and 380.1 nm. The diameters of the liposomes in the culture medium were 117.5, 199.2, 242.1, and 749.8 nm. The diameter of the small liposomes (<200 nm in diameter) did not change much, at least for 7 days. SPM-L in saline or culture medium were applied to the basal layer side or stratum corneum side of the cultured skin model, and ceramide II, III, V, and VI were then extracted from it. The extracted ceramide molecules were separated by HPTLC, and the concentration of each type of ceramide was quantified using a densitometer. When the small SPM-L (110 or 190 nm in diameter) were applied to the basal layer side, the levels of ceramide III and V were increased. When they were applied to the stratum corneum side, the levels of ceramide II, III, V, and VI were significantly increased compared to those of the PBS group, especially after the application of the small SPM-L (110 nm in diameter). Thus, the application of small SPM-L was useful for increasing the ceramide II, III, V, and VI levels of a cultured human skin model.

  10. Fusogenicity of Naja naja atra cardiotoxin-like basic protein on sphingomyelin vesicles containing oxidized phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Kao, Pei-Hsiu; Chen, Ying-Jung; Yang, Shin-Yi; Lin, Shinne-Ren; Hu, Wan-Ping; Chang, Long-Sen

    2013-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of oxidized phosphatidylcholine (oxPC) and cholesterol (Chol) on Naja naja atra cardiotoxin-like basic protein (CLBP)-induced fusion and leakage in sphingomyelin (SM) vesicles. Compared with those on PC/SM/Chol vesicles, CLBP showed a lower activity to induce membrane permeability but a higher fusogenicity on oxPC/SM/Chol vesicles. A reduction in inner-leaflet fusion elucidated that CLBP fusogenicity was not in parallel to its membrane-leakage activity on oxPC/SM/Chol vesicles. The lipid domain formed by Chol and SM supported CLBP fusogenicity on oxPC/SM/Chol vesicles, while oxPC altered the interacted mode of CLBP with oxPC/SM/Chol vesicles as evidenced by Fourier transform infrared spectra analyses and colorimetric phospholipid/polydiacetylene membrane assay. Although CLBP showed similar binding affinity with PC/SM/Chol and oxPC/SM/Chol vesicles, the binding capability of CLBP with PC/SM/Chol and oxPC/SM/Chol vesicles was affected differently by NaCl. This emphasized that CLBP adopted different membrane interaction modes upon binding with PC/SM/Chol and oxPC/SM/Chol vesicles. CLBP induced fusion in vesicles containing oxPC bearing the aldehyde group, and aldehyde scavenger methoxyamine abrogated the CLBP ability to induce oxPC/SM/Chol fusion. Taken together, our data indicate that Chol and oxPC bearing aldehyde group alter the CLBP membrane-binding mode, leading to fusogenicity promotion while reducing the membrane-damaging activity of CLBP.

  11. PC-PLC/sphingomyelin synthase activity plays a central role in the development of myogenic tone in murine resistance arteries.

    PubMed

    Mauban, Joseph R H; Zacharia, Joseph; Fairfax, Seth; Wier, Withrow Gil

    2015-06-15

    Myogenic tone is an intrinsic property of the vasculature that contributes to blood pressure control and tissue perfusion. Earlier investigations assigned a key role in myogenic tone to phospholipase C (PLC) and its products, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG). Here, we used the PLC inhibitor, U-73122, and two other, specific inhibitors of PLC subtypes (PI-PLC and PC-PLC) to delineate the role of PLC in myogenic tone of pressurized murine mesenteric arteries. U-73122 inhibited depolarization-induced contractions (high external K(+) concentration), thus confirming reports of nonspecific actions of U-73122 and its limited utility for studies of myogenic tone. Edelfosine, a specific inhibitor of PI-PLC, did not affect depolarization-induced contractions but modulated myogenic tone. Because PI-PLC produces IP3, we investigated the effect of blocking IP3 receptor-mediated Ca(2+) release on myogenic tone. Incubation of arteries with xestospongin C did not affect tone, consistent with the virtual absence of Ca(2+) waves in arteries with myogenic tone. D-609, an inhibitor of PC-PLC and sphingomyelin synthase, strongly inhibited myogenic tone and had no effect on depolarization-induced contraction. D-609 appeared to act by lowering cytoplasmic Ca(2+) concentration to levels below those that activate contraction. Importantly, incubation of pressurized arteries with a membrane-permeable analog of DAG induced vasoconstriction. The results therefore mandate a reexamination of the signaling pathways activated by the Bayliss mechanism. Our results suggest that PI-PLC and IP3 are not required in maintaining myogenic tone, but DAG, produced by PC-PLC and/or SM synthase, is likely through multiple mechanisms to increase Ca(2+) entry and promote vasoconstriction.

  12. Clearance of Hepatic Sphingomyelin by Olipudase Alfa Is Associated With Improvement in Lipid Profiles in Acid Sphingomyelinase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Thurberg, Beth L; Wasserstein, Melissa P; Jones, Simon A; Schiano, Thomas D; Cox, Gerald F; Puga, Ana Cristina

    2016-09-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase deficiency (ASMD; Niemann-Pick disease type A and B) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by abnormal intracellular sphingomyelin (SM) accumulation. Prominent liver involvement results in hepatomegaly, fibrosis/cirrhosis, abnormal liver chemistries, and a proatherogenic lipid profile. Olipudase alfa (recombinant human ASM) is in clinical development as an investigational enzyme replacement therapy for the non-neurological manifestations of ASMD. In a phase 1b study conducted to evaluate the safety and tolerability of within-patient dose escalation with olipudase alfa, measurement of SM levels in liver biopsies was used as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of substrate burden. Five adult patients with non neuronopathic ASMD received escalating doses of olipudase alfa every 2 weeks for 26 weeks. Liver biopsies obtained at baseline and 26 weeks after treatment were evaluated for SM storage by histomorphometric analysis, biochemistry, and electron microscopy. Biopsies were also assessed for inflammation and fibrosis, and for the association of SM levels with liver volume, liver function tests, and lipid profiles. At baseline, SM storage present in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes ranged from 9.8% to 53.8% of the microscopic field. After 26 weeks of treatment, statistically significant reductions in SM (P<0.0001) measured by morphometry were seen in 4 patients with evaluable liver biopsies. The 26-week biopsy of the fifth patient was insufficient for morphometric quantitation. Posttreatment SM levels ranged from 1.2% to 9.5% of the microscopic field, corresponding to an 84% to 92% relative reduction from baseline. Improvements in liver volume, liver function tests, and lipid profiles were also observed. This study illustrates the utility of SM assessment by liver biopsy as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of disease burden in these patients. PMID:27340749

  13. Characterization of the role of sphingomyelin synthase 2 in glucose metabolism in whole-body and peripheral tissues in mice.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yoichi; Zhao, Songji; Ukon, Naoyuki; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Wakabayashi, Masato; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Okuda, Tomohiko; Tamaki, Nagara; Hanamatsu, Hisatoshi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2) is a proposed potential therapeutic target for obesity and insulin resistance. However, the contributions of SMS2 to glucose metabolism in tissues and its possible therapeutic mechanisms remain unclear. Thus, to determine whole-body glucose utilization and the contributions of each insulin-targeted tissue to glucose uptake, we performed a glucose kinetics study, using the radiolabeled glucose analog (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG), in wild-type (WT) and SMS2 knockout (KO) mice. Insulin signaling was enhanced in the liver, white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of SMS2 KO mice compared with those of WT mice. In addition, compared with in WT mice, blood clearance of (18)F-FDG was accelerated in SMS2 KO mice when they were fed either a normal or a high fat diet. (18)F-FDG uptake was also increased in insulin-targeted tissues such as skeletal muscle in the SMS2 KO mice. Whereas skeletal muscle sphingolipid content was not clearly affected, plasma levels of very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA)-containing ceramides were markedly increased in SMS2 KO mice, compared with in WT mice. We also generated liver-conditional SMS2 KO mice and performed glucose and insulin tolerance tests on mice with a high fat diet. However, no significant effect was observed. Thus, our study provided evidence that genetic inhibition of SMS2 elevated glucose clearance through activation of glucose uptake into insulin-targeted tissues such as skeletal muscle by a mechanism independent of hepatic SMS2. Our findings further indicate that this occurs, at least in part, via indirect mechanisms such as elevation of VLCFA-containing ceramides.

  14. Triton X-100 partitioning into sphingomyelin bilayers at subsolubilizing detergent concentrations: effect of lipid phase and a comparison with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine.

    PubMed

    Arnulphi, Cristina; Sot, Jesús; García-Pacios, Marcos; Arrondo, José-Luis R; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Félix M

    2007-11-15

    We examined the partitioning of the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 at subsolubilizing concentrations into bilayers of either egg sphingomyelin (SM), palmitoyl SM, or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine. SM is known to require less detergent than phosphatidylcholine to achieve the same extent of solubilization, and for all three phospholipids solubilization is temperature dependent. In addition, the three lipids exhibit a gel-fluid phase transition in the 38-41 degrees C temperature range. Experiments have been performed at Triton X-100 concentrations well below the critical micellar concentration, so that only detergent monomers have to be considered. Lipid/detergent mol ratios were never <10:1, thus ensuring that the solubilization stage was never reached. Isothermal titration calorimetry, DSC, and infrared, fluorescence, and (31)P-NMR spectroscopies were applied in the 5-55 degrees C temperature range. The results show that, irrespective of the chemical nature of the lipid, DeltaG degrees of partitioning remained in the range of -27 kJ/mol lipid in the gel phase and of -30 kJ/mol lipid in the fluid phase. This small difference cannot account for the observed phase-dependent differences in solubilization. Such virtually constant DeltaG degrees occurred as a result of the compensation of enthalpic and entropic components, which varied with both temperature and lipid composition. Consequently, the observed different susceptibilities to solubilization cannot be attributed to differential binding but to further events in the solubilization process, e.g., bilayer saturability by detergent or propensity to form lipid-detergent mixed micelles. The data here shed light on the relatively unexplored early stages of membrane solubilization and open new ways to understand the phenomenon of membrane resistance toward detergent solubilization. PMID:17675347

  15. Characterization of the role of sphingomyelin synthase 2 in glucose metabolism in whole-body and peripheral tissues in mice.

    PubMed

    Sugimoto, Masayuki; Shimizu, Yoichi; Zhao, Songji; Ukon, Naoyuki; Nishijima, Ken-ichi; Wakabayashi, Masato; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Okuda, Tomohiko; Tamaki, Nagara; Hanamatsu, Hisatoshi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-08-01

    Sphingomyelin synthase 2 (SMS2) is a proposed potential therapeutic target for obesity and insulin resistance. However, the contributions of SMS2 to glucose metabolism in tissues and its possible therapeutic mechanisms remain unclear. Thus, to determine whole-body glucose utilization and the contributions of each insulin-targeted tissue to glucose uptake, we performed a glucose kinetics study, using the radiolabeled glucose analog (18)F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ((18)F-FDG), in wild-type (WT) and SMS2 knockout (KO) mice. Insulin signaling was enhanced in the liver, white adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of SMS2 KO mice compared with those of WT mice. In addition, compared with in WT mice, blood clearance of (18)F-FDG was accelerated in SMS2 KO mice when they were fed either a normal or a high fat diet. (18)F-FDG uptake was also increased in insulin-targeted tissues such as skeletal muscle in the SMS2 KO mice. Whereas skeletal muscle sphingolipid content was not clearly affected, plasma levels of very long-chain fatty acid (VLCFA)-containing ceramides were markedly increased in SMS2 KO mice, compared with in WT mice. We also generated liver-conditional SMS2 KO mice and performed glucose and insulin tolerance tests on mice with a high fat diet. However, no significant effect was observed. Thus, our study provided evidence that genetic inhibition of SMS2 elevated glucose clearance through activation of glucose uptake into insulin-targeted tissues such as skeletal muscle by a mechanism independent of hepatic SMS2. Our findings further indicate that this occurs, at least in part, via indirect mechanisms such as elevation of VLCFA-containing ceramides. PMID:27151272

  16. Clearance of Hepatic Sphingomyelin by Olipudase Alfa Is Associated With Improvement in Lipid Profiles in Acid Sphingomyelinase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstein, Melissa P.; Jones, Simon A.; Schiano, Thomas D.; Cox, Gerald F.; Puga, Ana Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase deficiency (ASMD; Niemann-Pick disease type A and B) is a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by abnormal intracellular sphingomyelin (SM) accumulation. Prominent liver involvement results in hepatomegaly, fibrosis/cirrhosis, abnormal liver chemistries, and a proatherogenic lipid profile. Olipudase alfa (recombinant human ASM) is in clinical development as an investigational enzyme replacement therapy for the non-neurological manifestations of ASMD. In a phase 1b study conducted to evaluate the safety and tolerability of within-patient dose escalation with olipudase alfa, measurement of SM levels in liver biopsies was used as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of substrate burden. Five adult patients with non neuronopathic ASMD received escalating doses of olipudase alfa every 2 weeks for 26 weeks. Liver biopsies obtained at baseline and 26 weeks after treatment were evaluated for SM storage by histomorphometric analysis, biochemistry, and electron microscopy. Biopsies were also assessed for inflammation and fibrosis, and for the association of SM levels with liver volume, liver function tests, and lipid profiles. At baseline, SM storage present in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes ranged from 9.8% to 53.8% of the microscopic field. After 26 weeks of treatment, statistically significant reductions in SM (P<0.0001) measured by morphometry were seen in 4 patients with evaluable liver biopsies. The 26-week biopsy of the fifth patient was insufficient for morphometric quantitation. Posttreatment SM levels ranged from 1.2% to 9.5% of the microscopic field, corresponding to an 84% to 92% relative reduction from baseline. Improvements in liver volume, liver function tests, and lipid profiles were also observed. This study illustrates the utility of SM assessment by liver biopsy as a pharmacodynamic biomarker of disease burden in these patients. PMID:27340749

  17. Limonoid Compounds Inhibit Sphingomyelin Biosynthesis by Preventing CERT Protein-dependent Extraction of Ceramides from the Endoplasmic Reticulum*

    PubMed Central

    Hullin-Matsuda, Françoise; Tomishige, Nario; Sakai, Shota; Ishitsuka, Reiko; Ishii, Kumiko; Makino, Asami; Greimel, Peter; Abe, Mitsuhiro; Laviad, Elad L.; Lagarde, Michel; Vidal, Hubert; Saito, Tamio; Osada, Hiroyuki; Hanada, Kentaro; Futerman, Anthony H.; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2012-01-01

    To identify novel inhibitors of sphingomyelin (SM) metabolism, a new and selective high throughput microscopy-based screening based on the toxicity of the SM-specific toxin, lysenin, was developed. Out of a library of 2011 natural compounds, the limonoid, 3-chloro-8β-hydroxycarapin-3,8-hemiacetal (CHC), rendered cells resistant to lysenin by decreasing cell surface SM. CHC treatment selectively inhibited the de novo biosynthesis of SM without affecting glycolipid and glycerophospholipid biosynthesis. Pretreatment with brefeldin A abolished the limonoid-induced inhibition of SM synthesis suggesting that the transport of ceramide (Cer) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus is affected. Unlike the Cer transporter (CERT) inhibitor HPA-12, CHC did not change the transport of a fluorescent short chain Cer analog to the Golgi apparatus or the formation of fluorescent and short chain SM from the corresponding Cer. Nevertheless, CHC inhibited the conversion of de novo synthesized Cer to SM. We show that CHC specifically inhibited the CERT-mediated extraction of Cer from the endoplasmic reticulum membranes in vitro. Subsequent biochemical screening of 21 limonoids revealed that some of them, such as 8β-hydroxycarapin-3,8-hemiacetal and gedunin, which exhibits anti-cancer activity, inhibited SM biosynthesis and CERT-mediated extraction of Cer from membranes. Model membrane studies suggest that 8β-hydroxycarapin-3,8-hemiacetal reduced the miscibility of Cer with membrane lipids and thus induced the formation of Cer-rich membrane domains. Our study shows that certain limonoids are novel inhibitors of SM biosynthesis and suggests that some biological activities of these limonoids are related to their effect on the ceramide metabolism. PMID:22605339

  18. Limonoid compounds inhibit sphingomyelin biosynthesis by preventing CERT protein-dependent extraction of ceramides from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Hullin-Matsuda, Françoise; Tomishige, Nario; Sakai, Shota; Ishitsuka, Reiko; Ishii, Kumiko; Makino, Asami; Greimel, Peter; Abe, Mitsuhiro; Laviad, Elad L; Lagarde, Michel; Vidal, Hubert; Saito, Tamio; Osada, Hiroyuki; Hanada, Kentaro; Futerman, Anthony H; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2012-07-13

    To identify novel inhibitors of sphingomyelin (SM) metabolism, a new and selective high throughput microscopy-based screening based on the toxicity of the SM-specific toxin, lysenin, was developed. Out of a library of 2011 natural compounds, the limonoid, 3-chloro-8β-hydroxycarapin-3,8-hemiacetal (CHC), rendered cells resistant to lysenin by decreasing cell surface SM. CHC treatment selectively inhibited the de novo biosynthesis of SM without affecting glycolipid and glycerophospholipid biosynthesis. Pretreatment with brefeldin A abolished the limonoid-induced inhibition of SM synthesis suggesting that the transport of ceramide (Cer) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus is affected. Unlike the Cer transporter (CERT) inhibitor HPA-12, CHC did not change the transport of a fluorescent short chain Cer analog to the Golgi apparatus or the formation of fluorescent and short chain SM from the corresponding Cer. Nevertheless, CHC inhibited the conversion of de novo synthesized Cer to SM. We show that CHC specifically inhibited the CERT-mediated extraction of Cer from the endoplasmic reticulum membranes in vitro. Subsequent biochemical screening of 21 limonoids revealed that some of them, such as 8β-hydroxycarapin-3,8-hemiacetal and gedunin, which exhibits anti-cancer activity, inhibited SM biosynthesis and CERT-mediated extraction of Cer from membranes. Model membrane studies suggest that 8β-hydroxycarapin-3,8-hemiacetal reduced the miscibility of Cer with membrane lipids and thus induced the formation of Cer-rich membrane domains. Our study shows that certain limonoids are novel inhibitors of SM biosynthesis and suggests that some biological activities of these limonoids are related to their effect on the ceramide metabolism. PMID:22605339

  19. Sustained Epigenetic Drug Delivery Depletes Cholesterol-Sphingomyelin Rafts from Resistant Breast Cancer Cells, Influencing Biophysical Characteristics of Membrane Lipids.

    PubMed

    Raghavan, Vijay; Vijayaraghavalu, Sivakumar; Peetla, Chiranjeevi; Yamada, Masayoshi; Morisada, Megan; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2015-10-27

    Cell-membrane lipid composition can greatly influence biophysical properties of cell membranes, affecting various cellular functions. We previously showed that lipid synthesis becomes altered in the membranes of resistant breast cancer cells (MCF-7/ADR); they form a more rigid, hydrophobic lipid monolayer than do sensitive cell membranes (MCF-7). These changes in membrane lipids of resistant cells, attributed to epigenetic aberration, significantly affected drug transport and endocytic function, thus impacting the efficacy of anticancer drugs. The present study's objective was to determine the effects of the epigenetic drug, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine (DAC), delivered in sustained-release nanogels (DAC-NGs), on the composition and biophysical properties of membrane lipids of resistant cells. Resistant and sensitive cells were treated with DAC in solution (DAC-sol) or DAC-NGs, and cell-membrane lipids were isolated and analyzed for lipid composition and biophysical properties. In resistant cells, we found increased formation of cholesterol-sphingomyelin (CHOL-SM) rafts with culturing time, whereas DAC treatment reduced their formation. In general, the effect of DAC-NGs was greater in changing the lipid composition than with DAC-sol. DAC treatment also caused a rise in levels of certain phospholipids and neutral lipids known to increase membrane fluidity, while reducing the levels of certain lipids known to increase membrane rigidity. Isotherm data showed increased lipid membrane fluidity following DAC treatment, attributed to decrease levels of CHOL-SM rafts (lamellar beta [Lβ] structures or ordered gel) and a corresponding increase in lipids that form lamellar alpha-structures (Lα, liquid crystalline phase). Sensitive cells showed marginal or insignificant changes in lipid profile following DAC-treatment, suggesting that epigenetic changes affecting lipid biosynthesis are more specific to resistant cells. Since membrane fluidity plays a major role in drug transport

  20. PC-PLC/sphingomyelin synthase activity plays a central role in the development of myogenic tone in murine resistance arteries

    PubMed Central

    Zacharia, Joseph; Fairfax, Seth; Wier, Withrow Gil

    2015-01-01

    Myogenic tone is an intrinsic property of the vasculature that contributes to blood pressure control and tissue perfusion. Earlier investigations assigned a key role in myogenic tone to phospholipase C (PLC) and its products, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and diacylglycerol (DAG). Here, we used the PLC inhibitor, U-73122, and two other, specific inhibitors of PLC subtypes (PI-PLC and PC-PLC) to delineate the role of PLC in myogenic tone of pressurized murine mesenteric arteries. U-73122 inhibited depolarization-induced contractions (high external K+ concentration), thus confirming reports of nonspecific actions of U-73122 and its limited utility for studies of myogenic tone. Edelfosine, a specific inhibitor of PI-PLC, did not affect depolarization-induced contractions but modulated myogenic tone. Because PI-PLC produces IP3, we investigated the effect of blocking IP3 receptor-mediated Ca2+ release on myogenic tone. Incubation of arteries with xestospongin C did not affect tone, consistent with the virtual absence of Ca2+ waves in arteries with myogenic tone. D-609, an inhibitor of PC-PLC and sphingomyelin synthase, strongly inhibited myogenic tone and had no effect on depolarization-induced contraction. D-609 appeared to act by lowering cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration to levels below those that activate contraction. Importantly, incubation of pressurized arteries with a membrane-permeable analog of DAG induced vasoconstriction. The results therefore mandate a reexamination of the signaling pathways activated by the Bayliss mechanism. Our results suggest that PI-PLC and IP3 are not required in maintaining myogenic tone, but DAG, produced by PC-PLC and/or SM synthase, is likely through multiple mechanisms to increase Ca2+ entry and promote vasoconstriction. PMID:25888510

  1. Membrane cholesterol and sphingomyelin, and ostreolysin A are obligatory for pore-formation by a MACPF/CDC-like pore-forming protein, pleurotolysin B.

    PubMed

    Ota, Katja; Leonardi, Adrijana; Mikelj, Miha; Skočaj, Matej; Wohlschlager, Therese; Künzler, Markus; Aebi, Markus; Narat, Mojca; Križaj, Igor; Anderluh, Gregor; Sepčić, Kristina; Maček, Peter

    2013-10-01

    The mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus has been reported to produce the hemolytic proteins ostreolysin (OlyA), pleurotolysin A (PlyA) and pleurotolysin B (PlyB). The present study of the native and recombinant proteins dissects out their lipid-binding characteristics and their roles in lipid binding and membrane permeabilization. Using lipid-binding studies, permeabilization of erythrocytes, large unilamellar vesicles of various lipid compositions, and electron microscopy, we show that OlyA, a PlyA homolog, preferentially binds to membranes rich in sterol and sphingomyelin, but it does not permeabilize them. The N-terminally truncated Δ48PlyB corresponds to the mature and active form of native PlyB, and it has a membrane attack complex-perforin (MACPF) domain. Δ48PlyB spontaneously oligomerizes in solution, and binds weakly to various lipid membranes but is not able to perforate them. However, binding of Δ48PlyB to the cholesterol and sphingomyelin membranes, and consequently, their permeabilization is dramatically promoted in the presence of OlyA. On these membranes, Δ48PlyB and OlyA form predominantly 13-meric oligomers. These are rosette-like structures with a thickness of ∼9 nm from the membrane surface, with 19.7 nm and 4.9 nm outer and inner diameters, respectively. When present on opposing vesicle membranes, these oligomers can dimerize and thus promote aggregation of vesicles. Based on the structural and functional characteristics of Δ48PlyB, we suggest that it shares some features with MACPF/cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) proteins. OlyA is obligatory for the Δ48PlyB permeabilization of membranes rich in cholesterol and sphingomyelin. PMID:23806422

  2. Regulation of SREBPs by Sphingomyelin in Adipocytes via a Caveolin and Ras-ERK-MAPK-CREB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Makdissy, Nehman; Haddad, Katia; Mouawad, Charbel; Popa, Iuliana; Younsi, Mohamed; Valet, Philippe; Brunaud, Laurent; Ziegler, Olivier; Quilliot, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Sterol response element binding protein (SREBP) is a key transcription factor in insulin and glucose metabolism. We previously demonstrated that elevated levels of membrane sphingomyelin (SM) were related to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ), which is a known target gene of SREBP-1 in adipocytes. However, the role of SM in SREBP expression in adipocytes remains unknown. In human abdominal adipose tissue from obese women with various concentrations of fasting plasma insulin, SREBP-1 proteins decreased in parallel with increases in membrane SM levels. An inverse correlation was found between the membrane SM content and the levels of SREBP-1c/ERK/Ras/PPARγ/CREB proteins. For the first time, we demonstrate the effects of SM and its signaling pathway in 3T3-F442A adipocytes. These cells were enriched or unenriched with SM in a range of concentrations similar to those observed in obese subjects by adding exogenous natural SMs (having different acyl chain lengths) or by inhibiting neutral sphingomyelinase. SM accumulated in caveolae of the plasma membrane within 24 h and then in the intracellular space. SM enrichment decreased SREBP-1 through the inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) but not JNK or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Ras/Raf-1/MEK1/2 and KSR proteins, which are upstream mediators of ERK, were down-regulated, whereas SREBP-2/caveolin and cholesterol were up-regulated. In SM-unmodulated adipocytes treated with DL-1-Phenyl-2-Palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol (PPMP), where the ceramide level increased, the expression levels of SREBPs and ERK were modulated in an opposite direction relative to the SM-enriched cells. SM inhibited the insulin-induced expression of SREBP-1. Rosiglitazone, which is an anti-diabetic agent and potent activator of PPARγ, reversed the effects of SM on SREBP-1, PPARγ and CREB. Taken together, these findings provide novel insights indicating that excess membrane SM might

  3. The size of lipid rafts: an atomic force microscopy study of ganglioside GM1 domains in sphingomyelin/DOPC/cholesterol membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Chunbo; Furlong, Jennifer; Burgos, Pierre; Johnston, Linda J

    2002-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy has been used to study the distribution of ganglioside GM1 in model membranes composed of ternary lipid mixtures that mimic the composition of lipid rafts. The results demonstrate that addition of 1% GM1 to 1:1:1 sphingomyelin/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol monolayers leads to the formation of small ganglioside-rich microdomains (40-100 nm in size) that are localized preferentially in the more ordered sphingomyelin/cholesterol-rich phase. With 5% GM1 some GM1 microdomains are also detected in the dioleoylphosphatidylcholine-rich phase. A similar preferential localization of GM1 in the ordered phase is observed for bilayers with the same ternary lipid mixture in the upper leaflet. The small GM1-rich domains observed in these experiments are similar to the sizes for lipid rafts in natural membranes but considerably smaller than the ordered bilayer domains that have been shown to be enriched in GM1 in recent fluorescence microscopy studies of lipid bilayers. The combined data from a number of studies of model membranes indicate that lateral organization occurs on a variety of length scales and mimics many of the properties of natural membranes. PMID:11964241

  4. Compounds of the sphingomyelin-ceramide-glycosphingolipid pathways as secondary messenger molecules: new targets for novel therapies for fatty liver disease and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ilan, Yaron

    2016-06-01

    The compounds of sphingomyelin-ceramide-glycosphingolipid pathways have been studied as potential secondary messenger molecules in various systems, along with liver function and insulin resistance. Secondary messenger molecules act directly or indirectly to affect cell organelles and intercellular interactions. Their potential role in the pathogenesis of steatohepatitis and diabetes has been suggested. Data samples collected from patients with Gaucher's disease, who had high levels of glucocerebroside, support a role for compounds from these pathways as a messenger molecules in the pathogenesis of fatty liver disease and diabetes. The present review summarizes some of the recent data on the role of glycosphingolipid molecules as messenger molecules in various physiological and pathological conditions, more specifically including insulin resistance and fatty liver disease. PMID:27173510

  5. FTIR-ATR study of the influence of the pyrimidine analog of fluphenazine on the chain-melting phase transition of sphingomyelin membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuć, Marta; Cieślik-Boczula, Katarzyna; Świątek, Piotr; Jaszczyszyn, Agata; Gąsiorowski, Kazimierz; Malinka, Wiesław

    2015-09-01

    The membrane perturbing potency of the highly effective anti-multidrug resistance (MDR) pyrimidine analog of fluphenazine (FPh-prm), has been studied using attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transfer infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-ATR). The temperature- and FPh-prm-dose-dependent evolutions of the infrared spectra of FPh-prm/sphingomyelin (SM) mixtures were analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA). It has been postulated that the distinct anti-MDR activity of FPh-prm could be related to its ability to affect the modification of SM membranes. A reduction in the temperature of the chain-melting phase transition was observed in FPh-prm-mixed SM membranes together with the loosing of the phase transition cooperativity. Increasing the temperature led to the trans to gauche isomerization of FPh-prm-rich lipid membranes, which resulted in the gradual release of FPh-prm from the lipid membrane to the water phase.

  6. [Functional state of a sphingomyeline cycle and free radical lipid oxidation activity of a rat's liver during different phases of starvation].

    PubMed

    Kuz'menko, D I; Burov, P G; Serebrov, V Iu; Faĭt, E A; Perevozchikova, T V

    2012-01-01

    The functional state of a sphingomyeline cycle and character of its mutual relations with the processes of free radical lipid oxidation during starvation of animals without any restriction of access to drinking water at 1, 2, 3 day (I phase) and 6 day (II phase of starvation) were studied at the liver of rats. The maximal values of the ceramide/sphingomyeline ratio and activity neutral sphingomyelinase and executive caspase-3 were reached in a liver of animals at the 3rd day of starvation. From the 3rd day of starvation the concentration of the tumour necrosis factor-alpha which is one of activators neutral sphingomyelinase was increase in rats blood serum. During the extent of large part of the I phase of starvation the intensity of free radical lipid peroxidation in a liver had almost the same level as in control group--that was a result of the high-grade functioning of antioxidant defense system. After transition the I phase of starvation into the II phase (6 day of experiment) the oxidative stress was developed as result of an exhaustion of system antioxidant defense potential in a liver. The results of this data can testify that during I phase of starvation in a liver the conditions was raised for display of the ceramide-mediated proapoptotic signalling. We assume that ceramide-mediated apoptosis is one of mechanisms of optimization of liver cellular population at the frames of metabolic adaptation. The I phase of starvation in a liver proves by the ceramide-mediated proapoptotic signaling developing. During the II phase of starvation the oxidative stress process were prevailed.

  7. [Urinary oestriol excretion and the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio in amniotic fluid in Bogota (2600 m) I. Normal pregnancy (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Sobrevilla, L A; Cristina Peña, M; Jaramillo, R

    1980-01-01

    We have studied 22 pregnancies in order to establish normal values for the urinary oestriol excretion in Bogotá, a city 2600 metres above sea level. The study subjects were normal pregnant women attending the prenatal clinic of the Hospital San José de Bogotá, and belong to a racially mixed community of medium to low socio-economic level. In the study, new born weight was found low (mean +/- SEM 2.97 +/-0.06 kg) while placental weight was high (0.6 +/- 0.02 kg) with a high placenta/newborn ratio. Maternal hemoglobin was elevated (12.8 +/- 0.2g/100 ml) reflecting the effect of altitude. In 66 determinations, oestriol excretion was more than 4mg/24 hours from week 31 to 36 and of more than 5 mg/24 hours from week 35 to 40. The decreased excretion of oestriol most likely reflects impaired intrauterine fetal growth, and is probably related to nutrional, racial and socio-economic factors as well as to the altitude. In five normal term pregnancies studied, the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio was of 2 or more and amniotic fluid creatinine was also elevated, indicating maturity of the pulmonary and renal enzyme systems of the fetus.

  8. Comparative studies on the influence of beta-sitosterol and stigmasterol on model sphingomyelin membranes: a grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction study.

    PubMed

    Hac-Wydro, Katarzyna; Flasiński, Michał; Broniatowski, Marcin; Dynarowicz-Łatka, Patrycja; Majewski, Jarosław

    2010-05-27

    Sterols are essential constituents of membranes, both in the plant world and in human organisms. Therefore, their activity on model lipid systems has systematically been studied. Despite intensive investigations, differences in the effect induced by beta-sitosterol (beta-sito) and stigmasterol (stigma) (two major phytosterols) are very controversial and still under debate. To compare the influence of these compounds on model membranes, we have performed grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) experiments on phytosterol/sphingomyelin (Sph) monolayers. The analysis of the X-ray scattering and the resulting in-plane parameters provided information on the lateral organization of pure lipid films and the mixed systems. The obtained results prove a nonideal mixing between the investigated lipids in the monolayers and the existence of strong interactions between phytosterols and Sph. Both the plant sterols incorporated into sphingolipid film condense the monolayer and order Sph chains. The results of GIXD experiments, compared with those obtained previously from Langmuir monolayer studies allowed us to observe the comparable influence of beta-sito and stigma on model membrane organization.

  9. Unique Backbone-Water Interaction Detected in Sphingomyelin Bilayers with 1H/31P and 1H/13C HETCOR MAS NMR Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Gregory P.; Alam, Todd M.

    2008-01-01

    Two-dimensional 1H/31P dipolar heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used to investigate the correlation of the lipid headgroup with various intra- and intermolecular proton environments. Cross-polarization NMR techniques involving 31P have not been previously pursued to a great extent in lipid bilayers due to the long 1H-31P distances and high degree of headgroup mobility that averages the dipolar coupling in the liquid crystalline phase. The results presented herein show that this approach is very promising and yields information not readily available with other experimental methods. Of particular interest is the detection of a unique lipid backbone-water intermolecular interaction in egg sphingomyelin (SM) that is not observed in lipids with glycerol backbones like phosphatidylcholines. This backbone-water interaction in SM is probed when a mixing period allowing magnetization exchange between different 1H environments via the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) is included in the NMR pulse sequence. The molecular information provided by these 1H/31P dipolar HETCOR experiments with NOE mixing differ from those previously obtained by conventional NOE spectroscopy and heteronuclear NOE spectroscopy NMR experiments. In addition, two-dimensional 1H/13C INEPT HETCOR experiments with NOE mixing support the 1H/31P dipolar HETCOR results and confirm the presence of a H2O environment that has nonvanishing dipolar interactions with the SM backbone. PMID:18390621

  10. Clot retraction is mediated by factor XIII-dependent fibrin-αIIbβ3-myosin axis in platelet sphingomyelin-rich membrane rafts.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kohji; Kaneda, Mizuho; Miki, Toshiaki; Iida, Kazuko; Sekino-Suzuki, Naoko; Kawashima, Ikuo; Suzuki, Hidenori; Shimonaka, Motoyuki; Arai, Morio; Ohno-Iwashita, Yoshiko; Kojima, Soichi; Abe, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Okazaki, Toshiro; Souri, Masayoshi; Ichinose, Akitada; Yamamoto, Naomasa

    2013-11-01

    Membrane rafts are spatially and functionally heterogenous in the cell membrane. We observed that lysenin-positive sphingomyelin (SM)-rich rafts are identified histochemically in the central region of adhered platelets where fibrin and myosin are colocalized on activation by thrombin. The clot retraction of SM-depleted platelets from SM synthase knockout mouse was delayed significantly, suggesting that platelet SM-rich rafts are involved in clot retraction. We found that fibrin converted by thrombin translocated immediately in platelet detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) rafts but that from Glanzmann's thrombasthenic platelets failed. The fibrinogen γ-chain C-terminal (residues 144-411) fusion protein translocated to platelet DRM rafts on thrombin activation, but its mutant that was replaced by A398A399 at factor XIII crosslinking sites (Q398Q399) was inhibited. Furthermore, fibrin translocation to DRM rafts was impaired in factor XIII A subunit-deficient mouse platelets, which show impaired clot retraction. In the cytoplasm, myosin translocated concomitantly with fibrin translocation into the DRM raft of thrombin-stimulated platelets. Furthermore, the disruption of SM-rich rafts by methyl-β-cyclodextrin impaired myosin activation and clot retraction. Thus, we propose that clot retraction takes place in SM-rich rafts where a fibrin-αIIbβ3-myosin complex is formed as a primary axis to promote platelet contraction. PMID:24002447

  11. Sphingomyelin synthase 2 affects CD14‑associated induction of NF‑κB by lipopolysaccharides in acute lung injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shidong; Ding, Yi; Gong, Jie; Yan, Nianlong

    2016-10-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is the predominant component of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, which can cause severe inflammation in the body. The acute lung injury (ALI) induced by LPS can cause extensive damage to the lung tissue, the severe stage of which is termed acute respiratory distress syndrome, when multiple organ dysfunction syndrome may appear. There are no effective clinical treatment measures at present. The involvement of cluster of differentiation (CD)14 assists LPS in causing inflammatory reactions, and CD14 and sphingomyelin (SM), located in lipid rafts areas, are closely associated. SM synthase (SMS) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of SM, however, the effect of SMS on the inflammatory pathway involving nuclear factor (NF)‑κB induced by LPS remains to be elucidated. Under the premise of the establishment of an ALI mouse model induced by LPS, the present study established a control group, LPS group and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC; an NF‑κB pathway inhibitor) group. Hematoxylin‑eosin staining, reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis, western blot analysis and thin layer chromatography were used to investigate the mechanism of SMS in ALI. Compared with the control group, the mRNA and protein levels of CD14 were significantly increased (P<0.001; n=5 and P<0.05, n=5), and the activity of SMS and expression of SMS2 were significantly upregulated (P<0.001; n=5 and P<0.05, n=5) in the model group. The increases of SMS2 and CD14 in the PDTC group were less marked, compared with those in the model group (P<0.05; n=5). These findings suggested that the degree of lung injury was reduced during the acute inflammatory reaction when NF‑κB was inhibited, and that the expression of SMS2 may affect the induction of the NF‑κB pathway by LPS through CD14. PMID:27510408

  12. In contrast to Chlamydia trachomatis, Waddlia chondrophila grows in human cells without inhibiting apoptosis, fragmenting the Golgi apparatus, or diverting post-Golgi sphingomyelin transport.

    PubMed

    Dille, Stephanie; Kleinschnitz, Eva-Maria; Kontchou, Collins Waguia; Nölke, Thilo; Häcker, Georg

    2015-08-01

    The Chlamydiales are an order of obligate intracellular bacteria sharing a developmental cycle inside a cytosolic vacuole, with very diverse natural hosts, from amoebae to mammals. The clinically most important species is Chlamydia trachomatis. Many uncertainties remain as to how Chlamydia organizes its intracellular development and replication. The discovery of new Chlamydiales species from other families permits the comparative analysis of cell-biological events and may indicate events that are common to all or peculiar to some species and more or less tightly linked to "chlamydial" development. We used this approach in the infection of human cells with Waddlia chondrophila, a species from the family Waddliaceae whose natural host is uncertain. Compared to C. trachomatis, W. chondrophila had slightly different growth characteristics, including faster cytotoxicity. The embedding in cytoskeletal structures was not as pronounced as for the C. trachomatis inclusion. C. trachomatis infection generates proteolytic activity by the protease Chlamydia protease-like activity factor (CPAF), which degrades host substrates upon extraction; these substrates were not cleaved in the case of W. chondrophila. Unlike Chlamydia, W. chondrophila did not protect against staurosporine-induced apoptosis. C. trachomatis infection causes Golgi apparatus fragmentation and redirects post-Golgi sphingomyelin transport to the inclusion; both were absent from W. chondrophila-infected cells. When host cells were infected with both species, growth of both species was reduced. This study highlights differences between bacterial species that both depend on obligate intracellular replication inside an inclusion. Some features seem principally dispensable for intracellular development of Chlamydiales in vitro but may be linked to host adaptation of Chlamydia and the higher virulence of C. trachomatis.

  13. Unique thermal behavior of sphingomyelin species with nonhydroxy and 2-hydroxy very-long-chain (C28-C32) PUFAs[S

    PubMed Central

    Peñalva, Daniel A.; Furland, Natalia E.; López, Gustavo H.; Aveldaño, Marta I.; Antollini, Silvia S.

    2013-01-01

    In rat germ cells and spermatozoa, sphingomyelin (SM) contains molecular species with nonhydroxy (n) and 2-hydroxy (h) very-long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (V), the most abundant being SMs with (n- and h-) 28:4n-6, 30:5n-6, and 32:5n-6 as acyl chains. The aim of this study was to gain information about their thermotropic behavior and interactions with other lipids. After isolation from rat testis, multilamellar and giant unilamellar vesicles from these SMs were examined using fluorescent probes. Only n-32:5 SM and h-32:5 SM displayed a gel-liquid transition temperature (Tt ∼ 21–22°C), the rest remaining in the liquid state in the 5°C–45°C range. The degree of order was larger in bilayers of any of the h-V SMs than in those of their chain-matched n-V SMs. Both, but n-V SM relatively more than h-V SM, decreased the Tt of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine as their proportion increased in binary phosphatidylcholine:SM liposomes. In contrast to the established ability of 16:0 SM to form lateral cholesterol/SM-rich ordered domains in ternary dioleoylphosphatidylcholine:cholesterol:SM bilayers, neither n-V SM nor h-V SM showed a tendency to do so. Thus, these SMs are in the fluid state and are not involved in this type of domains in spermatozoa at physiological temperatures. However, this state could be altered at the very low temperatures at which these gametes are usually preserved. PMID:23687296

  14. Improvement of skin condition by oral supplementation with sphingomyelin-containing milk phospholipids in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, S; Haruta-Ono, Y; Urazono, H; Kobayashi, T; Kadooka, Y

    2015-10-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM), an essential phospholipid for the skin, is contained largely in the milk fat globule membrane surrounding milk fat, concentrated fractions of which are also generated concurrently during the manufacture of dairy products. Such an SM-containing milk phospholipid concentrate (SM-MPC) is useful for investigating the benefits of dietary SM. Here, we examined the effect of consuming SM-MPC on the condition of skin in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Ninety-six healthy subjects aged 20 to 39 yr with low skin hydration were randomly assigned to 3 groups: a high-SM group supplemented with SM-MPC at a dose equivalent to 10 mg/d of SM, a low-SM group supplemented with SM-MPC equivalent to 5 mg/d of SM, and a placebo group fed a vehicle composed of olive oil and beeswax. During daily supplementation for 12 wk, parameters related to the condition of skin were evaluated at baseline and every 3 wk. Skin hydration at the heel was significantly increased at wk 9 and 12 in the low-SM group compared with the placebo group. Skin elasticity in the region below the eye was significantly increased at wk 9 in the high-SM group versus placebo. Questionnaire-based subjective perceptions of skin conditions were significantly improved for facial skin moisture at wk 3 and 12, and in the wrinkle around the eyes at wk 9 and 12 in the high-SM group versus placebo. Our results indicate that constant and long-term supplementation with SM-MPC is capable of improving the general condition of skin.

  15. Expression, immunolocalization, and serological reactivity of a novel sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase-like protein, an excretory/secretory antigen from Clonorchis sinensis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanwei; Zheng, Youwei; Li, Yuzhe; Yang, Mei; Li, Ting; Zeng, Suxiang; Yu, Xinbing; Huang, Huaiqiu; Hu, Xuchu

    2013-06-01

    Clonorchiasis, caused by Clonorchis sinensis infection, is a zoonotic parasitic disease of hepatobiliary system in which the proteins released by adult are major pathogenetic factors. In this study, we first characterized a putative sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase (CsSMPase) A-like secretory protein, which was highly expressed in the adult worm. The full-length gene was cloned. The putative protein is of relatively low homology comparing with SMPase from other species, and of rich T cell and B cell epitopes, suggesting that it is an antigen of strong antigenicity. The complete coding sequence of the gene was expressed in the Escherichia coli. The recombinant CsSMPase (rCsSMPase) can be recognized by C. sinensis-infected serum, and the protein immunoserum can recognize a specific band in excretory/secretory products (ESPs) of C. sinensis adult by western blotting. Immunolocalization revealed that CsSMPase was not only localized on tegument, ventral sucker of metacercaria, and the intestine of adult but also on the nearby epithelium of bile duct of the infected Sprague-Dawley rats, implying that CsSMPase was mainly secreted and excreted through adult intestine and directly interacted with bile duct epithelium. Although immunized rats evoked high level antibody response, the antigen level was low in clonorchiasis patients. And the sensitivity and specificity of rCsSMPase were 50.0 % (12/24) and 88.4 % (61/69), in sera IgG-ELISA, respectively. It is likely due to the fact that CsSMPase binding to the plasma membrane of biliary epithelium decreases the antigen immune stimulation.

  16. Improvement of skin condition by oral supplementation with sphingomyelin-containing milk phospholipids in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Higurashi, S; Haruta-Ono, Y; Urazono, H; Kobayashi, T; Kadooka, Y

    2015-10-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM), an essential phospholipid for the skin, is contained largely in the milk fat globule membrane surrounding milk fat, concentrated fractions of which are also generated concurrently during the manufacture of dairy products. Such an SM-containing milk phospholipid concentrate (SM-MPC) is useful for investigating the benefits of dietary SM. Here, we examined the effect of consuming SM-MPC on the condition of skin in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial. Ninety-six healthy subjects aged 20 to 39 yr with low skin hydration were randomly assigned to 3 groups: a high-SM group supplemented with SM-MPC at a dose equivalent to 10 mg/d of SM, a low-SM group supplemented with SM-MPC equivalent to 5 mg/d of SM, and a placebo group fed a vehicle composed of olive oil and beeswax. During daily supplementation for 12 wk, parameters related to the condition of skin were evaluated at baseline and every 3 wk. Skin hydration at the heel was significantly increased at wk 9 and 12 in the low-SM group compared with the placebo group. Skin elasticity in the region below the eye was significantly increased at wk 9 in the high-SM group versus placebo. Questionnaire-based subjective perceptions of skin conditions were significantly improved for facial skin moisture at wk 3 and 12, and in the wrinkle around the eyes at wk 9 and 12 in the high-SM group versus placebo. Our results indicate that constant and long-term supplementation with SM-MPC is capable of improving the general condition of skin. PMID:26277314

  17. In Contrast to Chlamydia trachomatis, Waddlia chondrophila Grows in Human Cells without Inhibiting Apoptosis, Fragmenting the Golgi Apparatus, or Diverting Post-Golgi Sphingomyelin Transport

    PubMed Central

    Dille, Stephanie; Kleinschnitz, Eva-Maria; Kontchou, Collins Waguia; Nölke, Thilo

    2015-01-01

    The Chlamydiales are an order of obligate intracellular bacteria sharing a developmental cycle inside a cytosolic vacuole, with very diverse natural hosts, from amoebae to mammals. The clinically most important species is Chlamydia trachomatis. Many uncertainties remain as to how Chlamydia organizes its intracellular development and replication. The discovery of new Chlamydiales species from other families permits the comparative analysis of cell-biological events and may indicate events that are common to all or peculiar to some species and more or less tightly linked to “chlamydial” development. We used this approach in the infection of human cells with Waddlia chondrophila, a species from the family Waddliaceae whose natural host is uncertain. Compared to C. trachomatis, W. chondrophila had slightly different growth characteristics, including faster cytotoxicity. The embedding in cytoskeletal structures was not as pronounced as for the C. trachomatis inclusion. C. trachomatis infection generates proteolytic activity by the protease Chlamydia protease-like activity factor (CPAF), which degrades host substrates upon extraction; these substrates were not cleaved in the case of W. chondrophila. Unlike Chlamydia, W. chondrophila did not protect against staurosporine-induced apoptosis. C. trachomatis infection causes Golgi apparatus fragmentation and redirects post-Golgi sphingomyelin transport to the inclusion; both were absent from W. chondrophila-infected cells. When host cells were infected with both species, growth of both species was reduced. This study highlights differences between bacterial species that both depend on obligate intracellular replication inside an inclusion. Some features seem principally dispensable for intracellular development of Chlamydiales in vitro but may be linked to host adaptation of Chlamydia and the higher virulence of C. trachomatis. PMID:26056386

  18. Evidence for the role of lipid rafts and sphingomyelin in Ca2+-gating of Transient Receptor Potential channels in trigeminal sensory neurons and peripheral nerve terminals.

    PubMed

    Sághy, Éva; Szőke, Éva; Payrits, Maja; Helyes, Zsuzsanna; Börzsei, Rita; Erostyák, János; Jánosi, Tibor Zoltán; Sétáló, György; Szolcsányi, János

    2015-10-01

    Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) cation channels, such as TRP Vanilloid 1 and TRP Ankyrin repeat domain 1 (TRPV1 and TRPA1) are nocisensors playing important role to signal pain. Two "melastatin" TRP receptors, like TRPM8 and TRPM3 are also expressed in a subgroup of primary sensory neurons. These channels serve as thermosensors with unique thermal sensitivity ranges and are activated also by several exogenous and endogenous chemical ligands inducing conformational changes from various allosteric ("multisteric") sites. We analysed the role of plasma membrane microdomains of lipid rafts on isolated trigeminal (TRG) neurons and TRPV1-expressing CHO cell line by measuring agonist-induced Ca2+ transients with ratiometric technique. Stimulation-evoked calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) release from sensory nerve endings of the isolated rat trachea by radioimmunoassay was also measured. Lipid rafts were disrupted by cleaving sphingomyelin (SM) with sphingomyelinase (SMase), cholesterol depletion with methyl β-cyclodextrin (MCD) and ganglioside breakdown with myriocin. It has been revealed that intracellular Ca2+ increase responses evoked by the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin, the TRPA1 agonsits allyl isothiocyanate (AITC) and formaldehyde as well as the TRPM8 activator icilin were inhibited after SMase, MCD and myriocin incubation but the response to the TRPM3 agonist pregnenolon sulphate was not altered. Extracellular SMase treatment did not influence the thapsigargin-evoked Ca2+-release from intracellular stores. Besides the cell bodies, SMase also inhibited capsaicin- or AITC-evoked CGRP release from peripheral sensory nerve terminals, this provides the first evidence for the importance of lipid raft integrity in TRPV1 and TRPA1 gating on capsaicin-sensitive nerve terminals. SM metabolites, ceramide and sphingosine, did not influence TRPA1 and TRPV1 activation on TRG neurons, TRPV1-expressing CHO cell line, and nerve terminals. We suggest, that the hydrophobic

  19. Sphingomyelin SM(d18:1/18:0) is significantly enhanced in cerebrospinal fluid samples dichotomized by pathological amyloid-β42, tau, and phospho-tau-181 levels.

    PubMed

    Koal, Therese; Klavins, Kristaps; Seppi, Daniele; Kemmler, Georg; Humpel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a severe and chronic neurodegenerative disorder of the brain. The laboratory diagnosis is limited to the analysis of three biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF): amyloid-β42 (Aβ42), total tau, and phospho-tau-181 (P-tau-181). However, there is a need to find more biomarkers in CSF that can improve the sensitivity and specificity. The aim of the present study was to analyze endogenous small metabolites (metabolome) in the CSF, which may provide potentially new insights into biochemical processes involved in AD. One hundred CSF samples were dichotomized by normal (n = 50) and pathological decreased Aβ42 and increased tau and P-tau-181 levels (n = 50; correlating to an AD-like pathology). These CSF samples were analyzed using the AbsoluteIDQ® p180 Kit (BIOCRATES Life Sciences), which included 40 acylcarnitines, 21 amino acids, 19 biogenic amines, 15 sphingolipids, and 90 glycerophospholipids. Our data show that two sphingomyelins (SM (d18:1/18:0) and SM (d18:1/18:1)), 5 glycerophospholipids (PC aa C32:0, PC aa C34:1, PC aa C36:1, PC aa C38:4 and PC aa C38:6), and 1 acylcarnitine (C3-DC-M/C5-OH) were significantly altered in the CSF with pathological "AD-like pathology". Sphingomyelin SM (d18:1/18:0) proved to be a specific (76%) and sensitive (66%) biomarker with a defined cut-off of 546 nM. Correct diagnoses for 21 out of 32 unknown samples could be achieved using this SM (d18:1/18:0) cut-off value. In conclusion, the sphingolipid SM (d18:1/18:0) is significantly increased in CSF of patients displaying pathological levels of Aβ42, tau, and P-tau-181.

  20. The dietary effect of milk sphingomyelin on the lipid metabolism of obese/diabetic KK-A(y) mice and wild-type C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Ippei; Uemura, Mariko; Hosokawa, Masashi; Iwashima-Suzuki, Ai; Shiota, Makoto; Miyashita, Kazuo

    2016-09-14

    Purified milk sphingomyelin (SM) was obtained from lipid concentrated butter serum (LC-BS) by successive separations involving solvent fractionation, selective saponification, and silicic acid column chromatography. The SM obtained was given to obese/diabetic KK-A(y) mice and wild-type C57BL/6J mice. SM supplementation significantly increased fecal lipids paralleled with a decrease in non-HDL cholesterol levels in the serum and neutral lipids and in cholesterol levels in the livers of KK-A(y) mice. The reduction of liver lipid levels also resulted in a decrease in the total fatty acid content of the KK-A(y) mice livers, while n-3 fatty acids derived from the conversion of α-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) increased due to SM supplementation. In contrast to the KK-A(y) mice, little change in the serum and liver lipids was observed in wild-type C57BL/6J mice. The present study suggests that SM may be effective only in subjects with metabolic disorders. PMID:27501823

  1. Host sphingomyelin increases West Nile virus infection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Martín-Acebes, Miguel A; Gabandé-Rodríguez, Enrique; García-Cabrero, Ana M; Sánchez, Marina P; Ledesma, María Dolores; Sobrino, Francisco; Saiz, Juan-Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Flaviviruses, such as the dengue virus and the West Nile virus (WNV), are arthropod-borne viruses that represent a global health problem. The flavivirus lifecycle is intimately connected to cellular lipids. Among the lipids co-opted by flaviviruses, we have focused on SM, an important component of cellular membranes particularly enriched in the nervous system. After infection with the neurotropic WNV, mice deficient in acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), which accumulate high levels of SM in their tissues, displayed exacerbated infection. In addition, WNV multiplication was enhanced in cells from human patients with Niemann-Pick type A, a disease caused by a deficiency of ASM activity resulting in SM accumulation. Furthermore, the addition of SM to cultured cells also increased WNV infection, whereas treatment with pharmacological inhibitors of SM synthesis reduced WNV infection. Confocal microscopy analyses confirmed the association of SM with viral replication sites within infected cells. Our results unveil that SM metabolism regulates flavivirus infection in vivo and propose SM as a suitable target for antiviral design against WNV.

  2. Sphingomyelin metabolism is involved in the differentiation of MDCK cells induced by environmental hypertonicity

    PubMed Central

    Favale, Nicolás Octavio; Santacreu, Bruno Jaime; Pescio, Lucila Gisele; Marquez, Maria Gabriela; Sterin-Speziale, Norma Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids (SLs) are relevant lipid components of eukaryotic cells. Besides regulating various cellular processes, SLs provide the structural framework for plasma membrane organization. Particularly, SM is associated with detergent-resistant microdomains. We have previously shown that the adherens junction (AJ) complex, the relevant cell-cell adhesion structure involved in cell differentiation and tissue organization, is located in an SM-rich membrane lipid domain. We have also demonstrated that under hypertonic conditions, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells acquire a differentiated phenotype with changes in SL metabolism. For these reasons, we decided to evaluate whether SM metabolism is involved in the acquisition of the differentiated phenotype of MDCK cells. We found that SM synthesis mediated by SM synthase 1 is involved in hypertonicity-induced formation of mature AJs, necessary for correct epithelial cell differentiation. Inhibition of SM synthesis impaired the acquisition of mature AJs, evoking a disintegration-like process reflected by the dissipation of E-cadherin and β- and α-catenins from the AJ complex. As a consequence, MDCK cells did not develop the hypertonicity-induced differentiated epithelial cell phenotype. PMID:25670801

  3. Free-cholesterol-mediated autophagy of ORMDL1 stimulates sphingomyelin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhui; Robinet, Peggy; Smith, Jonathan D; Gulshan, Kailash

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol confers unique biophysical properties to the plasma membrane bilayer that are essential for maintaining optimal membrane fluidity, which in turn regulate multiple physiological functions required to promote cellular integrity and viability. Conversely, excessive cholesterol causes pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis that can lead to heart attacks. Human atheroma macrophages carry a large burden of free cholesterol (FC) in addition to cholesterol esters. It is recognized that sterols can modulate the levels of other lipids to attain lipid homeostasis; thus, excess FC may play a role in modulating compensatory sphingolipid pathways. Recent studies have shown that excess lipids can cause ER stress and apoptosis. In contrast, autophagy may play a protective role by clearing excess lipids from macrophage foam cell lipid droplets. Interestingly, a macrophage study using a TLR4-specifc agonist showed that de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis is essential for autophagy induction, suggesting links between sphingolipid biosynthesis and autophagy. While the role of autophagy in removing excess lipids has been the focus of many studies, its role in fine-tuning cellular lipid homeostasis remains largely unexplored. PMID:26042659

  4. In-depth sphingomyelin characterization using electron impact excitation of ions from organics and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Baba, Takashi; Campbell, J Larry; Le Blanc, J C Yves; Baker, Paul R S

    2016-05-01

    Electron impact excitation of ions from organics (EIEIO), also referred to as electron-induced dissociation, was applied to singly charged SM molecular species in the gas phase. Using ESI and a quadrupole TOF mass spectrometer equipped with an electron-ion reaction device, we found that SMs fragmented sufficiently to identify their lipid class, acyl group structure, and the location of double bond(s). Using this technique, nearly 200 SM molecular species were found in four natural lipid extracts: bovine milk, porcine brain, chicken egg yolk, and bovine heart. In addition to the most common backbone, d18:1, sphingosines with a range of carbon chain lengths, sphingadienes, and some sphinganine backbones were also detected. Modifications in natural SMs were also identified, including addition of iodine/methanol across a carbon-carbon double bond. This unparalleled new approach to SM analysis using EIEIO-MS shows promise as a unique and powerful tool for structural characterization.

  5. Free-cholesterol-mediated autophagy of ORMDL1 stimulates sphingomyelin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuhui; Robinet, Peggy; Smith, Jonathan D; Gulshan, Kailash

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol confers unique biophysical properties to the plasma membrane bilayer that are essential for maintaining optimal membrane fluidity, which in turn regulate multiple physiological functions required to promote cellular integrity and viability. Conversely, excessive cholesterol causes pathological conditions such as atherosclerosis that can lead to heart attacks. Human atheroma macrophages carry a large burden of free cholesterol (FC) in addition to cholesterol esters. It is recognized that sterols can modulate the levels of other lipids to attain lipid homeostasis; thus, excess FC may play a role in modulating compensatory sphingolipid pathways. Recent studies have shown that excess lipids can cause ER stress and apoptosis. In contrast, autophagy may play a protective role by clearing excess lipids from macrophage foam cell lipid droplets. Interestingly, a macrophage study using a TLR4-specifc agonist showed that de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis is essential for autophagy induction, suggesting links between sphingolipid biosynthesis and autophagy. While the role of autophagy in removing excess lipids has been the focus of many studies, its role in fine-tuning cellular lipid homeostasis remains largely unexplored. PMID:26042659

  6. Lorenzo's oil inhibits ELOVL1 and lowers the level of sphingomyelin with a saturated very long-chain fatty acid.

    PubMed

    Sassa, Takayuki; Wakashima, Takeshi; Ohno, Yusuke; Kihara, Akio

    2014-03-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a peroxisomal disorder caused by impaired degradation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) due to mutations in the ABCD1 gene responsible for VLCFA transport into peroxisomes. Lorenzo's oil, a 4:1 mixture of glyceryl trioleate and glyceryl trierucate, has been used to reduce the saturated VLCFA level in the plasma of X-ALD patients; however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains elusive. We report the biochemical characterization of Lorenzo's oil activity toward elongation of very long-chain fatty acid (ELOVL) 1, the primary enzyme responsible for the synthesis of saturated and monounsaturated VLCFAs. Oleic and erucic acids inhibited ELOVL1, and, moreover, their 4:1 mixture (the FA composition of Lorenzo's oil) exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity. The kinetics analysis revealed that this was a mixed (not a competitive) inhibition. At the cellular level, treatment with the 4:1 mixture reduced the level of SM with a saturated VLCFA accompanied by an increased level of SM with a monounsaturated VLCFA, probably due to the incorporation of erucic acid into the FA elongation cycle. These results suggest that inhibition of ELOVL1 may be an underlying mechanism by which Lorenzo's oil exerts its action.

  7. Lorenzo's oil inhibits ELOVL1 and lowers the level of sphingomyelin with a saturated very long-chain fatty acid[S

    PubMed Central

    Sassa, Takayuki; Wakashima, Takeshi; Ohno, Yusuke; Kihara, Akio

    2014-01-01

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) is a peroxisomal disorder caused by impaired degradation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) due to mutations in the ABCD1 gene responsible for VLCFA transport into peroxisomes. Lorenzo's oil, a 4:1 mixture of glyceryl trioleate and glyceryl trierucate, has been used to reduce the saturated VLCFA level in the plasma of X-ALD patients; however, the mechanism by which this occurs remains elusive. We report the biochemical characterization of Lorenzo's oil activity toward elongation of very long-chain fatty acid (ELOVL) 1, the primary enzyme responsible for the synthesis of saturated and monounsaturated VLCFAs. Oleic and erucic acids inhibited ELOVL1, and, moreover, their 4:1 mixture (the FA composition of Lorenzo's oil) exhibited the most potent inhibitory activity. The kinetics analysis revealed that this was a mixed (not a competitive) inhibition. At the cellular level, treatment with the 4:1 mixture reduced the level of SM with a saturated VLCFA accompanied by an increased level of SM with a monounsaturated VLCFA, probably due to the incorporation of erucic acid into the FA elongation cycle. These results suggest that inhibition of ELOVL1 may be an underlying mechanism by which Lorenzo's oil exerts its action. PMID:24489110

  8. Liquid Chromatography with Dual Parallel Mass Spectrometry and 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy for Analysis of Sphingomyelin and Dihydrosphingomyelin. II. Bovine Milk Sphingolipids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS), in parallel, was used for simultaneous detection of bovine milk sphingolipids (BMS). APCI-MS mass spectra exhibited mostly ceramide-like fragment ions, [Cer-H2O...

  9. Two-photon Laurdan studies of the ternary lipid mixture DOPC:SM:cholesterol reveal a single liquid phase at sphingomyelin:cholesterol ratios lower than 1.

    PubMed

    Carravilla, Pablo; Nieva, José L; Goñi, Félix M; Requejo-Isidro, Jose; Huarte, Nerea

    2015-03-10

    The ternary lipid mixture DOPC:eggSM:cholesterol in excess water has been studied in the form of giant unilamellar vesicles using two-photon fluorescence microscopy. Previous publications based on single-photon fluorescence microscopy had reported heterogeneous phase behavior (phase coexistence) in the region of the triangular phase diagram corresponding to SM:cholesterol molar ratios <1. We have examined this region by two-photon microscopy of Laurdan-labeled mixtures and have found that, under our conditions, only a single liquid phase exists. We have shown that macroscopic phase separation in the above region can be artifactually induced by one-photon excitation of the fluorescent probes and ensuing photooxidation and is prevented using two-photon excitation. The main effect of increasing the concentration of cholesterol in mixtures containing 30 mol % SM was to increase the rigidity of the disordered domains. Increasing the concentration of SM in mixtures containing 20 mol % cholesterol gradually augmented the rigidity of the ordered domains, while the disordered domains reached minimal order at a SM:cholesterol 2.25:1 molar ratio, which then increased again. Moreover, the detailed measurement of Laurdan generalized polarization across the whole phase diagram allowed the representation, for both the single- and two-phase regions, of the gradual variation of membrane lateral packing along the diagram, which we found to be governed largely by SM:cholesterol interactions.

