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Sample records for spinal cord lamina

  1. The contributions to the human dorsal column tracts from the spinal cord laminae.

    PubMed

    Kirazlı, Özlem; Solmaz, Bilgehan; Çavdar, Safiye

    2016-09-01

    The dorsal column tracts (fasciculus gracilis and fasciculus cuneatus) are concerned with discriminative qualities of sensation. There are controversial descriptions related to the relations of dorsal column tracts with the dorsal horn laminae in text-books. The present study aims to define the laminae of the dorsal horn of the spinal cord that contribute fibers to the dorsal column tracts in the cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal level. Series paraffin spinal cords sections of six formalin-embalmed adult human cadavers were evaluated. The present study shows that dorsal column tracts receive fiber contributions from laminae III and V and from Clarke's dorsal nucleus at varying spinal levels. At upper cervical levels (C1-C4) fiber contributions were from lamina V and few from lamina III, and at lower cervical levels (C5-C8) there were, in addition to these laminae, also contributions from the Clarke's dorsal nucleus. At upper thoracic levels (T1-T4) fiber contributions were from lamina V and few from Clarke's dorsal nucleus. At lower thoracic (T5-T12) and lumbar levels (L1-L5), in contrast, fiber contributions were only from Clarke's dorsal nucleus. The detailed knowledge of organization of the dorsal column tracts of the spinal cord may pave the way for future treatments of the spinal cord injuries.

  2. Direct and indirect pathways to lamina I in the medulla oblongata and spinal cord of the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstege, Gert

    1988-01-01

    The pathways to lamina I in the medulla oblongata and spinal cord of the cat were traced using horse-radish-peroxidase (HRP) and autoradiographic techniques. The HRP results indicated that several neuronal cell groups in the brain stem and hypothalamus project to the spinal cord throughout its total length. The autoradiographic tracing results demonstrated that the strongest projections to lamina I are derived from the following four areas: the caudal nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), the ventral part of the caudal pontine and NRM, the contralaterally projecting lateral pontine or paralemniscal tegmentum, and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. In addition, a limited, especially at lumbosacral levels, distinct projection to lamina I was found to originate in the most caudal part of the medullary tegmentum.

  3. Direct and indirect pathways to lamina I in the medulla oblongata and spinal cord of the cat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstege, Gert

    1988-01-01

    The pathways to lamina I in the medulla oblongata and spinal cord of the cat were traced using horse-radish-peroxidase (HRP) and autoradiographic techniques. The HRP results indicated that several neuronal cell groups in the brain stem and hypothalamus project to the spinal cord throughout its total length. The autoradiographic tracing results demonstrated that the strongest projections to lamina I are derived from the following four areas: the caudal nucleus raphe magnus (NRM), the ventral part of the caudal pontine and NRM, the contralaterally projecting lateral pontine or paralemniscal tegmentum, and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. In addition, a limited, especially at lumbosacral levels, distinct projection to lamina I was found to originate in the most caudal part of the medullary tegmentum.

  4. Axon diversity of lamina I local-circuit neurons in the lumbar spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Szucs, Peter; Luz, Liliana L; Pinho, Raquel; Aguiar, Paulo; Antal, Zsófia; Tiong, Sheena Y X; Todd, Andrew J; Safronov, Boris V

    2013-08-15

    Spinal lamina I is a key area for relaying and integrating information from nociceptive primary afferents with various other sources of inputs. Although lamina I projection neurons have been intensively studied, much less attention has been given to local-circuit neurons (LCNs), which form the majority of the lamina I neuronal population. In this work the infrared light-emitting diode oblique illumination technique was used to visualize and label LCNs, allowing reconstruction and analysis of their dendritic and extensive axonal trees. We show that the majority of lamina I neurons with locally branching axons fall into the multipolar (with ventrally protruding dendrites) and flattened (dendrites limited to lamina I) somatodendritic categories. Analysis of their axons revealed that the initial myelinated part gives rise to several unmyelinated small-diameter branches that have a high number of densely packed, large varicosities and an extensive rostrocaudal (two or three segments), mediolateral, and dorsoventral (reaching laminae III-IV) distribution. The extent of the axon and the occasional presence of long, solitary branches suggest that LCNs may also form short and long propriospinal connections. We also found that the distribution of axon varicosities and terminal field locations show substantial heterogeneity and that a substantial portion of LCNs is inhibitory. Our observations indicate that LCNs of lamina I form intersegmental as well as interlaminar connections and may govern large numbers of neurons, providing anatomical substrate for rostrocaudal "processing units" in the dorsal horn.

  5. Axon Diversity of Lamina I Local-Circuit Neurons in the Lumbar Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Szucs, Peter; Luz, Liliana L; Pinho, Raquel; Aguiar, Paulo; Antal, Zsófia; Tiong, Sheena YX; Todd, Andrew J; Safronov, Boris V

    2013-01-01

    Spinal lamina I is a key area for relaying and integrating information from nociceptive primary afferents with various other sources of inputs. Although lamina I projection neurons have been intensively studied, much less attention has been given to local-circuit neurons (LCNs), which form the majority of the lamina I neuronal population. In this work the infrared light-emitting diode oblique illumination technique was used to visualize and label LCNs, allowing reconstruction and analysis of their dendritic and extensive axonal trees. We show that the majority of lamina I neurons with locally branching axons fall into the multipolar (with ventrally protruding dendrites) and flattened (dendrites limited to lamina I) somatodendritic categories. Analysis of their axons revealed that the initial myelinated part gives rise to several unmyelinated small-diameter branches that have a high number of densely packed, large varicosities and an extensive rostrocaudal (two or three segments), mediolateral, and dorsoventral (reaching laminae III–IV) distribution. The extent of the axon and the occasional presence of long, solitary branches suggest that LCNs may also form short and long propriospinal connections. We also found that the distribution of axon varicosities and terminal field locations show substantial heterogeneity and that a substantial portion of LCNs is inhibitory. Our observations indicate that LCNs of lamina I form intersegmental as well as interlaminar connections and may govern large numbers of neurons, providing anatomical substrate for rostrocaudal “processing units” in the dorsal horn. J. Comp. Neurol. 521:2719–2741, 2013. PMID:23386329

  6. Implications of olfactory lamina propria transplantation on hyperreflexia and myelinated fiber regeneration in rats with complete spinal cord transection.

    PubMed

    Centenaro, Lígia Aline; da Cunha Jaeger, Mariane; Ilha, Jocemar; de Souza, Marcelo Alves; Balbinot, Luciane Fachin; do Nascimento, Patrícia Severo; Marcuzzo, Simone; Achaval, Matilde

    2013-02-01

    Transplantation with olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) has been adopted after several models of spinal cord injury (SCI) with the purpose of creating a favorable environment for the re-growth of injured axons. However, a consensus on the efficacy of this cellular transplantation has yet to be reached. In order to explore alternative parameters that could demonstrate the possible restorative properties of such grafts, the present study investigated the effects of olfactory lamina propria (OLP) transplantation on hyperreflexia and myelinated fiber regeneration in adult rats with complete spinal cord transection. The efficacy of OLP (graft containing OECs) and respiratory lamina propria (RLP, graft without OECs) was tested at different post-injury times (acutely, 2- and 4-week delayed), to establish the optimum period for transplantation. In the therapeutic windows used, OLP and RLP grafts produced no considerable improvements in withdrawal reflex responses or on the low-frequency dependent depression of H-reflex. Both lamina propria grafts produced comparable results for the myelinated fiber density and for the estimated total number of myelinated fibers at the lesion site, indicating that the delayed transplantation approach does not seem to limit the regenerative effects. However, animals transplanted with OLP 2 or 4 weeks after injury exhibit smaller myelin sheath thickness and myelinated fiber area and diameter at the lesion site compared to their respective RLP groups. Despite the ongoing clinical use of OECs, it is important to emphasize the need for more experimental studies to clarify the exact nature of the repair capacity of these grafts in the treatment of SCI.

  7. Calbindin D-28k is expressed in the microvascular basal lamina in the ventral horn at early time after transient spinal cord ischemia in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Chul; Hwang, In Koo; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Jung, Ju-Young; Cho, Jun Hwi; Moon, Seung Myung; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Kim, Won-Ki; Kim, Yong-Sun; Won, Moo Ho

    2005-06-14

    Much evidence has been accumulated that the increased expression of calbindin D-28k (CB) is involved in the blockade of calcium-evoked excitotoxicity in cerebral ischemia. We investigated the expression of CB in the basal lamina of microvessels in the ventral horn of the rabbit spinal cord after transient spinal cord ischemia. Spinal cord sections at the level of L7 were immunostained using monoclonal antibody raised against CB at light and electron microscopic levels. CB immunoreactivity was detected in the basal lamina of microvessels at 30 min after ischemic insult. By 3 h after ischemia, CB immunoreactivity was increased in the basal lamina of the microvessels. CB immunoreactivity began to decrease at 6 h after ischemia and nearly disappeared at 48 h after ischemic insult. For calcium detection in the blood vessels of spinal cord, we conducted an alizarin red staining. Alizarin red reactivity was detected in some microvessels at 3 h after ischemic insult. Our results suggest that the ectopic expression of CB in the microvascular basal laminae may be associated with the buffering of calcium in the endothelial cells of microvessels after ischemic damage.

  8. Cholera toxin B subunit labeling in lamina II of spinal cord dorsal horn following chronic inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qing Ping; Tian, Li

    2002-07-26

    We have investigated the effect of inflammation on the labeling pattern of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)-conjugated horseradish peroxidase, an A-fiber marker, by an intra-sciatic nerve injection of the tracer. Following chronic inflammation in one hind paw in rats, there was substantial CTB labeling in lamina II of the spinal dorsal horn, which is normally absent. However, there was no change in the labeling pattern of wheat germ agglutinin or fluoride resistant acid phosphatase/thiamine monophosphatase, two C-fiber markers. The CTB labeling in lamina II after peripheral nerve injury has been interpreted as central sprouting of A-fibers or uptake of the tracer by injured C-fibers. Our results suggest that chronic inflammation and nerve injury may share some common mechanisms in generating allodynia and hyperalgesia.

  9. Endomorphin-2 Inhibition of Substance P Signaling within Lamina I of the Spinal Cord Is Impaired in Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Rats

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Fa-Ping; Bai, Yang; Kou, Zhen-Zhen; Zhang, Ting; Li, Hui; Wang, Ya-Yun; Li, Yun-Qing

    2017-01-01

    Opiate analgesia in the spinal cord is impaired in diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP), but until now the reason is unknown. We hypothesized that it resulted from a decreased inhibition of substance P (SP) signaling within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. To investigate this possibility, we evaluated the effects of endomorphin-2 (EM2), an endogenous ligand of the μ-opioid receptor (MOR), on SP release within lamina I of the spinal dorsal horn (SDH) in rats with DNP. We established the DNP rat model and compared the analgesic efficacy of EM2 between inflammation pain and DNP rat models. Behavioral results suggested that the analgesic efficacy of EM2 was compromised in the condition of painful diabetic neuropathy. Then, we measured presynaptic SP release induced by different stimulating modalities via neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R) internalization. Although there was no significant change in basal and evoked SP release between control and DNP rats, EM2 failed to inhibit SP release by noxious mechanical and thermal stimuli in DNP but not in control and inflammation pain model. We also observed that EM2 decreased the number of FOS-positive neurons within lamina I of the SDH but did not change the amount of FOS/NK1R double-labeled neurons. Finally, we identified a remarkable decrease in MORs within the primary afferent fibers and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons by Western blot (WB) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Taken together, these data suggest that reduced presynaptic MOR expression might account for the loss of the inhibitory effect of EM2 on SP signaling, which might be one of the neurobiological foundations for decreased opioid efficacy in the treatment of DNP. PMID:28119567

  10. Spinal Cord Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal cord tumor Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A spinal tumor is a growth that develops within your ... as vertebral tumors. Tumors that begin within the spinal cord itself are called spinal cord tumors. There are ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury Map

    MedlinePlus

    ... Counseling About Blog Facing Disability Jeff Shannon Donate Spinal Cord Injury Map Loss of function depends on what ... control. Learn more about spinal cord injuries. A spinal cord injury affects the entire family FacingDisability is designed ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types of illnesses and disabilities Spinal cord injury Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a ... your health on a daily basis. Living with spinal cord injury — your questions answered top What are pediatric ...

  13. Growing rod erosion through the lamina causing spinal cord compression in an 8-year-old girl with early-onset scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Fahad H; Waly, Feras; Nooh, Anas; Ouellet, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Early-onset scoliosis often occurs by the age of 5 years and is attributed to many structural abnormalities. Syndromic early-onset scoliosis is considered one of the most aggressive types of early-onset scoliosis. Treatment starts with serial casting and bracing, but eventually most of these patients undergo growth-sparing procedures, such as a single growing rod, dual growing rods, or a vertical expandable titanium prosthetic rib. This case report aimed to describe an unusual complication of erosion of a growing rod through the lamina that caused spinal cord compression in an 8-year-old girl with early-onset scoliosis. This is a case report. A retrospective chart review was used to describe the clinical course and radiographic findings of this case after rod erosion into the spinal canal. The patient underwent successful revision surgery removing the rod without neurologic complications. Patients with syndromic early-onset scoliosis are more prone to progressive curves and severe rotational deformity. We believe that the severe kyphotic deformity in addition to the dysplastic nature of the deformity in this population may predispose them to this unusual complication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Morphological characterization of spinal cord dorsal horn lamina I neurons projecting to the parabrachial nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Almarestani, L; Waters, S M; Krause, J E; Bennett, G J; Ribeiro-da-Silva, A

    2007-09-20

    Many Rexed's lamina I neurons are nociceptive and project to the brain. Lamina I projection neurons can be classified as multipolar, fusiform, or pyramidal, based on cell body shape and characteristics of their proximal dendrites in the horizontal plane. There is also evidence that both multipolar and fusiform cells are nociceptive and pyramidal neurons nonnociceptive. In this investigation we identified which types of lamina I neurons belong to the spinoparabrachial tract in the rat and characterized them regarding the presence or absence of neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1r) immunoreactivity. For this, cholera toxin subunit B (CTb), conjugated to a fluorescent marker was injected unilaterally into the parabrachial nucleus. Sections were additionally stained for the detection of NK-1r immunoreactivity and were examined using fluorescence and confocal microscopy. Serial confocal optical sections and 3D reconstructions were obtained for a considerable number of neurons per animal. Using immunofluorescence, we assessed the proportion of lamina I neurons belonging to the spinoparabrachial (SPB) tract and/or expressing NK-1r. The relative distribution of neurons belonging to the SPB tract was: 38.7% multipolar, 36.8% fusiform, 22.7% pyramidal, and 1.9% unclassified. Most of the SPB neurons expressing NK-1r were either multipolar or fusiform. Pyramidal SPB neurons were seldom immunoreactive for NK-1r, an observation that provides further support to the concept that most lamina I projection neurons of the pyramidal type are nonnociceptive. In addition, our study provides further evidence that these distinct morphological types of neurons differ in their phenotypic properties, but not in their projection patterns.

  15. A quantitative study of neurochemically defined excitatory interneuron populations in laminae I–III of the mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez-Mecinas, Maria; Furuta, Takahiro; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Background Excitatory interneurons account for the majority of neurons in laminae I–III, but their functions are poorly understood. Several neurochemical markers are largely restricted to excitatory interneuron populations, but we have limited knowledge about the size of these populations or their overlap. The present study was designed to investigate this issue by quantifying the neuronal populations that express somatostatin (SST), neurokinin B (NKB), neurotensin, gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and the γ isoform of protein kinase C (PKCγ), and assessing the extent to which they overlapped. Since it has been reported that calretinin- and SST-expressing cells have different functions, we also looked for co-localisation of calretinin and SST. Results SST, preprotachykinin B (PPTB, the precursor of NKB), neurotensin, PKCγ or calretinin were detected with antibodies, while cells expressing GRP were identified in a mouse line (GRP-EGFP) in which enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) was expressed under control of the GRP promoter. We found that SST-, neurotensin-, PPTB- and PKCγ-expressing cells accounted for 44%, 7%, 12% and 21% of the neurons in laminae I–II, and 16%, 8%, 4% and 14% of those in lamina III, respectively. GRP-EGFP cells made up 11% of the neuronal population in laminae I–II. The neurotensin, PPTB and GRP-EGFP populations showed very limited overlap, and we estimate that between them they account for ∼40% of the excitatory interneurons in laminae I–II. SST which is expressed by ∼60% of excitatory interneurons in this region, was found in each of these populations, as well as in cells that did not express any of the other peptides. Neurotensin and PPTB were often found in cells with PKCγ, and between them, constituted around 60% of the PKCγ cells. Surprisingly, we found extensive co-localisation of SST and calretinin. Conclusions These results suggest that cells expressing neurotensin, NKB or GRP form largely non-overlapping sets

  16. Role of glial and neuronal glycine transporters in the control of glycinergic and glutamatergic synaptic transmission in lamina X of the rat spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Bradaïa, Amyaouch; Schlichter, Rémy; Trouslard, Jérôme

    2004-01-01

    Using whole cell voltage clamp recordings from lamina X neurones in rat spinal cord slices, we investigated the effect of glycine transporter (GlyT) antagonists on both glycinergic inhibitory postsynaptic current (IPSCs) and glutamatergic excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSCs). We used ORG 24598 and ORG 25543, selective antagonists of the glial GlyT (GlyT1) and neuronal GlyT (GlyT2), respectively. In rats (P12–P16) and in the presence of kynurenic acid, 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX) and bicuculline, ORG 24598 and ORG 25543 applied individually at a concentration of 10 μm induced a mean inward current of −10/−50 pA at −60 mV and increased significantly the decay time constants of miniature (mIPSCs), spontaneous (sIPSCs) and electrically evoked glycinergic (eIPSCs) inhibitory postsynaptic currents. ORG 25543, but not ORG 24598, decreased the frequency of mIPSCs and sIPSCs. Replacing extracellular sodium with N-methyl-d-glucamine or superfusing the slice with micromolar concentrations of glycine also increased the decay time constant of glycinergic IPSCs. By contrast, the decay time constant, amplitude and frequency of miniature GABAergic IPSCs recorded in the presence of strychnine were not affected by ORG 24598 and ORG 25543. In the presence of strychnine, bicuculline and CNQX, we recorded electrically evoked NMDA receptor-mediated EPSCs (eEPSCs). eEPSCs were suppressed by 30 μmd-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (APV), an antagonist of the NMDA receptor, and by 30 μm dichlorokynurenic acid (DCKA), an antagonist of the glycine site of the NMDA receptor. Glycine (1–5 μm) and d-serine (10 μm) increased the amplitude of eEPSCs whereas l-serine had no effect. ORG 24598 and ORG 25543 increased significantly the amplitude of NMDA receptor-mediated eEPSCs without affecting the amplitude of non-NMDA receptor-mediated eEPSCs. We conclude that blocking glial and/or neuronal glycine transporters increased the level of glycine in spinal cord slices

  17. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disparities Neural Interfaces Parkinson's Disease Spinal Cord Injury Stem Cells Traumatic Brain Injury Trans-Agency Activities Interagency Research ... Disparities Neural Interfaces Parkinson's Disease Spinal Cord Injury Stem Cells Traumatic Brain Injury Trans-Agency Activities Interagency Research ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injuries

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... bone disks that make up your spine. Most injuries don't cut through your spinal cord. Instead, ...

  19. Spinal Cord Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Degenerative diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal muscular atrophy Symptoms vary but might include pain, numbness, loss of sensation and muscle weakness. These symptoms can occur around the spinal cord, and also in other areas such as ...

  20. [Spinal cord ischemia].

    PubMed

    Masson, C; Leys, D; Meder, J F; Dousset, V; Pruvo, J P

    2004-01-01

    Traditional data and recent advances in the field of spinal cord ischemia are reviewed, with special attention to clinical and radiological features, as well as underlying etiology, outcome, and pathophysiology. Acute spinal cord ischemia includes arterial and venous infarction and global ischemia resulting from cardiac arrest or severe hypotension. MRI has become the technique of choice for the imaging diagnosis of spinal cord infarction. Correlation of clinical and MRI data has allowed diagnosis of clinical syndromes due to small infarcts in the central or peripheral arterial territory of the spinal cord. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging may increase the sensitivity and specificity for diagnosis of acute spinal cord infarction. Diagnosis of venous spinal cord infarction remains difficult. As for global ischemia, neuropathological studies demonstrated a great sensitivity of spinal cord to ischemia, with selective vulnerability of lumbosacral neurons. Chronic spinal cord ischemia results in a syndrome of progressive myelopathy. The cause is usually an arteriovenous malformation. Most often, diagnosis may be suspected on MRI, leading to diagnostic, and eventually therapeutic, spinal angiography.

  1. [Spontaneous spinal cord herniation].

    PubMed

    Rivas, J J; de la Lama, A; Gonza Lez, P; Ramos, A; Zurdo, M; Alday, R

    2004-10-01

    Spontaneous spinal cord herniation through a dural defect is an unusual condition. This entity has been probably underestimated before the introduction of MRI. We report a case of a 49-year-old man with a progressive Brown-Sequard syndrome. MRI and CT myelogram showed a ventrally displaced spinal cord at level T6-T7 and expansion of the posterior subarachnoid space. Through a laminectomy, a spinal cord herniation was identified and reduced. The anterior dural defect was repaired with a patch of lyophilized dura. The patient recovered muscle power but there was no improvement of the sensory disturbance. The diagnosis of spontaneous spinal cord herniation must be considered when progressive myelopathy occurs in middle-aged patients, without signs of spinal cord compression and typical radiological findings. Surgical treatment may halt the progressive deficits and even yield improvement in many cases.

  2. Modeling spinal cord biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Carlos; Shah, Sameer; Cohen, Avis; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration after spinal cord injury is a serious health issue and there is no treatment for ailing patients. To understand regeneration of the spinal cord we used a system where regeneration occurs naturally, such as the lamprey. In this work, we analyzed the stress response of the spinal cord to tensile loading and obtained the mechanical properties of the cord both in vitro and in vivo. Physiological measurements showed that the spinal cord is pre-stressed to a strain of 10%, and during sinusoidal swimming, there is a local strain of 5% concentrated evenly at the mid-body and caudal sections. We found that the mechanical properties are homogeneous along the body and independent of the meninges. The mechanical behavior of the spinal cord can be characterized by a non-linear viscoelastic model, described by a modulus of 20 KPa for strains up to 15% and a modulus of 0.5 MPa for strains above 15%, in agreement with experimental data. However, this model does not offer a full understanding of the behavior of the spinal cord fibers. Using polymer physics we developed a model that relates the stress response as a function of the number of fibers.

  3. Monosynaptic excitatory inputs to spinal lamina I anterolateral-tract-projecting neurons from neighbouring lamina I neurons.

    PubMed

    Luz, Liliana L; Szucs, Peter; Pinho, Raquel; Safronov, Boris V

    2010-11-15

    Spinal lamina I receives nociceptive primary afferent input to project through diverse ascending pathways, including the anterolateral tract (ALT). Large projection neurons (PNs) form only a few per cent of the cell population in this layer, and little is known about their local input from other lamina I neurons. We combined single-cell imaging in the isolated spinal cord, paired recordings, 3-D reconstructions of biocytin-labelled neurons and computer simulations to study the monosynaptic input to large ALT-PNs from neighbouring (somata separated by less than 80 μm) large lamina I neurons. All 11 connections identified were excitatory. We have found that an axon of a presynaptic neuron forms multiple synapses on an ALT-PN, and both Ca(2+)-permeable and Ca(2+)-impermeable AMPA receptors are involved in transmission. The monosynaptic EPSC latencies (1-12 ms) are determined by both post- and presynaptic factors. The postsynaptic delay, resulting from the electrotonic EPSC propagation in the dendrites of an ALT-PN, could be 4 ms at most. The presynaptic delay, caused by the spike propagation in a narrow highly branched axon of a local-circuit neuron, can be about 10 ms for neighbouring ALT-PNs and longer for more distant neurons. In many cases, the EPSPs evoked by release from a lamina I neuron were sufficient to elicit a spike in an ALT-PN. Our data show that ALT-PNs can receive input from both lamina I local-circuit neurons and other ALT-PNs. We suggest that lamina I is a functionally interconnected layer. The intralaminar network described here can amplify the overall output from the principal spinal nociceptive projection area.

  4. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Circulatory control. A spinal cord injury may cause circulatory problems ranging from low blood pressure when you rise ( ... deep vein thrombosis or a pulmonary embolus. Another problem with circulatory control is a potentially life-threatening rise in ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury

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    ... almost complete recovery. Others will result in complete paralysis × Definition A spinal cord injury usually begins with ... almost complete recovery. Others will result in complete paralysis View Full Definition Treatment Improved emergency care for ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    ... is "Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? When can we ...

  7. Canine spinal cord glioma.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Daniel R; Barber, Renee; Burnum, Annabelle; Miller, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord glioma is uncommonly reported in dogs. We describe the clinicopathologic and diagnostic features of 7 cases of canine spinal cord glioma and briefly review the veterinary literature on this topic. The median age at presentation was 7.2 y. Six females and 1 male were affected and 4 dogs were brachycephalic. The clinical course lasted from 3 d to 12 wk, and clinical signs were progressive and associated with multiple suspected neuroanatomic locations in the spinal cord. Magnetic resonance imaging of 6 cases revealed T2-weighted hyperintense lesions with variable contrast enhancement in the spinal cord. All dogs had a presumptive clinical diagnosis of intraparenchymal neoplasia or myelitis based on history, advanced imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Euthanasia was elected in all cases because of poor outcome despite anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive treatment or because of poor prognosis at the time of diagnosis. Tumor location during autopsy ranged from C1 to L6, with no clear predilection for a specific spinal cord segment. The diagnosis was based on histopathology and the immunohistochemistry expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2, 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, neuron-specific enolase, synaptophysin, and Ki-67. Diagnoses consisted of 4 cases of oligodendroglioma, 2 cases of gliomatosis cerebri, and 1 astrocytoma. This case series further defines the clinicopathologic features of canine spinal glioma and highlights the need for comprehensive immunohistochemistry in addition to routine histopathology to confirm the diagnosis of these tumors.

  8. Collateral projections of neurons in laminae I, III, and IV of rat spinal cord to thalamus, periaqueductal gray matter, and lateral parabrachial area.

    PubMed

    Al-Khater, Khulood M; Todd, Andrew J

    2009-08-20

    Projection neurons in lamina I, together with those in laminae III-IV that express the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1r), form a major route through which nociceptive information reaches the brain. Axons of these cells innervate various targets, including thalamus, periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), and lateral parabrachial area (LPb), and many cells project to more than one target. The aims of this study were to quantify projections from cervical enlargement to PAG and LPb, to determine the proportion of spinothalamic neurons at lumbar and cervical levels that were labelled from PAG and LPb, and to investigate morphological differences between projection populations. The C7 segment contained fewer lamina I spinoparabrachial cells than L4, but a similar number of spino-PAG cells. Virtually all spinothalamic lamina I neurons at both levels were labelled from LPb and between one-third and one-half from PAG. This suggests that significant numbers project to all three targets. Spinothalamic lamina I neurons differed from those labelled only from LPb in that they were generally larger, were more often multipolar, and (in cervical enlargement) had stronger NK1r immunoreactivity. Most lamina III/IV NK1r cells at both levels projected to LPb, but few were labelled from PAG. The great majority of these cells in C7 and over one-fourth of those in L4 were spinothalamic, and at each level some projected to both thalamus and LPb. These results confirm that neurons in these laminae have extensive collateral projections and suggest that different neuronal subpopulations in lamina I have characteristic patterns of supraspinal projection.

  9. Living with Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... to send and receive messages to and from the brain. About 200,000 people in the United States have spinal cord injuries. Most injuries occur from a traumatic event, according to the National Spinal Cord Injury ...

  10. A progressive compression model of thoracic spinal cord injury in mice: function assessment and pathological changes in spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guo-dong; Chen, Yan; Zhou, Zhi-gang; Yang, Shu-xian; Zhong, Cheng; Li, Zhi-zhong

    2017-01-01

    Non-traumatic injury accounts for approximately half of clinical spinal cord injury, including chronic spinal cord compression. However, previous rodent spinal cord compression models are mainly designed for rats, few are available for mice. Our aim is to develop a thoracic progressive compression mice model of spinal cord injury. In this study, adult wild-type C57BL/6 mice were divided into two groups: in the surgery group, a screw was inserted at T9 lamina to compress the spinal cord, and the compression was increased by turning it further into the canal (0.2 mm) post-surgery every 2 weeks up to 8 weeks. In the control group, a hole was drilled into the lamina without inserting a screw. The results showed that Basso Mouse Scale scores were lower and gait worsened. In addition, the degree of hindlimb dysfunction in mice was consistent with the degree of spinal cord compression. The number of motor neurons in the anterior horn of the spinal cord was reduced in all groups of mice, whereas astrocytes and microglia were gradually activated and proliferated. In conclusion, this progressive compression of thoracic spinal cord injury in mice is a preferable model for chronic progressive spinal cord compression injury. PMID:28966654

  11. Two populations of neurokinin 1 receptor-expressing projection neurons in lamina I of the rat spinal cord that differ in AMPA receptor subunit composition and density of excitatory synaptic input

    PubMed Central

    Polgár, E.; Al Ghamdi, K.S.; Todd, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Lamina I of the spinal cord contains many projection neurons that express the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1r). It has been reported that these cells can undergo long-term potentiation (LTP), which may result from insertion of AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPArs) containing GluA1 or GluA4 subunits. We therefore investigated synaptic AMPAr expression on these cells with immunocytochemistry following antigen-retrieval. We also examined their density of glutamatergic input (by analysing AMPAr synaptic puncta and contacts from glutamatergic boutons), and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (pERKs) following noxious stimulation. Our results indicate that there are two populations of NK1r-expressing projection neurons: large GluA4+/GluA1− cells with a high density of glutamatergic input and small GluA1+/GluA4− cells with a much lower input density. Results from pERK experiments suggested that the two groups may not differ in the types of noxious stimulus that activate them. Glutamatergic synapses on distal dendrites of the large cells were significantly longer than those on proximal dendrites, which presumably compensates for the greater attenuation of distally-generated excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Both types of cell received contacts from peptidergic primary afferents, however, on the large cells these appeared to constitute over half of the glutamatergic synapses, and were often associated with elongated AMPAr puncta. This suggests that these afferents, which probably contain substance P, provide a powerful, secure synaptic input to large NK1r-expressing projection neurons. These results demonstrate the importance of GluA4-containing AMPArs in nociceptive transmission and raise the possibility that different forms of LTP in lamina I projection neurons may be related to differential expression of GluA1/GluA4. PMID:20303396

  12. Presynaptic functional trkB receptors mediate the release of excitatory neurotransmitters from primary afferent terminals in lamina II (substantia gelatinosa) of postnatal rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Merighi, Adalberto; Bardoni, Rita; Salio, Chiara; Lossi, Laura; Ferrini, Francesco; Prandini, Massimiliano; Zonta, Micaela; Gustincich, Stefano; Carmignoto, Giorgio

    2008-03-01

    A subset of primary sensory neurons produces BDNF, which is implicated in control of nociceptive neurotransmission. We previously localized full-length trkB receptors on their terminals within lamina II. To functionally study these receptors, we here employed patch-clamp recordings, calcium imaging and immunocytochemistry on slices from 8-12 days post-natal rats. In this preparation, BDNF (100-500 ng/mL) enhances the release of sensory neurotransmitters (glutamate, substance P, CGRP) in lamina II by acting on trkB receptors expressed by primary afferent fibers of the peptidergic nociceptive type (PN-PAFs). Effect was blocked by trk antagonist K252a or anti-trkB antibody clone 47. A pre-synaptic mechanism was demonstrated after (i) patch-clamp recordings where the neurotrophin induced a significant increase in frequency, but not amplitude, of AMPA-mediated mEPSCs, (ii) real time calcium imaging, where sustained application of BDNF evoked an intense response in up to 57% lamina II neurons with a significant frequency rise. Antagonists of ionotropic glutamate receptors and NK(1) receptors completely inhibited the calcium response to BDNF. Reduction of CGRP (a specific marker of PN-PAFs) and substance P content in dorsal horn following BDNF preincubation, and analysis of the calcium response after depletion with capsaicin, confirmed that the neurotrophin presynaptically enhanced neurotransmitter release from PN-PAFs. This is the first demonstration that trkB receptors expressed by PN-PAF terminals in lamina II are functional during postnatal development. Implications of this finding are discussed considering that BDNF can be released by these same terminals and microglia, a fraction of which (as shown here) contains BDNF also in unactivated state.

  13. Projections from the paralemniscal nucleus to the spinal cord in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huazheng; Duan, Deyi; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2013-09-01

    The present study investigated the projection from the paralemniscal nucleus (PL) to the spinal cord in the mouse by injecting the retrograde tracer fluoro-gold to different levels of the spinal cord and injecting the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine into PL. We found that PL projects to the entire spinal cord with obvious contralateral predominance--420 neurons projected to the contralateral cervical cord and 270 to the contralateral lumbar cord. Fibers from PL descended in the dorsolateral funiculus on the contralateral side and terminated in laminae 5, 6, 7, and to a lesser extent in the dorsal and ventral horns. A smaller number of fibers also descended in the ventral funiculus on the ipsilateral side and terminated in laminae 7, 8 and, to a lesser extent in lamina 9. The present study is the first demonstration of the PL fiber termination in the spinal cord in mammals. The PL projection to the spinal cord may be involved in vocalization and locomotion.

  14. Traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Christopher S; Wilson, Jefferson R; Nori, Satoshi; Kotter, Mark R N; Druschel, Claudia; Curt, Armin; Fehlings, Michael G

    2017-04-27

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) has devastating consequences for the physical, social and vocational well-being of patients. The demographic of SCIs is shifting such that an increasing proportion of older individuals are being affected. Pathophysiologically, the initial mechanical trauma (the primary injury) permeabilizes neurons and glia and initiates a secondary injury cascade that leads to progressive cell death and spinal cord damage over the subsequent weeks. Over time, the lesion remodels and is composed of cystic cavitations and a glial scar, both of which potently inhibit regeneration. Several animal models and complementary behavioural tests of SCI have been developed to mimic this pathological process and form the basis for the development of preclinical and translational neuroprotective and neuroregenerative strategies. Diagnosis requires a thorough patient history, standardized neurological physical examination and radiographic imaging of the spinal cord. Following diagnosis, several interventions need to be rapidly applied, including haemodynamic monitoring in the intensive care unit, early surgical decompression, blood pressure augmentation and, potentially, the administration of methylprednisolone. Managing the complications of SCI, such as bowel and bladder dysfunction, the formation of pressure sores and infections, is key to address all facets of the patient's injury experience.

  15. Termination of vestibulospinal fibers arising from the spinal vestibular nucleus in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Liang, H; Bácskai, T; Paxinos, G

    2015-05-21

    The present study investigated the vestibulospinal system which originates from the spinal vestibular nucleus (SpVe) with both retrograde and anterograde tracer injections. We found that fluoro-gold (FG) labeled neurons were found bilaterally with a contralateral predominance after FG injections into the upper lumbar cord. Anterogradely labeled fibers from the rostral SpVe traveled in the medial part of the ventral funiculus ipsilaterally and the dorsolateral funiculus bilaterally in the cervical cord. They mainly terminated in laminae 5-8, and 10 of the ipsilateral spinal cord. The contralateral side had fewer fibers and they were found in laminae 6-8, and 10. In the thoracic cord, fibers were also found to terminate in bilateral intermediolateral columns. In the lumbar and lower cord, fibers were mainly found in the dorsolateral funiculus bilaterally and they terminated predominantly in laminae 3-7 contralaterally. Anterogradely labeled fibers from the caudal SpVe did not travel in the medial part of the ventral funiculus but in the dorsolateral funiculus bilaterally. They mainly terminated in laminae 3-8 and 10 contralaterally. The present study is the first to describe the termination of vestibulospinal fibers arising from the SpVe in the spinal cord. It will lay the anatomical foundation for those who investigate the physiological role of vestibulospinal fibers and potentially target these fibers during rehabilitation after stroke, spinal cord injury, or vestibular organ injury.

  16. The dura causes spinal cord compression after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Saadoun, Samira; Werndle, Melissa C; Lopez de Heredia, Luis; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2016-10-01

    MR scans from 65 patients with traumatic spinal cord injury were analysed; on admission 95% had evidence of cord compression - in 26% due to the dura, and in the remaining 74% due to extradural factors. Compression due to dural factors resolved with a half-life of 5.5 days. These findings suggest that bony decompression alone may not relieve spinal cord compression in the quarter of patients in whom dural factors are significant.

  17. Thoracic spinal cord compression by a tophus.

    PubMed

    Ntsiba, Honoré; Makosso, Edouard; Moyikoua, Armand

    2010-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic (T10) spinal cord compression by a tophus in a patient with known chronic gout. Spastic paraplegia developed gradually over 6 months in this 43-year-old man with hypertension, alcohol abuse, and chronic gouty arthritis with tophi. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography visualized an intradural nodule measuring 1.5cm in diameter at the level of T10, as well as geodes in the left T10 lamina and left T9-T10 articular processes. The nodule was removed surgically and shown by histological examination to be a tophus. The neurological impairments resolved rapidly and completely. We found about 60 similar cases in the literature. Spinal cord compression in a patient with chronic gout can be caused by a tophus. Copyright 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; hide

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  19. Retraining the injured spinal cord

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Leon, R. D.; Harkema, S. J.; Hodgson, J. A.; London, N.; Reinkensmeyer, D. J.; Roy, R. R.; Talmadge, R. J.; Tillakaratne, N. J.; Timoszyk, W.; Tobin, A.

    2001-01-01

    The present review presents a series of concepts that may be useful in developing rehabilitative strategies to enhance recovery of posture and locomotion following spinal cord injury. First, the loss of supraspinal input results in a marked change in the functional efficacy of the remaining synapses and neurons of intraspinal and peripheral afferent (dorsal root ganglion) origin. Second, following a complete transection the lumbrosacral spinal cord can recover greater levels of motor performance if it has been exposed to the afferent and intraspinal activation patterns that are associated with standing and stepping. Third, the spinal cord can more readily reacquire the ability to stand and step following spinal cord transection with repetitive exposure to standing and stepping. Fourth, robotic assistive devices can be used to guide the kinematics of the limbs and thus expose the spinal cord to the new normal activity patterns associated with a particular motor task following spinal cord injury. In addition, such robotic assistive devices can provide immediate quantification of the limb kinematics. Fifth, the behavioural and physiological effects of spinal cord transection are reflected in adaptations in most, if not all, neurotransmitter systems in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Evidence is presented that both the GABAergic and glycinergic inhibitory systems are up-regulated following complete spinal cord transection and that step training results in some aspects of these transmitter systems being down-regulated towards control levels. These concepts and observations demonstrate that (a) the spinal cord can interpret complex afferent information and generate the appropriate motor task; and (b) motor ability can be defined to a large degree by training.

  20. Attitudes Towards Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Cassandra Sligh D.; Gooden, Randy; Nowell, Jennifer; Wilson, Navodda

    2010-01-01

    This paper will shed light on the lives of persons with spinal cord injuries by revealing the literature on spinal cord injuries that focuses on research that can shed light on attitudes towards persons with spinal cord injuries. The background literature related to incidences, the definition of spinal cord injury, and vocational opportunities are…

  1. Physiological properties of spinal lamina II GABAergic neurons in mice following peripheral nerve injury.

    PubMed

    Schoffnegger, Doris; Heinke, Bernhard; Sommer, Claudia; Sandkühler, Jürgen

    2006-12-15

    Aberrant GABAergic inhibition in spinal dorsal horn may underlie some forms of neuropathic pain. Potential, but yet unexplored, mechanisms include reduced excitability, abnormal discharge patterns or altered synaptic input of spinal GABAergic neurons. To test these hypotheses, we quantitatively compared active and passive membrane properties, firing patterns in response to depolarizing current steps and synaptic input of GABAergic neurons in spinal dorsal horn lamina II of neuropathic and of control animals. Transgenic mice were used which expressed enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) controlled by the GAD67 promoter, thereby labelling one-third of all spinal GABAergic neurons. In all neuropathic mice included in this study, chronic constriction injury of one sciatic nerve led to tactile allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Control mice were sham-operated. Membrane excitability of GABAergic neurons from neuropathic or sham-treated animals was indistinguishable. The most frequent firing patterns observed in neuropathic and sham-operated animals were the initial burst (neuropathic: 46%, sham-treated: 42%), the gap (neuropathic: 31%, sham-treated: 29%) and the tonic firing pattern (neuropathic: 16%, sham-treated: 24%). The synaptic input from dorsal root afferents was similar in neuropathic and in control animals. Thus, a reduced membrane excitability, altered firing patterns or changes in synaptic input of this group of GABAergic neurons in lamina II of the spinal cord dorsal horn are unlikely causes for neuropathic pain.

  2. Distinctive membrane and discharge properties of rat spinal lamina I projection neurones in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ruscheweyh, Ruth; Ikeda, Hiroshi; Heinke, Bernhard; Sandkühler, Jürgen

    2004-01-01

    Most lamina I neurones with a projection to the brainstem express the neurokinin 1 receptor and thus belong to a small subgroup of lamina I neurones that are necessary for the development of hyperalgesia in rat models of persisting pain. These neurones are prone to synaptic plasticity following primary afferent stimulation in the noxious range while other nociceptive lamina I neurones are not. Here, we used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from lamina I neurones in young rat spinal cord transverse slices to test if projection neurones possess membrane properties that set them apart from other lamina I neurones. Neurones with a projection to the parabrachial area or the periaqueductal grey (PAG) were identified by retrograde labelling with the fluorescent tracer DiI. The properties of lamina I projection neurones were found to be fundamentally different from those of unidentified, presumably propriospinal lamina I neurones. Two firing patterns, the gap and the bursting firing pattern, occurred almost exclusively in projection neurones. Most spino-parabrachial neurones showed the gap firing pattern while the bursting firing pattern was characteristic of spino-PAG neurones. The underlying membrane currents had the properties of an A-type K+ current and a Ca2+ curent with a low activation threshold, respectively. Projection neurones, especially those of the burst firing type, were more easily excitable than unidentified neurones and received a larger proportion of monosynaptic input from primary afferent C-fibres. Intracellular labelling with Lucifer yellow showed that projection neurones had larger somata than unidentified neurones and many had a considerable extension in the mediolateral plane. PMID:14694142

  3. Intramedullary Cervical Spinal Cord Abscess.

    PubMed

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Kim, Paul E; Attenello, Frank J

    2017-10-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord abscesses are rarely encountered in modern neurosurgical practice. Select patients are at high risk for developing an intramedullary spinal cord abscess, which can result in acute neurologic deficits. Patients with failed conservative management may benefit from early surgical intervention; however, the evidence is limited by level 3 studies. In this case presentation, the patient failed conservative management for a cervical intramedullary spinal cord abscess and developed acute neurologic deficits. The decision was made to perform an urgent cervical laminectomy and drainage to avoid any further decline that may have occurred with continued conservative management. Increased awareness of intramedullary spinal cord abscess is warranted for its clinical suspicion and emergent treatment in select circumstances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    in order to minimize scarring and injected dissociated adult DRGs rostral to a dorsal column transection of the spinal cord. From the sensory... columns were dissected and post-fixed overnight in 4% paraformaldehyde, and then spinal cords were dissected from spinal columns and cryoprotected...AD______________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0941 TITLE: Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue

  5. [Surgical anatomy of spinal cord tumors].

    PubMed

    Peltier, J; Chenin, L; Hannequin, P; Page, C; Havet, É; Foulon, P; Le Gars, D

    2015-08-03

    In this article, we respectively describe the morphology of the spinal cord, spinal meningeal layers, main fiber tracts, and both arterial and venous distribution in order to explain signs of spinal cord compression. We will then describe a surgical technique for spinal cord tumor removal.

  6. Upper cervical spinal cord compression due to bony stenosis of the spinal canal.

    PubMed

    Benitah, S; Raftopoulos, C; Balériaux, D; Levivier, M; Dedeire, S

    1994-04-01

    Compression of the upper cervical spinal cord due to stenosis of the bony spinal canal is infrequent. In the first case reported here, stenosis was due to acquired extensive, unilateral osteophytes centered on the left apophyseal joints of C1-C2 in an elderly professional violinist. In the second case, stenosis was secondary to isolated congenital hypertrophy of the laminae of C1 and C2.

  7. Spinal cord projections to the cerebellum in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Sengul, Gulgun; Fu, YuHong; Yu, You; Paxinos, George

    2015-09-01

    The projections from the spinal cord to the cerebellar cortex were studied using retrograde neuronal tracers. Thus far, no study has shown the detailed topographic mapping of the projections from the spinal neuron clusters to the cerebellar cortex regions for experimental animals, and there are no studies for the mouse. Tracers Fluoro-Gold and cholera toxin B were injected into circumscribed regions of the cerebellar cortex, and retrogradely labeled spinal cord neurons were mapped throughout the spinal cord. Spinal projections to the cerebellar cortex were mainly from five neuronal columns--central cervical nucleus, dorsal nucleus, lumbar and sacral precerebellar nuclei, and lumbar border precerebellar cells--and from scattered neurons located in the deep dorsal horn and laminae 6-8. The spinocerebellar projections to the cortex were mainly to the vermis. All five precerebellar cell columns projected to both anterior and posterior parts of the cerebellar cortex. Results of this study provide an amendment to the known rostral and caudal boundaries of the precerebellar cell columns in the mouse. Scattered precerebellar neurons in the most caudal deep dorsal horn and laminae 6-8 projected exclusively to the anterior part of the cerebellar cortex. In this study, no labeled spinal neurons were found to project to the lobules 6 and 7 of the cerebellar vermis, the flocculus, and the paraflocculus. Spinocerebellar neurons were located bilaterally, but the majority of the projections were contralateral for the central cervical nucleus, and ipsilateral for the remaining spinal precerebellar neuronal clusters.

  8. Hypothermia for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Brian K; Mann, Cody; Sohn, Hong Moon; Hilibrand, Alan S; Phillips, Frank M; Wang, Jeffrey C; Fehlings, Michael G

    2008-01-01

    Interest in systemic and local hypothermia extends back over many decades, and both have been investigated as potential neuroprotective interventions in a number of clinical settings, including traumatic brain injury, stroke, cardiac arrest, and both intracranial and thoracoabdominal aortic aneurysm surgery. The recent use of systemic hypothermia in an injured National Football League football player has focused a great deal of attention on the potential use of hypothermia in acute spinal cord injury. To provide spinal clinicians with an overview of the biological rationale for using hypothermia, the past studies and current clinical applications of hypothermia, and the basic science studies and clinical reports of the use of hypothermia in acute traumatic spinal cord injury. A review of the English literature on hypothermia was performed, starting with the original clinical description of the use of systemic hypothermia in 1940. Pertinent basic science and clinical articles were identified using PubMed and the bibliographies of the articles. Each article was reviewed to provide a concise description of hypothermia's biological rationale, current clinical applications, complications, and experience as a neuroprotective intervention in spinal cord injury. Hypothermia has a multitude of physiologic effects. From a neuroprotective standpoint, hypothermia slows basic enzymatic activity, reduces the cell's energy requirements, and thus maintains Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) concentrations. As such, systemic hypothermia has been shown to be neuroprotective in patients after cardiac arrest, although its benefit in other clinical settings such as traumatic brain injury, stroke, and intracranial aneurysm surgery has not been demonstrated. Animal studies of local and systemic hypothermia in traumatic spinal cord injury models have produced mixed results. Local hypothermia was actively studied in the 1970s in human acute traumatic spinal cord injury, but no case series of

  9. Directing Spinal Cord Plasticity: The Impact of Stretch Therapy on Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0587 TITLE: Directing Spinal Cord Plasticity: The Impact of Stretch ...Directing Spinal Cord Plasticity: The Impact of Stretch Therapy on Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury. 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1...ABSTRACT Essentially all spinal cord injured patients receive stretching therapies beginning within the first few weeks post-injury. Despite

  10. Neuronal organization of the spinal cord in the red stingray (Dasyatis akajei: chondrichthyes).

    PubMed

    Iwahori, N; Kawawaki, T; Baba, J

    1998-01-01

    The neuronal organization of the spinal cord in red stingray was studied using the rapid Golgi method. The gray matter of the spinal cord was divided into seven laminae: RS-I, RS-II, RS-III, RS-IV, RS-V, RS-VI and RS-VII. RS-I is cell dense lamina which occupies the major part of the dorsal horn and corresponds to laminae I and II of the spinal cord of mammals, birds and reptiles. The neurons of the lamina I are interspersed with those of lamina II, without forming a discrete lamina. RS-II is located at the base of the dorsal horn and is considered to correspond to the nucleus proprius. RS-III and IV form the intermediate zone and are highly reticulated. A few neurons of various shapes and sizes are distributed among the numerous fibers. The nuclei such as the intermediolateral, intermediomedial or Clarke's nucleus cannot be identified in the intermediate zone. RS-V and VI constitute the ventral horn. RS-V occupies the major part of the ventral horn and contains motoneurons which are distributed diffusely, without forming any distinct cell groups. RS-VI is located in the ventromedial part of the ventral horn, contains commissural neurons and correspond to lamina VIII. RS-VII is a small area surrounding the central canal and corresponds to lamina X. Thus, while the major features of the spinal cord of the red stingray can be correlated with those of the spinal cord of mammals, birds and reptiles, the neuronal organization of the spinal cord of the red stingray remains in an undifferentiated state.

  11. Aquaporins in the Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Oklinski, Michal K.; Skowronski, Mariusz T.; Skowronska, Agnieszka; Rützler, Michael; Nørgaard, Kirsten; Nieland, John D.; Kwon, Tae-Hwan; Nielsen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporins (AQPs) are water channel proteins robustly expressed in the central nervous system (CNS). A number of previous studies described the cellular expression sites and investigated their major roles and function in the brain and spinal cord. Among thirteen different mammalian AQPs, AQP1 and AQP4 have been mainly studied in the CNS and evidence has been presented that they play important roles in the pathogenesis of CNS injury, edema and multiple diseases such as multiple sclerosis, neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, glioblastoma multiforme, Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. The objective of this review is to highlight the current knowledge about AQPs in the spinal cord and their proposed roles in pathophysiology and pathogenesis related to spinal cord lesions and injury. PMID:27941618

  12. Spinal Myoclonus After Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Calancie, Blair

    2006-01-01

    Background/Objective: In the course of examining spinal motor function in many hundreds of people with traumatic spinal cord injury, we encountered 6 individuals who developed involuntary and rhythmic contractions in muscles of their legs. Although there are many reports of unusual muscle activation patterns associated with different forms of myoclonus, we believe that certain aspects of the patterns seen with these 6 subjects have not been previously reported. These patterns share many features with those associated with a spinal central pattern generator for walking. Methods: Subjects in this case series had a history of chronic injury to the cervical spinal cord, resulting in either complete (ASIA A; n = 4) or incomplete (ASIA D; n = 2) quadriplegia. We used multi-channel electromyography recordings of trunk and leg muscles of each subject to document muscle activation patterns associated with different postures and as influenced by a variety of sensory stimuli. Results: Involuntary contractions spanned multiple leg muscles bilaterally, sometimes including weak abdominal contractions. Contractions were smooth and graded and were highly reproducible in rate for a given subject (contraction rates were 0.3–0.5 Hz). These movements did not resemble the brief rapid contractions (ie, "jerks") ascribed to some forms of spinal myoclonus. For all subjects, the onset of involuntary muscle contraction was dependent upon hip angle; contractions did not occur unless the hips (and knees) were extended (ie, subjects were supine). In the 4 ASIA A subjects, contractions occurred simultaneously in all muscles (agonists and antagonists) bilaterally. In sharp contrast, contractions in the 2 ASIA D subjects were reciprocal between agonists and antagonists within a limb and alternated between limbs, such that movements in these 2 subjects looked just like repetitive stepping. Finally, each of the 6 subjects had a distinct pathology of their spinal cord, nerve roots, distal trunk

  13. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Fang, Marong; Chen, Haohao; Gou, Fangming; Ding, Mingxing

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies. PMID:25598784

  14. Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search Search En Español Category Cancer A-Z Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Adults If you have a brain or spinal cord tumor or are close to ... cope. Here you can find out all about brain and spinal cord tumors in adults, including risk ...

  15. Diverse firing properties and Aβ-, Aδ-, and C-afferent inputs of small local circuit neurons in spinal lamina I.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Elisabete C; Luz, Liliana L; Mytakhir, Oleh; Lukoyanov, Nikolai V; Szucs, Peter; Safronov, Boris V

    2016-02-01

    Spinal lamina I is a key element of the pain processing system, which integrates primary afferent input and relays it to supraspinal areas. More than 90% of neurons in this layer are local circuit neurons, whose role in the signal processing is poorly understood. We performed whole-cell recordings in a spinal cord preparation with attached dorsal roots to examine morphological features and physiological properties of small local circuit neurons (n = 47) in lamina I. Cells successfully filled with biocytin (n = 17) had fusiform (n = 10), flattened (n = 4), and multipolar (n = 3) somatodendritic morphology; their axons branched extensively and terminated in laminae I-III. Intrinsic firing properties were diverse; in addition to standard tonic (n = 16), adapting (n = 7), and delayed (n = 6) patterns, small local circuit neurons also generated rhythmic discharges (n = 6) and plateau potentials (n = 10), the latter were suppressed by the L-type Ca(2+)-channel blocker nifedipine. The neurons received monosynaptic inputs from Aδ and C afferents and could generate bursts of spikes on the root stimulation. In addition, we identified lamina I neurons (n = 7) with direct inputs from the low-threshold Aβ afferents, which could be picked up by ventral dendrites protruding to lamina III. Stimulation of afferents also evoked a disynaptic inhibition of neurons. Thus, small local circuit neurons exhibit diverse firing properties, can generate rhythmic discharges and plateau potentials, and their dendrites extending into several laminae allow broad integration of Aβ-, Aδ-, and C-afferent inputs. These properties are required for processing diverse modalities of nociceptive inputs in lamina I and may underlie spinal sensitization to pain.

  16. Spinal Cord Monitoring Data in Pediatric Spinal Deformity Patients With Spinal Cord Pathology.

    PubMed

    Aleem, Alexander W; Thuet, Earl D; Padberg, Anne M; Wallendorf, Michael; Luhmann, Scott J

    2015-01-01

    Retrospective. The purpose of this study is to review the efficacy of monitoring data and outcomes in pediatric patients with spinal cord pathology. The incidence of spinal cord pathology in pediatric patients with scoliosis has been reported between 3% and 20%. Previous studies demonstrated that intraoperative spinal cord monitoring (IOM) during scoliosis surgery can be reliable despite underlying pathology. A single-center retrospective review of 119 spinal surgery procedures in 82 patients with spinal cord pathology was performed. Diagnoses included Arnold-Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, myelomeningocele, spinal cord tumor, tethered cord, and diastematomyelia. Baseline neurologic function and history of prior neurosurgical intervention were identified. Outcome measures included ability to obtain reliable monitoring data during surgery and presence of postoperative neurologic deficits. Results were compared for 82 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Usable IOM data were obtained in 82% of cases (97/119). Twenty-two cases (18%) had no lower extremity data. Patients with Arnold-Chiari malformation or syringomyelia pathologies, in isolation or together, had a significantly higher rate of reliable data compared to other pathologies (p < .0001). Among study group cases with usable data, there were 1 false negative (1%) and 4 true positive (4%) outcomes. There were no permanent neurologic deficits. The spinal cord pathology group demonstrated 80% sensitivity and 92% specificity. Spinal cord monitoring is a valuable tool in pediatric patients with spinal cord pathology undergoing spinal deformity surgeries. When obtained, data allow to detect changes in spinal cord function. Patients with a diagnosis of Arnold-Chiari or syringomyelia have monitoring data similar to those patients with AIS. Patients with other spinal cord pathologies have less reliable data, and surgeons should have a lower threshold for performing wake-up tests to assess spinal cord

  17. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in superficial dorsal horn sensory neurons after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoyu C; Pappalardo, Laura W; Waxman, Stephen G; Tan, Andrew M

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a major complication of spinal cord injury, and despite aggressive efforts, this type of pain is refractory to available clinical treatment. Our previous work has demonstrated a structure-function link between dendritic spine dysgenesis on nociceptive sensory neurons in the intermediate zone, laminae IV/V, and chronic pain in central nervous system and peripheral nervous system injury models of neuropathic pain. To extend these findings, we performed a follow-up structural analysis to assess whether dendritic spine remodeling occurs on superficial dorsal horn neurons located in lamina II after spinal cord injury. Lamina II neurons are responsible for relaying deep, delocalized, often thermally associated pain commonly experienced in spinal cord injury pathologies. We analyzed dendritic spine morphometry and localization in tissue obtained from adult rats exhibiting neuropathic pain one-month following spinal cord injury. Although the total density of dendritic spines on lamina II neurons did not change after spinal cord injury, we observed an inverse relationship between the densities of thin- and mushroom-shaped spines: thin-spine density decreased while mushroom-spine density increased. These structural changes were specifically noted along dendritic branches within 150 µm from the soma, suggesting a possible adverse contribution to nociceptive circuit function. Intrathecal treatment with NSC23766, a Rac1-GTPase inhibitor, significantly reduced spinal cord injury-induced changes in both thin- and mushroom-shaped dendritic spines. Overall, these observations demonstrate that dendritic spine remodeling occurs in lamina II, regulated in part by the Rac1-signaling pathway, and suggests that structural abnormalities in this spinal cord region may also contribute to abnormal nociception after spinal cord injury.

  18. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in superficial dorsal horn sensory neurons after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Xiaoyu C; Pappalardo, Laura W; Waxman, Stephen G

    2017-01-01

    Neuropathic pain is a major complication of spinal cord injury, and despite aggressive efforts, this type of pain is refractory to available clinical treatment. Our previous work has demonstrated a structure–function link between dendritic spine dysgenesis on nociceptive sensory neurons in the intermediate zone, laminae IV/V, and chronic pain in central nervous system and peripheral nervous system injury models of neuropathic pain. To extend these findings, we performed a follow-up structural analysis to assess whether dendritic spine remodeling occurs on superficial dorsal horn neurons located in lamina II after spinal cord injury. Lamina II neurons are responsible for relaying deep, delocalized, often thermally associated pain commonly experienced in spinal cord injury pathologies. We analyzed dendritic spine morphometry and localization in tissue obtained from adult rats exhibiting neuropathic pain one-month following spinal cord injury. Although the total density of dendritic spines on lamina II neurons did not change after spinal cord injury, we observed an inverse relationship between the densities of thin- and mushroom-shaped spines: thin-spine density decreased while mushroom-spine density increased. These structural changes were specifically noted along dendritic branches within 150 µm from the soma, suggesting a possible adverse contribution to nociceptive circuit function. Intrathecal treatment with NSC23766, a Rac1-GTPase inhibitor, significantly reduced spinal cord injury-induced changes in both thin- and mushroom-shaped dendritic spines. Overall, these observations demonstrate that dendritic spine remodeling occurs in lamina II, regulated in part by the Rac1-signaling pathway, and suggests that structural abnormalities in this spinal cord region may also contribute to abnormal nociception after spinal cord injury. PMID:28326929

  19. Management of Chronic Spinal Cord Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Gary M.; Ganguly, Karunesh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Both acute and chronic spinal cord disorders present multisystem management problems to the clinician. This article highlights key issues associated with chronic spinal cord dysfunction. Recent Findings: Advances in symptomatic management for chronic spinal cord dysfunction include use of botulinum toxin to manage detrusor hyperreflexia, pregabalin for management of neuropathic pain, and intensive locomotor training for improved walking ability in incomplete spinal cord injuries. Summary: The care of spinal cord dysfunction has advanced significantly over the past 2 decades. Management and treatment of neurologic and non-neurologic complications of chronic myelopathies ensure that each patient will be able to maximize their functional independence and quality of life. PMID:25651225

  20. Pain following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ullrich, Philip M

    2007-05-01

    Pain is one of the most common, severe, and treatment-resistant complications that follows SCI. Recent years have seen a surge of research on methods for assessing and treating spinal cord injury pain. In this article, pain after SCI is reviewed in terms of nature, scope, assessment techniques, and treatment strategies.

  1. Transection of Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Stanford T.; Madden, John D.; Esterly, John R.; Shanklin, Douglas R.

    1971-01-01

    A newborn infant, delivered following mid-forceps rotation, presented with apnoea, anaesthesia below the level of the mid-neck, and flaccid quadriplegia. At necropsy there was transection of the cord, and atlanto-occipital and atlantoaxial dislocations. Cord injury usually follows breech presentation, the lesion is in the lower cervical or upper thoracic segments, and results from excessive traction. By contrast, in the rare cases following cephalic delivery, the lesion is most often in the upper cervical cord and probably results from rotational forces. PMID:5104538

  2. Localization of Brain Natriuretic Peptide Immunoreactivity in Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Abdelalim, Essam M.; Bellier, Jean-Pierre; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) exerts its functions through NP receptors. Recently, BNP has been shown to be involved in a wide range of functions. Previous studies reported BNP expression in the sensory afferent fibers in the dorsal horn (DH) of the spinal cord. However, BNP expression and function in the neurons of the central nervous system are still controversial. Therefore, in this study, we investigated BNP expression in the rat spinal cord in detail using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. RT-PCR analysis showed that BNP mRNA was present in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion (DRG). BNP immunoreactivity was observed in different structures of the spinal cord, including the neuronal cell bodies and neuronal processes. BNP immunoreactivity was observed in the DH of the spinal cord and in the neurons of the intermediate column (IC) and ventral horn (VH). Double-immunolabeling showed a high level of BNP expression in the afferent fibers (laminae I–II) labeled with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), suggesting BNP involvement in sensory function. In addition, BNP was co-localized with CGRP and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in the motor neurons of the VH. Together, these results indicate that BNP is expressed in sensory and motor systems of the spinal cord, suggesting its involvement in several biological actions on sensory and motor neurons via its binding to NP receptor-A (NPR-A) and/or NP receptor-B (NPR-B) at the spinal cord level. PMID:27994541

  3. Distribution and localization of 5-HT(1A) receptors in the rat lumbar spinal cord after transection and deafferentation.

    PubMed

    Otoshi, Chad K; Walwyn, Wendy M; Tillakaratne, Niranjala J K; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2009-04-01

    The serotonergic system is highly plastic, capable of adapting to changing afferent information in diverse mammalian systems. We hypothesized that removing supraspinal and/or peripheral input would play an important role in defining the distribution of one of the most prevalent serotonergic receptors, the 5-HT(1A) receptor (R), in the spinal cord. We investigated the distribution of this receptor in response to a complete thoracic (T7-T8) spinal cord transection (eliminating supraspinal input), or to spinal cord isolation (eliminating both supraspinal and peripheral input) in adult rats. Using two antibodies raised against either the second extracellular region (ECL(2)) or the third intracellular region (ICL(3)) of the 5-HT(1A)R, we compared the 5-HT(1A)R levels and distributions in specific laminae of the L3-L5 segments among the control, spinal cord-transected, and spinal cord-isolated groups. Each antibody labeled different populations of 5-HT(1A)R: ECL(2) labeled receptors in the axon hillock, whereas ICL(3) labeled receptors predominantly throughout the soma and proximal dendrites. Spinal cord transection increased the number of ECL(2)-positive cells in the medial region of laminae III-IV and lamina VII, and the mean length of the labeled axon hillocks in lamina IX. The number of ICL(3)-labeled cells was higher in lamina VII and in both the medial and lateral regions of lamina IX in the spinal cord-transected compared to the control group. In contrast, the length and number of ECL(2)-immunolabeled processes and ICL(3)-immunolabeled cells were similar in the spinal cord-isolated and control groups. Combined, these data demonstrate that the upregulation in 5-HT(1A)R that occurs with spinal cord transection alone is dependent on the presence of sensory input.

