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Sample records for spinal treatment exercise

  1. Spinal rehabilitative exercise or manual treatment for the prevention of tension-type headache in adults.

    PubMed

    Leininger, Brent; Brønfort, Gert; Haas, Mitchell; Schmitt, John; Evans, Roni L; Levin, Morris; Westrom, Kristine; Goldsmith, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the short- and long-term effects of manual treatment and spinal rehabilitative exercise for the prevention of tension-type headache in adults.

  2. Spinal rehabilitative exercise or manual treatment for the prevention of cervicogenic headache in adults.

    PubMed

    Haas, Mitchell; Brønfort, Gert; Evans, Roni L; Leininger, Brent; Schmitt, John; Levin, Morris; Westrom, Kristine; Goldsmith, Charles H

    2016-05-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To quantify and compare the short- and long-term effects of manual treatment and spinal rehabilitative exercise for cervicogenic headache, classified according to the International Headache Society's (IHS) diagnostic criteria, with an active or placebo/sham comparison or wait-list control.

  3. VOLUNTARY EXERCISE INCREASES OLIGODENDROGENESIS IN SPINAL CORD

    PubMed Central

    Krityakiarana, W.; Espinosa-Jeffrey, A.; Ghiani, C.A.; Zhao, P. M.; Gomez-Pinilla, F.; Yamaguchi, M.; Kotchabhakdi, N.; de Vellis, J.

    2009-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to increase hippocampal neurogenesis, but the effects of exercise on oligodendrocyte generation have not yet been reported. In this study, we evaluated the hypothesis that voluntary exercise may affect neurogenesis, and more in particular, oligodendrogenesis, in the thoracic segment of the intact spinal cord of adult nestin-GFP transgenic mice. Voluntary exercise for 7 and 14 days increased nestin-GFP expression around the ependymal area. In addition, voluntary exercise for 7 days significantly increased nestin-GFP expression in both the white and gray matter of the thoracic segment of the intact spinal cord, whereas, 14 days-exercise decreased nestin-GFP expression. Markers for immature oligodendrocytes (Transferrin and CNPase) were significantly increased after 7 days of voluntary exercise. These results suggest that voluntary exercise positively influences oligodendrogenesis in the intact spinal cord, emphasizing the beneficial effect of voluntary exercise as a possible co-treatment for spinal cord injury. PMID:20374076

  4. Effects of diet and/or exercise in enhancing spinal cord sensorimotor learning.

    PubMed

    Joseph, M Selvan; Ying, Zhe; Zhuang, Yumei; Zhong, Hui; Wu, Aiguo; Bhatia, Harsharan S; Cruz, Rusvelda; Tillakaratne, Niranjala J K; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Given that the spinal cord is capable of learning sensorimotor tasks and that dietary interventions can influence learning involving supraspinal centers, we asked whether the presence of omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and the curry spice curcumin (Cur) by themselves or in combination with voluntary exercise could affect spinal cord learning in adult spinal mice. Using an instrumental learning paradigm to assess spinal learning we observed that mice fed a diet containing DHA/Cur performed better in the spinal learning paradigm than mice fed a diet deficient in DHA/Cur. The enhanced performance was accompanied by increases in the mRNA levels of molecular markers of learning, i.e., BDNF, CREB, CaMKII, and syntaxin 3. Concurrent exposure to exercise was complementary to the dietary treatment effects on spinal learning. The diet containing DHA/Cur resulted in higher levels of DHA and lower levels of omega-6 fatty acid arachidonic acid (AA) in the spinal cord than the diet deficient in DHA/Cur. The level of spinal learning was inversely related to the ratio of AA:DHA. These results emphasize the capacity of select dietary factors and exercise to foster spinal cord learning. Given the non-invasiveness and safety of the modulation of diet and exercise, these interventions should be considered in light of their potential to enhance relearning of sensorimotor tasks during rehabilitative training paradigms after a spinal cord injury.

  5. The effects of McKenzie and Brunkow exercise program on spinal mobility comparative study.

    PubMed

    Mujić Skikić, Emela; Trebinjac, Suad; Sakota, Slavica; Avdić, Dijana

    2004-02-01

    This study encompassed 64 participants with symptoms of low back pain, 33 in McKenzie group and 31 in Brunkow group. Patients attended exercise program daily and they were asked to do the same exercise at home--five times a day in series of 5 to 10 repetition each time, depending of stage of disease and pain intensity. All patients were assessed for the spinal motion, before and after the treatment. All parameters for spinal movements showed improvement after exercising McKenzie program for lower back pain with a significant difference of p<0.01 for all motions. Also, in Brunkow group, all of the parameters showed statistically significant improvement at the end of treatment in relation to pre-treatment values, with significant difference of p<0.01 for all motions. Statistically comparison between McKenzie and Brunkow difference in score at the end of the treatment showed statistically significant improvement in McKenzie group, for extension, right and left side flexion, while flexion score didn't show statistically significant difference. McKenzie exercises seemed to be more effective than Brunkow exercises for improvement in spinal motion. Both, McKenzie and Brunkow exercises can be used for spinal mobility improvement in patients with lower back pain, but is preferable to use McKenzie exercises first, to decrease the pain and increase spinal mobility, and then Brunkow exercises to strengthen the paravertebral muscles.

  6. Exercise recommendations for individuals with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Patrick L; Nash, Mark S

    2004-01-01

    Persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) exhibit deficits in volitional motor control and sensation that limit not only the performance of daily tasks but also the overall activity level of these persons. This population has been characterised as extremely sedentary with an increased incidence of secondary complications including diabetes mellitus, hypertension and atherogenic lipid profiles. As the daily lifestyle of the average person with SCI is without adequate stress for conditioning purposes, structured exercise activities must be added to the regular schedule if the individual is to reduce the likelihood of secondary complications and/or to enhance their physical capacity. The acute exercise responses and the capacity for exercise conditioning are directly related to the level and completeness of the spinal lesion. Appropriate exercise testing and training of persons with SCI should be based on the individual's exercise capacity as determined by accurate assessment of the spinal lesion. The standard means of classification of SCI is by application of the International Standards for Classification of Spinal Cord Injury, written by the Neurological Standards Committee of the American Spinal Injury Association. Individuals with complete spinal injuries at or above the fourth thoracic level generally exhibit dramatically diminished cardiac acceleration with maximal heart rates less than 130 beats/min. The work capacity of these persons will be limited by reductions in cardiac output and circulation to the exercising musculature. Persons with complete spinal lesions below the T(10) level will generally display injuries to the lower motor neurons within the lower extremities and, therefore, will not retain the capacity for neuromuscular activation by means of electrical stimulation. Persons with paraplegia also exhibit reduced exercise capacity and increased heart rate responses (compared with the non-disabled), which have been associated with circulatory limitations

  7. Exercise Training Promotes Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Juanjuan; Deng, Lingxiao; Li, Jianan

    2016-01-01

    The exercise training is an effective therapy for spinal cord injury which has been applied to clinic. Traditionally, the exercise training has been considered to improve spinal cord function only through enhancement, compensation, and replacement of the remaining function of nerve and muscle. Recently, accumulating evidences indicated that exercise training can improve the function in different levels from end-effector organ such as skeletal muscle to cerebral cortex through reshaping skeletal muscle structure and muscle fiber type, regulating physiological and metabolic function of motor neurons in the spinal cord and remodeling function of the cerebral cortex. We compiled published data collected in different animal models and clinical studies into a succinct review of the current state of knowledge. PMID:28050288

  8. Short term treatment versus long term management of neck and back disability in older adults utilizing spinal manipulative therapy and supervised exercise: a parallel-group randomized clinical trial evaluating relative effectiveness and harms

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Back and neck disability are frequent in older adults resulting in loss of function and independence. Exercise therapy and manual therapy, like spinal manipulative therapy (SMT), have evidence of short and intermediate term effectiveness for spinal disability in the general population and growing evidence in older adults. For older populations experiencing chronic spinal conditions, long term management may be more appropriate to maintain improvement and minimize the impact of future exacerbations. Research is limited comparing short courses of treatment to long term management of spinal disability. The primary aim is to compare the relative effectiveness of 12 weeks versus 36 weeks of SMT and supervised rehabilitative exercise (SRE) in older adults with back and neck disability. Methods/Design Randomized, mixed-methods, comparative effectiveness trial conducted at a university-affiliated research clinic in the Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota metropolitan area. Participants Independently ambulatory community dwelling adults ≥ 65 years of age with back and neck disability of minimum 12 weeks duration (n = 200). Interventions 12 weeks SMT + SRE or 36 weeks SMT + SRE. Randomization Blocked 1:1 allocation; computer generated scheme, concealed in sequentially numbered, opaque, sealed envelopes. Blinding Functional outcome examiners are blinded to treatment allocation; physical nature of the treatments prevents blinding of participants and providers to treatment assignment. Primary endpoint 36 weeks post-randomization. Data collection Self-report questionnaires administered at 2 baseline visits and 4, 12, 24, 36, 52, and 78 weeks post-randomization. Primary outcomes include back and neck disability, measured by the Oswestry Disability Index and Neck Disability Index. Secondary outcomes include pain, general health status, improvement, self-efficacy, kinesiophobia, satisfaction, and medication use. Functional outcome assessment occurs

  9. Exercise modulates chloride homeostasis after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Côté, Marie-Pascale; Gandhi, Sapan; Zambrotta, Marina; Houlé, John D

    2014-07-02

    Activity-based therapies are routinely integrated in spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation programs because they result in a reduction of hyperreflexia and spasticity. However, the mechanisms by which exercise regulates activity in spinal pathways to reduce spasticity and improve functional recovery are poorly understood. Persisting alterations in the action of GABA on postsynaptic targets is a signature of CNS injuries, including SCI. The action of GABA depends on the intracellular chloride concentration, which is determined largely by the expression of two cation-chloride cotransporters (CCCs), KCC2 and NKCC1, which serve as chloride exporters and importers, respectively. We hypothesized that the reduction in hyperreflexia with exercise after SCI relies on a return to chloride homeostasis. Sprague Dawley rats received a spinal cord transection at T12 and were assigned to SCI-7d, SCI-14d, SCI-14d+exercise, SCI-28d, SCI-28d+exercise, or SCI-56d groups. During a terminal experiment, H-reflexes were recorded from interosseus muscles after stimulation of the tibial nerve and the low-frequency-dependent depression (FDD) was assessed. We provide evidence that exercise returns spinal excitability and levels of KCC2 and NKCC1 toward normal levels in the lumbar spinal cord. Acutely altering chloride extrusion using the KCC2 blocker DIOA masked the effect of exercise on FDD, whereas blocking NKCC1 with bumetanide returned FDD toward intact levels after SCI. Our results indicate that exercise contributes to reflex recovery and restoration of endogenous inhibition through a return to chloride homeostasis after SCI. This lends support for CCCs as part of a pathway that could be manipulated to improve functional recovery when combined with rehabilitation programs.

  10. Combined Effects of Acrobatic Exercise and Magnetic Stimulation on the Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Wieraszko, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    Abstract The objective of the study was to determine whether physical exercise combined with epidural spinal cord magnetic stimulation could improve recovery after injury of the spinal cord. Spinal cord lesioning in mice resulted in reduced locomotor function and negatively affected the muscle strength tested in vitro. Acrobatic exercise attenuated the behavioral effects of spinal cord injury. The exposure to magnetic fields facilitated further this improvement. The progress in behavioral recovery was correlated with reduced muscle degeneration and enhanced muscle contraction. The acrobatic exercise combined with stimulation with magnetic fields significantly facilitates behavioral recovery and muscle physiology in mice following spinal cord injury. PMID:18986227

  11. Resistance Strength Training Exercise in Children with Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lewelt, Aga; Krosschell, Kristin J.; Stoddard, Gregory J.; Weng, Cindy; Xue, Mei; Marcus, Robin L.; Gappmaier, Eduard; Viollet, Louis; Johnson, Barbara A.; White, Andrea T.; Viazzo-Trussell, Donata; Lopes, Philippe; Lane, Robert H.; Carey, John C.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Preliminary evidence in adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) and in SMA animal models suggests exercise has potential benefits in improving or stabilizing muscle strength and motor function. Methods We evaluated feasibility, safety, and effects on strength and motor function of a home-based, supervised progressive resistance strength training exercise program in children with SMA types II and III. Up to 14 bilateral proximal muscles were exercised 3 times weekly for 12 weeks. Results Nine children with SMA, aged 10.4±3.8 years, completed the resistance training exercise program. Ninety percent of visits occurred per protocol. Training sessions were pain-free (99.8%), and no study-related adverse events occurred. Trends in improved strength and motor function were observed. Conclusions A 12-week supervised, home-based, 3 days/week progressive resistance training exercise program is feasible, safe, and well tolerated in children with SMA. These findings can inform future studies of exercise in SMA. PMID:25597614

  12. Successful medical treatment of spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bo-Ren; Wang, Chih-Wei; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2008-04-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare but potentially fatal disease. A 67-year-old female suffered fever and painful swelling of the right knee and lower leg for one week. Both synovial fluid and blood cultures yielded methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Low back pain developed and fever was sustained despite the administration of intravenous oxacillin. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracolumbar spine revealed spinal epidural abscess from T12 to S1. Because of severe hypoalbuminemia and general anasarca and followed by exploratory laparotomy for massive duodenal bleeding, she did not receive surgical intervention for the spinal epidural abscess. After intravenous administration of oxacillin 2 g 4-hourly for 12 weeks, she recovered and follow-up MRI confirmed the efficacy of the medical treatment. She remained well at 1-year follow-up. In a patient with minimal neurological deficit or surgical contraindication, spinal epidural abscess can be successfully treated with a medical regimen.

  13. Exercise after spinal cord injury as an agent for neuroprotection, regeneration and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Sandrow-Feinberg, Harra R; Houlé, John D

    2015-09-04

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a traumatic event from which there is limited recovery of function, despite the best efforts of many investigators to devise realistic therapeutic treatments. Partly this is due to the multifaceted nature of SCI, where there is considerable disarray and dysfunction secondary to the initial injury. Contributing to this secondary degeneration is neurotoxicity, vascular dysfunction, glial scarring, neuroinflammation, apoptosis and demyelination. It seems logical that addressing the need for neuroprotection, regeneration and rehabilitation will require different treatment strategies that may be applied at varied stages of the post-injury response. Here we focus on a single strategy, exercise/physical training, which appears to have multiple applications and benefits for an acute or chronic SCI. Exercise has been demonstrated to be advantageous at cellular and biochemical levels, as well as being of benefit for the whole animal or human subject. Data from our lab and others will be discussed to further elucidate the many positive aspects of implementing exercise following injury and to suggest that rehabilitation is not the sole target of a training regimen following SCI. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Spinal cord injury.

  14. Effect of Regular Exercise on Cardiopulmonary Fitness in Males With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Hee; Kong, In Deok; Kim, Sung Hoon; Shinn, Jong Mock; Kim, Jong Heon; Yi, Dongsoo; Lee, Jin Hyeong; Chang, Jae Seung; Kim, Tae-ho; Kim, Eun Ju

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cardiopulmonary endurance of subjects with spinal cord injury by measuring the maximal oxygen consumption with varying degrees of spinal cord injury level, age, and regular exercise. Methods We instructed the subjects to perform exercises using arm ergometer on healthy adults at 20 years of age or older with spinal cord injury, and their maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) was measured with a metabolic measurement system. The exercise proceeded stepwise according to the exercise protocol and was stopped when the subject was exhausted or when VO2 reached an equilibriu Results Among the 40 subjects, there were 10 subjects with cervical cord injury, 27 with thoracic cord injury, and 3 with lumbar cord injury. Twenty-five subjects who were exercised regularly showed statistically higher results of VO2max than those who did not exercise regularly. Subjects with cervical injury showed statistically lower VO2max than the subjects with thoracic or lumbar injury out of the 40 subjects with neurologic injury. In addition, higher age showed a statistically lower VO2max. Lastly, the regularly exercising paraplegic group showed higher VO2max than the non-exercising paraplegic group. Conclusion There are differences in VO2max of subjects with spinal cord injury according to the degree of neurologic injury, age, and whether the subject participates in regular exercise. We found that regular exercise increased the VO2max in individuals with spinal cord injury. PMID:25750877

  15. Treadmill exercise facilitates recovery of locomotor function through axonal regeneration following spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sun-Young; Seo, Tae-Beom; Kim, Dae-Young

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) disrupts both axonal pathways and segmental spinal cord circuity, resulting in permanent neurological deficits. Physical exercise is known to increase the expression of neurotrophins for improving the injured spinal cord. In the present study, we investigated the effects of treadmill exercise on locomotor function in relation with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) expression after SCI. The rats were divided into five groups: control group, sham operation group, sham operation and exercise group, SCI group, and SCI and exercise group. The laminectomy was performed at the T9–T10 level. The exposed dorsal surface of the spinal cord received contusion injury (10 g × 25 mm) using the impactor. Treadmill exercise was performed 6 days per a week for 6 weeks. In order to evaluate the locomotor function of animals, Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scale was conducted once a week for 6 weeks. We examined BDNF expression and axonal sprouting in the injury site of the spinal cord using Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining. SCI induced loss of locomotor function with decreased BDNF expression in the injury site. Treadmill exercise increased the score of BBB locomotor scale and reduced cavity formation in the injury site. BDNF expression and axonal sprouting within the trabecula were further facilitated by treadmill exercise in SCI-exposed rats. The present study provides the evidence that treadmill exercise may facilitate recovery of locomotor function through axonal regeneration via BDNF expression following SCI. PMID:27656624

  16. Treatment of spinal fractures in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Michael; Bolesta, Michael J

    2013-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory spondyloarthropathy with the potential for progressive spinal stiffness that ultimately makes patients susceptible to spinal fractures with traumatic spinal cord injury from even low-energy trauma. Treatment of patients with AS and spinal fractures (AS+FX) is controversial because, although these patients need especially rigorous stabilization, surgery has been associated with an increased risk of complications and persistent neurological deficits. The purpose of this retrospective case series was to profile patients with AS+FX from a 19-year period within the authors' county hospital system, including differences of neurological status in patients treated operatively vs nonoperatively. The study group comprised 11 patients with AS+FX (9 men and 2 women; mean age, 63 years [range, 38-91 years]). The authors reviewed available clinical notes and imaging reports. Six patients had posterior operative fixation, and 5 were stabilized nonoperatively. By the time of either discharge or final follow-up, 3 of the patients treated operatively deteriorated neurologically (2 of them preoperatively) and 3 remained stable. Of the patients treated nonoperatively, 3 remained neurologically intact, 1 deteriorated, and 1 recovered completely. The most common complications in all patients were pneumonia and urinary tract infection. Operative and nonoperative management produced acceptable outcomes in most patients. The authors recommend individualized treatment, accounting for patient preferences and comorbidities.

  17. Exercise Training after Spinal Cord Injury Selectively Alters Synaptic Properties in Neurons in Adult Mouse Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Flynn, Jamie R.; Dunn, Lynda R.; Galea, Mary P.; Callister, Robin; Rank, Michelle M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Following spinal cord injury (SCI), anatomical changes such as axonal sprouting occur within weeks in the vicinity of the injury. Exercise training enhances axon sprouting; however, the exact mechanisms that mediate exercised-induced plasticity are unknown. We studied the effects of exercise training after SCI on the intrinsic and synaptic properties of spinal neurons in the immediate vicinity (<2 segments) of the SCI. Male mice (C57BL/6, 9–10 weeks old) received a spinal hemisection (T10) and after 1 week of recovery, they were randomized to trained (treadmill exercise for 3 weeks) and untrained (no exercise) groups. After 3 weeks, mice were killed and horizontal spinal cord slices (T6–L1, 250 μm thick) were prepared for visually guided whole cell patch clamp recording. Intrinsic properties, including resting membrane potential, input resistance, rheobase current, action potential (AP) threshold and after-hyperpolarization (AHP) amplitude were similar in neurons from trained and untrained mice (n=67 and 70 neurons, respectively). Neurons could be grouped into four categories based on their AP discharge during depolarizing current injection; the proportions of tonic firing, initial bursting, single spiking, and delayed firing neurons were similar in trained and untrained mice. The properties of spontaneous excitatory synaptic currents (sEPSCs) did not differ in trained and untrained animals. In contrast, evoked excitatory synaptic currents recorded after dorsal column stimulation were markedly increased in trained animals (peak amplitude 78.9±17.5 vs. 42.2±6.8 pA; charge 1054±376 vs. 348±75 pA·ms). These data suggest that 3 weeks of treadmill exercise does not affect the intrinsic properties of spinal neurons after SCI; however, excitatory synaptic drive from dorsal column pathways, such as the corticospinal tract, is enhanced. PMID:23320512

  18. Spinal manipulation and exercise for low back pain in adolescents: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low back pain is among the most common and costly chronic health care conditions. Recent research has highlighted the common occurrence of non-specific low back pain in adolescents, with prevalence estimates similar to adults. While multiple clinical trials have examined the effectiveness of commonly used therapies for the management of low back pain in adults, few trials have addressed the condition in adolescents. The purpose of this paper is to describe the methodology of a randomized clinical trial examining the effectiveness of exercise with and without spinal manipulative therapy for chronic or recurrent low back pain in adolescents. Methods/design This study is a randomized controlled trial comparing twelve weeks of exercise therapy combined with spinal manipulation to exercise therapy alone. Beginning in March 2010, a total of 184 participants, ages 12 to 18, with chronic or recurrent low back pain are enrolled across two sites. The primary outcome is self-reported low back pain intensity. Other outcomes include disability, quality of life, improvement, satisfaction, activity level, low back strength, endurance, and motion. Qualitative interviews are conducted to evaluate participants’ perceptions of treatment. Discussion This is the first randomized clinical trial assessing the effectiveness of combining spinal manipulative therapy with exercise for adolescents with low back pain. The results of this study will provide important evidence on the role of these conservative treatments for the management of low back pain in adolescents. Trial registration (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01096628). PMID:24904748

  19. History of the treatment of spinal injuries.

    PubMed

    Silver, J R

    2005-02-01

    Injury of the spinal cord has been known since antiquity. There is no cure for the injury and until modern times patients died rapidly from a combination of pressure sores and urinary tract infection. Treatment consists of preventing complications until the spine has stabilised and the patient can be rehabilitated to an independent life. This article explores how this treatment developed in the ancient world, the middle ages, in Europe, Great Britain, and latterly in the United States. It describes how these principles of treatment were recognised particularly in Germany, the United States, and Great Britain and evaluates the relative contributions made by the different pioneers.

  20. Update on treatment options for spinal brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Ulu-Kilic, A; Karakas, A; Erdem, H; Turker, T; Inal, A S; Ak, O; Turan, H; Kazak, E; Inan, A; Duygu, F; Demiraslan, H; Kader, C; Sener, A; Dayan, S; Deveci, O; Tekin, R; Saltoglu, N; Aydın, M; Horasan, E S; Gul, H C; Ceylan, B; Kadanalı, A; Karabay, O; Karagoz, G; Kayabas, U; Turhan, V; Engin, D; Gulsun, S; Elaldı, N; Alabay, S

    2014-02-01

    We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of antibiotic regimens and optimal duration of therapy in complicated and uncomplicated forms of spinal brucellosis. This is a multicentre, retrospective and comparative study involving a total of 293 patients with spinal brucellosis from 19 health institutions. Comparison of complicated and uncomplicated spinal brucellosis was statistically analysed. Complicated spinal brucellosis was diagnosed in 78 (26.6%) of our patients. Clinical presentation was found to be significantly more acute, with fever and weight loss, in patients in the complicated group. They had significantly higher leukocyte and platelet counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rates and C-reactive protein levels, and lower haemoglobulin levels. The involvement of the thoracic spine was significantly more frequent in complicated cases. Spondylodiscitis was complicated, with paravertebral abscess in 38 (13.0%), prevertebral abscess in 13 (4.4%), epidural abscess in 30 (10.2%), psoas abscess in 10 (3.4%) and radiculitis in 8 (2.7%) patients. The five major combination regimens were: doxycycline 200 mg/day, rifampicin 600 mg/day and streptomycin 1 g/day; doxycycline 200 mg/day, rifampicin 600 mg/day and gentamicin 5 mg/kg; doxycycline 200 mg/day and rifampicin 600 mg/day; doxycycline 200 mg/day and streptomycin 1 g/day; and doxycycline 200 mg/day, rifampicin 600 mg/day and ciprofloxacin 1 g/day. There were no significant therapeutic differences between these antibiotic groups; the results were similar regarding the complicated and uncomplicated groups. Patients were mostly treated with doxycycline and rifampicin with or without an aminoglycoside. In the former subgroup, complicated cases received antibiotics for a longer duration than uncomplicated cases. Early recognition of complicated cases is critical in preventing devastating complications. Antimicrobial treatment should be prolonged in complicated spinal brucellosis in particular.

  1. Exercise induces cortical plasticity after neonatal spinal cord injury in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Kao, T; Shumsky, JS; Murray, M; Moxon, KA

    2009-01-01

    Exercise-induced cortical plasticity is associated with improved functional outcome after brain or nerve injury. Exercise also improves functional outcomes after spinal cord injury, but its effects on cortical plasticity are not known. The goal of this investigation was to study the effect of moderate exercise (treadmill locomotion, 3 min/day, 5days/week) on the somatotopic organization of forelimb and hindlimb somatosensory cortex (SI) after neonatal thoracic transection. We used adult rats spinalized as neonates because some of these animals develop weight-supported stepping and, therefore, the relationship between cortical plasticity and stepping could also be examined. Acute, single-neuron mapping was used to determine the percentage of cortical cells responding to cutaneous forelimb stimulation in normal, spinalized, and exercised spinalized rats. Multiple single neuron recording from arrays of chronically implanted microwires examined the magnitude of response of these cells in normal and exercised spinalized rats. Our results show that exercise not only increased the percentage of responding cells in the hindlimb SI, but also increased the magnitude of the response of these cells. This increase in response magnitude was correlated with behavioral outcome measures. In the forelimb SI, neonatal transection reduced the percentage of responding cells to forelimb stimulation but exercise reversed this loss. This restoration in the percentage of responding cells after exercise was accompanied by an increase in their response magnitude. Therefore, the increase in responsiveness of hindlimb SI to forelimb stimulation after neonatal transection and exercise may be due, in part, to the effect of exercise on the forelimb SI. PMID:19515923

  2. Spinal Recurrence From Intracranial Germinoma: Risk Factors and Treatment Outcome for Spinal Recurrence

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko Yoshii, Yoshihiko; Shikama, Naoto; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Uno, Takashi; Onishi, Hiroshi; Itami, Jun; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Iraha, Shiro; Hyodo, Akio; Toita, Takafumi; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Tamaki, Wakana; Ito, Hisao; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To analyze retrospectively the risk factors of spinal recurrence in patients with intracranial germinoma and clinical outcomes of patients who developed spinal recurrence. Methods and Materials: Between 1980 and 2007, 165 patients with no evidence of spinal metastases at diagnosis were treated with cranial radiotherapy without spinal irradiation. The median follow-up in all 165 patients was 61.2 months (range, 1.2-260.1 months). Results: After the initial treatment, 15 patients (9.1%) developed spinal recurrences. Multivariate analysis revealed that large intracranial disease ({>=}4 cm) and multifocal intracranial disease were independent risk factors for spinal recurrence. Radiation field, total radiation dose, and the use of chemotherapy did not affect the occurrence of spinal recurrences. Of the 15 patients who experienced spinal recurrence, the 3-year actuarial overall survival and disease-free survival (DFS) rates from the beginning of salvage treatments were 65% and 57%, respectively. In the analysis, presence of intracranial recurrence and salvage treatment modality (radiotherapy with chemotherapy vs. radiotherapy alone) had a statistically significant impact on DFS. The 3-year DFS rate in patients with no intracranial recurrence and treated with both spinal radiotherapy and chemotherapy was 100%, whereas only 17% in patients with intracranial recurrence or treated with radiotherapy alone (p = 0.001). Conclusion: Large intracranial disease and multifocal intracranial disease were risk factors for spinal recurrence in patients with intracranial germinoma with no evidence of spinal metastases at diagnosis. For patients who developed spinal recurrence alone, salvage treatment combined with spinal radiotherapy and chemotherapy was effective in controlling the recurrent disease.

  3. Physical exercise improves arterial stiffness after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hubli, Michèle; Currie, Katharine D.; West, Christopher R.; Gee, Cameron M.; Krassioukov, Andrei V.

    2014-01-01

    Objective/background Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV), the gold-standard assessment of central arterial stiffness, has prognostic value for cardiovascular disease risk in able-bodied individuals. The aim of this study was to compare aortic PWV in athletes and non-athletes with spinal cord injury (SCI). Design Cross-sectional comparison. Methods Aortic PWV was assessed in 20 individuals with motor-complete, chronic SCI (C2–T5; 18 ± 8 years post-injury) using applanation tonometry at the carotid and femoral arterial sites. Ten elite hand-cyclists were matched for sex to 10 non-athletes; age and time since injury were comparable between the groups. Heart rate and discrete brachial blood pressure measurements were collected throughout testing. Outcome measures Aortic PWV, blood pressure, heart rate. Results Aortic PWV was significantly lower in athletes vs. non-athletes (6.9 ± 1.0 vs. 8.7 ± 2.5 m/second, P = 0.044). There were no significant between-group differences in resting supine mean arterial blood pressure (91 ± 19 vs. 81 ± 10 mmHg) and heart rate (60 ± 10 vs. 58 ± 6 b.p.m.). Conclusion Athletes with SCI exhibited improved central arterial stiffness compared to non-athletes, which is in agreement with the previous able-bodied literature. This finding implies that chronic exercise training may improve arterial health and potentially lower cardiovascular disease risk in the SCI population. PMID:24976366

  4. Exercise Decreases Myelin-Associated Glycoprotein Expression in the Spinal Cord and Positively Modulates Neuronal Growth

    PubMed Central

    GHIANI, CRISTINA A.; YING, ZHE; DE VELLIS, JEAN; GOMEZ-PINILLA, FERNANDO

    2009-01-01

    To successfully grow, neurons need to overcome the effects of hostile environments, such as the inhibitory action of myelin. We have evaluated the potential of exercise to overcome the intrinsic limitation of the central nervous system for axonal growth. In line with the demonstrated ability of exercise to increase the regenerative potential of neurons, here we show that exercise reduces the inhibitory capacity of myelin. Cortical neurons grown on myelin from exercised rats showed a more pronounced neurite extension compared with neurons grown on poly-D-lysine, or on myelin extracted from sedentary animals. The activity of cyclin-dependent kinase 5, a kinase involved in neurite outgrowth, was found to be increased in cortical neurons grown on exercise-myelin and in the lumbar spinal cord enlargement of exercised animals. Exercise significantly decreased the levels of myelin-associated glycoprotein (MAG), a potent axonal growth inhibitor, suggesting that downregulation of MAG is part of the mechanism through which exercise reduces growth inhibition. It is known that exercise elevates brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) spinal cord levels and that BDNF acts to overcome the inhibitory effects of myelin. Accordingly, we blocked the action of BDNF during exercise, which suppressed the exercise-related MAG decrease. Protein kinase A (PKA) has been related to the ability of BDNF to overcome growth inhibition; in agreement, we found that exercise increased PKA levels and this effect was reverted by blocking BDNF. Overall, these results show that exercise promotes a permissive cellular environment for axonal growth in the adult spinal cord requiring BDNF action. PMID:17497667

  5. Effects of inspiratory muscle training on exercise responses in Paralympic athletes with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    West, C R; Taylor, B J; Campbell, I G; Romer, L M

    2014-10-01

    We asked whether specific inspiratory muscle training (IMT) improves respiratory structure and function and peak exercise responses in highly trained athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Ten Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) were paired by functional classification then randomly assigned to an IMT or placebo group. Diaphragm thickness (B-mode ultrasonography), respiratory function [spirometry and maximum static inspiratory (PI ,max ) and expiratory (PE ,max ) pressures], chronic activity-related dyspnea (Baseline and Transition Dyspnea Indices), and physiological responses to incremental arm-crank exercise were assessed before and after 6 weeks of pressure threshold IMT or sham bronchodilator treatment. Compared to placebo, the IMT group showed significant increases in diaphragm thickness (P = 0.001) and PI ,max (P = 0.016). There was a significant increase in tidal volume at peak exercise in IMT vs placebo (P = 0.048) and a strong trend toward an increase in peak work rate (P = 0.081, partial eta-squared = 0.33) and peak oxygen uptake (P = 0.077, partial eta-squared = 0.34). No other indices changed post-intervention. In conclusion, IMT resulted in significant diaphragmatic hypertrophy and increased inspiratory muscle strength in highly trained athletes with cervical SCI. The strong trend, with large observed effect, toward an increase in peak aerobic performance suggests IMT may provide a useful adjunct to training in this population.

  6. Spinal electro-magnetic stimulation combined with transgene delivery of neurotrophin NT-3 and exercise: novel combination therapy for spinal contusion injury.

    PubMed

    Petrosyan, Hayk A; Alessi, Valentina; Hunanyan, Arsen S; Sisto, Sue A; Arvanian, Victor L

    2015-11-01

    Our recent terminal experiments revealed that administration of a single train of repetitive spinal electromagnetic stimulation (sEMS; 35 min) enhanced synaptic plasticity in spinal circuitry following lateral hemisection spinal cord injury. In the current study, we have examined effects of repetitive sEMS applied as a single train and chronically (5 wk, every other day) following thoracic T10 contusion. Chronic studies involved examination of systematic sEMS administration alone and combined with exercise training and transgene delivery of neurotrophin [adeno-associated virus 10-neurotrophin 3 (AAV10-NT3)]. Electrophysiological intracellular/extracellular recordings, immunohistochemistry, behavioral testing, and anatomical tracing were performed to assess effects of treatments. We found that administration of a single sEMS train induced transient facilitation of transmission through preserved lateral white matter to motoneurons and hindlimb muscles in chronically contused rats with effects lasting for at least 2 h. These physiological changes associated with increased immunoreactivity of GluR1 and GluR2/3 glutamate receptors in lumbar neurons. Systematic administration of sEMS alone for 5 wk, however, was unable to induce cumulative improvements of transmission in spinomuscular circuitry or improve impaired motor function following thoracic contusion. Encouragingly, chronic administration of sEMS, followed by exercise training (running in an exercise ball and swimming), induced the following: 1) sustained strengthening of transmission to lumbar motoneurons and hindlimb muscles, 2) better retrograde transport of anatomical tracer, and 3) improved locomotor function. Greatest improvements were seen in the group that received exercise combined with sEMS and AAV-NT3.

  7. Cardio Respiratory Adaptations with Long Term Personalized Exercise Program in a T12 Spinal Cord Injured Person

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasiliadis, Angelo; Christoulas, Kosmas; Evaggelinou, Christina; Vrabas, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological adaptations in cardio respiratory endurance with a personalized exercise program with arm-cranking exercise in a paraplegic person (incomplete T12 spinal cord injury). A 32 year-old man with spinal cord injury (T12) participated in the present study performing 30 minutes arm cranking…

  8. Renal function and endocrine responses to arm exercise in euhydrated individuals with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kawasaki, Takashi; Nakamura, Takeshi; Sasaki, Yusuke; Sakamoto, Keiko; Ito, Tomoyuki; Goto, Masaki; Shimomatsu, Tomoya; Tajima, Fumihiro

    2012-04-01

    This study investigated the renal and endocrine responses to arm exercise in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI) under euhydration conditions (ad libitum drinking of water) and determined the physiological effects of exercise on renal function in these subjects. Eleven SCI (spinal lesions between T6 and L1, American Spinal Injury Association impairment scale A) and 14 able-bodied (AB) persons first rested for 1 h in a sitting position, before undergoing 2-h arm-crank ergometer exercise at 60% of maximum oxygen consumption followed by a 2-h recovery period. On another day, all subjects participated in a time control study (5 h of rest condition in sitting position). Urine and blood samples were collected hourly. There were no differences in mean blood pressure between the two groups. SCI patients showed attenuated increase in plasma adrenaline and increase in plasma aldosterone compared with AB controls, but similar changes in human atrial natriuretic polypeptide, plasma renin activity and plasma antidiuretic hormone following the exercise. Creatinine clearance, osmolal clearance, free water clearance and fractional excretion of Na(+) did not change during exercise in any of the subjects. These findings suggested that activated aldosterone and attenuated adrenaline responses during exercise in SCI could be due to adaptation to disordered sympathetic nervous system triggered to maintain renal function. The results showed no exercise-related adverse effects on renal function in hydrated subjects with SCI.

  9. Childhood Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors Treatment Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... before the cancer is diagnosed and continue for months or years. Childhood brain and spinal cord tumors ... after treatment. Some cancer treatments cause side effects months or years after treatment has ended. These are ...

  10. The treatment for multilevel noncontiguous spinal fractures

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Xiao Feng; Hou, Tie Sheng; Yuan, Jian Dong; Jin, Gen Yang; Li, Zhong Hai

    2006-01-01

    We report the outcome of 30 patients with multilevel noncontiguous spinal fractures treated between 2000 and 2005. Ten cases were treated conservatively (group A), eight cases were operated on at only one level (group B), and 12 cases were treated surgically at both levels (group C). All cases were followed up for 14–60 months (mean 32 months). Initial mobilisation with a wheelchair or crutches in group A was 9.2±1.1 weeks, which was significantly longer than groups B and C with 6.8±0.7 weeks and 3.1±0.4 weeks, respectively. Operative time and blood loss in group C were significantly more than group B. The neurological deficit improved in six cases in group A (60%), six in group B (75%) and eight in group C (80%). Correction of kyphotic deformity was significantly superior in groups C and B at the operated level, and increasing deformity occurred in groups A and B at the non-operated level. From the results we believe that three treatment strategies were suitable for multilevel noncontiguous spinal fractures, and individualised treatment should be used in these patients. In the patients treated surgically, the clinical and radiographic outcomes are much better. PMID:17043863

  11. Exercise pressor reflex function following acute hemi-section of the spinal cord in cats

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Megan N.; Ichiyama, Ronaldo M.; Iwamoto, Gary A.; Mitchell, Jere H.; Smith, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients post spinal cord injury (SCI). The prescription of exercise as a therapeutic modality for disease prevention in this population is promising. It is logical to suggest that the sooner an exercise program can begin the more benefit the patient will receive from the therapy. However, the time point after injury at which the requisite circulatory responses needed to support exercise are viable remains largely unknown. The skeletal muscle exercise pressor reflex (EPR) significantly contributes to cardiovascular control during exercise in healthy individuals. Experiments in patients with a chronic lateral hemi-section of the spinal cord (Brown-Séquard syndrome) suggest that the EPR, although blunted, is operational when examined months to years post injury. However, whether this critically important reflex remains functional immediately after lateral SCI or, in contrast, experiences a period of reduced capacity due to spinal shock has not been established. This study was designed to assess EPR function after acute lateral transection of the spinal cord. The EPR was selectively activated in seven decerebrate cats via electrically stimulated static contraction of the triceps surae muscles of each hindlimb before and after lateral hemi-section of the T13–L2 region of the spinal cord. Compared to responses prior to injury, increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP) were significantly decreased when contracting the hindlimb either ipsilateral to the lesion (MAP = 17 ± 3 mmHg before and 9 ± 2 mmHg after) or contralateral to the lesion (MAP = 22 ± 5 mmHg before and 12 ± 4 mmHg after). The heart rate (HR) response to stimulation of the EPR was largely unaffected by induction of acute SCI. The findings suggest that the EPR maintains the ability to importantly contribute to cardiovascular regulation during exercise immediately following a Brown-Séquard-like injury. PMID:23403764

  12. Effects of a standard transfer exercise program on transfer quality and activities of daily living for transfer-dependent spinal cord injury patients

    PubMed Central

    You, Ji-Sung; Kim, You Lim; Lee, Suk Min

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of this study was to analyze the effect of a standard transfer exercise program on the transfer quality and activities of daily living (ADL) in wheelchair-dependent spinal cord injury patients. [Subjects and Methods] We randomly divided 22 patients into 2 groups. During the intervention period, one group received treatment with both conventional physical therapy and a standard sitting pivot transfer exercise program (experimental group, n=12) and the other group was managed solely with conventional physical therapy (control group, n=10). The standard transfer exercise program comprised of an independent and a dependent program. Exercises were conducted 30 minutes daily, 3 times per week, over a period of 6 weeks. All subjects were tested using a transfer assessment instrument (TAI) and spinal cord independence measure (SCIM) before and after the intervention. [Results] Compared to the control group, the intervention group scored higher on both the transfer assessment instrument (TAI Part 1, Part 2, TAI total score) and spinal cord independence measure tests (SCIM mobility room and toilet score; SCIM total score). [Conclusion] In conclusion, the standard transfer exercise program is an effective tool which improves transfer quality and the ability of wheelchair-dependent spinal cord injury patients to carry out their ADLs. PMID:28356635

  13. Differential regulation of perineuronal nets in the brain and spinal cord with exercise training.

    PubMed

    Smith, Calvin C; Mauricio, Rui; Nobre, Luis; Marsh, Barnaby; Wüst, Rob C I; Rossiter, Harry B; Ichiyama, Ronaldo M

    2015-02-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are lattice like structures which encapsulate the cell body and proximal dendrites of many neurons and are thought to be involved in regulating synaptic plasticity. It is believed that exercise can enhance the plasticity of the Central Nervous System (CNS) in healthy and dysfunctional states by shifting the balance between plasticity promoting and plasticity inhibiting factors in favor of the former. Recent work has focused on exercise effects on trophic factors but its effect on other plasticity regulators is poorly understood. In the present study we investigated how exercise regulates PNN expression in the lumbar spinal cord and areas of the brain associated with motor control and learning and memory. Adult, female Sprague-Dawley rats with free access to a running wheel for 6 weeks had significantly increased PNN expression in the spinal cord compared to sedentary rats (PNN thickness around motoneurons, exercise=15.75±0.63μm, sedentary=7.98±1.29μm, p<0.01). Conversely, in areas of the brain associated with learning and memory there was a significant reduction in perineuronal net expression (number of neurons with PNN in hippocampus CA1-exercise 21±0.56 and sedentary 24±0.34, p<0.01, thickness-exercised=2.37±0.13μm, sedentary=4.27±0.21μm; p<0.01). Our results suggest that in response to exercise, PNNs are differentially regulated in select regions of the CNS, with a general decreased expression in the brain and increased expression in the lumbar spinal cord. This differential expression may indicate different regulatory mechanisms associated with plasticity in the brain compared to the spinal cord.

  14. Minimally invasive treatment of multilevel spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Maurer, Adrian J; Rabb, Craig H

    2013-01-01

    The use of minimally invasive tubular retractor microsurgery for treatment of multilevel spinal epidural abscess is described. This technique was used in 3 cases, and excellent results were achieved. The authors conclude that multilevel spinal epidural abscesses can be safely and effectively managed using microsurgery via a minimally invasive tubular retractor system.

  15. Functional role of exercise-induced cortical organization of sensorimotor cortex after spinal transection

    PubMed Central

    Kao, T.; Shumsky, J. S.; Knudsen, E. B.; Murray, M.

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord transection silences neuronal activity in the deafferented cortex to cutaneous stimulation of the body and untreated animals show no improvement in functional outcome (weight-supported stepping) with time after lesion. However, adult rats spinalized since neonates that receive exercise therapy exhibit greater functional recovery and exhibit more cortical reorganization. This suggests that the change in the somatotopic organization of the cortex may be functionally relevant. To address this issue, we chronically implanted arrays of microwire electrodes into the infragranular layers of the hindlimb somatosensory cortex of adult rats neonatally transected at T8/T9 that received exercise training (spinalized rats) and of normal adult rats. Multiple, single neuron activity was recorded during passive sensory stimulation, when the animals were anesthetized, and during active sensorimotor stimulation during treadmill-induced locomotion when the animal was awake and free to move. Our results demonstrate that cortical neurons recorded from the spinalized rats that received exercise 1) had higher spontaneous firing rates, 2) were more likely to respond to both sensory and sensorimotor stimulations of the forelimbs, and also 3) responded with more spikes per stimulus than those recorded from normal rats, suggesting expansion of the forelimb map into the hindlimb map. During treadmill locomotion the activity of neurons recorded from neonatally spinalized rats was greater during weight-supported steps on the treadmill compared with the neuronal activity during nonweight supported steps. We hypothesize that this increased activity is related to the ability of the animal to take weight supported steps and that, therefore, these changes in cortical organization after spinal cord injury are relevant for functional recovery. PMID:21865438

  16. Clinical Guideline for Treatment of Symptomatic Thoracic Spinal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong-qiang; Sun, Chui-guo

    2015-08-01

    Thoracic spinal stenosis is a relatively common disorder causing paraplegia in the population of China. Until nowadays, the clinical management of thoracic spinal stenosis is still demanding and challenging with lots of questions remaining to be answered. A clinical guideline for the treatment of symptomatic thoracic spinal stenosis has been created by reaching the consensus of Chinese specialists using the best available evidence as a tool to aid practitioners involved with the care of this disease. In this guideline, many fundamental questions about thoracic spinal stenosis which were controversial have been explained clearly, including the definition of thoracic spinal stenosis, the standard procedure for diagnosing symptomatic thoracic spinal stenosis, indications for surgery, and so on. According to the consensus on the definition of thoracic spinal stenosis, the soft herniation of thoracic discs has been excluded from the pathological factors causing thoracic spinal stenosis. The procedure for diagnosing thoracic spinal stenosis has been quite mature, while the principles for selecting operative procedures remain to be improved. This guideline will be updated on a timely schedule and adhering to its recommendations should not be mandatory because it does not have the force of law.

  17. Current and emerging treatment options for spinal cord ischemia.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Pikija, Slaven; Mutzenbach, J Sebastian; Seidl, Martin; Leis, Stefan; Trinka, Eugen; Sellner, Johann

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord infarction (SCI) is a rare but disabling disorder caused by a wide spectrum of conditions. Given the lack of randomized-controlled trials, contemporary treatment concepts are adapted from guidelines for cerebral ischemia, atherosclerotic vascular disease, and acute traumatic spinal cord injury. In addition, patients with SCI are at risk for several potentially life-threatening but preventable systemic and neurologic complications. Notably, there is emerging evidence from preclinical studies for the use of neuroprotection in acute ischemic injury of the spinal cord. In this review, we discuss the current state of the art for the therapy and prevention of SCI and highlight potential emerging treatment concepts awaiting translational adoption.