  10. A Thin Layer Chromatography Laboratory Experiment of Medical Importance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharma, Loretta; Desai, Ankur; Sharma, Ajit

    2006-01-01

    A thin layer chromatography experiment of medical importance is described. The experiment involves extraction of lipids from simulated amniotic fluid samples followed by separation, detection, and scanning of the lecithin and sphingomyelin bands on TLC plates. The lecithin-to-sphingomyelin ratio is calculated. The clinical significance of this…

  11. STUDIES OF THE HEMOLYSIS OF RED BLOOD CELLS BY MUMPS VIRUS

    PubMed Central

    Soule, David W.; Marinetti, Guido V.; Morgan, Herbert R.

    1959-01-01

    Hemolysis of chicken red blood cells by mumps virus is associated with the release of sphingomyelin from the stromal lipoprotein and the destruction of 65 per cent of the sphingomyelin of the red cell stroma. However, the virus had no effect on isolated phosphatides extracted from the erythrocytes. The hemolytic action of the virus and changes in sphingomyelin content of the erythrocytes fail to occur at a pH of 6.0. The viral hemolysis of human erythrocytes is not associated with similar alterations in their content of sphingomyelin. The absence of lecithin from sheep erythrocytes, which are also lysed by mumps virus, is additional evidence that a viral lecithinase is not associated with the hemolytic property of mumps virus. Mumps virus concentrated from the amniotic fluid of viral infected chick embryos contains about 7 per cent phosphatide, 60 per cent of which is sphingomyelin. PMID:13664871

  12. Role for the Src Family Kinase Fyn in Sphingolipid Acquisition by Chlamydiae ▿

    PubMed Central

    Mital, Jeffrey; Hackstadt, Ted

    2011-01-01

    The bacterial obligate intracellular pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis replicates within a membrane-bound vacuole termed the inclusion. From within this protective environment, chlamydiae usurp numerous functions of the host cell to promote chlamydial survival and replication. Here we utilized a small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based screening protocol designed to identify host proteins involved in the trafficking of sphingomyelin to the chlamydial inclusion. Twenty-six host proteins whose deficiency significantly decreased sphingomyelin trafficking to the inclusion and 16 proteins whose deficiency significantly increased sphingomyelin trafficking to the inclusion were identified. The reduced sphingomyelin trafficking caused by downregulation of the Src family tyrosine kinase Fyn was confirmed in more-detailed analyses. Fyn silencing did not alter sphingomyelin synthesis or trafficking in the absence of chlamydial infection but reduced the amount of sphingomyelin trafficked to the inclusion in infected cells, as determined by two independent quantitative assays. Additionally, inhibition of Src family kinases resulted in increased cellular retention of sphingomyelin and significantly decreased incorporation into elementary bodies of both C. trachomatis and Chlamydophila caviae. PMID:21896774

  13. Phospholipids of liver cell nuclei during hibernation of Yakutian ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Lakhina, A A; Markevich, L N; Zakharova, N M; Afanasyev, V N; Kolomiytseva, I K; Fesenko, E E

    2016-07-01

    In hibernating Yakutian ground squirrels S. undulatus, the content of total phospholipids in the nuclei of liver increased by 40% compared to that in animals in summer. In torpid state, the amount of sphingomyelin increased almost 8 times; phosphatidylserine, 7 times; and cardiolipin, 4 times. In active "winter" ground squirrels, the amount of sphingomyelin, phosphatidylserine, and cardiolipin decreased compared to the hibernating individuals but remained high compared to the "summer" ones. The torpor state did not affect the amount of lysophosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol.

  14. Ionizing radiation acts on cellular membranes to generate ceramide and initiate apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Recent investigations provided evidence that the sphingomyelin signal transduction pathway mediates apoptosis for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in several hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells. In this pathway, TNF-receptor interaction initiates sphingomyelin hydrolysis to ceramide by a sphingomyelinase. Ceramide acts as a second messenger stimulating a ceramide-activated serine/threonine protein kinase. The present studies show that ionizing radiation, like TNF, induces rapid sphingomyelin hydrolysis to ceramide and apoptosis in bovine aortic endothelial cells. Elevation of ceramide with exogenous ceramide analogues was sufficient for induction of apoptosis. Protein kinase C activation blocked both radiation-induced sphingomyelin hydrolysis and apoptosis, and apoptosis was restored by ceramide analogues added exogenously. Ionizing radiation acted directly on membrane preparations devoid of nuclei, stimulating sphingomyelin hydrolysis enzymatically through a neutral sphingomyelinase. These studies provide the first conclusive evidence that apoptotic signaling can be generated by interaction of ionizing radiation with cellular membranes and suggest an alternative to the hypothesis that direct DNA damage mediates radiation-induced cell kill. PMID:8046331

  15. Administration of pyrene lipids by receptor-mediated endocytosis and their degradation in skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Agmon, V.; Dinur, T.; Cherbu, S.; Dagan, A.; Gatt, S. )

    1991-10-01

    Sphingomyelin and seven glycosphingolipids were labeled with the fluorescent probe pyrene and administered into cultured fibroblasts by receptor-mediated endocytosis. For this purpose pyrene sphingomyelin or mixtures of pyrene glycolipid and unlabeled sphingomyelin were dispersed as small, unilamellar liposomes. Apolipoprotein E was then added and the receptor for this ligand on the cell surface was utilized for uptake of the liposomes and their transport to the lysosomes, where the respective pyrene lipids were degraded. Following incubation with each of the respective pyrene lipids, only the administered compound and the pyrene ceramide were present; intermediate hydrolysis products were not detected. This indicated that, in skin fibroblasts, the lysosomal ceramidase was limiting and controlled the rate of total degradation of the pyrene sphingolipids.

  16. Sphingolipid symmetry governs membrane lipid raft structure.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Lipid domain formation in membranes underlies the concept of rafts but their structure is controversial because the key role of cholesterol has been challenged. The configuration of glycosphingolipid receptors for agonists, bacterial toxins and enveloped viruses in plasma membrane rafts appears to be an important factor governing ligand binding and infectivity but the details are as yet unresolved. I have used X-ray diffraction methods to examine how cholesterol affects the distribution of glycosphingolipid in aqueous dispersions of an equimolar mixture of cholesterol and egg-sphingomyelin containing different proportions of glucosylceramide from human extracts. Three coexisting liquid-ordered bilayer structures are observed at 37°C in mixtures containing up to 20mol% glycosphingolipid. All the cholesterol was sequestered in one bilayer with the minimum amount of sphingomyelin (33mol%) to prevent formation of cholesterol crystals. The other two bilayers consisted of sphingomyelin and glucosylceramide. Asymmetric molecular species of glucosylceramide with N-acyl chains longer than 20 carbons form an equimolar complex with sphingomyelin in which the glycosidic residues are arranged in hexagonal array. Symmetric molecular species mix with sphingomyelin in proportions less than equimolar to form quasicrystalline bilayers. When the glycosphingolipid exceeds equimolar proportions with sphingomyelin cholesterol is incorporated into the structure and formation of a gel phase of glucosylceramide is prevented. The demonstration of particular structural features of ceramide molecular species combined with the diversity of sugar residues of glycosphingolipid classes paves the way for a rational approach to understanding the functional specificity of lipid rafts and how they are coupled across cell membranes.

  17. Effect of the nature of phospholipids on the degree of their interaction with isobornylphenol antioxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marakulina, K. M.; Kramor, R. V.; Lukanina, Yu. K.; Plashchina, I. G.; Polyakov, A. V.; Fedorova, I. V.; Chukicheva, I. Yu.; Kutchin, A. V.; Shishkina, L. N.

    2016-02-01

    The parameters of complexation between natural phospholipids (lecithin, sphingomyelin, and cephalin) with antioxidants of a new class, isobornylphenols (IBPs), were determined by UV and IR spectroscopy. The self-organization of phospholipids (PLs) was studied depending on the structure of IBPs by dynamic light scattering. The nature of phospholipids and the structure of IBPs was found to produce a substantial effect both on the degree of complexation and on the size of PL aggregates in a nonpolar solvent. Based on the obtained data it was concluded that the structure of biological membranes mainly depends on the complexation of IBP with sphingomyelin.

  18. Phospholipids of liver cell nuclei during hibernation of Yakutian ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Lakhina, A A; Markevich, L N; Zakharova, N M; Afanasyev, V N; Kolomiytseva, I K; Fesenko, E E

    2016-07-01

    In hibernating Yakutian ground squirrels S. undulatus, the content of total phospholipids in the nuclei of liver increased by 40% compared to that in animals in summer. In torpid state, the amount of sphingomyelin increased almost 8 times; phosphatidylserine, 7 times; and cardiolipin, 4 times. In active "winter" ground squirrels, the amount of sphingomyelin, phosphatidylserine, and cardiolipin decreased compared to the hibernating individuals but remained high compared to the "summer" ones. The torpor state did not affect the amount of lysophosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol. PMID:27599501

  19. Diversity and Complexity of Ceramide Generation After Exposure of Jurkat Leukemia Cells to Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ardail, Dominique Maalouf, Mira; Boivin, Anthony; Chapet, Olivier; Bodennec, Jacques; Rousson, Robert; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, Claire

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To define which intracellular pools of sphingomyelin and ceramide are involved in the triggering of apoptosis of Jurkat leukemia cells in response to {gamma}-ray exposure. Methods and Materials: We examined the kinetics of ceramide generation at the whole-cell level and in different subcellular compartments (plasma membrane rafts, mitochondria, and endoplasmic reticulum) after irradiation with photons. Ceramide was measured by high-performance liquid chromatography or after pulse labeling experiments, and the presence of sphingomyelinase within mitochondria was assessed by electron microscopy. Results: Irradiation of Jurkat leukemia cells resulted in the sequential triggering of sphingomyelin hydrolysis, followed by de novo synthesis that led to a late ceramide response (from 24 h) correlated with the triggering of apoptosis. At the subcellular level, pulse-label experiments, using [{sup 3}H]-palmitate as a precursor, strengthened the involvement of the radiation-induced sphingomyelin breakdown and revealed a very early peak (15 min) of ceramide in plasma membrane rafts. A second peak in mitochondria was measured 4 h after irradiation, resulting from an increase of the sphingomyelin content relating to the targeting of acid sphingomyelinase toward this organelle. Conclusion: These data confirm that ceramide is a major determinant in the triggering of radiation-induced apoptosis and highlight the complexity of the sequential compartment-specific ceramide-mediated response of Jurkat leukemia cells to {gamma}-rays.

  20. Genetics Home Reference: Niemann-Pick disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... is responsible for the conversion of a fat (lipid) called sphingomyelin into another type of lipid called ceramide. Mutations in SMPD1 lead to a ... these genes are involved in the movement of lipids within cells. Mutations in these genes lead to ...

  1. Sphingomyelinase D Activity in Model Membranes: Structural Effects of in situ Generation of Ceramide-1-Phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Stock, Roberto P.; Brewer, Jonathan; Wagner, Kerstin; Ramos-Cerrillo, Blanca; Duelund, Lars; Jernshøj, Kit Drescher; Olsen, Lars Folke; Bagatolli, Luis A.

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of Loxosceles spider venom has been attributed to a rare enzyme, sphingomyelinase D, which transforms sphingomyelin to ceramide-1-phosphate. The bases of its inflammatory and dermonecrotic activity, however, remain unclear. In this work the effects of ceramide-1-phosphate on model membranes were studied both by in situ generation of this lipid using a recombinant sphingomyelinase D from the spider Loxosceles laeta and by pre-mixing it with sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The systems of choice were large unilamellar vesicles for bulk studies (enzyme kinetics, fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering) and giant unilamellar vesicles for fluorescence microscopy examination using a variety of fluorescent probes. The influence of membrane lateral structure on the kinetics of enzyme activity and the consequences of enzyme activity on the structure of target membranes containing sphingomyelin were examined. The findings indicate that: 1) ceramide-1-phosphate (particularly lauroyl ceramide-1-phosphate) can be incorporated into sphingomyelin bilayers in a concentration-dependent manner and generates coexistence of liquid disordered/solid ordered domains, 2) the activity of sphingomyelinase D is clearly influenced by the supramolecular organization of its substrate in membranes and, 3) in situ ceramide-1-phosphate generation by enzymatic activity profoundly alters the lateral structure and morphology of the target membranes. PMID:22558302

  2. Peripheral sphingolipids are associated with variation in white matter microstructure in older adults.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Christopher E; Venkatraman, Vijay K; An, Yang; Landman, Bennett A; Davatzikos, Christos; Ratnam Bandaru, Veera Venkata; Haughey, Norman J; Ferrucci, Luigi; Mielke, Michelle M; Resnick, Susan M

    2016-07-01

    Sphingolipids serve important structural and functional roles in cellular membranes and myelin sheaths. Plasma sphingolipids have been shown to predict cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease. However, the association between plasma sphingolipid levels and brain white matter (WM) microstructure has not been examined. We investigated whether plasma sphingolipids (ceramides and sphingomyelins) were associated with magnetic resonance imaging-based diffusion measures, fractional anisotropy (FA), and mean diffusivity, 10.5 years later in 17 WM regions of 150 cognitively normal adults (mean age 67.2). Elevated ceramide species (C20:0, C22:0, C22:1, and C24:1) were associated with lower FA in multiple WM regions, including total cerebral WM, anterior corona radiata, and the cingulum of the cingulate gyrus. Higher sphingomyelins (C18:1 and C20:1) were associated with lower FA in regions such as the anterior corona radiata and body of the corpus callosum. Furthermore, lower sphingomyelin to ceramide ratios (C22:0, C24:0, and C24:1) were associated with lower FA or higher mean diffusivity in regions including the superior and posterior corona radiata. However, although these associations were significant at the a priori p < 0.05, only associations with some regional diffusion measures for ceramide C22:0 and sphingomyelin C18:1 survived correction for multiple comparisons. These findings suggest plasma sphingolipids are associated with variation in WM microstructure in cognitively normal aging.

  3. Integration of Cytokine Biology and Lipid Metabolism in Stroke**

    PubMed Central

    Adibhatla, Rao Muralikrishna; Dempsey, R.; Hatcher, J. F.

    2007-01-01

    Cytokines regulate the innate and adaptive immune responses and are pleiotropic, redundant and multifunctional. Expression of most cytokines, including TNF-α and IL-1α/ß, is very low in normal brain. Metabolism of lipids is of particular interest due to their high concentration in the brain. Inflammatory response after stroke suggests that cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1 α/ß, IL-6), affect the phospholipid metabolism and subsequent production of eicosanoids, ceramide, and ROS that may potentiate brain injury. Phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin are source for lipid messengers. Sphingomyelin synthase serves as a bridge between metabolism of glycerolipids and sphingolipids. TNF-α and IL-1 α/ß can induce phospholipases (A2, C, and D) and sphingomyelinases, and concomitantly proteolyse phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin synthesizing enzymes. Together, these alterations contribute to loss of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin after stroke that can be attenuated by inhibiting TNF-α or IL-1 α/ß signaling. Inflammatory responses are instrumental in the formation and destabilization of atherosclerotic plaques. Secretory PLA2 IIA is found in human atherosclerotic lesions and is implicated in initiation, progression and maturation of atherosclerosis, a risk factor for stroke. Lipoprotein-PLA2, part of apolipoprotein B-100 of LDL, plays a role in vascular inflammation and coronary endothelial dysfunction. Cytokine antagonism attenuated secretory PLA2 IIA actions, suggesting cytokine-lipid integration studies will lead to new concepts contributing to bench-to-bedside transition for stroke therapy. PMID:17981627

  4. Phospholipases in arterial tissue

    PubMed Central

    Eisenberg, S.; Stein, Y.; Stein, O.

    1969-01-01

    The role of phospholipases in the regulation of the changing phospholipid composition of normal human aortae with age was studied. Portions of grossly and histologically lesion-free ascending aortae from 16 females and 29 males obtained at autopsy, were analyzed for deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), phospholipid, and cholesterol content and phospholipid composition. Enzymic activity toward four substrates, lecithin (LE), phosphatidyl ethanolamine, lysolecithin, and sphingomyelin (SP), was determined on portions of the same homogenate. By regression analysis for correlation between all determinations and age the following results were obtained: (a) total phospholipids and choleserol increased linearly with age; (b) the increase in sphingomyelin accounted for about 70% of the phospholipid increment; (c) hydrolysis of lecithin and phosphatidyl ethanolamine increased markedly with age, that of lysolecithin only moderately; (d) hydrolysis of sphingomyelin decreased with age; and (e) an inverse relation between the SP/LE ratio and age and sphingomyelinase/lecithinase activity and age was obtained. These results were interpreted to indicate that a causal relation exists between the fall in sphingomyelinase activity, both absolute and relative to lecithinase activity, and the accumulation of sphingomyelin with age. PMID:5355343

  5. Influence of lipids on the interfacial disposition of respiratory syncytical virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Helen K; Carlisle, Jennifer L; Beeby, Andrew; Money, Victoria A; Watson, Scott M D; Yeo, R Paul; Sanderson, John M

    2011-01-01

    The propensity of a matrix protein from an enveloped virus of the Mononegavirales family to associate with lipids representative of the viral envelope has been determined using label-free methods, including tensiometry and Brewster angle microscopy on lipid films at the air-water interface and atomic force microscopy on monolayers transferred to OTS-treated silicon wafers. This has enabled factors that influence the disposition of the protein with respect to the lipid interface to be characterized. In the absence of sphingomyelin, respiratory syncytial virus matrix protein penetrates monolayers composed of mixtures of phosphocholines with phosphoethanolamines or cholesterol at the air-water interface. In ternary mixtures composed of sphingomyelin, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and cholesterol, the protein exhibits two separate behaviors: (1) peripheral association with the surface of sphingomyelin-rich domains and (2) penetration of sphingomyelin-poor domains. Prolonged incubation of the protein with mixtures of phosphocholines and phosphoethanolamines leads to the formation of helical protein assemblies of uniform diameter that demonstrate an inherent propensity of the protein to assemble into a filamentous form. PMID:21141948

  6. Long-chain bases in the sphingolipids of atherosclerotic human aorta.

    PubMed

    Panganamala, R V; Geer, J C; Cornwell, D G

    1969-07-01

    Long-chain bases were prepared from human aorta sphingomyelin by a combined enzymatic hydrolysis-alkaline hydrolysis procedure and these bases were isolated by thin-layer chromatography. Aldehydes, obtained from the long-chain bases by periodate oxidation, were converted to 1,3-dioxolane derivatives. Dioxolanes were identified and quantified by gas-liquid chromatography before and after catalytic hydrogenation, and before and after separation into saturated, monoene, and diene dioxolane fractions. The monoene dioxolanes were converted to aldehydes by reductive ozonolysis with dimethyl sulfide and these aldehydes were isolated and identified as dioxolane derivatives. The double bond positions in the major diene component were established by reductive ozonolysis and permanganate-periodate oxidation. Sphingenines in the cerebroside-sulfatide and sulfatide fractions of aorta were converted to aldehydes by the reductive ozonolysis of intact sphingolipids and these aldehydes were analyzed as the dioxolanes. Human aorta sphingomyelin contained significant amounts of 4-hexadecasphingenine, 4-heptadecasphingenine, sphinganine, 4-sphingenine, and 4,x14-sphingadienine. Small amounts of hexadecasphinganine, 4-tetradecasphingenine, a sphingadienine isomer, an unknown sphinganine, and two unknown diene long-chain bases were also found in sphingomyelin. The presence of a branched-chain 4-sphingenine was tentatively established and the possible presence of a sphingenine isomer was suggested. The major sphingenines were the same in the sphingomyelin, sulfatide, and cerebroside-sulfatide fractions of human aorta.

  7. Phospholipid profile in tracheal aspirates of very preterm neonates: effect of prenatal betamethasone administration.

    PubMed

    Landmann, Eva; Weller, Eberhard; Stoll-Becker, Simone; Gortner, Ludwig

    2004-07-15

    We compared the phospholipid profile in tracheal aspirates from surfactant-treated preterm neonates with and without prenatal betamethasone administration. We found higher phosphatidylglycerol concentrations and lower phosphatidylinositol and sphingomyelin concentrations in corticosteroid-treated preterms ( P < 0.01). We speculate that prenatal corticosteroids enhance biochemical surfactant phospholipid maturation.

  8. Unprecedented staining of polar lipids by a luminescent rhenium complex revealed by FTIR microspectroscopy in adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Bader, C A; Carter, E A; Safitri, A; Simpson, P V; Wright, P; Stagni, S; Massi, M; Lay, P A; Brooks, D A; Plush, S E

    2016-06-21

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy and confocal imaging have been used to demonstrate that the neutral rhenium(i) tricarbonyl 1,10-phenanthroline complex bound to 4-cyanophenyltetrazolate as the ancillary ligand is able to localise in regions with high concentrations of polar lipids such as phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), sphingomyelin, sphingosphine and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in mammalian adipocytes. PMID:27170554

  9. Localization of cholesterol in sphingomyelinase-treated fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Pörn, M I; Slotte, J P

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of cellular unesterified cholesterol was studied in fibroblasts, which had been depleted of plasma membrane sphingomyelin by exposure to exogenous sphingomyelinase. This treatment has previously been shown to induce an increase in cholesterol esterification, a decrease in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, and a decreased susceptibility of cell cholesterol to oxidation with cholesterol oxidase. When the cellular localization of cholesterol was studied with fluorescent filipin staining, sphingomyelin depletion did not cause any visible changes in the filipin-cholesterol staining pattern, suggesting that the major part of cellular cholesterol was retained in the plasma membrane after sphingomyelinase treatment. After the oxidation of cell-surface cholesterol with cholesterol oxidase, the plasma membrane was no longer stained by filipin, but the plasma membrane cholesterol of sphingomyelin-depleted cells appeared to be resistant to oxidation with cholesterol oxidase when sphingomyelinase was used as an oxidation-promoting agent. However, the use of hypotonic buffer or phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C together with cholesterol oxidase resulted in a complete oxidation of the cell-surface cholesterol in sphingomyelin-depleted cells, as evidenced by the filipin-cholesterol staining pattern. Similar results were obtained when [3H]cholesterol-labelled fibroblasts were used for determination of the susceptibility to cholesterol oxidation. The kinetics of [3H]cholesterol oxidation in sphingomyelin-depleted cells with cholesterol oxidase in hypotonic buffer indicated that approximately 85% of the cellular cholesterol still resided in the plasma membrane after sphingomyelin depletion. These results are contradictory to earlier reports on sphingomyelinase-induced changes in cellular cholesterol distribution and suggest that minor changes in the kinetics of cholesterol transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum may be responsible

  10. Localization of cholesterol in sphingomyelinase-treated fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pörn, M I; Slotte, J P

    1995-05-15

    The distribution of cellular unesterified cholesterol was studied in fibroblasts, which had been depleted of plasma membrane sphingomyelin by exposure to exogenous sphingomyelinase. This treatment has previously been shown to induce an increase in cholesterol esterification, a decrease in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, and a decreased susceptibility of cell cholesterol to oxidation with cholesterol oxidase. When the cellular localization of cholesterol was studied with fluorescent filipin staining, sphingomyelin depletion did not cause any visible changes in the filipin-cholesterol staining pattern, suggesting that the major part of cellular cholesterol was retained in the plasma membrane after sphingomyelinase treatment. After the oxidation of cell-surface cholesterol with cholesterol oxidase, the plasma membrane was no longer stained by filipin, but the plasma membrane cholesterol of sphingomyelin-depleted cells appeared to be resistant to oxidation with cholesterol oxidase when sphingomyelinase was used as an oxidation-promoting agent. However, the use of hypotonic buffer or phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C together with cholesterol oxidase resulted in a complete oxidation of the cell-surface cholesterol in sphingomyelin-depleted cells, as evidenced by the filipin-cholesterol staining pattern. Similar results were obtained when [3H]cholesterol-labelled fibroblasts were used for determination of the susceptibility to cholesterol oxidation. The kinetics of [3H]cholesterol oxidation in sphingomyelin-depleted cells with cholesterol oxidase in hypotonic buffer indicated that approximately 85% of the cellular cholesterol still resided in the plasma membrane after sphingomyelin depletion. These results are contradictory to earlier reports on sphingomyelinase-induced changes in cellular cholesterol distribution and suggest that minor changes in the kinetics of cholesterol transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum may be responsible

  11. Crassaostrea gigas oyster shell extract inhibits lipogenesis via suppression of serine palmitoyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nguyen Khoi Song; Kwon, Jeong Eun; Kang, Se Chan; Shim, Soon-Mi; Park, Tae-Sik

    2015-02-01

    Oysters are widely consumed seafood, but their shells impose a serious environmental problem. To extend the utilization of oyster shell waste, we investigated the biological role of oyster shell extract. In this study, we verified that the ethanol extract of oyster shell (EOS) contains taurine and betaine, the major components of oyster body. EOS downregulated transcription of Sptlc1 and Sptlc2 mRNA, the subunits of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT). Suppression of SPT subunits reduced sphinganine and sphingomyelin by inhibiting de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis. Inhibition of sphingomyelin biosynthesis resulted in downregulation of lipogenic gene expression such as ACC, FAS, SCD1, and DGAT2. Consistent with inhibition of lipogenesis, cellular triglyceride levels were diminished by EOS, but cholesterol levels were not altered. Taken together, these results suggest that EOS has a lipid-lowering effect and could be applied as either a therapeutic or preventive measure for metabolic dysfunction.

  12. Composition and microstructure of colostrum and mature bovine milk fat globule membrane.

    PubMed

    Zou, Xiaoqiang; Guo, Zheng; Jin, Qingzhe; Huang, Jianhua; Cheong, Lingzhi; Xu, Xuebing; Wang, Xingguo

    2015-10-15

    The microstructures of colostrum and mature bovine milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) were investigated using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) at different temperatures, and the relationships between microstructure variations and the chemical compositions of the MFGM were also examined. Using a fluorophore-labeled phospholipid probe, we found that non-fluorescent domains on the MFGM were positively correlated with the amount of sphingomyelin at both room (20 °C) and physiological (37 °C) temperatures. However, at the storage temperature (4 °C), there were more non-fluorescent domains on the MFGM. These results indicate that the heterogeneities in the MFGM are most likely to be the result of the lateral segregation of sphingomyelin at the room and physiological temperatures, and at the storage temperature, phospholipids with saturated fatty acids affect the formation of these domains. PMID:25952880

  13. Sphingolipids in High Fat Diet and Obesity-Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Songhwa; Snider, Ashley J.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient oversupply associated with a high fat diet (HFD) significantly alters cellular metabolism, and specifically including sphingolipid metabolism. Sphingolipids are emerging as bioactive lipids that play key roles in regulating functions, in addition to their traditional roles as membrane structure. HFD enhances de novo sphingolipid synthesis and turnover of sphingolipids via the salvage pathway, resulting in the generation of ceramide, and more specifically long chain ceramide species. Additionally, HFD elevates sphingomyelin and sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) levels in several tissues including liver, skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and cardiovascular tissues. HFD-stimulated sphingolipid generation contributes to systemic insulin resistance, dysregulated lipid accumulation, and cytokine expression and secretion from skeletal muscle and adipose tissues, exacerbating obesity-related conditions. Furthermore, altered sphingolipid levels, particularly ceramide and sphingomyelin, are involved in obesity-induced endothelial dysfunction and atherosclerosis. In this review, HFD-mediated sphingolipid metabolism and its impact on HFD-induced biology and pathobiology will be discussed. PMID:26648664

  14. Crassaostrea gigas oyster shell extract inhibits lipogenesis via suppression of serine palmitoyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Tran, Nguyen Khoi Song; Kwon, Jeong Eun; Kang, Se Chan; Shim, Soon-Mi; Park, Tae-Sik

    2015-02-01

    Oysters are widely consumed seafood, but their shells impose a serious environmental problem. To extend the utilization of oyster shell waste, we investigated the biological role of oyster shell extract. In this study, we verified that the ethanol extract of oyster shell (EOS) contains taurine and betaine, the major components of oyster body. EOS downregulated transcription of Sptlc1 and Sptlc2 mRNA, the subunits of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT). Suppression of SPT subunits reduced sphinganine and sphingomyelin by inhibiting de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis. Inhibition of sphingomyelin biosynthesis resulted in downregulation of lipogenic gene expression such as ACC, FAS, SCD1, and DGAT2. Consistent with inhibition of lipogenesis, cellular triglyceride levels were diminished by EOS, but cholesterol levels were not altered. Taken together, these results suggest that EOS has a lipid-lowering effect and could be applied as either a therapeutic or preventive measure for metabolic dysfunction. PMID:25920281

  15. Lipids from nerve tissues of the horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus.

    PubMed

    Lee, R F; Gonsoulin, F

    1979-01-01

    1. The predominant lipids of nerve cords, ganglion and brain from horseshoe crabs were cholesterol (11% of lipid) and phospholipid (81% of lipid). 2. Major phospholipids were phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl choline with lesser amounts of phosphatidyl serine and phosphatidyl inositol and sphingomyelin. 3. The phospholipid fraction was characterized by a high content of plasmalogen, i.e. alk-1-enyl acyl phosphatides, so that 42% of the ethanolamine phosphatides were the plasmalogen, phosphatidal ethanolamine. 4. Phosphatidyl choline and phosphatidyl ethanolamine were high in polyunsaturation with 20:4 and 20:5 major fatty acids. Sphingomyelin had predominantly long chain saturated fatty acids. 5. Cerebrosides and gangliosides, which are associated with vertebrate nerve tissues, were absent from nerves of horseshoe crabs.

  16. Acid and neutral sphingomyelinases: roles and mechanisms of regulation.

    PubMed

    Marchesini, Norma; Hannun, Yusuf A

    2004-02-01

    Ceramide, an emerging bioactive lipid and second messenger, is mainly generated by hydrolysis of sphingomyelin through the action of sphingomyelinases. At least two sphingomyelinases, neutral and acid sphingomyelinases, are activated in response to many extracellular stimuli. Despite extensive studies, the precise cellular function of each of these sphingomyelinases in sphingomyelin turnover and in the regulation of ceramide-mediated responses is not well understood. Therefore, it is essential to elucidate the factors and mechanisms that control the activation of acid and neutral sphingomyelinases to understand their the roles in cell regulation. This review will focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate these enzymes in vivo and in vitro, especially the roles of oxidants (glutathione, peroxide, nitric oxide), proteins (saposin, caveolin 1, caspases), and lipids (diacylglycerol, arachidonic acid, and ceramide).

  17. Changes in lipid metabolism and cell morphology following attack by phospholipase C (Clostridium perfringens) on red cells or lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Allan, D; Low, M G; Finean, J B; Michell, R H

    1975-12-01

    When intact human erythrocytes were treated with phospholipase C (Clostridium perfringens), up to 30% of the membrane phospholipids were broken down without significant cell lysis. Only phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin were attacked. Ceramide (derived from sphingomyelin) accumulated, but 1,2-diacylglycerol (derived from phosphatidylcholine) was largely converted into phosphatidate. Up to 12% of the cell phospholipid could be converted into phosphatidate in this way. Pig erythrocytes and lymphocytes showed a similar but smaller synthesis of phosphatidate after phospholipase C attack. Phospholipase C also caused a marked morphological change in erythrocytes, giving rise to spherical cells containing internal membrane vesicles. This change appeared to be due to ceramide and de and diacylglycerol accumulation rather than to increased phosphatidate content of the cells.

  18. Niemann-Pick Disease Type B in a 21 Year Old Male.

    PubMed

    Haque, M A; Miah, M Z

    2016-04-01

    Niemann-pick disease is a group of autosomal recessive disorder of lipid storage with progressive accumulation of sphingomyelin and other lipids in the lysosomes of various tissues. We are reporting a 21 year old male who had hepatosplenomegaly, cherry red macula and normal cognitive function. Bone marrow biopsy showed plenty of foam cells and sphingomyelinase level was low, thus conforming our diagnosis. Survival into adulthood and absence of gross neurological involvement suggests Niemann-Pick disease type B. PMID:27277377

  19. Prion Protein Accumulation in Lipid Rafts of Mouse Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Federica; Dotti, Carlos G.; Pérez-Cañamás, Azucena; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC) is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrPC. In old mice, this change favors PrPC accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrPC translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), we looked at PrPC compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) knockout (KO) mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrPC in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases. PMID:24040215

  20. Fecal Microbiota, Fecal Metabolome, and Colorectal Cancer Interrelations

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Rashmi; Ahn, Jiyoung; Sampson, Joshua N.; Shi, Jianxin; Yu, Guoqin; Xiong, Xiaoqin; Hayes, Richard B.; Goedert, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Investigation of microbe-metabolite relationships in the gut is needed to understand and potentially reduce colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. Methods Microbiota and metabolomics profiling were performed on lyophilized feces from 42 CRC cases and 89 matched controls. Multivariable logistic regression was used to identify statistically independent associations with CRC. First principal coordinate-component pair (PCo1-PC1) and false discovery rate (0.05)-corrected P-values were calculated for 116,000 Pearson correlations between 530 metabolites and 220 microbes in a sex*case/control meta-analysis. Results Overall microbe-metabolite PCo1-PC1 was more strongly correlated in cases than in controls (Rho 0.606 vs 0.201, P = 0.01). CRC was independently associated with lower levels of Clostridia, Lachnospiraceae, p-aminobenzoate and conjugated linoleate, and with higher levels of Fusobacterium, Porphyromonas, p-hydroxy-benzaldehyde, and palmitoyl-sphingomyelin. Through postulated effects on cell shedding (palmitoyl-sphingomyelin), inflammation (conjugated linoleate), and innate immunity (p-aminobenzoate), metabolites mediated the CRC association with Fusobacterium and Porphyromonas by 29% and 34%, respectively. Overall, palmitoyl-sphingomyelin correlated directly with abundances of Enterobacteriaceae (Gammaproteobacteria), three Actinobacteria and five Firmicutes. Only Parabacteroides correlated inversely with palmitoyl-sphingomyelin. Other lipids correlated inversely with Alcaligenaceae (Betaproteobacteria). Six Bonferroni-significant correlations were found, including low indolepropionate and threnoylvaline with Actinobacteria and high erythronate and an uncharacterized metabolite with Enterobacteriaceae. Conclusions Feces from CRC cases had very strong microbe-metabolite correlations that were predominated by Enterobacteriaceae and Actinobacteria. Metabolites mediated a direct CRC association with Fusobacterium and Porphyromonas, but not an inverse

  1. Spider, bacterial and fungal phospholipase D toxins make cyclic phosphate products.

    PubMed

    Lajoie, Daniel M; Cordes, Matthew H J

    2015-12-15

    Phospholipase D (PLD) toxins from sicariid spiders, which cause disease in mammals, were recently found to convert their primary substrates, sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine, to cyclic phospholipids. Here we show that two PLD toxins from pathogenic actinobacteria and ascomycete fungi, which share distant homology with the spider toxins, also generate cyclic phospholipids. This shared function supports divergent evolution of the PLD toxins from a common ancestor and suggests the importance of cyclic phospholipids in pathogenicity.

  2. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on ejection of cell nucleus from pigeon erythrocytes and state of membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Devyatkin, A A; Revin, V V; Yudanov, M A; Kozlova, O V; Samuilov, V D

    2006-02-01

    The nuclei are ejected from the pigeon erythrocytes and apoptotic vesicles form in these cells in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide intensifies LPO processes and changes phospholipid content. The relative content of phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and phosphatidylserine decreased, while that of phosphatidylethanolamine and lisophosphatidylcholine increased. The content of unsaturated fatty acids also decreased under these conditions. Presumably, these changes in the lipid phase of the erythrocyte membrane are a mechanism preparing the cell to nucleus ejection and apoptosis.

  3. Ceramide is involved in alcohol-induced neural proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhixin; Deng, Tongxing; Deng, Jiexin; Deng, Jinbo; Gao, Xiaoqun; Shi, Yuanyuan; Liu, Bin; Ma, Zhanyou; Jin, Haixiao

    2013-01-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure, especially during early pregnancy, can lead to fetal alcohol syndrome. The pharmacological and toxicological mechanisms of ethanol are related to the effects of ceramide. In this study, we established an alcohol exposure model in wild-type mice and in knockout mice for the key enzyme involved in ceramide metabolism, sphingomyelin synthase 2. This model received daily intragastric administration of 25% ethanol, and pups were used at postnatal days 0, 7, 14, 30 for experiments. Serology and immunofluorescence staining found that ethanol exposure dose-dependently reduced blood sphingomyelin levels in two genotypes of pups, and increased neural cell proliferation and the number of new neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Western blot analysis showed that the relative expression level of protein kinase C α increased in two notypes of pups after ethanol exposure. Compared with wild-type pups, the expression level of the important activator protein of the ceramide/ceramide-1-phosphate pathway, protein kinase C α, was reduced in the hippocampus of sphingomyelin synthase 2 knockouts. Our findings illustrate that ceramide is involved in alcohol-induced neural proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of pups after prenatal ethanol exposure, and the mechanism may be associated with increased pression of protein kinase C α activating the ceramide/ceramide-1-phosphate pathway. PMID:25206527

  4. Lipidome of atherosclerotic plaques from hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bojic, Lazar A; McLaren, David G; Shah, Vinit; Previs, Stephen F; Johns, Douglas G; Castro-Perez, Jose M

    2014-12-15

    The cellular, macromolecular and neutral lipid composition of the atherosclerotic plaque has been extensively characterized. However, a comprehensive lipidomic analysis of the major lipid classes within atherosclerotic lesions has not been reported. The objective of this study was to produce a detailed framework of the lipids that comprise the atherosclerotic lesion of a widely used pre-clinical model of plaque progression. Male New Zealand White rabbits were administered regular chow supplemented with 0.5% cholesterol (HC) for 12 weeks to induce hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Our lipidomic analyses of plaques isolated from rabbits fed the HC diet, using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and high-resolution mass spectrometry, detected most of the major lipid classes including: Cholesteryl esters, triacylglycerols, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, diacylglycerols, fatty acids, phosphatidylserines, lysophosphatidylcholines, ceramides, phosphatidylglycerols, phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylethanolamines. Given that cholesteryl esters, triacylglycerols and phosphatidylcholines comprise greater than 75% of total plasma lipids, we directed particular attention towards the qualitative and quantitative assessment of the fatty acid composition of these lipids. We additionally found that sphingomyelins were relatively abundant lipid class within lesions, and compared the abundance of sphingomyelins to their precursor phosphatidylcholines. The studies presented here are the first approach to a comprehensive characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque lipidome.

  5. Low serum sphingolipids in children with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez-Henríquez, Marcela P.; Solari, Sandra; Quiroga, Teresa; Kim, Benjamin I.; Deckelbaum, Richard J.; Worgall, Tilla S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most prevalent neuropsychiatric condition in childhood. ADHD is a multifactorial trait with a strong genetic component. One neurodevelopmental hypothesis is that ADHD is associated with a lag in brain maturation. Sphingolipids are essential for brain development and neuronal functioning, but their role in ADHD pathogenesis is unexplored. We hypothesized that serum sphingolipid levels distinguish ADHD patients from unaffected subjects. Methods: We characterized serum sphingolipid profiles of ADHD patients and two control groups: non-affected relatives and non-affected subjects without a family history of ADHD. Sphingolipids were measured by LC-MS/MS in 77 participants (28 ADHD patients, 28 related controls, and 21 unrelated controls). ADHD diagnosis was based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM IV-TR). Diagnostic criteria were assessed by two independent observers. Groups were compared by parametrical statistics. Results: Serum sphingomyelins C16:0, C18:0, C18:1, C24:1, ceramide C24:0, and deoxy-ceramide C24:1 were significantly decreased in ADHD patients at 20–30% relative reductions. In our sample, decreased serum sphingomyelin levels distinguished ADHD patients with 79% sensitivity and 78% specificity. Conclusions: Our results showed lower levels of all major serum sphingomyelins in ADHD. These findings may reflect brain maturation and affect neuro-functional pathways characteristic for ADHD. PMID:26379487

  6. Lipidome of Atherosclerotic Plaques from Hypercholesterolemic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Bojic, Lazar A.; McLaren, David G.; Shah, Vinit; Previs, Stephen F.; Johns, Douglas G.; Castro-Perez, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    The cellular, macromolecular and neutral lipid composition of the atherosclerotic plaque has been extensively characterized. However, a comprehensive lipidomic analysis of the major lipid classes within atherosclerotic lesions has not been reported. The objective of this study was to produce a detailed framework of the lipids that comprise the atherosclerotic lesion of a widely used pre-clinical model of plaque progression. Male New Zealand White rabbits were administered regular chow supplemented with 0.5% cholesterol (HC) for 12 weeks to induce hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis. Our lipidomic analyses of plaques isolated from rabbits fed the HC diet, using ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) and high-resolution mass spectrometry, detected most of the major lipid classes including: Cholesteryl esters, triacylglycerols, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, diacylglycerols, fatty acids, phosphatidylserines, lysophosphatidylcholines, ceramides, phosphatidylglycerols, phosphatidylinositols and phosphatidylethanolamines. Given that cholesteryl esters, triacylglycerols and phosphatidylcholines comprise greater than 75% of total plasma lipids, we directed particular attention towards the qualitative and quantitative assessment of the fatty acid composition of these lipids. We additionally found that sphingomyelins were relatively abundant lipid class within lesions, and compared the abundance of sphingomyelins to their precursor phosphatidylcholines. The studies presented here are the first approach to a comprehensive characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque lipidome. PMID:25517033

  7. Rapid quantitative analysis of sphingolipids in seafood using HPLC with evaporative light-scattering detection: its application in tissue distribution of sphingolipids in fish.

    PubMed

    Duan, Jingjing; Sugawara, Tatsuya; Hirata, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Sphingolipids are ubiquitous in all eukaryotic organisms and known to be essential constituents of cellular membranes. Recently, various physiological functions of dietary sphingolipids, such as preventing cancer, improving skin barrier and contributing to central nervous system myelination have been demonstrated. To characterize the sphingolipids from fish as food components, tissue distribution of sphingomyelin and glycosylceramide (ceramide monohexoside, CMH) in fish were determined in this study. We established a rapid, accurate and effective method for separation, purification and determination of sphingolipids by using high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light-scattering detector (ELSD-HPLC). Sphingolipids were extracted and quantified from pacific saury (Cololabis saira). Sphingomyelin in different tissues of Cololabis saira ranged from 2.5 +/- 0.2 mg/g to 27.6 +/- 2.1 mg/g, the content in brain was the highest, followed by eyes, and CMH contents were less than 23.0 +/- 2.4 mg/g in all tissues. These results revealed that fish contained CMH and sphingomyelin as same levels as most of the terrestrial organisms and suggested marine organisms could be used as a potential source of precious and useful complex lipids. PMID:20720382

  8. Novel evidence for the specific interaction between cholesterol and α-haemolysin of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Vazquez, Romina F; Maté, Sabina M; Bakás, Laura S; Fernández, Marisa M; Malchiodi, Emilio L; Herlax, Vanesa S

    2014-03-15

    Several toxins that act on animal cells present different, but specific, interactions with cholesterol or sphingomyelin. In the present study we demonstrate that HlyA (α-haemolysin) of Escherichia coli interacts directly with cholesterol. We have recently reported that HlyA became associated with detergent-resistant membranes enriched in cholesterol and sphingomyelin; moreover, toxin oligomerization, and hence haemolytic activity, diminishes in cholesterol-depleted erythrocytes. Considering these results, we studied the insertion process, an essential step in the lytic mechanism, by the monolayer technique, finding that HlyA insertion is favoured in cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-containing membranes. On the basis of this result, we studied the direct interaction with either of the lipids by lipid dot blotting, lysis inhibition and SPR (surface plasmon resonance) assays. The results of the present study demonstrated that an interaction between cholesterol and HlyA exists that seems to favour a conformational state of the protein that allows its correct insertion into the membrane and its further oligomerization to form pores. PMID:24351077

  9. Non-enzymatic triggering of the ceramide signalling cascade by solar UVA radiation.

    PubMed

    Grether-Beck, S; Bonizzi, G; Schmitt-Brenden, H; Felsner, I; Timmer, A; Sies, H; Johnson, J P; Piette, J; Krutmann, J

    2000-11-01

    Ceramide is a key component of intracellular stress responses. Evidence is provided for a novel mechanism of ceramide formation that mediates solar ultraviolet (UV) A radiation-induced expression of the intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1. Similarly to UVA radiation, ceramide stimulation of human keratinocytes induced ICAM-1 mRNA expression and activated the ICAM-1 promoter through transcription factor AP-2. Ceramide-activated AP-2 and ceramide-induced ICAM-1 reporter gene activation were abrogated through deletion of the AP-2 binding site. UVA radiation increased the level of ceramide in keratinocytes and inhibition of sphingomyelin synthesis prevented UVA radiation-induced ICAM-1 expression. Hitherto, two pathways have been identified for ceramide accumulation: hydrolysis from sphingomyelin through neutral and acid sphingomyelinases, and de novo synthesis by ceramide synthase. UVA radiation did not activate any of these enzymes. Ceramide generation in UVA-irradiated cells, however, was inhibited by singlet oxygen quenchers and mimicked in unirradiated cells by a singlet oxygen-generating system. In addition, UVA radiation and singlet oxygen both generated ceramide in protein-free, sphingomyelin-containing liposomes. This study indicates that singlet oxygen triggers a third, non-enzymatic mechanism of ceramide formation.

  10. Degradation of plasma membrane phosphatidylcholine appears not to affect the cellular cholesterol distribution.

    PubMed

    Pörn, M I; Ares, M P; Slotte, J P

    1993-08-01

    To clarify the role of possible cholesterol/phosphatidylcholine interactions in cellular cholesterol distribution, we have used a phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus to degrade the cell surface phosphatidylcholine of cultured human fibroblasts. Of cellular phosphatidylcholine, approximately 15% was susceptible to degradation by the phospholipase. In spite of the dramatic redistribution of cellular cholesterol that can be observed after sphingomyelin depletion, the degradation of cell surface phosphatidylcholine did not affect the distribution of cholesterol in fibroblasts. In cholesterol-depleted cells as well as in cholesterol-loaded cells, the size of the cell surface cholesterol pool (susceptible to cholesterol oxidase) remained unchanged after phosphatidylcholine degradation. The rate of cholesterol esterification with [3H]oleic acid and the rate of [3H]cholesterol efflux from fibroblasts to high density lipoproteins also remained unchanged after degradation of plasma membrane phosphatidylcholine. An increase in the level of [3H]cholesterol efflux to high density lipoproteins was observed after degradation of plasma membrane sphingomyelin with exogenous sphingomyelinase, in-contrast to earlier reports, where no such effect was observed. The results suggest that interactions between cholesterol and phosphatidylcholine in the fibroblast plasma membranes are less important than cholesterol/sphingomyelin interactions for the asymmetric distribution of cellular cholesterol.

  11. Lipids and glycosphingolipids in caveolae and surrounding plasma membrane of primary rat adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ortegren, Unn; Karlsson, Margareta; Blazic, Natascha; Blomqvist, Maria; Nystrom, Fredrik H; Gustavsson, Johanna; Fredman, Pam; Strålfors, Peter

    2004-05-01

    We have made a comprehensive and quantitative analysis of the lipid composition of caveolae from primary rat fat cells and compared the composition of plasma membrane inside and outside caveolae. We isolated caveolae from purified plasma membranes using ultrasonication in carbonate buffer to disrupt the membrane, or extraction with nonionic detergent, followed by density gradient ultracentrifugation. The carbonate-isolated caveolae fraction was further immunopurified using caveolin antibodies. Carbonate-isolated caveolae were enriched in cholesterol and sphingomyelin, and the concentration was three- and twofold higher, respectively, in caveolae compared to the surrounding plasma membrane. The concentration of glycerophospholipids was similar suggesting that glycerophospholipids constitute a constant core throughout the plasma membrane. The composition of detergent-insoluble fractions of the plasma membrane was very variable between preparations, but strongly enriched in sphingomyelin and depleted of glycerophospholipids compared to carbonate-isolated caveolae; indicating that detergent extraction is not a suitable technique for caveolae preparation. An average adipocyte caveola contained about 22 x 10(3) molecules of cholesterol, 7.5 x 10(3) of sphingomyelin and 23 x 10(3) of glycerophospholipid. The glycosphingolipid GD3 was highly enriched in caveolae, whereas GM3, GM1 and GD1a were present inside as well as outside the caveolae membrane. GD1b, GT1b, GM2, GQ1b, sulfatide and lactosylceramide sulfate were not detected in caveolae.

  12. Role of Inositol Phosphosphingolipid Phospholipase C1, the Yeast Homolog of Neutral Sphingomyelinases in DNA Damage Response and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Kaushlendra

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids play a very crucial role in many diseases and are well-known as signaling mediators in many pathways. Sphingolipids are produced during the de novo process in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) from the nonsphingolipid precursor and comprise both structural and bioactive lipids. Ceramide is the central core of the sphingolipid pathway, and its production has been observed following various treatments that can induce several different cellular effects including growth arrest, DNA damage, apoptosis, differentiation, and senescence. Ceramides are generally produced through the sphingomyelin hydrolysis and catalyzed by the enzyme sphingomyelinase (SMase) in mammals. Presently, there are many known SMases and they are categorized into three groups acid SMases (aSMases), alkaline SMases (alk-SMASES), and neutral SMases (nSMases). The yeast homolog of mammalians neutral SMases is inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C. Yeasts generally have inositol phosphosphingolipids instead of sphingomyelin, which may act as a homolog of mammalian sphingomyelin. In this review, we shall explain the structure and function of inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C1, its localization inside the cells, mechanisms, and its roles in various cell responses during replication stresses and diseases. This review will also give a new basis for our understanding for the mechanisms and nature of the inositol phosphosphingolipid phospholipase C1/nSMase. PMID:26346287

  13. Expression of ceramide-metabolising enzymes in subcutaneous and intra-abdominal human adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inflammation and increased ceramide concentrations characterise adipose tissue of obese women with high liver fat content compared to equally obese women with normal liver fat content. The present study characterises enzymes involved in ceramide metabolism in subcutaneous and intra-abdominal adipose tissue. Methods Pathways leading to increased ceramide concentrations in inflamed versus non-inflamed adipose tissue were investigated by quantifying expression levels of key enzymes involved in ceramide metabolism. Sphingomyelinases (sphingomyelin phosphodiesterases SMPD1-3) were investigated further using immunohistochemistry to establish their location within adipose tissue, and their mRNA expression levels were determined in subcutaneous and intra-abdominal adipose tissue from both non-obese and obese subject. Results Gene expression levels of sphingomyelinases, enzymes that hydrolyse sphingomyelin to ceramide, rather than enzymes involved in de novo ceramide synthesis, were higher in inflamed compared to non-inflamed adipose tissue of obese women (with high and normal liver fat contents respectively). Sphingomyelinases were localised to both macrophages and adipocytes, but also to blood vessels and to extracellular regions surrounding vessels within adipose tissue. Expression levels of SMPD3 mRNA correlated significantly with concentrations of different ceramides and sphingomyelins. In both non-obese and obese subjects SMPD3 mRNA levels were higher in the more inflamed intra-abdominal compared to the subcutaneous adipose tissue depot. Conclusions Generation of ceramides within adipose tissue as a result of sphingomyelinase action may contribute to inflammation in human adipose tissue. PMID:22974251

  14. Nonclinical safety assessment of recombinant human acid sphingomyelinase (rhASM) for the treatment of acid sphingomyelinase deficiency:the utility of animal models of disease in the toxicological evaluation of potential therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Murray, James M; Thompson, Anne Marie; Vitsky, Allison; Hawes, Michael; Chuang, Wei-Lien; Pacheco, Joshua; Wilson, Stephen; McPherson, John M; Thurberg, Beth L; Karey, Kenneth P; Andrews, Laura

    2015-02-01

    Recombinant human acid sphingomyelinase (rhASM) is being developed as an enzyme replacement therapy for patients with acid sphingomyelinase deficiency (Niemann-Pick disease types A and B), which causes sphingomyelin to accumulate in lysosomes. In the acid sphingomyelinase knock-out (ASMKO) mouse, intravenously administered rhASM reduced tissue sphingomyelin levels in a dose-dependent manner. When rhASM was administered to normal rats, mice, and dogs, no toxicity was observed up to a dose of 30mg/kg. However, high doses of rhASM≥10mg/kg administered to ASMKO mice resulted in unexpected toxicity characterized by cardiovascular shock, hepatic inflammation, adrenal hemorrhage, elevations in ceramide and cytokines (especially IL-6, G-CSF, and keratinocyte chemoattractant [KC]), and death. The toxicity could be completely prevented by the administration of several low doses (3mg/kg) of rhASM prior to single or repeated high doses (≥20mg/kg). These results suggest that the observed toxicity involves the rapid breakdown of large amounts of sphingomyelin into ceramide and/or other toxic downstream metabolites, which are known signaling molecules with cardiovascular and pro-inflammatory effects. Our results suggest that the nonclinical safety assessment of novel therapeutics should include the use of specific animal models of disease whenever feasible.

  15. H2O2 acts on cellular membranes to generate ceramide signaling and initiate apoptosis in tracheobronchial epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Goldkorn, T; Balaban, N; Shannon, M; Chea, V; Matsukuma, K; Gilchrist, D; Wang, H; Chan, C

    1998-11-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an inflammatory oxidant which contributes to the pathogenesis of chronic diseases such as lung injury of the respiratory tract, atherosclerosis and cancer. The mechanisms and target sites of this reactive oxidant are mainly unknown. So far there are opposing reports as to whether reactive oxidants inhibit or promote apoptosis. We activated the death pathway in primary tracheobronchial epithelial (TBE) cells with H2O2 (20-200 microM) and observed the morphological changes, DNA laddering patterns, and DNA fragmentation associated with apoptosis. Elevation of ceramide with exogenous ceramide analogs was sufficient for apoptosis induction with the same characteristics and in the same time frame. H2O2 induced rapid sphingomyelin hydrolysis to ceramide, the elevation of which paralleled the induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, H2O2 acted directly on TBE cells membrane preparations devoid of nuclei, stimulating sphingomyelin hydrolysis through a neutral Mg2+ dependent sphingomyelinase (SMase). These data suggest that the formation of ceramide from sphingomyelin in the plasma membrane is a key event in H2O2-induced apoptosis in tracheobronchial epithelial cells.

  16. Ceramide is involved in alcohol-induced neural proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhixin; Deng, Tongxing; Deng, Jiexin; Deng, Jinbo; Gao, Xiaoqun; Shi, Yuanyuan; Liu, Bin; Ma, Zhanyou; Jin, Haixiao

    2013-08-15

    Prenatal alcohol exposure, especially during early pregnancy, can lead to fetal alcohol syndrome. The pharmacological and toxicological mechanisms of ethanol are related to the effects of ceramide. In this study, we established an alcohol exposure model in wild-type mice and in knockout mice for the key enzyme involved in ceramide metabolism, sphingomyelin synthase 2. This model received daily intragastric administration of 25% ethanol, and pups were used at postnatal days 0, 7, 14, 30 for experiments. Serology and immunofluorescence staining found that ethanol exposure dose-dependently reduced blood sphingomyelin levels in two genotypes of pups, and increased neural cell proliferation and the number of new neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. Western blot analysis showed that the relative expression level of protein kinase C α increased in two notypes of pups after ethanol exposure. Compared with wild-type pups, the expression level of the important activator protein of the ceramide/ceramide-1-phosphate pathway, protein kinase C α, was reduced in the hippocampus of sphingomyelin synthase 2 knockouts. Our findings illustrate that ceramide is involved in alcohol-induced neural proliferation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus of pups after prenatal ethanol exposure, and the mechanism may be associated with increased pression of protein kinase C α activating the ceramide/ceramide-1-phosphate pathway. PMID:25206527

  17. Alterations of the Lipid Metabolome in Dairy Cows Experiencing Excessive Lipolysis Early Postpartum

    PubMed Central

    Humer, Elke; Khol-Parisini, Annabella; Metzler-Zebeli, Barbara U.; Gruber, Leonhard; Zebeli, Qendrim

    2016-01-01

    A decrease in insulin sensitivity enhances adipose tissue lipolysis helping early lactation cows counteracting their energy deficit. However, excessive lipolysis poses serious health risks for cows, and its underlying mechanisms are not clearly understood. The present study used targeted ESI-LC-MS/MS-based metabolomics and indirect insulin sensitivity measurements to evaluate metabolic alterations in the serum of dairy cows of various parities experiencing variable lipolysis early postpartum. Thirty (12 primiparous and 18 multiparous) cows of Holstein Friesian and Simmental breeds, fed the same diet and kept under the same management conditions, were sampled at d 21 postpartum and classified as low (n = 10), medium (n = 8), and high (n = 12) lipolysis groups, based on serum concentration of nonesterified fatty acids. Overall, excessive lipolysis in the high group came along with impaired estimated insulin sensitivity and characteristic shifts in acylcarnitine, sphingomyelin, phosphatidylcholine and lysophospholipid metabolome profiles compared to the low group. From the detected phosphatidylcholines mainly those with diacyl-residues showed differences among lipolysis groups. Furthermore, more than half of the detected sphingomyelins were increased in cows experiencing high lipomobilization. Additionally, strong differences in serum acylcarnitines were noticed among lipolysis groups. The study suggests an altered serum phospholipidome in dairy cows associated with an increase in certain long-chain sphingomyelins and the progression of disturbed insulin function. In conclusion, the present study revealed 37 key metabolites as part of alterations in the synthesis or breakdown of sphingolipids and phospholipids associated with lowered estimated insulin sensitivity and excessive lipolysis in early-lactating cows. PMID:27383746

  18. Effect of beta-sitosterol, a plant sterol, on growth, protein phosphatase 2A, and phospholipase D in LNCaP cells.

    PubMed

    Awad, A B; Gan, Y; Fink, C S

    2000-01-01

    Previous work from this laboratory suggests an activation of the sphingomyelin cycle as a mechanism for growth inhibition with the incorporation of beta-sitosterol (SIT) into human prostate cancer LNCaP cells. In the present study we examined two key enzymes that have been shown to play a role in the sphingomyelin cycle. Dietary sterols (SIT and cholesterol) were compared for their effect on LNCaP cell growth, phospholipase D (PLD) activity, and protein phosphatase 2A (PP 2A) activity and expression. PP 2A has been suggested as a direct in vitro target of ceramide action on cell growth and apoptosis. Ceramide also inhibits phorbol myristate acetate-stimulated PLD. SIT (16 microM) increased PP 2A activity by 50% compared with cholesterol treatment in LNCaP prostate cells; however, SIT did not alter protein levels of PP 2A. There was an increase in PLD activity in the presence of phorbol myristate acetate in cells supplemented with 16 microM SIT compared with those supplemented with cholesterol after five days of treatment. The present study suggests that the activation of PP 2A added support to the role of the activation of the sphingomyelin cycle by SIT treatment. However, the increase in PLD activity, which was modest but significant, with SIT supplementation suggests that this pathway may be modulated by other mechanisms. This includes the incorporation of SIT into cell membranes that may alter fluidity and, thus, influence the activation of membrane-bound enzymes such as PLD.

  19. Structural Basis for Nucleotide Hydrolysis by the Acid Sphingomyelinase-like Phosphodiesterase SMPDL3A.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-03-18

    Sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase, acid-like 3A (SMPDL3A) is a member of a small family of proteins founded by the well characterized lysosomal enzyme, acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase). ASMase converts sphingomyelin into the signaling lipid, ceramide. It was recently discovered that, in contrast to ASMase, SMPDL3A is inactive against sphingomyelin and, surprisingly, can instead hydrolyze nucleoside diphosphates and triphosphates, which may play a role in purinergic signaling. As none of the ASMase-like proteins has been structurally characterized to date, the molecular basis for their substrate preferences is unknown. Here we report crystal structures of murine SMPDL3A, which represent the first structures of an ASMase-like protein. The catalytic domain consists of a central mixed β-sandwich surrounded by α-helices. Additionally, SMPDL3A possesses a unique C-terminal domain formed from a cluster of four α-helices that appears to distinguish this protein family from other phosphoesterases. We show that SMDPL3A is a di-zinc-dependent enzyme with an active site configuration that suggests a mechanism of phosphodiester hydrolysis by a metal-activated water molecule and protonation of the leaving group by a histidine residue. Co-crystal structures of SMPDL3A with AMP and α,β-methylene ADP (AMPCP) reveal that the substrate binding site accommodates nucleotides by establishing interactions with their base, sugar, and phosphate moieties, with the latter the major contributor to binding affinity. Our study provides the structural basis for SMPDL3A substrate specificity and sheds new light on the function of ASMase-like proteins. PMID:26792860

  20. Successful Within-patient Dose Escalation of Olipudase Alfa in Acid Sphingomyelinase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wasserstein, Melissa P.; Jones, Simon A.; Soran, Handrean; Diaz, George A.; Lippa, Natalie; Thurberg, Beth L.; Culm-Merdek, Kerry; Shamiyeh, Elias; Inguilizian, Haig; Cox, Gerald F.; Puga, Ana Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Background Olipudase alfa, a recombinant human acid sphingomyelinase (rhASM), is an investigational enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for patients with ASM deficiency [ASMD; Niemann-Pick Disease (NPD) A and B]. This open-label phase 1b study assessed the safety and tolerability of olipudase alfa using within-patient dose escalation to gradually debulk accumulated sphingomyelin and mitigate the rapid production of metabolites, which can be toxic. Secondary objectives were pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and exploratory efficacy. Methods Five adults with nonneuronopathic ASMD (NPD B) received escalating doses (0.1 to 3.0 mg/kg) of olipudase alfa intravenously every 2 weeks for 26 weeks. Results All patients successfully reached 3.0 mg/kg without serious or severe adverse events. One patient repeated a dose (2.0 mg/kg) and another had a temporary dose reduction (1.0 to 0.6 mg/kg). Most adverse events (97%) were mild and all resolved without sequelae. The most common adverse events were headache, arthralgia, nausea and abdominal pain. Two patients experienced single acute phase reactions. No patient developed hypersensitivity or anti-olipudase alfa antibodies. The mean circulating half-life of olipudase alfa ranged from 20.9 to 23.4 hours across doses without accumulation. Ceramide, a sphingomyelin catabolite, rose transiently in plasma after each dose, but decreased over time. Reductions in sphingomyelin storage, spleen and liver volumes, and serum chitotriosidase activity, as well as improvements in infiltrative lung disease, lipid profiles, platelet counts, and quality of life assessments, were observed. Conclusions This study provides proof-of-concept for the safety and efficacy of within-patient dose escalation of olipudase alfa in patients with nonneuronopathic ASMD. PMID:26049896

  1. Lectin histochemistry and ultrastructure of feline kidneys from six different storage diseases.

    PubMed

    Castagnaro, M; Alroy, J; Ucci, A A; Glew, R H

    1987-01-01

    We have compared the pattern of lectin staining with the ultrastructural features of kidneys from normal cats and 19 cats with 6 different lysosomal storage diseases. The diseases studied include GM1 and GM2 gangliosidosis, mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS)-I and MPS-VI, sphingomyelin-lipidosis (i.e., Niemann-Pick disease) and mannosidosis. Ten different biotinylated lectins were used as histochemical probes for carbohydrate residues and avidin-biotin-peroxidase complex as visualant. Concanavalia ensiformis agglutinin (Con A) stained mesangial cells in all storage diseases but GM1, epithelial cells in sphingomyelin-lipidosis and mannosidosis, endothelial cells in GM1 and mannosidosis and Bowman's capsule cells in all but GM2. Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin I (GS-I) stained the glomerular endothelium in all six diseases, but not in control kidneys. Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I) stained the glomerular epithelium only in GM1 and MPS-I. Succinylated wheat germ agglutinin (SWGA) stained the glomerular endothelium and epithelium in mannosidosis, and the glomerular epithelium and Bowman's capsule in MPS-I. Ultrastructure studies demonstrated an accumulation of oligosaccharides in cases of mannosidosis and GM1 gangliosidosis, a mixture of oligosaccharides and lipids in MPS-I, MPS-VI and GM2 gangliosidosis and only lipid storage in sphingomyelin lipidosis. These studies show that morphologic and histochemical changes are manifested in some kidney cell types in lysosomal storage diseases, even though the enzyme deficiency occurs in all cell types. Furthermore, we show that the nature of the undegraded stored material is complex and that other factors, such as rate of membrane turn over, membrane composition, and cell function may influence the amount and nature of the "stored" material. PMID:2892300

  2. [Physical arrangement of membrane lipids susceptible to being used in the process of cell sorting of proteins].