  4. Spinal cord astrocytoma mimicking multifocal myelitis

    PubMed Central

    Neutel, Dulce; Teodoro, Tiago; Coelho, Miguel; Pimentel, José; Albuquerque, Luísa

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Differential diagnosis of acute/subacute intrinsic spinal cord lesions can be challenging. In addition, intramedullary neoplasms typically show gadolinium enhancement, mass effect, and cord expansion. Case report We report a patient with spinal cord and brain stem lesions resembling multifocal myelitis. Magnetic resonance imaging showed no spinal cord enlargement or gadolinium enhancing. Treatment of myelitis was undertaken without stopping the progression of the disease. Biopsy was made and led to a histological diagnosis of astrocytoma. Discussion Astrocytoma must remain as a possible diagnosis of spinal cord lesions, even without typical characteristics of neoplasms. Furthermore, biopsy should always be considered when diagnosis is uncertain. PMID:24621037

  5. Developmental regulation of membrane excitability in rat spinal lamina I projection neurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Baccei, Mark L

    2012-05-01

    It is now universally recognized that neonates can experience considerable pain. While spinal lamina I neurons projecting to the brain contribute to the generation of hyperalgesia, nothing is known about their electrophysiological properties during early life. Here we have used in vitro whole cell patch-clamp recordings in rat spinal cord slices to determine whether the intrinsic membrane properties of lamina I projection neurons, as well as their synaptic inputs, are developmentally regulated during the early postnatal period. Projection neurons were identified via retrograde transport of DiI injected into the parabrachial nucleus (PB) or periaqueductal gray (PAG) and characterized at postnatal days (P)2-5, P10-12, P19-23, and P30-32. Both spino-PB and spino-PAG neurons demonstrated an age-dependent reduction in spike threshold and duration at room temperature, which was accompanied by a developmental increase in the frequency of miniature excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents. Notably, in both groups, age-dependent changes in the passive membrane properties or rheobase only occurred after the third postnatal week. However, spontaneous activity was significantly more prevalent within the developing spino-PB population and was dominated by an irregular pattern of discharge. In addition, while the instantaneous firing frequency remained unaltered in spino-PB neurons during the first weeks of life, spino-PAG cells fired at a higher rate at P19-23 compared with younger groups, suggesting that the gain of parallel ascending nociceptive pathways may be independently regulated during development. Overall, these results demonstrate that intrinsic membrane excitability is modulated in a cell type-specific manner within developing spinal nociceptive circuits.

  6. Psychological Aspects of Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Daniel W.

    1976-01-01

    Reviewing literature on the psychological impact of spinal cord injury suggests: (a) depression may not be a precondition for injury adjustment; (b) many persons sustaining cord injury may have experienced psychological disruption prior to injury; and (c) indexes of rehabilitation success need to be developed for the spinal cord injured. (Author)

  7. Psychological Aspects of Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Daniel W.

    1976-01-01

    Reviewing literature on the psychological impact of spinal cord injury suggests: (a) depression may not be a precondition for injury adjustment; (b) many persons sustaining cord injury may have experienced psychological disruption prior to injury; and (c) indexes of rehabilitation success need to be developed for the spinal cord injured. (Author)

  8. The shortened spinal cord in tetraodontiform fishes.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Masato; Hosaka, Yoshinao Z; Doi, Hiroyuki; Sakai, Harumi

    2015-03-01

    In teleosts, the spinal cord generally extends along the entire vertebral canal. The Tetraodontiformes, in which the spinal cord is greatly reduced in length with a distinct long filum terminale and cauda equina, have been regarded as an aberration. The aims of this study are: 1) to elucidate whether the spinal cord in all tetraodontiform fishes shorten with the filum terminale, and 2) to describe the gross anatomical and histological differences in the spinal cord among all families of the Tetraodontiformes. Representative species from all families of the Tetraodontiformes, and for comparison the carp as a common teleost, were investigated. In the Triacanthodidae, Triacanthidae, and Triodontidae, which are the more ancestral taxa of the Tetraodontiformes, the spinal cord extends through the entire vertebral canal. In the Triacanthidae and Triodontidae, the caudal half or more spinal segments of the spinal cord, however, lack gray matter and consist largely of nerve fibers. In the other tetraodontiform families, the spinal cord is shortened forming a filum terminale with the cauda equina, which is prolonged as far as the last vertebra. The shortened spinal cord is divided into three groups. In the Ostraciidae and Molidae, the spinal cord tapers abruptly at the cranium or first vertebra forming a cord-like filum terminale. In the Monacanthidae, Tetraodontidae, and Diodontidae, it abruptly flattens at the rostral vertebrae forming a flat filum terminale. The spinal cord is relatively longer in the Monacanthidae than that in the other two families. It is suggested by histological features of the flat filum terminale that shortening of the spinal cord in this group progresses in order of the Monacanthidae, Tetraodontidae, and Diodontidae. In the Balistidae and Aracanidae, the cord is relatively long and then gradually decreased in dorso-ventral thickness.

  9. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Letaif, Olavo Biraghi; da Rocha, Ivan Dias

    2012-01-01

    This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a “disease that should not be treated.” Over the last two decades, several studies have been performed to obtain more effective treatments for spinal cord injury. Most of these studies approach a patient with acute spinal cord injury in one of four manners: corrective surgery or a physical, biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life. PMID:23070351

  10. New posterior column reconstruction using titanium lamina mesh after total en bloc spondylectomy of spinal tumour.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae-Yoon; Kim, Sung-Kyu; Jung, Sung-Taek; Lee, Keun-Bae

    2013-03-01

    To investigate the usefulness of titanium lamina mesh for posterior column reconstruction after total en bloc spondylectomy in patients with spinal tumour and evaluate the radiographic outcomes of this method. Eight patients who underwent total en bloc spondylectomy with posterior column reconstruction using titanium lamina mesh and bone graft to treat a spinal tumour were included in this study. The mean age at the time of surgery was 50.6 years (range, 16.5-70.9 years) and the mean follow-up duration was 50.2 months (range, 28.1-68.7 months). The pathological lesions were located from the T2 to L1 vertebrae. There were four patients in each primary and metastatic tumour group. For the posterior column reconstruction, titanium lamina mesh was used and bone graft was applied over the lamina mesh. Radiographic evaluation was used to investigate the displacement of lamina mesh and union of the grafted bone above lamina mesh. At the postoperative six month follow-up, a bony bridge on the titanium mesh between upper and lower adjacent lamina was observed in all cases, except for one with infection. On the last follow-up, there was no collapse or displacement of titanium lamina mesh, and there was no instability or malalignment of the spinal column. Posterior column reconstruction using titanium lamina mesh during total en bloc spondylectomy for spinal tumour was a useful surgical option that provided new lamina reconstruction for stability of spinal column and protection of the neural elements.

  11. Neurochemistry Study of Spinal Cord in Non-Human Primate (Sapajus Spp.)

    PubMed Central

    Torres-da-Silva, K.R.; da Silva, A.V.; Barioni, N.O.; Tessarin, G.W.L.; de Oliveira, J.A.; Ervolino, E.; Horta-Júnior, J.A.C.; Casatti, C.A.

    2016-01-01

    The spinal cord is involved in local, ascending and descending neural pathways. Few studies analyzed the distribution of neuromediators in the laminae of non-human primates along all segments. The present study described the classic neuromediators in the spinal cord of the non-human primate Sapajus spp. through histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide hydrogen phosphate-diaphorase (NADPH-d) method showed neuronal somata in the intermediolateral column (IML), central cervical nucleus (CCN), laminae I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII and X, besides dense presence of nerve fibers in laminae II and IX. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity was evident in the neuronal somata in laminae V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, CCN, IML and in the Clarke’s column (CC). Immunohistochemistry data revealed neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) immunoreactivity in neuronal somata and in fibers of laminae I, II, III, VII, VIII, X and IML; choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) in neuronal somata and in fibers of laminae VII, VIII and IX; calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was noticed in neuronal somata of lamina IX and in nerve fibers of laminae I, II, III, IV, V, VI and VII; substance P (SP) in nerve fibers of laminae I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X, CCN, CC and IML; serotonin (5-HT) and vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (VGLUT1) was noticed in nerve fibers of all laminae; somatostatin (SOM) in neuronal somata of laminae III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII and IX and nerve fibers in laminae I, II, V, VI, VII, X and IML; calbindin (Cb) in neuronal somata of laminae I, II, VI, VII, IX and X; parvalbumin (PV) was found in neuronal somata and in nerve fibers of laminae III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX and CC; finally, gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) was present in neuronal somata of laminae V, VI, VII, VIII, IX and X. This study revealed interesting results concerning the chemoarchitecture of the Sapajus spp. spinal cord with a distribution pattern mostly similar to

  12. Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-01

    funded grant, we demonstrated proof-of-concept success of bridging a lateral hemisection of the rat spinal cord with engineered (“stretch-grown...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0941 TITLE: Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0941 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  13. Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    success of bridging a lateral hemisection in the rat spinal cord with engineered (“stretch-grown”) living nervous tissue constructs 2 . For the current...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0941 TITLE: Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered...SUBTITLE Spinal Cord Repair with Engineered Nervous Tissue 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0941 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6

  14. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  15. Survival Rates for Selected Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diagnosis, and Staging Survival Rates for Selected Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors Survival rates are often ... Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors More In Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Children About Brain ...

  16. Pia Mater Significantly Contributes to Spinal Cord Intraparenchymal Pressure in a Simulated Model of Edema.

    PubMed

    Harwell, Daniel M; Gibson, Justin L; Fessler, Richard David; Holtz, Jeffrey; Pettigrew, David B; Kuntz, Charles

    2016-05-01

    Intraparenchymal pressure (IPP) measurements in an in vitro cadaveric model of CNS edema. To assess the contribution of pia mater to IPP and the effect of piotomy. Multicenter randomized control trials have shown that decompression with durotomy/duroplasty significantly decreases intracranial pressure (ICP). There is a paucity of evidence regarding the effectiveness of decompression of the spinal cord by piotomy. The supratentorial brain and spinal cord were removed from six fresh cadavers. Dura and arachnoid mater were removed. ICP monitors were placed bilaterally in the frontal and parietal lobes, and centrally in the cervical and thoracic spinal cord. To simulate edema, specimens were submerged in hypotonic solution. IPP was recorded for 5 days. A complete dorsal midline piotomy was performed on the spinal cord and resulting IPP was recorded. Brain and spinal cord both increased in weight. IPP significantly increased in both brain and spinal cord. The IPP increase within the spinal cord was substantially greater (averages: all four lobes = 4.0 mm Hg; cervical = 73.7 mm Hg; thoracic = 49.3 mm Hg). After piotomy, cervical and thoracic spinal cord IPP decreased immediately (avg. postpiotomy IPP = 9.7 and 10.3, respectively). There were differential effects on brain and spinal cord IPP. Brain IPP increased only slightly, possibly because of the absence of the cranium and dura mater. In contrast, spinal cord IPP increased substantially even in the absence of the laminae, dura, and arachnoid mater. Piotomy immediately and dramatically reduced spinal cord IPP. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that spinal cord IPP is primarily dependent on constraints imposed by the pia mater. Conversely, in the absence of the cranium and dura mater, the sulci may permit the pia-invested brain to better accommodate edema without significant increases in IPP. N/A.

  17. The Pia Mater Significantly Contributes to Spinal Cord Intraparenchymal Pressure in a Simulated Model of Edema.

    PubMed

    Harwell, Daniel M; Gibson, Justin L; Fessler, R David; Holtz, Jeffrey; Pettigrew, David B; Kuntz, Charles

    2015-11-30

    Intraparenchymal pressure (IPP) measurements in an in vitro cadaveric model of CNS edema OBJECTIVE.: To assess the contribution of pia mater to IPP and the effect of piotomy. Multicenter randomized control trials have shown that decompression with durotomy/duroplasty significantly decreases intracranial pressure (ICP). There is a paucity of evidence regarding the effectiveness of decompression of the spinal cord by piotomy. The supratentorial brain and spinal cord were removed from six fresh cadavers. Dura and arachnoid mater were removed. ICP monitors were placed bilaterally in the frontal and parietal lobes, and centrally in the cervical and thoracic spinal cord. To simulate edema, specimens were submerged in hypotonic solution. IPP was recorded over five days. A complete dorsal midline piotomy was performed on the spinal cord and resulting IPP was recorded. Brain and spinal cord both increased in weight. IPP significantly increased in both brain and spinal cord. The IPP increase within the spinal cord was substantially greater (averages: all four lobes = 4.0 mm Hg; cervical = 73.7 mm Hg; thoracic = 49.3 mm Hg). After piotomy, cervical and thoracic spinal cord IPP decreased immediately (avg. post-piotomy IPP = 9.7 and 10.3, respectively). There were differential effects on brain and spinal cord IPP. Brain IPP increased only slightly, possibly due to the absence of the cranium and dura mater. In contrast, spinal cord IPP increased substantially even in the absence of the laminae, dura, and arachnoid mater. Piotomy immediately and dramatically reduced spinal cord IPP. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that spinal cord IPP is primarily dependent on constraints imposed by the pia mater. Conversely, in the absence of the cranium and dura mater, the sulci may permit the pia-invested brain to better accommodate edema without significant increases in IPP. N/A.

  18. Spinal cord compression in pseudohypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Timothy T; Khasnavis, Siddharth; Papaliodis, Dean N; Citone, Isabella; Carl, Allen L

    2013-12-01

    Spinal cord compression associated with pseudohypoparathyroidism (PHP) is an increasingly reported sequelae of the underlying metabolic syndrome. The association of neurologic dysfunction with PHP is not well appreciated. We believe this to be secondary to a combination of underlying congenital stenosis, manifest by short pedicles secondary to premature physeal closure, and hypertrophic ossification of the vertebral bony and ligamentous complexes. The purpose of this case report is to review the case of spinal stenosis in a child with PHP Type Ia. We are aware of only eight published reports of patients with PHP Type Ia and spinal stenosis-there are only two previously known cases of pediatric spinal stenosis secondary to PHP. This is a case report detailing the symptoms, diagnosis, interventions, complications, and ultimate outcomes of a pediatric patient undergoing spinal decompression and fusion for symptomatic stenosis secondary to PHP Type Ia. Literature search was reviewed regarding the reports of spinal stenosis and PHP, and the results are culminated and discussed. We report on a 14-year-old obese male with PHP and progressive lower extremity weakness secondary to congenital spinal stenosis. Examination revealed functional upper extremities with spastic paraplegia of bilateral lower extremities. The patient's neurologic function was cautiously monitored, but he deteriorated to a bed-bound state, preoperatively. The patient's chart was reviewed, summarized, and presented. Literature was searched using cross-reference of PHP and the terms "spinal stenosis," "myelopathy", "myelopathic," and "spinal cord compression." All relevant case reports were reviewed, and the results are discussed herein. The patient underwent decompression and instrumented fusion of T2-T11. He improved significantly with regard to lower extremity function, achieving unassisted ambulation function after extensive rehabilitation. Results from surgical decompression in previously reported

  19. Somatostatinergic nerves in the cervical spinal cord of the monkey.

    PubMed

    Burnweit, C; Forssmann, W G

    1979-08-03

    Somatostatinergic nerves in the spinal cord of the monkey were investigated utilizing immunohistochemistry with various antibodies against synthetic somatostatin. In contrast to earlier investigations, it is shown that somatostatinergic nerve endings occur in most of the areas of the grey matter of the spinal cord. The somatostatinergic axons are, however, characteristically distributed in three main regions: (1) Densely-packed endings are seen in lamina II of the substantia gelatinosa, forming a crescent-shaped pattern in the columna dorsalis. Somatostatin immunoreactivity is also seen in lamina I and in the Lissauer tract. (2) A fine network of fibers is observed around the central canal; the endings are concentrated on special cell bodies. Some single perikarya are also stained in this region. (3) A loose network of single fibers is found ending on perikarya of the columna lateralis or ventralis. The perikarya of the nerve axons, with the exception of those terminating in the columna dorsalis, have as yet not been identified. In order to better understand the somatostatinergic system of the spinal cord, these newly-detected somatostatinergic nerves must be studied and their exact pathways analyzed.

  20. Functional Organization of Cutaneous and Muscle Afferent Synapses onto Immature Spinal Lamina I Projection Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that sensory afferents innervating muscle are more effective at inducing hyperexcitability within spinal cord circuits compared with skin afferents, which likely contributes to the higher prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal pain compared with pain of cutaneous origin. However, the mechanisms underlying these differences in central nociceptive signaling remain incompletely understood, as nothing is known about how superficial dorsal horn neurons process sensory input from muscle versus skin at the synaptic level. Using a novel ex vivo spinal cord preparation, here we identify the functional organization of muscle and cutaneous afferent synapses onto immature rat lamina I spino-parabrachial neurons, which serve as a major source of nociceptive transmission to the brain. Stimulation of the gastrocnemius nerve and sural nerve revealed significant convergence of muscle and cutaneous afferent synaptic input onto individual projection neurons. Muscle afferents displayed a higher probability of glutamate release, although short-term synaptic plasticity was similar between the groups. Importantly, muscle afferent synapses exhibited greater relative expression of Ca2+-permeable AMPARs compared with cutaneous inputs. In addition, the prevalence and magnitude of spike timing-dependent long-term potentiation were significantly higher at muscle afferent synapses, where it required Ca2+-permeable AMPAR activation. Collectively, these results provide the first evidence for afferent-specific properties of glutamatergic transmission within the superficial dorsal horn. A larger propensity for activity-dependent strengthening at muscle afferent synapses onto developing spinal projection neurons could contribute to the enhanced ability of these sensory inputs to sensitize central nociceptive networks and thereby evoke persistent pain in children following injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The neurobiological mechanisms underlying the high prevalence of chronic

  1. Part 1: recognizing neonatal spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Brand, M Colleen

    2006-02-01

    Neonatal spinal cord injury can occur in utero, as well as after either a difficult delivery or a nontraumatic delivery. Spinal cord injury can also be related to invasive nursery procedures or underlying neonatal pathology. Early clinical signs of spinal cord injury that has occurred in utero or at delivery includes severe respiratory compromise and profound hypotonia. Knowledge of risk factors and awareness of symptoms is required for early recognition and appropriate treatment. This article reviews the embryological development of the spinal column highlighting mechanisms of injury and identifying underlying factors that increase the risk of spinal cord injury in newborns. Signs and symptoms of injury, cervical spine immobilization, and the differential diagnosis are discussed. Nursing implications, general prognosis, and research in spinal cord injury are provided.

  2. Nutrition of People with Spinal Cord Injuries

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This conference proceeding summarizes current knowledge about the nutritional status and needs of the spinal cord injured patient. Topics covered include the aspects of spinal cord injury that influence nutrient intakes and status, and the nutrients most likely to be problematic in this diverse gro...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury: Hope through Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... many organ systems, including parts of the abdomen. Lumbar spinal nerves (L1 to L5) emerge from the spinal cord ... L2 vertebral body level. A thick set of nerves from the lumbar and sacral cord form the “cauda equina” in ...

  4. Sphingolipids in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Zachary B; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Despite progress over the last few decades, the molecular mechanisms of secondary SCI that continue to occur days and weeks after the original trauma remain poorly understood. As a result, current therapies for SCI are only marginally effective. Sphingolipids, a diverse class of bioactive lipids, have been shown to regulate SCI repair and key secondary injury processes such as apoptosis, ischemia and inflammation. This review will discuss the numerous roles of sphingolipids and highlight the potential of sphingolipid-targeted therapies for SCI. PMID:27570580

  5. Spinal cord ischemia secondary to hypovolemic shock.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jacob Yl; Kapoor, Siddhant; Koh, Roy Km; Yang, Eugene Wr; Hee, Hwan-Tak

    2014-12-01

    A 44-year-old male presented with symptoms of spinal cord compression secondary to metastatic prostate cancer. An urgent decompression at the cervical-thoracic region was performed, and there were no complications intraoperatively. Three hours postoperatively, the patient developed acute bilateral lower-limb paralysis (motor grade 0). Clinically, he was in class 3 hypovolemic shock. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, showing no epidural hematoma. He was managed aggressively with medical therapy to improve his spinal cord perfusion. The patient improved significantly, and after one week, he was able to regain most of his motor functions. Although not commonly reported, spinal cord ischemia post-surgery should be recognized early, especially in the presence of hypovolemic shock. MRI should be performed to exclude other potential causes of compression. Spinal cord ischemia needs to be managed aggressively with medical treatment to improve spinal cord perfusion. The prognosis depends on the severity of deficits, and is usually favorable.

  6. Galactorrhea: a complication of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Yarkony, G M; Novick, A K; Roth, E J; Kirschner, K L; Rayner, S; Betts, H B

    1992-09-01

    Galactorrhea, a secretion of milk or milk-like products from the breast in the absence of parturition, has been reported to occur in women with spinal cord injuries in association with amenorrhea and hyperprolactinemia. Four cases of galactorrhea in association with spinal cord injury are reported. Galactorrhea developed in four spinal cord injured women who had thoracic paraplegia. The onset of galactorrhea was from one month to five months after injury. Although the onset of galactorrhea may have been related to prescribed medications in all four cases, insufficient data exist to draw conclusions. The three women whose galactorrhea persisted declined treatment and galactorrhea continuing for more than two years in one instance. We conclude that galactorrhea with or without amenorrhea may develop after a spinal cord injury and that spinal cord injured women may have an enhanced sensitivity to medication-induced galactorrhea.

  7. [Therapy progress of spinal cord compression by metastatic spinal tumor].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao-sheng; He, Qi-zhen; Liu, Shu-bin; Jiang, Wei-gang; Lei, Ming-xing

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic epidural compression of the spinal cord is a significant source of morbidity in patients with systemic cancer. With improvment of oncotheray, survival period in the patients is improving and metastatic cord compression is en- countered increasingly often. Surgical management performed for early circumferential decompression for the spinal cord com- pression with spine instability, and spine reconstruction performed. Patients with radiosensitive tumours without spine instabili- ty, radiotherapy is an effective therapy. Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery and minimally invasive techniques, such as vertebro- plasty and kyphoplasty, percutaneous pedicle screw fixation, radiofrequency ablation are promising options for treatment of cer- tain selected patients with spinal metastases.

  8. Projections from the oral pontine reticular nucleus to the spinal cord of the mouse.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huazheng; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated projections of the mouse oral pontine reticular nucleus (PnO) to the spinal cord by (a) injecting a retrograde tracer fluoro-gold (FG) to the lumbar cord and (b) an anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) to PnO. We found that PnO projects to the entire spinal cord with an ipsilateral predominance. PnO fibers mainly travel in the ipsilateral ventral funiculus in the entire cord, terminating in laminae 7-10 with a lower density of fibers and boutons in lower segments. A small number of fibers travel in the contralateral ventral funiculus in the cervical cord with a similar terminating pattern to the ipsilateral counterpart. The present study is the first demonstration of PnO fiber terminals in the mouse spinal cord. This pathway might be responsible for muscle atonia during REM sleep, but needs physiological research to confirm this.

  9. Relationship between Spinal Cord Volume and Spinal Cord Injury due to Spinal Shortening

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Feng; Yang, Jin-Cheng; Ma, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Jun-Jie; Yang, Qing-Lei; Zhou, Xin; Xiao, Yao-Sheng; Hu, Hai-Sheng; Xia, Li-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral column resection is associated with a risk of spinal cord injury. In the present study, using a goat model, we aimed to investigate the relationship between changes in spinal cord volume and spinal cord injury due to spinal shortening, and to quantify the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height in order to clarify a safe limit for shortening. Vertebral column resection was performed at T10 in 10 goats. The spinal cord was shortened until the somatosensory-evoked potential was decreased by 50% from the baseline amplitude or delayed by 10% relative to the baseline peak latency. A wake-up test was performed, and the goats were observed for two days postoperatively. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to measure the spinal cord volume, T10 height, disc height, osteotomy segment height, and spinal segment height pre- and postoperatively. Two of the 10 goats were excluded, and hence, only data from eight goats were analyzed. The somatosensory-evoked potential of these eight goats demonstrated meaningful changes. With regard to neurologic function, five and three goats were classified as Tarlov grades 5 and 4 at two days postoperatively. The mean shortening distance was 23.6 ± 1.51 mm, which correlated with the d-value (post-pre) of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment (r = 0.95, p < 0.001) and with the height of the T10 body (r = 0.79, p = 0.02). The mean d-value (post-pre) of the spinal cord volume per 1-mm height of the osteotomy segment was 142.87 ± 0.59 mm3 (range, 142.19–143.67 mm3). The limit for shortening was approximately 106% of the vertebral height. The mean volumes of the osteotomy and spinal segments did not significantly change after surgery (t = 0.310, p = 0.765 and t = 1.241, p = 0.255, respectively). Thus, our results indicate that the safe limit for shortening can be calculated using the change in spinal cord volume per 1-mm height. PMID:26001196

  10. Topologically preserving straightening of spinal cord MRI.

    PubMed

    De Leener, Benjamin; Mangeat, Gabriel; Dupont, Sara; Martin, Allan R; Callot, Virginie; Stikov, Nikola; Fehlings, Michael G; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-10-01

    To propose a robust and accurate method for straightening magnetic resonance (MR) images of the spinal cord, based on spinal cord segmentation, that preserves spinal cord topology and that works for any MRI contrast, in a context of spinal cord template-based analysis. The spinal cord curvature was computed using an iterative Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) approximation. Forward and inverse deformation fields for straightening were computed by solving analytically the straightening equations for each image voxel. Computational speed-up was accomplished by solving all voxel equation systems as one single system. Straightening accuracy (mean and maximum distance from straight line), computational time, and robustness to spinal cord length was evaluated using the proposed and the standard straightening method (label-based spline deformation) on 3T T2 - and T1 -weighted images from 57 healthy subjects and 33 patients with spinal cord compression due to degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). The proposed algorithm was more accurate, more robust, and faster than the standard method (mean distance = 0.80 vs. 0.83 mm, maximum distance = 1.49 vs. 1.78 mm, time = 71 vs. 174 sec for the healthy population and mean distance = 0.65 vs. 0.68 mm, maximum distance = 1.28 vs. 1.55 mm, time = 32 vs. 60 sec for the DCM population). A novel image straightening method that enables template-based analysis of quantitative spinal cord MRI data is introduced. This algorithm works for any MRI contrast and was validated on healthy and patient populations. The presented method is implemented in the Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1209-1219. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. [Traumatic recurrence of idiopathic spinal cord herniation].

    PubMed

    Lorente-Muñoz, Asís; Cortés-Franco, Severiano; Moles-Herbera, Jesús; Casado-Pellejero, Juan; Rivero-Celada, David; Alberdi-Viñas, Juan

    2013-01-01

    Idiopathic spinal cord herniation is a rare cause of thoracic myelopathy and its recurrence is even more infrequent. Cord herniation is through an anterior dural defect in thoracic spine with unknown causes. Symptomatic cases must be surgically treated to reduce the hernia and seal the defect to prevent recurrences. We report a patient presenting a Brown-Séquard syndrome secondary to a D5 spinal cord herniation treated successfully and its posterior traumatic recurrence.

  12. [Osteoporosis associated with spinal cord lesion].

    PubMed

    Miladinović, Ksenija; Vavra-Hadziahmetović, Narcisa; Muftić, Mirsad; Sakota, Slavica

    2007-01-01

    One of the complications caused by spinal lesion is osteoporosis which development is induced by lesion itself, and its mechanism is not explained enough. Risk factor of this kind of osteoporosis is fracture which management is difficult and is cause of further complications which aggravate already damaged quality of life of patients with spinal cord injury, and demand additional health insurance expenses. Importance of prevention and treatment of spinal cord injury induced osteoporosis is enlightened by case report.

  13. The cellular and subcellular localization of zinc transporter 7 in the mouse spinal cord

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The present work addresses the cellular and subcellular localization of the zinc transporter 7 (ZNT7, SLC30a7) protein and the distribution of zinc ions (Zn2+) in the mouse spinal cord. Our results indicated that the ZNT7 immunoreactive neurons were widely distributed in the Rexed’s laminae of the g...

  14. Rehabilitation of spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Nas, Kemal; Yazmalar, Levent; Şah, Volkan; Aydın, Abdulkadir; Öneş, Kadriye

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the injury of the spinal cord from the foramen magnum to the cauda equina which occurs as a result of compulsion, incision or contusion. The most common causes of SCI in the world are traffic accidents, gunshot injuries, knife injuries, falls and sports injuries. There is a strong relationship between functional status and whether the injury is complete or not complete, as well as the level of the injury. The results of SCI bring not only damage to independence and physical function, but also include many complications from the injury. Neurogenic bladder and bowel, urinary tract infections, pressure ulcers, orthostatic hypotension, fractures, deep vein thrombosis, spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, pulmonary and cardiovascular problems, and depressive disorders are frequent complications after SCI. SCI leads to serious disability in the patient resulting in the loss of work, which brings psychosocial and economic problems. The treatment and rehabilitation period is long, expensive and exhausting in SCI. Whether complete or incomplete, SCI rehabilitation is a long process that requires patience and motivation of the patient and relatives. Early rehabilitation is important to prevent joint contractures and the loss of muscle strength, conservation of bone density, and to ensure normal functioning of the respiratory and digestive system. An interdisciplinary approach is essential in rehabilitation in SCI, as in the other types of rehabilitation. The team is led by a physiatrist and consists of the patients’ family, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietician, psychologist, speech therapist, social worker and other consultant specialists as necessary. PMID:25621206

  15. Rehabilitation of spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Nas, Kemal; Yazmalar, Levent; Şah, Volkan; Aydın, Abdulkadir; Öneş, Kadriye

    2015-01-18

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is the injury of the spinal cord from the foramen magnum to the cauda equina which occurs as a result of compulsion, incision or contusion. The most common causes of SCI in the world are traffic accidents, gunshot injuries, knife injuries, falls and sports injuries. There is a strong relationship between functional status and whether the injury is complete or not complete, as well as the level of the injury. The results of SCI bring not only damage to independence and physical function, but also include many complications from the injury. Neurogenic bladder and bowel, urinary tract infections, pressure ulcers, orthostatic hypotension, fractures, deep vein thrombosis, spasticity, autonomic dysreflexia, pulmonary and cardiovascular problems, and depressive disorders are frequent complications after SCI. SCI leads to serious disability in the patient resulting in the loss of work, which brings psychosocial and economic problems. The treatment and rehabilitation period is long, expensive and exhausting in SCI. Whether complete or incomplete, SCI rehabilitation is a long process that requires patience and motivation of the patient and relatives. Early rehabilitation is important to prevent joint contractures and the loss of muscle strength, conservation of bone density, and to ensure normal functioning of the respiratory and digestive system. An interdisciplinary approach is essential in rehabilitation in SCI, as in the other types of rehabilitation. The team is led by a physiatrist and consists of the patients' family, physiotherapist, occupational therapist, dietician, psychologist, speech therapist, social worker and other consultant specialists as necessary.

  16. Solitary osteochondroma of the cervical spine causing spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Cagatay; Tezer, Mehmet; Hamzaoglu, Azmi

    2007-02-01

    Osteochondromas are common benign tumours of bone that often occur in the metaphysodiaphyseal parts of long bones. They rarely occur in the spine. We present a case of solitary osteochondroma arising from the C-1 vertebral lamina, causing neurological symptoms. A 46-year-old man presented to our institution, complaining of pain and numbness originating from his neck and extending down to his left arm. Radiographs, CT and MRI showed a solitary benign appearing expansile bone tumour arising from the left vertebral lamina of C-1, spreading to C-2, exerting an eccentric posterolateral compression on the spinal cord in the left part of the spinal canal and causing stenosis of the left neural foramen between C-1 and C-2. The lesion was surgically explored through a posterior longitudinal incision. Leaving the left lateral mass of C-1 intact, a left hemilaminectomy was performed. The lesion and the part spreading to C-2 were excised, completely clearing the spinal cord compression. For posterior stabilisation, lateral mass screws were inserted bilaterally in C-1 and pedicle screws and a rod system were used in C-2. The interlaminar region between C-1 and C-2 was fused using cancellous allograft chips. Follow-up controls with radiological examination revealed that the decompression had been adequate and fusion was achieved. Excision of the lesions is necessary to relieve neurological compression in such cases. In order to avoid complications associated with instability following extensive laminectomy, posterior stabilisation and fusion should also be performed.

  17. Segmentation of the human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    De Leener, Benjamin; Taso, Manuel; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Callot, Virginie

    2016-04-01

    Segmenting the spinal cord contour is a necessary step for quantifying spinal cord atrophy in various diseases. Delineating gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) is also useful for quantifying GM atrophy or for extracting multiparametric MRI metrics into specific WM tracts. Spinal cord segmentation in clinical research is not as developed as brain segmentation, however with the substantial improvement of MR sequences adapted to spinal cord MR investigations, the field of spinal cord MR segmentation has advanced greatly within the last decade. Segmentation techniques with variable accuracy and degree of complexity have been developed and reported in the literature. In this paper, we review some of the existing methods for cord and WM/GM segmentation, including intensity-based, surface-based, and image-based methods. We also provide recommendations for validating spinal cord segmentation techniques, as it is important to understand the intrinsic characteristics of the methods and to evaluate their performance and limitations. Lastly, we illustrate some applications in the healthy and pathological spinal cord. One conclusion of this review is that robust and automatic segmentation is clinically relevant, as it would allow for longitudinal and group studies free from user bias as well as reproducible multicentric studies in large populations, thereby helping to further our understanding of the spinal cord pathophysiology and to develop new criteria for early detection of subclinical evolution for prognosis prediction and for patient management. Another conclusion is that at the present time, no single method adequately segments the cord and its substructure in all the cases encountered (abnormal intensities, loss of contrast, deformation of the cord, etc.). A combination of different approaches is thus advised for future developments, along with the introduction of probabilistic shape models. Maturation of standardized frameworks, multiplatform availability, inclusion

  18. Distribution and Localization of 5-HT1A Receptors in the Rat Lumbar Spinal Cord after Transection and Deafferentation

    PubMed Central

    Otoshi, Chad K.; Walwyn, Wendy M.; Tillakaratne, Niranjala J.K.; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The serotonergic system is highly plastic, capable of adapting to changing afferent information in diverse mammalian systems. We hypothesized that removing supraspinal and/or peripheral input would play an important role in defining the distribution of one of the most prevalent serotonergic receptors, the 5-HT1A receptor (R), in the spinal cord. We investigated the distribution of this receptor in response to a complete thoracic (T7–T8) spinal cord transection (eliminating supraspinal input), or to spinal cord isolation (eliminating both supraspinal and peripheral input) in adult rats. Using two antibodies raised against either the second extracellular region (ECL2) or the third intracellular region (ICL3) of the 5-HT1AR, we compared the 5-HT1AR levels and distributions in specific laminae of the L3–L5 segments among the control, spinal cord–transected, and spinal cord–isolated groups. Each antibody labeled different populations of 5-HT1AR: ECL2 labeled receptors in the axon hillock, whereas ICL3 labeled receptors predominantly throughout the soma and proximal dendrites. Spinal cord transection increased the number of ECL2-positive cells in the medial region of laminae III–IV and lamina VII, and the mean length of the labeled axon hillocks in lamina IX. The number of ICL3-labeled cells was higher in lamina VII and in both the medial and lateral regions of lamina IX in the spinal cord–transected compared to the control group. In contrast, the length and number of ECL2-immunolabeled processes and ICL3-immunolabeled cells were similar in the spinal cord–isolated and control groups. Combined, these data demonstrate that the upregulation in 5-HT1AR that occurs with spinal cord transection alone is dependent on the presence of sensory input. PMID:19260781

  19. Properties of Mouse Spinal Lamina I GABAergic Interneurons.

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Kimberly J.; Sawchuk, Michael A.; Hochman, Shawn

    2009-01-01

    Lamina I is a sensory relay region containing projection cells and local interneurons involved in thermal and nociceptive signaling. These neurons differ in morphology, sensory response modality, and firing characteristics. We examined intrinsic properties of mouse lamina I GABAergic neurons expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). GABAergic neuron identity was confirmed by a high correspondence between GABA immunolabeling and EGFP fluorescence. Morphologies of these EGFP+/GABA+ cells were multipolar (65%), fusiform (31%), and pyramidal (4%). In whole cell recordings, cells fired a single spike (44%), tonically (35%), or an initial burst (21%) in response to current steps, representing a subset of reported lamina I firing properties. Membrane properties of tonic and initial burst cells were indistinguishable and these neurons may represent one functional population because, in individual neurons, their firing patterns could interconvert. Single spike cells were less excitable with lower membrane resistivity and higher rheobase. Most fusiform cells (64%) fired tonically while most multipolar cells (56%) fired single spikes. In summary, lamina I inhibitory interneurons are functionally divisible into at least two major groups both of which presumably function to limit excitatory transmission. PMID:16014799

  20. Chronic pain following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Rekand, Tiina; Hagen, Ellen Merete; Grønning, Marit

    2012-04-30

    Chronic pain following spinal cord injury is common, and may result in a substantially reduced quality of life. The aim of the paper is to provide an overview of pain conditions resulting from spinal cord injuries and an update on therapy options. The article is based on literature searches in PubMed review articles for the period 2006-2011, using the search phrases «pain and spinal cord injury/injuries», «chronic pain and spinal cord injury/injuries» and «neuropathic pain and spinal cord injury/injuries». Some key articles on neuropathic pain are also included, irrespective of the year of publication. Patients with spinal cord injury may develop nociceptive and/or neuropathic pain.The cause, nature and localisation of the pain must be established before therapy is initiated. Neuropathic pain should primarily be treated with amitriptyline, gabapentin or pregabalin. Duloxetine, lamotrigine and tramadol may also be effective. Local treatment with high-concentration capsaicin and lidocaine may relieve localised neuropathic pain. Selected patients with intractable chronic neuropathic pain can be treated with intrathecal medication using an implanted pain pump or by microsurgical DREZotomy (Dorsal Root Entry Zone). Physiotherapy, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and opioids are most widely used for treating nociceptive pain. Physical exercise and acupuncture may provide relief from shoulder pain. There may be several causes of chronic pain following spinal cord injury. Different measures have been tested for the management of chronic pain after spinal cord injury, but most studies have been performed on a limited number of patients. Further studies are needed to find more effective means of relieving pain following spinal cord injuries.

  1. Sensory feedback synchronizes motor and sensory neuronal networks in the neonatal rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Inácio, Ana R; Nasretdinov, Azat; Lebedeva, Julia; Khazipov, Roustem

    2016-10-07

    Early stages of sensorimotor system development in mammals are characterized by the occurrence of spontaneous movements. Whether and how these movements support correlated activity in developing sensorimotor spinal cord circuits remains unknown. Here we show highly correlated activity in sensory and motor zones in the spinal cord of neonatal rats in vivo. Both during twitches and complex movements, movement-generating bursts in motor zones are followed by bursts in sensory zones. Deafferentation does not affect activity in motor zones and movements, but profoundly suppresses activity bursts in sensory laminae and results in sensorimotor uncoupling, implying a primary role of sensory feedback in sensorimotor synchronization. This is further supported by largely dissociated activity in sensory and motor zones observed in the isolated spinal cord in vitro. Thus, sensory feedback resulting from spontaneous movements is instrumental for coordination of activity in developing sensorimotor spinal cord circuits.

  2. Sensory feedback synchronizes motor and sensory neuronal networks in the neonatal rat spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Inácio, Ana R.; Nasretdinov, Azat; Lebedeva, Julia; Khazipov, Roustem

    2016-01-01

    Early stages of sensorimotor system development in mammals are characterized by the occurrence of spontaneous movements. Whether and how these movements support correlated activity in developing sensorimotor spinal cord circuits remains unknown. Here we show highly correlated activity in sensory and motor zones in the spinal cord of neonatal rats in vivo. Both during twitches and complex movements, movement-generating bursts in motor zones are followed by bursts in sensory zones. Deafferentation does not affect activity in motor zones and movements, but profoundly suppresses activity bursts in sensory laminae and results in sensorimotor uncoupling, implying a primary role of sensory feedback in sensorimotor synchronization. This is further supported by largely dissociated activity in sensory and motor zones observed in the isolated spinal cord in vitro. Thus, sensory feedback resulting from spontaneous movements is instrumental for coordination of activity in developing sensorimotor spinal cord circuits. PMID:27713428

  3. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  4. Fitness and Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Mackie, J. William; McCormack, Rebecca; Campbell, Duncan

    1989-01-01

    Activity for many disabled persons often begins as therapy, but the additional rewards derived from exercise must be appreciated. Public attitudes toward disabled persons have changed during the last few decades, recently focusing on abilities rather than on disabilities. The family physician of patients with spinal cord injuries will assist in managing acute medical problems and the association with loss of some degree of physical capacity. Physicians also can guide these individuals to choose a life that remains active and interesting over a “house-bound,” but safe, existence. Sensitivity and timing play key roles in establishing exercise as an intergral part of a disabled individuals' altered lifestyle. The physician can advocate increased access to wheelchairs and other facilities that make life easier for disabled individuals. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:21248871

  5. Spinal cord injury in youth.

    PubMed

    Apple, D F; Anson, C A; Hunter, J D; Bell, R B

    1995-02-01

    To identify special characteristics of the pediatric spinal cord-injured (SCI) population, we analyzed a database of 1,770 traumatic SCI patients; 88 (5%) fell into the two pediatric subgroups: 0-12 years (n = 26) and 13-15 years (n = 62) at time of injury. Differences between age groups were identified with regard to demographics, neurologic characteristics, associated injuries and complications, and management. Mode level of bony injury was C2 in preteens, C4 in teens, and C4-C5 in adults. Scoliosis developed far more frequently in children, particularly preteens (23%), than in adults (5%). Violent etiologies, predominantly gunshots, accounted for a disproportionate share of injuries to preteens (19%) and African-Americans (28%), as compared with adults (12%) and Caucasians (7%). This last finding underscores the urgent need to mount a response to the nationwide proliferation of gunshot-related SCI in children and minorities.

  6. Spinal cord transection in the larval zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Briona, Lisa K; Dorsky, Richard I

    2014-05-21

    Mammals fail in sensory and motor recovery following spinal cord injury due to lack of axonal regrowth below the level of injury as well as an inability to reinitiate spinal neurogenesis. However, some anamniotes including the zebrafish Danio rerio exhibit both sensory and functional recovery even after complete transection of the spinal cord. The adult zebrafish is an established model organism for studying regeneration following spinal cord injury, with sensory and motor recovery by 6 weeks post-injury. To take advantage of in vivo analysis of the regenerative process available in the transparent larval zebrafish as well as genetic tools not accessible in the adult, we use the larval zebrafish to study regeneration after spinal cord transection. Here we demonstrate a method for reproducibly and verifiably transecting the larval spinal cord. After transection, our data shows sensory recovery beginning at 2 days post-injury (dpi), with the C-bend movement detectable by 3 dpi and resumption of free swimming by 5 dpi. Thus we propose the larval zebrafish as a companion tool to the adult zebrafish for the study of recovery after spinal cord injury.

  7. Spinal cord lesions - The rehabilitation perspective.

    PubMed

    Faria, Filipa

    2006-02-01

    The present study provides an overview of the spinal cord injury focusing mainly on aspects related to rehabilitation. Spinal cord injury affects young people in an active phase of life, determining severe handicaps. Most of the lesions are traumatic, caused by car accidents. Until fifty years ago, the survival of individuals with spinal cord injury was very reduced and the leading cause of death was renal failure. Due to developments in medical knowledge and technical advances, the survival rates have significantly improved. The causes of death have also changed being respiratory complications, particularly pneumonia, the leading causes. Immediately after a spinal cord lesion there is a phase of spinal shock which is characterized by flaccid paralysis and bladder and bowel retention. Progressively there is a return of the spinal cord automatism with the beginning of some reflex activities. Based on neurological evaluation it is pos-sible to predict motor and functional recovery and establish the rehabilitation program. We can consider three phases on the rehabilitation program: the first while the patient is still in bed, directed to prevent or treat complications due to immobility and begin sphincters reeducation; the second phase is intended to achieve wheelchair autonomy; the last phase is training in ortostatism. The rehabilitation program also comprises sports and recreational activities, psychological and social support in order to achieve an integral of the individual with a spinal cord injury.

  8. Cardiovascular control after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gondim, F A A; Lopes, A C A; Oliveira, G R; Rodrigues, C L; Leal, P R L; Santos, A A; Rola, F H

    2004-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to profound haemodynamic changes. Constant outflows from the central autonomic pattern generators modulate the activity of the spinal sympathetic neurons. Sudden loss of communication between these centers and the sympathetic neurons in the intermediolateral thoracic and lumbar spinal cord leads to spinal shock. After high SCI, experimental data demonstrated a brief hypertensive peak followed by bradycardia with escape arrhythmias and marked hypotension. Total peripheral resistance and cardiac output decrease, while central venous pressure remains unchanged. The initial hypertensive peak is thought to result from direct sympathetic stimulation during SCI and its presence is anaesthetic agent dependent. Hypotension improves within days in most animal species because of reasons not totally understood, which may include synaptic reorganization or hyper responsiveness of alpha receptors. No convincing data has demonstrated that the deafferented spinal cord can generate significant basal sympathetic activity. However, with the spinal shock resolution, the deafferented spinal cord (in lesions above T6) will generate life-threatening hypertensive bouts with compensatory bradycardia, known as autonomic hyperreflexia (AH) after stimuli such as pain or bladder/colonic distension. AH results from the lack of supraspinal control of the sympathetic neurons and altered neurotransmission (e.g. glutamatergic) within the spinal cord. Despite significant progress in recent years, further research is necessary to fully understand the spectrum of haemodynamic changes after SCI.

  9. VOLUNTARY EXERCISE INCREASES OLIGODENDROGENESIS IN SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    Krityakiarana, W.; Espinosa-Jeffrey, A.; Ghiani, C.A.; Zhao, P. M.; Gomez-Pinilla, F.; Yamaguchi, M.; Kotchabhakdi, N.; de Vellis, J.

    2009-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase hippocampal neurogenesis, but the effects of exercise on oligodendrocyte generation have not yet been reported. In this study, we evaluated the hypothesis that voluntary exercise may affect neurogenesis, and more in particular, oligodendrogenesis, in the thoracic segment of the intact spinal cord of adult nestin-GFP transgenic mice. Voluntary exercise for 7 and 14 days increased nestin-GFP expression around the ependymal area. In addition, voluntary exercise for 7 days significantly increased nestin-GFP expression in both the white and gray matter of the thoracic segment of the intact spinal cord, whereas, 14 days-exercise decreased nestin-GFP expression. Markers for immature oligodendrocytes (Transferrin and CNPase) were significantly increased after 7 days of voluntary exercise. These results suggest that voluntary exercise positively influences oligodendrogenesis in the intact spinal cord, emphasizing the beneficial effect of voluntary exercise as a possible co-treatment for spinal cord injury. PMID:20374076

  10. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Women with SCI Video Series EatRight® Weight Management Program Smoking's Effects on ... of Alabama at Birmingham Spinal Cord Injury Model System (UAB-SCIMS) maintains this Information Network as a ...

  11. Ganglioside patterns in human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Vorwerk, C K

    2001-12-01

    To examine the distribution of gangliosides in human cervical and lumbar spinal cord. Magdeburg, Germany. The ganglioside distribution of human cervical and lumbar spinal cord enlargements from 10 neurological normal patients was analyzed. Gangliosides were isolated from different areas corresponding to the columna anterior, columna lateralis and columna posterior. Ganglioside GfD1b/GD1b and GD3 were the most abundant gangliosides in all examined tissues. The total concentration of sialic acid bound gangliosides GM2 and GM3 was less than 5%. The GD3 fraction constantly consisted of a double band as assessed by TLC after lipid extraction. There were significant differences in the ganglioside distribution when comparing tissue from the columna anterior, columna lateralis and columna posterior of the lumbar enlargement of the spinal cord. Differences in the ganglioside composition in human spinal cord regions may reflect the different function of those molecules in the two regions investigated.

  12. Cell transplantation therapy for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Assinck, Peggy; Duncan, Greg J; Hilton, Brett J; Plemel, Jason R; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2017-04-25

    Spinal cord injury can lead to severe motor, sensory and autonomic dysfunction. Currently, there is no effective treatment for the injured spinal cord. The transplantation of Schwann cells, neural stem cells or progenitor cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, oligodendrocyte precursor cells and mesenchymal stem cells has been investigated as potential therapies for spinal cord injury. However, little is known about the mechanisms through which these individual cell types promote repair and functional improvements. The five most commonly proposed mechanisms include neuroprotection, immunomodulation, axon regeneration, neuronal relay formation and myelin regeneration. A better understanding of the mechanisms whereby these cells promote functional improvements, as well as an appreciation of the obstacles in implementing these therapies and effectively modeling spinal cord injury, will be important to make cell transplantation a viable clinical option and may lead to the development of more targeted therapies.

  13. Neuropraxia of the cervical spinal cord following cervical spinal cord trauma: a report of five patients.

    PubMed

    Bernsen, H J; Koetsveld, A; Frenken, C W; van Norel, G J

    2000-06-01

    Neuropraxia of the cervical spinal cord is a rare condition which is almost exclusively reported in American football players following cervical hyperextension or hyperflexion trauma. In this entity-neurological symptoms of both arms and legs for a period of up to 15 minutes are observed with complete recovery. We report the characteristics of five patients not involved in contact sport activities with a neuropraxia of the spinal cord following cervical trauma. In four of the five patients, this syndrome was associated with a cervical canal stenosis. Surgical decompression was performed in two patients with progressive neurological symptoms after an initial period of recovery. The cases illustrates that although neuropraxia of the spinal cord is usually seen in athletes, also other persons may be at risk for developing this condition, especially when a preexisting spinal stenosis is present. Patients who experienced neuropraxia of the spinal cord should thus be evaluated carefully for the presence of cervical spinal cord abnormalities.

  14. Retinoic acid signaling in spinal cord development.

    PubMed

    Lara-Ramírez, Ricardo; Zieger, Elisabeth; Schubert, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is an important signaling molecule mediating intercellular communication through vertebrate development. Here, we present and discuss recent information on the roles of the RA signaling pathway in spinal cord development. RA is an important player in the patterning and definition of the spinal cord territory from very early stages of development, even before the appearance of the neural plate and further serves a role in the patterning of the spinal cord both along the dorsoventral and anteroposterior axes, particularly in the promotion of neuronal differentiation. It is thus required to establish a variety of neuronal cell types at specific positions of the spinal cord. The main goal of this review is to gather information from vertebrate models, including fish, frogs, chicken and mice, and to put this information in a comparative context in an effort to visualize how the RA pathway was incorporated into the evolving vertebrate spinal cord and to identify mechanisms that are both common and different in the various vertebrate models. In doing so, we try to reconstruct how spinal cord development has been regulated by the RA signaling cascade through vertebrate diversification, highlighting areas which require further studies to obtain a better understanding of the evolutionary events that shaped this structure in the vertebrate lineage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Topographically specific regeneration of sensory axons in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Pamela; Gong, Bangjian; Rossomando, Anthony J; Frank, Eric

    2010-06-22

    Artemin, a member of the glial-derived neurotrophic factor family, promotes robust regeneration of sensory axons after dorsal root crush. We report here that several classes of sensory axons regenerate to topographically appropriate regions of the dorsal horn with artemin treatment. Projections of regenerated muscle and cutaneous myelinated sensory afferents are restricted to the correct spinal segments and to appropriate regions within spinal gray matter. Regenerated unmyelinated axons expressing calcitonin gene-related peptide project only to superficial laminae of the dorsal horn, where uninjured nociceptive afferents project normally. In contrast, intraventricular infusion of a soluble form of the Nogo receptor that blocks the action of several myelin-associated inhibitory proteins promotes relatively unrestricted regeneration of sensory axons throughout the dorsal white and gray matter of the spinal cord. These results demonstrate that cues capable of guiding regenerating axons to appropriate spinal targets persist in the adult mammalian cord, but only some methods of stimulating regeneration allow the use of these cues by growing axons.

  16. Spinal cord thermosensitivity: An afferent phenomenon?

    PubMed Central

    Brock, James A.; McAllen, Robin M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We review the evidence for thermoregulatory temperature sensors in the mammalian spinal cord and reach the following conclusions. 1) Spinal cord temperature contributes physiologically to temperature regulation. 2) Parallel anterolateral ascending pathways transmit signals from spinal cooling and spinal warming: they overlap with the respective axon pathways of the dorsal horn neurons that are driven by peripheral cold- and warm-sensitive afferents. 3) We hypothesize that these ‘cold’ and ‘warm’ ascending pathways transmit all extracranial thermosensory information to the brain. 4) Cutaneous cold afferents can be activated not only by cooling the skin but also by cooling sites along their axons: we consider that this is functionally insignificant in vivo. 5) By a presynaptic action on their central terminals, local spinal cooling enhances neurotransmission from incoming ‘cold’ afferent action potentials to second order neurons in the dorsal horn; this effect disappears when the spinal cord is warm. 6) Spinal warm sensitivity is due to warm-sensitive miniature vesicular transmitter release from afferent terminals in the dorsal horn: this effect is powerful enough to excite second order neurons in the ‘warm’ pathway independently of any incoming sensory traffic. 7) Distinct but related presynaptic mechanisms at cold- and warm-sensitive afferent terminals can thus account for the thermoregulatory actions of spinal cord temperature. PMID:27857953

  17. Spinal cord stimulation: uses and applications.

    PubMed

    Golovac, Stanley

    2010-05-01

    Spinal cord stimulation has been used successfully for more than 40 years. The application of an electrical impulse field on to the spinal cord is used with a battery generator source and a variety of either cylindrical or paddle/plate leads. Energy is delivered from either a conventional internal programmable generator or a rechargeable style battery. Many clinical conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome, failed back spinal syndrome, and extremity neuropathic pain involving the trunk and limbs are approved for its use. This device allows patients to live a successful life without pain.

  18. Diagnosis and management of spinal cord emergencies.

    PubMed

    Flanagan, E P; Pittock, S J

    2017-01-01

    Most spinal cord injury is seen with trauma. Nontraumatic spinal cord emergencies are discussed in this chapter. These myelopathies are rare but potentially devastating neurologic disorders. In some situations prior comorbidity (e.g., advanced cancer) provides a clue, but in others (e.g., autoimmune myelopathies) it may come with little warning. Neurologic examination helps distinguish spinal cord emergencies from peripheral nervous system emergencies (e.g., Guillain-Barré), although some features overlap. Neurologic deficits are often severe and may quickly become irreversible, highlighting the importance of early diagnosis and treatment. Emergent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the entire spine is the imaging modality of choice for nontraumatic spinal cord emergencies and helps differentiate extramedullary compressive causes (e.g., epidural abscess, metastatic compression, epidural hematoma) from intramedullary etiologies (e.g., transverse myelitis, infectious myelitis, or spinal cord infarct). The MRI characteristics may give a clue to the diagnosis (e.g., flow voids dorsal to the cord in dural arteriovenous fistula). However, additional investigations (e.g., aquaporin-4-IgG) are often necessary to diagnose intramedullary etiologies and guide treatment. Emergency decompressive surgery is necessary for many extramedullary compressive causes, either alone or in combination with other treatments (e.g., radiation) and preoperative neurologic deficit is the best predictor of outcome.

  19. International spinal cord injury spinal column injury basic data set.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, M F; Wing, P C; Fehlings, M G; Vaccaro, A R; Itshayek, E; Biering-Sorensen, F; Noonan, V K

    2012-11-01

    Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. To describe the development of the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Column Injury Basic Data Set. International working group. A committee of experts was established to select and define data elements. The data set was then disseminated to the appropriate committees and organizations for comment. All suggested revisions were considered and the final version was endorsed by both the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS) and the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA). The data set consists of seven variables: (1) penetrating or blunt injury, (2) spinal column injury(ies), (3) single or multiple level spinal column injury(ies), (4) spinal column injury level number, (5) spinal column injury level, (6) disc and/or posterior ligamentous complex injury and (7) traumatic translation. All variables are coded using numbers or characters. For variables 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7, response categories are assigned a numeric point score. Variable 5 assigns both characters and numbers to identify level(s) of spinal injured vertebra(e). When there are several distinct and separate levels of injury, then each one is described using variables 4 through 7. The International SCI Spinal Column Injury Basic Data Set was developed to facilitate comparisons of spinal column injury data among studies, centres and countries. This data set is part of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Common Data Element project, and tools are now available to assist investigators in collecting this data in their SCI clinical studies.

  20. Critical ischemia time in a model of spinal cord section. A study performed on dogs

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Martinez, David; Rosales Corral, Sergio A.; Flores Soto, Mario E.; Velarde Silva, Gustavo; Portilla de Buen, Eliseo

    2006-01-01

    Vascular changes after acute spinal cord trauma are important factors that predispose quadriplegia, in most cases irreversible. Repair of the spinal blood flow helps the spinal cord recovery. The average time to arrive and perform surgery is 3 h in most cases. It is important to determine the critical ischemia time in order to offer better functional prognosis. A spinal cord section and vascular clamping of the spinal anterior artery at C5–C6 model was used to determine critical ischemia time. The objective was to establish a critical ischemia time in a model of acute spinal cord section. Four groups of dogs were used, anterior approach and vascular clamp of spinal anterior artery with 1, 2, 3, and 4 h of ischemia and posterior hemisection of spinal cord at C5–C6 was performed. Clinical evaluation was made during 12 weeks and morphological evaluation at the end of this period. We obtained a maximal neurological coordination at 23 days average. Two cases showed sequels of right upper limb paresis at 1 and 3 ischemia hours. There was nerve conduction delay of 56% at 3 h of ischemia. Morphological examination showed 25% of damaged area. The VIII and IX Rexed’s laminae were the most affected. The critical ischemia time was 3 h. Dogs with 4 h did not exhibit any recovery. PMID:17024402

  1. Spinal cord collaterals from axons of type II slowly adapting units in the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A G; Fyffe, R E; Rose, P K; Snow, P J

    1981-01-01

    1. The morphology of single axons, and their collaterals, of Type II slowly adapting mechanoreceptors situated at the claw bases was studied. Intra-axonal injections of horseradish peroxidase were made into the axons near their entrance to the lumbosacral spinal cord of anaesthetized cats. The morphology was revealed by subsequent histochemistry. 2. Nine Type II axons were stained. All but one bifurcated into ascending and descending branches upon entering the cord. Eighty-nine collaterals arose from the axons at a mean spacing of about 570 micrometers. 3. The collaterals formed plate-like arborizations usually about 500-600 micrometers wide in the transverse plane but only 100-300 micrometers thick in the longitudinal axis of the cord. The terminal arborizations were in laminae III-VI. 4. Synaptic boutons in laminae III and IV were more numerous than in laminae V and VI. Boutons en passant were common in laminae III and IV and arranged in series of three to six, whereas in deeper laminae only two or three boutons formed a series de passage. 5. The morphology of the slowly adapting Type II collateral is discussed. 6. Some general principles of the organization of cutaneous afferent fibres in the lumbosacral cord are presented. Images PLATE 1 PLATE 2 PMID:7320876

  2. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  3. Managing chronic pain with spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Lawrence J; Palmieri, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Since its introduction as a procedure of last resort in a terminally ill patient with intractable cancer-related pain, spinal cord stimulation has been used to effectively treat chronic pain of varied origins. Spinal cord stimulation is commonly used for control of pain secondary to failed back surgery syndrome and complex regional pain syndrome, as well as pain from angina pectoris, peripheral vascular disease, and other causes. By stimulating one or more electrodes implanted in the posterior epidural space, the patient feels paresthesias in their areas of pain, which reduces the level of pain. Pain is reduced without the side effects associated with analgesic medications. Patients have improved quality of life and improved function, with many returning to work. Spinal cord stimulation has been shown to be cost effective as compared with conservative management alone. There is strong evidence for efficacy and cost effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation in the treatment of pain associated with intractable angina, failed back surgery syndrome, and complex regional pain syndrome. In this article, we review the history and pathophysiology of spinal cord stimulation, and the evidence (or lack thereof) for efficacy in common clinical practice.

  4. Transcranial magnetic stimulation after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Awad, Basem I; Carmody, Margaret A; Zhang, Xiaoming; Lin, Vernon W; Steinmetz, Michael P

    2015-02-01

    To review the basic principles and techniques of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and provide information and evidence regarding its applications in spinal cord injury clinical rehabilitation. A review of the available current and historical literature regarding TMS was conducted, and a discussion of its potential use in spinal cord injury rehabilitation is presented. TMS provides reliable information about the functional integrity and conduction properties of the corticospinal tracts and motor control in the diagnostic and prognostic assessment of various neurological disorders. It allows one to follow the evolution of motor control and to evaluate the effects of different therapeutic procedures. Motor-evoked potentials can be useful in follow-up evaluation of motor function during treatment and rehabilitation, specifically in patients with spinal cord injury and stroke. Although studies regarding somatomotor functional recovery after spinal cord injury have shown promise, more trials are required to provide strong and substantial evidence. TMS is a promising noninvasive tool for the treatment of spasticity, neuropathic pain, and somatomotor deficit after spinal cord injury. Further investigation is needed to demonstrate whether different protocols and applications of stimulation, as well as alternative cortical sites of stimulation, may induce more pronounced and beneficial clinical effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Radiation tolerance of the cervical spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    McCunniff, A.J.; Liang, M.J.

    1989-03-01

    The incidence of permanent injury to the spinal cord as a complication of radiation therapy generally correlates positively with total radiation dosage. However, several reports in the literature have indicated that fraction size is also an important factor in the development or nondevelopment of late injuries in normal tissue. To determine the effect of fraction size on the incidence of radiation-induced spinal cord injuries, we reviewed 144 cases of head and neck cancer treated at our institution between 1971 and 1980 with radiation greater than 5600 cGy to a portion of the cervical spinal cord. Most of these patients received greater than or equal to 6000 cGy, with fraction sizes ranging from 133 cGy to 200 cGy. Fifty-three of the 144 patients have been followed up for 2 years or more. Nearly half of these (26 patients) received greater than 6000 cGy with fraction sizes of 133 cGy to 180 cGy. Only 1 of the 53 (1.9%) has sustained permanent spinal cord injury; 20 months after completion of radiation treatments he developed Brown-Sequard syndrome. Our experience suggests that radiation injuries to the spinal cord correlate not only with total radiation dosage, but also with fraction size; low fraction sizes appear to decrease the incidence of such injuries.