  18. Effects of Exercise on Spinal Deformities and Quality of Life in Patients with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad; Abu Shaphe, Md.; Anwar, Dilshad

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This systematic review was conducted to examine the effects of exercise on spinal deformities and quality of life in patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Data Sources. Electronic databases, including PubMed, CINAHL, Embase, Scopus, Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, PEDro, and Web of Science, were searched for research articles published from the earliest available dates up to May 31, 2015, using the key words “exercise,” “postural correction,” “posture,” “postural curve,” “Cobb's angle,” “quality of life,” and “spinal deformities,” combined with the Medical Subject Heading “scoliosis.” Study Selection. This systematic review was restricted to randomized and nonrandomized controlled trials on AIS published in English language. The quality of selected studies was assessed by the PEDro scale, the Cochrane Collaboration's tool, and the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation System (GRADE). Data Extraction. Descriptive data were collected from each study. The outcome measures of interest were Cobb angle, trunk rotation, thoracic kyphosis, lumbar kyphosis, vertebral rotation, and quality of life. Data Synthesis. A total of 30 studies were assessed for eligibility. Six of the 9 selected studies reached high methodological quality on the PEDro scale. Meta-analysis revealed moderate-quality evidence that exercise interventions reduce the Cobb angle, angle of trunk rotation, thoracic kyphosis, and lumbar lordosis and low-quality evidence that exercise interventions reduce average lateral deviation. Meta-analysis revealed moderate-quality evidence that exercise interventions improve the quality of life. Conclusions. A supervised exercise program was superior to controls in reducing spinal deformities and improving the quality of life in patients with AIS. PMID:26583083

  19. Hemodynamic Adaptations to Regular Exercise in People With Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate the real-time cardiovascular response to the progressive overload exercise in different levels of spinal cord injury (SCI), and to find out whether regular exercise has effect on these cardiovascular responses. Methods The study enrolled 8 able-bodied individuals in the control group plus 15 SCI subjects who were divided into two groups by their neurological level of injury: high-level SCI group (T6 or above) and low-level SCI group (T7 or below). Also, subjects were divided into exercise group and non-exercise group by usual exercise habits. We instructed the subjects to perform exercises using arm ergometer according to the protocol and checked plethysmograph for the real time assessment of blood pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output. Results Six subjects were included in high-level SCI group (3 cervical, 3 thoracic injuries), 9 subjects in low-level SCI group (9 thoracic injuries), and 8 able-bodied individuals in control group. During arm ergometer-graded exercise, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was significantly lower in high-level SCI subjects of non-exercise group, compared with high-level SCI subjects of exercise group. In addition, HR was significantly higher in low-level SCI group compared with control group. Conclusion There are significant differences in mean arterial pressure of high-level SCI group according to usual exercise habits. We discovered that even in non-athlete high-level SCI, regular exercise can bring cardiac modulation through blood pressure control. PMID:28289632

  20. Physical therapy treatment time during inpatient spinal cord injury rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Schroeder, Sally; LaBarbera, Jacqueline; McDowell, Shari; Zanca, Jeanne M.; Natale, Audrey; Mumma, Sherry; Gassaway, Julie; Backus, Deborah

    2011-01-01

    Background/objective To describe the nature and distribution of activities during physical therapy (PT) delivered in inpatient spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation and discuss predictors (patient and injury characteristics) of the amount of time spent in PT for specific treatment activities. Methods Six hundred patients from six inpatient SCI centers were enrolled in the SCIRehab study. Physical therapists documented details, including time spent, of treatment provided during 37 306 PT sessions that occurred during inpatient SCI rehabilitation. Ordinary least squares regression models associated patient and injury characteristics with time spent in specific PT activities. Results SCIRehab patients received a mean total of 55.3 hours of PT over the course of their rehabilitation stay. Significant differences among four neurologic groups were seen in the amount of time spent on most activities, including the most common PT activities of strengthening exercises, stretching, transfer training, wheelchair mobility training, and gait training. Most PT work (77%) was provided in individual therapy sessions; the remaining 23% was done in group settings. Patient and injury characteristics explained only some of the variations seen in time spent on wheelchair mobility, transfer and bed mobility training, and range of motion/stretching. Conclusion Analysis yielded both expected and unexpected trends in SCI rehabilitation. Significant variation was seen in time spent on PT activities within and among injury groups. Providing therapeutic strengthening treatments consumed the greatest proportion of PT time. About one-quarter of all PT services were provided in group settings. Details about services provided, including time spent, will serve as a starting point in detailing the optimal treatment delivery for maximal outcomes. PMID:21675354

  1. Cardiovascular Health and Exercise Rehabilitation in Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Warburton, Darren E R; Eng, Janice J; Krassioukov, Andrei; Sproule, Shannon

    2007-01-01

    There appears to be an increased prevalence and earlier onset of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in persons with SCI. Physical inactivity is thought to be a key factor in the increased risk for CVD. Physical inactivity is highly prevalent in persons with SCI and it appears that activities of daily living are not sufficient to maintain cardiovascular fitness and health. This systematic review examines the current literature regarding the risk for CVD and the effectiveness of varied exercise rehabilitation programs in attenuating the risk for CVD in SCI.

  2. Cardiovascular Health and Exercise Rehabilitation in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Warburton, Darren E. R.; Eng, Janice J.; Krassioukov, Andrei; Sproule, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    There appears to be an increased prevalence and earlier onset of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in persons with SCI. Physical inactivity is thought to be a key factor in the increased risk for CVD. Physical inactivity is highly prevalent in persons with SCI and it appears that activities of daily living are not sufficient to maintain cardiovascular fitness and health. This systematic review examines the current literature regarding the risk for CVD and the effectiveness of varied exercise rehabilitation programs in attenuating the risk for CVD in SCI. PMID:22719205

  3. Conservative and Surgical Treatment Improves Pain and Ankle-Brachial Index in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Masaomi; Murata, Yasuaki; Eguchi, Yawara; Aoki, Yasuchika; Ataka, Hiromi; Hirayama, Jiro; Ozawa, Tomoyuki; Morinaga, Tatsuo; Arai, Hajime; Mimura, Masaya; Kamoda, Hiroto; Orita, Sumihisa; Miyagi, Masayuki; Miyashita, Tomohiro; Okamoto, Yuzuru; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Sameda, Hiroaki; Kinoshita, Tomoaki; Hanaoka, Eiji; Suzuki, Miyako; Suzuki, Munetaka; Aihara, Takato; Ito, Toshinori; Inoue, Gen; Yamagata, Masatsune; Toyone, Tomoaki; Kubota, Gou; Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Sainoh, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The pathological mechanism of lumbar spinal stenosis is reduced blood flow in nerve roots and degeneration of nerve roots. Exercise and prostaglandin E1 is used for patients with peripheral arterial disease to increase capillary flow around the main artery and improve symptoms; however, the ankle-brachial index (ABI), an estimation of blood flow in the main artery in the leg, does not change after treatment. Lumbar spinal nerve roots contain somatosensory, somatomotor, and unmyelinated autonomic nerves. Improved blood flow by medication with prostaglandin E1 and decompression surgery in these spinal nerve roots may improve the function of nerve fibers innervating muscle, capillary, and main vessels in the lower leg, resulting in an increased ABI. The purpose of the study was to examine whether these treatments can improve ABI. Materials and Methods One hundred and seven patients who received conservative treatment such as exercise and medication (n=56) or surgical treatment (n=51) were included. Low back pain and leg pain scores, walking distance, and ABI were measured before treatment and after 3 months of conservative treatment alone or surgical treatment followed by conservative treatment. Results Low back pain, leg pain, and walking distance significantly improved after both treatments (p<0.05). ABI significantly increased in each group (p<0.05). Conclusion This is the first investigation of changes in ABI after treatment in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Improvement of the spinal nerve roots by medication and decompression surgery may improve the supply of blood flow to the lower leg in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:23709437

  4. Ankylosing Spondylitis: Patterns of Spinal Injury and Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Yuksel, Kasım Zafer

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective review. Purpose We retrospectively reviewed our patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS) to identify their patterns of spinal fractures to help clarify management strategies and the morbidity and mortality rates associated with this group of patients. Overview of Literature Because of the brittleness of bone and long autofused spinal segments in AS, spinal fractures are common even after minor trauma and often associated with overt instability. Methods Between January 1, 1998 and March 2011, 30 patients (23 males, 7 females; mean age, 70.43 years; range, 45 to 95 years) with the radiographic diagnosis of AS of the spinal column had 42 fractures. Eight patients presented with significant trauma, 17 after falls, and 5 after minor falls or no recorded trauma. Eleven patients presented with a neurological injury, ranging from mild sensory loss to quadriplegia. Results There were 16 compression and 10 transverse fractures, two Jefferson's fractures, one type II and two type III odontoid process fractures, and five fractures of the posterior spinal elements (including lamina and/or facet, three spinous process fractures, three transverse process fractures). Twenty-four fractures affected the craniocervical junction and/or cervical vertebrae, 17 were thoracic, and one involved the lumbar spine. The most affected vertebrae were C6 and T10. The mean follow-up was 29.9 months. One patient was lost to follow-up. Eighteen patients were treated conservatively with bed rest and bracing. Twelve patients underwent surgery for spinal stabilization either with an anterior, posterior or combined approach. Conclusions Nonsurgical treatment can be considered especially in the elderly patients with AS and spinal trauma but without instability or major neurological deficits. The nonfusion rate in conservatively treated patients is low. When treatment is selected for patients with spinal fractures and AS, the pattern of injury must be considered and the need

  5. Biomaterial Design Strategies for the Treatment of Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Straley, Karin S.; Po Foo, Cheryl Wong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The highly debilitating nature of spinal cord injuries has provided much inspiration for the design of novel biomaterials that can stimulate cellular regeneration and functional recovery. Many experts agree that the greatest hope for treatment of spinal cord injuries will involve a combinatorial approach that integrates biomaterial scaffolds, cell transplantation, and molecule delivery. This manuscript presents a comprehensive review of biomaterial-scaffold design strategies currently being applied to the development of nerve guidance channels and hydrogels that more effectively stimulate spinal cord tissue regeneration. To enhance the regenerative capacity of these two scaffold types, researchers are focusing on optimizing the mechanical properties, cell-adhesivity, biodegradability, electrical activity, and topography of synthetic and natural materials, and are developing mechanisms to use these scaffolds to deliver cells and biomolecules. Developing scaffolds that address several of these key design parameters will lead to more successful therapies for the regeneration of spinal cord tissue. PMID:19698073

  6. Paediatric exercise training in prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Pieles, Guido E; Horn, Richard; Williams, Craig A; Stuart, A Graham

    2014-04-01

    Exercise training is an underused intervention in paediatric healthcare. This is surprising, since initial evidence demonstrates its effectiveness and safety; furthermore it confers socioeconomic benefits for healthcare systems. Pilot studies have assessed and confirmed the feasibility of exercise training in many paediatric disease settings. However, more research is needed to understand the pathophysiology, quantify treatment effects and monitor outcomes. A concerted effort from researchers, health professionals and police makers will be necessary to make exercise training an evidence-based and cost-effective intervention in paediatric care.

  7. Role of prostaglandins in spinal transmission of the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrated rats.

    PubMed

    Stone, A J; Copp, S W; Kaufman, M P

    2014-09-26

    Previous studies found that prostaglandins in skeletal muscle play a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex; however the role played by prostaglandins in the spinal transmission of the reflex is not known. We determined, therefore, whether or not spinal blockade of cyclooxygenase (COX) activity and/or spinal blockade of endoperoxide (EP) 2 or 4 receptors attenuated the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrated rats. We first established that intrathecal doses of a non-specific COX inhibitor Ketorolac (100 μg in 10 μl), a COX-2-specific inhibitor Celecoxib (100 μg in 10 μl), an EP2 antagonist PF-04418948 (10 μg in 10 μl), and an EP4 antagonist L-161,982 (4 μg in 10 μl) effectively attenuated the pressor responses to intrathecal injections of arachidonic acid (100 μg in 10 μl), EP2 agonist Butaprost (4 ng in 10 μl), and EP4 agonist TCS 2510 (6.25 μg in 2.5 μl), respectively. Once effective doses were established, we statically contracted the hind limb before and after intrathecal injections of Ketorolac, Celecoxib, the EP2 antagonist and the EP4 antagonist. We found that Ketorolac significantly attenuated the pressor response to static contraction (before Ketorolac: 23 ± 5 mmHg, after Ketorolac 14 ± 5 mmHg; p<0.05) whereas Celecoxib had no effect. We also found that 8 μg of L-161,982, but not 4 μg of L-161,982, significantly attenuated the pressor response to static contraction (before L-161,982: 21 ± 4 mmHg, after L-161,982 12 ± 3 mmHg; p<0.05), whereas PF-04418948 (10 μg) had no effect. We conclude that spinal COX-1, but not COX-2, plays a role in evoking the exercise pressor reflex, and that the spinal prostaglandins produced by this enzyme are most likely activating spinal EP4 receptors, but not EP2 receptors.

  8. Image-guided minimally invasive percutaneous treatment of spinal metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping-Lin; He, Xi-Jing; Li, Hao-Peng; Zang, Quan-Jin; Wang, Guo-Yu

    2017-01-01

    In order to provide effective options for minimally invasive treatment of spinal metastases, the present study retrospectively evaluated the efficacy and safety of image-guided minimally invasive percutaneous treatment of spinal metastases. Image-guided percutaneous vertebral body enhancement, radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and tumor debulking combined with other methods to strengthen the vertebrae were applied dependent on the indications. Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) was used when vertebral body destruction was simple. In addition, RFA was used in cases where pure spinal epidural soft tissue mass or accessories (spinous process, vertebral plate and vertebral pedicle) were destroyed, but vertebral integrity and stability existed. Tumor debulking (also known as limited RFA) combined with vertebral augmentation were used in cases presenting destruction of the epidural soft tissue mass and accessories, and pathological vertebral fractures. A comprehensive assessment was performed through a standardized questionnaire and indicators including biomechanical stability of the spine, quality of life, neurological status and tumor progression status were assessed during the 6 weeks-6 months follow-up following surgery. After the most suitable treatment was used, the biomechanical stability of the spine was increased, the pain caused by spinal metastases within 6 weeks was significantly reduced, while the daily activities and quality of life were improved. The mean progression-free survival of tumors was 330±54 days, and no associated complications occurred. Therefore, the use of a combination of image-guided PVP, RFA and other methods is safe and effective for the treatment of spinal metastases. PMID:28352355

  9. Impact of post-manipulation corrective core exercises on the spinal deformation and lumbar strength in golfers: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Chul-ho; Kim, Minjeong; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined spinal shape in professional golfers with chronic back pain, and analyzed the effects of a 4-week regimen of semi-weekly manipulation and corrective core exercises on spinal shape. [Subjects] Two golfers with chronic back pain. [Methods] The pelvis and spinal vertebrae were corrected using the Thompson “drop” technique. Angle and force were adjusted to place the pelvis, lumbar spine, and thoracic vertebrae in neutral position. The technique was applied twice weekly after muscle massage in the back and pelvic areas. The golfers performed corrective, warmup stretching exercises, followed by squats on an unstable surface using the Togu ball. They then used a gym ball for repetitions of hip rotation, upper trunk extension, sit-ups, and pelvic anterior-posterior, pelvic left-right, and trunk flexion-extension exercises. The session ended with cycling as a cool-down exercise. Each session lasted 60 minutes. [Results] The difference in height was measured on the left and right sides of the pelvic bone. The pelvic tilt changed significantly in both participants after the 4-week program. [Conclusion] In golfers, core muscles are critical and are closely related to spinal deformation. Core strengthening and spinal correction play a pivotal role in the correction of spinal deformation. PMID:26504350

  10. Impact of post-manipulation corrective core exercises on the spinal deformation and lumbar strength in golfers: a case study.

    PubMed

    Shin, Chul-Ho; Kim, Minjeong; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study examined spinal shape in professional golfers with chronic back pain, and analyzed the effects of a 4-week regimen of semi-weekly manipulation and corrective core exercises on spinal shape. [Subjects] Two golfers with chronic back pain. [Methods] The pelvis and spinal vertebrae were corrected using the Thompson "drop" technique. Angle and force were adjusted to place the pelvis, lumbar spine, and thoracic vertebrae in neutral position. The technique was applied twice weekly after muscle massage in the back and pelvic areas. The golfers performed corrective, warmup stretching exercises, followed by squats on an unstable surface using the Togu ball. They then used a gym ball for repetitions of hip rotation, upper trunk extension, sit-ups, and pelvic anterior-posterior, pelvic left-right, and trunk flexion-extension exercises. The session ended with cycling as a cool-down exercise. Each session lasted 60 minutes. [Results] The difference in height was measured on the left and right sides of the pelvic bone. The pelvic tilt changed significantly in both participants after the 4-week program. [Conclusion] In golfers, core muscles are critical and are closely related to spinal deformation. Core strengthening and spinal correction play a pivotal role in the correction of spinal deformation.

  11. Effect of unilateral exercise on spinal and pelvic deformities, and isokinetic trunk muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Kim, Soonyoung

    2016-03-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to collect basic data regarding the prevention of spinal and pelvic deformities by investigating the spinal shape and muscular function characteristics of imbalance reduction and functional improvement following asymmetric activities. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 14 archery athletes who mostly perform unilateral motion with spinal and pelvic pain, and 19 healthy subjects. All the participants were evaluated using spinal structure analysis and for 60°/sec isokinetic muscular strength of the trunk. [Results] Between the two groups, there were significant differences in the interaction effect of trunk inclination deformities, and flexor and extensor 60°/sec isokinetic muscular strength of the trunk. Also, the main effects of gender comparison showed significant differences in the trunk inclination deformities, pelvic rotation deformities, lordosis angles, and flexor and extensor 60 ˚/sec isokinetic muscular strengths of the trunk. [Conclusion] The basic data obtained in this study can be used to help develop a strategic exercise program for improving unilateral movement and malalignment of the spine and pelvis.

  12. Effect of unilateral exercise on spinal and pelvic deformities, and isokinetic trunk muscle strength

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Kim, Soonyoung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to collect basic data regarding the prevention of spinal and pelvic deformities by investigating the spinal shape and muscular function characteristics of imbalance reduction and functional improvement following asymmetric activities. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 14 archery athletes who mostly perform unilateral motion with spinal and pelvic pain, and 19 healthy subjects. All the participants were evaluated using spinal structure analysis and for 60°/sec isokinetic muscular strength of the trunk. [Results] Between the two groups, there were significant differences in the interaction effect of trunk inclination deformities, and flexor and extensor 60°/sec isokinetic muscular strength of the trunk. Also, the main effects of gender comparison showed significant differences in the trunk inclination deformities, pelvic rotation deformities, lordosis angles, and flexor and extensor 60 ˚/sec isokinetic muscular strengths of the trunk. [Conclusion] The basic data obtained in this study can be used to help develop a strategic exercise program for improving unilateral movement and malalignment of the spine and pelvis. PMID:27134369

  13. Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Treatment of Spinal Metastases Recurring in Close Proximity to Previously Irradiated Spinal Cord

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Clara Y.H.; Adler, John R.; Gibbs, Iris C.; Chang, Steven D.; Jackson, Paul S.; Minn, A. Yuriko; Lieberson, Robert E.; Soltys, Scott G.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: As the spinal cord tolerance often precludes reirradiation with conventional techniques, local recurrence within a previously irradiated field presents a treatment challenge. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 51 lesions in 42 patients treated from 2002 to 2008 whose spinal metastases recurred in a previous radiation field (median previous spinal cord dose of 40 Gy) and were subsequently treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). Results: SRS was delivered to a median marginal dose of 20 Gy (range, 10-30 Gy) in 1-5 fractions (median, 2), targeting a median tumor volume of 10.3 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.2-128.6 cm{sup 3}). Converting the SRS regimens with the linear quadratic model ({alpha}/{beta} = 3), the median spinal cord maximum single-session equivalent dose (SSED) was 12.1 Gy{sub 3} (range, 4.7-19.3 Gy{sub 3}). With a median follow-up of 7 months (range, 2-47 months), the Kaplan-Meier local control and overall survival rates at 6/12 months were 87%/73% and 81%/68%, respectively. A time to retreatment of {<=}12 months and the combination of time to retreatment of {<=}12 months with an SSED of <15 Gy{sub 10} were significant predictors of local failure on univariate and multivariate analyses. In patients with a retreatment interval of <12 months, 6/12 month local control rates were 88%/58%, with a SSED of >15 Gy{sub 10}, compared to 45%/0% with <15 Gy{sub 10}, respectively. One patient (2%) experienced Grade 4 neurotoxicity. Conclusion: SRS is safe and effective in the treatment of spinal metastases recurring in previously irradiated fields. Tumor recurrence within 12 months may correlate with biologic aggressiveness and require higher SRS doses (SSED >15 Gy{sub 10}). Further research is needed to define the partial volume retreatment tolerance of the spinal cord and the optimal target dose.

  14. Passive Exercise of the Hind Limbs after Complete Thoracic Transection of the Spinal Cord Promotes Cortical Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Eric B.; Shumsky, Jed; Moxon, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Physical exercise promotes neural plasticity in the brain of healthy subjects and modulates pathophysiological neural plasticity after sensorimotor loss, but the mechanisms of this action are not fully understood. After spinal cord injury, cortical reorganization can be maximized by exercising the non-affected body or the residual functions of the affected body. However, exercise per se also produces systemic changes – such as increased cardiovascular fitness, improved circulation and neuroendocrine changes – that have a great impact on brain function and plasticity. It is therefore possible that passive exercise therapies typically applied below the level of the lesion in patients with spinal cord injury could put the brain in a more plastic state and promote cortical reorganization. To directly test this hypothesis, we applied passive hindlimb bike exercise after complete thoracic transection of the spinal cord in adult rats. Using western blot analysis, we found that the level of proteins associated with plasticity – specifically ADCY1 and BDNF – increased in the somatosensory cortex of transected animals that received passive bike exercise compared to transected animals that received sham exercise. Using electrophysiological techniques, we then verified that neurons in the deafferented hindlimb cortex increased their responsiveness to tactile stimuli delivered to the forelimb in transected animals that received passive bike exercise compared to transected animals that received sham exercise. Passive exercise below the level of the lesion, therefore, promotes cortical reorganization after spinal cord injury, uncovering a brain-body interaction that does not rely on intact sensorimotor pathways connecting the exercised body parts and the brain. PMID:23349859

  15. Cardiovascular responses to arm static exercise in men with thoracic spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Keiko; Nakamura, Takeshi; Umemoto, Yasunori; Koike, Yumi; Sasaki, Yusuke; Tajima, Fumihiro

    2012-02-01

    Isometric muscle contraction (static exercise) induces circulatory response. Static exercise in individuals with thoracic spinal cord injury (TSCI) induces cardiovascular response and blood redistribution to the non-exercising muscles. The aim of our study was to determine the circulatory response during arm static exercise in individuals with TSCI and able-bodied (AB) controls. Mean blood pressure (MBP), heart rate (HR), cardiac output (CO), leg skin blood flow (SBF), and leg muscle blood flow (MBF) were recorded noninvasively, total peripheral resistance (TPR) was estimated by dividing MBP by CO, and hormonal changes were measured before, during and after static 35% maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the arm flexor muscles in seven male individuals with TSCI (T7-T11) and seven age-comparable AB control (32.2 ± 7.6 and 31.0 ± 4.7 years, respectively). The 35% MVC was similar in TSCI and AB individuals (107.3 ± 28.2 and 101.0 ± 22.5 N, respectively). HR, CO, MBP, TPR, SBF and MBF increased in both groups during arm static exercise. Plasma epinephrine concentration increased during arm static exercise in AB controls only (P < 0.05). Circulation to leg muscles was similar in TSCI and AB individuals and the lack of sympathetic vasoconstriction in the paralyzed leg area did not alter the cardiovascular responses during 35% MVC of arm static exercise. We conclude that sympathetic vasoconstriction in the resting leg area did not contribute to the pressor reflex during 35% MVC of arm static exercise.

  16. A randomized controlled trial of exercise in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shrader, Joseph A; Kats, Ilona; Kokkinis, Angela; Zampieri, Cris; Levy, Ellen; Joe, Galen O; Woolstenhulme, Joshua G; Drinkard, Bart E; Smith, Michaele R; Ching, Willie; Ghosh, Laboni; Fox, Derrick; Auh, Sungyoung; Schindler, Alice B; Fischbeck, Kenneth H; Grunseich, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the safety and efficacy of a home-based functional exercise program in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). Methods Subjects were randomly assigned to participate in 12 weeks of either functional exercises (intervention) or a stretching program (control) at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD. A total of 54 subjects enrolled, and 50 completed the study with 24 in the functional exercise group and 26 in the stretching control group. The primary outcome measure was the Adult Myopathy Assessment Tool (AMAT) total score, and secondary measures included total activity by accelerometry, muscle strength, balance, timed up and go, sit-to-stand test, health-related quality of life, creatine kinase, and insulin-like growth factor-1. Results Functional exercise was well tolerated but did not lead to significant group differences in the primary outcome measure or any of the secondary measures. The functional exercise did not produce significantly more adverse events than stretching, and was not perceived to be difficult. To determine whether a subset of the subjects may have benefited, we divided them into high and low functioning based on baseline AMAT scores and performed a post hoc subgroup analysis. Low-functioning individuals receiving the intervention increased AMAT functional subscale scores compared to the control group. Interpretation Although these trial results indicate that functional exercise had no significant effect on total AMAT scores or on mobility, strength, balance, and quality of life, post hoc findings indicate that low-functioning men with SBMA may respond better to functional exercises, and this warrants further investigation with appropriate exercise intensity. PMID:26273686

  17. Effects of aquatic exercise on physical function and fitness among people with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunxiao; Khoo, Selina; Adnan, Athirah

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The aim of this review is to synthesize the evidence on the effects of aquatic exercise interventions on physical function and fitness among people with spinal cord injury. Data source: Six major databases were searched from inception till June 2015: MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsychInfo, SPORTDiscus, and Cochrane Center Register of Controlled Trials. Study appraisal and synthesis methods: Two reviewers independently rated methodological quality using the modified Downs and Black Scale and extracted and synthesized key findings (i.e., participant characteristics, study design, physical function and fitness outcomes, and adverse events). Results: Eight of 276 studies met the inclusion criteria, of which none showed high research quality. Four studies assessed physical function outcomes and 4 studies evaluated aerobic fitness as outcome measures. Significant improvements on these 2 outcomes were generally found. Other physical or fitness outcomes including body composition, muscular strength, and balance were rarely reported. Conclusions and implications of key findings: There is weak evidence supporting aquatic exercise training to improve physical function and aerobic fitness among adults with spinal cord injury. Suggestions for future research include reporting details of exercise interventions, evaluating other physical or fitness outcomes, and improving methodological quality. PMID:28296754

  18. Lumbar spinal stenosis: clinical/radiologic therapeutic evaluation in 145 patients. Conservative treatment or surgical intervention?

    PubMed

    Onel, D; Sari, H; Dönmez, C

    1993-02-01

    In this prospective study, 145 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis were evaluated for clinical signs and radiologic findings and conservative treatment results. Clinical parameters such as pain on motion, lumbar range of motion, straight leg raising test, deep tendon reflexes, dermatomal sensations, motor functions and neurogenic claudication distances were assessed at admission and were compared after a conservative treatment program was completed. A conservative treatment program consisted of physical therapy (infrared heating, ultrasonic diathermy and active lumbar exercises) and salmon calcitonin. Pain on motion (100%), restriction of extension (77%), limited straight leg raising test (23%), neurogenic claudication (100%), dermatomal sensory impairment (47%), motor deficit (29%), and reflex deficit (40%) were observed in the patients. All aforementioned disturbances except reflex deficits improved by the conservative treatment and results were statistically significant. The authors conclude that this conservative treatment should be the treatment of choice in elderly patients and in those patients without clinical surgical indications.

  19. Exercise training as treatment in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Lira, Fábio Santos; Neto, José Cesar Rosa; Seelaender, Marília

    2014-06-01

    Cachexia is a wasting syndrome that may accompany a plethora of diseases, including cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, aids, and rheumatoid arthritis. It is associated with central and systemic increases of pro-inflammatory factors, and with decreased quality of life, response to pharmacological treatment, and survival. At the moment, there is no single therapy able to reverse cachexia many symptoms, which include disruption of intermediary metabolism, endocrine dysfunction, compromised hypothalamic appetite control, and impaired immune function, among other. Growing evidence, nevertheless, shows that chronic exercise, employed as a tool to counteract systemic inflammation, may represent a low-cost, safe alternative for the prevention/attenuation of cancer cachexia. Despite the well-documented capacity of chronic exercise to counteract sustained disease-related inflammation, few studies address the effect of exercise training in cancer cachexia. The aim of the present review was hence to discuss the results of cachexia treatment with endurance training. As opposed to resistance exercise, endurance exercise may be performed devoid of equipment, is well tolerated by patients, and an anti-inflammatory effect may be observed even at low-intensity. The decrease in inflammatory status induced by endurance protocols is paralleled by recovery of various metabolic pathways. The mechanisms underlying the response to the treatment are considered.

  20. Impact of exercise training on oxidative stress in individuals with a spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    van Duijnhoven, Noortje; Hesse, Evelyne; Janssen, Thomas; Wodzig, Will; Scheffer, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI) have an increased cardiovascular risk. We hypothesize that (anti)oxidative imbalance is associated with the increased cardiovascular risk in SCI, while exercise can reverse this status. The aim of the study is to compare baseline levels of oxidative stress and antioxidative capacity between individuals with SCI and able-bodied (AB) subjects, and to assess acute and long-term effects of functional electrical stimulation (FES) exercise on oxidative stress and antioxidative capacity in SCI. Venous blood was taken from subjects with an SCI (n = 9) and age- and gender-matched AB subjects (n = 9) to examine oxidative stress through malondialdehyde (MDA) levels, while superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) enzyme levels represented anti-oxidative capacity. Subsequently, subjects with an SCI performed an 8-week FES exercise training period. Blood was taken before and after the first exercise bout and after the last FES session to examine the acute and chronic effect of FES exercise, respectively. Baseline levels of MDA, SOD and GPx were not different between individuals with SCI and AB subjects. SCI demonstrated a correlation between initial fitness level and MDA (R = −0.83, P = 0.05). MDA, SOD and GPx levels were neither altered by a single FES exercise bout nor by 8 weeks FES training. In conclusion, although individuals with an SCI demonstrate a preserved (anti)oxidative status, the correlation between fitness level and (anti)oxidative balance suggests that higher fitness levels are related to improved (anti)oxidative status in SCI. Nonetheless, the FES exercise stimulus was insufficient to acutely or chronically change (anti)oxidative status in individuals with an SCI. PMID:20364349

  1. Acute exercise prevents the development of neuropathic pain and the sprouting of non-peptidergic (GDNF- and artemin-responsive) c-fibers after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Detloff, Megan Ryan; Smith, Evan J; Quiros Molina, Daniel; Ganzer, Patrick D; Houlé, John D

    2014-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) impaired sensory fiber transmission leads to chronic, debilitating neuropathic pain. Sensory afferents are responsive to neurotrophic factors, molecules that are known to promote survival and maintenance of neurons, and regulate sensory neuron transduction of peripheral stimuli. A subset of primary afferent fibers responds only to the glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family of ligands (GFLs) and is non-peptidergic. In peripheral nerve injury models, restoration of GDNF or artemin (another GFL) to pre-injury levels within the spinal cord attenuates neuropathic pain. One non-invasive approach to increase the levels of GFLs in the spinal cord is through exercise (Ex), and to date exercise training is the only ameliorative, non-pharmacological treatment for SCI-induced neuropathic pain. The purpose of this study was 3-fold: 1) to determine whether exercise affects the onset of SCI-induced neuropathic pain; 2) to examine the temporal profile of GDNF and artemin in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord dorsal horn regions associated with forepaw dermatomes after SCI and Ex; and 3) to characterize GFL-responsive sensory fiber plasticity after SCI and Ex. Adult, female, Sprague-Dawley rats received a moderate, unilateral spinal cord contusion at C5. A subset of rats was exercised (SCI+Ex) on automated running wheels for 20min, 5days/week starting at 5days post-injury (dpi), continuing until 9 or 37dpi. Hargreaves' and von Frey testing was performed preoperatively and weekly post-SCI. Forty-two percent of rats in the unexercised group exhibited tactile allodynia of the forepaws while the other 58% retained normal sensation. The development of SCI-induced neuropathic pain correlated with a marked decrease in the levels of GDNF and artemin in the spinal cord and DRGs. Additionally, a dramatic increase in the density and the distribution throughout the dorsal horn of GFL-responsive afferents was observed in rats with SCI

  2. Acute exercise prevents the development of neuropathic pain and the sprouting of non-peptidergic (GDNF- and artemin-responsive) c-fibers after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Detloff, Megan Ryan; Smith, Evan J.; Molina, Daniel Quiros; Ganzer, Patrick D.; Houlé, John D

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) impaired sensory fiber transmission leads to chronic, debilitating neuropathic pain. Sensory afferents are responsive to neurotrophic factors, molecules that are known to promote survival and maintenance of neurons, and regulate sensory neuron transduction of peripheral stimuli. A subset of primary afferent fibers responds only to the glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family of ligands (GFLs) and are non-peptidergic. In peripheral nerve injury models, restoration of GDNF or artemin (another GFL) to pre-injury levels within the spinal cord attenuates neuropathic pain. One noninvasive approach to increase the levels of GFLs in the spinal cord is through exercise (Ex), and to date exercise training is the only ameliorative, nonpharmacological treatment for SCI-induced neuropathic pain. The purpose of this study was three fold: 1) to determine whether exercise affects the onset of SCI-induced neuropathic pain; 2) to examine the temporal profile of GDNF and artemin in the dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord dorsal horn regions associated with forepaw dermatomes after SCI and Ex; and 3) to characterize GFL-responsive sensory fiber plasticity after SCI and Ex. Adult, female, Sprague-Dawley rats received a moderate, unilateral spinal cord contusion at C5. A subset of rats was exercised (SCI+Ex) on automated running wheels for 20 minutes, 5d/week starting at 5 days post injury (dpi), continuing until 9 or 37 dpi. Hargreaves' and von Frey testing was performed preoperatively and weekly post SCI. Forty-two percent of rats in the unexercised group exhibited tactile allodynia of the forepaws while the other 58% retained normal sensation. The development of SCI-induced neuropathic pain correlated with a marked decrease in the levels of GDNF and artemin in the spinal cord and DRGs. Additionally, a dramatic increase in the density and the distribution throughout the dorsal horn of GFL-responsive afferents was observed in rats with SCI

  3. Human spinal cord injury: new and emerging approaches to treatment.

    PubMed

    Johnston, L

    2001-11-01

    The World Health Organization together with the Iceland Ministry of Health and Social Security sponsored a conference entitled 'Human Spinal Cord Injury: New and Emerging Approaches to Treatment' held on May 31-June 2, 2001 in Reykjavik, Iceland. To help catalyze the development of new paradigms to address spinal cord injury, the conference's overall goal was to bring in a diversity of perspectives, ranging from state-of-the-art stem cell biology to the ancient wisdom of Eastern Medicine. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the presentations of the conference's 26 speakers.

  4. The effects of exercise on the GAP-43 expression in the spinal cord of arthritis-induced rats

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo-Jin; Jung, Nam-Jin; Na, Sang-Su

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of exercise on the recovery of spinal cord nerve cells damaged due to pain signals which are a major symptom of osteoarthritis. [Subjects and Methods] Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=40) were used and induction of osteoarthritis by monosodium iodoacetate. Injected rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: Sham control group without MIA injection (SG), control group with injected MIA (CG), OA without exercise (NEG), OA with exercise (EG). Sham control group was injected normal cell line instead of MIA. The exercise group was submitted to 4-week training program on a treadmill for 5 days/week, 30 min/day, 16 m/min velocity, then spinal cord were removed and measured the GAP-43 expression by immunohistochemistry analysis. [Results] In this study, a results of measuring the expression of GAP-43. GAP-43 was observed in all groups, showed that the significant difference in each group. [Conclusion] It could be seen that exercise increased the GAP-43 expression in the spinal cord to promote the recovery of spinal cord nerve cells damaged due to chronic osteoarthritis. PMID:27821962

  5. Surgical treatment for bacterial meningitis after spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li-Min; Ren, Liang; Zhao, Zhen-Qi; Zhao, Yan-Rui; Zheng, Yin-Feng; Zhou, Jun-Lin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Bacterial meningitis (BM) has been recognized as a rare complication of spinal surgery. However, there are few reports on the management of postoperative BM in patients who have undergone spinal surgery. The initial approach to the treatment of patients suspected with acute BM depends on the stage at which the syndrome is recognized, the speed of the diagnostic evaluation, and the need for antimicrobial and adjunctive therapy. Patient concerns: Here, we report the case of a patient with lumbar spinal stenosis and underwent a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion at L4–L5. The dura mater was damaged intraoperatively. After the surgery, the patient displayed dizziness and vomiting. A CSF culture revealed Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. Diagnoses: The patient was diagnosed with postoperative BM. Interventions: Antibiotic was administered intravenously depends on the organism isolated. Nevertheless, the patient's clinical condition continued to deteriorate. The patient underwent 2 open revision surgeries for dural lacerations and cyst debridement repair. Outcomes: The patient's mental status returned to normal and her headaches diminished. The patient did not have fever and the infection healed. Lessons: Surgical intervention is an effective method to treat BM after spinal operation in cases where conservative treatments have failed. Further, early surgical repair of dural lacerations and cyst debridement can be a treatment option for selected BM patients with complications including pseudomeningocele, wound infection, or cerebrospinal fluid leakage. PMID:28296723

  6. Spinal muscular atrophy: development and implementation of potential treatments.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W David; Burghes, Arthur H M

    2013-09-01

    In neurodegenerative disorders, effective treatments are urgently needed, along with methods to determine whether treatment worked. In this review, we discuss the rapid progress in the understanding of recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy and how this is leading to exciting potential treatments of the disease. Spinal muscular atrophy is caused by loss of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and reduced levels of SMN protein. The critical downstream targets of SMN deficiency that result in motor neuron loss are not known. However, increasing SMN levels has a marked impact in mouse models, and these therapeutics are rapidly moving toward clinical trials. Promising preclinical therapies, the varying degree of impact on the mouse models, and potential measures of treatment effect are reviewed. One key issue discussed is the variable outcome of increasing SMN at different stages of disease progression.

  7. Diabetes mellitus and spinal epidural abscess: clinical or surgical treatment?

    PubMed

    Felício, João S; Martins, Carlliane Lins P; Liberman, Bernardo

    2011-12-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is an uncommon condition and its most important predisposing factor is diabetes mellitus. Although the treatment of choice is prompt surgical abscess evacuation, followed by antibiotic therapy, successful conservative treatment of SEA has been reported in some cases. We describe a SEA case in a 23-year old white woman with diabetes for 14 years, who was successfully treated only with antibiotics, and achieved full recovery at the fourth month of follow-up.

  8. Effects of passive pedaling exercise on the intracortical inhibition in subjects with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nardone, Raffaele; Langthaler, Patrick B; Bathke, Arne C; Höller, Yvonne; Brigo, Francesco; Lochner, Piergiorgio; Christova, Monica; Trinka, Eugen

    2016-06-01

    Cortical reorganization can be induced by exercise below the level of the lesion after spinal cord injury (SCI). The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of passive and active pedaling exercise on leg motor cortical area excitability of subjects with traumatic SCI. Ten subjects with chronic cervical or thoracic SCI were enrolled in the study. We found a significant effect of pedaling on short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI), which did not interact with the experimental condition (active vs. passive). This corresponded to a significant reduction of SICI in the subjects with SCI, together with no evidence that this pattern differed for passive vs. active pedaling. We found no significant effect of pedaling on intracortical facilitation. Our results showed that also passive cycling may be beneficial in activating motor cortical regions and possibly also facilitating motor recovery after SCI. The present study confirms and extends the findings of previous studies that have observed task-specific cortical activation during passive pedaling. Therefore passive exercise therapies when applied below the level of the lesion in subjects with SCI could promote cortical neuroplastic reorganization.

  9. Strategies for Rapid Muscle Fatigue Reduction during FES Exercise in Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ibitoye, Morufu Olusola; Hamzaid, Nur Azah; Hasnan, Nazirah; Abdul Wahab, Ahmad Khairi; Davis, Glen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid muscle fatigue during functional electrical stimulation (FES)-evoked muscle contractions in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) is a significant limitation to attaining health benefits of FES-exercise. Delaying the onset of muscle fatigue is often cited as an important goal linked to FES clinical efficacy. Although the basic concept of fatigue-resistance has a long history, recent advances in biomedical engineering, physiotherapy and clinical exercise science have achieved improved clinical benefits, especially for reducing muscle fatigue during FES-exercise. This review evaluated the methodological quality of strategies underlying muscle fatigue-resistance that have been used to optimize FES therapeutic approaches. The review also sought to synthesize the effectiveness of these strategies for persons with SCI in order to establish their functional impacts and clinical relevance. Methods Published scientific literature pertaining to the reduction of FES-induced muscle fatigue was identified through searches of the following databases: Science Direct, Medline, IEEE Xplore, SpringerLink, PubMed and Nature, from the earliest returned record until June 2015. Titles and abstracts were screened to obtain 35 studies that met the inclusion criteria for this systematic review. Results Following the evaluation of methodological quality (mean (SD), 50 (6) %) of the reviewed studies using the Downs and Black scale, the largest treatment effects reported to reduce muscle fatigue mainly investigated isometric contractions of limited functional and clinical relevance (n = 28). Some investigations (n = 13) lacked randomisation, while others were characterised by small sample sizes with low statistical power. Nevertheless, the clinical significance of emerging trends to improve fatigue-resistance during FES included (i) optimizing electrode positioning, (ii) fine-tuning of stimulation patterns and other FES parameters, (iii) adjustments to the mode and

  10. Nanomedicine strategies for treatment of secondary spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    White-Schenk, Désirée; Shi, Riyi; Leary, James F

    2015-01-01

    Neurological injury, such as spinal cord injury, has a secondary injury associated with it. The secondary injury results from the biological cascade after the primary injury and affects previous uninjured, healthy tissue. Therefore, the mitigation of such a cascade would benefit patients suffering a primary injury and allow the body to recover more quickly. Unfortunately, the delivery of effective therapeutics is quite limited. Due to the inefficient delivery of therapeutic drugs, nanoparticles have become a major field of exploration for medical applications. Based on their material properties, they can help treat disease by delivering drugs to specific tissues, enhancing detection methods, or a mixture of both. Incorporating nanomedicine into the treatment of neuronal injury and disease would likely push nanomedicine into a new light. This review highlights the various pathological issues involved in secondary spinal cord injury, current treatment options, and the improvements that could be made using a nanomedical approach. PMID:25673988

  11. Fertility treatment in spinal cord injury and other neurologic disease

    PubMed Central

    Trofimenko, Vera

    2016-01-01

    Infertility in individuals with neurologic disorders is complex in etiology and manifestation. Its management therefore often requires a multimodal approach. This review addresses the implications of spinal cord injury (SCI) and other neurologic disease on fertility, including the high prevalence of sexual dysfunction, ejaculation disorders and compromised semen parameters. Available treatment approaches discussed include assisted ejaculation techniques and assisted reproductive technology including surgical sperm retrieval and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). PMID:26904416

  12. Fertility treatment in spinal cord injury and other neurologic disease.

    PubMed

    Trofimenko, Vera; Hotaling, James M

    2016-02-01

    Infertility in individuals with neurologic disorders is complex in etiology and manifestation. Its management therefore often requires a multimodal approach. This review addresses the implications of spinal cord injury (SCI) and other neurologic disease on fertility, including the high prevalence of sexual dysfunction, ejaculation disorders and compromised semen parameters. Available treatment approaches discussed include assisted ejaculation techniques and assisted reproductive technology including surgical sperm retrieval and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI).

  13. Correction of camptocormia using a cruciform anterior spinal hyperextension brace and back extensor strengthening exercise in a patient with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Ye, Byung Kook; Kim, Hyoung-Seop; Kim, Yong Wook

    2015-02-01

    Parkinson disease, one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases, is characterized by cardinal motor features including bradykinesia, rigidity, resting tremor, postural instability, freezing gait, and fatigue. Of these, postural instability in the form of hyperflexion of the thoracolumbar spine upon standing and walking that disappears on recumbent positioning is called camptocormia. Many different trials have been conducted on the treatment of camptocormia, including physiotherapy, corsets, medications, and deep brain stimulation. However, there is insufficient evidence as to which treatment modality is the most valid in terms of effectiveness, cost, safety, and patient satisfaction. In this study, we present a patient whose symptom of camptocormia was effectively resolved using a cruciform anterior spinal hyperextension (CASH) brace and back extensor strengthening exercise which was modified through follow-ups based on a short-term outpatient setting for proper application with minimal discomfort. The patient was satisfied with the amount of correction provided by the brace and exercise.

  14. Meaningful Components of Exercise and Active Recreation for Spinal Cord Injuries.

    PubMed

    Luchauer, Bryna; Shurtleff, Timothy

    2015-10-01

    This qualitative study used focus groups to identify meaningful components of exercise and active recreation (E/AR) related to consistent participation for those with spinal cord injury (SCI). Transcripts from each focus group were analyzed with classical content analysis, grounded theory coding, and meaning condensation using the International Classification of Function, Disability and Health (ICF). Variables within each of the ICF domains (body structures and functions, activities/participation, and environment) were indicated as meaningful components leading to increased participation, independence, and reasons why people consistently participated in E/AR. Occupational therapists can utilize these components to implement therapeutic intervisions, which provide clients with a sense of purpose and being, thus improving outcomes in meaningful occupations.

  15. Effect of abdominal binding on respiratory mechanics during exercise in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    West, Christopher R.; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L.; Campbell, Ian G.

    2014-01-01

    We asked whether elastic binding of the abdomen influences respiratory mechanics during wheelchair propulsion in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Eight Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) performed submaximal and maximal incremental exercise tests on a treadmill, both with and without abdominal binding. Measurements included pulmonary function, pressure-derived indices of respiratory mechanics, operating lung volumes, tidal flow-volume data, gas exchange, blood lactate, and symptoms. Residual volume and functional residual capacity were reduced with binding (77 ± 18 and 81 ± 11% of unbound, P < 0.05), vital capacity was increased (114 ± 9%, P < 0.05), whereas total lung capacity was relatively well preserved (99 ± 5%). During exercise, binding introduced a passive increase in transdiaphragmatic pressure, due primarily to an increase in gastric pressure. Active pressures during inspiration were similar across conditions. A sudden, sustained rise in operating lung volumes was evident in the unbound condition, and these volumes were shifted downward with binding. Expiratory flow limitation did not occur in any subject and there was substantial reserve to increase flow and volume in both conditions. V̇o2 was elevated with binding during the final stages of exercise (8–12%, P < 0.05), whereas blood lactate concentration was reduced (16–19%, P < 0.05). V̇o2/heart rate slopes were less steep with binding (62 ± 35 vs. 47 ± 24 ml/beat, P < 0.05). Ventilation, symptoms, and work rates were similar across conditions. The results suggest that abdominal binding shifts tidal breathing to lower lung volumes without influencing flow limitation, symptoms, or exercise tolerance. Changes in respiratory mechanics with binding may benefit O2 transport capacity by an improvement in central circulatory function. PMID:24855136

  16. Effect of abdominal binding on respiratory mechanics during exercise in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    West, Christopher R; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L; Campbell, Ian G; Romer, Lee M

    2014-07-01

    We asked whether elastic binding of the abdomen influences respiratory mechanics during wheelchair propulsion in athletes with cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Eight Paralympic wheelchair rugby players with motor-complete SCI (C5-C7) performed submaximal and maximal incremental exercise tests on a treadmill, both with and without abdominal binding. Measurements included pulmonary function, pressure-derived indices of respiratory mechanics, operating lung volumes, tidal flow-volume data, gas exchange, blood lactate, and symptoms. Residual volume and functional residual capacity were reduced with binding (77 ± 18 and 81 ± 11% of unbound, P < 0.05), vital capacity was increased (114 ± 9%, P < 0.05), whereas total lung capacity was relatively well preserved (99 ± 5%). During exercise, binding introduced a passive increase in transdiaphragmatic pressure, due primarily to an increase in gastric pressure. Active pressures during inspiration were similar across conditions. A sudden, sustained rise in operating lung volumes was evident in the unbound condition, and these volumes were shifted downward with binding. Expiratory flow limitation did not occur in any subject and there was substantial reserve to increase flow and volume in both conditions. V̇o2 was elevated with binding during the final stages of exercise (8-12%, P < 0.05), whereas blood lactate concentration was reduced (16-19%, P < 0.05). V̇o2/heart rate slopes were less steep with binding (62 ± 35 vs. 47 ± 24 ml/beat, P < 0.05). Ventilation, symptoms, and work rates were similar across conditions. The results suggest that abdominal binding shifts tidal breathing to lower lung volumes without influencing flow limitation, symptoms, or exercise tolerance. Changes in respiratory mechanics with binding may benefit O2 transport capacity by an improvement in central circulatory function.