    PubMed

    Wolf, C; Quinn, P; Koumanov, K; Chachaty, C; Tenchov, B

    1999-01-01

    Detection of immiscible lipid domains in biological membranes offers an alternative support to protein sorting. Liquid ordered domains ("rafts") comprising cholesterol and saturated sphingolipids incorporate saturated glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored or acylated (palmitoyl- and myristoyl-) proteins or particular transmembrane protein sequences. These lipid domains can be isolated in the form of Detergent resistant membranes (DRM) from biological plasma membrane preparations. Caveolae appear to be a differentiated fraction of plasma membranes comprising such numerous cross-linked microdomains associated with caveolin in different cell types. While the biological relevance of such membrane domains is evidenced in vivo by co-patching of proteins sharing the identical affinity for sphingolipids and by the disruption of co-patching following cell cholesterol depletion, only a few physical studies confort the principle of membrane heterogeneity. Results are now presented where cholesterol addition in a tertiary lipid mixture forces outphase-separation, as a realistic model where the lipid segregation can promote protein sorting to the segregated Lo phase. A lipid mixture comprising phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin of natural origin in the ratio (1/4/3: mole/mole) has been rendered neatly heterogeneous after the addition of cholesterol (27 mole%). Xray diffraction (Small angle Xray scattering) showed the splitting of two neatly resolved lamellar diffractions in the presence of cholesterol. Above 37 degrees C the heterogeneity was traceable by a broadened diffraction spot up to the complete get-to-liquid transition of sphingomyelin at temperatures > 40 degrees C where the spot became again symmetrical and narrow. The large temperature range where the immiscible lamellar phases are detected, the specific requirement for cholesterol association with sphingomyelin, the positive influence of calcium and the reversibility of domain

  3. Acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) deficiency leads to abnormal microglia behavior and disturbed retinal function

    SciTech Connect

    Dannhausen, Katharina; Karlstetter, Marcus; Caramoy, Albert; Volz, Cornelia; Jägle, Herbert; Liebisch, Gerhard; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Langmann, Thomas

    2015-08-21

    Mutations in the acid sphingomyelinase (aSMase) coding gene sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (SMPD1) cause Niemann-Pick disease (NPD) type A and B. Sphingomyelin storage in cells of the mononuclear phagocyte system cause hepatosplenomegaly and severe neurodegeneration in the brain of NPD patients. However, the effects of aSMase deficiency on retinal structure and microglial behavior have not been addressed in detail yet. Here, we demonstrate that retinas of aSMase{sup −/−} mice did not display overt neuronal degeneration but showed significantly reduced scotopic and photopic responses in electroretinography. In vivo fundus imaging of aSMase{sup −/−} mice showed many hyperreflective spots and staining for the retinal microglia marker Iba1 revealed massive proliferation of retinal microglia that had significantly enlarged somata. Nile red staining detected prominent phospholipid inclusions in microglia and lipid analysis showed significantly increased sphingomyelin levels in retinas of aSMase{sup −/−} mice. In conclusion, the aSMase-deficient mouse is the first example in which microglial lipid inclusions are directly related to a loss of retinal function. - Highlights: • aSMase-deficient mice show impaired retinal function and reactive microgliosis. • aSMase-deficient microglia express pro-inflammatory transcripts. • aSMase-deficient microglia proliferate and have increased cell body size. • In vivo imaging shows hyperreflective spots in the fundus of aSMase-deficient mice. • aSMase-deficient microglia accumulate sphingolipid-rich intracellular deposits.

  4. [Physical arrangement of membrane lipids susceptible to being used in the process of cell sorting of proteins].

    PubMed

    Wolf, C; Quinn, P; Koumanov, K; Chachaty, C; Tenchov, B

    1999-01-01

    Detection of immiscible lipid domains in biological membranes offers an alternative support to protein sorting. Liquid ordered domains ("rafts") comprising cholesterol and saturated sphingolipids incorporate saturated glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored or acylated (palmitoyl- and myristoyl-) proteins or particular transmembrane protein sequences. These lipid domains can be isolated in the form of Detergent resistant membranes (DRM) from biological plasma membrane preparations. Caveolae appear to be a differentiated fraction of plasma membranes comprising such numerous cross-linked microdomains associated with caveolin in different cell types. While the biological relevance of such membrane domains is evidenced in vivo by co-patching of proteins sharing the identical affinity for sphingolipids and by the disruption of co-patching following cell cholesterol depletion, only a few physical studies confort the principle of membrane heterogeneity. Results are now presented where cholesterol addition in a tertiary lipid mixture forces outphase-separation, as a realistic model where the lipid segregation can promote protein sorting to the segregated Lo phase. A lipid mixture comprising phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin of natural origin in the ratio (1/4/3: mole/mole) has been rendered neatly heterogeneous after the addition of cholesterol (27 mole%). Xray diffraction (Small angle Xray scattering) showed the splitting of two neatly resolved lamellar diffractions in the presence of cholesterol. Above 37 degrees C the heterogeneity was traceable by a broadened diffraction spot up to the complete get-to-liquid transition of sphingomyelin at temperatures > 40 degrees C where the spot became again symmetrical and narrow. The large temperature range where the immiscible lamellar phases are detected, the specific requirement for cholesterol association with sphingomyelin, the positive influence of calcium and the reversibility of domain

  5. Lipid metabolism in various regions of squid giant nerve fiber.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Yamaguchi, H; Kishimoto, Y; Gould, R M

    1987-10-31

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the incorporation of radioactivity from various precursors into lipids of different regions of squid giant nerve fiber systems including axoplasm, axon sheath, giant fiber lobes which contain stellate ganglion cell bodies, and the remaining ganglion including giant synapses. To identify the labeled lipids, stellate ganglia including giant fiber lobes and the remaining tissue were first incubated separately with [14C]glucose, [32P]phosphate, [14C]serine, [14C]acetate and [3H]myristate. The radioactivity from glucose, after conversion to glycerol and fatty acids, was incorporated into most lipids, including triacylglycerol, free fatty acids, cardiolipin, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, sphingomyelin and ceramide 2-aminoethylphosphanate [corrected]. The radioactivity from serine was largely incorporated into phosphatidylserine and, to a lesser extent, into other phospholipids, mainly as the base component. The sphingoid bases of ceramide and sphingomyelin were also significantly labeled. Saturated and monounsaturated and, to a lesser extent, polyunsaturated fatty acids of these lipids were synthesized from acetate, glucose and myristate. Among the major lipids, cholesterol was not labeled by any of the radioactive compounds used. Ganglion residues incorporated the most radioactivity in total lipids from either [14C]glucose or [14C]serine, followed by giant fiber lobes and then sheath. Axoplasm incorporated the least. Among various lipids, phosphatidylethanolamine with shorter saturated fatty acids and phosphatidylglycerol contained the most radioactivity from glucose in all regions. Axoplasm was characterized by a higher proportion of glucose radioactivity in ceramide, sphingomyelin and phosphatidylglycerol. Axoplasm and sheath contained a higher proportion of serine radioactivity than did the other two regions in ceramide. Essentially no

  6. Cholesterol-dependent increases in glucosylceramide synthase activity in Niemann-Pick disease type C model cells: Abnormal trafficking of endogenously formed ceramide metabolites by inhibition of the enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Ikiru; Takahashi, Hiromasa; Ashikawa, Hitomi; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Toshihiko

    2016-11-01

    Sphingolipids such as sphingomyelin and glycosphingolipids (GSLs) derived from glucosylceramide (GlcCer), in addition to cholesterol, accumulate in cells/neurons in Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC). The activities of acid sphingomyelinase and lysosomal glucocerebrosidase (GCase), which degrade sphingomyelin and GlcCer, respectively, are down-regulated in NPC cells, however, changes in GlcCer synthase activity have not yet been elucidated. We herein demonstrated for the first time that GlcCer synthase activity for the fluorescent ceramide, 4-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazole-labeled C6-ceramide (NBD-ceramide) increased in intact NPC1((-/-)) cells and cell lysates without affecting the protein levels. In NBD-ceramide-labeled NPC1((-/-)) cells, NBD-fluorescence preferentially accumulated in the Golgi complex and vesicular specks in the cytoplasm 40 and 150 min, respectively, after labeling, while a treatment for 48 h with the GlcCer synthase inhibitors, N-butyldeoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ) and 1-phenyl-2-palmitoylamino-3-morpholino-1-propanol, accelerated the appearance of vesicular specks emitting NBD-fluorescence within 40 min. The treatment of NPC1((-/-)) cells with NB-DNJ for 48 h additionally increased the levels of cholesterol, but not those of sphingomyelin. Increases in the activity of GlcCer synthase and formation of vesicular specks emitting NBD-fluorescence in NPC1((-/-)) cells were dependent on cholesterol. LacCer taken up by endocytosis, which accumulated in the Golgi complex in normal cells, accumulated in vesicular specks after 10 and 40 min in NPC1((-/-)) cells, and this response was not accelerated by the NB-DNJ treatment, but was restored by the depletion of cholesterol. The cellular roles for enhanced GlcCer synthesis and increased levels of cholesterol in the trafficking of NBD-ceramide metabolites in NPC1((-/-)) cells have been discussed.

  7. Metabolic alterations in children with environmental enteric dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Semba, Richard D; Shardell, Michelle; Trehan, Indi; Moaddel, Ruin; Maleta, Kenneth M; Ordiz, M Isabel; Kraemer, Klaus; Khadeer, Mohammed; Ferrucci, Luigi; Manary, Mark J

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enteric dysfunction, an asymptomatic condition characterized by inflammation of the small bowel mucosa, villous atrophy, malabsorption, and increased intestinal permeability, is a major contributor to childhood stunting in low-income countries. Here we report the relationship of increased intestinal permeability with serum metabolites in 315 children without acute malnutrition, aged 12-59 months, in rural Malawi. Increased gut permeability was associated with significant differences in circulating metabolites that included lower serum phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, tryptophan, ornithine, and citrulline, and elevated serum glutamate, taurine, and serotonin. Our findings suggest that environmental enteric dysfunction is characterized by alterations in important metabolites involved in growth and differentiation and gut function and integrity. PMID:27294788

  8. Metabolic alterations in children with environmental enteric dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Semba, Richard D.; Shardell, Michelle; Trehan, Indi; Moaddel, Ruin; Maleta, Kenneth M.; Ordiz, M. Isabel; Kraemer, Klaus; Khadeer, Mohammed; Ferrucci, Luigi; Manary, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Environmental enteric dysfunction, an asymptomatic condition characterized by inflammation of the small bowel mucosa, villous atrophy, malabsorption, and increased intestinal permeability, is a major contributor to childhood stunting in low-income countries. Here we report the relationship of increased intestinal permeability with serum metabolites in 315 children without acute malnutrition, aged 12–59 months, in rural Malawi. Increased gut permeability was associated with significant differences in circulating metabolites that included lower serum phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, tryptophan, ornithine, and citrulline, and elevated serum glutamate, taurine, and serotonin. Our findings suggest that environmental enteric dysfunction is characterized by alterations in important metabolites involved in growth and differentiation and gut function and integrity. PMID:27294788

  9. [Serum phospholipids and processes of cholesterol esterification in the European North].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, E R; Bichkaeva, F A; Tkachev, A V

    2002-01-01

    Lipid profile was studied in blood serum of 146 European northerns (trans-polar Nenets Autonomous district and Archangelsk). Monolayer chromatography was used to determine sphingomyelin (SP), phosphatidyl ethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine (PC), lisophosphatidylcholine, glycerophosphatides and phosphatide acides. The northerns were found to have very low concentrations of blood PC. At the same time, the NAD population have a little higher SP which may play an adaptive role in terms of the cell membrane function. The transpolar natives appear to possess an adaptive mechanism of increasing total cholesterol and reducing cholesterol of high-density lipoproteins, and activation of cholesterol esterification resulting in decrease in the free cholesterol fraction in serum.

  10. Amniotic fluid fluorescence polarisation values for assessing fetal lung maturation.

    PubMed Central

    Legge, M; Potter, H C

    1981-01-01

    The fluorescence probe 1,6, diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene was used to determine the micro-viscosity of third trimester amniotic fluid samples utilising an Aminco Bowman spectrofluorometer fitted with a polariser prism. The results were related to the lecithin sphingomyelin (L:S) ratio. A fluorescence polarisation value of 0.360 corresponded to an L:S ratio of 2.0 in uncomplicated and diabetic pregnancies. Pregnancies complicated by Rhesus disease gave significantly different fluorescence polarisation values when compared with the uncomplicated pregnancies. PMID:7309891

  11. Tools for characterizing biomembranes : final LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect

    Alam, Todd Michael; Stevens, Mark; Holland, Gregory P.; McIntyre, Sarah K.

    2007-10-01

    A suite of experimental nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy tools were developed to investigate lipid structure and dynamics in model membrane systems. By utilizing both multinuclear and multidimensional NMR experiments a range of different intra- and inter-molecular contacts were probed within the membranes. Examples on pure single component lipid membranes and on the canonical raft forming mixture of DOPC/SM/Chol are presented. A unique gel phase pretransition in SM was also identified and characterized using these NMR techniques. In addition molecular dynamics into the hydrogen bonding network unique to sphingomyelin containing membranes were evaluated as a function of temperature, and are discussed.

  12. Involvement of oxidative stress-induced abnormalities in ceramide and cholesterol metabolism in brain aging and Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Roy G.; Kelly, Jeremiah; Storie, Kristin; Pedersen, Ward A.; Tammara, Anita; Hatanpaa, Kimmo; Troncoso, Juan C.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2004-02-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related disorder characterized by deposition of amyloid -peptide (A) and degeneration of neurons in brain regions such as the hippocampus, resulting in progressive cognitive dysfunction. The pathogenesis of AD is tightly linked to A deposition and oxidative stress, but it remains unclear as to how these factors result in neuronal dysfunction and death. We report alterations in sphingolipid and cholesterol metabolism during normal brain aging and in the brains of AD patients that result in accumulation of long-chain ceramides and cholesterol. Membrane-associated oxidative stress occurs in association with the lipid alterations, and exposure of hippocampal neurons to A induces membrane oxidative stress and the accumulation of ceramide species and cholesterol. Treatment of neurons with -tocopherol or an inhibitor of sphingomyelin synthesis prevents accumulation of ceramides and cholesterol and protects them against death induced by A. Our findings suggest a sequence of events in the pathogenesis of AD in which A induces membrane-associated oxidative stress, resulting in perturbed ceramide and cholesterol metabolism which, in turn, triggers a neurodegenerative cascade that leads to clinical disease. amyloid | apoptosis | hippocampus | lipid peroxidation | sphingomyelin

  13. Structure of Human Acid Sphingomyelinase Reveals the Role of the Saposin Domain in Activating Substrate Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zi-Jian; Huang, Jingjing; Poda, Gennady; Pomès, Régis; Privé, Gilbert G

    2016-07-31

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal phosphodiesterase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide and phosphocholine. While other lysosomal sphingolipid hydrolases require a saposin activator protein for full activity, the ASM polypeptide incorporates a built-in N-terminal saposin domain and does not require an external activator protein. Here, we report the crystal structure of human ASM and describe the organization of the three main regions of the enzyme: the N-terminal saposin domain, the proline-rich connector, and the catalytic domain. The saposin domain is tightly associated along an edge of the large, bowl-shaped catalytic domain and adopts an open form that exposes a hydrophobic concave surface approximately 30Å from the catalytic center. The calculated electrostatic potential of the enzyme is electropositive at the acidic pH of the lysosome, consistent with the strict requirement for the presence of acidic lipids in target membranes. Docking studies indicate that sphingomyelin binds with the ceramide-phosphate group positioned at the binuclear zinc center and molecular dynamic simulations indicate that the intrinsic flexibility of the saposin domain is important for monomer-dimer exchange and for membrane interactions. Overall, ASM uses a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions to cause local disruptions of target bilayers in order to bring the lipid headgroup to the catalytic center in a membrane-bound reaction. PMID:27349982

  14. Isolation and Analysis of Phospholipids in Dairy Foods.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Lígia; Gomes, Ana; Pintado, Manuela; Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The lipid fraction of milk is one of the most complex matrixes in foodstuffs due to the presence of a high number of moieties with different physical and chemical properties. Glycerolipids include glycerol and two fatty acids esterified in positions sn-1 and sn-2 with higher concentration of unsaturated fatty acids than in the triglyceride fraction of milk. Sphingolipids consist of a sphingoid base linked to a fatty acid across an amide bond. Their amphiphilic nature makes them suitable to be added into a variety of foods and recent investigations show that phospholipids, mainly phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin, can exert antimicrobial, antiviral, and anticancer activities as well as positive effects in Alzheimer's disease, stress, and memory decline. Polar lipids can be found as natural constituents in the membranes of all living organisms with soybean and eggs as the principal industrial sources, yet they have low contents in phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin. Animal products are rich sources of these compounds but since there are legal restrictions to avoid transmission of prions, milk and dairy products are gaining interest as alternative sources. This review summarizes the analysis of polar lipids in dairy products including sample preparation (extraction and fractionation/isolation) and analysis by GC or HPLC and the latest research works using ELSD, CAD, and MS detectors.

  15. Isolation and Analysis of Phospholipids in Dairy Foods

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Lígia; Gomes, Ana; Pintado, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    The lipid fraction of milk is one of the most complex matrixes in foodstuffs due to the presence of a high number of moieties with different physical and chemical properties. Glycerolipids include glycerol and two fatty acids esterified in positions sn-1 and sn-2 with higher concentration of unsaturated fatty acids than in the triglyceride fraction of milk. Sphingolipids consist of a sphingoid base linked to a fatty acid across an amide bond. Their amphiphilic nature makes them suitable to be added into a variety of foods and recent investigations show that phospholipids, mainly phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin, can exert antimicrobial, antiviral, and anticancer activities as well as positive effects in Alzheimer's disease, stress, and memory decline. Polar lipids can be found as natural constituents in the membranes of all living organisms with soybean and eggs as the principal industrial sources, yet they have low contents in phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin. Animal products are rich sources of these compounds but since there are legal restrictions to avoid transmission of prions, milk and dairy products are gaining interest as alternative sources. This review summarizes the analysis of polar lipids in dairy products including sample preparation (extraction and fractionation/isolation) and analysis by GC or HPLC and the latest research works using ELSD, CAD, and MS detectors. PMID:27610267

  16. Variable Substrate Preference among Phospholipase D Toxins from Sicariid Spiders.

    PubMed

    Lajoie, Daniel M; Roberts, Sue A; Zobel-Thropp, Pamela A; Delahaye, Jared L; Bandarian, Vahe; Binford, Greta J; Cordes, Matthew H J

    2015-04-24

    Venoms of the sicariid spiders contain phospholipase D enzyme toxins that can cause severe dermonecrosis and even death in humans. These enzymes convert sphingolipid and lysolipid substrates to cyclic phosphates by activating a hydroxyl nucleophile present in both classes of lipid. The most medically relevant substrates are thought to be sphingomyelin and/or lysophosphatidylcholine. To better understand the substrate preference of these toxins, we used (31)P NMR to compare the activity of three related but phylogenetically diverse sicariid toxins against a diverse panel of sphingolipid and lysolipid substrates. Two of the three showed significantly faster turnover of sphingolipids over lysolipids, and all three showed a strong preference for positively charged (choline and/or ethanolamine) over neutral (glycerol and serine) headgroups. Strikingly, however, the enzymes vary widely in their preference for choline, the headgroup of both sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine, versus ethanolamine. An enzyme from Sicarius terrosus showed a strong preference for ethanolamine over choline, whereas two paralogous enzymes from Loxosceles arizonica either preferred choline or showed no significant preference. Intrigued by the novel substrate preference of the Sicarius enzyme, we solved its crystal structure at 2.1 Å resolution. The evolution of variable substrate specificity may help explain the reduced dermonecrotic potential of some natural toxin variants, because mammalian sphingolipids use primarily choline as a positively charged headgroup; it may also be relevant for sicariid predatory behavior, because ethanolamine-containing sphingolipids are common in insect prey.

  17. Characteristics of the rat cardiac sphingolipid pool in two mitochondrial subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Monette, Jeffrey S; Gómez, Luis A; Moreau, Régis F; Bemer, Brett A; Taylor, Alan W; Hagen, Tory M

    2010-07-23

    Mitochondrial sphingolipids play a diverse role in normal cardiac function and diseases, yet a precise quantification of cardiac mitochondrial sphingolipids has never been performed. Therefore, rat heart interfibrillary mitochondria (IFM) and subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) were isolated, lipids extracted, and sphingolipids quantified by LC-tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed that sphingomyelin (approximately 10,000 pmol/mg protein) was the predominant sphingolipid regardless of mitochondrial subpopulation, and measurable amounts of ceramide (approximately 70 pmol/mg protein) sphingosine, and sphinganine were also found in IFM and SSM. Both mitochondrial populations contained similar quantities of sphingolipids except for ceramide which was much higher in SSM. Analysis of sphingolipid isoforms revealed ten different sphingomyelins and six ceramides that differed from 16- to 24-carbon units in their acyl side chains. Sub-fractionation experiments further showed that sphingolipids are a constituent part of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, inner membrane ceramide levels were 32% lower versus whole mitochondria (45 pmol/mg protein). Three ceramide isotypes (C20-, C22-, and C24-ceramide) accounted for the lower amounts. The concentrations of the ceramides present in the inner membranes of SSM and IFM differed greatly. Overall, mitochondrial sphingolipid content reflected levels seen in cardiac tissue, but the specific ceramide distribution distinguished IFM and SSM from each other.

  18. Characteristics of the Rat Cardiac Sphingolipid Pool in Two Mitochondrial Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Monette, Jeffrey S.; Gómez, Luis A.; Moreau, Régis F.; Bemer, Brett A.; Taylor, Alan W.; Hagen, Tory M.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial sphingolipids play a diverse role in normal cardiac function and diseases, yet a precise quantification of cardiac mitochondrial sphingolipids has never been performed. Therefore, rat heart interfibrillary (IFM) and subsarcolemmal (SSM) mitochondria were isolated, lipids extracted, and sphingolipids quantified by LC-tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed that sphingomyelin (~10,000 pmols/mg protein) was the predominant sphingolipid regardless of mitochondrial subpopulation, and measurable amounts of ceramide (~70 pmols/mg protein) sphingosine, and sphinganine were also found in IFM and SSM. Both mitochondrial populations contained similar quantities of sphingolipids except for ceramide which was much higher in SSM. Analysis of sphingolipid isoforms revealed ten different sphingomyelins and six ceramides that differed from 16 to 24 carbon units in their acyl side-chains. Sub-fractionation experiments further showed that sphingolipids are a constituent part of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, inner membrane ceramide levels were 32% lower versus whole mitochondria (45 pmols/mg protein). Three ceramide isotypes (C20-, C22-, and C24-ceramide) accounted for the lower amounts. The concentrations of the ceramides present in the inner membranes of SSM and IFM differed greatly. Overall, mitochondrial sphingolipid content reflected levels seen in cardiac tissue, but the specific ceramide distribution distinguished IFM and SSM from each other. PMID:20599536

  19. Highly Selective Anti-Cancer Activity of Cholesterol-Interacting Agents Methyl-β-Cyclodextrin and Ostreolysin A/Pleurotolysin B Protein Complex on Urothelial Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, Nataša; Repnik, Urška; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Sepčić, Kristina; Maček, Peter; Turk, Boris; Veranič, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol content can vary distinctly between normal and cancer cells, with elevated levels in cancer cells. Here, we investigated cholesterol sequestration with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD), and pore-formation with the ostreolysin A/pleurotolysin B (OlyA/PlyB) protein complex that binds to cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membrane domains. We evaluated the effects on viability of T24 invasive and RT4 noninvasive human urothelial cancer cells and normal porcine urothelial (NPU) cells. Cholesterol content strongly correlated with cancerous transformation, as highest in the T24 high-grade invasive urothelial cancer cells, and lowest in NPU cells. MCD treatment induced prominent cell death of T24 cells, whereas OlyA/PlyB treatment resulted in greatly decreased viability of the RT4 low-grade noninvasive carcinoma cells. Biochemical and transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that MCD and OlyA/PlyB induce necrotic cell death in these cancer cells, while viability of NPU cells was not significantly affected by either treatment. We conclude that MCD is more toxic for T24 high-grade invasive urothelial cancer cells, and OlyA/PlyB for RT4 low-grade noninvasive urothelial cancer cells, and neither is toxic for NPU cells. The cholesterol and cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membrane domains in urothelial cancer cells thus constitute a selective therapeutic target for elimination of urothelial cancer cells. PMID:26361392

  20. Highly Selective Anti-Cancer Activity of Cholesterol-Interacting Agents Methyl-β-Cyclodextrin and Ostreolysin A/Pleurotolysin B Protein Complex on Urothelial Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Resnik, Nataša; Repnik, Urška; Kreft, Mateja Erdani; Sepčić, Kristina; Maček, Peter; Turk, Boris; Veranič, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol content can vary distinctly between normal and cancer cells, with elevated levels in cancer cells. Here, we investigated cholesterol sequestration with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD), and pore-formation with the ostreolysin A/pleurotolysin B (OlyA/PlyB) protein complex that binds to cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membrane domains. We evaluated the effects on viability of T24 invasive and RT4 noninvasive human urothelial cancer cells and normal porcine urothelial (NPU) cells. Cholesterol content strongly correlated with cancerous transformation, as highest in the T24 high-grade invasive urothelial cancer cells, and lowest in NPU cells. MCD treatment induced prominent cell death of T24 cells, whereas OlyA/PlyB treatment resulted in greatly decreased viability of the RT4 low-grade noninvasive carcinoma cells. Biochemical and transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that MCD and OlyA/PlyB induce necrotic cell death in these cancer cells, while viability of NPU cells was not significantly affected by either treatment. We conclude that MCD is more toxic for T24 high-grade invasive urothelial cancer cells, and OlyA/PlyB for RT4 low-grade noninvasive urothelial cancer cells, and neither is toxic for NPU cells. The cholesterol and cholesterol/sphingomyelin-rich membrane domains in urothelial cancer cells thus constitute a selective therapeutic target for elimination of urothelial cancer cells. PMID:26361392

  1. Fungal MACPF-like proteins and aegerolysins: bi-component pore-forming proteins?

    PubMed

    Ota, Katja; Butala, Matej; Viero, Gabriella; Dalla Serra, Mauro; Sepčić, Kristina; Maček, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Proteins with membrane-attack complex/perforin (MACPF) domains are found in almost all kingdoms of life, and they have a variety of biological roles, including defence and attack, organism development, and cell adhesion and signalling. The distribution of these proteins in fungi appears to be restricted to some Pezizomycotina and Basidiomycota species only, in correlation with another group of proteins with unknown biological function, known as aegerolysins. These two protein groups coincide in only a few species, and they might operate in concert as cytolytic bi-component pore-forming agents. Representative proteins here include pleurotolysin B, which has a MACPF domain, and the aegerolysin-like protein pleurotolysin A, and the very similar ostreolysin A, which have been purified from oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus). These have been shown to act in concert to perforate natural and artificial lipid membranes with high cholesterol and sphingomyelin content. The aegerolysin-like proteins provide the membrane cholesterol/sphingomyelin selectivity and recruit oligomerised pleurotolysin B molecules, to create a membrane-inserted pore complex. The resulting protein structure has been imaged with electron microscopy, and it has a 13-meric rosette-like structure, with a central lumen that is ~4-5 nm in diameter. The opened transmembrane pore is non-selectively permeable for ions and smaller neutral solutes, and is a cause of cytolysis of a colloid-osmotic type. The biological significance of these proteins for the fungal life-style is discussed. PMID:24798017

  2. Endogenous lipolytic activities during autolysis of highly enriched hepatic lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Beckman, J K; Owens, K; Weglicki, W B

    1981-11-01

    High enriched (50- to 70-fold) fractions of "native" lysosomes were isolated using continuous flow electrophoresis from livers of rats which had not been pretreated with Triton WR-1339. Incubation of lysosomes for 30 min at pH 5.0 in the presence of 5 mM EDTA resulted in a dramatic loss in the content of fatty acids bound to triacylglycerols (137 down to 10 mumol/mg protein) and to phospholipids and an elevation in the level of unesterified fatty acid. Phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin concentrations decreased whereas those of lysophosphatidylethanolamine (0.8 up to 8.5% of total lipid-P) and lysophosphatidylcholine (1.9 up to 16.7%) rose in a manner parallel to their respective, fully acylated lipids. Other phospholipids, including phosphatidylinositol, did not change in concentration during incubation. These results indicate that lysosomal phospholipase A, sphingomyelin and triacylglycerol lipase are activated by incubation at acid pH, enabling them to hydrolyze endogenous lysosomal lipids. However, lysosomal phosphatidylinositol-directed phospholipase C is apparently unable to interact with phosphatidylinositol of the lysosomal membrane. PMID:7311738

  3. Lipid Profiling of In Vitro Cell Models of Adipogenic Differentiation: Relationships With Mouse Adipose Tissues.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Lucy; Prudovsky, Igor; Koza, Robert A; Anunciado-Koza, Rea V; Siviski, Matthew E; Lindner, Volkhard; Friesel, Robert E; Rosen, Clifford J; Baker, Paul R S; Simons, Brigitte; Vary, Calvin P H

    2016-09-01

    Our objective was to characterize lipid profiles in cell models of adipocyte differentiation in comparison to mouse adipose tissues in vivo. A novel lipid extraction strategy was combined with global lipid profiling using direct infusion and sequential precursor ion fragmentation, termed MS/MS(ALL) . Perirenal and inguinal white adipose tissue and interscapular brown adipose tissues from adult C57BL/6J mice were analyzed. 3T3-L1 preadipocytes, ear mesenchymal progenitor cells, and brown adipose-derived BAT-C1 cells were also characterized. Over 3000 unique lipid species were quantified. Principal component analysis showed that perirenal versus inguinal white adipose tissues varied in lipid composition of triacyl- and diacylglycerols, sphingomyelins, glycerophospholipids and, notably, cardiolipin CL 72:3. In contrast, hexosylceramides and sphingomyelins distinguished brown from white adipose. Adipocyte differentiation models showed broad differences in lipid composition among themselves, upon adipogenic differentiation, and with adipose tissues. Palmitoyl triacylglycerides predominate in 3T3-L1 differentiation models, whereas cardiolipin CL 72:1 and SM 45:4 were abundant in brown adipose-derived cell differentiation models, respectively. MS/MS(ALL) data suggest new lipid biomarkers for tissue-specific lipid contributions to adipogenesis, thus providing a foundation for using in vitro models of adipogenesis to reflect potential changes in adipose tissues in vivo. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2182-2193, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Variable Substrate Preference among Phospholipase D Toxins from Sicariid Spiders*

    PubMed Central

    Lajoie, Daniel M.; Roberts, Sue A.; Zobel-Thropp, Pamela A.; Delahaye, Jared L.; Bandarian, Vahe; Binford, Greta J.; Cordes, Matthew H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Venoms of the sicariid spiders contain phospholipase D enzyme toxins that can cause severe dermonecrosis and even death in humans. These enzymes convert sphingolipid and lysolipid substrates to cyclic phosphates by activating a hydroxyl nucleophile present in both classes of lipid. The most medically relevant substrates are thought to be sphingomyelin and/or lysophosphatidylcholine. To better understand the substrate preference of these toxins, we used 31P NMR to compare the activity of three related but phylogenetically diverse sicariid toxins against a diverse panel of sphingolipid and lysolipid substrates. Two of the three showed significantly faster turnover of sphingolipids over lysolipids, and all three showed a strong preference for positively charged (choline and/or ethanolamine) over neutral (glycerol and serine) headgroups. Strikingly, however, the enzymes vary widely in their preference for choline, the headgroup of both sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine, versus ethanolamine. An enzyme from Sicarius terrosus showed a strong preference for ethanolamine over choline, whereas two paralogous enzymes from Loxosceles arizonica either preferred choline or showed no significant preference. Intrigued by the novel substrate preference of the Sicarius enzyme, we solved its crystal structure at 2.1 Å resolution. The evolution of variable substrate specificity may help explain the reduced dermonecrotic potential of some natural toxin variants, because mammalian sphingolipids use primarily choline as a positively charged headgroup; it may also be relevant for sicariid predatory behavior, because ethanolamine-containing sphingolipids are common in insect prey. PMID:25752604

  5. Synthesis of a glioma-related ganglioside, O-Ac GM3 having 3-O-Ac ceramide and its substrate property toward hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Tsuchihashi, K; Daino, T; Akino, T; Gasa, S

    1996-10-01

    An O-acetyl group was selectively introduced into the ceramide moiety at the C-3-O on ganglioside GM3 containing N-acetyl neuraminic acid, the product of which has been previously found in rat glioma tissue as a glioma-associated ganglioside. The introduction of the acetyl residue involved a two-step process involving per O-acetylation of GM3 and saponification with a mild alkaline solution in a bilayer system constituted of water and water-immiscible organic solvent. Of the several solvents studied, 2-pentanol and diethyl ether gave the highest yields (68% and 62%, respectively). The chemical structure of the synthesized 3-O-acetyl GM3 was confirmed by proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry, as well as by comparing the mobilities on thin-layer chromatography of its exoglycosidase-digested products with those of the synthesized, authentic 3-O-acetyl-lactosylceramide and ceramide. Furthermore, the substrate specificities of both 3-O-acetyl GM3 and 3-O-acetyl sphingomyelin toward exo- and endo-hydrolases were examined, revealing that they were hardly cleaved by the endoglycoceramidase and sphingolipid N-deacylase for the 3-O-acetyl GM3 and by sphingomyelinase for 3-O-acetyl sphingomyelin. Thus, the enzymes were found to recognize a free C-3 hydroxyl group on ceramide.

  6. Structure of Human Acid Sphingomyelinase Reveals the Role of the Saposin Domain in Activating Substrate Hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zi-Jian; Huang, Jingjing; Poda, Gennady; Pomès, Régis; Privé, Gilbert G

    2016-07-31

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) is a lysosomal phosphodiesterase that catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to produce ceramide and phosphocholine. While other lysosomal sphingolipid hydrolases require a saposin activator protein for full activity, the ASM polypeptide incorporates a built-in N-terminal saposin domain and does not require an external activator protein. Here, we report the crystal structure of human ASM and describe the organization of the three main regions of the enzyme: the N-terminal saposin domain, the proline-rich connector, and the catalytic domain. The saposin domain is tightly associated along an edge of the large, bowl-shaped catalytic domain and adopts an open form that exposes a hydrophobic concave surface approximately 30Å from the catalytic center. The calculated electrostatic potential of the enzyme is electropositive at the acidic pH of the lysosome, consistent with the strict requirement for the presence of acidic lipids in target membranes. Docking studies indicate that sphingomyelin binds with the ceramide-phosphate group positioned at the binuclear zinc center and molecular dynamic simulations indicate that the intrinsic flexibility of the saposin domain is important for monomer-dimer exchange and for membrane interactions. Overall, ASM uses a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions to cause local disruptions of target bilayers in order to bring the lipid headgroup to the catalytic center in a membrane-bound reaction.

  7. Sphingolipid metabolism regulates development and lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Roy G; Thompson, Kenneth W; Camandola, Simonetta; Mack, Kendra T; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-12-15

    Sphingolipids are a highly conserved lipid component of cell membranes involved in the formation of lipid raft domains that house many of the receptors and cell-to-cell signaling factors involved in regulating cell division, maturation, and terminal differentiation. By measuring and manipulating sphingolipid metabolism using pharmacological and genetic tools in Caenorhabditis elegans, we provide evidence that the synthesis and remodeling of specific ceramides (e.g., dC18:1-C24:1), gangliosides (e.g., GM1-C24:1), and sphingomyelins (e.g., dC18:1-C18:1) influence development rate and lifespan. We found that the levels of fatty acid chain desaturation and elongation in many sphingolipid species increased during development and aging, with no such changes in developmentally-arrested dauer larvae or normal adults after food withdrawal (an anti-aging intervention). Pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs directed against serine palmitoyl transferase and glucosylceramide synthase acted to slow development rate, extend the reproductive period, and increase lifespan. In contrast, worms fed an egg yolk diet rich in sphingolipids exhibited accelerated development and reduced lifespan. Our findings demonstrate that sphingolipid accumulation and remodeling are critical events that determine development rate and lifespan in the nematode model, with both development rate and aging being accelerated by the synthesis of sphingomyelin, and its metabolism to ceramides and gangliosides. PMID:25437839

  8. Activation of TRPML1 clears intraneuronal Aβ in preclinical models of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Bae, Mihyun; Patel, Neha; Xu, Haoxing; Lee, Mingwaoh; Tominaga-Yamanaka, Kumiko; Nath, Avindra; Geiger, Jonathan; Gorospe, Myriam; Mattson, Mark P; Haughey, Norman J

    2014-08-20

    Antiretroviral therapy extends the lifespan of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, but many survivors develop premature impairments in cognition. These residual cognitive impairments may involve aberrant deposition of amyloid β-peptides (Aβ). By unknown mechanisms, Aβ accumulates in the lysosomal and autophagic compartments of neurons in the HIV-infected brain. Here we identify the molecular events evoked by the HIV coat protein gp120 that facilitate the intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ. We created a triple transgenic gp120/APP/PS1 mouse that recapitulates intraneuronal deposition of Aβ in a manner reminiscent of the HIV-infected brain. In cultured neurons, we found that the HIV coat protein gp120 increased the transcriptional expression of BACE1 through repression of PPARγ, and increased APP expression by promoting interaction of the translation-activating RBP heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C with APP mRNA. APP and BACE1 were colocalized into stabilized membrane microdomains, where the β-cleavage of APP and Aβ formation were enhanced. Aβ-peptides became localized to lysosomes that were engorged with sphingomyelin and calcium. Stimulating calcium efflux from lysosomes with a TRPM1 agonist promoted calcium efflux, luminal acidification, and cleared both sphingomyelin and Aβ from lysosomes. These findings suggest that therapeutics targeted to reduce lysosomal pH in neurodegenerative conditions may protect neurons by facilitating the clearance of accumulated sphingolipids and Aβ-peptides. PMID:25143627

  9. Sphingolipid metabolism regulates development and lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Cutler, Roy G.; Thompson, Kenneth W.; Camandola, Simonetta; Mack, Kendra T.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are a highly conserved lipid component of cell membranes involved in the formation of lipid raft domains that house many of the receptors and cell-to-cell signaling factors involved in regulating cell division, maturation, and terminal differentiation. By measuring and manipulating sphingolipid metabolism using pharmacological and genetic tools in Caenorhabditis elegans, we provide evidence that the synthesis and remodeling of specific ceramides (e.g., dC18:1–C24:1), gangliosides (e.g., GM1–C24:1), and sphingomyelins (e.g., dC18:1–C18:1) influence development rate and lifespan. We found that the levels of fatty acid chain desaturation and elongation in many sphingolipid species increased during development and aging, with no such changes in developmentally-arrested dauer larvae or normal adults after food withdrawal (an anti-aging intervention). Pharmacological inhibitors and small interfering RNAs directed against serine palmitoyl transferase and glucosylceramide synthase acted to slow development rate, extend the reproductive period, and increase lifespan. In contrast, worms fed an egg yolk diet rich in sphingolipids exhibited accelerated development and reduced lifespan. Our findings demonstrate that sphingolipid accumulation and remodeling are critical events that determine development rate and lifespan in the nematode model, with both development rate and aging being accelerated by the synthesis of sphingomyelin, and its metabolism to ceramides and gangliosides. PMID:25437839

  10. Activation of TRPML1 Clears Intraneuronal Aβ in Preclinical Models of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Mihyun; Patel, Neha; Xu, Haoxing; Lee, Mingwaoh; Tominaga-Yamanaka, Kumiko; Nath, Avindra; Geiger, Jonathan; Gorospe, Myriam; Mattson, Mark P.

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy extends the lifespan of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, but many survivors develop premature impairments in cognition. These residual cognitive impairments may involve aberrant deposition of amyloid β-peptides (Aβ). By unknown mechanisms, Aβ accumulates in the lysosomal and autophagic compartments of neurons in the HIV-infected brain. Here we identify the molecular events evoked by the HIV coat protein gp120 that facilitate the intraneuronal accumulation of Aβ. We created a triple transgenic gp120/APP/PS1 mouse that recapitulates intraneuronal deposition of Aβ in a manner reminiscent of the HIV-infected brain. In cultured neurons, we found that the HIV coat protein gp120 increased the transcriptional expression of BACE1 through repression of PPARγ, and increased APP expression by promoting interaction of the translation-activating RBP heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C with APP mRNA. APP and BACE1 were colocalized into stabilized membrane microdomains, where the β-cleavage of APP and Aβ formation were enhanced. Aβ-peptides became localized to lysosomes that were engorged with sphingomyelin and calcium. Stimulating calcium efflux from lysosomes with a TRPM1 agonist promoted calcium efflux, luminal acidification, and cleared both sphingomyelin and Aβ from lysosomes. These findings suggest that therapeutics targeted to reduce lysosomal pH in neurodegenerative conditions may protect neurons by facilitating the clearance of accumulated sphingolipids and Aβ-peptides. PMID:25143627

  11. Human acid sphingomyelinase structures provide insight to molecular basis of Niemann–Pick disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yan-Feng; Metcalf, Matthew C.; Garman, Scott C.; Edmunds, Tim; Qiu, Huawei; Wei, Ronnie R.

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) hydrolyzes sphingomyelin to ceramide and phosphocholine, essential components of myelin in neurons. Genetic alterations in ASM lead to ASM deficiency (ASMD) and have been linked to Niemann–Pick disease types A and B. Olipudase alfa, a recombinant form of human ASM, is being developed as enzyme replacement therapy to treat the non-neurological manifestations of ASMD. Here we present the human ASM holoenzyme and product bound structures encompassing all of the functional domains. The catalytic domain has a metallophosphatase fold, and two zinc ions and one reaction product phosphocholine are identified in a histidine-rich active site. The structures reveal the underlying catalytic mechanism, in which two zinc ions activate a water molecule for nucleophilic attack of the phosphodiester bond. Docking of sphingomyelin provides a model that allows insight into the selectivity of the enzyme and how the ASM domains collaborate to complete hydrolysis. Mapping of known mutations provides a basic understanding on correlations between enzyme dysfunction and phenotypes observed in ASMD patients. PMID:27725636

  12. The Chlamydia trachomatis IncA protein is required for homotypic vesicle fusion.

    PubMed

    Hackstadt, T; Scidmore-Carlson, M A; Shaw, E I; Fischer, E R

    1999-09-01

    Chlamydiae replicate within an intracellular vacuole, termed an inclusion, that is non-fusogenic with vesicles of the endosomal or lysosomal compartments. Instead, the inclusion appears to intersect an exocytic pathway from which chlamydiae intercept sphingomyelin en route from the Golgi apparatus to the plasma membrane. Chlamydial protein synthesis is required to establish this interaction. In an effort to identify those chlamydial proteins controlling vesicle fusion, we have prepared polyclonal antibodies against several Chlamydia trachomatis inclusion membrane proteins. Microinjection of polyclonal antibodies against three C. trachomatis inclusion membrane proteins, IncA, F and G, into the cytosol of cells infected with C. trachomatis demonstrates reactivity with antigens on the cytoplasmic face of the inclusion membrane, without apparent inhibition of chlamydial multiplication. Microinjection of antibodies against the C. trachomatis IncA protein, however, results in the development of an aberrant multilobed inclusion structure remarkably similar to that of C. psittaci GPIC. These results suggest that the C. trachomatis IncA protein is involved in homotypic vesicle fusion and/or septation of the inclusion membrane that is believed to accompany bacterial cell division in C. psittaci. This proposal is corroborated by the expression of C. trachomatis and C. psittaci IncA in a yeast two-hybrid system to demonstrate C. trachomatis, but not C. psittaci, IncA interactions. Despite the inhibition of homotypic fusion of C. trachomatis inclusions, fusion of sphingomyelin-containing vesicles with the inclusion was not suppressed.

  13. Impaired Epidermal Permeability Barrier in Mice Lacking Elovl1, the Gene Responsible for Very-Long-Chain Fatty Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Sassa, Takayuki; Ohno, Yusuke; Suzuki, Shotaro; Nomura, Toshifumi; Nishioka, Chieko; Kashiwagi, Toshiki; Hirayama, Taisuke; Akiyama, Masashi; Taguchi, Ryo; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Itohara, Shigeyoshi

    2013-01-01

    The sphingolipid backbone ceramide (Cer) is a major component of lipid lamellae in the stratum corneum of epidermis and has a pivotal role in epidermal barrier formation. Unlike Cers in other tissues, Cers in epidermis contain extremely long fatty acids (FAs). Decreases in epidermal Cer levels, as well as changes in their FA chain lengths, cause several cutaneous disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms that produce such extremely long Cers and determine their chain lengths are poorly understood. We generated mice deficient in the Elovl1 gene, which encodes the FA elongase responsible for producing C20 to C28 FAs. Elovl1 knockout mice died shortly after birth due to epidermal barrier defects. The lipid lamellae in the stratum corneum were largely diminished in these mice. In the epidermis of the Elovl1-null mice, the levels of Cers with ≥C26 FAs were decreased, while those of Cers with ≤C24 FAs were increased. In contrast, the levels of C24 sphingomyelin were reduced, accompanied by an increase in C20 sphingomyelin levels. Two ceramide synthases, CerS2 and CerS3, expressed in an epidermal layer-specific manner, regulate Elovl1 to produce acyl coenzyme As with different chain lengths. Elovl1 is a key determinant of epidermal Cer chain length and is essential for permeability barrier formation. PMID:23689133

  14. Isolation and Analysis of Phospholipids in Dairy Foods.

    PubMed

    Pimentel, Lígia; Gomes, Ana; Pintado, Manuela; Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luis Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The lipid fraction of milk is one of the most complex matrixes in foodstuffs due to the presence of a high number of moieties with different physical and chemical properties. Glycerolipids include glycerol and two fatty acids esterified in positions sn-1 and sn-2 with higher concentration of unsaturated fatty acids than in the triglyceride fraction of milk. Sphingolipids consist of a sphingoid base linked to a fatty acid across an amide bond. Their amphiphilic nature makes them suitable to be added into a variety of foods and recent investigations show that phospholipids, mainly phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin, can exert antimicrobial, antiviral, and anticancer activities as well as positive effects in Alzheimer's disease, stress, and memory decline. Polar lipids can be found as natural constituents in the membranes of all living organisms with soybean and eggs as the principal industrial sources, yet they have low contents in phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin. Animal products are rich sources of these compounds but since there are legal restrictions to avoid transmission of prions, milk and dairy products are gaining interest as alternative sources. This review summarizes the analysis of polar lipids in dairy products including sample preparation (extraction and fractionation/isolation) and analysis by GC or HPLC and the latest research works using ELSD, CAD, and MS detectors. PMID:27610267

  15. Self-consistent mean-field model for palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine-palmitoyl sphingomyelin–cholesterol lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Tumaneng, Paul W.; Pandit, Sagar A.; Zhao, Guijun; Scott, H. L.

    2012-01-01

    The connection between membrane inhomogeneity and the structural basis of lipid rafts has sparked interest in the lateral organization of model lipid bilayers of two and three components. In an effort to investigate anisotropic lipid distribution in mixed bilayers, a self-consistent mean-field theoretical model is applied to palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)–palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM)–cholesterol mixtures. The compositional dependence of lateral organization in these mixtures is mapped onto a ternary plot. The model utilizes molecular dynamics simulations to estimate interaction parameters and to construct chain conformation libraries. We find that at some concentration ratios the bilayers separate spatially into regions of higher and lower chain order coinciding with areas enriched with PSM and POPC, respectively. To examine the effect of the asymmetric chain structure of POPC on bilayer lateral inhomogeneity, we consider POPC-lipid interactions with and without angular dependence. Results are compared with experimental data and with results from a similar model for mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, steroyl sphingomyelin, and cholesterol. PMID:21517541

  16. Molecular modeling of human alkaline sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Panneer Selvam; Olubiyi, Olujide; Thirunavukkarasu, Chinnasamy; Strodel, Birgit; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Alkaline sphingomyelinase, which is expressed in the human intestine and hydrolyses sphingomyelin, is a component of the plasma and the lysosomal membranes. Hydrolase of sphingomyelin generates ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate that have regulatory effects on vital cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The enzyme belongs to the Nucleotide Pyrophosphatase/Phosphodiesterase family and it differs in structural similarity with acidic and neutral sphingomyelinase. In the present study we modeled alkaline sphingomyelinase using homology modeling based on the structure of Nucleotide Pyrophosphatase/Phosphodiesterase from Xanthomonas axonopodis with which it shares 34% identity. Homology modeling was performed using Modeller9v7. We found that Cys78 and Cys394 form a disulphide bond. Further analysis shows that Ser76 may be important for the function of this enzyme, which is supported by the findings of Wu et al. (2005), that S76F abolishes the activity completely. We found that the residues bound to Zn(2+) are conserved and geometrically similar with the template. Molecular Dynamics simulations were carried out for the modeled protein to observe the effect of Zinc metal ions. It was observed that the metal ion has little effect with regard to the stability but induces increased fluctuations in the protein. These analyses showed that Zinc ions play an important role in stabilizing the secondary structure and in maintaining the compactness of the active site. PMID:21544170

  17. Nuclear lipid microdomain as resting place of dexamethasone to impair cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Cataldi, Samuela; Codini, Michela; Cascianelli, Giacomo; Tringali, Sabina; Tringali, Anna Rita; Lazzarini, Andrea; Floridi, Alessandro; Bartoccini, Elisa; Garcia-Gil, Mercedes; Lazzarini, Remo; Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Curcio, Francesco; Beccari, Tommaso; Albi, Elisabetta

    2014-01-01

    The action of dexamethasone is initiated by, and strictly dependent upon, the interaction of the drug with its receptor followed by its translocation into the nucleus where modulates gene expression. Where the drug localizes at the intranuclear level is not yet known. We aimed to study the localization of the drug in nuclear lipid microdomains rich in sphingomyelin content that anchor active chromatin and act as platform for transcription modulation. The study was performed in non-Hodgkin's T cell human lymphoblastic lymphoma (SUP-T1 cell line). We found that when dexamethasone enters into the nucleus it localizes in nuclear lipid microdomains where influences sphingomyelin metabolism. This is followed after 24 h by a cell cycle block accompanied by the up-regulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B), growth arrest and DNA-damage 45A (GADD45A), and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) genes and by the reduction of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and phospho signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (phoshoSTAT3) proteins. After 48 h some cells show morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis while the number of the cells that undergo cell division and express B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) is very low. We suggest that the integrity of nuclear lipid microdomains is important for the response to glucocorticoids of cancer cells.

  18. ORMDL orosomucoid-like proteins are degraded by free-cholesterol-loading–induced autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuhui; Robinet, Peggy; Smith, Jonathan D.; Gulshan, Kailash

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved robust mechanisms to counter excess cholesterol including redistribution of lipids into different compartments and compensatory up-regulation of phospholipid biosynthesis. We demonstrate here that excess cellular cholesterol increased the activity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) enzyme serine palmitoyl-CoA transferase (SPT), the rate-limiting enzyme in sphingomyelin synthesis. This increased SPT activity was not due to altered levels of SPTLC1 or SPTLC2, the major subunits of SPT. Instead, cholesterol loading decreased the levels of ORMDL1, a negative regulator of SPT activity, due to its increased turnover. Several lines of evidence demonstrated that free-cholesterol–induced autophagy, which led to increased turnover of ORMDL1. Cholesterol loading induced ORMDL1 redistribution from the ER to cytoplasmic p62 positive autophagosomes. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis of cholesterol-loaded cells showed increased association between ORMDL1 and p62. The lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine or siRNA knockdown of Atg7 inhibited ORMDL1 degradation by cholesterol, whereas proteasome inhibitors showed no effect. ORMDL1 degradation was specific to free-cholesterol loading as autophagy induced by serum starvation or general ER stress did not lead to ORMDL1 degradation. ORMDL proteins are thus previously unidentified responders to excess cholesterol, exiting the ER to activate SPT and increase sphingomyelin biosynthesis, which may buffer excess cellular cholesterol. PMID:25775599

  19. Defective CFTR increases synthesis and mass of sphingolipids that modulate membrane composition and lipid signaling.

    PubMed

    Hamai, Hiroko; Keyserman, Fannie; Quittell, Lynne M; Worgall, Tilla S

    2009-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) that affect protein structure and channel function. CFTR, localized in the apical membrane within cholesterol and sphingomyelin rich regions, is an ABC transporter that functions as a chloride channel. Here, we report that expression of defective CFTR (DeltaF508CFTR or decreased CFTR) in human lung epithelial cell lines increases sphingolipid synthesis and mass of sphinganine, sphingosine, four long-chain saturated ceramide species, C16 dihydroceramide, C22, C24, C26-ceramide, and sphingomyelin, and decreases mass of C18 and unsaturated C18:1 ceramide species. Decreased expression of CFTR is associated with increased expression of long-chain base subunit 1 of serine-palmitoyl CoA, the rate-limiting enzyme of de novo sphingolipid synthesis and increased sphingolipid synthesis. Overexpression of DeltaF508CFTR in bronchoalveolar cells that do not express CFTR increases sphingolipid synthesis and mass, whereas overexpression of wild-type CFTR, but not of an unrelated ABC transporter, ABCA7, decreases sphingolipid synthesis and mass. The data are consistent with a model in which CFTR functions within a feedback system that affects sphingolipid synthesis and in which increased sphingolipid synthesis could reflect a physiological response to sequestration of sphingolipids or altered membrane structure. PMID:19144995

  20. ORMDL orosomucoid-like proteins are degraded by free-cholesterol-loading-induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhui; Robinet, Peggy; Smith, Jonathan D; Gulshan, Kailash

    2015-03-24

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved robust mechanisms to counter excess cholesterol including redistribution of lipids into different compartments and compensatory up-regulation of phospholipid biosynthesis. We demonstrate here that excess cellular cholesterol increased the activity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) enzyme serine palmitoyl-CoA transferase (SPT), the rate-limiting enzyme in sphingomyelin synthesis. This increased SPT activity was not due to altered levels of SPTLC1 or SPTLC2, the major subunits of SPT. Instead, cholesterol loading decreased the levels of ORMDL1, a negative regulator of SPT activity, due to its increased turnover. Several lines of evidence demonstrated that free-cholesterol-induced autophagy, which led to increased turnover of ORMDL1. Cholesterol loading induced ORMDL1 redistribution from the ER to cytoplasmic p62 positive autophagosomes. Coimmunoprecipitation analysis of cholesterol-loaded cells showed increased association between ORMDL1 and p62. The lysosomal inhibitor chloroquine or siRNA knockdown of Atg7 inhibited ORMDL1 degradation by cholesterol, whereas proteasome inhibitors showed no effect. ORMDL1 degradation was specific to free-cholesterol loading as autophagy induced by serum starvation or general ER stress did not lead to ORMDL1 degradation. ORMDL proteins are thus previously unidentified responders to excess cholesterol, exiting the ER to activate SPT and increase sphingomyelin biosynthesis, which may buffer excess cellular cholesterol. PMID:25775599

  1. Role of Sphingolipids and Metabolizing Enzymes in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kitatani, Kazuyuki; Taniguchi, Makoto; Okazaki, Toshiro

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids such as ceramide, sphingosine-1-phosphate and sphingomyelin have been emerging as bioactive lipids since ceramide was reported to play a role in human leukemia HL-60 cell differentiation and death. Recently, it is well-known that ceramide acts as an inducer of cell death, that sphingomyelin works as a regulator for microdomain function of the cell membrane, and that sphingosine-1-phosphate plays a role in cell survival/proliferation. The lipids are metabolized by the specific enzymes, and each metabolite could be again returned to the original form by the reverse action of the different enzyme or after a long journey of many metabolizing/synthesizing pathways. In addition, the metabolites may serve as reciprocal bio-modulators like the rheostat between ceramide and sphingosine-1-phosphate. Therefore, the change of lipid amount in the cells, the subcellular localization and the downstream signal in a specific subcellular organelle should be clarified to understand the pathobiological significance of sphingolipids when extracellular stimulation induces a diverse of cell functions such as cell death, proliferation and migration. In this review, we focus on how sphingolipids and their metabolizing enzymes cooperatively exert their function in proliferation, migration, autophagy and death of hematopoetic cells, and discuss the way developing a novel therapeutic device through the regulation of sphingolipids for effectively inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing cell death in hematological malignancies such as leukemia, malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma. PMID:25997737

  2. An acidic sphingomyelinase Type C activity from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Castro-Garza, Jorge; González-Salazar, Francisco; Quinn, Frederick D; Karls, Russell K; De La Garza-Salinas, Laura Hermila; Guzmán-de la Garza, Francisco J; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomyelinases (SMases) catalyze the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide and phosphorylcholine. Sphingolipids are recognized as diverse and dynamic regulators of a multitude of cellular processes mediating cell cycle control, differentiation, stress response, cell migration, adhesion, and apoptosis. Bacterial SMases are virulence factors for several species of pathogens. Whole cell extracts of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains H37Rv and CDC1551 were assayed using [N-methyl-(14)C]-sphingomyelin as substrate. Acidic Zn(2+)-dependent SMase activity was identified in both strains. Peak SMase activity was observed at pH 5.5. Interestingly, overall SMase activity levels from CDC1551 extracts are approximately 1/3 of those of H37Rv. The presence of exogenous SMase produced by M. tuberculosis during infection may interfere with the normal host inflammatory response thus allowing the establishment of infection and disease development. This Type C activity is different from previously identified M. tuberculosis SMases. Defining the biochemical characteristics of M. tuberculosis SMases helps to elucidate the roles that these enzymes play during infection and disease. PMID:26948102

  3. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching measured by confocal microscopy as a tool for the analysis of vesicular lipid transport and plasma membrane mobility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Gerd; Goetz, Alexandra; Orso, Evelyn; Rothe, Gregor

    1998-04-01

    The vesicular transport of lipids from the endoplasmic reticulum via the Golgi apparatus affects the composition of the plasma membrane. The purpose of our study was to develop an in vitro test system for characterization of vesicular lipid transport kinetics by using confocal microscopy and fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). Fibroblasts from two patients homozygous for the hypercatabolic HDL deficiency syndrome Tangier disease and 4 control subjects were pulsed with the C6-NBD-ceramide for 30 minutes. Chase incubation at room temperature resulted in the metabolic accumulation of fluorescent C6-NBD-sphingolyelin and C6-NBD-glycosylceramides in the medial- and trans-Golgi region. Cells were analyzed with an inverted Leica TCS microscope. Calibration was performed through the analysis of diffusion of 50 nm microparticles embedded in media of different viscosity. An acousto optical tunable filter (AOTF) was used for the selective bleaching of the medial- and trans- Golgi region followed by analysis of the fluorescence recovery for 4 minutes. Post-bleach fluorescence recovery through the trans-Golgi-oriented transport of NBD-sphingomyelin was calculated from 2-dimensional scans. Tangier fibroblasts displayed a retarded recovery of fluorescence in the trans- Golgi region. This suggests that the vesicular transport of sphingomyelin and cholesterol is disturbed in Tangier disease confirming data from our laboratory generated with radiometabolites on whole cells. Our data suggest that FRAP analysis allows a sensitive kinetic and spatially resolved analysis of disturbances of vesicular lipid transport.

  4. Ceramide and neurodegeneration: Susceptibility of neurons and oligodendrocytes to cell damage and death

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Arundhati; Hogan, Edward L.; Pahan, Kalipada

    2009-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are marked by extensive neuronal apoptosis and gliosis. Although several apoptosis-inducing agents have been described, understanding of the regulatory mechanisms underlying modes of cell death is incomplete. A major breakthrough in delineation of the mechanism of cell death came from elucidation of the sphingomyelin (SM)-ceramide pathway that has received worldwide attention in recent years. The SM pathway induces apoptosis, differentiation, proliferation, and growth arrest depending upon cell and receptor types, and on downstream targets. Sphingomyelin, a plasma membrane constituent, is abundant in mammalian nervous system, and ceramide, its primary catabolic product released by activation of either neutral or acidic sphingomyelinase, serves as a potential lipid second messenger or mediator molecule modulating diverse cellular signaling pathways. Neutral sphingomyelinase (NSMase) is a key enzyme in the regulated activation of the SM cycle and is particularly sensitive to oxidative stress. In a context of increasing clarification of the mechanisms of neurodegeneration, we thought that it would be useful to review details of recent findings that we and others have made concerning different pro-apoptotic neurotoxins including proinflammatory cytokines, hypoxia-induced SM hydrolysis and ceramide production that induce cell death in human primary neurons and primary oligodendrocytes: redox sensitive events. What has and is emerging is a vista of therapeutically important ceramide regulation affecting a variety of different neurodegenerative and neuroinflammatory disorders. PMID:19147160

  5. Characterization and comparison of lipids in different squid nervous tissues.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, H; Tanaka, T; Ichioka, T; Stoskopf, M; Kishimoto, Y; Gould, R

    1987-10-31

    We have studied the lipid composition of brain (optic and cerebral lobes), stellate ganglia and fin nerves of the squid. Cholesterol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine were the major lipids in these nervous tissues. Phosphatidylethanolamine contained about 3% of its amount in [corrected] plasmalogen form. Phosphatidylserine and -inositol, sphingomyelin and ceramide 2-aminoethylphosphonate were also present in significant amounts. In addition, cardiolipin and free fatty acids were detected in brain (each 2-3% of total lipids) and stellate ganglia (about 1% each), but not in fin nerves. Phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol from brain contained large amounts of polyunsaturated fatty acids, namely 20:4, 20:5 and 22:6 in the n-3 family. On the other hand, phosphatidylcholine, cardiolipin, and sphingomyelin, and ceramide 2-aminoethylphosphonate contained only saturated or monounsaturated C16-C18 fatty acids. The aldehyde moieties of ethanolamine plasmalogen were also C16-C18 saturated or monounsaturated. These lipid compositions are compared with those in other invertebrate nervous systems.