  6. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID

  7. Spinal neurons bursting in phase with fictive scratching are not related to spontaneous cord dorsum potentials.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, C A; Trejo, A; Linares, P; Delgado-Lezama, R; Jiménez-Estrada, I; Abyazova, L M; Baltina, T V; Manjarrez, E

    2014-04-25

    Spontaneous cord dorsum potentials (spontaneous CDPs) are produced by the activation of dorsal horn neurons distributed along the L4 to S1 spinal cord segments, in Rexed's laminae III-VI, in the same region in which there are interneurons rhythmically bursting during fictive scratching in cats. An interesting observation is that spontaneous CDPs are not rhythmically superimposed on the sinusoidal CDPs generated during fictive scratching episodes, thus suggesting that the interneurons producing both types of CDPs belong to different spinal circuits. In order to provide experimental data to support this hypothesis, we recorded unitary activity of neurons in the L6 spinal cord segment. We found that the neurons firing rhythmically during the sinusoidal CDPs associated with the extensor, flexor or intermediate phases of scratching were not synchronized with the spontaneous CDPs. Moreover, we found that the neurons firing during the spontaneous CDPs were not synchronized with the sinusoidal CDPs. These results suggest that the neurons involved in the occurrence of spontaneous CDPs are not part of the spinal cord central pattern generators (CPGs). This study will be relevant for understanding the relationships between the spinal cord neuronal populations firing spontaneously and the CPGs, in the intact and injured spinal cord. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Vocational Rehabilitation of Persons with Spinal Cord Injuries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poor, Charles R.

    1975-01-01

    Reviews historical development of organized vocational rehabilitation programming for the spinal cord injured in the United States. Significant factors that affect vocational rehabilitation outcomes with spinal cord injured persons are listed and discussed. (Author)

  9. How Are Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Children Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Are Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors Diagnosed in Children? Brain ... resonance angiography (MRA) or computerized tomographic angiography (CTA). Brain or spinal cord tumor biopsy Imaging tests such ...

  10. Characteristics and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord stab injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangyong; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Shudong; Lv, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Liu, Jiesheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The objective of the study was to compare the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with spinal cord stab injury to those with the more common spinal cord contusion injury. [Subjects] Of patients hospitalized in China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1994 to 2014, 40 of those having a spinal cord stab injury and 50 with spinal cord contusion were selected. [Methods] The data of all patients were analyzed retrospectively. The cases were evaluated by collecting admission and discharge ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) and ADL (activity of daily living) scores. [Results] After a comprehensive rehabilitation program, ASIA and ADL scores of patients having both spinal cord stab injury and spinal cord contusion significantly increase. However, the increases were noted to be higher in patients having a spinal cord stab injury than those having spinal cord contusion. [Conclusion] Comprehensive rehabilitation is effective both for patients having spinal cord stab injury and those with spinal cord contusion injury. However, the prognosis of patients having spinal cord stab injury is better than that of patients with spinal cord contusion.

  11. Characteristics and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord stab injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangyong; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Shudong; Lv, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Liu, Jiesheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of the study was to compare the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with spinal cord stab injury to those with the more common spinal cord contusion injury. [Subjects] Of patients hospitalized in China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1994 to 2014, 40 of those having a spinal cord stab injury and 50 with spinal cord contusion were selected. [Methods] The data of all patients were analyzed retrospectively. The cases were evaluated by collecting admission and discharge ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) and ADL (activity of daily living) scores. [Results] After a comprehensive rehabilitation program, ASIA and ADL scores of patients having both spinal cord stab injury and spinal cord contusion significantly increase. However, the increases were noted to be higher in patients having a spinal cord stab injury than those having spinal cord contusion. [Conclusion] Comprehensive rehabilitation is effective both for patients having spinal cord stab injury and those with spinal cord contusion injury. However, the prognosis of patients having spinal cord stab injury is better than that of patients with spinal cord contusion. PMID:26834329

  12. Spinal cord infarction: a rare cause of paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sonali; Naidoo, Khimara; Thomas, Peter

    2014-06-25

    Spinal cord infarction is rare and represents a diagnostic challenge for many physicians. There are few reported cases worldwide with a prevalence of 1.2% of all strokes. Circulation to the spinal cord is supplied by a rich anastomosis. The anterior spinal artery supplies the anterior two thirds of the spinal cord and infarction to this area is marked by paralysis, spinothalamic sensory deficit and loss of sphincter control depending on where the lesion is. Treatment of spinal cord infarction focuses on rehabilitation with diverse outcomes. This report presents a case of acute spinal cord infarction with acquisition of MRI to aid diagnosis.

  13. Causes of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background: Knowledge of the causes of spinal cord injury (SCI) and associated factors is critical in the development of successful prevention programs. Objective: This study analyzed data from the National SCI Database (NSCID) and National Shriners SCI Database (NSSCID) in the United States to examine specific etiologies of SCI by age, sex, race, ethnicity, day and month of injury, and neurologic outcomes. Methods: NSCID and NSSCID participants who had a traumatic SCI from 2005 to 2011 with known etiology were included in the analyses (N=7,834). Thirty-seven causes of injury documented in the databases were stratified by personal characteristics using descriptive analysis. Results: The most common causes of SCI were automobile crashes (31.5%) and falls (25.3%), followed by gunshot wounds (10.4%), motorcycle crashes (6.8%), diving incidents (4.7%), and medical/surgical complications (4.3%), which collectively accounted for 83.1% of total SCIs since 2005. Automobile crashes were the leading cause of SCI until age 45 years, whereas falls were the leading cause after age 45 years. Gunshot wounds, motorcycle crashes, and diving caused more SCIs in males than females. The major difference among race/ethnicity was in the proportion of gunshot wounds. More SCIs occurred during the weekends and warmer months, which seemed to parallel the increase of motorcycle- and diving-related SCIs. Level and completeness of injury are also associated with etiology of injury. Conclusions: The present findings suggest that prevention strategies should be tailored to the targeted population and major causes to have a meaningful impact on reducing the incidence of SCI. PMID:23678280

  14. Surgical Neurostimulation for Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chari, Aswin; Hentall, Ian D.; Papadopoulos, Marios C.; Pereira, Erlick A. C.

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological condition characterized by a constellation of symptoms including paralysis, paraesthesia, pain, cardiovascular, bladder, bowel and sexual dysfunction. Current treatment for SCI involves acute resuscitation, aggressive rehabilitation and symptomatic treatment for complications. Despite the progress in scientific understanding, regenerative therapies are lacking. In this review, we outline the current state and future potential of invasive and non-invasive neuromodulation strategies including deep brain stimulation (DBS), spinal cord stimulation (SCS), motor cortex stimulation (MCS), transcutaneous direct current stimulation (tDCS) and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in the context of SCI. We consider the ability of these therapies to address pain, sensorimotor symptoms and autonomic dysregulation associated with SCI. In addition to the potential to make important contributions to SCI treatment, neuromodulation has the added ability to contribute to our understanding of spinal cord neurobiology and the pathophysiology of SCI. PMID:28208601

  15. Intractable Pruritus After Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Deborah A; Jaffee, Kenneth M; Kundu, Anjana

    2009-01-01

    Background: This report describes a young woman with incomplete traumatic cervical spinal cord injury and intractable pruritus involving her dorsal forearm. Method: Case report. Findings: Anatomic distribution of the pruritus corresponded to the dermatomal distribution of her level of spinal cord injury and vertebral fusion. Symptoms were attributed to the spinal cord injury and possible cervical root injury. Pruritus was refractory to all treatments, including topical lidocaine, gabapentin, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, intravenous Bier block, stellate ganglion block, and acupuncture. Conclusions: Further understanding of neuropathic pruritus is needed. Diagnostic workup of intractable pruritus should include advanced imaging to detect ongoing nerve root compression. If diagnostic studies suggest radiculopathy, epidural steroid injection should be considered. Because the autonomic nervous system may be involved in complex chronic pain or pruritic syndromes, sympatholysis via such techniques as stellate ganglion block might be effective. PMID:19777867

  16. Intractable pruritus after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Crane, Deborah A; Jaffee, Kenneth M; Kundu, Anjana

    2009-01-01

    This report describes a young woman with incomplete traumatic cervical spinal cord injury and intractable pruritus involving her dorsal forearm. Case report. Anatomic distribution of the pruritus corresponded to the dermatomal distribution of her level of spinal cord injury and vertebral fusion. Symptoms were attributed to the spinal cord injury and possible cervical root injury. Pruritus was refractory to all treatments, including topical lidocaine, gabapentin, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, intravenous Bier block, stellate ganglion block, and acupuncture. Further understanding of neuropathic pruritus is needed. Diagnostic workup of intractable pruritus should include advanced imaging to detect ongoing nerve root compression. If diagnostic studies suggest radiculopathy, epidural steroid injection should be considered. Because the autonomic nervous system may be involved in complex chronic pain or pruritic syndromes, sympatholysis via such techniques as stellate ganglion block might be effective.

  17. Vascular anatomy of the spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Thron, A.K.

    1988-01-01

    The book summarizes the anatomic guidelines of external blood supply to the spinal cord. The basic principles of arterial supply and venous drainage are illustrated by explicit schemes for quick orientation. In the first part of the book, systematic radiologic-anatomic investigations of the superficial and deep vessels of all segments of the spinal cord are introduced. The microvascular morphology is portrayed by numerous microradiographic sections in all three dimensions without overshadowing. The three-dimensional representation of the vascular architecture illustrates elementary outlines and details of arterial territories, anastomotic cross-linking as well as the capillary system, particularly the hitherto unknown structure of the medullary venous system with its functionally important anastomoses and varying regional structures. These often now radiologic-anatomic findings are discussed as to their functional and pathophysiologic impact and constitute the basic on which to improve one's understanding of vascular syndromes of the spinal cord.

  18. Sexuality Counseling with Clients Who Have Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrow, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Examines effects of spinal cord injury on sexuality. Discusses areas of sexual concern. Provides suggestions for treating clients with spinal cord injuries experiencing sexual difficulties. Concludes that major goal in working with clients with spinal cord injuries who have sexual difficulties should be the facilitation of a creative and…

  19. Turkish Adaptation of Spinal Cord Independence Measure--Version III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesiktas, Nur; Paker, Nurdan; Bugdayci, Derya; Sencan, Sureyya; Karan, Ayse; Muslumanoglu, Lutfiye

    2012-01-01

    Various rating scales have been used to assess ability in individuals with spinal cord injury. There is no specific functional assessment scale for Turkish patients with spinal cord injury. The Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) is a specific test, which has become popular in the last decade. A study was conducted to validate and evaluate the…

  20. Turkish Adaptation of Spinal Cord Independence Measure--Version III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesiktas, Nur; Paker, Nurdan; Bugdayci, Derya; Sencan, Sureyya; Karan, Ayse; Muslumanoglu, Lutfiye

    2012-01-01

    Various rating scales have been used to assess ability in individuals with spinal cord injury. There is no specific functional assessment scale for Turkish patients with spinal cord injury. The Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) is a specific test, which has become popular in the last decade. A study was conducted to validate and evaluate the…

  1. Sexuality Counseling with Clients Who Have Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrow, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Examines effects of spinal cord injury on sexuality. Discusses areas of sexual concern. Provides suggestions for treating clients with spinal cord injuries experiencing sexual difficulties. Concludes that major goal in working with clients with spinal cord injuries who have sexual difficulties should be the facilitation of a creative and…

  2. Vascular Defects and Spinal Cord Hypoxia in Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Somers, Eilidh; Lees, Robert D; Hoban, Katie; Sleigh, James N; Zhou, Haiyan; Muntoni, Francesco; Talbot, Kevin; Gillingwater, Thomas H; Parson, Simon H

    2016-02-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a major inherited cause of infant death worldwide. It results from mutations in a single, ubiquitously expressed gene (SMN1), with loss of lower motor neurons being the primary pathological signature. Systemic defects have also been reported in SMA patients and animal models. We investigated whether defects associated with the vasculature contribute to motor neuron pathology in SMA. Development and integrity of the capillary bed was examined in skeletal muscle and spinal cord of SMA mice, and muscle biopsies from SMA patients and controls, using quantitative morphometric approaches on immunohistochemically labeled tissue. Pimonidazole hydrochloride-based assays were used to identify functional hypoxia. The capillary bed in muscle and spinal cord was normal in presymptomatic SMA mice (postnatal day 1), but failed to match subsequent postnatal development in control littermates. At mid- and late-symptomatic time points, the extent of the vascular architecture observed in two distinct mouse models of SMA was ∼50% of that observed in control animals. Skeletal muscle biopsies from human patients confirmed the presence of developmentally similar, significant vascular depletion in severe SMA. Hypovascularity in SMA mouse spinal cord was accompanied by significant functional hypoxia and defects in the blood-spinal cord barrier. Our results indicate that vascular defects are a major feature of severe forms of SMA, present in both mouse models and patients, resulting in functional hypoxia of motor neurons. Thus, abnormal vascular development and resulting hypoxia may contribute to the pathogenesis of SMA. © 2016 American Neurological Association.

  3. Serotonergic transmission after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Thomschewski, Aljoscha; Höller, Peter; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Golaszewski, Stefan; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-02-01

    Changes in descending serotonergic innervation of spinal neural activity have been implicated in symptoms of paralysis, spasticity, sensory disturbances and pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). Serotonergic neurons possess an enhanced ability to regenerate or sprout after many types of injury, including SCI. Current research suggests that serotonine (5-HT) release within the ventral horn of the spinal cord plays a critical role in motor function, and activation of 5-HT receptors mediates locomotor control. 5-HT originating from the brain stem inhibits sensory afferent transmission and associated spinal reflexes; by abolishing 5-HT innervation SCI leads to a disinhibition of sensory transmission. 5-HT denervation supersensitivity is one of the key mechanisms underlying the increased motoneuron excitability that occurs after SCI, and this hyperexcitability has been demonstrated to underlie the pathogenesis of spasticity after SCI. Moreover, emerging evidence implicates serotonergic descending facilitatory pathways from the brainstem to the spinal cord in the maintenance of pathologic pain. There are functional relevant connections between the descending serotonergic system from the rostral ventromedial medulla in the brainstem, the 5-HT receptors in the spinal dorsal horn, and the descending pain facilitation after tissue and nerve injury. This narrative review focussed on the most important studies that have investigated the above-mentioned effects of impaired 5-HT-transmission in humans after SCI. We also briefly discussed the promising therapeutical approaches with serotonergic drugs, monoclonal antibodies and intraspinal cell transplantation.

  4. Trigemino-cervical-spinal reflexes after traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Orioli, Andrea; Brigo, Francesco; Christova, Monica; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-05-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI) reorganization of spinal cord circuits occur both above and below the spinal lesion. These functional changes can be determined by assessing electrophysiological recording. We aimed at investigating the trigemino-cervical reflex (TCR) and trigemino-spinal reflex (TSR) responses after traumatic SCI. TCR and TSR were registered after stimulation of the infraorbital nerve from the sternocleidomastoid, splenius, deltoid, biceps and first dorsal interosseous muscles in 10 healthy subjects and 10 subjects with incomplete cervical SCI. In the control subjects reflex responses were registered from the sternocleidomastoid, and splenium muscles, while no responses were obtained from upper limb muscles. In contrast, smaller but clear short latency EMG potentials were recorded from deltoid and biceps muscles in about half of the SCI patients. Moreover, the amplitudes of the EMG responses in the neck muscles were significantly higher in patients than in control subjects. The reflex responses are likely to propagate up the brainstem and down the spinal cord along the reticulospinal tracts and the propriospinal system. Despite the loss of corticospinal axons, synaptic plasticity in pre-existing pathways and/or formation of new circuits through sprouting processes above the injury site may contribute to the findings of this preliminary study and may be involved in the functional recovery. Trigemino-cervical-spinal reflexes can be used to demonstrate and quantify plastic changes at brainstem and cervical level following SCI. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [The use micro-polarization in spinal cord lesions].

    PubMed

    Sheliakin, A M; Preobrazhenskaia, I G; Komantsev, V N; Makarovskiĭ, A N; Bogdanov, O V

    1998-01-01

    Transdermal micropolarization of the spinal cord was made in patients with consequences of the spinal cord injury or tuberculous spondylitis. Changes in clinical and electrophysiologic status were evaluated. It was found that local direct current through dermal electrodes promotes an improvement of both motor and autonomic functions in such patients. This corresponded to a positive dynamics both of the spinal cord state and cardiac activity. Possible mechanisms of influence of the direct current on the spinal cord as well as perspectives of application of micropolarization in spinal cord's damage are outlined.

  6. Diffuse distribution of sulforhodamine-labeled neurons during serotonin-evoked locomotion in the neonatal rat thoracolumbar spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Cina, C; Hochman, S

    2000-08-07

    The fluorescent dye sulforhodamine-101 undergoes synaptic activity-dependent endocytotic uptake and consequent retrograde transport in presynaptic neurons. We used sulforhodamine to identify thoracolumbar spinal premotor neurons (T11-L6) activated during serotonin (5-HT) -induced hindlimb locomotor-like activity in the in vitro neonatal rat spinal cord preparation. Sulforhodamine labeling required locomotor-like activity because few neurons were labeled unless bath applied 5-HT recruited the locomotor rhythm. In contrast, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA; 5 microM) profoundly increased spinal neuronal labeling irrespective of locomotor activity. The contribution of false-positive activity labeling during locomotion induced by application of NMDA with 5-HT (Kjaerulff et al. [1994] J Physiol (Lond). 478:265-273) necessitated the present re-mapping of sulforhodamine-labeled neurons. During 5-HT-evoked locomotion, the sulforhodamine-labeled neurons were diffusely scattered within the spinal cord with predominant labeling in lamina VII. Motor nuclei (lamina IX) and superficial laminae (I-II) were typically devoid of labeled cells in the isolated spinal cord. However, unilateral labeling of motoneurons was achieved when the ipsilateral hindlimb remained attached, suggesting that uptake in motoneurons requires an intact neuromuscular junction. The rostrocaudal incidence and distribution of labeled neurons was uniform in spinal segments L1-L5, with reduced numbers observed in thoracic and L6 spinal segments. Mean total cell labeling was less than 400 per spinal segment, suggesting recruitment from a very small fraction of the neurons contained within the spinal cord (calculated at < 0.1%). These results are consistent with the limited transfer of locomotor-related synaptic activity (Raastad et al. [1996] Neuron 17:729-738) and severe synaptic fatigue (Lev-Tov and Pinco [1992] J Physiol. 447:149-169; Pinco and Lev-Tov [1993] J Neurophysiol. 70:1151-1158; Fleoter and Lev-Tov [1993

  7. GFAP and Fos immunoreactivity in lumbo-sacral spinal cord and medulla oblongata after chronic colonic inflammation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yi-Ning; Luo, Jin-Yan; Rao, Zhi-Ren; Lan, Li; Duan, Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the response of astrocytes and neurons in rat lumbo-sacral spinal cord and medulla oblongata induced by chronic colonic inflammation, and the relationship between them. METHODS: Thirty-three male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into two groups: experimental group (n = 17), colonic inflammation was induced by intra-luminal administration of trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS); control group (n = 16), saline was administered intra-luminally. After 3, 7, 14, and 28 d of administration, the lumbo-sacral spinal cord and medulla oblongata were removed and processed for anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), Fos and GFAP/Fos immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: Activated astrocytes positive for GFAP were mainly distributed in the superficial laminae (laminae I-II) of dorsal horn, intermediolateral nucleus (laminae V), posterior commissural nucleus (laminae X) and anterolateral nucleus (laminae IX). Fos-IR (Fos-immunoreactive) neurons were mainly distributed in the deeper laminae of the spinal cord (laminae III-IV, V-VI). In the medulla oblongata, both GFAP-IR astrocytes and Fos-IR neurons were mainly distributed in the medullary visceral zone (MVZ). The density of GFAP in the spinal cord of experimental rats was significantly higher after 3, 7, and 14 d of TNBS administration compared with the controls (50.4±16.8, 29.2±6.5, 24.1±5.6, P<0.05). The density of GFAP in MVZ was significantly higher after 3 d of TNBS administration (34.3±2.5, P<0.05). After 28 d of TNBS administration, the density of GFAP in the spinal cord and MVZ decreased and became comparable to that of the controls (18.0±4.9, 14.6±6.4, P>0.05). CONCLUSION: Astrocytes in spinal cord and medulla oblongata can be activated by colonic inflammation. The activated astrocytes are closely related to Fos-IR neurons. With the recovery of colonic inflammation, the activity of astrocytes in the spinal cord and medulla oblongata is reduced. PMID:16097052

  8. The morphology of hair follicle afferent fibre collaterals in the spinal cord of the cat.

    PubMed

    Brown, A G; Rose, P K; Snow, P J

    1977-11-01

    1. The enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was injected into single axons that innervated hair follicle receptors to study the morphology of their collaterals in the dorsal horn of the cord. The axons were impaled near the dorsal root entrance zone in the lumbosacral spinal cord of anaesthetized cats and HRP injected by passing current through the intra-axonal micro-electrode. The morphology was revealed by subsequent histochemistry.2. Thirteen hair-follicle afferent fibres were stained including six that innervated tylotrichs (type T hair follicle afferent units) and one that innervated guard hairs (type G unit). The remaining six axons were not classified according to hair type, but, on the basis of their axonal conduction velocities, would have been either type G or T.3. Eleven axons could be traced back into the dorsal roots. Eight of these, upon entering the cord, turned and ran towards the brain. They did not divide into rostral and caudal branches. Three of the eleven did divide and gave rise to both rostral and caudal branches.4. Sixty-three collaterals were given off the thirteen stained axons. All well-filled collaterals had a strikingly similar morphology. They descended through laminae I-III of the dorsal horn into the deeper parts of lamina IV or into lamina V, before turning and ascending back into superficial lamina IV and lamina III where they branched profusely to give rise to their terminal arborizations. Terminal boutons, most commonly of the ;en passant' type, were numerous in lamina III, but were also seen in the dorsal part of lamina IV and in ventral lamina II. None were observed in dorsal lamina II or near the junction of the grey and white matter (lamina I) or in lamina V.5. The terminal arborizations of collaterals from a single hair follicle afferent fibre were in line with one another in the longitudinal axis of the cord. In the better-stained preparations the terminal arborizations of adjacent collaterals from a single axon formed a

  9. Employment Outcomes Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, S.; Murphy, G. S.; Athanasou, J. A.; Hickey, L.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 83 Australian adults with spinal cord injuries found that at least 56% had worked at some time post-injury and those who were working when surveyed had done so for an average of close to 10 years. Clerical, office, and administrative occupations proved to be the most suitable. (Author/CR)

  10. Strategies for neuroprotection following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Tederko, Piotr; Krasuski, Marek; Kiwerski, Jerzy; Nyka, Izabela; Białoszewski, Dariusz

    2009-01-01

    Progress in neuropathology has made possible the description of local responses of neural tissue in early stages after traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). The recent identification of multiple factors responsible for secondary spinal cord damage and for potential regenerative abilities has not resulted in the development of a standard for neuroprotective therapy in SCI patients. The paper reviews current knowledge concerning the sequence of biochemical events in the injured spinal cord and gives an overview of therapeutic possibilities for preventing the spread of secondary injury. The literature survey has led to the following conclusions: 1. The primary zone of traumatic damage enlarges due to local vascular disturbances, hypoxia, and the resulting inflammation. 2. Inflammation in the region of secondary injury, apart from having a destructive impact, is the source of substances which may induce neural tissue repair. 3. The administration of methylprednisolone and surgical decompression of the spinal cord within several hours after SCI improves functional and neurological outcomes in patients with incomplete neurological deficits. Currently there is no sufficient scientific evidence to support the safety and efficacy of other neuroprotective methods in humans.

  11. Anorgasmia in anterior spinal cord syndrome.

    PubMed

    Berić, A; Light, J K

    1993-05-01

    Three male and two female patients with anorgasmia and dissociated sensory loss due to an anterior spinal cord syndrome are described. Clinical, neurophysiological and quantitative sensory evaluation revealed preservation of the large fibre dorsal column functions from the lumbosacral segments with concomitant severe dysfunction or absence of the small fibre neospinothalamic mediated functions. These findings indicate a role for the spinothalamic system in orgasm.

  12. Spinal cord compression due to vertebral hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Aksu, Gorkem; Fayda, Merdan; Saynak, Mert; Karadeniz, Ahmet

    2008-02-01

    This article presents a case of multiple vertebral hemangiomas in a 58-year-old man with pain in the dorsal region and bilateral progressive foot numbness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed multiple vertebral hemangiomas. One hemangioma at the T7 level demonstrated epidural extension, causing spinal cord compression. After treatment with radiotherapy, the patient's symptoms improved significantly.

  13. Employment Outcomes Following Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engel, S.; Murphy, G. S.; Athanasou, J. A.; Hickey, L.

    1998-01-01

    A study of 83 Australian adults with spinal cord injuries found that at least 56% had worked at some time post-injury and those who were working when surveyed had done so for an average of close to 10 years. Clerical, office, and administrative occupations proved to be the most suitable. (Author/CR)

  14. Accommodating Workers with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowler, Denetta; Batiste, Linda; Whidden, Eddie

    1998-01-01

    Examination of over 1,000 calls to the Job Accommodation Network involving workers with spinal cord injury identified the nature of the industry, job, career progression, and accessibility solutions. The number of calls increased dramatically after passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act. (SK)

  15. Simplified spinal cord phantom for evaluation of SQUID magnetospinography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Y.; Oyama, D.; Somchai, N.; Kawabata, S.; Uehara, G.

    2014-05-01

    Spinal cord functional imaging by magnetospinography (MSG) is a noninvasive diagnostic method for spinal cord diseases. However, the accuracy and spatial resolution of lesion localization by MSG have barely been evaluated in detail so far. We developed a simplified spinal cord phantom for MSG evaluation. The spinal cord phantom is composed of a cylindrical vessel filled with saline water, which acts as a model of a neck. A set of modeled vertebrae is arranged in the cylindrical vessel, which has a neural current model made from catheter electrodes. The neural current model emulates the current distribution around the activated site along the axon of the spinal cord nerve. Our MSG system was used to observe the magnetic field from the phantom; a quadrupole-like pattern of the magnetic field distribution, which is a typical distribution pattern for spinal cord magnetic fields, was successfully reproduced by the phantom. Hence, the developed spinal cord phantom can be used to evaluate MSG source analysis methods.

  16. Comparative analysis of NADPH-diaphorase positive neurons in the rat, rabbit and pheasant thoracic spinal cord. A histochemical study.

    PubMed

    Kluchová, D; Rybárová, S; Miklosová, M; Lovásová, K; Schmidtová, K; Dorko, F

    2001-01-01

    The distribution of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d) activity was investigated and compared in the rat, rabbit and pheasant thoracic spinal cord. The investigation of all spinal cord regions (laminae) in three experimental species revealed marked differences in the distribution of NADPH-d activity. Cross sectional analysis of the spinal cord of the rat, rabbit and pheasant confirmed differences in the shape of the gray matter in all examined species. More detailed investigation of Rexed's laminas showed similar distribution of NADPH-d activity in the spinal cord of the rat and rabbit, which were different when compared with the spinal cord of the pheasant. Ventral horn of the rat and rabbit showed no labelling whereas in pheasant this area possessed a number of scattered, intensively stained neurons. In the location of autonomic preganglionic neurons, differences were found as well. In the rat there was seen a number of densely packed, clearly dark blue coloured neurons. Similarly, these neurons were present in the rabbit spinal cord but they were less numerous. No staining was found in this region of pheasant. Pericentral area (lamina X) and intermediate zone (laminaVII) revealed the presence of NADPH-d positive neurons in all examined species although they differed in number and shape of their bodies. The dorsal horn showed the presence of NADPH-d staining in all three animals but its distribution was different in medio-lateral direction. It can be suggested that observed differencies in the presence and distribution of NADPH-d activity across the examined species may reflect different fylogenetic development.

  17. Functional MRI of the thoracic spinal cord during vibration sensation.

    PubMed

    Kornelsen, Jennifer; Smith, Stephen D; McIver, Theresa A; Sboto-Frankenstein, Uta; Latta, Peter; Tomanek, Boguslaw

    2013-04-01

    To demonstrate that it is possible to acquire accurate functional magnetic resonance images from thoracic spinal cord neurons. The lower thoracic spinal dermatomes (T7-T11) on the right side of the body were mechanically stimulated by vibration for 15 participants. Neuronal responses to vibration sensation were measured in the thoracic spinal cord using a HASTE sequence on a 3 Tesla MRI system. Signal increases were observed in the corresponding lower thoracic spinal cord segments ipsilateral to the side of stimulation in the dorsal aspect of the spinal cord. This is the first study to provide proof of principle that functional imaging of the entire thoracic spinal cord is possible, by detecting neuronal activity in the thoracic spinal cord during sensory stimulation using spinal fMRI. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Metastatic carcinoid tumour with spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Scott, Si; Antwi-Yeboah, Y; Bucur, Sd

    2012-07-01

    Carcinoid tumours are rare with an incidence of 5.25/100,000. They predominantly originate in the gastrointestinal tract (50-60%) or bronchopulmonary system (25-30%). Common sites of metastasis are lymph nodes, liver, lungs and bone. Spinal metastasis are rare, but has been reported in patients with symptoms of spinal cord compression including neurological deficits. We report a rare case of carcinoid metastasis with spinal cord compression, in a 63-year-old man, presenting with a one-year history of back pain without any neurological symptoms. The patient underwent a two-level decompressive laminectomy of T10 and T11 as well as piecemeal tumour resection. Post-operatively the patient made a good recovery without complications.

  19. Metastatic carcinoid tumour with spinal cord compression

    PubMed Central

    Scott, SI; Antwi-Yeboah, Y; Bucur, SD

    2012-01-01

    Carcinoid tumours are rare with an incidence of 5.25/100,000. They predominantly originate in the gastrointestinal tract (50-60%) or bronchopulmonary system (25-30%). Common sites of metastasis are lymph nodes, liver, lungs and bone. Spinal metastasis are rare, but has been reported in patients with symptoms of spinal cord compression including neurological deficits. We report a rare case of carcinoid metastasis with spinal cord compression, in a 63-year-old man, presenting with a one-year history of back pain without any neurological symptoms. The patient underwent a two-level decompressive laminectomy of T10 and T11 as well as piecemeal tumour resection. Post-operatively the patient made a good recovery without complications. PMID:24960730

  20. Spinal cord neuron inputs to the cuneate nucleus that partially survive dorsal column lesions: A pathway that could contribute to recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chia-Chi; DiCarlo, Gabriella E; Gharbawie, Omar A; Qi, Hui-Xin; Kaas, Jon H

    2015-10-01

    Dorsal column lesions at a high cervical level deprive the cuneate nucleus and much of the somatosensory system of its major cutaneous inputs. Over weeks of recovery, much of the hand representations in the contralateral cortex are reactivated. One possibility for such cortical reactivation by hand afferents is that preserved second-order spinal cord neurons reach the cuneate nucleus through pathways that circumvent the dorsal column lesions, contributing to cortical reactivation in an increasingly effective manner over time. To evaluate this possibility, we first injected anatomical tracers into the cuneate nucleus and plotted the distributions of labeled spinal cord neurons and fibers in control monkeys. Large numbers of neurons in the dorsal horn of the cervical spinal cord were labeled, especially ipsilaterally in lamina IV. Labeled fibers were distributed in the cuneate fasciculus and lateral funiculus. In three other squirrel monkeys, unilateral dorsal column lesions were placed at the cervical segment 4 level and tracers were injected into the ipsilateral cuneate nucleus. Two weeks later, a largely unresponsive hand representation in contralateral somatosensory cortex confirmed the effectiveness of the dorsal column lesion. However, tracer injections in the cuneate nucleus labeled only about 5% of the normal number of dorsal horn neurons, mainly in lamina IV, below the level of lesions. Our results revealed a small second-order pathway to the cuneate nucleus that survives high cervical dorsal column lesions by traveling in the lateral funiculus. This could be important for cortical reactivation by hand afferents, and recovery of hand use.

  1. Spinal cord neuron inputs to the cuneate nucleus that partially survive dorsal column lesions: a pathway that could contribute to recovery after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Chia-Chi; DiCarlo, Gabriella E.; Gharbawie, Omar A.; Qi, Hui-Xin; Kaas, Jon H.

    2015-01-01

    Dorsal column lesions at a high cervical level deprive the cuneate nucleus and much of the somatosensory system of its major cutaneous inputs. Over weeks of recovery, much of the hand representations in the contralateral cortex are reactivated. One possibility for such cortical reactivation by hand afferents is that preserved second-order spinal cord neurons reach the cuneate nucleus through pathways that circumvent the dorsal column lesions, contributing to cortical reactivation in an increasingly effective manner over time. To evaluate this possibility, we first injected anatomical tracers into the cuneate nucleus and plotted the distributions of labeled spinal cord neurons and fibers in control monkeys. Large numbers of neurons in the dorsal horn of the cervical spinal cord were labeled, especially unilaterally in lamina IV. Labeled fibers were distributed in the cuneate fasciculus and lateral funiculus. In three other squirrel monkeys, unilateral dorsal column lesions were placed at the cervical segment 4 (C4) level and tracers were injected into the ipsilateral cuneate nucleus. Two weeks later, a largely unresponsive hand representation in contralateral somatosensory cortex confirmed the effectiveness of the dorsal column lesion. However, tracer injections in the cuneate nucleus labeled only about 5% of the normal number of dorsal horn neurons, mainly in lamina IV, below the level of lesions. Our results revealed a small second-order pathway to the cuneate nucleus that survives high cervical dorsal column lesions by traveling in the lateral funiculus. This could be important for cortical reactivation by hand afferents, and recovery of hand use. PMID:25845707

  2. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... information from a specific dermatome is carried by sensory nerve fibers to the spinal nerve root of a specific ... the back of the thigh, is carried by sensory nerve fibers to the 2nd sacral vertebra (S2) nerve root. ...

  3. Multiple sclerosis of the spinal cord: Magnetic resonance appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Thielen, K.R.; Miller, G.M.

    1996-05-01

    To determine the MR appearance of spinal cord multiple sclerosis (MS) plaques in patients presenting with myclopathy by using a high-field (1.5 T) imager. We studied 119 patients who underwent high-field (1.5 T) MR studies of the spinal cord for evaluation of myelopathy. All 119 patients were thought to have possible findings of spinal cord MS at the time of the MRI interpretation. Sixty-four plaques were studied in 47 patients with clinically definite MS and adequate quality MRI. Of these patients 68% had a single spinal cord plaque, 19% had two plaques, and 13% had three or more plaques. Sixty-two percent of the plaques occurred in the cervical spinal cord and most frequently involved the posterior (41%) and lateral (25%) aspects of the spinal cord. None of the 64 lesions involved the entire thickness of the spinal cord. The lesion length varied from 2 to 60 mm, with 84% of the lesions <15 mm in length. The spinal cord diameter was unchanged in 84% of plaques, enlarged at the level of the lesion in 14%, and atrophic in 2%. Just over half (55%) of the plaques enhanced with intravenously administered gadolinium. Of the patients who received synchronous head and spinal cord examinations on the same day, 24% had normal findings on the MR study of the head. Follow-up spinal cord studies were available in nine patients. New lesions developed in two patients, while previously described lesions resolved. In three patients only new lesions developed. In four patients no change occurred in the existing number of cord plaques. Spinal cord demyelinating plaques present as well-circumscribed foci of increased T2 signal that asymmetrically involve the spinal cord parenchyma. Knowledge of their usual appearance may prevent unnecessary biopsy. An MR examination of the head may confirm the imaging suggestion of spinal cord demyelinating disease, because up to 76% of patients have abnormal intracranial findings. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  4. Dopamine is produced in the rat spinal cord and regulates micturition reflex after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shaoping; Carson, David M; Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C; Houlé, John D; Tom, Veronica J

    2016-11-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the mammalian central nervous system are thought to be restricted to the brain. DA-mediated regulation of urinary activity is considered to occur through an interaction between midbrain DA neurons and the pontine micturition center. Here we show that DA is produced in the rat spinal cord and modulates the bladder reflex. We observed numerous tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)(+) neurons in the autonomic nuclei and superficial dorsal horn in L6-S3 spinal segments. These neurons are dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH)(-) and some contain detectable dopamine decarboxylase (DDC), suggesting their capacity to produce DA. Interestingly, following a complete thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) to interrupt supraspinal projections, more TH(+) neurons emerged in the lumbosacral spinal cord, coincident with a sustained, low level of DA expression there and a partially recovered micturition reflex. Non-selective blockade of spinal DA receptors reduced bladder activity whereas activation of spinal D2-like receptors increased bladder activity and facilitated voiding. Additionally, depletion of lumbosacral TH(+) neurons with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) decreased bladder non-voiding contractions and voiding efficiency. Furthermore, injecting the transsynaptic neuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) into the bladder detrusor labeled TH(+) cells in the lumbosacral cord, confirming their involvement in spinal micturition reflex circuits. These results illustrate that DA is synthesized in the rat spinal cord; plasticity of lumbosacral TH(+) neurons following SCI may contribute to DA expression and modulate the spinal bladder reflex. Thus, spinally-derived DA and receptors could be a novel therapeutic target to improve micturition recovery after SCI.

  5. Dopamine is produced in the rat spinal cord and regulates micturition reflex after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shaoping; Carson, David M.; Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C.; Houlé, John D.; Tom, Veronica J.

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the mammalian central nervous system are thought to be restricted to the brain. DA-mediated regulation of urinary activity is considered to occur through an interaction between midbrain DA neurons and the pontine micturition center. Here we show that DA is produced in the rat spinal cord and modulates the bladder reflex. We observed numerous tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)+ neurons in the autonomic nuclei and superficial dorsal horn in L6–S3 spinal segments. These neurons are dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH)− and some contain detectable dopamine decarboxylase (DDC), suggesting their capacity to produce DA. Interestingly, following a complete thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) to interrupt supraspinal projections, more TH+ neurons emerged in the lumbosacral spinal cord, coincident with a sustained, low level of DA expression there and a partially recovered micturition reflex. Non-selective blockade of spinal DA receptors reduced bladder activity whereas activation of spinal D2-like receptors increased bladder activity and facilitated voiding. Additionally, depletion of lumbosacral TH+ neurons with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) decreased bladder non-voiding contractions and voiding efficiency. Furthermore, injecting the transsynaptic neuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) into the bladder detrusor labeled TH+ cells in the lumbosacral cord, confirming their involvement in spinal micturition reflex circuits. These results illustrate that DA is synthesized in the rat spinal cord; plasticity of lumbosacral TH+ neurons following SCI may contribute to DA expression and modulate the spinal bladder reflex. Thus, spinally-derived DA and receptors could be a novel therapeutic target to improve micturition recovery after SCI. PMID:26655672

  6. The cross-talk between autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum stress in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yulong; Wu, Yanqing; Liu, Yanlong; He, Zili; Zou, Shuang; Wang, Qingqing; Li, Jiawei; Zheng, Zengming; Chen, Jian; Wu, Fenzan; Gong, Fanhua; Zhang, Hongyu; Xu, Huazi; Xiao, Jian

    2017-01-03

    Spinal cord injury induces the disruption of blood-spinal cord barrier and triggers a complex array of tissue responses, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy. However, the roles of ER stress and autophagy in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption have not been discussed in acute spinal cord trauma. In the present study, we respectively detected the roles of ER stress and autophagy in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after spinal cord injury. Besides, we also detected the cross-talking between autophagy and ER stress both in vivo and in vitro. ER stress inhibitor, 4-phenylbutyric acid, and autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine, were respectively or combinedly administrated in the model of acute spinal cord injury rats. At day 1 after spinal cord injury, blood-spinal cord barrier was disrupted and activation of ER stress and autophagy were involved in the rat model of trauma. Inhibition of ER stress by treating with 4-phenylbutyric acid decreased blood-spinal cord barrier permeability, prevented the loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins and reduced autophagy activation after spinal cord injury. On the contrary, inhibition of autophagy by treating with chloroquine exacerbated blood-spinal cord barrier permeability, promoted the loss of TJ proteins and enhanced ER stress after spinal cord injury. When 4-phenylbutyric acid and chloroquine were combinedly administrated in spinal cord injury rats, chloroquine abolished the blood-spinal cord barrier protective effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid by exacerbating ER stress after spinal cord injury, indicating that the cross-talking between autophagy and ER stress may play a central role on blood-spinal cord barrier integrity in acute spinal cord injury. The present study illustrates that ER stress induced by spinal cord injury plays a detrimental role on blood-spinal cord barrier integrity, on the contrary, autophagy induced by spinal cord injury plays a furthersome role in blood-spinal cord barrier integrity in

  7. The cross-talk between autophagy and endoplasmic reticulum stress in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    He, Zili; Zou, Shuang; Wang, Qingqing; Li, Jiawei; Zheng, Zengming; Chen, Jian; Wu, Fenzan; Gong, Fanhua; Zhang, Hongyu; Xu, Huazi; Xiao, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury induces the disruption of blood-spinal cord barrier and triggers a complex array of tissue responses, including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy. However, the roles of ER stress and autophagy in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption have not been discussed in acute spinal cord trauma. In the present study, we respectively detected the roles of ER stress and autophagy in blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after spinal cord injury. Besides, we also detected the cross-talking between autophagy and ER stress both in vivo and in vitro. ER stress inhibitor, 4-phenylbutyric acid, and autophagy inhibitor, chloroquine, were respectively or combinedly administrated in the model of acute spinal cord injury rats. At day 1 after spinal cord injury, blood-spinal cord barrier was disrupted and activation of ER stress and autophagy were involved in the rat model of trauma. Inhibition of ER stress by treating with 4-phenylbutyric acid decreased blood-spinal cord barrier permeability, prevented the loss of tight junction (TJ) proteins and reduced autophagy activation after spinal cord injury. On the contrary, inhibition of autophagy by treating with chloroquine exacerbated blood-spinal cord barrier permeability, promoted the loss of TJ proteins and enhanced ER stress after spinal cord injury. When 4-phenylbutyric acid and chloroquine were combinedly administrated in spinal cord injury rats, chloroquine abolished the blood-spinal cord barrier protective effect of 4-phenylbutyric acid by exacerbating ER stress after spinal cord injury, indicating that the cross-talking between autophagy and ER stress may play a central role on blood-spinal cord barrier integrity in acute spinal cord injury. The present study illustrates that ER stress induced by spinal cord injury plays a detrimental role on blood-spinal cord barrier integrity, on the contrary, autophagy induced by spinal cord injury plays a furthersome role in blood-spinal cord barrier integrity in

  8. Spinal cord grey matter segmentation challenge.

    PubMed

    Prados, Ferran; Ashburner, John; Blaiotta, Claudia; Brosch, Tom; Carballido-Gamio, Julio; Cardoso, Manuel Jorge; Conrad, Benjamin N; Datta, Esha; Dávid, Gergely; Leener, Benjamin De; Dupont, Sara M; Freund, Patrick; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M Gandini; Grussu, Francesco; Henry, Roland; Landman, Bennett A; Ljungberg, Emil; Lyttle, Bailey; Ourselin, Sebastien; Papinutto, Nico; Saporito, Salvatore; Schlaeger, Regina; Smith, Seth A; Summers, Paul; Tam, Roger; Yiannakas, Marios C; Zhu, Alyssa; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-03-07

    An important image processing step in spinal cord magnetic resonance imaging is the ability to reliably and accurately segment grey and white matter for tissue specific analysis. There are several semi- or fully-automated segmentation methods for cervical cord cross-sectional area measurement with an excellent performance close or equal to the manual segmentation. However, grey matter segmentation is still challenging due to small cross-sectional size and shape, and active research is being conducted by several groups around the world in this field. Therefore a grey matter spinal cord segmentation challenge was organised to test different capabilities of various methods using the same multi-centre and multi-vendor dataset acquired with distinct 3D gradient-echo sequences. This challenge aimed to characterize the state-of-the-art in the field as well as identifying new opportunities for future improvements. Six different spinal cord grey matter segmentation methods developed independently by various research groups across the world and their performance were compared to manual segmentation outcomes, the present gold-standard. All algorithms provided good overall results for detecting the grey matter butterfly, albeit with variable performance in certain quality-of-segmentation metrics. The data have been made publicly available and the challenge web site remains open to new submissions. No modifications were introduced to any of the presented methods as a result of this challenge for the purposes of this publication.

  9. Update on traumatic acute spinal cord injury. Part 2.

    PubMed

    Mourelo Fariña, M; Salvador de la Barrera, S; Montoto Marqués, A; Ferreiro Velasco, M E; Galeiras Vázquez, R

    2017-02-01

    The aim of treatment in acute traumatic spinal cord injury is to preserve residual neurologic function, avoid secondary injury, and restore spinal alignment and stability. In this second part of the review, we describe the management of spinal cord injury focusing on issues related to short-term respiratory management, where the preservation of diaphragmatic function is a priority, with prediction of the duration of mechanical ventilation and the need for tracheostomy. Surgical assessment of spinal injuries based on updated criteria is discussed, taking into account that although the type of intervention depends on the surgical team, nowadays treatment should afford early spinal decompression and stabilization. Within a comprehensive strategy in spinal cord injury, it is essential to identify and properly treat patient anxiety and pain associated to spinal cord injury, as well as to prevent and ensure the early diagnosis of complications secondary to spinal cord injury (thromboembolic disease, gastrointestinal and urinary disorders, pressure ulcers).

  10. Projections from the lateral vestibular nucleus to the spinal cord in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huazheng; Bácskai, Timea; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2014-05-01

    The present study investigated the projections from the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVe) to the spinal cord using retrograde and anterograde tracers. Retrogradely labeled neurons were found after fluoro-gold injections into both the cervical and lumbar cord, with a smaller number of labeled neurons seen after lumbar cord injections. Labeled neurons in the LVe were found in clusters at caudal levels of the nucleus, and a small gap separated these clusters from labeled neurons in the spinal vestibular nucleus (SpVe). In the anterograde study, BDA-labeled fiber tracts were found in both the ventral and ventrolateral funiculi on the ipsilateral side. These fibers terminated in laminae 6-9. Some fibers were continuous with boutons in contact with motor neurons in both the medial and lateral motor neuron columns. In the lumbar and sacral segments, some collaterals from the ipsilateral vestibulospinal tracts were found on the contralateral side, and these fibers mainly terminated in laminae 6-8. The present study reveals for the first time the fiber terminations of the lateral vestibular nucleus in the mouse spinal cord and therefore enhances future functional studies of the vestibulospinal system.

  11. Projections from Pacinian corpuscles and rapidly adapting mechanoreceptors of glabrous skin to the cat's spinal cord.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A G; Fyffe, R E; Noble, R

    1980-01-01

    1. Single axons innervating Pacinian corpuscles and rapidly adapting mechanoreceptors of the foot and toe pads were injected with horseradish peroxidase near their entrance to the lumbosacral spinal cord in cats anaesthetized with chloralose and paralysed with gallamine triethiodide. Subsequent histochemistry revealed the morphology of the intra-spinal parts of the axons. 2. All Pacinian corpuscle axons that could be traced into the dorsal root bifurcated upon entering the cord into ascending and descending branches. All Pacinian corpuscle axons gave rise to collaterals that entered the dorsal horn. 3. The collaterals of Pacinian corpuscle afferent fibres had a distinctive morphology. They provided two regions of termination, a larger dorsal region in laminae III and IV and a smaller ventral region in laminae V and VI. Within the dorsal region the terminal axons ran mainly in the longitudinal axis of the cord and carried many boutons en passant. Within the ventral region the axons ran dorso-ventrally in the transverse plane of the cord and although carrying some boutons en passant also gave rise to clusters of boutons. 4. The collaterals of rapidly adapting afferent fibres had a distinctive morphology different from that of the Pacinian corpuscle afferent fibre collaterals. The termination region of rapidly adapting afferents was limited almost exclusively to lamina III, with only slight extension into lamina IV. Boutons were mainly of the en passant type and terminal axons were generally orientated within the longitudinal axis of the cord. 5. The morphology of the afferent fibre collaterals is discussed in relation to the physiology of the dorsal horn. Images Plate 1 Plate 2 PMID:7205669

  12. Gene therapy approaches for spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Corinne

    As the biomedical engineering field expands, combination technologies are demonstrating enormous potential for treating human disease. In particular, intersections between the rapidly developing fields of gene therapy and tissue engineering hold promise to achieve tissue regeneration. Nonviral gene therapy uses plasmid DNA to deliver therapeutic proteins in vivo for extended periods of time. Tissue engineering employs biomedical materials, such as polymers, to support the regrowth of injured tissue. In this thesis, a combination strategy to deliver genes and drugs in a polymeric scaffold was applied to a spinal cord injury model. In order to develop a platform technology to treat spinal cord injury, several nonviral gene delivery systems and polymeric scaffolds were evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Nonviral vector trafficking was evaluated in primary neuronal culture to develop an understanding of the barriers to gene transfer in neurons and their supporting glia. Although the most efficient gene carrier in vitro differed from the optimal gene carrier in vivo, confocal and electron microscopy of these nonviral vectors provided insights into the interaction of these vectors with the nucleus. A novel pathway for delivering nanoparticles into the nuclei of neurons and Schwann cells via vesicle trafficking was observed in this study. Reporter gene expression levels were evaluated after direct and remote delivery to the spinal cord, and the optimal nonviral vector, dose, and delivery strategy were applied to deliver the gene encoding the basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) to the spinal cord. An injectable and biocompatible gel, composed of the amphiphillic polymer poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-PCL-PEG) was evaluated as a drug and gene delivery system in vitro, and combined with the optimized nonviral gene delivery system to treat spinal cord injury. Plasmid DNA encoding the bFGF gene and the therapeutic NEP1--40 peptide

  13. A new minimally invasive experimental spinal cord injury model in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Baydin, A; Cokluk, C; Aydin, K

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to evaluate the effectivity of epidural microballoon inflation into the unroofed spinal column for the creation of a new experimental spinal cord injury model in rabbits. 10 New Zealand white rabbits were used for this study. Before operation and after anasthesia with 50 mg/kg ketamine and 8 mg/kg xylazine, spinal evoked potentials (SEP) were recorded in all rabbits. A midline skin incision was done on the lomber skin at the level of L1-L4. Paravertebral muscles were dissected bilaterally. A microhemilaminotomy was done in the right L3 lamina close to the midline by using Midas-rex micro-diamond drill instruments. The ligamentum flavum was opened and removed with microscissors. A microballoon was inserted into the spinal column between the bone and dura mater to the level of T12. The microballoon was inflated by using a pressure- and volume-controlled microballoon inflation device. Pre-injury and post-injury SEPs were recorded. The microballoon was deflated 15 minutes later and removed completely from the epidural space. 24 hours later the SEP study was repeated. Following microballoon inflation the SEP waves dropped to the basal level. All rabbits were paraplegic after the operation. In conclusion, this experimental study demonstrated that the microballoon inflation technique is a very successful method for the evaluation of spinal cord injury in rabbits. Unroofing of the spinal column is extremely important because decompression may be an effective treatment in spinal cord injury. Also the traumatic effect of aneurysm clips represents a different type of injury to the spinal cord. This new model may be used in experimental studies of spinal cord injury in rabbits.

  14. Neurocontrol of Movement in Humans With Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Dimitrijevic, Milan R; Danner, Simon M; Mayr, Winfried

    2015-10-01

    In this review of neurocontrol of movement after spinal cord injury, we discuss neurophysiological evidences of conducting and processing mechanisms of the spinal cord. We illustrate that external afferent inputs to the spinal cord below the level of the lesion can modify, initiate, and maintain execution of movement in absence or partial presence of brain motor control after chronic spinal cord injury. We review significant differences between spinal reflex activity elicited by single and repetitive stimulation. The spinal cord can respond with sensitization, habituation, and dis-habituation to regular repetitive stimulation. Therefore, repetitive spinal cord reflex activity can contribute to the functional configuration of the spinal network. Moreover, testing spinal reflex activity in individuals with motor complete spinal cord injury provided evidences for subclinical residual brain influence, suggesting the existence of axons traversing the injury site and influencing the activities below the level of lesion. Thus, there are two motor control models of chronic spinal cord injury in humans: "discomplete" and "reduced and altered volitional motor control." We outline accomplishments in modification and initiation of altered neurocontrol in chronic spinal cord injury people with epidural and functional electrical stimulation. By nonpatterned electrical stimulation of lumbar posterior roots, it is possible to evoke bilateral extension as well as rhythmic motor outputs. Epidural stimulation during treadmill stepping shows increased and/or modified motor activity. Finally, volitional efforts can alter epidurally induced rhythmic activities in incomplete spinal cord injury. Overall, we highlight that upper motor neuron paralysis does not entail complete absence of connectivity between cortex, brain stem, and spinal motor cells, but there can be altered anatomy and corresponding neurophysiological characteristics. With specific input to the spinal cord below the level

  15. Critical care of traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jia, Xiaofeng; Kowalski, Robert G; Sciubba, Daniel M; Geocadin, Romergryko G

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 11 000 people suffer traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) in the United States, each year. TSCI incidences vary from 13.1 to 52.2 per million people and the mortality rates ranged from 3.1 to 17.5 per million people. This review examines the critical care of TSCI. The discussion will focus on primary and secondary mechanisms of injury, spine stabilization and immobilization, surgery, intensive care management, airway and respiratory management, cardiovascular complication management, venous thromboembolism, nutrition and glucose control, infection management, pressure ulcers and early rehabilitation, pharmacologic cord protection, and evolving treatment options including the use of pluripotent stem cells and hypothermia.

  16. Is hydrocephalus after spinal cord injury really caused by the injured spinal cord? Two case reports and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Chrastina, J; Novák, Z; Feitová, V

    Posttraumatic hydrocephalus caused by cerebrospinal fluid circulation disturbances frequently complicates the clinical course and treatment after craniocerebral injury. Hydrocephalus complicating spinal cord injury is only exceptionally reported. The paper presents two cases of complete cervical spinal cord injury with subsequent development of hydrocephalus. The analysis of both cases and literature data confirmed the dominant role of non-spinal factors in the development of hydrocephalus after spinal cord injury. Despite the exceptional occurrence of hydrocephalus after spinal cord injury, this diagnosis should be considered in cases of delayed deterioration of a patient with cervical spinal cord injury, particularly if cerebrospinal fluid space abnormalities and posttraumatic subarachnoid haemorrhage are present. spinal cord injury hydrocephalus subarachnoid hemorrhage Blakes pouch cyst neuroendoscopy.

  17. Hodgkin disease with spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vineeta; Srivastava, Arvind; Bhatia, Baldev

    2009-10-01

    Hodgkin disease is a nodal disease. Spinal cord or root compression is a rare complication and usually seen in the setting of progressive, advanced disease. We report 2 cases of Hodgkin disease in pediatric patients who presented with neurologic signs. One patient had paravertebral masses and involvement of thoracic vertebrae, which was initially misdiagnosed as spinal tuberculosis. The second patient who presented with paraplegia and bladder and bowel involvement had an epidural mass with collapse of thoracic vertebra. Lymph node biopsy revealed Hodgkin disease, mixed cellularity in both the cases. Both were treated with chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy.

  18. Spinal cord testing: auditing for quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Marr, J A; Reid, B

    1991-04-01

    A quality assurance audit of spinal cord testing as documented by staff nurses was carried out. Twenty-five patient records were examined for accuracy of documented testing and compared to assessments performed by three investigators. A pilot study established interrater reliability of a tool that was designed especially for this study. Results indicated staff nurses failed to meet pre-established 100% standard in all categories of testing when compared with investigator's findings. Possible reasons for this disparity are discussed as well as indications for modifications in the spinal testing record, teaching program and preset standards.

  19. SCT: Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data.

    PubMed

    De Leener, Benjamin; Lévy, Simon; Dupont, Sara M; Fonov, Vladimir S; Stikov, Nikola; Louis Collins, D; Callot, Virginie; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-01-15

    For the past 25 years, the field of neuroimaging has witnessed the development of several software packages for processing multi-parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI) to study the brain. These software packages are now routinely used by researchers and clinicians, and have contributed to important breakthroughs for the understanding of brain anatomy and function. However, no software package exists to process mpMRI data of the spinal cord. Despite the numerous clinical needs for such advanced mpMRI protocols (multiple sclerosis, spinal cord injury, cervical spondylotic myelopathy, etc.), researchers have been developing specific tools that, while necessary, do not provide an integrative framework that is compatible with most usages and that is capable of reaching the community at large. This hinders cross-validation and the possibility to perform multi-center studies. In this study we introduce the Spinal Cord Toolbox (SCT), a comprehensive software dedicated to the processing of spinal cord MRI data. SCT builds on previously-validated methods and includes state-of-the-art MRI templates and atlases of the spinal cord, algorithms to segment and register new data to the templates, and motion correction methods for diffusion and functional time series. SCT is tailored towards standardization and automation of the processing pipeline, versatility, modularity, and it follows guidelines of software development and distribution. Preliminary applications of SCT cover a variety of studies, from cross-sectional area measures in large databases of patients, to the precise quantification of mpMRI metrics in specific spinal pathways. We anticipate that SCT will bring together the spinal cord neuroimaging community by establishing standard templates and analysis procedures.

  20. Terminations of reticulospinal fibers originating from the gigantocellular reticular formation in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Liang, Huazheng; Watson, Charles; Paxinos, George

    2016-04-01

    The present study investigated the projections of the gigantocellular reticular nucleus (Gi) and its neighbors--the dorsal paragigantocellular reticular nucleus (DPGi), the alpha/ventral part of the gigantocellular reticular nucleus (GiA/V), and the lateral paragigantocellular reticular nucleus (LPGi)--to the mouse spinal cord by injecting the anterograde tracer biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) into the Gi, DPGi, GiA/GiV, and LPGi. The Gi projected to the entire spinal cord bilaterally with an ipsilateral predominance. Its fibers traveled in both the ventral and lateral funiculi with a greater presence in the ventral funiculus. As the fibers descended in the spinal cord, their density in the lateral funiculus increased. The terminals were present mainly in laminae 7-10 with a dorsolateral expansion caudally. In the lumbar and sacral cord, a considerable number of terminals were also present in laminae 5 and 6. Contralateral fibers shared a similar pattern to their ipsilateral counterparts and some fibers were seen to cross the midline. Fibers arising from the DPGi were similarly distributed in the spinal cord except that there was no dorsolateral expansion in the lumbar and sacral segments and there were fewer fiber terminals. Fibers arising from GiA/V predominantly traveled in the ventral and lateral funiculi ipsilaterally. Ipsilaterally, the density of fibers in the ventral funiculus decreased along the rostrocaudal axis, whereas the density of fibers in the lateral funiculus increased. They terminate mainly in the medial ventral horn and lamina 10 with a smaller number of fibers in the dorsal horn. Fibers arising from the LPGi traveled in both the ventral and lateral funiculi and the density of these fibers in the ventral and lateral funiculi decreased dramatically in the lumbar and sacral segments. Their terminals were present in the ventral horn with a large portion of them terminating in the motor neuron columns. The present study is the first demonstration

  1. Nitrergic neurons in the spinal cord of the bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Bombardi, Cristiano; Grandis, Annamaria; Gardini, Anna; Cozzi, Bruno

    2013-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a freely diffusible gaseous neurotransmitter generated by a selected population of neurons and acts as a paracrine molecule in the nervous system. NO is synthesized from l-arginine by means of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), an enzyme requiring nicotine adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) as cofactor. In this study, we used histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques to investigate the distribution of NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d) and nNOS in the spinal cord of the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus). Cells with a fusiform-shaped somata were numerous in the laminae I and II. The intermediolateral horn showed darkly-stained cells with a multipolar morphology. Neurons with a multipolar or fusiform morphology were observed in the ventral horn. Multipolar and fusiform neurons were the most common cell types in lamina X. Nitrergic fibers were numerous especially in the dorsal and intermediolateral horns. The presence of nitrergic cells and fibers in different laminae of the spinal cord suggests that NO may be involved in spinal sensory and visceral circuitries, and potentially contribute to the regulation of the complex retia mirabilia.

  2. Noninvasive Spinal Cord Stimulation: Technical Aspects and Therapeutic Applications.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Taylor, Alexandra; Thomschewski, Aljoscha; Orioli, Andrea; Frey, Vanessa; Trinka, Eugen; Brigo, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Electrical and magnetic trans-spinal stimulation can be used to increase the motor output of multiple spinal segments and modulate cortico-spinal excitability. The application of direct current through the scalp as well as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation are known to influence brain excitability, and hence can also modulate other central nervous system structures, including spinal cord. This study aimed to evaluate the effects and the therapeutic usefulness of these noninvasive neuromodulatory techniques in healthy subjects and in the neurorehabilitation of patients with spinal cord disorders, as well as to discuss the possible mechanisms of action. A comprehensive review that summarizes previous studies using noninvasive spinal cord stimulation is lacking. PubMed (MEDLINE) and EMBASE were systematically searched to identify the most relevant published studies. We performed here an extensive review in this field. By decreasing the spinal reflex excitability, electrical and magnetic trans-spinal stimulation could be helpful in normalizing reflex hyperexcitability and treating hypertonia in subjects with lesions to upper motor neurons. Transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation, based on applying direct current through the skin, influences the ascending and descending spinal pathways as well as spinal reflex excitability, and there is increasing evidence that it also can induce prolonged functional neuroplastic changes. When delivered repetitively, magnetic stimulation could also modulate spinal cord functions; however, at present only a few studies have documented spastic-reducing effects induced by repetitive spinal magnetic stimulation. Moreover, paired peripheral and transcranial stimulation can be used to target the spinal cord and may have potential for neuromodulation in spinal cord-injured subjects. Noninvasive electrical and magnetic spinal stimulation may provide reliable means to characterize important neurophysiologic and

  3. Identifying functional populations among the interneurons in laminae I-III of the spinal dorsal horn

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The spinal dorsal horn receives input from primary afferent axons, which terminate in a modality-specific fashion in different laminae. The incoming somatosensory information is processed through complex synaptic circuits involving excitatory and inhibitory interneurons, before being transmitted to the brain via projection neurons for conscious perception. The dorsal horn is important, firstly because changes in this region contribute to chronic pain states, and secondly because it contains potential targets for the development of new treatments for pain. However, at present, we have only a limited understanding of the neuronal circuitry within this region, and this is largely because of the difficulty in defining functional populations among the excitatory and inhibitory interneurons. The recent discovery of specific neurochemically defined interneuron populations, together with the development of molecular genetic techniques for altering neuronal function in vivo, are resulting in a dramatic improvement in our understanding of somatosensory processing at the spinal level. PMID:28326935

  4. Repair therapies in spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Tederko, Piotr; Krasuski, Marek; Kiwerski, Jerzy; Nyka, Izabela; Białoszewski, Dariusz

    2009-01-01

    Spinal cord repair therapies (SCRT) are experimental treatments which are attracting a growing interest among both spinal cord injury sufferers and their families as well as physicians and physiotherapists. Basing on current professional literature, this article presents the most important SCRT strategies. The majority of currently developed SCRTs are at the stage of experimental in vitro or animal studies. Few of these studies are in the early clinical trial stage or are being offered as non-standard commercial health care services. Basing on a review of the literature, it can be stated that currently there are few studies which meet the criterion of reliability, and their results make possible an objective assessment of the safety and efficacy of SCRT. Available study results are insufficient to confirm the advisability of widespread application of these methods.