  17. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-24

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  18. Effect of Surgical Curve Correction on Exercise Tolerance and Physical Capacities in Patients of Severe Spinal Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Rathod, Ashok K; Borde, Mandar; Singh, Vishwajeet; Singh, Hemant U

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Traditionally, surgical intervention for patients with a spinal deformity has been considered for cosmetic benefits, but surgical intervention can alter the lung physiology or volumes and in turn leads to increase in physical capacity and exercise tolerance. Therefore, we conducted this to determine whether a surgical correction would restore the lung physiology, physical capacity and exercise tolerance in patients with kyphoscoliosis. Aim To evaluate the usage of six-minute walk test scores and modified Borg scores as tools/measures for exercise tolerance in patients with spinal deformity and to study the effects of surgical correction of spinal deformity on exercise tolerance with above parameters as the measures. Materials and Methods Thirty patients with spinal deformity, who had undergone surgery for deformity correction, were evaluated. All patients were investigated pre-operatively with x-rays of the spine (anteroposterior and lateral views). Clinical tests like breath holding time (after full inspiration) in number of seconds, modified Borg scores, six-minute walk test scores (heart rate, respiratory rate, maximum distance walked); were recorded as measures of exercise tolerance. The patients were followed up on the first, third, sixth and twelfth month post-operatively and tested clinically for breath holding time, modified Borg scores, six-minute walk test scores (heart rate, respiratory rate, maximum distance walked) and x-rays of the spine (anteroposterior and lateral views). Results In our study, breath holding time (p-value = 0.001) and modified Borg scores (p-value = 0.012) showed a significant improvement at 12 months post-operatively. We noted similar findings with heart rate, respiratory rate and maximum distance walked after a six-minute walk test. Improvements were noted in all the parameters, especially in the group of patients with greater than 60 degrees of cobb angle. However, the differences between the two groups (pre

  19. Menstrual state and exercise as determinants of spinal trabecular bone density in female athletes.

    PubMed Central

    Wolman, R L; Clark, P; McNally, E; Harries, M; Reeve, J

    1990-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study the effects of amenorrhoea and intensive back exercise on the bone mineral density of the lumbar spine in female athletes. DESIGN--Cross sectional study comparing amenorrhoeic with eumenorrhoeic athletes and rowers with non-rowers. SETTING--The British Olympic Medical Centre, Northwick Park Hospital. PATIENTS--46 Elite female athletes comprising 19 rowers, 18 runners, and nine dancers, of whom 25 were amenorrhoeic and 21 eumenorrhoeic. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Trabecular bone mineral density of the lumbar spine measured by computed tomography. RESULTS--Mean trabecular bone mineral density was 42 mg/cm3 (95% confidence interval 22 to 62 mg/cm3) lower in the amenorrhoeic than the eumenorrhoeic athletes; this difference was highly significant (p = 0.0002). Mean trabecular bone mineral density was 21 mg/cm3 (1 to 41 mg/cm3) lower in the non-rowers than the rowers; this was also significant (p = 0.05). There was no interaction between these two effects (p = 0.28). CONCLUSION--The effect of intensive exercise on the lumbar spine partially compensates for the adverse effect of amenorrhoea on spinal trabecular bone density. Images p516-a PMID:2207417

  20. Survival and Recurrence Rate after Treatment for Primary Spinal Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Wonik

    2013-01-01

    Objective We have limited understanding on the presentation and survival of primary spinal sarcomas. The survival, recurrence rate, and related prognostic factors were investigated after treatment for primary sarcomas of the spine. Methods Retrospective analysis of medical records and radiological data was done for 29 patients in whom treatment was performed due to primary sarcoma of the spine from 2000 to 2010. As for treatment method, non-radical operation, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy were simultaneously or sequentially combined. Overall survival (OS), progression free survival (PFS), ambulatory function, and pain status were analyzed. In addition, factors affecting survival and recurrence were analyzed : age (≤42 or ≥43), gender, tumor histologic type, lesion location (mobile spine or rigid spine), weakness at diagnosis, pain at diagnosis, ambulation at diagnosis, initial treatment, radiation therapy, kind of irradiation, surgery, chemotherapy and distant metastasis. Results Median OS was 60 months, the recurrence rate was 79.3% and median PFS was 26 months. Patients with distant metastasis showed significantly shorter survival than those without metastasis. No factors were found to be significant relating to recurrence. Prognostic factor associated with walking ability was the presence of weakness at diagnosis. Conclusion Primary spinal sarcomas are difficult to cure and show high recurrence rate. However, the development of new treatment methods is improving survival. PMID:23826479

  1. [Maximal exercise in spinal cord injured subjects: effects of an antigravity suit].

    PubMed

    Bazzi-Grossin, C; Bonnin, P; Bailliart, O; Bazzi, H; Kedra, A W; Martineaud, J P

    1996-01-01

    Paraplegics have low aerobic capacity because of the spinal cord injury. Their functional muscle mass is reduced and usually untrained. They have to use upperbody muscles for displacements and daily activities. Sympathic nervous system injury is responsible of vasomotricity disturbances in leg vessels and possible abdominal vessels, proportionally to level injury. If cord injury level is higher than T5, then sympathic cardiac efferences may be damaged. Underbody muscles atrophy and vasomotricity disturbances contribute to phlebostasis. This stasis may decrease venous return, preload and stroke volume (Starling). To maintain appropriate cardiac output, tachycardia is necessary, especially during exercise. Low stroke volume, all the more since it is associated with cardio-acceleration disturbances, may reduce cardiac output reserve, and so constitutes a limiting factor for adaptation to exercise. The aim of this study was to verify if use of an underlesional pressure suit may increase cardiac output reserve because of lower venous stasis, and increase performance. We studied 10 able-bodied and 14 traumatic paraplegic subjects. Able-bodied subjects were 37 +/- 6 years old, wellbeing, not especially trained with upperbody muscles: there were 2 women and 8 men. Paraplegics were 27 +/- 7 years old, wellbeing except paraplegia, five of them practiced sport regularly (athletism or basket for disabled), and the others just daily propelled their wheelchair; there were 5 women and 9 men. For 8 of them, cord injury levels were located below T7, between T1 and T6 for the others. The age disability varied from 6 months to 2 years for 9 of them, it was approximately five years for 4 of them, and 20 years for one. We used a maximal triangular arm crank exercise with an electro-magnetic ergocycle Gauthier frame. After five minutes warm up, it was proceeded in one minute successive stages until maximal oxygen consumption is raised. VO2, VCO2, RER were measured by direct method with

  2. Intensive exercise program after spinal cord injury (“Full-On”): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Rehabilitation after spinal cord injury (SCI) has traditionally involved teaching compensatory strategies for identified impairments and deficits in order to improve functional independence. There is some evidence that regular and intensive activity-based therapies, directed at activation of the paralyzed extremities, promotes neurological improvement. The aim of this study is to compare the effects of a 12-week intensive activity-based therapy program for the whole body with a program of upper body exercise. Methods/Design A multicenter, parallel group, assessor-blinded randomized controlled trial will be conducted. One hundred eighty-eight participants with spinal cord injury, who have completed their primary rehabilitation at least 6 months prior, will be recruited from five SCI units in Australia and New Zealand. Participants will be randomized to an experimental or control group. Experimental participants will receive a 12-week program of intensive exercise for the whole body, including locomotor training, trunk exercises and functional electrical stimulation-assisted cycling. Control participants will receive a 12-week intensive upper body exercise program. The primary outcome is the American Spinal Injuries Association (ASIA) Motor Score. Secondary outcomes include measurements of sensation, function, pain, psychological measures, quality of life and cost effectiveness. All outcomes will be measured at baseline, 12 weeks, 6 months and 12 months by blinded assessors. Recruitment commenced in January 2011. Discussion The results of this trial will determine the effectiveness of a 12-week program of intensive exercise for the whole body in improving neurological recovery after spinal cord injury. Trial registration NCT01236976 (10 November 2010), ACTRN12610000498099 (17 June 2010). PMID:24025260

  3. [Principles of treatment of spinal injuries.].

    PubMed

    Vojtassák, J; Olos, M

    1997-01-01

    The authors describe the diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in diseases of the shoulder joint with regard to arthroscopic possibilities, assembled over a five-year period. Surgery of the shoulder joint accounts at the Clinic for 4 % of all surgical operations. This number comprises 46 arthroscopies of the shoulder, i. e. 21 % of all surgical operations of the shoulder joint. The autors describe the procedure during arthroscopy of the shoulder. The rations of arthroscopic diagnoses were folows: PHS of adhesion 11 %, instability 13 %, synovitis 11 %, arthritis, "mouse" 9 %, tendopathy of the rotator cuff, bursitis 20 %, tendinosis calcarea 9 %, rupture of the rotator cuff 20 % acromioclavicular arthritis 9 %. In half these patients an open operation followed: treatment of instability 26 %, operation sec. Neer 26 %, suture of rotator cuffs + operation sec. Neer 39 %, extirpation of calcificate 9 %. The arthroscopic procedure was: lavage 13 %, extirpation of "mouse" 4 %, smoothing of cartilage, forage 4 %, synovectomy - shaving 17 %, intraarticular elimination of adhesions 13 %, subacromial elimination of adhesions 13 %, subacromial decompression - shaving 27 %, extirpation of calcificate 9 %. Satisfactory results after Neer's open surgery, as well as after arthroscopic decompression were recorded in 84 % of patients. After Neer's open plastic operation satisfactory results are obtained after 3-6 months, after arthroscopic decompression already after 1.5 to 2 months. The authors consider arthroscopy a good diagnostic and therapeutic procedure in the framework of surgery of the shoulder joint. The advantage of arthroscopy is the shortening of the rehabilitation stage to half as compared with an open operation. Key words: arthroscopy of the shoulder, indications.

  4. Exercise addiction- diagnosis, bio-psychological mechanisms and treatment issues.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, Aviv; Weinstein, Yitzhak

    2014-01-01

    Exercise and sports activity are beneficial both physically and psychologically but excessive exercise may have adverse physiological and psychological effects. There are methodological issues in the definition, diagnosis and etiology of exercise addiction. Several questionnaires and diagnostic tools have been developed and validated and they show high validity and reliability. Exercise addiction has been suggested as having an obsessive-compulsive dimension as well as rewarding aspects that may include it among the behavioral addictions. Biological studies show that in rodents, exercise such as wheel running activates the dopamine reward system and thus contributing to stress reduction. Further evidence suggests that running is associated with endorphins and cannabinoids thus explaining the "runners high" or euphoric feelings that may lead to exercise addiction. Genetic studies suggest that genes which control preference for drugs also control the preference for naturally rewarding behaviors such as exercise. Psychological studies also explain exercise addiction in terms of reward, habituation, social support, stress-relief, avoidance of withdrawal and reduction of anxiety. It has been suggested that exercise addiction is a part of a continuum of sportive activity that develops in stages from the recreational exercise to at-risk exercise, problematic exercise and finally into exercise addiction. Assessment and treatment should take into account the various stages of exercise addiction development, its comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders such as eating disorders or substance use and alcohol disorders. Treatment approaches for exercise addiction are based on the cognitive-behavioral approach but little is known about their effectiveness. A single-case study shows promise of pharmacological treatment for exercise addiction and further studies are required. This review summarizes diagnostic and phenomenology of exercise addiction with emphasis on

  5. Functional changes in deep dorsal horn interneurons following spinal cord injury are enhanced with different durations of exercise training

    PubMed Central

    Rank, M M; Flynn, J R; Battistuzzo, C R; Galea, M P; Callister, R; Callister, R J

    2015-01-01

    Following incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI), collaterals sprout from intact and injured axons in the vicinity of the lesion. These sprouts are thought to form new synaptic contacts that effectively bypass the lesion epicentre and contribute to improved functional recovery. Such anatomical changes are known to be enhanced by exercise training; however, the mechanisms underlying exercise-mediated plasticity are poorly understood. Specifically, we do not know how SCI alone or SCI combined with exercise alters the intrinsic and synaptic properties of interneurons in the vicinity of a SCI. Here we use a hemisection model of incomplete SCI in adult mice and whole-cell patch-clamp recording in a horizontal spinal cord slice preparation to examine the functional properties of deep dorsal horn (DDH) interneurons located in the vicinity of a SCI following 3 or 6 weeks of treadmill exercise training. We examined the functional properties of local and descending excitatory synaptic connections by recording spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) and responses to dorsal column stimulation, respectively. We find that SCI in untrained animals exerts powerful effects on intrinsic, and especially, synaptic properties of DDH interneurons. Plasticity in intrinsic properties was most prominent at 3 weeks post SCI, whereas synaptic plasticity was greatest at 6 weeks post injury. Exercise training did not markedly affect intrinsic membrane properties; however, local and descending excitatory synaptic drive were enhanced by 3 and 6 weeks of training. These results suggest exercise promotes synaptic plasticity in spinal cord interneurons that are ideally placed to form new intraspinal circuits after SCI. PMID:25556804

  6. Corticosteroid Treatment Impact on Spinal Deformity in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sanzarello, Ilaria; Merlini, Luciano; Traina, Francesco; Rosa, Michele Attilio; Faldini, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease with loss of ambulation at around 9-10 years of age, followed, if untreated, by development of scoliosis, respiratory insufficiency, and death in the second decade of life. This review highlights the natural history of the disease, in particular, with regard to the development of the spinal deformity and how this complication has been modified by surgical interventions and overall by corticosteroid treatment. The beneficial effect of corticosteroids may have also an impact on the clinical trial design of the new emerging causative therapies. PMID:27382620

  7. The use of micropolarization in the treatment of spinal cord lesions.

    PubMed

    Shelyakin, A M; Preobrazhenskaya, I G; Komantsev, V N; Makarovskii, A N; Bogdanov, O V

    2000-01-01

    Transdermal micropolarization of the spinal cord was performed in patients suffering sequelae of spinal cord trauma and tuberculous spondylitis. Changes in clinical and electrophysiological status were monitored. These studies demonstrated that the use of local direct currents passed via skin electrodes promoted improvements in motor and autonomic functions in these patients, leading to positive changes in measures of the functional state of the spinal cord and heart activity. The possible mechanisms of the action of direct currents acting on the spinal cord are discussed, along with the potential for applying micropolarization in the treatment of spinal cord lesions.

  8. Glutamatergic receptor dysfunction in spinal cord contributes to the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Han-Jun; Cahoon, Rebecca; Cahoon, Edgar B.; Zheng, Hong; Patel, Kaushik P.

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory amino acids (e.g., glutamate) released by contraction-activated skeletal muscle afferents into the dorsal horn of the spinal cord initiate the central component of the exercise pressor reflex (EPR) in physiological conditions. However, the role of glutamate and glutamate receptors in mediating the exaggerated EPR in the chronic heart failure (CHF) state remains to be determined. In the present study, we performed microinjection of glutamate receptor antagonists into ipisilateral L4/L5 dorsal horns to investigate their effects on the pressor response to static contraction induced by stimulation of the peripheral end of L4/L5 ventral roots in decerebrate sham-operated (sham) and CHF rats. Microinjection of glutamate (10 mM, 100 nl) into the L4 or L5 dorsal horn caused a greater pressor response in CHF rats compared with sham rats. Furthermore, microinjection of either the broad-spectrum glutamate receptor antagonist kynurenate (10 mM, 100 nl) or the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist dl-2-amino-5-phosphonovalerate (50 mM, 100 nl) or the non-NMDA-sensitive receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (5 mM, 100 nl) into L4/5 dorsal horns decreased the pressor response to static contraction in CHF rats to a greater extent than in sham rats. Molecular evidence showed that the protein expression of glutamate receptors (both non-NMDA and NMDA) was elevated in the dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord in CHF rats. In addition, data from microdialysis experiments demonstrated that although basal glutamate release at the dorsal horn at rest was similar between sham and CHF rats (225 ± 50 vs. 260 ± 63 nM in sham vs. CHF rats, n = 4, P > 0.05), CHF rats exhibit greater glutamate release into the dorsal horn during muscle contraction compared with sham rats (549 ± 60 vs. 980 ± 65 nM in sham vs. CHF rats, n = 4, P < 0.01). These data indicate that the spinal glutamate system contributes to the exaggerated EPR in the CHF state. PMID

  9. Treatment of Pain and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0559 TITLE: Treatment of Pain and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation...Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Treatment of Pain and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain...as a method for treating pain and autonomic dysreflexia in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). It is collaboration between the

  10. Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... Video Back About Video Struggling with Low Back Pain? Many people are surprised to learn that carefully selected exercise can actually reduce back pain. Some exercises can even provide quick and significant ...

  11. Sweat gland density and response during high-intensity exercise in athletes with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, R C; Al-Nawaiseh, A M; Pritchett, K K; Nethery, V; Bishop, P A; Green, J M

    2015-09-01

    Sweat production is crucial for thermoregulation. However, sweating can be problematic for individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI), as they display a blunting of sudomotor and vasomotor responses below the level of the injury. Sweat gland density and eccrine gland metabolism in SCI are not well understood. Consequently, this study examined sweat lactate (S-LA) (reflective of sweat gland metabolism), active sweat gland density (SGD), and sweat output per gland (S/G) in 7 SCI athletes and 8 able-bodied (AB) controls matched for arm ergometry VO2peak. A sweat collection device was positioned on the upper scapular and medial calf of each subject just prior to the beginning of the trial, with iodine sweat gland density patches positioned on the upper scapular and medial calf. Participants were tested on a ramp protocol (7 min per stage, 20 W increase per stage) in a common exercise environment (21±1°C, 45-65% relative humidity). An independent t-test revealed lower (p<0.05) SGD (upper scapular) for SCI (22.3 ±14.8 glands · cm(-2)) vs. AB. (41.0 ± 8.1 glands · cm(-2)). However, there was no significant difference for S/G between groups. S-LA was significantly greater (p<0.05) during the second exercise stage for SCI (11.5±10.9 mmol · l(-1)) vs. AB (26.8±11.07 mmol · l(-1)). These findings suggest that SCI athletes had less active sweat glands compared to the AB group, but the sweat response was similar (SLA, S/G) between AB and SCI athletes. The results suggest similar interglandular metabolic activity irrespective of overall sweat rate.

  12. Comparison of non-surgical treatment methods for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis: protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is the most common reason for spinal surgery in older adults. Previous studies have shown that surgery is effective for severe cases of stenosis, but many patients with mild to moderate symptoms are not surgical candidates. These patients and their providers are seeking effective non-surgical treatment methods to manage their symptoms; yet there is a paucity of comparative effectiveness research in this area. This knowledge gap has hindered the development of clinical practice guidelines for non-surgical treatment approaches for lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods/design This study is a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial that will be conducted from November 2013 through October 2016. The sample will consist of 180 older adults (>60 years) who have both an anatomic diagnosis of stenosis confirmed by diagnostic imaging, and signs/symptoms consistent with a clinical diagnosis of lumbar spinal stenosis confirmed by clinical examination. Eligible subjects will be randomized into one of three pragmatic treatment groups: 1) usual medical care; 2) individualized manual therapy and rehabilitative exercise; or 3) community-based group exercise. All subjects will be treated for a 6-week course of care. The primary subjective outcome is the Swiss Spinal Stenosis Questionnaire, a self-reported measure of pain/function. The primary objective outcome is the Self-Paced Walking Test, a measure of walking capacity. The secondary objective outcome will be a measurement of physical activity during activities of daily living, using the SenseWear Armband, a portable device to be worn on the upper arm for one week. The primary analysis will use linear mixed models to compare the main effects of each treatment group on the changes in each outcome measure. Secondary analyses will include a responder analysis by group and an exploratory analysis of potential baseline predictors of treatment outcome. Discussion Our study should provide evidence

  13. Exercise as Treatment for Anxiety: Systematic Review and Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stonerock, Gregory L.; Hoffman, Benson M.; Smith, Patrick J.; Blumenthal, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exercise has been shown to reduce symptoms of anxiety, but few studies have studied exercise in individuals pre-selected because of their high anxiety. Purpose To review and critically evaluate studies of exercise training in adults with either high levels of anxiety or an anxiety disorder. Methods We conducted a systematic review of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in which anxious adults were randomized to an exercise or non-exercise control condition. Data were extracted concerning anxiety outcomes and study design. Existing meta-analyses were also reviewed. Results Evidence from 12 RCTs suggested benefits of exercise, for select groups, similar to established treatments and greater than placebo. However, most studies had significant methodological limitations, including small sample sizes, concurrent therapies, and inadequate assessment of adherence and fitness levels. Conclusions Exercise may be a useful treatment for anxiety, but lack of data from rigorous, methodologically sound RCTs precludes any definitive conclusions about its effectiveness. PMID:25697132

  14. Spinal manipulation as a valid treatment for low back pain.

    PubMed

    Vernon, L F

    1996-03-01

    The practice of chiropractic has been regulated in the State of Delaware since 1937. Since that time, the battle lines in the state between medicine and chiropractic have been drawn. This war has existed on both the political and clinical fronts, and although it has always been believed by the chiropractic profession that once the "scientific evidence" of the benefit of chiropractic was proven, the war would end. This has not occurred to the extent believed. Even with its 1980 victory over the AMA, chiropractic has still been unable to achieve full acceptance as a clinical discipline among other professions. Many hospitals in this country have opened their doors to DCs. This by and large, has solely been for economic reasons and not as a recognition of the clinical benefit of manipulation. There is, however, a growing population of primary care physicians and researchers suggesting the benefit of manipulation for low back pain as well as suggesting that increased cooperation between MDs and DCs could be of extreme benefit to the patient population at large. This group continues to be in the minority. However, with increased knowledge of the benefits of spinal manipulation and the scientific evidence that now exists to support its efficacy, it is now believed that this interprofessional referral pattern will increase. In addition, many managed care programs now require primary care physicians to determine the necessity for referral to a chiropractor, thus causing a need for the primary physician to have some knowledge of spinal manipulation. This paper is presented to inform the physician community of Delaware of some of the evidence pointing to the efficacy of spinal manipulation as a treatment for low back pain.

  15. Delayed Exercise Is Ineffective at Reversing Aberrant Nociceptive Afferent Plasticity or Neuropathic Pain After Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

    PubMed

    Detloff, Megan Ryan; Quiros-Molina, Daniel; Javia, Amy S; Daggubati, Lekhaj; Nehlsen, Anthony D; Naqvi, Ali; Ninan, Vinu; Vannix, Kirsten N; McMullen, Mary-Katharine; Amin, Sheena; Ganzer, Patrick D; Houlé, John D

    2016-08-01

    Neuropathic pain is a debilitating consequence of spinal cord injury (SCI) that correlates with sensory fiber sprouting. Recent data indicate that exercise initiated early after SCI prevents the development of allodynia and modulated nociceptive afferent plasticity. This study determined if delaying exercise intervention until pain is detected would similarly ameliorate established SCI-induced pain. Adult, female Sprague-Dawley rats with a C5 unilateral contusion were separated into SCI allodynic and SCI non-allodynic cohorts at 14 or 28 days postinjury when half of each group began exercising on automated running wheels. Allodynia, assessed by von Frey testing, was not ameliorated by exercise. Furthermore, rats that began exercise with no allodynia developed paw hypersensitivity within 2 weeks. At the initiation of exercise, the SCI Allodynia group displayed marked overlap of peptidergic and non-peptidergic nociceptive afferents in the C7 and L5 dorsal horn, while the SCI No Allodynia group had scant overlap. At the end of 5 weeks of exercise both the SCI Allodynia and SCI No Allodynia groups had extensive overlap of the 2 c-fiber types. Our findings show that exercise therapy initiated at early stages of allodynia is ineffective at attenuating neuropathic pain, but rather that it induces allodynia-aberrant afferent plasticity in previously pain-free rats. These data, combined with our previous results, suggest that there is a critical therapeutic window when exercise therapy may be effective at treating SCI-induced allodynia and that there are postinjury periods when exercise can be deleterious.

  16. Intrathecal baclofen for the treatment of spinal myoclonus: a case series

    PubMed Central

    Chiodo, Anthony E.; Saval, April

    2012-01-01

    Context/objective To demonstrate the utility of intrathecal baclofen in the treatment of secondary myoclonus of spinal origin. Design Case series. Setting University medical center. Participants Two patients with spinal myoclonus who required the use of an assistive device because of difficulty walking resulting in falls. Interventions Intrathecal baclofen management. Outcome measures Symptom management and mobility function. Results Both experienced resolution of their spinal myoclonus and became community-level ambulators without the need of an assistive device. Conclusion Intrathecal baclofen is an effective treatment of secondary myoclonus of spinal origin. PMID:22330193

  17. Is exercise an alternative treatment for chronic insomnia?

    PubMed Central

    Passos, Giselle Soares; Poyares, Dalva Lucia Rollemberg; Santana, Marcos Gonçalves; Tufik, Sergio; de Mello, Marco Túlio

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this systematic/critical review are: 1) to identify studies on the effects of exercise on chronic insomnia and sleep complaints in middle-aged and older adults and to compare the results of exercise with those obtained with hypnotic medications and 2) to discuss potential mechanisms by which exercise could promote sleep in insomniac patients. We identified studies from 1983 through 2011 using MEDLINE, SCOPUS and Web of Science. For systematic analyses, only studies assessing the chronic effects of exercise on sleep in people with sleep complaints or chronic insomnia were considered. We used the following keywords when searching for articles: insomnia, sleep, sleep complaints, exercise and physical activity. For a critical review, studies were selected on the effects of exercise and possible mechanisms that may explain the effects of exercise on insomnia. We identified five studies that met our inclusion criteria for systematic review. Exercise training is effective at decreasing sleep complaints and insomnia. Aerobic exercise has been more extensively studied, and its effects are similar to those observed after hypnotic medication use. Mechanisms are proposed to explain the effects of exercise on insomnia. There is additional documented evidence on the antidepressant and anti-anxiety effects of exercise. Exercise is effective to decrease sleep complaints and to treat chronic insomnia. Exercise presented similar results when compared with hypnotics; however, prospective studies comparing the effects of exercise with medical and non-medical treatments are warranted before including exercise as a first-line treatment for chronic insomnia are necessary. PMID:22760906

  18. Preferences for Exercise as a Treatment for Depression

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Andrew M.; Ciccolo, Joseph T.; Puspitasari, Ajeng J.; Nosrat, Sanaz; Whitworth, James W.; Stults-Kolehmainen, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Depression is a leading cause of disability worldwide, but most depressed individuals do not receive treatment. There is now significant support for physical exercise as an effective alternative treatment for depression, which may be more accessible than traditional psychiatric treatments. Little is known about preferences for exercise as a depression treatment. Method A total of 102 individuals (50% female, mean age = 39 (SD=13.1; range: 18–62), 83% Caucasian) with likely major depression completed an online survey of exercise for depression treatment preferences and barriers to increased exercise. Results are reported by gender due to well established gender differences in exercise preferences. Results Both genders reported a high level of interest in an exercise for depression program. On average, participants preferred an individual walking program that was coached, asked them to engage in one longer bout multiple times per week, and was provided in home. However, there was significant variability within and between genders. Lack of motivation, mood, and fatigue were reported as barriers to exercise by the majority of participants of both genders. Conclusion The majority of those with depression have interest in an exercise for depression program, but symptoms of depression are seen as significant barriers. Future studies should use these results to design exercise for depression programs. The variability and gender differences in our results suggest that flexible programs may be needed. PMID:27453730

  19. Spinal Traumas and their Treatments According to Avicenna's Canon of Medicine.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Farzaneh; Naseri, Mohsen; Movahhed, Mina; Zargaran, Arman

    2015-07-01

    Spinal Traumas have been categorized as disabling diseases that cause irretrievable personal and social problems. Having conducted a rather comprehensive diagnosis of the anatomy of the backbone and spinal cord as well as their functions, Avicenna (Ibn Sina, 980-1037) stated the levels and kinds of spinal impairments that are caused by spinal traumas in his great masterpiece Al-Qanun fi al-Tibb (The Canon of Medicine). He also based his treatment process on his etiological diagnosis of such impairments. Avicenna had used the following methods to treat spinal traumas: food and drug therapy and regimental therapies such as massage, phlebotomy, cupping, dry sauna, and surgery. The authors of the present article review the bases of Avicenna's viewpoints regarding spinal traumas and their treatment.

  20. Spinal Cord Lesions in Congenital Toxoplasmosis Demonstrated with Neuroimaging, Including Their Successful Treatment in an Adult

    PubMed Central

    Burrowes, Delilah; Boyer, Kenneth; Swisher, Charles N.; Noble, A. Gwendolyn; Sautter, Mari; Heydemann, Peter; Rabiah, Peter; Lee, Daniel; McLeod, Rima

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies for persons in the National Collaborative Chicago-Based Congenital Toxoplasmosis Study (NCCCTS) with symptoms and signs referable to the spinal cord were reviewed. Three infants had symptomatic spinal cord lesions, another infant a Chiari malformation, and another infant a symptomatic peri-spinal cord lipoma. One patient had an unusual history of prolonged spinal cord symptoms presenting in middle age. Neuroimaging was used to establish her diagnosis and response to treatment. This 43 year-old woman with congenital toxoplasmosis developed progressive leg spasticity, weakness, numbness, difficulty walking, and decreased visual acuity and color vision without documented re-activation of her chorioretinal disease. At 52 years of age, spinal cord lesions in locations correlating with her symptoms and optic atrophy were diagnosed with 3 Tesla MRI scan. Treatment with pyrimethamine and sulfadiazine decreased her neurologic symptoms, improved her neurologic examination, and resolved her enhancing spinal cord lesions seen on MRI. PMID:23487348

  1. Dosimetric comparison of metastatic spinal photon treatment techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, Marvene M.; Carnes, Samuel M.; Henderson, Mark A.; Das, Indra J.

    2012-01-01

    Traditional palliative treatment of metastatic cancer to the vertebral bodies often results in doses to the spinal cord that are higher than the dose prescribed to the target, or gross tumor volume (GTV). This study compares traditional techniques of spine palliation with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). The purpose of the study is 2-fold: first, the study demonstrates the benefits of using IMRT to lower the dose to the organs at risk (OAR), particularly for the spinal cord and other nonspecified normal tissues; second, the article provides information regarding the advantages and disadvantages of commonly used conventional techniques for treating the vertebral bodies based on patient anatomy. Because the use of IMRT or other advanced techniques may be prohibitive because of insurance issues, treatment plans were created that compared optimal coverage vs. optimal sparing for single-field, wedged-pair, and opposed-beam arrangements. Fifty-five patients were selected and divided by location of target (cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine) and also by the measured separation between the anterior and posterior surface of the patient at the level of mid-GTV. Within each anatomic category the patients again were divided into the categories of small, medium, and large based on separation. The patient dataset that most closely represented the average separation within each category was selected, resulting in a total of 9 patients, and the appropriate treatment plan techniques were calculated for each of the 9 patients. The results of the study do show that the use of IMRT is far superior when compared with other techniques, both for coverage and for sparing of the surrounding tissue, regardless of patient size and the section of spine being treated. Based on a combination of both target coverage and sparing of normal tissues, the conventional plan of choice may vary by both the section of spine to be treated and by the size of the patient.

  2. High-Intensity Locomotor Exercise Increases Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in Individuals with Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Leech, Kristan A; Hornby, T George

    2017-03-15

    High-intensity locomotor exercise is suggested to contribute to improved recovery of locomotor function after neurological injury. This may be secondary to exercise-intensity-dependent increases in neurotrophin expression demonstrated previously in control subjects. However, rigorous examination of intensity-dependent changes in neurotrophin levels is lacking in individuals with motor incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI). Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of locomotor exercise intensity on peripheral levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in individuals with incomplete SCI. We also explored the impact of the Val66Met single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) on the BDNF gene on intensity-dependent changes. Serum concentrations of BDNF and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), as well as measures of cardiorespiratory dynamics, were evaluated across different levels of exercise intensity achieved during a graded-intensity, locomotor exercise paradigm in 11 individuals with incomplete SCI. Our results demonstrate a significant increase in serum BDNF at high, as compared to moderate, exercise intensities (p = 0.01) and 15 and 30 min post-exercise (p < 0.01 for both), with comparison to changes at low intensity approaching significance (p = 0.05). Serum IGF-1 demonstrated no intensity-dependent changes. Significant correlations were observed between changes in BDNF and specific indicators of exercise intensity (e.g., rating of perceived exertion; R = 0.43; p = 0.02). Additionally, the data suggest that Val66Met SNP carriers may not exhibit intensity-dependent changes in serum BDNF concentration. Given the known role of BDNF in experience-dependent neuroplasticity, these preliminary results suggest that exercise intensity modulates serum BDNF concentrations and may be an important parameter of physical rehabilitation interventions after neurological injury.

  3. Chronic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: The Role of Immunogenetics and Time of Injury Pain Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    nociceptive stimuli culminates in profound debilitating pain that serves no adaptive purpose for the sufferer. It is now established that spinal...Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0806 TITLE: Chronic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: The Role of Immunogenetics and Time of Injury Pain Treatment...Sep 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Chronic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: The Role of Immunogenetics and Time of Injury Pain

  4. The treatment of symptomatic osteoporotic spinal compression fractures.

    PubMed

    Esses, Stephen I; McGuire, Robert; Jenkins, John; Finkelstein, Joel; Woodard, Eric; Watters, William C; Goldberg, Michael J; Keith, Michael; Turkelson, Charles M; Wies, Janet L; Sluka, Patrick; Boyer, Kevin M; Hitchcock, Kristin

    2011-03-01

    This clinical practice guideline is based on a series of systematic reviews of published studies on the treatment of symptomatic osteoporotic spinal compression fractures. Of 11 recommendations, one is strong; one, moderate; three, weak; and six, inconclusive. The strong recommendation is against the use of vertebroplasty to treat the fractures; the moderate recommendation is for the use of calcitonin for 4 weeks following the onset of fracture. The weak recommendations address the use of ibandronate and strontium ranelate to prevent additional symptomatic fractures, the use of L2 nerve root blocks to treat the pain associated with L3 or L4 fractures, and the use of kyphoplasty to treat symptomatic fractures in patients who are neurologically intact.

  5. Return to Full Functioning after Graded Exercise Assessment and Progressive Exercise Treatment of Postconcussion Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baker, John G.; Freitas, Michael S.; Leddy, John J.; Kozlowski, Karl F.; Willer, Barry S.

    2012-01-01

    Exercise assessment and aerobic exercise training for postconcussion syndrome (PCS) may reduce concussion-related physiological dysfunction and symptoms by restoring autonomic balance and improving cerebral blood flow autoregulation. In a descriptive pilot study of 91 patients referred to a university clinic for treatment of PCS, a subset of 63 patients were contacted by telephone for assessment of symptoms and return to full daily functioning. Those who experienced symptoms during a graded exercise treadmill test (physiologic PCS, n = 40) were compared to those who could exercise to capacity (PCS, n = 23). Both groups had been offered progressive exercise rehabilitation. Overall 41 of 57 (72%) who participated in the exercise rehabilitation program returned to full daily functioning. This included 27 of 35 (77%) from the physiologic PCS group, and 14 of 22 (64%) from the PCS group. Only 1 of the 6 patients who declined exercise rehabilitation returned to full functioning. Interpretation of these results is limited by the descriptive nature of the study, the small sample size, and the relatively few patients who declined exercise treatment. Nonetheless, exercise assessment indicates that approximately one third of those examined did not have physiologic PCS. PMID:22292122

  6. A nurse-coached exercise program to increase muscle strength, improve quality of life, and increase self-efficacy in people with tetraplegic spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, Susan Budassi

    2013-08-01

    A nurse-coached exercise intervention for 10 people with tetraplegic spinal cord injuries was conducted over a period of 2 years at an accessible, community-based YMCA using an equipment especially designed for people with mobility issues and neurological deficits. In this single-subject design study, each participant completed three 3-hour exercise sessions a week for over 6 months. The purpose of the study was to determine what effects the program would have on increasing muscle strength, improving quality of life, and increasing self-efficacy after traditional outpatient therapy sessions were no longer available or affordable. The Sheehy Spinal Cord Injury Functional Improvement via Exercise Model was constructed at the conclusion of an unpublished pilot study and was tested in this study. Expectations of the model were that, if a person with a tetraplegic spinal cord injury participated in a coached program of exercise, muscle strength would increase and functional ability would improve, resulting in greater independence, a higher sense of self-efficacy, and a higher quality of life. Study results using a single-subject design of graph-trend analysis showed upward trajectories in muscle strength, quality of life, and self-efficacy in all study participants regardless of the length of time since his or her original injury. The results support the efficacy of this nurse-coached program for people with tetraplegic spinal cord injuries and validate the Sheehy Spinal Cord Injury Functional Improvement via Exercise Model.

  7. Exercise Training and Parkinson's Disease: Placebo or Essential Treatment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reuter, Iris; Engelhardt, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Exercise training is often recommended for people with Parkinson's disease, though there is debate about the pathophysiologic cause of impaired movement in Parkinsonism which makes it difficult to develop a specific exercise treatment for symptoms that include hypokinesia, tremor, and muscular rigidity. Most published studies show a benefit of…

  8. Effects of a Home Exercise Program on the Self-report Disability Index and Gait Parameters in Patients with Lumbar Spinal Stenosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eui-Ryong; Kang, Min-Hyeok; Kim, Yang-Gon; Oh, Jae-Seop

    2014-02-01

    [Purpose] The present study was performed to identify the effect of a home exercise program on the self-reported disability index and gait parameters in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). [Methods] Fifteen patients with LSS were enrolled in this study and were trained in a 4-week home exercise program (40 min/day). All patients were evaluated with three self-reported disability indices (Oswestry Disability Index, Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, and Spinal Stenosis Scale), and gait parameters were assessed using a GAITRite system before and after the home exercise program. [Results] Patients with LSS showed significant decreases in the self-reported questionnaire scores and pain intensity after the home exercise program. However, the gait parameters did not significantly change. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that home exercise programs can improve self-reported questionnaire scores and decrease pain in patients with LSS.

  9. Mixed-Reality Exercise Effects on Participation of Individuals with Spinal Cord Injuries and Developmental Disabilities: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Baumgardner, Chad A.; McLachlan, Leslie; Bodine, Cathy

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate the effectiveness of a mixed-reality (MR) exercise environment on engagement and enjoyment levels of individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) and intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Methods: Six people participated in this cross-sectional, observational pilot study involving one MR exercise trial. The augmented reality environment was based on a first-person perspective video of a scenic biking/walking trail in Colorado. Males and females (mean age, 43.3 ± 13.7 years) were recruited from a research database for their participation in previous clinical studies. Of the 6 participants, 2 had SCI, 2 had IDD, and 2 were without disability. The primary outcome measurement of this pilot study was the self-reported engagement and enjoyment level of each participant after the exercise trial. Results: All participants reported increased levels of engagement, enjoyment, and immersion involving the MR exercise environment as well as positive feedback recommending this type of exercise approach to peers with similar disabilities. All the participants reported higher than normal levels of enjoyment and 66.7% reported higher than normal levels of being on a real trail. Conclusion: Participants’ feedback suggested that the MR environment could be entertaining, motivating, and engaging for users with disabilities, resulting in a foundation for further development of this technology for use in individuals with cognitive and physical disabilities. PMID:25477747

  10. The Potential of Curcumin in Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sanivarapu, Raghavendra; Vallabhaneni, Vijayalakshmi; Verma, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Current treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI) is supportive at best; despite great efforts, the lack of better treatment solutions looms large on neurological science and medicine. Curcumin, the active ingredient in turmeric, a spice known for its medicinal and anti-inflammatory properties, has been validated to harbor immense effects for a multitude of inflammatory-based diseases. However, to date there has not been a review on curcumin's effects on SCI. Herein, we systematically review all known data on this topic and juxtapose results of curcumin with standard therapies such as corticosteroids. Because all studies that compare the two show superior results for curcumin over corticosteroids, it could be true that curcumin better acts at the inflammatory source of SCI-mediated neurological injury, although this question remains unanswered in patients. Because curcumin has shown improvements from current standards of care in other diseases with few true treatment options (e.g., osteoarthritis), there is immense potential for this compound in treating SCI. We critically and systematically summarize available data, discuss clinical implications, and propose further testing of this well-tolerated compound in both the preclinical and the clinical realms. Analyzing preclinical data from a clinical perspective, we hope to create awareness of the incredible potential that curcumin shows for SCI in a patient population that direly needs improvements on current therapy. PMID:27298735

  11. Use of intraoperative sodium tetradecyl sulfate for the treatment of a spinal epidural hemangioma. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Baig, Mirza N; Saquib, Syed; Christoforidis, Greg; Caragine, Louis P

    2007-08-01

    Spinal hemangiomas can be categorized into three different groups based on location. Vertebral body (VB) hemangiomas are frequent incidental findings on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. There is a subdivision of these with spinal epidural extension that have been reported in the literature. Spinal hemangiomas can also be epidural without VB involvement; these are extremely rare with few reported cases in the thoracic epidural spinal column. The diagnosis and imaging characteristics as well as the surgical tools used in gross-total resection of spinal epidural hemangioma are not well understood. The authors present a detailed characterization of a spinal epidural hemangioma in a 30-year-old woman who presented with complaints of gradual onset of low-back pain that worsened over 1 year. The MR imaging findings indicated a large L2-S1 epidural spinal mass causing thecal sac compression. The patient underwent an L2-S1 laminectomy, and a vascular extradural mass was noted on the posterior aspect of the dura mater. Preoperative spinal angiography as well as intraoperative angiography was performed. Total resection of the tumor was achieved using intraoperative embolization with sodium tetradecyl sulfate and microscopic dissection. The postoperative MR imaging findings and clinical outcome were excellent. The findings and use of sodium tetradecyl sulfate in gross-total resection are discussed. The authors also review treatment modalities and demonstrate the utility and effectiveness of intraoperative sodium tetradecyl sulfate in grosstotal resection of large difficult spinal epidural hemangiomas.

  12. A Systematic Review of Exercise Training To Promote Locomotor Recovery in Animal Models of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Callister, Robert J.; Callister, Robin; Galea, Mary P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In the early 1980s experiments on spinalized cats showed that exercise training on the treadmill could enhance locomotor recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI). In this review, we summarize the evidence for the effectiveness of exercise training aimed at promoting locomotor recovery in animal models of SCI. We performed a systematic search of the literature using Medline, Web of Science, and Embase. Of the 362 studies screened, 41 were included. The adult female rat was the most widely used animal model. The majority of studies (73%) reported that exercise training had a positive effect on some aspect of locomotor recovery. Studies employing a complete SCI were less likely to have positive outcomes. For incomplete SCI models, contusion was the most frequently employed method of lesion induction, and the degree of recovery depended on injury severity. Positive outcomes were associated with training regimens that involved partial weight-bearing activity, commenced within a critical period of 1–2 weeks after SCI, and maintained training for at least 8 weeks. Considerable heterogeneity in training paradigms and methods used to assess or quantify recovery was observed. A 13-item checklist was developed and employed to assess the quality of reporting and study design; only 15% of the studies had high methodological quality. We recommend that future studies include control groups, randomize animals to groups, conduct blinded assessments, report the extent of the SCI lesion, and report sample size calculations. A small battery of objective assessment methods including assessment of over-ground stepping should also be developed and routinely employed. This would allow future meta-analyses of the effectiveness of exercise interventions on locomotor recovery. PMID:22401139

  13. A randomised controlled trial of preventive spinal manipulation with and without a home exercise program for patients with chronic neck pain

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Evidence indicates that supervised home exercises, combined or not with manual therapy, can be beneficial for patients with non-specific chronic neck pain (NCNP). The objective of the study is to investigate the efficacy of preventive spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) compared to a no treatment group in NCNP patients. Another objective is to assess the efficacy of SMT with and without a home exercise program. Methods Ninety-eight patients underwent a short symptomatic phase of treatment before being randomly allocated to either an attention-group (n = 29), a SMT group (n = 36) or a SMT + exercise group (n = 33). The preventive phase of treatment, which lasted for 10 months, consisted of meeting with a chiropractor every two months to evaluate and discuss symptoms (attention-control group), 1 monthly SMT session (SMT group) or 1 monthly SMT session combined with a home exercise program (SMT + exercise group). The primary and secondary outcome measures were represented by scores on a 10-cm visual analog scale (VAS), active cervical ranges of motion (cROM), the neck disability index (NDI) and the Bournemouth questionnaire (BQ). Exploratory outcome measures were scored on the Fear-avoidance Behaviour Questionnaire (FABQ) and the SF-12 Questionnaire. Results Our results show that, in the preventive phase of the trial, all 3 groups showed primary and secondary outcomes scores similar to those obtain following the non-randomised, symptomatic phase. No group difference was observed for the primary, secondary and exploratory variables. Significant improvements in FABQ scores were noted in all groups during the preventive phase of the trial. However, no significant change in health related quality of life (HRQL) was associated with the preventive phase. Conclusions This study hypothesised that participants in the combined intervention group would have less pain and disability and better function than participants from the 2 other groups during the preventive phase

  14. The usefulness of ozone treatment in spinal pain

    PubMed Central

    Bocci, Velio; Borrelli, Emma; Zanardi, Iacopo; Travagli, Valter

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this review is to elucidate the biochemical, molecular, immunological, and pharmaceutical mechanisms of action of ozone dissolved in biological fluids. Studies performed during the last two decades allow the drawing of a comprehensive framework for understanding and recommending the integration of ozone therapy for spinal pain. Methods An in-depth screening of primary sources of information online – via SciFinder Scholar, Google Scholar, and Scopus databases as well as Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews – was performed. In this review, the most significant papers of the last 25 years are presented and their proposals critically evaluated, regardless of the bibliometric impact of the journals. Results The efficacy of standard treatments combined with the unique capacity of ozone therapy to reactivate the innate antioxidant system is the key to correcting the oxidative stress typical of chronic inflammatory diseases. Pain pathways and control systems of algesic signals after ozone administration are described. Conclusion This paper finds favors the full insertion of ozone therapy into pharmaceutical sciences, rather than as either an alternative or an esoteric approach. PMID:26028964

  15. Exercise as an augmentation strategy for treatment of major depression.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Madhukar H; Greer, Tracy L; Grannemann, Bruce D; Chambliss, Heather O; Jordan, Alexander N

    2006-07-01

    The use of augmentation strategies among patients with major depression is increasing because rates of complete remission with standard antidepressant monotherapy are quite low. Clinical and neurobiological data suggest that exercise may be a good candidate for use as an augmentation treatment for depression. This pilot study examined the use of exercise to augment antidepressant medication in patients with major depression. Seventeen patients with incomplete remission of depressive symptoms began a 12-week exercise program while continuing their antidepressant medication (unchanged in type or dose). Individual exercise prescriptions were calculated based on an exercise dose consistent with currently recommended public health guidelines. The exercise consisted of both supervised and home-based sessions. The 17-item Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) and the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report (IDS-SR30) were used to assess symptoms of depression on a weekly basis. Intent-to-treat analyses yielded significant decreases on both the HRSD17 (5.8 points, p < 0.008) and IDS-SR30 (13.9 points, p < 0.002). For patients who completed the study (n = 8), HRSD17 scores decreased by 10.4 points and IDS-SR30 scores decreased by 18.8 points. This study provides preliminary evidence for exercise as an effective augmentation treatment for antidepressant medication. This is a lower-cost augmentation strategy that has numerous health benefits and may further reduce depressive symptoms in partial responders to antidepressant treatment. Practical tips on how practitioners can use exercise to enhance antidepressant treatment are discussed. Longer-term use of exercise is also likely to confer additional health benefits for this population.

  16. Cervical Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... valuable things you can do for your overall health and is especially important if you have neck pain. Con- tinue exercises as long as your symptoms do not return, get worse, or move away from the center of the back. Special equipment and gyms can be helpful, but there are good, low- ...

  17. Role of exercise in the treatment of alcohol use disorders

    PubMed Central

    MANTHOU, EIRINI; GEORGAKOULI, KALLIOPI; FATOUROS, IOANNIS G.; GIANOULAKIS, CHRISTINA; THEODORAKIS, YANNIS; JAMURTAS, ATHANASIOS Z.