  6. Cholesterol segregates into submicrometric domains at the living erythrocyte membrane: evidence and regulation.

    PubMed

    Carquin, Mélanie; Conrard, Louise; Pollet, Hélène; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; Cominelli, Antoine; Veiga-da-Cunha, Maria; Courtoy, Pierre J; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2015-12-01

    Although cholesterol is essential for membrane fluidity and deformability, the level of its lateral heterogeneity at the plasma membrane of living cells is poorly understood due to lack of appropriate probe. We here report on the usefulness of the D4 fragment of Clostridium perfringens toxin fused to mCherry (theta*), as specific, non-toxic, sensitive and quantitative cholesterol-labeling tool, using erythrocyte flat membrane. By confocal microscopy, theta* labels cholesterol-enriched submicrometric domains in coverslip-spread but also gel-suspended (non-stretched) fresh erythrocytes, suggesting in vivo relevance. Cholesterol domains on spread erythrocytes are stable in time and space, restricted by membrane:spectrin anchorage via 4.1R complexes, and depend on temperature and sphingomyelin, indicating combined regulation by extrinsic membrane:cytoskeleton interaction and by intrinsic lipid packing. Cholesterol domains partially co-localize with BODIPY-sphingomyelin-enriched domains. In conclusion, we show that theta* is a useful vital probe to study cholesterol organization and demonstrate that cholesterol forms submicrometric domains in living cells.

  7. An acidic sphingomyelinase Type C activity from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Castro-Garza, Jorge; González-Salazar, Francisco; Quinn, Frederick D; Karls, Russell K; De La Garza-Salinas, Laura Hermila; Guzmán-de la Garza, Francisco J; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Sphingomyelinases (SMases) catalyze the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide and phosphorylcholine. Sphingolipids are recognized as diverse and dynamic regulators of a multitude of cellular processes mediating cell cycle control, differentiation, stress response, cell migration, adhesion, and apoptosis. Bacterial SMases are virulence factors for several species of pathogens. Whole cell extracts of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains H37Rv and CDC1551 were assayed using [N-methyl-(14)C]-sphingomyelin as substrate. Acidic Zn(2+)-dependent SMase activity was identified in both strains. Peak SMase activity was observed at pH 5.5. Interestingly, overall SMase activity levels from CDC1551 extracts are approximately 1/3 of those of H37Rv. The presence of exogenous SMase produced by M. tuberculosis during infection may interfere with the normal host inflammatory response thus allowing the establishment of infection and disease development. This Type C activity is different from previously identified M. tuberculosis SMases. Defining the biochemical characteristics of M. tuberculosis SMases helps to elucidate the roles that these enzymes play during infection and disease.

  8. The influence of an antitumor lipid - erucylphosphocholine - on artificial lipid raft system modeled as Langmuir monolayer.

    PubMed

    Wnętrzak, Anita; Łątka, Kazimierz; Makyła-Juzak, Katarzyna; Zemla, Joanna; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2015-01-01

    Outer layer of cellular membrane contains ordered domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, called 'lipid rafts', which play various biological roles, i.e., are involved in the induction of cell death by apoptosis. Recent studies have shown that these domains may constitute binding sites for selected drugs. For example alkylphosphocholines (APCs), which are new-generation antitumor agents characterized by high selectivity and broad spectrum of activity, are known to have their molecular targets located at cellular membrane and their selective accumulation in tumor cells has been hypothesized to be linked with the alternation of biophysical properties of lipid rafts. To get a deeper insight into this issue, interactions between representative APC: erucylphosphocholine, and artificial lipid raft system, modeled as Langmuir monolayer (composed of cholesterol and sphingomyelin mixed in 1:2 proportion) were investigated. The Langmuir monolayer experiments, based on recording surface pressure-area isotherms, were complemented with Brewster angle microscopy results, which enabled direct visualization of the monolayers structure. In addition, the investigated monolayers were transferred onto solid supports and studied with AFM. The interactions between model raft system and erucylphosphocholine were analyzed qualitatively (with mean molecular area values) as well as quantitatively (with ΔG(exc) function). The obtained results indicate that erucylphosphocholine introduced to raft-mimicking model membrane causes fluidizing effect and weakens the interactions between cholesterol and sphingomyelin, which results in phase separation at high surface pressures. This leads to the redistribution of cholesterol molecules in model raft, which confirms the results observed in biological studies.

  9. Isolation and analysis of membrane lipids and lipid rafts in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Brogden, Graham; Propsting, Marcus; Adamek, Mikolaj; Naim, Hassan Y; Steinhagen, Dieter

    2014-03-01

    Cell membranes act as an interface between the interior of the cell and the exterior environment and facilitate a range of essential functions including cell signalling, cell structure, nutrient uptake and protection. It is composed of a lipid bilayer with integrated proteins, and the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer comprises of liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains. Lo microdomains, also named as lipid rafts are enriched in cholesterol, sphingomyelin and certain types of proteins, which facilitate cell signalling and nutrient uptake. Lipid rafts have been extensively researched in mammals and the presence of functional lipid rafts was recently demonstrated in goldfish, but there is currently very little knowledge about their composition and function in fish. Therefore a protocol was established for the analysis of lipid rafts and membranous lipids in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) tissues. Twelve lipids were identified and analysed in the Ld domain of the membrane with the most predominant lipids found in all tissues being; triglycerides, cholesterol, phosphoethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. Four lipids were identified in lipid rafts in all tissues analysed, triglycerides (33-62%) always found in the highest concentration followed by cholesterol (24-32%), phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. Isolation of lipid rafts was confirmed by identifying the presence of the lipid raft associated protein flotillin, present at higher concentrations in the detergent resistant fraction. The data provided here build a lipid library of important carp tissues as a baseline for further studies into virus entry, protein trafficking or environmental stress analysis.

  10. Isolation and Analysis of Phospholipids in Dairy Foods

    PubMed Central

    Pimentel, Lígia; Gomes, Ana; Pintado, Manuela

    2016-01-01

    The lipid fraction of milk is one of the most complex matrixes in foodstuffs due to the presence of a high number of moieties with different physical and chemical properties. Glycerolipids include glycerol and two fatty acids esterified in positions sn-1 and sn-2 with higher concentration of unsaturated fatty acids than in the triglyceride fraction of milk. Sphingolipids consist of a sphingoid base linked to a fatty acid across an amide bond. Their amphiphilic nature makes them suitable to be added into a variety of foods and recent investigations show that phospholipids, mainly phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin, can exert antimicrobial, antiviral, and anticancer activities as well as positive effects in Alzheimer's disease, stress, and memory decline. Polar lipids can be found as natural constituents in the membranes of all living organisms with soybean and eggs as the principal industrial sources, yet they have low contents in phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin. Animal products are rich sources of these compounds but since there are legal restrictions to avoid transmission of prions, milk and dairy products are gaining interest as alternative sources. This review summarizes the analysis of polar lipids in dairy products including sample preparation (extraction and fractionation/isolation) and analysis by GC or HPLC and the latest research works using ELSD, CAD, and MS detectors.

  11. Evidence for the association of ultraviolet-C and H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis with acid sphingomyelinase activation.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, M; Takahashi, T; Abe, T; Takahashi, I; Ida, H; Takada, G

    2001-08-29

    Ceramide appears to be a potent second messenger implicated in the regulation of diverse cellular processes such as cell growth and differentiation, gene transcription, ligand binding, and cell death. Environmental stress-induced apoptosis is believed to be associated with the sphingomyelin degradation pathway, which generates ceramide as a second messenger in initiating the apoptosis response. To date, two distinct sphingomyelinases, a lysosomal acid sphingomyelinase (ASM), which is deficient in patients affected with types A and B Niemann-Pick disease (NPD), and a neutral, magnesium-dependent sphingomyelinase (NSM), are candidate enzymes which respond to apoptotic stimulations and cause sphingomyelin hydrolysis and subsequent ceramide generation. Using Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed lymphoblast cells from type A NPD patient which have defined splicing site mutation in the ASM gene, we showed that ASM-deficient cells were defective in ultraviolet-C (UV-C) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) induced apoptosis. As another induction of apoptosis, we exposed this cell line to serum starvation which influences to p53 expression and leads to apoptosis. There were no differences by the degree of apoptosis between ASM-deficient lymphoblast cells and normal lymphoblast cells. These results are evidence that ASM plays one of the important roles in apoptosis induction by UV-C and H(2)O(2).

  12. Studies on rat liver plasma membrane. Altered protein and phospholipid metabolism after injection of D-galactosamine.

    PubMed Central

    Bachmann, W; Harms, E; Hassels, B; Henninger, H; Reuitter, W

    1977-01-01

    1. The metabolism of protein and phospholipid in rat liver plasma membranes isolated by the method of Neville [(1960) J. Biophys. Biochem. Cytol. 8, 413-422] was investigated 3 and 6 h after the injection of D-galactosamine in vivo. During this time, all the biochemical and morphological alterations associated with hepatitis developed. 2. After the injection of D-galactosamine the concentration of sphingomyelin in the plasma membrane decreased to below 60% of the control values. 3. The activity of 5'-nucleotidase (EC 3.1.3.5), which has been purified as a sphingomyelin-protein complex, decreased in the total homogenate as well as in the plasma-membrane fraction of livers of rats treated with galactosamine, to about 60% of the control values. 4. Protein synthesis, as measured by the incorporation of [14C]leucine into plasma membranes, was decreased to 45% of that of the controls. However, only small differences were observed in the amino acid composition of the plasma membrane after D-galactosamine treatment. 5. The protein composition of the plasma membranes was determined by sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The results showed a change from low- to high-molecular-weight proteins after the injection of galactosamine. 6. These results demonstrate different metabolic processes of the plasma membrane altered during the induction of galactosamine hepatitis. Images Fig. 1. PMID:597240

  13. Efficient trafficking of ceramide from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi apparatus requires a VAMP-associated protein-interacting FFAT motif of CERT.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Miyuki; Kumagai, Keigo; Nishijima, Masahiro; Hanada, Kentaro

    2006-10-01

    Ceramide is synthesized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and transported to the Golgi apparatus by CERT for its conversion to sphingomyelin in mammalian cells. CERT has a pleck-strin homology (PH) domain for Golgi targeting and a START domain catalyzing the intermembrane transfer of ceramide. The region between the two domains contains a short peptide motif designated FFAT, which is supposed to interact with the ER-resident proteins VAP-A and VAP-B. Both VAPs were actually co-immunoprecipitated with CERT, and the CERT/VAP interaction was abolished by mutations in the FFAT motif. These mutations did not affect the Golgi targeting activity of CERT. Whereas mutations of neither the FFAT motif nor the PH domain inhibited the ceramide transfer activity of CERT in a cell-free system, they impaired the ER-to-Golgi transport of ceramide in intact and in semi-intact cells at near endogenous expression levels. By contrast, when overexpressed, both the FFAT motif and the PH domain mutants of CERT substantially supported the transport of ceramide from the ER to the site where sphingomyelin is produced. These results suggest that the Golgi-targeting PH domain and ER-interacting FFAT motif of CERT spatially restrict the random ceramide transfer activity of the START domain in cells.

  14. Nonadditive Compositional Curvature Energetics of Lipid Bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodt, A. J.; Venable, R. M.; Lyman, E.; Pastor, R. W.

    2016-09-01

    The unique properties of the individual lipids that compose biological membranes together determine the energetics of the surface. The energetics of the surface, in turn, govern the formation of membrane structures and membrane reshaping processes, and thus they will underlie cellular-scale models of viral fusion, vesicle-dependent transport, and lateral organization relevant to signaling. The spontaneous curvature, to the best of our knowledge, is always assumed to be additive. We describe observations from simulations of unexpected nonadditive compositional curvature energetics of two lipids essential to the plasma membrane: sphingomyelin and cholesterol. A model is developed that connects molecular interactions to curvature stress, and which explains the role of local composition. Cholesterol is shown to lower the number of effective Kuhn segments of saturated acyl chains, reducing lateral pressure below the neutral surface of bending and favoring positive curvature. The effect is not observed for unsaturated (flexible) acyl chains. Likewise, hydrogen bonding between sphingomyelin lipids leads to positive curvature, but only at sufficient concentration, below which the lipid prefers negative curvature.

  15. Characteristics of the rat cardiac sphingolipid pool in two mitochondrial subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Monette, Jeffrey S; Gómez, Luis A; Moreau, Régis F; Bemer, Brett A; Taylor, Alan W; Hagen, Tory M

    2010-07-23

    Mitochondrial sphingolipids play a diverse role in normal cardiac function and diseases, yet a precise quantification of cardiac mitochondrial sphingolipids has never been performed. Therefore, rat heart interfibrillary mitochondria (IFM) and subsarcolemmal mitochondria (SSM) were isolated, lipids extracted, and sphingolipids quantified by LC-tandem mass spectrometry. Results showed that sphingomyelin (approximately 10,000 pmol/mg protein) was the predominant sphingolipid regardless of mitochondrial subpopulation, and measurable amounts of ceramide (approximately 70 pmol/mg protein) sphingosine, and sphinganine were also found in IFM and SSM. Both mitochondrial populations contained similar quantities of sphingolipids except for ceramide which was much higher in SSM. Analysis of sphingolipid isoforms revealed ten different sphingomyelins and six ceramides that differed from 16- to 24-carbon units in their acyl side chains. Sub-fractionation experiments further showed that sphingolipids are a constituent part of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Furthermore, inner membrane ceramide levels were 32% lower versus whole mitochondria (45 pmol/mg protein). Three ceramide isotypes (C20-, C22-, and C24-ceramide) accounted for the lower amounts. The concentrations of the ceramides present in the inner membranes of SSM and IFM differed greatly. Overall, mitochondrial sphingolipid content reflected levels seen in cardiac tissue, but the specific ceramide distribution distinguished IFM and SSM from each other. PMID:20599536

  16. Ectocytosis caused by sublytic autologous complement attack on human neutrophils. The sorting of endogenous plasma-membrane proteins and lipids into shed vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Stein, J M; Luzio, J P

    1991-01-01

    During sublytic complement attack on human neutrophils, plasma-membrane vesicles are shed from the cell surface as a cell-protection mechanism. By using surface-iodinated neutrophils it was found that less than 2% of surface label was recovered in shed vesicles under conditions where 40% of complement component C9 was shed. SDS/PAGE of 125I-labelled shed vesicles and plasma membranes showed differences in iodination pattern, demonstrating the sorting of membrane proteins into the shed vesicles. Analysis of 32P-labelled phospholipids after labeling of neutrophils with [32P]Pi before sublytic complement attack showed the presence of phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidyl-ethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol and polyphosphoinositides in shed vesicles. Quantitative analysis using [3H]acetic anhydride-labelling method showed that the molar proportions of phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine and sphingomyelin were the same in shed vesicles as in plasma membranes. In contrast, the molar proportions of cholesterol and diacylglycerol relative to sphingomyelin were almost twice those found in plasma membranes. The data demonstrate the existence of protein and lipid sorting mechanisms during the formation of shed vesicles when neutrophils are subject to sublytic complement attack. The term 'ectocytosis' is proposed to describe triggered shedding of right-side-out membrane vesicles from the surface of eukaryotic cells. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:1848755

  17. Magnesium deficiency upregulates serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT 1 and SPT 2) in cardiovascular tissues: relationship to serum ionized Mg and cytochrome c.

    PubMed

    Altura, Burton M; Shah, Nilank C; Li, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Xian-Cheng; Perez-Albela, Jose Luis; Altura, Bella T

    2010-09-01

    The present work tested the hypothesis that a short-term dietary deficiency of magnesium (Mg) (21 days) in rats would result in the upregulation of the two major subunits of serine palmitoyl-CoA-transferase, serine palmitoyl transferase (SPT 1) and SPT 2 (the rate-limiting enzymes responsible for the de novo biosynthesis of ceramides) in left ventricular, right ventricular, and atrial heart muscle and abdominal aortic smooth muscle, as well as induce a reduction in serum sphingomyelin concomitant with the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c (Cyto c) in these tissues. Our data indicate that short-term Mg deficiency (MgD) resulted in an upregulation of SPT 1 and SPT 2, concomitant with a very significant release of Cyto c in left ventricular, right ventricular, atrial, and abdominal aortic smooth muscle. Short-term MgD also produced a lowering of serum sphingomyelin and ionized Mg. The greater the reduction in serum ionized Mg, the greater the upregulation of SPT 1 and 2 and the more the increase in free Cyto c. The data suggest that MgD, most likely, causes a biosynthesis of ceramides via two pathways in cardiovascular tissues, viz., via the activation of serine palmitoyl-CoA-transferase and sphingomyelinase, which lead to apoptotic events via intrinsic (present study) and extrinsic pathways (previous studies). Low levels of drinking water Mg were cardio- and vasculoprotective.

  18. Cooperation between the Hepatitis C Virus p7 and NS5B Proteins Enhances Virion Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Aligeti, Mounavya; Roder, Allison

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The molecular mechanisms that govern hepatitis C virus (HCV) assembly, release, and infectivity are still not yet fully understood. In the present study, we sequenced a genotype 2A strain of HCV (JFH-1) that had been cell culture adapted in Huh-7.5 cells to produce nearly 100-fold-higher viral titers than the parental strain. Sequence analysis identified nine mutations in the genome, present within both the structural and nonstructural genes. The infectious clone of this virus containing all nine culture-adapted mutations had 10-fold-higher levels of RNA replication and RNA release into the supernatant but had nearly 1,000-fold-higher viral titers, resulting in an increased specific infectivity compared to wild-type JFH-1. Two mutations, identified in the p7 polypeptide and NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, were sufficient to increase the specific infectivity of JFH-1. We found that the culture-adapted mutation in p7 promoted an increase in the size of cellular lipid droplets following transfection of viral RNA. In addition, we found that the culture-adaptive mutations in p7 and NS5B acted synergistically to enhance the specific viral infectivity of JFH-1 by decreasing the level of sphingomyelin in the virion. Overall, these results reveal a genetic interaction between p7 and NS5B that contributes to virion specific infectivity. Furthermore, our results demonstrate a novel role for the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5B in HCV assembly. IMPORTANCE Hepatitis C virus assembly and release depend on viral interactions with host lipid metabolic pathways. Here, we demonstrate that the viral p7 and NS5B proteins cooperate to promote virion infectivity by decreasing sphingomyelin content in the virion. Our data uncover a new role for the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase NS5B and p7 proteins in contributing to virion morphogenesis. Overall, these findings are significant because they reveal a genetic interaction between p7 and NS5B, as well as an interaction with

  19. Thyroid function appears to be significantly reduced in Space-borne MDS mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saverio Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco; Curcio, Francesco; Fontanini, Elisabetta; Perrella, Giuseppina; Spelat, Renza; Zambito, Anna Maria; Damaskopoulou, Eleni; Peverini, Manola; Albi, Elisabetta

    It is known that prolonged space flights induced changes in human cardiovascular, muscu-loskeletal and nervous systems whose function is regulated by the thyroid gland but, until now, no data were reported about thyroid damage during space missions. We have demonstrated in vitro that, during space missions (Italian Soyuz Mission "ENEIDE" in 2005, Shuttle STS-120 "ESPERIA" in 2007), thyroid in vitro cultured cells did not respond to thyroid stimulating hor-mone (TSH) treatment; they appeared healthy and alive, despite their being in a pro-apopotic state characterised by a variation of sphingomyelin metabolism and consequent increase in ce-ramide content. The insensitivity to TSH was largely due to a rearrangement of specific cell membrane microdomains, acting as platforms for TSH-receptor (TEXUS-44 mission in 2008). To study if these effects were present also in vivo, as part of the Mouse Drawer System (MDS) Tissue Sharing Program, we performed experiments in mice maintained onboard the Interna-tional Space Station during the long-duration (90 days) exploration mission STS-129. After return to earth, the thyroids isolated from the 3 animals were in part immediately frozen to study the morphological modification in space and in part immediately used to study the effect of TSH treatment. For this purpose small fragments of tissue were treated with 10-7 or 10-8 M TSH for 1 hour by using untreated fragments as controls. Then the fragments were fixed with absolute ethanol for 10 min at room temperature and centrifuged for 20 min. at 3000 x g. The supernatants were used for cAMP analysis whereas the pellet were used for protein amount determination and for immunoblotting analysis of TSH-receptor, sphingomyelinase and sphingomyelin-synthase. The results showed a modification of the thyroid structure and also the values of cAMP production after treatment with 10-7 M TSH for 1 hour were significantly lower than those obtained in Earth's gravity. The treatment with TSH

  20. Reconstituting the barrier properties of a water-tight epithelial membrane by design of leaflet-specific liposomes.

    PubMed

    Hill, W G; Zeidel, M L

    2000-09-29

    To define aspects of lipid composition and bilayer asymmetry critical to barrier function, we examined the permeabilities of liposomes that model individual leaflets of the apical membrane of a barrier epithelium, Madin-Darby canine kidney type 1 cells. Using published lipid compositions we prepared exofacial liposomes containing phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, glycosphingolipids, and cholesterol; and cytoplasmic liposomes containing phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and cholesterol. The osmotic permeability of cytoplasmic liposomes to water (P(f)), solutes, and NH(3) was 18-90-fold higher than for the exofacial liposomes (P(f(ex)) = 2.4 +/- 0.4 x 10(-4) cm/s, P(f(cy)) = 4.4 +/- 0.3 x 10(-3) cm/s; P(glycerol(ex)) = 2.5 +/- 0.3 x 10(-8) cm/s, P(glycerol(cy)) = 2.2 +/- 0.02 x 10(-6) cm/s; P(NH3(ex)) = 0. 13 +/- 0.4 x 10(-4) cm/s, P(NH3(cy)) = 7.9 +/- 1.0 x 10(-3) cm/s). By contrast, the apparent proton permeability of exofacial liposomes was 4-fold higher than cytoplasmic liposomes (P(H+(ex)) = 1.1 +/- 0. 1 x 10(-2) cm/s, P(H+(cy)) = 2.7 +/- 0.6 x 10(-3) cm/s). By adding single leaflet permeabilities, we calculated a theoretical P(f) for a Madin-Darby canine kidney apical membrane of 4.6 x 10(-4) cm/s, which compares favorably with experimentally determined values. In exofacial liposomes lacking glycosphingolipids or sphingomyelin, permeabilities were 2-7-fold higher, indicating that both species play a role in barrier function. Removal of cholesterol resulted in 40-280-fold increases in permeability. We conclude: 1) that we have reconstituted the biophysical properties of a barrier membrane, 2) that the barrier resides in the exofacial leaflet, 3) that both sphingomyelin and glycosphingolipids play a role in reducing membrane permeability but that there is an absolute requirement for cholesterol to mediate this effect, 4) that these results further validate the hypothesis that each leaflet offers an independent resistance to permeation, and 5) that

  1. Ceramide formation mediated by acid sphingomyelinase facilitates endosomal escape of caliciviruses.

    PubMed

    Shivanna, Vinay; Kim, Yunjeong; Chang, Kyeong-Ok

    2015-09-01

    Our recent results demonstrated that bile acids facilitate virus escape from the endosomes into the cytoplasm for successful replication of porcine enteric calicivirus (PEC). We report a novel finding that bile acids can be substituted by cold treatment for endosomal escape and virus replication. This endosomal escape by cold treatment or bile acids is associated with ceramide formation by acid sphingomyelinase (ASM). ASM catalyzes hydrolysis of sphingomyelin into ceramide, which is known to destabilize lipid bilayer. Treatment of LLC-PK cells with bile acids or cold led to ceramide formation, and small molecule antagonists or siRNA of ASM blocked ceramide formation in the endosomes and significantly reduced PEC replication. Inhibition of ASM resulted in the retention of PEC, feline calicivirus or murine norovirus in the endosomes in correlation with reduced viral replication. These results suggest the importance of viral escape from the endosomes for the replication of various caliciviruses. PMID:25985440

  2. WIP modulates dendritic spine actin cytoskeleton by transcriptional control of lipid metabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Franco-Villanueva, Ana; Fernández-López, Estefanía; Gabandé-Rodríguez, Enrique; Bañón-Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Esteban, Jose Antonio; Antón, Inés M; Ledesma, María Dolores

    2014-08-15

    We identify Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP)-interacting protein (WIP) as a novel component of neuronal synapses whose absence increases dendritic spine size and filamentous actin levels in an N-WASP/Arp2/3-independent, RhoA/ROCK/profilinIIa-dependent manner. These effects depend on the reduction of membrane sphingomyelin (SM) due to transcriptional upregulation of neutral sphingomyelinase (NSM) through active RhoA; this enhances RhoA binding to the membrane, raft partitioning and activation in steady state but prevents RhoA changes in response to stimulus. Inhibition of NSM or SM addition reverses RhoA, filamentous actin and functional anomalies in synapses lacking WIP. Our findings characterize WIP as a link between membrane lipid composition and actin cytoskeleton at dendritic spines. They also contribute to explain cognitive deficits shared by individuals bearing mutations in the region assigned to the gene encoding for WIP.

  3. Identification and evaluation of neutral sphingomyelinase 2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Hun; Kim, Sung Hyun; Ahn, Kyong Hoon; Kim, Seok Kyun; Choi, Jong Min; Ji, Jung Eun; Won, Jong Hoon; Park, Yang Hui; Lim, Chaemin; Kim, Sanghee; Kim, Dae Kyong

    2011-02-01

    Sphingomyelinase catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to generate ceramide, an important molecule involved in the regulation of various cellular responses. In this study, we partially purified the neutral sphingomyelinase2 (nSMase2) and identified the inhibitors, D-lyxophytosphingosine and D-arabino-phytosphingosine, which have an inhibitory effect on nSMase2 in a concentration-dependent manner. A Dixon plot of each phytosphingosines revealed their probable inhibitory pattern, i.e., apparent competitive inhibition. These compounds did not inhibit the Mg(2+)-independent neutral SMase activity, although the known nSMase2 inhibitor, GW4869, showed inhibitory effects on Mg(2+)-independent neutral SMase activity. Further, the two phytosphingosines specifically inhibited the ceramide generation regulated by nSMase2.

  4. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X.; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann–Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann–Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  5. Application of PCDA/SPH/CHO/Lysine vesicles to detect pathogenic bacteria in chicken.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Taíla V; Soares, Nilda de F F; de Andrade, Nélio J; Silva, Deusanilde J; Medeiros, Eber Antônio A; Badaró, Amanda T

    2015-04-01

    During the course of infection, Salmonella must successively survive the harsh acid stress of the stomach and multiply into a mild acidic compartment within macrophages. Inducible amino acid decarboxylases are known to promote adaptation to acidic environments, as lysine decarboxylation to cadaverine. The idea of Salmonella defenses responses could be employed in systems as polydiacetylene (PDA) to detect this pathogen so important to public health system. Beside that PDA is an important substance because of the unique optical property; that undergoes a colorimetric transitions by various external stimuli. Therefore 10,12-pentacosadyinoic acid (PCDA)/Sphingomyelin(SPH)/Cholesterol(CHO)/Lysine system was tested to determine the colorimetric response induced by Salmonella choleraesuis. PCDA/SPH/CHO/Lysine vesicles showed a colour change even in low S. choleraesuis concentration present in laboratory conditions and in chicken meat. Thus, this work showed a PCDA/SPH/CHO/Lysine vesicle application to simplify routine analyses in food industry, as chicken meat industry.

  6. Crystal structure of mammalian acid sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Gorelik, Alexei; Illes, Katalin; Heinz, Leonhard X; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Nagar, Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, ASM, SMPD1) converts sphingomyelin into ceramide, modulating membrane properties and signal transduction. Inactivating mutations in ASMase cause Niemann-Pick disease, and its inhibition is also beneficial in models of depression and cancer. To gain a better understanding of this critical therapeutic target, we determined crystal structures of mammalian ASMase in various conformations. The catalytic domain adopts a calcineurin-like fold with two zinc ions and a hydrophobic track leading to the active site. Strikingly, the membrane interacting saposin domain assumes either a closed globular conformation independent from the catalytic domain, or an open conformation, which establishes an interface with the catalytic domain essential for activity. Structural mapping of Niemann-Pick mutations reveals that most of them likely destabilize the protein's fold. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanism of ASMase function, and provides a platform for the rational development of ASMase inhibitors and therapeutic use of recombinant ASMase. PMID:27435900

  7. Microbial sphingomyelinase induces RhoA-mediated reorganization of the apical brush border membrane and is protective against invasion.

    PubMed

    Saslowsky, David E; Thiagarajah, Jay R; McCormick, Beth A; Lee, Jean C; Lencer, Wayne I

    2016-04-01

    The apical brush border membrane (BBM) of intestinal epithelial cells forms a highly structured and dynamic environmental interface that serves to regulate cellular physiology and block invasion by intestinal microbes and their products. How the BBM dynamically responds to pathogenic and commensal bacterial signals can define intestinal homeostasis and immune function. We previously found that in model intestinal epithelium, the conversion of apical membrane sphingomyelin to ceramide by exogenous bacterial sphingomyelinase (SMase) protected against the endocytosis and toxicity of cholera toxin. Here we elucidate a mechanism of action by showing that SMase induces a dramatic, reversible, RhoA-dependent alteration of the apical cortical F-actin network. Accumulation of apical membrane ceramide is necessary and sufficient to induce the actin phenotype, and this coincides with altered membrane structure and augmented innate immune function as evidenced by resistance to invasion by Salmonella. PMID:26864627

  8. Analysis of Sphingolipid Synthesis and Transport by Metabolic Labeling of Cultured Cells with [³H]Serine.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, Neale D

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of lipid biosynthesis by radioactive precursor incorporation provides information on metabolic rates and the identity of rate-limiting enzymes and transporters. The biosynthesis of sphingolipids in cultured cells is initiated in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by the formation of a sphingoid base from serine and palmitoyl-CoA. N-acylation of the sphingoid base produces ceramide, which is transported to the Golgi apparatus where phosphocholine or carbohydrate headgroups are added to form sphingomyelin (SM) and complex glycosphingolipids (GSLs), respectively. Herein is described a protocol to measure ceramide and SM biosynthesis in cultured cells based on [(3)H]serine incorporation at the first step in the pathway. The method can be used to assay the effect of pharmacological and genetic manipulations on ceramide synthesis and transport to the Golgi apparatus. PMID:26552685

  9. Isolation and Analysis of Detergent-Resistant Membrane Fractions.

    PubMed

    Aureli, Massimo; Grassi, Sara; Sonnino, Sandro; Prinetti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    The hypothesis that the Golgi apparatus is capable of sorting proteins and sending them to the plasma membrane through "lipid rafts," membrane lipid domains highly enriched in glycosphingolipids, sphingomyelin, ceramide, and cholesterol, was formulated by van Meer and Simons in 1988 and came to a turning point when it was suggested that lipid rafts could be isolated thanks to their resistance to solubilization by some detergents, namely Triton X-100. An incredible number of papers have described the composition and properties of detergent-resistant membrane fractions. However, the use of this method has also raised the fiercest criticisms. In this chapter, we would like to discuss the most relevant methodological aspects related to the preparation of detergent-resistant membrane fractions, and to discuss the importance of discriminating between what is present on a cell membrane and what we can prepare from cell membranes in a laboratory tube.

  10. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  11. Selective analysis of lipids by thin-layer chromatography blot matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zaima, Nobuhiro; Goto-Inoue, Naoko; Adachi, Kohsuke; Setou, Mitsutoshi

    2011-01-01

    Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is an essential method for food composition analyses such as lipid nutrition analysis. TLC can be used to obtain information about the lipid composition of foods; however, it cannot be used for analyses at the molecular level. Recently we developed a new method that combines matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry (MALDI-IMS) with TLC-blotting (TLC-Blot-MALDI-IMS). The combination of MALDI-IMS and TLC blotting enabled detailed and sensitive analyses of lipids. In this study, we applied TLC-Blot-MALDI-IMS for analysis of major phospholipids extracted from bluefin tuna. We showed that TLC-Blot-MALDI-IMS analysis could visualize and identify major phospholipids such as phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin.

  12. Sortilin is associated with the chlamydial inclusion and is modulated during infection.

    PubMed

    Teo, Wei Xuan; Kerr, Markus Charles; Huston, Wilhelmina May; Teasdale, Rohan David

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia species are obligate intracellular pathogens that have a major impact on human health. The pathogen replicates within an intracellular niche called an inclusion and is thought to rely heavily on host-derived proteins and lipids, including ceramide. Sortilin is a transmembrane receptor implicated in the trafficking of acid sphingomyelinase, which is responsible for catalysing the breakdown of sphingomyelin to ceramide. In this study, we examined the role of sortilin in Chlamydia trachomatis L2 development. Western immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry analysis revealed that endogenous sortilin is not only associated with the inclusion, but that protein levels increase in infected cells. RNAi-mediated depletion of sortilin, however, had no detectable impact on ceramide delivery to the inclusion or the production of infectious progeny. This study demonstrates that whilst Chlamydia redirects sortilin trafficking to the chlamydial inclusion, RNAi knockdown of sortilin expression is insufficient to determine if this pathway is requisite for the development of the pathogen. PMID:26962046

  13. Method of fabricating lipid bilayer membranes on solid supports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cho, Nam-Joon (Inventor); Frank, Curtis W. (Inventor); Glenn, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Cheong, Kwang Ho (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of producing a planar lipid bilayer on a solid support. With this method, a solution of lipid vesicles is first deposited on the solid support. Next, the lipid vesicles are destabilized by adding an amphipathic peptide solution to the lipid vesicle solution. This destabilization leads to production of a planar lipid bilayer on the solid support. The present invention also provides a supported planar lipid bilayer, where the planar lipid bilayer is made of naturally occurring lipids and the solid support is made of unmodified gold or titanium oxide. Preferably, the supported planar lipid bilayer is continuous. The planar lipid bilayer may be made of any naturally occurring lipid or mixture of lipids, including, but not limited to phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinsitol, cardiolipin, cholesterol, and sphingomyelin.

  14. Niemann-Pick disease type B: first-trimester prenatal diagnosis on chorionic villi and biochemical study of a foetus at 12 weeks of development.

    PubMed

    Vanier, M T; Boue, J; Dumez, Y

    1985-10-01

    First-trimester prenatal diagnosis of Niemann-Pick disease type B was successfully achieved by sphingomyelinase assay on chorionic villi, performed directly and after 3 weeks' culture. Cultured chorionic cells were normally found to exhibit sphingomyelinase activities 3 times higher than seen in the solid biopsy, and showed a lower residual activity in the affected foetus. Their study may thus prove helpful in dubious cases. Enzyme activities and lipid patterns were studied in several organs of the aborted foetus. Lysosomal sphingomyelinase was deficient in all tissues. The lipid pattern of the brain was normal for the age, but a 4-fold sphingomyelin storage had already taken place in the liver (2.5-fold in the spleen) of this 12-gestational week foetus.

  15. Roles and regulation of Neutral Sphingomyelinase-2 in cellular and pathological processes

    PubMed Central

    Shamseddine, Achraf A.; Airola, Michael V.; Hannun, Yusuf A.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the functions of ceramide signaling has advanced tremendously over the past decade. In this review, we focus on the roles and regulation of neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2), an enzyme that generates the bioactive lipid ceramide through the hydrolysis of the membrane lipid sphingomyelin. A large body of work has now implicated nSMase2 in a diverse set of cellular functions, physiological processes, and disease pathologies. We discuss different aspects of this enzyme’s regulation from transcriptional, post-translational, and biochemical. Furthermore, we highlight nSMase2 involvement in cellular processes including inflammatory signaling, exosome generation, cell growth, and apoptosis, which in turn play important roles in pathologies such as cancer metastasis, Alzheimer’s disease, and other organ systems disorders. Lastly, we examine avenues where targeted nSMase2-inhibition may be clinically beneficial in disease scenarios. PMID:25465297

  16. Quantification of phospholipids in infant formula and growing up milk by high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detector.

    PubMed

    Braun, Marcel; Flück, Brigitte; Cotting, Claudia; Monard, Florence; Giuffrida, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipids (PLs) are well known for their excellent emulsifier properties and more recently for their biological functions, such as cell signing, brain development, immune function, heart health, and cancer prevention, besides their physiological role in membrane composition. In dairy products, PLs represent 0.2-1% of milk fat. The milk PLs comprise phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and sphingomyelin (SPH) as the major compounds; phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine are minor PLs. A new generation of dairy products claiming PL family content, such as SPH, is being produced; therefore, a validated method for quantifying PL families in dairy products is needed. In this study, an HPLC-evaporative light scattering detector method to quantify the most abundant milk PL families, i.e., PC, PE, and SPH, in infant formula and growing up milk was developed and validated. PMID:20629400

  17. Flagellar membranes are rich in raft-forming phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Serricchio, Mauro; Schmid, Adrien W.; Steinmann, Michael E.; Sigel, Erwin; Rauch, Monika; Julkowska, Daria; Bonnefoy, Serge; Fort, Cécile; Bastin, Philippe; Bütikofer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The observation that the membranes of flagella are enriched in sterols and sphingolipids has led to the hypothesis that flagella might be enriched in raft-forming lipids. However, a detailed lipidomic analysis of flagellar membranes is not available. Novel protocols to detach and isolate intact flagella from Trypanosoma brucei procyclic forms in combination with reverse-phase liquid chromatography high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry allowed us to determine the phospholipid composition of flagellar membranes relative to whole cells. Our analyses revealed that phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, ceramide and the sphingolipids inositol phosphorylceramide and sphingomyelin are enriched in flagella relative to whole cells. In contrast, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol are strongly depleted in flagella. Within individual glycerophospholipid classes, we observed a preference for ether-type over diacyl-type molecular species in membranes of flagella. Our study provides direct evidence for a preferential presence of raft-forming phospholipids in flagellar membranes of T. brucei. PMID:26276100

  18. Lateral organization of complex lipid mixtures from multiscale modeling

    PubMed Central

    Tumaneng, Paul W.; Pandit, Sagar A.; Zhao, Guijun; Scott, H. L.

    2010-01-01

    The organizational properties of complex lipid mixtures can give rise to functionally important structures in cell membranes. In model membranes, ternary lipid-cholesterol (CHOL) mixtures are often used as representative systems to investigate the formation and stabilization of localized structural domains (“rafts”). In this work, we describe a self-consistent mean-field model that builds on molecular dynamics simulations to incorporate multiple lipid components and to investigate the lateral organization of such mixtures. The model predictions reveal regions of bimodal order on ternary plots that are in good agreement with experiment. Specifically, we have applied the model to ternary mixtures composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine:18:0 sphingomyelin:CHOL. This work provides insight into the specific intermolecular interactions that drive the formation of localized domains in these mixtures. The model makes use of molecular dynamics simulations to extract interaction parameters and to provide chain configuration order parameter libraries. PMID:20151760

  19. Quantification of phospholipids in infant formula and growing up milk by high-performance liquid chromatography with evaporative light scattering detector.

    PubMed

    Braun, Marcel; Flück, Brigitte; Cotting, Claudia; Monard, Florence; Giuffrida, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipids (PLs) are well known for their excellent emulsifier properties and more recently for their biological functions, such as cell signing, brain development, immune function, heart health, and cancer prevention, besides their physiological role in membrane composition. In dairy products, PLs represent 0.2-1% of milk fat. The milk PLs comprise phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), and sphingomyelin (SPH) as the major compounds; phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylserine are minor PLs. A new generation of dairy products claiming PL family content, such as SPH, is being produced; therefore, a validated method for quantifying PL families in dairy products is needed. In this study, an HPLC-evaporative light scattering detector method to quantify the most abundant milk PL families, i.e., PC, PE, and SPH, in infant formula and growing up milk was developed and validated.

  20. Microbial sphingomyelinase induces RhoA-mediated reorganization of the apical brush border membrane and is protective against invasion

    PubMed Central

    Saslowsky, David E.; Thiagarajah, Jay R.; McCormick, Beth A.; Lee, Jean C.; Lencer, Wayne I.

    2016-01-01

    The apical brush border membrane (BBM) of intestinal epithelial cells forms a highly structured and dynamic environmental interface that serves to regulate cellular physiology and block invasion by intestinal microbes and their products. How the BBM dynamically responds to pathogenic and commensal bacterial signals can define intestinal homeostasis and immune function. We previously found that in model intestinal epithelium, the conversion of apical membrane sphingomyelin to ceramide by exogenous bacterial sphingomyelinase (SMase) protected against the endocytosis and toxicity of cholera toxin. Here we elucidate a mechanism of action by showing that SMase induces a dramatic, reversible, RhoA-dependent alteration of the apical cortical F-actin network. Accumulation of apical membrane ceramide is necessary and sufficient to induce the actin phenotype, and this coincides with altered membrane structure and augmented innate immune function as evidenced by resistance to invasion by Salmonella. PMID:26864627

  1. Egg phospholipids and cardiovascular health.

    PubMed

    Blesso, Christopher N

    2015-04-01

    Eggs are a major source of phospholipids (PL) in the Western diet. Dietary PL have emerged as a potential source of bioactive lipids that may have widespread effects on pathways related to inflammation, cholesterol metabolism, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) function. Based on pre-clinical studies, egg phosphatidylcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin appear to regulate cholesterol absorption and inflammation. In clinical studies, egg PL intake is associated with beneficial changes in biomarkers related to HDL reverse cholesterol transport. Recently, egg PC was shown to be a substrate for the generation of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a gut microbe-dependent metabolite associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. More research is warranted to examine potential serum TMAO responses with chronic egg ingestion and in different populations, such as diabetics. In this review, the recent basic science, clinical, and epidemiological findings examining egg PL intake and risk of CVD are summarized.

  2. [The characteristics of the radiation-initiated peroxidation of the phosphatidylcholine making up liposomes containing phospholipids which are susceptible to free-radical fragmentation].

    PubMed

    Davydov, V Iu; Kisel', M A; Shadyro, O I; Iurkova, I L

    2000-01-01

    The regularities of accumulation of conjugated dienes and thiobarbituric acid (TBA)-reactive substances under gamma-irradiation of liposomes from rat liver phosphatidylcholine (PC) and its mixtures with the resistant to lipid peroxidation saturated phospholipids and bovine brain sphingomyelin (SM) were studied. It was established that the incorporation of negatively charged dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanol (DPPET) into lipid bilayer resulted in the increase of primary and secondary products of LPO, whereas neutral dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and SM involving in the phospholipid mixtures inhibited the peroxidation of PC. For anionic phospholipids, DPPG had more profound activating action on LPO, amongst the neutral phospholipids SM was more potent inhibitor of the reaction. Unlike DPPET and DPPC, DPPG and SM were subjected to free radical fragmentation on gamma-radiation. It is suggested that the intermediates and products of free radical fragmentation may modulate the progress of LPO. PMID:11031481

  3. Stable and Unstable Lipid Domains in Ceramide-Containing Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Boulgaropoulos, Beate; Arsov, Zoran; Laggner, Peter; Pabst, Georg

    2011-01-01

    We applied x-ray diffraction, calorimetry, and infrared spectroscopy to lipid mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and ceramide. This combination of experimental techniques allowed us to probe the stability and structural properties of coexisting lipid domains without resorting to any molecular probes. In particular, we found unstable microscopic domains (compositional/phase fluctuations) in the absence of ceramide, and macroscopically separated fluid and gel phases upon addition of ceramide. We also observed phase fluctuations in the presence of ceramide within the broad phase transition regions. We compare our results with fluorescence spectroscopy data and complement the previously reported phase diagram. We also obtained electron paramagnetic resonance data to assess the possible limitations of techniques employing a single label. Our study demonstrates the necessity of applying a combination of experimental techniques to probe local/global structural and fast/slow motional properties in complex lipid mixtures. PMID:21539783

  4. Bioactivity and mechanism of action of Lophozozymus pictor toxin.

    PubMed

    Lau, C O; Tan, C H; Li, Q T; Ng, F H; Yuen, R; Khoo, H E

    1995-07-01

    The bioactivity of Lophozozymus pictor toxin (LPTX) and the possible mechanism of action of the purified toxin are described. LPTX is found to possess palytoxin-like bioactivities. Besides exhibiting cytotoxic and haemolytic properties, LPTX causes the release of K+ from erythrocytes and inhibits 2-[14C]deoxy-D-glucose uptake into HeLa cells. Although LPTX acts on HeLa cell and erythrocyte membranes, it does not interact with mitochondrial or liposomal membranes containing different phospholipid compositions. Ouabain, but not sphingomyelin, is able to prevent the toxic effects of LPTX. This antagonistic effect of ouabain on LPTX suggests that the toxin might mediate its toxic effects via the membrane Na+/K(+)-ATPase but not through interaction with membrane lipids.

  5. [Serum lipid spectrum in patients with obstructive jaundice].

    PubMed

    Makarov, V K; Mokhov, E M; Mosiagin, A V

    2007-11-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the serum lipid profile in patients with obstructive jaundice (OJ) of various genesis versus those with chronic viral hepatitis B (CVHB). The serum lipid profile was studied in 50 patients with OJ whose cause was cancer diseases and calculous cholecystitis in 20 and 30 patients, respectively. Thirty patients with CVHB were examined as a control group. In patients with OJ, the relative serum content of phospholipids was found to be twice less than that in patients with CVHB. In patients with OJ, hyperlipemia was mainly caused by free cholesterol or cholesterol esters. As compared with the patients with calculous cholecystitis and CVHB, the patients with cancer diseases had low sphingomyelin levels; this fact may be used as an additional measure in detecting OJ of cancer genesis. PMID:18228656

  6. Use of canonical variate analysis biplot in examination of choline content data of some foods.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Baris; Atakan, Cemal

    2011-03-01

    Adequate intake (AI) of choline as part of the daily diet can help prevent major diseases. Low choline intake is a major risk factor for liver and several neurological disorders. Extreme choline consumption may cause diseases such as hypotension, sweating, diarrhea, and fishy body odor. The AI of choline is 425 mg/day for adult women; higher for pregnant and lactating women. The AI for adult men is 550 mg/day. The total choline content of foods is calculated as the sum of free choline, glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. These are called the choline variables. Observed values of choline variables may be different in amounts of nutrients. So different food groups in terms of choline variables are useful to compare. The present paper shows the advantages of using canonical variate analysis biplot to optimally separate groups and explore the differentiality of choline variables amounts in foods.

  7. Ceramide transport from endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi apparatus is not vesicle-mediated.

    PubMed

    Kok, J W; Babia, T; Klappe, K; Egea, G; Hoekstra, D

    1998-08-01

    Ceramide (Cer) transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus was measured under conditions that block vesicle-mediated protein transfer. This was done either in intact cells by reducing the incubation temperature to 15 degreesC, or in streptolysin O-permeabilized cells by manipulating the intracellular environment. In both cases, Cer transfer was not inhibited, as demonstrated by the biosynthesis of ceramide monohexosides and sphingomyelin (SM) de novo from metabolically (with [14C]serine) labelled Cer. This assay is based on the knowledge that Cer is synthesized, starting from serine and palmitoyl-CoA, at the ER, whereas glycosphingolipids and SM are synthesized in the (early) Golgi apparatus. Formation of [14C]glycosphingolipids and [14C]SM was observed under conditions that block vesicle-mediated vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein transport. These results indicate that [14C]Cer is transferred from ER to Golgi by a non-vesicular mechanism.

  8. Reconstituting ring-rafts in bud-mimicking topography of model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Lee, In-Ho; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Park, Seung Chul; Oh, Soojung; Jordan, Luke R.; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Jeon, Noo Li; Lee, Byoungho; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2014-07-01

    During vesicular trafficking and release of enveloped viruses, the budding and fission processes dynamically remodel the donor cell membrane in a protein- or a lipid-mediated manner. In all cases, in addition to the generation or relief of the curvature stress, the buds recruit specific lipids and proteins from the donor membrane through restricted diffusion for the development of a ring-type raft domain of closed topology. Here, by reconstituting the bud topography in a model membrane, we demonstrate the preferential localization of cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains in the collar band of the bud-neck interfaced with the donor membrane. The geometrical approach to the recapitulation of the dynamic membrane reorganization, resulting from the local radii of curvatures from nanometre-to-micrometre scales, offers important clues for understanding the active roles of the bud topography in the sorting and migration machinery of key signalling proteins involved in membrane budding.

  9. The relation between sphingomyelinase activity, lipid peroxide oxidation and NO-releasing in mice liver and brain.

    PubMed

    Alessenko, A V; Shupik, M A; Bugrova, A E; Dudnik, L B; Shingarova, L N; Mikoyan, A; Vanin, A F

    2005-10-24

    We used animal models to study connection between oxidating system and sphingomyelin signaling cascade, because this models are more close related to people disease. Activation of n-sphingomyelinase (n-SMase) in mice liver and brain is coincided in time with increased level of peroxide products (conjugated dienes) after injection of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). We found that ceramide can induce peroxide oxidation and lead to accumulation of TNF-alpha in animal organs. Nitric oxide (NO) donors (S-nitrosoglutathione and dinitrosyl iron complex) reversibly inhibited activity of n-SMase and decreased level of lipid peroxidation products. This data proposed that both SMase and messengers of oxidative systems could be targets for NO-derived oxidants. PMID:16225875

  10. Resveratrol induces ordered domains formation in biomembranes: Implication for its pleiotropic action.

    PubMed

    Neves, Ana Rute; Nunes, Cláudia; Reis, Salette

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenol compound with great value in cancer therapy, cardiovascular protection, and neurodegenerative disorders. The mechanism by which resveratrol exerts such pleiotropic effects is not yet clear and there is a huge need to understand the influence of this compound on the regulation of lipid domains formation on membrane structure. The aim of the present study was to reveal potential molecular interactions between resveratrol and lipid rafts found in cell membranes by means of Förster resonance energy transfer, DPH fluorescence quenching, and triton X-100 detergent resistance assay. Liposomes composed of egg phosphatidylcholine, cholesterol, and sphingomyelin were used as model membranes. The results revealed that resveratrol induces phase separation and formation of liquid-ordered domains in bilayer structures. The formation of such tightly packed lipid rafts is important for different signal transduction pathways, through the regulation of membrane-associating proteins, that can justify several pharmacological activities of this compound. PMID:26456556

  11. Chemical and hemolytic properties of sphingolipids modified by ozonolysis and reduction.

    PubMed

    Uemura, K; Hara, A; Taketomi, T

    1976-06-01

    Various sphingolipids were chemically modified in their sphingosine base by ozonolysis and reduction. The derivatives obtained from Forssman globoside, globoside I, galactosyl ceramide, and sphingomyelin were purified and all were found to be hemolytic. The presence of cholesterol could inhibit this activity. The simultaneous cleavage at a double bond in the fatty acid as well as in the sphingosine of Forssman globoside resulted in the formation of a more polar compound with no detectable hemolytic activity. The haptenic reactivity was retained after ozonolysis and reduction of Forssman globoside, as shown by precipitin line formation in agar gel with appropriate antibodies. The results indicate that this modification procedure may be useful in studies of the physiological and immunological properties of sphingolipids.

  12. Characterizations of sphingosylphosphorylcholine-induced scratching responses in ICR mice using naltrexon, capsaicin, ketotifen and Y-27632.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyoung June; Kim, Hyuk; Han, Eun-Sil; Park, Sun-Mi; Koh, Jae-Young; Kim, Kwang-Mi; Noh, Min-Soo; Kim, Jung-Ju; Lee, Chang-Hoon

    2008-03-31

    Sphingosylphosphorylcholine (SPC) is upregulated in the stratum corneum of atopic dermatitis patients by sphingomyelin deacylase. We conducted an investigation, both to confirm that intradermal injection of SPC elicits scratching in mice, and to elucidate the detailed mechanism of the SPC-induced itch-scratch response. Intradermal administration of SPC increased the incidence of scratching behavior in a dose-dependent manner. SPC-induced scratching could be suppressed, significantly, by the mu-opoid receptor antagonist, naltrexon, the vaniloid receptor agonist, capsaicin, and the histamine H1 receptor antagonist ketotifen. d-erythro SPC, one of the SPC stereotypes, could elicit the scratch response, but not l-threo SPC. Y-27632 (1 mg/kg, an inhibitor of Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK)), was found to suppress SPC-induced scratching. Both the stereospecificity of SPC and the involvement of the Rho/ROCK pathway suggested that SPC-induced scratching is related to the receptor.

  13. Dynamic Reorganization and Correlation among Lipid Raft Components.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Mónica M; Hovis, Jennifer S; Moss, Frank R; Boxer, Steven G

    2016-08-10

    Lipid rafts are widely believed to be an essential organizational motif in cell membranes. However, direct evidence for interactions among lipid and/or protein components believed to be associated with rafts is quite limited owing, in part, to the small size and intrinsically dynamic interactions that lead to raft formation. Here, we exploit the single negative charge on the monosialoganglioside GM1, commonly associated with rafts, to create a gradient of GM1 in response to an electric field applied parallel to a patterned supported lipid bilayer. The composition of this gradient is visualized by imaging mass spectrometry using a NanoSIMS. Using this analytical method, added cholesterol and sphingomyelin, both neutral and not themselves displaced by the electric field, are observed to reorganize with GM1. This dynamic reorganization provides direct evidence for an attractive interaction among these raft components into some sort of cluster. At steady state we obtain an estimate for the composition of this cluster.

  14. Mitochondrial Respiration Controls Lysosomal Function during Inflammatory T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2015-09-01

    The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4(+) T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation, and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward proinflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD(+) levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases.

  15. Regulation of the NPC2 protein-mediated cholesterol trafficking by membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Gallala, Hichem D; Breiden, Bernadette; Sandhoff, Konrad

    2011-03-01

    Recycling and turnover of cell membranes play a critical role in cell metabolism. The internalization of membranes through the different processes of endocytosis, phagocytosis, and autophagy deliver a considerable amount of membranes and lipids to the endosomal and lysosomal system which is tasked with its degradation. Its failure to do so leads to severe fatal neurodegenerative diseases. In order to better understand how membranes are degraded, we have to investigate the complex interactions that take place in this compartment between complex membrane lipids, enzymes and lipid binding and transfer proteins involved. To this end, we developed lipid transfer and fusion assays which allow us to quantify these interactions and assess their specificity. The published results of these investigations are summarized in this article. One of our main conclusions is that we have provided evidence for the hypothesis that acid sphingomyelinase stimulates Niemann pick disease protein type 2-mediated cholesterol export substantially by converting sphingomyelin to ceramide in the inner membranes of late endosomes.

  16. Earthworm-derived pore-forming toxin lysenin and screening of its inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sukumwang, Neelanun; Umezawa, Kazuo

    2013-08-01

    Lysenin is a pore-forming toxin from the coelomic fluid of earthworm Eisenia foetida. This protein specifically binds to sphingomyelin and induces erythrocyte lysis. Lysenin consists of 297 amino acids with a molecular weight of 41 kDa. We screened for cellular signal transduction inhibitors of low molecular weight from microorganisms and plants. The purpose of the screening was to study the mechanism of diseases using the obtained inhibitors and to develop new chemotherapeutic agents acting in the new mechanism. Therefore, our aim was to screen for inhibitors of Lysenin-induced hemolysis from plant extracts and microbial culture filtrates. As a result, we isolated all-E-lutein from an extract of Dalbergia latifolia leaves. All-E-lutein is likely to inhibit the process of Lysenin-membrane binding and/or oligomer formation rather than pore formation. Additionally, we isolated tyrosylproline anhydride from the culture filtrate of Streptomyces as an inhibitor of Lysenin-induced hemolysis. PMID:23965430

  17. Changes in surfactant in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid after hemithorax irradiation in patients with mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, M.; Maasilta, P.; Kivisaari, L.; Mattson, K. )

    1990-04-01

    Experimental studies have shown that the surfactant system of the lung is affected shortly after irradiation. It is unclear, however, whether surfactant plays a role in the pathogenesis of radiation pneumonitis. In the present study surfactant components (saturated phosphatidylcholine, surfactant protein A, phosphatidylglycerol, and phosphatidylinositol) and other phospholipids of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) were studied in four patients with pleural mesothelioma before and during hemithorax irradiation (70 Gy) as well as zero, 1, 2, 3, and 4 months following irradiation. The concentrations of these same components and of soluble proteins were also estimated in the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) using urea as a marker of dilution. After radiotherapy, the concentrations of the surfactant components in ELF decreased to 12 to 55% of the control values before radiation, whereas the concentration of sphingomyelin in ELF increased ninefold. There were small changes in the other phospholipids. The concentration of soluble protein in ELF increased sevenfold. The minimum surface activity of crude BAL increased from 12 +/- 4 to 32 +/- 6 mN/m, and that of the sediment fraction of BAL increased from 7 +/- 4 to 22 +/- 6 mN/m, p less than 0.001. The protein-rich supernatant fraction of BAL from irradiated lung had a inhibitory effect on normal surfactant. There were significant correlations between the increasing severity of the radiologic changes on the one hand and, on the other, the saturated phosphatidylcholine/sphingomyelin ratio (p less than 0.001), the concentrations of soluble protein (p less than 0.001), and the concentrations of the surfactant components (p less than 0.02-0.001) in ELF.

  18. Neutron reflection study of the interaction of the eukaryotic pore-forming actinoporin equinatoxin II with lipid membranes reveals intermediate states in pore formation.

    PubMed

    Wacklin, Hanna P; Bremec, Biserka Bakrač; Moulin, Martina; Rojko, Nejc; Haertlein, Michael; Forsyth, Trevor; Anderluh, Gregor; Norton, Raymond S

    2016-04-01

    Equinatoxin II (EqtII), a eukaryotic pore-forming toxin, lyses cell membranes through a mechanism involving the insertion of its N-terminal α-helix into the membrane. EqtII pore formation is dependent on sphingomyelin (SM), although cholesterol (Chol) and membrane microdomains have also been suggested to enhance its activity. We have investigated the mechanism of EqtII binding and insertion by using neutron reflection to determine the structures of EqtII-membrane assemblies in situ. EqtII has several different modes of binding to membranes depending on the lipid composition. In pure dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes, EqtII interacts weakly and reversibly with the lipid head groups in an orientation approximately parallel to the membrane surface. The presence of sphingomyelin (SM) gives rise to a more upright orientation of EqtII, but Chol is required for insertion into the core of the membrane. Cooling the EqtII-lipid assembly below the lipid phase transition temperature leads to deep water penetration and a significant reduction in the extension of the protein outside the membrane, indicating that phase-separation plays a role in EqtII pore-formation. An inactive double-cysteine mutant of EqtII in which the α-helix is covalently tethered to the rest of the protein, interacts only reversibly with all the membranes. Releasing the α-helix in situ by reduction of the disulphide bridge, however, causes the mutant protein to penetrate in DMPC-SM-Chol membranes in a manner identical to that of the wild-type protein. Our results help clarify the early steps in pore formation by EqtII and highlight the valuable information on protein-membrane interactions available from neutron reflection measurements.

  19. Lipid composition of membrane rafts, isolated with and without detergent, from the spleen of a mouse model of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Hattersley, Kathryn J; Hein, Leanne K; Fuller, Maria

    2013-12-01

    Biological membranes are composed of functionally relevant liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains that coexist. Within the liquid-ordered domains are low-density microdomains known as rafts with a unique lipid composition that is crucial for their structure and function. Lipid raft composition is altered in sphingolipid storage disorders, and here we determined the lipid composition using a detergent and detergent-free method in spleen tissue, the primary site of pathology, in a mouse model of the sphingolipid storage disorder, Gaucher disease. The accumulating lipid, glucosylceramide, was 30- and 50-fold elevated in the rafts with the detergent and detergent-free method, respectively. Secondary accumulation of di- and trihexosylceramide resided primarily in the rafts with both methods. The phospholipids distributed differently with more than half residing in the rafts with the detergent-free method and less than 10% with the detergent method, with the exception of the fully saturated species that were primarily in the rafts. Individual isoforms of sphingomyelin correlated with detergent-free extraction and more than half resided in the raft fractions. However, this correlation was not seen with the detergent extraction method as sphingomyelin species were spread across both the raft and non-raft domains. Therefore caution must be exercised when interpreting phospholipid distribution in raft domains as it differs considerably depending on the method of isolation. Importantly, both methods revealed the same lipid alterations in the raft domains in the spleen of the Gaucher disease mouse model highlighting that either method is appropriate to determine membrane lipid changes in the diseased state.

  20. Folate intake and the MTHFR C677T genotype influence choline status in young Mexican American women☆

    PubMed Central

    Abratte, Christian M.; Wang, Wei; Li, Rui; Moriarty, David J.; Caudill, Marie A.

    2009-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported a relationship between folate status, the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) 677C→T variant and disease risk. Although folate and choline metabolism are inter-related, only limited data are available on the relationship between choline and folate status in humans. This study sought to examine the influences of folate intake and the MTHFR 677C→T variant on choline status. Mexican-American women (n =43; 14 CC, 12 CT and 17 TT) consumed 135 μg/day as dietary folate equivalents (DFE) for 7 weeks followed by randomization to 400 or 800 μg DFE/day for 7 weeks. Throughout the study, total choline intake remained unchanged at ∼350 mg/day. Plasma concentrations of betaine, choline, glycerophosphocholine, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin were measured via LC-MS/MS for Weeks 0, 7 and 14. Phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin declined ( P=.001, P=.009, respectively) in response to folate restriction and increased ( P=.08, P=.029, respectively) in response to folate treatment. The increase in phosphatidylcholine occurred in response to 800 ( P=.03) not 400 ( P=.85) μg DFE/day (week×folate interaction, P=.017). The response of phosphatidylcholine to folate intake appeared to be influenced by MTHFR C677T genotype. The decline in phosphatidylcholine during folate restriction occurred primarily in women with the CC or CT genotype and not in the TT genotype (week×genotype interaction, P=.089). Moreover, when examined independent of folate status, phosphatidylcholine was higher ( P <.05) in the TT genotype relative to the CT genotype. These data suggest that folate intake and the MTHFR C677T genotype influence choline status in humans. PMID:17588738

  1. Lipid Adaptation of Shrimp Rimicaris exoculata in Hydrothermal Vent.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Si; Ye, Mengwei; Yan, Xiaojun; Zhou, Yadong; Wang, Chunsheng; Xu, Jilin

    2015-12-01

    The shrimp Rimicaris exoculata is the most abundant species in hydrothermal vents. Lipids, the component of membranes, play an important role in maintaining their function normally in such extreme environments. In order to understand the lipid adaptation of R. exoculata (HV shrimp) to hydrothermal vents, we compared its lipid profile with the coastal shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (EZ shrimp) which lives in the euphotic zone, using ultra performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. As a result, the following lipid adaptation can be observed. (1) The proportion of 16:1 and 18:1, and non-methylene interrupted fatty acid (48.9 and 6.2 %) in HV shrimp was higher than that in EZ shrimp (12.7 and 0 %). While highly-unsaturated fatty acids were only present in the EZ shrimp. (2) Ceramide and sphingomyelin in the HV shrimp were enriched in d14:1 long chain base (96.5 and 100 %) and unsaturated fatty acids (67.1 and 57.7 %). While in the EZ shrimp, ceramide and sphingomyelin had the tendency to contain d16:1 long chain base (68.7 and 75 %) and saturated fatty acids (100 and 100 %). (3) Triacylglycerol content (1.998 ± 0.005 nmol/mg) in the HV shrimp was higher than that in the EZ shrimp (0.092 ± 0.005 nmol/mg). (4) Phosphatidylinositol and diacylglycerol containing highly-unsaturated fatty acids were absent from the HV shrimp. (5) Lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylethanolamine were rarely detected in the HV shrimp. A possible reason for such differences was the result of food resources and inhabiting environments. Therefore, these lipid classes mentioned above may be the biomarkers to compare the organisms from different environments, which will be benefit for the further exploitation of the hydrothermal environment.