  5. Hydrogels in Spinal Cord Injury Repair Strategies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays there are at present no efficient therapies for spinal cord injury (SCI), and new approaches have to be proposed. Recently, a new regenerative medicine strategy has been suggested using smart biomaterials able to carry and deliver cells and/or drugs in the damaged spinal cord. Among the wide field of emerging materials, research has been focused on hydrogels, three-dimensional polymeric networks able to swell and absorb a large amount of water. The present paper intends to give an overview of a wide range of natural, synthetic, and composite hydrogels with particular efforts for the ones studied in the last five years. Here, different hydrogel applications are underlined, together with their different nature, in order to have a clearer view of what is happening in one of the most sparkling fields of regenerative medicine. PMID:22816020

  6. Neural plasticity after spinal cord injury☆

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Yang, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Lianying; Wang, Chunxin; Yang, Maoguang

    2012-01-01

    Plasticity changes of uninjured nerves can result in a novel neural circuit after spinal cord injury, which can restore sensory and motor functions to different degrees. Although processes of neural plasticity have been studied, the mechanism and treatment to effectively improve neural plasticity changes remain controversial. The present study reviewed studies regarding plasticity of the central nervous system and methods for promoting plasticity to improve repair of injured central nerves. The results showed that synaptic reorganization, axonal sprouting, and neurogenesis are critical factors for neural circuit reconstruction. Directed functional exercise, neurotrophic factor and transplantation of nerve-derived and non-nerve-derived tissues and cells can effectively ameliorate functional disturbances caused by spinal cord injury and improve quality of life for patients. PMID:25774179

  7. Therapeutic Antibodies for Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dan-Yang; Zhao, Wei-Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a long-lasting damage in the spinal cord that leads to paraparesis, paraplegia, quadriplegia and other lifetime disabilities. The underlying mechanisms responsible for the failure of axonal regeneration after SCI remain only partially understood. Although a spectrum of medical treatments has been made available for this disease, the therapeutic effects remain disappointing. The emergence of antibody treatment has paved a new pathway for the management of SCI. In this current review, we summarized the application of antibodies in SCI in studies of myelin repair, neuroprotection, axon outgrowth, and anti-immune reaction. In the meantime, the combination treatment of the antibody with other reagents or stem cell transplant was also reviewed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Cardiac dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Iacobini, MA; Stoian, R; Neascu, C; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze cardiac dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Cardiac dysfunctions are common complications following SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. We reviewed epidemiology of cardiac disturbances after SCI, and neuroanatomy and pathophysiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic. SCI causes disruption of descendent pathways from central control centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating into intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 spinal cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant cardiac dysfunction. Impairment of autonomic nervous control system, mostly in patients with cervical or high thoracic SCI, causes cardiac dysrrhythmias, especially bradycardia and, rarely, cardiac arrest, or tachyarrhytmias and hypotension. Specific complication dependent on the period of time after trauma like spinal shock and autonomic dysreflexia are also reviewed. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe bradycardia and hypotension. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Besides all this, additional cardiac complications, such as cardiac deconditioning and coronary heart disease may also occur. Proper prophylaxis, including nonpharmacologic and pharmacological strategies and cardiac rehabilitation diminish occurrence of the cardiac dysfunction following

  9. Calbindin-D28k immunoreactivity in the mice thoracic spinal cord after space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porseva, Valentina V.; Shilkin, Valentin V.; Krasnov, Igor B.; Masliukov, Petr M.

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the work was to analyse changes in the location and morphological characteristics of calbindin (CB)-immunoreactive (IR) neurons of the thoracic spinal cord of C57BL/6N male mice after completion of a 30-day space flight on board the BION-M1 biosatellite (Russia, 2013). Space flight induced multidirectional changes of the number and morphological parameters of CB-positive neurons. The number of IR neurons increased in laminae I (from 10 to 17 neurons per section), II (from 42 to 67 cells per section) and IX (from two neurons per segment to two neurons per section), but CB disappeared in neurons of lamina VIII. Weightlessness did not affect the number of CB-IR neurons in laminae III-V and VII, including preganglionic sympathetic neurons. The cross-sectional area of CB-IR neurons decreased in lamina II and VII (group of partition cells) and increased in laminae III-V and IX. After a space flight, few very large neurons with long dendrites appeared in lamina IV. The results obtained give evidence about substantial changes in the calcium buffer system and imbalance of different groups of CB-IR neurons due to reduction of afferent information under microgravity.

  10. Shoulder biomechanics and muscle plasticity: implications in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Thay Q; McMahon, Patrick J

    2002-10-01

    After spinal cord injury, excessive burden falls on the upper extremity, especially the shoulder. Overall, 51% of persons with spinal cord injury have shoulder problems. Common shoulder problems in persons with spinal cord injury begin with muscle imbalance that can lead to glenohumeral instability, impingement disease, rotator cuff tears, and subsequent degenerative joint disease. These problems can be attributed to the functional demands placed on the shoulder that are specific to patients with spinal cord injury, including overhead activities, wheelchair use, and transfers. Despite preventive exercises, shoulder problems in persons with spinal cord injury remain a significant problem, causing pain and functional limitations. The biomechanics of the shoulder for persons with spinal cord injury resulting from changes in muscle plasticity will be elucidated. Specifically, the effects of scapular protraction that can result from muscle imbalance, the age-dependent properties of the anterior band of the inferior glenohumeral ligament, and the influence of the dynamic restraints around the shoulder will be addressed.

  11. Update on traumatic acute spinal cord injury. Part 1.

    PubMed

    Galeiras Vázquez, R; Ferreiro Velasco, M E; Mourelo Fariña, M; Montoto Marqués, A; Salvador de la Barrera, S

    2017-02-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury requires a multidisciplinary approach both for specialized treatment of the acute phase and for dealing with the secondary complications. A suspicion or diagnosis of spinal cord injury is the first step for a correct management. A review is made of the prehospital management and characteristics of the acute phase of spinal cord injury. Respiratory monitoring for early selective intubation, proper identification and treatment of neurogenic shock are essential for the prevention of secondary spinal cord injury. The use of corticosteroids is currently not a standard practice in neuroprotective treatment, and hemodynamic monitoring and early surgical decompression constitute the cornerstones of adequate management. Traumatic spinal cord injury usually occurs as part of multiple trauma, and this can make diagnosis difficult. Neurological examination and correct selection of radiological exams prevent delayed diagnosis of spinal cord injuries, and help to establish the prognosis.

  12. Anorgasmia in anterior spinal cord syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Berić, A; Light, J K

    1993-01-01

    Three male and two female patients with anorgasmia and dissociated sensory loss due to an anterior spinal cord syndrome are described. Clinical, neurophysiological and quantitative sensory evaluation revealed preservation of the large fibre dorsal column functions from the lumbosacral segments with concomitant severe dysfunction or absence of the small fibre neospinothalamic mediated functions. These findings indicate a role for the spinothalamic system in orgasm. PMID:8505649

  13. Alleviating Autonomic Dysreflexia after Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    SPN innervation. We have previously shown that we are able to promote robust functional axonal regeneration using a combination of transplantation and...spinal cord injury, transplantation , axon regeneration   2   ACCOMPLISHMENTS Through 9-30-2014 through 9-30-2015, we focused our efforts on...pressure and heart rate in conscious animals. At least one week later, we assay blood pressure and heart rate in these animals at rest and after

  14. Tracking Changes following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Curt, Armin; Friston, Karl; Thompson, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is often disabling and recovery of function is limited. As a consequence of damage, both spinal cord and brain undergo anatomical and functional changes. Besides clinical measures of recovery, biomarkers that can detect early anatomical and functional changes might be useful in determining clinical outcome—during the course of rehabilitation and recovery—as well as furnishing a tool to evaluate novel treatment interventions and their mechanisms of action. Recent evidence suggests an interesting three-way relationship between neurological deficit and changes in the spinal cord and of the brain and that, importantly, noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging techniques, both structural and functional, provide a sensitive tool to lay out these interactions. This review describes recent findings from multimodal imaging studies of remote anatomical changes (i.e., beyond the lesion site), cortical reorganization, and their relationship to clinical disability. These developments in this field may improve our understanding of effects on the nervous system that are attributable to the injury itself and will allow their distinction from changes that result from rehabilitation (i.e., functional retraining) and from interventions affecting the nervous system directly (i.e., neuroprotection or regeneration). PMID:22730072

  15. Spinal cord evolution in early Homo.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marc R; Haeusler, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The discovery at Nariokotome of the Homo erectus skeleton KNM-WT 15000, with a narrow spinal canal, seemed to show that this relatively large-brained hominin retained the primitive spinal cord size of African apes and that brain size expansion preceded postcranial neurological evolution. Here we compare the size and shape of the KNM-WT 15000 spinal canal with modern and fossil taxa including H. erectus from Dmanisi, Homo antecessor, the European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, and Pan troglodytes. In terms of shape and absolute and relative size of the spinal canal, we find all of the Dmanisi and most of the vertebrae of KNM-WT 15000 are within the human range of variation except for the C7, T2, and T3 of KNM-WT 15000, which are constricted, suggesting spinal stenosis. While additional fossils might definitively indicate whether H. erectus had evolved a human-like enlarged spinal canal, the evidence from the Dmanisi spinal canal and the unaffected levels of KNM-WT 15000 show that unlike Australopithecus, H. erectus had a spinal canal size and shape equivalent to that of modern humans. Subadult status is unlikely to affect our results, as spinal canal growth is complete in both individuals. We contest the notion that vertebrae yield information about respiratory control or language evolution, but suggest that, like H. antecessor and European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, early Homo possessed a postcranial neurological endowment roughly commensurate to modern humans, with implications for neurological, structural, and vascular improvements over Pan and Australopithecus.

  16. Optical monitoring of spinal cord hemodynamics, a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shadgan, Babak; Kwon, Brian K.; Streijger, Femke; Manouchehri, Neda; So, Kitty; Shortt, Katelyn; Cripton, Peter A.; Macnab, Andrew

    2017-02-01

    Background: After an acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), the spinal cord is subjected to ischemia, hypoxia, and increased hydrostatic pressure which exacerbate further secondary damage and neuronal deficit. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the use of near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) for non-invasive and real-time monitoring of these changes within the injured spinal cord in an animal model. NIRS is a non-invasive optical technique that utilizes light in the near infrared spectrum to monitor changes in the concentration of tissue chromophores from which alterations in tissues oxygenation and perfusion can be inferred in real time. Methods: A custom-made miniaturized NIRS sensor was developed to monitor spinal cord hemodynamics and oxygenation noninvasively and in real time simultaneously with invasive, intraparenchymal monitoring in a pig model of SCI. The spinal cord around the T10 injury site was instrumented with intraparenchymal probes inserted directly into the spinal cord to measure oxygen pressure, blood flow, and hydrostatic pressure, and the same region of the spinal cord was monitored with the custom-designed extradural NIRS probe. We investigated how well the extradural NIRS probe detected intraparenchymal changes adjacent to the injury site after alterations in systemic blood pressure, global hypoxia, and traumatic injury generated by a weight-drop contusion. Results: The NIRS sensor successfully identified periods of systemic hypoxia, re-ventilation and changes in spinal cord perfusion and oxygenation during alterations of mean arterial pressure and following spinal cord injury. Conclusion: This pilot study indicates that extradural NIRS monitoring of the spinal cord is feasible as a non-invasive optical method to identify changes in spinal cord hemodynamics and oxygenation in real time. Further development of this technique would allow clinicians to monitor real-time physiologic changes within the injured spinal cord during the

  17. Review of Epidural Spinal Cord Stimulation for Augmenting Cough after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hachmann, Jan T.; Calvert, Jonathan S.; Grahn, Peter J.; Drubach, Dina I.; Lee, Kendall H.; Lavrov, Igor A.

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) remains a debilitating condition for which there is no cure. In addition to loss of somatic sensorimotor functions, SCI is also commonly associated with impairment of autonomic function. Importantly, cough dysfunction due to paralysis of expiratory muscles in combination with respiratory insufficiency can render affected individuals vulnerable to respiratory morbidity. Failure to clear sputum can aggravate both risk for and severity of respiratory infections, accounting for frequent hospitalizations and even mortality. Recently, epidural stimulation of the lower thoracic spinal cord has been investigated as novel means for restoring cough by evoking expiratory muscle contraction to generate large positive airway pressures and expulsive air flow. This review article discusses available preclinical and clinical evidence, current challenges and clinical potential of lower thoracic spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for restoring cough in individuals with SCI. PMID:28400726

  18. Review of Epidural Spinal Cord Stimulation for Augmenting Cough after Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Hachmann, Jan T; Calvert, Jonathan S; Grahn, Peter J; Drubach, Dina I; Lee, Kendall H; Lavrov, Igor A

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) remains a debilitating condition for which there is no cure. In addition to loss of somatic sensorimotor functions, SCI is also commonly associated with impairment of autonomic function. Importantly, cough dysfunction due to paralysis of expiratory muscles in combination with respiratory insufficiency can render affected individuals vulnerable to respiratory morbidity. Failure to clear sputum can aggravate both risk for and severity of respiratory infections, accounting for frequent hospitalizations and even mortality. Recently, epidural stimulation of the lower thoracic spinal cord has been investigated as novel means for restoring cough by evoking expiratory muscle contraction to generate large positive airway pressures and expulsive air flow. This review article discusses available preclinical and clinical evidence, current challenges and clinical potential of lower thoracic spinal cord stimulation (SCS) for restoring cough in individuals with SCI.

  19. What Are the Key Statistics about Brain and Spinal Cord Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Adults What Are the Key Statistics About Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors? The American Cancer Society’s ... Spinal Cord Tumor Research and Treatment? More In Brain And Spinal Cord Tumors In Adults About Brain ...

  20. Tert-butylhydroquinone protects the spinal cord against inflammatory response produced by spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wei; Ni, Hongbin; Hou, Xiaoshan; Ming, Xing; Wang, Jing; Yuan, Baoyu; Zhu, Tiansheng; Jiang, Jian; Wang, Handong; Liang, Weibang

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidant transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) has been shown in our previous studies to play an important role in protection against spinal cord injury (SCI) induced inflammatory response. The objective of this study was to test whether tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ), a novel Nrf2 activator, can protect the spinal cord against SCI-induced inflammatory damage. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to laminectomy at T8-T9 and compression with a vascular clip. Three groups were analyzed: a sham group, a SCI group, and a SCI+rhEPO group (n=16 per group). We measured Nrf2 and nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) binding activities by an electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). We also measured the concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); we also measured hindlimb locomotion function by the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) rating, spinal cord edema by wet/dry weight method, and apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) analysis. The results showed that the induction of the Nrf2 activity by tBHQ markedly decreased NF-κB activation and inflammatory cytokines production in the injured spinal cord. Administration of tBHQ also significantly attenuated SCI induced hindlimb locomotion deficits, spinal cord edema, and apoptosis. To conclude, pre-treatment with tBHQ could attenuate the spinal cord inflammatory response after SCI.

  1. Congenital malformations of the spinal cord without early symptoms.

    PubMed

    Moffie, D; Stefanko, S Z; Makkink, B

    1986-01-01

    Description of 11 patients with congenital malformations of the spinal cord. Six of them were males, five females and the age varied from 7 to 70 years. Most of these cases produced clinical neurological signs indicating spinal cord disease in later life during an intercurrent disease. It was thought that changes in the bloodvessels and/or perfusion of the area of the spinal cord malformation was the ultimate cause of the neurological symptoms. An exact explanation of the origin of these developmental disturbances of the spinal cord remains unknown. Different hypotheses proposed in the literature, concerning these malformations, are not satisfactory.

  2. Effect of hypovolemia on traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    de Cassia Sampaio, O; Defino, H L A; Del Bel Belluz Guimarães, E A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Experimentally evaluate the effect of hypovolemia in acute traumatic spinal cord injury. Methods: Twenty adult male Wistar rats were submitted to traumatic spinal cord injury through spinal cord contusion by direct impact. Ten animals were subjected to bleeding of 20% of their estimated blood to simulate a hypovolemic condition after spinal cord contusion and 10 animals were used as control. The animals were evaluated before, 1, 3, 7 and 14 days after the production of the spinal cord injury through behavioral tests (inclined plane test and motor assessment). Results: The spinal cord contusion associated with hypovolemia had a negative influence on functional outcomes of the spinal cord injury. The animals submitted to hypovolemia after spinal cord contusion had lower scores in behavioral tests (inclined plane test and motor assessment), presenting a slower recovery of the motor function. Conclusion: In the experimental model used, the group of animals with hypovolemia after traumatic spinal cord injury had slower recovery and lower intensity in behavioral tests. PMID:26951739

  3. The spinal cord: a review of functional neuroanatomy.

    PubMed

    Bican, Orhan; Minagar, Alireza; Pruitt, Amy A

    2013-02-01

    The spinal cord controls the voluntary muscles of the trunk and limbs and receives sensory input from these areas. It extends from the medulla oblongata to the lower border of the first lumbar vertebra. A basic knowledge of spinal cord anatomy is essential for interpretation of clinical signs and symptoms and for understanding of pathologic processes involving the spinal cord. In this article, anatomic structures are correlated with relevant clinical signs and symptoms and a step-wise approach to spinal cord diagnosis is outlined.

  4. Subacute combined degeneration mimicking traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Paul, Ian; Reichard, R Ross

    2009-03-01

    Subacute combined degeneration (SCD) of the spinal cord is the most common neurologic manifestation of vitamin B12 (cobalamin) deficiency and is usually secondary to autoimmune gastritis, but may also be seen in malnutrition syndromes such as chronic alcoholism, strict vegetarianism, gastrectomy, and also in nitrous oxide abuse. Although traumatic spinal cord injury is routinely encountered in the medical examiner's office, medical causes of spinal cord abnormalities such as SCD should be considered in the appropriate clinical setting. We report a case of alcohol-associated SCD mimicking traumatic spinal cord injury.

  5. Optical Monitoring and Detection of Spinal Cord Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Rickson C.; D’Souza, Angela; Bilfinger, Thomas V.; Galler, Robert M.; Emanuel, Asher; Schenkel, Steven S.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Floyd, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord ischemia can lead to paralysis or paraparesis, but if detected early it may be amenable to treatment. Current methods use evoked potentials for detection of spinal cord ischemia, a decades old technology whose warning signs are indirect and significantly delayed from the onset of ischemia. Here we introduce and demonstrate a prototype fiber optic device that directly measures spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. This technical advance in neurological monitoring promises a new standard of care for detection of spinal cord ischemia and the opportunity for early intervention. We demonstrate the probe in an adult Dorset sheep model. Both open and percutaneous approaches were evaluated during pharmacologic, physiological, and mechanical interventions designed to induce variations in spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. The induced variations were rapidly and reproducibly detected, demonstrating direct measurement of spinal cord ischemia in real-time. In the future, this form of hemodynamic spinal cord diagnosis could significantly improve monitoring and management in a broad range of patients, including those undergoing thoracic and abdominal aortic revascularization, spine stabilization procedures for scoliosis and trauma, spinal cord tumor resection, and those requiring management of spinal cord injury in intensive care settings. PMID:24358279

  6. Vascular dysfunctions following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Popa, F; Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Sandu, AM; Popescu, M; Burnei, G; Strambu, V; Sinescu, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the vascular dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Vascular dysfunctions are common complications of SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. Neuroanatomy and physiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic, is reviewed. SCI implies disruption of descendent pathways from central centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating in intermediolateral nuclei of T1–L2 cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant vascular dysfunction. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and it is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe arterial hypotension and bradycardia. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life–threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5–T6). Arterial hypotension with orthostatic hypotension occurs in both acute and chronic phases. The etiology is multifactorial. We described a few factors influencing the orthostatic hypotension occurrence in SCI: sympathetic nervous system dysfunction, low plasma catecholamine levels, rennin–angiotensin–aldosterone activity, peripheral alpha–adrenoceptor hyperresponsiveness, impaired function of baroreceptors, hyponatremia and low plasmatic volume, cardiovascular deconditioning, morphologic changes in sympathetic neurons, plasticity within spinal circuits, and motor deficit leading to loss of skeletal muscle pumping activity. Additional associated cardiovascular concerns in SCI, such as

  7. Vascular dysfunctions following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Popa, Constantin; Popa, Florian; Grigorean, Valentin Titus; Onose, Gelu; Sandu, Aurelia Mihaela; Popescu, Mihai; Burnei, Gheorghe; Strambu, Victor; Sinescu, Crina

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the vascular dysfunctions occurring after spinal cord injury (SCI). Vascular dysfunctions are common complications of SCI. Cardiovascular disturbances are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in both acute and chronic stages of SCI. Neuroanatomy and physiology of autonomic nervous system, sympathetic and parasympathetic, is reviewed. SCI implies disruption of descendent pathways from central centers to spinal sympathetic neurons, originating in intermediolateral nuclei of T1-L2 cord segments. Loss of supraspinal control over sympathetic nervous system results in reduced overall sympathetic activity below the level of injury and unopposed parasympathetic outflow through intact vagal nerve. SCI associates significant vascular dysfunction. Spinal shock occurs during the acute phase following SCI and it is a transitory suspension of function and reflexes below the level of the injury. Neurogenic shock, part of spinal shock, consists of severe arterial hypotension and bradycardia. Autonomic dysreflexia appears during the chronic phase, after spinal shock resolution, and it is a life-threatening syndrome of massive imbalanced reflex sympathetic discharge occurring in patients with SCI above the splanchnic sympathetic outflow (T5-T6). Arterial hypotension with orthostatic hypotension occurs in both acute and chronic phases. The etiology is multifactorial. We described a few factors influencing the orthostatic hypotension occurrence in SCI: sympathetic nervous system dysfunction, low plasma catecholamine levels, rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone activity, peripheral alpha-adrenoceptor hyperresponsiveness, impaired function of baroreceptors, hyponatremia and low plasmatic volume, cardiovascular deconditioning, morphologic changes in sympathetic neurons, plasticity within spinal circuits, and motor deficit leading to loss of skeletal muscle pumping activity. Additional associated cardiovascular concerns in SCI, such as deep vein

  8. In-vivo spinal cord deformation in flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Qing; Dougherty, Lawrence; Margulies, Susan S.

    1997-05-01

    Traumatic mechanical loading of the head-neck complex results cervical spinal cord injury when the distortion of the cord is sufficient to produce functional or structural failure of the cord's neural and/or vascular components. Characterizing cervical spinal cord deformation during physiological loading conditions is an important step to defining a comprehensive injury threshold associated with acute spinal cord injury. In this study, in vivo quasi- static deformation of the cervical spinal cord during flexion of the neck in human volunteers was measured using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of motion with spatial modulation of magnetization (SPAMM). A custom-designed device was built to guide the motion of the neck and enhance more reproducibility. the SPAMM pulse sequence labeled the tissue with a series of parallel tagging lines. A single- shot gradient-recalled-echo sequence was used to acquire the mid-sagittal image of the cervical spine. A comparison of the tagged line pattern in each MR reference and deformed image pair revealed the distortion of the spinal cord. The results showed the cervical spinal cord elongates during head flexion. The elongation experienced by the spinal cord varies linearly with head flexion, with the posterior surface of the cord stretching more than the anterior surface. The maximal elongation of the cord is about 12 percent of its original length.

  9. Pediatric Spinal Cord Tumors and Masses

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Pamela E; Oleszek, Joyce L; Clayton, Gerald H

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Spinal cord tumors are a relatively rare diagnosis, accounting for 1% to 10% of all pediatric central nervous system tumors. Understanding the etiology and clinical outcomes of these tumors is therefore very important. This study presents detailed information regarding clinical presentation, histological findings, outcomes, functional assessment, and management of a series of patients with this diagnosis. Method: Retrospective, descriptive study. Subjects: Thirty-five children with a final diagnosis of spinal cord tumor or mass, excluding dysraphism. Results: Neurodevelopmental tumors (dermoid tumors, epidermoid tumors, and teratomas) were the most common tumor type (31%), followed by astrocytomas (29%) and neuroblastomas (14%). Other types included schwannomas, meningiomas, giant cell tumors, extradural cystic masses, leukemic-related masses, and masses related to neurofibromatosis. Mean age at diagnosis was 6.6 years (SD = 5.5 y) and did not vary significantly by tumor type except for children with neuroblastoma (mean = 0.4 y, SD = 0.5 y). More boys (57%) were identified in the series than girls (43%); however, there was no association between tumor type and sex. Presenting complaints of pain were noted in 57% and were localized to the back, neck, or extremities. Extremity weakness was reported as an initial presenting symptom in 46%. Three children had scoliosis as a presenting issue and 14 had gait abnormalities. Regardless of treatment modality, mobility was retained in 83% of children with or without gait aids. Neurogenic bowel and/or bladder were present in 23% of the population. Conclusions: This study corroborates other studies indicating that intramedullary tumors are the predominant form of pediatric spinal cord tumor. This population, however, presented with an unusually large number of developmental tumors, contrary to several published studies. The disparity may be the result of this institution acting as a regional referral

  10. Clinical radiology of the spine and spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Banna, M.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a source of information about aspects of radiology of the spine and spinal column. It presents coverage of both normal and abnormal conditions. Contents: Spinal fractures and dislocations. Degenerative diseases of the spine. Gross anatomy of the spinal cord and meninges. Intraspinal mass lesions. Spinal dysraphism. Congenital anomalies. Tumors of the vertebral column, and more.

  11. Central pattern generators of the mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Frigon, Alain

    2012-02-01

    Neuronal networks within the spinal cord of mammals are responsible for generating various rhythmic movements, such as walking, running, swimming, and scratching. The ability to generate multiple rhythmic movements highlights the complexity and flexibility of the mammalian spinal circuitry. The present review describes features of some rhythmic motor behaviors generated by the mammalian spinal cord and discusses how the spinal circuitry is able to produce different rhythmic movements with their own sets of goals and demands.

  12. Molecular basis of vascular events following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Popa, F; Grigorean, VT; Onose, G; Sandu, A; Popescu, M; Burnei, G; Strambu, V; Popa, C

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this article is to analyze the effects of the molecular basis of vascular events following spinal cord injury and their contribution in pathogenesis. First of all, we reviewed the anatomy of spinal cord vessels. The pathophysiology of spinal cord injuries revealed two types of pathogenic mechanisms. The primary event, the mechanic trauma, results in a disruption of neural and vascular structures into the spinal cord. It is followed by secondary pathogenesis that leads to the progression of the initial lesion. We reviewed vascular responses following spinal cord injury, focusing on both primary and secondary events. The intraparenchymal hemorrhage is a direct consequence of trauma; it has a typical pattern of distribution into the contused spinal cord, inside the gray matter and, it is radially extended into the white matter. The intraparenchymal hemorrhage is restricted to the dorsal columns, into adjacent rostral and caudal spinal segments. Distribution of chronic lesions overlaps the pattern of the early intraparenchymal hemorrhage. We described the mechanisms of action, role, induction and distribution of the heme oxygenase isoenzymes 1 and 2. Posttraumatic inflammatory response contributes to secondary pathogenesis. We analyzed the types of cells participating in the inflammatory response, the moment of appearance after the injury, the decrease in number, and the nature of their actions. The disruption of the blood–spinal cord barrier is biphasic. It exposes the spinal cord to inflammatory cells and to toxic effects of other molecules. Endothelin 1 mediates oxidative stress into the spinal cord through the modulation of spinal cord blood flow. The role of matrix metalloproteinases in blood–spinal cord barrier disruption, inflammation, and angiogenesis are reviewed. PMID:20945816

  13. Cranial plate anchoring of spinal cord stimulation paddle leads: technical note.

    PubMed

    Tomycz, Nestor D; Cameron, Jeffrey; Whiting, Donald M; Oh, Michael Y

    2012-09-01

    Lead migration is a frequent complication of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) and requires revision surgery. The evolution of wider paddle leads has necessitated more extensive laminotomy and epidural adhesiolysis, which may increase the risk of lead migration. We describe a novel anchoring technique for SCS paddle leads with use of a cranial "dogbone" plate. We retrospectively reviewed a consecutive series of 11 patients who underwent placement of paddle lead spinal cord stimulators with titanium plate anchoring. Patients were followed for a mean of 29.5 months from SCS implantation (range, 5-65 months). A 4-hole linear titanium cranial plate and two 4-mm screws were used to tightly affix the proximal paddle lead wiring to the lamina below the laminotomy defect. All patients continue to have satisfactory spinal cord stimulation with no loss of efficacy or need for revision. No complications have been attributed to titanium plate anchoring, and there have been no cases of lead migration with this technique. Titanium plate anchoring added minimal time (approximately 3-5 minutes) to the operative case. We report a safe and effective anchoring technique for paddle lead SCS with the use of a cranial plate. Our experience has been that this technique, which anchors the proximal lead wiring to the remaining lamina at the inferior laminotomy defect, is superior to anchoring methods that rely on suturing of lead wiring.

  14. RhoA/Rho kinase in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiangbing; Xu, Xiao-ming

    2016-01-01

    A spinal cord injury refers to an injury to the spinal cord that is caused by a trauma instead of diseases. Spinal cord injury includes a primary mechanical injury and a much more complex secondary injury process involving inflammation, oxidation, excitotoxicity, and cell death. During the secondary injury, many signal pathways are activated and play important roles in mediating the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury. Among them, the RhoA/Rho kinase pathway plays a particular role in mediating spinal degeneration and regeneration. In this review, we will discuss the role and mechanism of RhoA/Rho kinase-mediated spinal cord pathogenesis, as well as the potential of targeting RhoA/Rho kinase as a strategy for promoting both neuroprotection and axonal regeneration. PMID:26981071

  15. Therapeutic Stimulation for Restoration of Function After Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Ievins, Aiva; Moritz, Chet T

    2017-09-01

    Paralysis due to spinal cord injury can severely limit motor function and independence. This review summarizes different approaches to electrical stimulation of the spinal cord designed to restore motor function, with a brief discussion of their origins and the current understanding of their mechanisms of action. Spinal stimulation leads to impressive improvements in motor function along with some benefits to autonomic functions such as bladder control. Nonetheless, the precise mechanisms underlying these improvements and the optimal spinal stimulation approaches for restoration of motor function are largely unknown. Finally, spinal stimulation may augment other therapies that address the molecular and cellular environment of the injured spinal cord. The fact that several stimulation approaches are now leading to substantial and durable improvements in function following spinal cord injury provides a new perspectives on the previously "incurable" condition of paralysis. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Management of acute traumatic spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Shank, C D; Walters, B C; Hadley, M N

    2017-01-01

    Acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating disease process affecting tens of thousands of people across the USA each year. Despite the increase in primary prevention measures, such as educational programs, motor vehicle speed limits, automobile running lights, and safety technology that includes automobile passive restraint systems and airbags, SCIs continue to carry substantial permanent morbidity and mortality. Medical measures implemented following the initial injury are designed to limit secondary insult to the spinal cord and to stabilize the spinal column in an attempt to decrease devastating sequelae. This chapter is an overview of the contemporary management of an acute traumatic SCI patient from the time of injury through the stay in the intensive care unit. We discuss initial triage, immobilization, and transportation of the patient by emergency medical services personnel to a definitive treatment facility. Upon arrival at the emergency department, we review initial trauma protocols and the evidence-based recommendations for radiographic evaluation of the patient's vertebral column. Finally, we outline closed cervical spine reduction and various aggressive medical therapies aimed at improving neurologic outcome.

  17. Spinal cord pattern generators for locomotion.

    PubMed

    Dietz, V

    2003-08-01

    It is generally accepted that locomotion in mammals, including humans, is based on the activity of neuronal circuits within the spinal cord (the central pattern generator, CPG). Afferent information from the periphery (i.e. the limbs) influences the central pattern and, conversely, the CPG selects appropriate afferent information according to the external requirement. Both the CPG and the reflexes that mediate afferent input to the spinal cord are under the control of the brainstem. There is increasing evidence that in central motor diseases, a defective utilization of afferent input, in combination with secondary compensatory processes, is involved in typical movement disorders, such as spasticity and Parkinson's disease. Recent studies indicate a plastic behavior of the spinal neuronal circuits following a central motor lesion. This has implications for any rehabilitative therapy that should be directed to take advantage of the plasticity of the central nervous system. The significance of this research is in a better understanding of the pathophysiology underlying movement disorders and the consequences for an appropriate treatment.

  18. Subdural hematoma following spinal cord stimulator implant.

    PubMed

    Chiravuri, Srinivas; Wasserman, Ronald; Chawla, Amit; Haider, Naeem

    2008-01-01

    Headache following interventional procedures is a diagnostic challenge due to the multitude of possible etiologies involved. Presentation can be simple (PDPH alone) or complex (exacerbation of pre-existing chronic headache along with PDPH) or headache associated with a new onset intracranial process. Subdural hematoma is a rare complication of cranio-spinal trauma. Cranial subdural hematoma may present in an acute, sub-acute, or chronic fashion. Diagnosis of a subdural hematoma in the wake of a PDPH is difficult, requiring a high level of suspicion. Delayed diagnosis of subdural hematoma is usually related to failure to consider it in the differential diagnosis. Thorough history, assessment of the evolution of symptoms, and imaging studies may identify the possible cause and help direct treatment. Change in the character of initial presenting symptoms may be a sign of resolution of the headache or the onset of a secondary process. We report a case of acute intracranial subdural hematoma secondary to unintentional dural puncture during placement of a permanent spinal cord stimulator lead for refractory angina. There is need for careful follow-up of patients with a known post-dural tear. Failure to identify uncommon adverse events in patients with complicated spinal cord stimulator implantation may lead to permanent injury.

  19. Plasticity of the Injured Human Spinal Cord: Insights Revealed by Spinal Cord Functional MRI

    PubMed Central

    Cadotte, David W.; Bosma, Rachael; Mikulis, David; Nugaeva, Natalia; Smith, Karen; Pokrupa, Ronald; Islam, Omar; Stroman, Patrick W.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction While numerous studies have documented evidence for plasticity of the human brain there is little evidence that the human spinal cord can change after injury. Here, we employ a novel spinal fMRI design where we stimulate normal and abnormal sensory dermatomes in persons with traumatic spinal cord injury and perform a connectivity analysis to understand how spinal networks process information. Methods Spinal fMRI data was collected at 3 Tesla at two institutions from 38 individuals using the standard SEEP functional MR imaging techniques. Thermal stimulation was applied to four dermatomes in an interleaved timing pattern during each fMRI acquisition. SCI patients were stimulated in dermatomes both above (normal sensation) and below the level of their injury. Sub-group analysis was performed on healthy controls (n = 20), complete SCI (n = 3), incomplete SCI (n = 9) and SCI patients who recovered full function (n = 6). Results Patients with chronic incomplete SCI, when stimulated in a dermatome of normal sensation, showed an increased number of active voxels relative to controls (p = 0.025). There was an inverse relationship between the degree of sensory impairment and the number of active voxels in the region of the spinal cord corresponding to that dermatome of abnormal sensation (R2 = 0.93, p<0.001). Lastly, a connectivity analysis demonstrated a significantly increased number of intraspinal connections in incomplete SCI patients relative to controls suggesting altered processing of afferent sensory signals. Conclusions In this work we demonstrate the use of spinal fMRI to investigate changes in spinal processing of somatosensory information in the human spinal cord. We provide evidence for plasticity of the human spinal cord after traumatic injury based on an increase in the average number of active voxels in dermatomes of normal sensation in chronic SCI patients and an increased number of intraspinal connections in incomplete

  20. Spinal cord distribution of sup 3 H-morphine after intrathecal administration: Relationship to analgesia

    SciTech Connect

    Nishio, Y.; Sinatra, R.S.; Kitahata, L.M.; Collins, J.G. )

    1989-09-01

    The distribution of intrathecally administered {sup 3}H-morphine was examined by light microscopic autoradiography in rat spinal cord and temporal changes in silver grain localization were compared with results obtained from simultaneous measurements of analgesia. After tissue processing, radio-activity was found to have penetrated in superficial as well as in deeper layers (Rexed lamina V, VII, and X) of rat spinal cord within minutes after application. Silver grain density reached maximal values at 30 min in every region of cord studied. Radioactivity decreased rapidly between 30 min and 2 hr and then more slowly over the next 24 hr. In rats tested for responses to a thermal stimulus (tail flick test), intrathecal administration of morphine (5 and 15 micrograms) resulted in significant dose dependent analgesia that peaked at 30 min and lasted up to 5 hr (P less than 0.5). There was a close relationship between analgesia and spinal cord silver grain density during the first 4 hr of the study. It is postulated that the onset of spinal morphine analgesia depends on appearance of molecules at sites of action followed by the activation of anti-nociceptive mechanisms.

  1. [Calbindin and parvalbumin distribution in spinal cord of normal and rabies-infected mice].

    PubMed

    Monroy-Gómez, Jeison; Torres-Fernández, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Rabies is a fatal infectious disease of the nervous system; however, the knowledge about the pathogenic neural mechanisms in rabies is scarce. In addition, there are few studies of rabies pathology of the spinal cord. To study the distribution of calcium binding proteins calbindin and parvalbumin and assessing the effect of rabies virus infection on their expression in the spinal cord of mice. MATERIALES Y METHODS: Mice were inoculated with rabies virus, by intracerebral or intramuscular route. The spinal cord was extracted to perform some crosscuts which were treated by immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies to reveal the presence of the two proteins in normal and rabies infected mice. We did qualitative and quantitative analyses of the immunoreactivity of the two proteins. Calbindin and parvalbumin showed differential distribution in Rexed laminae. Rabies infection produced a decrease in the expression of calbindin. On the contrary, the infection caused an increased expression of parvalbumin. The effect of rabies infection on the two proteins expression was similar when comparing both routes of inoculation. The differential effect of rabies virus infection on the expression of calbindin and parvalbumin in the spinal cord of mice was similar to that previously reported for brain areas. This result suggests uniformity in the response to rabies infection throughout the central nervous system. This is an important contribution to the understanding of the pathogenesis of rabies.

  2. Permissive Schwann cell graft/spinal cord interfaces for axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ryan R; Henao, Martha; Pearse, Damien D; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2015-01-01

    The transplantation of autologous Schwann cells (SCs) to repair the injured spinal cord is currently being evaluated in a clinical trial. In support, this study determined properties of spinal cord/SC bridge interfaces that enabled regenerated brainstem axons to cross them, possibly leading to improvement in rat hindlimb movement. Fluid bridges of SCs and Matrigel were placed in complete spinal cord transections. Compared to pregelled bridges of SCs and Matrigel, they improved regeneration of brainstem axons across the rostral interface. The regenerating brainstem axons formed synaptophysin(+) bouton-like terminals and contacted MAP2A(+) dendrites at the caudal interface. Brainstem axon regeneration was directly associated with glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP(+)) astrocyte processes that elongated into the SC bridge. Electron microscopy revealed that axons, SCs, and astrocytes were enclosed together within tunnels bounded by a continuous basal lamina. Neuroglycan (NG2) expression was associated with these tunnels. One week after injury, the GFAP(+) processes coexpressed nestin and brain lipid-binding protein, and the tips of GFAP(+)/NG2(+) processes extended into the bridges together with the regenerating brainstem axons. Both brainstem axon regeneration and number of GFAP(+) processes in the bridges correlated with improvement in hindlimb locomotion. Following SCI, astrocytes may enter a reactive state that prohibits axon regeneration. Elongation of astrocyte processes into SC bridges, however, and formation of NG2(+) tunnels enable brainstem axon regeneration and improvement in function. It is important for spinal cord repair to define conditions that favor elongation of astrocytes into lesions/transplants.

  3. Directing Spinal Cord Plasticity: The Impact of Stretch Therapy on Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Louisville, KY After spinal cord injury (SCI) patients commonly develop spasticity and contractures as secondary complications of “upper motor neuron...lesions. Physical therapists use stretching maneuvers to maintain extensibility of soft tissues and to manage spasticity . Previous studies in our lab

  4. Segmental somatotopic organization of cutaneous afferent fibers in the lumbar spinal cord dorsal horn in rats.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuzuru; Aoki, Yasuchika; Doya, Hideo

    2007-03-01

    In the present study, we investigated the central representation of segmental cutaneous afferent fiber projection fields in the horizontal plane of the spinal cord dorsal horn in adult rats. The neurotracer 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate (Dil) was applied to spinal nerves T12-S2 and cutaneous ventrodorsal axial lines T13-S1. The Dil fluorescent zones in transverse sections of the dorsal horn were observed microscopically. Mediolateral locations of Dil fluorescent zones were measured, followed by reorganization on the horizontal plane through lamina I-I111. Rostral and caudal boundary lines of the central projection fields of spinal nerves T12-S2 formed 'waves' in the horizontal plane of the dorsal horn, pitching rostrocaudally about one spinal cord segment. The rostral and caudal apexes of the waves could be linked with those of adjacent segments, suggesting that the wave pattern is continuous rostrocaudally in the dorsal horn. The waves were markedly transformed in the central projection fields of the hindlimb and genital regions, in the L5 and L6 spinal cord segments.

  5. Personal Adjustment Training for the Spinal Cord Injured

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roessler, Richard; And Others

    1976-01-01

    This article describes experiences with Personal Achievement Skills (PAS), a group counseling process in a spinal cord injury project, emphasizing training in communication and goal setting in the context of group process. Issues in conducting such training and providing comprehensive service to the spinal cord injured are discussed in detail.…

  6. Pediatric spinal cord injury: a review by organ system.

    PubMed

    Powell, Aaron; Davidson, Loren

    2015-02-01

    In this article, an overview is provided of pediatric spinal cord injury, organized by effects of this injury on various organ systems. Specific management differences between children and adults with spinal cord injury are highlighted. A detailed management approach is offered for particularly complex topics, such as spasticity and upper extremity reconstruction.

  7. Shriners Hospital Spinal Cord Injury Self Care Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Carol

    This manual is intended for young people with spinal cord injuries who are receiving rehabilitation services within the Spinal Cord Injury Unit at Shriners Hospital (San Francisco, California). An introduction describes the rehabilitation program, which includes family conferences, an individualized program, an independent living program,…

  8. Shriners Hospital Spinal Cord Injury Self Care Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Carol

    This manual is intended for young people with spinal cord injuries who are receiving rehabilitation services within the Spinal Cord Injury Unit at Shriners Hospital (San Francisco, California). An introduction describes the rehabilitation program, which includes family conferences, an individualized program, an independent living program,…

  9. Spinal cord injuries in Australian footballers.

    PubMed

    2003-07-01

    Acute spinal cord injury is a serious concern in football, particularly the rugby codes. This Australia-wide study covers the years 1986-1996 and data are compared with those from a previous identical study for 1960-1985. A retrospective review of 80 players with a documented acute spinal cord injury admitted to the six spinal cord injury units in Australia. Personal interview was carried out in 85% of the participants to determine the injury circumstances and the level of compensation. The severity of the neurological deficit and the functional recovery were determined (Frankel grade). The annual incidence of injuries for all codes combined did not change over the study period, but there was some decrease in rugby union and an increase in rugby league. In particular there was a significant decline in the incidence of adult rugby union injuries (P = 0.048). Scrum injuries in union have decreased subsequent to law changes in 1985, particularly in schoolboys, although ruck and maul injuries are increasing; 39% of scrum injuries occurred in players not in their regular position. Tackles were the most common cause of injury in league, with two-on-one tackles accounting for nearly half of these. Schoolboy injuries tended to mirror those in adults, but with a lower incidence. Over half of the players remain wheelchair-dependent, and 10% returned to near-normality. Six players (7.5%) died as a result of their injuries. The rugby codes must be made safer by appropriate preventative strategies and law changes. In particular, attention is necessary for tackle injuries in rugby league and players out of regular position in scrummage. Compensation for injured players is grossly inadequate. There is an urgent need to establish a national registry to analyse these injuries prospectively.

  10. Prognosis and Treatment of Spinal Cord Astrocytoma

    SciTech Connect

    Minehan, Kiernan J. Brown, Paul D.; Scheithauer, Bernd W.; Krauss, William E.; Wright, Michael P.

    2009-03-01

    Purpose: To identify the prognostic factors for spinal cord astrocytoma and determine the effects of surgery and radiotherapy on outcome. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study reviewed the cases of consecutive patients with spinal cord astrocytoma treated at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 1962 and 2005. Results: A total of 136 consecutive patients were identified. Of these 136 patients, 69 had pilocytic and 67 had infiltrative astrocytoma. The median follow-up for living patients was 8.2 years (range, 0.08-37.6), and the median survival for deceased patients was 1.15 years (range, 0.01-39.9). The extent of surgery included incisional biopsy only (59%), subtotal resection (25%), and gross total resection (16%). Patients with pilocytic tumors survived significantly longer than those with infiltrative astrocytomas (median overall survival, 39.9 vs. 1.85 years; p < 0.001). Patients who underwent resection had a worse, although nonsignificant, median survival than those who underwent biopsy only (pilocytic, 18.1 vs. 39.9 years, p = 0.07; infiltrative, 19 vs. 30 months, p = 0.14). Postoperative radiotherapy, delivered in 75% of cases, gave no significant survival benefit for those with pilocytic tumors (39.9 vs. 18.1 years, p = 0.33) but did for those with infiltrative astrocytomas (24 vs. 3 months; Wilcoxon p = 0.006). On multivariate analysis, pilocytic histologic type, diagnosis after 1984, longer symptom duration, younger age, minimal surgical extent, and postoperative radiotherapy predicted better outcome. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that histologic type is the most important prognostic variable affecting the outcome of spinal cord astrocytomas. Surgical resection was associated with shorter survival and thus remains an unproven treatment. Postoperative radiotherapy significantly improved survival for patients with infiltrative astrocytomas but not for those with pilocytic tumors.

  11. Effect of lycopene on the blood-spinal cord barrier after spinal cord injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jianbo; Gu, Zhengsong; Zhang, Qing; Zheng, Hong

    2016-09-05

    The current study aimed to investigate the effect of lycopene on the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) after spinal cord injury (SCI) in a mouse model. Lycopene inhibited lipid peroxidation and oxidative DNA damage as a highly efficient antioxidant and free radical scavenger. Lycopene (4 mg/kg/d) was administrated immediately following SCI. The permeability of the BSCB and water content in the spinal cord tissue were evaluated. Additionally, levels of expression of tight junction proteins and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) were determined with Western blotting. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis of spinal cord tissue homogenates was performed 48 h after SCI to evaluate the expression of inflammation-related cytokines. In addition, recovery of motor function was assessed 1 d, 2 d, 5 d, 10 d, and 15 d after SCI using the Basso Mouse Scale to score locomotion. Compared to the group with an untreated SCI, mice with an SCI treated with lycopene had significantly reduced spinal cord tissue water content and BSCB permeability. Furthermore, motor function of mice with an SCI was also greatly improved by lycopene administration. The expression of the proinflammatory factors TNF-α and NF-kB increased markedly 48 h after SCI, and their upregulation was significantly attenuated by lycopene treatment. The expression of molecules that protect tight junctions, zonula occluden-1 and claudin-5, was upregulated by lycopene treatment after SCI. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that lycopene attenuated SCI by promoting repair of the damaged BSCB, so lycopene is a novel and promising treatment for SCI in humans.

  12. Contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging for assessment of spinal cord blood flow in experimental spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Dubory, Arnaud; Laemmel, Elisabeth; Badner, Anna; Duranteau, Jacques; Vicaut, Eric; Court, Charles; Soubeyrand, Marc

    2015-05-07

    Reduced spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) (i.e., ischemia) plays a key role in traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) pathophysiology and is accordingly an important target for neuroprotective therapies. Although several techniques have been described to assess SCBF, they all have significant limitations. To overcome the latter, we propose the use of real-time contrast enhanced ultrasound imaging (CEU). Here we describe the application of this technique in a rat contusion model of SCI. A jugular catheter is first implanted for the repeated injection of contrast agent, a sodium chloride solution of sulphur hexafluoride encapsulated microbubbles. The spine is then stabilized with a custom-made 3D-frame and the spinal cord dura mater is exposed by a laminectomy at ThIX-ThXII. The ultrasound probe is then positioned at the posterior aspect of the dura mater (coated with ultrasound gel). To assess baseline SCBF, a single intravenous injection (400 µl) of contrast agent is applied to record its passage through the intact spinal cord microvasculature. A weight-drop device is subsequently used to generate a reproducible experimental contusion model of SCI. Contrast agent is re-injected 15 min following the injury to assess post-SCI SCBF changes. CEU allows for real time and in-vivo assessment of SCBF changes following SCI. In the uninjured animal, ultrasound imaging showed uneven blood flow along the intact spinal cord. Furthermore, 15 min post-SCI, there was critical ischemia at the level of the epicenter while SCBF remained preserved in the more remote intact areas. In the regions adjacent to the epicenter (both rostral and caudal), SCBF was significantly reduced. This corresponds to the previously described "ischemic penumbra zone". This tool is of major interest for assessing the effects of therapies aimed at limiting ischemia and the resulting tissue necrosis subsequent to SCI.

  13. Steroids, spinal cord and pain sensation.

    PubMed

    Patte-Mensah, Christine; Meyer, Laurence; Mensah-Nyagan, Ayikoe Guy

    2011-10-01

    During the whole life, the nervous system is continuously submitted to the actions of different categories of hormones, including steroids. Therefore, the interactions between hormonal compounds and neural tissues are subjected to intense investigations. While a majority of studies focus on the brain, the spinal cord (SC) has received little attention, although this structure is also an important part of the central nervous system, controlling motor and sensory functions. To point out the importance of interactions between hormones and the SC in the regulation of neurobiological activities, we recapitulated and discussed herein various key data, revealing that the pivotal role played by the SC in nociception and pain modulation, directly depends on the SC ability to metabolize and synthesize steroidal molecules. The paper suggests that future investigations aiming to develop effective strategies against chronic pain, must integrate regulatory effects exerted by hormonal steroids on the SC activity, as well as the actions of endogenous neurosteroids locally synthesized in spinal neural networks.

  14. Spinal cord injuries and orgasm: a review.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Marca; Rosen, Raymond C

    2008-01-01

    Definitions of orgasm remain varied, and physiologic markers have not been standardized or consistently applied. The occurrence of orgasm after spinal cord injury (SCI) has been documented for a number of years; however, in the recent past, the neurologic and autonomic correlates associated with orgasm after SCI have been investigated. In this article we review recent studies pertaining to the occurrence of orgasm after SCI. Laboratory-based assessments of orgasmic responsiveness of women and men with known levels and degrees of SCI have shown the effects of orgasm on peripheral autonomic responses and the effects of varying injury patterns on the ability to achieve orgasm. A spinal pattern generator has also been identified that mediates ejaculation in male rats and responses similar to orgasm in female rats. Taken together, these findings suggest that retraining reflexic orgasm through vibratory or other forms of neural stimulation may provide a means to remediate orgasmic dysfunction in persons with SCI.

  15. Early elective colostomy following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Michelle

    Elective colostomy is an accepted method of bowel management for patients who have had a spinal cord injury (SCI). Approximately 2.4% of patients with SCI have a colostomy, and traditionally it is performed as a last resort several years after injury, and only if bowel complications persist when all other methods have failed. This is despite evidence that patients find a colostomy easier to manage and frequently report wishing it had been performed earlier. It was noticed in the author's spinal unit that increasing numbers of patients were requesting colostomy formation during inpatient rehabilitation following SCI. No supporting literature was found for this; it appears to be an emerging and untested practice. This article explores colostomy formation as a method of bowel management in patients with SCI, considers the optimal time for colostomy formation after injury and examines issues for health professionals.

  16. Vascular Imaging Techniques of the Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Maria Isabel; Barnaure, Isabelle; Gariani, Joanna; Boto, José; Pellaton, Alain; Dietemann, Jean-Louis; Kulcsar, Zsolt

    2017-04-01

    The various imaging techniques used to depict vascular lesions of the spinal cord are described in this article with particular emphasis on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), vascular sequences, and advantages of high-field MRI. Technical vascular protocols are discussed in computed tomography, MRI, and conventional angiography. The diverse magnetic resonance angiography protocols are presented as well as their findings, specificities, and pitfalls. A review of the vascular anatomy and the most common pathologies analyzed by magnetic resonance angiography and conventional angiography is described.

  17. Natural Polyphenols and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Khalatbary, Ali Reza

    2014-01-01

    Polyphenols have been shown to have some of the neuroprotective effects against neurodegenerative diseases. These effects are attributed to a variety of biological activities, including free radical scavenging/antioxidant and anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic activities. In this regard, many efforts have been made to study the effects of various well-known dietary polyphenols on spinal cord injury (SCI) and to explore the mechanisms behind the neuroprotective effects. The aim of this paper is to present the mechanisms of neuroprotection of natural polyphenols used in animal models of SCI. PMID:24842137

  18. Agreement in Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression.

    PubMed

    Arana, Estanislao; Kovacs, Francisco M; Royuela, Ana; Asenjo, Beatriz; Pérez-Ramírez, Úrsula; Zamora, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (ESCC) is a devastating medical emergency. The purpose of this study was to determine the reliability of the 6-point ESCC scoring system and the identification of the spinal level presenting ESCC. Clinical data and imaging from 90 patients with biopsy-proven spinal metastases were provided to 83 specialists from 44 hospitals. The spinal levels presenting metastases and the ESCC scores for each case were calculated twice by each clinician, with a minimum of 6 weeks' interval. Clinicians were blinded to assessments made by other specialists and their own previous assessment. Fleiss kappa (κ) statistic was used to assess intraobserver and interobserver agreement. Subgroup analyses were performed according to clinicians' specialty (medical oncology, neurosurgery, radiology, orthopedic surgery, and radiation oncology), years of experience, and type of hospital. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement on the location of ESCC was substantial (κ>0.61). Intraobserver agreement on the ESCC score was "excellent" (κ=0.82), whereas interobserver agreement was substantial (κ=0.64). Overall agreement with the tumor board classification was substantial (κ=0.71). Results were similar across specialties, years of experience and hospital category. The ESCC score can help improve communication among clinicians involved in oncology care. Copyright © 2016 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  19. Motoneuron differentiation of immortalized human spinal cord cell lines.

    PubMed

    Li, R; Thode, S; Zhou, J; Richard, N; Pardinas, J; Rao, M S; Sah, D W

    2000-02-01

    Human motoneuron cell lines will be valuable tools for spinal cord research and drug discovery. To create such cell lines, we immortalized NCAM(+)/neurofilament(+) precursors from human embryonic spinal cord with a tetracycline repressible v-myc oncogene. Clonal NCAM(+)/neurofilament(+) cell lines differentiated exclusively into neurons within 1 week. These neurons displayed extensive processes, exhibited immunoreactivity for mature neuron-specific markers such as tau and synaptophysin, and fired action potentials upon current injection. Moreover, a clonal precursor cell line gave rise to multiple types of spinal cord neurons, including ChAT(+)/Lhx3(+)/Lhx4(+) motoneurons and GABA(+) interneurons. These neuronal restricted precursor cell lines will expedite the elucidation of molecular mechanisms that regulate the differentiation, maturation and survival of specific subsets of spinal cord neurons, and the identification and validation of novel drug targets for motoneuron diseases and spinal cord injury.

  20. Epidemiologic change of patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Shin, Ji Cheol; Kim, Dae Hyun; Yu, Su Jin; Yang, Hea Eun; Yoon, Seo Yeon

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the epidemiologic change of patients with spinal cord injury who were admitted to a Rehabilitation Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, during 1987-1996 and 2004-2008. Medical records of 629 patients with spinal cord injury admitted to the Rehabilitation Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, from 2004 to 2008 were collected and reviewed retrospectively. The male-to-female ratio decreased to 2.86:1, the mean age at injury increased, nontraumatic etiology increased, traffic accident remained to be the most common in traumatic spinal cord injury, and falling increased significantly. Tumor was the most common etiology in nontraumatic spinal cord injury, tetraplegia and incomplete injuries occurred more than paraplegia and complete injuries, indwelling catheter was the most common voiding method, and the duration of hospitalization decreased. Many trends changed in epidemiology of spinal cord injury.

  1. Neonatal spinal cord injury after an uncomplicated vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    Neonatal spinal cord injury has been reported after traumatic births and as a consequence of underlying lesions in the spinal cord. This report describes an infant who was born with bilateral flaccid paralysis of the upper extremities after an atraumatic, noninstrumented vaginal delivery. The infant was otherwise neurologically intact. The infant was initially thought to exhibit bilateral brachial plexus injury. However, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an upper cervical spinal cord hemorrhage, with no underlying lesions of the spinal cord or surrounding vasculature. This case highlights the importance of thoroughly evaluating any neurologic deficit in the newborn, and suggests that normal mechanical forces of labor and delivery may be sufficient to cause damage to the newborn spinal cord.

  2. Spinal cord injury following operative shoulder intervention: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Christine; Walker, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Context Cervical myelopathy is a spinal cord dysfunction that results from extrinsic compression of the spinal cord, its blood supply, or both. It is the most common cause of spinal cord dysfunction in patients greater than 55 years of age. Findings: A 57-year-old male with right shoulder septic arthritis underwent surgical debridement of his right shoulder and sustained a spinal cord injury intraoperatively. The most likely etiology is damage to the cervical spinal cord during difficult intubation requiring multiple attempts in this patient with underlying asymptomatic severe cervical stenosis. Conclusion Although it is not feasible to perform imaging studies on all patients undergoing intubation for surgery, this patient's outcome would suggest consideration of inclusion of additional pre-surgical screening examination techniques, such as testing for a positive Hoffman's reflex, is appropriate to detect asymptomatic patients who may have underlying cervical stenosis. PMID:24679185

  3. Use of wavelet energy for spinal cord vibration analysis during spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yu; Zhang, Jianxun; Xue, Yuan

    2013-12-01

    An online non-contact measurement system using a laser displacement sensor was developed for obtaining the vibration amplitude of spinal cord and hard tissue. The discrete wavelet transform was used to extract the distinctive features of tissue vibration signals. The spinal cord and spinal cancellous bone can be discriminated by the comparison of wavelet energy over a characteristic scale. We also derived the integro-differential equation of motion to describe the spinal cord vibration excited by the motion of bone. Experimental results show that the method works well in identifying spinal cord and bone. However, available viscoelastic constants cannot describe the high-frequency features of spinal cord. The examined issue of tissue vibration due to the operation power device is a significant problem. The proposed method can be used by a surgery robot, and then spinal surgery may greatly benefit from the enhanced safety of robotics. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Extra and Intramedullary Anaplastic Ependymoma in Thoracic Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Byung Soo; Kwak, Kyung-Woo; Choi, Jun Huck

    2013-01-01

    Spinal ependymoma occupies 40-60% of primary spinal cord tumors and has a feature of intramedullary tumor. The tumor most commonly arises from the central canal of the spinal cord, the conus medullaris or the filum terminale and its pathological features are usually benign. Unlike above characteristics, intra and extramedullary ependymomas are reported very rarely and have wide variety of histological features. We present a rare case of spinal anaplastic ependymoma with an accompanied exophytic lesions extramedullary as well. The tumor was poorly delineated between a spinal cord and the extramedullary components in operative view. After we had confirmed the frozen biopsy as anaplastic ependymoma, the remnant mass embedded in the spinal cord was remained because of its unclear resection margin and the risk of neurological deterioration. She underwent radiotherapy with 50.4 Gy, and there were newly developed mass lesions at the lumbosacral region on the MRI, 14 months postoperatively. PMID:24757483

  5. Lizard tail spinal cord: a new experimental model of spinal cord injury without limb paralysis.

    PubMed

    Szarek, Dariusz; Marycz, Krzysztof; Lis, Anna; Zawada, Zbigniew; Tabakow, Paweł; Laska, Jadwiga; Jarmundowicz, Włodzimierz

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a well-known devastating lesion that sadly is very resistant to all treatment attempts. This fact has stimulated the exploration of multiple regenerative strategies that are examined at both the basic and clinical level. For laboratory research, differentin vivomodels are used, but each has many important limitations. The main limitation of these models is the high level of animal suffering related to the inflicted neurologic injury. It has caused a growing tendency to limit the injury, but this, in turn, produces incomplete SCI models and uncertainties in the neuroregeneration interpretation. To overcome such limitations, a new experimental SCI model is proposed. Geckos have been extensively examined as a potential animal model of SCI. Their spinal cord extends into the tail and can be transected without causing the typical neurologic consequences observed in rat models. In this study, we compared the gecko tail SCI model with the rat model of thoracic SCI. Anatomic and histologic analyses showed comparability between the gecko and rat in diameter of spinal canal and spinal cord, as well as applicability of multiple staining techniques (hematoxylin and eosin, immunostaining, and scanning and transmission electron microscopy). We tested the suitability ofin vivostudy with 3 prototype implants for the reconstruction of SCI: a multichannel sponge, a multilaminar tube, and a gel cylinder. These were compared with a spinal cord excision (control). A 20-wk observation revealed no adverse effects of SCI on the animals' well-being. The animals were easily housed and observed. Histologic analysis showed growth of nervous tissue elements on implant surface and implant cellular colonization. The study showed that the gecko SCI model can be used as a primary model for the assessment of SCI treatment methods. It provides a platform for testing multiple solutions with limited animal suffering before performing tests on mammals. Detailed results of

  6. Spinal cord interneurons expressing the gastrin releasing peptide receptor convey itch through VGLUT2-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Aresh, Bejan; Freitag, Fabio B; Perry, Sharn; Blümel, Edda; Lau, Joey; Franck, Marina C M; Lagerström, Malin C

    2017-02-01

    Itch is a sensation that promotes the desire to scratch, which can be evoked by mechanical and chemical stimuli. In the spinal cord, neurons expressing the gastrin releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) have been identified as specific mediators of itch. However, our understanding of the GRPR-population in the spinal cord, and thus how these neurons exercise their functions, is limited. For this purpose, we constructed a Cre line designed to target the GRPR population of neurons (Grpr-Cre). Our analysis revealed that Grpr-Cre cells in the spinal cord are predominantly excitatory interneurons that are found in the dorsal lamina, especially in lamina II-IV. Application of the specific agonist gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) induced spike responses in 43.3% of the patched Grpr-Cre neurons, where the majority of the cells displayed a tonic firing property. Additionally, our analysis showed that the Grpr-Cre population expresses Vglut2 mRNA and mice ablated of Vglut2 in Grpr-Cre cells (Vglut2-lox;Grpr-Cre mice) displayed less spontaneous itch, and attenuated responses to both histaminergic and non-histaminergic agents. We could also show that application of the itch-inducing peptide natriuretic polypeptide b (NPPB) induces calcium influx in a sub-population of Grpr-Cre neurons. To summarize, our data indicate that the Grpr-Cre spinal cord neural population is composed of interneurons that use VGLUT2-mediated signaling for transmitting chemical and spontaneous itch stimuli to the next, currently unknown, neurons in the labeled line of itch.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  7. Assessment of in vivo spinal cord conduction velocity in rats in an experimental model of ischemic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Basoglu, H; Kurtoglu, T; Cetin, N K; Bilgin, M D; Kiylioglu, N

    2013-08-01

    Experimental laboratory investigation of spinal cord conductivity alterations in a rat model of ischemic spinal cord injury (SCI). To observe the epidural spinal cord stimulation-induced electromyography responses, and to investigate the possible alterations of spinal cord conduction velocity (SCCV) and compound muscle action potentials (CMAPs) after ischemic SCI in rats. Adnan Menderes University, Institute of Health Science, Aydin, Turkey. SCI was induced by transient occlusion of the abdominal aorta in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Spinal cord histopathology was examined to determine neuronal damage and Tarlov scale was used to grade locomotor functions. Epidural electrical stimulation of spinal cord was performed by monopolar needle electrodes sequentially at L1-L2 and L5-L6 levels, and CMAPs were recorded from the left gastrocnemius muscle by surface electrodes. Amplitudes and durations of CMAPs were evaluated and SCCVs were calculated by analyzing the latency difference of CMAPs. Ischemia-induced SCI resulted in significant reduction of Tarlov scores and a significant decline in number of viable neurons. Similarly, a significant decrement was observed in SCCV following spinal cord ischemia. This study demonstrated that measurement of SCCV via epidural electrical stimulation is possible and displays a significant decline after spinal cord ischemia in rats. We suggest that this method can be beneficial to quantify neuronal damage after experimental ischemic SCI.