    2016-01-01

    Excessive alcohol use can cause harmful effects on the human body, which are associated with serious health problems, and it can also lead to the development of alcohol use disorders (AUDs). There is certain evidence that physical exercise positively affects excessive alcohol use and the associated problems by leading to reduced alcohol intake. A literature search was conducted using the databases PubMed, Medline and Web of Science. The search terms used as keywords were: Addiction, abuse, alcohol use disorders, exercise training, β-endorphin, opioids, brain, ethanol and alcohol. The current study presents the studies that reported on the use of exercise in the treatment of AUDs between 1970 and 2015. The potential psychological and physiological mechanisms that contribute to the action of exercise were also reviewed, highlighting the role of β-endorphin and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in AUDs and the possible association among physical activity, the endogenous opioid system and the desire for alcohol. Only 11 studies were identified that refer to the effect of exercise on alcohol consumption and/or the associated outcomes. Six of those studies concluded that exercise may have a positive impact towards alcohol consumption, abstinence rates or the urge to drink. One of those studies also indicated that a bout of exercise affects the endogenous opioids, which may be associated with the urge to drink. Another 3 studies indicated that responses to acute exercise in individuals with AUDs are different compared to those in healthy ones. Generally, despite limited research data and often contradictory results, there is certain early promising evidence for the role of exercise as an adjunctive tool in the treatment of AUDs. Physiological and biochemical parameters that would confirm that exercise is safe for individuals with AUDs should be examined in future studies. PMID:27123244

  18. Kegel's exercises with biofeedback therapy for treatment of stress incontinence.

    PubMed

    Burns, P A; Marecki, M A; Dittmar, S S; Bullough, B

    1985-02-01

    True stress incontinence due to a weakened pelvic floor is one of the most frequently cited urologic complaints of multiparous women past age 40. One treatment modality currently used to treat stress incontinence is exercising the pubococcygeus muscle. Combining biofeedback therapy with a vaginal probe (perineometer) helps patients identify the muscle, provides immediate feedback and assists the nurse and patient in assessing problem resolution. This article describes an intervention program using biofeedback, and measured Kegel's exercises on a small number of women with symptoms of stress incontinence. The lessening of symptoms became a major factor in continued compliance with the exercise program.

  19. Exercise and cognitive-behavioural treatment in fibromyalgia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kurtais, Yesim; Kutlay, Sehim; Ergin, Süreyya

    2006-01-01

    Fibromyalgia syndrome is a nonarticular rheumatic disorder characterised by diffuse musculoskeletal pain, stiffness, fatigue, disturbed sleep and tender points. The pathophysiology is not well understood and treatment remains a challenge. Although pharmacological therapy is still the primary treatment choice, a long-term effective intervention has not been demonstrated yet. Thus, besides pharmacotherapy, other multimodal interventions are often used. Exercise and cognitive-behavioural treatments which exist in the multimodal approach and encompass largely self-managed strategy, are reviewed in this article. Although, there is a great number of exercise studies, the large diversity of outcome measures and measurement instruments that have been used in studies, varying intensity and types of exercises, small sample sizes, high attrition rates, large variability in baseline function, symptom severity and psychosocial status limit to come to a conclusion about the efficacy of exercise in the treatment of fibromyalgia syndrome. There are also inconclusive results about the efficacy of cognitive-behavioural treatment because of limited number of studies with small sample sizes of patients with fibromyalgia syndrome. However, the results of the trials overall demonstrate the beneficial effects of both different types of exercise and cognitive-behavioural treatment, on the other hand, there is still a need for larger, more systematic and randomised controlled trials to evaluate the effectiveness.

  20. Spa and exercise treatment in ankylosing spondylitis: fact or fancy?

    PubMed

    van Tubergen, Astrid; Hidding, Alita

    2002-09-01

    Physical therapy plays an important role in the overall treatment of ankylosing spondylitis. Apart from exercising at home, patients are advised to follow weekly group physical therapy. In addition, many patients often follow annual courses of in-patient physiotherapy or spa therapy in which exercises also play a central role. This chapter focuses on evidence for benefits of physical therapy and spa therapy in ankylosing spondylitis.

  1. Effectiveness of an Upper Extremity Exercise Device Integrated With Computer Gaming for Aerobic Training in Adolescents With Spinal Cord Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Widman, Lana M; McDonald, Craig M; Abresch, R. Ted

    2006-01-01

    Background/Objective: To determine whether a new upper extremity exercise device integrated with a video game (GameCycle) requires sufficient metabolic demand and effort to induce an aerobic training effect and to explore the feasibility of using this system as an exercise modality in an exercise intervention. Design: Pre-post intervention. Setting: University-based research facility. Subject Population: A referred sample of 8 adolescent subjects with spina bifida (4 girls, 15.5 ± 0.6 years; 4 boys, 17.5 ± 0.9 years) was recruited to participate in the project. All subjects had some level of mobility impairment that did not allow them to participate in mainstream sports available to their nondisabled peers. Five subjects used a wheelchair full time, one used a wheelchair occasionally, but walked with forearm crutches, and 2 were fully ambulatory, but had impaired gait. Main Outcome Measures: Peak oxygen uptake, maximum work output, aerobic endurance, peak heart rate, rating of perceived exertion, and user satisfaction. Results: Six of the 8 subjects were able to reach a Vo2 of at least 50% of their Vo2 reserve while using the GameCycle. Seven of the 8 subjects reached a heart rate of at least 50% of their heart rate reserve. One subject did not reach either 50% of Vo2 reserve or 50% of heart rate reserve. Seven of the 8 subjects increased their maximum work capability after training with the GameCycle at least 3 times per week for 16 weeks. Conclusions: The data suggest that the GameCycle seems to be adequate as an exercise device to improve oxygen uptake and maximum work capability in adolescents with lower extremity disability caused by spinal cord dysfunction. The subjects in this study reported that the video game component was enjoyable and provided a motivation to exercise. PMID:17044386

  2. Treatment of metastatic spinal cord compression: cepo review and clinical recommendations

    PubMed Central

    L’Espérance, S.; Vincent, F.; Gaudreault, M.; Ouellet, J.A.; Li, M.; Tosikyan, A.; Goulet, S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Metastatic spinal cord compression (mscc) is an oncologic emergency that, unless diagnosed early and treated appropriately, can lead to permanent neurologic impairment. After an analysis of relevant studies evaluating the effectiveness of various treatment modalities, the Comité de l’évolution des pratiques en oncologie (cepo) made recommendations on mscc management. Method A review of the scientific literature published up to February 2011 considered only phase ii and iii trials that included assessment of neurologic function. A total of 26 studies were identified. Recommendations Considering the evidence available to date, cepo recommends that cancer patients with mscc be treated by a specialized multidisciplinary team.dexamethasone 16 mg daily be administered to symptomatic patients as soon as mscc is diagnosed or suspected.high-loading-dose corticosteroids be avoided.histopathologic diagnosis and scores from scales evaluating prognosis and spinal instability be considered before treatment.corticosteroids and chemotherapy with radiotherapy be offered to patients with spinal cord compression caused by myeloma, lymphoma, or germ cell tumour without sign of spinal instability or compression by bone fragment.short-course radiotherapy be administered to patients with spinal cord compression and short life expectancy.long-course radiotherapy be administered to patients with inoperable spinal cord compression and good life expectancy.decompressive surgery followed by long-course radiotherapy be offered to appropriate symptomatic mscc patients (including spinal instability, displacement of vertebral fragment); andpatients considered for surgery have a life expectancy of at least 3–6 months. PMID:23300371

  3. Predictive Ability of Pender's Health Promotion Model for Physical Activity and Exercise in People with Spinal Cord Injuries: A Hierarchical Regression Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keegan, John P.; Chan, Fong; Ditchman, Nicole; Chiu, Chung-Yi

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to validate Pender's Health Promotion Model (HPM) as a motivational model for exercise/physical activity self-management for people with spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Quantitative descriptive research design using hierarchical regression analysis (HRA) was used. A total of 126 individuals with SCI were recruited…

  4. Combinational Spinal GAD65 Gene Delivery and Systemic GABA-Mimetic Treatment for Modulation of Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Kakinohana, Osamu; Hefferan, Michael P.; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Nejime, Tetsuya; Marsala, Silvia; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Motlik, Jan; Kucharova, Karolina; Strnadel, Jan; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Lazar, Peter; Galik, Jan; Vinay, Laurent; Marsala, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background Loss of GABA-mediated pre-synaptic inhibition after spinal injury plays a key role in the progressive increase in spinal reflexes and the appearance of spasticity. Clinical studies show that the use of baclofen (GABAB receptor agonist), while effective in modulating spasticity is associated with major side effects such as general sedation and progressive tolerance development. The goal of the present study was to assess if a combined therapy composed of spinal segment-specific upregulation of GAD65 (glutamate decarboxylase) gene once combined with systemic treatment with tiagabine (GABA uptake inhibitor) will lead to an antispasticity effect and whether such an effect will only be present in GAD65 gene over-expressing spinal segments. Methods/Principal Findings Adult Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were exposed to transient spinal ischemia (10 min) to induce muscle spasticity. Animals then received lumbar injection of HIV1-CMV-GAD65 lentivirus (LVs) targeting ventral α-motoneuronal pools. At 2–3 weeks after lentivirus delivery animals were treated systemically with tiagabine (4, 10, 20 or 40 mg/kg or vehicle) and the degree of spasticity response measured. In a separate experiment the expression of GAD65 gene after spinal parenchymal delivery of GAD65-lentivirus in naive minipigs was studied. Spastic SD rats receiving spinal injections of the GAD65 gene and treated with systemic tiagabine showed potent and tiagabine-dose-dependent alleviation of spasticity. Neither treatment alone (i.e., GAD65-LVs injection only or tiagabine treatment only) had any significant antispasticity effect nor had any detectable side effect. Measured antispasticity effect correlated with increase in spinal parenchymal GABA synthesis and was restricted to spinal segments overexpressing GAD65 gene. Conclusions/Significance These data show that treatment with orally bioavailable GABA-mimetic drugs if combined with spinal-segment-specific GAD65 gene overexpression can represent a novel

  5. Lower limb conduit artery endothelial responses to acute upper limb exercise in spinal cord injured and able-bodied men

    PubMed Central

    Totosy de Zepetnek, Julia O; Au, Jason S; Ditor, David S; MacDonald, Maureen J

    2015-01-01

    Vascular improvements in the nonactive regions during exercise are likely primarily mediated by increased shear rate (SR). Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) experience sublesional vascular deconditioning and could potentially benefit from upper body exercise-induced increases in lower body SR. The present study utilized a single bout of incremental arm-crank exercise to generate exercise-induced SR changes in the superficial femoral artery in an effort to evaluate the acute postexercise impact on superficial femoral artery endothelial function via flow-mediated dilation (FMD), and determine regulatory factors in the nonactive legs of individuals with and without SCI. Eight individuals with SCI and eight age, sex, and waist-circumference-matched able-bodied (AB) controls participated. Nine minutes of incremental arm-crank exercise increased superficial femoral artery anterograde SR (P = 0.02 and P < 0.01), retrograde SR (P < 0.01 and P < 0.01), and oscillatory shear index (OSI) (P < 0.001 and P < 0.001) in both SCI and AB, respectively. However, these SR alterations resulted in acute postexercise increases in FMD in the AB group only (SCI 6.0 ± 1.2% to 6.3 ± 2.7%, P = 0.74; AB 7.5 ± 1.4% to 11.2 ± 1.4%, P = 0.03). While arm exercise has many cardiovascular benefits and results in changes in SR patterns in the nonactive legs, these changes are not sufficient to induce acute changes in FMD among individuals with SCI, and therefore are less likely to stimulate exercise training-associated improvements in nonactive limb endothelial function. Understanding the role of SR patterns on FMD brings us closer to designing effective strategies to combat impaired vascular function in both healthy and clinical populations. PMID:25847920

  6. Primary Spinal Germ Cell Tumors: A Case Analysis and Review of Treatment Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Loya, Joshua J.; Jung, Henry; Temmins, Caroline; Cho, Nam; Singh, Harminder

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Primary intramedullary spinal germ cell tumors are exceedingly rare. As such, there are no established treatment paradigms. We describe our management for spinal germ cell tumors and a review of the literature. Clinical Presentation. We describe the case of a 45-year-old man with progressive lower extremity weakness and sensory deficits. He was found to have enhancing intramedullary mass lesions in the thoracic spinal cord, and pathology was consistent with an intramedullary germ cell tumor. A video presentation of the case and surgical approach is provided. Conclusion. As spinal cord germinomas are highly sensitive to radiation and chemotherapy, a patient can be spared radical surgery. Diverse treatment approaches exist across institutions. We advocate biopsy followed by local radiation, with or without adjuvant chemotherapy, as the optimal treatment for these tumors. Histological findings have prognostic value if syncytiotrophoblastic giant cells (STGCs) are found, which are associated with a higher rate of recurrence. The recurrence rate in STGC-positive spinal germinomas is 33% (2/6), whereas it is only 8% in STGC-negative tumors (2/24). We advocate limited volume radiotherapy combined with systemic chemotherapy in patients with high risk of recurrence. To reduce endocrine and neurocognitive side effects, cranio-spinal radiation should be used as a last resort in patients with recurrence. PMID:24312128

  7. Wheelchair Tai Chi as a Therapeutic Exercise for Individuals with Spinal Cord Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Yong Tai; Chang, Li-Shan; Chen, Shihui; Zhong, Yaping; Yang, Yi; Li, Zhanghua; Madison, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Individuals with spinal cord injuries (SCI) rarely participate in health-promotion programs or wellness screenings due to the lack of accessibility, adaptations, and tertiary healthcare providers. An unconditioned body is more prone to suffer injury and is at risk for more severe health problems than a conditioned one. As is common in individuals…

  8. [Intramedullary spinal cord cavernous hemangiomas: clinical features and surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Ishii, Ken; Nakamura, Masaya

    2011-01-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord cavernous hemangiomas (angiomas) are occult vascular malformations characterized by rare lesions consisting of closely packed capillary-like vessels. In general, patients with this disease become symptomatic because of hemorrhage leads to progressive neurological deficits. Therefore, surgical tumor resection should be considered for symptomatic patients should be considered a surgical tumor resection.

  9. Effects of peripheral and spinal κ-opioid receptor stimulation on the exercise pressor reflex in decerebrate rats

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Audrey J.; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Kaufman, Marc P.

    2014-01-01

    The exercise pressor reflex is greater in rats with ligated femoral arteries than it is in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. The exaggerated reflex in rats with ligated arteries is attenuated by stimulation of μ-opioid and δ-opioid receptors on the peripheral endings of thin-fiber muscle afferents. The effect of stimulation of κ-opioid receptors on the exercise pressor reflex is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that stimulation of κ-opioid receptors attenuates the exercise pressor reflex in rats with ligated, but not freely perfused, femoral arteries. The pressor responses to static contraction were compared before and after femoral arterial or intrathecal injection of the κ-opioid receptor agonist U62066 (1, 10, and 100 μg). Femoral arterial injection of U62066 did not attenuate the pressor responses to contraction in either group of rats. Likewise, intrathecal injection of U62066 did not attenuate the pressor response to contraction in rats with freely perfused femoral arteries. In contrast, intrathecal injection of 10 and 100 μg of U62066 attenuated the pressor response to contraction in rats with ligated femoral arteries, an effect that was blocked by prior intrathecal injection of the κ-opioid receptor antagonist nor-binaltorphimine. In rats with ligated femoral arteries, the pressor response to stimulation of peripheral chemoreceptors by sodium cyanide was not changed by intrathecal U62066 injections, indicating that these injections had no direct effect on the sympathetic outflow. We conclude that stimulation of spinal, but not peripheral, κ-opioid receptors attenuates the exaggerated exercise pressor reflex in rats with ligated femoral arteries. PMID:24920732

  10. De novo spinal teratoma after treatment of an intracranial germ cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Tohma, Y; Kaneko, T; Kita, D; Iwato, M; Hayashi, Y; Tachibana, O; Hasegawa, M; Yamashita, J

    2000-11-01

    The authors report an extremely rare case of de novo spinal teratoma after treatment for intracranial germ cell tumor. A 17-year-old male developed pain of bilateral lower extremities and urinary retention 18 months after complete remission of intracranial mixed germ cell tumor. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a huge spinal tumor associated with spina bifida occulta. Total resection was performed, and histogenetical findings led to the diagnosis of a mature teratoma with normal p16 gene, whereas analysis of intracranial tumor showed p16 deletion. The spinal anomaly and genetic analysis strongly suggest that the spinal teratoma was a de novo tumor rather than a metastasis or dissemination of the original intracranial germ cell tumor.

  11. [Exercise reduced the need for operation in lumbar spinal stenosis. Circulatory load in the form of cycling gave good effect].

    PubMed

    Nord, Tomas; Kornerup, Ulf; Grönlund, Per; Reuterwall, Christina

    2015-01-27

    Conservative treatment is being reported to relieve walk related leg pain or improve life quality in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Such treatment often combines various interventions, making it difficult to identify single effective measures. At our clinic, specialized in spine surgery, the care of the patients with lumbar spinal stenosis starts with a 4 months training program when the patient typically uses a stationary bike at a circulatory load of about 70% of maximal capacity. Need of surgery is evaluated after the training period. The present study compares oxygen uptake capacity and walking capacity before and after the training period. The main findings are: no clear correlation between change of oxygen uptake capacity and change of walking distance; no correlation between individual cauda equina cross-sectional area and improvement of walking distance during the training program; almost half of the patients who completed the training program felt their lumbar spinal stenosis symptoms improved to such an extent that surgery was not required (26/54).

  12. Spinal brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Tali, E Turgut; Koc, A Murat; Oner, A Yusuf

    2015-05-01

    Spinal involvement in human brucellosis is a common condition and a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in endemic areas, because it is often associated with therapeutic failure. Most chronic brucellosis cases are the result of inadequate treatment of the initial episode. Recognition of spinal brucellosis is challenging. Early diagnosis is important to ensure proper treatment and decrease morbidity and mortality. Radiologic evaluation has gained importance in diagnosis and treatment planning, including interventional procedures and monitoring of all spinal infections.

  13. Generalizable Class Solutions for Treatment Planning of Spinal Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weksberg, David C.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Vu, Khoi N.; Rebueno, Neal C.; Sharp, Hadley J.; Luo, Dershan; Yang, James N.; Shiu, Almon S.; Rhines, Laurence D.; McAleer, Mary Frances; Brown, Paul D.; Chang, Eric L.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: Spinal stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) continues to emerge as an effective therapeutic approach to spinal metastases; however, treatment planning and delivery remain resource intensive at many centers, which may hamper efficient implementation in clinical practice. We sought to develop a generalizable class solution approach for spinal SBRT treatment planning that would allow confidence that a given plan provides optimal target coverage, reduce integral dose, and maximize planning efficiency. Methods and Materials: We examined 91 patients treated with spinal SBRT at our institution. Treatment plans were categorized by lesion location, clinical target volume (CTV) configuration, and dose fractionation scheme, and then analyzed to determine the technically achievable dose gradient. A radial cord expansion was subtracted from the CTV to yield a planning CTV (pCTV) construct for plan evaluation. We reviewed the treatment plans with respect to target coverage, dose gradient, integral dose, conformality, and maximum cord dose to select the best plans and develop a set of class solutions. Results: The class solution technique generated plans that maintained target coverage and improved conformality (1.2-fold increase in the 95% van't Riet Conformation Number describing the conformality of a reference dose to the target) while reducing normal tissue integral dose (1.3-fold decrease in the volume receiving 4 Gy (V{sub 4Gy}) and machine output (19% monitor unit (MU) reduction). In trials of planning efficiency, the class solution technique reduced treatment planning time by 30% to 60% and MUs required by {approx}20%: an effect independent of prior planning experience. Conclusions: We have developed a set of class solutions for spinal SBRT that incorporate a pCTV metric for plan evaluation while yielding dosimetrically superior treatment plans with increased planning efficiency. Our technique thus allows for efficient, reproducible, and high-quality spinal

  14. Eccentric Exercise Leads to Glial Activation but not Apoptosis in Mice Spinal Cords.

    PubMed

    Pereira, B C; Lucas, G; da Rocha, A L; Pauli, J R; Ropelle, E R; Cintra, D; de Souza, C T; Bueno, C R; da Silva, A S

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the effects of 3 overtraining (OT) protocols on the glial activation and apoptosis in the spinal cords of mice. Rodents were divided into control (C; sedentary mice), overtrained by downhill running (OTR/down), overtrained by uphill running (OTR/up) and overtrained by running without inclination (OTR). The incremental load test, ambulation test, exhaustive test and functional behavioural assessment were used as performance evaluation parameters. 36 h after the exhaustive test, the dorsal and ventral parts of the lumbar spinal cord (L4-L6) were dissected for subsequent protein analysis by immunoblotting. The OT protocols led to similar responses of some performance parameters. The ventral glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) protein levels were diminished in the OTR/up and OTR compared to CT and OTR/down groups. The ventral ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba-1), and the dorsal GFAP and Iba-1 protein levels were increased in the OTR/down compared to the other groups. The ratio between the cleaved capase-3/caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-9/caspase-9 measured in the spinal cord were not sensitive to the OT protocols. In summary, the OTR/down activated the glial cells in the motor (i. e. Iba-1) and sensory (i. e. GFAP and Iba-1) neurons without leading to apoptosis.

  15. Exercise for the treatment of depression and anxiety.

    PubMed

    Carek, Peter J; Laibstain, Sarah E; Carek, Stephen M

    2011-01-01

    Depression and anxiety are the most common psychiatric conditions seen in the general medical setting, affecting millions of individuals in the United States. The treatments for depression and anxiety are multiple and have varying degrees of effectiveness. Physical activity has been shown to be associated with decreased symptoms of depression and anxiety. Physical activity has been consistently shown to be associated with improved physical health, life satisfaction, cognitive functioning, and psychological well-being. Conversely, physical inactivity appears to be associated with the development of psychological disorders. Specific studies support the use of exercise as a treatment for depression. Exercise compares favorably to antidepressant medications as a first-line treatment for mild to moderate depression and has also been shown to improve depressive symptoms when used as an adjunct to medications. While not as extensively studied, exercise has been shown to be an effective and cost-efficient treatment alternative for a variety of anxiety disorders. While effective, exercise has not been shown to reduce anxiety to the level achieved by psychopharmaceuticals.

  16. Thermoelectric device for treatment of radiculitis and spinal massage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anatychuk, L. I.; Kobylyansky, R. R.

    2012-06-01

    Results of development of a thermoelectric device that enables controlled cyclic temperature impact on the damaged area of human organism are presented. Unlike the existing medical devices employing direct supply current for thermoelectric module, the present device controls supply current according to time dependence of temperature change assigned by doctor. It is established that such a device is an efficient means of therapy at herniation of intervertebral disks with marked radiculitis and tunicary syndromes, at meningitis, other spinal diseases and back traumas.

  17. Caffeine treatment aggravates secondary degeneration after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cheng-Chang; Jou, I-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in some form of paralysis. Recently, SCI therapy has been focused on preventing secondary injury to reduce both neuroinflammation and lesion size so that functional outcome after an SCI may be improved. Previous studies have shown that adenosine receptors (AR) are a major regulator of inflammation after an SCI. The current study was performed to examine the effect of caffeine, a pan-AR blocker, on spontaneous functional recovery after an SCI. Animals were assigned into 3 groups randomly, including sham, PBS and caffeine groups. The rat SCI was generated by an NYU impactor with a 10 g rod dropped from a 25 mm height at thoracic 9 spinal cord level. Caffeine and PBS were injected daily during the experiment period. Hind limb motor function was evaluated by the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale at 1 week and 4 weeks after the SCI. Spinal cord segments were collected after final behavior evaluation for morphological analysis. The tissue sparing was evaluated by luxol fast blue staining. Immunofluorescence stain was employed to assess astrocyte activation and neurofilament positioning, while microglia activation was examined by immunohistochemistry stain.The results showed that spontaneous functional recovery was blocked after the animals were subjected caffeine daily. Moreover, caffeine administration increased the demyelination area, promoted astrocyte and microglia activation and decreased the quantity of neurofilaments. These findings suggest that the neurotoxicity effect of caffeine may be associated with the inhibition of neural repair and the promotion of neuroinflammation.

  18. Clinical Outcomes of Surgical Treatments for Traumatic Spinal Injuries due to Snowboarding

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Takahiro; Wakahara, Kazuhiko; Matsumoto, Kazu; Hioki, Akira; Shimokawa, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Katsuji; Ogura, Shinji; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To assess treatment outcomes of snowboarding-related spinal and spinal cord injuries. Overview of Literature Snowboarding-related spinal or spinal cord injury have a great impact on social and sporting activities. Methods A retrospective review of 19 cases of surgically treated snowboard-related injury was done. Analyzed parameters included site of injury, type of fracture, peri- and postoperative complications, pre- and postoperative neurological status, activities of daily living, and participation in sports activities at the final follow-up. Results The major site of injury was the thoracolumbar junction caused by fracture-dislocation (13/19 cases). The remaining 6 cases had cervical spine injuries. Over 60% of the patients had Frankel A and B paralysis. All patients were surgically treated by posterior fusion with instrumentation. Five underwent additional anterior fusion. Surgical outcome was restoration of ambulatory capacity in 12 patients (63.2%). Ultimately, 15 patients (78.9%) could return to work. Patients with complete paralysis upon admission showed reduced ambulatory capacity compared to those with incomplete paralysis. None of the patients again participated in any sports activities, including snowboarding. Conclusions Snowboarding-related spinal or spinal cord injury has a great impact on social as well as sports activities. It is necessary to enhance promotion of injury prevention emphasizing the snowboarders' responsibility code. PMID:25705340

  19. Responses of subjects with spinal cord injuries to maximal wheelchair exercise: comparison of discontinuous and continuous protocols.

    PubMed

    Rasche, W; Janssen, T W; Van Oers, C A; Hollander, A P; Van der Woude, L H

    1993-01-01

    Six male subjects with spinal cord injuries (SCI) participated in this investigation to compare peak values of oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (fc), ventilation (VE), respiratory exchange ratio (R) and power output (W) obtained using a discontinuous (DP) and a continuous jump max protocol (JMP) in a maximal wheelchair exercise test on a treadmill. The W increments were achieved by imposing an extra mass upon the wheelchair through a pulley system. The DP involved exercise periods of 3 min separated by 2-min intervals at relative rest. Increments in W consisted of 0.10 or 0.15 W.kg-1 total mass. During the rest intervals no mass was imposed on the wheelchair. The JMP involved an increase in W each minute. Increments and velocity in the JMP were the same as during the exercise periods for DP. Mean peak values for W [99.5 (SD 13.6) W], VO2 [2.13 (SD 0.27) l.min-1, standard temperature and pressure, dry], R [1.25 (SD 0.16)] and VE [82.8 (SD 11.2) l.min-1, body temperature and pressure, saturated] in DP were not different from values observed for W [103.5 (SD 13.1)], VO2 [2.18 (SD 0.31) l.min-1], R [1.17 (SD 0.16)] and VE [78.9 (SD 16.0) l.min-1] in the JMP. The only significant difference was observed for fc: 198 (SD 11) beats.min-1 in DP and 187 (SD 11) beats.min-1 in JMP. The higher values for fc elicited using DP have been discussed. It was concluded that both a DP and a JMP seem to be equally appropriate in determining peak VO2 and peak W in SCI persons.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Case report: management of differential diagnosis and treatment of severe anaphylaxis in the setting of spinal anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Osman, Brian M; Maga, Joni M; Baquero, Sebastian M

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this case report is to educate fellow anesthesiologists of a complicated differential diagnosis for sudden cardiovascular collapse after spinal anesthesia. We report a case where anaphylaxis occurred while under spinal anesthesia and resulted in difficult resuscitation. A 58-year-old woman undergoing bilateral knee replacements under spinal anesthesia experienced sudden seizure and cardiovascular collapse from acute anaphylactic shock while administering a cephalosporin. Local anesthetic toxicity, high spinal, and anaphylaxis were considered due to overlapping of symptoms. Successful resuscitation required prolonged advanced cardiac life support with substantially larger doses of epinephrine. Anaphylactic shock under spinal anesthesia is an acute and life-threatening complication, worsened by the spinal-induced sympathectomy, and aggressive resuscitation is warranted. Despite the presence of overlapping symptoms of differential diagnoses, rapid identification of the cause of cardiovascular collapse is crucial given that resuscitation treatment modalities may conflict. Timing of antibiotic administration should be adjusted for spinal anesthesia cases to allow time to detect possible anaphylaxis.

  1. Comparison of Naloxone and Thyrotropin-Releasing Hormone in the Treatment of Experimental Spinal Injury: Endogenous Opioids and Experimental Spinal Injury.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-30

    For these reasons we evaluated TRH treatment in a feline model of cervical spinal cord injury (8). Animals treated with -1...photomicrograph of lung illustrates severe pulmonary edema. Alveoli are filled with an eosinophilic , proteinaceous fluid. Scattered macrophages are...compression trauma to the feline spinal cord. J Neurosurg 55:200-208, 1981 26. Meyer GA, Berman IR, Dote DB, et al: Hemodynamic responses to acute

  2. [Flexible endoscopy in surgical treatment of spinal adhesive arachnoiditis and arachnoid cysts].

    PubMed

    Kashcheev, A A; Arestov, S O; Gushcha, A O

    2013-01-01

    Thecaloscopy is less invasive exploration of spinal subarachnoid space with ultra-thin flexible endoscope and endoscopic fenestration of scars and adhesions. Thecalopscopy was used in Russian neurosurgery at the first time. Since 2009 we operated 32 patients with following diagnosis: 17--spinal adhesive arachnoiditis (8--local forms, 9--diffuse forms), 12--spinal arachnoid cysts (7--posstraumatic cysts, 5--idiopathic cysts), 3--extramedullary tumors (thecaloscopic videoassistance and biopsy). In all cases we realized exploration of subarachnoid space and pathologic lesion with endoscopic perforation of cyst or dissection of adhesions using special instrumentation. Mean follow-up in our group was 11.4 months. Neurological improvement (mean 1.4 by modified Frankel scale, 1.8 by Ashworth spasticity scale) was seen in 87% of patients operated for spinal arachnopathies. Temporary neurological deterioration (mild disturbances of deep sensitivity) was seen in 9% of patients and managed successfully with conservative treatment. 1 (3.1%) patient was operated 3 times because of relapse of adhesions. There were no serious intraoperative complications (e.g., serious bleeding, dura perforation etc). Postoperative complications included 1 CSF leakage and 1 postoperative neuralgic pain. Mean term of hospitalization was 7.6 days. According to our data, we suppose that thecaloscopy is efficient and safe method, and should be widely used for spinal arachnopaties, adhesive arachnoiditis and arachnoid cysts. Taking into account that adhesive spinal arachnoiditis is systemic process and spinal arachnoid cysts can be extended as well, thecaloscopy may be regarded as the most radical and less-invasive way of surgical treatment existing currently in neurosurgery.

  3. Efficacy of Epidural Injections in the Treatment of Lumbar Central Spinal Stenosis: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Kaye, Alan David; Manchikanti, Kavita; Boswell, Mark; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Hirsch, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Context: Lumbar central spinal stenosis is common and often results in chronic persistent pain and disability, which can lead to multiple interventions. After the failure of conservative treatment, either surgical or nonsurgical modalities such as epidural injections are contemplated in the management of lumbar spinal stenosis. Evidence Acquisition: Recent randomized trials, systematic reviews and guidelines have reached varying conclusions about the efficacy of epidural injections in the management of central lumbar spinal stenosis. The aim of this systematic review was to determine the efficacy of all three anatomical epidural injection approaches (caudal, interlaminar, and transforaminal) in the treatment of lumbar central spinal stenosis. A systematic review was performed on randomized trials published from 1966 to July 2014 of all types of epidural injections used in the management of lumbar central spinal stenosis. Methodological quality assessment and grading of the evidence was performed. Results: The evidence in managing lumbar spinal stenosis is Level II for long-term improvement for caudal and lumbar interlaminar epidural injections. For transforaminal epidural injections, the evidence is Level III for short-term improvement only. The interlaminar approach appears to be superior to the caudal approach and the caudal approach appears to be superior to the transforaminal one. Conclusions: The available evidence suggests that epidural injections with local anesthetic alone or with local anesthetic with steroids offer short- and long-term relief of low back and lower extremity pain for patients with lumbar central spinal stenosis. However, the evidence is Level II for the long-term efficacy of caudal and interlaminar epidural injections, whereas it is Level III for short-term improvement only with transforaminal epidural injections. PMID:25789241

  4. Treatment of Spinal Tuberculosis by Debridement, Interbody Fusion and Internal Fixation via Posterior Approach Only.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ming-xing; Zhang, Hong-qi; Wang, Yu-xiang; Guo, Chao-feng; Liu, Jin-yang

    2016-02-01

    Surgical treatment for spinal tuberculosis includes focal tuberculosis debridement, segmental stability reconstruction, neural decompression and kyphotic deformity correction. For the lesions mainly involved anterior and middle column of the spine, anterior operation of debridement and fusion with internal fixation has been becoming the most frequently used surgical technique for the spinal tuberculosis. However, high risk of structural damage might relate with anterior surgery, such as damage in lungs, heart, kidney, ureter and bowel, and the deformity correction is also limited. Due to the organs are in the front of spine, there are less complications in posterior approach. Spinal pedicle screw passes through the spinal three-column structure, which provides more powerful orthopedic forces compared with the vertebral body screw, and the kyphotic deformity correction effect is better in posterior approach. In this paper, we report a 68-year-old male patient with thoracic tuberculosis who underwent surgical treatment by debridement, interbody fusion and internal fixation via posterior approach only. The patient was placed in prone position under general anesthesia. Posterior midline incision was performed, and the posterior spinal construction was exposed. Then place pedicle screw, and fix one side rod temporarily. Make the side of more bone destruction and larger abscess as lesion debridement side. Resect the unilateral facet joint, and retain contralateral structure integrity. Protect the spinal cord, nerve root. Clear sequestrum, necrotic tissue, abscess of paravertebral and intervertebral space. Specially designed titanium mesh cages or bone blocks were implanted into interbody. Fix both side rods and compress both sides to make the mesh cages and bone blocks tight. Reconstruct posterior column structure with allogeneic bone and autologous bone. Using this technique, the procedures of debridement, spinal cord decompression, deformity correction, bone grafting

  5. Repeated amphetamine treatment alters spinal magnetic resonance signals and pain sensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Lei, Bing-Hsuan; Chen, Jyh-Horng; Yin, Hsiang-Shu

    2014-11-07

    Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI) has been extensively used in studying the structural and functional features of the central nervous system (CNS). Divalent manganese ion (Mn(2+)) not only enhances MRI contrast, but also enters cells via voltage-gated calcium channels or ionotropic glutamate receptors, which represents an index of neural activities. In the current mouse model, following the repeated amphetamine (Amph) treatment, a reduction of reactivity to thermal pain stimulus was noticed. Since the spinal dorsal horn is the first relay station for pain transmission in CNS, we examined the changes of neural activity in the dorsal spinal cord, particularly the superficial dorsal horn, by analyzing manganese-enhanced T1-weighted MR images (T1WIs). Our data revealed a temporal correlation between reduced pain sensitivity and increased MEMR signals in the spinal dorsal horn subsequent to repeated Amph treatments.

  6. The use of pedicle-screw internal fixation for the operative treatment of spinal disorders.

    PubMed

    Gaines, R W

    2000-10-01

    Pedicle screws have dramatically improved the outcomes of spinal reconstruction requiring spinal fusion. Short-segment surgical treatments based on the use of pedicle screws for the treatment of neoplastic, developmental, congenital, traumatic, and degenerative conditions have been proved to be practical, safe, and effective. The Funnel Technique provides a straightforward, direct, and inexpensive way to very safely apply pedicle screws in the cervical, thoracic, or lumbar spine. Carefully applied pedicle-screw fixation does not produce severe or frequent complications. Pedicle-screw fixation can be effectively and safely used wherever a vertebral pedicle can accommodate a pedicle screw--that is, in the cervical, thoracic, or lumbar spine. Training in pedicle-screw application should be standard in orthopaedic training programs since pedicle-screw fixation represents the so-called gold standard of spinal internal fixation.

  7. Temperature Regulation during Upper Body Exercise: Able Bodied and Spinal Cord Injured

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    REFERENCES 1. Asmussen. E. and M . Nielsen. The regulation of the body temperature during work performed with the arms and with the legs. Acta Physiol. Scand...14:373-382. 1947. 2. Astrand. I. Aerobic work capacity in men and women. Acta Physiol. Scand. 49: (Suppl. 169)64-73, 1960. 3. Attia, M . and P. Engel...9:225-228. 1984. 10. Downey. J.A.. H.P. Chiodi and R.C. Darling. Central temperature regulation in the spinal man. J. AppI. Physiol. 22:91-94. 1967

  8. Imaging of post-surgical treatment and of related complications in spinal trauma.

    PubMed

    Caranci, F; Leone, G; Ugga, L; Cesarano, E; Capasso, R; Schipani, S; Bianco, A; Fonio, P; Briganti, F; Brunese, L

    2017-03-01

    Spinal trauma is a devastating event with a high morbidity and mortality. The rationale of imaging is to diagnose the traumatic abnormalities and characterize the type of injury, to estimate the severity of the lesions, to evaluate the potential spinal instability. In case of spinal instability, the goals of operative treatment are decompression of the spinal cord canal and stabilization of the disrupted vertebral column. Particularly, diagnostic imaging, mainly by CT and MR, has a main role in the post-treatment evaluation. The neuroradiological evaluation of the postoperative spine requires a general knowledge of the surgical approach to each spinal region and of the normal temporal evolution of expected postoperative changes. The neuroradiologist should evaluate the devices implanted, their related complications and promptly alert the surgeon of acute complications, mainly vascular and infective. During the follow-up, it is mandatory to know and search chronic complications as pseudomeningocele, accelerated degenerative disease, arachnoiditis, peridural fibrosis. Knowledge of specific complications relating to each surgical approach will assist the neuroradiologist in interpretation of postoperative images.

  9. The Comparative Effects of Spinal and Peripheral Thrust Manipulation and Exercise on Pain Sensitivity and the Relation to Clinical Outcome: A Mechanistic Trial Using a Shoulder Pain Model

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, Rogelio A.; Bialosky, Joel E.; Bishop, Mark D.; Riley, Joseph L.; Robinson, Michael E.; Michener, Lori A.; George, Steven Z.

    2016-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Single-blind randomized trial. OBJECTIVES To compare the effects of cervical and shoulder thrust manipulation (TM) and exercise on pain sensitivity, and to explore associations with clinical outcomes in patients with shoulder pain. BACKGROUND Experimental studies indicate that spinal TM has an influence on central pain processes, supporting its application for treatment of extremity conditions. Direct comparison of spinal and peripheral TM on pain sensitivity has not been widely examined. METHODS Seventy-eight participants with shoulder pain (36 female; mean ± SD age, 39.0 ± 14.5 years) were randomized to receive 3 treatments of cervical TM (n = 26), shoulder TM (n = 27), or shoulder exercise (n = 25) over 2 weeks. Twenty-five healthy participants (13 female; mean ± SD age, 35.2 ± 11.1 years) were assessed to compare pain sensitivity with that in clinical participants at baseline. Primary outcomes were changes in local (eg, shoulder) and remote (eg, tibialis anterior) pressure pain threshold and heat pain threshold occurring over 2 weeks. Secondary outcomes were shoulder pain intensity and patient-rated function at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Analysis-of-variance models and partial-correlation analyses were conducted to examine comparative effects and the relationship between measures. RESULTS At baseline, clinical participants demonstrated lower local (mean difference, −1.63 kg; 95% confidence interval [CI]: −2.40, −0.86) and remote pressure pain threshold (mean difference, −1.96 kg; 95% CI: −3.09, −0.82) and heat pain threshold (mean difference, −1.15°C; 95% CI: −2.06, −0.24) compared to controls, suggesting enhanced pain sensitivity. Following intervention, there were no between-group differences in pain sensitivity or clinical outcome (P>.05). However, improvements were noted, regardless of intervention, for pressure pain threshold (range of mean differences, 0.22–0.32 kg; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.43), heat pain threshold (range of mean

  10. Limited effect of fly-wheel and spinal mobilization exercise countermeasures on lumbar spine deconditioning during 90 d bed-rest in the Toulouse LTBR study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belavý, Daniel L.; Ohshima, Hiroshi; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Rittweger, Jörn; Felsenberg, Dieter

    2011-09-01

    We examined the effect of high-load fly-wheel (targeting the lower-limb musculature and concurrent loading of the spine via shoulder restraints) and spinal movement countermeasures against lumbar spine muscle atrophy, disc and spinal morphology changes and trunk isokinetic torque loss during prolonged bed-rest. Twenty-four male subjects underwent 90 d head-down tilt bed-rest and performed either fly-wheel (FW) exercises every three days, spinal movement exercises in lying five times daily (SpMob), or no exercise (Ctrl). There was no significant impact of countermeasures on losses of isokinetic trunk flexion/extension ( p≥0.65). Muscle volume change by day-89 of bed-rest in the psoas, iliacus, lumbar erector spinae, lumbar multifidus and quadratus lumborum, as measured via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), was statistically similar in all three groups ( p≥0.33). No significant effect on MRI-measures of lumbar intervertebral disc volume, spinal length and lordosis ( p≥0.09) were seen either, but there was some impact ( p≤0.048) on axial plane disc dimensions (greater reduction than in Ctrl) and disc height (greater increases than in Ctrl). MRI-data from subjects measured 13 and 90-days after bed-rest showed partial recovery of the spinal extensor musculature by day-13 after bed-rest with this process complete by day-90. Some changes in lumbar spine and disc morphology parameters were still persistent 90-days after bed-rest. The present results indicate that the countermeasures tested were not optimal to maintain integrity of the spine and trunk musculature during bed rest.

  11. Exploring patient satisfaction: a secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial of spinal manipulation, home exercise, and medication for acute and subacute neck pain

    PubMed Central

    Leininger, Brent D; Evans, Roni; Bronfort, Gert

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to assess satisfaction with specific aspects of care for acute neck pain and explore the relationship between satisfaction with care, neck pain and global satisfaction. Methods This study was a secondary analysis of patient satisfaction from a randomized trial of spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) delivered by doctors of chiropractic, home exercise and advice (HEA) delivered by exercise therapists, and medication (MED) prescribed by a medical physician for acute/subacute neck pain. Differences in satisfaction with specific aspects of care were analyzed using a linear mixed model. The relationship between specific aspects of care and 1) change in neck pain (primary outcome of the randomized trial) and 2) global satisfaction were assessed using Pearson’s correlation and multiple linear regression. Results Individuals receiving SMT or HEA were more satisfied with the information and general care received than MED group participants. SMT and HEA groups reported similar satisfaction with information provided during treatment; however, the SMT group was more satisfied with general care. Satisfaction with general care (r=−0.75 to −0.77, R2= 0.55 to 0.56) had a stronger relationship with global satisfaction compared to satisfaction with information provided (r=−0.65 to 0.67, R2=0.39 to 0.46). The relationship between satisfaction with care and neck pain was weak (r=0.17 to 0.38, R2=0.08 to 0.21). Conclusions Individuals with acute/subacute neck pain were more satisfied with specific aspects of care from SMT delivered by doctors of chiropractic or HEA interventions compared to MED prescribed by a medical physician. PMID:25199824

  12. Effect of antioxidant treatment on spinal GABA neurons in a neuropathic pain model in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Yowtak, June; Wang, Jigong; Kim, Hee Young; Lu, Ying; Chung, Kyungsoon; Chung, Jin Mo

    2013-11-01

    One feature of neuropathic pain is a reduced spinal gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibitory function. However, the mechanisms behind this attenuation remain to be elucidated. This study investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species in the spinal GABA neuron loss and reduced GABA neuron excitability in spinal nerve ligation (SNL) model of neuropathic pain in mice. The importance of spinal GABAergic inhibition in neuropathic pain was tested by examining the effects of intrathecally administered GABA receptor agonists and antagonists in SNL and naïve mice, respectively. The effects of SNL and antioxidant treatment on GABA neuron loss and functional changes were examined in transgenic GAD67-enhanced green fluorescent protein positive (EGFP+) mice. GABA receptor agonists transiently reversed mechanical hypersensitivity of the hind paw in SNL mice. On the other hand, GABA receptor antagonists made naïve mice mechanically hypersensitive. Stereological analysis showed that the numbers of enhanced green fluorescent protein positive (EGFP+) GABA neurons were significantly decreased in the lateral superficial laminae (I-II) on the ipsilateral L5 spinal cord after SNL. Repeated antioxidant treatments significantly reduced the pain behaviors and prevented the reduction in EGFP+ GABA neurons. The response rate of the tonic firing GABA neurons recorded from SNL mice increased with antioxidant treatment, whereas no change was seen in those recorded from naïve mice, which suggested that oxidative stress impaired some spinal GABA neuron activity in the neuropathic pain condition. Together the data suggest that neuropathic pain, at least partially, is attributed to oxidative stress, which induces both a GABA neuron loss and dysfunction of surviving GABA neurons.

  13. Pain and quality of life in patients undergoing radiotherapy for spinal metastatic disease treatment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiotherapy is an important tool in the control of pain in patients with spinal metastatic disease. We aimed to evaluate pain and of quality of life of patients with spinal metastatic disease undergoing radiotherapy with supportive treatment. Methods The study enrolled 30 patients. From January 2008 to January 2010, patients selection included those treated with a 20 Gy tumour dose in five fractions. Patients completed the visual analogue scale for pain assessment and the SF-36 questionnaire for quality of life assessment. Results The most frequent primary sites were breast, multiple myeloma, prostate and lymphoma. It was found that 14 spinal metastatic disease patients (46.66%) had restricted involvement of three or fewer vertebrae, while 16 patients (53.33%) had cases involving more than three vertebrae. The data from the visual analogue scale evaluation of pain showed that the average initial score was 5.7 points, the value 30 days after the end of radiotherapy was 4.60 points and the average value 6 months after treatment was 4.25 points. Notably, this final value was 25.43% lower than the value from the initial analysis. With regard to the quality of life evaluation, only the values for the functional capability and social aspects categories of the questionnaire showed significant improvement. Conclusion Radiotherapy with supportive treatment appears to be an important tool for the treatment of pain in patients with spinal metastatic disease. PMID:23418821

  14. Evidence-based practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of lumbar spinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Robert L

    2016-12-16

    Low back pain remains one of the most common patient complaints. It can exist alone or with the presence of lower extremity symptoms. Review of evidence-based guidelines will assist primary care providers in the identification and treatment of various lumbar disorders in addition to ruling out specific lumbar spinal pathologies.

  15. Chronic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: The Role of Immunogenetics and Time of Injury Pain Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    elicits a number of changes in the activity, properties and transmitter content of pain -pathway neurons2. This central sensitization to nociceptive ...AD______ Award Number: W81XHW-11-1-0806 TITLE: Chronic pain following spinal cord injury. The...role of immunogenetics and time of injury pain treatment. PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Mark Hutchinson CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The

  16. [Prophylaxis and treatment of arterial hypotension during caesarean with spinal anaesthesia].

    PubMed

    Arias, J; Lacassie, H J

    2013-11-01

    Caesarean section is one of the most common surgical procedures worldwide. Arterial hypotension is the most prevalent adverse effect after spinal anaesthesia. Various methods have been used to prevent or treat hypotension. Since there is no treatment 100% effective by itself, a multimodal management is required to achieve an optimum balance and avoidance of hemodynamic imbalance. Strategies to avoid this side effect are analyzed on the basis of the best evidence available so far, summarized as mechanical factors, anesthetics, fluids and vasopressors. After spinal anaesthesia for caesarean section, the best strategy available for prevention of hypotension appears to be the combination of crystalloids along with an alpha 1 agonist vasopressor.