  2. Acid Sphingomyelinase Promotes Endothelial Stress Response in Systemic Inflammation and Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ha-Yeun; Hupe, Daniel C; Otto, Gordon P; Sprenger, Marcel; Bunck, Alexander C; Dorer, Michael J; Bockmeyer, Clemens L; Deigner, Hans-Peter; Gräler, Markus H; Claus, Ralf A

    2016-01-01

    The pathophysiology of sepsis involves activation of acid sphingomyelinase (SMPD1) with subsequent generation of the bioactive mediator ceramide. We herein evaluate the hypothesis that the enzyme exerts biological effects in endothelial stress response. Plasma-secreted sphingomyelinase activity, ceramide generation and lipid raft formation were measured in human microcirculatory endothelial cells (HMEC-1) stimulated with serum obtained from sepsis patients. Clustering of receptors relevant for signal transduction was studied by immunostaining. The role of SMPD1 for macrodomain formation was tested by pharmacological inhibition. To confirm the involvement of the stress enzyme, direct inhibitors (amino bisphosphonates) and specific downregulation of the gene was tested with respect to ADAMTS13 expression and cytotoxicity. Plasma activity and amount of SMPD1 were increased in septic patients dependent on clinical severity. Increased breakdown of sphingomyelin to ceramide in HMECs was observed following stimulation with serum from sepsis patients in vitro. Hydrolysis of sphingomyelin, clustering of receptor complexes, such as the CD95L/Fas-receptor, as well as formation of ceramide enriched macrodomains were abrogated using functional inhibitors (desipramine and NB6). Strikingly, the stimulation of HMECs with serum obtained from sepsis patients or mixture of proinflammatory cytokines resulted in cytotoxicity and ADAMTS13 downregulation which was abrogated using desipramine, amino bisphosphonates and genetic inhibitors. SMPD1 is involved in the dysregulation of ceramide metabolism in endothelial cells leading to macrodomain formation, cytotoxicity and downregulation of ADAMTS13 expression. Functional inhibitors, such as desipramine, are capable of improving endothelial stress response during sepsis and might be considered as a pharmacological treatment strategy to obtain a favorable outcome. PMID:27341515

  3. Inhibition of Acid Sphingomyelinase Depletes Cellular Phosphatidylserine and Mislocalizes K-Ras from the Plasma Membrane.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang-Jin; van der Hoeven, Dharini; Zhou, Yong; Maekawa, Masashi; Ma, Xiaoping; Chen, Wei; Fairn, Gregory D; Hancock, John F

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras must localize to the plasma membrane for biological activity; thus, preventing plasma membrane interaction blocks K-Ras signal output. Here we show that inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) mislocalizes both the K-Ras isoforms K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B from the plasma membrane to the endomembrane and inhibits their nanoclustering. We found that fendiline, a potent ASM inhibitor, reduces the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) and cholesterol content of the inner plasma membrane. These lipid changes are causative because supplementation of fendiline-treated cells with exogenous PtdSer rapidly restores K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding, nanoclustering, and signal output. Conversely, supplementation with exogenous cholesterol restores K-Ras4A but not K-Ras4B nanoclustering. These experiments reveal different operational pools of PtdSer on the plasma membrane. Inhibition of ASM elevates cellular sphingomyelin and reduces cellular ceramide levels. Concordantly, delivery of recombinant ASM or exogenous ceramide to fendiline-treated cells rapidly relocalizes K-Ras4B and PtdSer to the plasma membrane. K-Ras4B mislocalization is also recapitulated in ASM-deficient Neimann-Pick type A and B fibroblasts. This study identifies sphingomyelin metabolism as an indirect regulator of K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B signaling through the control of PtdSer plasma membrane content. It also demonstrates the critical and selective importance of PtdSer to K-Ras4A and K-Ras4B plasma membrane binding and nanoscale spatial organization. PMID:26572827

  4. Differential regulation of acid sphingomyelinase in macrophages stimulated with oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and oxidized LDL immune complexes: role in phagocytosis and cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Truman, Jean-Philip; Al Gadban, Mohammed M; Smith, Kent J; Jenkins, Russell W; Mayroo, Nalini; Virella, Gabriel; Lopes-Virella, Maria F; Bielawska, Alicja; Hannun, Yusuf A; Hammad, Samar M

    2012-05-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) and oxLDL-containing immune complexes (oxLDL-IC) contribute to the formation of lipid-laden macrophages (foam cells). Fcγ receptors mediate uptake of oxLDL-IC, whereas scavenger receptors internalize oxLDL. We have previously reported that oxLDL-IC, but not free oxLDL, activate macrophages and prolong their survival. Sphingomyelin is a major constituent of cell membranes and lipoprotein particles and acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) hydrolyses sphingomyelin to generate the bioactive lipid ceramide. ASMase exists in two forms: lysosomal (L-ASMase) and secretory (S-ASMase). In this study we examined whether oxLDL and oxLDL-IC regulate ASMase differently, and whether ASMase mediates monocyte/macrophage activation and cytokine release. The oxLDL-IC, but not oxLDL, induced early and consistent release of catalytically active S-ASMase. The oxLDL-IC also consistently stimulated L-ASMase activity, whereas oxLDL induced a rapid transient increase in L-ASMase activity before it steadily declined below baseline. Prolonged exposure to oxLDL increased L-ASMase activity; however, activity remained significantly lower than that induced by oxLDL-IC. Further studies were aimed at defining the function of the activated ASMase. In response to oxLDL-IC, heat-shock protein 70B' (HSP70B') was up-regulated and localized with redistributed ASMase in the endosomal compartment outside the lysosome. Treatment with oxLDL-IC induced the formation and release of HSP70-containing and IL-1β-containing exosomes via an ASMase-dependent mechanism. Taken together, the results suggest that oxLDL and oxLDL-IC differentially regulate ASMase activity, and the pro-inflammatory responses to oxLDL-IC are mediated by prolonged activation of ASMase. These findings may contribute to increased understanding of mechanisms mediating macrophage involvement in atherosclerosis.

  5. Neutron reflection study of the interaction of the eukaryotic pore-forming actinoporin equinatoxin II with lipid membranes reveals intermediate states in pore formation.

    PubMed

    Wacklin, Hanna P; Bremec, Biserka Bakrač; Moulin, Martina; Rojko, Nejc; Haertlein, Michael; Forsyth, Trevor; Anderluh, Gregor; Norton, Raymond S

    2016-04-01

    Equinatoxin II (EqtII), a eukaryotic pore-forming toxin, lyses cell membranes through a mechanism involving the insertion of its N-terminal α-helix into the membrane. EqtII pore formation is dependent on sphingomyelin (SM), although cholesterol (Chol) and membrane microdomains have also been suggested to enhance its activity. We have investigated the mechanism of EqtII binding and insertion by using neutron reflection to determine the structures of EqtII-membrane assemblies in situ. EqtII has several different modes of binding to membranes depending on the lipid composition. In pure dimyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) membranes, EqtII interacts weakly and reversibly with the lipid head groups in an orientation approximately parallel to the membrane surface. The presence of sphingomyelin (SM) gives rise to a more upright orientation of EqtII, but Chol is required for insertion into the core of the membrane. Cooling the EqtII-lipid assembly below the lipid phase transition temperature leads to deep water penetration and a significant reduction in the extension of the protein outside the membrane, indicating that phase-separation plays a role in EqtII pore-formation. An inactive double-cysteine mutant of EqtII in which the α-helix is covalently tethered to the rest of the protein, interacts only reversibly with all the membranes. Releasing the α-helix in situ by reduction of the disulphide bridge, however, causes the mutant protein to penetrate in DMPC-SM-Chol membranes in a manner identical to that of the wild-type protein. Our results help clarify the early steps in pore formation by EqtII and highlight the valuable information on protein-membrane interactions available from neutron reflection measurements. PMID:26706098

  6. Organization of lipids in the artificial outer membrane of bull spermatozoa reconstructed at the air-water interface.

    PubMed

    Le Guillou, J; Ropers, M-H; Gaillard, C; David-Briand, E; Desherces, S; Schmitt, E; Bencharif, D; Amirat-Briand, L; Tainturier, D; Anton, M

    2013-08-01

    Cryopreservation is widely used to preserve the quality of bull spermatozoa over time. Sequestration of seminal plasma proteins by low density lipoproteins and formation of a protective film around the spermatozoa membrane by low density lipoproteins were the main mechanisms proposed. However, the organization of lipids in the outer leaflet of the spermatozoa membrane has been never considered as a possible parameter. This study evaluated whether a change in the organization of the outer leaflet of the spermotozoa membrane could occur during cooling down. The organization of the main components of the spermatozoa membrane's outer layer at the liquid-gas interface was analysed. Cryopreservative media (at 8° and 34°C) were used to study the miscibility of the spermatozoa membrane lipids using epifluorescence imaging and by tensiometry on Langmuir films. The results show that the four lipids: sphingomyelin, cholesterol, 1-palmitoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PC) and plasmalogen 1-(1Z-octadecenyl)-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (P-PC) were not fully miscible and their organization was controlled by temperature. Cholesterol and sphingomyelin form condensed domains surrounded by a mixture of PC and P-PC at 34°C while these condensed domains are surrounded by separated domains of pure PC and pure P-PC at 8°C. The organization of the outer membrane lipids, in particular the separation of PC and P-PC lipids during cooling down, must be considered to fully understand preservation of membrane integrity during cryopreservation. PMID:23563290

  7. Seminal vesicle autoantigen, a novel phospholipid-binding protein secreted from luminal epithelium of mouse seminal vesicle, exhibits the ability to suppress mouse sperm motility.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Y H; Chu, S T; Chen, Y H

    1999-01-01

    Seminal vesicle autoantigen (SVA) is a 19 kDa glycoprotein purified from mouse seminal vesicle secretion. It was quantified to be 0.9% (w/v) in the seminal vesicle fluid. We examined its distribution in the accessory sexual gland, characterized its binding sites on the sperm surface and assessed its effect on sperm motility. It was immunolocalized on the epithelium of the primary and secondary folds in the tissue. Mouse spermatozoa collected from caudal epididymis were devoid of SVA. A cytochemical study illustrated the presence of SVA-binding region on the entire cells. The cytochemical staining intensity for the binding of SVA to spermatozoa remained even when the cells were pretreated with protease digestion, acid or heat at 100 degrees C for 10 min. Moreover, the SVA-sperm binding could be inhibited by the dispersed sperm lipid. The specificity of interaction between (125)I-SVA and phospholipids was studied by TLC overlay techniques. The radiolabelled protein showed strong binding to purified phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylserine and weak binding to purified sphingomyelin, lysophosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine, but did not interact with phosphatidic acid, lysophosphatidic acid or phosphatidylinositol. Among the lipids extracted from spermatozoa, SVA showed strong binding to phosphatidylcholine and weak binding to sphingomyelin and neutral lipids. The assay for SVA-sperm binding with (125)I-SVA determined the IC(50) as being (3.89+/-0.65)x10(-5) M(-1), which is compatible with an apparent dissociation constant of (9.10+/-0.02)x10(-5) M(-1) estimated by fitting the data of phosphatidylcholine-perturbed SVA fluorescence to a modified Scatchard plot. SVA showed an ability to suppress sperm motility. The average path velocity, straight-line velocity and curvilinear velocity of sperm were not detectable by computer-assisted sperm assay after incubation of the cells in the presence of 0.3% SVA at 37 degrees C for more than 40 min. PMID:10493935

  8. [Tumor necrosis faсtor-alpha - potential target for neuroprotector dimebon].

    PubMed

    Alessenko, A V; Bachurin, S O; Gurianova, S V; Karatasso, Y O; Shevtsova, E F; Shingarova, L N

    2016-05-01

    Dimebon (Dimebolin) is an antihistamine drug which has been used in Russia since 1983. Recently Dimebolin has attracted renewed interest after being shown to have positive effects on persons suffering from Alzheimer's disease. Animal studies have shown that dimebon acts through multiple mechanisms, both blocking the action of neurotoxic beta-amyloid peptides and inhibiting L-type calcium channels, modulating the action of AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors. Our experiments with cell culture L929 and mice have shown that dimebon may exert its neuroprotective effect by blocking cytotoxic signals induced by proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-a which are believed to play a central role in Alzheimer's disease. Dimebon (10 mg/ml) protected mouse fibroblasts L929 against the toxic action of TNF-a. Our study included 65 male mice. TNF-a (10 mg per mouse), dimebon (0,2 mg/kg) and their combination were injected intraperitonealy. Changes in the level of molecular species of sphingomyelin and galactosyl ceramide in hippocampus, cerebellum and cerebral cortex within 30 min, 2 h, 4 h, and 24 h after injection were detected by chromato-mass-spectrometry. Maximal changes in sphingomyelin and galactosyl ceramides contents of different molecular species after single TNF-a administration were found in the hippocampus, and were less expressed in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum after 24 h. Dimebon itself did not induce changes in the sphingolipid spectrum in brain sections, but protected them against disorders induced by TNF-a in the brain. Modern strategies in the search of new therapeutic approaches are based on the multitarget properties of new drugs. According to our results TNF-a may serve as a new target for dimebon. PMID:27562995

  9. Altered Clathrin-Independent Endocytosis in Type A Niemann-Pick Disease Cells and Rescue by ICAM-1-Targeted Enzyme Delivery.

    PubMed

    Rappaport, Jeff; Manthe, Rachel L; Garnacho, Carmen; Muro, Silvia

    2015-05-01

    Pharmaceutical intervention often requires therapeutics and/or their carriers to enter cells via endocytosis. Therefore, endocytic aberrancies resulting from disease represent a key, yet often overlooked, parameter in designing therapeutic strategies. In the case of lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), characterized by lysosomal accumulation of undegraded substances, common clinical interventions rely on endocytosis of recombinant enzymes. However, the lysosomal defect in these diseases can affect endocytosis, as we recently demonstrated for clathrin-mediated uptake in patient fibroblasts with type A Niemann-Pick disease (NPD), a disorder characterized by acid sphingomylinase (ASM) deficiency and subsequent sphingomyelin storage. Using similar cells, we have examined if this is also the case for clathrin-independent pathways, including caveolae-mediated endocytosis and macropinocytosis. We observed impaired caveolin-1 enrichment at ligand-binding sites in NPD relative to wild type fibroblasts, corresponding with altered uptake of ligands and fluid-phase markers by both pathways. Similarly, aberrant lysosomal storage of sphingomyelin induced by pharmacological means also diminished uptake. Partial degradation of the lysosomal storage by untargeted recombinant ASM led to partial uptake enhancement, whereas both parameters were restored to wild type levels by ASM delivery using model polymer nanocarriers specifically targeted to intercellular adhesion molecule-1. Carriers also restored caveolin-1 enrichment at ligand-binding sites and uptake through the caveolar and macropinocytic routes. These results demonstrate a link between lysosomal storage in NPD and alterations in clathrin-independent endocytosis, which could apply to other LSDs. Hence, this study shall guide the design of therapeutic approaches using viable endocytic pathways.

  10. Ursodeoxycholic acid upregulates ERK and Akt in the protection of cardiomyocytes against CoCl2.

    PubMed

    Hanafi, N I; Mohamed, A S; Md Noor, J; Abdu, N; Hasani, Hamid; Siran, R; Osman, N J; Ab Rahim, S; Sheikh Abdul Kadir, S H

    2016-01-01

    Ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) is used to treat liver diseases and demonstrates cardioprotective effects. Accumulation of the plasma membrane sphingolipid sphingomyelin in the heart can lead to atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. Sphingomyelinases (SMases) break down sphingomyelin, producing ceramide, and inhibition of SMases activity can promote cell survival. We hypothesized that UDCA regulates activation of ERK and Akt survival signaling pathways and SMases in protecting cardiac cells against hypoxia. Neonatal cardiomyocytes were isolated from 0- to 2-day-old Sprague Dawley rats, and given 100 μM CoCl2, 150 μM H2O2, or placed in a hypoxia chamber for 24 h. The ameliorative effects of 100-μM UDCA treatment for 12 h were then assessed using MTS, QuantiGene Plex (for Smpd1 and Smpd2), and SMase assays, beating rate assessment, and western blotting (for ERK and Akt). Data were analyzed by the paired Student t-tests and one-way analyses of variance. Cell viability decreased significantly after H2O2 (85%), CoCl2 (50%), and hypoxia chamber (52%) treatments compared to the untreated control (100%). UDCA significantly counteracted the effects of chamber- and CoCl2- induced hypoxia on viability and beating rate. However, no significant differences were observed in acid SMase gene and protein expression between the untreated, CoCl2, and UDCA-CoCl2 groups. In contrast, neutral SMase gene and protein expression did significantly differ between the latter two groups. ERK and Akt phosphorylation was higher in hypoxic cardiomyocytes treated with UDCA than those given CoCl2 alone. In conclusion, UDCA regulates the activation of survival signaling proteins and SMases in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes during hypoxia. PMID:27323195

  11. Molecular mechanism of dietary phospholipid requirement of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, fry.

    PubMed

    Carmona-Antoñanzas, G; Taylor, J F; Martinez-Rubio, L; Tocher, D R

    2015-11-01

    The phospholipid (PL) requirement in fish is revealed by enhanced performance when larvae are provided PL-enriched diets. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying PL requirement in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, were fed a minimal PL diet and tissue samples from major lipid metabolic sites were dissected from fry and parr. In silico analysis and cloning techniques demonstrated that salmon possess a full set of enzymes for the endogenous production of PL. The gene expression data indicated that major PL biosynthetic genes of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho), phosphatidylethanolamine (PtdEtn) and phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) display lower expression in intestine during the early developmental stage (fry). This is consistent with the hypothesis that the intestine of salmon is immature at the early developmental stage with limited capacity for endogenous PL biosynthesis. The results also indicate that intact PtdCho, PtdEtn and PtdIns are required in the diet at this stage. PtdCho and sphingomyelin constitute the predominant PL in chylomicrons, involved in the transport of dietary lipids from the intestine to the rest of the body. As sphingomyelin can be produced from PtdCho in intestine of fry, our findings suggest that supplementation of dietary PtdCho alone during early developmental stages of Atlantic salmon would be sufficient to promote chylomicron formation. This would support efficient transport of dietary lipids, including PL precursors, from the intestine to the liver where biosynthesis of PtdEtn, PtdSer, and PtdIns is not compromised as in intestine facilitating efficient utilisation of dietary energy and the endogenous production of membrane PL for the rapidly growing and developing animal.

  12. Prenatal alcohol exposure inducing the apoptosis of mossy cells in hippocampus of SMS2-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lai; Wu, Lin; Wang, Xiaoqing; Deng, Jiexin; Ma, Zhanyou; Fan, Wenjuan; He, Weiya; Deng, Jinbo

    2015-11-01

    In order to understand the mechanisms of alcohol-induced neuroapoptosis through the ceramide pathway, sphingomyelin synthase 2 knockout (SMS2-/-) mice were used to make the prenatal alcohol exposure model, and the role of ceramide regulation on alcohol-induced neuroapoptosis was studied in the offspring. Initially the levels of serum sphingomyelin (SM) were detected with enzymatic method in P0 pups after alcohol exposure in parents. Then the apoptosis of mossy cells in the offspring hippocampus was investigated after prenatal alcohol exposure with immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assay. Finally the expression of activated Caspase 8 and activated Caspase 3 in the offspring hippocampus was detected with Western blot analysis. Our results showed that SM levels were down-regulated in a dose-dependent manner (p<0.05) after prenatal alcohol exposure in wild-type (WT) and SMS2-/- pups. However, SM levels of serum in SMS2-/- pups were significantly lower than that in WT pups (p<0.01). Furthermore, we found that mossy cells were very sensitive to alcohol-induced neuroapoptosis. In both WT pups and SMS2-/- pups, the number of apoptotic mossy cells in the hippocampus increased after prenatal alcohol exposure in a dose dependent manner (p<0.05) and decreased with the growing age. Compared with WT pups, the number of apoptotic mossy cells in the hippocampus of SMS2-/- pups increased (p<0.05). Western blotting showed that the expression of activated Caspase 8 and activated Caspase 3 of hippocampal tissue in WT pups and SMS2-/- pups increases after prenatal alcohol exposure, consistent with results from TUNEL assay and immunocytochemistry. Our study suggests that mossy cells may be the easily attacked cells for fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD), and ceramide is involved in the alcohol-induced neural apoptosis. The mechanism probably lies in the accumulated ceramide in SMS2 mice, and the increase of activated Caspase 8 and Caspase 3 promotes alcohol-induced neuroapoptosis.

  13. Lipid Adaptation of Shrimp Rimicaris exoculata in Hydrothermal Vent.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Si; Ye, Mengwei; Yan, Xiaojun; Zhou, Yadong; Wang, Chunsheng; Xu, Jilin

    2015-12-01

    The shrimp Rimicaris exoculata is the most abundant species in hydrothermal vents. Lipids, the component of membranes, play an important role in maintaining their function normally in such extreme environments. In order to understand the lipid adaptation of R. exoculata (HV shrimp) to hydrothermal vents, we compared its lipid profile with the coastal shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (EZ shrimp) which lives in the euphotic zone, using ultra performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. As a result, the following lipid adaptation can be observed. (1) The proportion of 16:1 and 18:1, and non-methylene interrupted fatty acid (48.9 and 6.2 %) in HV shrimp was higher than that in EZ shrimp (12.7 and 0 %). While highly-unsaturated fatty acids were only present in the EZ shrimp. (2) Ceramide and sphingomyelin in the HV shrimp were enriched in d14:1 long chain base (96.5 and 100 %) and unsaturated fatty acids (67.1 and 57.7 %). While in the EZ shrimp, ceramide and sphingomyelin had the tendency to contain d16:1 long chain base (68.7 and 75 %) and saturated fatty acids (100 and 100 %). (3) Triacylglycerol content (1.998 ± 0.005 nmol/mg) in the HV shrimp was higher than that in the EZ shrimp (0.092 ± 0.005 nmol/mg). (4) Phosphatidylinositol and diacylglycerol containing highly-unsaturated fatty acids were absent from the HV shrimp. (5) Lysophosphatidylcholine and lysophosphatidylethanolamine were rarely detected in the HV shrimp. A possible reason for such differences was the result of food resources and inhabiting environments. Therefore, these lipid classes mentioned above may be the biomarkers to compare the organisms from different environments, which will be benefit for the further exploitation of the hydrothermal environment. PMID:26475295

  14. Morphology and Molecular Composition of Purified Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Callens, Nathalie; Brügger, Britta; Bonnafous, Pierre; Drobecq, Hervé; Gerl, Mathias J.; Krey, Thomas; Roman-Sosa, Gleyder; Rümenapf, Till; Lambert, Olivier; Dubuisson, Jean; Rouillé, Yves

    2016-01-01

    The family Flaviviridae includes viruses that have different virion structures and morphogenesis mechanisms. Most cellular and molecular studies have been so far performed with viruses of the Hepacivirus and Flavivirus genera. Here, we studied bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a member of the Pestivirus genus. We set up a method to purify BVDV virions and analyzed their morphology by electron microscopy and their protein and lipid composition by mass spectrometry. Cryo-electron microscopy showed near spherical viral particles displaying an electron-dense capsid surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer with no visible spikes. Most particles had a diameter of 50 nm and about 2% were larger with a diameter of up to 65 nm, suggesting some size flexibility during BVDV morphogenesis. Morphological and biochemical data suggested a low envelope glycoprotein content of BVDV particles, E1 and E2 being apparently less abundant than Erns. Lipid content of BVDV particles displayed a ~2.3 to 3.5-fold enrichment in cholesterol, sphingomyelin and hexosyl-ceramide, concomitant with a 1.5 to 5-fold reduction of all glycerophospholipid classes, as compared to lipid content of MDBK cells. Although BVDV buds in the endoplasmic reticulum, its lipid content differs from a typical endoplasmic reticulum membrane composition. This suggests that BVDV morphogenesis includes a mechanism of lipid sorting. Functional analyses confirmed the importance of cholesterol and sphingomyelin for BVDV entry. Surprisingly, despite a high cholesterol and sphingolipid content of BVDV envelope, E2 was not found in detergent-resistant membranes. Our results indicate that there are differences between the structure and molecular composition of viral particles of Flaviviruses, Pestiviruses and Hepaciviruses within the Flaviviridae family. PMID:26939061

  15. Evaluation of the effect of alcohol consumption on erythrocyte lipids and vitamins in a healthy population.

    PubMed

    Simonetti, P; Brusamolino, A; Pellegrini, N; Viani, P; Clemente, G; Roggi, C; Cestaro, B

    1995-04-01

    There is epidemiological evidence that a moderate consumption of alcohol could reduce coronary heart disease. To corroborate this statement and to see how the consumption of red wine affects phospholipid and fatty acid patterns and antioxidant status, a survey was conducted on 58 adult males (20-75 years old). A questionnaire was used to discover their medical history, various constitutional and life-style factors, food habits, and nutrient intake; and the type and amount of alcoholic intake were investigated by means of a questionnaire. Subjects were divided into two groups of nondrinkers and average drinkers (mean 46.5 +/- 4.4, range 30.2-63.4 g/day), and the effect of alcohol was made on the following variables: gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase, apolipoprotein AI, apolipoprotein B, total and high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglycerides, and antioxidant vitamins were determined in plasma; and phospholipids the fatty acids of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine total cholesterol, alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene, and retinol were determined in red blood cells (RBCs). There were no significant differences between the two groups in protein, fat, carbohydrate, retinol equivalent, alpha-tocopherol content, and cholesterol/saturated fat index of their diet. Analysis of the plasma levels of biochemical variables--adjusted for age, smoking (number of cigarettes/day), and body mass index--showed a significant increase of gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase and apolipoprotein AI concentration in the average drinkers compared with nondrinkers. Plasma alpha-tocopherol and retinol levels were also significantly higher in average drinkers. In the latter group, ANCOVA demonstrated a lower percentage of sphingomyelin in RBCs, with a lower sphingomyelin/PC ratio.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Phosphoregulation of the Ceramide Transport Protein CERT at Serine 315 in the Interaction with VAMP-associated Protein (VAP) for Inter-organelle Trafficking of Ceramide in Mammalian Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Keigo; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Hanada, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    The ceramide transport protein CERT mediates the inter-organelle transport of ceramide for the synthesis of sphingomyelin, presumably through endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi membrane contact sites. CERT has a short peptide motif named FFAT, which associates with the ER-resident membrane protein VAP. We show that the phosphorylation of CERT at serine 315, which is adjacent to the FFAT motif, markedly enhanced the interaction of CERT with VAP. The phosphomimetic CERT S315E mutant exhibited higher activity to support the ER-to-Golgi transport of ceramide than the wild-type control in a semi-intact cell system, and this enhanced activity was abrogated when its FFAT motif was deleted. The level of phosphorylation of CERT at Ser-315 increased in HeLa cells treated with a sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitor or exogenous sphingomyelinase. Expression of CERT S315E induced intracellular punctate structures, to which CERT and VAP were co-localized, and the occurrence of the structure was dependent on both phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate binding and VAP binding activities of CERT. Phosphorylation of another region (named a serine-rich motif) in CERT is known to down-regulate the activity of CERT. Analysis of various CERT mutant constructs showed that the de-phosphorylation of the serine-rich motif and the phosphorylation of Ser-315 likely have the additive contribution to enhance the activity of CERT. These results demonstrate that the phosphorylation of CERT at the FFAT motif-adjacent serine affected its affinity for VAP, which may regulate the inter-organelle trafficking of ceramide in response to the perturbation of cellular sphingomyelin and/or other sphingolipids. PMID:24569996

  17. Phosphoregulation of the ceramide transport protein CERT at serine 315 in the interaction with VAMP-associated protein (VAP) for inter-organelle trafficking of ceramide in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Keigo; Kawano-Kawada, Miyuki; Hanada, Kentaro

    2014-04-11

    The ceramide transport protein CERT mediates the inter-organelle transport of ceramide for the synthesis of sphingomyelin, presumably through endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi membrane contact sites. CERT has a short peptide motif named FFAT, which associates with the ER-resident membrane protein VAP. We show that the phosphorylation of CERT at serine 315, which is adjacent to the FFAT motif, markedly enhanced the interaction of CERT with VAP. The phosphomimetic CERT S315E mutant exhibited higher activity to support the ER-to-Golgi transport of ceramide than the wild-type control in a semi-intact cell system, and this enhanced activity was abrogated when its FFAT motif was deleted. The level of phosphorylation of CERT at Ser-315 increased in HeLa cells treated with a sphingolipid biosynthesis inhibitor or exogenous sphingomyelinase. Expression of CERT S315E induced intracellular punctate structures, to which CERT and VAP were co-localized, and the occurrence of the structure was dependent on both phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate binding and VAP binding activities of CERT. Phosphorylation of another region (named a serine-rich motif) in CERT is known to down-regulate the activity of CERT. Analysis of various CERT mutant constructs showed that the de-phosphorylation of the serine-rich motif and the phosphorylation of Ser-315 likely have the additive contribution to enhance the activity of CERT. These results demonstrate that the phosphorylation of CERT at the FFAT motif-adjacent serine affected its affinity for VAP, which may regulate the inter-organelle trafficking of ceramide in response to the perturbation of cellular sphingomyelin and/or other sphingolipids.

  18. Alteration in metabolic signature and lipid metabolism in patients with angina pectoris and myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Park, Ju Yeon; Lee, Sang-Hak; Shin, Min-Jeong; Hwang, Geum-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolites are indispensable regulators of physiological and pathological processes, including atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the complex changes in lipid metabolites and metabolism that occur in patients with these conditions are incompletely understood. We performed lipid profiling to identify alterations in lipid metabolism in patients with angina and myocardial infarction (MI). Global lipid profiling was applied to serum samples from patients with CAD (angina and MI) and age-, sex-, and body mass index-matched healthy subjects using ultra-performance liquid chromatography/quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry and multivariate statistical analysis. A multivariate analysis showed a clear separation between the patients with CAD and normal controls. Lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) and lysophosphatidylethanolamine (lysoPE) species containing unsaturated fatty acids and free fatty acids were associated with an increased risk of CAD, whereas species of lysoPC and lyso-alkyl PC containing saturated fatty acids were associated with a decreased risk. Additionally, PC species containing palmitic acid, diacylglycerol, sphingomyelin, and ceramide were associated with an increased risk of MI, whereas PE-plasmalogen and phosphatidylinositol species were associated with a decreased risk. In MI patients, we found strong positive correlation between lipid metabolites related to the sphingolipid pathway, sphingomyelin, and ceramide and acute inflammatory markers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein). The results of this study demonstrate altered signatures in lipid metabolism in patients with angina or MI. Lipidomic profiling could provide the information to identity the specific lipid metabolites under the presence of disturbed metabolic pathways in patients with CAD.

  19. Release of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored enzyme ecto-5'-nucleotidase by phospholipase C: catalytic activation and modulation by the lipid bilayer.

    PubMed Central

    Lehto, M T; Sharom, F J

    1998-01-01

    Many hydrolytic enzymes are attached to the extracellular face of the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. Little is currently known about the consequences for enzyme function of anchor cleavage by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. We have examined this question for the GPI-anchored protein 5'-nucleotidase (5'-ribonucleotide phosphohydrolase; EC 3.1.3.5), both in the native lymphocyte plasma membrane, and following purification and reconstitution into defined lipid bilayer vesicles, using Bacillus thuringiensis phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). Membrane-bound, detergent-solubilized and cleaved 5'-nucleotidase all obeyed Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with a Km for 5'-AMP in the range 11-16 microM. The GPI anchor was removed from essentially all 5'-nucleotidase molecules, indicating that there is no phospholipase-resistant pool of enzyme. However, the phospholipase was much less efficient at cleaving the GPI anchor when 5'-nucleotidase was present in detergent solution, dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine, egg phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin, compared with the native plasma membrane, egg phosphatidylcholine and a sphingolipid/cholesterol-rich mixture. Lipid molecular properties and bilayer packing may affect the ability of PI-PLC to gain access to the GPI anchor. Catalytic activation, characterized by an increase in Vmax, was observed following PI-PLC cleavage of reconstituted 5'-nucleotidase from vesicles of several different lipids. The highest degree of activation was noted for 5'-nucleotidase in egg phosphatidylethanolamine. An increase in Vmax was also noted for a sphingolipid/cholesterol-rich mixture, the native plasma membrane and egg phosphatidylcholine, whereas vesicles of sphingomyelin and dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine showed little activation. Km generally remained unchanged following cleavage, except in the case of the sphingolipid/cholesterol-rich mixture. Insertion

  20. Podocyte pathology and nephropathy - sphingolipids in glomerular diseases.

    PubMed

    Merscher, Sandra; Fornoni, Alessia

    2014-01-01

    Sphingolipids are components of the lipid rafts in plasma membranes, which are important for proper function of podocytes, a key element of the glomerular filtration barrier. Research revealed an essential role of sphingolipids and sphingolipid metabolites in glomerular disorders of genetic and non-genetic origin. The discovery that glucocerebrosides accumulate in Gaucher disease in glomerular cells and are associated with clinical proteinuria initiated intensive research into the function of other sphingolipids in glomerular disorders. The accumulation of sphingolipids in other genetic diseases including Tay-Sachs, Sandhoff, Fabry, hereditary inclusion body myopathy 2, Niemann-Pick, and nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type and its implications with respect to glomerular pathology will be discussed. Similarly, sphingolipid accumulation occurs in glomerular diseases of non-genetic origin including diabetic kidney disease (DKD), HIV-associated nephropathy, focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and lupus nephritis. Sphingomyelin metabolites, such as ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate have also gained tremendous interest. We recently described that sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase acid-like 3b (SMPDL3b) is expressed in podocytes where it modulates acid sphingomyelinase activity and acts as a master modulator of danger signaling. Decreased SMPDL3b expression in post-reperfusion kidney biopsies from transplant recipients with idiopathic FSGS correlates with the recurrence of proteinuria in patients and in experimental models of xenotransplantation. Increased SMPDL3b expression is associated with DKD. The consequences of differential SMPDL3b expression in podocytes in these diseases with respect to their pathogenesis will be discussed. Finally, the role of sphingolipids in the formation of lipid rafts in podocytes and their contribution to the maintenance of a functional slit diaphragm in the glomerulus will be discussed. PMID:25126087

  1. Morphology and Molecular Composition of Purified Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus Envelope.

    PubMed

    Callens, Nathalie; Brügger, Britta; Bonnafous, Pierre; Drobecq, Hervé; Gerl, Mathias J; Krey, Thomas; Roman-Sosa, Gleyder; Rümenapf, Till; Lambert, Olivier; Dubuisson, Jean; Rouillé, Yves

    2016-03-01

    The family Flaviviridae includes viruses that have different virion structures and morphogenesis mechanisms. Most cellular and molecular studies have been so far performed with viruses of the Hepacivirus and Flavivirus genera. Here, we studied bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), a member of the Pestivirus genus. We set up a method to purify BVDV virions and analyzed their morphology by electron microscopy and their protein and lipid composition by mass spectrometry. Cryo-electron microscopy showed near spherical viral particles displaying an electron-dense capsid surrounded by a phospholipid bilayer with no visible spikes. Most particles had a diameter of 50 nm and about 2% were larger with a diameter of up to 65 nm, suggesting some size flexibility during BVDV morphogenesis. Morphological and biochemical data suggested a low envelope glycoprotein content of BVDV particles, E1 and E2 being apparently less abundant than Erns. Lipid content of BVDV particles displayed a ~2.3 to 3.5-fold enrichment in cholesterol, sphingomyelin and hexosyl-ceramide, concomitant with a 1.5 to 5-fold reduction of all glycerophospholipid classes, as compared to lipid content of MDBK cells. Although BVDV buds in the endoplasmic reticulum, its lipid content differs from a typical endoplasmic reticulum membrane composition. This suggests that BVDV morphogenesis includes a mechanism of lipid sorting. Functional analyses confirmed the importance of cholesterol and sphingomyelin for BVDV entry. Surprisingly, despite a high cholesterol and sphingolipid content of BVDV envelope, E2 was not found in detergent-resistant membranes. Our results indicate that there are differences between the structure and molecular composition of viral particles of Flaviviruses, Pestiviruses and Hepaciviruses within the Flaviviridae family.

  2. Thyrotropin receptor and membrane interactions in FRTL-5 thyroid cell strain in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Albi, E; Ambesi-Impiombato, F S; Peverini, M; Damaskopoulou, E; Fontanini, E; Lazzarini, R; Curcio, F; Perrella, G

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the possible alteration of thyrotropin (TSH) receptors in microgravity, which could explain the absence of thyroid cell proliferation in the space environment. Several forms of the TSH receptor are localized on the plasma membrane associated with caveolae and lipid rafts. The TSH regulates the fluidity of the cell membrane and the presence of its receptors in microdomains that are rich in sphingomyelin and cholesterol. TSH also stimulates cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and cell proliferation. Reported here are the results of an experiment in which the FRTL-5 thyroid cell line was exposed to microgravity during the Texus-44 mission (launched February 7, 2008, from Kiruna, Sweden). When the parabolic flight brought the sounding rocket to an altitude of 264 km, the culture media were injected with or without TSH in the different samples, and weightlessness prevailed on board for 6 minutes and 19 seconds. Control experiments were performed, in parallel, in an onboard 1g centrifuge and on the ground in Kiruna laboratory. Cell morphology and function were analyzed. Results show that in microgravity conditions the cells do not respond to TSH treatment and present an irregular shape with condensed chromatin, a modification of the cell membrane with shedding of the TSH receptor in the culture medium, and an increase of sphingomyelin-synthase and Bax proteins. It is possible that real microgravity induces a rearrangement of specific sections of the cell membrane, which act as platforms for molecular receptors, thus influencing thyroid cell function in astronauts during space missions.

  3. SPHINGOLIPIDOMICS: METHODS FOR THE COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF SPHINGOLIPIDS

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Christopher A.; Allegood, Jeremy C.; Park, Hyejung; Sullards, M. Cameron

    2009-01-01

    Sphingolipids comprise a highly diverse and complex class of molecules that serve as both structural components of cellular membranes and signaling molecules capable of eliciting apoptosis, differentiation, chemotaxis, and other responses in mammalian cells. Comprehensive or “sphingolipidomic” analyses (structure specific, quantitative analyses of all sphingolipids, or at least all members of a critical subset) are required in order to elucidate the role(s) of sphingolipids in a given biological context because so many of the sphingolipids in a biological system are inter-converted structurally and metabolically. Despite the experimental challenges posed by the diversity of sphingolipid-regulated cellular responses, the detection and quantitation of multiple sphingolipids in a single sample has been made possible by combining classical analytical separation techniques such as high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with state-of-the-art tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques. As part of the Lipid MAPS consortium an internal standard cocktail was developed that comprises the signaling metabolites (i.e. sphingoid bases, sphingoid base-1-phosphates, ceramides, and ceramide-1-phosphates) as well as more complex species such as mono- and di-hexosylceramides and sphingomyelin. Additionally, the number of species that can be analyzed is growing rapidly with the addition of fatty acyl Co-As, sulfatides, and other complex sphingolipids as more internal standards are becoming available. The resulting LC-MS/MS analyses are one of the most analytically rigorous technologies that can provide the necessary sensitivity, structural specificity, and quantitative precision with high-throughput for “sphingolipidomic” analyses in small sample quantities. This review summarizes historical and state-of-the-art analytical techniques used for the for the identification, structure determination, and quantitation of sphingolipids from free sphingoid bases through more

  4. Modulation of membrane phospholipids, the cytosolic calcium influx and cell proliferation following treatment of B16-F10 cells with recombinant phospholipase-D from Loxosceles intermedia (brown spider) venom.

    PubMed

    Wille, Ana Carolina Martins; Chaves-Moreira, Daniele; Trevisan-Silva, Dilza; Magnoni, Mariana Gabriel; Boia-Ferreira, Marianna; Gremski, Luiza Helena; Gremski, Waldemiro; Chaim, Olga Meiri; Senff-Ribeiro, Andrea; Veiga, Silvio Sanches

    2013-06-01

    The mechanism through which brown spiders (Loxosceles genus) cause dermonecrosis, dysregulated inflammatory responses, hemolysis and platelet aggregation, which are effects reported following spider bites, is currently attributed to the presence of phospholipase-D in the venom. In the present investigation, through two-dimensional immunoblotting, we observed immunological cross-reactivity for at least 25 spots in crude Loxosceles intermedia venom, indicating high expression levels for different isoforms of phospholipase-D. Using a recombinant phospholipase-D from the venom gland of L. intermedia (LiRecDT1) in phospholipid-degrading kinetic experiments, we determined that this phospholipase-D mainly hydrolyzes synthetic sphingomyelin in a time-dependent manner, generating ceramide 1-phosphate plus choline, as well as lysophosphatidylcholine, generating lysophosphatidic acid plus choline, but exhibits little activity against phosphatidylcholine. Through immunofluorescence assays with antibodies against LiRecDT1 and using a recombinant GFP-LiRecDT1 fusion protein, we observed direct binding of LiRecDT1 to the membrane of B16-F10 cells. We determined that LiRecDT1 hydrolyzes phospholipids in detergent extracts and from ghosts of B16-F10 cells, generating choline, indicating that the enzyme can access and modulate and has activity against membrane phospholipids. Additionally, using Fluo-4, a calcium-sensitive fluorophore, it was shown that treatment of cells with phospholipase-D induced an increase in the calcium concentration in the cytoplasm, but without altering viability or causing damage to cells. Finally, based on the known endogenous activity of phospholipase-D as an inducer of cell proliferation and the fact that LiRecDT1 binds to the cell surface, hydrolyzing phospholipids to generate bioactive lipids, we employed LiRecDT1 as an exogenous source of phospholipase-D in B16-F10 cells. Treatment of the cells was effective in increasing their proliferation in a

  5. Sphingosine inhibits sphingomyelinase-induced cholesteryl ester formation in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Härmälä, A S; Pörn, M I; Slotte, J P

    1993-12-01

    We have in this study examined the effects of sphingosine, a possible secondary degradation product following sphingomyelin hydrolysis, on cholesterol homeostasis in cultured human fibroblasts treated with sphingomyelinase. The activation of cholesterol esterification, which resulted from the degradation of plasma membrane sphingomyelin (by sphingomyelinase), was observed to be effectively blocked by sphingosine (half-maximal dose 6-7 microM). The inhibitory action of sphingosine could not be reproduced with other amines (e.g., dodecyl amine or imipramine). The onset of inhibition of cholesteryl ester formation by sphingosine was rapid (maximal effect within 15 min). Sphingosine itself had no spontaneous effects on the distribution of cellular cholesterol. At concentrations below 10 microM, sphingosine was not cytotoxic, as determined by cellular trypan blue permeability. The inhibitory action of sphingosine on cholesteryl ester formation apparently did not result from a direct inhibition of acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), since the activity of this enzyme was unaffected by sphingosine (10 microM) in a cell-free homogenate, using [14C]oleoyl-CoA as a co-substrate. Sphingosine was also unable to prevent the formation of activated fatty acids (oleoyl-CoA), since acyl-CoA synthetase activity in a cell-free homogenate was not inhibited by sphingosine (at 5 microM). The cellular cholesteryl ester cycle (i.e., the neutral cholesteryl ester hydrolase) was unaffected by sphingosine (at 5 microM). Down-regulation of PKC activity (24 h exposure of cells to 100 nM (62 ng/ml) phorbol ester) did not affect the sphingomyelinase-induced stimulation of [3H]cholesteryl ester formation. In addition, the sphingosine-induced inhibition of [3H]cholesteryl ester formation was not reversed in the presence of phorbol ester (short-term exposures), suggesting that the effect of sphingosine was not mediated via PKC. In conclusion, we have shown that sphingosine is an inhibitor

  6. Serine palmitoyl-CoA transferase (SPT) deficiency and sphingolipid levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Hojjati, Mohammad Reza; Li, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2005-10-15

    Sphingolipids play a very important role in cell membrane formation, signal transduction, and plasma lipoprotein metabolism, and all these functions may have an impact on atherosclerotic development. Serine palmitoyl-CoA transferase (SPT) is the key enzyme in sphingolipid biosynthesis. To evaluate in vivo SPT activity and its role in sphingolipid metabolism, we applied homologous recombination to embryonic stem cells, producing mice with long chain base 1 (Sptlc1) and long chain base 2 (Sptlc2), two subunits of SPT, gene deficiency. Homozygous Sptlc11 and Sptlc2 mice are embryonic lethal, whereas heterozygous versions of both animals (Sptlc1(+/-), Sptlc2(+/-)) are healthy. Analysis showed that, compared with WT mice, Sptlc1(+/-) and Sptlc2(+/-) mice had: (1) decreased liver Sptlc1 and Sptlc2 mRNA by 44% and 57% (P<0.01 and P<0.0001, respectively); (2) decreased liver Sptlc1 mass by 50% and Sptlc2 mass by 70% (P<0.01 and P<0.01, respectively), moreover, Sptlc1 mass decreased by 70% in Sptlc2(+/-) mouse liver, while Sptlc2 mass decreased by 53% in Sptlc1(+/-) mouse liver (P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively); (3) decreased liver SPT activity by 45% and 60% (P<0.01, respectively); (4) decreased liver ceramide (22% and 39%, P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively) and sphingosine levels (22% and 31%, P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively); (5) decreased plasma ceramide (45% and 39%, P<0.01, respectively), sphingosine-1-phosphate (31% and 32%, P<0.01, respectively) and sphingosine levels (22.5% and 25%, P<0.01, respectively); (6) dramatically decreased plasma lysosphingomyelin (17-fold and 16-fold, P<0.0001, respectively); and (7) no change of plasma sphingomyelin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, phospholipids, and liver sphingomyelin levels. These results indicated that both Sptlc1 and Sptlc2 interactions are necessary for SPT activity in vivo, and that SPT activity directly influences plasma sphingolipid levels. Furthermore, manipulation of SPT activity might well influence the

  7. Sticholysins, two pore-forming toxins produced by the Caribbean Sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus: their interaction with membranes.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Carlos; Mancheño, José M; Martínez, Diana; Tejuca, Mayra; Pazos, Fabiola; Lanio, María E

    2009-12-15

    Sticholysins (Sts) I and II (StI/II) are pore-forming toxins (PFTs) produced by the Caribbean Sea anemone Stichodactyla helianthus belonging to the actinoporin family, a unique class of eukaryotic PFTs exclusively found in sea anemones. As for the rest of the members of this family, Sts are cysteine-less proteins, with molecular weights around 20 kDa, high isoelectric points (>9.5), and a preference for sphingomyelin-containing membranes. A three-dimensional structure of StII, solved by X-ray crystallography, showed that it is composed of a hydrophobic beta-sandwich core flanked on the opposite sides by two alpha helices comprising residues 14-23 and 128-135. A variety of experimental results indicate that the first thirty N-terminal residues, which include one of the helices, are directly involved in pore formation. This region contains an amphipathic stretch, well conserved in all actinoporins, which is the only portion of the molecule that can change conformation without perturbing the general protein fold; in fact, binding to model membranes only produces a slight increase in the regular secondary structure content of Sts. Sts are produced in soluble form but they readily bind to different cell and model membrane systems such as lipidic monolayers, micelles, and lipid vesicles. Remarkably, both the binding and pore-formation steps are critically dependent on the physico-chemical nature of the membrane. In fact, a large population of toxin irreversibly binds with high affinity in membranes containing sphingomyelin whereas binding in membranes lacking this sphingolipid is relatively low and reversible. The joint presence of SM and cholesterol largely promotes binding and pore formation. Minor amounts of lipids favoring a non-lamellar organization also augment the efficiency of pore formation. The functional pore formed in cellular and model membranes has a diameter of approximately 2.0 nm and is presumably formed by the N-terminal alpha helices of four monomers

  8. Sphingosine inhibits sphingomyelinase-induced cholesteryl ester formation in cultured fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Härmälä, A S; Pörn, M I; Slotte, J P

    1993-12-01

    We have in this study examined the effects of sphingosine, a possible secondary degradation product following sphingomyelin hydrolysis, on cholesterol homeostasis in cultured human fibroblasts treated with sphingomyelinase. The activation of cholesterol esterification, which resulted from the degradation of plasma membrane sphingomyelin (by sphingomyelinase), was observed to be effectively blocked by sphingosine (half-maximal dose 6-7 microM). The inhibitory action of sphingosine could not be reproduced with other amines (e.g., dodecyl amine or imipramine). The onset of inhibition of cholesteryl ester formation by sphingosine was rapid (maximal effect within 15 min). Sphingosine itself had no spontaneous effects on the distribution of cellular cholesterol. At concentrations below 10 microM, sphingosine was not cytotoxic, as determined by cellular trypan blue permeability. The inhibitory action of sphingosine on cholesteryl ester formation apparently did not result from a direct inhibition of acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), since the activity of this enzyme was unaffected by sphingosine (10 microM) in a cell-free homogenate, using [14C]oleoyl-CoA as a co-substrate. Sphingosine was also unable to prevent the formation of activated fatty acids (oleoyl-CoA), since acyl-CoA synthetase activity in a cell-free homogenate was not inhibited by sphingosine (at 5 microM). The cellular cholesteryl ester cycle (i.e., the neutral cholesteryl ester hydrolase) was unaffected by sphingosine (at 5 microM). Down-regulation of PKC activity (24 h exposure of cells to 100 nM (62 ng/ml) phorbol ester) did not affect the sphingomyelinase-induced stimulation of [3H]cholesteryl ester formation. In addition, the sphingosine-induced inhibition of [3H]cholesteryl ester formation was not reversed in the presence of phorbol ester (short-term exposures), suggesting that the effect of sphingosine was not mediated via PKC. In conclusion, we have shown that sphingosine is an inhibitor

  9. Serine palmitoyl-CoA transferase (SPT) deficiency and sphingolipid levels in mice.

    PubMed

    Hojjati, Mohammad Reza; Li, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2005-10-15

    Sphingolipids play a very important role in cell membrane formation, signal transduction, and plasma lipoprotein metabolism, and all these functions may have an impact on atherosclerotic development. Serine palmitoyl-CoA transferase (SPT) is the key enzyme in sphingolipid biosynthesis. To evaluate in vivo SPT activity and its role in sphingolipid metabolism, we applied homologous recombination to embryonic stem cells, producing mice with long chain base 1 (Sptlc1) and long chain base 2 (Sptlc2), two subunits of SPT, gene deficiency. Homozygous Sptlc11 and Sptlc2 mice are embryonic lethal, whereas heterozygous versions of both animals (Sptlc1(+/-), Sptlc2(+/-)) are healthy. Analysis showed that, compared with WT mice, Sptlc1(+/-) and Sptlc2(+/-) mice had: (1) decreased liver Sptlc1 and Sptlc2 mRNA by 44% and 57% (P<0.01 and P<0.0001, respectively); (2) decreased liver Sptlc1 mass by 50% and Sptlc2 mass by 70% (P<0.01 and P<0.01, respectively), moreover, Sptlc1 mass decreased by 70% in Sptlc2(+/-) mouse liver, while Sptlc2 mass decreased by 53% in Sptlc1(+/-) mouse liver (P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively); (3) decreased liver SPT activity by 45% and 60% (P<0.01, respectively); (4) decreased liver ceramide (22% and 39%, P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively) and sphingosine levels (22% and 31%, P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively); (5) decreased plasma ceramide (45% and 39%, P<0.01, respectively), sphingosine-1-phosphate (31% and 32%, P<0.01, respectively) and sphingosine levels (22.5% and 25%, P<0.01, respectively); (6) dramatically decreased plasma lysosphingomyelin (17-fold and 16-fold, P<0.0001, respectively); and (7) no change of plasma sphingomyelin, triglyceride, total cholesterol, phospholipids, and liver sphingomyelin levels. These results indicated that both Sptlc1 and Sptlc2 interactions are necessary for SPT activity in vivo, and that SPT activity directly influences plasma sphingolipid levels. Furthermore, manipulation of SPT activity might well influence the

  10. Cholesterol-rich membrane coatings for interaction studies in capillary electrophoresis: application to red blood cell lipid extracts.

    PubMed

    Lindén, Maria V; Holopainen, Juha M; Laukkanen, Antti; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa; Wiedmer, Susanne K

    2006-10-01

    The purpose was to develop a stable biological membrane coating for CE useful for membrane interaction studies. The effect of cholesterol (chol) on the stability of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and sphingomyelin (SM) coatings was studied. In addition, a fused-silica capillary for CE was coated with human red blood cell (RBC) ghost lipids. Liposomes prepared of DPPC/SM with and without chol or RBC ghost lipids were flushed through the capillary and the stability of the coating was measured electrophoretically. Similar mixtures of DPPC/SM with and without chol were further studied by differential scanning calorimetry. The presence of phosphatidylcholine as a basic component in the coating solution of DPPC/SM/chol was found to be essential to achieve a good and stable coating. The results also confirmed the stability of coatings obtained with solutions of DPPC with 0-30 mol% of chol and SM in different ratios, which more closely resemble natural membranes. Finally, the electrophoretic measurements revealed that a stable coating is formed when capillaries are coated with liposomes of RBC ghost lipids. PMID:16983633

  11. Interaction Study of Phospholipid Membranes with an N-Glucosylated β-Turn Peptide Structure Detecting Autoantibodies Biomarkers of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Becucci, Lucia; Benci, Stefano; Nuti, Francesca; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Vaezi, Zahra; Stella, Lorenzo; Venanzi, Mariano; Rovero, Paolo; Papini, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of lipid environments with the type I' β-turn peptide structure called CSF114 and its N-glucosylated form CSF114(Glc), previously developed as a synthetic antigenic probe recognizing specific autoantibodies in a subpopulation of multiple sclerosis patients' serum, was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and electrochemical experiments using large unilamellar vesicles, mercury supported lipid self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs). The synthetic antigenic probe N-glucosylated peptide CSF114(Glc) and its unglucosylated form interact with the polar heads of lipid SAMs of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine at nonzero transmembrane potentials, probably establishing a dual electrostatic interaction of the trimethylammonium  and phosphate groups of the phosphatidylcholine polar head with the Glu⁵ and His⁸ residues on the opposite ends of the CSF114(Glc) β-turn encompassing residues 6-9. His⁸ protonation at pH 7 eliminates this dual interaction. CSF114(Glc) is adsorbed on top of SAMs of mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with sphingomyelin, an important component of myelin, whose proteins are hypothesized to undergo an aberrant N-glucosylation triggering the autoimmune response. Incorporation of the type I' β-turn peptide structure CSF114 into lipid SAMs by potential scans of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy induces defects causing a slight permeabilization toward cadmium ions. The N-glucopeptide CSF114(Glc) does not affect  tBLMs to a detectable extent. PMID:26437433

  12. Intercellular and intracellular functions of ceramides and their metabolites in skin (Review).

    PubMed

    Cha, Hwa Jun; He, Congfen; Zhao, Hua; Dong, Yinmao; An, In-Sook; An, Sungkwan

    2016-07-01

    The skin consists of the epidermis, dermis and subcutis. The epidermis is primarily comprised of keratinocytes and is separated into four layers according to the stage of differentiation of the keratinocytes. Corneocytes are terminally differentiated keratinocytes that closely interact with other corneocytes through corneodesmosomes, and synthesize lamellar bodies and the intercellular multilamellar barrier, which protects the body from the external environment. As ceramides are the principal components of lamellar bodies and the multilamellar barrier, it is important to understand the biosynthesis of ceramides and their functions in skin. Ceramides are synthesized by amide bond‑mediated interactions between sphingoid bases, long‑chain amino alcohols [long-chain base] and fatty acids through a de novo pathway, a sphingomyelin (SM) hydrolysis pathway and a catabolic pathway. The majority of ceramides produced by the de novo pathway form the epidermal barrier. Ceramides used as signaling molecules are synthesized by the SM and catabolic pathways. Synthesized ceramides are released from corneocytes and form the multilamellar barrier. Additionally, ceramides and their metabolites regulate the apoptosis, proliferation and differentiation of skin cells as well as the formation of the skin barrier. Thus, the study of ceramides and their metabolites is crucial to understanding the function and regulation of the skin barrier. PMID:27222347

  13. Lipids and the malarial parasite*

    PubMed Central

    Holz, George G.

    1977-01-01

    Merozoite endocytosis initiates Plasmodium development in a vacuole bounded by an erythrocyte-derived membrane, whose asymmetrical distribution of lipids and proteins is reversed in its orientation with respect to the parasite plasma membrane. Reorientation may accompany the proliferation of the membrane associated with the parasite's growth and phagocytic and pinocytic feeding. Increases in the membrane surface area of the parasite, and in some cases of the erythrocyte, parallel parasite growth and segmentation. Augmentation of all the membrane systems of the infected erythrocyte causes the lipid content to rise rapidly, but the parasite lipid composition differs from that of the erythrocyte in many respects: it is higher in diacyl phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylinositol, polyglycerol phosphatides, diacylglycerols, unesterified fatty acids, triacylglycerols, and hexadecanoic and octadecenoic fatty acids and lower in sphingomyelin, phosphatidylserine, alkoxy phosphatidylethanolamine, cholesterol, and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Active lipid metabolism accompanies the membrane proliferation associated with feeding, growth, and reproduction. Plasmodium is incapable of de novo biosynthesis of fatty acids and cholesterol; however, it can fabricate its glycerides and phosphoglycerides with host-supplied fatty acids, nitrogenous bases, alcohols, ATP, and coenzyme A, and can generate the glyceryl moiety during glycolysis. Cholesterol is obtained from the host but nothing is known of sphingolipid origins. Lipid metabolism of the parasite may be associated with alterations in the amounts of octadecenoic fatty acids and cholesterol in the erythrocyte plasma membrane, which in turn are responsible for changes in permeability and fragility. PMID:412602

  14. Lipid mediator profile in vernix caseosa reflects skin barrier development

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Antonio; Holm, Tina; Sjödin, Marcus O. D.; Reinke, Stacey N.; Alm, Johan; Scheynius, Annika; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Vernix caseosa (VC) is a protective layer that covers the skin of most human newborns. This study characterized the VC lipid mediator profile, and examined its relationship to gestational period, gender of the newborn and maternal lifestyle. VC collected at birth from 156 newborns within the ALADDIN birth cohort was analyzed and 3 different groups of lipid mediators (eicosanoids and related oxylipin analogs, endocannabinoids and sphingolipids) were screened using LC-MS/MS. A total of 54 compounds were detected in VC. A number of associations between lipid mediators and the gestational period were observed, including increases in the ceramide to sphingomyelin ratio as well as the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol. Gender-specific differences in lipid mediator levels were observed for all 3 lipid classes. In addition, levels of the linoleic acid oxidation products 9(10)-epoxy-12Z-octadecenoic and 12(13)-epoxy-9Z-octadecenoic acid (EpOMEs) as well as 12,13-dihydroxy-9Z-octadecenoic acid (DiHOME) were increased in VC of children from mothers with an anthroposophic lifestyle. Accordingly, VC was found to be rich in multiple classes of bioactive lipid mediators, which evidence lifestyle, gender and gestational week dependencies. Levels of lipid mediators in VC may therefore be useful as early stage non-invasive markers of the development of the skin as a protective barrier. PMID:26521946

  15. Nervonic acid and demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Sargent, J R; Coupland, K; Wilson, R

    1994-04-01

    Demyelination in adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is associated with an accumulation of very long chain saturated fatty acids such as 26:0 stemming from a genetic defect in the peroxisomal beta oxidation system responsible for the chain shortening of these fatty acids. Long chain monoenoic acids such as erucic acid, 22:1(n-9), can normalise elevated serum levels of 26:0 in ALD by depressing their biosynthesis from shorter chain saturated fatty acids. Sphingolipids from post mortem ALD brain have decreased levels of nervonic acid, 24:1(n-9), and increased levels of stearic acid, 18:0. Increased levels of 26:0 are accompanied by decreased nervonic acid biosynthesis in skin fibroblasts from ALD patients. Sphingolipids from post mortem MS brain have the same decreased 24:1(n-9) and increased 18:0 seen in post mortem ALD brain. The 24:1(n-9) content of sphingomyelin is depressed in erythrocytes from multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Defects in the microsomal biosynthesis of very long chain fatty acids including 24:1(n-9) in 'jumpy' and 'quaking' mice are accompanied by impaired myelination. An impairment in the provision of nervonic acid in demyelinating diseases is indicated, suggesting that dietary therapy with oils rich in very long chain monenoic acid fatty acids may be beneficial in such conditions.

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Otero, Lisandro H.; Beassoni, Paola R.; Domenech, Carlos E.; Lisa, Angela T.; Albert, Armando

    2010-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa phosphorylcholine phosphatase (PchP) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphorylcholine to produce choline and inorganic phosphate. Phosphorylcholine is released by the action of haemolytic phospholipase C (PlcH) on phosphatidylcholine or sphingomyelin. PchP belongs to the HAD superfamily and its activity is dependent on Mg2+, Zn2+ or Cu2+. The possible importance of PchP in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa, the lack of information about its structure and its low identity to other members of this family led us to attempt its crystallization in order to solve its three-dimensional structure. Crystals of the protein have been grown and diffraction data have been obtained to 2.7 Å resolution. The crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 137.16, b = 159.15, c = 73.31 Å, β = 117.89°. Statistical analysis of the unit-cell contents and the self-rotation function suggest a tetrameric state of the molecule with 222 point-group symmetry. PMID:20693680

  17. Phospholipids in Human Milk and Infant Formulas: Benefits and Needs for Correct Infant Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Cilla, Antonio; Diego Quintaes, Késia; Barberá, Reyes; Alegría, Amparo

    2016-08-17

    The composition of human milk has served as a basis for the development of infant formulas, which are used when breastfeeding is not possible. Among the human milk nutrients, 50% of the total energetic value corresponds to fat, with a high level of fatty acids and 0.2-2.0% present in the form of phospholipids (PLs). The PL contents and fatty acid distribution in PL species have been investigated as bioactive elements for the production of infant formulas, since they offer potential benefits for the optimum growth and health of the newborn infant. The differences in the amount of PLs and in fatty acid distribution in PL species between human milk and infant formulas can imply biologically significant differences for newborn infants fed with infant formulas versus human milk-mainly due to the greater proportion of sphingomyelin with respect to phosphatidylcholine in infant formulas. The limited information referred to the characterization of fatty acid distribution in PL species in infant formulas or in ingredients used to enrich them merits further research in order to obtain products with benefits similar to those of human milk in terms of infant growth, visual acuity, and neurological development. The present review establishes the scientific basis for helping to adjust formulations to the requirements of infant nutrition.

  18. Quantitative profiling of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its mycelia by using UHPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jia-Ning; Wang, Jing-Rong; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2016-02-12

    In the present study, 101 sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its five mycelia were quantitatively profiled by using a fully validated UHPLC-MS method. The results revealed that a general rank order for the abundance of different classes of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its mycelia is sphingoid bases/ceramides > phosphosphingolipids > glycosphingolipids. However, remarkable sphingolipid differences between wild Cordyceps and its mycelia were observed. One is that sphingoid base is the dominant sphingolipid in wild Cordyceps, whereas ceramide is the major sphingolipid in mycelia. Another difference is that the abundance of sphingomyelins in wild Cordyceps is almost 10-folds higher than those in most mycelia. The third one is that mycelia contain more inositol phosphorylceramides and glycosphingolipids than wild Cordyceps. Multivariate analysis was further employed to visualize the difference among wild Cordyceps and different mycelia, leading to the identification of respective sphingolipids as potential chemical markers for the differentiation of wild Cordyceps and its related mycelia. This study represents the first report on the quantitative profiling of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its related mycelia, which provided comprehensive chemical evidence for the quality control and rational utilization of wild Cordyceps and its mycelia.