  8. Intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Aloe, Luigi; Bianchi, Patrizia; De Bellis, Alberto; Soligo, Marzia; Rocco, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate whether, by intranasal administration, the nerve growth factor bypasses the blood-brain barrier and turns over the spinal cord neurons and if such therapeutic approach could be of value in the treatment of spinal cord injury. Adult Sprague-Dawley rats with intact and injured spinal cord received daily intranasal nerve growth factor administration in both nostrils for 1 day or for 3 consecutive weeks. We found an increased content of nerve growth factor and enhanced expression of nerve growth factor receptor in the spinal cord 24 hours after a single intranasal administration of nerve growth factor in healthy rats, while daily treatment for 3 weeks in a model of spinal cord injury improved the deficits in locomotor behaviour and increased spinal content of both nerve growth factor and nerve growth factor receptors. These outcomes suggest that the intranasal nerve growth factor bypasses blood-brain barrier and affects spinal cord neurons in spinal cord injury. They also suggest exploiting the possible therapeutic role of intranasally delivered nerve growth factor for the neuroprotection of damaged spinal nerve cells. PMID:25206755

  9. Anatomical evidence for red nucleus projections to motoneuronal cell groups in the spinal cord of the monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstege, Gert; Blok, Bertil F.; Ralston, Diane Daly

    1988-01-01

    In four rhesus monkeys wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injections were made in the mesencephalic tegmentum. In three cases with injections involving the red nucleus (RN), rubrospinal fibers descended mainly contralaterally to terminate in laminae V, VI and dorsal VII of the spinal cord and in the lateral motoneuronal cell groups at the level of the cervical and lumbosacral enlargements. In all four cases the area of the interstitial nucleus of Cajal (INC) was injected, which resulted in labeled interstitiospinal fibers in the medial part of the ipsilateral ventral funiculus of the spinal cord. The results indicate that there is no major qualitative difference between the mesencephalic (RN and INC) and motor cortical projections to the spinal cord.

  10. Anatomical evidence for red nucleus projections to motoneuronal cell groups in the spinal cord of the monkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstege, Gert; Blok, Bertil F.; Ralston, Diane Daly

    1988-01-01

    In four rhesus monkeys wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injections were made in the mesencephalic tegmentum. In three cases with injections involving the red nucleus (RN), rubrospinal fibers descended mainly contralaterally to terminate in laminae V, VI and dorsal VII of the spinal cord and in the lateral motoneuronal cell groups at the level of the cervical and lumbosacral enlargements. In all four cases the area of the interstitial nucleus of Cajal (INC) was injected, which resulted in labeled interstitiospinal fibers in the medial part of the ipsilateral ventral funiculus of the spinal cord. The results indicate that there is no major qualitative difference between the mesencephalic (RN and INC) and motor cortical projections to the spinal cord.

  11. Stab wound to the intramedullary spinal cord: Presurgical and surgical management options for a retained blade to optimize neurological preservation

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Prateek; Burke, John F.; Abdullah, Kalil G.; Piazza, Matthew; Smith, Brian P.; Thawani, Jayesh P.; Malhotra, Neil R.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We present a rare case of an intraparenchymal nonmissile penetrating spinal injury (NMPSI) occurring at the T11 level in a patient presenting without neurological deficit. Case Description: The patient sustained a knife wound that penetrated the lamina without incurring bony injury and entered the spinal cord at the T11 level. During surgery, the intramedullary penetration of the cord was confirmed, and following surgical removal of the knife, the patient fully recovered without losing any neurological function. Conclusions: The surgical management of NMPSI in patients who are neurologically intact is controversial. Here, we report surgical excision of a knife that penetrated the spinal cord at the T11 level, without the patient incurring further neurological deterioration. PMID:28144493

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis of spinal cord diseases.

    PubMed Central

    Aichner, F; Poewe, W; Rogalsky, W; Wallnöfer, K; Willeit, J; Gerstenbrand, F

    1985-01-01

    Experience with magnetic resonance imaging in 22 patients with diseases of the spinal cord is reported. Important additional diagnostic information as compared to conventional neuroradiological techniques (myelography, spinal CT) was gained especially in cases of hydrosyringomyelia, intraspinal tumour and multiple sclerosis. It is suggested that magnetic resonance imaging may become the method of choice in the diagnosis of structural spinal cord diseases. Images PMID:3936900

  13. Cyto- and myeloarchitectonic organisation of the spinal cord of an echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus).

    PubMed

    Ashwell, K W; Zhang, L L

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the cyto- and myeloarchitectural organisation of the spinal cord of an echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) with the aid of Nisst staining, darkfield examination and p-phenylenediamine staining. We have also examined the distribution of unmyelinated afferents by labelling with a peroxidase-conjugated lectin derived from Griffonia simplicifolia (B1 isolectin). The cytoarchitectural features characterising the laminar organisation of the spinal cord in eutherian mammals were broadly applicable to the spinal cord of this monotreme. In addition, we identified a distinct group of large neurons in the ventral part of lamina X, extending into the ventral funiculus, that we have called the median nuclear group. We were unable to identify a central cervical nucleus in this echidna on the basis of cytoarchitectural criteria, although all other spinal cord nuclei found in eutherians could be found in this monotreme. Lectin labelling with the Griffonia simplicifolia isolectin B4 revealed a subpopulation of dorsal root ganglion cells similar to those labelled in Eutheria. In this echidna, labelling of unmyelinated fibres was found in Lissauer's zone and laminae I and II, as seen in rats (Rattus norvegicus); there were also deeper patches extending into laminae III to V and what appeared to be commissural axons approaching the dorsal grey commissure, which have not been seen in Eutheria. Fibre calibre in the dorsal and ventral roots of this echidna was similar to that reported in Eutheria, suggesting similar proportion of afferent fibre classes and alpha and gamma motoneurons. In the echidna, mean diameter of myelinated dorsal root axons was 4.65 microns at T1 and 5.22 microns at L3, with a clear bimodal distribution in the L3 dorsal root showing distinct groups at 1 to 5 microns and 6 to 12 microns. These made up approximately 45 and 55% of the total myelinated axon population, respectively. Myelinated fibres in the ventral root at L3 showed two major peaks in

  14. Expression and action of cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase Ialpha in inflammatory hyperalgesia in rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Tao, Y X; Hassan, A; Haddad, E; Johns, R A

    2000-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have shown a role for the nitric oxide/cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling pathway in the development of spinal hyperalgesia. However, the roles of effectors for cyclic guanosine monophosphate are not fully understood in the processing of pain in the spinal cord. The present study showed that cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha but not Ibeta was localized in the neuronal bodies and processes, and was distributed primarily in the superficial laminae of the spinal cord. Intrathecal administration of a selective inhibitor of cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha, Rp-8-[(4-chlorophenyl)thio]-cGMPS triethylamine, produced a significant antinociception demonstrated by the decrease in the number of flinches and shakes in the formalin test. This was accompanied by a marked reduction in formalin-induced c-fos expression in the spinal dorsal horn. Moreover, cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha protein expression was dramatically increased in the lumbar spinal cord 96 h after injection of formalin into a hindpaw, which occurred mainly in the superficial laminae on the ipsilateral side of a formalin-injected hindpaw. This up-regulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha expression was completely blocked not only by a neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole, and a soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, but also by an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist, dizocilpine maleate (MK-801). The present results indicate that noxious stimulation not only initially activates but also later up-regulates cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha expression in the superficial laminae via an N-methyl-D-aspartate-nitric oxide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate signaling pathway, suggesting that cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase Ialpha may play an

  15. Recovery of spinal cord function induced by direct current stimulation of the injured rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Wallace, M C; Tator, C H; Piper, I

    1987-06-01

    Direct current stimulation has been shown by others to enhance the regeneration of several types of tissues, including nervous tissue in some species. The purpose of the present experiment was to assess the value of direct current stimulation for enhancing the recovery of spinal cord function after clip compression injury of the rat spinal cord. Twenty Wistar rats underwent a 1-minute, 50-g clip compression injury at T-1, after which electrodes were placed epidurally with the anode proximal and the cathode distal to the injury site. These electrodes were attached to a stimulator implanted subcutaneously. Ten animals received stimulators that produced a constant current of 14 microA, and the remainder received stimulators with no electrical output and served as controls. Assignment of stimulators was random, and the treatment group was not identified until sacrifice. Neurological function was tested weekly for 15 weeks by the inclined plane technique, after which the animals were killed and the injured cords were examined for histological evidence of regeneration. The mean inclined plane result for the treatment group (39 +/- 5 degrees) was significantly better than that for the control group (31 +/- 6 degrees) (P less than 0.02), although there was no significant difference in histological findings between the two groups. Thus, direct current stimulation of the injured mammalian spinal cord produced improvement in neurological function and warrants further investigation.

  16. Targeting the blood-spinal cord barrier: A therapeutic approach to spinal cord protection against ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ji; Yu, Qijing; Xie, Lijie; Zhu, Hongfei

    2016-08-01

    One of the principal functions of physical barriers between the blood and central nervous system protects system (i.e., blood brain barrier and blood-spinal cord barrier) is the protection from toxic and pathogenic agents in the blood. Disruption of blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) plays a key role in spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury (SCIRI). Following SCIRI, the permeability of the BSCB increases. Maintaining the integrity of the BSCB alleviates the spinal cord injury after spinal cord ischemia. This review summarizes current knowledge of the structure and function of the BSCB and its changes following SCIRI, as well as the prevention and cure of SCIRI and the role of the BSCB.

  17. Dual Cortical Plasticity After Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Humanes-Valera, Desire; Foffani, Guglielmo; Alonso-Calviño, Elena; Fernández-López, Elena; Aguilar, Juan

    2017-05-01

    During cortical development, plasticity reflects the dynamic equilibrium between increasing and decreasing functional connectivity subserved by synaptic sprouting and pruning. After adult cortical deafferentation, plasticity seems to be dominated by increased functional connectivity, leading to the classical expansive reorganization from the intact to the deafferented cortex. In contrast, here we show a striking "decrease" in the fast cortical responses to high-intensity forepaw stimulation 1-3 months after complete thoracic spinal cord transection, as evident in both local field potentials and intracellular in vivo recordings. Importantly, this decrease in fast cortical responses co-exists with an "increase" in cortical activation over slower post-stimulus timescales, as measured by an increased forepaw-to-hindpaw propagation of stimulus-triggered cortical up-states, as well as by the enhanced slow sustained depolarization evoked by high-frequency forepaw stimuli in the deafferented hindpaw cortex. This coincidence of diminished fast cortical responses and enhanced slow cortical activation offers a dual perspective of adult cortical plasticity after spinal cord injury. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Neurogenic bladder in spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Taweel, Waleed Al; Seyam, Raouf

    2015-01-01

    Neurogenic bladder dysfunction due to spinal cord injury poses a significant threat to the well-being of patients. Incontinence, renal impairment, urinary tract infection, stones, and poor quality of life are some complications of this condition. The majority of patients will require management to ensure low pressure reservoir function of the bladder, complete emptying, and dryness. Management typically begins with anticholinergic medications and clean intermittent catheterization. Patients who fail this treatment because of inefficacy or intolerability are candidates for a spectrum of more invasive procedures. Endoscopic managements to relieve the bladder outlet resistance include sphincterotomy, botulinum toxin injection, and stent insertion. In contrast, patients with incompetent sphincters are candidates for transobturator tape insertion, sling surgery, or artificial sphincter implantation. Coordinated bladder emptying is possible with neuromodulation in selected patients. Bladder augmentation, usually with an intestinal segment, and urinary diversion are the last resort. Tissue engineering is promising in experimental settings; however, its role in clinical bladder management is still evolving. In this review, we summarize the current literature pertaining to the pathology and management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction in patients with spinal cord injury. PMID:26090342

  19. Fibronectin Matrix Assembly after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yunjiao; Soderblom, Cynthia; Trojanowsky, Michelle; Lee, Do-Hun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract After spinal cord injury (SCI), a fibrotic scar forms at the injury site that is best characterized by the accumulation of perivascular fibroblasts and deposition of the extracellular matrix protein fibronectin. While fibronectin is a growth-permissive substrate for axons, the fibrotic scar is inhibitory to axon regeneration. The mechanism behind how fibronectin contributes to the inhibitory environment and how the fibronectin matrix is assembled in the fibrotic scar is unknown. By deleting fibronectin in myeloid cells, we demonstrate that fibroblasts are most likely the major source of fibronectin in the fibrotic scar. In addition, we demonstrate that fibronectin is initially present in a soluble form and is assembled into a matrix at 7 d post-SCI. Assembly of the fibronectin matrix may be mediated by the canonical fibronectin receptor, integrin α5β1, which is primarily expressed by activated macrophages/microglia in the fibrotic scar. Despite the pronounced cavitation after rat SCI, fibrotic scar also is observed in a rat SCI model, which is considered to be more similar to human pathology. Taken together, our study provides insight into the mechanism of fibrotic scar formation after spinal cord injury. PMID:25492623

  20. The effects of cyclosporin-A on functional outcome and axonal regrowth following spinal cord injury in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Roozbehi, Amrollah; Joghataie, Mohammad Taghi; Mehdizadeh, Mehdi; Mirzaei, Ali; Delaviz, Hamdollah

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the immunophilin ligands have the special advantage in spinal cord repair. In this study, the effects of cyclosporine A (CsA) on functional recovery and histological outcome were evaluated following spinal cord injury in rats. After spinal cord hemisection in thirty six adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (200- 250 g), treatment groups received CsA (2.5 mg/kg i.p.) at 15min and 24h after lesion (CsA 15min group and CsA 24h group) daily, for 8 weeks. Control and sham groups received normal saline and in sham operated animals the spinal cord was exposed in the same manner as treatment groups, but was not hemisected. Hindlimb motor function was assessed in 1, 3, 5 and 7 weeks after lesion, using locomotive rating scale developed by Basso, Bresnahan and Beattie (BBB). Motor neurons were counted within the lamina IX of ventral horn and lesion size was measured in 5 mm of spinal lumbar segment with the epicenter of the lesion site. The mean number of motor neurons and the mean BBB scale in 3, 5 and 7 weeks in CsA 15min groups significantly increased compared to the control group. Although, the lesion size reduced in rats with CsA treatment compared to the control group, no significant difference was observed. Thus, it can be concluded that CsA can improve locomotor function and histological outcome in the partial spinal cord injury.

  1. Termination of supraspinal descending pathways in the spinal cord of the tegu lizard, Tupinambis nigropunctatus.

    PubMed

    Cruce, W L

    1975-01-01

    Descending fiber projections to the lizard spinal cord were studied using anterograde axonal degeneration. Following hemisection of the cord at the first spinal segment, degeneration was found in the white and gray matter as far down as the 31st (caudal) segment. Degenerating fibers in the white matter were confined to the ipsilateral side and were found in the medial longitudinal fasiculus and the outer half ot the lateral and ventral funiculi. Degeneration was more intense in the dorsolateral and ventromedial funiculi than in the ventrolateral funiculus. In the gray matter, REXED's criteria were applied to Nissl-stained material to delimit boundaries of ten laminae. Degeneration of suprospinal axons was most intense in the medial part of VII, dorsal and ventral commissures to ramify contralaterally in the medial part of VII, in VII, and in medial IX. No degeneration was present in the lateral part of the spinal gray on the contralateral side. In Golgi-stained material, dendrites of lateral IX cells were seen to extend into lamina VII, the dorsolateral part of VII, and the lateral funiculus. Thus, fibers of the ventromedial supraspinal pathway may make axodendritic contact with motoneurons of lateral IX as well as medial IX, ipsilaterally. In addition, there is a possibility of a crossed connection to contralateral motoneurons.

  2. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  3. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  4. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  5. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5880 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief... Implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal cord stimulator for pain relief is a device that is used to stimulate electrically a patient's spinal cord to...

  7. Anti-NGF Local Therapy for Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    pathophysiological basis of neurogenic detrusor overactivity with spinal cord injury (SCI). However, the... bladder distention after SCI. Using adult female rats with chronic spinal cord injury induced by Th4 spinal cord transection, we will investigate: (1...autonomic dysreflexia during bladder distention in rats with spinal cord injury . 111th Annual Meeting AUA, Abstract No. 34, San Diego, May 4-8, 2013.

  8. The thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, T R; Dineen, R; White, B; Jaspan, T

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study included a series of middle-aged male and female patients who presented with chronic anterior hemicord dysfunction progressing to paraplegia. Imaging of anterior thoracic cord displacement by either a dural adhesion or a dural defect with associated cord herniation is presented. Methods This is a retrospective review of cases referred to a tertiary neuroscience centre over a 19-year period. Imaging series were classified by two experienced neuroradiologists against several criteria and correlated with clinical examination and/or findings at surgery. Results 16 cases were available for full review. Nine were considered to represent adhesions (four confirmed surgically) and four to represent true herniation (three confirmed surgically). In the three remaining cases the diagnosis was radiologically uncertain. Conclusion The authors propose “thoracic anterior spinal cord adhesion syndrome” as a novel term to describe this patient cohort and suggest appropriate clinicoradiological features for diagnosis. Several possible aetiologies are also suggested, with disc rupture and inflammation followed by disc resorption and dural pocket formation being a possible mechanism predisposing to herniation at the extreme end of a clinicopathological spectrum. PMID:22665931

  9. Central nociceptive sensitization vs. spinal cord training: opposing forms of plasticity that dictate function after complete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    The spinal cord demonstrates several forms of plasticity that resemble brain-dependent learning and memory. Among the most studied form of spinal plasticity is spinal memory for noxious (nociceptive) stimulation. Numerous papers have described central pain as a spinally-stored memory that enhances future responses to cutaneous stimulation. This phenomenon, known as central sensitization, has broad relevance to a range of pathological conditions. Work from the spinal cord injury (SCI) field indicates that the lumbar spinal cord demonstrates several other forms of plasticity, including formal learning and memory. After complete thoracic SCI, the lumbar spinal cord can be trained by delivering stimulation to the hindleg when the leg is extended. In the presence of this response-contingent stimulation the spinal cord rapidly learns to hold the leg in a flexed position, a centrally mediated effect that meets the formal criteria for instrumental (response-outcome) learning. Instrumental flexion training produces a central change in spinal plasticity that enables future spinal learning on both the ipsilateral and contralateral leg. However, if stimulation is given in a response-independent manner, the spinal cord develops central maladaptive plasticity that undermines future spinal learning on both legs. The present paper tests for interactions between spinal cord training and central nociceptive sensitization after complete spinal cord transection. We found that spinal training alters future central sensitization by intradermal formalin (24 h post-training). Conversely intradermal formalin impaired future spinal learning (24 h post-injection). Because formalin-induced central sensitization has been shown to involve NMDA receptor activation, we tested whether pre-treatment with NMDA would also affect spinal learning in manner similar to formalin. We found intrathecal NMDA impaired learning in a dose-dependent fashion, and that this effect endures for at least 24 h. These

  10. Revisiting the segmental organization of the human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Leijnse, J N; D'Herde, K

    2016-09-01

    In classic anatomic atlases, the spinal cord is standardly represented in its anatomical form with symmetrically emerging anterior and posterior roots, which at the level of the intervertebral foramen combine into the spinal nerves. The parts of the cord delimited by the boundaries of the roots are called segments or myelomeres. Associated with their regular repetitive appearance is the notion that the cord is segmentally organized. This segmental view is reinforced by clinical practice. Spinal cord roots innervate specific body parts. The level of cord trauma is diagnosed by the de-innervation symptoms of these parts. However, systemically, the case for a segmentally organized cord is not so clear. To date, developmental and genetic research points to a regionally rather than a segmentally organized cord. In the present study, to what degree the fila radicularia are segmentally implanted along the cord was investigated. The research hypothesis was that if the fila radicularia were non-segmentally implanted at the cord surface, it would be unlikely that the internal neuron stratum would be segmented. The visual segmented aspect of the myelomeres would then be the consequence of the necessary bundling of axons towards the vertebral foramen as the only exits of the vertebral canal, rather than of an underlying segment organization of the cord itself. To investigate the research hypothesis, the fila radicularia in the cervical-upper thoracic part of five spinal cords were detached from their spinal nerves and dissected in detail. The principal research question was if the fila radicularia are separated from their spinal nerves and dissected from their connective tissues up to the cord, would it be possible to reconstruct the original spinal segments from the morphology and interspaces of the fila? The dissections revealed that the anterior fila radicularia emerge from the cord at regular regionally modulated interspaces without systematic segmental delineations. The

  11. A knowledge-based approach to automatic detection of the spinal cord in CT images.

    PubMed

    Archip, Neculai; Erard, Pierre-Jean; Egmont-Petersen, Michael; Haefliger, Jean-Marie; Germond, Jean-Francois

    2002-12-01

    Accurate planning of radiation therapy entails the definition of treatment volumes and a clear delimitation of normal tissue of which unnecessary exposure should be prevented. The spinal cord is a radiosensitive organ, which should be precisely identified because an overexposure to radiation may lead to undesired complications for the patient such as neuronal disfunction or paralysis. In this paper, a knowledge-based approach to identifying the spinal cord in computed tomography images of the thorax is presented. The approach relies on a knowledge-base which consists of a so-called anatomical structures map (ASM) and a task-oriented architecture called the plan solver. The ASM contains a frame-like knowledge representation of the macro-anatomy in the human thorax. The plan solver is responsible for determining the position, orientation and size of the structures of interest to radiation therapy. The plan solver relies on a number of image processing operators. Some are so-called atomic (e.g., thresholding and snakes) whereas others are composite. The whole system has been implemented on a standard PC. Experiments performed on the image material from 23 patients show that the approach results in a reliable recognition of the spinal cord (92% accuracy) and the spinal canal (85% accuracy). The lamina is more problematic to locate correctly (accuracy 72%). The position of the outer thorax is always determined correctly.

  12. GABA and Central Neuropathic Pain following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Gwak, Young S.; Hulsebosch, Claire E.

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury induces maladaptive synaptic transmission in the somatosensory system that results in chronic central neuropathic pain. Recent literature suggests that glial-neuronal interactions are important modulators in synaptic transmission following spinal cord injury. Neuronal hyperexcitability is one of the predominant phenomenon caused by maladaptive synaptic transmission via altered glial-neuronal interactions after spinal cord injury. In the somatosensory system, spinal inhibitory neurons counter balance the enhanced synaptic transmission from peripheral input. For a decade, the literature suggests that hypofunction of GABAergic inhibitory tone is an important factor in the enhanced synaptic transmission that often results in neuronal hyperexcitability in dorsal horn neurons following spinal cord injury. Neurons and glial cells synergistically control intracellular chloride ion gradients via modulation of chloride transporters, extracellular glutamate and GABA concentrations via uptake mechanisms. Thus, the intracellular “GABA-glutamate-glutamine cycle” is maintained for normal physiological homeostasis. However, hyperexcitable neurons and glial activation after spinal cord injury disrupts the balance of chloride ions, glutamate and GABA distribution in the spinal dorsal horn and results in chronic neuropathic pain. In this review, we address spinal cord injury induced mechanisms in hypofunction of GABAergic tone that results in chronic central neuropathic pain. PMID:21216257

  13. Disability, atrophy and cortical reorganization following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Freund, Patrick; Weiskopf, Nikolaus; Ward, Nick S; Hutton, Chloe; Gall, Angela; Ciccarelli, Olga; Craggs, Michael; Friston, Karl; Thompson, Alan J

    2011-06-01

    The impact of traumatic spinal cord injury on structural integrity, cortical reorganization and ensuing disability is variable and may depend on a dynamic interaction between the severity of local damage and the capacity of the brain for plastic reorganization. We investigated trauma-induced anatomical changes in the spinal cord and brain, and explored their relationship to functional changes in sensorimotor cortex. Structural changes were assessed using cross-sectional cord area, voxel-based morphometry and voxel-based cortical thickness of T1-weighted images in 10 subjects with cervical spinal cord injury and 16 controls. Cortical activation in response to right-sided (i) handgrip; and (ii) median and tibial nerve stimulation were assessed using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Regression analyses explored associations between cord area, grey and white matter volume, cortical activations and thickness, and disability. Subjects with spinal cord injury had impaired upper and lower limb function bilaterally, a 30% reduced cord area, smaller white matter volume in the pyramids and left cerebellar peduncle, and smaller grey matter volume and cortical thinning in the leg area of the primary motor and sensory cortex compared with controls. Functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed increased activation in the left primary motor cortex leg area during handgrip and the left primary sensory cortex face area during median nerve stimulation in subjects with spinal cord injury compared with controls, but no increased activation following tibial nerve stimulation. A smaller cervical cord area was associated with impaired upper limb function and increased activations with handgrip and median nerve stimulation, but reduced activations with tibial nerve stimulation. Increased sensory deficits were associated with increased activations in the left primary sensory cortex face area due to median nerve stimulation. In conclusion, spinal cord injury leads to cord atrophy

  14. Connexin36 identified at morphologically mixed chemical/electrical synapses on trigeminal motoneurons and at primary afferent terminals on spinal cord neurons in adult mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Bautista, W; McCrea, D A; Nagy, J I

    2014-03-28

    Morphologically mixed chemical/electrical synapses at axon terminals, with the electrical component formed by gap junctions, is common in the CNS of lower vertebrates. In mammalian CNS, evidence for morphologically mixed synapses has been obtained in only a few locations. Here, we used immunofluorescence approaches to examine the localization of the neuronally expressed gap junction forming protein connexin36 (Cx36) in relation to the axon terminal marker vesicular glutamate transporter-1 (vglut1) in the spinal cord and the trigeminal motor nucleus (Mo5) of rat and mouse. In adult rodents, immunolabeling for Cx36 appeared exclusively as Cx36-puncta, and was widely distributed at all rostro-caudal levels in most spinal cord laminae and in the Mo5. A high proportion of Cx36-puncta was co-localized with vglut1, forming morphologically mixed synapses on motoneurons, in intermediate spinal cord lamina, and in regions of medial lamina VII, where vglut1-containing terminals associated with Cx36 converged on neurons adjacent to the central canal. Unilateral transection of lumbar dorsal roots reduced immunolabeling of both vglut1 and Cx36 in intermediate laminae and lamina IX. Further, vglut1-terminals displaying Cx36-puncta were contacted by terminals labeled for glutamic acid decarboxylase65, which is known to be contained in presynaptic terminals on large-diameter primary afferents. Developmentally, mixed synapses begin to emerge in the spinal cord only after the second to third postnatal week and thereafter increase to adult levels. Our findings demonstrate that axon terminals of primary afferent origin form morphologically mixed synapses containing Cx36 in broadly distributed areas of adult rodent spinal cord and Mo5.

  15. Cooling athletes with a spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Griggs, Katy E; Price, Michael J; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L

    2015-01-01

    Cooling strategies that help prevent a reduction in exercise capacity whilst exercising in the heat have received considerable research interest over the past 3 decades, especially in the lead up to a relatively hot Olympic and Paralympic Games. Progressing into the next Olympic/Paralympic cycle, the host, Rio de Janeiro, could again present an environmental challenge for competing athletes. Despite the interest and vast array of research into cooling strategies for the able-bodied athlete, less is known regarding the application of these cooling strategies in the thermoregulatory impaired spinal cord injured (SCI) athletic population. Individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI) have a reduced afferent input to the thermoregulatory centre and a loss of both sweating capacity and vasomotor control below the level of the spinal cord lesion. The magnitude of this thermoregulatory impairment is proportional to the level of the lesion. For instance, individuals with high-level lesions (tetraplegia) are at a greater risk of heat illness than individuals with lower-level lesions (paraplegia) at a given exercise intensity. Therefore, cooling strategies may be highly beneficial in this population group, even in moderate ambient conditions (~21 °C). This review was undertaken to examine the scientific literature that addresses the application of cooling strategies in individuals with an SCI. Each method is discussed in regards to the practical issues associated with the method and the potential underlying mechanism. For instance, site-specific cooling would be more suitable for an athlete with an SCI than whole body water immersion, due to the practical difficulties of administering this method in this population group. From the studies reviewed, wearing an ice vest during intermittent sprint exercise has been shown to decrease thermal strain and improve performance. These garments have also been shown to be effective during exercise in the able-bodied. Drawing on

  16. Temperature sensitivity of neurones in slices of the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed Central

    Pehl, U; Schmid, H A; Simon, E

    1997-01-01

    1. The inherent temperature sensitivity of 343 spontaneously active neurones recorded from rat spinal cord (SC) slices was investigated electrophysiologically. Recordings were made from 321 neurons from transverse and 22 neurons from longitudinal slices and their thermosensitivity was determined by relating changes in firing rate to changes in slice temperature. 2. Of the neurones from transverse slices, 53% were warm sensitive, 2% were cold sensitive and 45% were temperature insensitive. In longitudinal slices, 68% were warm sensitive and the remaining neurones were temperature insensitive. 3. When classified according to their recording sites in transverse slices, warm-sensitive neurones in laminae I and II had the same mean temperature coefficient compared with those recorded from lamina X, despite the fact that the latter had a significantly higher spontaneous activity. 4. The intrinsic temperature sensitivity of the majority of warm-sensitive neurones was confirmed by blocking their synaptic input. 5. A transient overshoot in activity, i.e. a dynamic response characteristic following rapid temperature stimuli (0.4 degree C s-1) was observed in 73% of the warm-sensitive and 59% of the temperature-insensitive neurones in laminae I and II in response to rapid warming, but only rarely (< 10%) in lamina X. 6. Temperature-sensitive SC neurones share response characteristics with temperature-sensitive neurones in the preoptic and anterior hypothalamic (PO/AH) area and with peripheral temperature receptors. Functionally, these neurones may represent the cellular basis for the temperature sensory function of the spinal cord that has been well characterized in vivo in homeothermic species. PMID:9032695

  17. Spinal cord stimulation for refractory angina pectoris: a shocking experience.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Paul M; Macsullivan, Roisin

    2004-10-01

    Spinal cord stimulation has been extensively utilized in the treatment of conditions including complex regional pain syndrome, ischemic limb pain, failed back surgery syndrome, and angina pectoris. Recognized complications include infection, dural tap, and electrode movement. We report the case of a patient who experienced a sensation of extremely enhanced stimulation in the area covered by the spinal cord stimulator while in the vicinity of a high-tension electricity substation. Full resolution of symptoms occurred when the spinal cord stimulator was switched off, indicating that active stimulators may be susceptible to the effects of external electrical fields.

  18. Neuromyelitis optica mimics the morphology of spinal cord tumors.

    PubMed

    Erol, İlknur; Özkale, Murat; Savaş, Tülin; Alkan, Özlem; Çekinmez, Melih; Erbay, Ayşe

    2016-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune disorder of the central nervous system, that predominantly affects the spinal cord and the optic nerve. Its key features include transverse myelitis, commonly associated with extensive inflammation spanning three or more consecutive vertebral segments. Longitudinal extensive spinal cord lesions can also occur in systemic autoimmune diseases, infections, vascular and metabolic disorders, subsequent to irradiation, intramedullary tumors and paraneoplastic myelopathies. We present a case study of an 8-year-old girl seropositive for antibodies against the aquaporin 4 who displayed longitudinal extensive spinal cord lesions, that was initially misdiagnosed as an intramedullary tumor.

  19. Partial agonistic action of endomorphins in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Mizoguchi, H; Wu, H E; Narita, M

    2001-09-07

    The partial agonistic properties of endogenous mu-opioid peptides endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 for G-protein activation were determined in the mouse spinal cord, monitoring the increases in guanosine-5'-o-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate binding. The G-protein activation induced by endogenous opioid peptide beta-endorphin in the spinal cord was significantly, but partially, attenuated by co-incubation with endomorphin-1 or endomorphin-2. The data indicates that endomorphin-1 and endomorphin-2 are endogenous partial agonists for mu-opioid receptor in the mouse spinal cord.

  20. Current therapeutic strategies for inflammation following traumatic spinal cord injury☆

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Priyanka L.; Agarwal, Nitin; Barrese, James C.; Heary, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    Damage from spinal cord injury occurs in two phases – the trauma of the initial mechanical insult and a secondary injury to nervous tissue spared by the primary insult. Apart from damage sustained as a result of direct trauma to the spinal cord, the post-traumatic inflammatory response contributes significantly to functional motor deficits exacerbated by the secondary injury. Attenuating the detrimental aspects of the inflammatory response is a promising strategy to potentially ameliorate the secondary injury, and promote significant functional recovery. This review details how the inflammatory component of secondary injury to the spinal cord can be treated currently and in the foreseeable future. PMID:25624806

  1. Neurogenic period of ascending tract neurons in the upper lumbar spinal cord of the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, K.N.; Beal, J.A.; Knight, D.S. )

    1990-02-01

    Although the neurogenic period for neurons in the lumbar spinal cord has been clearly established (Days 12 through 16 of gestation), it is not known when the neurogenesis of ascending tract neurons is completed within this period. The purpose of the present study was to determine the duration of the neurogenic period for projection neurons of the ascending tracts. To label neurons undergoing mitosis during this period, tritiated thymidine was administered to fetal rats on Embryonic (E) Days E13 through E16 of gestation. Ascending tract neurons of the lumbar cord were later (Postnatal Days 40-50) labeled in each animal with a retrograde tracer, Fluoro-Gold, applied at the site of a hemisection at spinal cord segment C3. Ascending tract neurons which were undergoing mitosis in the upper lumbar cord were double labeled, i.e., labeled with both tritiated thymidine and Fluoro-Gold. On Day E13, 89-92% of the ascending tract neurons were double labeled; on Day E14, 35-37%; and on Day E15, 1-4%. Results showed, then, that some ascending tract neurons were double labeled through Day E15 and were, therefore, proliferating in the final one-third of the neurogenic period. Ascending tract neurons proliferating on Day E15 were confined to laminae III, IV, V, and X and the nucleus dorsalis. Long tract neurons in the superficial dorsal horn (laminae I and II), on the other hand, were found to have completed neurogenesis on Day E14 of gestation. Results of the present study show that spinal neurogenesis of ascending projection neurons continues throughout most of the neurogenic period and does not completely follow the well-established ventral to dorsal gradient.

  2. Propitious Therapeutic Modulators to Prevent Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier Disruption in Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Hemant; Ropper, Alexander E; Lee, Soo-Hong; Han, Inbo

    2016-05-18

    The blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) is a specialized protective barrier that regulates the movement of molecules between blood vessels and the spinal cord parenchyma. Analogous to the blood-brain barrier (BBB), the BSCB plays a crucial role in maintaining the homeostasis and internal environmental stability of the central nervous system (CNS). After spinal cord injury (SCI), BSCB disruption leads to inflammatory cell invasion such as neutrophils and macrophages, contributing to permanent neurological disability. In this review, we focus on the major proteins mediating the BSCB disruption or BSCB repair after SCI. This review is composed of three parts. Section 1. SCI and the BSCB of the review describes critical events involved in the pathophysiology of SCI and their correlation with BSCB integrity/disruption. Section 2. Major proteins involved in BSCB disruption in SCI focuses on the actions of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), angiopoietins (Angs), bradykinin, nitric oxide (NO), and endothelins (ETs) in BSCB disruption and repair. Section 3. Therapeutic approaches discusses the major therapeutic compounds utilized to date for the prevention of BSCB disruption in animal model of SCI through modulation of several proteins.

  3. Cervical Spinal Cord Compression: A Rare Presentation of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chime, Chukwunonso; Arjun, Shiva; Reddy, Pavithra; Niazi, Masooma

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common primary malignancy of liver. Distant metastasis to various organs is well known. Skeletal metastasis is also reported to various locations. Vertebral metastasis has been reported mostly to thoracic spine. However, cervical spinal cord involvement leading to cord compression has been reported very rarely in literature. We present a case of 58-year-old male with liver cirrhosis presenting as neck pain. Further work-up revealed metastatic HCC to cervical spinal cord resulting in acute cord compression. Patient has been treated with neurosurgical intervention. PMID:28299213

  4. The Therapeutic Effectiveness of Delayed Fetal Spinal Cord Tissue Transplantation on Respiratory Function Following Mid-Cervical Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chia-Ching; Lai, Sih-Rong; Shao, Yu-Han; Chen, Chun-Lin; Lee, Kun-Ze

    2017-01-17

    Respiratory impairment due to damage of the spinal respiratory motoneurons and interruption of the descending drives from brainstem premotor neurons to spinal respiratory motoneurons is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality following cervical spinal cord injury. The present study was designed to evaluate the therapeutic effectiveness of delayed transplantation of fetal spinal cord (FSC) tissue on respiratory function in rats with mid-cervical spinal cord injury. Embryonic day-14 rat FSC tissue was transplanted into a C4 spinal cord hemilesion cavity in adult male rats at 1 week postinjury. The histological results showed that FSC-derived grafts can survive, fill the lesion cavity, and differentiate into neurons and astrocytes at 8 weeks post-transplantation. Some FSC-derived graft neurons exhibited specific neurochemical markers of neurotransmitter (e.g., serotonin, noradrenalin, or acetylcholine). Moreover, a robust expression of glutamatergic and γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic fibers was observed within FSC-derived grafts. Retrograde tracing results indicated that there was a connection between FSC-derived grafts and host phrenic nucleus. Neurophysiological recording of the phrenic nerve demonstrated that phrenic burst amplitude ipsilateral to the lesion was significantly greater in injured animals that received FSC transplantation than in those that received buffer transplantation under high respiratory drives. These results suggest that delayed FSC transplantation may have the potential to repair the injured spinal cord and promote respiratory functional recovery after mid-cervical spinal cord injury.

  5. Brain gliomas presenting with symptoms of spinal cord metastasis.

    PubMed

    Mariniello, Giuseppe; Peca, Carmela; Del Basso De Caro, Marialaura; Carotenuto, Biagio; Formicola, Fabiana; Elefante, Andrea; Maiuri, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    Three patients with brain gliomas (aged 41, 37, and 43 years) presented spinal cord symptoms as first neurological presentation (two cases) or at anaplastic progression (one case). Histologically, two cases were anaplastic (WHO III) astrocytomas and one anaplastic (WHO III) oligodendroglioma. The spinal surgery consisted of partial tumor resection in two cases with localized spinal cord metastasis, and tumor biopsy in another with diffuse spreading to the conus and cauda. Spinal irradiation was performed in one case. The time interval between the spinal surgery and the appearance of brain symptoms was very short (1 month or less). Two patients underwent brain surgery (tumor resection in one and stereotactic biopsy in another). The survival time was very short (2 and 3 months) in the two patients with anaplastic astrocytoma, whereas the patient with anaplastic oligodendroglioma survived 1 year after the spinal surgery. Brain gliomas may exceptionally present with symptoms of a spinal cord metastasis. The magnetic resonance imaging finding of a spinal cord enhancing lesion, particularly if associated with root enhancement, should suggest the presence of a brain glioma. In cases with a localized spinal lesion, an early spinal surgery is advised for both diagnosis and decompression of the nervous structures. However, the clinical outcome is poor and the survival time is short. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Malignant Spinal Cord Compression: Adapting Conventional Rehabilitation Approaches.

    PubMed

    Ruppert, Lisa Marie

    2017-02-01

    Spinal tumors are classically grouped into 3 categories: extradural, intradural extramedullary, and intradural intramedullary. Spinal tumors may cause spinal cord compression and vascular compromise resulting in pain or neurologic compromise. They may also alter the architecture of the spinal column, resulting in spinal instability. Oncologic management of spinal tumors varies according to the stability of the spine, neurologic status, and presence of pain. Treatment options include surgical intervention, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hormonal manipulation. When combined with this management, rehabilitation can serve to relieve symptoms, improve quality of life, enhance functional independence, and prevent further complications in patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Functional Electrical Stimulation and Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Chester H.; Triolo, Ronald J.; Elias, Anastasia L.; Kilgore, Kevin L.; DiMarco, Anthony F.; Bogie, Kath; Vette, Albert H.; Audu, Musa; Kobetic, Rudi; Chang, Sarah R.; Chan, K. Ming; Dukelow, Sean; Bourbeau, Dennis J.; Brose, Steven W.; Gustafson, Kenneth J.; Kiss, Zelma; Mushahwar, Vivian K.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Spinal cord injuries (SCI) can disrupt communications between the brain and the body, leading to a loss of control over otherwise intact neuromuscular systems. The use of electrical stimulation (ES) of the central and peripheral nervous system can take advantage of these intact neuromuscular systems to provide therapeutic exercise options, to allow functional restoration, and even to manage or prevent many medical complications following SCI. The use of ES for the restoration of upper extremity, lower extremity and truncal functions can make many activities of daily living a potential reality for individuals with SCI. Restoring bladder and respiratory functions and preventing pressure ulcers may significantly decrease the morbidity and mortality following SCI. Many of the ES devices are already commercially available and should be considered by all SCI clinicians routinely as part of the lifelong rehabilitation care plan for all eligible individuals with SCI. PMID:25064792

  8. [Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Pittner, Y; Dufour, J-F; David, G; Boibieux, A; Peyramond, D

    2009-06-01

    We report the case of an atypical localization of a spinal cord "toxoplasmic abscess". The 46-year-old patient, HIV-1 positive, was admitted for acute urine retention and gait disorders. MRI revealed a T12-L1 medullary lesion suggesting a tumoral, inflammatory and infectious pathology. The radiological aspect and immunosuppression lead to the initiation of a treatment against Toxoplasma gondii, following the same treatment principles as for cerebral toxoplasmosis. The diagnosis can only be proved by data from autopsy or surgical biopsy, but toxoplasmosis PCR on CSF seems to be an interesting alternative to confirm the diagnosis. According to the literature, PCR is not sensitive enough as a diagnostic tool. Improvement after treatment supported the diagnosis confirmed by PCR.

  9. Spinal cord infarction mimicking ischemic heart disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae Won; Choi, Yoon Hee

    2017-06-01

    Spinal cord infarction is a rare condition and is easily misdiagnosed owing to its initial non-specific manifestation. We report a case of a 77-year-old man who presented with chest pain and upper back pain initially, and was misdiagnosed with a myocardial infarction. Four hours after admission, he complained of numbness in his entire left leg below the knee, with rapid deterioration of neurological symptoms. After 9 hours, loss of sensation progressed up to the T4 dermatome, strength of both lower extremities deteriorated to grade 0, and decrease in anal tone and deep tendon reflex was observed. Initial magnetic resonance imaging findings were normal; however, a signal change occurred 3 days after symptom onset. When patients present with acute chest pain and neurologic symptoms, the possibility of ischemic cardiac disease as well as any neurological manifestations must be investigated. Emergency physicians must remember the value of serial physical examinations.

  10. Spinal Cord Injury and Related Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Kee-Yong; Kim, Sang-Il

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) has been considered an incurable condition and it often causes devastating sequelae. In terms of the pathophysiology of SCI, reducing secondary damage is the key to its treatment. Various researches and clinical trials have been performed, and some of them showed promising results; however, there is still no gold standard treatment with sufficient evidence. Two therapeutic concepts for SCI are neuroprotective and neuroregenerative strategies. The neuroprotective strategy modulates the pathomechanism of SCI. The purpose of neuroprotective treatment is to minimize secondary damage following direct injury. The aim of neuroregenerative treatment is to enhance the endogenous regeneration process and to alter the intrinsic barrier. With advancement in biotechnology, cell therapy using cell transplantation is currently under investigation. This review discusses the pathophysiology of SCI and introduces the therapeutic candidates that have been developed so far. PMID:28261421

  11. Fas and FasL expression in the spinal cord following cord hemisection in the monkey.

    PubMed

    Jia, Liu; Yu, Zou; Hui, Li; Yu-Guang, Guan; Xin-Fu, Zhou; Chao, You; Yanbin, Xiyang; Xi, Zhan; Jun, Wang; Xin-Hua, Heng; Xin-Hua, Hen; Ting-Hua, Wang

    2011-03-01

    The changes of endogenous Fas/FasL in injured spinal cord, mostly in primates, are not well known. In this study, we investigated the temporal changes in the expression of Fas and FasL and explored their possible roles in the ventral horn of the spinal cord and associated precentral gyrus following T(11) spinal cord hemisection in the adult rhesus monkey. A significant functional improvement was seen with the time going on in monkeys subjected to cord hemisection. Apoptotic cells were also seen in the ventral horn of injured spinal cord with TUNEL staining, and a marked increase presents at 7 days post operation (dpo). Simultaneously, the number of Fas and FasL immunoreactive neurons in the spinal cords caudal and rostral to injury site and their intracellular optical density (OD) in the ipsilateral side of injury site at 7 dpo increased significantly more than that of control group and contralateral sides. This was followed by a decrease and returned to normal level at 60 dpo. No positive neurons were observed in precentral gyrus. The present results may provide some insights to understand the role of Fas/FasL in the spinal cord but not motor cortex with neuronal apoptosis and neuroplasticity in monkeys subjected to hemisection spinal cord injury.

  12. Ischemic spinal cord infarction in children without vertebral fracture

    PubMed Central

    Nance, Jessica R.; Golomb, Meredith R.

    2007-01-01

    Spinal cord infarction in children is a rare condition which is becoming more widely recognized. There are few reports in the pediatric literature characterizing etiology, diagnosis, treament and prognosis. The risk factors for pediatric ischemic spinal cord infarction include obstruction of blood flow associated with cardiovascular compromise or malformation, iatrogenic or traumatic vascular inujury, cerebellar herniation, thrombotic or embolic disease, infection, and vasculitis. In many children the cause of spinal cord ischemia in the absence of vertebral fracture is unknown. Imaging diagnosis of spinal cord ischemia is often difficult due to the small transverse area of the cord, cerebrospinal fluid artifact and inadequate resolution of MRI. Physical therapy is the most important treatment option. The prognosis is dependent on the level of spinal cord damage, early identification and reversal of ischemia, and follow-up with intensive physical therapy and medical support. In addition to summarizing the literature regarding spinal cord infarction in children without vertebral fracture, this review article adds two cases to the literature which highlight the difficulties and controversies in the management of this condition. PMID:17437902

  13. Cervical spinal cord infarction after cervical spine decompressive surgery.

    PubMed

    Kalb, Samuel; Fakhran, Saeed; Dean, Bruce; Ross, Jeffrey; Porter, Randall W; Kakarla, Udaya K; Ruggieri, Paul; Theodore, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    To report five patients who underwent cervical decompressive surgeries and developed persistent postoperative neurologic deficits compatible with spinal cord infarctions and evaluate causes for these rare complications. The clinical courses and imaging studies of five patients were retrospectively analyzed. Imaging findings, types of surgeries, vascular compromise or risk factors, hypotensive episodes, intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials, concomitant brain infarctions, and clinical degree and radiographic extent of spinal cord infarction were studied. The presence of spinal cord infarction was determined by clinical course and imaging evaluation. All five patients had antecedent cervical cord region vascular compromise or generalized vascular risk factors. Four patients developed hypotensive episodes, two intraoperatively and two postoperatively. None of the four patients with hypotensive episodes had imaging or clinical evidence of concomitant brain infarctions. Neuroimaging evaluation of spinal cord infarction after decompressive surgery is done to exclude spinal cord compression, to ensure adequate surgical decompression, and to confirm infarction by imaging. Antecedent, unrecognized preoperative vascular compromise may be a significant contributor to spinal cord infarction by itself or in combination with hypotension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of taurine in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R C; Seki, Y; Yosida, J

    2006-08-01

    Taurine is a sulfur amino acid. It is found endogenously in human and several others tissues. It is significantly in high concentration in mammals. Human body contains about 0.1% of body weight as taurine. It has a number of physiological and pharmacological actions. It is also used in the therapy of important organs dysfunctions. In spinal cord it has inhibitory effects; like antiepileptic and anti-nociceptive. Taurine also inhibits substance p induced biting and scratching behavior. In spinal cord injury elevated level of taurine has been observed. Higher level of taurine has been also recorded in SCI therapy using, known clinical agent methyl prednisolone (MP). The increased taurine concentration seems to be involved in protection and regeneration of tissues following injury. In SCI along with physical injury secondary activities also takes place which are complex in nature. Secondary activity includes vascular events and activation of neutrophils, resulting endothelial damage. Activated neutrophils; release a variety of inflammatory mediators such as myeloperoxidase (MPO), reactive oxygen species (ROS), and some others. It is believed that taurine exert its protective action through scavenging of ROS and down regulating several other inflammatory mediators like tumor necrosis factors (TNFalpha). The inside of mechanism reveals toxic substance HOCl is produced by MPO is converted to less toxic substances through scavenging action of taurine. Amino acid therapy has its own limitations and to over come such situation there is a need to develop small, simple lipophilic analogs of taurine. Use of taurine analogs has provided better results; for example, N- chloro taurine (NCT) which is a taurine derivative has exhibited therapeutic advances over taurine. Taurine and its analogs with sound experimental and clinical support may constitute a new class of therapeutic agents for SCI., and perhaps this review may provide enough material to think of this.

  15. Injury alters intrinsic functional connectivity within the primate spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li Min; Mishra, Arabinda; Yang, Pai-Feng; Wang, Feng; Gore, John C

    2015-05-12

    Recent demonstrations of correlated low-frequency MRI signal variations between subregions of the spinal cord at rest in humans, similar to those found in the brain, suggest that such resting-state functional connectivity constitutes a common feature of the intrinsic organization of the entire central nervous system. We report our detection of functional connectivity within the spinal cords of anesthetized squirrel monkeys at rest and show that the strength of connectivity within these networks is altered by the effects of injuries. By quantifying the low-frequency MRI signal correlations between different horns within spinal cord gray matter, we found distinct functional connectivity relationships between the different sensory and motor horns, a pattern that was similar to activation patterns evoked by nociceptive heat or tactile stimulation of digits. All horns within a single spinal segment were functionally connected, with the strongest connectivity occurring between ipsilateral dorsal and ventral horns. Each horn was strongly connected to the same horn on neighboring segments, but this connectivity reduced drastically along the spinal cord. Unilateral injury to the spinal cord significantly weakened the strength of the intrasegment horn-to-horn connectivity only on the injury side and in slices below the lesion. These findings suggest resting-state functional connectivity may be a useful biomarker of functional integrity in injured and recovering spinal cords.

  16. Rapid changes in expression of glutamate transporters after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Vera-Portocarrero, Louis P; Mills, Charles D; Ye, Zaiming; Fullwood, Steven D; McAdoo, David J; Hulsebosch, Claire E; Westlund, Karin N

    2002-02-08

    Glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS. After its release, specific transporter proteins rapidly remove extracellular glutamate from the synaptic cleft. The clearance of excess extracellular glutamate prevents accumulation under normal conditions; however, CNS injury elevates extracellular glutamate concentrations to neurotoxic levels. The purpose of this study was to examine changes in expression and in spatial localization of glial glutamate transporters GLAST (EAAT1) and GLT-1 (EAAT2) and the neuronal glutamate transporter EAAC1 (EAAT3) after spinal cord contusion injury (SCI). The levels of all three transporters significantly increased at the epicenter of injury (T10) and in segments rostral and caudal to the epicenter as determined by Western blot analysis. Quantitative immunohistochemistry demonstrated an increase in GLAST staining in laminae I-V and lamina X both rostral and caudal to the epicenter of injury. Staining for GLT-1 increased significantly in lamina I rostral to the injury site and in the entire gray matter caudal to the injury site. A significant increase in EAAC1 staining was observed in laminae I-IV rostral to the epicenter of injury and throughout the gray matter caudal to the injury site. The results suggest that upregulation of these high affinity transporters occurs rapidly and is important in regulating glutamate homeostasis after SCI.

  17. Alterations in cardiac autonomic control in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Biering-Sørensen, Fin; Biering-Sørensen, Tor; Liu, Nan; Malmqvist, Lasse; Wecht, Jill Maria; Krassioukov, Andrei

    2017-02-15

    A spinal cord injury (SCI) interferes with the autonomic nervous system (ANS). The effect on the cardiovascular system will depend on the extent of damage to the spinal/central component of ANS. The cardiac changes are caused by loss of supraspinal sympathetic control and relatively increased parasympathetic cardiac control. Decreases in sympathetic activity result in heart rate and the arterial blood pressure changes, and may cause arrhythmias, in particular bradycardia, with the risk of cardiac arrest in those with cervical or high thoracic injuries. The objective of this review is to give an update of the current knowledge related to the alterations in cardiac autonomic control following SCI. With this purpose the review includes the following subheadings: 2. Neuro-anatomical plasticity and cardiac control 2.1 Autonomic nervous system and the heart 2.2 Alteration in autonomic control of the heart following spinal cord injury 3. Spinal shock and neurogenic shock 3.1 Pathophysiology of spinal shock 3.2 Pathophysiology of neurogenic shock 4. Autonomic dysreflexia 4.1 Pathophysiology of autonomic dysreflexia 4.2 Diagnosis of autonomic dysreflexia 5. Heart rate/electrocardiography following spinal cord injury 5.1 Acute phase 5.2 Chronic phase 6. Heart rate variability 6.1 Time domain analysis 6.2 Frequency domain analysis 6.3 QT-variability index 6.4 Nonlinear (fractal) indexes 7. Echocardiography 7.1 Changes in cardiac structure following spinal cord injury 7.2 Changes in cardiac function following spinal cord injury 8. International spinal cord injury cardiovascular basic data set and international standards to document the remaining autonomic function in spinal cord injury.

  18. Use of intraoperative ultrasonography in canine spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Nanai, Beatrix; Lyman, Ronald; Bichsel, Pierre S

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe the intraoperative appearance of various spinal cord conditions, and to investigate how intraoperative ultrasonography assisted in modification of surgical and postoperative treatment plans. Intraoperative ultrasonography (B-mode, and power Doppler mode) was used in 25 dogs undergoing spinal surgery. The neurologic conditions included cervical spondylomyelopathy, intervertebral disc (IVD) protrusion, IVD extrusion, spinal tumors, nerve sheath mass, granulomatous myelitis, and discospondylitis. All of these diagnoses were supported by histopathologic and/or cytologic evaluation. It was possible to visualize the spinal cord and the abnormal spinal tissue in all of the patients. Power Doppler imaging allowed assessment of the spinal cord microcirculation, and assisted in judgment of the degree of decompression. Ultrasound imaging directly impacted the surgical and the medical treatment plans in four patients. Owing to the intraoperative imaging, two hemilaminectomies were extended cranially and caudally, and additional disc spaces were fenestrated, one hemilaminectomy site was extended dorsally to retrieve the disc material from the opposite side, and one intramedullary cervical spinal cord lesion was discovered, aspirated, and consequently diagnosed as granulomatous inflammation, which altered the long-term medication protocol in that dog. This study suggests that intraoperative sonographic spinal cord imaging is a useful and viable technique.

  19. [Spinal cord compression due to a epidural lipoma].

    PubMed

    Urculo, E; Samprón, N; Alfaro, R; Arrazola, M; Linazasoro, G

    2008-04-01

    The spinal extradural space is normally occupied by adipose tissue and a venous plexus, so it should be not surprising that lipomas arise and reach sufficient size to compress symptomatically the spinal cord. Nevertheless, the spinal epidural lipomas are rare and benign tumours may present as a progressive spinal cord compression syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging is useful in demonstrating the full extent and characteristics of these lesions, the severity of cord compression and the location in the canal. Usually, the lesion is amenable to total surgical extirpation and the functional prognosis is good. Histopathologically the tumour consists of a mature adipose cells matrix intermixed with vascular endothelial channels, that is the reason why it is also named angiolipomas. A 47 year-old woman complained of dorsal and bilateral submamarian pain lasting two years and progressive loss of sensibility and weakness in her legs. Following magnetic resonance studies a posterior spinal cord compression by an extradural tumour at T3-T7 levels was observed. She was operated on and we found an extradural yellow tumour easily to dissect and it was completely removed. One year later she is asymptomatic. Spinal epidural lipoma is a benign tumour which initially presents itself with local or radicular pain accompanied by progressive spinal cord compression syndrome. The choice treatment is laminectomy and total excision. Probably, this is one of the easiest tumours to remove of the spinal canal and a source of satisfaction because a complete recovery can usually be achieved.

  20. Spinal cord injuries due to diving accidents.

    PubMed

    Aito, S; D'Andrea, M; Werhagen, L

    2005-02-01

    Retrospective study and data analysis. To investigate and analyse the main features of spinal cord injuries due to diving accidents accepted in our Centre from June 1978 to December 2002. Regional Spinal Unit of Florence, Italy. Diving accidents mostly occur in a young and healthy population and most of the patients develop tetraplegia with a severe lifelong disability. From 1978 to 2002, 65 patients with spinal injuries due to diving accidents were admitted to the Regional Spinal Unit of Florence. A retrospective study was conducted by analysing data stored in our local computerized database. We considered the vertebral injury, ASIA-ISCOS neurological classification on admission and discharge, gender, age at the time of injury, month of injury, treatment of vertebral lesion, length of stay in the Spinal Unit, neurological outcome, and complications. Data were analysed statistically by using the Fisher's exact test and logistic regression. In all, 62/65 patients were males (95%). Mean age at injury time: 22 years. On admission, 35/65 were neurologically complete ASIA A (54%), while 16 were classified ASIA B, 7 ASIA C and 7 ASIA D, according to the ASIA-ISCOS neurological standard of classification. C6 was the most common neurological motor level (40%) and C5 the most common vertebral injury level. In all, 36/65 (55%) patients underwent surgical treatment. Mean hospitalization time was 5 months. No neurological deterioration was recorded. In all, 20/65 (31%) patients improved neurologically and 16/20 (80%) of those had received surgical treatment. In all, 15/65 (23%) patients had complications and one patient died during the hospitalization period. Patients whose vertebral lesions were surgically treated had a better neurological outcome than conservatively treated ones. Teardrop fractures showed worse neurological outcome as compared with burst fractures. Neurological improvement was more present in initially incomplete lesions. Treatment with high dose

  1. Endogenous neurogenesis in adult mammals after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Duan, Hongmei; Song, Wei; Zhao, Wen; Gao, Yudan; Yang, Zhaoyang; Li, Xiaoguang

    2016-12-01

    During the whole life cycle of mammals, new neurons are constantly regenerated in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles. Thanks to emerging methodologies, great progress has been made in the characterization of spinal cord endogenous neural stem cells (ependymal cells) and identification of their role in adult spinal cord development. As recently evidenced, both the intrinsic and extrinsic molecular mechanisms of ependymal cells control the sequential steps of the adult spinal cord neurogenesis. This review introduces the concept of adult endogenous neurogenesis, the reaction of ependymal cells after adult spinal cord injury (SCI), the heterogeneity and markers of ependymal cells, the factors that regulate ependymal cells, and the niches that impact the activation or differentiation of ependymal cells.

  2. Experimental studies on spinal cord function using evoked action potentials.

    PubMed

    Soeda, S; Satomi, K; Hirabayashi, K

    1990-01-01

    Experiments were carried out on cats to determine the use of conductive evoked spinal cord action potentials in diagnosing motor function of the spinal cord. Direct stimulation from the dura produced three negative wave potentials, N1, N2 and N3. The intraspinal pathway of N2 and N3 was the dorsal column. The pathways of N1, determined by dorsal and ventral epidural recording, were the dorsilateral funicle and the extrapyramidal tracts. A collision experiment between potential N1 and pyramidal tract action potential did not reflect the function of the tract as the amplitude of the action potential was too small. Nevertheless, it is considered that conductive evoked spinal cord action potentials could become a valuable method of assessing spinal cord function as they reflect the function of the extrapyramidal tracts, as well as of the dorsilateral funicle and the dorsal column.

  3. Dynamic loading characteristics of an intradural spinal cord stimulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliynyk, M. S.; Gillies, G. T.; Oya, H.; Wilson, S.; Reddy, C. G.; Howard, M. A.

    2013-01-01

    We have measured the forces that act on the electrode-bearing surface of an intradural neuromodulator designed to be in direct contact with the pial surface of the spinal cord, as part of our effort to develop a new method for treating intractable pain. The goal was to investigate the pressures produced by this device on the spinal cord and compare them with normal intrathecal pressure. For this purpose, we employed a dual-sensor arrangement that allowed us to measure the response of a custom-designed silicone spinal cord surrogate to the forces applied by the device. We found that the device had a mean compliance of ≈63 μN μm-1, and that over a 3 mm range of compression, the mid-span pressure it exerted on the spinal cord was ≈1.88 × 103 Pa = 14.1 mm Hg, which lies within the range of normal intrathecal pressure in humans.

  4. Biomaterial Design Strategies for the Treatment of Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Straley, Karin S.; Po Foo, Cheryl Wong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The highly debilitating nature of spinal cord injuries has provided much inspiration for the design of novel biomaterials that can stimulate cellular regeneration and functional recovery. Many experts agree that the greatest hope for treatment of spinal cord injuries will involve a combinatorial approach that integrates biomaterial scaffolds, cell transplantation, and molecule delivery. This manuscript presents a comprehensive review of biomaterial-scaffold design strategies currently being applied to the development of nerve guidance channels and hydrogels that more effectively stimulate spinal cord tissue regeneration. To enhance the regenerative capacity of these two scaffold types, researchers are focusing on optimizing the mechanical properties, cell-adhesivity, biodegradability, electrical activity, and topography of synthetic and natural materials, and are developing mechanisms to use these scaffolds to deliver cells and biomolecules. Developing scaffolds that address several of these key design parameters will lead to more successful therapies for the regeneration of spinal cord tissue. PMID:19698073

  5. Rare adverse effect of spinal cord stimulation: micturition inhibition.

    PubMed

    La Grua, Marco; Michelagnoli, Giuliano

    2010-06-01

    In current medical literature, most of the reported complications of spinal cord stimulation concern technical problems, such as lead malfunction, migration, breakage, or internal pulse generator dysfunction, whereas reports about the side effects on internal organ function caused by spinal cord stimulation are rare. In this clinical report, we describe uncommon side effects owing to spinal cord stimulation in a patient with chronic neuropathic pain. Our patient developed unexpected urinary retention during electrical epidural stimulation. This case report highlights the incomplete knowledge about the mechanism of action of spinal cord stimulation and its influence on the interactions between the autonomic nervous system and voluntary control of urinary function. The complete recovery of bladder function after the interruption of stimulation suggests that electrical stimulation caused the adverse effects in this clinical case.