  17. Minocycline treatment inhibits microglial activation and alters spinal levels of endocannabinoids in a rat model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    Guasti, Leonardo; Richardson, Denise; Jhaveri, Maulik; Eldeeb, Khalil; Barrett, David; Elphick, Maurice R; Alexander, Stephen PH; Kendall, David; Michael, Gregory J; Chapman, Victoria

    2009-01-01

    Activation of spinal microglia contributes to aberrant pain responses associated with neuropathic pain states. Endocannabinoids (ECs) are present in the spinal cord, and inhibit nociceptive processing; levels of ECs may be altered by microglia which modulate the turnover of endocannabinoids in vitro. Here, we investigate the effect of minocycline, an inhibitor of activated microglia, on levels of the endocannabinoids anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG), and the related compound N-palmitoylethanolamine (PEA), in neuropathic spinal cord. Selective spinal nerve ligation (SNL) in rats resulted in mechanical allodynia and the presence of activated microglia in the ipsilateral spinal cord. Chronic daily treatment with minocycline (30 mg/kg, ip for 14 days) significantly reduced the development of mechanical allodynia at days 5, 10 and 14 post-SNL surgery, compared to vehicle-treated SNL rats (P < 0.001). Minocycline treatment also significantly attenuated OX-42 immunoreactivity, a marker of activated microglia, in the ipsilateral (P < 0.001) and contralateral (P < 0.01) spinal cord of SNL rats, compared to vehicle controls. Minocycline treatment significantly (P < 0.01) decreased levels of 2-AG and significantly (P < 0.01) increased levels of PEA in the ipsilateral spinal cord of SNL rats, compared to the contralateral spinal cord. Thus, activation of microglia affects spinal levels of endocannabinoids and related compounds in neuropathic pain states. PMID:19570201

  18. Physical exercise is associated with better fat mass distribution and lower insulin resistance in spinal cord injured individuals

    PubMed Central

    D’Oliveira, Giselle Louise C.; Figueiredo, Flávia A.; Passos, Magna Cottini Fonseca; Chain, Amina; Bezerra, Flávia F.; Koury, Josely Correa

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to compare total and regional body composition and their relationship with glucose homeostasis in physically active and non-active individuals with cervical spinal cord injury (c-SCI). Methods Individuals with lesion level between C5–C7 were divided into two groups: physically active (PA; n = 14; who practiced physical exercise for at least 3 months, three times per week or more, minimum of 150 minutes/week): and non-physically active (N-PA n = 8). Total fat mass (t-FM) and regional fat mass (r-FM) were assessed by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. Fasting plasma insulin (FPI) was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results PA group present lower (P < 0.01) total fat mass (t-FM), % and kg, regional fat mass (r-FM), % and kg, FPI levels and HOMA index, while they had higher (P < 0.001) total free fat mass (t-FFM), %, and regional free fat mass (r-FFM), %, compared to the N-PA group. In the N-PA group, FPI and HOMA index were negatively (P < 0.05) correlated with FFM% (r = −0.71, −0.69, respectively) and positively correlated to trunk-FM (r = 0.71, 0.69, respectively) and trunk-FM:t-FM (kg) ratio (r = 0.83, 0.79, respectively). Conclusion Physical exercise is associated with lower t-FM, r-FM, and insulin resistance, which could contribute to the decrease of the risk of cardiovascular and metabolic conditions in individuals with c-SCI. PMID:24090139

  19. Delayed Imatinib Treatment for Acute Spinal Cord Injury: Functional Recovery and Serum Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Anja; Hao, Jingxia; Wellfelt, Katrin; Josephson, Anna; Svensson, Camilla I.; Wiesenfeld-Hallin, Zsuzsanna; Eriksson, Ulf; Abrams, Mathew

    2015-01-01

    Abstract With no currently available drug treatment for spinal cord injury, there is a need for additional therapeutic candidates. We took the approach of repositioning existing pharmacological agents to serve as acute treatments for spinal cord injury and previously found imatinib to have positive effects on locomotor and bladder function in experimental spinal cord injury when administered immediately after the injury. However, for imatinib to have translational value, it needs to have sustained beneficial effects with delayed initiation of treatment, as well. Here, we show that imatinib improves hind limb locomotion and bladder recovery when initiation of treatment was delayed until 4 h after injury and that bladder function was improved with a delay of up to 24 h. The treatment did not induce hypersensitivity. Instead, imatinib-treated animals were generally less hypersensitive to either thermal or mechanical stimuli, compared with controls. In an effort to provide potential biomarkers, we found serum levels of three cytokines/chemokines—monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-3α, and keratinocyte chemoattractant/growth-regulated oncogene (interleukin 8)—to increase over time with imatinib treatment and to be significantly higher in injured imatinib-treated animals than in controls during the early treatment period. This correlated to macrophage activation and autofluorescence in lymphoid organs. At the site of injury in the spinal cord, macrophage activation was instead reduced by imatinib treatment. Our data strengthen the case for clinical trials of imatinib by showing that initiation of treatment can be delayed and by identifying serum cytokines that may serve as candidate markers of effective imatinib doses. PMID:25914996

  20. Giant extramedullary arteriovenous fistula supplied by the anterior spinal artery: treatment by detachable balloons.

    PubMed

    Riché, M C; Scialfa, G; Gueguen, B; Merland, J J

    1983-01-01

    A case of a large extramedullary arteriovenous fistula in a young man, which was deemed inoperable, is described. The fistula was mainly supplied by the anterior spinal artery and was responsible for a progressive myeloradicular syndrome. Successful treatment with detachable balloons was carried out. Along with this case report, a review is made of the different types of extramedullary arteriovenous fistulas and their treatment based upon 11 cases seen at Lariboisière Hospital: type 1 is a plain small fistula where embolization is contraindicated; type 2 shows an enlarged anterior spinal artery with dysplastic vein and may be embolized with solid particles; type 3 is a very large multipediculated fistula where the best treatment seems to be detachable balloons. The indications for using detachable balloons for temporary occlusion and for definitive treatment are reviewed. Special emphasis is placed on the possibility of detaching balloons without the need for a coaxial catheter.

  1. Rationale for Using Exercise in the Treatment of Stimulant Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Greer, Tracy L.; Ring, Kolette M.; Warden, Diane; Grannemann, Bruce D.; Church, Timothy S.; Somoza, Eugene; Blair, Steven N.; Szapocznik, Jose; Stoutenberg, Mark; Rethorst, Chad; Walker, Robrina; Morris, David W.; Kosinski, Andrzej S.; Kyle, Tiffany; Marcus, Bess; Crowell, Becca; Oden, Neal; Nunes, Edward; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2013-01-01

    Novel approaches to the treatment of stimulant abuse and dependence are needed. Clinical data examining the use of exercise as a treatment for the abuse of nicotine, alcohol, and other substances suggest that exercise may be a beneficial treatment for stimulant abuse. In addition, exercise has been associated with improvements in many other health-related areas that may be adversely affected by stimulant use or its treatment, such as sleep disturbance, cognitive function, mood, weight, quality of life, and anhedonia. Neurobiological evidence provides plausible mechanisms by which exercise could positively affect treatment outcomes in stimulant abuse. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) Clinical Trials Network (CTN) CTN-0037 Stimulant Reduction Intervention using Dosed Exercise (STRIDE) study is a multisite randomized clinical trial that compares exercise to health education as potential treatments for stimulant abuse or dependence. If effective, exercise may provide an additional approach to the treatment of stimulant use disorders. PMID:25364477

  2. Successful treatment of SAPHO syndrome with severe spinal disorder using entercept: a case study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L L; Zhao, J X; Liu, X Y

    2012-07-01

    SAPHO syndrome (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) is a rare disease. Presently, there is no treatment guideline for this illness. Several studies suggested entercept, a novel biological agent against tumor necrosis factor-alpha, is effective in treating SAPHO syndrome. We report a case in which the clinical conditions of a middle-aged female patient diagnosed with SAPHO syndrome, with noted spinal disorder, improved significantly after receiving entercept treatment. The patient remained stable after 3-month follow-up.

  3. Locomotor recovery after spinal cord contusion injury in rats is improved by spontaneous exercise.

    PubMed

    Van Meeteren, Nico L U; Eggers, Ruben; Lankhorst, Alex J; Gispen, Willem Hendrik; Hamers, Frank P T

    2003-10-01

    We have recently shown that enriched environment (EE) housing significantly enhances locomotor recovery following spinal cord contusion injury (SCI) in rats. As the type and intensity of locomotor training with EE housing are rather poorly characterized, we decided to compare the effectiveness of EE housing with that of voluntary wheel running, the latter of which is both well characterized and easily quantified. Female Wistar rats were made familiar with three types of housing conditions, social housing (nine together) in an EE (EHC), individual housing in a running wheel cage (RUN, n = 8), and standard housing two together (CON, n = 10). Subsequently, a 12.5 gcm SCI at Th8 was produced and animals were randomly divided over the three housing conditions. Locomotor function was measured regularly, once a week by means of the BBB score, BBB sub score, TLH test, Gridwalk test, and CatWalk test. In the RUN group, daily distance covered was also measured. Locomotor recovery in the EHC and the RUN groups was equal and significantly better than in the CON group. The extent of recovery at 8 weeks post injury in the RUN group did not correlate with distance covered. We conclude that locomotor training needs to exceed a given threshold in order to be effective in enhancing locomotor recovery in this experimental model, but that once this threshold is exceeded no further improvement occurs, and that the specificity of locomotor training plays little role.

  4. New products tissue-engineering in the treatment of spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshakov, I. N.; Sergienko, V. I.; Kiselev, S. L.; Lagarkova, M. A.; Remigaylo, A. A.; Mihaylov, A. A.; Prokopenko, S. V.

    2015-11-01

    In the treatment of patients with complicated spinal cord injury the Russian Health spends about one million rubles for each patient in the acute and the interim period after the injury. The number of complicated spinal cord injury is different in geographical areas Russian Federation from 30 to 50 people per 1 million that is affected by the year 5600. Applied to the present surgical and pharmacological techniques provide unsatisfactory results or minimally effective treatment. Transplantation of 100 thousand neuronal mouse predecessors (24 rats) or human neuronal predecessors (18 rats) in the anatomical gap rat spinal cord, followed by analysis of neurological deficit. The neuro-matrix implantation in the rat spinal cord containing 100 thousand neuronal precursors hESC, repeatable control neuro-matrix transplantation, non-cell mass, eliminating neurological deficit for 14 weeks after transplantation about 5-9 points on the scale of the BBB. The cultivation under conditions in vitro human induced pluripotent stem cells on collagen-chitosan matrix (hIPSC) showed that neurons differentiated from induced pluripotent stem cells grown on scaffolds as compact groups and has no neurites. Cells do not penetrate into the matrix during long-term cultivation and formed near the surface of the spherical structures resembling neurospheres. At least 90% of the cells were positive for the neuronal marker tubulin b3. Further studies should be performed to examine the compatibility of neuronal cultures and matrices.

  5. Moving towards treatments for spinal muscular atrophy: hopes and limits.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Brunhilde; Barkats, Martine; Martinat, Cecile; Sendtner, Michael; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2015-09-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), one of the most frequent and devastating genetic disorders causing neuromuscular degeneration, has reached the forefront of clinical translation. The quite unique genetic situation of SMA patients, who lack functional SMN1 but carry the misspliced SMN2 copy gene, creates the possibility of correcting SMN2 splicing by antisense oligonucleotides or drugs. Both strategies showed impressive results in pre-clinical trials and are now in Phase II-III clinical trials. SMN gene therapy approaches using AAV9-SMN vectors are also highly promising and have entered a Phase I clinical trial. However, careful analysis of SMA animal models and patients has revealed some limitations that need to be taken very seriously, including: i) a limited time-window for successful therapy delivery, making neonatal screening of SMA mandatory; ii) multi-organ impairment, requiring systemic delivery of therapies; and iii) a potential need for combined therapies that both increase SMN levels and target pathways that preserve/rescue motor neuron function over the lifespan. Meeting these challenges will likely be crucial to cure SMA, instead of only ameliorating symptoms, particularly in its most severe form. This review discusses therapies currently in clinical trials, the hopes for SMA therapy, and the potential limitations of these new approaches.

  6. Spinal infections.

    PubMed

    Tay, Bobby K-B; Deckey, Jeffrey; Hu, Serena S

    2002-01-01

    Spinal infections can occur in a variety of clinical situations. Their presentation ranges from the infant with diskitis who is unwilling to crawl or walk to the adult who develops an infection after a spinal procedure. The most common types of spinal infections are hematogenous bacterial or fungal infections, pediatric diskitis, epidural abscess, and postoperative infections. Prompt and accurate diagnosis of spinal infections, the cornerstone of treatment, requires a high index of suspicion in at-risk patients and the appropriate evaluation to identify the organism and determine the extent of infection. Neurologic function and spinal stability also should be carefully evaluated. The goals of therapy should include eradicating the infection, relieving pain, preserving or restoring neurologic function, improving nutrition, and maintaining spinal stability.

  7. Exercise responses and adaptations in rowers and spinal cord injury individuals.

    PubMed

    Hagerman, Fredrick; Jacobs, Patrick; Backus, Deborah; Dudley, Gary A

    2006-05-01

    Elite rowers (ROWERS) and those who have had a spinal cord injury (SCI) are different physically in many realms. Both have physical activity histories that affect their lower-extremity extensor muscles in a dramatically different fashion. ROWERS can sustain a 500-W power output during their 5- to 6-min race. After a complete SCI, a 75-W power output might be achieved during a VO(2peak) test. Elite SCI wheelchair racers can achieve a higher value that is similar to that of a sedentary able-bodied person. ROWERS can attain a VO(2 max) of more than 7.5 L.min(-1) and can tolerate a blood lactate of 30 mmol.L(-1). After a complete SCI in which muscles become markedly atrophied, a peak VO(2) of 2 L.min(-1) and a blood lactate of 10 mmol.L(-1) might be achieved. ROWERS rely on the 75% slow-twitch fiber composition of their trained thigh muscles to train and race. Such activity modestly increases fiber size and markedly increases mitochondrial content. After a complete SCI, affected muscle fibers markedly atrophy, maintain most of their mitochondrial content, and become fast-twitch. These data suggest remarkable plasticity of physical function to the extreme that a marked increase in energy demanding, rather continuous physical activity can make a muscle more "slow-twitch"; so it will demand less energy when contracted. In contrast, SCI eventually causes muscle to be composed of more fast-twitch fibers. Molecular biologists may explain why fast-twitch fibers, which appear ideal for some athletes because of their high power output, are abundant in muscles that are seldom recruited. Until then, our results indicate that the fiber type composition of muscle in humans is stable unless extreme alterations in physical activity are endured.

  8. Lumbar Thrust Manipulation and Exercise for the Treatment of Mechanical Low Back Pain in Adolescents: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Walston, Zachary; Yake, Dale

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Case series. Background Low back pain (LBP) is an increasing problem in health care. The evidence for the use of spinal manipulative therapy to treat pediatric patients with LBP is minimal. The treatment of pediatrics with manual therapy, particularly spinal manipulation, is controversial within the medical community, primarily with respect to adverse events. The purpose of this case series was to illustrate the feasibility and safety of lumbar manipulation plus exercise in the adolescent population with mechanical LBP. Case Description Three patients-a 13-year-old adolescent girl, 15-year-old adolescent girl, and 13-year-old adolescent boy-were treated in an outpatient physical therapy setting for mechanical LBP. All 3 patients were assessed using a lumbar manipulation clinical prediction rule and treated with sidelying lumbar manipulation and exercise. Outcomes Patients were treated for a total of 10 to 14 visits over a course of 8 to 9 weeks. Pain (measured by a numeric pain-rating scale) and disability (measured by the modified Oswestry Disability Index) improved to 0/10 and 0%, respectively, in each patient. No adverse reactions to manipulation were reported. Discussion The results of this case series describe the use of lumbar thrust manipulation and exercise for the treatment of mechanical LBP in adolescents. The positive results indicate that lumbar manipulation may be a safe adjunct therapy. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, are needed to determine effectiveness. Level of Evidence Therapy, level 4. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(5):391-398. Epub 6 Apr 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6366.

  9. FK506 treatment inhibits caspase-3 activation and promotes oligodendroglial survival following traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Nottingham, Stephanie; Knapp, Pamela; Springer, Joe

    2002-09-01

    The focus of this study is to examine the ability of FK506, an immunosuppressant that inhibits calcineurin activation, to limit caspase-3 activation in oligodendroglia following spinal cord injury (SCI). To better establish a role for calcineurin and caspase-3 activation in oligodendroglia following SCI, rats received a contusion injury to the spinal cord followed by treatment with FK506 or rapamycin (another immunosuppressant with no detectable inhibitory action on calcineurin activation). Animals were then sacrificed at 8 days postinjury and spinal cord tissue was processed using immunofluorescence histochemistry to examine cellular caspase-3 activation in ventral and dorsal white matter. In all treatment groups, numerous oligodendroglia were found to express the activated form of caspase-3 in regions proximal and distal to the injury epicenter. However, our findings suggest that treatment with FK506, but not rapamycin reduces the number of oligodendroglia expressing activated caspase-3 and increases the number of surviving oligodendroglia in dorsal white matter. These results provide initial evidence that agents that reduce the actions of calcineurin and subsequent caspase-3 activation may prove beneficial in the treatment of traumatic SCI.

  10. Optimising treatment strategies in spinal ependymoma based on 20years of experience at a single centre.

    PubMed

    Keil, Vera C; Schmitt, Anne J; Martin, Sean C; Cadoux-Hudson, Tom A D; Pereira, Erlick A C

    2016-07-01

    Spinal ependymomas are rare tumours, with total resection favoured where possible. Several case series assessing the outcome following neurosurgical treatment for spinal ependymoma advocate the usage of adjuvant radiotherapy in cases of subtotal resection, or in unencapsulated tumours. We assessed the outcome of 61 consecutive cases of spinal ependymoma in a single centre over a 20year period using a variety of outcome measures. Sex distribution was equal, with a mean age at surgery of 43.6years (range 5-76years). Overall, most tumours occurred in the lumbosacral region (70.5%), with fewer in the thoracic (27.9%) and cervical regions (18.0%). Myxopapillary features were seen in 41.0% of tumours, and were more common when occurring in the lumbar region (51.2%). Gross total resection was achieved in 52.5%, subtotal resection in 37.7% and biopsy alone in 9.8% of patients and 31.1% received adjuvant radiotherapy. Two-thirds of patients achieved an excellent post-operative neurological outcome (Frankel grade E). Tumour recurrence was rare. Gross total resection and good preoperative neurological condition were most strongly predictive of good outcome. Post-operative radiotherapy did not seem to confer survival benefit in this case series, even in cases of incomplete resection, leading us to question its utility for all cases of spinal cord ependymoma.

  11. Ventilatory thresholds during wheelchair exercise in individuals with spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Coutts, K D; McKenzie, D C

    1995-07-01

    The ventilatory thresholds of 30 male wheelchair athletes were determined from their respiratory and metabolic responses to a continuously progressive exercise protocol to peak oxygen uptake on a wheelchair ergometer. The peak oxygen uptake (peak VO2), ventilatory threshold in 1 min-1 (VTL), and ventilatory threshold expressed as a percentage of peak VO2 (VT%) were measured for all subjects. Statistical analyses of selected subsamples were used to note sport and functional ability level differences in these variables. Analysis of peak VO2 by functional classification (old International Stoke Mandeville Games Federation system; classes 1A-5, plus an amputee class) indicated that paraplegic (classes 2-5) and the amputee class athletes (2.48 1 min-1) were higher than tetraplegic (classes 1A-1C) athletes (0.95 1 min-1). The paraplegic and amputee classes were combined for a comparison of peak VO2 by sport which showed that track athletes (2.80 1 min-1) were higher than basketball players (2.41 1 min-1) who were higher than athletes from other sports (1.88 1 min-1). The VTL analyses demonstrated differences similar to the peak VO2 analyses. The VT% analyses, however, showed no sport differences, but the tetraplegic athletes had higher VT% values (87%) than the paraplegic plus amputee group (69%).

  12. Contemporary treatment with radiosurgery for spine metastasis and spinal cord compression in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Hannah; Stessin, Alexander; Gutman, Fred; Rosiello, Arthur; Davis, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    With the progress of image-guided localization, body immobilization system, and computerized delivery of intensity-modulated radiation delivery, it became possible to perform spine radiosurgery. The next question is how to translate the high technology treatment to the clinical application. Clinical trials have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of spine radiosurgery and efficacy of the treatment in the setting of spine metastasis, leading to the randomized trials by a cooperative group. Radiosurgery has also demonstrated its efficacy to decompress the spinal cord compression in selected group of patients. The experience indicates that spine radiosurgery has a potential to change the clinical practice in the management of spine metastasis and spinal cord compression. PMID:25874172

  13. Spinal epidural abscess associated with infliximab treatment for psoriatic arthritis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam P; Musacchio, Michael J; O'Toole, John E

    2008-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors are used to treat numerous chronic inflammatory and rheumatological diseases, such as Crohn disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. Because the mechanism of these inhibitors is to decrease the body's inflammatory response, the primary complication of treatment is infection. The authors present the first case of a spinal epidural abscess in a patient receiving long-term infliximab therapy for severe psoriatic arthritis. Infliximab and its side-effect profile are discussed, along with other associated complications.

  14. Treatment of Spinal Epidural Abscess and Predisposing Factors of Motor Weakness: Experience with 48 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Min-Wook; Kwon, Hyon-Jo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Koh, Hyeon-Song; Youm, Jin-Young; Song, Shi-Hun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) can be fatal if untreated, so early diagnosis and treatment are essential. We conducted a retrospective study to define its clinical features and evaluate the risk factors of motor weakness. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records and images of patients with SEA who had been hospitalized in our institute from January 2005 to June 2012. Pyogenic SEA patients were categorized as patients without motor weakness (Group A) and with motor weakness (Group B). Abscess volume was measured using the Gamma-Plan program. Intervertebral foramen height and posterior disc height were measured to evaluate degree of spinal stenosis. Results Of 48 patients with pyogenic SEA, 33 (68%) were treated surgically, and 15 (32%) were treated with antibiotics. Eleven patients had weakness and abscess volume was unrelated to motor weakness. Old age, 'spare room' (abscess volume subtracted from spinal volume) and intervertebral foramen height and posterior disc height were statistically significant. Among the 48 patients, 43 (85%) had good outcome and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was the only meaningful prognostic factor (p=0.014). The cut-off value of ESR was 112mm/h with 80% sensitivity and 79% specificity and had borderline significance (p=0.062). Conclusion SEA needs emergent diagnosis and treatment. Motor weakness is the most important factor in treatment decision. By careful image reading, early surgical treatment can be an option for selected patients with severe spinal stenosis for prevent motor weakness. Inflammatory markers, especially ESR, are valuable to identify worsening of SEA. PMID:26512265

  15. Inverse treatment planning for spinal robotic radiosurgery: an international multi-institutional benchmark trial.

    PubMed

    Blanck, Oliver; Wang, Lei; Baus, Wolfgang; Grimm, Jimm; Lacornerie, Thomas; Nilsson, Joakim; Luchkovskyi, Sergii; Cano, Isabel Palazon; Shou, Zhenyu; Ayadi, Myriam; Treuer, Harald; Viard, Romain; Siebert, Frank-Andre; Chan, Mark K H; Hildebrandt, Guido; Dunst, Jürgen; Imhoff, Detlef; Wurster, Stefan; Wolff, Robert; Romanelli, Pantaleo; Lartigau, Eric; Semrau, Robert; Soltys, Scott G; Schweikard, Achim

    2016-05-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is the accurate, conformal delivery of high-dose radiation to well-defined targets while minimizing normal structure doses via steep dose gradients. While inverse treatment planning (ITP) with computerized optimization algorithms are routine, many aspects of the planning process remain user-dependent. We performed an international, multi-institutional benchmark trial to study planning variability and to analyze preferable ITP practice for spinal robotic radiosurgery. 10 SRS treatment plans were generated for a complex-shaped spinal metastasis with 21 Gy in 3 fractions and tight constraints for spinal cord (V14Gy<2 cc, V18Gy<0.1 cc) and target (coverage >95%). The resulting plans were rated on a scale from 1 to 4 (excellent-poor) in five categories (constraint compliance, optimization goals, low-dose regions, ITP complexity, and clinical acceptability) by a blinded review panel. Additionally, the plans were mathematically rated based on plan indices (critical structure and target doses, conformity, monitor units, normal tissue complication probability, and treatment time) and compared to the human rankings. The treatment plans and the reviewers' rankings varied substantially among the participating centers. The average mean overall rank was 2.4 (1.2-4.0) and 8/10 plans were rated excellent in at least one category by at least one reviewer. The mathematical rankings agreed with the mean overall human rankings in 9/10 cases pointing toward the possibility for sole mathematical plan quality comparison. The final rankings revealed that a plan with a well-balanced trade-off among all planning objectives was preferred for treatment by most participants, reviewers, and the mathematical ranking system. Furthermore, this plan was generated with simple planning techniques. Our multi-institutional planning study found wide variability in ITP approaches for spinal robotic radiosurgery. The participants', reviewers', and mathematical match on

  16. Spinal cord injury pressure ulcer treatment: an experience-based approach.

    PubMed

    Sunn, Gabriel

    2014-08-01

    Pressure ulcers continue to impact the lives of spinal cord injury patients severely. Pressure ulcers must be accurately staged according to National Pressure Ulcer Advisory recommendations before treatment design. The first priority in treatment of pressure ulcers is offloading. Intact skin ulcers may be treated with noncontact nonthermal low-frequency ultrasound. Superficial pressure ulcers may be treated with a combination of collagenase and foam dressings. Deeper pressure ulcers warrant negative-pressure wound therapy dressings along with biologic adjuncts to fill in wound depth. Discovery and treatment of osteomyelitis is a high priority when initially evaluating pressure ulcers. Surgical intervention must always be considered.

  17. Robotically assisted treadmill exercise training for improving peak fitness in chronic motor incomplete spinal cord injury: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Scott, William; York, Henry; Theyagaraj, Melita; Price-Miller, Naomi; McQuaid, Jean; Eyvazzadeh, Megan; Ivey, Frederick M.; Macko, Richard F.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effectiveness of robotically assisted body weight supported treadmill training (RABWSTT) for improving cardiovascular fitness in chronic motor incomplete spinal cord injury (CMISCI). Design Pilot prospective randomized, controlled clinical trial. Setting Outpatient rehabilitation specialty hospital. Participants Eighteen individuals with CMISCI with American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) level between C4 and L2 and at least one-year post injury. Interventions CMISCI participants were randomized to RABWSTT or a home stretching program (HSP) three times per week for three months. Those in the home stretching group were crossed over to three months of RABWSTT following completion of the initial three month phase. Outcome measures Peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) was measured during both robotic treadmill walking and arm cycle ergometry: twice at baseline, once at six weeks (mid-training) and twice at three months (post-training). Peak VO2 values were normalized for body mass. Results The RABWSTT group improved peak VO2 by 12.3% during robotic treadmill walking (20.2 ± 7.4 to 22.7 ± 7.5 ml/kg/min, P = 0.018), compared to a non-significant 3.9% within group change observed in HSP controls (P = 0.37). Neither group displayed a significant change in peak VO2 during arm cycle ergometry (RABWSTT, 8.5% (P = 0.25); HSP, 1.76% (P = 0.72)). A repeated measures analysis showed statistically significant differences between treatments for peak VO2 during both robotic treadmill walking (P = 0.002) and arm cycle ergometry (P = 0.001). Conclusion RABWSTT is an effective intervention model for improving peak fitness levels assessed during robotic treadmill walking in persons with CMISCI. PMID:25520035

  18. Strategy in the Surgical Treatment of Primary Spinal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Richard; Foote, Matthew; Deverall, Hamish

    2012-01-01

    Primary spine tumors are rare, accounting for only 4% of all tumors of the spine. A minority of the more common primary benign lesions will require surgical treatment, and most amenable malignant lesions will proceed to attempted resection. The rarity of malignant primary lesions has resulted in a paucity of historical data regarding optimal surgical and adjuvant treatment and, although we now derive benefit from standardized guidelines of overall care, management of each neoplasm often proceeds on a case-by-case basis, taking into account the individual characteristics of patient operability, tumor resectability, and biological potential. This article aims to provide an overview of diagnostic techniques, staging algorithms and the authors' experience of surgical treatment alternatives that have been employed in the care of selected benign and malignant lesions. Although broadly a review of contemporary management, it is hoped that the case illustrations given will serve as additional “arrows in the quiver” of the treating surgeon. PMID:24353976

  19. Behavioral Intervention, Exercise, and Nutrition Education to Improve Health and Fitness (BENEfit) in Adolescents With Mobility Impairment Due to Spinal Cord Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Liusuwan, Rungsinee Amanda; Widman, Lana M; Abresch, Richard Ted; Johnson, Allan J; McDonald, Craig M

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Determine the effects of a nutrition education and exercise intervention on the health and fitness of adolescents with mobility impairment due to spinal cord dysfunction from myelomeningocele and spinal cord injury. Subjects participated in a 16-week intervention consisting of a behavioral approach to lifestyle change, exercise, and nutrition education to improve fitness (BENEfit) program. Participants were given a schedule of aerobic and strengthening exercises and attended nutrition education and behavior modification sessions every other week along with their parent(s). Subjects: Twenty adolescents (aged 11–18 years, mean 15.4 ± 2.2 years) with spinal cord dysfunction. Methods: Subjects were tested immediately prior to starting and upon completion of the program. Aerobic fitness was measured using a ramp protocol with an arm ergometer. Heart rate and oxygen uptake were measured. Values at anaerobic threshold and maximum oxygen uptake were recorded. Peak isokinetic arm and shoulder strength were determined with a dynamometer. Body composition was estimated with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Serum chemistry included measures of cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and triglycerides. Results: Fourteen individuals completed all testing sessions. There was no significant overall change in weight, body mass index, body mass index z-scores, or serum chemistry. Overall, there was a significant increase in whole body lean tissue without a concomitant increase in whole body fat. Fitness measures revealed a significant increase in maximum power output, work efficiency as measured by the amount of power output produced aerobically, and resting oxygen uptake. Strength measurements revealed a significant increase in shoulder extension strength and a trend towards increased shoulder flexion strength. There were no significant changes in high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, total cholesterol, or triglycerides

  20. Robotic Radiosurgery for the Treatment of Intramedullary Spinal Cord Metastases: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Rafael; Sallabanda, Kita; Santa-Olalla, Iciar; Avilés, Lijia; Sallabanda, Morena; Rivin, Eleonor; Samblás, José

    2016-01-01

    Modern technologies allow the delivery of high radiation doses to intramedullary spinal cord metastases while lowering the dose to the neighboring organs at risk. Whether this dosimetric advantage translates into clinical benefit is not well known. This study evaluates the acute and late toxicity outcomes in a patient treated with robotic radiosurgery for an intramedullary spinal cord metastasis. A 50-year-old woman diagnosed in May 2006 with invasive ductal carcinoma of the right breast T2N3M1 (two liver metastases) received chemotherapy with a complete response. Subsequently, she underwent adjuvant whole-breast radiotherapy, along with tamoxifen. After several distant relapses, treated mainly with systemic therapy, the patient developed an intramedullary lesion at the C3-C4 level and was referred to our CyberKnife unit for assessment. A total dose of 14 Gy prescribed to the 74% isodose line was administered to the intramedullary lesion in one fraction. One hundred and two treatment beams were used covering 95.63% of the target volume. The mean dose was 15.93 Gy and the maximum dose, 18.92 Gy. Maximum dose to the spinal cord was 13.96 Gy, V12 ~ 0.13 cc and V8 ~ 0.43 cc. Three months after treatment, magnetic resonance imaging showed a reduction in size and enhancement of the intramedullary lesion with no associated toxicity. During this period, the patient showed a good performance status without neurological deficits. Currently, with a follow-up of 37 months, the patient has the ability to perform activities of daily life. Intramedullary spinal cord metastases is a rare and aggressive disease, often treatment-refractory. Our case demonstrates that radiation therapy delivery with robotic radiosurgery allows the achievement of a high local control without adding toxicity. PMID:27330877

  1. Prolonged Minocycline Treatment Impairs Motor Neuronal Survival and Glial Function in Organotypic Rat Spinal Cord Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pinkernelle, Josephine; Fansa, Hisham; Ebmeyer, Uwe; Keilhoff, Gerburg

    2013-01-01

    Background Minocycline, a second-generation tetracycline antibiotic, exhibits anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects in various experimental models of neurological diseases, such as stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and spinal cord injury. However, conflicting results have prompted a debate regarding the beneficial effects of minocycline. Methods In this study, we analyzed minocycline treatment in organotypic spinal cord cultures of neonatal rats as a model of motor neuron survival and regeneration after injury. Minocycline was administered in 2 different concentrations (10 and 100 µM) at various time points in culture and fixed after 1 week. Results Prolonged minocycline administration decreased the survival of motor neurons in the organotypic cultures. This effect was strongly enhanced with higher concentrations of minocycline. High concentrations of minocycline reduced the number of DAPI-positive cell nuclei in organotypic cultures and simultaneously inhibited microglial activation. Astrocytes, which covered the surface of the control organotypic cultures, revealed a peripheral distribution after early minocycline treatment. Thus, we further analyzed the effects of 100 µM minocycline on the viability and migration ability of dispersed primary glial cell cultures. We found that minocycline reduced cell viability, delayed wound closure in a scratch migration assay and increased connexin 43 protein levels in these cultures. Conclusions The administration of high doses of minocycline was deleterious for motor neuron survival. In addition, it inhibited microglial activation and impaired glial viability and migration. These data suggest that especially high doses of minocycline might have undesired affects in treatment of spinal cord injury. Further experiments are required to determine the conditions for the safe clinical administration of minocycline in spinal cord injured patients. PMID:23967343

  2. Spinal Cord Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... care for people with spinal cord injuries and aggressive treatment and rehabilitation can minimize damage to the ... care for people with spinal cord injuries and aggressive treatment and rehabilitation can minimize damage to the ...

  3. NBQX treatment improves mitochondrial function and reduces oxidative events after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaojun; Azbill, Robert D; Springer, Joe E

    2002-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of inhibiting ionotropic glutamate receptor subtypes on measures of oxidative stress events at acute times following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Rats received a moderate contusion injury and 15 min later were treated with one of two doses of 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6-nitro-2,3-dioxo-benzol[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide disodium (NBQX), MK-801, or the appropriate vehicle. At 4 h following injury, spinal cords were removed and a crude synaptosomal preparation obtained to examine mitochondrial function using the MTT assay, as well as measures of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation, and glutamate and glucose uptake. We report here that intraspinal treatment with either 15 or 30 nmol of NBQX improves mitochondrial function and reduces the levels of ROS and lipid peroxidation products. In contrast, MK-801, given intravenously at doses of 1.0 or 5.0 mg/kg, was without effect on these same measures. Neither drug treatment had an effect on glutamate or glucose uptake, both of which are reduced at acute times following SCI. Previous studies have documented that drugs acting on non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors exhibit greater efficacy compared to NMDA receptor antagonists on recovery of function and tissue sparing following traumatic spinal cord injury. The results of this study provide a potential mechanism by which blockade of the non-NMDA ionotropic receptors exhibit positive effects following traumatic SCI.

  4. Muscle stretching for treatment and prevention of contracture in people with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Harvey, L A; Herbert, R D

    2002-01-01

    Contracture, or reduced joint mobility, is a common and disabling sequel of spinal cord injury. The primary intervention for the treatment and prevention of contracture is regular stretch to soft tissues. While the rationale for this intervention appears sound, the effectiveness of stretching has not been verified with well designed clinical trials. One recent randomised trial suggests there is no clinically worthwhile effect from a typical stretch protocol applied to spinal cord injured patients. Despite the negative results of this first trial, we argue that therapists should continue administering stretch for the treatment and prevention of contracture until the results of further studies emerge. To maximise the probability of attaining a clinically worthwhile effect, we suggest that therapists stretch soft tissues for long periods (at least 20 min, and perhaps for as long as 12 h a day). Practical suggestions are given on how to readily provide spinal cord injured patients with sustained stretch to key joints and muscle groups. Stretch is most likely to be effective if started before the onset of contracture. Soft tissues most at risk should be targeted, particularly if contracture is likely to impose functionally important limitations.

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of spinal cord injuries: A review

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Venkata Ramesh; Veeravalli, Krishna Kumar; Dinh, Dzung H

    2014-01-01

    With technological advances in basic research, the intricate mechanism of secondary delayed spinal cord injury (SCI) continues to unravel at a rapid pace. However, despite our deeper understanding of the molecular changes occurring after initial insult to the spinal cord, the cure for paralysis remains elusive. Current treatment of SCI is limited to early administration of high dose steroids to mitigate the harmful effect of cord edema that occurs after SCI and to reduce the cascade of secondary delayed SCI. Recent evident-based clinical studies have cast doubt on the clinical benefit of steroids in SCI and intense focus on stem cell-based therapy has yielded some encouraging results. An array of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from various sources with novel and promising strategies are being developed to improve function after SCI. In this review, we briefly discuss the pathophysiology of spinal cord injuries and characteristics and the potential sources of MSCs that can be used in the treatment of SCI. We will discuss the progress of MSCs application in research, focusing on the neuroprotective properties of MSCs. Finally, we will discuss the results from preclinical and clinical trials involving stem cell-based therapy in SCI. PMID:24772239

  6. Treatment with resveratrol attenuates sublesional bone loss in spinal cord-injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua-Dong; Shi, Ya-Min; Li, Li; Guo, Ji-Dong; Zhang, Yu-Peng; Hou, Shu-Xun

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Sublesional osteoporosis predisposes individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) to an increased risk of low-trauma fracture. The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of treatment with resveratrol (RES) on sublesional bone loss in spinal cord-injured rats. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Complete SCI was generated by surgical transaction of the cord at the T10–12 level. Treatment with RES (400 mg·kg−1 body mass per day−1, intragastrically) was initiated 12 h after the surgery for 10 days. Then, blood was collected and femurs and tibiae were removed for evaluation of the effects of RES on bone tissue after SCI. KEY RESULTS Treatment of SCI rats with RES prevented the reduction of bone mass including bone mineral content and bone mineral density in tibiae, preserved bone structure including trabecular bone volume fraction, trabecular number, and trabecular thickness in tibiae, and preserved mechanical strength including ultimate load, stiffness, and energy in femurs. Treatment of SCI rats with RES enhanced femoral total sulfhydryl content, reduced femoral malondialdehyde and IL-6 mRNA levels. Treatment of SCI rats with RES suppressed the up-regulation of mRNA levels of PPARγ, adipose-specific fatty-acid-binding protein and lipoprotein lipase, and restored mRNA levels of Wnt1, low-density lipoprotein-related protein 5, Axin2, ctnnb1, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and receptor for IGF-1 in femurs and tibiae. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Treatment with RES attenuated sublesional bone loss in spinal-cord-injured rats, associated with abating oxidative stress, attenuating inflammation, depressing PPARγ signalling, and restoring Wnt/β-catenin and IGF-1 signalling. PMID:23848300

  7. Diagnosis and results of different treatment regimens in patients with spinal abscesses.

    PubMed

    Lange, M; Tiecks, F; Schielke, E; Yousry, T; Haberl, R; Oeckler, R

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial abscesses involving the spinal canal are associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Most frequently, these lesions are found in the epidural, rarely in the subdural space. In this report, our clinical material consists of a series of 16 patients treated during the last seven years. The clinical presentation included local neurological signs (back pain, para-/tetraparesis, bladder dysfunction), disturbances of consciousness (ranging from drowsiness to deep coma) and general inflammatory signs (meningism, fever). All patients presented with risk factors (septic foci, chronic diseases, and iatrogenic causes). Laboratory investigations revealed typically pathological blood sedimentation rate, leucocytosis and CSF-pleocytosis. Radiologically, the diagnosis was confirmed by myelography, CT and preferably MRI. The abscesses were located epidurally in 14 and subdurally in 2 cases. The surgical treatment included laminectomy, or multiple flavectomies in extensive lesions. Drainage systems (either simple silicon outflow drains or suction-/irrigation systems) were installed in all cases, as well as antibiotic treatment. Results of treatment: Following an observation period of 0.5-6 years, we found complete recovery in six (38%) cases, six (38%) others were mildly disabled and four (25%) patients died. Focussing on the results of the two different drainage systems, we found a statistically significant superiority of the inflow-/outflow system. Complications included mandatory re-exploration, post-inflammatory hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, spinal instability, surgical treatment of peripheral septic foci and therapy resistant septicaemia. In conclusion, we propose that spinal epi- or subdural abscesses require surgical evacuation, using a suction-/irrigation drainage system, as well as antibiotic and intensive care treatment.

  8. Transdermal monosialoganglioside with laser in the treatment of spinal cord lesion in rats

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Fabiano Inácio; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Marcon, Raphael Martus; Ferreira, Ricardo; dos Santos, Gustavo Bispo; de Barros, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of monosialoganglioside (GM1) administered transdermally with laser in the recovery of spinal cord injury in rats. METHODS: Forty male Wistar rats underwent spinal cord contusion using the NYU Impactor. In Group 1, the rats received 0,2 ml of saline intraperitoneally daily; in Group 2, GM1 was administered intraperitoneally at a concentration of 30 mg/kg per day; in Group 3, rats were treated daily with laser at low temperature on the skin, and in Group 4, the daily laser session also contained GM1. All the groups were treated for 42 days. The animals were evaluated by the Basso, Baettie and Bresnahan (BBB) functional scale on days 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 after the injury, and by histopathology and motor evoked potential after 42 days of injury. RESULTS: The animals in Group 4 had higher BBB scores compared with the other groups. There were no differences between the groups, or in the comparisons over time. Histological evaluation showed no differences, and no differences were found in the motor evoked potential tests either. CONCLUSION: GM1 associated with the use of low-temperature laser shows no superior functional, neurological or histological results in the treatment of spinal cord lesions in rats. Evidence Level I, Experimental, Controlled, Animal Study. PMID:24453649

  9. A comprehensive review of 46 exercise treatment studies in fibromyalgia (1988–2005)

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Kim Dupree; Adams, Dianne; Winters-Stone, Kerri; Burckhardt, Carol S

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this review was to: (1) locate all exercise treatment studies of fibromyalgia (FM) patients from 1988 through 2005, (2) present in tabular format the key details of each study and (3) to provide a summary and evaluation of each study for exercise and health outcomes researchers. Exercise intervention studies in FM were retrieved through Cochrane Collaboration Reviews and key word searches of the medical literature, conference proceedings and bibliographies. Studies were reviewed for inclusion using a standardized process. A table summarizing subject characteristics, exercise mode, timing, duration, frequency, intensity, attrition and outcome variables was developed. Results, conclusions and comments were made for each study. Forty-six exercise treatment studies were found with a total of 3035 subjects. The strongest evidence was in support of aerobic exercise a treatment prescription for fitness and symptom and improvement. In general, the greatest effect and lowest attrition occurred in exercise programs that were of lower intensity than those of higher intensity. Exercise is a crucial part of treatment for people with FM. Increased health and fitness, along with symptom reduction, can be expected with exercise that is of appropriate intensity, self-modified, and symptom-limited. Exercise and health outcomes researchers are encouraged to use the extant literature to develop effective health enhancing programs for people with FM and to target research to as yet understudied FM subpopulations, such as children, men, older adults, ethnic minorities and those with common comorbidities of osteoarthritis and obesity. PMID:16999856

  10. Therapeutic Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Spinal Cord Injury: A Promising Supplementary Treatment in Future

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Hao; An, Jing; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Bo; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by trauma. Pathophysiological events occurring after SCI include acute, subacute, and chronic phases, while complex mechanisms are comprised. As an abundant source of natural drugs, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) attracts much attention in SCI treatment recently. Hence, this review provides an overview of pathophysiology of SCI and TCM application in its therapy. Methods. Information was collected from articles published in peer-reviewed journals via electronic search (PubMed, SciFinder, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and CNKI), as well as from master's dissertations, doctoral dissertations, and Chinese Pharmacopoeia. Results. Both active ingredients and herbs could exert prevention and treatment against SCI, which is linked to antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, or antiapoptosis effects. The detailed information of six active natural ingredients (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, ligustrazine, quercitrin, and puerarin) and five commonly used herbs (i.e., Danshen, Ginkgo, Ginseng, Notoginseng, and Astragali Radix) was elucidated and summarized. Conclusions. As an important supplementary treatment, TCM may provide benefits in repair of injured spinal cord. With a general consensus that future clinical approaches will be diversified and a combination of multiple strategies, TCM is likely to attract greater attention in SCI treatment. PMID:27118982

  11. Therapeutic Effects of Traditional Chinese Medicine on Spinal Cord Injury: A Promising Supplementary Treatment in Future.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Yang, Hao; An, Jing; Zhang, Rui; Chen, Bo; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating neurological disorder caused by trauma. Pathophysiological events occurring after SCI include acute, subacute, and chronic phases, while complex mechanisms are comprised. As an abundant source of natural drugs, Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) attracts much attention in SCI treatment recently. Hence, this review provides an overview of pathophysiology of SCI and TCM application in its therapy. Methods. Information was collected from articles published in peer-reviewed journals via electronic search (PubMed, SciFinder, Google Scholar, Web of Science, and CNKI), as well as from master's dissertations, doctoral dissertations, and Chinese Pharmacopoeia. Results. Both active ingredients and herbs could exert prevention and treatment against SCI, which is linked to antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, or antiapoptosis effects. The detailed information of six active natural ingredients (i.e., curcumin, resveratrol, epigallocatechin gallate, ligustrazine, quercitrin, and puerarin) and five commonly used herbs (i.e., Danshen, Ginkgo, Ginseng, Notoginseng, and Astragali Radix) was elucidated and summarized. Conclusions. As an important supplementary treatment, TCM may provide benefits in repair of injured spinal cord. With a general consensus that future clinical approaches will be diversified and a combination of multiple strategies, TCM is likely to attract greater attention in SCI treatment.

  12. First aid and treatment for cervical spinal cord injury with fracture and dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Yisheng, W; Fuying, Z; Limin, W; Junwei, Li; Guofu, P; Weidong, W

    2007-01-01

    patients were treated by posterior approach surgery and combined anterior and posterior approach surgery was performed in a single sitting on 28 patients. Results: All patients were followed for 0.5-18 years (mean 11.8 years). At least one Frankel grade improvement was observed in 178 (60.3%) patients. In the anterior surgery group, the best results were observed in the cases with slight compressive fracture with disc herniation (44/50 patients, 88.0%). In the posterior surgery group, one Frankel grade improvement was observed in the cases with developmental spinal canal stenosis with trauma, lamina fractures, ligament injuries and hematoma (27/31, 87.1%). Most of the patients in the Frankel D group recovered normal neurological function after surgery. The majority of the patients with Frankel C neurological deficit (102/124) had the ability to walk postoperatively, while most of the seriously injured patients (Frankel A and B) had no improvement in their neurological function. Radiolographic fusion of the operated segments occurred in most patients within three months. Loss of intervertebral height and cervical physiological curvature was observed to varying degrees in 30.1% (71/236) of the cases in the anterior surgery group. Conclusion: First aid measures of early closed reduction or realignment and immobilization of the cervical spine, breathing support and high-dose methylprednisolone were most important in the treatment for traumatic spinal cord injury. Surgery should be performed as soon as the indications of spinal injury appear. The choice of the approach—anterior, posterior or both, should be based on the type of the injury and the surgeon's experience. Any complications should be actively prevented and treated. PMID:21139782

  13. Contemporary insights into painful diabetic neuropathy and treatment with spinal cord stimulation.

    PubMed

    McGreevy, Kai; Williams, Kayode A

    2012-02-01

    A substantial body of literature is available on the natural history of diabetes, but much less is understood of the natural history of painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy (PDPN), a pervasive and costly complication of diabetes mellitus. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed, including polyol pathway activation, advanced glycosylation end-product formation, and vasculopathic changes. Nevertheless, specific treatment modalities addressing these basic issues are still lacking. The mainstay of treatment includes pharmacological management with antidepressants, anticonvulsants, and opioids, but these drugs are often limited by unfavorable side-effect profiles. For over 30 years, spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used extensively for the management of various chronic neuropathic pain states. In the past decade, interest in the use of SCS for treatment of PDPN has increased. This article reviews pathophysiological mechanisms of PDPN, proposed mechanisms of SCS, and the role of SCS for the treatment of PDPN.