  19. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  20. Synaptic Vesicle Docking: Sphingosine Regulates Syntaxin1 Interaction with Munc18

    PubMed Central

    Morando, Laura; Connell, Emma; Marletto, Fabio P.; Giustetto, Maurizio; Sassoè-Pognetto, Marco; Van Veldhoven, Paul P.; Ledesma, Maria Dolores

    2009-01-01

    Consensus exists that lipids must play key functions in synaptic activity but precise mechanistic information is limited. Acid sphingomyelinase knockout mice (ASMko) are a suitable model to address the role of sphingolipids in synaptic regulation as they recapitulate a mental retardation syndrome, Niemann Pick disease type A (NPA), and their neurons have altered levels of sphingomyelin (SM) and its derivatives. Electrophysiological recordings showed that ASMko hippocampi have increased paired-pulse facilitation and post-tetanic potentiation. Consistently, electron microscopy revealed reduced number of docked vesicles. Biochemical analysis of ASMko synaptic membranes unveiled higher amounts of SM and sphingosine (Se) and enhanced interaction of the docking molecules Munc18 and syntaxin1. In vitro reconstitution assays demonstrated that Se changes syntaxin1 conformation enhancing its interaction with Munc18. Moreover, Se reduces vesicle docking in primary neurons and increases paired-pulse facilitation when added to wt hippocampal slices. These data provide with a novel mechanism for synaptic vesicle control by sphingolipids and could explain cognitive deficits of NPA patients. PMID:19390577

  1. Determination of phosphatidylcholine and disaturated phosphatidylcholine content in lung surfactant by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Scarim, J; Ghanbari, H; Taylor, V; Menon, G

    1989-04-01

    A rapid isocratic method for determining the total phosphatidylcholine and disaturated phosphatidylcholine levels in lung surfactant preparations by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is described. The analysis was performed on a 3.9 x 300 mm mu-Porasil column with detection by refractive index. The lipids were eluted with a solvent system of chloroform-acetonitrile-methanol-water-85% phosphoric acid 650:650:500:130:2 (v/v/v/v/v). A 4.6 x 30 mm silica guard column was used in place of an injector loop which served as a sample concentrator and purifier. Phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylglycerol, all known components of lung surfactants, were eluted from the loop column and were prevented from reaching the analytical column. Sphingomyelin and lysophosphatidylcholine elute later than the phosphatidylcholines on the analytical column. The method was developed so that phosphatidylcholines elute as a single peak regardless of the fatty acid chain length (C12-C20). When the sample was first oxidized with a potassium permanganate-potassium metaperiodate solution, and potentially interfering oxidation products were removed by extraction into a basic aqueous phase, then only the disaturated phosphatidylcholines were analyzed. PMID:2754340

  2. Fusion of Boar Sperm with Nanoliposomes Prepared from Synthetic Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Kasimanickam, V R; Buhr, M M

    2016-08-01

    Liposomes are artificial membrane vesicles that can be used to test and model the functions and interactions of various biological membranes, or as a carrier system to deliver biologically active substances into the cells, or to incorporate lipids into the plasma membrane of target cells to modify membrane structure-function relationships. Sperm plasma membrane undergoes lipid modification during maturation in epididymis and during capacitation in the female reproductive tract to facilitate fertilization. Natural variation in the amounts and composition of lipids in the sperm plasma membrane may also contribute to the species-specific sperm sensitivities to handling and storage conditions. Boar sperm are notoriously susceptible to membrane damage and are resistant to compositional alteration by artificial liposomes. This study used flow cytometry to demonstrate stable incorporation of nanoliposomes prepared from a complex mixture of various phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine : phosphatidylethanolamine : sphingomyelin : phosphatidylserine : phosphatidylinositol) with high fusion efficiency. Over 90% of sperm rapidly took up fluorescently labelled liposomes and retained the lipids for at least 60 min, in a significant time- and concentration-dependent manner. This unique fusion efficacy could be used to alter sperm plasma membrane composition and hence membrane-based functional responses. PMID:27217373

  3. Self-calibrated line-scan STED-FCS to quantify lipid dynamics in model and cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Benda, Aleš; Ma, Yuanqing; Gaus, Katharina

    2015-02-01

    Only a limited number of noninvasive techniques are available to directly measure the dynamic behavior of lipids in model and cell membranes. Here, we explored whether a commercial instrument could be used for fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) under pulsed stimulated emission depletion (STED). To overcome issues with photobleaching and poor distinction between confocal and STED signals, we implemented resonant line-scan STED with filtered FCS, which has the additional benefit of autocalibrating the dimensions of the point-spread function and obtaining spatially resolved molecular mobility at subdiffraction resolution. With supported lipid bilayers, we achieved a detection spot radius of 40 nm, although at the expense of decreased molecular brightness. We also used this approach to map the dynamics of Atto646N-labeled sphingomyelin and phosphatidylethanolamine in the plasma membrane. Despite the reliability of the method and the demonstration that photobleaching and the photophysical properties of the dye did not influence diffusion measurements, we found great heterogeneities even within one cell. For both lipids, regions of high local density correlated with slow molecular diffusion, indicating trapping of Atto646N-labeled lipids. Future studies with new dyes are needed to reveal the origin of the trapping. PMID:25650927

  4. Activity testing of alveolar macrophages and changes in surfactant phospholipids after irradiation in bronchoalveolar lavage: Experimental and clinical data

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, F.; Rehn, B.; Kraus, R.; Quabeck, K.; Bruch, J.; Beelen, D.W.; Schaefer, U.W.; Streffer, C. )

    1992-07-01

    This study presents results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) after irradiation to the lungs in mice as well as clinical data. The number of BAL cells, mainly macrophages, lymphocytes, and granulocytes, changed in a time-dependent manner. The phagocytic activity of the macrophages measured as the phagocytosis of microbeads and measured as the esterase activity also showed a strong time-dependent increase during the acute phase up to 21 days after irradiation. The contents of surfactant phospholipids (SF) and sphingomyelin (SPH; as a parameter for cell death) were quantified by HPLC. Both were significantly changed between day 2 and 21 after irradiation. Three BALs of a patient with idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis, who had received an allogenic bone marrow graft after total body irradiation with 10 Gy, showed similar effects in the cellular and surfactant parameters. These data indicate that there are positive interactions between the number of different BAL cells, macrophage activity, and SF and SPH content in the preclinical model of the mouse as well as in the clinical situation after lung irradiation. 30 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Molecular determinants of phospholipid synergy in blood clotting.

    PubMed

    Tavoosi, Narjes; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L; Pogorelov, Taras V; Ohkubo, Y Zenmei; Arcario, Mark J; Clay, Mary C; Rienstra, Chad M; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Morrissey, James H

    2011-07-01

    Many regulatory processes in biology involve reversible association of proteins with membranes. Clotting proteins bind to phosphatidylserine (PS) on cell surfaces, but a clear picture of this interaction has yet to emerge. We present a novel explanation for membrane binding by GLA domains of clotting proteins, supported by biochemical studies, solid-state NMR analyses, and molecular dynamics simulations. The model invokes a single "phospho-L-serine-specific" interaction and multiple "phosphate-specific" interactions. In the latter, the phosphates in phospholipids interact with tightly bound Ca(2+) in GLA domains. We show that phospholipids with any headgroup other than choline strongly synergize with PS to enhance factor X activation. We propose that phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin (the major external phospholipids of healthy cells) are anticoagulant primarily because their bulky choline headgroups sterically hinder access to their phosphates. Following cell damage or activation, exposed PS and phosphatidylethanolamine collaborate to bind GLA domains by providing phospho-L-serine-specific and phosphate-specific interactions, respectively. PMID:21561861

  6. Mast cell- and dendritic cell-derived exosomes display a specific lipid composition and an unusual membrane organization.

    PubMed Central

    Laulagnier, Karine; Motta, Claude; Hamdi, Safouane; Roy, Sébastien; Fauvelle, Florence; Pageaux, Jean-François; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Salles, Jean-Pierre; Perret, Bertrand; Bonnerot, Christian; Record, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Exosomes are small vesicles secreted from multivesicular bodies, which are able to stimulate the immune system leading to tumour cell eradication. We have analysed lipids of exosomes secreted either upon stimulation from rat mast cells (RBL-2H3 cells), or constitutively from human dendritic cells. As compared with parent cells, exosomes displayed an enrichment in sphingomyelin, but not in cholesterol. Phosphatidylcholine content was decreased, but an enrichment was noted in disaturated molecular species as in phosphatidylethanolamines. Lyso(bis)phosphatidic acid was not enriched in exosomes as compared with cells. Fluorescence anisotropy demonstrated an increase in exosome-membrane rigidity from pH 5 to 7, suggesting their membrane reorganization between the acidic multivesicular body compartment and the neutral outer cell medium. NMR analysis established a bilayer organization of exosome membrane, and ESR studies using 16-doxyl stearic acid demonstrated a higher flip-flop of lipids between the two leaflets as compared with plasma membrane. In addition, the exosome membrane exhibited no asymmetrical distribution of phosphatidylethanolamines. Therefore exosome membrane displays a similar content of the major phospholipids and cholesterol, and is organized as a lipid bilayer with a random distribution of phosphatidylethanolamines. In addition, we observed tight lipid packing at neutral pH and a rapid flip-flop between the two leaflets of exosome membranes. These parameters could be used as a hallmark of exosomes. PMID:14965343

  7. Signal transduction of stress via ceramide.

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, S; Peña, L A; Kolesnick, R N

    1998-01-01

    The sphingomyelin (SM) pathway is a ubiquitous, evolutionarily conserved signalling system analogous to conventional systems such as the cAMP and phosphoinositide pathways. Ceramide, which serves as second messenger in this pathway, is generated from SM by the action of a neutral or acidic SMase, or by de novo synthesis co-ordinated through the enzyme ceramide synthase. A number of direct targets for ceramide action have now been identified, including ceramide-activated protein kinase, ceramide-activated protein phosphatase and protein kinase Czeta, which couple the SM pathway to well defined intracellular signalling cascades. The SM pathway induces differentiation, proliferation or growth arrest, depending on the cell type. Very often, however, the outcome of signalling through this pathway is apoptosis. Mammalian systems respond to diverse stresses with ceramide generation, and recent studies show that yeast manifest a form of this response. Thus ceramide signalling is an older stress response system than the caspase/apoptotic death pathway, and hence these two pathways must have become linked later in evolution. Signalling of the stress response through ceramide appears to play a role in the development of human diseases, including ischaemia/reperfusion injury, insulin resistance and diabetes, atherogenesis, septic shock and ovarian failure. Further, ceramide signalling mediates the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy and radiation in some cells. An understanding of the mechanisms by which ceramide regulates physiological and pathological events in specific cells may provide new targets for pharmacological intervention. PMID:9794783

  8. Differential regulation of AKT, MAPK and GSK3β during C2-ceramide-induced neuronal death.

    PubMed

    Arboleda, Gonzalo; Cárdenas, Yolanda; Rodríguez, Yeldy; Morales, Luis Carlos; Matheus, Luisa; Arboleda, Humberto

    2010-12-01

    Evidence has implicated apoptosis as a mechanism underlying cell demise in diverse neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD). Endogenous toxins and other stress signals activate the sphingomyelin pathway increasing the levels of ceramide, an important regulator of cell death. In the present paper we have analysed the contribution of PI3K/AKT-GSK3β and MAPK (ERK and JNK) pathways to cell death in a catecholaminergic cell line following exposure to C(2)-ceramide. We also explored the potential neuroprotective action of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and neurotrophin-3 (NT3). We demonstrated that C(2)-ceramide-induced cell death is associated to an early decrease in phosphorylation (inhibition) of PI3K/AKT and ERK, followed by phosphorylation (activation) of JNK and de-phosphorylation (activation) of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK3β). NT3 and IGF-1 increased survival at early time points, but only IGF-1 is capable to attenuate C(2)-ceramide-mediated neuronal death, and this neuroprotection is associated to strong and permanent activation of AKT and inhibition of GSK3β. In conclusion, C(2)-ceramide initiates a series of events including an early inactivation of PI3K/AKT and ERK pathways followed by activation of JNK and activation of GSK3β and neuronal death, changes that are counteracted by IGF-1.

  9. Juvenile-onset loss of lipid-raft domains in attractin-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Azouz, Abdallah; Gunn, Teresa M.; Duke-Cohan, Jonathan S. . E-mail: Jonathan_Duke-Cohan@dfci.harvard.edu

    2007-02-15

    Mutations at the attractin (Atrn) locus in mice result in altered pigmentation on an agouti background, higher basal metabolic rate and juvenile-onset hypomyelination leading to neurodegeneration, while studies on human immune cells indicate a chemotaxis regulatory function. The underlying biochemical defect remains elusive. In this report we identify a role for attractin in plasma membrane maintenance. In attractin's absence there is a decline in plasma membrane glycolipid-enriched rafts from normal levels at 8 weeks to a complete absence by 24 weeks. The structural integrity of lipid rafts depends upon cholesterol and sphingomyelin, and can be identified by partitioning within of ganglioside GM{sub 1}. Despite a significant fall in cellular cholesterol with maturity, and a lesser fall in both membrane and total cellular GM{sub 1}, these parameters lag behind raft loss, and are normal when hypomyelination/neurodegeneration has already begun thus supporting consequence rather than cause. These findings can be recapitulated in Atrn-deficient cell lines propagated in vitro. Further, signal transduction through complex membrane receptor assemblies is not grossly disturbed despite the complete absence of lipid rafts. We find these results compatible with a role for attractin in plasma membrane maintenance and consistent with the proposal that the juvenile-onset hypomyelination and neurodegeneration represent a defect in attractin-mediated raft-dependent myelin biogenesis.

  10. Metabolomic Profiling of Plasma from Melioidosis Patients Using UHPLC-QTOF MS Reveals Novel Biomarkers for Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna K. P.; Lee, Kim-Chung; Lo, George C. S.; Ding, Vanessa S. Y.; Chow, Wang-Ngai; Ke, Tony Y. H.; Curreem, Shirly O. T.; To, Kelvin K. W.; Ho, Deborah T. Y.; Sridhar, Siddharth; Wong, Sally C. Y.; Chan, Jasper F. W.; Hung, Ivan F. N.; Sze, Kong-Hung; Lam, Ching-Wan; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick C. Y.

    2016-01-01

    To identify potential biomarkers for improving diagnosis of melioidosis, we compared plasma metabolome profiles of melioidosis patients compared to patients with other bacteremia and controls without active infection, using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that the metabolomic profiles of melioidosis patients are distinguishable from bacteremia patients and controls. Using multivariate and univariate analysis, 12 significant metabolites from four lipid classes, acylcarnitine (n = 6), lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LysoPE) (n = 3), sphingomyelins (SM) (n = 2) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) (n = 1), with significantly higher levels in melioidosis patients than bacteremia patients and controls, were identified. Ten of the 12 metabolites showed area-under-receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) >0.80 when compared both between melioidosis and bacteremia patients, and between melioidosis patients and controls. SM(d18:2/16:0) possessed the largest AUC when compared, both between melioidosis and bacteremia patients (AUC 0.998, sensitivity 100% and specificity 91.7%), and between melioidosis patients and controls (AUC 1.000, sensitivity 96.7% and specificity 100%). Our results indicate that metabolome profiling might serve as a promising approach for diagnosis of melioidosis using patient plasma, with SM(d18:2/16:0) representing a potential biomarker. Since the 12 metabolites were related to various pathways for energy and lipid metabolism, further studies may reveal their possible role in the pathogenesis and host response in melioidosis. PMID:26927094

  11. Sphingomyelinase activity of Trichomonas vaginalis extract and subfractions.

    PubMed

    González-Salazar, Francisco; Garza-González, Jesús N; Hernandez-Luna, Carlos E; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito David; Carranza-Rosales, Pilar; Castro-Garza, Jorge Enrique; Hernández-García, Magda Elizabeth; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Trichomoniasis is one of the most common acute sexually transmitted curable diseases, and it is disseminated worldwide generating more than 170 million cases annually. Trichomonas vaginalis is the parasite that causes trichomoniasis and has the ability to destroy cell monolayers of the vaginal mucosa in vitro. Sphingomyelinases (SMase) are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin into ceramide and phosphorylcholine. Ceramide appears to be a second messenger lipid in programmed apoptosis, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Sphingomyelinase is probably a major source of ceramide in cells. Signal transduction mediated by ceramide leads cells to produce cytokine induced apoptosis during several inflammatory responses. SMase are also relevant toxins in several microorganisms. The main objective of this research is to identify SMase activity of T. vaginalis in the total extract (TE), P30, and S30 subfractions from brooked trophozoites. It was found that these fractions of T. vaginalis have SMase activity, which comes principally from P30 subfraction and was mainly type C. Enzymatic activity of SMase increased linearly with time and is pH dependent with two peaks by pH 5.5 and pH 7.5. The addition of manganese to the reaction mixture increased the SMase activity by 1.97. PMID:24024206

  12. Emerging roles for vascular smooth muscle cell exosomes in calcification and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Kapustin, A N; Shanahan, C M

    2016-06-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) phenotypic conversion from a contractile to 'synthetic' state contributes to vascular pathologies including restenosis, atherosclerosis and vascular calcification. We have recently found that the secretion of exosomes is a feature of 'synthetic' VSMCs and that exosomes are novel players in vascular repair processes as well as pathological vascular thrombosis and calcification. Pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors as well as mineral imbalance stimulate exosome secretion by VSMCs, most likely by the activation of sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (SMPD3) and cytoskeletal remodelling. Calcium stress induces dramatic changes in VSMC exosome composition and accumulation of phosphatidylserine (PS), annexin A6 and matrix metalloproteinase-2, which converts exosomes into a nidus for calcification. In addition, by presenting PS, VSMC exosomes can also provide the catalytic surface for the activation of coagulation factors. Recent data showing that VSMC exosomes are loaded with proteins and miRNA regulating cell adhesion and migration highlight VSMC exosomes as potentially important communication messengers in vascular repair. Thus, the identification of signalling pathways regulating VSMC exosome secretion, including activation of SMPD3 and cytoskeletal rearrangements, opens up novel avenues for a deeper understanding of vascular remodelling processes. PMID:26864864

  13. Role of acid sphingomyelinase in the age-dependent dysregulation of sphingolipids turnover in the tissues of rats.

    PubMed

    Babenko, Nataliya A; Garkavenko, Vladimir V; Storozhenko, Galina V; Timofiychuk, Olga A

    2016-04-01

    Old age-associated pathologies usually coincide with altered sphingolipid metabolism. In the present article, the role of acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase) in the age-dependent changes of sphingomyelin (SM) and ceramide contents in the tissues has been investigated by means of ASMase inhibitors, imipramine and zoledronic acid. It has been determined that ceramide content and ceramide/SM ratio increased, while SM level decreased in the heart, liver, blood serum and skeletal muscles of 24-month old rats in contrast to 3-month old animals. Injections of imipramine or zoledronic acid to 24-month old rats resulted in significant downregulation of ASMase in the liver and skeletal and heart muscles. The both inhibitors decreased the ceramide content and ceramide/SM ratio and increased the SM content in all tissues studied, except the heart, of old rats to the levels close to those observed in the young animals. Long-term treatment of rats by inhibitors, which have different mechanisms of action on ASMase, exerts the similar, but not equal effects on enzyme activity and SM turnover. In summary, the data above strongly suggest that the age-dependent up-regulation of ASMase plays an important role in the modulation of ceramide and SM contents in rat tissues and that imipramine and zoledronic acid are useful tools for SM turnover manipulation at old age. PMID:26830134

  14. Targeting acid sphingomyelinase reduces cardiac ceramide accumulation in the post-ischemic heart.

    PubMed

    Klevstig, Martina; Ståhlman, Marcus; Lundqvist, Annika; Scharin Täng, Margareta; Fogelstrand, Per; Adiels, Martin; Andersson, Linda; Kolesnick, Richard; Jeppsson, Anders; Borén, Jan; Levin, Malin C

    2016-04-01

    Ceramide accumulation is known to accompany acute myocardial ischemia, but its role in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease is unclear. In this study, we aimed to determine how ceramides accumulate in the ischemic heart and to determine if cardiac function following ischemia can be improved by reducing ceramide accumulation. To investigate the association between ceramide accumulation and heart function, we analyzed myocardial left ventricle biopsies from subjects with chronic ischemia and found that ceramide levels were higher in biopsies from subjects with reduced heart function. Ceramides are produced by either de novo synthesis or hydrolysis of sphingomyelin catalyzed by acid and/or neutral sphingomyelinase. We used cultured HL-1 cardiomyocytes to investigate these pathways and showed that acid sphingomyelinase activity rather than neutral sphingomyelinase activity or de novo sphingolipid synthesis was important for hypoxia-induced ceramide accumulation. We also used mice with a partial deficiency in acid sphingomyelinase (Smpd1(+/-) mice) to investigate if limiting ceramide accumulation under ischemic conditions would have a beneficial effect on heart function and survival. Although we showed that cardiac ceramide accumulation was reduced in Smpd1(+/-) mice 24h after an induced myocardial infarction, this reduction was not accompanied by an improvement in heart function or survival. Our findings show that accumulation of cardiac ceramides in the post-ischemic heart is mediated by acid sphingomyelinase. However, targeting ceramide accumulation in the ischemic heart may not be a beneficial treatment strategy. PMID:26930027

  15. Role of Sphingolipids in Infant Gut Health and Immunity.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Åke

    2016-06-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM), glycosphingolipids, and gangliosides are important polar lipids in the milk fat globule membrane but are not found in standard milk replacement formulas. Because digestion and absorption of SM and glycosphingolipids generate the bioactive metabolites ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), and because intact gangliosides may have beneficial effects in the gut, this may be important for gut integrity and immune maturation in the neonate. The brush border enzymes that hydrolyze milk SM, alkaline sphingomyelinase (nucleotide phosphodiesterase pyrophosphatase 7), and neutral ceramidase are expressed at birth in both term and preterm infants. Released sphingosine is absorbed, phosphorylated to S1P, and converted to palmitic acid via S1P-lyase in the gut mucosa. Hypothetically, S1P also may be released from absorptive cells and exert important paracrine actions favoring epithelial integrity and renewal, as well as immune function, including secretory IgA production and migration of T lymphocyte subpopulations. Gluco-, galacto-, and lactosylceramide are hydrolyzed to ceramide by lactase-phlorizin hydrolase, which also hydrolyzes lactose. Gangliosides may adhere to the brush border and is internalized, modified, and possibly transported into blood, and may exert protective functions by their interactions with bacteria, bacterial toxins, and the brush border. PMID:27234412

  16. Changes in membrane sphingolipid composition modulate dynamics and adhesion of integrin nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Eich, Christina; Manzo, Carlo; de Keijzer, Sandra; Bakker, Gert-Jan; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; García-Parajo, Maria F; Cambi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids are essential constituents of the plasma membrane (PM) and play an important role in signal transduction by modulating clustering and dynamics of membrane receptors. Changes in lipid composition are therefore likely to influence receptor organisation and function, but how this precisely occurs is difficult to address given the intricacy of the PM lipid-network. Here, we combined biochemical assays and single molecule dynamic approaches to demonstrate that the local lipid environment regulates adhesion of integrin receptors by impacting on their lateral mobility. Induction of sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity reduced sphingomyelin (SM) levels by conversion to ceramide (Cer), resulting in impaired integrin adhesion and reduced integrin mobility. Dual-colour imaging of cortical actin in combination with single molecule tracking of integrins showed that this reduced mobility results from increased coupling to the actin cytoskeleton brought about by Cer formation. As such, our data emphasizes a critical role for the PM local lipid composition in regulating the lateral mobility of integrins and their ability to dynamically increase receptor density for efficient ligand binding in the process of cell adhesion. PMID:26869100

  17. Enhanced Sphingomyelinase Activity Contributes to the Apoptotic Capacity of Electronegative Low-Density Lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Ke, Liang-Yin; Chan, Hua-Chen; Chen, Chih-Chieh; Lu, Jonathan; Marathe, Gopal K; Chu, Chih-Sheng; Chan, Hsiu-Chuan; Wang, Chung-Ya; Tung, Yi-Ching; McIntyre, Thomas M; Yen, Jeng-Hsien; Chen, Chu-Huang

    2016-02-11

    Sphingomyelinase (SMase) catalyzes the degradation of sphingomyelin to ceramide. In patients with metabolic syndrome or diabetes, circulating plasma ceramide levels are significantly higher than in normal individuals. Our data indicate that electronegative low-density lipoprotein (LDL) shows SMase activity, which leads to increased ceramide levels that can produce pro-inflammatory effects and susceptibility to aggregation. According to sequence alignment and protein structure predictions, the putative catalytic site of SMase activity is in the α2 region of apoB-100. To identify specific post-translational modifications of apoB100 near the catalytic region, we performed data-independent, parallel-fragmentation liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS(E)), followed by data analysis with ProteinLynx GlobalServer v2.4. Results showed that the serine of apoB100 in electronegative LDL was highly O-glycosylated, including S(1732), S(1959), S(2378), S(2408), and S(2429). These findings may support the changing of the α-helix/β-pleated sheets ratio in protein structure analysis. Further study is necessary to confirm the activation of SMase activity by electronegative LDL. PMID:26766134

  18. Smpd3 Expression in both Chondrocytes and Osteoblasts Is Required for Normal Endochondral Bone Development.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingjing; Manickam, Garthiga; Ray, Seemun; Oh, Chun-do; Yasuda, Hideyo; Moffatt, Pierre; Murshed, Monzur

    2016-09-01

    Sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 3 (SMPD3), a lipid-metabolizing enzyme present in bone and cartilage, has been identified to be a key regulator of skeletal development. A homozygous loss-of-function mutation called fragilitas ossium (fro) in the Smpd3 gene causes poor bone and cartilage mineralization resulting in severe congenital skeletal deformities. Here we show that Smpd3 expression in ATDC5 chondrogenic cells is downregulated by parathyroid hormone-related peptide through transcription factor SOX9. Furthermore, we show that transgenic expression of Smpd3 in the chondrocytes of fro/fro mice corrects the cartilage but not the bone abnormalities. Additionally, we report the generation of Smpd3(flox/flox) mice for the tissue-specific inactivation of Smpd3 using the Cre-loxP system. We found that the skeletal phenotype in Smpd3(flox/flox); Osx-Cre mice, in which the Smpd3 gene is ablated in both late-stage chondrocytes and osteoblasts, closely mimics the skeletal phenotype in fro/fro mice. On the other hand, Smpd3(flox/flox); Col2a1-Cre mice, in which the Smpd3 gene is knocked out in chondrocytes only, recapitulate the fro/fro mouse cartilage phenotype. This work demonstrates that Smpd3 expression in both chondrocytes and osteoblasts is required for normal endochondral bone development. PMID:27325675

  19. Psychosine-triggered endomitosis is modulated by membrane sphingolipids through regulation of phosphoinositide 4,5-bisphosphate production at the cleavage furrow.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Okahara, Kyohei; Naito-Matsui, Yuko; Abe, Mitsuhiro; Go, Shinji; Inokuchi, Jinichi; Okazaki, Toshiro; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Oka, Shogo; Takematsu, Hiromu

    2016-07-01

    Endomitosis is a special type of mitosis in which only cytokinesis-the final step of the cell division cycle-is defective, resulting in polyploid cells. Although endomitosis is biologically important, its regulatory aspects remain elusive. Psychosine, a lysogalactosylceramide, prevents proper cytokinesis when supplemented to proliferating cells. Cytokinetic inhibition by psychosine does not inhibit genome duplication. Consequently cells undergo multiple rounds of endomitotic cell cycles, resulting in the formation of giant multiploid cells. Here we successfully quantified psychosine-triggered multiploid cell formation, showing that membrane sphingolipids ratios modulate psychosine-triggered polyploidy in Namalwa cells. Among enzymes that experimentally remodel cellular sphingolipids, overexpression of glucosylceramide synthase to biosynthesize glycosylsphingolipids (GSLs) and neutral sphingomyelinase 2 to hydrolyze sphingomyelin (SM) additively enhanced psychosine-triggered multiploidy; almost all of the cells became polyploid. In the presence of psychosine, Namalwa cells showed attenuated cell surface SM clustering and suppression of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate production at the cleavage furrow, both important processes for cytokinesis. Depending on the sphingolipid balance between GSLs and SM, Namalwa cells could be effectively converted to viable multiploid cells with psychosine. PMID:27170180

  20. Resveratrol-induced transcriptional up-regulation of ASMase (SMPD1) of human leukemia and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Naoki; Omori, Yukari; Kawamoto, Yoshiyuki; Sobue, Sayaka; Ichihara, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Motoshi; Kyogashima, Mamoru; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Tamiya-Koizumi, Keiko; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Murate, Takashi

    2016-02-19

    Resveratrol (RSV) is a plant-derived phytoalexin present in plants, whose pleiotropic effects for health benefits have been previously reported. Its anti-cancer activity is among the current topics for novel cancer treatment. Here, effects of RSV on cell proliferation and the sphingolipid metabolism of K562, a human leukemia cell line, were analyzed. Some experiments were also performed in HCT116, a human colon cancer cell line. RSV inhibited cell proliferation of both cell lines. Increased cellular ceramide and decreased sphingomyelin and S1P by RSV were observed in RSV-treated K562 cells. Further analysis revealed that acid sphingomyelinase mRNA and enzyme activity levels were increased by RSV. Desipramine, a functional ASMase inhibitor, prevented RSV-induced ceramide increase. RSV increased ATF3, EGR1, EGR3 proteins and phosphorylated c-Jun and FOXO3. However, co-transfection using these transcription factor expression vectors and ASMase promoter reporter vector revealed positive effects of EGR1 and EGR3 but not others. Electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) and Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay demonstrated the direct binding of EGR1/3 transcription factors with ASMase 5'-promoter. These results indicate that increased EGR1/3 and ASMase expression play an important role in cellular ceramide increase by RSV treatment. PMID:26809095

  1. The multigene families of actinoporins (part II): Strategies for heterologous production in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Valle, A; Hervis, Y P; Socas, L B P; Canet, L; Faheem, M; Barbosa, J A R G; Lanio, M E; Pazos, I F

    2016-08-01

    The sea anemone venom contains pore-forming proteins (PFP) named actinoporins, due to their purification from organisms belonging to Actiniaria order and its ability to form pores in sphingomyelin-containing membranes. Actinoporins are generally basic, monomeric and single-domain small proteins (∼20 kDa) that are classified as α-type PFP since the pore formation in membranes occur through α-helical elements. Different actinoporin isoforms have been isolated from most of the anemones species, as was analyzed in the first part of this review. Several actinoporin full-length genes have been identified from genomic-DNA libraries or messenger RNA. Since the actinoporins lack carbohydrates and disulfide bridges, their expression in bacterial systems is suitable. The actinoporins heterologous expression in Escherichia coli simplifies their production, replaces the natural source reducing the ecological damage in anemone populations, and allows the production of site-specific mutants for the study of the structure-function relationship. In this second part of the review, the strategies for heterologous production of actinoporins in Escherichia coli are analyzed, as well as the different approaches used for their purification. The activity of the recombinant proteins with respect to the wild-type is also reviewed. PMID:27080349

  2. Influence of molecular packing and phospholipid type on rates of cholesterol exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Lund-Katz, S.; Laboda, H.M.; McLean, L.R.; Phillips, M.C.

    1986-05-01

    The rate-limiting step for transfer of cholesterol molecules between membranes and lipoproteins is desorption from the donor lipid-water interface. Cholesterol-phospholipid (PL) interactions influence this process so that at 50/sup 0/C the halftimes for transfer of (/sup 14/C)cholesterol from liquid-crystal, small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) containing 10 mol % cholesterol in egg phosphatidylcholine (PC), dipalmitoyl PC and egg or brain sphingomyelin (SM) are about 0.5, 3 and 5 h, respectively. The molecular packing in these cholesterol-PC mixtures has been investigated using (/sup 13/C)NMR and monolayer techniques. The relaxation times of the 4-(/sup 13/C)cholesterol nucleus in SUV of the above PL are essentially the same suggesting that the fast and slow molecular motions of the cholesterol molecules are similar in all bilayers. Comparison of surface pressure-molecular area isotherms of mixed cholesterol-PL monolayers indicates that the relative condensations of average PL molecular areas by cholesterol increase in the order unsaturated PC < saturated PC < SM. It follows that tighter molecular packing in the lipid-water interface correlates with a slower rate of cholesterol exchange. Because SM are generally more saturated than PC, increasing the SM/PC ratio increases the residence time of cholesterol molecules in a given PL environment. Such an effect is observed in human LDL compared to HDL.

  3. Effect of lipid composition and packing on the adsorption of apolipoproteins to lipid monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Ibdah, J.A.; Lund-Katz, S.; Phillips, M.C.

    1987-05-01

    The monolayer system has been used to study the effects of lipoprotein surface lipid composition and packing on the affinities of apolipoproteins for the surfaces of lipoprotein particles. The adsorption of apolipoproteins injected beneath lipid monolayers prepared with pure lipids or lipoprotein surface lipids is evaluated by monitoring the surface pressure of the film and the surface concentration (Gamma) of /sup 14/C-labelled apolipoprotein. At a given initial film pressure (..pi../sub i/) there is a higher adsorption of human apo A-I to unsaturated phosphatidylcholine (PC) monolayers compared to saturated PC monolayers (e.g., at ..pi../sub i/ = 10 mN/m, Gamma = 0.35 and 0.06 mg/m/sup 2/ for egg PC and distearoyl PC, respectively, with 3 x 10/sup -4/ mg/ml apo A-I in the subphase). In addition, adsorption of apo A-I is less to an egg sphingomyelin monolayer than to an egg PC monolayer. The adsorption of apo A-I to PC monolayers is decreased by addition of cholesterol. Generally, apo A-I adsorption diminishes as the lipid molecular area decreases. Apo A-I adsorbs more to monolayers prepared with HDL/sub 3/ surface lipids than with LDL surface lipids. These studies suggest that lipoprotein surface lipid composition and packing are crucial factors influencing the transfer and exchange of apolipoproteins among various lipoprotein classes during metabolism of lipoprotein particles.

  4. TNFα-induced neutral sphingomyelinase-2 modulates synaptic plasticity by controlling the membrane insertion of NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, David; Knapp, Edward; Bandaru, Veera V.R.; Wang, Yue; Knorr, David; Poirier, Christophe; Mattson, Mark P.; Geiger, Jonathan D.; Haughey, Norman J.

    2009-01-01

    The insertion and removal of N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors from the synapse are critical events that modulate synaptic plasticity. While a great deal of progress has been made on understanding the mechanisms that modulate trafficking of NMDA receptors, we do not currently understand the molecular events required for the fusion of receptor containing vesicles with the plasma membrane. Here we show that sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase3 (also known as neutral sphingomyelinase-2; nSMase2) is critical for TNFα-induced trafficking of NMDA receptors and synaptic plasticity. TNFα initiated a rapid increase in ceramide that was associated with increased surface localization of NMDA receptor NR1 subunits and a specific clustering of NR1 phosphorylated on serines 896 and 897 into lipid rafts. Brief applications of TNFα increased the rate and amplitude of NMDA-evoked calcium bursts and enhanced excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Pharmacological inhibition or genetic mutation of nSMase2 prevented TNFα-induced generation of ceramide, phosphorylation of NR1 subuints, clustering of NR1, enhancement of NMDA-evoked calcium flux and EPSCs. PMID:19476542

  5. Lateral Organization of Lipids in Multi-component Liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, Sanoop; Laradji, Mohamed; Sunil Kumar, P. B.

    2009-04-01

    Inspite of the fluid nature and low elastic modulus, membranes play a crucial role in maintaining the structural integrity of the cell. Recent experiments have challenged the passive nature of the membrane as proposed by the classical fluid mosaic model. Experiments indicate that biomembranes of eukaryotic cells may be laterally organized into small nanoscopic domains, called rafts, which are rich in sphingomyelin and cholesterol. It is largely believed that this in-plane organization is essential for a variety of physiological functions such as signaling, recruitment of specific proteins and endocytosis. However, elucidation of the fundamental issues including the mechanisms leading to the formation of lipid rafts, their stability, and their size remain difficult. This has reiterated the importance of understanding the equilibrium phase behavior and the kinetics of fluid multicomponent lipid membranes before attempts are made to find the effects of more complex mechanisms that may be involved in the formation and stability of lipid rafts. Current increase in interest in the domain formation in multicomponent membranes also stems from the experiments demonstrating fluid-fluid coexistence in mixtures of lipids and cholesterol and the success of several computational models in predicting their behavior. Here we review time dependent Ginzburg Landau model, dynamical triangulation Monte Carlo, and dissipative particle dynamics which are some of the methods that are commonly employed.

  6. Fatty acid-dependent globotriaosyl ceramide receptor function in detergent resistant model membranes.

    PubMed

    Mahfoud, Radhia; Manis, Adam; Lingwood, Clifford A

    2009-09-01

    Glycosphingolipid (GSL) fatty acid strictly regulates verotoxin 1 (VT1) and the HIV adhesin, gp120 binding to globotriaosyl ceramide within Gb(3)/cholesterol detergent resistant membrane (DRM) vesicle constructs and in Gb(3) water-air interface monolayers in a similar manner. VT2 bound Gb(3)/cholesterol vesicles irrespective of fatty acid composition, but VT1 bound neither C18 nor C20Gb(3)vesicles. C18/C20Gb(3) were dominant negative in mixed Gb(3) fatty acid isoform vesicles, but including C24:1Gb(3) gave maximal binding. VT1 bound C18Gb(3) vesicles after cholesterol removal, but C20Gb(3)vesicles required sphingomyelin in addition for binding. HIV-1gp120 also bound C16, C22, and C24, but neither C18 nor C20Gb(3) vesicles. C18 and C20Gb(3) were, in mixtures without C24:1Gb(3), dominant negative for gp120 vesicle binding. Gp120/VT1bound C18 and C24:1Gb(3) mixtures, although neither isoform bound alone. Monolayer surface pressure measurement showed VT1, but not VT2, bound Gb(3) at cellular DRM surface pressures, and confirmed loss of VT1 and gp120 (but not VT2) specific C18Gb(3) binding. We conclude fatty-acid mediated fluidity within simple model GSL/cholesterol DRM can selectively regulate GSL carbohydrate-ligand binding.

  7. Changes in ganglioside content affect the binding of Clostridium perfringens epsilon-toxin to detergent-resistant membranes of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells.

    PubMed

    Shimamoto, Seiko; Tamai, Eiji; Matsushita, Osamu; Minami, Junzaburo; Okabe, Akinobu; Miyata, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    Epsilon-toxin (ET) of Clostridium perfringens, which causes fatal enterotoxemia in ungulates, was previously shown to bind to and form a heptameric pore within the detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) of MDCK cells. Depletion of cholesterol has also been shown to decrease the cytotoxicity of ET and its heptamerization. In this study, we investigated the effects of changes in sphingolipids, other DRM components of MDCK cells, on the cells' susceptibility to ET. Treatment with fumonisin B1 and PDMP, inhibitors of sphingolipid and glycosphingolipid syntheses, respectively, increased the susceptibility, while D609, a sphingomyelin synthesis inhibitor, had the opposite effect. The exogenous addition of ganglioside G(M1) dramatically decreased the ET binding, heptamerization and cytotoxicity. These effects were shown not to be due to ET binding to G(M1) or to denaturation of ET. We also found that the ET cytotoxicity towards MDCK cells decreased with an increase in culture time. In accordance with the resistance observed for prolonged cultured cells, G(M3), a major ganglioside component, increased and sialidase treatment increased their susceptibility. These results suggest that membrane-anchored sialic acid of G(M3) within DRMs inhibits ET binding, leading to prevention of the heptamerization of ET and cell death. It is also suggested that sialidase produced by this organism aids the targeting of ET to MDCK cells.

  8. New Insights into VacA Intoxication Mediated through Its Cell Surface Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Yahiro, Kinnosuke; Hirayama, Toshiya; Moss, Joel; Noda, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori), a major cause of gastroduodenal diseases, produces VacA, a vacuolating cytotoxin associated with gastric inflammation and ulceration. The C-terminal domain of VacA plays a crucial role in receptor recognition on target cells. We have previously identified three proteins (i.e., RPTPα, RPTPβ, and LRP1) that serve as VacA receptors. These receptors contribute to the internalization of VacA into epithelial cells, activate signal transduction pathways, and contribute to cell death and gastric ulceration. In addition, other factors (e.g., CD18, sphingomyelin) have also been identified as cell-surface, VacA-binding proteins. Since we believe that, following interactions with its host cell receptors, VacA participates in events leading to disease, a better understanding of the cellular function of VacA receptors may provide valuable information regarding the mechanisms underlying the pleiotropic actions of VacA and the pathogenesis of H. pylori-mediated disease. In this review, we focus on VacA receptors and their role in events leading to cell damage. PMID:27187473

  9. UPLC-HRMS based metabolomics reveals the sphingolipids with long fatty chains and olefinic bonds up-regulated in metabolic pathway for hypoxia preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Wang, Mingming; Cheng, Haiting; Cui, Can; Su, Su; Xu, Pingxiang; Xue, Ming

    2015-12-01

    Hypoxia preconditioning (HPC) could protect cells, tissues, organs and systems from hypoxia injury, but the molecular mechanism still remained unclear. The ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled high resolution mass spectrometry (UPLC-HRMS) based metabolomics method was utilized to explore the key endogenous metabolites and metabolic pathways related to HPC. Our results clearly showed that the HPC mice model was established and refined, suggesting that there were significant differences between the control group and 6 × HPC group at the molecular levels. A serious of statistical analyses, including univariate analysis and multivariate analysis, were performed by the Progenesis QI software package and MetaboAnalyst web-server. The sphingolipid metabolic pathways were noticed due to the low p-value and high pathway impact calculated by the MetaboAnalyst and the pathways were altered under HPC condition. Especially, the sphingolipid compound sphingomyelin, ceramide, glucosylceramide, galactosylceramide and lactosylceramide were mapping in this metabolic pathway. Interestingly, these sphingolipid metabolites with olefinic bond in the long fatty chain were up-regulated, while those sphingolipids without olefinic bond were down-regulated. The results indicated that C24:1-Cers played a critical role in HPC and had potential in endogenous protective mechanism. Our data provided an insight to further reveal the protection mechanism of HPC. PMID:26433137

  10. Solution Asymmetry and Salt Expand Fluid-Fluid Coexistence Regions of Charged Membranes.

    PubMed

    Kubsch, Bastian; Robinson, Tom; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Dimova, Rumiana

    2016-06-21

    Liquid-liquid phase separation in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) leads to the formation of intramembrane domains. To mimic charged biological membranes, we studied phase separation and domain formation in GUVs of ternary lipid mixtures composed of egg sphingomyelin, cholesterol, and the negatively charged lipid dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol. The GUVs were exposed to solutions of sucrose and high-saline buffer. The phase diagram was determined using epifluorescence microscopy for vesicle populations with symmetric and asymmetric solution compositions across the membranes. Trans-membrane solution asymmetry was found to affect the membrane phase state. Furthermore, compared to the case of salt-free conditions, the phase diagram in the presence of high-saline buffer (both symmetrically or asymmetrically present across the membrane) was found to exhibit a significantly extended region of liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered coexistence. These observations were confirmed on single GUVs using microfluidics and confocal microscopy. Moreover, we found that the miscibility temperatures markedly increased for vesicles in the presence of symmetric and asymmetric salt solutions. Our results demonstrate a substantial effect of salt and solution asymmetry on the phase behavior of charged membranes, which has direct implications for protein adsorption onto these membranes and for the repartitioning of proteins within the membrane domains. PMID:27288275

  11. Lipids that determine detergent resistance of MDCK cell membrane fractions.

    PubMed

    Manni, Marco M; Cano, Ainara; Alonso, Cristina; Goñi, Félix M

    2015-10-01

    A comparative lipidomic study has been performed of whole Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells and of the detergent-resistant membrane fraction (DRM) obtained after treating the cells with the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100. The DRM were isolated following a standard procedure that is extensively used in cell biology studies. Significant differences were found in the lipid composition of the whole cells and of DRM. The latter were enriched in all the analyzed sphingolipid classes: sphingomyelins, ceramides and hexosylceramides. Diacylglycerols were also preferentially found in DRM. The detergent-resistant fraction was also enriched in saturated over unsaturated fatty acyl chains, and in sn-1 acyl chains containing 16 carbon atoms, over the longer and shorter ones. The glycerophospholipid species phosphatidylethanolamines and phosphatidylinositols, that were mainly unsaturated, did not show a preference for DRM. Phosphatidylcholines were an intermediate case: the saturated, but not the unsaturated species were found preferentially in DRM. The question remains on whether these DRM, recovered from detergent-membrane mixtures by floatation over a sucrose gradient, really correspond to membrane domains existing in the cell membrane prior to detergent treatment.

  12. Concentrations of choline-containing compounds and betaine in common foods.

    PubMed

    Zeisel, Steven H; Mar, Mei-Heng; Howe, Juliette C; Holden, Joanne M

    2003-05-01

    Choline is important for normal membrane function, acetylcholine synthesis and methyl group metabolism; the choline requirement for humans is 550 mg/d for men (Adequate Intake). Betaine, a choline derivative, is important because of its role in the donation of methyl groups to homocysteine to form methionine. In tissues and foods, there are multiple choline compounds that contribute to total choline concentration (choline, glycerophosphocholine, phosphocholine, phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin). In this study, we collected representative food samples and analyzed the choline concentration of 145 common foods using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Foods with the highest total choline concentration (mg/100 g) were: beef liver (418), chicken liver (290), eggs (251), wheat germ (152), bacon (125), dried soybeans (116) and pork (103). The foods with the highest betaine concentration (mg/100 g) were: wheat bran (1339), wheat germ (1241), spinach (645), pretzels (237), shrimp (218) and wheat bread (201). A number of epidemiologic studies have examined the relationship between dietary folic acid and cancer or heart disease. It may be helpful to also consider choline intake as a confounding factor because folate and choline methyl donation can be interchangeable. PMID:12730414

  13. Electrostatic interaction between oxysterol-binding protein and VAMP-associated protein A revealed by NMR and mutagenesis studies.

    PubMed

    Furuita, Kyoko; Jee, JunGoo; Fukada, Harumi; Mishima, Masaki; Kojima, Chojiro

    2010-04-23

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP), a cytosolic receptor of cholesterol and oxysterols, is recruited to the endoplasmic reticulum by binding to the cytoplasmic major sperm protein (MSP) domain of integral endoplasmic reticulum protein VAMP-associated protein-A (VAP-A), a process essential for the stimulation of sphingomyelin synthesis by 25-hydroxycholesterol. To delineate the interaction mechanism between VAP-A and OSBP, we determined the complex structure between the VAP-A MSP domain (VAP-A(MSP)) and the OSBP fragment containing a VAP-A binding motif FFAT (OSBP(F)) by NMR. This solution structure explained that five of six conserved residues in the FFAT motif are required for the stable complex formation, and three of five, including three critical intermolecular electrostatic interactions, were not explained before. By combining NMR relaxation and titration, isothermal titration calorimetry, and mutagenesis experiments with structural information, we further elucidated the detailed roles of the FFAT motif and underlying motions of VAP-A(MSP), OSBP(F), and the complex. Our results show that OSBP(F) is disordered in the free state, and VAP-A(MSP) and OSBP(F) form a final complex by means of intermediates, where electrostatic interactions through acidic residues, including an acid patch preceding the FFAT motif, probably play a collective role. Additionally, we report that the mutation that causes the familial motor neuron disease decreases the stability of the MSP domain. PMID:20178991

  14. Phosphatidylcholine passes through lateral tight junctions for paracellular transport to the apical side of the polarized intestinal tumor cell-line CaCo2.

    PubMed

    Stremmel, Wolfgang; Staffer, Simone; Gan-Schreier, Hongying; Wannhoff, Andreas; Bach, Margund; Gauss, Annika

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the most abundant phospholipid in intestinal mucus, indicative of a specific transport system across the mucosal epithelium to the intestinal lumen. To elucidate this transport mechanism, we employed a transwell tissue culture system with polarized CaCo2 cells. It was shown that PC could not substantially be internalized by the cells. However, after basal application of increasing PC concentrations, an apical transport of 47.1±6.3nmolh(-1)mMPC(-1) was observed. Equilibrium distribution studies with PC applied in equal concentrations to the basal and apical compartments showed a 1.5-fold accumulation on the expense of basal PC. Disruption of tight junctions (TJ) by acetaldehyde or PPARγ inhibitors or by treatment with siRNA to TJ proteins suppressed paracellular transport by at least 50%. Transport was specific for the choline containing the phospholipids PC, lysoPC and sphingomyelin. We showed that translocation is driven by an electrochemical gradient generated by apical accumulation of Cl(-) and HCO3(-) through CFTR. Pretreatment with siRNA to mucin 3 which anchors in the apical plasma membrane of mucosal cells inhibited the final step of luminal PC secretion. PC accumulates in intestinal mucus using a paracellular, apically directed transport route across TJs. PMID:27365309

  15. Phospholipid profile of amniotic fluid in ovine model of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH): the effect of fetal tracheal occlusion.

    PubMed

    Mimmi, Maria Chiara; Ballico, Maurizio; Amoroso, Francesco; Calcaterra, Valeria; Marotta, Mario; Peiro, Jose Luis; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2015-03-01

    Fetal endoscopic tracheal occlusion has been proposed as a prenatal intervention to ameliorate congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) prognosis. Tracheal occlusion (TO) prevents pulmonary fluid egress, leading to tissue expansion, reversal of lung hypoplasia, and potential maturation. Fetal lung maturity strongly correlates with amniotic fluid (AF) phospholipidic composition. In this preliminary study, we characterized the AF phospholipidic profile in CDH-induced, TO-treated, and healthy fetal lambs to define the prenatal treatment benefits of TO on lung maturity. CDH induction was performed at 70 days of gestation, TO was carried out at 102 days of gestation, and caesarean section was carried out at 136 days of gestation. AF samples, taken at 102-136 days of gestation, were evaluated using mass spectrometry. The analysis focused on phosphatidylcholines (PCs) and sphingomyelins (SMs). The most abundant phosphatidylcholine species retrieved in healthy AF was POPC [PC(18:1/16:0)], while the level of DPPC [PC(16:0/16:0)] was extremely low at both gestational ages. CDH induction caused a decrease in POPC and many other PCs. A substantial return of some PCs, in particular POPC, PC(34:2) and PC(18:0/16:0), to a more physiological level was prompted by TO. SMs were unaltered. The AF phospholipidic profile could provide prenatal prognostic markers of CDH and possible indices of lung maturation after fetal treatment. PMID:25625961

  16. Continuity of monolayer-bilayer junctions for localization of lipid raft microdomains in model membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ryu, Yong -Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng -Hun; Lee, Sang -Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang -Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin -Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed betweenmore » the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Furthermore, our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.« less

  17. N-Nervonoylsphingomyelin (C24:1) Prevents Lateral Heterogeneity in Cholesterol-Containing Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Maté, Sabina; Busto, Jon V.; García-Arribas, Aritz B.; Sot, Jesús; Vazquez, Romina; Herlax, Vanesa; Wolf, Claude; Bakás, Laura; Goñi, Félix M.

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore how the nature of the acyl chains of sphingomyelin (SM) influence its lateral distribution in the ternary lipid mixture SM/cholesterol/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), focusing on the importance of the hydrophobic part of the SM molecule for domain formation. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements showed that the presence of a double bond in the 24:1 SM molecule in mixtures with cholesterol (CHO) or in pure bilayers led to a decrease in the molecular packing. Confocal microscopy and AFM showed, at the meso- and nanoscales respectively, that unlike 16:0 and 24:0 SM, 24:1 SM does not induce phase segregation in ternary lipid mixtures with DOPC and CHO. This ternary lipid mixture had a nanomechanical stability intermediate between those displayed by liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) phases, as reported by AFM force spectroscopy measurements, demonstrating that 24:1 SM is able to accommodate both DOPC and CHO, forming a single phase. Confocal experiments on giant unilamellar vesicles made of human, sheep, and rabbit erythrocyte ghosts rich in 24:1 SM and CHO, showed no lateral domain segregation. This study provides insights into how the specific molecular structure of SM affects the lateral behavior and the physical properties of both model and natural membranes. Specifically, the data suggest that unsaturated SM may help to keep membrane lipids in a homogeneous mixture rather than in separate domains. PMID:24940778

  18. Comprehensive analysis of lipids in biological systems by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS)-based lipidomics has been a subject of dramatic developments over the past decade. This review focuses on state of the art in LC-MS-based lipidomics, covering all the steps of global lipidomic profiling. On the basis of review of 185 original papers and application notes, we can conclude that typical LC-MS-based lipidomics methods involve: (1) extraction using chloroform/MeOH or MTBE/MeOH protocols, both with addition of internal standards covering each lipid class; (2) separation of lipids using short microbore columns with sub-2-μm or 2.6–2.8-μm (fused-core) particle size with C18 or C8 sorbent with analysis time <30 min; (3) electrospray ionization in positive- and negative-ion modes with full spectra acquisition using high-resolution MS with capability to MS/MS. Phospholipids (phosphatidylcholines, phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylinositols, phosphatidylserines, phosphatidylglycerols) followed by sphingomyelins, di- and tri-acylglycerols, and ceramides were the most frequently targeted lipid species. PMID:25309011

  19. Lipids that determine detergent resistance of MDCK cell membrane fractions.

    PubMed

    Manni, Marco M; Cano, Ainara; Alonso, Cristina; Goñi, Félix M

    2015-10-01

    A comparative lipidomic study has been performed of whole Madin-Darby canine kidney epithelial cells and of the detergent-resistant membrane fraction (DRM) obtained after treating the cells with the non-ionic detergent Triton X-100. The DRM were isolated following a standard procedure that is extensively used in cell biology studies. Significant differences were found in the lipid composition of the whole cells and of DRM. The latter were enriched in all the analyzed sphingolipid classes: sphingomyelins, ceramides and hexosylceramides. Diacylglycerols were also preferentially found in DRM. The detergent-resistant fraction was also enriched in saturated over unsaturated fatty acyl chains, and in sn-1 acyl chains containing 16 carbon atoms, over the longer and shorter ones. The glycerophospholipid species phosphatidylethanolamines and phosphatidylinositols, that were mainly unsaturated, did not show a preference for DRM. Phosphatidylcholines were an intermediate case: the saturated, but not the unsaturated species were found preferentially in DRM. The question remains on whether these DRM, recovered from detergent-membrane mixtures by floatation over a sucrose gradient, really correspond to membrane domains existing in the cell membrane prior to detergent treatment. PMID:26320877

  20. Ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry characterisation of milk polar lipids from dairy cows fed different diets.

    PubMed

    Craige Trenerry, V; Akbaridoust, Ghazal; Plozza, Tim; Rochfort, Simone; Wales, William J; Auldist, Martin; Ajlouni, Said

    2013-11-15

    Milk polar lipids are an important class of biologically active species for human health and for improving the physical functionality of food ingredients. Milk polar lipids from 144 multiparous Holstein-Friesian dairy cows fed different diets were analysed using ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-ion trap mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS(n)). A complex profile of polar lipids, consisting of 7 species of phosphatidylinositol (PI), 12 species of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), 18 species of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and 13 species of sphingomyelin (SM) were identified from the molecular ions and sequential MS(n) fragmentation. Qualitative assessment of the data suggested that different cow diets influenced the relative amounts of a small number of species in the milk samples, e.g. PE 14:0/18:1, PE 18:0/18:1, PC 15:0/18:1, PC 18:0/18:1, SM d18:1/14:0, SM d18:1/15:0, SM d18:1/22:0 and SM d18:1/23:0. PMID:23790938

  1. Release of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 from human astrocytes is regulated by intracellular ceramide.

    PubMed

    Kimura, M; Soeda, S; Oda, M; Ochiai, T; Kihara, T; Ono, N; Shimeno, H

    2000-12-15

    The present study underscores a regulatory role of intracellular ceramide in astrocytes for the release of an extracellular serine protease, tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA), and its inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). Treatment of cultured human astrocytes with N-acetylsphingosine, a cell-permeable short-chain ceramide analogue or daunorubicin that could increase intracellular ceramide via activation of ceramide synthase or sphingomyelin hydrolysis increased the release of t-PA and conversely decreased the PAI-1 release. Interestingly, treatment of the astrocytes with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha also increased the intracellular ceramide levels but caused the elevation of PAI-1 release without altering the t-PA release. These data suggest that the generation of ceramide in astrocytes is linked at least with the regulation of PAI-1 release. We also demonstrate that the suppression of PAI-1 release with daunorubicin accelerates the cell death of neuronally differentiated PC12 cells and suggest an antiapoptotic role of PAI-1 in the nervous system.

  2. Quantitative profiling of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its mycelia by using UHPLC-MS

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Jia-Ning; Wang, Jing-Rong; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, 101 sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its five mycelia were quantitatively profiled by using a fully validated UHPLC-MS method. The results revealed that a general rank order for the abundance of different classes of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its mycelia is sphingoid bases/ceramides > phosphosphingolipids > glycosphingolipids. However, remarkable sphingolipid differences between wild Cordyceps and its mycelia were observed. One is that sphingoid base is the dominant sphingolipid in wild Cordyceps, whereas ceramide is the major sphingolipid in mycelia. Another difference is that the abundance of sphingomyelins in wild Cordyceps is almost 10-folds higher than those in most mycelia. The third one is that mycelia contain more inositol phosphorylceramides and glycosphingolipids than wild Cordyceps. Multivariate analysis was further employed to visualize the difference among wild Cordyceps and different mycelia, leading to the identification of respective sphingolipids as potential chemical markers for the differentiation of wild Cordyceps and its related mycelia. This study represents the first report on the quantitative profiling of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its related mycelia, which provided comprehensive chemical evidence for the quality control and rational utilization of wild Cordyceps and its mycelia. PMID:26868933

  3. Bacterial phospholipases C.

    PubMed Central

    Titball, R W

    1993-01-01

    A variety of pathogenic bacteria produce phospholipases C, and since the discovery in 1944 that a bacterial toxin (Clostridium perfringens alpha-toxin) possessed an enzymatic activity, there has been considerable interest in this class of proteins. Initial speculation that all phospholipases C would have lethal properties has not been substantiated. Most of the characterized enzymes fall into one of four groups of structurally related proteins: the zinc-metallophospholipases C, the sphingomyelinases, the phosphatidylinositol-hydrolyzing enzymes, and the pseudomonad phospholipases C. The zinc-metallophospholipases C have been most intensively studied, and lethal toxins within this group possess an additional domain. The toxic phospholipases C can interact with eukaryotic cell membranes and hydrolyze phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin, leading to cell lysis. However, measurement of the cytolytic potential or lethality of phospholipases C may not accurately indicate their roles in the pathogenesis of disease. Subcytolytic concentrations of phospholipase C can perturb host cells by activating the arachidonic acid cascade or protein kinase C. Nonlethal phospholipases C, such as the Listeria monocytogenes PLC-A, appear to enhance the release of the organism from the host cell phagosome. Since some phospholipases C play important roles in the pathogenesis of disease, they could form components of vaccines. A greater understanding of the modes of action and structure-function relationships of phospholipases C will facilitate the interpretation of studies in which these enzymes are used as membrane probes and will enhance the use of these proteins as models for eukaryotic phospholipases C. PMID:8336671

  4. Comprehensive Plasma Metabolomic Analyses of Atherosclerotic Progression Reveal Alterations in Glycerophospholipid and Sphingolipid Metabolism in Apolipoprotein E-deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Dang, Vi T.; Huang, Aric; Zhong, Lexy H.; Shi, Yuanyuan; Werstuck, Geoff H.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is the major underlying cause of most cardiovascular diseases. Despite recent advances, the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of atherogenesis are not clear. In this study, comprehensive plasma metabolomics were used to investigate early-stage atherosclerotic development and progression in chow-fed apolipoprotein E-deficient mice at 5, 10 and 15 weeks of age. Comprehensive plasma metabolomic profiles, based on 4365 detected metabolite features, differentiate atherosclerosis-prone from atherosclerosis-resistant models. Metabolites in the sphingomyelin pathway were significantly altered prior to detectable lesion formation and at all subsequent time-points. The cytidine diphosphate-diacylglycerol pathway was up-regulated during stage I of atherosclerosis, while metabolites in the phosphatidylethanolamine and glycosphingolipid pathways were augmented in mice with stage II lesions. These pathways, involving glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism, were also significantly affected during the course of atherosclerotic progression. Our findings suggest that distinct plasma metabolomic profiles can differentiate the different stages of atherosclerotic progression. This study reveals that alteration of specific, previously unreported pathways of glycerophospholipid and sphingolipid metabolism are associated with atherosclerosis. The clear difference in the level of several metabolites supports the use of plasma lipid profiling as a diagnostic tool of atherogenesis. PMID:27721472

  5. Identification of lipid-phosphatidylserine (PS) as the target of unbiasedly selected cancer specific peptide-peptoid hybrid PPS1

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Tanvi J.; Toombs, Jason E.; Minna, John D.; Brekken, Rolf A.; Udugamasooriya, Damith Gomika

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) is an anionic phospholipid maintained on the inner-leaflet of the cell membrane and is externalized in malignant cells. We previously launched a careful unbiased selection targeting biomolecules (e.g. protein, lipid or carbohydrate) distinct to cancer cells by exploiting HCC4017 lung cancer and HBEC30KT normal epithelial cells derived from the same patient, identifying HCC4017 specific peptide-peptoid hybrid PPS1. In this current study, we identified PS as the target of PPS1. We validated direct PPS1 binding to PS using ELISA-like assays, lipid dot blot and liposome based binding assays. In addition, PPS1 recognized other negatively charged and cancer specific lipids such as phosphatidic acid, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylglycerol. PPS1 did not bind to neutral lipids such as phosphatidylethanolamine found in cancer and phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin found in normal cells. Further we found that the dimeric version of PPS1 (PPS1D1) displayed strong cytotoxicity towards lung cancer cell lines that externalize PS, but not normal cells. PPS1D1 showed potent single agent anti-tumor activity and enhanced the efficacy of docetaxel in mice bearing H460 lung cancer xenografts. Since PS and anionic phospholipid externalization is common across many cancer types, PPS1 may be an alternative to overcome limitations of protein targeted agents. PMID:27120792

  6. Phospholipid Profile of the Stomach and Duodenum of Normal Rabbits Fed with Supplements of Unripe Pawpaw (Carica papaya) and Unripe Plantain (Musa sapientum) Extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriyamremu, G. E.; Asagba, S. O.; Osagie, V. E.; Ojeaburu, S. I.; Lolodi, O.

    This study reports the effect of unripe pawpaw and/or unripe plantain extracts on the phospholipid profile of the stomach and duodenum of normal rabbits. Supplementation of chow with unripe pawpaw or plantain extract significantly reduced (p< 0.05) the weight gained by rabbits compared with the control. The total phospholipids content in the stomach and duodenum were significantly increased (p< 0.05) in the test groups compared to the control. In the stomach and duodenum, phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and sphingomyelin (SGM) were significantly increased (p< 0.05) in the test groups compared to the control. Pawpaw occasioned a decrease in the PE/PC ratio in both tissues as against an increase observed in the SGM/PC ratio. The results presented suggests that unripe pawpaw meal and unripe plantain extract alter the phospholipid profile of the stomach and duodenum in ways which may affect membrane fluidity of these tissues and would have profound effect on the gastro-duodenal mucosa and thus have implication(s) for gastric and duodenal ulcers in rabbits.

  7. Discovery of Infection Associated Metabolic Markers in Human African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Lamour, Sabrina D; Gomez-Romero, Maria; Vorkas, Panagiotis A; Alibu, Vincent P; Saric, Jasmina; Holmes, Elaine; Sternberg, Jeremy M

    2015-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) remains a major neglected tropical disease in Sub-Saharan Africa. As clinical symptoms are usually non-specific, new diagnostic and prognostic markers are urgently needed to enhance the number of identified cases and optimise treatment. This is particularly important for disease caused by Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense, where indirect immunodiagnostic approaches have to date been unsuccessful. We have conducted global metabolic profiling of plasma from T.b.rhodesiense HAT patients and endemic controls, using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and ultra-performance liquid chromatography, coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS) and identified differences in the lipid, amino acid and metabolite profiles. Altogether 16 significantly disease discriminatory metabolite markers were found using NMR, and a further 37 lipid markers via UPLC-MS. These included significantly higher levels of phenylalanine, formate, creatinine, N-acetylated glycoprotein and triglycerides in patients relative to controls. HAT patients also displayed lower concentrations of histidine, sphingomyelins, lysophosphatidylcholines, and several polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholines. While the disease metabolite profile was partially consistent with previous data published in experimental rodent infection, we also found unique lipid and amino acid profile markers highlighting subtle but important differences between the host response to trypanosome infections between animal models and natural human infections. Our results demonstrate the potential of metabolic profiling in the identification of novel diagnostic biomarkers and the elucidation of pathogenetic mechanisms in this disease.