  6. Molecular and cellular development of spinal cord locomotor circuitry

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Daniel C.; Niu, Tianyi; Alaynick, William A.

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord of vertebrate animals is comprised of intrinsic circuits that are capable of sensing the environment and generating complex motor behaviors. There are two major perspectives for understanding the biology of this complicated structure. The first approaches the spinal cord from the point of view of function and is based on classic and ongoing research in electrophysiology, adult behavior, and spinal cord injury. The second view considers the spinal cord from a developmental perspective and is founded mostly on gene expression and gain-of-function and loss-of-function genetic experiments. Together these studies have uncovered functional classes of neurons and their lineage relationships. In this review, we summarize our knowledge of developmental classes, with an eye toward understanding the functional roles of each group. PMID:26136656

  7. Modeling the neuroanatomic propagation of ALS in the spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drawert, Brian; Thakore, Nimish; Mitchell, Brian; Pioro, Erik; Ravits, John; Petzold, Linda R.

    2017-07-01

    Recent hypotheses of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) progression have posited a point-source origin of motor neuron death with neuroanatomic propagation either contiguously to adjacent regions, or along networks via axonal and synaptic connections. Although the molecular mechanisms of propagation are unknown, one leading hypothesis is a "prion-like" spread of misfolded and aggregated proteins, including SOD1 and TDP-43. We have developed a mathematical model representing cellular and molecular spread of ALS in the human spinal cord. Our model is based on the stochastic reaction-diffusion master equation approach using a tetrahedral discretized space to capture the complex geometry of the spinal cord. Domain dimension and shape was obtained by reconstructing human spinal cord from high-resolution magnetic resonance (MR) images and known gross and histological neuroanatomy. Our preliminary results qualitatively recapitulate the clinically observed pattern of spread of ALS thorough the spinal cord.

  8. Toxoplasmosis of the spinal cord in an immunocompromised patient

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Ernesto; Bolívar, Guillermo; Sánchez, Sandra; Carrascal, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    We, herein, describe an HIV-positive patient with toxoplasmosis of the spinal cord. We also carried out a comprehensive literature review of this topic, with emphasis on the diagnostic tools and therapeutic approach. PMID:24892240

  9. What Are Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors in Children?

    MedlinePlus

    ... cells in the brain. They transmit chemical and electric signals that determine thought, memory, emotion, speech, muscle ... brain and spinal cord. This helps neurons send electric signals through the axons. Tumors starting in these ...

  10. Corticospinal circuit plasticity in motor rehabilitation from spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Serradj, Najet; Agger, Sydney F; Hollis, Edmund R

    2016-12-06

    Restoring corticospinal function after spinal cord injury is a significant challenge as the corticospinal tract elicits no substantive, spontaneous regeneration, and its interruption leaves a permanent deficit. The corticospinal circuit serves multiple motor and sensory functions within the mammalian nervous system as the direct link between isocortex and spinal cord. Maturation of the corticospinal circuit involves the refinement of projections within the spinal cord and a subsequent refinement of motor maps within the cortex. The plasticity of these cortical motor maps mirrors the acquisition of skilled motor learning, and both the maps and motor skills are disrupted following injury to the corticospinal tract. The motor cortex exhibits the capacity to incorporate changes in corticospinal projections induced by both spontaneous and therapeutic-mediated plasticity of corticospinal axons through appropriate rehabilitation. An understanding of the mechanisms of corticospinal plasticity in motor learning will undoubtedly help inform strategies to improve motor rehabilitation after spinal cord injury.

  11. Spinal Cord Injury: Facts and Figures at a Glance

    MedlinePlus

    ... statistics are not derived from the National SCI Database. SCI is falls, followed by acts of violence ( ... SINCE 2005 T he National Spinal Cord Injury Database has been in existence since 1973 and captures ...

  12. Diaphragm activation via high frequency spinal cord stimulation in a rodent model of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Krzysztof E; Hsieh, Yee-Hsee; Dick, Thomas E; DiMarco, Anthony F

    2013-09-01

    As demonstrated in a canine model, high frequency spinal cord stimulation (HF-SCS) is a novel and more physiologic method of electrical activation of the inspiratory muscles compared to current techniques. The dog model, however, has significant limitations due to cost and societal concerns. Since the rodent respiratory system is also a relevant model for the study of neuronal circuitry function, the aims of the present study were to a) assess the effects of HF-SCS and b) determine the methodology of application of this technique in rats. In 9 Sprague Dawley rats, diaphragm multiunit and single motor unit EMG activity were assessed during spontaneous breathing and HF-SCS applied on the ventral epidural surface of the spinal cord at the T2 level following C1 spinal section. As in dogs, HF-SCS results in the activation of the diaphragm at physiological firing frequencies and the generation of large inspired volumes. Mean maximum firing frequencies of the diaphragm during spontaneous breathing and HF-SCS were 23.3 ± 1.4 Hz (range: 9.8-51.6 Hz) and 26.6 ± 1.3 Hz; range: 12.0-72.9 Hz, respectively, at comparable inspired volumes. Moreover, HF-SCS was successful in pacing these animals over a 60-min period without evidence of system fatigue. Our results suggest that, similar to the dog model, HF-SCS in the rat results in the activation of spinal cord tracts which synapse with the phrenic motoneuron pool, allowing the processing of the stimulus and consequent physiologic activation of the inspiratory muscles. The rat may be a useful model for further studies evaluating phrenic motoneuron physiology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Spinal cord stress injury assessment (SCOSIA): clinical applications of mechanical modeling of the spinal cord and brainstem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Kenneth H.; Choi, Jae; Wilson, William; Berry, Joel; Henderson, Fraser C., Sr.

    2009-02-01

    Abnormal stretch and strain is a major cause of injury to the spinal cord and brainstem. Such forces can develop from age-related degeneration, congenital malformations, occupational exposure, or trauma such as sporting accidents, whiplash and blast injury. While current imaging technologies provide excellent morphology and anatomy of the spinal cord, there is no validated diagnostic tool to assess mechanical stresses exerted upon the spinal cord and brainstem. Furthermore, there is no current means to correlate these stress patterns with known spinal cord injuries and other clinical metrics such as neurological impairment. We have therefore developed the spinal cord stress injury assessment (SCOSIA) system, which uses imaging and finite element analysis to predict stretch injury. This system was tested on a small cohort of neurosurgery patients. Initial results show that the calculated stress values decreased following surgery, and that this decrease was accompanied by a significant decrease in neurological symptoms. Regression analysis identified modest correlations between stress values and clinical metrics. The strongest correlations were seen with the Brainstem Disability Index (BDI) and the Karnofsky Performance Score (KPS), whereas the weakest correlations were seen with the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scale. SCOSIA therefore shows encouraging initial results and may have wide applicability to trauma and degenerative disease involving the spinal cord and brainstem.

  14. Radiation myelopathy of cervical spinal cord simulating intramedullary neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Fogelholm, R.; Haltia, M.; Andersson, L. C.

    1974-01-01

    Radiation myelopathy is a well-known complication of irradiation therapy of neoplasms in the vicinity of the spinal cord. Most earlier authors have stressed the association of a normal myelogram and normal CSF protein level with this condition. One case of radiation myelopathy with a myelogram simulating intramedullary neoplasm and with extremely high CSF protein concentration is presented. Six months after myelography necropsy revealed severe atrophy of the previously thickened lower cervical spinal cord. The pathogenetic mechanisms are discussed. Images PMID:4443812

  15. [Spinal cord stimulation for the management of chronic pain].

    PubMed

    Perruchoud, Christophe; Mariotti, Nicolas

    2016-06-22

    Neuromodulation techniques modify the activity of the central or peripheral nervous system. Spinal cord stimulation is a reversible and minimally invasive treatment whose efficacy and cost effectiveness are recognized for the treatment of chronic neuropathic pain or ischemic pain. Spinal cord stimulation is not the option of last resort and should be considered among other options before prescribing long-term opioids or considering reoperation. The selection and regular follow-up of patients are crucial to the success of the therapy.

  16. Robust, accurate and fast automatic segmentation of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    De Leener, Benjamin; Kadoury, Samuel; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2014-09-01

    Spinal cord segmentation provides measures of atrophy and facilitates group analysis via inter-subject correspondence. Automatizing this procedure enables studies with large throughput and minimizes user bias. Although several automatic segmentation methods exist, they are often restricted in terms of image contrast and field-of-view. This paper presents a new automatic segmentation method (PropSeg) optimized for robustness, accuracy and speed. The algorithm is based on the propagation of a deformable model and is divided into three parts: firstly, an initialization step detects the spinal cord position and orientation using a circular Hough transform on multiple axial slices rostral and caudal to the starting plane and builds an initial elliptical tubular mesh. Secondly, a low-resolution deformable model is propagated along the spinal cord. To deal with highly variable contrast levels between the spinal cord and the cerebrospinal fluid, the deformation is coupled with a local contrast-to-noise adaptation at each iteration. Thirdly, a refinement process and a global deformation are applied on the propagated mesh to provide an accurate segmentation of the spinal cord. Validation was performed in 15 healthy subjects and two patients with spinal cord injury, using T1- and T2-weighted images of the entire spinal cord and on multiecho T2*-weighted images. Our method was compared against manual segmentation and against an active surface method. Results show high precision for all the MR sequences. Dice coefficients were 0.9 for the T1- and T2-weighted cohorts and 0.86 for the T2*-weighted images. The proposed method runs in less than 1min on a normal computer and can be used to quantify morphological features such as cross-sectional area along the whole spinal cord.

  17. Anatomy and biomechanics of the spinal column and cord.

    PubMed

    Miele, Vincent J; Panjabi, Manohar M; Benzel, Edward C

    2012-01-01

    The field of biomechanics combines the disciplines of biology and engineering, attempting to quantitatively describe the complicated properties of biological materials. These properties depend not only upon the inherent attributes of its constituents but also upon how the constituents are arranged relative to each other. Its importance in understanding spinal column and spinal cord pathology cannot be overemphasized. This chapter is a primer on the application of biomechanical principles to the normal and pathological spine. The basic concepts of biomechanics will first be reviewed followed by a review of the structural anatomy of the osteoligamentous spinal column and the biomechanics of injury. Relevant spinal cord anatomy will then be addressed as well as current biomechanical theories of spinal cord injury.

  18. Effect of Combination of Non-Invasive Spinal Cord Electrical Stimulation and Serotonin Receptor Activation in Patients with Chronic Spinal Cord Lesion.

    PubMed

    Moshonkina, T R; Shapkova, E Yu; Sukhotina, I A; Emeljannikov, D V; Gerasimenko, Yu P

    2016-10-01

    We analyzed the efficiency of percutaneous electrical stimulation of the spinal cord and serotonin receptor activation in rehabilitation of paralyzed patients. Four-week course of spinal cord electrical stimulation combined with mechanotherapy produced positive shifts in the status of chronically paralyzed patients. Serotonin receptor activation potentiated the effect of spinal cord stimulation and can be regarded as an additional neurorehabilitation option.

  19. Resolving TRPV1 and TNF-α Mediated Spinal Cord Synaptic Plasticity and Inflammatory Pain with Neuroprotectin D1

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chul-Kyu; Lü, Ning; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Liu, Tong; Serhan, Charles N.; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Mechanisms of inflammatory pain are not fully understood. We investigated the role of TRPV1 and TNF-α, two critical mediators for inflammatory pain, in regulating spinal cord synaptic transmission. We found in mice lacking Trpv1 the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) in lamina II neurons of spinal cord slices is reduced. Further, C-fiber-induced spinal long-term potentiation (LTP) in vivo is abolished in Trpv1 knockout mice. TNF-α also increases sEPSC frequency but not amplitude in spinal lamina IIo neurons, and this increase is abolished in Trpv1 knockout mice. Single-cell PCR analysis revealed that TNF-α-responding neurons in lamina IIo are exclusively excitatory (vGluT2+) neurons. Notably, neuroprotectin-1 (NPD1), an anti-inflammatory lipid mediator derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (docosahexaenoic acid) blocks TNF-α- and capsaicin-evoked sEPSC frequency increases but has no effect on basal synaptic transmission. Strikingly, NPD1 potently inhibits capsaicin-induced TRPV1 current (IC50=0.4 nM) in dissociated dorsal root ganglion neurons, and this IC50 is ≈ 500 times lower than that of AMG9810, a commonly used TRPV1 antagonist. NPD1 inhibition of TRPV1 is mediated by GPCRs, since the effects were blocked by pertussis toxin. In contrast, NPD1 had not effect on mustard oil-induced TRPA1 currents. Spinal injection of NPD1, at very low doses (0.1–10 ng), blocks spinal LTP and reduces TRPV1-dependent inflammatory pain, without affecting baseline pain. NPD1 also reduces TRPV1-independent but TNF-α-dependent pain hypersensitivity. Our findings demonstrate a novel role of NPD1 in regulating TRPV1/TNF-α-mediated spinal synaptic plasticity and identify NPD1 as a novel analgesic for treating inflammatory pain. PMID:22016541

  20. [Vascular and autonomic disorders of the spinal cord in dystopia of the spinal motor segment].

    PubMed

    Gongal'skiĭ, V V; Kuftyreva, T P

    1992-01-01

    Microcirculation disorders may cause functional deviation in gray matter cells of the spinal cord. One of the setting moments of the disorders is the subluxation of a vertebra as a result of the disturbance in carrying ability of the spinal disc in case of spinal osteochondrosis. In this position the soft tissues of the spinal motional well innervated segment are stretched, which induces irritation in the segmental part of the spinal cord including vegetative nervous structures. Subluxation of a vertebra causes changes in the structures and in the microcirculation vessels which grow simultaneously and this permits supposing their interrelation.

  1. A surgery protocol for adult zebrafish spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ping; Lin, Jin-Fei; Pan, Hong-Chao; Shen, Yan-Qin; Schachner, Melitta

    2012-09-20

    Adult zebrafish has a remarkable capability to recover from spinal cord injury, providing an excellent model for studying neuroregeneration. Here we list equipment and reagents, and give a detailed protocol for complete transection of the adult zebrafish spinal cord. In this protocol, potential problems and their solutions are described so that the zebrafish spinal cord injury model can be more easily and reproducibly performed. In addition, two assessments are introduced to monitor the success of the surgery and functional recovery: one test to assess free swimming capability and the other test to assess extent of neuroregeneration by in vivo anterograde axonal tracing. In the swimming behavior test, successful complete spinal cord transection is monitored by the inability of zebrafish to swim freely for 1 week after spinal cord injury, followed by the gradual reacquisition of full locomotor ability within 6 weeks after injury. As a morphometric correlate, anterograde axonal tracing allows the investigator to monitor the ability of regenerated axons to cross the lesion site and increasingly extend into the gray and white matter with time after injury, confirming functional recovery. This zebrafish model provides a paradigm for recovery from spinal cord injury, enabling the identification of pathways and components of neuroregeneration. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Spinal cord lesions and disability in Hispanics with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Amezcua, L.; Lerner, A.; Ledezma, K.; Conti, D.; Law, M.; Weiner, L.; Langer-Gould, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (LESCLs) are believed to occur predominantly with opticospinal multiple sclerosis (OSMS) and are associated with disability. Objective To describe the prevalence and patterns of spinal cord lesions in Hispanics with multiple sclerosis (MS) and OSMS and their association with disability. Methods Cross-sectional study of 164 patients with complete MRIs. Spinal cord was classified: LESCLs, scattered spinal cord lesions (sSCLs) or no spinal cord lesions (noSCLs). Clinical course was defined as classical MS or OSMS. Risk of disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale ≥4.0) was adjusted for age, disease duration and sex using logistic regression. Results 125/164(73%) MS patients had spinal cord lesions (sSCLs, 57%; LESCLs, 19%) but only 11(7%) had OSMS. LESCLs were associated with disability (p<0.0001), longer disease duration (p<0.0001) and MS (n=21 vs. n=10 OSMS; p<0.0001). LESCLs was associated with the greatest risk to disability (OR 7.3, 95% CIs1.9-26.5; p=0.003; sSCLs OR 2.5, 95% CIs0.9-7.1; p=0.09) compared with noSCLs. Conclusion LESCLs are more common than OSMS and are associated with worse disability even in patients with MS. These results suggest that LESCLs are a more important marker of disability in MS than OSMS and may be an early indicator of more aggressive disease in this population. PMID:23912723

  3. Intrinsically organized resting state networks in the human spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Yazhuo; Eippert, Falk; Beckmann, Christian F.; Andersson, Jesper; Finsterbusch, Jürgen; Büchel, Christian; Tracey, Irene; Brooks, Jonathan C. W.

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous fluctuations in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) signals of the brain have repeatedly been observed when no task or external stimulation is present. These fluctuations likely reflect baseline neuronal activity of the brain and correspond to functionally relevant resting-state networks (RSN). It is not known however, whether intrinsically organized and spatially circumscribed RSNs also exist in the spinal cord, the brain’s principal sensorimotor interface with the body. Here, we use recent advances in spinal fMRI methodology and independent component analysis to answer this question in healthy human volunteers. We identified spatially distinct RSNs in the human spinal cord that were clearly separated into dorsal and ventral components, mirroring the functional neuroanatomy of the spinal cord and likely reflecting sensory and motor processing. Interestingly, dorsal (sensory) RSNs were separated into right and left components, presumably related to ongoing hemibody processing of somatosensory information, whereas ventral (motor) RSNs were bilateral, possibly related to commissural interneuronal networks involved in central pattern generation. Importantly, all of these RSNs showed a restricted spatial extent along the spinal cord and likely conform to the spinal cord’s functionally relevant segmental organization. Although the spatial and temporal properties of the dorsal and ventral RSNs were found to be significantly different, these networks showed significant interactions with each other at the segmental level. Together, our data demonstrate that intrinsically highly organized resting-state fluctuations exist in the human spinal cord and are thus a hallmark of the entire central nervous system. PMID:25472845

  4. Spinal Cord Stimulation for Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) to manage chronic intractable neuropathic pain and to evaluate the adverse events and Ontario-specific economic profile of this technology. Clinical Need SCS is a reversible pain therapy that uses low-voltage electrical pulses to manage chronic, intractable neuropathic pain of the trunk or limbs. Neuropathic pain begins or is caused by damage or dysfunction to the nervous system and can be difficult to manage. The prevalence of neuropathic pain has been estimated at about 1.5% of the population in the United States and 1% of the population in the United Kingdom. These prevalence rates are generalizable to Canada. Neuropathic pain is extremely difficult to manage. People with symptoms that persist for at least 6 months or who have symptoms that last longer than expected for tissue healing or resolution of an underlying disease are considered to have chronic pain. Chronic pain is an emotional, social, and economic burden for those living with it. Depression, reduced quality of life (QOL), absenteeism from work, and a lower household income are positively correlated with chronic pain. Although the actual number is unknown, a proportion of people with chronic neuropathic pain fail to obtain pain relief from pharmacological therapies despite adequate and reasonable efforts to use them. These people are said to have intractable neuropathic pain, and they are the target population for SCS. The most common indication for SCS in North America is chronic intractable neuropathic pain due to failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS), a term that describes persistent leg or back and leg pain in patients who have had back or spine surgery. Neuropathic pain due to complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), which can develop in the distal aspect of a limb a minor injury, is another common indication. To a lesser extent, chronic intractable

  5. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder....5850 Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal... paraplegic patient who has a complete transection of the spinal cord and who is unable to empty his or...

  6. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder....5850 Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal... paraplegic patient who has a complete transection of the spinal cord and who is unable to empty his or...

  7. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder....5850 Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal... paraplegic patient who has a complete transection of the spinal cord and who is unable to empty his or...

  8. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder....5850 Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal... paraplegic patient who has a complete transection of the spinal cord and who is unable to empty his or...

  9. 21 CFR 882.5850 - Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder....5850 Implanted spinal cord stimulator for bladder evacuation. (a) Identification. An implanted spinal... paraplegic patient who has a complete transection of the spinal cord and who is unable to empty his or...

  10. Anti-NGF Local Therapy for Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    bladder distention between spinal intact and spinal cord injury ...excitability of bladder afferent neurons in rats with spinal cord injury : a role of A-type voltage-gated potassium channels. 110th Annual Meeting AUA...Increased excitability of bladder afferent neurons in rats with spinal cord injury : a role of A-type voltage-gated potassium channels. 110th Annual

  11. Early radiation-induced endothelial cell loss and blood-spinal cord barrier breakdown in the rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Qing; Chen, Paul; Jain, Vipan; Reilly, Raymond M; Wong, C Shun

    2004-02-01

    Using a rat spinal cord model, this study was designed to characterize radiation-induced vascular endothelial cell loss and its relationship to early blood-brain barrier disruption in the central nervous system. Adult rats were given a single dose of 0, 2, 8, 19.5, 22, 30 or 50 Gy to the cervical spinal cord. At various times up to 2 weeks after irradiation, the spinal cord was processed for histological and immunohistochemical analysis. Radiation-induced apoptosis was assessed by morphology and TdT-mediated dUTP nick end labeling combined with immunohistochemical markers for endothelial and glial cells. Image analysis was performed to determine endothelial cell and microvessel density using immunohistochemistry with endothelial markers, namely endothelial barrier antigen, glucose transporter isoform 1, laminin and zonula occludens 1. Blood-spinal cord barrier permeability was assessed using immunohistochemistry for albumin and (99m)Tc-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid as a vascular tracer. Endothelial cell proliferation was assessed using in vivo BrdU labeling. During the first 24 h after irradiation, apoptotic endothelial cells were observed in the rat spinal cord. The decrease in endothelial cell density at 24 h after irradiation was associated with an increase in albumin immunostaining around microvessels. The decrease in the number of endothelial cells persisted for 7 days and recovery of endothelial density was apparent by day 14. A similar pattern of blood-spinal cord barrier disruption and recovery of permeability was observed over the 2 weeks, and an increase in BrdU-labeled endothelial cells was seen at day 3. These results are consistent with an association between endothelial cell death and acute blood-spinal cord barrier disruption in the rat spinal cord after irradiation.

  12. Extramedullary haematopoiesis in thalassaemia major causing spinal cord compression.

    PubMed

    Chiam, Q L L; Lau, K K

    2007-04-01

    A 33-year-old, homozygous beta-thalassaemic, Jehovah witness man presented with subacute spinal cord compression secondary to extramedullary haematopoiesis within the thoracic spinal canal. In this case, MRI showed characteristic features of extramedullary haematopoiesis, leading to an early diagnosis.

  13. Fibrocartilagenous embolism: an unusual cause of spinal cord infarction.

    PubMed

    Yousef, O M; Appenzeller, P; Kornfeld, M

    1998-12-01

    A 14-year-old girl experienced sudden onset of weakness progressing rapidly to paralysis. She died 7 days later from a massive pulmonary thromboembolus. Autopsy revealed extensive infarction of the spinal cord with a fibrocartilaginous embolus of the corresponding segment of the anterior spinal artery.

  14. Surgical Outcomes of High-Grade Spinal Cord Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Syunsuke; Aoyama, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Izumi; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to obtain useful information for establishing the guidelines for treating high-grade spinal cord gliomas. Overview of Literature The optimal management of high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains controversial. We report the outcomes of the surgical management of 14 high-grade spinal glioma. Methods We analyzed the outcomes of 14 patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas who were surgically treated between 1989 and 2012. Survival was charted with the Kaplan-Meier plots and comparisons were made with the log-rank test. Results None of the patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas underwent total resection. Subtotal resection was performed in two patients, partial resection was performed in nine patients, and open biopsy was performed in three patients. All patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy and six patients further underwent radiation cordotomy. The median survival time for patients with high-grade spinal cord gliomas was 15 months, with a 5-year survival rate of 22.2%. The median survival time for patients with World Health Organization grade III tumors was 25.5 months, whereas the median survival time for patients with glioblastoma multiforme was 12.5 months. Both univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models demonstrated a significant effect only in the group that did not include cervical cord lesion as a factor associated with survival (p=0.04 and 0.03). Conclusions The surgical outcome of patients diagnosed with high-grade spinal cord gliomas remains poor. Notably, only the model which excluded cervical cord lesions as a factor significantly predicted survival. PMID:26713128

  15. In Vivo Measurement of Cervical Spinal Cord Deformation During Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in a Rodent Model.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Tim; Liu, Jie; Yung, Andrew; Cripton, Peter A; Kozlowski, Piotr; Oxland, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The spinal cord undergoes physical deformation during traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI), which results in biological damage. This study demonstrates a novel approach, using magnetic resonance imaging and image registration techniques, to quantify the three-dimensional deformation of the cervical spinal cord in an in vivo rat model. Twenty-four male rats were subjected to one of two clinically relevant mechanisms of TSCI (i.e. contusion and dislocation) inside of a MR scanner using a novel apparatus, enabling imaging of the deformed spinal cords. The displacement fields demonstrated qualitative differences between injury mechanisms. Three-dimensional Lagrangian strain fields were calculated, and the results from the contusion injury mechanism were deemed most reliable. Strain field error was assessed using a Monte Carlo approach, which showed that simulated normal strain error experienced a bias, whereas shear strain error did not. In contusion injury, a large region of dorso-ventral compressive strain was observed under the impactor which extended into the ventral region of the spinal cord. High tensile lateral strains under the impactor and compressive lateral strains in the lateral white matter were also observed in contusion. The ability to directly observe and quantify in vivo spinal cord deformation informs our knowledge of the mechanics of TSCI.

  16. Cervical Cord-Canal Mismatch: A New Method for Identifying Predisposition to Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Aria; Montejo, Julio; Sun, Xin; Virojanapa, Justin; Kolb, Luis E; Abbed, Khalid M; Cheng, Joseph

    2017-08-11

    The risk for spinal cord injuries (SCIs) ranging from devastating traumatic injuries, compression due to degenerative pathology, and neurapraxia is increased in patients with congenital spinal stenosis. Classical diagnostic criteria include an absolute anteroposterior diameter of <12-13mm or a Torg-Pavlov Ratio of <0.80-0.82; however, these factors do not take into account the size of the spinal cord, which varies across patients independent of canal size. Recent large MRI studies of population cohorts have allowed newer methods to emerge that account for both cord and canal size by measuring a spinal cord occupation ratio (SCOR). SCOR defined as ≥70% on mid-sagittal imaging, ≥80% on axial imaging appear to be effective methods of identifying cord-canal mismatch, but require further validation. Cord-Canal Size mismatch predisposes patients to SCI due to: (1) less space within the canal lowering the amount of degenerative changes needed for cord compression, (2) less CSF surrounding the spinal cord decreasing the ability to absorb kinetic forces directed at the spine. Patients with cord-canal mismatch have been reported to be at a substantially higher risk of traumatic SCI, and present with degenerative cervical myelopathy at a younger age than patients without cord-canal mismatch. However, neurological outcome after SCI has occurred does not appear to be different in patients with or without a cord-canal mismatch. Recognition that canal and cord size are both factors which predispose to SCI, support that cord-canal size mismatch rather than a narrow cervical canal in isolation should be viewed as the underlying mechanism predisposing to SCI. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. A case of real spinal cord injury without radiologic abnormality in a pediatric patient with spinal cord concussion.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Hiroki; Ishikawa, Kouhei; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Takeuchi, Ikuto; Jitsuiki, Kei; Ohsaka, Hiromichi; Omori, Kazuhiko; Yanagawa, Youichi

    2017-01-01

    Real spinal cord injury without radiologic abnormality (SCIWORA) is a rare clinical entity. The patient was a 13-year-old girl whose body was overturned anteriorly after crashing her bicycle into a curb. Following the accident, in which her neck and upper back hit the ground, she could not move due to paralysis. On arrival, she had paresis of the bilateral upper extremities and experienced a painful sensation when her upper extremities were touched. Cervical roentgenography and whole-body computed tomography revealed no traumatic lesions in either the intracranium or the cervical bone. Urgent spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no significant spinal cord lesions or spinal canal stenosis. She was put on complete bed rest with a cervical collar. On the 2nd hospital day (24 h after the accident), her motor weakness had almost completely subsided, and she felt only mild dysesthesia in both forearms. Roentgenography revealed no instability. Her motor weakness completely recovered on the third day after accident and she was diagnosed with spinal cord concussion. The present case study, in which MRI was performed, showed that an immediate improvement was obtained in a patient who experienced real SCIWORA. The importance of not only spinal cord lesions, but also perispinal soft tissue injury on MRI has been emphasized for predicting patient outcomes. Accordingly, immediate MRI is essential for evaluating patients with signs and symptoms of spinal cord injury, even when plain neck roentgenography and cervical CT are negative.

  18. Spinal Cord Tolerance for Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sahgal, Arjun; Ma Lijun; Gibbs, Iris; Gerszten, Peter C.; Ryu, Sam; Soltys, Scott; Weinberg, Vivian; Wong Shun; Chang, Eric; Fowler, Jack; Larson, David A.

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric data are reported for five cases of radiation-induced myelopathy after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to spinal tumors. Analysis per the biologically effective dose (BED) model was performed. Methods and Materials: Five patients with radiation myelopathy were compared to a subset of 19 patients with no radiation myelopathy post-SBRT. In all patients, the thecal sac was contoured to represent the spinal cord, and doses to the maximum point, 0.1-, 1-, 2-, and 5-cc volumes, were analyzed. The mean normalized 2-Gy-equivalent BEDs (nBEDs), calculated using an alpha/beta value of 2 for late toxicity with units Gy 2/2, were compared using the t test and analysis of variance test. Results: Radiation myelopathy was observed at the maximum point with doses of 25.6 Gy in two fractions, 30.9 Gy in three fractions, and 14.8, 13.1, and 10.6 Gy in one fraction. Overall, there was a significant interaction between patient subsets and volume based on the nBED (p = 0.0003). Given individual volumes, a significant difference was observed for the mean maximum point nBED (p = 0.01). Conclusions: The maximum point dose should be respected for spine SBRT. For single-fraction SBRT 10 Gy to a maximum point is safe, and up to five fractions an nBED of 30 to 35 Gy 2/2 to the thecal sac also poses a low risk of radiation myelopathy.

  19. Inflammogenesis of Secondary Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Anwar, M. Akhtar; Al Shehabi, Tuqa S.; Eid, Ali H.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) and spinal infarction lead to neurological complications and eventually to paraplegia or quadriplegia. These extremely debilitating conditions are major contributors to morbidity. Our understanding of SCI has certainly increased during the last decade, but remains far from clear. SCI consists of two defined phases: the initial impact causes primary injury, which is followed by a prolonged secondary injury consisting of evolving sub-phases that may last for years. The underlying pathophysiological mechanisms driving this condition are complex. Derangement of the vasculature is a notable feature of the pathology of SCI. In particular, an important component of SCI is the ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) that leads to endothelial dysfunction and changes in vascular permeability. Indeed, together with endothelial cell damage and failure in homeostasis, ischemia reperfusion injury triggers full-blown inflammatory cascades arising from activation of residential innate immune cells (microglia and astrocytes) and infiltrating leukocytes (neutrophils and macrophages). These inflammatory cells release neurotoxins (proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, free radicals, excitotoxic amino acids, nitric oxide (NO)), all of which partake in axonal and neuronal deficit. Therefore, our review considers the recent advances in SCI mechanisms, whereby it becomes clear that SCI is a heterogeneous condition. Hence, this leads towards evidence of a restorative approach based on monotherapy with multiple targets or combinatorial treatment. Moreover, from evaluation of the existing literature, it appears that there is an urgent requirement for multi-centered, randomized trials for a large patient population. These clinical studies would offer an opportunity in stratifying SCI patients at high risk and selecting appropriate, optimal therapeutic regimens for personalized medicine. PMID:27147970

  20. [Mortality structure following spine and spinal cord injuries].

    PubMed

    Bazilevskaia, Z V; Golovnykh, L L; Kirkinskaia, T A

    1980-01-01

    In a group of 520 patients with injury to the spine and spinal cord 125 died within 10 years. The highest fatality rate (76.0 +/0 3.8) is recorded in the first year after the injury. In the following 10 years the fatality rate was uniform and ranged between 1.6 and 4.1%. This value increases with the patient's age, the severity of the spinal cord injury, and the degree of damage to the spinal ligamento-bursal apparatus. Among the total number of injured, 76% have a survival period of more than 10 years.

  1. De novo expression of the neurokinin 1 receptor in spinal lamina I pyramidal neurons in polyarthritis.

    PubMed

    Almarestani, L; Waters, S M; Krause, J E; Bennett, G J; Ribeiro-da-Silva, A

    2009-05-20

    Spinal lamina I (LI) neurons play a major role in the transmission and integration of pain-related information that is relayed to higher centers. Alterations in the excitability of these neurons influence chronic pain development, and expression of the neurokinin 1 receptor (NK-1r) is thought to play a major role in such changes. Novel expression of NK-1r may underlie hyperexcitability in new populations of LI neurons. LI projection neurons can be classified morphologically into fusiform, pyramidal, and multipolar cells, differing in their functional properties, with the pyramidal type being nonnociceptive. In agreement with this, we have shown that spinoparabrachial pyramidal neurons seldom express NK-1r, in contrast with the other two cell types. In this study we investigated in the rat the long-term changes in NK-1r expression by spinoparabrachial LI neurons following the unilateral injection in the hindpaw plantar surface of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Cholera toxin subunit B (CTb) was injected unilaterally into the parabrachial nucleus. Our results revealed that, ipsilaterally, pyramidal neurons were seldom immunoreactive for NK-1r both in saline-injected and in CFA-injected rats, up to 10 days post-CFA. However, a considerable number of pyramidal cells were immunoreactive for NK-1r at 15, 21, and 30 days post-CFA. Our data raise the possibility -- which needs to be confirmed by electrophysiology -- that most LI projection neurons of the pyramidal type are likely nonnociceptive in naive animals but might become nociceptive following the development of arthritis.

  2. Transformation of the output of spinal lamina I neurons after nerve injury and microglia stimulation underlying neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Keller, A Florence; Beggs, Simon; Salter, Michael W; De Koninck, Yves

    2007-01-01

    Background Disinhibition of neurons in the superficial spinal dorsal horn, via microglia – neuron signaling leading to disruption of chloride homeostasis, is a potential cellular substrate for neuropathic pain. But, a central unresolved question is whether this disinhibition can transform the activity and responses of spinal nociceptive output neurons to account for the symptoms of neuropathic pain. Results Here we show that peripheral nerve injury, local spinal administration of ATP-stimulated microglia or pharmacological disruption of chloride transport change the phenotype of spinal lamina I output neurons, causing them to 1) increase the gain of nociceptive responsiveness, 2) relay innocuous mechanical input and 3) generate spontaneous bursts of activity. The changes in the electrophysiological phenotype of lamina I neurons may account for three principal components of neuropathic pain: hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia and spontaneous pain, respectively. Conclusion The transformation of discharge activity and sensory specificity provides an aberrant signal in a primarily nociceptive ascending pathway that may serve as a basis for the symptoms of neuropathic pain. PMID:17900333

  3. Peripheral nerve grafts support regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Côté, Marie-Pascale; Amin, Arthi A; Tom, Veronica J; Houle, John D

    2011-04-01

    Traumatic insults to the spinal cord induce both immediate mechanical damage and subsequent tissue degeneration leading to a substantial physiological, biochemical, and functional reorganization of the spinal cord. Various spinal cord injury (SCI) models have shown the adaptive potential of the spinal cord and its limitations in the case of total or partial absence of supraspinal influence. Meaningful recovery of function after SCI will most likely result from a combination of therapeutic strategies, including neural tissue transplants, exogenous neurotrophic factors, elimination of inhibitory molecules, functional sensorimotor training, and/or electrical stimulation of paralyzed muscles or spinal circuits. Peripheral nerve grafts provide a growth-permissive substratum and local neurotrophic factors to enhance the regenerative effort of axotomized neurons when grafted into the site of injury. Regenerating axons can be directed via the peripheral nerve graft toward an appropriate target, but they fail to extend beyond the distal graft-host interface because of the deposition of growth inhibitors at the site of SCI. One method to facilitate the emergence of axons from a graft into the spinal cord is to digest the chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans that are associated with a glial scar. Importantly, regenerating axons that do exit the graft are capable of forming functional synaptic contacts. These results have been demonstrated in acute injury models in rats and cats and after a chronic injury in rats and have important implications for our continuing efforts to promote structural and functional repair after SCI.

  4. SIMS and MALDI MS imaging of the spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Eric B.; Annangudi, Suresh P.; Hatcher, Nathan G.; Gutstein, Howard B.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2009-01-01

    The application of mass spectrometry to imaging, or MS imaging (MSI), allows for the direct investigation of tissue sections to identify biological compounds and determine their spatial distribution. We present an approach to MSI that combines secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and MALDI MS for the imaging and analysis of rat spinal cord sections, thereby enhancing the chemical coverage obtained from an MSI experiment. The spinal cord is organized into discrete, anatomically defined areas that include motor and sensory networks composed of chemically diverse cells. The MSI data presented here reveal the spatial distribution of multiple phospholipids, proteins, and neuropeptides obtained within single, 20-μm sections of rat spinal cord. Analyte identities are initially determined by primary mass match and confirmed in follow-up experiments using LC MS/MS from extracts of adjacent spinal cord sections. Additionally, a regional analysis of differentially localized signals serves to rapidly screen compounds of varying intensities across multiple spinal regions. These MSI analyses reveal new insights into the chemical architecture of the spinal cord and set the stage for future imaging studies of the chemical changes induced by pain, anesthesia, and drug tolerance. PMID:18712768

  5. Management of severe spinal cord injury following hyperbaric exposure.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Bruce; Laden, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence that drainage of lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) improves functional neurological outcome after reperfusion injury to the spinal cord that occasionally follows aortic reconstructive surgery. This beneficial effect is considered owing to lowering of the CSF pressure thereby normalising spinal cord blood flow and reducing the 'secondary' cord injury caused by vascular congestion and cord swelling in the relatively confined spinal canal. Whilst lacking definitive proof, there are convincing randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cohort data and systematic reviews supporting this intervention. The therapeutic window for lumbar CSF drainage requires further elucidation; however, it appears to be days rather than hours post insult. We contend that the same benefit is likely to be achieved following other primary spinal cord injuries that cause cord swelling and elicit the 'secondary' injury. Traditionally the concept of CSF drainage has been considered more applicable to the brain as contained in a 'closed box' by lowering intracranial pressure (ICP) to improve cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP). The control of CPP is intended to limit 'secondary' brain injury and is a key concept of brain injury management. Using microdialysis in the spinal cords of trauma patients, it has been shown that intraspinal pressure (ISP) needs to be kept below 20 mmHg and spinal cord perfusion pressure (SCPP) above 70 mmHg to avoid biochemical evidence of secondary cord damage. Vasopressor have also been used in spinal cord injury to improve perfusion, however complications are common, typically cardiac in nature, and require very careful monitoring; the evidence supporting this approach is notably less convincing. Decompression illness (DCI) of the spinal cord is treated with recompression, hyperbaric oxygen, various medications designed to reduce the inflammatory response and fluid administration to normalise blood pressure and haematocrit. These

  6. Undirected compensatory plasticity contributes to neuronal dysfunction after severe spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Beauparlant, Janine; van den Brand, Rubia; Barraud, Quentin; Friedli, Lucia; Musienko, Pavel; Dietz, Volker; Courtine, Grégoire

    2013-11-01

    Severe spinal cord injury in humans leads to a progressive neuronal dysfunction in the chronic stage of the injury. This dysfunction is characterized by premature exhaustion of muscle activity during assisted locomotion, which is associated with the emergence of abnormal reflex responses. Here, we hypothesize that undirected compensatory plasticity within neural systems caudal to a severe spinal cord injury contributes to the development of neuronal dysfunction in the chronic stage of the injury. We evaluated alterations in functional, electrophysiological and neuromorphological properties of lumbosacral circuitries in adult rats with a staggered thoracic hemisection injury. In the chronic stage of the injury, rats exhibited significant neuronal dysfunction, which was characterized by co-activation of antagonistic muscles, exhaustion of locomotor muscle activity, and deterioration of electrochemically-enabled gait patterns. As observed in humans, neuronal dysfunction was associated with the emergence of abnormal, long-latency reflex responses in leg muscles. Analyses of circuit, fibre and synapse density in segments caudal to the spinal cord injury revealed an extensive, lamina-specific remodelling of neuronal networks in response to the interruption of supraspinal input. These plastic changes restored a near-normal level of synaptic input within denervated spinal segments in the chronic stage of injury. Syndromic analysis uncovered significant correlations between the development of neuronal dysfunction, emergence of abnormal reflexes, and anatomical remodelling of lumbosacral circuitries. Together, these results suggest that spinal neurons deprived of supraspinal input strive to re-establish their synaptic environment. However, this undirected compensatory plasticity forms aberrant neuronal circuits, which may engage inappropriate combinations of sensorimotor networks during gait execution.

  7. Enrichment of spinal cord cell cultures with motoneurons

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Spinal cord cell cultures contain several types of neurons. Two methods are described for enriching such cultures with motoneurons (defined here simply as cholinergic cells that are capable of innervating muscle). In the first method, 7-day embryonic chick spinal cord neurons were separated according to size by 1 g velocity sedimentation. It is assumed that cholinergic motoneurons are among the largest cells present at this stage. The spinal cords were dissociated vigorously so that 95-98% of the cells in the initial suspension were isolated from one another. Cells in leading fractions (large cell fractions: LCFs) contain about seven times as much choline acetyltransferase (CAT) activity per unit cytoplasm as do cells in trailing fractions (small cell fractions: SCFs). Muscle cultures seeded with LCFs develop 10-70 times as much CAT as cultures seeded with SCFs and six times as much CAT as cultures seeded with control (unfractionated) spinal cord cells. More than 20% of the large neurons in LCF-muscle cultures innervate nearby myotubes. In the second method, neurons were gently dissociated from 4-day embryonic spinal cords and maintained in vitro. This approach is based on earlier observations that cholinergic neurons are among the first cells to withdraw form the mitotic cycle in the developing chick embryo (Hamburger, V. 1948. J. Comp. Neurol. 88:221- 283; and Levi-Montalcini, R. 1950. J. Morphol. 86:253-283). 4-Day spinal cord-muscle cultures develop three times as much CAT as do 7-day spinal cord-muscle plates, prepared in the same (gentle) manner. More than 50% of the relatively large 4-day neurons innervate nearby myotubes. Thus, both methods are useful first steps toward the complete isolation of motoneurons. Both methods should facilitate study of the development of cholinergic neurons and of nerve-muscle synapse formation. PMID:566275

  8. Chronic complications of spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sezer, Nebahat; Akkuş, Selami; Uğurlu, Fatma Gülçin

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a serious medical condition that causes functional, psychological and socioeconomic disorder. Therefore, patients with SCI experience significant impairments in various aspects of their life. The goals of rehabilitation and other treatment approaches in SCI are to improve functional level, decrease secondary morbidity and enhance health-related quality of life. Acute and long-term secondary medical complications are common in patients with SCI. However, chronic complications especially further negatively impact on patients’ functional independence and quality of life. Therefore, prevention, early diagnosis and treatment of chronic secondary complications in patients with SCI is critical for limiting these complications, improving survival, community participation and health-related quality of life. The management of secondary chronic complications of SCI is also important for SCI specialists, families and caregivers as well as patients. In this paper, we review data about common secondary long-term complications after SCI, including respiratory complications, cardiovascular complications, urinary and bowel complications, spasticity, pain syndromes, pressure ulcers, osteoporosis and bone fractures. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of risk factors, signs, symptoms, prevention and treatment approaches for secondary long-term complications in patients with SCI. PMID:25621208

  9. Cardiovascular dysfunction following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Partida, Elizabeth; Mironets, Eugene; Hou, Shaoping; Tom, Veronica J.

    2016-01-01

    Both sensorimotor and autonomic dysfunctions often occur after spinal cord injury (SCI). Particularly, a high thoracic or cervical SCI interrupts supraspinal vasomotor pathways and results in disordered hemodynamics due to deregulated sympathetic outflow. As a result of the reduced sympathetic activity, patients with SCI may experience hypotension, cardiac dysrhythmias, and hypothermia post-injury. In the chronic phase, changes within the CNS and blood vessels lead to orthostatic hypotension and life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia (AD). AD is characterized by an episodic, massive sympathetic discharge that causes severe hypertension associated with bradycardia. The syndrome is often triggered by unpleasant visceral or sensory stimuli below the injury level. Currently the only treatments are palliative – once a stimulus elicits AD, pharmacological vasodilators are administered to help reduce the spike in arterial blood pressure. However, a more effective means would be to mitigate AD development by attenuating contributing mechanisms, such as the reorganization of intraspinal circuits below the level of injury. A better understanding of the neuropathophysiology underlying cardiovascular dysfunction after SCI is essential to better develop novel therapeutic approaches to restore hemodynamic performance. PMID:27073353

  10. Spinal cord involvement in patients with cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Storti, Monica; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2014-03-14

    A severe spinal cord involvement may rarely occur in patients with cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases; this complication is usually associated with overt liver failure and surgical or spontaneous porto-systemic shunt. Hepatic myelopathy (HM) is characterized by progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower extremities, while sensory and sphincter disturbances have rarely been described and are usually less important. The diagnosis is assigned in the appropriate clinical setting on clinical grounds after the exclusion of other clinical entities leading to spastic paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging is often unremarkable; however, also intracerebral corticospinal tract abnormalities have been reported recently. The study of motor evoked potentials may disclose central conduction abnormalities even before HM is clinically manifest. HM responds poorly to blood ammonia-lowering and other conservative medical therapy. Liver transplantation represents a potentially definitive treatment for HM in patients with decompensated cirrhosis of Child-Pugh B and C grades. Other surgical treatment options in HM include surgical ligation, shunt reduction, or occlusion by interventional procedures.

  11. Spinal cord involvement in patients with cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, Raffaele; Höller, Yvonne; Storti, Monica; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Tezzon, Frediano; Golaszewski, Stefan; Brigo, Francesco; Trinka, Eugen

    2014-01-01

    A severe spinal cord involvement may rarely occur in patients with cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases; this complication is usually associated with overt liver failure and surgical or spontaneous porto-systemic shunt. Hepatic myelopathy (HM) is characterized by progressive weakness and spasticity of the lower extremities, while sensory and sphincter disturbances have rarely been described and are usually less important. The diagnosis is assigned in the appropriate clinical setting on clinical grounds after the exclusion of other clinical entities leading to spastic paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging is often unremarkable; however, also intracerebral corticospinal tract abnormalities have been reported recently. The study of motor evoked potentials may disclose central conduction abnormalities even before HM is clinically manifest. HM responds poorly to blood ammonia-lowering and other conservative medical therapy. Liver transplantation represents a potentially definitive treatment for HM in patients with decompensated cirrhosis of Child-Pugh B and C grades. Other surgical treatment options in HM include surgical ligation, shunt reduction, or occlusion by interventional procedures. PMID:24627593

  12. Venous Thromboembolism Following Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Teasell, R.W.; Hsieh, T.J.; Aubut, JA. L.; Eng, J.J.; Krassioukov, A.; Tu, L.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the published literature on the treatment of deep venous thromboembolism post-spinal cord injury (SCI). Data Sources MEDLINE/Pubmed, CINAHL, EMBASE, and PsycINFO databases were searched for articles addressing the treatment of deep venous thromboembolism post-SCI. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were assessed for methodologic quality using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database Scale, while non-RCTs were assessed using the Downs and Black evaluation tool. Study Selection Studies included RCTs, non-RCTS, cohort, case-control, case series, pre-post, and postinterventional studies. Case studies were included only when no other studies were available. Data Extraction Data extracted included demographics, the nature of the study intervention, and study results. Data Synthesis Levels of evidence were assigned to the interventions using a modified Sackett scale. Conclusions Twenty-three studies met inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies examined various pharmacologic interventions for the treatment or prevention of deep venous thrombosis in SCI patients. There was strong evidence to support the use of low molecular weight heparin in reducing venous thrombosis events, and a higher adjusted dose of unfractionated heparin was found to be more effective than 5000 units administered every 12 hours, although bleeding complication was more common. Nonpharmacologic treatments were also reviewed, but again limited evidence was found to support these treatments. PMID:19236977

  13. Stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kan, E M; Ling, E A; Lu, J

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) damages axons and disrupts myelination interrupting sensory and motor neuronal transmission to and from the brain. Patients suffering from SCI although continue to survive, are often left chronically disabled and with no promise of a cure. Advances in stem cell biology has opened up doors for the use of human embryonic, adult neural and induced pluripotent stem cell strategies for SCI. Despite great promise from animal research, clinical trials have been limited and the jury is still out on its safety and efficacy. This review discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the various stem cell types, barriers hindering translation from animal to humans, and the need for established guidelines for standardization of clinical trials ensuring subsequent implementation. Ultimately, unrealistic expectations of stem cell therapy (SCT) as the elixir for SCI should be managed. The success of SCT for SCI lies in the network of research scientists, medical professionals and patients working cooperatively to build up a knowledge-intensive platform for a comprehensive risk-benefit assessment of SCT for SCI.

  14. Osteoporosis in individuals with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bauman, William A; Cardozo, Christopher P

    2015-02-01

    The pathophysiology, clinical considerations, and relevant experimental findings with regard to osteoporosis in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) will be discussed. The bone loss that occurs acutely after more neurologically motor complete SCI is unique for its sublesional skeletal distribution and rate, at certain skeletal sites approaching 1% of bone mineral density per week, and its resistance to currently available treatments. The areas of high bone loss include the distal femur, proximal tibia, and more distal boney sites. Evidence from a study performed in monozygotic twins discordant for SCI indicates that sublesional bone loss in the twin with SCI increases for several decades, strongly suggesting that the heightened net bone loss after SCI may persist for an extended period of time. The increased frequency of fragility fracture after paralysis will be discussed, and a few risk factors for such fractures after SCI will be examined. Because vitamin D deficiency, regardless of disability, is a relevant consideration for bone health, as well as an easily reversible condition, the increased prevalence of and treatment target values for vitamin D in this deficiency state in the SCI population will be reviewed. Pharmacological and mechanical approaches to preserving bone integrity in persons with acute and chronic SCI will be reviewed, with emphasis placed on efficacy and practicality. Emerging osteoanabolic agents that improve functioning of WNT/β-catenin signaling after paralysis will be introduced as therapeutic interventions that may hold promise.

  15. New rehabilitation interventions in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kirshblum, Steven

    2004-01-01

    Progress in the care of people with spinal cord injury (SCI) spans every aspect, from research in neuroregeneration to pharmacologic interventions. This article focuses on advances in rehabilitation interventions, which have employed bioengineering, computerization, and advanced therapeutic techniques. These interventions are being applied to functional deficits of the bladder, bowel, upper extremities, and respiratory system, as well as to improvements in ambulation and mobility. Functional electrical stimulation (FES) is being used to augment the function of the lower extremities, the upper extremities (Freehand System), and the bowel and bladder (Vocare System). Tendon transfer is a reconstructive technique used to improve upper extremity function; it is sometimes combined with FES. Body weight-supported treadmill training is being used to improve ambulation in people with incomplete SCI, and advances in wheelchair technology are expanding options for mobility. Cushion design and pressure mapping are modalities being used to reduce the high risk for pressure ulcers in the SCI population. Research on shoulder stressors is being applied to transfer techniques, exercise regimens, adaptive equipment and wheelchair mechanics to minimize shoulder pain, another common complication. The effectiveness of rehabilitation interventions needs to be documented by evidence-based research. Researchers are focusing on the identification of outcomes measures that will form the basis for established standards of care for individuals with SCI. Perhaps the combination of conventional and newer therapies may enhance neurological recovery. Well-designed studies are needed before we can make this determination.

  16. Spinal meningioma: relationship between degree of cord compression and outcome.

    PubMed

    Davies, Simon; Gregson, Barbara; Mitchell, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to find the relationships between the degree of cord compression as seen on MRIs with persisting cord atrophy after decompression and patient outcomes in spinal meningiomas. We undertook a retrospective analysis of 31 patients' pre- and postoperative MRIs, preoperative functional status and their outcomes at follow-up. The following metrics were analysed; percentage cord area at maximum compression, percentage tumour occupancy and percentage cord occupancy. These were then compared with outcome as measured by the Nurick scale. Of the 31 patients, 27 (87%) had thoracic meningiomas, 3 (10%) cervical and 1 (3%) cervicothoracic. The meningiomas were pathologically classified as grade 1 (29) or grade 2 (2) according to the WHO classification. The average remaining cord cross-sectional area was 61% of the estimated original value. The average tumour occupancy of the canal was 72%. The average cord occupancy of the spinal canal at maximum compression was 20%. No correlation between cord cross-section area and Nurick Scale was seen. On the postoperative scan, the average cord area had increased to 84%. No correlation was seen between this value and outcome. We found that cross-section area measurements on MRI scans have no obvious relationship with function before or after surgery. This is a base for future research into the mechanism of cord recovery and other compressive cord conditions.

  17. Spinal cord compression in two related Ursus arctos horribilis.

    PubMed

    Thomovsky, Stephanie A; Chen, Annie V; Roberts, Greg R; Schmidt, Carrie E; Layton, Arthur W

    2012-09-01

    Two 15-yr-old grizzly bear littermates were evaluated within 9 mo of each other with the symptom of acute onset of progressive paraparesis and proprioceptive ataxia. The most significant clinical examination finding was pelvic limb paresis in both bears. Magnetic resonance examinations of both bears showed cranial thoracic spinal cord compression. The first bear had left-sided extradural, dorsolateral spinal cord compression at T3-T4. Vertebral canal stenosis was also observed at T2-T3. Images of the second bear showed lateral spinal cord compression from T2-T3 to T4-T5. Intervertebral disk disease and associated spinal cord compression was also observed at T2-T3 and T3-T4. One grizzly bear continued to deteriorate despite reduced exercise, steroid, and antibiotic therapy. The bear was euthanized, and a necropsy was performed. The postmortem showed a spinal ganglion cyst that caused spinal cord compression at the level of T3-T4. Wallerian-like degeneration was observed from C3-T6. The second bear was prescribed treatment that consisted of a combination of reduced exercise and steroid therapy. He continued to deteriorate with these medical therapies and was euthanized 4 mo after diagnosis. A necropsy showed hypertrophy and protrusion of the dorsal longitudinal ligament at T2-T3 and T3-T4, with resulting spinal cord compression in this region. Wallerian-like degeneration was observed from C2-L1. This is one of few case reports that describes paresis in bears. It is the only case report, to the authors' knowledge, that describes spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings in a grizzly bear and also the only report that describes a cranial thoracic myelopathy in two related grizzly bears with neurologic signs.

  18. Spinal Cord Tolerance in the Age of Spinal Radiosurgery: Lessons From Preclinical Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Medin, Paul M.; Boike, Thomas P.

    2011-04-01

    Clinical implementation of spinal radiosurgery has increased rapidly in recent years, but little is known regarding human spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction irradiation. In contrast, preclinical studies in single-fraction spinal cord tolerance have been ongoing since the 1970s. The influences of field length, dose rate, inhomogeneous dose distributions, and reirradiation have all been investigated. This review summarizes literature regarding single-fraction spinal cord tolerance in preclinical models with an emphasis on practical clinical significance. The outcomes of studies that incorporate uniform irradiation are surprisingly consistent among multiple small- and large-animal models. Extensive investigation of inhomogeneous dose distributions in the rat has demonstrated a significant dose-volume effect while preliminary results from one pig study are contradictory. Preclinical spinal cord dose-volume studies indicate that dose distribution is more critical than the volume irradiated suggesting that neither dose-volume histogram analysis nor absolute volume constraints are effective in predicting complications. Reirradiation data are sparse, but results from guinea pig, rat, and pig studies are consistent with the hypothesis that the spinal cord possesses a large capacity for repair. The mechanisms behind the phenomena observed in spinal cord studies are not readily explained and the ability of dose response models to predict outcomes is variable underscoring the need for further investigation. Animal studies provide insight into the phenomena and mechanisms of radiosensitivity but the true significance of animal studies can only be discovered through clinical trials.

  19. Intraspinal AAV Injections Immediately Rostral to a Thoracic Spinal Cord Injury Site Efficiently Transduces Neurons in Spinal Cord and Brain

    PubMed Central

    Klaw, Michelle C; Xu, Chen; Tom, Veronica J

    2013-01-01

    In the vast majority of studies utilizing adeno-associated virus (AAV) in central nervous system applications, including those published with spinal cord injury (SCI) models, AAV has been administered at the level of the cell body of neurons targeted for genetic modification, resulting in transduction of neurons in the vicinity of the injection site. However, as SCI interrupts many axon tracts, it may be more beneficial to transduce a diverse pool of supraspinal neurons. We determined if descending axons severed by SCI are capable of retrogradely transporting AAV to remotely transduce a variety of brain regions. Different AAV serotypes encoding the reporter green fluorescent protein (GFP) were injected into gray and white matter immediately rostral to a spinal transection site. This resulted in the transduction of thousands of neurons within the spinal cord and in multiple regions within the brainstem that project to spinal cord. In addition, we established that different serotypes had disparate regional specificity and that AAV5 transduced the most brain and spinal cord neurons. This is the first demonstration that retrograde transport of AAV by axons severed by SCI is an effective means to transduce a collection of supraspinal neurons. Thus, we identify a novel, minimally invasive means to transduce a variety of neuronal populations within both the spinal cord and the brain following SCI. This paradigm to broadly distribute viral vectors has the potential to be an important component of a combinatorial strategy to promote functional axonal regeneration. PMID:23881451

  20. Developmental changes in the distribution of gamma-aminobutyric acid-immunoreactive neurons in the embryonic chick lumbosacral spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Antal, M; Berki, A C; Horváth, L; O'Donovan, M J

    1994-05-08

    The development of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-immunoreactive neurons was investigated in the embryonic and posthatch chick lumbosacral spinal cord by using pre- and postembedding immunostaining with an anti-GABA antiserum. The first GABA-immunoreactive cells were detected in the ventral one-half of the spinal cord dorsal to the lateral motor column at E4. GABAergic neurons in this location sharply increased in number and, with the exception of the lateral motor column, appeared throughout the entire extent of the ventral one-half of the spinal gray matter by E6. Thereafter, GABA-immunoreactive neurons extended from ventral to dorsal regions. Stained perikarya first appeared at E8 and then progressively accumulated in the dorsal horn, while immunoreactive neurons gradually declined in the ventral horn. The general pattern of GABA immunoreactivity characteristic of mature animals had been achieved by E12 and was only slightly altered afterwards. In the dorsal horn, most of the stained neurons were observed in laminae I-III, both at the upper (LS 1-3) and at the lower (LS 5-7) segments of the lumbosacral spinal cord. In the ventral horn, the upper and lower lumbosacral segments showed marked differences in the distribution of stained perikarya. GABAergic neurons were scattered in a relatively large region dorsomedial to the lateral motor column at the level of the upper lumbosacral segments, whereas they were confined to the dorsalmost region of lamina VII at the lower segments. The early expression of GABA immunoreactivity may indicate a trophic and synaptogenetic role for GABA in early phases of spinal cord development.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Simultaneous Brain-Cervical Cord fMRI Reveals Intrinsic Spinal Cord Plasticity during Motor Sequence Learning.

    PubMed

    Vahdat, Shahabeddin; Lungu, Ovidiu; Cohen-Adad, Julien; Marchand-Pauvert, Veronique; Benali, Habib; Doyon, Julien

    2015-06-01

    The spinal cord participates in the execution of skilled movements by translating high-level cerebral motor representations into musculotopic commands. Yet, the extent to which motor skill acquisition relies on intrinsic spinal cord processes remains unknown. To date, attempts to address this question were limited by difficulties in separating spinal local effects from supraspinal influences through traditional electrophysiological and neuroimaging methods. Here, for the first time, we provide evidence for local learning-induced plasticity in intact human spinal cord through simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal cord during motor sequence learning. Specifically, we show learning-related modulation of activity in the C6-C8 spinal region, which is independent from that of related supraspinal sensorimotor structures. Moreover, a brain-spinal cord functional connectivity analysis demonstrates that the initial linear relationship between the spinal cord and sensorimotor cortex gradually fades away over the course of motor sequence learning, while the connectivity between spinal activity and cerebellum gains strength. These data suggest that the spinal cord not only constitutes an active functional component of the human motor learning network but also contributes distinctively from the brain to the learning process. The present findings open new avenues for rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injuries, as they demonstrate that this part of the central nervous system is much more plastic than assumed before. Yet, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying this intrinsic functional plasticity in the spinal cord warrant further investigations.

  2. Simultaneous Brain–Cervical Cord fMRI Reveals Intrinsic Spinal Cord Plasticity during Motor Sequence Learning

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Adad, Julien; Marchand-Pauvert, Veronique; Benali, Habib; Doyon, Julien

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord participates in the execution of skilled movements by translating high-level cerebral motor representations into musculotopic commands. Yet, the extent to which motor skill acquisition relies on intrinsic spinal cord processes remains unknown. To date, attempts to address this question were limited by difficulties in separating spinal local effects from supraspinal influences through traditional electrophysiological and neuroimaging methods. Here, for the first time, we provide evidence for local learning-induced plasticity in intact human spinal cord through simultaneous functional magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spinal cord during motor sequence learning. Specifically, we show learning-related modulation of activity in the C6–C8 spinal region, which is independent from that of related supraspinal sensorimotor structures. Moreover, a brain–spinal cord functional connectivity analysis demonstrates that the initial linear relationship between the spinal cord and sensorimotor cortex gradually fades away over the course of motor sequence learning, while the connectivity between spinal activity and cerebellum gains strength. These data suggest that the spinal cord not only constitutes an active functional component of the human motor learning network but also contributes distinctively from the brain to the learning process. The present findings open new avenues for rehabilitation of patients with spinal cord injuries, as they demonstrate that this part of the central nervous system is much more plastic than assumed before. Yet, the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying this intrinsic functional plasticity in the spinal cord warrant further investigations. PMID:26125597

  3. Frequency Mapping of Rat Spinal Cord at 7T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Evan; Rauscher, Alexander; Kozlowski, Piotr; Yung, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    The spinal cord is an integral part of the nervous system responsible for sensory, motor, and reflex control crucial to all bodily function. Due to its non-invasive nature, MRI is well matched for characterizing and imaging of spinal cord, and is used extensively for clinical applications. Recent developments in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at high field (7T) using phase represents a new approach of characterizing spinal cord myelin. Theory suggests that microstructure differences in myelinated white matter (WM) and non-myelinated gray matter (GM) affect MR phase, measurable frequency shifts. Data from pilot experiments using a multi-gradient echo (MGE) sequence to image rat spinal cords placed parallel to main magnetic field B0 has shown frequency shifts between not only between WM and GM, but also between specific WM tracts of the dorsal column, including the fasciculus gracilis, fasciculus cuneatus, and corticospinal tract. Using MGE, frequency maps at multiple echo times (TE) between 4ms and 22ms show a non-linear relationship between WM frequency, contrary to what was previously expected. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of MGE in revealing new information about spinal cord tissue microstructure, and lays important groundwork for in-vivo and human studies.