  14. Treatment of neuromuscular scoliosis with posterior spinal fusion using the Galveston technique: a retrospective review and results of 62 patients.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Bryan T; Zura, Robert; Bertrand, Styles; Leonard, Sharon; Pellett, Jonathan

    2003-01-01

    Historically, the operative treatment of neuromuscular scoliosis has been associated with a high rate of complication. Recent literature has shown a decreased rate of complication (less 50%) in the management of neuromuscular scoliosis with spinal arthrodesis techniques. A retrospective chart and radiographic review of 62 spinal fusions for neuromuscular scoliosis was performed. There were 53 posterior spinal fusions and 9 anteroposterior spinal fusions. The Galveston technique was used in all patients. The average age at surgery was 13 years 7 months, with an average follow-up of 23 months (minimum 10 months). The mean preoperative and postoperative curve magnitudes were 66 degree and 31 degree, respectively. There were 20 minor complications and 5 major complications in 20 patients. There were no neurologic complications or deaths.

  15. Exercises

    MedlinePlus

    ... Living with Chronic Lung Disease Common Feelings Anxiety Depression Sleep Intimacy Importance of Being Together Body Changes with Age Communicating with Your Partner Exercise and Sexual Activity Less Strenuous Positions for Sexual ...

  16. How process analysis could improve the implementation of spinal cord stimulation treatment for chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kayode A; McLeod, Julia C; Reinhardt, Gilles

    2012-05-01

    SUMMARY Spinal cord stimulation has been in clinical use for the treatment of chronic pain for over four decades. Since the initial use by Norman Shealy, the indications for its use have increased steadily over the decades to include neuropathic pain owing to failed back surgery syndrome, complex regional pain syndrome and painful diabetic peripheral neuropathies. To date, the precise mechanism of action of spinal cord stimulation remains unclear, yet it is still one of the most expensive interventional treatment modalities available in pain medicine with increasing application across the world. Given the worldwide focus on cost-effective care, there is an opportunity to focus on process analysis as a mechanism for optimizing the operations within and between all specialties engaged in the provision of care in pain medicine. Here, we propose a process analysis approach to model, measure and improve the delivery of disease-based care to enhance effective treatment with a costly modality. Systems-based process analysis is not widely utilized in pain medicine, and there is a limited body of evidence for its application. The purpose of this article is to generate interest in the discipline of process analysis in pain medicine, as it has found value in other healthcare settings and industries. We mention the applicability across countries and specialties that we hope will increase the awareness of this concept and possibly generate interest in further examination by investigators that will lead to the development of highly efficient and effective healthcare delivery processes and systems across the globe.

  17. The objective evaluation of effectiveness of manual treatment of spinal function disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Szulc, Paweł; Lewandowski, Jacek; Boch-Kmieciak, Joanna; Berski, Paweł; Matusiak, Marta

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background The aim of this paper is the evaluation of effectiveness of manual therapy in the treatment of functional disturbances of the spine. Material/Methods The study subjects were 40 persons aged 45–60 years, in whom degenerative changes in intervertebral discs and physical limitations within the spine were found (NMR), which were manifested as pain. Subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups of 20 persons each. The first group went on a monthly rehabilitation tour, where the manual therapy methods were applied. The second group was treated by means of physical methods. In order to verify the results of effectiveness of the therapies, the examination of the sectional mobility and the evaluation of the spinal curvatures before and after the completion of the therapy were made by means of a tensiometric electrogoniometer. Results The percentage differences in significance result from the lower value of parameter t1 in the group of persons treated physically. The dynamics of changes in the parameters in the sectional mobility in both tested groups was highest in the cervical and lumbar spine. The manually treated group had greater dynamics of changes in functional parameters of the spine. Conclusions Manual therapy is an effective method for treatment of functional changes and early structural changes within the spine, and may be used as supplementary therapy in relation to the standard model of treatment of spinal pain. PMID:22534712

  18. Spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Bunnell, W P

    1986-12-01

    Spinal deformity is a relatively common disorder, particularly in teenage girls. Early detection is possible by a simple, quick visual inspection that should be a standard part of the routine examination of all preteen and teenage patients. Follow-up observation will reveal those curvatures that are progressive and permit orthotic treatment to prevent further increase in the deformity. Spinal fusion offers correction and stabilization of more severe degrees of scoliosis.

  19. Anterolateral Radical Debridement and Interbody Bone Grafting Combined With Transpedicle Fixation in the Treatment of Thoracolumbar Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Zhaohui; Wang, Jian; Zheng, Qixin; Wu, Yongchao; Guo, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This retrospective cohort study was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes of radical anterolateral debridement and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting with transpedicle fixation for the treatment of thoracolumbar tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis operation aims to remove the lesions and necrotic tissues, remove spinal cord compression, and reconstruct spinal stability. However, traditional operation methods cannot effectively correct cyrtosis or stabilize the spine. In addition, the patient needs to stay in bed for a long time and may have many complications. So far, the best surgical method and fixation method for spinal tuberculosis remain controversial. There were a total of 43 patients, 16 involving spinal cord injury, from January 2004 to January 2011. The patients were surgically treated for radical anterolateral debridement via posterolateral incision and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting and single-stage transpedicle fixation. All the patients were followed up to determine the stages of intervertebral bone fusion and the corrections of spinal kyphosis with the restoration of neurological deficit. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) of these patients decreased to normal levels for a mean of 2.8 months. The function of feeling, motion, and sphincter in 16 paraplegia cases gradually recovered after 1 week to 3 months postoperatively, and the American Spinal Injury Association scores significantly increased at the final follow-up. Intervertebral bone fusions were all achieved postoperatively. No internal fixation devices were loose, extracted, or broken. There was no correction degree loss during the follow-up. The method of radical anterolateral debridement and autogenous ilium with rib or titanium cage interbody autografting and single-stage transpedicle fixation was effective for the treatment of thoracolumbar tuberculosis, correcting kyphotic deformity, and reconstructing

  20. The role of exercise in the treatment of cardiovascular disease associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    McGavock, Jonathan M; Eves, Neil D; Mandic, Sandra; Glenn, Nicole M; Quinney, H Arthur; Haykowsky, Mark J

    2004-01-01

    The role of exercise training in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus has been studied extensively over the past two decades. Although the primary treatment aim for patients with type 2 diabetes is metabolic control, the morbidity and mortality associated with the disease is more a function of cardiovascular disease. As exercise is associated with favourable reductions in the risk for cardiovascular disease in other high-risk populations, here we explore the role of exercise in the treatment of cardiovascular maladaptations associated with type 2 diabetes. The cardiovascular adaptation to type 2 diabetes is characterised by hypertrophy, stiffening and loss of functional reserve. Clinically, the cardiovascular adaptations to the diabetic state are associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Functionally, these adaptations have been shown to contribute to a reduced exercise capacity, which may explain the reduced cardiovascular fitness observed in this population. Exercise training is associated with improved exercise capacity in various populations, including type 2 diabetes. Several structural and functional adaptations within the cardiovascular system following exercise training could explain these findings, such as reductions in ventricular and vascular structural hypertrophy and compliance coupled with increased functional reserve. Although these cardiovascular adaptations to aerobic exercise training have been well documented in older populations with similar decrements in cardiovascular fitness and function, they have yet to be examined in patients with type 2 diabetes. For this reason, we contend that exercise training may be an excellent therapeutic adjunct in the treatment of diabetic cardiovascular disease.

  1. Electrical treatment of spinal cord injuries in the 18th and 19th centuries.

    PubMed

    Silver, John R; Weiner, M-F

    2013-05-01

    Two centuries ago, electricity was being used for the treatment of paraplegia and trials were taking place in France. This study aims to identify cases of traumatic paraplegia treated with electricity in the 19th century in order to assess the therapeutic benefit. Only four such cases were identified, none with a complete transection of the spinal cord since these patients would have died from pressure sores and urinary tract infections. The personalities involved, William Gull, William Erb, Guillaume Duchenne and Cyril Henry Golding Bird are portrayed and contemporaneous views on electrotherapy analysed. While the four patients apparently benefited from the treatment, the lack of follow-up and the incomplete data prevented a definitive conclusion on the therapeutic value of electrical treatment in traumatic paraplegia.

  2. Treatment of Combined Spinal Deformity in Patient with Ollier Disease and Abnormal Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Ryabykh, S. О.; Gubin, A. V.; Prudnikova, О. G.; Kobyzev, А. Е.

    2012-01-01

    We report staged treatment of severe combined spinal deformity in an 11-year-old patient with Ollier disease and abnormal cervical vertebra. Combined scoliosis with systemic pathology and abnormal vertebrae is a rare condition and features atypical deformity location and rapid progression rate and frequently involves the rib cage and pelvis, disturbing the function of chest organs and skeleton. Progressive deformity resulted in cachexia and acute respiratory failure. A halo-pelvic distraction device assembled of Ilizarov components was employed for a staged surgical treatment performed for lifesaving indications. After vital functions stabilized, the scoliosis curve of the cervical spine was corrected and fixed with a hybrid system of transpedicular supporting points, connecting rods, and connectors that provided staged distraction during growth. The treatment showed good functional and cosmetic result. PMID:24436859

  3. Exploring exercise as an avenue for the treatment of anxiety disorders

    PubMed Central

    DeBoer, Lindsey B; Powers, Mark B; Utschig, Angela C; Otto, Michael W; Smits, Jasper AJ

    2012-01-01

    Anxiety disorders constitute a significant public health problem. Current gold standard treatments are limited in their effectiveness, prompting the consideration of alternative approaches. In this review, we examine the evidence for exercise as an intervention for anxiety disorders. This evidence comes from population studies, studies of nonclinical anxiety reduction, as well as a limited number of studies of clinically anxious individuals. All of these studies provide converging evidence for consistent beneficial effects of exercise on anxiety, and are consistent with a variety of accounts of the mechanism of anxiety reduction with exercise. Further study of clinical populations is encouraged, as are studies of the mechanism of change of exercise interventions, which have the potential to help refine exercise intervention strategies. Likewise, studies that identify moderators of treatment efficacy will assist clinicians in deciding how and for whom to prescribe exercise. PMID:23002943

  4. Cervical radiculopathy: a systematic review on treatment by spinal manipulation and measurement with the Neck Disability Index

    PubMed Central

    Rodine, Robert J.; Vernon, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Cervical radiculopathy (CR), while less common than conditions with neck pain alone, can be a significant cause of neck pain and disability; thus the determination of adequate treatment options for patients is essential. Currently, inadequate scientific literature restricts specific conservative management recommendations for CR. Despite a paucity of evidence for high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) spinal manipulation in the treatment for CR, this strategy has been frequently labeled as contraindicated. Scientific support for appropriate outcome measures for CR is equally deficient. While more scientific data is needed to draw firm conclusions, the present review suggests that spinal manipulation may be cautiously considered as a therapeutic option for patients suffering from CR. With respect to outcome measures, the Neck Disability Index appears well-suited for spinal manipulative treatment of CR. PMID:22457538

  5. Successful endovascular treatment of a spinal dural arteriovenous fistula with trisacryl gelatin microspheres.

    PubMed

    Rodiek, S O

    2002-09-01

    We report on the endovascular treatment of a spinal dural arteriovenous fistula (SDAVF) in a 50-year-old man, who presented with rapidly progressive paraparesis of lower extremities. Standard treatment of SDAVFs is by either embolization with liquid adhesive agents like NBCA or microsurgery. In our case the fistula was successfully occluded by application of trisacryl gelatin microspheres (TGM). Due to a small size of the feeding intercostal artery a superselective catheterization of the fistula itself by a microcatheter could not be performed. The particles were hence delivered through a diagnostic spinal catheter positioned within the proximal part of the feeding intercostal artery. Control MRI five weeks after intervention showed normalized perimedullary veins, which were dilated and tortuous initially. It also displayed a clinically silent focal ischaemia within the spongiosa of an adjacent hemi-vertebra due to particle passage through intersegmental vascular collaterals. A control angiogram confirmed the disappearance of the fistula. The patient underwent physiotherapy and experienced significant improvement of his gait within three months after intervention.

  6. Variability in the treatment of acute spinal cord injury in the United Kingdom: results of a national survey.

    PubMed

    Werndle, Melissa C; Zoumprouli, Argyro; Sedgwick, Philip; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2012-03-20

    The aim of this study was to examine how traumatic spinal cord injury is managed in the United Kingdom via a questionnaire survey of all neurosurgical units. We contacted consultant neurosurgeons and neuroanesthetists in all neurosurgical centers that manage patients with acute spinal cord injury. Two clinical scenarios-of complete and incomplete cervical spinal cord injuries-were given to determine local treatment policies. There were 175 responders from the 33 centers (36% response rate). We ascertained neurosurgical views on urgency of transfer, timing of surgery, nature and aim of surgery, as well as neuroanesthetic views on type of anesthetic, essential intraoperative monitoring, drug treatment, and intensive care management. Approximately 70% of neurosurgeons will admit patients with incomplete spinal cord injury immediately, but only 40% will admit patients with complete spinal cord injury immediately. There is no consensus on the timing or even the role of surgery for incomplete or complete injuries. Most (96%) neuroanesthetists avoid anesthetics known to elevate intracranial pressure. What was deemed essential intraoperative monitoring, however, varied widely. Many (22%) neuroanesthetists do not routinely measure arterial blood pressure invasively, central venous pressure (85%), or cardiac output (94%) during surgery. There is no consensus among neuroanesthetists on the optimal levels of arterial blood pressure, or oxygen and carbon dioxide partial arterial pressure. We report wide variability among U.K. neurosurgeons and neuroanesthetists in their treatment of acute traumatic spinal cord injury. Our findings reflect the lack of Class 1 evidence that early surgical decompression and intensive medical management of patients with spinal cord injury improves neurological outcome.

  7. Four-rod Instrumentation for Treatment of Charcot Spinal Arthropathy Causing Autonomic Dysreflexia: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Toshkezi, Gentian; Pizzuti, John; Marawar, Satya

    2016-01-01

    Late complications of spinal cord injury can include Charcot arthropathy, in which spinal instability occurs as a result of repetitive trauma in the insensate spine. In rare cases, this can present as autonomic dysreflexia. We present the case of a 60-year-old man with longstanding C6 quadriplegia who presented with six months of hypertension, diaphoresis and dizziness. After an extensive workup, the patient's symptoms were attributed to autonomic dysreflexia in the setting of spinal instability from Charcot spinal arthropathy. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed instability with degenerative changes at L1-L2. We present our case with a literature review to discuss management of this uncommon situation. The patient underwent posterior fusion and instrumentation from T8-L5 with four rods, alternating screws and crosslinks with a good reduction and solid stabilization of the spine. Postoperatively, the patient experienced immediate relief of all symptoms. Our case demonstrates effective surgical treatment for Charcot spinal arthropathy causing autonomic dysreflexia. Stabilization with instrumentation and fusion of underlying Charcot spinal arthropathy removed the trigger of the autonomic dysreflexia and alleviated our patient's symptoms. PMID:27909638

  8. Sustained release of estrogens from PEGylated nanoparticles for treatment of secondary spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, John

    Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) is a debilitating condition which causes neurological damage and can result in paralysis. SCI results in immediate mechanical damage to the spinal cord, but secondary injuries due to inflammation, oxidative damage, and activated biochemical pathways leading to apoptosis exacerbate the injury. The only currently available treatment, methylprednisolone, is controversial because there is no convincing data to support its therapeutic efficacy for SCI treatment. In the absence of an effective SCI treatment option, 17beta-estradiol has gained significant attention for its anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-apoptotic abilities, all events associated with secondary. Sadly, 17beta-estradiol is associated with systemic adverse effects preclude the use of free estrogen even for local administration due to short drug half-life in the body. Biodegradable nanoparticles can be used to increase half-life after local administration and to bestow sustained release. Sustained release using PEGylated biodegradable polymeric nanoparticles constructed from poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) will endow a consistent, low, but effective dose to be delivered locally. This will limit systemic effects due to local administration and low dose, sustained release. PLGA was chosen because it has been used extensively for sustained release, and has a record of safety in humans. Here, we show the in vitro efficacy of PEGylated nanoparticles loaded with 17beta-estradiol for treatment of secondary SCI. We achieved a high loading efficiency and controlled release from the particles over a several day therapeutic window. The particles also show neuroprotection in two in vitro cell culture models. Both the dose and pretreatment time with nanoparticles was evaluated in an effort to translate the treatment into an animal model for further study.

  9. A systematic review into the effectiveness of hand exercise therapy in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bergstra, S A; Murgia, A; Te Velde, A F; Caljouw, S R

    2014-11-01

    Hand exercises are often part of the treatment of hand rheumatoid arthritis; however, it is still unclear whether and what type of exercises is effective in the treatment of this condition. Therefore, a systematic review into the effectiveness of hand exercises in the treatment of hand rheumatoid arthritis has been performed. Studies were identified in the literature databases by predefined search criteria. The eight included studies are peer-reviewed studies published between 2000 and 2014. Hand exercises differed between studies, but always included resistance and/or active range of motion exercises. Grip strength in various grip types (power grip, key pinch, precision pinch and tripod pinch) was found to improve by hand exercise therapy without having adverse effects on pain or disease activity. Adaptations in the range of motion in response to hand exercise therapy were less pronounced. There appears to be some transfer from the improvements on the body functioning level to the level of daily functioning, with the largest improvements found on grip ability. With regard to the intervention content, there was some evidence in favour of a longer therapy duration and a higher therapy intensity. No conclusions could be drawn on the effectiveness of the different types of exercises. Collectively, the studies indicate that hand exercises may have positive effects on strength and some aspects of daily functioning without aggravating disease activity or pain, although caution should be taken for subjects in the exacerbation period.

  10. Atypical depressive symptoms as a predictor of treatment response to exercise in Major Depressive Disorder.

    PubMed

    Rethorst, Chad D; Tu, Jian; Carmody, Thomas J; Greer, Tracy L; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2016-08-01

    Effective treatment of Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) will require the development of alternative treatments and the ability for clinicians to match patients with the treatment likely to produce the greatest effect. We examined atypical depression subtype as a predictor of treatment response to aerobic exercise augmentation in persons with non-remitted MDD. Our results revealed a small-to-moderate effect, particularly in a group assigned to high-dose exercise (semi-partial eta-squared =0.0335, p=0.0735), indicating that those with atypical depression tended to have larger treatment response to exercise. Through this hypothesis-generating analysis, we indicate the need for research to examine depression subtype, along with other demographic, clinical and biological factors as predictors of treatment response to exercise.

  11. Australian Institute of Sport and the Australian Paralympic Committee position statement: urinary tract infection in spinal cord injured athletes.

    PubMed

    Compton, Stacey; Trease, Larissa; Cunningham, Corey; Hughes, David

    2015-10-01

    Patients with spinal cord injuries are at increased risk of developing symptomatic urinary tract infections. Current evidence-based knowledge regarding prevention and treatment of urinary tract infection in the spinal cord injured population is limited. There are currently no urinary tract infection prevention and management guidelines specifically targeted towards elite spinal cord injured athletes. This position statement represents a set of recommendations intended to provide clinical guidelines for sport and exercise medicine physicians and other healthcare providers for the prevention and treatment of urinary tract infection in spinal cord injured athletes. It has been endorsed by the Australian Institute of Sport (AIS) and the Australian Paralympic Committee (APC).

  12. Neural stem cell transplantation combined with erythropoietin for the treatment of spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Zuo, Yuan; Jiang, Jianming; Yan, Huibo; Wang, Xiliang; Huo, Hunjun; Xiao, Yulong

    2016-10-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) comprises nerve and motor function disorders that may be caused by a variety of damaging factors and is challenging to treat. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regenerative effects of neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation combined with intraperitoneal injection of erythropoietin (EPO) on cross-sectional SCI in rats. A model of SCI was induced in 40 adult Wistar rats via the complete transection of the 10th thoracic vertebra (T10). The rats were allocated at random into 4 groups: Control, NSC, EPO and NSC + EPO groups (n=10 per group). Morphological alterations associated with axonal regeneration were detected using neurofilament (NF)-200 immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining after 8 weeks. Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) scoring was used to evaluate the recovery of hindlimb function. A total of 5 rats died following surgery, including 2 control rats and 1 rat each in the EPO, NSC and NSC + EPO groups. NSCs labeled with bromodeoxyuridine were observed to have survived and migrated in the spinal cord tissue after 8 weeks. Significant histomorphological differences were observed in the NSC and NSC + EPO groups compared with the EPO and control groups. Furthermore, the rats of the NSC + EPO group exhibited significantly enhanced axonal regeneration in the SCI area compared with the NSC group rats. The rats of the NSC and NSC + EPO groups exhibited significantly improved BBB scores compared with the EPO and control group rats at 7 days after treatment (P<0.05). In addition, the BBB scores of the NSC + EPO group were significantly improved compared with those of the three other groups at 7 days after surgery (P<0.05). Therefore, the results of the present study suggest that NSC transplantation combined with intraperitoneal injection of EPO may benefit the survival and regeneration of injured axons, and accelerate the repair of injured spinal cord tissue, thus facilitating the functional recovery of hindlimb

  13. Neural stem cell transplantation combined with erythropoietin for the treatment of spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yan; Zuo, Yuan; Jiang, Jianming; Yan, Huibo; Wang, Xiliang; Huo, Hunjun; Xiao, Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) comprises nerve and motor function disorders that may be caused by a variety of damaging factors and is challenging to treat. The aim of the present study was to investigate the regenerative effects of neural stem cell (NSC) transplantation combined with intraperitoneal injection of erythropoietin (EPO) on cross-sectional SCI in rats. A model of SCI was induced in 40 adult Wistar rats via the complete transection of the 10th thoracic vertebra (T10). The rats were allocated at random into 4 groups: Control, NSC, EPO and NSC + EPO groups (n=10 per group). Morphological alterations associated with axonal regeneration were detected using neurofilament (NF)-200 immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence staining after 8 weeks. Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan (BBB) scoring was used to evaluate the recovery of hindlimb function. A total of 5 rats died following surgery, including 2 control rats and 1 rat each in the EPO, NSC and NSC + EPO groups. NSCs labeled with bromodeoxyuridine were observed to have survived and migrated in the spinal cord tissue after 8 weeks. Significant histomorphological differences were observed in the NSC and NSC + EPO groups compared with the EPO and control groups. Furthermore, the rats of the NSC + EPO group exhibited significantly enhanced axonal regeneration in the SCI area compared with the NSC group rats. The rats of the NSC and NSC + EPO groups exhibited significantly improved BBB scores compared with the EPO and control group rats at 7 days after treatment (P<0.05). In addition, the BBB scores of the NSC + EPO group were significantly improved compared with those of the three other groups at 7 days after surgery (P<0.05). Therefore, the results of the present study suggest that NSC transplantation combined with intraperitoneal injection of EPO may benefit the survival and regeneration of injured axons, and accelerate the repair of injured spinal cord tissue, thus facilitating the functional recovery of hindlimb

  14. Theophylline treatment improves mitochondrial function after upper cervical spinal cord hemisection.

    PubMed

    Hüttemann, Maik; Nantwi, Kwaku D; Lee, Icksoo; Liu, Jenney; Mohiuddin, Syed; Petrov, Theodor

    2010-06-01

    The importance of mitochondria in spinal cord injury has mainly been attributed to their participation in apoptosis at the site of injury. But another aspect of mitochondrial function is the generation of more than 90% of cellular energy in the form of ATP, mediated by the oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) process. Cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a central OxPhos component and changes in its activity reflect changes in energy demand. A recent study suggests that respiratory muscle function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients is compromised via alterations in mitochondrial function. In an animal model of cervical spinal cord hemisection (C2HS) respiratory dysfunction, we have shown that theophylline improves respiratory function. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that theophylline improves respiratory function at the cellular level via improved mitochondrial function in the C2HS model. We demonstrate that CcO activity was significantly (33%) increased in the spinal cord adjacent to the site of injury (C3-C5), and that administration of theophylline (20mg/kg 3x daily orally) after C2HS leads to an even more pronounced increase in CcO activity of 62% compared to sham-operated animals. These results are paralleled by a significant increase in cellular ATP levels (51% in the hemidiaphragm ipsilateral to the hemisection). We conclude that C2HS increases energy demand and activates mitochondrial respiration, and that theophylline treatment improves energy levels through activation of the mitochondrial OxPhos process to provide energy for tissue repair and functional recovery after paralysis in the C2HS model.

  15. Exercise in the prevention and treatment of cancer. An update.

    PubMed

    Shephard, R J

    1993-04-01

    Physical activity potentially encourages a healthy lifestyle and it could have a more direct preventive effect on certain forms of carcinogenesis (for instance, by speeding gastrointestinal transit, or by moderating sex hormone levels). However, there are also potential negative effects, particularly an excessive exposure to ultraviolet light in certain water sports. The many types of neoplasm and the equally varied sources of physical activity militate against finding any simple relationship between the risk of malignancy and the individual's physical activity history. Nevertheless, evidence that physical activity protects against certain forms of cancer can be deduced from studies of experimental animals, former athletes, people employed in active occupations, and those with an active recreational lifestyle. Many occupational surveys and a number of studies of recreational activity show an association between sedentary living and a risk of colon cancer, both in men and in women. Moreover, an application of Bradford Hill's criteria gives some support to the causal nature of the association. More limited data suggest that a history of active leisure is associated with a reduced risk of all-cause cancer and in women of breast and reproductive system cancers. The last observation must still be reconciled with an apparent increase in the risk of prostatic cancer in active men. Since moderate exercise elevates mood and helps to conserve lean tissue, it may finally be a helpful component of treatment after a neoplasm has been diagnosed.

  16. [Central nervous pain in patients with spinal cord injury. Medical and surgical treatment].

    PubMed

    Grønning, M; Ertzgaard, P; Myrseth, E

    1997-05-20

    About 50% of patients with spinal cord injury suffer from persistent central neurogenic pain. The authors review the case of a patient with traumatic paraplegia who developed persistent central neurogenic pain. The pain was described as burning in the buttock area, icing in the rectum area and as lancinating pain to the lower extremities. The combination of amitryptilin and morphine had a slight, short-term effect, but the pain did not respond to treatment with simple analgetica, dextropropoxyphen or ketobemidone, neither administered alone nor in combination with tricyclic antidepressants, carbamazepine or baclophen. Transcutanous nerve stimulation and acupuncture had no effect. The patient was operated on by means of the computer-assisted dorsal root entry zone (DREZ)-microcoagulation technique 2.5 years after the trauma. This technique is described in brief. The prevalence and classification of neurogenic pain, and possible medical and surgical treatment, are also discussed.

  17. Small Molecules in Development for the Treatment of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Calder, Alyssa N; Androphy, Elliot J; Hodgetts, Kevin J

    2016-11-23

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease resulting from pathologically low levels of survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. The majority of mRNA from the SMN2 allele undergoes alternative splicing and excludes critical codons, causing an SMN protein deficiency. While there is currently no FDA-approved treatment for SMA, early therapeutic efforts have focused on testing repurposed drugs such as phenylbutyrate (2), valproic acid (3), riluzole (6), hydroxyurea (7), and albuterol (9), none of which has demonstrated clinical effectiveness. More recently, clinical trials have focused on novel small-molecule compounds identified from high-throughput screening and medicinal chemistry optimization such as olesoxime (11), CK-2127107, RG7800, LMI070, and RG3039 (17). In this paper, we review both repurposed drugs and small-molecule compounds discovered following medicinal chemistry optimization for the potential treatment of SMA.

  18. Prevention and Treatment of Bone Loss after a Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ashe, Maureen C.; Craven, Cathy; Eng, Janice J.; Krassioukov, Andrei

    2012-01-01

    Preserving and maintaining bone mass after a spinal cord injury (SCI) is crucial to decrease the risk of fragility or low trauma fractures— significant health events that occur as a result of minimal trauma such as falling during transfers or from a standing height or less. There is an increased risk for low trauma fractures after a SCI especially in the lower extremity. Therefore, purpose of this systematic review was to appraise the literature to provide clinical guidance for the optimization of bone health after SCI. The key research questions focused on prevention of acute bone loss and effective treatment of established low bone mass with long-standing SCI (≥ 1year). We report moderate evidence for the treatment of bone loss using pharmacology; however, non-pharmacological evidence for preventing and treating bone loss is limited. PMID:22767990

  19. Prevention and Treatment of Bone Loss after a Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Ashe, Maureen C; Craven, Cathy; Eng, Janice J; Krassioukov, Andrei

    2007-01-01

    Preserving and maintaining bone mass after a spinal cord injury (SCI) is crucial to decrease the risk of fragility or low trauma fractures- significant health events that occur as a result of minimal trauma such as falling during transfers or from a standing height or less. There is an increased risk for low trauma fractures after a SCI especially in the lower extremity. Therefore, purpose of this systematic review was to appraise the literature to provide clinical guidance for the optimization of bone health after SCI. The key research questions focused on prevention of acute bone loss and effective treatment of established low bone mass with long-standing SCI (≥ 1year). We report moderate evidence for the treatment of bone loss using pharmacology; however, non-pharmacological evidence for preventing and treating bone loss is limited.

  20. Spinal Headaches

    MedlinePlus

    ... undergo a spinal tap (lumbar puncture) or spinal anesthesia. Both procedures require a puncture of the tough ... is withdrawn from your spinal canal. During spinal anesthesia, medication is injected into your spinal canal to ...

  1. The roles of exercise in bone remodeling and in prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yu; Chen, Xi; Zhang, Lingli; Wu, Juanni; Guo, Jianming; Zou, Dongchen; Chen, Binglin; Sun, Zhongguang; Shen, Chao; Zou, Jun

    2016-11-01

    With a rapid increase in the aging population, osteoporosis has become a global health problem. Although anti-resorption and anabolic drugs are available, osteoporosis cannot be completely cured. Exercise is an economical, efficacious, and safe way to prevent the development of osteoporosis. Recent studies have investigated the mechanisms by which exercise affects bone remodeling. Here we update the progress made on the effects of exercise on bone cells, including bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, osteoblasts, osteocytes, and osteoclasts, as well as on bone mass, bone strength, and geometry, hoping to provide a theoretical basis to improve osteoporosis prevention and treatment with exercise.

  2. Exercise training manages cardiopulmonary function and fatigue during and following cancer treatment in male cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Carole M; Hsieh, City C; Sprod, Lisa K; Carter, Susan D; Hayward, Reid

    2007-09-01

    This investigation determined the cardiopulmonary function and fatigue alterations in male cancer survivors during treatment as well as following treatment utilizing similar exercise assessment protocols and individualized, prescriptive exercise interventions. The study included 45 male cancer survivors that were referred by local oncologists. Following a comprehensive screening and physical examination, cardiovascular endurance, pulmonary function, and fatigue were assessed leading to the development of 12-week individualized exercise prescriptions and exercise interventions. The cancer survivors were divided into during treatment (DTm) and following treatment (FTm) groups. Repeated-measures analysis of variance and analyses of covariance were used to compare pre- versus postintervention and between groups. Cardiopulmonary function was maintained in the DTm, whereas the FTm showed significant reductions in resting heart rate (P < .05) with concurrent increases in predicted VO2max and time on treadmill ( P < .05) postexercise intervention. Fatigue levels did not increase in the DTm group, whereas the FTm group showed significant reductions in behavioral fatigue, affective fatigue, sensory fatigue, cognitive/mood fatigue, and total fatigue (P < .05) after the exercise intervention. The results of the current study suggest that moderate intensity, individualized, prescriptive exercise intervention maintains or improves cardiovascular and pulmonary function with concomitant reductions in fatigue in cancer survivors during and following cancer treatment. Exercise appears to be a safe, efficacious strategy for improving physical fitness in cancer survivors during and following treatment.

  3. Early versus late spinal decompression surgery in treatment of traumatic spinal cord injuries; a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yousefifard, Mahmoud; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Baikpour, Masoud; Ghelichkhani, Parisa; Hosseini, Mostafa; Jafari, AliMoghadas; Aziznejad, Heidar; Tafakhori, Abbas

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Despite the vast number of surveys, no consensus has been reached on the optimum timing of spinal decompression surgery. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to compare the effects of early and latespinal decompression surgery on neurologic improvement and post-surgical complications in patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries. Methods: Two independent reviewers carried out an extended search in electronic databases. Data of neurological outcome and post-surgery complication were extracted. Finally, pooled relative risk (RR) with a 95% confidence interval (CI) was reported for comparing of efficacy of early and late surgical decompression. Results: Eventually 22 studies were included. The pooled RRwas 0.77 (95% CI: 0.68-0.89)for at least one grade neurological improvement, and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.77-0.92)for at least two grade improvement. Pooled RR for surgical decompression performed within 12 hours after the injury was 0.26 (95% CI: 0.13-0.52; p<0.001), while it was 0.75 (95% CI: 0.63-0.90; p=0.002) when the procedure was performed within 24 hours, and 0.93 (95% CI: 0.76-1.14; p=0.48) when it was carried out in the first 72 hours after the injury. Surgical decompression performed within 24 hours after injury was found to be associated with significantly lower rates of post-surgical complications (RR=0.77; 95% CI: 0.68-0.86; p<0.001). Conclusion: The findings of this study indicate that early spinal decompression surgery can improve neurologic recovery and is associated with less post-surgical complications. The optimum efficacy is observed when the procedure is performed within 12 hours of the injury. PMID:28286844

  4. The importance of exercise in lung cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Michaels, Carol

    2016-06-01

    There is emerging evidence that exercise can help in a variety of different ways for people with lung cancer. Exercise can be beneficial at any stage of the patient journey through increasing strength, endurance and decreasing emotional issues. A recovery fitness program is described and provides guidance on breathing, stretching, aerobic exercise and strength training. There are more people surviving lung cancer with services needing to cater for the varying requirements of each patient. Promoting physical activity is an important facet of health care management and collaboration between providers of services is required.

  5. The importance of exercise in lung cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that exercise can help in a variety of different ways for people with lung cancer. Exercise can be beneficial at any stage of the patient journey through increasing strength, endurance and decreasing emotional issues. A recovery fitness program is described and provides guidance on breathing, stretching, aerobic exercise and strength training. There are more people surviving lung cancer with services needing to cater for the varying requirements of each patient. Promoting physical activity is an important facet of health care management and collaboration between providers of services is required. PMID:27413700

  6. A novel thermoelectric cooling device using Peltier modules for inducing local hypothermia of the spinal cord: the effect of local electrically controlled cooling for the treatment of spinal cord injuries in conscious rats.

    PubMed

    Morizane, Kei; Ogata, Tadanori; Morino, Tadao; Horiuchi, Hideki; Yamaoka, Gotaro; Hino, Masayuki; Miura, Hiromasa

    2012-03-01

    We developed a novel thermoelectric cooling device using Peltier modules for the treatment of spinal cord injury in rats. The extracorporeal electrically cooling component was attached to the aluminum arched plate which was placed on the surface of the spinal cord after the contusion injury in the 11th thoracic spinal cord. During the hypothermic treatment, rats were awake and could move in the cage. Hind limb motor function, evaluated using a BBB scale, in the hypothermic animals (33°C for 48 h) was significantly higher than that in the normothermic animals from 2 weeks to 8 weeks after the injury.

  7. Exercise Self-Efficacy Moderates the Relation between Anxiety Sensitivity and Body Mass Index and Exercise Tolerance in Treatment-Seeking Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Farris, Samantha G.; Davis, Michelle L.; Rosenfield, David; Kauffman, Brooke Y.; Baird, Scarlett O.; Powers, Mark B.; Otto, Michael W.; Marcus, Bess H.; Church, Timothy S.; Smits, Jasper A. J.; Zvolensky, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    There is little known about factors that contribute to the comorbidity of cigarette smoking and obesity. The current study sought to test whether exercise self-efficacy moderated the relation between anxiety sensitivity (fear of internal sensations) and BMI and exercise tolerance among cigarette smokers. Smokers (n = 72; 50% female; Mcpd = 19.3, SD = 10.65) were recruited to participate in a smoking cessation treatment trial. During medical screen, we measured weight, height, and exercise tolerance (functional capacity) employing a standardized maximal exercise testing protocol. After adjusting for participant sex and cigarettes per day, exercise self-efficacy moderated the association between anxiety sensitivity and BMI, such that the positive association between anxiety sensitivity and BMI was significantly stronger when exercise self-efficacy was low. The same pattern of results emerged for exercise tolerance. Exercise self-efficacy moderated the association between anxiety sensitivity and exercise tolerance, such that the negative association between anxiety sensitivity and exercise tolerance was significantly stronger when exercise self-efficacy was low. Among smokers, anxiety sensitivity may be a risk variable that, directly and indirectly in the context of low self-efficacy for exercise, causes or maintains higher body weight and lower exercise tolerance. PMID:27725844

  8. Dosimetry of a single ''hockey stick'' portal for treatment of tumors of the cranio-spinal axis

    SciTech Connect

    Glasgow, G.P.; Marks, J.E.

    1983-09-01

    Conventional treatment of tumors of the cranio-spinal axis portal usually involves multiple-field, moving junction treatments to avoid overlapping fields over the spinal cord. To avoid these problems, we irradiate the cranio-spinal axis using a single ''hockey stick'' portal and the 25-MV x-ray beam from a Varian Clinac-35/sup X/ linear accelerator. Patients are positioned prone on the floor 229 cm from the radiation source and the collimators are rotated 45/sup 0/ so the maximum diagonal dimension of the field 116 cm at 229 cm is coincident with the cranio-spinal axis. The head is alternately rotated to treat the right-hand side one day and the left-hand side the next day. Thermoluminescent dosimetry in an anatomical phantom reveals that, relative to the 100% dose delivered at 4-cm depth on the central axis of the blocked field, the midline posterior fossa dose is about 100%, with a maximum dose of about 105% to the extreme posterior portion of the skull. The midline neck dose is about 95% and the dose to the inferior portion of the spinal cord is about 105%. The doses to other critical organs are also presented.

  9. The use of stem cells for the treatment of spinal surgical conditions.

    PubMed

    Aftab, Syed; Chimutengwende-Gordon, Mukai; Malik, Atif; Lee, Robert

    2013-11-01

    Spinal pathologies are a major burden on society and individuals. Recent years have seen a large number of studies dedicated to the use of stem cells in spinal surgery. This review focuses on recent advances and controversies regarding the applications of stem cells in spinal fusion surgery, spinal cord injury and intervertebral disc degeneration. There are significant concerns regarding the ethics and risks of stem cell use. Animal models do not always accurately depict the human condition. While a great deal has been achieved, successful translation into clinical practice is needed. However there is no doubt that stem cells have a major role to play in the future management of spinal conditions.

  10. Neurobiology of exercise.

    PubMed

    Dishman, Rod K; Berthoud, Hans-Rudolf; Booth, Frank W; Cotman, Carl W; Edgerton, V Reggie; Fleshner, Monika R; Gandevia, Simon C; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Hillman, Charles H; Kramer, Arthur F; Levin, Barry E; Moran, Timothy H; Russo-Neustadt, Amelia A; Salamone, John D; Van Hoomissen, Jacqueline D; Wade, Charles E; York, David A; Zigmond, Michael J

    2006-03-01

    Voluntary physical activity and exercise training can favorably influence brain plasticity by facilitating neurogenerative, neuroadaptive, and neuroprotective processes. At least some of the processes are mediated by neurotrophic factors. Motor skill training and regular exercise enhance executive functions of cognition and some types of learning, including motor learning in the spinal cord. These adaptations in the central nervous system have implications for the prevention and treatment of obesity, cancer, depression, the decline in cognition associated with aging, and neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's dementia, ischemic stroke, and head and spinal cord injury. Chronic voluntary physical activity also attenuates neural responses to stress in brain circuits responsible for regulating peripheral sympathetic activity, suggesting constraint on sympathetic responses to stress that could plausibly contribute to reductions in clinical disorders such as hypertension, heart failure, oxidative stress, and suppression of immunity. Mechanisms explaining these adaptations are not as yet known, but metabolic and neurochemical pathways among skeletal muscle, the spinal cord, and the brain offer plausible, testable mechanisms that might help explain effects of physical activity and exercise on the central nervous system.

  11. Exercise, Behavioral Therapy Reduce Menopausal Symptoms Caused by Breast Cancer Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Women with breast cancer who were suffering from treatment-related menopausal symptoms experienced symptom relief with cognitive behavioral therapy, physical exercise, or both, according to a Dutch study.

  12. CT-Guided 125I Seed Interstitial Brachytherapy as a Salvage Treatment for Recurrent Spinal Metastases after External Beam Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Lihong; Cao, Qianqian; Yang, Jiwen; Meng, Na; Guo, Fuxin; Jiang, Yuliang; Tian, Suqing; Sun, Haitao

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility, safety, and clinical efficacy of CT-guided 125I seed interstitial brachytherapy in patients with recurrent spinal metastases after external beam radiotherapy (EBRT). Between August 2003 and September 2015, 26 spinal metastatic lesions (24 patients) were reirradiated by this salvage therapy modality. Treatment for all patients was preplanned using a three-dimensional treatment planning system 3–5 days before 125I seed interstitial brachytherapy; dosimetry verification was performed immediately after seed implantation. Median actual D90 was 99 Gy (range, 90–176), and spinal cord median Dmax was 39 Gy (range, 6–110). Median local control (LC) was 12 months (95% CI: 7.0–17.0). The 6- and 12-month LC rates were 52% and 40%, respectively. Median overall survival (OS) was 11 months (95% CI: 7.7–14.3); 6-month and 1-, 2-, and 3-year OS rates were 65%, 37%, 14%, and 9%, respectively. Pain-free survival ranged from 2 to 42 months (median, 6; 95% CI: 4.6–7.4). Treatment was well-tolerated, with no radiation-induced vertebral compression fractures or myelopathy reported. Reirradiation with CT-guided 125I seed interstitial brachytherapy appears to be feasible, safe, and effective as pain relief or salvage treatment for patients with recurrent spinal metastases after EBRT. PMID:28105434

  13. Clinical and imaging findings in patients with aggressive spinal hemangioma requiring surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Urrutia, Julio; Postigo, Roberto; Larrondo, Roberto; Martin, Aliro San

    2011-02-01

    Vertebral hemangiomas (VHs) are frequently asymptomatic lesions found incidentally during investigations for other spinal problems. Symptomatic VHs are less common, and there are few reports of compressive VHs in the literature. VHs with aggressive behavior present with low signal intensity on T1-weighted and high signal intensity on T2-weighted MRI. We present a case series of four patients with compressive VH, all of whom were neurologically compromised. Each of the four patients underwent preoperative arterial embolization followed by surgical treatment of their VHs. All patients recovered normal motor function after surgery. At follow-up (average 53 months), one patient had a recurrent tumor requiring reoperation and radiotherapy. Although it is rare, aggressive VH can be a devastating condition. Total surgical resection or subtotal resection with radiotherapy may be warranted.

  14. Cervical epidural steroid injections for the treatment of cervical spinal (neck) pain.

    PubMed

    Candido, Kenneth D; Knezevic, Nebojsa 'nick'

    2013-02-01

    Cervical epidural steroid injections (CESI) are an accepted treatment for neck pain with a radicular component, and may be accomplished by using either transforaminal (CTFESI) or interlaminar (CILESI) approaches. CESIs are routinely performed using real-time fluoroscopic-guidance in conjunction with the injection of water soluble, iodine-based contrast media to enhance visualization of intravascular injections. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging is an adjuvant to fluoroscopic methods for visualizing blood vessels while performing spinal injections. However, as with any neuraxial procedure, various complications associated with CESIs have been reported. Complications are directly associated with the technical procedures of CESIs. Particulate steroids may have a prolonged duration of action but non-particulate steroids are safer for CESIs. Blunt-beveled needles are less likely than sharp-beveled needles to penetrate blood vessels to cause bleeding complications during CTFESI procedures. Small doses of local anesthetics appear to be safe and assist in identifying intravascular injections previously overlooked by conventional techniques.

  15. Reduction in Bladder-Related Autonomic Dysreflexia after OnabotulinumtoxinA Treatment in Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fougere, Renée J.; Currie, Katharine D.; Nigro, Mark K.; Stothers, Lynn; Rapoport, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Bladder-related events, including neurogenic detrusor overactivity, are the leading cause of autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injured individuals. Self-reported autonomic dysreflexia is reduced following onabotulinumtoxinA treatment for neurogenic detrusor overactivity; however, none of these trials have assessed autonomic dysreflexia events using the clinical cutoff of an increase in systolic blood pressure ≥20 mm Hg. This study used a prospective, open-labelled design from 2013 to 2014 to quantitatively assess the efficacy of one cycle 200 U intradetrusor-injected onabotulinumtoxinA (20 sites) on reducing the severity and frequency of bladder-related autonomic dysreflexia events and improving quality of life. Twelve men and five women with chronic, traumatic spinal cord injuries at or above the sixth thoracic level, and concomitant autonomic dysreflexia and neurogenic detrusor overactivity, underwent blood pressure monitoring during urodynamics and over a 24 h period using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring pre- and 1 month post-treatment. Post-onabotulinumtoxinA, autonomic dysreflexia severity was reduced during urodynamics (systolic blood pressure increase: 42 ± 23 mm Hg vs. 20 ± 10 mm Hg, p < 0.001) and during bladder-related events across the 24 h period (systolic blood pressure increase: 49 ± 2 mm Hg vs. 26 ± 22 mm Hg, p = 0.004). Frequency of 24 h bladder-related autonomic dysreflexia events was also decreased post-onabotulinumtoxinA (4 ± 2 events vs. 1 ± 1 events, p < 0.001). Autonomic dysreflexia and incontinence quality of life indices were also improved post-onabotulinumtoxinA (p < 0.05). Intradetrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxinA for the management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in individuals with high level spinal cord injuries decreased the severity and frequency of bladder-related episodes of autonomic dysreflexia, and improved bladder function and quality of

  16. Reduction in Bladder-Related Autonomic Dysreflexia after OnabotulinumtoxinA Treatment in Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Fougere, Renée J; Currie, Katharine D; Nigro, Mark K; Stothers, Lynn; Rapoport, Daniel; Krassioukov, Andrei V

    2016-09-15

    Bladder-related events, including neurogenic detrusor overactivity, are the leading cause of autonomic dysreflexia in spinal cord injured individuals. Self-reported autonomic dysreflexia is reduced following onabotulinumtoxinA treatment for neurogenic detrusor overactivity; however, none of these trials have assessed autonomic dysreflexia events using the clinical cutoff of an increase in systolic blood pressure ≥20 mm Hg. This study used a prospective, open-labelled design from 2013 to 2014 to quantitatively assess the efficacy of one cycle 200 U intradetrusor-injected onabotulinumtoxinA (20 sites) on reducing the severity and frequency of bladder-related autonomic dysreflexia events and improving quality of life. Twelve men and five women with chronic, traumatic spinal cord injuries at or above the sixth thoracic level, and concomitant autonomic dysreflexia and neurogenic detrusor overactivity, underwent blood pressure monitoring during urodynamics and over a 24 h period using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring pre- and 1 month post-treatment. Post-onabotulinumtoxinA, autonomic dysreflexia severity was reduced during urodynamics (systolic blood pressure increase: 42 ± 23 mm Hg vs. 20 ± 10 mm Hg, p < 0.001) and during bladder-related events across the 24 h period (systolic blood pressure increase: 49 ± 2 mm Hg vs. 26 ± 22 mm Hg, p = 0.004). Frequency of 24 h bladder-related autonomic dysreflexia events was also decreased post-onabotulinumtoxinA (4 ± 2 events vs. 1 ± 1 events, p < 0.001). Autonomic dysreflexia and incontinence quality of life indices were also improved post-onabotulinumtoxinA (p < 0.05). Intradetrusor injections of onabotulinumtoxinA for the management of neurogenic detrusor overactivity in individuals with high level spinal cord injuries decreased the severity and frequency of bladder-related episodes of autonomic dysreflexia, and improved bladder function and quality of life.

  17. Differentiation of recurrent spinal ependymoma from postradiation treatment necrosis through multiparametric PET-MR and perfusion MRI.