  8. Changes in membrane sphingolipid composition modulate dynamics and adhesion of integrin nanoclusters

    PubMed Central

    Eich, Christina; Manzo, Carlo; Keijzer, Sandra de; Bakker, Gert-Jan; Reinieren-Beeren, Inge; García-Parajo, Maria F.; Cambi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids are essential constituents of the plasma membrane (PM) and play an important role in signal transduction by modulating clustering and dynamics of membrane receptors. Changes in lipid composition are therefore likely to influence receptor organisation and function, but how this precisely occurs is difficult to address given the intricacy of the PM lipid-network. Here, we combined biochemical assays and single molecule dynamic approaches to demonstrate that the local lipid environment regulates adhesion of integrin receptors by impacting on their lateral mobility. Induction of sphingomyelinase (SMase) activity reduced sphingomyelin (SM) levels by conversion to ceramide (Cer), resulting in impaired integrin adhesion and reduced integrin mobility. Dual-colour imaging of cortical actin in combination with single molecule tracking of integrins showed that this reduced mobility results from increased coupling to the actin cytoskeleton brought about by Cer formation. As such, our data emphasizes a critical role for the PM local lipid composition in regulating the lateral mobility of integrins and their ability to dynamically increase receptor density for efficient ligand binding in the process of cell adhesion. PMID:26869100

  9. [Involvement of nonstructural protein 5A and lipids on production of hepatitis C virus particles].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tetsuro; Masaki, Takahiro; Aizaki, Hideki

    2008-12-01

    A robust system for production of recombinant infectious hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been established in 2005 and classical virological techniques are now able to be applied to the HCV research, especially regarding molecular mechanisms on virion assembly and maturation. We recently demonstrated that the C-terminal serine cluster of NS5A is a determinant of NS5A interaction with Core and the subcellular localization of NSSA. Mutation of this cluster blocks the NS5A-Core interaction, resulting in perturbation of association between Core and HCV RNA. It is thus tempting to consider that NS5A plays a key role in transporting the viral genome RNA synthesized by the replication complex to the surface of lipid droplets (LDs) or LD-associated membranes, where Core localizes, leading to facilitation of nucleocapsid formation. We also demonstrated an important role of cholesterol and sphingolipid in HCV infection and virion maturation. Specifically, mature HCV particles are rich in cholesterol. Depletion of cholesterol from HCV or hydrolysis of virion-associated sphingomyelin results in a loss of infectivity, and the addition of exogenous cholesterol restores infectivity. In addition, cholesterol and sphingolipid on the HCV membrane play a key role in virus internalization. Finally, inhibitors of the sphingolipid biosynthetic pathway efficiently block virion production. PMID:19374198

  10. MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry as a simple tool to determine the phospholipid/glycolipid composition of sperm: pheasant spermatozoa as one selected example.

    PubMed

    Teuber, Kristin; Schiller, Jürgen; Jakop, Ulrike; Lüpold, Stefan; Orledge, Josephine M; Blount, Jonathan D; Royle, Nick J; Hoodless, Andrew; Müller, Karin

    2011-02-01

    Cellular membranes are composed of highly variable lipid molecules, mainly cholesterol and phospholipids (PLs). The cholesterol moiety and the saturation degree of the fatty acyl residues of PL determine the fluidity of the membrane, which is particularly important for sperm because they have to undergo characteristic membrane-dependent processes (acrosomal exocytosis and fusion with the oocyte). Glycolipids are an essential part of the membrane surface acting as key mediators in the interactions of sperm with components of the female genital tract. Although the lipid composition of many mammalian spermatozoa has already been determined, the lipid composition of avian spermatozoa has scarcely been investigated. Using spermatozoa extracts of the ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) as a selected example, this work demonstrates that matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) is a simple and fast method to determine spermatozoal lipid compositions. The lipid compositions of pheasant spermatozoa have not yet been investigated. In addition to common membrane (primarily diacyl) PL (sphingomyelin, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine), remarkable variation of different sulfoglycolipids (sulfogalactocerebrosides) was identified. This is in strong contrast to all other animal species investigated so far which nearly exclusively contain the sulfoglycolipid seminolipid (sulfogalactoalkylacylglycerol). We emphasize that the MALDI MS approach allows the characterization of sulfoglycolipids of sperm within a few minutes without the necessity for previous chromatographic separation.

  11. Clostridium perfringens Delta-Toxin Induces Rapid Cell Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Seike, Soshi; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Takehara, Masaya; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens delta-toxin is a β-pore-forming toxin and a putative pathogenic agent of C. perfringens types B and C. However, the mechanism of cytotoxicity of delta-toxin remains unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of cell death induced by delta-toxin in five cell lines (A549, A431, MDCK, Vero, and Caco-2). All cell lines were susceptible to delta-toxin. The toxin caused rapid ATP depletion and swelling of the cells. Delta-toxin bound and formed oligomers predominantly in plasma membrane lipid rafts. Destruction of the lipid rafts with methyl β-cyclodextrin inhibited delta-toxin-induced cytotoxicity and ATP depletion. Delta-toxin caused the release of carboxyfluorescein from sphingomyelin-cholesterol liposomes and formed oligomers; toxin binding to the liposomes declined with decreasing cholesterol content in the liposomes. Flow cytometric assays with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that delta-toxin treatment induced an elevation in the population of annexin V-negative and propidium iodide-positive cells. Delta-toxin did not cause the fragmentation of DNA or caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, delta-toxin caused damage to mitochondrial membrane permeability and cytochrome c release. In the present study, we demonstrate that delta-toxin produces cytotoxic activity through necrosis.

  12. Counterion-mediated pattern formation in membranes containing anionic lipids

    PubMed Central

    Slochower, David R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Tourdot, Richard W.; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Janmey, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Most lipid components of cell membranes are either neutral, like cholesterol, or zwitterionic, like phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. Very few lipids, such as sphingosine, are cationic at physiological pH. These generally interact only transiently with the lipid bilayer, and their synthetic analogs are often designed to destabilize the membrane for drug or DNA delivery. However, anionic lipids are common in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cell membranes. The net charge per anionic phospholipid ranges from −1 for the most abundant anionic lipids such has phosphatidylserine, to near −7 for phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5 trisphosphate, although the effective charge depends on many environmental factors. Anionic phospholipids and other negatively charged lipids such as lipopolysaccharides are not randomly distributed in the lipid bilayer, but are highly restricted to specific leaflets of the bilayer and to regions near transmembrane proteins or other organized structures within the plane of the membrane. This review highlights some recent evidence that counterions, in the form of monovalent or divalent metal ions, polyamines, or cationic protein domains, have a large influence of the lateral distribution of anionic lipids within the membrane, and that lateral demixing of anionic lipids has effects on membrane curvature and protein function that are important for biological control. PMID:24556233

  13. Lack of biliary lipid excretion in the little skate, Raja erinacea, indicates the absence of functional Mdr2, Abcg5, and Abcg8 transporters.

    PubMed

    Elferink, Ronald P J Oude; Ottenhoff, Roelof; Fricker, Gert; Seward, David J; Ballatori, Nazzareno; Boyer, James

    2004-05-01

    The ABC transporters bile salt export pump (BSEP; encoded by the ABCB11 gene), MDR3 P-glycoprotein (ABCB4), and sterolin 1 and 2 (ABCG5 and ABCG8) are crucial for the excretion of bile salt, phospholipid, and cholesterol, respectively, into the bile of mammals. The current paradigm is that phospholipid excretion mainly serves to protect membranes of the biliary tree against bile salt micelles. Bile salt composition and cytotoxicity, however, differ greatly between species. We investigated whether biliary phospholipid and cholesterol excretion occurs in a primitive species, the little skate, which almost exclusively excretes the sulphated bile alcohol scymnolsulphate. We observed no phospholipid and very little cholesterol excretion into bile of these animals. Conversely, when scymnolsulphate was added to the perfusate of isolated mouse liver perfusions, it was very well capable of driving biliary phospholipid and cholesterol excretion. Furthermore, in an erythrocyte cytolysis assay, scymnolsulphate was found to be at least as cytotoxic as taurocholate. These results demonstrate that the little skate does not have a system for the excretion of phospholipid and cholesterol and that both the MDR3 and the two half-transporter genes, ABCG5 and ABCG8, have evolved relatively late in evolution to mediate biliary lipid excretion. Little skate plasma membranes may be protected against bile salt micelles mainly by their high sphingomyelin content.

  14. Lysis of erythrocytes from stored human blood by phospholipase C (Bacillus cereus).

    PubMed Central

    Little, C; Rumsby, M G

    1980-01-01

    The ability of phospholipase C (Bacillus cereus) to lyse erythrocytes from human blood that had been stored under Transfusion Service conditions for up to 16 weeks has been examined. When incubated at 20 degrees C with enzyme (0.03 mg/ml, 55 units/ml) for up to 1 h fresh erythrocytes were not lysed. After about 4 weeks of storage a population of very readily lysed erythrocytes appeared. The morphological changes in erythrocytes from blood stored up to 16 weeks were examined by scanning electron microscopy. The proportion of very readily lysed erythrocytes correlated well with the proportion of spheroechinocytes I. This morphological form was shown to be preferentially removed by phospholipase C and before lysis a transient appearance of smooth spheres occurred. The decrease in blood ATP concentrations on storage was measured and found to correlate with the disappearance of discoid erythrocyte forms, but not directly with the increased susceptibility of the erythrocytes to lysis by the enzyme. However, erythrocytes of up to at least 15 weeks of age could be made less susceptible to lysis by pre-incubation in a medium designed to cause intracellular regeneration of ATP. During the lysis of spheroechinocytes I by electrophoretically pure recrystallized phospholipase C a rapid degradation of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylserine + phosphatidylinositol) occurred together with a slower degradation of sphingomyelin. Images PLATE 2 PLATE 1 PMID:6773524

  15. A facile method for controlling the reaction equilibrium of sphingolipid ceramide N-deacylase for lyso-glycosphingolipid production[S

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Feng-Tao; Han, Yun-Bin; Feng, Yan; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Lyso-glycosphingolipids (lyso-GSLs), the N-deacylated forms of glycosphingolipids (GSLs), are important synthetic intermediates for the preparation of GSL analogs. Although lyso-GSLs can be produced by hydrolyzing natural GSLs using sphingolipid ceramide N-deacylase (SCDase), the yield for this reaction is usually low because SCDase also catalyzes the reverse reaction, ultimately establishing an equilibrium between hydrolysis and synthesis. In the present study, we developed an efficient method for controlling the reaction equilibrium by introducing divalent metal cation and detergent in the enzymatic reaction system. In the presence of both Ca2+ and taurodeoxycholate hydrate, the generated fatty acids were precipitated by the formation of insoluble stearate salts and pushing the reaction equilibrium toward hydrolysis. The yield of GM1 hydrolysis can be achieved as high as 96%, with an improvement up to 45% compared with the nonoptimized condition. In preparative scale, 75 mg of lyso-GM1 was obtained from 100 mg of GM1 with a 90% yield, which is the highest reported yield to date. The method can also be used for the efficient hydrolysis of a variety of GSLs and sphingomyelin. Thus, this method should serve as a facile, easily scalable, and general tool for lyso-GSL production to facilitate further GSL research. PMID:26130766

  16. The way we view cellular (glyco)sphingolipids.

    PubMed

    Hoetzl, Sandra; Sprong, Hein; van Meer, Gerrit

    2007-11-01

    Mammalian cells synthesize ceramide in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and convert this to sphingomyelin and complex glycosphingolipids on the inner, non-cytosolic surface of Golgi cisternae. From there, these lipids travel towards the outer, non-cytosolic surface of the plasma membrane and all membranes of the endocytic system, where they are eventually degraded. At the basis of the selective, anterograde traffic out of the Golgi lies the propensity of the sphingolipids to self-aggregate with cholesterol into microdomains termed 'lipid rafts'. At the plasma membrane surface these rafts are thought to function as the scaffold for various types of (glyco) signaling domains of different protein and lipid composition that can co-exist on one and the same cell. In the past decade, various unexpected findings on the sites where sphingolipid-mediated events occur have thrown a new light on the localization and transport mechanisms of sphingolipids. These findings are largely based on biochemical experiments. Further progress in the field is hampered by a lack of morphological techniques to localize lipids with nanometer resolution. In the present paper, we critically evaluate the published data and discuss techniques and potential improvements.

  17. Altered lipid metabolism in the aging kidney identified by three layered omic analysis.

    PubMed

    Braun, Fabian; Rinschen, Markus M; Bartels, Valerie; Frommolt, Peter; Habermann, Bianca; Hoeijmakers, Jan H J; Schumacher, Björn; Dollé, Martijn E T; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Kurschat, Christine E

    2016-03-01

    Aging-associated diseases and their comorbidities affect the life of a constantly growing proportion of the population in developed countries. At the center of these comorbidities are changes of kidney structure and function as age-related chronic kidney disease predisposes to the development of cardiovascular diseases such as stroke, myocardial infarction or heart failure. To detect molecular mechanisms involved in kidney aging, we analyzed gene expression profiles of kidneys from adult and aged wild-type mice by transcriptomic, proteomic and targeted lipidomic methodologies. Interestingly, transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed differential expression of genes primarily involved in lipid metabolism and immune response. Additional lipidomic analyses uncovered significant age-related differences in the total amount of phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins as well as in subspecies of phosphatidylserines and ceramides with age. By integration of these datasets we identified Aldh1a1, a key enzyme in vitamin A metabolism specifically expressed in the medullary ascending limb, as one of the most prominent upregulated proteins in old kidneys. Moreover, ceramidase Asah1 was highly expressed in aged kidneys, consistent with a decrease in ceramide C16. In summary, our data suggest that changes in lipid metabolism are involved in the process of kidney aging and in the development of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26886165

  18. Bilayer registry in a multicomponent asymmetric membrane: Dependence on lipid composition and chain length

    SciTech Connect

    Polley, Anirban; Mayor, Satyajit; Rao, Madan E-mail: madan@ncbs.res.in

    2014-08-14

    A question of considerable interest to cell membrane biology is whether phase segregated domains across an asymmetric bilayer are strongly correlated with each other and whether phase segregation in one leaflet can induce segregation in the other. We answer both these questions in the affirmative, using an atomistic molecular dynamics simulation to study the equilibrium statistical properties of a 3-component asymmetric lipid bilayer comprising an unsaturated palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidyl-choline, a saturated sphingomyelin, and cholesterol with different composition ratios. Our simulations are done by fixing the composition of the upper leaflet to be at the coexistence of the liquid ordered (l{sub o})-liquid disordered (l{sub d}) phases, while the composition of the lower leaflet is varied from the phase coexistence regime to the mixed l{sub d} phase, across a first-order phase boundary. In the regime of phase coexistence in each leaflet, we find strong transbilayer correlations of the l{sub o} domains across the two leaflets, resulting in bilayer registry. This transbilayer correlation depends sensitively upon the chain length of the participating lipids and possibly other features of lipid chemistry, such as degree of saturation. We find that the l{sub o} domains in the upper leaflet can induce phase segregation in the lower leaflet, when the latter is nominally in the mixed (l{sub d}) phase.

  19. Central Nervous System Demyelination and Remyelination is Independent from Systemic Cholesterol Level in Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Raddatz, Barbara B; Sun, Wenhui; Brogden, Graham; Sun, Yanyong; Kammeyer, Patricia; Kalkuhl, Arno; Colbatzky, Florian; Deschl, Ulrich; Naim, Hassan Y; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Ulrich, Reiner

    2016-01-01

    High dietary fat and/or cholesterol intake is a risk factor for multiple diseases and has been debated for multiple sclerosis. However, cholesterol biosynthesis is a key pathway during myelination and disturbances are described in demyelinating diseases. To address the possible interaction of dyslipidemia and demyelination, cholesterol biosynthesis gene expression, composition of the body's major lipid repositories and Paigen diet-induced, systemic hypercholesterolemia were examined in Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis (TME) using histology, immunohistochemistry, serum clinical chemistry, microarrays and high-performance thin layer chromatography. TME-virus (TMEV)-infected mice showed progressive loss of motor performance and demyelinating leukomyelitis. Gene expression associated with cholesterol biosynthesis was overall down-regulated in the spinal cord of TMEV-infected animals. Spinal cord levels of galactocerebroside and sphingomyelin were reduced on day 196 post TMEV infection. Paigen diet induced serum hypercholesterolemia and hepatic lipidosis. However, high dietary fat and cholesterol intake led to no significant differences in clinical course, inflammatory response, astrocytosis, and the amount of demyelination and remyelination in the spinal cord of TMEV-infected animals. The results suggest that down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis is a transcriptional marker for demyelination, quantitative loss of myelin-specific lipids, but not cholesterol occurs late in chronic demyelination, and serum hypercholesterolemia exhibited no significant effect on TMEV infection.

  20. Physiological changes due to mild cooling in healthy lean males of white Caucasian and South Asian descent: A metabolomics study.

    PubMed

    Nahon, Kimberly J; Boon, Mariëtte R; Bakker, Leontine E H; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; Jazet, Ingrid M; van Dijk, Ko Willems; Rensen, Patrick C N; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O

    2016-01-01

    During mild cold exposure, non-shivering thermogenesis increases to maintain core body temperature by increasing utilization of substrates, especially fatty acids (FA), ultimately affecting lipid-associated metabolites. We aimed to investigate whether mild cooling induces changes in other metabolites and whether this response differs between white Caucasians and South Asians, who have a disadvantageous metabolic phenotype. 12 lean male Dutch white Caucasians and 12 matched Dutch South Asians were exposed to mild cold. Before and after 100 min exposure, serum samples were collected for analysis of 163 metabolites and 27 derived parameters using high throughput metabolomics. The overall response to mild cooling between both ethnicities was not different, therefore the data were pooled. After Bonferroni correction, mild cooling significantly changed 44 of 190 (23%) metabolic parameters. Specifically, cooling increased 19 phosphatidylcholine (PC) species, only those containing very long chain FAs, and increased the total class of PC containing mono-unsaturated FAs (+12.5%). Furthermore, cooling increased 10 sphingomyelin species as well as the amino acids glutamine (+18.7%), glycine (+11.6%) and histidine (+10.6%), and decreased short-chain (C3 and C4) acylcarnitines (-17.1% and -19.4%, respectively). In conclusion, mild cooling elicits substantial effects on serum metabolites in healthy males, irrespective of white Caucasian or South Asian ethnicity. PMID:26384768

  1. Use of quantitative amniotic fluid phosphatidylglycerol as a criterion for fetal lung maturation.

    PubMed

    Tsao, F H; Zachman, R D

    1992-01-01

    Phosphatidylglycerol (PG) in amniotic fluid was quantitatively measured by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) in 941 amniotic fluid samples and related to the presence or absence of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in neonates born within 7 days of the amniocentesis. In 639 case tests with PG 1 nmol/ml or more of amniotic fluid, there was no RDS. However, there were six cases of RDS associated with 109 tests of PG from 0 to less than 1 nmol/ml. These 109 tests would all have been reported as PG positive if PG were only qualitatively assessed on the TLC plate by the naked eye. The highest incidence of RDS occurred when PG was absent (23 RDS of 193 patients). Hence, this study suggests that quantitative analysis of PG determines a cutoff point of PG that eliminates false-positive PG assessments (1 nmol/ml in our laboratory). There was no difference in the levels of PG between males and females at equal gestational ages, but the incidence of RDS among male neonates was 2.4 times higher (p less than 0.05) than female neonates in the group with an immature amniotic fluid lecithin to sphingomyelin ratio and PG less than 1.0 nmol/ml. PMID:1550630

  2. Quantitative profiling of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its mycelia by using UHPLC-MS.

    PubMed

    Mi, Jia-Ning; Wang, Jing-Rong; Jiang, Zhi-Hong

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, 101 sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its five mycelia were quantitatively profiled by using a fully validated UHPLC-MS method. The results revealed that a general rank order for the abundance of different classes of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its mycelia is sphingoid bases/ceramides > phosphosphingolipids > glycosphingolipids. However, remarkable sphingolipid differences between wild Cordyceps and its mycelia were observed. One is that sphingoid base is the dominant sphingolipid in wild Cordyceps, whereas ceramide is the major sphingolipid in mycelia. Another difference is that the abundance of sphingomyelins in wild Cordyceps is almost 10-folds higher than those in most mycelia. The third one is that mycelia contain more inositol phosphorylceramides and glycosphingolipids than wild Cordyceps. Multivariate analysis was further employed to visualize the difference among wild Cordyceps and different mycelia, leading to the identification of respective sphingolipids as potential chemical markers for the differentiation of wild Cordyceps and its related mycelia. This study represents the first report on the quantitative profiling of sphingolipids in wild Cordyceps and its related mycelia, which provided comprehensive chemical evidence for the quality control and rational utilization of wild Cordyceps and its mycelia. PMID:26868933

  3. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  4. Inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase by tricyclic antidepressants and analogons

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Nadine; Sharma, Deepa; Gulbins, Erich; Becker, Katrin Anne; Edelmann, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, has been used in the clinic to treat a number of disorders, in particular major depression and neuropathic pain. In the 1970s the ability of tricyclic antidepressants to inhibit acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) was discovered. The enzyme ASM catalyzes the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin to ceramide. ASM and ceramide were shown to play a crucial role in a wide range of diseases, including cancer, cystic fibrosis, diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and major depression, as well as viral (e.g., measles virus) and bacterial (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) infections. Ceramide molecules may act in these diseases by the alteration of membrane biophysics, the self-association of ceramide molecules within the cell membrane and the ultimate formation of larger ceramide-enriched membrane domains/platforms. These domains were shown to serve the clustering of certain receptors such as CD95 and may also act in the above named diseases. The potential to block the generation of ceramide by inhibiting the ASM has opened up new therapeutic approaches for the treatment of these conditions. Since amitriptyline is one of the longest used clinical drugs and side effects are well studied, it could potentially become a cheap and easily accessible medication for patients suffering from these diseases. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of current in vitro and in vivo studies and clinical trials utilizing amitriptyline to inhibit ASM and contemplate possible future applications of the drug. PMID:25228885

  5. Clostridium perfringens Delta-Toxin Induces Rapid Cell Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Seike, Soshi; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Takehara, Masaya; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens delta-toxin is a β-pore-forming toxin and a putative pathogenic agent of C. perfringens types B and C. However, the mechanism of cytotoxicity of delta-toxin remains unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of cell death induced by delta-toxin in five cell lines (A549, A431, MDCK, Vero, and Caco-2). All cell lines were susceptible to delta-toxin. The toxin caused rapid ATP depletion and swelling of the cells. Delta-toxin bound and formed oligomers predominantly in plasma membrane lipid rafts. Destruction of the lipid rafts with methyl β-cyclodextrin inhibited delta-toxin-induced cytotoxicity and ATP depletion. Delta-toxin caused the release of carboxyfluorescein from sphingomyelin-cholesterol liposomes and formed oligomers; toxin binding to the liposomes declined with decreasing cholesterol content in the liposomes. Flow cytometric assays with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that delta-toxin treatment induced an elevation in the population of annexin V-negative and propidium iodide-positive cells. Delta-toxin did not cause the fragmentation of DNA or caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, delta-toxin caused damage to mitochondrial membrane permeability and cytochrome c release. In the present study, we demonstrate that delta-toxin produces cytotoxic activity through necrosis. PMID:26807591

  6. Differential human urinary lipid profiles using various lipid-extraction protocols: MALDI-TOF and LIFT-TOF/TOF analyses.

    PubMed

    Tipthara, Phornpimon; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2016-01-01

    Changes in lipid levels/profiles can reflect health status and diseases. Urinary lipidomics, thus, has a great potential in clinical diagnostics/prognostics. Previously, only chloroform and methanol were used for extracting lipids from the urine. The present study aimed to optimize lipid extraction and examine differential lipid classes obtained by various extraction protocols. Urine samples were collected from eight healthy individuals and then pooled. Lipids were extracted by six solvent protocols, including (i) chloroform/methanol (1:1, v/v), (ii) chloroform/methanol (2:1, v/v), (iii) hexane/isopropanol (3:2, v/v), (iv) chloroform, (v) diethyl ether, and (vi) hexane. Lipid profiles of the six extracts were acquired by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (MS) and some lipid classes were verified by LIFT-TOF/TOF MS/MS. The data revealed that phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and phosphatidylinositol (PI) could be detected by all six protocols. However, phosphatidylcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin (SM) were detectable only by protocols (i)-(iv), whereas phosphatidylserine (PS) was detectable only by protocols (iii)-(vi), and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was detectable only by protocols (v)-(vi). In summary, we have demonstrated differential lipidome profiles yielded by different extraction protocols. These data can serve as an important source for selection of an appropriate extraction method for further highly focused studies on particular lipid classes in the human urine. PMID:27646409

  7. Proteomic characterisation of toxins isolated from nematocysts of the South Atlantic jellyfish Olindias sambaquiensis.

    PubMed

    Weston, Andrew J; Chung, Ray; Dunlap, Walter C; Morandini, André C; Marques, Antonio C; Moura-da-Silva, Ana M; Ward, Malcolm; Padilla, Gabriel; da Silva, Luiziana Ferreira; Andreakis, Nikos; Long, Paul F

    2013-09-01

    Surprisingly little is known of the toxic arsenal of cnidarian nematocysts compared to other venomous animals. Here we investigate the toxins of nematocysts isolated from the jellyfish Olindias sambaquiensis. A total of 29 unique ms/ms events were annotated as potential toxins homologous to the toxic proteins from diverse animal phyla, including cone-snails, snakes, spiders, scorpions, wasp, bee, parasitic worm and other Cnidaria. Biological activities of these potential toxins include cytolysins, neurotoxins, phospholipases and toxic peptidases. The presence of several toxic enzymes is intriguing, such as sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase B (SMase B) that has only been described in certain spider venoms, and a prepro-haystatin P-IIId snake venom metalloproteinase (SVMP) that activates coagulation factor X, which is very rare even in snake venoms. Our annotation reveals sequence orthologs to many representatives of the most important superfamilies of peptide venoms suggesting that their origins in higher organisms arise from deep eumetazoan innovations. Accordingly, cnidarian venoms may possess unique biological properties that might generate new leads in the discovery of novel pharmacologically active drugs.

  8. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Sensitizes To Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Impairing Mitophagy

    PubMed Central

    Baulies, Anna; Ribas, Vicent; Núñez, Susana; Torres, Sandra; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Martínez, Laura; Suda, Jo; Ybanez, Maria D.; Kaplowitz, Neil; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, Jose C.

    2015-01-01

    The role of lysosomes in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the impact of genetic and drug-induced lysosomal cholesterol (LC) accumulation in APAP hepatotoxicity. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)−/− mice exhibit LC accumulation and higher mortality after APAP overdose compared to ASMase+/+ littermates. ASMase−/− hepatocytes display lower threshold for APAP-induced cell death and defective fusion of mitochondria-containing autophagosomes with lysosomes, which decreased mitochondrial quality control. LC accumulation in ASMase+/+ hepatocytes caused by U18666A reproduces the susceptibility of ASMase−/− hepatocytes to APAP and the impairment in the formation of mitochondria-containing autolysosomes. LC extraction by 25-hydroxycholesterol increased APAP-mediated mitophagy and protected ASMase−/− mice and hepatocytes against APAP hepatotoxicity, effects that were reversed by chloroquine to disrupt autophagy. The regulation of LC by U18666A or 25-hydroxycholesterol did not affect total cellular sphingomyelin content or its lysosomal distribution. Of relevance, amitriptyline-induced ASMase inhibition in human hepatocytes caused LC accumulation, impaired mitophagy and increased susceptibility to APAP. Similar results were observed upon glucocerebrosidase inhibition by conduritol β-epoxide, a cellular model of Gaucher disease. These findings indicate that LC accumulation determines susceptibility to APAP hepatotoxicity by modulating mitophagy, and imply that genetic or drug-mediated ASMase disruption sensitizes to APAP-induced liver injury. PMID:26657973

  9. A simple desalting method for direct MALDI mass spectrometry profiling of tissue lipids.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hay-Yan J; Liu, Cheng Bin; Wu, Hsuan-Wen

    2011-04-01

    Direct MALDI-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) profiling of tissue lipids often observes isobaric phosphatidylcholine (PC) species caused by the endogenous alkali metal ions that bias the relative abundance of tissue lipids. Fresh rat brain cryosections were washed with 70% ethanol (EtOH), water (H₂O), or 150 mM ammonium acetate (NH₄Ac), and the desalting effectiveness of each fluid was evaluated by MALDI-MS profiling of PC and sphingomyelin (SM) species in tissue and in the washing runoff. The results indicated that EtOH and H₂O only partially desalted the tissue lipids, yet both substantially displaced the tissue lipids to the washing runoffs. On the other hand, NH₄Ac effectively desalted the tissue lipids and produced a runoff containing no detectable PCs or SMs. NH₄Ac wash also unveiled the underlying changes of PCs and SMs in the infarcted rat cortex previously masked by edema-caused increase of tissue sodium. The MS/MS of an isobaric PC in the infarcted cortex revealed the precursor change as the result of NH₄Ac wash and confirmed the desalting effectiveness of such wash. Other than desalting, NH₄Ac wash also removes contaminants in tissue, enhances the overall spectral quality, and benefits additionally in profiling of biological molecules in tissue. PMID:21266365

  10. Milk and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pfeuffer, M; Schrezenmeir, J

    2007-03-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of metabolic disorders, namely dyslipidaemia, hypertension, obesity and glucose intolerance. Insulin resistance is the core phenomenon. Co-occurrence is associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Observational studies found no increased CVD risk with increasing consumption of milk and other dairy products. In several studies dairy consumption was inversely associated with the occurrence of one or several facets of the metabolic syndrome. Many dairy components may contribute to the beneficial effects. Milk and particularly whey appeared insulinotropic when given in a single meal, but not in longer-term intervention. Medium chain fatty acids improve insulin sensitivity. Whey proteins, amino acids, medium chain fatty acids and in particular calcium and other minerals may contribute to the beneficial effect of dairy products on body weight and body fat. Peptides, calcium and other minerals reduce blood pressure. Fermented products and probiotic bacteria decrease absorption of cholesterol, sphingomyelin of cholesterol and fat, calcium of cholesterol, bile acids and fat. Proteins, peptides and bacteria may also reduce plasma cholesterol. Lactose, citrate, proteins and peptides improve weight control, blood pressure and plasma lipids indirectly, by improving calcium bioavailability. Furthermore, dairy consumption improves the bioavailability of folate and other secondary plant components.

  11. Unique plasma metabolomic signatures of individuals with inherited disorders of long-chain fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    McCoin, Colin S; Piccolo, Brian D; Knotts, Trina A; Matern, Dietrich; Vockley, Jerry; Gillingham, Melanie B; Adams, Sean H

    2016-05-01

    Blood and urine acylcarnitine profiles are commonly used to diagnose long-chain fatty acid oxidation disorders (FAOD: i.e., long-chain hydroxy-acyl-CoA dehydrogenase [LCHAD] and carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 [CPT2] deficiency), but the global metabolic impact of long-chain FAOD has not been reported. We utilized untargeted metabolomics to characterize plasma metabolites in 12 overnight-fasted individuals with FAOD (10 LCHAD, two CPT2) and 11 healthy age-, sex-, and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls, with the caveat that individuals with FAOD consume a low-fat diet supplemented with medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) while matched controls consume a typical American diet. In plasma 832 metabolites were identified, and partial least squared-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) identified 114 non-acylcarnitine variables that discriminated FAOD subjects and controls. FAOD individuals had significantly higher triglycerides and lower specific phosphatidylethanolamines, ceramides, and sphingomyelins. Differences in phosphatidylcholines were also found but the directionality differed by metabolite species. Further, there were few differences in non-lipid metabolites, indicating the metabolic impact of FAOD specifically on lipid pathways. This analysis provides evidence that LCHAD/CPT2 deficiency significantly alters complex lipid pathway flux. This metabolic signature may provide new clinical tools capable of confirming or diagnosing FAOD, even in subjects with a mild phenotype, and may provide clues regarding the biochemical and metabolic impact of FAOD that is relevant to the etiology of FAOD symptoms. PMID:26907176

  12. Sphingosine, a Modulator of Human Translesion DNA Polymerase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Kamath-Loeb, Ashwini S.; Balakrishna, Sharath; Whittington, Dale; Shen, Jiang-Cheng; Emond, Mary J.; Okabe, Takayoshi; Masutani, Chikahide; Hanaoka, Fumio; Nishimura, Susumu; Loeb, Lawrence A.

    2014-01-01

    Translesion (TLS) DNA polymerases are specialized, error-prone enzymes that synthesize DNA across bulky, replication-stalling DNA adducts. In so doing, they facilitate the progression of DNA synthesis and promote cell proliferation. To potentiate the effect of cancer chemotherapeutic regimens, we sought to identify inhibitors of TLS DNA polymerases. We screened five libraries of ∼3000 small molecules, including one comprising ∼600 nucleoside analogs, for their effect on primer extension activity of DNA polymerase η (Pol η). We serendipitously identified sphingosine, a lipid-signaling molecule that robustly stimulates the activity of Pol η by ∼100-fold at low micromolar concentrations but inhibits it at higher concentrations. This effect is specific to the Y-family DNA polymerases, Pols η, κ, and ι. The addition of a single phosphate group on sphingosine completely abrogates this effect. Likewise, the inclusion of other sphingolipids, including ceramide and sphingomyelin to extension reactions does not elicit this response. Sphingosine increases the rate of correct and incorrect nucleotide incorporation while having no effect on polymerase processivity. Endogenous Pol η activity is modulated similarly as the recombinant enzyme. Importantly, sphingosine-treated cells exhibit increased lesion bypass activity, and sphingosine tethered to membrane lipids mimics the effects of free sphingosine. Our studies have uncovered sphingosine as a modulator of TLS DNA polymerase activity; this property of sphingosine may be associated with its known role as a signaling molecule in regulating cell proliferation in response to cellular stress. PMID:24928506

  13. Altered lipid metabolism in the aging kidney identified by three layered omic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Fabian; Rinschen, Markus M.; Bartels, Valerie; Frommolt, Peter; Habermann, Bianca; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Schumacher, Björn; Dollé, Martijn E.T.; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Benzing, Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Kurschat, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    Aging-associated diseases and their comorbidities affect the life of a constantly growing proportion of the population in developed countries. At the center of these comorbidities are changes of kidney structure and function as age-related chronic kidney disease predisposes to the development of cardiovascular diseases such as stroke, myocardial infarction or heart failure. To detect molecular mechanisms involved in kidney aging, we analyzed gene expression profiles of kidneys from adult and aged wild-type mice by transcriptomic, proteomic and targeted lipidomic methodologies. Interestingly, transcriptome and proteome analyses revealed differential expression of genes primarily involved in lipid metabolism and immune response. Additional lipidomic analyses uncovered significant age-related differences in the total amount of phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines and sphingomyelins as well as in subspecies of phosphatidylserines and ceramides with age. By integration of these datasets we identified Aldh1a1, a key enzyme in vitamin A metabolism specifically expressed in the medullary ascending limb, as one of the most prominent upregulated proteins in old kidneys. Moreover, ceramidase Asah1 was highly expressed in aged kidneys, consistent with a decrease in ceramide C16. In summary, our data suggest that changes in lipid metabolism are involved in the process of kidney aging and in the development of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26886165

  14. Deregulation of sphingolipid metabolism in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    He, Xingxuan; Huang, Yu; Li, Bin; Gong, Cheng-Xing; Schuchman, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal sphingolipid metabolism has been previously reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD). To extend these findings, several sphingolipids and sphingolipid hydrolases were analyzed in brain samples from AD patients and age-matched normal individuals. We found a pattern of elevated acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) and acid ceramidase (AC) expression in AD, leading to a reduction in sphingomyelin and elevation of ceramide. More sphingosine also was found in the AD brains, although sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) levels were reduced. Notably, significant correlations were observed between the brain ASM and S1P levels and the levels of amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) and phosphorylated tau protein. Based on these findings, neuronal cell cultures were treated with Aβ oligomers, which were found to activate ASM, increase ceramide, and induce apoptosis. Pre-treatment of the neurons with purified, recombinant AC prevented the cells from undergoing Aβ-induced apoptosis. We propose that ASM activation is an important pathological event leading to AD, perhaps due to Aβ deposition. The downstream consequences of ASM activation are elevated ceramide, activation of ceramidases, and production of sphingosine. The reduced levels of S1P in the AD brain, together with elevated ceramide, likely contribute to the disease pathogenesis. PMID:18547682

  15. Intramembrane congestion effects on lysenin channel voltage-induced gating

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, Eric; Bryant, Sheenah; Shrestha, Nisha; Clark, Tyler; Hanna, Charles; Pink, David; Fologea, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    All cell membranes are packed with proteins. The ability to investigate the regulatory mechanisms of protein channels in experimental conditions mimicking their congested native environment is crucial for understanding the environmental physicochemical cues that may fundamentally contribute to their functionality in natural membranes. Here we report on investigations of the voltage-induced gating of lysenin channels in congested conditions experimentally achieved by increasing the number of channels inserted into planar lipid membranes. Typical electrophysiology measurements reveal congestion-induced changes to the voltage-induced gating, manifested as a significant reduction of the response to external voltage stimuli. Furthermore, we demonstrate a similar diminished voltage sensitivity for smaller populations of channels by reducing the amount of sphingomyelin in the membrane. Given lysenin’s preference for targeting lipid rafts, this result indicates the potential role of the heterogeneous organization of the membrane in modulating channel functionality. Our work indicates that local congestion within membranes may alter the energy landscape and the kinetics of conformational changes of lysenin channels in response to voltage stimuli. This level of understanding may be extended to better characterize the role of the specific membrane environment in modulating the biological functionality of protein channels in health and disease. PMID:26695013

  16. Interaction Study of Phospholipid Membranes with an N-Glucosylated β-Turn Peptide Structure Detecting Autoantibodies Biomarkers of Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Becucci, Lucia; Benci, Stefano; Nuti, Francesca; Real-Fernandez, Feliciana; Vaezi, Zahra; Stella, Lorenzo; Venanzi, Mariano; Rovero, Paolo; Papini, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of lipid environments with the type I’ β-turn peptide structure called CSF114 and its N-glucosylated form CSF114(Glc), previously developed as a synthetic antigenic probe recognizing specific autoantibodies in a subpopulation of multiple sclerosis patients’ serum, was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and electrochemical experiments using large unilamellar vesicles, mercury supported lipid self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs). The synthetic antigenic probe N-glucosylated peptide CSF114(Glc) and its unglucosylated form interact with the polar heads of lipid SAMs of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine at nonzero transmembrane potentials, probably establishing a dual electrostatic interaction of the trimethylammonium  and phosphate groups of the phosphatidylcholine polar head with the Glu5 and His9 residues on the opposite ends of the CSF114(Glc) β-turn encompassing residues 6-9. His9 protonation at pH 7 eliminates this dual interaction. CSF114(Glc) is adsorbed on top of SAMs of mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with sphingomyelin, an important component of myelin, whose proteins are hypothesized to undergo an aberrant N-glucosylation triggering the autoimmune response. Incorporation of the type I’ β-turn peptide structure CSF114 into lipid SAMs by potential scans of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy induces defects causing a slight permeabilization toward cadmium ions. The N-glucopeptide CSF114(Glc) does not affect  tBLMs to a detectable extent. PMID:26437433

  17. Curcumin is a lipid dependent inhibitor of the Na,K-ATPase that likely interacts at the protein-lipid interface.

    PubMed

    Mahmmoud, Yasser A

    2011-01-01

    Curcumin is an important nutraceutical widely used in disease treatment and prevention. We have previously suggested that curcumin interferes with K(+) binding to pig kidney Na,K-ATPase by interaction with its extracellular domains. The aim of this study was to further characterize the site of curcumin interaction with the ATPase. We have performed pair inhibitor studies and investigated the sided action of curcumin on pig kidney Na,K-ATPase reconstituted into lipid vesicles of defined composition. An addition of curcumin to either the intracellular or extracellular domains of the Na,K-ATPase produced similar inhibition. The lipid environment and temperature strongly influenced the potency of the drug. Curcumin inhibition decreased following insertion of the ATPase in sphingomyelin-cholesterol 'raft' domains and fully abolished following treatment with non-ionic detergents. The drug induced cross-linking of membrane embedded domains of the Na,K-ATPase. We conclude that curcumin interacts with Na,K-ATPase at the protein-lipid interface. Non-annulus lipids likely participate in this interaction. These results provide new information on the molecular mechanism of curcumin action and explain (at least partly) the ambiguous effectiveness of this polyphenol in the different systems.

  18. Lipid Peroxides Promote Large Rafts: Effects of Excitation of Probes in Fluorescence Microscopy and Electrochemical Reactions during Vesicle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ayuyan, Artem G.; Cohen, Fredric S.

    2006-01-01

    Raft formation and enlargement was investigated in liposomes and supported bilayers prepared from sphingomyelin (SM), cholesterol, and unsaturated phospholipids; NBD-DPPE and rhodamine-(DOPE) were employed as fluorescent probes. Rafts were created by lowering temperature. Maintaining 20 mol % SM, fluorescence microscopy showed that, in the absence of photooxidation, large rafts did not form in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) containing 20 or more mol % cholesterol. But if photooxidation was allowed to proceed, large rafts were readily observed. In population, cuvette experiments, small rafts formed without photooxidation at high cholesterol concentrations. Thus, photooxidation was the cause of raft enlargement during microscopy experiments. Because photooxidation results in peroxidation at lipid double bonds, photosensitization experiments were performed to explicitly produce peroxides of SM and an unsaturated phospholipid. GUVs of high cholesterol content containing the breakdown products of SM-peroxide, but not phospholipid-peroxide, resulted in large rafts after lowering temperature. In addition, GUV production by electroswelling can result in peroxides that cause large raft formation. The use of titanium electrodes eliminates this problem. In conclusion, lipid peroxides and their breakdown products are the cause of large raft formation in GUVs containing biological levels of cholesterol. It is critical that experiments investigating rafts in bilayer membranes avoid the production of peroxides. PMID:16815906

  19. Effects of weight loss on erythrocyte membrane composition and fluidity in overweight and moderately obese women.

    PubMed

    Cazzola, Roberta; Rondanelli, Mariangela; Trotti, Rosita; Cestaro, Benvenuto

    2011-04-01

    A previous study showed chemical and physical impairment of the erythrocyte membrane of overweight and moderately obese women. The present study investigated the effects of a low-calorie diet (800 kcal/day deficit for 8 weeks) on erythrocyte membrane properties in 70 overweight and moderately obese (body mass index, 25-33 kg/m(2)) normotensive, nondiabetic women. At the end of dietary intervention, 24.3% of women dropped out, 45.7% lost less than 5% of their initial weight (Group I) and only 30% of patients lost at least 5% of their initial body weight (Group II). Group I showed no significant changes in erythrocyte membrane composition and function. The erythrocyte membranes of Group II showed significant reductions in malondialdehyde, lipofuscin, cholesterol, sphingomyelin, palmitic acid and nervonic acid and an increase in di-homo-γ-linolenic acid, arachidonic acid and membrane fluidity. Moreover, Group II showed an improvement in total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glycemia and insulin resistance. These changes in erythrocyte membrane composition could reflect a virtuous cycle resulting from the reduction in insulin resistance associated with increased membrane fluidity that, in turn, results in a sequence of metabolic events that concur to further improve membrane fluidity.

  20. Maternal and embryonic control of uterine sphingolipid-metabolizing enzymes during murine embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Kaneko-Tarui, Tomoko; Zhang, Ling; Austin, Kathleen J; Henkes, Luiz E; Johnson, Joshua; Hansen, Thomas R; Pru, James K

    2007-10-01

    During early gestation in invasively implanting species, the uterine stromal compartment undergoes dramatic remodeling, defined by the differentiation of stromal fibroblast cells into decidual cells. Lipid signaling molecules from a number of pathways are well-established functional components of this decidualization reaction. Because of a correlation in the events that transpire in the uterus during early implantation with known functions of bioactive sphingolipid metabolites established from studies in other organ systems, we hypothesized that uterine sphingolipid metabolism would change during implantation. By a combination of Northern blot, Western blot, and immunohistochemical analyses, we establish that enzymes at each of the major catalytic steps in the sphingolipid cascade become transcriptionally up-regulated in the uterus during decidualization. Each of the enzymes analyzed was up-regulated from Days of Pregnancy (DOP) 4.5-7.5. When comparing embryo-induced decidualization (decidual) with mechanically induced decidualization (deciduomal), sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1 (Smpd1) mRNA and sphingosine kinase 1 (SPHK1) protein were shown to be dually regulated in the endometrium by both maternal and embryonic factors. As measured by the diacyl glycerol kinase assay, ceramide levels rose in parallel with Smpd1 gene expression, suggesting that elevated transcription of sphingolipid enzymes results in heightened catalytic activity of the pathway. Altogether, these findings place sphingolipids on a growing list of lipid signaling molecules that become increasingly present at the maternal-embryonic interface.

  1. Psychosine-triggered endomitosis is modulated by membrane sphingolipids through regulation of phosphoinositide 4,5-bisphosphate production at the cleavage furrow

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Okahara, Kyohei; Naito-Matsui, Yuko; Abe, Mitsuhiro; Go, Shinji; Inokuchi, Jinichi; Okazaki, Toshiro; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Oka, Shogo; Takematsu, Hiromu

    2016-01-01

    Endomitosis is a special type of mitosis in which only cytokinesis—the final step of the cell division cycle—is defective, resulting in polyploid cells. Although endomitosis is biologically important, its regulatory aspects remain elusive. Psychosine, a lysogalactosylceramide, prevents proper cytokinesis when supplemented to proliferating cells. Cytokinetic inhibition by psychosine does not inhibit genome duplication. Consequently cells undergo multiple rounds of endomitotic cell cycles, resulting in the formation of giant multiploid cells. Here we successfully quantified psychosine-triggered multiploid cell formation, showing that membrane sphingolipids ratios modulate psychosine-triggered polyploidy in Namalwa cells. Among enzymes that experimentally remodel cellular sphingolipids, overexpression of glucosylceramide synthase to biosynthesize glycosylsphingolipids (GSLs) and neutral sphingomyelinase 2 to hydrolyze sphingomyelin (SM) additively enhanced psychosine-triggered multiploidy; almost all of the cells became polyploid. In the presence of psychosine, Namalwa cells showed attenuated cell surface SM clustering and suppression of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate production at the cleavage furrow, both important processes for cytokinesis. Depending on the sphingolipid balance between GSLs and SM, Namalwa cells could be effectively converted to viable multiploid cells with psychosine. PMID:27170180

  2. Myelin Lipids Inhibit Axon Regeneration Following Spinal Cord Injury: a Novel Perspective for Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mar, Fernando M; da Silva, Tiago F; Morgado, Marlene M; Rodrigues, Lorena G; Rodrigues, Daniel; Pereira, Marta I L; Marques, Ana; Sousa, Vera F; Coentro, João; Sá-Miranda, Clara; Sousa, Mónica M; Brites, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Lack of axon regeneration following spinal cord injury has been mainly ascribed to the inhibitory environment of the injury site, i.e., to chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) and myelin-associated inhibitors (MAIs). Here, we used shiverer (shi) mice to assess axon regeneration following spinal cord injury in the presence of MAIs and CSPG but in the absence of compact myelin. Although in vitro shi neurons displayed a similar intrinsic neurite outgrowth to wild-type neurons, in vivo, shi fibers had increased regenerative capacity, suggesting that the wild-type spinal cord contains additional inhibitors besides MAIs and CSPG. Our data show that besides myelin protein, myelin lipids are highly inhibitory for neurite outgrowth and suggest that this inhibitory effect is released in the shi spinal cord given its decreased lipid content. Specifically, we identified cholesterol and sphingomyelin as novel myelin-associated inhibitors that operate through a Rho-dependent mechanism and have inhibitory activity in multiple neuron types. We further demonstrated the inhibitory action of myelin lipids in vivo, by showing that delivery of 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, a drug that reduces the levels of lipids specifically in the injury site, leads to increased axon regeneration of wild-type (WT) dorsal column axons following spinal cord injury. In summary, our work shows that myelin lipids are important modulators of axon regeneration that should be considered together with protein MAIs as critical targets in strategies aiming at improving axonal growth following injury.

  3. Whole Reproductive System Non-Negative Matrix Factorization Mass Spectrometry Imaging of an Early-Stage Ovarian Cancer Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jaeyeon; Bennett, Rachel V.; Parry, R. Mitchell; Gaul, David A.; Wang, May D.; Matzuk, Martin M.; Fernández, Facundo M.

    2016-01-01

    High-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is the most common and deadliest form of ovarian cancer. Yet it is largely asymptomatic in its initial stages. Studying the origin and early progression of this disease is thus critical in identifying markers for early detection and screening purposes. Tissue-based mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can be employed as an unbiased way of examining localized metabolic changes between healthy and cancerous tissue directly, at the onset of disease. In this study, we describe MSI results from Dicer-Pten double-knockout (DKO) mice, a mouse model faithfully reproducing the clinical nature of human HGSC. By using non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) for the unsupervised analysis of desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) datasets, tissue regions are segregated based on spectral components in an unbiased manner, with alterations related to HGSC highlighted. Results obtained by combining NMF with DESI-MSI revealed several metabolic species elevated in the tumor tissue and/or surrounding blood-filled cyst including ceramides, sphingomyelins, bilirubin, cholesterol sulfate, and various lysophospholipids. Multiple metabolites identified within the imaging study were also detected at altered levels within serum in a previous metabolomic study of the same mouse model. As an example workflow, features identified in this study were used to build an oPLS-DA model capable of discriminating between DKO mice with early-stage tumors and controls with up to 88% accuracy. PMID:27159635

  4. Identification of Altered Metabolomic Profiles Following a Panchakarma-based Ayurvedic Intervention in Healthy Subjects: The Self-Directed Biological Transformation Initiative (SBTI)

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Christine Tara; Lucas, Joseph; John-Williams, Lisa St.; Thompson, J. Will; Moseley, M. Arthur; Patel, Sheila; Peterson, Scott N.; Porter, Valencia; Schadt, Eric E.; Mills, Paul J.; Tanzi, Rudolph E.; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Chopra, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    The effects of integrative medicine practices such as meditation and Ayurveda on human physiology are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to identify altered metabolomic profiles following an Ayurveda-based intervention. In the experimental group, 65 healthy male and female subjects participated in a 6-day Panchakarma-based Ayurvedic intervention which included herbs, vegetarian diet, meditation, yoga, and massage. A set of 12 plasma phosphatidylcholines decreased (adjusted p < 0.01) post-intervention in the experimental (n = 65) compared to control group (n = 54) after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing; within these compounds, the phosphatidylcholine with the greatest decrease in abundance was PC ae C36:4 (delta = −0.34). Application of a 10% FDR revealed an additional 57 metabolites that were differentially abundant between groups. Pathway analysis suggests that the intervention results in changes in metabolites across many pathways such as phospholipid biosynthesis, choline metabolism, and lipoprotein metabolism. The observed plasma metabolomic alterations may reflect a Panchakarma-induced modulation of metabotypes. Panchakarma promoted statistically significant changes in plasma levels of phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and others in just 6 days. Forthcoming studies that integrate metabolomics with genomic, microbiome and physiological parameters may facilitate a broader systems-level understanding and mechanistic insights into these integrative practices that are employed to promote health and well-being. PMID:27611967

  5. Sphingomyelinase Activity of Trichomonas vaginalis Extract and Subfractions

    PubMed Central

    González-Salazar, Francisco; Garza-González, Jesús N.; Hernandez-Luna, Carlos E.; Mata-Cárdenas, Benito David; Carranza-Rosales, Pilar; Castro-Garza, Jorge Enrique; Hernández-García, Magda Elizabeth; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Trichomoniasis is one of the most common acute sexually transmitted curable diseases, and it is disseminated worldwide generating more than 170 million cases annually. Trichomonas vaginalis is the parasite that causes trichomoniasis and has the ability to destroy cell monolayers of the vaginal mucosa in vitro. Sphingomyelinases (SMase) are enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of sphingomyelin into ceramide and phosphorylcholine. Ceramide appears to be a second messenger lipid in programmed apoptosis, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Sphingomyelinase is probably a major source of ceramide in cells. Signal transduction mediated by ceramide leads cells to produce cytokine induced apoptosis during several inflammatory responses. SMase are also relevant toxins in several microorganisms. The main objective of this research is to identify SMase activity of T. vaginalis in the total extract (TE), P30, and S30 subfractions from brooked trophozoites. It was found that these fractions of T. vaginalis have SMase activity, which comes principally from P30 subfraction and was mainly type C. Enzymatic activity of SMase increased linearly with time and is pH dependent with two peaks by pH 5.5 and pH 7.5. The addition of manganese to the reaction mixture increased the SMase activity by 1.97. PMID:24024206

  6. Omega-3 fatty acids regulate the interaction of the Alzheimer's aβ(25-35) peptide with lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Vitiello, Giuseppe; Di Marino, Sara; D'Ursi, Anna Maria; D'Errico, Gerardino

    2013-11-19

    Polyunsaturated omega-3 fatty acids are increasingly proposed as dietary supplements able to reduce the risk of development or progression of the Alzheimer's disease (AD). To date, the molecular mechanism through which these lipids act has not been yet univocally identified. In this work, we investigate whether omega-3 fatty acids could interfere with the fate of the Alzheimer-related amyloid peptide by tuning the microstructural and dynamical properties of the neuronal membrane. To this aim, the influence of the omega-3 lipid, 1,2-didocosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine [22:6(cis)PC] on the biophysical properties of lipid bilayers, and on their interaction with the amyloid peptide fragment Aβ(25-35) has been investigated by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), using spin-labeled phospholipids. The results show that the peptide selectively interacts with bilayers enriched in cholesterol (Chol) and sphingomyelin (SM). [22:6(cis)PC] enhances the Aβ(25-35)/membrane interaction, favoring a deeper internalization of the peptide among the lipid acyl chains and, consequently, hindering its pathogenic self-aggregation. PMID:24144219

  7. Glycerophospholipid Profiles of Bats with White Nose Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pannkuk, Evan L.; Mcguire, Liam P.; Warnecke, Lisa; Turner, James M.; Willis, Craig K.R.; Risch, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudogymnoascus destructans is an ascomycetous fungus responsible for the disease dubbed white nose syndrome (WNS) and massive mortalities of cave dwelling bats. The fungus infects bat epidermal tissue causing damage to integumentary cells and pilosebaceous units. Differences in epidermal lipid composition caused by P. destructans infection could have drastic consequences for a variety of physiological functions, including innate immune efficiency and water retention. While bat surface lipid and stratum corneum lipid composition have been described; the differences in epidermal lipid content between healthy tissue and P. destructans infected tissue have not been documented. In this study, we analyzed the effect of wing damage from P. destructans infection on the epidermal polar lipid composition (glycerophospholipids [GPs] and sphingomyelin [SM]) of little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus). We hypothesized that bats infected with P. destructans would have altered lipid profiles compared to healthy bats. Polar lipids from three damaged and three healthy wing samples were profiled by electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The SM fraction was not significantly affected by P. destructans infection. We found lower total broad lipid levels in damaged tissue, specifically ether-linked phospholipids, lysophospholipids, phosphatidylcholine, and phosphatidylethanolamine. Thirteen individual GP species from 4 broad GP classes were present in higher amounts in healthy tissue. Six unsaturated GP species were absent in damaged tissue. Our results confirm P. destructans infection leads to altered lipid profiles. Clinical signs of WNS may include lower lipid levels and lower proportions of unsaturated lipids due to cellular and glandular damage. PMID:26052639

  8. Mechanism of choline deficiency and membrane alteration in postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome primary skin fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Schenkel, Laila C; Singh, Ratnesh K; Michel, Vera; Zeisel, Steven H; da Costa, Kerry-Ann; Johnson, Amy R; Mudd, Harvey S; Bakovic, Marica

    2015-05-01

    Fibroblasts from a patient with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS), who presented with low plasma choline and betaine, were studied to determine the metabolic characteristics of the choline deficiency. Choline is required for the synthesis of the phospholipid phosphatidylcholine (PC) and for betaine, an important osmoregulator. Here, choline transport, lipid homeostasis, and mitochondria function were analyzed in skin fibroblasts from POTS and compared with control cells. The choline transporter-like protein 1/solute carrier 44A1 (CTL1/SLC44A1) and mRNA expression were 2-3 times lower in POTS fibroblasts, and choline uptake was reduced 60% (P < 0.05). Disturbances of membrane homeostasis were observed by reduced ratios between PC:phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin:cholesterol, as well as by modified phospholipid fatty acid composition. Choline deficiency also impaired mitochondria function, which was observed by a reduction in oxygen consumption, mitochondrial potential, and glycolytic activity. When POTS cells were treated with choline, transporter was up-regulated, and uptake of choline increased, offering an option for patient treatment. The characteristics of the POTS fibroblasts described here represent a first model of choline and CTL1/SLC44A1 deficiency, in which choline transport, membrane homeostasis, and mitochondrial function are impaired.

  9. Phospholipid composition of plasma and erythrocyte membranes in animal species by 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Ferlazzo, Alida Maria; Bruschetta, Giuseppe; Di Pietro, Patrizia; Medica, Pietro; Notti, Anna; Rotondo, Enrico

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to provide basal values of phospholipid (PL) composition in different animal species by 31P NMR analysis using detergents. This fast and accurate method allowed a quantitative analysis of PLs without any previous separation. Plasma and erythrocyte membrane PLs were investigated in mammals (pig, cow, horse). Moreover, for the first time, the composition of plasma PLs in avian (chicken and ostrich) was performed by 31P NMR. Significant qualitative and quantitative interspecies differences in plasma PL levels were found. Phosphatidilcholine (PC) and sphingomyelin (SPH) levels were significantly higher (P < 0.001) in chicken plasma than all the other species tested. In erythrocytes, cow PC and phosphatidylcholine diarachidoyl were significantly lower (P < 0.001) than for pigs and horses, whereas pig PC presented intermediate values among cows and horses. Inorganic phosphate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels were also significantly different between the species under investigation. The [SPH/total PLs] molar ratios in erythrocytes confirmed interspecies differences in phospholipid composition while the PC/SPH molar ratios could be related to a distinct erythrocyte flexibility and aggregability. Diet and nutrition may contribute primarily to the interspecies differences in plasma PL amounts detected. Significant differences between chicken plasma PC and SPH levels and those of the other animal species could be ascribed to a fat metabolism specific to egg production.

  10. Desipramine induces disorder in cholesterol-rich membranes: implications for viral trafficking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakkanen, Kirsi; Salonen, Emppu; Mäkelä, Anna R.; Oker-Blom, Christian; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Vuento, Matti

    2009-12-01

    In this study, the effect of desipramine (DMI) on phospholipid bilayers and parvoviral entry was elucidated. In atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, DMI was found to introduce disorder in cholesterol-rich phospholipid bilayers. This was manifested by a decrease in the deuterium order parameter SCD as well as an increase in the membrane area. Disordering of the membrane suggested DMI to destabilize cholesterol-rich membrane domains (rafts) in cellular conditions. To relate the raft disrupting ability of DMI with novel biological relevance, we studied the intracellular effect of DMI using canine parvovirus (CPV), a virus known to interact with endosomal membranes and sphingomyelin, as an intracellular probe. DMI was found to cause retention of the virus in intracellular vesicular structures leading to the inhibition of viral proliferation. This implies that DMI has a deleterious effect on the viral traffic. As recycling endosomes and the internal vesicles of multivesicular bodies are known to contain raft components, the effect of desipramine beyond the plasma membrane step could be caused by raft disruption leading to impaired endosomal function and possibly have direct influence on the penetration of the virus through an endosomal membrane.

  11. Neutral sphingomyelinase activity dependent on Mg2+ and anionic phospholipids in the intraerythrocytic malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed Central

    Hanada, K; Mitamura, T; Fukasawa, M; Magistrado, P A; Horii, T; Nishijima, M

    2000-01-01

    Sphingolipid metabolism and metabolites are important in various cellular events in eukaryotes. However, little is known about their function in plasmodial parasites. Here we demonstrate that neutral sphingomyelinase (SMase) involved in the sphingomyelin (SM) catabolism is retained by the intraerythrocytic parasite Plasmodium falciparum. When assayed in a neutral pH buffer supplemented with Mg(2+) and phosphatidylserine, an activity for the release of the phosphocholine group from SM was detected in parasite-infected, but not in uninfected, erythrocyte ghosts. The SMase activity in the parasite-infected erythrocyte ghosts was enhanced markedly by anionic phospholipids including unsaturated but not saturated phosphatidylserine. Mn(2+) could not substitute for Mg(2+) to activate SMase in parasite-infected erythrocyte ghosts, whereas both Mn(2+) and Mg(2+) activated mammalian neutral SMase. The specific activity level of SMase was higher in isolated parasites than in infected erythrocyte ghosts; further fractionation of lysates of the isolated parasites showed that the activity was bound largely to the membrane fraction of the parasites. The plasmodial SMase seemed not to hydrolyse phosphatidylcholine or phosphatidylinositol. The plasmodial SMase, but not SM synthase, was sensitive to scyphostatin, an inhibitor of mammalian neutral SMase, indicating that the plasmodial activities for SM hydrolysis and SM synthesis are mediated by different catalysts. Our finding that the malaria parasites possess SMase activity might explain why the parasites seem to have an SM synthase activity but no activity to synthesize ceramide de novo. PMID:10698693

  12. The Lipid-Modifying Enzyme SMPDL3B Negatively Regulates Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Heinz, Leonhard X.; Baumann, Christoph L.; Köberlin, Marielle S.; Snijder, Berend; Gawish, Riem; Shui, Guanghou; Sharif, Omar; Aspalter, Irene M.; Müller, André C.; Kandasamy, Richard K.; Breitwieser, Florian P.; Pichlmair, Andreas; Bruckner, Manuela; Rebsamen, Manuele; Blüml, Stephan; Karonitsch, Thomas; Fauster, Astrid; Colinge, Jacques; Bennett, Keiryn L.; Knapp, Sylvia; Wenk, Markus R.; Superti-Furga, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lipid metabolism and receptor-mediated signaling are highly intertwined processes that cooperate to fulfill cellular functions and safeguard cellular homeostasis. Activation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) leads to a complex cellular response, orchestrating a diverse range of inflammatory events that need to be tightly controlled. Here, we identified the GPI-anchored Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase, Acid-Like 3B (SMPDL3B) in a mass spectrometry screening campaign for membrane proteins co-purifying with TLRs. Deficiency of Smpdl3b in macrophages enhanced responsiveness to TLR stimulation and profoundly changed the cellular lipid composition and membrane fluidity. Increased cellular responses could be reverted by re-introducing affected ceramides, functionally linking membrane lipid composition and innate immune signaling. Finally, Smpdl3b-deficient mice displayed an intensified inflammatory response in TLR-dependent peritonitis models, establishing its negative regulatory role in vivo. Taken together, our results identify the membrane-modulating enzyme SMPDL3B as a negative regulator of TLR signaling that functions at the interface of membrane biology and innate immunity. PMID:26095358

  13. Bacterial Sphingomyelinases and Phospholipases as Virulence Factors.

    PubMed

    Flores-Díaz, Marietta; Monturiol-Gross, Laura; Naylor, Claire; Alape-Girón, Alberto; Flieger, Antje

    2016-09-01

    Bacterial sphingomyelinases and phospholipases are a heterogeneous group of esterases which are usually surface associated or secreted by a wide variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. These enzymes hydrolyze sphingomyelin and glycerophospholipids, respectively, generating products identical to the ones produced by eukaryotic enzymes which play crucial roles in distinct physiological processes, including membrane dynamics, cellular signaling, migration, growth, and death. Several bacterial sphingomyelinases and phospholipases are essential for virulence of extracellular, facultative, or obligate intracellular pathogens, as these enzymes contribute to phagosomal escape or phagosomal maturation avoidance, favoring tissue colonization, infection establishment and progression, or immune response evasion. This work presents a classification proposal for bacterial sphingomyelinases and phospholipases that considers not only their enzymatic activities but also their structural aspects. An overview of the main physiopathological activities is provided for each enzyme type, as are examples in which inactivation of a sphingomyelinase- or a phospholipase-encoding gene impairs the virulence of a pathogen. The identification of sphingomyelinases and phospholipases important for bacterial pathogenesis and the development of inhibitors for these enzymes could generate candidate vaccines and therapeutic agents, which will diminish the impacts of the associated human and animal diseases. PMID:27307578

  14. Molecular cloning, expression, function and immunoreactivities of members of a gene family of sphingomyelinases from Loxosceles venom glands.