  4. Spinal cord regeneration in a tail autotomizing urodele.

    PubMed

    Dawley, Ellen M; O Samson, Shoji; Woodard, Kenton T; Matthias, Kathryn A

    2012-02-01

    Adult urodele amphibians possess extensive regenerative abilities, including lens, jaws, limbs, and tails. In this study, we examined the cellular events and time course of spinal cord regeneration in a species, Plethodon cinereus, that has the ability to autotomize its tail as an antipredator strategy. We propose that this species may have enhanced regenerative abilities as further coadaptations with this antipredator strategy. We examined the expression of nestin, vimentin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) after autotomy as markers of neural precursor cells and astroglia; we also traced the appearance of new neurons using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine/neuronal nuclei (BrdU/NeuN) double labeling. As expected, the regenerating ependymal tube was a major source of new neurons; however, the spinal cord cranial to the plane of autotomy showed significant mitotic activity, more extensive than what is reported for other urodeles that cannot autotomize their tails. In addition, this species shows upregulation of nestin, vimentin, and GFAP within days after tail autotomy; further, this expression is upregulated within the spinal cord cranial to the plane of autotomy, not just within the extending ependymal tube, as reported in other urodeles. We suggest that enhanced survival of the spinal cord cranial to autotomy allows this portion to participate in the enhanced recovery and regeneration of the spinal cord. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Spinal Cord Injury Immediately Changes the State of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Humanes-Valera, Desiré; Alonso-Calviño, Elena; Yague, Josué G.; Moxon, Karen A.; Oliviero, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Spinal cord injury can produce extensive long-term reorganization of the cerebral cortex. Little is known, however, about the sequence of cortical events starting immediately after the lesion. Here we show that a complete thoracic transection of the spinal cord produces immediate functional reorganization in the primary somatosensory cortex of anesthetized rats. Besides the obvious loss of cortical responses to hindpaw stimuli (below the level of the lesion), cortical responses evoked by forepaw stimuli (above the level of the lesion) markedly increase. Importantly, these increased responses correlate with a slower and overall more silent cortical spontaneous activity, representing a switch to a network state of slow-wave activity similar to that observed during slow-wave sleep. The same immediate cortical changes are observed after reversible pharmacological block of spinal cord conduction, but not after sham. We conclude that the deafferentation due to spinal cord injury can immediately (within minutes) change the state of large cortical networks, and that this state change plays a critical role in the early cortical reorganization after spinal cord injury. PMID:20519527

  6. Iatrogenic Spinal Cord Injury Resulting From Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; Hart, Robert A; Hilibrand, Alan S; Fish, David E; Wang, Jeffrey C; Lord, Elizabeth L; Buser, Zorica; Tortolani, P Justin; Stroh, D Alex; Nassr, Ahmad; Currier, Bradford L; Sebastian, Arjun S; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Mroz, Thomas E; Riew, K Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Retrospective cohort study of prospectively collected data. To examine the incidence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury following elective cervical spine surgery. A retrospective multicenter case series study involving 21 high-volume surgical centers from the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network was conducted. Medical records for 17 625 patients who received cervical spine surgery (levels from C2 to C7) between January 1, 2005, and December 31, 2011, were reviewed to identify occurrence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury. In total, 3 cases of iatrogenic spinal cord injury following cervical spine surgery were identified. Institutional incidence rates ranged from 0.0% to 0.24%. Of the 3 patients with quadriplegia, one underwent anterior-only surgery with 2-level cervical corpectomy, one underwent anterior surgery with corpectomy in addition to posterior surgery, and one underwent posterior decompression and fusion surgery alone. One patient had complete neurologic recovery, one partially recovered, and one did not recover motor function. Iatrogenic spinal cord injury following cervical spine surgery is a rare and devastating adverse event. No standard protocol exists that can guarantee prevention of this complication, and there is a lack of consensus regarding evaluation and treatment when it does occur. Emergent imaging with magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography myelography to evaluate for compressive etiology or malpositioned instrumentation and avoidance of hypotension should be performed in cases of intraoperative and postoperative spinal cord injury.

  7. Neuroprotection and its molecular mechanism following spinal cord injury☆

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nai-Kui; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Acute spinal cord injury initiates a complex cascade of molecular events termed ‘secondary injury’, which leads to progressive degeneration ranging from early neuronal apoptosis at the lesion site to delayed degeneration of intact white matter tracts, and, ultimately, expansion of the initial injury. These secondary injury processes include, but are not limited to, inflammation, free radical-induced cell death, glutamate excitotoxicity, phospholipase A2 activation, and induction of extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways, which are important targets in developing neuroprotective strategies for treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, a number of studies have shown promising results on neuroprotection and recovery of function in rodent models of spinal cord injury using treatments that target secondary injury processes including inflammation, phospholipase A2 activation, and manipulation of the PTEN-Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. The present review outlines our ongoing research on the molecular mechanisms of neuroprotection in experimental spinal cord injury and briefly summarizes our earlier findings on the therapeutic potential of pharmacological treatments in spinal cord injury. PMID:25624837

  8. Circumferential intradural meningioma of the thoracic spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Foster, Mitchell; Soh, Calvin; DuPlessis, Daniel; Karabatsou, Konstantina

    2016-07-01

    There are very few reported cases of a meningioma circumferentially surrounding the spinal cord. To date, this entity has only been described at the conus medullaris and in the cervical cord. Herewith, the authors describe a case of an intradural extramedullary meningioma that completely encircled the thoracic spinal cord. A 40-year-old woman with progressive numbness of the lower limbs and spasticity of gait following a fall presented to our hospital. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine demonstrated an abnormality at T6-T7 completely encircling the spinal cord. The patient underwent a T6-T8 laminectomy and subtotal resection of the intradural partially calcified lesion. Resection of the anterolateral portion was not feasible. Histology revealed psammomatous meningioma (WHO Grade 1). The patient recovered well and was discharged with improved gait but some residual numbness of her feet and right hemithorax. This is the first reported case of an intradural extramedullary meningioma completely encircling the thoracic spinal cord. Achieving complete resection of this circumferential meningioma was not possible via a posterior approach. The optimum management of this condition is unknown; clearly, achieving symptomatic relief with adequate cord decompression is paramount; however, the long-term outcome and risk of recurrence in these cases, given their rarity and the difficulties in achieving complete resection, is unknown. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Nonlinear viscoelastic characterization of the porcine spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Shetye, Snehal S; Troyer, Kevin L; Streijger, Femke; Lee, Jae H T; Kwon, Brian K; Cripton, Peter A; Puttlitz, Christian M

    2014-02-01

    Although quasi-static and quasi-linear viscoelastic properties of the spinal cord have been reported previously, there are no published studies that have investigated the fully (strain-dependent) nonlinear viscoelastic properties of the spinal cord. In this study, stress relaxation experiments and dynamic cycling were performed on six fresh porcine lumbar cord specimens to examine their viscoelastic mechanical properties. The stress relaxation data were fitted to a modified superposition formulation and a novel finite ramp time correction technique was applied. The parameters obtained from this fitting methodology were used to predict the average dynamic cyclic viscoelastic behavior of the porcine cord. The data indicate that the porcine spinal cord exhibited fully nonlinear viscoelastic behavior. The average weighted root mean squared error for a Heaviside ramp fit was 2.8 kPa, which was significantly greater (p<0.001) than that of the nonlinear (comprehensive viscoelastic characterization method) fit (0.365 kPa). Further, the nonlinear mechanical parameters obtained were able to accurately predict the dynamic behavior, thus exemplifying the reliability of the obtained nonlinear parameters. These parameters will be important for future studies investigating various damage mechanisms of the spinal cord and studies developing high-resolution finite elements models of the spine. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Characterization of the Porcine Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Shetye, Snehal; Troyer, Kevin; Streijger, Femke; Lee, Jae H. T.; Kwon, Brian K.; Cripton, Peter; Puttlitz, Christian M.

    2014-01-01

    Although quasi-static and quasi-linear viscoelastic properties of the spinal cord have been reported previously, there are no published studies that have investigated the fully (strain-dependent) nonlinear viscoelastic properties of the spinal cord. In this study, stress relaxation experiments and dynamic cycling were performed on six fresh porcine lumbar cord specimens to examine their viscoelastic mechanical properties. The stress relaxation data were fitted to a modified superposition formulation and a novel finite ramp time correction technique was applied. The parameters obtained from this fitting methodology were used to predict the average dynamic cyclic viscoelastic behavior of the porcine cord. The data indicate that the porcine spinal cord exhibited fully nonlinear viscoelastic behavior. The average weighted RMSE for a Heaviside ramp fit was 2.8kPa, which was significantly greater (p < 0.001) than that of the nonlinear (comprehensive viscoelastic characterization (CVC) method) fit (0.365kPa). Further, the nonlinear mechanical parameters obtained were able to accurately predict the dynamic behavior, thus exemplifying the reliability of the obtained nonlinear parameters. These parameters will be important for future studies investigating various damage mechanisms of the spinal cord and studies developing high resolution finite elements models of the spine. PMID:24211612

  11. TRPV1, NK1 receptor and substance P immunoreactivity and gene expression in the rat lumbosacral spinal cord and urinary bladder after systemic, low dose vanilloid administration.

    PubMed

    Heng, Yujing J; Saunders, Cassandra I M; Kunde, Dale A; Geraghty, Dominic P

    2011-04-11

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor and substance P (SP) immunoreactivity (-ir) and mRNA in the rat lumbosacral spinal cord and urinary bladder were measured 24h after s.c. injection of the vanilloids, capsaicin (50mg/kg) and resiniferatoxin (RTX, 100μg/kg), or vehicle (10% ethanol/10% Tween 80/saline). In the spinal cord, capsaicin significantly reduced TRPV1 and SP-ir (40-45%) in laminae I/II compared to controls, while RTX produced decreases of ~35%. NK1-ir in the spinal cord was unaffected by both vanilloid treatments. In the bladder, SP-ir was reduced in urothelial cells of some capsaicin- and RTX-treated rats, while SP-ir in the suburothelium and muscularis was significantly reduced by RTX. A significant increase in NK1-ir was observed in the urothelium and muscularis after capsaicin administration. Capsaicin significantly increased SP mRNA in the spinal cord, and TRPV1 and SP mRNA in the bladder, whereas RTX increased TRPV1, SP and NK1 mRNA in the spinal cord, and TRPV1 and SP mRNA in the bladder. These data suggest that stimulation of TRPV1 by low dose vanilloid administration can rapidly (within 24h) alter both transcription and translation of TRPV1 channels, SP and NK1 receptors in the rat urinary bladder and spinal cord. 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Electrophysiological and Anatomical Correlates of Spinal Cord Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Maurizio; Krstajic, Nikola; Biella, Gabriele E. M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the continuous improvement in medical imaging technology, visualizing the spinal cord poses severe problems due to structural or incidental causes, such as small access space and motion artifacts. In addition, positional guidance on the spinal cord is not commonly available during surgery, with the exception of neuronavigation techniques based on static pre-surgical data and of radiation-based methods, such as fluoroscopy. A fast, bedside, intraoperative real-time imaging, particularly necessary during the positioning of endoscopic probes or tools, is an unsolved issue. The objective of our work, performed on experimental rats, is to demonstrate potential intraoperative spinal cord imaging and probe guidance by optical coherence tomography (OCT). Concurrently, we aimed to demonstrate that the electromagnetic OCT irradiation exerted no particular effect at the neuronal and synaptic levels. OCT is a user-friendly, low-cost and endoscopy-compatible photonics-based imaging technique. In particular, by using a Fourier-domain OCT imager, operating at 850 nm wavelength and scanning transversally with respect to the spinal cord, we have been able to: 1) accurately image tissue structures in an animal model (muscle, spine bone, cerebro-spinal fluid, dura mater and spinal cord), and 2) identify the position of a recording microelectrode approaching and inserting into the cord tissue 3) check that the infrared radiation has no actual effect on the electrophysiological activity of spinal neurons. The technique, potentially extendable to full three-dimensional image reconstruction, shows prospective further application not only in endoscopic intraoperative analyses and for probe insertion guidance, but also in emergency and adverse situations (e.g. after trauma) for damage recognition, diagnosis and fast image-guided intervention. PMID:27050096

  13. Automated identification of spinal cord and vertebras on sagittal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Dong, Qian; He, Bo; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Couriel, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    We are developing an automated method for the identification of the spinal cord and the vertebras on spinal MR images, which is an essential step for computerized analysis of bone marrow diseases. The spinal cord segment was first enhanced by a newly developed hierarchical multiscale tubular (HMT) filter that utilizes the complementary hyper- and hypo- intensities in the T1-weighted (T1W) and STIR MRI sequences. An Expectation-Maximization (EM) analysis method was then applied to the enhanced tubular structures to extract candidates of the spinal cord. The spinal cord was finally identified by a maximum-likelihood registration method by analysis of the features extracted from the candidate objects in the two MRI sequences. Using the identified spinal cord as a reference, the vertebras were localized based on the intervertebral disc locations extracted by another HMT filter applied to the T1W images. In this study, 5 and 30 MRI scans from 35 patients who were diagnosed with multiple myeloma disease were collected retrospectively with IRB approval as training and test set, respectively. The vertebras manually outlined by a radiologist were used as reference standard. A total of 422 vertebras were marked in the 30 test cases. For the 30 test cases, 100% (30/30) of the spinal cords were correctly segmented with 4 false positives (FPs) mistakenly identified on the back muscles in 4 scans. A sensitivity of 95.0% (401/422) was achieved for the identification of vertebras, and 5 FPs were marked in 4 scans with an average FP rate of 0.17 FPs/scan.

  14. Spinal stimulation of the upper lumbar spinal cord modulates urethral sphincter activity in rats after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Abud, Edsel M; Ichiyama, Ronaldo M; Havton, Leif A; Chang, Huiyi H

    2015-05-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), the neurogenic bladder is observed to develop asynchronous bladder and external urethral sphincter (EUS) contractions in a condition known as detrusor-sphincter dyssnergia (DSD). Activation of the EUS spinal controlling center located at the upper lumbar spinal cord may contribute to reduce EUS dyssynergic contractions and decrease urethral resistance during voiding. However, this mechanism has not been well studied. This study aimed at evaluating the effects of epidural stimulation (EpS) over the spinal EUS controlling center (L3) in combination with a serotonergic receptor agonist on EUS relaxation in naive rats and chronic (6-8 wk) T8 SCI rats. Cystometrogram and EUS electromyography (EMG) were obtained before and after the intravenous administration of 5HT-1A receptor agonist and antagonist. The latency, duration, frequency, amplitude, and area under curve of EpS-evoked EUS EMG responses were analyzed. EpS on L3 evoked an inhibition of EUS tonic contraction and an excitation of EUS intermittent bursting/relaxation correlating with urine expulsion in intact rats. Combined with a 5HT-1A receptor agonist, EpS on L3 evoked a similar effect in chronic T8 SCI rats to reduce urethral contraction (resistance). This study examined the effect of facilitating the EUS spinal controlling center to switch between urine storage and voiding phases by using EpS and a serotonergic receptor agonist. This novel approach of applying EpS on the EUS controlling center modulates EUS contraction and relaxation as well as reduces urethral resistance during voiding in chronic SCI rats with DSD.

  15. 76 FR 56504 - Proposed Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Activity: Comment Request

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-13

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Activity: Comment Request... spinal cord patients' satisfaction with VA rehabilitation and health care system. Affected Public... of automated collection techniques or the use of other forms of information technology. Title:...

  16. The spinal cord supports of vertebrae in the crown-group salamanders (Caudata, Urodela).

    PubMed

    Skutschas, Pavel P; Baleeva, Nataly V

    2012-09-01

    The development of spinal cord supports (bony thickenings which extend into the vertebral canal of vertebrae) in primitive (Salamandrella keyserlingii) and derived (Lissotriton vulgaris) salamanders were described. The spinal cord supports develop as the protuberances of periostal bone of the neural arches in the anteroproximal part of the septal collagenous fibers which connect a transverse myoseptum with the notochord and spinal cord, in the septal bundle inside the vertebral canal. Spinal cord supports were also found in some teleostean (Salmo salar, Oncorhynchus mykiss) and dipnoan (Protopterus sp.) fishes. The absence of the spinal cord supports in vertebrates with cartilaginous vertebrae (lampreys, chondrichthyan, and chondrostean fishes) corresponds to the fact that the spinal cord supports are bone structures. The absence of the spinal cord supports in frogs correlates with the lack of the well developed septal bundles inside the vertebral canal. The spinal cord supports are, presumably, a synapomorphic character for salamanders which originated independently of those observed in teleostean and dipnoan fishes.

  17. Biomechanical Behaviors in Three Types of Spinal Cord Injury Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Khuyagbaatar, Batbayar; Kim, Kyungsoo; Man Park, Won; Hyuk Kim, Yoon

    2016-08-01

    Clinically, spinal cord injuries (SCIs) are radiographically evaluated and diagnosed from plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging. However, it is difficult to conclude that radiographic evaluation of SCI can directly explain the fundamental mechanism of spinal cord damage. The von-Mises stress and maximum principal strain are directly associated with neurological damage in the spinal cord from a biomechanical viewpoint. In this study, the von-Mises stress and maximum principal strain in the spinal cord as well as the cord cross-sectional area (CSA) were analyzed under various magnitudes for contusion, dislocation, and distraction SCI mechanisms, using a finite-element (FE) model of the cervical spine with spinal cord including white matter, gray matter, dura mater with nerve roots, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). A regression analysis was performed to find correlation between peak von-Mises stress/peak maximum principal strain at the cross section of the highest reduction in CSA and corresponding reduction in CSA of the cord. Dislocation and contusion showed greater peak stress and strain values in the cord than distraction. The substantial increases in von-Mises stress as well as CSA reduction similar to or more than 30% were produced at a 60% contusion and a 60% dislocation, while the maximum principal strain was gradually increased as injury severity elevated. In addition, the CSA reduction had a strong correlation with peak von-Mises stress/peak maximum principal strain for the three injury mechanisms, which might be fundamental information in elucidating the relationship between radiographic and mechanical parameters related to SCI.

  18. Military gunshot wound-induced spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Alaca, Ridvan; Yilmaz, Bilge; Goktepe, Ahmet Salim; Yazicioglu, Kamil; Gunduz, Sukru

    2002-11-01

    Gunshot wounds are the second leading cause of spinal cord injuries in developed countries, whereas in undeveloped and developing countries, this likelihood is much more. However, the weapon and injury characteristics are very different between those two groups of countries. The aim of this study was to review our experience with gunshot wound-caused spinal cord injury during our struggle with terrorism, to examine surgical and medical complications, and to determine the difference between civilian and military gunshot wounds. One hundred five male patients (mean, 25 years of age) were examined according to completeness, spinal and nonspinal injuries, American Spinal Injury Association classification, motor and pinprick scores, surgical and nonsurgical interventions, surgical complications, and spinal cord injury-related medical complications. This study has shown that the likelihood of completeness was higher in gunshot wounds with high velocity weapons. Because of their higher wounding capacity, the difference between vertebral and neurological levels was not very different as it was on the other etiologies. Fortunately, spinal cord injury-related medical complications were less than expected.

  19. Are all spinal segments equal: intrinsic membrane properties of superficial dorsal horn neurons in the developing and mature mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, M A; Harris, B M; Anderson, W B; Brichta, A M; Graham, B A; Callister, R J

    2012-01-01

    Neurons in the superficial dorsal horn (SDH; laminae I–II) of the spinal cord process nociceptive information from skin, muscle, joints and viscera. Most of what we know about the intrinsic properties of SDH neurons comes from studies in lumbar segments of the cord even though clinical evidence suggests nociceptive signals from viscera and head and neck tissues are processed differently. This ‘lumbar-centric’ view of spinal pain processing mechanisms also applies to developing SDH neurons. Here we ask whether the intrinsic membrane properties of SDH neurons differ across spinal cord segments in both the developing and mature spinal cord. Whole cell recordings were made from SDH neurons in slices of upper cervical (C2–4), thoracic (T8–10) and lumbar (L3–5) segments in neonatal (P0–5) and adult (P24–45) mice. Neuronal input resistance (RIN), resting membrane potential, AP amplitude, half-width and AHP amplitude were similar across spinal cord regions in both neonates and adults (∼100 neurons for each region and age). In contrast, these intrinsic membrane properties differed dramatically between neonates and adults. Five types of AP discharge were observed during depolarizing current injection. In neonates, single spiking dominated (∼40%) and the proportions of each discharge category did not differ across spinal regions. In adults, initial bursting dominated in each spinal region, but was significantly more prevalent in rostral segments (49% of neurons in C2–4 vs. 29% in L3–5). During development the dominant AP discharge pattern changed from single spiking to initial bursting. The rapid A-type potassium current (IAr) dominated in neonates and adults, but its prevalence decreased (∼80%vs. ∼50% of neurons) in all regions during development. IAr steady state inactivation and activation also changed in upper cervical and lumbar regions during development. Together, our data show the intrinsic properties of SDH neurons are generally conserved

  20. Peripheral injury and anterograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horse radish peroxidase to the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Valtschanoff, J G; Weinberg, R J; Rustioni, A

    1992-10-01

    Previous observations have revealed labeling in the extracellular space surrounding boutons and unmyelinated fibers in superficial laminae of the spinal cord after injection of the tracer wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase in dorsal root ganglia. The degree of extracellular labeling appeared related to the extent of the damage to the ganglia at the time of the injection. To determine whether injury might produce extracellular labeling, we investigated the effects of unilateral nerve crush or transection on spinal labeling after bilateral injections of the tracer into sciatic nerves. Confirming previous reports, labeling was confined to small dorsal root ganglion cells and to spinal laminae I and II, suggesting a selective affinity of this tracer for unmyelinated fibers. Labeling of both ganglion neurons and superficial spinal laminae was increased on the injured side, probably as a result of increased efficiency of receptor-mediated endocytosis. Electron microscopical observations revealed that the tracer was largely confined to unmyelinated dorsal root fibers bilaterally; a higher percentage of these fibers were labeled on the injured side. In the dorsal horn, the tracer was predominantly within unmyelinated axons and their terminals on the control side, whereas most of the labeling was extracellular and transneuronal on the injured side. The extracellular labeling surrounded unmyelinated fibers and their terminals in the spinal cord, but was excluded from the synaptic cleft. The demonstration that injury is accompanied by significantly increased release of this tracer from the terminals of unmyelinated fibers into the extracellular space suggests that endogenous substances may be released after peripheral lesions as a central signal of injury.

  1. Sexual function in spinal cord lesioned men.

    PubMed

    Biering-Sørensen, F; Sønksen, J

    2001-09-01

    Review of literature. To review the physical aspects related to penile erection, ejaculatory dysfunction, semen characteristics, and techniques for enhancement of fertility in spinal cord lesioned (SCL) men. Worldwide: individuals with traumatic as well as non-traumatic SCL. Recommendations for management of erectile dysfunction in SCL men: If it is possible to obtain a satisfactory erection but of insufficient duration, then try to use a venous constrictor band to find out if this is sufficient to maintain the erection. Otherwise we recommend Sildenafil. If Sildenafil is not satisfactory then use intracavernous injection with prostaglandin E(1) (some SCL men may prefer cutaneous or intraurethral application). We discourage the implantation of penile prosthesis for the sole purpose of erection. Recommendations for management of ejaculatory dysfunction in SCL men: Penile vibratory stimulation (PVS) to induce ejaculation is recommended as first treatment choice. If PVS fails, SCL men should be referred for electroejaculation (EEJ). Semen characteristics: Impaired semen profiles with low motility rates are seen in the majority of SCL men. Recently reported data gives evidence of a decline in spermatogenesis and motility of ejaculated spermatozoa shortly after (few weeks) an acute SCL. It is suggested that some factors in the seminal plasma and/or disordered storage of spermatozoa in the seminal vesicles are mainly responsible for the impaired semen profiles in men with chronic SCL. Fertility: Home insemination with semen obtained by PVS and introduced intravaginally in order to achieve successful pregnancies may be an option for some SCL men and their partners. The majority of SCL men will further enhance their fertility potential when using either PVS or EEJ combined with assisted reproduction techniques such as intrauterine insemination or in vitro fertilization with or without intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

  2. [Electrophysiological testing in spinal cord tumors].

    PubMed

    André-Obadia, N; Mauguière, F

    2017-02-01

    Evoked potentials (EPs) are useful to evaluate the functional impairment of motor and somatosensory pathways in spinal cord tumors. Conduction through pyramidal tracts is evaluated by motor EPs (MEPs) elicited by transcranial stimulation, magnetic for awake patients or electric in the operating room. Somatosensory EPs (SEPs) and laser EPs (LEPs) are complementary procedures to explore conduction in dorsal columns and spinothalamic tracts, respectively. MEPs as well as SEPs show conduction abnormalities in about 60% of cases with a sensitivity that increases up to 70% when both procedures are carried out. Abnormalities are observed in the absence of any clinical sign in respectively 7% and 15% of cases for MEPs and SEPs. Multilevel stimulations for SEPs recordings permit to detect segmental dysfunction in 70% in case of cervical TIM, even in the absence of clinical signs. LEPs are useful in specific clinical situations: they allow a dermatomal stimulation and are correlated to segmental thermoalgic anaesthesia. Electrophysiological testing plays an important role in the diagnostic and therapeutic strategy: before surgery, MEPs and SEPs objectively evaluate the functional impairment directly related to the lesion. They also help by permitting a follow-up, either before surgery when the surgical decision is delayed because of a good clinical tolerance of the lesion, or after operation to evaluate the functional evolution. Intraoperative monitoring of MEPs and SEPs allows informing the surgeon about the impact on each surgical manipulation. No prospective randomized study has been performed to date to compare clinical evolution after surgery with or without monitoring. Nevertheless, a wide consensus became established in favor of monitoring to limit the risk of postoperative definite deficit and to permit an optimal surgical resection without risk when responses are preserved.

  3. Nociceptive plasticity inhibits adaptive learning in the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, A R; Crown, E D; Grau, J W

    2006-08-11

    Spinal plasticity is known to play a role in central neurogenic pain. Over the last 100 years researchers have found that the spinal cord is also capable of supporting other forms of plasticity including several forms of learning. To study instrumental (response-outcome) learning in the spinal cord, we use a preparation in which spinally transected rats are given shock to the hind leg when the leg is extended. The spinal cord rapidly learns to hold the leg in a flexed position when given this controllable shock. However, if shock is independent of leg position (uncontrollable shock), subjects fail to learn. Uncontrollable shock also impairs future learning. As little as 6 min of uncontrollable shock to either the leg or the tail generates a learning deficit that lasts up to 48 h. Recent data suggest links between the learning deficit and the sensitization of pain circuits associated with inflammation or injury (central sensitization). Here, we explored whether central sensitization and the spinal learning deficit share pharmacological and behavioral features. Central sensitization enhances reactivity to mechanical stimulation (allodynia) and depends on the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR). The uncontrollable shock stimulus that generates a learning deficit produced a tactile allodynia (Exp. 1) and administration of the NMDAR antagonist MK-801 blocked induction of the learning deficit (Exp. 2). Finally, a treatment known to induce central sensitization, intradermal carrageenan, produced a spinal learning deficit (Exp. 3). The findings suggest that the induction of central sensitization inhibits selective response modifications.

  4. Schwannosis: role of gliosis and proteoglycan in human spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Bruce, J H; Norenberg, M D; Kraydieh, S; Puckett, W; Marcillo, A; Dietrich, D

    2000-09-01

    Schwannosis (aberrant proliferation of Schwann cells and nerve fibers) has been reported following spinal cord injury (SCI). In this study, we examined the incidence of schwannosis following human SCI, and investigated its relationship to gliosis. We found evidence of schwannosis in 32 out of 65 cases (48%) of human SCI that survived 24 h to 24 years after injury; this incidence rose to 82% in those patients who survived for more than 4 months. Schwannosis was not observed in cases that survived less than 4 months after injury. In affected cases, it was generally noted in areas that had low immunoreactivity for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), suggesting that reduced gliosis might have contributed to the aberrant proliferation of Schwann cells following SCI. Since chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) has been proposed to play a role in Schwann cell/glial interaction, we performed immunohistochemical staining for CSPG to investigate its potential relationship with schwannosis. CSPG in the injured cord was generally associated with the blood vessel walls, but was also sometimes noted in reactive astrocytes. In SCI with schwannosis, CSPG staining was more prominent and confined largely to the extracellular matrix and basal lamina of proliferating Schwann cells. Our study suggests that Schwann cells, which may have been displaced from spinal roots and introduced into the injured cord through a break in the pial surface, are capable of proliferating and producing CSPG, particularly in the setting of reduced gliosis. Since CSPG has been associated with inhibition of neurite outgrowth, its increased production by aberrant Schwann cells may impair spinal cord regeneration after injury.

  5. Somatotopic arrangement of thermal sensory regions in the healthy human spinal cord determined by means of spinal cord functional MRI.

    PubMed

    Stroman, Patrick W; Bosma, Rachael L; Tsyben, Anastasia

    2012-09-01

    Previous functional MRI studies of normal sensory function in the human spinal cord, including right-to-left symmetry of activity, have been influenced by order effects between repeated studies. In this study, we apply thermal sensory stimulation to four dermatomes within each functional MRI time-series acquisition. Each of the four dermatomes receives a unique stimulation paradigm, such that the four paradigms form a linearly independent set, enabling detection of each individual stimulus response. Functional MRI data are shown spanning the cervical spinal cord and brainstem in 10 healthy volunteers. Results of general linear model analysis demonstrate consistent patterns of activity within the spinal cord segments corresponding to each dermatome, and a high degree of symmetry between right-side and left-side stimulation. Connectivity analyses also demonstrate consistent areas of activity and connectivity between spinal cord and brainstem regions corresponding to known anatomy. However, right-side and left-side responses are not at precisely the same rostral-caudal positions, but are offset by several millimeters, with left-side responses consistently more caudal than right-side responses. The results confirm that distinct responses to multiple interleaved sensory stimuli can be distinguished, enabling studies of sensory responses within the spinal cord without the confounding effects of comparing sequential studies.

  6. Treadmill training promotes spinal changes leading to locomotor recovery after partial spinal cord injury in cats.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Marina; Delivet-Mongrain, Hugo; Rossignol, Serge

    2013-06-01

    After a spinal hemisection at thoracic level in cats, the paretic hindlimb progressively recovers locomotion without treadmill training but asymmetries between hindlimbs persist for several weeks and can be seen even after a further complete spinal transection at T13. To promote optimal locomotor recovery after hemisection, such asymmetrical changes need to be corrected. In the present study we determined if the locomotor deficits induced by a spinal hemisection can be corrected by locomotor training and, if so, whether the spinal stepping after the complete spinal cord transection is also more symmetrical. This would indicate that locomotor training in the hemisected period induces efficient changes in the spinal cord itself. Sixteen adult cats were first submitted to a spinal hemisection at T10. One group received 3 wk of treadmill training, whereas the second group did not. Detailed kinematic and electromyographic analyses showed that a 3-wk period of locomotor training was sufficient to improve the quality and symmetry of walking of the hindlimbs. Moreover, after the complete spinal lesion was performed, all the trained cats reexpressed bilateral and symmetrical hindlimb locomotion within 24 h. By contrast, the locomotor pattern of the untrained cats remained asymmetrical, and the hindlimb on the side of the hemisection was still deficient. This study highlights the beneficial role of locomotor training in facilitating bilateral and symmetrical functional plastic changes within the spinal circuitry and in promoting locomotor recovery after an incomplete spinal cord injury.

  7. An investigation of motion correction algorithms for pediatric spinal cord DTI in healthy subjects and patients with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Devon M; Mohamed, Feroze B; Barakat, Nadia; Hunter, Louis N; Shellikeri, Sphoorti; Finsterbusch, Jürgen; Faro, Scott H; Shah, Pallav; Samdani, Amer F; Mulcahey, M J

    2014-06-01

    Patient and physiological motion can cause artifacts in DTI of the spinal cord which can impact image quality and diffusion indices. The purpose of this investigation was to determine a reliable motion correction method for pediatric spinal cord DTI and show effects of motion correction on DTI parameters in healthy subjects and patients with spinal cord injury. Ten healthy subjects and ten subjects with spinal cord injury were scanned using a 3T scanner. Images were acquired with an inner field-of-view DTI sequence covering cervical spine levels C1 to C7. Images were corrected for motion using two types of transformation (rigid and affine) and three cost functions. Corrected images and transformations were examined qualitatively and quantitatively using in-house developed code. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) indices were calculated and tested for statistical significance pre- and post- motion correction. Images corrected using rigid methods showed improvements in image quality, while affine methods frequently showed residual distortions in corrected images. Blinded evaluation of pre and post correction images showed significant improvement in cord homogeneity and edge conspicuity in corrected images (p<0.0001). The average FA changes were statistically significant (p<0.0001) in the spinal cord injury group, while healthy subjects showed less FA change and were not significant. In both healthy subjects and subjects with spinal cord injury, quantitative and qualitative analysis showed the rigid scaled-least-squares registration technique to be the most reliable and effective in improving image quality. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Current and emerging treatment options for spinal cord ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Pikija, Slaven; Mutzenbach, J Sebastian; Seidl, Martin; Leis, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen; Sellner, Johann

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord infarction (SCI) is a rare but disabling disorder caused by a wide spectrum of conditions. Given the lack of randomized-controlled trials, contemporary treatment concepts are adapted from guidelines for cerebral ischemia, atherosclerotic vascular disease, and acute traumatic spinal cord injury. In addition, patients with SCI are at risk for several potentially life-threatening but preventable systemic and neurologic complications. Notably, there is emerging evidence from preclinical studies for the use of neuroprotection in acute ischemic injury of the spinal cord. In this review, we discuss the current state of the art for the therapy and prevention of SCI and highlight potential emerging treatment concepts awaiting translational adoption. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Respiration following Spinal Cord Injury: Evidence for Human Neuroplasticity

    PubMed Central

    Hoh, Daniel J.; Mercier, Lynne M.; Hussey, Shaunn P.; Lane, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Respiratory dysfunction is one of the most devastating consequences of cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) with impaired breathing being a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in this population. However, there is mounting experimental and clinical evidence for moderate spontaneous respiratory recovery, or “plasticity”, after some spinal cord injuries. Pre-clinical models of respiratory dysfunction following SCI have demonstrated plasticity at neural and behavioral levels that result in progressive recovery of function. Temporal changes in respiration after human SCI have revealed some functional improvements suggesting plasticity paralleling that seen in experimental models – a concept that has been previously under-appreciated. While the extent of spontaneous recovery remains limited, it is possible that enhancing or facilitating neuroplastic mechanisms may have significant therapeutic potential. The next generation of treatment strategies for SCI and related respiratory dysfunction should aim to optimize these recovery processes of the injured spinal cord for lasting functional restoration. PMID:23891679

  10. Exercise Training Promotes Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Juanjuan; Deng, Lingxiao; Li, Jianan

    2016-01-01

    The exercise training is an effective therapy for spinal cord injury which has been applied to clinic. Traditionally, the exercise training has been considered to improve spinal cord function only through enhancement, compensation, and replacement of the remaining function of nerve and muscle. Recently, accumulating evidences indicated that exercise training can improve the function in different levels from end-effector organ such as skeletal muscle to cerebral cortex through reshaping skeletal muscle structure and muscle fiber type, regulating physiological and metabolic function of motor neurons in the spinal cord and remodeling function of the cerebral cortex. We compiled published data collected in different animal models and clinical studies into a succinct review of the current state of knowledge. PMID:28050288

  11. The spinal cord research foundation: two decades of progress.

    PubMed

    Kelley, M S

    2001-04-01

    Over the course of the past 24 years, the Paralyzed Veterans of America's Spinal Cord Research Foundation (SCRF) has provided support for more than 400 research grants in a wide range of areas, from improved wheelchair design to axon pathfinding in Drosophila. The Founders of SCRF, as well as its current trustees, believe that it is imperative to target a broad range of research areas to maximize the quality of life for people, both veterans and nonveterans, with paralysis. This approach has involved the support of basic science and clinical research directed towards repair of the spinal cord, as well as research into improved treatments for complications of spinal cord dysfunction and other projects, including engineering grants and conferences, that may enhance the quality of life for people with paralysis within the immediate future.

  12. Spatiotemporal patterns of Gem expression after rat spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wen, Hai; Cao, Jianhua; Yu, Xiaowei; Sun, Binbin; Ding, Tao; Li, Ming; Li, Debao; Wu, Hao; Long, Long; Xu, Guangfei; Zhang, Feng

    2013-06-21

    Gem is an atypical protein of the Ras superfamily that plays a role in regulating voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels and cytoskeletal reorganization. To elucidate the certain expression and biological function in central nervous system (CNS), we performed an acute spinal cord contusion injury model in adult rats. Western blot analysis showed a marked up-regulation of Gem after spinal cord injury (SCI). Immunohistochemistry revealed wide distribution of Gem in spinal cord, including neurons and glial cells. Double immunofluorescent staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and phenotype-specific markers indicated increases of Gem expression in proliferating microglia and astrocytes. Our data suggest that Gem may be implicated in the proliferation of microglia and astrocytes after SCI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Malnutrition in Spinal Cord Injury: More Than Nutritional Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Dionyssiotis, Yannis

    2012-01-01

    Denervation of the spinal cord below the level of injury leads to complications producing malnutrition. Nutritional status affects mortality and pathology of injured subjects and it has been reported that two thirds of individuals enrolled in rehabilitation units are malnourished. Therefore, the aim should be either to maintain an optimal nutritional status, or supplement these subjects in order to overcome deficiencies in nutrients or prevent obesity. This paper reviews methods of nutritional assessment and describes the physiopathological mechanisms of malnutrition based on the assumption that spinal cord injured subjects need to receive adequate nutrition to promote optimal recovery, placing nutrition as a first line treatment and not an afterthought in the rehabilitation of spinal cord injury. PMID:22870169

  14. Spinal cord stimulation for refractory angina in a patient implanted with a cardioverter defibrillator.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Paolo; Grimaldi, Roberto; Massa, Riccardo; Chiribiri, Amedeo; De Luca, Anna; Castellano, Maddalena; Cardano, Paola; Trevi, Gian Paolo

    2007-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation is currently used to treat refractory angina. Some concerns may arise about the possible interaction concerning the spinal cord stimulator in patients already implanted with a pacemaker or a cardioverter defibrillator. We are going to describe the successful implantation of a spinal cord stimulator in a patient previously implanted with a cardioverter defibrillator.

  15. 76 FR 71623 - Agency Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Under OMB Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey) Under OMB Review AGENCY.... 2900-New (VA Form 10-0515).'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Spinal Cord Injury Patient Care Survey... Collection. Abstract: Information collected on VA Form 10-0515 will be used to determine spinal cord...

  16. Delayed paraplegia after spinal cord ischemic injury requires caspase-3 activation in mice.

    PubMed

    Kakinohana, Manabu; Kida, Kotaro; Minamishima, Shizuka; Atochin, Dmitriy N; Huang, Paul L; Kaneki, Masao; Ichinose, Fumito

    2011-08-01

    Delayed paraplegia remains a devastating complication after ischemic spinal cord injury associated with aortic surgery and trauma. Although apoptosis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of delayed neurodegeneration, mechanisms responsible for the delayed paraplegia remain incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of apoptosis in delayed motor neuron degeneration after spinal cord ischemia. Mice were subjected to spinal cord ischemia induced by occlusion of the aortic arch and left subclavian artery for 5 or 9 minutes. Motor function in the hind limb was evaluated up to 72 hours after spinal cord ischemia. Histological studies were performed to detect caspase-3 activation, glial activation, and motor neuron survival in the serial spinal cord sections. To investigate the impact of caspase-3 activation on spinal cord ischemia, outcome of the spinal cord ischemia was examined in mice deficient for caspase-3. In wild-type mice, 9 minutes of spinal cord ischemia caused immediate paraplegia, whereas 5 minutes of ischemia caused delayed paraplegia. Delayed paraplegia after 5 minutes of spinal cord ischemia was associated with histological evidence of caspase-3 activation, reactive astrogliosis, microglial activation, and motor neuron loss starting at approximately 24 to 48 hours after spinal cord ischemia. Caspase-3 deficiency prevented delayed paraplegia and motor neuron loss after 5 minutes of spinal cord ischemia, but not immediate paraplegia after 9 minutes of ischemia. The present results suggest that caspase-3 activation is required for delayed paraplegia and motor neuron degeneration after spinal cord ischemia.

  17. Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Seth D. Messinger...SUBTITLE Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service- Social Reintegration of Service Me Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord...communities and cultural identities that is key to long-term success . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Spinal Cord Injury, Community Reintegration , Qualitative

  18. Overcoming the Practical Barriers to Spinal Cord Cell Transplantation for ALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Spinal Cord Cell Transplantation for ALS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nicholas Boulis CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Emory University...COVERED 30September2012–29September2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Overcoming the Practical Barriers to Spinal Cord Cell Transplantation 5a. CONTRACT...injections. At the same time, little is understood about the appropriate immunosuppressive therapy for spinal cord stem cell transplant recipients. In our

  19. Vascular malformations of the spinal cord (angiodysgenetic myelomalacia): a critique on its pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Badejo, L; Sangalang, V E

    1979-02-01

    Two cases of angiodysgenetic myelomalacia are presented. Both patients had progressive weakness and sensory deficits in the lower extremities and vascular malformations of their spinal cords. The lesions were located on the dorsum of the spinal cord and the dorso-spinal roots. We believe the symptoms that developed later in life were due to spinal cord ischemia resulting from late degenerative changes in the vessels of the malformation and an ever increasing spinal "steal".

  20. Potential associations between chronic whiplash and incomplete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Smith, AC; Parrish, TB; Hoggarth, MA; McPherson, JG; Tysseling, VM; Wasielewski, M; Kim, HE; Hornby, TG; Elliott, JM

    2015-01-01

    Study Design: This research utilized a cross-sectional design with control group inclusion. Objectives: Preliminary evidence suggests that a portion of the patient population with chronic whiplash may have sustained spinal cord damage. Our hypothesis is that in some cases of chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WAD), observed muscle weakness in the legs will be associated with local signs of a partial spinal cord injury of the cervical spine. Setting: University based laboratory in Chicago, IL, USA. Methods: Five participants with chronic WAD were compared with five gender/age/height/weight/body mass index (BMI) control participants. For a secondary investigation, the chronic WAD group was compared with five unmatched participants with motor incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI). Spinal cord motor tract integrity was assessed using magnetization transfer imaging. Muscle fat infiltration (MFI) was quantified using fat/water separation magnetic resonance imaging. Central volitional muscle activation of the plantarflexors was assessed using a burst superimposition technique. Results: We found reduced spinal cord motor tract integrity, increased MFI of the neck and lower extremity muscles and significantly impaired voluntary plantarflexor muscle activation in five participants with chronic WAD. The lower extremity structural changes and volitional weakness in chronic WAD were comparable to participants with iSCI. Conclusion: The results support the position that a subset of the chronic whiplash population may have sustained partial damage to the spinal cord. Sponsorship: NIH R01HD079076-01A1, NIH T32 HD057845 and the Foundation for Physical Therapy Promotion of Doctoral Studies program. PMID:27630770

  1. Spinal cord lesions and disability in Hispanics with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Amezcua, L; Lerner, A; Ledezma, K; Conti, D; Law, M; Weiner, L; Langer-Gould, A

    2013-11-01

    Longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesions (LESCLs) are believed to occur predominantly with opticospinal multiple sclerosis (OSMS) and are associated with disability. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence and patterns of spinal cord lesions in Hispanics with multiple sclerosis (MS) and OSMS and their association with disability. A cross-sectional study of 164 patients with complete MRIs was used. In each case the spinal cord was classified: LESCLs, scattered spinal cord lesions (sSCLs) or no spinal cord lesions (noSCLs). Clinical course was defined as classical MS or OSMS. Risk of disability (Expanded Disability Status Scale ≥4.0) was adjusted for age, disease duration and sex using logistic regression. A total of 125/164 (73 %) MS patients had spinal cord lesions (sSCLs, 57 %; LESCLs, 19 %), but only 11 (7 %) had OSMS. LESCLs were associated with disability (p < 0.0001), longer disease duration (p < 0.0001) and MS (n = 21 vs. n = 10 OSMS; p < 0.0001). LESCLs were also associated with the greatest risk to disability (OR 7.3, 95 % CIs 1.9-26.5; p = 0.003; sSCLs OR 2.5, 95 % CIs 0.9-7.1; p = 0.09) compared with noSCLs. LESCLs are more common than OSMS and are associated with worse disability even in patients with MS. These results suggest that LESCLs are a more important marker of disability in MS than OSMS and may be an early indicator of more aggressive disease in this population.

  2. Scratching activates microglia in the mouse spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Dun, Siok L.; Chen, Yi-Hung; Luo, Jin J.; Cowan, Alan; Dun, Nae J.

    2014-01-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that repetitive scratching provoked by either of two known pruritogens, compound 48/80 and 5′-guanidinonaltrindole (GNTI), is accompanied by activation of microglia cells in the mouse spinal cord. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that CD11b, a cell surface marker of microglia cells, was up-regulated in the spinal cord 10–30 min post subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of compound 48/80 (50 μg/100 μl) or GNTI (0.3 mg/kg) to the back of the mouse neck. Numerous intensely labeled CD11b immunoreactive (irCD11b) cells, with the appearance of hypertrophic reactive microglia, were distributed throughout the gray and white matter. In contrast, weakly labeled irCD11b cells were distributed in the spinal cord from mice injected with saline. Western blots showed that CD11b expression levels were significantly increased in spinal cords of mice injected s.c. with either pruritogen, reached a peak response in about 30 min, and declined toward the basal level in the ensuing 60 min. In addition, phospho-p38 (p-p38), but not p38, levels were up-regulated in spinal cords from mice injected with compound 48/80 or GNTI, with a time course parallel to that of CD11b expression. Pretreatment of the mice with nalfurafine (20 μg/kg; s.c.), a κ opioid receptor agonist that has been shown to suppress scratching, reduced CD11b and p-p38 expression induced by either pruritogen. The result demonstrates, for the first time, that scratch behavior induced by pruritogens GNTI and compound 48/80 is accompanied by a parallel activation of microglia cells in the spinal cord. PMID:25354468

  3. [Operative ultrasonography of the brain and spinal cord pathology].

    PubMed

    Machi, J; Sigel, B; Menoni, R; Jafar, J J; Beitler, J C; Crowell, R M

    1984-07-01

    B-mode real-time ultrasound using 5 or 7.5 MHz transducer has been employed during 21 operations for brain pathology and spinal cord lesions. Ultrasonic scanning was performed at the following operations: 10 brain tumors (4 glioblastomas multiforme, 2 astrocytomas, 1 medulloblastoma, 2 metastatic tumors), 2 brain cysts (arachnoid, epidermoid), 1 tuberculous abscess, 3 cerebral hematomas: 2 spinal cord tumors (malignant melanoma, glioma), 2 syringomyelias, 1 posterior longitudinal ligament thickening. Operative ultrasound was useful prior to dural incisions and particularly for subcortical lesions. In addition, ultrasound provided assistance at spinal cord surgery. Our experience has been reviewed and summarized in this report in terms of specific usefulness of assistance of this method which has proven helpful to the neurosurgeons. The types of assistance provided by operative ultrasonography include: Location of dural incision. Localization of brain and spinal cord lesions prior to biopsy. Diagnosis which has not been made preoperatively (e.g. necrosis or cystic area in tumor). Consistency of each lesion (e.g. solid or cystic, necrosis, loculation). Size, extent and depth of brain tumor, cyst, abscess and hematoma. Presence and extent of spinal cord syrinx. Relation of tumor to spinal cord and dura. Access route for biopsy and drainage (avoiding critical areas such as motor strip). Exclusion of bleeding or hematoma following biopsy. Confirmation of the effectiveness of drainage or resection of lesions. Relationship between pathology and surrounding anatomic structures. A number of important assistance by the utilization of ultrasound during neurological surgery have been identified.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Scratching activates microglia in the mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Dun, Siok L; Chen, Yi-Hung; Luo, Jin J; Cowan, Alan; Dun, Nae J

    2015-03-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that repetitive scratching provoked by two known pruritogens, compound 48/80 and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole (GNTI), is accompanied by activation of microglial cells in the mouse spinal cord. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the complement receptor 3, also known as cluster determinant 11b (CD11b), a cell surface marker of microglial cells, was upregulated in the spinal cord 10-30 min after a subcutaneous (s.c.) injection of compound 48/80 (50 μg/100 μl) or GNTI (0.3 mg/kg) to the back of the mouse neck. Numerous intensely labeled CD11b-immunoreactive (CD11b-ir) cells, with the appearance of hypertrophic reactive microglia, were distributed throughout the gray and white matter. In contrast, weakly labeled CD11b-ir cells were distributed in the spinal cord from mice injected with saline. Western blots showed that CD11b expression levels were significantly increased in spinal cords of mice injected s.c. with either pruritogen, reached a peak response in about 30 min, and declined to about the basal level in the ensuing 60 min. In addition, phospho-p38 (p-p38) but not p38 levels were upregulated in spinal cords from mice injected with compound 48/80 or GNTI, with a time course parallel to that of CD11b expression. Pretreatment of the mice with nalfurafine (20 µg/kg; s.c.), a κ-opioid receptor agonist that has been shown to suppress scratching, reduced CD11b and p-p38 expression induced by either pruritogen. The results demonstrate, for the first time, that scratch behavior induced by the pruritogens GNTI and compound 48/80 is accompanied by a parallel activation of microglial cells in the spinal cord.

  5. Nogo-A expression dynamically varies after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jian-wei; Yang, Jun-feng; Ma, Yong; Hua, Zhen; Guo, Yang; Gu, Xiao-lin; Zhang, Ya-feng

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism involved in neural regeneration after spinal cord injury is unclear. The myelin-derived protein Nogo-A, which is specific to the central nervous system, has been identified to negatively affect the cytoskeleton and growth program of axotomized neurons. Studies have shown that Nogo-A exerts immediate and chronic inhibitory effects on neurite outgrowth. In vivo, inhibitors of Nogo-A have been shown to lead to a marked enhancement of regenerative axon extension. We established a spinal cord injury model in rats using a free-falling weight drop device to subsequently investigate Nogo-A expression. Nogo-A mRNA and protein expression and immunoreactivity were detected in spinal cord tissue using real-time quantitative PCR, immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis. At 24 hours after spinal cord injury, Nogo-A protein and mRNA expression was low in the injured group compared with control and sham-operated groups. The levels then continued to drop further and were at their lowest at 3 days, rapidly rose to a peak after 7 days, and then gradually declined again after 14 days. These changes were observed at both the mRNA and protein level. The transient decrease observed early after injury followed by high levels for a few days indicates Nogo-A expression is time dependent. This may contribute to the lack of regeneration in the central nervous system after spinal cord injury. The dynamic variation of Nogo-A should be taken into account in the treatment of spinal cord injury. PMID:25883620

  6. Multiple extradural spinal arachnoid cysts causing diffuse myelomalacia of the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Ergun, Tarkan; Lakadamyali, Hatice

    2009-11-01

    Extradural spinal cyst is a rare cause of compression myelopathy. It is usually solitary and its typical location is posterior to the spinal cord. We present a case of multiple spinal arachnoid cysts causing diffuse myelomalacia secondary to a significant compression of the spinal cord with no symptom relief after surgical decompression. A 35-year-old female patient presented to our hospital complaining of progressive weakness and numbness of both lower extremities for the last 2 months, being more prominent on the right side. Her history was significant for back pain that started after a vaginal delivery 1 year ago. Spinal MRI revealed multiple extradural arachnoid cysts and diffuse myelomalacia. A T4-T6 level laminectomy was performed. The cyst was nearly totally resected. There was partial symptomatic relief after surgery, but 5 months later her symptoms worsened. MRI revealed nodular syringomyelia and atrophy of the thoracic spinal cord. Extradural spinal arachnoid cyst is to be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord compression. Vaginal delivery may accelerate the process and symptoms by a sudden increase in the cyst size. In cases of myelomalacia secondary to cyst pressure postoperative results are quite poor.

  7. Targeting Lumbar Spinal Neural Circuitry by Epidural Stimulation to Restore Motor Function After Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Minassian, Karen; McKay, W Barry; Binder, Heinrich; Hofstoetter, Ursula S

    2016-04-01

    Epidural spinal cord stimulation has a long history of application for improving motor control in spinal cord injury. This review focuses on its resurgence following the progress made in understanding the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms and on recent reports of its augmentative effects upon otherwise subfunctional volitional motor control. Early work revealed that the spinal circuitry involved in lower-limb motor control can be accessed by stimulating through electrodes placed epidurally over the posterior aspect of the lumbar spinal cord below a paralyzing injury. Current understanding is that such stimulation activates large-to-medium-diameter sensory fibers within the posterior roots. Those fibers then trans-synaptically activate various spinal reflex circuits and plurisegmentally organized interneuronal networks that control more complex contraction and relaxation patterns involving multiple muscles. The induced change in responsiveness of this spinal motor circuitry to any residual supraspinal input via clinically silent translesional neural connections that have survived the injury may be a likely explanation for rudimentary volitional control enabled by epidural stimulation in otherwise paralyzed muscles. Technological developments that allow dynamic control of stimulation parameters and the potential for activity-dependent beneficial plasticity may further unveil the remarkable capacity of spinal motor processing that remains even after severe spinal cord injuries.

  8. Spinal cord ischemia following thoracotomy without epidural anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Raz, Aeyal; Avramovich, Aharon; Saraf-Lavi, Efrat; Saute, Milton; Eidelman, Leonid A

    2006-06-01

    Paraplegia is an uncommon yet devastating complication following thoracotomy, usually caused by compression or ischemia of the spinal cord. Ischemia without compression may be a result of global ischemia, vascular injury and other causes. Epidural anesthesia has been implicated as a major cause. This report highlights the fact that perioperative cord ischemia and paraplegia may be unrelated to epidural intervention. A 71-yr-old woman was admitted for a left upper lobectomy for resection of a non-small cell carcinoma of the lung. The patient refused epidural catheter placement and underwent a left T5-6 thoracotomy under general anesthesia. During surgery, she was hemodynamically stable and good oxygen saturation was maintained. Several hours following surgery the patient complained of loss of sensation in her legs. Neurological examination disclosed a complete motor and sensory block at the T5-6 level. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed spinal cord ischemia. The patient received iv steroid treatment, but remained paraplegic. Five months following the surgery there was only partial improvement in her motor symptoms. A follow-up MRI study was consistent with a diagnosis of spinal cord ischemia. In this case of paraplegia following thoracic surgery for lung resection, epidural anesthesia/analgesia was not used. The MRI demonstrated evidence of spinal cord ischemia, and no evidence of cord compression. This case highlights that etiologies other than epidural intervention, such as injury to the spinal segmental arteries during thoracotomy, should be considered as potential causes of cord ischemia and resultant paraplegia in this surgical population.

  9. Human spinal cord injury: new and emerging approaches to treatment.

    PubMed

    Johnston, L

    2001-11-01

    The World Health Organization together with the Iceland Ministry of Health and Social Security sponsored a conference entitled 'Human Spinal Cord Injury: New and Emerging Approaches to Treatment' held on May 31-June 2, 2001 in Reykjavik, Iceland. To help catalyze the development of new paradigms to address spinal cord injury, the conference's overall goal was to bring in a diversity of perspectives, ranging from state-of-the-art stem cell biology to the ancient wisdom of Eastern Medicine. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the presentations of the conference's 26 speakers.

  10. Expression of Lymphatic Markers in the Adult Rat Spinal Cord.

    PubMed

    Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schroedl, Falk; Bieler, Lara; Trost, Andrea; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Zaunmair, Pia; Kreutzer, Christina; Traweger, Andreas; Reitsamer, Herbert A; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, lymphatic vessels are thought to be absent from the central nervous system (CNS), although they are widely distributed within the rest of the body. Recent work in the eye, i.e., another organ regarded as alymphatic, revealed numerous cells expressing lymphatic markers. As the latter can be involved in the response to pathological conditions, we addressed the presence of cells expressing lymphatic markers within the spinal cord by immunohistochemistry. Spinal cord of young adult Fisher rats was scrutinized for the co-expression of the lymphatic markers PROX1 and LYVE-1 with the cell type markers Iba1, CD68, PGP9.5, OLIG2. Rat skin served as positive control for the lymphatic markers. PROX1-immunoreactivity was detected in many nuclei throughout the spinal cord white and gray matter. These nuclei showed no association with LYVE-1. Expression of LYVE-1 could only be detected in cells at the spinal cord surface and in cells closely associated with blood vessels. These cells were found to co-express Iba1, a macrophage and microglia marker. Further, double labeling experiments using CD68, another marker found in microglia and macrophages, also displayed co-localization in the Iba1+ cells located at the spinal cord surface and those apposed to blood vessels. On the other hand, PROX1-expressing cells found in the parenchyma were lacking Iba1 or PGP9.5, but a significant fraction of those cells showed co-expression of the oligodendrocyte lineage marker OLIG2. Intriguingly, following spinal cord injury, LYVE-1-expressing cells assembled and reorganized into putative pre-vessel structures. As expected, the rat skin used as positive controls revealed classical lymphatic vessels, displaying PROX1+ nuclei surrounded by LYVE-1-immunoreactivity. Classical lymphatics were not detected in adult rat spinal cord. Nevertheless, numerous cells expressing either LYVE-1 or PROX1 were identified. Based on their localization and overlapping expression with

  11. Rodent spinal cord injury models for studies of axon regeneration.

    PubMed

    Steward, Oswald; Willenberg, Rafer

    2017-01-01

    For over a century, axon regeneration has been considered the Holy Grail for spinal cord injury (SCI) repair. Although there are other factors that could contribute to improving function, restoring the long motor and sensory tracts that are interrupted by SCI has the greatest potential for actually reversing paralysis, restoring the brain's control of autonomic functions mediated by sympathetic and parasympathetic circuits of the spinal cord and restoring sensation. Accordingly and in keeping with the overall theme of this special issue, this review focuses narrowly on rodent SCI models for studies of axon regeneration.

  12. Spinal cord stimulation in pain management: a review.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Young Hoon

    2012-07-01

    Spinal cord stimulation has become a widely used and efficient alternative for the management of refractory chronic pain that is unresponsive to conservative therapies. Technological improvements have been considerable and the current neuromodulation devices are both extremely sophisticated and reliable in obtaining good results for various clinical situations of chronic pain, such as failed back surgery syndrome, complex regional pain syndrome, ischemic and coronary artery disease. This technique is likely to possess a savings in costs compared with alternative therapy strategies despite its high initial cost. Spinal cord stimulation continues to be a valuable tool in the treatment of chronic disabling pain.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Axonal Response to Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    The STEAM DW imaging sequence was used to acquire axial images of the cervical spinal cord (C4-C5) in six healthy volunteers (3 female, age = 18 – 32...years), using an eight-channel cervical -thoracic-lumbar (CTL) phased-array RF receive coil, with the first three channels activated. In the first...of this study was to use the ihMT imaging technique to acquire a global myelin-specific image over the cervical spinal cord in the sagittal plane. A

  14. Acute Management of Nutritional Demands after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Thibault-Halman, Ginette; Casha, Steven; Singer, Shirley

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A systematic review of the literature was performed to address pertinent clinical questions regarding nutritional management in the setting of acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Specific metabolic challenges are present following spinal cord injury. The acute stage is characterized by a reduction in metabolic activity, as well as a negative nitrogen balance that cannot be corrected, even with aggressive nutritional support. Metabolic demands need to be accurately monitored to avoid overfeeding. Enteral feeding is the optimal route following SCI. When oral feeding is not possible, nasogastric, followed by nasojejunal, then by percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy, if necessary, is suggested. PMID:20373845

  15. Cell therapy for spinal cord injury informed by electromagnetic waves.

    PubMed

    Finnegan, Jack; Ye, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury devastates the CNS, besetting patients with symptoms including but not limited to: paralysis, autonomic nervous dysfunction, pain disorders and depression. Despite the identification of several molecular and genetic factors, a reliable regenerative therapy has yet to be produced for this terminal disease. Perhaps the missing piece of this puzzle will be discovered within endogenous electrotactic cellular behaviors. Neurons and stem cells both show mediated responses (growth rate, migration, differentiation) to electromagnetic waves, including direct current electric fields. This review analyzes the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury, the rationale for regenerative cell therapy and the evidence for directing cell therapy via electromagnetic waves shown by in vitro experiments.

  16. Spinal cord stimulation for neuropathic pain: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Wolter, Tilman

    2014-01-01

    Neuropathic pain constitutes a significant portion of chronic pain. Patients with neuropathic pain are usually more heavily burdened than patients with nociceptive pain. They suffer more often from insomnia, anxiety, and depression. Moreover, analgesic medication often has an insufficient effect on neuropathic pain. Spinal cord stimulation constitutes a therapy alternative that, to date, remains underused. In the last 10 to 15 years, it has undergone constant technical advancement. This review gives an overview of the present practice of spinal cord stimulation for chronic neuropathic pain and current developments such as high-frequency stimulation and peripheral nerve field stimulation. PMID:25429237

  17. Motor cortex changes in spinal cord injury: a TMS study.

    PubMed

    Saturno, Eleonora; Bonato, Claudio; Miniussi, Carlo; Lazzaro, Vincenzodi; Callea, Leonardo

    2008-12-01

    Using paired pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) paradigms, we studied cortical excitability in a patient with spinal cord lesion. During posterior tibial nerve stimulation, the contextual flexion of hand fingers contralateral to the stimulated lower limb had suggested a change in motor cortex excitability. Results showed a decrease in the activity of motor cortex inhibitory circuits. This could suggest that in spinal cord injury, just as in stroke and peripheral deafferentation, a disinhibition of latent synapses within the motor cortex and the rewriting of a new motor map can occur.