    PubMed

    Hojjati, Mojgan; Garg, Vasant; Badve, Chaitra A; Abboud, Salim E; Sloan, Andrew E; Wolansky, Leo J

    A 67-year-old male presented with papilledema and back pain localized to the T10 level. Initial workup revealed multifocal spinal ependymoma which was resected and treated with external beam radiotherapy. Nine years after treatment, the patient had a relapse of back pain, and MRI was inconclusive in distinguishing posttreatment radiation necrosis from recurrent tumor. We present the first described report with the utilization of multiparametric positron emission tomography-magnetic resonance imaging and perfusion MRI to distinguish recurrent spinal ependymoma from radiation necrosis.

  18. Exercise dependent increase in axon regeneration into peripheral nerve grafts by propriospinal but not sensory neurons after spinal cord injury is associated with modulation of regeneration-associated genes.

    PubMed

    Sachdeva, Rahul; Theisen, Catherine C; Ninan, Vinu; Twiss, Jeffery L; Houlé, John D

    2016-02-01

    Insufficient regeneration of central nervous system (CNS) axons contributes to persisting neurological dysfunction after spinal cord injury (SCI). Peripheral nerve grafts (PNGs) support regeneration by thousands of injured intraspinal axons and help them bypass some of the extracellular barriers that form after SCI. However this number represents but a small portion of the total number of axons that are injured. Here we tested if rhythmic sensory stimulation during cycling exercise would boost the intrinsic regenerative state of neurons to enhance axon regeneration into PNGs after a lower thoracic (T12) spinal transection of adult rats. Using True Blue retrograde tracing, we show that 4 weeks of cycling improves regeneration into a PNG from lumbar interneurons but not by primary sensory neurons. The majority of neurons that regenerate their axon are within 5 mm of the lesion and their number increased 70% with exercise. Importantly propriospinal neurons in more distant regions (5-20 mm from the lesion) that routinely exhibit very limited regeneration responded to exercise by increasing the number of regenerating neurons by 900%. There was no exercise-associated increase in regeneration from sensory neurons. Analyses using fluorescent in situ hybridization showed that this increase in regenerative response is associated with changes in levels of mRNAs encoding the regeneration associated genes (RAGs) GAP43, β-actin and Neuritin. While propriospinal neurons showed increased mRNA levels in response to SCI alone and then to grafting and exercise, sensory neurons did not respond to SCI, but there was a response to the presence of a PNG. Thus, exercise is a non-invasive approach to modulate gene expression in injured neurons leading to an increase in regeneration. This sets the stage for future studies to test whether exercise will promote axon outgrowth beyond the PNG and reconnection with spinal cord neurons, thereby demonstrating a potential clinical application of

  19. The role of exercise and alternative treatments for low back pain.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Kevin A; Rittenberg, Joshua D

    2010-11-01

    The determination of whether a patient should pursue an active or passive treatment program is often made by medical practitioners. Knowledge about all forms of treatment, including complementary and alternative (CAM) treatments, is essential in the treatment of low back pain. Medical practitioner-directed active treatments that have been shown to be effective for the treatment of low back pain include physical therapy-directed exercise programs such as core stabilization and mechanical diagnosis and therapy (MDT). Based on the current literature, it appears that yoga is the most effective nonphysician-directed active treatment approach to nonspecific low back pain when comparing other CAM treatments. Acupuncture is a medical practitioner-directed passive treatment that has been shown to be a good adjunct treatment. More randomized controlled studies are needed to support both CAM treatments and exercise in the treatment of low back pain.

  20. Scoliosis treatment using spinal manipulation and the Pettibon Weighting System™: a summary of 3 atypical presentations

    PubMed Central

    Morningstar, Mark W; Joy, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    Background Given the relative lack of treatment options for mild to moderate scoliosis, when the Cobb angle measurements fall below the 25–30° range, conservative manual therapies for scoliosis treatment have been increasingly investigated in recent years. In this case series, we present 3 specific cases of scoliosis. Case presentation Patient presentation, examination, intervention and outcomes are detailed for each case. The types of scoliosis presented here are left thoracic, idiopathic scoliosis after Harrington rod instrumentation, and a left thoracic scoliosis secondary to Scheuermann's Kyphosis. Each case carries its own clinical significance, in relation to clinical presentation. The first patient presented for chiropractic treatment with a 35° thoracic dextroscoliosis 18 years following Harrington Rod instrumentation and fusion. The second patient presented with a 22° thoracic levoscoliosis and concomitant Scheuermann's Disease. Finally, the third case summarizes the treatment of a patient with a primary 37° idiopathic thoracic levoscoliosis. Each patient was treated with a novel active rehabilitation program for varying lengths of time, including spinal manipulation and a patented external head and body weighting system. Following a course of treatment, consisting of clinic and home care treatments, post-treatment radiographs and examinations were conducted. Improvement in symptoms and daily function was obtained in all 3 cases. Concerning Cobb angle measurements, there was an apparent reduction in Cobb angle of 13°, 8°, and 16° over a maximum of 12 weeks of treatment. Conclusion Although mild to moderate reductions in Cobb angle measurements were achieved in these cases, these improvements may not be related to the symptomatic and functional improvements. The lack of a control also includes the possibility of a placebo effect. However, this study adds to the growing body of literature investigating methods by which mild to moderate cases of

  1. Sildenafil treatment in COPD does not affect stroke volume or exercise capacity.

    PubMed

    Rietema, H; Holverda, S; Bogaard, H J; Marcus, J T; Smit, H J; Westerhof, N; Postmus, P E; Boonstra, A; Vonk-Noordegraaf, A

    2008-04-01

    In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, stroke volume response to exercise is impaired. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether 3 months of sildenafil treatment improves stroke volume and, if so, whether this improvement is related to the pulmonary artery pressure and translated into an improved exercise capacity. A total of 15 stable COPD patients (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage II-IV) underwent right heart catheterisation at rest and during exercise. Stroke volume was assessed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at rest and during submaximal exercise in the supine position and compared with eight age-matched controls. Additionally, a cardiopulmonary exercise test and a 6-min walking distance test were performed. Exercise tests and MRI were repeated after 12 weeks of oral therapy with 50 mg sildenafil three times daily. Stroke volume in COPD patients was significantly lower than in healthy controls (62+/-12 versus 81+/-22 mL at rest and 70+/-15 versus 101+/-28 mL during exercise). Pulmonary hypertension (PH) was diagnosed in nine patients and was absent in six. Treatment with sildenafil had no effect on stroke volume or exercise capacity. Although the stroke volume was lower in COPD patients with associated PH in comparison with non-PH patients, there was no difference in treatment response between both groups. In the present group of 15 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, a reduced stroke volume was found at rest and during exercise. Neither stroke volume nor exercise capacity were improved by 3 months of sildenafil therapy.

  2. Cost-effectiveness evaluation of an RCT in rehabilitation after lumbar spinal fusion: a low-cost, behavioural approach is cost-effective over individual exercise therapy.

    PubMed

    Søgaard, Rikke; Bünger, Cody E; Laurberg, Ida; Christensen, Finn B

    2008-02-01

    Recently, Christensen et al. reported the clinical effects of a low-cost rehabilitation program equally efficient to a relatively intensive program of individual, physiotherapist-guided exercise therapy. Yet, the low-cost approach is not fully supported as an optimal strategy until a full-scale economic evaluation, including extra-hospital effects such as service utilization in the primary health care sector and return-to-work, is conducted. The objective of this study was to conduct such evaluation i.e. investigate the cost-effectiveness of (1) a low-cost rehabilitation regimen with a behavioural element and (2) a regimen of individual exercise therapy, both in comparison with usual practice, from a health economic, societal perspective. Study design was a cost-effectiveness evaluation of an RCT with a 2-year follow-up. Ninety patients having had posterolateral or circumferential fusion (indicated by chronic low back pain and localized pathology) were randomized 3 months after their spinal fusion. Validated pain- and disability index scales were applied at baseline and at 2 years postoperative. Costs were measured in a full-scale societal perspective. The probability of the behavioural approach being cost-effective was close to 1 given pain as the prioritized effect measure, and 0.8 to 0.6 (dependent on willingness to pay per effect unit) given disability as the prioritized effect measure. The probability of the exercise therapy approach being cost-effective was modest due to inferior effectiveness. Results proved robust to relevant sensitivity analysis although a differentiated cost-effectiveness ratio between males and females was suspected. In conclusion, a simple behavioural extension, of setting up group meetings for patients, to a regimen with a strict physiotherapeutic focus was found cost-effective, whereas the cost-effectiveness of increasing frequency and guidance of a traditional physiotherapeutic regimen was unlikely in present trial setting.

  3. Biodegradable chitin conduit tubulation combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury by reducing glial scar and cavity formation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Feng; Wu, Er-Jun; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Li-Ya, A; Kou, Yu-Hui; Yin, Xiao-Feng; Han, Na

    2015-01-01

    We examined the restorative effect of modified biodegradable chitin conduits in combination with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation after right spinal cord hemisection injury. Immunohistochemical staining revealed that biological conduit sleeve bridging reduced glial scar formation and spinal muscular atrophy after spinal cord hemisection. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells survived and proliferated after transplantation in vivo, and differentiated into cells double-positive for S100 (Schwann cell marker) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (glial cell marker) at 8 weeks. Retrograde tracing showed that more nerve fibers had grown through the injured spinal cord at 14 weeks after combination therapy than either treatment alone. Our findings indicate that a biological conduit combined with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation effectively prevented scar formation and provided a favorable local microenvironment for the proliferation, migration and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the spinal cord, thus promoting restoration following spinal cord hemisection injury.

  4. Methylprednisolone for the Treatment of Patients with Acute Spinal Cord Injuries: A Propensity Score-Matched Cohort Study from a Canadian Multi-Center Spinal Cord Injury Registry

    PubMed Central

    Evaniew, Nathan; Noonan, Vanessa K.; Fallah, Nader; Kwon, Brian K.; Rivers, Carly S.; Ahn, Henry; Bailey, Christopher S.; Christie, Sean D.; Fourney, Daryl R.; Hurlbert, R. John; Linassi, A.G.; Fehlings, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In prior analyses of the effectiveness of methylprednisolone for the treatment of patients with acute traumatic spinal cord injuries (TSCIs), the prognostic importance of patients' neurological levels of injury and their baseline severity of impairment has not been considered. Our objective was to determine whether methylprednisolone improved motor recovery among participants in the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR). We identified RHSCIR participants who received methylprednisolone according to the Second National Spinal Cord Injury Study (NASCIS-II) protocol and used propensity score matching to account for age, sex, time of neurological exam, varying neurological level of injury, and baseline severity of neurological impairment. We compared changes in total, upper extremity, and lower extremity motor scores using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test and performed sensitivity analyses using negative binomial regression. Forty-six patients received methylprednisolone and 1555 received no steroid treatment. There were no significant differences between matched participants for each of total (13.7 vs. 14.1, respectively; p=0.43), upper extremity (7.3 vs. 6.4; p=0.38), and lower extremity (6.5 vs. 7.7; p=0.40) motor recovery. This result was confirmed using a multivariate model and, as predicted, only cervical (C1–T1) rather than thoracolumbar (T2–L3) injury levels (p<0.01) and reduced baseline injury severity (American Spinal Injury Association [ASIA] Impairment Scale grades; p<0.01) were associated with greater motor score recovery. There was no in-hospital mortality in either group; however, the NASCIS-II methylprednisolone group had a significantly higher rate of total complications (61% vs. 36%; p=0.02) NASCIS-II methylprednisolone did not improve motor score recovery in RHSCIR patients with acute TSCIs in either the cervical or thoracic spine when the influence of anatomical level and severity of injury were included in the analysis. There

  5. Surgical Treatment for Adult Spinal Deformity: Projected Cost Effectiveness at 5-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Terran, Jamie; McHugh, Brian J.; Fischer, Charla R.; Lonner, Baron; Warren, Daniel; Glassman, Steven; Bridwell, Keith; Schwab, Frank; Lafage, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    Background In the United States, expenditures related to spine care are estimated to account for $86 billion annually. Policy makers have set a cost-effectiveness benchmark of less than $100,000/quality adjusted life year (QALY), forcing surgeons to defend their choices economically. This study projects the cost/QALY for surgical treatment of adult spinal deformity at 5-year follow-up based on 2-year cost- and health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) data. Methods In a review of 541 patients with adult spinal deformity, the patients who underwent revision or were likely to undergo revision were identified and cost of surgery was doubled to account for the second procedure; all other patients maintained the cost of the initial surgery. Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) was modeled by revision status based on literature findings. Total surgical cost was based on Medicare reimbursement. Chi square and student t tests were utilized to compare cost-effective and non–cost-effective patients. Results The average cost/QALY at 5-year follow-up was $120,311.73. A total of 40.7% of patients fell under the threshold of a cost/QALY <$100,000. Cost-effective patients had higher baseline ODI scores (45% vs 34% [P=0.001]), lower baseline total Scoliosis Research Society scores (2.89 vs 3.00 [P=0.04]), and shorter fusions (8.23 vs 9.87 [P=0.0001]). Conclusion We found 40.7% of patients to be below the threshold of cost effectiveness. Factors associated with reaching the threshold <$100,000/QALY were greater preoperative disability, diagnosis of idiopathic scoliosis, poor preoperative HRQOL scores, and fewer fusion levels. PMID:24688328

  6. Transsacrococcygeal approach to ganglion impar block for treatment of chronic coccygodynia after spinal arachnoid cyst removal

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Young Deog; Yang, Chun Woo; Han, Jung Uk; Song, Jang Ho; Na, WonJu; Oh, Sora; Kim, Byung-Gun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Coccygodynia is a pain in the region of the coccyx that radiates to the sacral, perineal area. The cause of the pain is often unknown. Coccygodynia is diagnosed through the patient's past history, a physical examination, and dynamic radiographic study, but the injection of local anesthetics or a diagnostic nerve blockade are needed to distinguish between somatic, neuropathic, and combined pain. Ganglion impar is a single retroperitoneal structure made of both paravertebral sympathetic ganglions. Although there are no standard guidelines for the treatment of coccygodynia, ganglion impar blockade is one of the effective options for treatment. Methods: Here, we report a 42-year-old female patient presenting with severe pain in the coccygeal area after spinal arachnoid cyst removal. Results: Treatment involved neurolysis with absolute alcohol on the ganglion impar through the transsacrococcygeal junction. Pain was relieved without any complications. Conclusion: Our case report offers the ganglion impar blockade using the transsacrococcygeal approach with absolute alcohol can improve intractable coccydynia. PMID:27684866

  7. Cranial Treatment and Spinal Manipulation for a Patient With Low Back Pain: A Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Wayne; Knaap, Simone F.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to present chiropractic management of a patient with chronic low back pain by focusing on the craniomandibular system. Clinical Features A 37-year-old man consulted a chiropractor for pain in the lumbosacral area with radiation down the anterolateral side of the upper left leg. The symptoms started after a fall the previous year. Examination showed a post-traumatic chronic L4-L5 facet dysfunction and left sacro-iliac joint dysfunction. Chiropractic spinal manipulation to the lumbar spine and pelvis gave only temporary relief from the pain. Intervention and Outcome A year later a bone scintigraphy was conducted, in which a lesion was found over the right sphenoid area. Cranial treatment of this area was added to the chiropractic treatment plan. After this treatment, the patient reported that he was pain free and could return to normal activities of daily living. Conclusion The clinical progress of this case suggests that for some patients, adding craniosacral therapy may be helpful in patients with low back symptoms. PMID:26644786

  8. The Cancer Drug Tamoxifen: A Potential Therapeutic Treatment for Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Guptarak, Jutatip; Wiktorowicz, John E.; Sadygov, Rovshan G.; Zivadinovic, Dragoslava; Paulucci-Holthauzen, Adriana A.; Vergara, Leoncio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Tamoxifen (TMX) is a selective estrogen receptor modulator that can mimic the neuroprotective effects of estrogen but lacks its systemic adverse effects. We found that TMX (1 mg/day) significantly improved the motor recovery of partially paralyzed hind limbs of male adult rats with thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI), thus indicating a translational potential for this cancer medication given its clinical safety and applicability and the lack of currently available treatments for SCI. To shed light on the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of TMX for SCI, we used proteomic analyses, Western blots and histological assays, which showed that TMX treatment spared mature oligodendrocytes/increased myelin levels and altered reactive astrocytes, including the upregulation of the water channels aquaporin 4 (AQP4), a novel finding. AQP4 increases in TMX-treated SCI rats were associated with smaller fluid-filled cavities with borders consisting of densely packed AQP4-expressing astrocytes that closely resemble the organization of normal glia limitans externa (in contrast to large cavities in control SCI rats that lacked glia limitans-like borders and contained reactive glial cells). Based on our findings, we propose that TMX is a promising candidate for the therapeutic treatment of SCI and a possible intervention for other neuropathological conditions associated with demyelination and AQP4 dysfunction. PMID:24004276

  9. Prescribed Exercise Behavior in the Treatment of Spouse Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, William W., Jr.

    This presentation by a practicing marital therapist describes how exercise behavior can be used as a preventive measure against spouse abuse. This crisis intervention approach is intended to help couples develop stopgap techniques to prevent physical violence; it is one segment of a more comprehensive approach which might include contingency…

  10. Spinal Disease in Aviators and Its Relationship to G-Exposure, Age, Aircraft Seating Angle, Exercise and Other Lifestyle Factors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    Length (hours) F-15 1.2 0.1 1.0-1.5 F-16 1.3 0.1 1.0-1.5 6-4 Chronic Neck and Low Back Symptoms Also, of interest was the difference in spinal pain ...detecting a two-fold difference Fig. 1: Frequency of Neck Pain in symptoms of only 40%. Similarly, a comparison of the reporting of low back pain for the F-15...Fe0 Timelyr Once/month was 40% for detecting a two-fold difference. to regularly HP vs NHP The frequency of low back pain was compared for HP Fig. 3

  11. Exercise as a treatment for depression: A meta-analysis adjusting for publication bias.

    PubMed

    Schuch, Felipe B; Vancampfort, Davy; Richards, Justin; Rosenbaum, Simon; Ward, Philip B; Stubbs, Brendon

    2016-06-01

    The effects of exercise on depression have been a source of contentious debate. Meta-analyses have demonstrated a range of effect sizes. Both inclusion criteria and heterogeneity may influence the effect sizes reported. The extent and influence of publication bias is also unknown. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were identified from a recent Cochrane review and searches of major electronic databases from 01/2013 to 08/2015. We included RCTs of exercise interventions in people with depression (including those with a diagnosis of major depressive disorder (MDD) or ratings on depressive symptoms), comparing exercise versus control conditions. A random effects meta-analysis calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD, 95% confidence interval; CI), meta-regressions, trim and fill and fail-safe n analyses were conducted. Twenty-five RCTs were included comparing exercise versus control comparison groups, including 9 examining participants with MDD. Overall, exercise had a large and significant effect on depression (SMD adjusted for publication bias = 1.11 (95% CI 0.79-1.43)) with a fail-safe number of 1057. Most adjusted analyses suggested publication bias led to an underestimated SMD. Larger effects were found for interventions in MDD, utilising aerobic exercise, at moderate and vigorous intensities, in a supervised and unsupervised format. In MDD, larger effects were found for moderate intensity, aerobic exercise, and interventions supervised by exercise professionals. Exercise has a large and significant antidepressant effect in people with depression (including MDD). Previous meta-analyses may have underestimated the benefits of exercise due to publication bias. Our data strongly support the claim that exercise is an evidence-based treatment for depression.

  12. Nonsurgical Korean Integrative Treatments for Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: A Three-Armed Randomized Controlled Pilot Trial Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kiok; Shin, Kyung-Min; Lee, Jun-Hwan; Seo, Bok-Nam; Jung, So-Young; Youn, Yousuk; Lee, Sang Ho; Kim, Jaehong; Qu, Wenchun

    2016-01-01

    This is a study protocol for a pilot three-armed randomized controlled trial on nonsurgical integrative Korean medicinal treatment for symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Thirty-six participants who have been diagnosed with (LSS) and recommended for spinal surgery by neurosurgeons or orthopedics and have had spinal symptoms such as severe low back pain and neurological claudication regardless of at least three months of conservative treatments will be recruited. Participants will be randomly assigned to be one of the three intervention groups, including the Mokhuri treatment program group 1 or 2 or usual care group. All treatments will be administered in inpatient units over a period of 4 weeks. The primary outcomes are 0 to 100 Visual Analogue Scales for low back pain and leg pain and the secondary outcomes are Oswestry Disability Index; EQ-5D; Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire; Oxford Claudication Score; physical function test, including treadmill test, walking duration, and distance assessment for free leg pain; radiologic testing; and adverse events which will be assessed during the 4-week treatment period as well as after 3 and 6 months of follow-up. Then, we will assess the feasibility of the clinical trial design as well as a nonsurgical integrative treatment program. This trial is registered with CRIS registration number: KCT0001218. PMID:26941823

  13. Diagnosis and surgical treatment of progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia in an adult with severe spinal disorders and polyarthropathy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xi; Song, Yueming; Kong, Qingquan

    2013-12-01

    Progressive pseudorheumatoid dysplasia (PPD) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder. The polyarthritis of PPD has been detailed before. However, the spinal disorder and surgical treatment been rarely mentioned. A 44-year-old patient who has been misdiagnosed as juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) and given unilateral total hip replacement yet, suffers mainly from severe spinal disorder this time. The platyspondyly, Scheuermann-like lesions of the spine and JRA-like features of the peripheral joints were found on radiographic films, combining negative inflammatory and rheumatoid factors, which most suggested the diagnosis of PPD. As the homozygous nucleotide deletion was found in WISP3 gene, diagnosis of PPD was definite. Neurological examination and further imaging examination indicated severe compression of thoracic and lumbar spinal cord which might lead to his conspicuous spinal disorder. Decompressive laminectomy, posterior fusion and fixation were performed. And an excellent clinical outcome was achieved 1 year after the decompression and fusion: leg pain and hypoesthesia resolved and osseous fusion performed. This is the first reported decompression in the adult spine of PPD. Surgical treatment could receive satisfactory result in PPD, however, it is a palliative therapy which has less help to prevent the development of this disease. Early diagnosis and rehabilitation interventions remain the most important. Clinical, radiographic and genetic features in PPD are crucial in the differential diagnosis.

  14. Exercise-induced cardioprotection is impaired by anabolic steroid treatment through a redox-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Elen A; Fortunato, Rodrigo S; Carvalho, Denise P; Nascimento, José Hamilton M; Oliveira, Marcus F

    2013-11-01

    High doses of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) impair the cardioprotective effects of exercise against ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) insult, possibly through cellular redox imbalance. Here, the effect of nandrolone decanoate (DECA) treatment on heart redox metabolism was investigated during I/R in sedentary and exercised rats. DECA treatment significantly reduced superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase activities in exercised rats after heart reperfusion. Catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities were not affected by DECA in both sedentary and trained rats, regardless the I/R period. DECA also induced myocardial oxidative stress, as evidenced by the reduced levels of total reduced thiols after heart reperfusion in exercised rats treated with the anabolic steroid. These results indicate that cardiotoxic effects of supraphysiological doses of AAS involve reduced heart antioxidant capacity.

  15. Does post-exercise massage treatment reduce delayed onset muscle soreness? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, E.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) is a frequent problem after unaccustomed exercise. No universally accepted treatment exists. Massage therapy is often recommended for this condition but uncertainty exists about its effectiveness. AIM: To determine whether post-exercise massage alleviates the symptoms of DOMS after a bout of strenuous exercise. METHOD: Various computerised literature searches were carried out and located seven controlled trials. RESULTS: Most of the trials were burdened with serious methodological flaws, and their results are far from uniform. However, most suggest that post-exercise massage may alleviate symptoms of DOMS. CONCLUSIONS: Massage therapy may be a promising treatment for DOMS. Definitive studies are warranted. 


 PMID:9773168

  16. Spinal cord stimulation in the treatment of post-stroke patients: current state and future directions.

    PubMed

    Robaina, F; Clavo, B

    2007-01-01

    A decrease in cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain metabolic activity are well-known complications of stroke. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is successfully being used for the treatment of several low-perfusion syndromes. The aim of this chapter is to describe the data that support the effect of SCS on CBF and the use of SCS in the treatment of stroke and cerebral low perfusion syndromes. In addition, we present our relevant studies. Since April 1995, we have assessed 49 non-stroke patients. The following parameters were measured pre- and post-stroke: (1) CBF in healthy contralateral tissue by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), (2) systolic and diastolic velocity in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) by transcranial Doppler, (3) blood flow quantification in the common carotid artery (CCA) by color Doppler, and (4) glucose metabolism in healthy contralateral tissue by positron emission tomography (PET). Our results showed that during cervical SCS there was a significant (p < 0.001) increase in systolic (> or =21%) and diastolic (>26%) velocity in the MCA, and CCA blood flow (> or =51%) as well as glucose metabolism (44%). We concluded that cervical SCS (cSCS) can modify CBF and brain metabolism. Its potential role in the management of stroke and low-perfusion syndromes is further investigated by experimental studies and reports describing clinical experience. Appropriate clinical trials are warranted.

  17. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Minimally Invasive Treatment with Bilateral Transpedicular Facet Augmentation System

    SciTech Connect

    Masala, Salvatore; Tarantino, Umberto; Nano, Giovanni; Iundusi, Riccardo; Fiori, Roberto Da Ros, Valerio Simonetti, Giovanni

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a new pedicle screw-based posterior dynamic stabilization device PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign Anchor and Stabilizer (Interventional Spine Inc., Irvine, CA) as alternative minimally invasive treatment for patients with lumbar spine stenosis. Methods. Twenty-four consecutive patients (8 women, 16 men; mean age 61.8 yr) with lumbar spinal stenosis underwent implantation of the minimally invasive pedicle screw-based device for posterior dynamic stabilization. Inclusion criteria were lumbar stenosis without signs of instability, resistant to conservative treatment, and eligible to traditional surgical posterior decompression. Results. Twenty patients (83 %) progressively improved during the 1-year follow-up. Four (17 %) patients did not show any improvement and opted for surgical posterior decompression. For both responder and nonresponder patients, no device-related complications were reported. Conclusions. Minimally invasive PDS Percudyn System Trade-Mark-Sign has effectively improved the clinical setting of 83 % of highly selected patients treated, delaying the need for traditional surgical therapy.

  18. Radioactive bone cement for the treatment of spinal metastases: a dosimetric analysis of simulated clinical scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, T. S.; Sehgal, V.; Skinner, H. B.; Al-Ghazi, M. S. A. L.; Ramsinghani, N. S.; Marquez Miranda, M.; Keyak, J. H.

    2012-07-01

    Vertebral metastases are a common manifestation of many cancers, potentially leading to vertebral collapse and neurological complications. Conventional treatment often involves percutaneous vertebroplasty/kyphoplasty followed by external beam radiation therapy. As a more convenient alternative, we have introduced radioactive bone cement, i.e. bone cement incorporating a radionuclide. In this study, we used a previously developed Monte Carlo radiation transport modeling method to evaluate dose distributions from phosphorus-32 radioactive cement in simulated clinical scenarios. Isodose curves were generally concentric about the surface of bone cement injected into cadaveric vertebrae, indicating that dose distributions are relatively predictable, thus facilitating treatment planning (cement formulation and dosimetry method are patent pending). Model results indicated that a therapeutic dose could be delivered to tumor/bone within ∼4 mm of the cement surface while maintaining a safe dose to radiosensitive tissue beyond this distance. This therapeutic range should be sufficient to treat target volumes within the vertebral body when tumor ablation or other techniques are used to create a cavity into which the radioactive cement can be injected. With further development, treating spinal metastases with radioactive bone cement may become a clinically useful and convenient alternative to the conventional two-step approach of percutaneous strength restoration followed by radiotherapy.

  19. Treatment of Thoracolumbar Spinal Infections through Anterolateral Approaches Using Expandable Titanium Mesh Cage for Spine Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Tarantino; Daniele, Marruzzo; Martina, Cappelletti; Tiziano, De Giacomo; Roberto, Delfini

    2012-01-01

    Pyogenic vertebral osteomyelitis (PVO) is still a rare pathology. However, its incidence is on the rise. This is due to an increasing population with predisposing factors. Also, the availability of more effective diagnostic tools has brought it increasingly to the surgeon's attention. In this study the patients were treated in the Neurosurgery Division of the Department of Neurological Sciences and Psychiatry of the Sapienza University of Rome, between 2001 and 2009. They had thoracolumbar pyogenic spondylitis. This study was undertaken in order to identify the correct diagnostic and therapeutic treatment needed in such cases. From the cases studied here, it is evident that spinal infections can be extremely insidious and that diagnosis tends to be reached late. Surgery, along with the antibiotic treatment, allows for eradication of the causes of the pathology by the reclamation of the affected region. Surgery is also fundamental in helping to recover vital functions and in restoring as much as possible the correct curvature of the rachises. The use of an anterolateral approach is dictated by the necessity of obtaining 360° stability as well as by the need to clear away extensive infections, which are not always reachable using a posterior approach. PMID:23193382

  20. Development of a documentation instrument for the conservative treatment of spinal disorders in the International Spine Registry, Spine Tango.

    PubMed

    Kessler, J T; Melloh, M; Zweig, Thomas; Aghayev, E; Röder, C

    2011-03-01

    Spine Tango is the first and only International Spine Registry in operation to date. So far, only surgical spinal interventions have been recorded and no comparable structured and comprehensive documentation instrument for conservative treatments of spinal disorders is available. This study reports on the development of a documentation instrument for the conservative treatment of spinal disorders by using the Delphi consensus method. It was conducted with a group of international experts in the field. We also assessed the usability of this new assessment tool with a prospective feasibility study on 97 outpatients and inpatients with low back or neck pain undergoing conservative treatment. The new 'Spine Tango conservative' questionnaire proved useful and suitable for the documentation of pathologies, conservative treatments and outcomes of patients with low back or neck problems. A follow-up questionnaire seemed less important in the predominantly outpatient setting. In the feasibility study, between 43 and 63% of patients reached the minimal clinically important difference in pain relief and Core Outcome Measures Index at 3 months after therapy; 87% of patients with back pain and 85% with neck pain were satisfied with the received treatment. With 'Spine Tango conservative' a first step has been taken to develop and implement a complementary system for documentation and evaluation of non-surgical spinal interventions and outcomes within the framework of the International Spine Registry. It proved useful and feasible in a first pilot study, but it will take the experience of many more cases and therapists to develop a version similarly mature as the surgical instruments of Spine Tango.

  1. The effectiveness of exercise as a treatment for postnatal depression: study protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Postnatal depression can have a substantial impact on the woman, the child and family as a whole. Thus, there is a need to examine different ways of helping women experiencing postnatal depression; encouraging them to exercise may be one way. A meta analysis found some support for exercise as an adjunctive treatment for postnatal depression but the methodological inadequacy of the few small studies included means that it is uncertain whether exercise reduces symptoms of postnatal depression. We aim to determine whether a pragmatic exercise intervention that involves one-to-one personalised exercise consultations and telephone support plus usual care in women with postnatal depression, is superior to usual care only, in reducing symptoms of postnatal depression. Methods We aim to recruit 208 women with postnatal depression in the West Midlands. Recently delivered women who meet the ICD-10 diagnosis for depression will be randomised to usual care plus exercise or usual care only. The exercise intervention will be delivered over 6 months. The primary outcome measure is difference in mean Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale score between the groups at six month follow-up. Outcome measures will be assessed at baseline and at six and 12 month post randomisation. Discussion Findings from the research will inform future clinical guidance on antenatal and postnatal mental health, as well as inform practitioners working with postnatal depression. Trial registration number ISRCTN84245563 PMID:22682671

  2. Characterization of dendritic morphology and neurotransmitter phenotype of thoracic descending propriospinal neurons after complete spinal cord transection and GDNF treatment.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lingxiao; Ruan, Yiwen; Chen, Chen; Frye, Christian Corbin; Xiong, Wenhui; Jin, Xiaoming; Jones, Kathryn; Sengelaub, Dale; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-03-01

    After spinal cord injury (SCI), poor regeneration of damaged axons of the central nervous system (CNS) causes limited functional recovery. This limited spontaneous functional recovery has been attributed, to a large extent, to the plasticity of propriospinal neurons, especially the descending propriospinal neurons (dPSNs). Compared with the supraspinal counterparts, dPSNs have displayed significantly greater regenerative capacity, which can be further enhanced by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). In the present study, we applied a G-mutated rabies virus (G-Rabies) co-expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP) to reveal Golgi-like dendritic morphology of dPSNs. We also investigated the neurotransmitters expressed by dPSNs after labeling with a retrograde tracer Fluoro-Gold (FG). dPSNs were examined in animals with sham injuries or complete spinal transections with or without GDNF treatment. Bilateral injections of G-Rabies and FG were made into the 2nd lumbar (L2) spinal cord at 3 days prior to a spinal cord transection performed at the 11th thoracic level (T11). The lesion gap was filled with Gelfoam containing either saline or GDNF in the injury groups. Four days post-injury, the rats were sacrificed for analysis. For those animals receiving G-rabies injection, the GFP signal in the T7-9 spinal cord was visualized via 2-photon microscopy. Dendritic morphology from stack images was traced and analyzed using a Neurolucida software. We found that dPSNs in sham injured animals had a predominantly dorsal-ventral distribution of dendrites. Transection injury resulted in alterations in the dendritic distribution with dorsal-ventral retraction and lateral-medial extension. Treatment with GDNF significantly increased the terminal dendritic length of dPSNs. The density of spine-like structures was increased after injury, and treatment with GDNF enhanced this effect. For the group receiving FG injections, immunohistochemistry for glutamate, choline

  3. Treatment of pressure ulcers with autologous bone marrow nuclear cells in patients with spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Sarasúa, J González; López, S Pérez; Viejo, M Álvarez; Basterrechea, M Pérez; Rodríguez, A Fernández; Gutiérrez, A Ferrero; Gala, J García; Menéndez, Y Menéndez; Augusto, D Escudero; Arias, A Pérez; Hernández, J Otero

    2011-01-01

    Context Pressure ulcers are especially difficult to treat in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) and recurrence rates are high. Prompted by encouraging results obtained using bone marrow stem cells to treat several diseases including chronic wounds, this study examines the use of autologous stem cells from bone marrow to promote the healing of pressure ulcers in patients with SCI. Objective To obtain preliminary data on the use of bone marrow mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) to treat pressure ulcers in terms of clinical outcome, procedure safety, and treatment time. Participants Twenty-two patients with SCI (19 men, 3 women; mean age 56.41 years) with single type IV pressure ulcers of more than 4 months duration. Interventions By minimally invasive surgery, the ulcers were debrided and treated with BM-MNCs obtained by Ficoll density gradient separation of autologous bone marrow aspirates drawn from the iliac crest. Results In 19 patients (86.36%), the pressure ulcers treated with BM-MNCs had fully healed after a mean time of 21 days. The number of MNCs isolated was patient dependent, although similar clinical outcomes were observed in each case. Compared to conventional surgical treatment, mean intra-hospital stay was reduced from 85.16 to 43.06 days. Following treatment, 5 minutes of daily wound care was required per patient compared to 20 minutes for conventional surgery. During a mean follow-up of 19 months, none of the resolved ulcers recurred. Conclusions Our data indicate that cell therapy using autologous BM-MNCs could be an option to treat type IV pressure ulcers in patients with SCI, avoiding major surgical intervention. PMID:21756569

  4. Electrical stimulation for the treatment of lower urinary tract dysfunction after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Meredith J.; Amundsen, Cindy L.; Grill, Warren M.

    2015-01-01

    Electrical stimulation for bladder control is an alternative to traditional methods of treating neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction (NLUTD) resulting from spinal cord injury (SCI). In this review, we systematically discuss the neurophysiology of bladder dysfunction following SCI and the applications of electrical stimulation for bladder control following SCI, spanning from historic clinical approaches to recent pre-clinical studies that offer promising new strategies that may improve the feasibility and success of electrical stimulation therapy in patients with SCI. Electrical stimulation provides a unique opportunity to control bladder function by exploiting neural control mechanisms. Our understanding of the applications and limitations of electrical stimulation for bladder control has improved due to many pre-clinical studies performed in animals and translational clinical studies. Techniques that have emerged as possible opportunities to control bladder function include pudendal nerve stimulation and novel methods of stimulation, such as high frequency nerve block. Further development of novel applications of electrical stimulation will drive progress towards effective therapy for SCI. The optimal solution for restoration of bladder control may encompass a combination of efficient, targeted electrical stimulation, possibly at multiple locations, and pharmacological treatment to enhance symptom control. PMID:25582564

  5. Acute spontaneous spinal subdural haematoma presenting as paraplegia and complete recovery with non-operative treatment

    PubMed Central

    Al, Behçet; Yildirim, Cuma; Zengin, Suat; Genc, Sinan; Erkutlu, Ibrahim; Mete, Ahmet

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal subdural haematoma (SSDH) with no underlying pathology is a very rare condition. Only 20 cases have been previously reported. It can be caused by abnormalities of coagulation, blood dyscrasia, or trauma, underlying neoplasm, and arteriovenous malformation. It occurs most commonly in the thoracic spine and presents with sudden back pain radiating to the arms, legs or trunk, and varying degrees of motor, sensory, and autonomic disturbances. Although the main approach to management is surgical decompression, conservative management is used as well. We report the case of a 57-year-old man who presented with sudden severe low back pain followed by rapid onset of complete paraplegia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an anterior subdural haematoma from T9 to L1 with cord compression. Corticosteroid treatment was administered. The patient showed substantial clinical improvement after 7 days of bed rest and an intense rehabilitation programme. An MRI scan and a computed tomography angiogram did not reveal any underlying pathology to account for the subdural haematoma. PMID:22065983

  6. Effectiveness of therapeutic physical exercise in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Alba-Martín, Pablo; Gallego-Izquierdo, T; Plaza-Manzano, Gustavo; Romero-Franco, Natalia; Núñez-Nagy, Susana; Pecos-Martín, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of conservative treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome with physical exercise. [Subjects and Methods] A computer-based review conducted of four databases (PubMed, the Cochrane Library, PEDro, and the University Library) was completed based on the inclusion criteria of patellofemoral pain syndrome patients treated with physical exercise methods and examination with self-reported pain and/or functional questionnaires. [Results] The findings of ten clinical trials of moderate to high quality were evaluated to determine the effectiveness of physical exercise as conservative management for patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Conclusion] The intervention programs that were most effective in relieving pain and improving function in patellofemoral pain syndrome included proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching and strengthening exercises for the hip external rotator and abductor muscles and knee extensor muscles.

  7. Responses of brown adipose tissue to diet-induced obesity, exercise, dietary restriction and ephedrine treatment.

    PubMed

    Slocum, Nikki; Durrant, Jessica R; Bailey, David; Yoon, Lawrence; Jordan, Holly; Barton, Joanna; Brown, Roger H; Clifton, Lisa; Milliken, Tula; Harrington, Wallace; Kimbrough, Carie; Faber, Catherine A; Cariello, Neal; Elangbam, Chandikumar S

    2013-07-01

    Drug-induced weight loss in humans has been associated with undesirable side effects not present in weight loss from lifestyle interventions (caloric restriction or exercise). To investigate the mechanistic differences of weight loss by drug-induced and lifestyle interventions, we examined the gene expression (mRNA) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and conducted histopathologic assessments in diet-induced obese (DIO) mice given ephedrine (18 mg/kg/day orally), treadmill exercise (10 m/min, 1-h/day), and dietary restriction (DR: 26% dietary restriction) for 7 days. Exercise and DR mice lost more body weight than controls and both ephedrine and exercise reduced percent body fat. All treatments reduced BAT and liver lipid accumulation (i.e., cytoplasmic lipids in brown adipocytes and hepatocytes) and increased oxygen consumption (VO2 ml/kg/h) compared with controls. Mitochondrial biogenesis/function-related genes (TFAM, NRF1 and GABPA) were up-regulated in the BAT of all groups. UCP-1 was up-regulated in exercise and ephedrine groups, whereas MFSD2A was up-regulated in ephedrine and DR groups. PGC-1α up-regulation was observed in exercise and DR groups but not in ephedrine group. In all experimental groups, except for ephedrine, fatty acid transport and metabolism genes were up-regulated, but the magnitude of change was higher in the DR group. PRKAA1 was up-regulated in all groups but not significantly in the ephedrine group. ADRß3 was slightly up-regulated in the DR group only, whereas ESRRA remained unchanged in all groups. Although our data suggest a common pathway of BAT activation elicited by ephedrine treatment, exercise or DR, mRNA changes were indicative of additional nutrient-sensing pathways in exercise and DR.

  8. Treatment of Pain and Autonomic Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Dysreflexia in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jonathan R. Jagid, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION...in Spinal Cord Injury with Deep Brain Stimulation 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0559 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This project aims to study electrical deep brain

  9. Chronic Pain Following Spinal Cord Injury: The Role of Immunogenetics and Time of Injury Pain Treatment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    individual. In addition, the immune genes that encode these key inflammatory mediators are highly polymorphic. Hence, an individual may have a genetic ...Critically, this genetic variability may significantly impact the long-term health and quality of life of the individual. Thus both genetics and drug...agents and genetic variability on the occurrence of chronic pain following spinal cord injury. KEYWORDS Pain, spinal cord injury, opioid, glia, innate

  10. Cost analysis of spinal and general anesthesia for the surgical treatment of lumbar spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Khanna, Arjun; Yanamadala, Vijay; Coumans, Jean-Valery; Peterfreund, Robert A

    2015-03-01

    Lumbar spine surgery is typically performed under general anesthesia, although spinal anesthesia can also be used. Given the prevalence of lumbar spine surgery, small differences in cost between the two anesthetic techniques have the potential to make a large impact on overall healthcare costs. We sought to perform a cost comparison analysis of spinal versus general anesthesia for lumbar spine operations. Following Institutional Review Board approval, a retrospective cohort study was performed from 2009-2012 on consecutive patients undergoing non-instrumented, elective lumbar spine surgery for spondylosis by a single surgeon. Each patient was evaluated for both types of anesthesia, with the decision for anesthetic method being made based on a combination of physical status, anatomical considerations, and ultimately a consensus agreement between patient, surgeon, and anesthesiologist. Patient demographics and clinical characteristics were compared between the two groups. Operating room costs were calculated whilst blinded to clinical outcomes and reported in percentage difference. General anesthesia (n=319) and spinal anesthesia (n=81) patients had significantly different median operative times of 175 ± 39.08 and 158 ± 32.75 minutes, respectively (p<0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). Operating room costs were 10.33% higher for general anesthesia compared to spinal anesthesia (p=0.003, Mann-Whitney U test). Complications of spinal anesthesia included excessive movement (n=1), failed spinal attempt (n=3), intraoperative conversion to general anesthesia (n=2), and a high spinal level (n=1). In conclusion, spinal anesthesia can be performed safely in patients undergoing lumbar spine surgery. It has the potential to reduce operative times, costs, and possibly, complications. Further prospective evaluation will help to validate these findings.

  11. Nerve growth factor delivery by ultrasound-mediated nanobubble destruction as a treatment for acute spinal cord injury in rats

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zhaojun; Wang, Zhigang; Shen, Jieliang; Xu, Shengxi; Hu, Zhenming

    2017-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injuries (SCIs) can cause severe disability or death. Treatment options include surgical intervention, drug therapy, and stem cell transplantation. However, the efficacy of these methods for functional recovery remains unsatisfactory. Purpose This study was conducted to explore the effect of ultrasound (US)-mediated destruction of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanobubbles (NBs) expressing nerve growth factor (NGF) (NGF/PLGA NBs) on nerve regeneration in rats following SCI. Materials and methods Adult male Sprague Dawley rats were randomly divided into four treatment groups after Allen hit models of SCI were established. The groups were normal saline (NS) group, NGF and NBs group, NGF and US group, and NGF/PLGA NBs and US group. Histological changes after SCI were observed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Neuron viability was determined by Nissl staining. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling staining was used to examine cell apoptosis. NGF gene and protein expressions were detected by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Green fluorescent protein expression in the spinal cord was examined using an inverted fluorescence microscope. The recovery of neural function was determined using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan test. Results NGF therapy using US-mediated NGF/PLGA NBs destruction significantly increased NGF expression, attenuated histological injury, decreased neuron loss, inhibited neuronal apoptosis in injured spinal cords, and increased BBB scores in rats with SCI. Conclusion US-mediated NGF/PLGA NBs destruction effectively transfects the NGF gene into target tissues and has a significant effect on the injured spinal cord. The combination of US irradiation and gene therapy through NGF/PLGA NBs holds great promise for the future of nanomedicine and the development of noninvasive treatment options for SCI and other diseases. PMID:28280337

  12. Effectiveness of Pilates-based exercises on upper extremity disorders related with breast cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Zengin Alpozgen, A; Razak Ozdincler, A; Karanlik, H; Yaman Agaoglu, F; Narin, A N

    2016-06-23

    Breast cancer treatment causes upper extremity (UE) impairments. This study aims to assess the efficacy of Pilates-based exercises (PE) in comparison with combined exercise (CE) and home exercise (HE) groups, in the rehabilitation of UE disorders related with breast cancer treatment. Fifty-five patients were randomly allocated to PE, CE (consisting of strengthening, stretching and range of motion [ROM] exercises) and HE groups (consisting of CE group exercises). Pain (using visual analogue scale), ROM (using digital goniometer), muscle strength (using dynamometer and pinch gauge), functional status (using Constant-Murley scale and Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand scale) were evaluated before and after intervention. For data analyses (using spss 21 version), one-way ANOVA, paired samples t-test and Kruskal-Wallis test were performed (p ≤ .05 was considered statistically significant). The data obtained in this study revealed significant improvements in almost all the parameters measured in the PE and CE groups, and some improvements were superior to HE group. PE seemed to have resulted similar improvements in pain, muscle strength and functional status when compared to CE group. Therefore, PE seems to be an effective method of rehabilitation of patients with UE disorders related with breast cancer treatment, and might be considered for use as an alternative to CE in this population.