    PubMed

    Tambourgi, Denise V; de F Fernandes Pedrosa, Matheus; van den Berg, Carmen W; Gonçalves-de-Andrade, Rute M; Ferracini, Matheus; Paixão-Cavalcante, Danielle; Morgan, B Paul; Rushmere, Neil K

    2004-07-01

    Loxoscelism is the clinical condition produced by the venom of spiders belonging to the genus Loxosceles, which can be observed as two well-defined clinical variants: cutaneous loxoscelism and systemic or viscerocutaneous loxoscelism. We have recently identified, purified and characterised the toxins (sphingomyelinases) from Loxosceles intermedia venom that are responsible for all the local (dermonecrosis) and systemic effects (complement dependent haemolysis) induced by whole venom. In the present study, we have cloned and expressed the two functional sphingomyelinases isoforms, P1 and P2, and shown that the recombinant proteins display all the functional characteristics of whole L. intermedia venom, e.g., dermonecrotic and complement-dependent hemolytic activities and ability of hydrolyzing sphingomyelin. We have also compared the cross-reactivities of antisera raised against the toxins from different Loxosceles species and show here that the cross-reactivity is high when toxins are from the same species (P1 and P2 from L. intermedia) but low when the toxins are from different species (L. intermedia versus L. laeta). These data suggest that in order to obtain a suitable comprehensive neutralizing antiserum using the recombinant toxin as an immunogen, a mixture of the recombinant toxins from the different species has to be used. The use of anti-recombinant toxin antisera may have clinical benefits to those individuals displaying acute loxoscelic lesions.

  15. Delayed fetal pulmonary maturation in a rabbit model of the diabetic pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Bose, C L; Manne, D N; D'Ercole, A J; Lawson, E E

    1980-01-01

    A rabbit model for the diabetic pregnancy was used to investigate the etiology of delayed pulmonary maturation observed in infants of diabetic mothers. Pregnant rabbit does were made glucose intolerant and insulinopenic by injection of alloxan, a pancreatic beta-cell cytotoxin. At 28 d (term approximately 31 d) fetuses of these animals were hyperglycemic, but were not hyperinsulinemic and did not demonstrate tissue overgrowth. Fetal pulmonary maturity was assessed by measurement of pressure-volume relationships on the fetal lungs. Fetuses of glucose-intolerant does demonstrated less retention of air on deflation. Phospholipid components of pulmonary surfactant were assayed on fluid obtained from lavage of the fetal lungs. Levels of disaturated phosphatidylcholine (per-cent total-lavage phospholipids) were diminished in fetuses of glucose-intolerant does compared to control fetuses (20.5 +/- 4.2 vs. 38.0 +/ 4.3%; P less than 0.01). Lecithin/sphingomyelin ratios were similar in both groups and phosphatidylglycerol was not detected in either group. There was a direct correlation between the percentage of alveolar disaturated phosphatidylcholine and retention of air on lung deflation. These findings suggest that in this model pulmonary instability was a result of diminished alveolar disaturated phosphatidylcholine, and this diminution did not result from fetal hyperinsulinemia. PMID:6995481

  16. Endogenous Ceramide Contributes to the Transcytosis of oxLDL across Endothelial Cells and Promotes Its Subendothelial Retention in Vascular Wall

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Xing, Shasha; Bian, Fang; Yao, Wanjing; Bai, Xiangli; Wu, Guangjie; Jin, Si

    2014-01-01

    Oxidized low density of lipoprotein (oxLDL) is the major lipid found in atherosclerotic lesion and elevated plasma oxLDL is recognized to be a risk factor of atherosclerosis. Whether plasma oxLDL could be transported across endothelial cells and initiate atherosclerotic changes remains unknown. In an established in vitro cellular transcytosis model, the present study found that oxLDL could traffic across vascular endothelial cells and further that the regulation of endogenous ceramide production by ceramide metabolizing enzyme inhibitors significantly altered the transcytosis of oxLDL across endothelial cells. It was found that acid sphingomyelinase inhibitor, desipramine (DES), and de novo ceramide synthesis inhibitor, myriocin (MYR), both decreasing the endogenous ceramide production, significantly inhibited the transcytosis of oxLDL. Ceramidase inhibitor, N-oleoylethanolamine (NOE), and sphingomyelin synthase inhibitor, O-Tricyclo[5.2.1.02,6]dec-9-yl dithiocarbonate potassium salt (D609), both increasing the endogenous ceramide production, significantly upregulated the transcytosis of oxLDL. In vivo, injection of fluorescence labeled oxLDL into mice body also predisposed to the subendothelial retention of these oxidized lipids. The observations provided in the present study demonstrate that endogenous ceramide contributes to the transcytosis of oxLDL across endothelial cells and promotes the initiating step of atherosclerosis—the subendothelial retention of lipids in vascular wall. PMID:24817993

  17. Elongation and desaturation pathways in mammary gland epithelial cells are associated with modulation of fat and membrane composition.

    PubMed

    Mida, Kfir; Shamay, Avi; Argov-Argaman, Nurit

    2012-10-24

    The aim was to determine the relative role of each of the lactogenic hormones (insulin, prolactin and hydrocortisol) and their combinations in regulating elongation and desaturation of polyunsaturated fatty acids and subsequently on composition of cellular lipid compartments in mammary epithelia. Cultured cells of the mammary gland epithelial cell line HC11 were subjected to 48 h of hormonal treatment with different combinations of insulin, hydrocortisone and prolactin. Only the combination of all three hormones induced differentiation according to the marker β-casein gene expression. Inclusion of insulin in the treatment medium increased total fatty acid amount by 50% and increased the concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids by 12% while decreasing that of saturated fatty acids by 35%. Changes in the levels of fatty acids by chain length and saturation paralleled mRNA expression of the desaturases and elongases, whose expression levels were regulated again by inclusion of all three hormones in the treatment medium. Gene expression levels of the Δ6 desaturase and elongase 5 genes (Elovl 5) increased by approximately 1.5-fold, whereas expression of Elovl 4 decreased in the presence of all three hormones. Insulin was the main hormone inducing compositional differences in membrane lipids, increasing phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol and decreasing sphingomyelin and cholesterol. The results indicate that mammary gland epithelial cells express five out of the seven known elongase subtypes which are regulated primarily by the processes of differentiation and produce major compositional changes in mammary gland epithelial cells. PMID:23039070

  18. [Mechanism of the membrane stabilizing action of vitamins K and E under conditions of chronic phenol poisoning in albino rats].

    PubMed

    Nazarov, P V; Lider, V A

    1996-01-01

    In experiment with white male-rats the influence of membranotropic phenol-poison on the qualitative composition of phospholipids of liver, kidneys, heart, skeletal muscles as well as biomembranes of erythrocytes and mitochondria of liver was investigates. Along with these investigations the possibility of preventing from supposed changes of qualitative composition of phospholipids has also been studied by additional injection K and K vitamins as minor lipid components. As the result of this research it was stated that when phenol (per, os) was repeatedly injected the content of lysophospholipids, phosphatidic acids in phospholipid composition increased and the content of phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin simultaneous decreased. Additional injection E and K vitamins (50 mg/kg by weight and 20 mg/kg accordingly) prevented to a greater extent the changes of fractional composition of the lipid phase of biomembranes. The mechanism of protective action of K and E vitamins is probably connected with spatial screening of pi-bonds in the radicals of polyunsaturated fatty acids in phospholipid composition from reoxidation and on the hand the competitive interrelations may exist between minor lipid components and on the other hand between the ethers of cholesterol. These conclusions agree with hypothesis that K and E vitamins are the natural modifiers of the membranes of different types of structure. PMID:8967049

  19. Heparin penetration into and permeation through human skin from aqueous and liposomal formulations in vitro.

    PubMed

    Betz, G; Nowbakht, P; Imboden, R; Imanidis, G

    2001-10-01

    The transport of unfractionated (UH) and low molecular weight Heparin (LMWH) in human skin was investigated in vitro using heat separated epidermal membrane and dermis and the effect of liposomal formulations with Phospholipon(R) 80 (PL80) and Sphingomyelin (SM) was assessed. The distribution of Heparin within skin tissue was studied by the tape stripping method. Heparin concentrations were measured with a biological assay. Transepidermal water loss was determined to characterize barrier properties of skin. No consistent permeation of Heparin through epidermal membrane was detected. Penetration into the epidermal membrane was for LMWH significantly greater than for UH. Accumulation of UH was largely restricted to the outermost layers of the stratum corneum while LMWH penetrated into deeper epidermal layers. UH penetration into epidermis was detected for the PL80 liposomal formulation only. The extent of LMWH penetration was independent of the formulation, LMWH, however, showed a trend to accumulate in deeper epidermal layers for the PL80 compared to the aqueous formulation. Thus, molecular weight and liposomal formulations influenced the penetration pattern of Heparin in the epidermis. It can not be concluded whether the concentration of LMWH achieved at the blood capillaries is sufficient to exert a pharmacological effect. UH permeated readily through dermis irrespectively of formulation and its accumulation in the dermis was significantly enhanced and its lag time of permeation increased in the presence of SM liposomes.

  20. [Alteration of serum lipid profile in young men with different somatotypes after food load].

    PubMed

    Fefelova, V V; Koloskova, T P; Kazakova, T V; Fefelova, Yu A

    2015-01-01

    Serum lipid profiles of 76 men of young age (17-21years) were investigated using thin layer chromatography and determination of somatotypes was realized using the scheme of V.P. Chtetsov et al. (1978). The investigation was conducted on an empty stomach and after one hour after food loads (test meal with energy value of 419 kcal, content of proteins - 17,9 g, fats - 11,9 g, carbohydrates - 60,1 g). Regularities inherent to certain somatotypes were revealed. In young men with the abdominal somatotype (with the most pronounced fat component), changes evidencing membranes rigidity growth were revealed: cholesterol esterification processes inhibition and increase of sphingomyelin after meal (p = 0.001). In young men with muscular somatotype the highest level of phosphatidylcholine and the lowest level of easily-oxidized phospholipid fractions in comparison to other somatotypes [thoracic (p = 0.044), abdominal (p = 0.037) and undetermined (p = 0.021)] were registered. General rule is lowering of the free fatty acids levels after meal in comparison with the indices on the empty stomach for all somatotypes: thoracic (p = 0.0001), muscular (p = 0.012), abdominal (p = 0.041) and undetermined (p = 000018). Definiteness of the effect of lowering of free fatty acids levels after meal for all somatotypes could evidence the importance Of this process for maintaining the homeostatic body constants. PMID:26402939

  1. Signal transduction activated by cannabinoid receptors.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Laviada, Inés; Ruiz-Llorente, Lidia

    2005-07-01

    Since the discovery that cannabinoids exert biological actions through binding to specific receptors, signal mechanisms triggered by these receptors have been focus of extensive study. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the signalling events produced by cannabinoids from membrane receptors to downstream regulators. Two types of cannabinoid receptors have been identified to date: CB(1) and CB(2) both belonging to the heptahelichoidal receptor family but with different tissue distribution and signalling mechanisms. Coupling to inhibitory guanine nucleotide-binding protein and thus inhibition of adenylyl cyclase has been observed in both receptors but other signal transduction pathways that are regulated or not by these G proteins are differently activated upon ligand-receptor binding including ion channels, sphingomyelin hydrolysis, ceramide generation, phospholipases activation and downstream targets as MAP kinase cascade, PI3K, FAK or NOS regulation. Cannabinoids may also act independently of CB(1)or CB(2) receptors. The existence of new unidentified putative cannabinoid receptors has been claimed by many investigators. Endocannabinoids activate vanilloid TRPV1 receptors that may mediate some of the cannabinoid effects. Other actions of cannabinoids can occur through non-receptor-mediated mechanisms.

  2. Circulating levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate are elevated in severe, but not mild psoriasis and are unresponsive to anti-TNF-α treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checa, Antonio; Xu, Ning; Sar, Daniel G.; Haeggström, Jesper Z.; Ståhle, Mona; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2015-07-01

    Sphingolipids are bioactive molecules with a putative role in inflammation. Alterations in sphingolipids, in particular ceramides, have been consistently observed in psoriatic skin. Herein, we quantified the circulating sphingolipid profile in individuals with mild or severe psoriasis as well as healthy controls. In addition, the effects of anti-TNF-α treatment were determined. Levels of sphingoid bases, including sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), increased in severe (P < 0.001 n = 32), but not in mild (n = 32), psoriasis relative to healthy controls (n = 32). These alterations were not reversed in severe patients (n = 16) after anti-TNF-α treatment despite significant improvement in psoriasis lesions. Circulating levels of sphingomyelins and ceramides shifted in a fatty acid chain length-dependent manner. These alterations were also observed in psoriasis skin lesions and were associated with changes in mRNA levels of ceramide synthases. The lack of S1P response to treatment may have pathobiological implications due to its close relation to the vascular and immune systems. In particular, increased levels of sphingolipids and especially S1P in severe psoriasis patients requiring biological treatment may potentially be associated with cardiovascular comorbidities. The fact that shifts in S1P levels were not ameliorated by anti-TNF-α treatment, despite improvements in the skin lesions, further supports targeting S1P receptors as therapy for severe psoriasis.

  3. Lipids of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris.

    PubMed

    Albro, P W; Schroeder, J L; Corbett, J T

    1992-02-01

    The lipid composition of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris has been reexamined under conditions intended to avoid enzymatic and chemical alterations during storage, extraction, and fractionation procedures. The simple lipids included aliphatic hydrocarbons, steryl esters, glycerides, and at least nine different sterols, all thought to be derived from the diet. Free fatty acids, previously considered to be major components of worm lipids, comprised only 0.3% of the total lipid weight. Phospholipids included (in order of relative abundance) phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylinositol, as well as sphingomyelin. Glycolipids included cerebrosides and sulfatides containing both glucose and galactose, and gangliosides containing glucosamine and sialic acid. The fatty acid compositions of these lipid classes appeared to be a mixture of what are considered typical plant, bacterial, and animal acids. Several fatty acids found in the worms, including cis-vaccenic and eicosapentaenoic acids, were essentially absent from the dietary components, and it is concluded that these acids were synthesized in the worms. The earthworm derives much of its lipid adventitiously, but exerts at least some control over its tissue lipid composition. PMID:1579058

  4. Phospholipids in Human Milk and Infant Formulas: Benefits and Needs for Correct Infant Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Cilla, Antonio; Diego Quintaes, Késia; Barberá, Reyes; Alegría, Amparo

    2016-08-17

    The composition of human milk has served as a basis for the development of infant formulas, which are used when breastfeeding is not possible. Among the human milk nutrients, 50% of the total energetic value corresponds to fat, with a high level of fatty acids and 0.2-2.0% present in the form of phospholipids (PLs). The PL contents and fatty acid distribution in PL species have been investigated as bioactive elements for the production of infant formulas, since they offer potential benefits for the optimum growth and health of the newborn infant. The differences in the amount of PLs and in fatty acid distribution in PL species between human milk and infant formulas can imply biologically significant differences for newborn infants fed with infant formulas versus human milk-mainly due to the greater proportion of sphingomyelin with respect to phosphatidylcholine in infant formulas. The limited information referred to the characterization of fatty acid distribution in PL species in infant formulas or in ingredients used to enrich them merits further research in order to obtain products with benefits similar to those of human milk in terms of infant growth, visual acuity, and neurological development. The present review establishes the scientific basis for helping to adjust formulations to the requirements of infant nutrition. PMID:26075805

  5. The late endocytic Rab39a GTPase regulates the interaction between multivesicular bodies and chlamydial inclusions.

    PubMed

    Gambarte Tudela, Julian; Capmany, Anahi; Romao, Maryse; Quintero, Cristian; Miserey-Lenkei, Stephanie; Raposo, Graca; Goud, Bruno; Damiani, Maria Teresa

    2015-08-15

    Given their obligate intracellular lifestyle, Chlamydia trachomatis ensure that they have access to multiple host sources of essential lipids by interfering with vesicular transport. These bacteria hijack Rab6-, Rab11- and Rab14-controlled trafficking pathways to acquire sphingomyelin from the Golgi complex. Another important source of sphingolipids, phospholipids and cholesterol are multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Despite their participation in chlamydial inclusion development and bacterial replication, the molecular mechanisms mediating the interaction between MVBs and chlamydial inclusions remain unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that Rab39a labels a subset of late endocytic vesicles - mainly MVBs - that move along microtubules. Moreover, Rab39a is actively recruited to chlamydial inclusions throughout the pathogen life cycle by a bacterial-driven process that depends on the Rab39a GTP- or GDP-binding state. Interestingly, Rab39a participates in the delivery of MVBs and host sphingolipids to maturing chlamydial inclusions, thereby promoting inclusion growth and bacterial development. Taken together, our findings indicate that Rab39a favours chlamydial replication and infectivity. This is the first report showing that a late endocytic Rab GTPase is involved in chlamydial infection development. PMID:26163492

  6. Systematic Genetic Analysis of the SMPD1 Gene in Chinese Patients with Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Deng, Sheng; Deng, Xiong; Song, Zhi; Xiu, Xiaofei; Guo, Yi; Xiao, Jingjing; Deng, Hao

    2016-09-01

    To examine the association between the sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase 1, acid lysosomal (SMPD1) gene, and Parkinson's disease (PD) in Han Chinese from Central South part of Mainland China, we performed systematic genetic analysis in 502 Chinese Han patients with PD and 637 gender-, age-, and ethnicity-matched normal controls from Central South part of the Mainland China. We identified 11 single nucleotide variants and Leu-Ala (Val) repeat variants in the SMPD1 gene in our large cohort. Two novel missense variants, c.638A > C (p.H213P) and c.1673T > C (p.L558P), and a rare known missense variant, c.1805G > A (p.R602H, rs370129081), were identified in three sporadic PD cases. None of these three variants were observed in controls. Additionally, case-control analysis showed association between Leu-Ala (Val) repeat variants in SMPD1 and Chinese Han patients with PD (P = 0.015, χ (2) = 8.451). Our data provide supportive evidence that some genetic variants in SMPD1 increase the risk of PD in the Chinese Han population. PMID:26377108

  7. Molecular Determinants of Phospholipid Synergy in Blood Clotting*

    PubMed Central

    Tavoosi, Narjes; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Pogorelov, Taras V.; Ohkubo, Y. Zenmei; Arcario, Mark J.; Clay, Mary C.; Rienstra, Chad M.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Morrissey, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Many regulatory processes in biology involve reversible association of proteins with membranes. Clotting proteins bind to phosphatidylserine (PS) on cell surfaces, but a clear picture of this interaction has yet to emerge. We present a novel explanation for membrane binding by GLA domains of clotting proteins, supported by biochemical studies, solid-state NMR analyses, and molecular dynamics simulations. The model invokes a single “phospho-l-serine-specific” interaction and multiple “phosphate-specific” interactions. In the latter, the phosphates in phospholipids interact with tightly bound Ca2+ in GLA domains. We show that phospholipids with any headgroup other than choline strongly synergize with PS to enhance factor X activation. We propose that phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin (the major external phospholipids of healthy cells) are anticoagulant primarily because their bulky choline headgroups sterically hinder access to their phosphates. Following cell damage or activation, exposed PS and phosphatidylethanolamine collaborate to bind GLA domains by providing phospho-l-serine-specific and phosphate-specific interactions, respectively. PMID:21561861

  8. Anticancer Activity of Buttermilk Against SW480 Colon Cancer Cells is Associated with Caspase-Independent Cell Death and Attenuation of Wnt, Akt, and ERK Signaling.

    PubMed

    Kuchta-Noctor, Anna M; Murray, Brian A; Stanton, Catherine; Devery, Rosaleen; Kelly, Phil M

    2016-10-01

    Buttermilk is a rich source of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) fragments assembled from bioactive polar lipids and proteins that originate from bovine mammary epithelial cells. The objective of this study was to examine growth-modulatory effects of experimental buttermilks varying in sphingolipid and phospholipid composition on a colon cancer cell line of human origin. Buttermilks were prepared from washed and unwashed cream using gravity or centrifugation. Compositional analysis showed that sphingomyelin (SM) (10.4-29.5%) and lactosylceramide (LacCer) (1.2-44.3%) were the predominant sphingolipids detected. Experimental samples inhibited in vitro growth of SW480 colon cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Antiproliferative activity was selective toward cancer cells. A fraction enriched in LacCer (44.3%), obtained by microfiltration induced caspase-independent cell death as evident by phosphatidylserine externalization, increased percentage of degraded DNA, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in SW480 cells. This fraction downregulated growth-signaling pathways mediated by β-catenin, phosphorylated Akt (serine/threonine-specific protein kinase), ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase), and c-myc. This study is to our knowledge the first to screen buttermilk samples that vary in polar lipid composition for antiproliferative activity in vitro. PMID:27472445

  9. In situ characterizing membrane lipid phenotype of breast cancer cells using mass spectrometry profiling

    PubMed Central

    He, Manwen; Guo, Shuai; Li, Zhili

    2015-01-01

    Lipid composition in cell membrane is closely associated with cell characteristics. Here, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization- Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry was employed to in situ determine membrane components of human mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10 A) and six different breast cancer cell lines (i.e., BT-20, MCF-7, SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-157, and MDA-MB-361) without any lipid extraction and separation. Partial least-square discriminant analysis indicated that changes in the levels of these membrane lipids were closely correlated with the types of breast cell lines. Elevated levels of polyunsaturated lipids in MCF-10 A cells relative to six breast cancer cells and in BT-20 cells relative to other breast cancer cell lines were detected. The Western blotting assays indicated that the expression of five lipogenesis-related enzymes (i.e., fatty acid synthase 1(FASN1), stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 (SCD1), stearoyl-CoA desaturase 5 (SCD5), choline kinase α (CKα), and sphingomyelin synthase 1) was associated with the types of the breast cells, and that the SCD1 level in MCF-7 cells was significantly increased relative to other breast cell lines. Our findings suggest that elevated expression levels of FASN1, SCD1, SCD5, and CKα may closely correlated with enhanced levels of saturated and monounsaturated lipids in breast cancer cell lines. PMID:26061164

  10. Phospholipase A2-Induced Remodeling Processes on Liquid-Ordered/Liquid-Disordered Membranes Containing Docosahexaenoic or Oleic Acid: A Comparison Study.

    PubMed

    Georgieva, Rayna; Mircheva, Kristina; Vitkova, Victoria; Balashev, Konstantin; Ivanova, Tzvetanka; Tessier, Cedric; Koumanov, Kamen; Nuss, Philippe; Momchilova, Albena; Staneva, Galya

    2016-02-23

    Vesicle cycling, which is an important biological event, involves the interplay between membrane lipids and proteins, among which the enzyme phospholipase A2 (PLA2) plays a critical role. The capacity of PLA2 to trigger the budding and fission of liquid-ordered (L(o)) domains has been examined in palmitoyl-docosahexaenoylphosphatidylcholine (PDPC) and palmitoyl-oleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)/sphingomyelin/cholesterol membranes. They both exhibited a L(o)/liquid-disordered (L(d)) phase separation. We demonstrated that PLA2 was able to trigger budding in PDPC-containing vesicles but not POPC ones. The enzymatic activity, line tension, and elasticity of the membrane surrounding the L(o) domains are critical for budding. The higher line tension of Lo domains in PDPC mixtures was assigned to the greater difference in order parameters of the coexisting phases. The higher amount of lysophosphatidylcholine generated by PLA2 in the PDPC-containing mixtures led to a less-rigid membrane, compared to POPC. The more elastic L(d) membranes in PDPC mixtures exert a lower counteracting force against the L(o) domain bending. PMID:26794691

  11. Micrometric segregation of fluorescent membrane lipids: relevance for endogenous lipids and biogenesis in erythrocytes[S

    PubMed Central

    D'Auria, Ludovic; Fenaux, Marisa; Aleksandrowicz, Paulina; Van Der Smissen, Patrick; Chantrain, Christophe; Vermylen, Christiane; Vikkula, Miikka; Courtoy, Pierre J.; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2013-01-01

    Micrometric membrane lipid segregation is controversial. We addressed this issue in attached erythrocytes and found that fluorescent boron dipyrromethene (BODIPY) analogs of glycosphingolipids (GSLs) [glucosylceramide (BODIPY-GlcCer) and monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1BODIPY)], sphingomyelin (BODIPY-SM), and phosphatidylcholine (BODIPY-PC inserted into the plasma membrane spontaneously gathered into distinct submicrometric domains. GM1BODIPY domains colocalized with endogenous GM1 labeled by cholera toxin. All BODIPY-lipid domains disappeared upon erythrocyte stretching, indicating control by membrane tension. Minor cholesterol depletion suppressed BODIPY-SM and BODIPY-PC but preserved BODIPY-GlcCer domains. Each type of domain exchanged constituents but assumed fixed positions, suggesting self-clustering and anchorage to spectrin. Domains showed differential association with 4.1R versus ankyrin complexes upon antibody patching. BODIPY-lipid domains also responded differentially to uncoupling at 4.1R complexes [protein kinase C (PKC) activation] and ankyrin complexes (in spherocytosis, a membrane fragility disease). These data point to micrometric compartmentation of polar BODIPY-lipids modulated by membrane tension, cholesterol, and differential association to the two nonredundant membrane:spectrin anchorage complexes. Micrometric compartmentation might play a role in erythrocyte membrane deformability and fragility. PMID:23322884

  12. Bright and photostable push-pull pyrene dye visualizes lipid order variation between plasma and intracellular membranes

    PubMed Central

    Niko, Yosuke; Didier, Pascal; Mely, Yves; Konishi, Gen-ichi; Klymchenko, Andrey S.

    2016-01-01

    Imaging lipid organization in cell membranes requires advanced fluorescent probes. Here, we show that a recently synthesized push-pull pyrene (PA), similarly to popular probe Laurdan, changes the emission maximum as a function of lipid order, but outperforms it by spectroscopic properties. In addition to red-shifted absorption compatible with common 405 nm diode laser, PA shows higher brightness and much higher photostability than Laurdan in apolar membrane environments. Moreover, PA is compatible with two-photon excitation at wavelengths >800 nm, which was successfully used for ratiometric imaging of coexisting liquid ordered and disordered phases in giant unilamellar vesicles. Fluorescence confocal microscopy in Hela cells revealed that PA efficiently stains the plasma membrane and the intracellular membranes at >20-fold lower concentrations, as compared to Laurdan. Finally, ratiometric imaging using PA reveals variation of lipid order within different cellular compartments: plasma membranes are close to liquid ordered phase of model membranes composed of sphingomyelin and cholesterol, while intracellular membranes are much less ordered, matching well membranes composed of unsaturated phospholipids without cholesterol. These differences in the lipid order were confirmed by fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) at the blue edge of PA emission band. PA probe constitutes thus a new powerful tool for biomembrane research. PMID:26750324

  13. Inhibition of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis by ajoene is associated with blockade of phosphatidylcholine biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    San-Blas, G; Urbina, J A; Marchán, E; Contreras, L M; Sorais, F; San-Blas, F

    1997-05-01

    In Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, a dimorphic fungus pathogenic for humans, no significant differences were observed in the phospholipid species of both morphological phases. The species observed were phosphatidylcholine (PC, 30-40%), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE, 27-28%), phosphatidylserine (16-19%), phosphatidylinositol (13-17%) and sphingomyelin (3-5%). The main fatty acids found in the yeast (Y) phase were palmitate (56%), linoleate (18%) and oleate (15%), while linoleate predominated (61%) in the mycelial (M) phase, followed by palmitate (27%) and oleate (7%). In the Y phase the main free sterol was ergosta-5,22-dien-3 beta-ol (82%) plus some lanosterol (12%) and ergosterol (6%), while in the M phase, the latter predominated (88%), followed by low levels of ergosta-5,22-dien-3 beta-ol (12%). Ajoene [(E,Z)-4,5,9-trithiadodeca-1,6,11-triene 9-oxide], a platelet aggregation inhibitor derived from garlic, induced alterations in phospholipid and fatty acid proportions such that PC was reduced to about 18% in both phases and PE increased to 38% (Y phase) or 44% (M phase), suggesting inhibition of PC synthesis. Ajoene also reduced saturated fatty acids (16:0 and 18:0) from 67 to 35% in the Y phase, with a corresponding increase in the unsaturated components. This effect was not seen in the M phase.

  14. Surface Behavior and Lipid Interaction of Alzheimer β-Amyloid Peptide 1–42: A Membrane-Disrupting Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Ambroggio, Ernesto E.; Kim, Dennis H.; Separovic, Frances; Barrow, Colin J.; Barnham, Kevin J.; Bagatolli, Luis A.; Fidelio, Gerardo D.

    2005-01-01

    Amyloid aggregates, found in patients that suffer from Alzheimer's disease, are composed of fibril-forming peptides in a β-sheet conformation. One of the most abundant components in amyloid aggregates is the β-amyloid peptide 1–42 (Aβ 1–42). Membrane alterations may proceed to cell death by either an oxidative stress mechanism, caused by the peptide and synergized by transition metal ions, or through formation of ion channels by peptide interfacial self-aggregation. Here we demonstrate that Langmuir films of Aβ 1–42, either in pure form or mixed with lipids, develop stable monomolecular arrays with a high surface stability. By using micropipette aspiration technique and confocal microscopy we show that Aβ 1–42 induces a strong membrane destabilization in giant unilamellar vesicles composed of palmitoyloleoyl-phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, and cholesterol, lowering the critical tension of vesicle rupture. Additionally, Aβ 1–42 triggers the induction of a sequential leakage of low- and high-molecular-weight markers trapped inside the giant unilamellar vesicles, but preserving the vesicle shape. Consequently, the Aβ 1–42 sequence confers particular molecular properties to the peptide that, in turn, influence supramolecular properties associated to membranes that may result in toxicity, including: 1), an ability of the peptide to strongly associate with the membrane; 2), a reduction of lateral membrane cohesive forces; and 3), a capacity to break the transbilayer gradient and puncture sealed vesicles. PMID:15681641

  15. Parallel artificial liquid membrane extraction as an efficient tool for removal of phospholipids from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Ask, Kristine Skoglund; Bardakci, Turgay; Parmer, Marthe Petrine; Halvorsen, Trine Grønhaug; Øiestad, Elisabeth Leere; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Stig; Gjelstad, Astrid

    2016-09-10

    Generic Parallel Artificial Liquid Membrane Extraction (PALME) methods for non-polar basic and non-polar acidic drugs from human plasma were investigated with respect to phospholipid removal. In both cases, extractions in 96-well format were performed from plasma (125μL), through 4μL organic solvent used as supported liquid membranes (SLMs), and into 50μL aqueous acceptor solutions. The acceptor solutions were subsequently analysed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) using in-source fragmentation and monitoring the m/z 184→184 transition for investigation of phosphatidylcholines (PC), sphingomyelins (SM), and lysophosphatidylcholines (Lyso-PC). In both generic methods, no phospholipids were detected in the acceptor solutions. Thus, PALME appeared to be highly efficient for phospholipid removal. To further support this, qualitative (post-column infusion) and quantitative matrix effects were investigated with fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, and quetiapine as model analytes. No signs of matrix effects were observed. Finally, PALME was evaluated for the aforementioned drug substances, and data were in accordance with European Medicines Agency (EMA) guidelines. PMID:27433988

  16. Phospholipase C (heat-labile hemolysin) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa: purification and preliminary characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Berka, R M; Vasil, M L

    1982-01-01

    Phospholipase C (heat-labile hemolysin) was purified from Pseudomonas aeruginosa culture supernatants to near homogeneity by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by a novel application of DEAE-Sephacel chromatography. Enzymatic activity remained associated with DEAE-Sephacel even in the presence of 1 M NaCl, but was eluted with a linear gradient of 0 to 5% tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide. Elution from DEAE-Sephacel was also obtained with 2% lysophosphatidylcholine, and to a lesser extent with 2% phosphorylcholine, but not at all with choline. The enzyme was highly active toward phospholipids possessing substituted ammonium groups (e.g., phosphatidycholine, lysophosphatidylcholine, and sphingomyelin); however, it had little if any activity toward phospholipids lacking substituted ammonium groups (e.g., phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphaditylglycerol). Collectively, these data suggest that phospholipase C from P. aeruginosa exhibits high affinity for substituted ammonium groups, but requires an additional hydrophobic moiety for optimum binding. The specific activity of the purified enzyme preparation increased 1,900-fold compared with that of culture supernatants. The molecular weight of the phospholipase C was estimated to be 78,000 by both sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Sephacryl S-200 column chromatography and was 76,000 by high-performance size exclusion chromatography. The isoelectric point was 5.5. Amino acid analysis showed that phospholipase C was rich in glycine, serine, threonine, aspartyl, glutamyl, and aromatic amino acids, but was cystine free. Images PMID:6811552

  17. Analysis of lipid-composition changes in plasma membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Ogiso, Hideo; Taniguchi, Makoto; Okazaki, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Sphingolipids accumulate in plasma membrane microdomain sites, such as caveolae or lipid rafts. Such microdomains are considered to be important nexuses for signal transduction, although changes in the microdomain lipid components brought about by signaling are poorly understood. Here, we applied a cationic colloidal silica bead method to analyze plasma membrane lipids from monolayer cells cultured in a 10 cm dish. The detergent-resistant fraction from the silica bead-coated membrane was analyzed by LC-MS/MS to evaluate the microdomain lipids. This method revealed that glycosphingolipids composed the microdomains as a substitute for sphingomyelin (SM) in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (tMEFs) from an SM synthase 1/2 double KO (DKO) mouse. The rate of formation of the detergent-resistant region was unchanged compared with that of WT-tMEFs. C2-ceramide (Cer) stimulation caused greater elevations in diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid levels than in Cer levels within the microdomains of WT-tMEFs. We also found that lipid changes in the microdomains of SM-deficient DKO-tMEFs caused by serum stimulation occurred in the same manner as that of WT-tMEFs. This practical method for analyzing membrane lipids will facilitate future comprehensive analyses of membrane microdomain-associated responses.

  18. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  19. Preparation of artificial plasma membrane mimicking vesicles with lipid asymmetry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qingqing; London, Erwin

    2014-01-01

    Lipid asymmetry, the difference in lipid distribution across the lipid bilayer, is one of the most important features of eukaryotic cellular membranes. However, commonly used model membrane vesicles cannot provide control of lipid distribution between inner and outer leaflets. We recently developed methods to prepare asymmetric model membrane vesicles, but facile incorporation of a highly controlled level of cholesterol was not possible. In this study, using hydroxypropyl-α-cyclodextrin based lipid exchange, a simple method was devised to prepare large unilamellar model membrane vesicles that closely resemble mammalian plasma membranes in terms of their lipid composition and asymmetry (sphingomyelin (SM) and/or phosphatidylcholine (PC) outside/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) and phosphatidylserine (PS) inside), and in which cholesterol content can be readily varied between 0 and 50 mol%. We call these model membranes "artificial plasma membrane mimicking" ("PMm") vesicles. Asymmetry was confirmed by both chemical labeling and measurement of the amount of externally-exposed anionic lipid. These vesicles should be superior and more realistic model membranes for studies of lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interaction in a lipid environment that resembles that of mammalian plasma membranes.

  20. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas.

    PubMed

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  1. Regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis by bioactive lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    Clària, Joan

    2006-11-01

    Bioactive lipid mediators are increasingly being recognized as important endogenous regulators of cell activation, signaling, apoptosis and proliferation. Most of these lipid mediators are originated from cleavage of constituents of cellular membranes under the activity of phospholipases and sphingomyelinases. One of the major cascades of bioactive lipid mediator production involves the release of arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids followed by the formation of eicosanoids (i.e. prostaglandins, leukotrienes and lipoxins). These biologically active metabolites of arachidonic acid are emerging as key regulators of cell proliferation and neo-angiogenesis and agents that specifically target these lipid mediators are being investigated as potential anticancer drugs. On the other hand, the lysophospholipid family, which includes members of the sphingomyelin-ceramide-sphingosine-1-phosphate and lysophosphatidic acid subfamilies, has evolved as an important group of lipid signaling molecules implicated in cellular differentiation, cell growth and apoptosis. This article reviews the most recent patents in this field of research, covering the following strategies based on the modulation of bioactive lipid mediators: (1) prostaglandin H synthase-2 inhibitors, (2) lipoxin analogs and aspirin-triggered lipid mediators, and (3) lysophosphatidic acid and other lysophospholipids. PMID:18221047

  2. Targeting acid sphingomyelinase reduces cardiac ceramide accumulation in the post-ischemic heart.

    PubMed

    Klevstig, Martina; Ståhlman, Marcus; Lundqvist, Annika; Scharin Täng, Margareta; Fogelstrand, Per; Adiels, Martin; Andersson, Linda; Kolesnick, Richard; Jeppsson, Anders; Borén, Jan; Levin, Malin C

    2016-04-01

    Ceramide accumulation is known to accompany acute myocardial ischemia, but its role in the pathogenesis of ischemic heart disease is unclear. In this study, we aimed to determine how ceramides accumulate in the ischemic heart and to determine if cardiac function following ischemia can be improved by reducing ceramide accumulation. To investigate the association between ceramide accumulation and heart function, we analyzed myocardial left ventricle biopsies from subjects with chronic ischemia and found that ceramide levels were higher in biopsies from subjects with reduced heart function. Ceramides are produced by either de novo synthesis or hydrolysis of sphingomyelin catalyzed by acid and/or neutral sphingomyelinase. We used cultured HL-1 cardiomyocytes to investigate these pathways and showed that acid sphingomyelinase activity rather than neutral sphingomyelinase activity or de novo sphingolipid synthesis was important for hypoxia-induced ceramide accumulation. We also used mice with a partial deficiency in acid sphingomyelinase (Smpd1(+/-) mice) to investigate if limiting ceramide accumulation under ischemic conditions would have a beneficial effect on heart function and survival. Although we showed that cardiac ceramide accumulation was reduced in Smpd1(+/-) mice 24h after an induced myocardial infarction, this reduction was not accompanied by an improvement in heart function or survival. Our findings show that accumulation of cardiac ceramides in the post-ischemic heart is mediated by acid sphingomyelinase. However, targeting ceramide accumulation in the ischemic heart may not be a beneficial treatment strategy.

  3. Circulating levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate are elevated in severe, but not mild psoriasis and are unresponsive to anti-TNF-α treatment

    PubMed Central

    Checa, Antonio; Xu, Ning; Sar, Daniel G.; Haeggström, Jesper Z.; Ståhle, Mona; Wheelock, Craig E.

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are bioactive molecules with a putative role in inflammation. Alterations in sphingolipids, in particular ceramides, have been consistently observed in psoriatic skin. Herein, we quantified the circulating sphingolipid profile in individuals with mild or severe psoriasis as well as healthy controls. In addition, the effects of anti-TNF-α treatment were determined. Levels of sphingoid bases, including sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), increased in severe (P < 0.001; n = 32), but not in mild (n = 32), psoriasis relative to healthy controls (n = 32). These alterations were not reversed in severe patients (n = 16) after anti-TNF-α treatment despite significant improvement in psoriasis lesions. Circulating levels of sphingomyelins and ceramides shifted in a fatty acid chain length-dependent manner. These alterations were also observed in psoriasis skin lesions and were associated with changes in mRNA levels of ceramide synthases. The lack of S1P response to treatment may have pathobiological implications due to its close relation to the vascular and immune systems. In particular, increased levels of sphingolipids and especially S1P in severe psoriasis patients requiring biological treatment may potentially be associated with cardiovascular comorbidities. The fact that shifts in S1P levels were not ameliorated by anti-TNF-α treatment, despite improvements in the skin lesions, further supports targeting S1P receptors as therapy for severe psoriasis. PMID:26174087

  4. Myeloid cell-specific serine palmitoyltransferase subunit 2 haploinsufficiency reduces murine atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Mahua; Lou, Caixia; Huan, Chongmin; Kuo, Ming-Shang; Park, Tae-Sik; Cao, Guoqing; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2013-04-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) is the first and rate-limiting enzyme of the de novo biosynthetic pathway of sphingomyelin (SM). Both SPT and SM have been implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, the development of which is driven by macrophages; however, the role of SPT in macrophage-mediated atherogenesis is unknown. To address this issue, we have analyzed macrophage inflammatory responses and reverse cholesterol transport, 2 key mediators of atherogenesis, in SPT subunit 2-haploinsufficient (Sptlc2(+/-)) macrophages. We found that Sptlc2(+/-) macrophages have significantly lower SM levels in plasma membrane and lipid rafts. This reduction not only impaired inflammatory responses triggered by TLR4 and its downstream NF-κB and MAPK pathways, but also enhanced reverse cholesterol transport mediated by ABC transporters. LDL receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice transplanted with Sptlc2(+/-) bone marrow cells exhibited significantly fewer atherosclerotic lesions after high-fat and high-cholesterol diet feeding. Additionally, Ldlr(-/-) mice with myeloid cell-specific Sptlc2 haploinsufficiency exhibited significantly less atherosclerosis than controls. These findings suggest that SPT could be a novel therapeutic target in atherosclerosis. PMID:23549085

  5. Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) deficient mice absorb less cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqiang; Park, Tae-Sik; Li, Yan; Pan, Xiaoyue; Iqbal, Jahangir; Lu, David; Tang, Weiqing; Yu, Liqing; Goldberg, Ira J; Hussain, M Mahmood; Jiang, Xian-Cheng

    2009-04-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) is the key enzyme for the biosynthesis of sphingolipids. It has been reported that oral administration of myriocin (an SPT inhibitor) decreases plasma sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol levels, and reduces atherosclerosis in apoE knockout (KO) mice. We studied cholesterol absorption in myriocin-treated WT or apoE KO animals and found that, after myriocin treatment, the mice absorbed significantly less cholesterol than controls, with no observable pathological changes in the small intestine. More importantly, we found that heterozygous Sptlc1 (a subunit of SPT) KO mice also absorbed significantly less cholesterol than controls. To understand the mechanism, we measured protein levels of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1), ABCG5, and ABCA1, three key factors involved in intestinal cholesterol absorption. We found that NPC1L1 and ABCA1 were decreased, whereas ABCG5 was increased in the SPT deficient small intestine. SM levels on the apical membrane were also measured and they were significantly decreased in SPT deficient mice, compared with controls. In conclusion, SPT deficiency might reduce intestinal cholesterol absorption by altering NPC1L1 and ABCG5 protein levels in the apical membranes of enterocytes through lowering apical membrane SM levels. This may be also true for ABCA1 which locates on basal membrane of enterocytes. Manipulation of SPT activity could thus provide a novel alternative treatment for dyslipidemia. PMID:19416652

  6. Endotoxin activates de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis via nuclear factor kappa B-mediated upregulation of Sptlc2.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zhi-Qiang; Lee, Su-Yeon; Kim, Hye-Jin; Kim, Jung Ran; Kim, Su-Jung; Hong, In-Kyung; Oh, Byung-Chul; Choi, Cheol-Soo; Goldberg, Ira J; Park, Tae-Sik

    2011-02-01

    Sphingolipids are membrane components and are involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis and metabolic regulation. In this study we investigated whether de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis in macrophages is regulated by inflammatory stimuli. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment upregulated Sptlc2, a subunit of serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT), mRNA and protein in Raw264.7 and mouse peritoneal macrophages, but Sptlc1, another subunit of SPT, was not altered. SPT activation by LPS elevated cellular levels of ceramides and sphingomyelin (SM). Pharmacological inhibition of nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) prevented LPS-induced upregulation of Sptlc2 while transfection of p65 subunit of NFκB upregulated Sptlc2 and increased cellular ceramide levels. In contrast, MAP kinases were not involved in regulation of sphingolipid biosynthesis. Analysis of Sptlc2 promoter and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed that NFκB binding sites are located in Sptlc2 promoter region. Our results demonstrate that inflammatory stimuli activate de novo sphingolipid biosynthesis via NFκB and may play a critical role in lipid metabolism in macrophages. PMID:21167294

  7. Imbalance in fatty-acid-chain length of gangliosides triggers Alzheimer amyloid deposition in the precuneus.

    PubMed

    Oikawa, Naoto; Matsubara, Teruhiko; Fukuda, Ryoto; Yasumori, Hanaki; Hatsuta, Hiroyuki; Murayama, Shigeo; Sato, Toshinori; Suzuki, Akemi; Yanagisawa, Katsuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid deposition, a crucial event of Alzheimer's disease (AD), emerges in distinct brain regions. A key question is what triggers the assembly of the monomeric amyloid ß-protein (Aß) into fibrils in the regions. On the basis of our previous findings that gangliosides facilitate the initiation of Aß assembly at presynaptic neuritic terminals, we investigated how lipids, including gangliosides, cholesterol and sphingomyelin, extracted from synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) isolated from autopsy brains were involved in the Aß assembly. We focused on two regions of the cerebral cortex; precuneus and calcarine cortex, one of the most vulnerable and one of the most resistant regions to amyloid deposition, respectively. Here, we show that lipids extracted from SPMs isolated from the amyloid-bearing precuneus, but neither the amyloid-free precuneus nor the calcarine cortex, markedly accelerate the Aß assembly in vitro. Through liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry of the lipids, we identified an increase in the ratio of the level of GD1b-ganglioside containing C20:0 fatty acid to that containing C18:0 as a cause of the enhanced Aß assembly in the precuneus. Our results suggest that the local glycolipid environment play a critical role in the initiation of Alzheimer amyloid deposition.

  8. Clostridium perfringens Delta-Toxin Induces Rapid Cell Necrosis.

    PubMed

    Seike, Soshi; Miyamoto, Kazuaki; Kobayashi, Keiko; Takehara, Masaya; Nagahama, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens delta-toxin is a β-pore-forming toxin and a putative pathogenic agent of C. perfringens types B and C. However, the mechanism of cytotoxicity of delta-toxin remains unclear. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of cell death induced by delta-toxin in five cell lines (A549, A431, MDCK, Vero, and Caco-2). All cell lines were susceptible to delta-toxin. The toxin caused rapid ATP depletion and swelling of the cells. Delta-toxin bound and formed oligomers predominantly in plasma membrane lipid rafts. Destruction of the lipid rafts with methyl β-cyclodextrin inhibited delta-toxin-induced cytotoxicity and ATP depletion. Delta-toxin caused the release of carboxyfluorescein from sphingomyelin-cholesterol liposomes and formed oligomers; toxin binding to the liposomes declined with decreasing cholesterol content in the liposomes. Flow cytometric assays with annexin V and propidium iodide revealed that delta-toxin treatment induced an elevation in the population of annexin V-negative and propidium iodide-positive cells. Delta-toxin did not cause the fragmentation of DNA or caspase-3 activation. Furthermore, delta-toxin caused damage to mitochondrial membrane permeability and cytochrome c release. In the present study, we demonstrate that delta-toxin produces cytotoxic activity through necrosis. PMID:26807591

  9. Purification, partial characterization and role in lipid transport to developing oocytes of a novel lipophorin from the cowpea weevil, Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Ximenes, A A; Oliveira, G A; Bittencourt-Cunha, P; Tomokyo, M; Leite, D B; Folly, E; Golodne, D M; Atella, G C

    2008-01-01

    Lipid transport in arthropods is achieved by highly specialized lipoproteins, which resemble those described in vertebrate blood. Here we describe purification and characterization of the lipid-apolipoprotein complex, lipophorin (Lp), from adults and larvae of the cowpea weevil Callosobruchus maculatus. We also describe the Lp-mediated lipid transfer to developing oocytes. Lps were isolated from homogenates of C. maculatus larvae and adults by potassio bromide gradient and characterized with respect to physicochemical properties and lipid content. The weevil Lp (465 kDa) and larval Lp (585 kDa), with hydrated densities of 1.22 and 1.14 g/mL, contained 34 and 56% lipids and 9 and 7% carbohydrates, respectively. In both Lps, mannose was the predominant monosaccharide detected by paper chromatography. SDS-PAGE revealed two apolipoproteins in each Lp with molecular masses of 225 kDa (apolipoprotein-I) and 79 kDa (apolipoprotein-II). The lipids were extracted and analyzed by thin-layer chromatography. The major phospholipids found were phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine in adult Lp, and phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and sphingomyelin in larval Lp. Hydrocarbons, fatty acids and triacylglycerol were the major neutral lipids found in both Lps. Lps labeled in the protein moiety with radioactive iodine (125I-iodine) or in the lipid moiety with fluorescent lipids revealed direct evidence of endocytic uptake of Lps in live oocytes of C. maculatus.

  10. Purinergic control of lysenin's transport and voltage-gating properties.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Sheenah; Shrestha, Nisha; Carnig, Paul; Kosydar, Samuel; Belzeski, Philip; Hanna, Charles; Fologea, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Lysenin, a pore-forming protein extracted from the coelomic fluid of the earthworm Eisenia foetida, manifests cytolytic activity by inserting large conductance pores in host membranes containing sphingomyelin. In the present study, we found that adenosine phosphates control the biological activity of lysenin channels inserted into planar lipid membranes with respect to their macroscopic conductance and voltage-induced gating. Addition of ATP, ADP, or AMP decreased the macroscopic conductance of lysenin channels in a concentration-dependent manner, with ATP being the most potent inhibitor and AMP the least. ATP removal from the bulk solutions by buffer exchange quickly reinstated the macroscopic conductance and demonstrated reversibility. Single-channel experiments pointed to an inhibition mechanism that most probably relies on electrostatic binding and partial occlusion of the channel-conducting pathway, rather than ligand gating induced by the highly charged phosphates. The Hill analysis of the changes in macroscopic conduction as a function of the inhibitor concentration suggested cooperative binding as descriptive of the inhibition process. Ionic screening significantly reduced the ATP inhibitory efficacy, in support of the electrostatic binding hypothesis. In addition to conductance modulation, purinergic control over the biological activity of lysenin channels has also been observed to manifest as changes of the voltage-induced gating profile. Our analysis strongly suggests that not only the inhibitor's charge but also its ability to adopt a folded conformation may explain the differences in the observed influence of ATP, ADP, and AMP on lysenin's biological activity. PMID:27318938

  11. Fusion of Boar Sperm with Nanoliposomes Prepared from Synthetic Phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Kasimanickam, V R; Buhr, M M

    2016-08-01

    Liposomes are artificial membrane vesicles that can be used to test and model the functions and interactions of various biological membranes, or as a carrier system to deliver biologically active substances into the cells, or to incorporate lipids into the plasma membrane of target cells to modify membrane structure-function relationships. Sperm plasma membrane undergoes lipid modification during maturation in epididymis and during capacitation in the female reproductive tract to facilitate fertilization. Natural variation in the amounts and composition of lipids in the sperm plasma membrane may also contribute to the species-specific sperm sensitivities to handling and storage conditions. Boar sperm are notoriously susceptible to membrane damage and are resistant to compositional alteration by artificial liposomes. This study used flow cytometry to demonstrate stable incorporation of nanoliposomes prepared from a complex mixture of various phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine : phosphatidylethanolamine : sphingomyelin : phosphatidylserine : phosphatidylinositol) with high fusion efficiency. Over 90% of sperm rapidly took up fluorescently labelled liposomes and retained the lipids for at least 60 min, in a significant time- and concentration-dependent manner. This unique fusion efficacy could be used to alter sperm plasma membrane composition and hence membrane-based functional responses.

  12. Differential Phospholipid Substrates and Directional Transport by ATP-binding Cassette Proteins ABCA1, ABCA7, and ABCA4 and Disease-causing Mutants*♦

    PubMed Central

    Quazi, Faraz; Molday, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    ABCA1, ABCA7, and ABCA4 are members of the ABCA subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters that share extensive sequence and structural similarity. Mutations in ABCA1 cause Tangier disease characterized by defective cholesterol homeostasis and high density lipoprotein (HDL) deficiency. Mutations in ABCA4 are responsible for Stargardt disease, a degenerative disorder associated with severe loss in central vision. Although cell-based studies have implicated ABCA proteins in lipid transport, the substrates and direction of transport have not been firmly established. We have purified and reconstituted ABCA1, ABCA7, and ABCA4 into liposomes for fluorescent-lipid transport studies. ABCA1 actively exported or flipped phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, and sphingomyelin from the cytoplasmic to the exocytoplasmic leaflet of membranes, whereas ABCA7 preferentially exported phosphatidylserine. In contrast, ABCA4 transported phosphatidylethanolamine in the reverse direction. The same phospholipids stimulated the ATPase activity of these ABCA transporters. The transport and ATPase activities of ABCA1 and ABCA4 were reduced by 25% in the presence of 20% cholesterol. Nine ABCA1 Tangier mutants and the corresponding ABCA4 Stargardt mutants showed significantly reduced phospholipid transport activity and subcellular mislocalization. These studies provide the first direct evidence for ABCA1 and ABCA7 functioning as phospholipid transporters and suggest that this activity is an essential step in the loading of apoA-1 with phospholipids for HDL formation. PMID:24097981

  13. Formation of 7-dehydrocholesterol-containing membrane rafts in vitro and in vivo, with relevance to the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Keller, R. Kennedy; Arnold, Thomas P.; Fliesler, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a recessive disease typified by 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) accumulation and depletion of cholesterol. Because cholesterol is a primary component of detergent-resistant membrane domains (“rafts”), we examined the compatibility of 7DHC with raft formation. Liposomes containing bovine brain phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, cerebrosides, and either cholesterol, 7DHC, or coprostanol (the latter being incompatible with raft formation) were prepared. 7DHC was indistinguishable from cholesterol in its ability to become incorporated into membrane rafts, as judged by physical and chemical criteria, whereas coprostanol did not form rafts. The in vivo compatibility of 7DHC with raft formation was evaluated in brains of rats treated with trans-1,4-bis(2-dichlorobenzylamino-ethyl)cyclohexane dihydrochloride (AY9944), which mimics the SLOS biochemical defect. 7DHC/cholesterol ratios in rafts and whole brains from AY9944-treated rats were similar, indicating comparable efficiency of 7DHC and cholesterol incorporation into brain rafts. In contrast, dolichol (a nonsterol isoprenoid incompatible with raft formation) was greatly depleted in brain rafts relative to whole brain. Although brain raft fractions prepared from AY9944-treated and control rats yielded similar sterol-protein ratios, their gel electrophoresis profiles exhibited multiple differences, suggesting that altered raft sterol composition perturbs raft protein content. These results are discussed in the context of the SLOS phenotype, particularly with regard to the associated central nervous system defects. PMID:14594996

  14. Severe Alterations in Lipid Composition of Frontal Cortex Lipid Rafts from Parkinson’s Disease and Incidental Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Santpere, Gabriel; Marín, Raquel; Torrent, Laia; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains that provide a highly saturated and viscous physicochemical microenvironment to promote protein–lipid and protein–protein interactions. We purified lipid rafts from human frontal cortex from normal, early motor stages of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and incidental Parkinson’s disease (iPD) subjects and analyzed their lipid composition. We observed that lipid rafts from PD and iPD cortices exhibit dramatic reductions in their contents of n-3 and n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (22:6-n3) and arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). Also, saturated fatty acids (16:0 and 18:0) were significantly higher than in control brains. Paralleling these findings, unsaturation and peroxidability indices were considerably reduced in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Lipid classes were also affected in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Thus, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were increased in PD and iPD, whereas cerebrosides and sulfatides and plasmalogen levels were considerably diminished. Our data pinpoint a dramatic increase in lipid raft order due to the aberrant biochemical structure in PD and iPD and indicate that these abnormalities of lipid rafts in the frontal cortex occur at early stages of PD pathology. The findings correlate with abnormal lipid raft signaling and cognitive decline observed during the development of these neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:21717034

  15. Asessment of fetal gestational age in high-risk pregnancies by amniotic fluid analyses and ultrasound mensuration.

    PubMed

    Robertson, E G; Holsinger, K K; Neer, K J; Garcia, S J

    1978-09-15

    Maturity studies are reported on 204 women with high-risk pregnancies. Estimates of fetal maturity were made prenatally by the use of ultrasonic measurements, the lecithin/sphingomyelin (L/S) ratio, and a gestational index based on amniotic fluid creatinine, urea nitrogen, and cytology. These estimates were compared with the neonatal pediatric estimate of maturity. The gestational score agreed with pediatric maturity to within 14 days in 95 per cent of the cases. Estimates of L/S ratio distinguished between mature and immature infants in 86 per cent of the cases. Ultrasound could estimate gestational age only to within 14 days in 75 per cent of the cases, and the disagreements were greatest where either growth retardation or macrosomia was present. However, ultrasound is more useful in estimating fetal size and abnormalities of growth pattern. An estimate of gestational age by gestational score aids management, particularly where growth retardation is present, enabling a decision about delivery to be made even though the infant is very small and has an immature L/S ratio.

  16. Trypanosoma brucei: a model micro-organism to study eukaryotic phospholipid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Serricchio, Mauro; Bütikofer, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Although the protozoan parasite, Trypanosoma brucei, can acquire lipids from its environment, recent reports have shown that it is also capable of de novo synthesis of all major phospholipids. Here we provide an overview of the biosynthetic pathways involved in phospholipid formation in T. brucei and highlight differences to corresponding pathways in other eukaryotes, with the aim of promoting trypanosomes as an attractive model organism to study lipid biosynthesis. We show that de novo synthesis of phosphatidylethanolamine involving CDP-activated intermediates is essential in T. brucei and that a reduction in its cellular content affects mitochondrial morphology and ultrastructure. In addition, we highlight that reduced levels of phosphatidylcholine inhibit nuclear division, suggesting a role for phosphatidylcholine formation in the control of cell division. Furthermore, we discuss possible routes leading to phosphatidylserine and cardiolipin formation in T. brucei and review the biosynthesis of phosphatidylinositol, which seems to take place in two separate compartments. Finally, we emphasize that T. brucei represents the only eukaryote so far that synthesizes all three sphingophospholipid classes, sphingomyelin, inositolphosphorylceramide and ethanolaminephosphorylceramide, and that their production is developmentally regulated.

  17. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Sensitizes To Acetaminophen Hepatotoxicity by Impairing Mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Baulies, Anna; Ribas, Vicent; Núñez, Susana; Torres, Sandra; Alarcón-Vila, Cristina; Martínez, Laura; Suda, Jo; Ybanez, Maria D; Kaplowitz, Neil; García-Ruiz, Carmen; Fernández-Checa, Jose C

    2015-12-11

    The role of lysosomes in acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the impact of genetic and drug-induced lysosomal cholesterol (LC) accumulation in APAP hepatotoxicity. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase)(-/-) mice exhibit LC accumulation and higher mortality after APAP overdose compared to ASMase(+/+) littermates. ASMase(-/-) hepatocytes display lower threshold for APAP-induced cell death and defective fusion of mitochondria-containing autophagosomes with lysosomes, which decreased mitochondrial quality control. LC accumulation in ASMase(+/+) hepatocytes caused by U18666A reproduces the susceptibility of ASMase(-/-) hepatocytes to APAP and the impairment in the formation of mitochondria-containing autolysosomes. LC extraction by 25-hydroxycholesterol increased APAP-mediated mitophagy and protected ASMase(-/-) mice and hepatocytes against APAP hepatotoxicity, effects that were reversed by chloroquine to disrupt autophagy. The regulation of LC by U18666A or 25-hydroxycholesterol did not affect total cellular sphingomyelin content or its lysosomal distribution. Of relevance, amitriptyline-induced ASMase inhibition in human hepatocytes caused LC accumulation, impaired mitophagy and increased susceptibility to APAP. Similar results were observed upon glucocerebrosidase inhibition by conduritol β-epoxide, a cellular model of Gaucher disease. These findings indicate that LC accumulation determines susceptibility to APAP hepatotoxicity by modulating mitophagy, and imply that genetic or drug-mediated ASMase disruption sensitizes to APAP-induced liver injury.

  18. Membrane Permeabilization Induced by Sphingosine: Effect of Negatively Charged Lipids

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez-Rojo, Noemi; Sot, Jesús; Viguera, Ana R.; Collado, M. Isabel; Torrecillas, Alejandro; Gómez-Fernández, J.C.; Goñi, Félix M.; Alonso, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine [(2S, 3R, 4E)-2-amino-4-octadecen-1, 3-diol] is the most common sphingoid long chain base in sphingolipids. It is the precursor of important cell signaling molecules, such as ceramides. In the last decade it has been shown to act itself as a potent metabolic signaling molecule, by activating a number of protein kinases. Moreover, sphingosine has been found to permeabilize phospholipid bilayers, giving rise to vesicle leakage. The present contribution intends to analyze the mechanism by which this bioactive lipid induces vesicle contents release, and the effect of negatively charged bilayers in the release process. Fluorescence lifetime measurements and confocal fluorescence microscopy have been applied to observe the mechanism of sphingosine efflux from large and giant unilamellar vesicles; a graded-release efflux has been detected. Additionally, stopped-flow measurements have shown that the rate of vesicle permeabilization increases with sphingosine concentration. Because at the physiological pH sphingosine has a net positive charge, its interaction with negatively charged phospholipids (e.g., bilayers containing phosphatidic acid together with sphingomyelins, phosphatidylethanolamine, and cholesterol) gives rise to a release of vesicular contents, faster than with electrically neutral bilayers. Furthermore, phosphorous 31-NMR and x-ray data show the capacity of sphingosine to facilitate the formation of nonbilayer (cubic phase) intermediates in negatively charged membranes. The data might explain the pathogenesis of Niemann-Pick type C1 disease. PMID:24940775

  19. Sphingolipid profiles are altered in prefrontal cortex of rats under acute hyperglycemia.

    PubMed

    Fiedorowicz, A; Prokopiuk, S; Zendzian-Piotrowska, M; Chabowski, A; Car, H

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes type 1 is a common autoimmune disease manifesting by insulin deficiency and hyperglycemia, which can lead to dementia-like brain dysfunctions. The factors triggering the pathological processes in hyperglycemic brain remain unknown. We reported in this study that brain areas with different susceptibility to diabetes (prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus, striatum and cerebellum) revealed differential alterations in ceramide (Cer) and sphingomyelin (SM) profiles in rats with streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia. Employing gas-liquid chromatography, we found that level of total Cer increased significantly only in the PFC of diabetic animals, which also exhibited a broad spectrum of