  18. Expression of Lymphatic Markers in the Adult Rat Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Kaser-Eichberger, Alexandra; Schroedl, Falk; Bieler, Lara; Trost, Andrea; Bogner, Barbara; Runge, Christian; Tempfer, Herbert; Zaunmair, Pia; Kreutzer, Christina; Traweger, Andreas; Reitsamer, Herbert A.; Couillard-Despres, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Under physiological conditions, lymphatic vessels are thought to be absent from the central nervous system (CNS), although they are widely distributed within the rest of the body. Recent work in the eye, i.e., another organ regarded as alymphatic, revealed numerous cells expressing lymphatic markers. As the latter can be involved in the response to pathological conditions, we addressed the presence of cells expressing lymphatic markers within the spinal cord by immunohistochemistry. Spinal cord of young adult Fisher rats was scrutinized for the co-expression of the lymphatic markers PROX1 and LYVE-1 with the cell type markers Iba1, CD68, PGP9.5, OLIG2. Rat skin served as positive control for the lymphatic markers. PROX1-immunoreactivity was detected in many nuclei throughout the spinal cord white and gray matter. These nuclei showed no association with LYVE-1. Expression of LYVE-1 could only be detected in cells at the spinal cord surface and in cells closely associated with blood vessels. These cells were found to co-express Iba1, a macrophage and microglia marker. Further, double labeling experiments using CD68, another marker found in microglia and macrophages, also displayed co-localization in the Iba1+ cells located at the spinal cord surface and those apposed to blood vessels. On the other hand, PROX1-expressing cells found in the parenchyma were lacking Iba1 or PGP9.5, but a significant fraction of those cells showed co-expression of the oligodendrocyte lineage marker OLIG2. Intriguingly, following spinal cord injury, LYVE-1-expressing cells assembled and reorganized into putative pre-vessel structures. As expected, the rat skin used as positive controls revealed classical lymphatic vessels, displaying PROX1+ nuclei surrounded by LYVE-1-immunoreactivity. Classical lymphatics were not detected in adult rat spinal cord. Nevertheless, numerous cells expressing either LYVE-1 or PROX1 were identified. Based on their localization and overlapping expression with

  19. Cystic Abnormalities of the Spinal Cord and Vertebral Column.

    PubMed

    da Costa, Ronaldo C; Cook, Laurie B

    2016-03-01

    Cystic lesions of the vertebral column and spinal cord are important differential diagnoses in dogs with signs of spinal cord disease. Synovial cysts are commonly associated with degenerative joint disease and usually affect the cervical and lumbosacral regions. Arachnoid diverticulum (previously known as cyst) is seen in the cervical region of large breed dogs and thoracolumbar region of small breed dogs. This article reviews the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of these and other, less common, cystic lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Repair, reconstruction, regeneration and rehabilitation strategies to spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Turbes, C C

    1997-01-01

    The structural changes seen in the transected spinal cord followed by transplantation of the distal ends (neuroma) of intercostal nerve inserted into the spinal cord proximal and distal to the transection lesion site. This activates CNS axonal regeneration. 2,3,4 These changes refer to the plasticity in the nervous system following damage to the spinal cord. There is regeneration and growth and synapotogenesis and remodeling of synaptic connections, development of reflex activity in the denervated cord. Nerve growth factors and neurotrophic factors sustain and maintain a degree of functional integrity of structural neural circuitry. 2,3,4,13 The end result is standing, stepping, and reflex walking in 28 female mature dogs. 2,3,4,5 Electrical stimulation of the anastomosed intercostal nerves resulted in hind limb movements and recording of the electromyograms of the contracting muscles. Twenty-six control dogs and animals with behavioral depression are unable to follow rehabilitative procedures developed muscle atrophy, ankylosis of joints, decrease in bone density, decrease in reflex activity of the spinal cord distal to the transection. 2,3,4,5

  1. Male fertility and sexual function after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Brown, D J; Hill, S T; Baker, H W G

    2006-01-01

    Spinal cord injury has an enormous impact upon the sexual relationship of a man and his partner. Erection may be partial or absent, orgasm altered or impossible, and fertility severely impaired. New understanding of the physiology of sexual function and improved treatment can enable most cord-injured men to achieve erections suitable for sexual satisfaction. Modern methods of sperm collection and fertility treatment mean that many can also be fathers. The best results are obtained by a team approach involving rehabilitation and reproductive medicine clinicians, nurses, spinal cord injury specialists and counselors with the cord-injured man and his partner. Erections can be achieved by drugs, such as sildenafil, that block phosphodiesterase 5, prolonging the action of nitric oxide with resultant smooth muscle relaxation. Intracavernosal prostaglandin E1 and mechanical systems, such as vacuum pumps and constriction rings, are also effective. Sexual gratification can be promoted in the context of an understanding relationship in which the cord-injured person can gain pleasure from pleasing his partner and also from his partner's exploration of erotogenic areas not affected by the spinal cord injury. An emphasis on the broader view of sexuality in relationships allows for a continuance and strengthening of bonds between the couple. Vibration ejaculation or electroejaculation can be used to collect semen. For a limited period in the acute phase, usually for about 6-12 days after injury, normal semen can be obtained by electroejaculation from some cord-injured men. With chronic spinal cord injury the semen is of variable quality. Some patients have necrospermia, which may be improved by regular ejaculation. Others have poor quality semen or spermatogenic disorders and, in this situation, in vitro fertilization techniques must be used to achieve parenthood. Trials of assisted ejaculation help individualize cost-effective management of the infertility.

  2. Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Axonal Response to Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    injury . They will supervise the creation of the cervical spine injuries , care of the animals, sacrifice and perfusion fixation, and, after completion...cord injury . They will supervise the creation of the cervical spine injuries , care of the animals, sacrifice and perfusion fixation, and, after...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-10-1-0715 TITLE: Magnetic Resonance Characterization of Axonal Response to Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR

  3. Midodrine improves ejaculation in spinal cord injured men.

    PubMed

    Soler, J M; Previnaire, J G; Plante, P; Denys, P; Chartier-Kastler, E

    2007-11-01

    We evaluated the effect of the alpha1-adrenergic agonist midodrine given orally for anejaculation in spinal cord injured men. A total of 185 spinal cord injured patients who reported absent ejaculation during sexual intercourse and who failed to respond to penile vibratory stimulation were treated with midodrine 30 to 120 minutes before a new stimulation. The procedure was repeated weekly, increasing doses by 7.5 mg to a maximum of 30 mg. Cardiovascular effects were monitored throughout the procedure. Antegrade or retrograde ejaculation was achieved in 102 spinal cord injured men (64.6%). A positive response was more frequent in patients with complete lesions (American Spinal Injury Association A) and upper motor neuron lesions above T10. Midodrine induced a significant but moderate increase (maximum 10 mm Hg) in mean arterial pressure in all patients. The highest systolic blood pressure (more than 200 mm Hg) was seen in patients with quadriplegia. No other significant side effect was recorded. The average dose of midodrine required for ejaculation was 18.7 mg. Midodrine is a safe and efficient adjunct to penile vibratory stimulation for anejaculation in spinal cord injured patients.

  4. Comparative analysis between thoracic spinal cord and sacral neuromodulation in a rat spinal cord injury model: a preliminary report of a rat spinal cord stimulation model.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Seung-Jae; Lee, Chang-Hyun; Kwon, Ji Woong; Yoon, Cheol-Yong; Lim, Jae-Young; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare a neuroprotective effect of thoracic cord neuromodulation to that of sacral nerve neuromodulation in rat thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) model. Twenty female Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: the normal control group (n=5), SCI with sham stimulation group (SCI, n=5), SCI with electrical stimulation at thoracic spinal cord (SCI + TES, n=5), and SCI with electrical stimulation at sacral nerve (SCI + SES, n=5). Spinal cord was injured by an impactor which dropped from 25mm height. Electrical stimulation was performed by the following protocol: pulse duration, 0.1ms; frequency, 20 Hz; stimulation time, 30 minutes; and stimulation duration at thoracic epidural space and S2 or 3 neural foramina for 4 weeks. Locomotor function, urodynamic study, muscle weights, and fiber cross sectional area (CSA) were investigated. All rats of the SCI + TES group expired within 3 days after the injury. The locomotor function of all survived rats improved over time but there was no significant difference between the SCI and the SCI + SES group. All rats experienced urinary retention after the injury and recovered self-voiding after 3-9 days. Voiding contraction interval was 25.5±7.5 minutes in the SCI group, 16.5±5.3 minutes in the SCI+SES group, and 12.5±4.2 minutes in the control group. The recovery of voiding contraction interval was significant in the SCI + SES group comparing to the SCI group (p<0.05). Muscle weight and CSA were slightly greater in the SCI + SES than in the SCI group, but the difference was not significant. We failed to establish a rat spinal cord stimulation model. However, sacral neuromodulation have a therapeutic potential to improve neurogenic bladder and muscle atrophy.

  5. Complete rat spinal cord transection as a faithful model of spinal cord injury for translational cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lukovic, Dunja; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria; Lopez-Mocholi, Eric; Rodriguez-Jiménez, Francisco Javier; Jendelova, Pavla; Sykova, Eva; Oria, Marc; Stojkovic, Miodrag; Erceg, Slaven

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in neural loss and consequently motor and sensory impairment below the injury. There are currently no effective therapies for the treatment of traumatic SCI in humans. Various animal models have been developed to mimic human SCI. Widely used animal models of SCI are complete or partial transection or experimental contusion and compression, with both bearing controversy as to which one more appropriately reproduces the human SCI functional consequences. Here we present in details the widely used procedure of complete spinal cord transection as a faithful animal model to investigate neural and functional repair of the damaged tissue by exogenous human transplanted cells. This injury model offers the advantage of complete damage to a spinal cord at a defined place and time, is relatively simple to standardize and is highly reproducible. PMID:25860664

  6. The Function of FGFR1 Signalling in the Spinal Cord: Therapeutic Approaches Using FGFR1 Ligands after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Lawrence D. F.

    2017-01-01

    Extensive research is ongoing that concentrates on finding therapies to enhance CNS regeneration after spinal cord injury (SCI) and to cure paralysis. This review sheds light on the role of the FGFR pathway in the injured spinal cord and discusses various therapies that use FGFR activating ligands to promote regeneration after SCI. We discuss studies that use peripheral nerve grafts or Schwann cell grafts in combination with FGF1 or FGF2 supplementation. Most of these studies show evidence that these therapies successfully enhance axon regeneration into the graft. Further they provide evidence for partial recovery of sensory function shown by electrophysiology and motor activity evidenced by behavioural data. We also present one study that indicates that combination with additional, synergistic factors might further drive the system towards functional regeneration. In essence, this review summarises the potential of nerve and cell grafts combined with FGF1/2 supplementation to improve outcome even after severe spinal cord injury. PMID:28197342

  7. Direct spinal cord stimulation and recording in hemorrhagic stock.

    PubMed

    Hitchon, P W; Lobosky, J M; Wilkinson, T T; Yamada, T; Torner, J C; Gant, P R

    1985-06-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) have been used extensively to evaluate the central nervous system. A limitation of using SSEPs is that the peripheral nervous system is intrinsically linked to the production of these potentials. Peripheral nerve ischemia and neuropathies have been shown to result in changes in SSEPs that may be misinterpreted as showing a pathological condition in the central nervous system. Our experimental paradigm was designed to study the practicality and possible benefits of obtaining spinal evoked potentials (SEPs) by direct cord stimulation and recording. Twelve lambs underwent laminectomies at C-7 and L-1. Epidural electrodes were placed at each level. Each lamb was then bled to produce mean arterial pressures of 80, 60, 40, and less than or equal to 30 mm Hg. At each of these designated pressures, SEPs were obtained by direct cord stimulation and recording. At the same time, spinal cord blood flow was measured using the radioactive microsphere technique. The spinal cord blood flow remained constant down to a mean arterial pressure of 40 mm Hg, whereas blood flow to the peripheral nerve and renal cortex decreased with the mean arterial pressure. SEPs produced by this method did not vary in terms of latency or amplitude over mean arterial pressures ranging from 100 to 30 mm Hg. We conclude that SEPs produced by direct cord recording and stimulation constitute a method of assessing cord viability free of the variables attributable to the peripheral nervous system.

  8. Modification of spasticity by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S.; McKay, William B.; Tansey, Keith E.; Mayr, Winfried; Kern, Helmut; Minassian, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Context/objective To examine the effects of transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation (tSCS) on lower-limb spasticity. Design Interventional pilot study to produce preliminary data. Setting Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Wilhelminenspital, Vienna, Austria. Participants Three subjects with chronic motor-incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) who could walk ≥10 m. Interventions Two interconnected stimulating skin electrodes (Ø 5 cm) were placed paraspinally at the T11/T12 vertebral levels, and two rectangular electrodes (8 × 13 cm) on the abdomen for the reference. Biphasic 2 ms-width pulses were delivered at 50 Hz for 30 minutes at intensities producing paraesthesias but no motor responses in the lower limbs. Outcome measures The Wartenberg pendulum test and neurological recordings of surface-electromyography (EMG) were used to assess effects on exaggerated reflex excitability. Non-functional co-activation during volitional movement was evaluated. The timed 10-m walk test provided measures of clinical function. Results The index of spasticity derived from the pendulum test changed from 0.8 ± 0.4 pre- to 0.9 ± 0.3 post-stimulation, with an improvement in the subject with the lowest pre-stimulation index. Exaggerated reflex responsiveness was decreased after tSCS across all subjects, with the most profound effect on passive lower-limb movement (pre- to post-tSCS EMG ratio: 0.2 ± 0.1), as was non-functional co-activation during voluntary movement. Gait speed values increased in two subjects by 39%. Conclusion These preliminary results suggest that tSCS, similar to epidurally delivered stimulation, may be used for spasticity control, without negatively impacting residual motor control in incomplete SCI. Further study in a larger population is warranted. PMID:24090290

  9. Modification of spasticity by transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S; McKay, William B; Tansey, Keith E; Mayr, Winfried; Kern, Helmut; Minassian, Karen

    2014-03-01

    To examine the effects of transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation (tSCS) on lower-limb spasticity. Interventional pilot study to produce preliminary data. Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Wilhelminenspital, Vienna, Austria. Three subjects with chronic motor-incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) who could walk ≥10 m. Two interconnected stimulating skin electrodes (Ø 5 cm) were placed paraspinally at the T11/T12 vertebral levels, and two rectangular electrodes (8 × 13 cm) on the abdomen for the reference. Biphasic 2 ms-width pulses were delivered at 50 Hz for 30 minutes at intensities producing paraesthesias but no motor responses in the lower limbs. The Wartenberg pendulum test and neurological recordings of surface-electromyography (EMG) were used to assess effects on exaggerated reflex excitability. Non-functional co-activation during volitional movement was evaluated. The timed 10-m walk test provided measures of clinical function. The index of spasticity derived from the pendulum test changed from 0.8 ± 0.4 pre- to 0.9 ± 0.3 post-stimulation, with an improvement in the subject with the lowest pre-stimulation index. Exaggerated reflex responsiveness was decreased after tSCS across all subjects, with the most profound effect on passive lower-limb movement (pre- to post-tSCS EMG ratio: 0.2 ± 0.1), as was non-functional co-activation during voluntary movement. Gait speed values increased in two subjects by 39%. These preliminary results suggest that tSCS, similar to epidurally delivered stimulation, may be used for spasticity control, without negatively impacting residual motor control in incomplete SCI. Further study in a larger population is warranted.

  10. First aid and treatment for cervical spinal cord injury with fracture and dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Yisheng, W; Fuying, Z; Limin, W; Junwei, Li; Guofu, P; Weidong, W

    2007-01-01

    Background: Traumatic cervical spinal cord injury with subaxial fracture and dislocation not only indicates a highly unstable spine but can also induce life-threatening complications. This makes first aid critically important before any definitive operative procedure is undertaken. The present study analyzes the various first aid measures and operative procedures for such injury. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and ninety-five patients suffered from cervical spinal cord injury with fracture and dislocation. The average period between injury and admission was 4.5 days (range 5 h-12 weeks). The injury includes burst fractures (n = 90), compression fractures with herniated discs (n = 50), fractures and dislocation (n = 88) and pure dislocation (n = 36). Other injuries including developmental spinal canal stenosis and/or multi-segment spinal cord compression associated with trauma (n = 12), lamina fractures compressing the spinal cord (n = 6), ligament injuries (n = 7) and hematoma (n = 6) were observed in the present study. The injury level was C4 (n = 17), C5 (n = 29), C6 (n = 39), C7 (n = 35), C4-5 (n = 38), C5-6 (n = 58), C6-7 (n = 49), C4-6 (n = 16) and C5-7 (n = 14). According to the Frankel grading system, grade A was observed in 20 cases, grade B in 91, grade C in 124 and grade D in 60. One hundred and eighteen (40%) patients had a high fever and difficulty in breathing on presentation. First aid measures included early reduction and immobilization of the injured cervical spine, controlling the temperature, breathing support, and administration of high-dose methylprednisolone within eight hours of the injury (n = 12) and administration of dehydration and neurotrophy medicine. Oxygen support was given and tracheotomy was performed for patients with serious difficulty in breathing. Measures were taken to prevent bedsores and infections of the respiratory and urological systems. Two hundred and thirty six patients were treated with anterior decompression, 31

  11. A Brain–Spinal Interface Alleviating Gait Deficits after Spinal Cord Injury in Primates

    PubMed Central

    Capogrosso, Marco; Milekovic, Tomislav; Borton, David; Wagner, Fabien; Moraud, Eduardo Martin; Mignardot, Jean-Baptiste; Buse, Nicolas; Gandar, Jerome; Barraud, Quentin; Xing, David; Rey, Elodie; Duis, Simone; Jianzhong, Yang; Ko, Wai Kin D.; Li, Qin; Detemple, Peter; Denison, Tim; Micera, Silvestro; Bezard, Erwan; Bloch, Jocelyne; Courtine, Grégoire

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury disrupts the communication between the brain and the spinal circuits that orchestrate movement. To bypass the lesion, brain–computer interfaces1–3 have directly linked cortical activity to electrical stimulation of muscles, which have restored grasping abilities after hand paralysis1,4. Theoretically, this strategy could also restore control over leg muscle activity for walking5. However, replicating the complex sequence of individual muscle activation patterns underlying natural and adaptive locomotor movements poses formidable conceptual and technological challenges6,7. Recently, we showed in rats that epidural electrical stimulation of the lumbar spinal cord can reproduce the natural activation of synergistic muscle groups producing locomotion8–10. Here, we interfaced leg motor cortex activity with epidural electrical stimulation protocols to establish a brain–spinal interface that alleviated gait deficits after a spinal cord injury in nonhuman primates. Rhesus monkeys were implanted with an intracortical microelectrode array into the leg area of motor cortex; and a spinal cord stimulation system composed of a spatially selective epidural implant and a pulse generator with real-time triggering capabilities. We designed and implemented wireless control systems that linked online neural decoding of extension and flexion motor states with stimulation protocols promoting these movements. These systems allowed the monkeys to behave freely without any restrictions or constraining tethered electronics. After validation of the brain–spinal interface in intact monkeys, we performed a unilateral corticospinal tract lesion at the thoracic level. As early as six days post-injury and without prior training of the monkeys, the brain–spinal interface restored weight-bearing locomotion of the paralyzed leg on a treadmill and overground. The implantable components integrated in the brain–spinal interface have all been approved for investigational

  12. Spinal cord projections of the rat main forelimb nerves, studied by transganglionic transport of WGA-HRP and by the disappearance of acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Castro-Lopes, J M; Coimbra, A

    1991-03-01

    The spinal cord projections of the 3 main forelimb nerves-median, radial and ulnar, were studied in the rat dorsal horn with transganglionic transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP), or using the disappearance of fluoride resistant acid phosphatase (FRAP) after nerve section. The projection patterns in lamina II were similar following the two procedures. The median and the radial nerve fibers projected to the medial and the intermediate thirds, respectively, of the dorsal horn lamina II in spinal cord segments C4-C8. The ulnar nerve projected to segments C6-C8 between the areas occupied by the other two nerves. The FRAP method also showed that the lateral part of lamina II, which was not filled by radial nerve fibers, received the projections from the dorsal cutaneous branches of cervical spinal nerves. In addition, FRAP disappeared from the medial end of segment T1 after skin incisions extending from the medial brachium to the axilla, which seemed due to severance of the cutaneous branchlets of the lateral anterior thoracic nerve. The FRAP procedure is thus sensitive enough to detect fibers in lamina II arising from small peripheral nerves, and may be used as an alternative to the anterograde tracing methods whenever there are no overlapping projections.

  13. Resolving TRPV1- and TNF-α-mediated spinal cord synaptic plasticity and inflammatory pain with neuroprotectin D1.

    PubMed

    Park, Chul-Kyu; Lü, Ning; Xu, Zhen-Zhong; Liu, Tong; Serhan, Charles N; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2011-10-19

    Mechanisms of inflammatory pain are not fully understood. We investigated the role of TRPV1 (transient receptor potential subtype V1) and TNF-α, two critical mediators for inflammatory pain, in regulating spinal cord synaptic transmission. We found in mice lacking Trpv1 the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous EPSCs (sEPSCs) in lamina II neurons of spinal cord slices is reduced. Further, C-fiber-induced spinal long-term potentiation (LTP) in vivo is abolished in Trpv1 knock-out mice. TNF-α also increases sEPSC frequency but not amplitude in spinal outer lamina II (lamina IIo) neurons, and this increase is abolished in Trpv1 knock-out mice. Single-cell PCR analysis revealed that TNF-α-responding neurons in lamina IIo are exclusively excitatory (vGluT2(+)) neurons. Notably, neuroprotectin-1 (NPD1), an anti-inflammatory lipid mediator derived from ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (docosahexaenoic acid), blocks TNF-α- and capsaicin-evoked sEPSC frequency increases but has no effect on basal synaptic transmission. Strikingly, NPD1 potently inhibits capsaicin-induced TRPV1 current (IC(50) = 0.4 nm) in dissociated dorsal root ganglion neurons, and this IC(50) is ≈ 500 times lower than that of AMG9810, a commonly used TRPV1 antagonist. NPD1 inhibition of TRPV1 is mediated by GPCRs, since the effects were blocked by pertussis toxin. In contrast, NPD1 had no effect on mustard oil-induced TRPA1 currents. Spinal injection of NPD1, at very low doses (0.1-10 ng), blocks spinal LTP and reduces TRPV1-dependent inflammatory pain, without affecting baseline pain. NPD1 also reduces TRPV1-independent but TNF-α-dependent pain hypersensitivity. Our findings demonstrate a novel role of NPD1 in regulating TRPV1/TNF-α-mediated spinal synaptic plasticity and identify NPD1 as a novel analgesic for treating inflammatory pain.

  14. Transient focal spinal cord hyperemia after resection of spinal meningioma: case report.

    PubMed

    Ijiri, Kosei; Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Shunsuke; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2009-06-01

    Transient postoperative focal hyperemia in the spinal cord is rare. We report 2 patients with transient focal hyperemia after the resection of a spinal meningioma that led to temporal neurological deterioration followed by complete recovery. Two patients presented with cervical meningiomas at the C7 and C1-C2 levels. Preoperatively, both patients experienced gradual exacerbation of spastic tetraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed isointensity on T1-weighted images and high intensity on T2-weighted images with homogeneous enhancement. Both patients underwent complete tumor removal. A histopathological examination revealed a meningothelial meningioma in both patients. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging revealed transient focal hyperemia of the cervical cord. Both patients manifested transient focal hyperemia of the spinal cord after acute decompression by resection of a spinal meningioma.

  15. Decreased Substance P and NK1 Receptor Immunoreactivity and Function in the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn of Morphine-Treated Neonatal Rats

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Lisa M.; Terman, Gregory W.; Zeng, Jinsong; Lowe, Janet; Chavkin, Charles; Hermes, Sam M.; Hegarty, Deborah M.; Aicher, Sue A.

    2008-01-01

    Opiate analgesic tolerance is defined as a need for higher doses of opiates to maintain pain relief following prolonged opiate exposure. Though changes in the opioid receptor undoubtedly occur during conditions of opiate tolerance, there is increasing evidence that opiate analgesic tolerance is also caused by pronociceptive adaptations in the spinal cord. We have previously observed increased glutamate release in the spinal cord dorsal horn of neonatal rats made tolerant to the opiate morphine. Here we investigate whether spinal substance P (SP) and its receptor, the neurokinin 1 (NK1) receptor, are also modulated by prolonged morphine exposure. Immunocytochemical studies show decreased SP- and NK1-immunoreactivity in the dorsal horn of morphine-treated rats, whereas SP mRNA in the dorsal root ganglia is not changed. Electrophysiological studies show that SP fails to activate the NK1 receptor in the morphine-treated rat. Taken together, the data indicate that chronic morphine treatment in the neonatal rat is characterized by a loss of SP effects on the NK1 receptor in lamina I of the neonatal spinal cord dorsal horn. The results are discussed in terms of compensatory spinal cord processes that may contribute to opiate analgesic tolerance. Perspective This article describes anatomical and physiological changes that occur in the spinal cord dorsal horn of neonatal rats following chronic morphine treatment. These changes may represent an additional compensatory process of morphine tolerance and may represent an additional therapeutic target for the retention and restoration of pain relief with prolonged morphine treatment. PMID:17950674

  16. Spinal Cord Stimulation for Refractory Angina Pectoris

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Hongguang; Si, Yanna; Xu, Chenjie; Chen, Hao; Gao, Xianzhong; Xie, Xinyi; Xu, Yajie; Sun, Fan; Zeng, Lingqing

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Paresthesia-free stimulation such as high frequency and burst have been demonstrated as effective therapies for neuropathic pain. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of conventional spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in the treatment of refractory angina pectoris (RAP). Materials and Methods: Relevant randomized controlled trials that investigated SCS for patients with RAP were comprehensively searched in Medline, Pubmed, Embase, and Cochrane Library. Five meta-analyses were performed examining the changes in Canadian Cardiovascular Society classes, exercise time, Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores of pain, Seattle Angina Questionnaire, and nitroglycerin use in RAP patients after SCS therapy. We analyzed standardized mean differences (MD) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for each outcome by Review Manager 5.0 and STATA 12.0. Results: A total of 12 randomized controlled trials involving 476 RAP patients were identified. A trend of reduction in the angina frequency (MD=−9.03, 95% CI, −15.70 to −2.36) and nitroglycerin consumption (MD=−0.64, 95% CI, −0.84 to −0.45) could be observed in the SCS group. Compared with the control group, SCS showed benefit on increasing exercise time (MD=0.49, 95% CI, 0.13-0.85) and treatment satisfaction (MD=6.87, 95% CI, 2.07-11.66) with decreased VAS scores of pain (MD=−0.50, 95% CI, −0.81 to −0.20) and disease perception (MD=−8.34, 95% CI, −14.45 to −2.23). However, the result did not reach the significance level in terms of physical limitation (95% CI, −8.75 to 3.38; P=0.39) or angina stability (95% CI, −7.55 to 3.67; P=0.50). Discussion: The current meta-analysis suggested that SCS was a potential alternative in the treatment of PAP patients. Further investigation for finding the appropriate intensity of stimulation is required before this treatment should be widely recommended and applied. PMID:27875377

  17. Inflammatory cascades mediate synapse elimination in spinal cord compression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical compressive myelopathy (CCM) is caused by chronic spinal cord compression due to spondylosis, a degenerative disc disease, and ossification of the ligaments. Tip-toe walking Yoshimura (twy) mice are reported to be an ideal animal model for CCM-related neuronal dysfunction, because they develop spontaneous spinal cord compression without any artificial manipulation. Previous histological studies showed that neurons are lost due to apoptosis in CCM, but the mechanism underlying this neurodegeneration was not fully elucidated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the pathophysiology of CCM by evaluating the global gene expression of the compressed spinal cord and comparing the transcriptome analysis with the physical and histological findings in twy mice. Methods Twenty-week-old twy mice were divided into two groups according to the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings: a severe compression (S) group and a mild compression (M) group. The transcriptome was analyzed by microarray and RT-PCR. The cellular pathophysiology was examined by immunohistological analysis and immuno-electron microscopy. Motor function was assessed by Rotarod treadmill latency and stride-length tests. Results Severe cervical calcification caused spinal canal stenosis and low functional capacity in twy mice. The microarray analysis revealed 215 genes that showed significantly different expression levels between the S and the M groups. Pathway analysis revealed that genes expressed at higher levels in the S group were enriched for terms related to the regulation of inflammation in the compressed spinal cord. M1 macrophage-dominant inflammation was present in the S group, and cysteine-rich protein 61 (Cyr61), an inducer of M1 macrophages, was markedly upregulated in these spinal cords. Furthermore, C1q, which initiates the classical complement cascade, was more upregulated in the S group than in the M group. The confocal and electron microscopy observations indicated

  18. Augmentation of Voluntary Locomotor Activity by Transcutaneous Spinal Cord Stimulation in Motor-Incomplete Spinal Cord-Injured Individuals.

    PubMed

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Krenn, Matthias; Danner, Simon M; Hofer, Christian; Kern, Helmut; McKay, William B; Mayr, Winfried; Minassian, Karen

    2015-10-01

    The level of sustainable excitability within lumbar spinal cord circuitries is one of the factors determining the functional outcome of locomotor therapy after motor-incomplete spinal cord injury. Here, we present initial data using noninvasive transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord stimulation (tSCS) to modulate this central state of excitability during voluntary treadmill stepping in three motor-incomplete spinal cord-injured individuals. Stimulation was applied at 30 Hz with an intensity that generated tingling sensations in the lower limb dermatomes, yet without producing muscle reflex activity. This stimulation changed muscle activation, gait kinematics, and the amount of manual assistance required from the therapists to maintain stepping with some interindividual differences. The effect on motor outputs during treadmill-stepping was essentially augmentative and step-phase dependent despite the invariant tonic stimulation. The most consistent modification was found in the gait kinematics, with the hip flexion during swing increased by 11.3° ± 5.6° across all subjects. This preliminary work suggests that tSCS provides for a background increase in activation of the lumbar spinal locomotor circuitry that has partially lost its descending drive. Voluntary inputs and step-related feedback build upon the stimulation-induced increased state of excitability in the generation of locomotor activity. Thus, tSCS essentially works as an electrical neuroprosthesis augmenting remaining motor control. Copyright © 2015 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A Neonatal Mouse Spinal Cord Compression Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Züchner, Mark; Glover, Joel C.; Boulland, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) typically causes devastating neurological deficits, particularly through damage to fibers descending from the brain to the spinal cord. A major current area of research is focused on the mechanisms of adaptive plasticity that underlie spontaneous or induced functional recovery following SCI. Spontaneous functional recovery is reported to be greater early in life, raising interesting questions about how adaptive plasticity changes as the spinal cord develops. To facilitate investigation of this dynamic, we have developed a SCI model in the neonatal mouse. The model has relevance for pediatric SCI, which is too little studied. Because neural plasticity in the adult involves some of the same mechanisms as neural plasticity in early life1, this model may potentially have some relevance also for adult SCI. Here we describe the entire procedure for generating a reproducible spinal cord compression (SCC) injury in the neonatal mouse as early as postnatal (P) day 1. SCC is achieved by performing a laminectomy at a given spinal level (here described at thoracic levels 9-11) and then using a modified Yasargil aneurysm mini-clip to rapidly compress and decompress the spinal cord. As previously described, the injured neonatal mice can be tested for behavioral deficits or sacrificed for ex vivo physiological analysis of synaptic connectivity using electrophysiological and high-throughput optical recording techniques1. Earlier and ongoing studies using behavioral and physiological assessment have demonstrated a dramatic, acute impairment of hindlimb motility followed by a complete functional recovery within 2 weeks, and the first evidence of changes in functional circuitry at the level of identified descending synaptic connections1. PMID:27078037

  20. Transcutaneous electrical spinal-cord stimulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Gerasimenko, Yury; Gorodnichev, Ruslan; Moshonkina, Tatiana; Sayenko, Dimitry; Gad, Parag; Reggie Edgerton, V

    2015-09-01

    Locomotor behavior is controlled by specific neural circuits called central pattern generators primarily located at the lumbosacral spinal cord. These locomotor-related neuronal circuits have a high level of automaticity; that is, they can produce a "stepping" movement pattern also seen on electromyography (EMG) in the absence of supraspinal and/or peripheral afferent inputs. These circuits can be modulated by epidural spinal-cord stimulation and/or pharmacological intervention. Such interventions have been used to neuromodulate the neuronal circuits in patients with motor-complete spinal-cord injury (SCI) to facilitate postural and locomotor adjustments and to regain voluntary motor control. Here, we describe a novel non-invasive stimulation strategy of painless transcutaneous electrical enabling motor control (pcEmc) to neuromodulate the physiological state of the spinal cord. The technique can facilitate a stepping performance in non-injured subjects with legs placed in a gravity-neutral position. The stepping movements were induced more effectively with multi-site than single-site spinal-cord stimulation. From these results, a multielectrode surface array technology was developed. Our preliminary data indicate that use of the multielectrode surface array can fine-tune the control of the locomotor behavior. As well, the pcEmc strategy combined with exoskeleton technology is effective for improving motor function in paralyzed patients with SCI. The potential impact of using pcEmc to neuromodulate the spinal circuitry has significant implications for furthering our understanding of the mechanisms controlling locomotion and for rehabilitating sensorimotor function even after severe SCI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. [Epidemiology of traumatic spinal cord injury in Gran Canaria].

    PubMed

    Bárbara-Bataller, Enrique; Méndez-Suárez, José Luis; Alemán-Sánchez, Carolina; Ramírez-Lorenzo, Teresa; Sosa-Henríquez, Manuel

    To evaluate the epidemiological and clinical trends in acute traumatic spinal cord injuries. A retrospective study was conducted of traumatic spinal cord injury patients in Gran Canaria (Canary Islands, Spain) from 2000 to 2014. Demographic and spinal injury severity trends were analysed by year of injury grouped into 3 periods: 2000-2005, 2006-2010, and 2011-2014. The sample included 141 patients. The mean incidence for the entire period was 12 cases/million/year. There was a decrease in cases in the second and third period. While the male/female ratio was 3.8/1 and was maintained in all periods, the mean patient age increased from 38.8 in 2000-5 to 54.5 years in 2011-4 (P<.05). Falls have been the leading cause of spinal cord injury (48.2%), followed by traffic accidents (37.6%). Falls have increased, especially in the older population. Incomplete tetraplegia has been the most prevalent group (30.5%). A vertebral fracture was suffered by 70.3% of all patients, with 93.2% of them requiring surgery. There has been a decrease in the incidence of traumatic spinal cord injury in recent years. The target population has changed, and the older population is currently the most affected. This reality suggests the need to change the local prevention campaigns for spinal cord injury in the elderly. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Combined Effects of Acrobatic Exercise and Magnetic Stimulation on the Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Wieraszko, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the study was to determine whether physical exercise combined with epidural spinal cord magnetic stimulation could improve recovery after injury of the spinal cord. Spinal cord lesioning in mice resulted in reduced locomotor function and negatively affected the muscle strength tested in vitro. Acrobatic exercise attenuated the behavioral effects of spinal cord injury. The exposure to magnetic fields facilitated further this improvement. The progress in behavioral recovery was correlated with reduced muscle degeneration and enhanced muscle contraction. The acrobatic exercise combined with stimulation with magnetic fields significantly facilitates behavioral recovery and muscle physiology in mice following spinal cord injury. PMID:18986227

  3. The use of micropolarization in the treatment of spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Shelyakin, A M; Preobrazhenskaya, I G; Komantsev, V N; Makarovskii, A N; Bogdanov, O V

    2000-01-01

    Transdermal micropolarization of the spinal cord was performed in patients suffering sequelae of spinal cord trauma and tuberculous spondylitis. Changes in clinical and electrophysiological status were monitored. These studies demonstrated that the use of local direct currents passed via skin electrodes promoted improvements in motor and autonomic functions in these patients, leading to positive changes in measures of the functional state of the spinal cord and heart activity. The possible mechanisms of the action of direct currents acting on the spinal cord are discussed, along with the potential for applying micropolarization in the treatment of spinal cord lesions.

  4. Early Versus Delayed Surgical Decompression of Spinal Cord after Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Cost-Utility Analysis.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Julio C; Craven, B Catharine; Massicotte, Eric M; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-04-01

    This cost-utility analysis was undertaken to compare early (≤24 hours since trauma) versus delayed surgical decompression of spinal cord to determine which approach is more cost effective in the management of patients with acute traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). This study includes the patients enrolled into the Surgical Timing in Acute Spinal Cord Injury Study (STASCIS) and admitted at Toronto Western Hospital. Cases were grouped into patients with motor complete SCI and individuals with motor incomplete SCI. A cost-utility analysis was performed for each group of patients by the use of data for the first 6 months after SCI. The perspective of a public health care insurer was adopted. Costs were estimated in 2014 U.S. dollars. Utilities were estimated from the STASCIS. The baseline analysis indicates early spinal decompression is more cost-effective approach compared with the delayed spinal decompression. When we considered the delayed spinal decompression as the baseline strategy, the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio analysis revealed a saving of US$ 58,368,024.12 per quality-adjusted life years gained for patients with complete SCI and a saving of US$ 536,217.33 per quality-adjusted life years gained in patients with incomplete SCI for the early spinal decompression. The probabilistic analysis confirmed the early-decompression strategy as more cost effective than the delayed-decompression approach, even though there is no clearly dominant strategy. The results of this economic analysis suggests that early decompression of spinal cord was more cost effective than delayed surgical decompression in the management of patients with motor complete and incomplete SCI, even though no strategy was clearly dominant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Spinal cord metastasis in small cell carcinoma of the lung

    SciTech Connect

    Holoye, P.; Libnoch, J.; Cox, J.; Kun, L.; Byhardt, R.; Almagro, U.; McCelland, S.; Chintapali, K.

    1984-03-01

    Among 50 patients with small cell bronchogenic carcinoma who were placed on a protocol of combined chemotherapy and radiation therapy, seven patients developed recurrence in the spinal cord. Five cases terminated in paraplegia and death. One patient with pontine recurrence recovered with local radiation therapy. One patient, diagnosed early, responded to local radiation therapy and is ambulatory. Methods of diagnosis were myelogram, computerized axial tomography, cerebro spinal fluid, chemistry and cytologies. The poor prognosis and the difficulty of diagnosis suggest that prophylactic therapy of the entire cranio-spinal axis should be evaluated.

  6. The calcium binding proteins calbindin, parvalbumin, and calretinin have specific patterns of expression in the gray matter of cat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Anelli, Roberta; Heckman, C J

    2005-12-01

    Calcium binding proteins (CBPs) regulate intracellular levels of calcium (Ca(2+)) ions. CBPs are particularly interesting from a morphological standpoint, because they are differentially expressed in certain sub-populations of cells in the nervous system of various species of vertebrate animals. However, knowledge on the cellular regulation governing such cell-specific CBP expression is still incomplete. In this work on the L7 segment of the cat spinal cord, we analyzed the localization and morphology of neurons expressing the CBPs calbindin-28 KD (CB), parvalbumin (PV), and calretinin (CR), and co-expressing CB and PV, CB and CR, and PV and CR. Single CBP-positive ((+)) neurons showed specific distributions: (1) CB was present in small neurons localized in laminae I, II, III and X, in small to medium size neurons in laminae III-VI, and in medium to large neurons in laminae VI-VIII; (2) PV was present in small size neurons in laminae III and IV and in medial portions of laminae V and VI, medium neurons and in lamina X at the border with lamina VII, in medium to large neurons in laminae VII and VIII; (3) CR labeling was detected in small size neurons in laminae I, II, III and VIII, in medium to large size neurons in laminae I and III-VII, and in small to medium size neurons in lamina X. Double labeled neurons were a small minority of the CBP(+) cells. Co-expression of CB and PV was seen in 1 to 2% of the CBP(+) cells, and they were detected in the ventral and intermediate portions of lamina VII and in lamina X. Co-localization of CB and CR was present in 0.3% of the cells and these cells were localized in lamina II. Double labeling for PV and CR occurred in 6% of the cells, and the cells were localized in ventral part of lamina VII and in lamina VIII. Overall, these results revealed distinct and reproducible patterns of localization of the neurons expressing single CBPs and co-expressing two of them. Distinct differences of CBP expression between cat and other

  7. Metabolic profile of injured human spinal cord determined using surface microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Suliang; Phang, Isaac; Zoumprouli, Argyro; Papadopoulos, Marios C; Saadoun, Samira

    2016-12-01

    The management of patients having traumatic spinal cord injury would benefit from understanding and monitoring of spinal cord metabolic states. We hypothesized that the metabolism of the injured spinal cord could be visualized using Kohonen self-organizing maps. Sixteen patients with acute, severe spinal cord injuries were studied. Starting within 72 h of the injury, and for up to a week, we monitored the injury site hourly for tissue glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate, and glycerol using microdialysis as well as intraspinal pressure and spinal cord perfusion pressure. A Kohonen map, which is an unsupervised, self-organizing topology-preserving neural network, was used to analyze 3366 h of monitoring data. We first visualized the different spinal cord metabolic states. Our data show that the injured cord assumes one or more of four metabolic states. On the basis of their metabolite profiles, we termed these states near-normal, ischemic, hypermetabolic, and distal. We then visualized how patients' intraspinal pressure and spinal cord perfusion pressure affect spinal cord metabolism. This revealed that for more than 60% of the time, spinal cord metabolism is patient-specific; periods of high intraspinal pressure or low perfusion pressure are not associated with specific spinal cord metabolic patterns. Finally, we determined relationships between spinal cord metabolism and neurological status. Patients with complete deficits have shorter periods of near-normal spinal cord metabolic states (7 ± 4% vs. 58 ± 12%, p < 0.01, mean ± standard error) and more variable injury site metabolic responses (metabolism spread in 70 ± 11 vs. 40 ± 6 hexagons, p < 0.05), compared with patients who have incomplete neurological deficits. We conclude that Kohonen maps allow us to visualize the metabolic responses of the injured spinal cord and may thus aid us in treating patients with acute spinal cord injuries.

  8. Triple projections of neurones located in S1 and S2 segments of the cat spinal cord to the C6 segment, the cerebellum and the reticular formation.

    PubMed

    Grottel, K; Krutki, P; Mrówczyński, W

    1998-11-01

    Electrophysiological investigation of neurones in sacral segments of the spinal cord was performed in alpha-chloralose-anaesthetized cats in order to establish whether at least some ascending tract neurones could diverge to three different centres located in the brainstem, the cerebellum or the spinal cord. Recordings of antidromic action potentials from cells in S1 and S2 segments were taken following stimulation of the contralateral gigantocellular nucleus, contralateral restiform body and ipsi- and contralateral grey matter of the C6 spinal segment. Antidromic responses allowed identification of several types of neurones that differed in their pattern of supraspinal or propriospinal projections. In eighteen out of a total of sixty-three neurones triple projections to all the above structures were found. In the majority of cells investigated their axons divided into two branches ascending both ipsi- and contralaterally in the lateral funiculi of the spinal cord. Their cell bodies were distributed in laminae VII-VIII except for a minor group of neurones that projected to the C6 segment only, which were located in laminae V-VI. The latter group also displayed lower values of axonal conduction velocities. Comparison of conduction velocities in proximal and distal parts of axons revealed significant slowing in most, raising the possibility that additional collaterals were present to other spinal or supraspinal centres. Dual and triple projections from most cells in this study suggest that such a divergence may be a more common feature of ascending tract neurones than has been reported before.

  9. Posterior spinal artery syndrome showing marked swelling of the spinal cord: A clinico-pathological study

    PubMed Central

    Matsubayashi, Jun; Tsuchiya, Kuniaki; Shimizu, Soichiro; Kitagawa, Naoyuki; Wakabayashi, Yukari; Kuroda, Masahiko; Sakurai, Michio; Nagao, Toshitaka

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe a rare autopsy case of posterior spinal artery syndrome with marked swelling of the spinal cord, an unusually subacute onset and short clinical course. Methods Case report. Findings An 84-year-old Japanese woman presented with bilateral muscle weakness of the lower legs and sensory disturbance 1 week after head contusion. Neurological findings worsened gradually. She developed phrenic nerve paralysis and died of respiratory failure 6 weeks after the onset of neurological symptoms. On pathological examination, the spinal cord was markedly swollen in the cervical and upper thoracic segments. Microscopically, there was loss of myelin sheath in the bilateral posterior columns and neuronal loss of the posterior horns in all of the spinal segments. However, findings were unremarkable in the bilateral anterior columns and bilateral anterior horns in most of the spinal segments. Posterior spinal arteries had no stenosis, occlusion, or thrombosis. We considered that pathogenesis was infarction associated with head injury. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of posterior spinal artery syndrome with a markedly swollen spinal cord and poor prognosis. PMID:23433332

  10. The Role of Hope in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinemann, Allen; And Others

    Hope has motivational importance to individuals who have suffered a major physical loss. Theories of adjustment to a spinal cord injury take one of three approaches: (1) premorbid personality, which highlights the individual's past experiences, personal meanings, and body image; (2) typologies of injury reactions, which range from normal to…

  11. Race-Ethnicity, Education, and Employment after Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, James S.; Saunders, Lee; Staten, David

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article was to identify the relationship between race-ethnicity and employment after spinal cord injury (SCI), while evaluating interrelationships with gender, injury severity, and education. The authors used a cohort design using the most current status from a post-injury interview from the National SCI Statistical Center.…

  12. Quality of Life in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurcay, Eda; Bal, Ajda; Eksioglu, Emel; Cakci, Aytul

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors. Secondary objectives were to determine the effects of various sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on QoL. This cross-sectional study included 54 patients with SCI. The Turkish version of the Short-Form-36 Health Survey was…

  13. Social Support, Stress, and Adjustment to Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rounds, James B; And Others

    Social support has been considered an important coping resource moderating the stress associated with physical illness and disability. The role of social support as a buffering agent for stressful life events inherent in physical illness and disability was examined in 78 individuals with spinal cord injury, residing in community settings in…

  14. Reducing synuclein accumulation improves neuronal survival after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Fogerson, Stephanie M.; van Brummen, Alexandra J.; Busch, David J.; Allen, Scott R.; Roychaudhuri, Robin; Banks, Susan M. L.; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Morgan, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury causes neuronal death, limiting subsequent regeneration and recovery. Thus, there is a need to develop strategies for improving neuronal survival after injury. Relative to our understanding of axon regeneration, comparatively little is known about the mechanisms that promote the survival of damaged neurons. To address this, we took advantage of lamprey giant reticulospinal neurons whose large size permits detailed examination of post-injury molecular responses at the level of individual, identified cells. We report here that spinal cord injury caused a select subset of giant reticulospinal neurons to accumulate synuclein, a synaptic vesicle-associated protein best known for its atypical aggregation and causal role in neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s and other diseases. Post-injury synuclein accumulation took the form of punctate aggregates throughout the somata and occurred selectively in dying neurons, but not in those that survived. In contrast, another synaptic vesicle protein, synaptotagmin, did not accumulate in response to injury. We further show that the post-injury synuclein accumulation was greatly attenuated after single dose application of either the “molecular tweezer” inhibitor, CLR01, or a translation-blocking synuclein morpholino. Consequently, reduction of synuclein accumulation not only improved neuronal survival, but also increased the number of axons in the spinal cord proximal and distal to the lesion. This study is the first to reveal that reducing synuclein accumulation is a novel strategy for improving neuronal survival after spinal cord injury. PMID:26854933

  15. Substance Use by Persons with Recent Spinal Cord Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinemann, Allen W.; And Others

    Substance use histories were obtained from 103 persons (16 to 63 years of age) with recent spinal cord injuries (SCI). Lifetime exposure to and current use of substances with abuse potential were substantially greater in this sample compared to a like-age national sample. Exposure to and recent use of substances with abuse potential was…

  16. Impaired blood-brain/spinal cord barrier in ALS patients.

    PubMed

    Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Hernandez-Ontiveros, Diana G; Rodrigues, Maria C O; Haller, Edward; Frisina-Deyo, Aric; Mirtyl, Santhia; Sallot, Sebastian; Saporta, Samuel; Borlongan, Cesario V; Sanberg, Paul R

    2012-08-21

    Vascular pathology, including blood-brain/spinal cord barrier (BBB/BSCB) alterations, has recently been recognized as a key factor possibly aggravating motor neuron damage, identifying a neurovascular disease signature for ALS. However, BBB/BSCB competence in sporadic ALS (SALS) is still undetermined. In this study, BBB/BSCB integrity in postmortem gray and white matter of medulla and spinal cord tissue from SALS patients and controls was investigated. Major findings include (1) endothelial cell damage and pericyte degeneration, (2) severe intra- and extracellular edema, (3) reduced CD31 and CD105 expressions in endothelium, (4) significant accumulation of perivascular collagen IV, and fibrin deposits (5) significantly increased microvascular density in lumbar spinal cord, (6) IgG microvascular leakage, (7) reduced tight junction and adhesion protein expressions. Microvascular barrier abnormalities determined in gray and white matter of the medulla, cervical, and lumbar spinal cord of SALS patients are novel findings. Pervasive barrier damage discovered in ALS may have implications for disease pathogenesis and progression, as well as for uncovering novel therapeutic targets.

  17. Emerging concepts in myeloid cell biology after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Alicia L; Popovich, Phillip G

    2011-04-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) affects the activation, migration, and function of microglia, neutrophils and monocyte/macrophages. Because these myeloid cells can positively and negatively affect survival of neurons and glia, they are among the most commonly studied immune cells. However, the mechanisms that regulate myeloid cell activation and recruitment after SCI have not been adequately defined. In general, the dynamics and composition of myeloid cell recruitment to the injured spinal cord are consistent between mammalian species; only the onset, duration, and magnitude of the response vary. Emerging data, mostly from rat and mouse SCI models, indicate that resident and recruited myeloid cells are derived from multiple sources, including the yolk sac during development and the bone marrow and spleen in adulthood. After SCI, a complex array of chemokines and cytokines regulate myelopoiesis and intraspinal trafficking of myeloid cells. As these cells accumulate in the injured spinal cord, the collective actions of diverse cues in the lesion environment help to create an inflammatory response marked by tremendous phenotypic and functional heterogeneity. Indeed, it is difficult to attribute specific reparative or injurious functions to one or more myeloid cells because of convergence of cell function and difficulties in using specific molecular markers to distinguish between subsets of myeloid cell populations. Here we review each of these concepts and include a discussion of future challenges that will need to be overcome to develop newer and improved immune modulatory therapies for the injured brain or spinal cord.

  18. Spinal cord compression due to extramedullary haemopoiesis in myelofibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, G; Sharp, R A

    1994-01-01

    Extramedullary haemopoiesis resulting in spinal cord compression is rare. This report of extramedullary myeloid metaplasia in a patient with myelofibrosis serves to illustrate the value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the diagnosis and management of good neurological recovery. Images PMID:8027402

  19. The spinal cord of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed

    Watson, Charles; Sengul, Gulgun; Tanaka, Ikuko; Rusznak, Zoltan; Tokuno, Hironobu

    2015-04-01

    The marmoset spinal cord possesses all the characteristic features of a typical mammalian spinal cord, but with some interesting variation in the levels of origin of the limb nerves. In our study Nissl and ChAT sections of the each segment of the spinal cord in two marmosets (Ma5 and Ma8), we found that the spinal cord can be functionally and anatomically divided into six regions: the prebrachial region (C1 to C3); the brachial region (C4 to C8) - segments supplying the upper limb; the post-brachial region (T1 to L1) - containing the sympathetic outflow, and supplying the hypaxial muscles of the body wall; the crural region (L2 to L5) - segments supplying the lower limb; the postcrural region (L6) - containing the parasympathetic outflow; and the caudal region (L7 to Co4) - supplying the tail. In the rat, mouse, and rhesus monkey, the prebrachial region consists of segments C1 to C4 (with the phrenic nucleus located at the C4 segment), and the brachial region extends from C5 to T1 inclusive. The prefixing of the upper limb outflow in these two marmosets mirrors the finding in the literature that a large C4 contribution to the brachial plexus is common in humans.

  20. Societal services after traumatic spinal cord injury in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Camilla; Levi, Richard; Ljunggren, Gunnar; Seiger, Ake

    2003-05-01

    Societal services after traumatic spinal cord injury in Sweden were investigated, including self-rated levels of satisfaction with the application process and resource allocation. Survey of an incidence population. Thirty-four persons of a total regional incidence population (n = 48) with traumatic spinal cord injury. Structured interviews using a standardized questionnaire. About 25 separate services were identified being available for persons with traumatic spinal cord injury. The average number of applications per person was 5 (range 0-11). The most common service was "transportation service". Of the applications, 17% were partially or totally rejected. Most subjects received information about available services from a social worker. For 13 available services at least 1 subject claimed ignorance about its existence. In Sweden, significant resources are allocated for allowing independence and financial compensation for individuals with traumatic spinal cord injury. However, this support system sometimes also results in frustration and disappointment. Insufficient information and co-ordination are reported as weaknesses. The persons' efforts to acquire knowledge of how the system works take time which could be better used for rehabilitation and full integration into the community.

  1. [Intramedullary spinal cord cavernous hemangiomas: clinical features and surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Ken; Nakamura, Masaya

    2011-01-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord cavernous hemangiomas (angiomas) are occult vascular malformations characterized by rare lesions consisting of closely packed capillary-like vessels. In general, patients with this disease become symptomatic because of hemorrhage leads to progressive neurological deficits. Therefore, surgical tumor resection should be considered for symptomatic patients should be considered a surgical tumor resection.

  2. Organisation of the sympathetic skin response in spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Cariga, P; Catley, M; Mathias, C; Savic, G; Frankel, H; Ellaway, P

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: The sympathetic skin response (SSR) is a technique to assess the sympathetic cholinergic pathways, and it can be used to study the central sympathetic pathways in spinal cord injury (SCI). This study investigated the capacity of the isolated spinal cord to generate an SSR, and determined the relation between SSR, levels of spinal cord lesion, and supraspinal connections. Methods: Palmar and plantar SSR to peripheral nerve electrical stimulation (median or supraorbital nerve above the lesion, and peroneal nerve below the lesion) were recorded in 29 patients with SCI at various neurological levels and in 10 healthy control subjects. Results: In complete SCI at any neurological level, SSR was absent below the lesion. Palmar SSR to median nerve stimuli was absent in complete SCI with level of lesion above T6. Plantar SSR was absent in all patients with complete SCI at the cervical and thoracic level. In incomplete SCI, the occurrence of SSR was dependent on the preservation of supraspinal connections. For all stimulated nerves, there was no difference between recording from ipsilateral and contralateral limbs. Conclusions: No evidence was found to support the hypothesis that the spinal cord isolated from the brain stem could generate an SSR. The results indicate that supraspinal connections are necessary for the SSR, together with integrity of central sympathetic pathways of the upper thoracic segments for palmar SSR, and possibly all thoracic segments for plantar SSR. PMID:11861696

  3. Calcium imaging of network function in the developing spinal cord.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, Michael J; Bonnot, Agnès; Wenner, Peter; Mentis, George Z

    2005-05-01

    We have used calcium imaging to visualize the spatiotemporal organization of activity generated by in vitro spinal cord preparations of the developing chick embryo and the neonatal mouse. During each episode of spontaneous activity, we found that chick spinal neurons were activated rhythmically and synchronously throughout the transverse extent of the spinal cord. At the onset of a spontaneous episode, optical activity originated in the ventrolateral part of the cord. Back-labeling of spinal interneurons with calcium dyes suggested that this ventrolateral initiation was mediated by activation of a class of interneurons, located dorsomedial to the motor nucleus, that receive direct monosynaptic input from motoneurons. Studies of locomotor-like activity in the anterior lumbar segments of the neonatal mouse cord revealed the existence of a rostrocaudal wave in the oscillatory component of each cycle of rhythmic motoneuron activity. This finding raises the possibility that the activation of mammalian motoneurons during locomotion may share some of the same rostrocaudally organized mechanisms that evolved to control swimming in fishes.

  4. Self-Esteem Differences among Persons with Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Irmo; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Surveyed 63 people with spinal cord injury (SCI) in either their first, second, or fifth year post-injury. Results indicated that perceived levels of self-esteem decreased following the SCI. Found that self-esteem was lowest in the second year of injury. Self-esteem may be connected to loss of employment. (RJM)

  5. Race-Ethnicity, Education, and Employment after Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krause, James S.; Saunders, Lee; Staten, David

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this article was to identify the relationship between race-ethnicity and employment after spinal cord injury (SCI), while evaluating interrelationships with gender, injury severity, and education. The authors used a cohort design using the most current status from a post-injury interview from the National SCI Statistical Center.…

  6. The Role of Hope in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heinemann, Allen; And Others

    Hope has motivational importance to individuals who have suffered a major physical loss. Theories of adjustment to a spinal cord injury take one of three approaches: (1) premorbid personality, which highlights the individual's past experiences, personal meanings, and body image; (2) typologies of injury reactions, which range from normal to…

  7. Incidence of Secondary Complications in Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, C. A.; Shepherd, C.

    1996-01-01

    Data from 348 patients (mean age 37) with postacute spinal cord injury revealed that 95% reported at least 1 secondary problem, and 58% reported 3 or more. The number and severity of complications varied with time since the injury. Obesity, pain, spasticity, urinary tract infections, pressure sores, and lack of social integration were common…

  8. Pregnancy outcomes in women with spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Lynn; Keunen, Johannes; Wigdor, Emilie; Sermer, Mathew; Maxwell, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Women with spinal cord lesions present special challenges during pregnancy. We studied their pregnancy outcomes with regard to medical, obstetrical, and social concerns. We reviewed the records of pregnant women with spinal cord injury who attended our institution between 1999 and 2009. Thirty-two women with a total of 37 pregnancies were identified. Most were nulliparous (65%) with either thoracic or lumbar spinal cord lesions due to neural tube defects (69%), trauma (19%), tumours (9%), or iatrogenic injury (3%). Most had undergone orthopedic surgery (63%) or neurosurgery (53%). The most common medical conditions were neurogenic bladder (53%), anemia (16%), autonomic hyperreflexia (9%), and elevated BMI > 30 (6%). Recurrent urinary tract infection occurred in 32%. Antibiotic suppression against bacteriuria was used in 35%. Antenatal hospitalization occurred in 46%, most often because of threatened preterm labour (19%). There were 33 live births and two stillbirths (6%). Preterm birth < 37 weeks occurred in 24%. Vaginal birth occurred in 33%. Pregnant women with spinal cord lesions generally have successful pregnancy outcomes. However, their pregnancies are at significant risk for preterm birth, infection, and Caesarean section. Coordinated multidisciplinary care is recommended for optimal management of these pregnancies.

  9. Incidence of Secondary Complications in Spinal Cord Injury.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, C. A.; Shepherd, C.

    1996-01-01

    Data from 348 patients (mean age 37) with postacute spinal cord injury revealed that 95% reported at least 1 secondary problem, and 58% reported 3 or more. The number and severity of complications varied with time since the injury. Obesity, pain, spasticity, urinary tract infections, pressure sores, and lack of social integration were common…

  10. Quality of Life in Patients with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurcay, Eda; Bal, Ajda; Eksioglu, Emel; Cakci, Aytul

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the quality of life (QoL) in spinal cord injury (SCI) survivors. Secondary objectives were to determine the effects of various sociodemographic and clinical characteristics on QoL. This cross-sectional study included 54 patients with SCI. The Turkish version of the Short-Form-36 Health Survey was…

  11. Wnt/β-catenin signaling promotes regeneration after adult zebrafish spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Strand, Nicholas S; Hoi, Kimberly K; Phan, Tien M T; Ray, Catherine A; Berndt, Jason D; Moon, Randall T

    2016-09-02

    Unlike mammals, zebrafish can regenerate their injured spinal cord and regain control of caudal tissues. It was recently shown that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is necessary for spinal cord regeneration in the larval zebrafish. However, the molecular mechanisms of regeneration may or may not be conserved between larval and adult zebrafish. To test this, we assessed the role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling after spinal cord injury in the adult zebrafish. We show that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is increased after spinal cord injury in the adult zebrafish. Moreover, overexpression of Dkk1b inhibited Wnt/β-catenin signaling in the regenerating spinal cord of adult zebrafish. Dkk1b overexpression also inhibited locomotor recovery, axon regeneration, and glial bridge formation in the injured spinal cord. Thus, our data illustrate a conserved role for Wnt/β-catenin signaling in adult and larval zebrafish spinal cord regeneration.

  12. Cell Therapy Augments Functional Recovery Subsequent to Spinal Cord Injury under Experimental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sabapathy, Vikram; Tharion, George; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord injury leads to enervation of normal tissue homeostasis ultimately leading to paralysis. Until now there is no proper cure for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, cell therapy in animal spinal cord injury models has shown some progress of recovery. At present, clinical trials are under progress to evaluate the efficacy of cell transplantation for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Different types of cells such as pluripotent stem cells derived neural cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, neural stem cells, glial cells are being tested in various spinal cord injury models. In this review we highlight both the advances and lacuna in the field of spinal cord injury by discussing epidemiology, pathophysiology, molecular mechanism, and various cell therapy strategies employed in preclinical and clinical injury models and finally we discuss the limitations and ethical issues involved in cell therapy approach for treating spinal cord injury. PMID:26240569

  13. The animal model of spinal cord injury as an experimental pain model.

    PubMed

    Nakae, Aya; Nakai, Kunihiro; Yano, Kenji; Hosokawa, Ko; Shibata, Masahiko; Mashimo, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Pain, which remains largely unsolved, is one of the most crucial problems for spinal cord injury patients. Due to sensory problems, as well as motor dysfunctions, spinal cord injury research has proven to be complex and difficult. Furthermore, many types of pain are associated with spinal cord injury, such as neuropathic, visceral, and musculoskeletal pain. Many animal models of spinal cord injury exist to emulate clinical situations, which could help to determine common mechanisms of pathology. However, results can be easily misunderstood and falsely interpreted. Therefore, it is important to fully understand the symptoms of human spinal cord injury, as well as the various spinal cord injury models and the possible pathologies. The present paper summarizes results from animal models of spinal cord injury, as well as the most effective use of these models.

  14. Cell Therapy Augments Functional Recovery Subsequent to Spinal Cord Injury under Experimental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Sabapathy, Vikram; Tharion, George; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The spinal cord injury leads to enervation of normal tissue homeostasis ultimately leading to paralysis. Until now there is no proper cure for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Recently, cell therapy in animal spinal cord injury models has shown some progress of recovery. At present, clinical trials are under progress to evaluate the efficacy of cell transplantation for the treatment of spinal cord injury. Different types of cells such as pluripotent stem cells derived neural cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, neural stem cells, glial cells are being tested in various spinal cord injury models. In this review we highlight both the advances and lacuna in the field of spinal cord injury by discussing epidemiology, pathophysiology, molecular mechanism, and various cell therapy strategies employed in preclinical and clinical injury models and finally we discuss the limitations and ethical issues involved in cell therapy approach for treating spinal cord injury.

  15. [Conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis after isolated spinal cord syndrome: value of brain and spinal MRI].

    PubMed

    Pericot, I; Tintoré, M; Grivé, E; Briev, L; Rovira, A; Montalbán, X

    2001-02-17

    Isolated spinal cord syndrome might be due to a first episode of multiple sclerosis. The aim of the study was to determine the clinical usefulness and paraclinical characteristics and of spinal and brain MR imaging predicting conversion to clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS) in patients with an isolated spinal cord syndrome. We have evaluate thirty-eight patients with isolated spinal cord syndrome. A clinical protocol, lumbar puncture, evoked potential and brain-spinal cord MRI were performed. Twenty two percent of the patients fulfilling brain MRI Paty criteria (p < 0.01), 54.5% Fazekas (p = 0.007) and 80% of patients fulfilling Barkhof criteria (p = 0.009) presented CDMS. The spinal MR imaging from CDMS patients was always abnormal, showing cervical and marginal location with a diameter < 2 cm. Brain MRI is strongly predictive of the risk of developing CDMS and spinal cord MRI may increase the sensitivity to detect conversion to CDMS.

  16. Transplantation of specific human astrocytes promotes functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Davies, Stephen J A; Shih, Chung-Hsuan; Noble, Mark; Mayer-Proschel, Margot; Davies, Jeannette E; Proschel, Christoph

    2011-03-02

    Repairing trauma to the central nervous system by replacement of glial support cells is an increasingly attractive therapeutic strategy. We have focused on the less-studied replacement of astrocytes, the major support cell in the central nervous system, by generating astrocytes from embryonic human glial precursor cells using two different astrocyte differentiation inducing factors. The resulting astrocytes differed in expression