  13. Resistance exercise interventions during and following cancer treatment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Focht, Brian C; Clinton, Steven K; Devor, Steven T; Garver, Matthew J; Lucas, Alexander R; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Grainger, Elizabeth

    2013-06-01

    Findings from prior systematic reviews suggest that exercise results in meaningful improvements in many clinically relevant physiologic and quality of life (QOL) outcomes during and following cancer treatment. However, the majority of exercise-cancer studies have focused upon the benefits of aerobic exercise (AE) and knowledge of the efficacy of resistance exercise (RE) alone as a supportive care intervention for cancer patients and survivors remains limited. Consequently, the purpose of this review was to provide the first systematic evaluation of the effects of RE alone upon clinically relevant physiologic and QOL outcomes during and following cancer treatment. Literature searches were conducted to identify studies examining RE interventions in cancer patients and survivors. Data were extracted on physiologic (fitness, physical function, and body composition) and QOL (fatigue, psychological well-being, and cancer-specific and global QOL outcomes. Cohen's d effect sizes were calculated for each outcome. A total of 15 studies (6 in samples undergoing active cancer treatment and 9 in samples having completed cancer treatment) involving 1,077 participants met the inclusion criteria. Findings revealed that, on average, RE resulted in large effect-size improvements in muscular strength (d = 0.86), moderate effect-size improvements in physical function (d = 0.66), and small effect-size improvements in body composition (d = 0.28) and QOL (d = 0.25) outcomes. The effect sizes observed following RE are comparable in magnitude to the effects of exercise interventions reported in prior comprehensive reviews of the exercise-cancer literature which primarily focused upon AE. Additionally, the methodologic quality of the studies was generally strong. Taken collectively, results of this systematic review suggest that RE is a promising supportive care intervention that results in meaningful improvements in clinically relevant physiologic and QOL outcomes during and following

  14. Randomised placebo-controlled trial on the effectiveness of nasal salmon calcitonin in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Tafazal, Suhayl I; Ng, Leslie; Sell, Philip

    2007-02-01

    This is a double blind randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of nasal salmon calcitonin in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. The trial compared the outcome of salmon calcitonin nasal spray to placebo nasal spray in patients with MRI confirmed lumbar spinal stenosis. Lumbar spinal stenosis is one of the commonest conditions encountered by spine surgeons. It more frequently affects elderly patients and lumbar decompression has been used to treat the condition with variable success. Non operative measures have been investigated, but their success ranges from 15% to 43% in patients followed up for 1-5 years (Simotas in Clin Orthop 1(384):153-161, 2001). Salmon calcitonin injections have been investigated in previous trials and may have a treatment effect. Nasal salmon calcitonin has become available and if effective would have advantages over injections. Forty patients with symptoms of neurogenic claudication and MRI proven lumbar spinal stenosis were randomly assigned either nasal salmon calcitonin or placebo nasal spray to use for 4 weeks. This was followed by a 'washout' period of 6 weeks, and subsequent treatment with 6 weeks of nasal salmon calcitonin. Standard spine outcome measures including Oswestry disability index (ODI), low back outcome score, visual analogue score and shuttle walking test were administered at baseline, 4, 10 and 16 weeks. Twenty patients received nasal salmon calcitonin and twenty patients received placebo nasal spray. At 4 weeks post treatment there was no statistically significant difference in the outcome measures between the two groups. The change in ODI was a mean 1.3 points for the calcitonin group and 0.6 points for the placebo group (P = 0.51), the mean change in visual analogue score for leg pain was 10 mm in the calcitonin group and 0 mm in the placebo group (P = 0.51). There was no significant difference in walking distance between the two groups, with a mean improvement in walking distance of 21 m in the

  15. An exploration of fluoroscopically guided spinal steroid injections in patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain

    PubMed Central

    Neve, Leon; Orchard, John; Gibbs, Nathan; van Mechelen, Willem; Verhagen, Evert; Sesel, Ken; Burgess, Ian; Hines, Brett

    2010-01-01

    Background Fluoroscopically guided lumbar cortisone injections have been proven useful in cases of lower-limb pain caused by lumbar disc prolapse (with evidence levels ll-1/ll-2). These injections are also sometimes used clinically in sports medicine for patients with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain, where no prolapse or other obvious cause of nerve-impingement is diagnosed via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or computed tomography (CT), even though this treatment scenario has not been adequately studied for this last diagnosis. Objectives To explore whether fluoroscopically guided transforaminal lumbar cortisone injections may be a valid treatment method for non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain. Study design Retrospective case series. Methods Patients were selected from databases at two sports clinics and divided into two groups: Group D, with back-related lower-limb pain and disc prolapse proven on CT or MR; and Group N, with non-specific exercise-related lower-limb pain. Patients were sent a questionnaire regarding: symptoms, improvement, effect of injections, satisfaction, side effects and other used treatments. Outcomes were compared between Group D and N. Results 153 patients were eligible for the study (Group D: 93/Group N: 60). Eventually 110 patients responded (Group D: 67/Group N: 43). Twelve percent of Group D and 14% of Group N indicated that the injections had fully cured their symptoms. Altogether, 27% of Group D and 24% of Group N were certain the injections had improved their symptoms in the long term. A larger proportion however, indicated that the injection had certainly improved their symptoms in the short term, but noted that the effects were non-lasting (Group D: 28%/Group N: 30%). Two patients were certain the injections had actually worsened their symptoms. No significant differences in characteristics and outcomes between Group D and Group N were noted. Conclusions Outcomes of this study suggest fluoroscopically

  16. Spinal cordectomy: A new hope for morbid spinal conditions.

    PubMed

    Konar, Subhas K; Maiti, Tanmoy K; Bir, Shyamal C; Nanda, Anil

    2017-01-01

    A spinal cordectomy is a treatment option for several disorders of the spinal cord like post-traumatic syringomyelia, spinal cord tumor and myelomeningocele. We have done a systematic analysis of all reported cases of spinal cordectomy to investigate the possible outcomes and complications. A PubMed search was performed for literature published from 1949 to 2015 with search words "spinal cordectomy", "spinal cord transection" and "cordectomy for malignant spinal cord tumors" to select articles containing information about the indication, outcome and complication of spinal cordectomy performed for diverse etiologies. Spinal cordectomy was performed for post-traumatic syrinx (76 cases), SPAM (2 cases), Central pain of spinal cord origin (22 cases), Spasticity (8 cases), Spinal tumors (16 cases) and Myelomeningocele (30 cases). Among the 76 cases, 60 cases fulfilled the inclusion criteria for our outcome analysis in terms of improvement, stabilization or deterioration after spinal cordectomy. The results showed 78.3% excellent improvement, 13.4% stable and 8.3% (5 cases) deterioration. The reported causes of failure of spinal cordectomy for post-traumatic syrinx were scarring of a proximal stump and severe arachnoid adhesion. Sixteen cases of spinal cordectomy related with spinal cord tumors have been reported. Also reported were seven cases of GBM, two cases of AA and one each case of anaplastic tanycytic ependymoma, schwanoma, neurofibroma, atypical meningioma and malignant ganglioglioma. Cordectomy shouldbe strongly considered in patients having malignant spinal cord tumors with complete motor loss and sensory loss below the level of the lesion as a means of preventing the spread of disease from the original tumor focus. Spinal cordectomy is a treatment option with a good outcome for post-traumatic spinal morbidity, spinal cord tumors and myelomeningocele. However, since it is an invasive and irreversible procedure, it is only considered when other options have

  17. Exercise in the treatment of rotator cuff impingement: a systematic review and a synthesized evidence-based rehabilitation protocol.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, John E

    2009-01-01

    A systematic review of the literature was performed to evaluate the role of exercise in treating rotator cuff impingement and to synthesize a standard evidence-based rehabilitation protocol. Eleven randomized, controlled trials (level 1 and 2) evaluating the effect of exercise in the treatment of impingement were identified. Data regarding demographics, methodology, and outcomes of pain, range of motion, strength, and function were recorded. Individual components of each rehabilitation program were catalogued. Effectiveness was determined by statistical and clinical significance. Although many articles had methodologic concerns, the data demonstrate that exercise has statistically and clinically significant effects on pain reduction and improving function, but not on range of motion or strength. Manual therapy augments the effects of exercise, yet supervised exercise was not different than home exercise programs. Information regarding specific components of the exercise programs was synthesized into a gold standard rehabilitation protocol for future studies on the nonoperative treatment of rotator cuff impingement.

  18. Neural stem/progenitor cell transplantation for spinal cord injury treatment; A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Yousefifard, M; Rahimi-Movaghar, V; Nasirinezhad, F; Baikpour, M; Safari, S; Saadat, S; Moghadas Jafari, A; Asady, H; Razavi Tousi, S M T; Hosseini, M

    2016-05-13

    Despite the vast improvements of cell therapy in spinal cord injury treatment, no optimum protocol has been developed for application of neural stem/progenitor cells. In this regard, the present meta-analysis showed that the efficacy of the neural stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) transplantation depends mainly on injury model, intervention phase, transplanted cell count, immunosuppressive use, and probably stem cell source. Improved functional recovery post NSPC transplantation was found to be higher in transection and contusion models. Moreover, NSPC transplantation in acute phase of spinal injury was found to have better functional recovery. Higher doses (>3×10(6)cell/kg) were also shown to be optimum for transplantation, but immunosuppressive agent administration negatively affected the motor function recovery. Scaffold use in NSPC transplantation could also effectively raise functional recovery.

  19. Spinal Cord Stimulation for the Treatment of Upper and Lower Extremity Neuropathic Pain due to Lyme Disease.

    PubMed

    Mearini, Massimo; Podetta, Stefano; Catenacci, Emanuela; d'Auria, Patrizia; Cornali, Claudio; Mortini, Pietro

    2007-04-01

    Background.  Lyme disease is caused by Borrelia, a bacterium transmitted by the bite of a deer tick. A slow developing encephalopathy or an axonal polyneuropathy with distal paresthesia and spinal or radicular pain rarely occurs and can be hard to treat. Materials and Methods.  We report here the case of a 44-year-old woman with four-limb, intolerable, neuropathic pain as sequelae to Lyme disease, which was resistant to conservative measures and was treated successfully with concurrent, thoracic, and cervical percutaneous spinal cord stimulation (SCS). Results.  After 18 months of therapy and follow-up, this patient's analgesia, as a result of SCS, continues to be excellent, with almost complete subjective pain relief and cessation of adjuvant analgesic medication. Conclusions.  SCS may be efficacious for the treatment of neuropathic pain due to Lyme disease.

  20. Clinical Factors for Prognosis and Treatment Guidance of Spinal Cord Astrocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Shunsuke; Aoyama, Takeshi; Koyanagi, Izumi; Sasamori, Toru; Hamauch, Shuji; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To obtain information useful in establishing treatment guidelines by evaluating baseline clinical features and treatment outcomes of patients with spinal cord astrocytoma (SCA). Overview of Literature The optimal management of SCA remains controversial, and there are no standard guidelines. Methods The study included 20 patients with low-grade and 13 with high-grade SCA surgically treated between 1989 and 2014. Patients were classified according to the extent of surgical resection. Survival was assessed using Kaplan–Meier plots and compared between groups by log-rank tests. Neurological status was defined by the modified McCormick scale and compared between groups by Mann–Whitney U tests. Results Surgical resection was performed for 19 of 20 low-grade (95%) and 10 of 13 high-grade (76.9%) SCA patients. Only nine patients (27.3%) underwent gross total resection, all of whom had low-grade SCA. Of all patients, 51.5% showed deteriorated neurological status compared to preoperative baseline. Median overall survival was significantly longer for low-grade SCA than that (91 months, 78% at 5 years vs. 15 months, 31% at 5 years; p=0.007). Low-grade SCA patients benefited from more aggressive resection, whereas high-grade SCA patients did not. Multivariate analysis revealed histology status (hazard ratio [HR], 0.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.09–0.98; p<0.05) and postoperative neurological status (HR, 0.12; CI, 0.02–0.95; p<0.05) as independent predictors of longer overall survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy had no significant impact on survival rate. However, a trend for increased survival was observed with radiation cordotomy (RCT) in high-grade SCA patients. Conclusions Aggressive resection for low-grade and RCT may prolong survival. Preservation of neurological status is an important treatment goal. Given the low incidence of SCA, establishing strong collaborative, interdisciplinary, and multi-institutional study groups

  1. Cost-effectiveness of three treatment strategies for lumbar spinal stenosis: Conservative care, laminectomy, and the Superion interspinous spacer

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Louise H.; Nelson, Teresa; Patel, Vikas V.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar spinal stenosis is a painful and debilitating condition resulting in healthcare costs totaling tens of billions of dollars annually. Initial treatment consists of conservative care modalities such as physical therapy, NSAIDs, opioids, and steroid injections. Patients refractory to these therapies can undergo decompressive surgery, which has good long-term efficacy but is more traumatic and can be associated with high post-operative adverse event (AE) rates. Interspinous spacers have been developed to offer a less-invasive alternative. The objective of this study was to compare the costs and quality adjusted life years (QALYs) gained of conservative care (CC) and decompressive surgery (DS) to a new minimally-invasive interspinous spacer. Methods A Markov model was developed evaluating 3 strategies of care for lumbar spinal stenosis. If initial therapies failed, the model moved patients to more invasive therapies. Data from the Superion FDA clinical trial, a prospective spinal registry, and the literature were used to populate the model. Direct medical care costs were modeled from 2014 Medicare reimbursements for healthcare services. QALYs came from the SF-12 PCS and MCS components. The analysis used a 2-year time horizon with a 3% discount rate. Results CC had the lowest cost at $10,540, while Spacers and DS were nearly identical at about $13,950. CC also had the lowest QALY increase (0.06), while Spacers and DS were again nearly identical (.28). The incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICER) for Spacers compared to CC was $16,300 and for DS was $15,200. Conclusions Both the Spacer and DS strategies are far below the commonly cited $50,000/QALY threshold and produced several times the QALY increase versus CC, suggesting that surgical care provides superior value (cost / effectiveness) versus sustained conservative care in the treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:26273546

  2. Spinal cord compression in two related Ursus arctos horribilis.

    PubMed

    Thomovsky, Stephanie A; Chen, Annie V; Roberts, Greg R; Schmidt, Carrie E; Layton, Arthur W

    2012-09-01

    Two 15-yr-old grizzly bear littermates were evaluated within 9 mo of each other with the symptom of acute onset of progressive paraparesis and proprioceptive ataxia. The most significant clinical examination finding was pelvic limb paresis in both bears. Magnetic resonance examinations of both bears showed cranial thoracic spinal cord compression. The first bear had left-sided extradural, dorsolateral spinal cord compression at T3-T4. Vertebral canal stenosis was also observed at T2-T3. Images of the second bear showed lateral spinal cord compression from T2-T3 to T4-T5. Intervertebral disk disease and associated spinal cord compression was also observed at T2-T3 and T3-T4. One grizzly bear continued to deteriorate despite reduced exercise, steroid, and antibiotic therapy. The bear was euthanized, and a necropsy was performed. The postmortem showed a spinal ganglion cyst that caused spinal cord compression at the level of T3-T4. Wallerian-like degeneration was observed from C3-T6. The second bear was prescribed treatment that consisted of a combination of reduced exercise and steroid therapy. He continued to deteriorate with these medical therapies and was euthanized 4 mo after diagnosis. A necropsy showed hypertrophy and protrusion of the dorsal longitudinal ligament at T2-T3 and T3-T4, with resulting spinal cord compression in this region. Wallerian-like degeneration was observed from C2-L1. This is one of few case reports that describes paresis in bears. It is the only case report, to the authors' knowledge, that describes spinal magnetic resonance imaging findings in a grizzly bear and also the only report that describes a cranial thoracic myelopathy in two related grizzly bears with neurologic signs.

  3. Treatment of Dyslipidemia with Statins and Physical Exercises: Recent Findings of Skeletal Muscle Responses

    PubMed Central

    Bonfim, Mariana Rotta; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; do Amaral, Sandra Lia; Monteiro, Henrique Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Statin treatment in association with physical exercise practice can substantially reduce cardiovascular mortality risk of dyslipidemic individuals, but this practice is associated with myopathic event exacerbation. This study aimed to present the most recent results of specific literature about the effects of statins and its association with physical exercise on skeletal musculature. Thus, a literature review was performed using PubMed and SciELO databases, through the combination of the keywords “statin” AND “exercise” AND “muscle”, restricting the selection to original studies published between January 1990 and November 2013. Sixteen studies evaluating the effects of statins in association with acute or chronic exercises on skeletal muscle were analyzed. Study results indicate that athletes using statins can experience deleterious effects on skeletal muscle, as the exacerbation of skeletal muscle injuries are more frequent with intense training or acute eccentric and strenuous exercises. Moderate physical training, in turn, when associated to statins does not increase creatine kinase levels or pain reports, but improves muscle and metabolic functions as a consequence of training. Therefore, it is suggested that dyslipidemic patients undergoing statin treatment should be exposed to moderate aerobic training in combination to resistance exercises three times a week, and the provision of physical training prior to drug administration is desirable, whenever possible. PMID:25993596

  4. Aerobic Exercise and Pharmacological Treatments Counteract Cachexia by Modulating Autophagy in Colon Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pigna, Eva; Berardi, Emanuele; Aulino, Paola; Rizzuto, Emanuele; Zampieri, Sandra; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Merigliano, Stefano; Gruppo, Mario; Mericskay, Mathias; Li, Zhenlin; Rocchi, Marco; Barone, Rosario; Macaluso, Filippo; Di Felice, Valentina; Adamo, Sergio; Coletti, Dario; Moresi, Viviana

    2016-05-31

    Recent studies have correlated physical activity with a better prognosis in cachectic patients, although the underlying mechanisms are not yet understood. In order to identify the pathways involved in the physical activity-mediated rescue of skeletal muscle mass and function, we investigated the effects of voluntary exercise on cachexia in colon carcinoma (C26)-bearing mice. Voluntary exercise prevented loss of muscle mass and function, ultimately increasing survival of C26-bearing mice. We found that the autophagic flux is overloaded in skeletal muscle of both colon carcinoma murine models and patients, but not in running C26-bearing mice, thus suggesting that exercise may release the autophagic flux and ultimately rescue muscle homeostasis. Treatment of C26-bearing mice with either AICAR or rapamycin, two drugs that trigger the autophagic flux, also rescued muscle mass and prevented atrogene induction. Similar effects were reproduced on myotubes in vitro, which displayed atrophy following exposure to C26-conditioned medium, a phenomenon that was rescued by AICAR or rapamycin treatment and relies on autophagosome-lysosome fusion (inhibited by chloroquine). Since AICAR, rapamycin and exercise equally affect the autophagic system and counteract cachexia, we believe autophagy-triggering drugs may be exploited to treat cachexia in conditions in which exercise cannot be prescribed.

  5. Aerobic Exercise and Pharmacological Treatments Counteract Cachexia by Modulating Autophagy in Colon Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pigna, Eva; Berardi, Emanuele; Aulino, Paola; Rizzuto, Emanuele; Zampieri, Sandra; Carraro, Ugo; Kern, Helmut; Merigliano, Stefano; Gruppo, Mario; Mericskay, Mathias; Li, Zhenlin; Rocchi, Marco; Barone, Rosario; Macaluso, Filippo; Di Felice, Valentina; Adamo, Sergio; Coletti, Dario; Moresi, Viviana

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have correlated physical activity with a better prognosis in cachectic patients, although the underlying mechanisms are not yet understood. In order to identify the pathways involved in the physical activity-mediated rescue of skeletal muscle mass and function, we investigated the effects of voluntary exercise on cachexia in colon carcinoma (C26)-bearing mice. Voluntary exercise prevented loss of muscle mass and function, ultimately increasing survival of C26-bearing mice. We found that the autophagic flux is overloaded in skeletal muscle of both colon carcinoma murine models and patients, but not in running C26-bearing mice, thus suggesting that exercise may release the autophagic flux and ultimately rescue muscle homeostasis. Treatment of C26-bearing mice with either AICAR or rapamycin, two drugs that trigger the autophagic flux, also rescued muscle mass and prevented atrogene induction. Similar effects were reproduced on myotubes in vitro, which displayed atrophy following exposure to C26-conditioned medium, a phenomenon that was rescued by AICAR or rapamycin treatment and relies on autophagosome-lysosome fusion (inhibited by chloroquine). Since AICAR, rapamycin and exercise equally affect the autophagic system and counteract cachexia, we believe autophagy-triggering drugs may be exploited to treat cachexia in conditions in which exercise cannot be prescribed. PMID:27244599

  6. Spinal cord stimulation for treatment of the pain associated with hereditary multiple osteochondromas

    PubMed Central

    Mirpuri, Ravi G; Brammeier, Jereme; Chen, Hamilton; Hsu, Frank PK; Chiu, Vi K; Chang, Eric Y

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hereditary multiple osteochondromas (HMO) usually presents with neoplastic lesions throughout the skeletal system. These lesions frequently cause chronic pain and are conventionally treated with surgical resection and medication. In cases where conventional treatments have failed, spinal cord stimulation (SCS) could be considered as a potential option for pain relief. The objective of this case was to determine if SCS may have a role in treating pain secondary to neoplastic lesions from HMO. Case presentation We report a 65-year-old female who previously received both surgical and pharmacological interventions for treating HMO neoplastic pain in the lumbar, pelvis, femur, and tibial regions. These interventions either failed to offer significant pain relief or caused excessive lethargy. A SCS trial was then offered with a dual 16-contact lead trial leading to 70%–80% improvement in pain from baseline and 85% reduction in oxycodone IR intake. This was followed by permanent implantation of two 2×8 contact paddle leads (T7–T8 and T9–T10 interspaces). After 8-week follow-up, settings were further optimized resulting in an additional 30% improvement in pain compared to last visit. At 6-month follow-up, the patient reported continued pain relief. Conclusion This case demonstrates the first successful use of SCS to treat both HMO and nonmalignant neoplastic-related pain. The patient reported pain improvement from baseline, reduced pain medication requirements, and subjective improvement in quality of life. Additionally, this case demonstrates the potential advantage of trialing multiple painful areas with a 16-contact lead in order to avoid multiple trials and placement. PMID:26316806

  7. Magnitude of spinal muscle damage is not statistically associated with exercise-induced low back pain intensity

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Mark D.; Horn, Maggie E.; Lott, Donovan J.; Arpan, Ishu; George, Steven Z.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT Findings on imaging of noncontractile anatomic abnormalities and the intensity of low back pain have weak associations because of false-positive rates among asymptomatic individuals. This association might be stronger for contractile tissues. PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between location and reports of pain intensity in the low back and exercise-induced muscle damage to the lumbar paraspinal muscles. STUDY DESIGN Nondiagnostic observational study in a laboratory setting. METHODS Delayed onset muscle soreness was induced in the low back of healthy pain-free volunteers. Measures of pain intensity (100-mm visual analog scale [VAS]) and location (area on the pain diagram) were taken before and 48 hours after exercise. Muscle damage was quantified using mechanical pain thresholds, motor performance deficits, and transverse relaxation time (T2)–weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Changes pre- to postexercise in signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging within the erector spinae, pain intensity, pain area, mechanical pain threshold, and isometric torque were assessed using paired t tests. Bivariate correlations were conducted to assess associations among muscle damage, pain intensity, and pain drawing area. RESULTS Twenty participants volunteered (11 women; average age, 22.3 years; average body mass index, 23.5) for study participation. Reports of pain intensity at 48 hours ranged from 0 to 59 mm on the VAS. Muscle damage was confirmed by reductions in mechanical threshold (p=.011) and motor performance (p<.001) and by changes in T2-weighted MRI (p=.007). This study was powered to find an association of at least r=0.5 to be statistically significant. Correlations of continuous variables revealed no significant correlations between pain intensity and measures of muscle damage (ranging between −0.075 and 0.151). There was a significant association between the remaining torque deficit at 48 hours and pain area

  8. Holistic Treatment Approaches to ADHD: Nutrition, Sleep,and Exercise, Part 7

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavoie, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    This article is part of a series exploring Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). In this seventh installment, the author discusses three holistic treatments for children and adults with ADHD: diet and nutrition, sleep, and exercise. These approaches focus and improve the overall health of ADHD patients. (For Part 6 of this series, see…

  9. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  10. Advances in the clinical research of the minimally invasive treatment for the posterior edge of vertebral-body defects by spinal metastases

    PubMed Central

    LIU, XUEFENG; YANG, ZUOZHANG; XIE, LIN; YUAN, ZONGQIN; REN, MINGYAN; HAN, LEI

    2015-01-01

    Spinal metastasis is one of the commonly observed complications in the advanced stages of cancer patients, and is a serious threat to human life and health. Malignant tumor invasion usually leads to defects in the posterior margins of the vertebral body, which caused significant cancer pains to patients and increased the risk of surgery. Currently, minimally invasive treatments of vertebral defects caused by spinal metastases include percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) combined with radiofrequency ablation and PVP combined with 125I seed implantation. These minimally invasive techniques have particular superiority to control pain in patients with spinal metastases, improve nerve function, reduce the incidence of fractures and surgical risk, and improve the quality of life. The present study reviewed the progress in clinical research on vertebral defects caused by spinal metastases, and the mechanisms and minimally invasive treatment. PMID:26405535

  11. Spinal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... center of the column of bones (vertebral or spinal column) through which the spinal cord and nerve roots ... be acquired at birth. Poor alignment of the spinal column when a vertebra slips forward onto the one ...

  12. Evidence-based guideline for neuropathic pain interventional treatments: Spinal cord stimulation, intravenous infusions, epidural injections and nerve blocks

    PubMed Central

    Mailis, Angela; Taenzer, Paul

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Special Interest Group of the Canadian Pain Society has produced consensus-based guidelines for the pharmacological management of neuropathic pain. The society aimed to generate an additional guideline for other forms of neuropathic pain treatments. OBJECTIVE: To develop evidence-based recommendations for neuropathic pain interventional treatments. METHODS: A task force was created and engaged the Institute of Health Economics in Edmonton, Alberta, to survey the literature pertaining to multiple treatments. Sufficient literature existed on four interventions only: spinal cord stimulation; epidural injections; intravenous infusions; and nerve blocks. A comprehensive search was conducted for systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials and evidence-based clinical practice guidelines; a critical review was generated on each topic. A modified United States Preventive Services Task Force tool was used for quality rating and grading of recommendations. RESULTS: Investigators reviewed four studies of spinal cord stimulation, 19 studies of intravenous infusions, 14 studies of epidural injections and 16 studies of nerve blocks that met the inclusion criteria. The task force chairs rated the quality of evidence and graded the recommendations. Feedback was solicited from the members of the task force. CONCLUSION: There is sufficient evidence to support recommendations for some of these interventions for selected neuropathic pain conditions. This evidence is, at best, moderate and is often limited or conflicting. Pain practitioners are encouraged to explore evidence-based treatment options before considering unproven treatments. Full disclosure of risks and benefits of the available options is necessary for shared decision making and informed consent. PMID:22606679

  13. Impact of an exercise intervention on methamphetamine use outcomes post-residential treatment care

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Richard A.; Chudzynski, Joy; Mooney, Larissa; Gonzales, Rachel; Ang, Alfonso; Dickerson, Daniel; Penate, Jose; Salem, Bilal A.; Dolezal, Brett; Cooper, Christopher B.

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined the efficacy of an 8-week exercise intervention on posttreatment methamphetamine (MA) use among MA-dependent individuals following residential treatment. Methods 135 individuals newly enrolled in treatment were randomly assigned to a structured 8-week exercise intervention or health education control group. Approximately 1 week after completion of the intervention, participants were discharged to the community. Interview data and urine samples were collected at 1-, 3-, and 6-months post-residential care. Of the sample, 54.8% were classified as higher severity users (using MA more than 18 days in the month before admission) and 45.2% as lower severity users (using MA for up to 18 days in the month before admission). Group differences in MA use outcomes were examined over the 3 timepoints using mixed-multivariate modeling. Results While fewer exercise participants returned to MA use compared to education participants at 1-, 3- and 6-months post-discharge, differences were not statistically significant. A significant interaction for self-reported MA use and MA urine drug test results by condition and MA severity was found: lower severity users in the exercise group reported using MA significantly fewer days at the three post-discharge timepoints than lower severity users in the education group. Lower severity users in the exercise group also had a lower percentage of positive urine results at the three timepoints than lower severity users in the education group. These relationships were not present in the comparison of the higher severity conditions. Conclusion Results support the value of exercise as a treatment component for individuals using MA 18 or fewer days/month. PMID:26371404

  14. The assessment and treatment of unhealthy exercise in adolescents with anorexia nervosa: A Delphi study to synthesize clinical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Noetel, Melissa; Dawson, Lisa; Hay, Phillipa; Touyz, Stephen

    2017-01-17

    This study aimed to explore and synthesize expert clinical knowledge on defining and managing unhealthy exercise in adolescents with AN. The Delphi methodology was used. Clinicians (n = 25) considered experts in the treatment of AN in adolescents were recruited internationally to form the panel. The first round of the questionnaires was comprised of five open-ended questions regarding defining, assessing, and treating unhealthy exercise in adolescents with AN. Statements were derived from this data using content analysis, and included as Likert-based items in two subsequent rounds, in which panellists were required to rate their level of agreement for each item. All 25 respondents completed the three rounds of questionnaires. Consensus was achieved for 59.0% of the items included in the second and third round of questionnaires. Although consensus was not achieved, compulsive exercise was the preferred term for the panel when referring to unhealthy exercise in adolescents with AN. The panel clearly delineated features of unhealthy and healthy exercise, and endorsed a number of items considered important to assess for when evaluating exercise in this clinical population. A variety of treatment approaches and strategies reached consensus. Notably, for those who are medically stable and progressing toward recovery, the panel recommended initial exercise restriction practices and reintroducing healthy exercise behaviors, rather than exercise cessation practices. The current findings can serve as preliminary treatment guidelines. A unified approach to labeling and defining unhealthy exercise in the eating disorder literature and clinical settings is required to achieve further progress.

  15. Exercise prescription in the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus : current practices, existing guidelines and future directions.

    PubMed

    O'Hagan, Ciara; De Vito, Giuseppe; Boreham, Colin A G

    2013-01-01

    Exercise is an effective treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus, resulting in stabilization of plasma glucose in the acute phase and improvements in body composition, insulin resistance and glycosylated haemoglobin with chronic exercise training. However, the most appropriate exercise prescription for type 2 diabetes has not yet been established, resulting from insufficient evidence to determine the optimum type, intensity, duration or frequency of exercise training. Furthermore, patient engagement in exercise is suboptimal. There are many likely reasons for low engagement in exercise; one possible contributory factor may be a tendency for expert bodies to prioritize the roles of diet and medication over exercise in their treatment guidelines. Published treatment guidelines vary in their approach to exercise training, but most agencies suggest that people with type 2 diabetes engage in 150 min of moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise per week. This prescription is similar to the established guidelines for cardiovascular health in the general population. Future possibilities in this area include investigation of the physiological effects and practical benefits of exercise training of different intensities in type 2 diabetes, and the use of individualized prescription to maximize the health benefits of training.

  16. Effects of Testosterone and Evoked Resistance Exercise after Spinal Cord Injury (TEREX-SCI): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Gorgey, Ashraf S; Khalil, Refka E; Gill, Ranjodh; O'Brien, Laura C; Lavis, Timothy; Castillo, Teodoro; Cifu, David X; Savas, Jeannie; Khan, Rehan; Cardozo, Christopher; Lesnefsky, Edward J; Gater, David R; Adler, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) are at a lifelong risk of obesity and chronic metabolic disorders including insulin resistance and dyslipidemia. Within a few weeks of injury, there is a significant decline in whole body fat-free mass, particularly lower extremity skeletal muscle mass, and subsequent increase in fat mass (FM). This is accompanied by a decrease in anabolic hormones including testosterone. Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) has been shown to increase skeletal muscle mass and improve metabolic profile. Additionally, resistance training (RT) has been shown to increase lean mass and reduce metabolic disturbances in SCI and other clinical populations. Methods and analysis 26 individuals with chronic, motor complete SCI between 18 and 50 years old were randomly assigned to a RT+TRT group (n=13) or a TRT group (n=13). 22 participants completed the initial 16-week training phase of the study and 4 participants withdrew. 12 participants of the 22 completed 16 weeks of detraining. The TRT was provided via transdermal testosterone patches (4–6 mg/day). The RT+TRT group had 16 weeks of supervised unilateral progressive RT using surface neuromuscular electrical stimulation with ankle weights. This study will investigate the effects of evoked RT+TRT or TRT alone on body composition (muscle cross-sectional area, visceral adipose tissue, %FM) and metabolic profile (glucose and lipid metabolism) in individuals with motor complete SCI. Findings from this study may help in designing exercise therapies to alleviate the deterioration in body composition after SCI and decrease the incidence of metabolic disorders in this clinical population. Ethics and dissemination The study is currently approved by the McGuire VA Medical Center and Virginia Commonwealth University. All participants read and signed approved consent forms. Results will be submitted to peer-reviewed journals and presented at national and international conferences. Trial

  17. Relationship between nutritional status and mortality during the first 2 weeks following treatment for cervical spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaobin; Liu, Zhi; Sun, Tiansheng; Ren, Jixin; Wang, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Background The effects of nutrition on the mortality of cervical spinal cord injury (CSCI) patients, unlike other risk factors, are poorly documented. Objective The relationship between dynamic nutritional status change and mortality in patients treated for CSCI was investigated. Methods A retrospective study of 128 patients treated for CSCI at the Beijing Army General Hospital was conducted between March 2006 and March 2011. Age, spinal segment damage (C1–C4 and C5–C7), American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) grade, hospitalization duration, ventilatory support, and serum protein levels (total protein, serum albumin, and serum prealbumin) were assessed during early-stage treatment (<14 days). Survival (n = 109) and death (n = 19) groups were assigned by final disposition of acute hospitalization. Results The survival group evidenced no significant changes in total protein levels during early-stage treatment, although these values decreased in the death group. Serum prealbumin and albumin levels significantly declined by treatment day 1 and throughout treatment (P < 0.05). By days 3–5 and thereafter, significantly lower serum proteins were observed in the death group compared to the survival group (P < 0.05). Multiple segment damage, elevated ASIA, and longer ventilatory support duration were more prevalent in the death group (P < 0.001) Conclusions Lower serum protein levels associated with hypoproteinemia and malnutrition are significant indicators of mortality in patients with CSCI, along with higher levels of lesions, elevated ASIA grades, and longer ventilatory support durations. Early corrective action for hypoalbuminemia may help to reduce mortality in patients with CSCI. PMID:24090082

  18. Columbia SMA Project: A Randomized, Control Trial of the Effects of Exercise on Motor Function and Strength in Patients With Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    www.CQillmbiasma.org No. 1994 ?. 2 Musc::ular Dystrophy Assoc1at1on (hUAJ Clinic Spinal Muscular Atrophy Clinical (SMA) Research Center Nan<:y E. Strauss, M.D...3 ~ COLUMBIA UNIVERSIT~ 0 ~ Muscutar Dystrophy Association (MDA) Clinic \\WI M C Spinal Muscular Atrophy Clinical {SMA) - EDICAL ENTER Research...9lu mbi~_rlli:’U~t9 0000000000 p.1 Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) Clinic Spinal Muscular Atrophy Clinical (SMA) Research Center Nancy E

  19. Long-term treatment with PP2 after spinal cord injury resulted in functional locomotor recovery and increased spared tissue

    PubMed Central

    Rosas, Odrick R.; Torrado, Aranza I.; Santiago, Jose M.; Rodriguez, Ana E.; Salgado, Iris K.; Miranda, Jorge D.

    2014-01-01

    The spinal cord has the ability to regenerate but the microenvironment generated after trauma reduces that capacity. An increase in Src family kinase (SFK) activity has been implicated in neuropathological conditions associated with central nervous system trauma. Therefore, we hypothesized that a decrease in SFK activation by a long-term treatment with 4-amino-5-(4-chlorophenyl)-7-(t-butyl)pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyramidine (PP2), a selective SFK inhibitor, after spinal cord contusion with the New York University (NYU) impactor device would generate a permissive environment that improves axonal sprouting and/or behavioral activity. Results demonstrated that long-term blockade of SFK activation with PP2 increases locomotor activity at 7, 14, 21 and 28 days post-injury in the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan open field test, round and square beam crossing tests. In addition, an increase in white matter spared tissue and serotonin fiber density was observed in animals treated with PP2. However, blockade of SFK activity did not change the astrocytic response or infiltration of cells from the immune system at 28 days post-injury. Moreover, a reduced SFK activity with PP2 diminished Ephexin (a guanine nucleotide exchange factor) phosphorylation in the acute phase (4 days post-injury) after trauma. Together, these findings suggest a potential role of SFK in the regulation of spared tissue and/or axonal outgrowth that may result in functional locomotor recovery during the pathophysiology generated after spinal cord injury. Our study also points out that ephexin1 phosphorylation (activation) by SFK action may be involved in the repulsive microenvironment generated after spinal cord injury. PMID:25657738

  20. Spinal Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Katonis, P.; Datsis, G.; Karantanas, A.; Kampouroglou, A.; Lianoudakis, S.; Licoudis, S.; Papoutsopoulou, E.; Alpantaki, K.

    2013-01-01

    Although osteosarcoma represents the second most common primary bone tumor, spinal involvement is rare, accounting for 3%–5% of all osteosarcomas. The most frequent symptom of osteosarcoma is pain, which appears in almost all patients, whereas more than 70% exhibit neurologic deficit. At a molecular level, it is a tumor of great genetic complexity and several genetic disorders have been associated with its appearance. Early diagnosis and careful surgical staging are the most important factors in accomplishing sufficient management. Even though overall prognosis remains poor, en-block tumor removal combined with adjuvant radiotherapy and chemotherapy is currently the treatment of choice. This paper outlines histopathological classification, epidemiology, diagnostic procedures, and current concepts of management of spinal osteosarcoma. PMID:24179411

  1. Prevention of exercised induced cardiomyopathy following Pip-PMO treatment in dystrophic mdx mice.

    PubMed

    Betts, Corinne A; Saleh, Amer F; Carr, Carolyn A; Hammond, Suzan M; Coenen-Stass, Anna M L; Godfrey, Caroline; McClorey, Graham; Varela, Miguel A; Roberts, Thomas C; Clarke, Kieran; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew J A

    2015-03-11

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the Dmd gene. In addition to skeletal muscle wasting, DMD patients develop cardiomyopathy, which significantly contributes to mortality. Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) are a promising DMD therapy, restoring functional dystrophin protein by exon skipping. However, a major limitation with current AOs is the absence of dystrophin correction in heart. Pip peptide-AOs demonstrate high activity in cardiac muscle. To determine their therapeutic value, dystrophic mdx mice were subject to forced exercise to model the DMD cardiac phenotype. Repeated peptide-AO treatments resulted in high levels of cardiac dystrophin protein, which prevented the exercised induced progression of cardiomyopathy, normalising heart size as well as stabilising other cardiac parameters. Treated mice also exhibited significantly reduced cardiac fibrosis and improved sarcolemmal integrity. This work demonstrates that high levels of cardiac dystrophin restored by Pip peptide-AOs prevents further deterioration of cardiomyopathy and pathology following exercise in dystrophic DMD mice.

  2. Effects of Clinical Pilates Exercises on Patients Developing Lymphedema after Breast Cancer Treatment: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Şener, Hülya Özlem; Malkoç, Mehtap; Ergin, Gülbin; Karadibak, Didem; Yavuzşen, Tuğba

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of clinical Pilates exercises with those of the standard lymphedema exercises on lymphedema developing after breast cancer treatment. Materials and Methods The study comprised 60 female patients with a mean age of 53.2±7.7 years who developed lymphedema after having breast cancer treatment. The patients were randomized into two groups: the clinical Pilates exercise group (n=30), and the control group (n=30). Before, and at the 8th week of treatment, the following parameters were measured: the severity of lymphedema, limb circumferences, body image using the Social Appearance Anxiety Scale, quality of life with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) quality of life questionnaire (QLQ-BR23), and upper extremity function using the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) outcome measure. Both groups performed one-hour exercises three days a week for 8 weeks. Results After treatment, the symptoms recovered significantly in both groups. Reductions in the severity of lymphedema, improvements in the social appearance anxiety scale scores, quality of life scores, and upper extremity functions scores in the clinical Pilates exercise group were greater than those in the control group. Clinical Pilates exercises were determined to be more effective on the symptoms of patients with lymphedema than were standard lymphedema exercises. Conclusions Clinical Pilates exercises could be considered a safe model and would contribute to treatment programs. PMID:28331763

  3. Exercise training versus propranolol in the treatment of the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qi; Vangundy, Tiffany B; Shibata, Shigeki; Auchus, Richard J; Williams, Gordon H; Levine, Benjamin D

    2011-08-01

    We have found recently that exercise training is effective in the treatment of the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). Whether this nondrug treatment is superior to "standard" drug therapies, such as β-blockade, is unknown. We tested the hypothesis that exercise training but not β-blockade treatment improves symptoms, hemodynamics, and renal-adrenal responses in POTS patients. Nineteen patients (18 women and 1 man) completed a double-blind drug trial (propranolol or placebo) for 4 weeks, followed by 3 months of exercise training. Fifteen age-matched healthy individuals (14 women and 1 man) served as controls. A 2-hour standing test was performed before and after drug treatment and training. Hemodynamics, catecholamines, plasma renin activity, and aldosterone were measured supine and during 2-hour standing. We found that both propranolol and training significantly lowered standing heart rate. Standing cardiac output was lowered after propranolol treatment (P=0.01) but was minimally changed after training. The aldosterone:renin ratio during 2-hour standing remained unchanged after propranolol treatment (4.1±1.7 [SD] before versus 3.9±2.0 after; P=0.46) but modestly increased after training (5.2±2.9 versus 6.5±3.0; P=0.05). Plasma catecholamines were not affected by propranolol or training. Patient quality of life, assessed using the 36-item Short-Form Health Survey, was improved after training (physical functioning score 33±10 before versus 50±9 after; social functioning score 37±9 versus 48±6; both P<0.01) but not after propranolol treatment (34±10 versus 36±11, P=0.63; 39±7 versus 39±5, P=0.73). These results suggest that, for patients with POTS, exercise training is superior to propranolol at restoring upright hemodynamics, normalizing renal-adrenal responsiveness, and improving quality of life.

  4. Exercise Training in Treatment and Rehabilitation of Hip Osteoarthritis: A 12-Week Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Radhika; Karinkanta, Saija; Tokola, Kari; Kannus, Pekka

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip is one of the major causes of pain and disability in the older population. Although exercise is an effective treatment for knee OA, there is lack of evidence regarding hip OA. The aim of this trial was to test the safety and feasibility of a specifically designed exercise program in relieving hip pain and improving function in hip OA participants and to evaluate various methods to measure changes in their physical functioning. Materials and Methods. 13 women aged ≥ 65 years with hip OA were recruited in this 12-week pilot study. Results. Pain declined significantly over 30% from baseline, and joint function and health-related quality of life improved slightly. Objective assessment of physical functioning showed statistically significant improvement in the maximal isometric leg extensor strength by 20% and in the hip extension range of motion by 30%. Conclusions. The exercise program was found to be safe and feasible. The present evidence indicates that the exercise program is effective in the short term. However, adequate powered RCTs are needed to determine effects of long-term exercise therapy on pain and progression of hip OA. PMID:28116214

  5. Manual therapy and therapeutic exercise in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the hip: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Romeo, A; Parazza, S; Boschi, M; Nava, T; Vanti, C

    2013-05-27

    This systematic review aimed at investigating the role of therapeutic exercise and/or manual therapy in the treatment of hip osteoarthritis (OA). Two independent reviewers (AR, CV) searched PubMed, Cinahl, Cochrane Library, PEDro and Scopus databases and a third one (SP) was consulted in case of disagreement. The research criteria were publication period (from May 2007 to April 2012) and publication language (English or Italian). Ten randomized controlled trials matched inclusion criteria, eight of which concerning therapeutic exercise and two manual therapy. Few good quality studies were found. At mid- and long-term follow-up land-based exercises showed insufficient evidence of effectiveness with respect to pain and quality of life, but positive results were found for physical function. Water exercises significantly reduced fall risk when combined with functional exercises. Programs containing progressive and gradual exposure of difficult activities, education and exercises promoted better outcomes, higher adherence to home program and increased amount of physical activity, especially walking. Manual therapy seemed to reduce pain and decrease disability at short-term. Less use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs was statistically significant at long-term follow-up in patients treated with manual therapy. The relationship between clinical results and radiological grade of OA was not investigated. Encouraging results were found in recent literature for manual therapy and functional training. Further research is needed to elucidate this issue through high-quality trials, especially addressing the aspects that have not been thoroughly explored yet, for instance type, amount and scheduling of conservative treatment.

  6. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for the Treatment of Spinal Arthrodesis: From Preclinical Research to Clinical Scenario

    PubMed Central

    Brodano, G. Barbanti; Griffoni, C.; Martini, L.; Boriani, S.

    2017-01-01

    The use of spinal fusion procedures has rapidly augmented over the last decades and although autogenous bone graft is the “gold standard” for these procedures, alternatives to its use have been investigated over many years. A number of emerging strategies as well as tissue engineering with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been planned to enhance spinal fusion rate. This descriptive systematic literature review summarizes the in vivo studies, dealing with the use of MSCs in spinal arthrodesis surgery and the state of the art in clinical applications. The review has yielded promising evidence supporting the use of MSCs as a cell-based therapy in spinal fusion procedures, thus representing a suitable biological approach able to reduce the high cost of osteoinductive factors as well as the high dose needed to induce bone formation. Nevertheless, despite the fact that MSCs therapy is an interesting and important opportunity of research, in this review it was detected that there are still doubts about the optimal cell concentration and delivery method as well as the ideal implantation techniques and the type of scaffolds for cell delivery. Thus, further inquiry is necessary to carefully evaluate the clinical safety and efficacy of MSCs use in spine fusion. PMID:28286524

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for the Treatment of Spinal Arthrodesis: From Preclinical Research to Clinical Scenario.

    PubMed

    Salamanna, F; Sartori, M; Brodano, G Barbanti; Griffoni, C; Martini, L; Boriani, S; Fini, M

    2017-01-01

    The use of spinal fusion procedures has rapidly augmented over the last decades and although autogenous bone graft is the "gold standard" for these procedures, alternatives to its use have been investigated over many years. A number of emerging strategies as well as tissue engineering with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been planned to enhance spinal fusion rate. This descriptive systematic literature review summarizes the in vivo studies, dealing with the use of MSCs in spinal arthrodesis surgery and the state of the art in clinical applications. The review has yielded promising evidence supporting the use of MSCs as a cell-based therapy in spinal fusion procedures, thus representing a suitable biological approach able to reduce the high cost of osteoinductive factors as well as the high dose needed to induce bone formation. Nevertheless, despite the fact that MSCs therapy is an interesting and important opportunity of research, in this review it was detected that there are still doubts about the optimal cell concentration and delivery method as well as the ideal implantation techniques and the type of scaffolds for cell delivery. Thus, further inquiry is necessary to carefully evaluate the clinical safety and efficacy of MSCs use in spine fusion.

  8. Spinal Epidural Hematoma Following Cupping Glass Treatment in an Infant With Hemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Fruchtman, Yariv; Dardik, Rima; Barg, Assaf Arie; Livnat, Tami; Feldman, Zeev; Rubinstein, Marina; Grinberg, Gahl; Rosenberg, Nurit; Kenet, Gili

    2016-06-01

    A 6 months old infant, diagnosed with a rare mutation causing severe hemophilia A, presented with spinal epidural hematoma. Parents later admitted the infant had glass cupping therapy performed within 2 weeks of the onset of symptoms. The rare mutation, rare bleeding complication, and the eventual course of therapy applied in this case will be discussed in our case report.

  9. Vemurafenib and concomitant stereotactic radiation for the treatment of melanoma with spinal metastases: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Stefan, Dinu; Popotte, Hosni; Stefan, Andreea Raluca; Tesniere, Audrey; Tomaszewski, Aurélie; Lesueur, Paul; Habrand, Jean-Louis; Verneuil, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old man with BRAFV600E melanoma and spinal metastases treated with vemurafenib and stereotactic radiation showed a partial response without neurological, skin or mucosal toxicity, 8 months after completion of this combination. This case suggests that stereotactic radiation spares normal tissues and might be safer than conventional fractionated radiation with vemurafenib. PMID:26900362

  10. Vemurafenib and concomitant stereotactic radiation for the treatment of melanoma with spinal metastases: A case report.

    PubMed

    Stefan, Dinu; Popotte, Hosni; Stefan, Andreea Raluca; Tesniere, Audrey; Tomaszewski, Aurélie; Lesueur, Paul; Habrand, Jean-Louis; Verneuil, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    A 56-year-old man with BRAFV600E melanoma and spinal metastases treated with vemurafenib and stereotactic radiation showed a partial response without neurological, skin or mucosal toxicity, 8 months after completion of this combination. This case suggests that stereotactic radiation spares normal tissues and might be safer than conventional fractionated radiation with vemurafenib.

  11. Adverse events after endovascular treatment of chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ghezzi, A; Annovazzi, P; Amato, M P; Capello, E; Cavalla, P; Cocco, E; Falcini, M; Gallo, A; Patti, F; Perini, P; Rodegher, M E; Rovaris, M; Rottoli, M R; Comi, G

    2013-06-01

    Although it is debated whether chronic cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) plays a role in multiple sclerosis (MS) development, many patients undergo endovascular treatment (ET) of CCSVI. A study is ongoing in Italy to evaluate the clinical outcome of ET. Severe adverse events (AEs) occurred in 15/462 subjects at a variable interval after ET: jugular thrombosis in seven patients, tetraventricular hydrocephalus, stroke, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, status epilepticus, aspiration pneumonia, hypertension with tachicardia, or bleeding of bedsore in the remaining seven cases. One patient died because of myocardial infarction 10 weeks after ET. The risk of severe AEs related to ET for CCSVI must be carefully considered.

  12. Decision making in surgical treatment of chronic low back pain: the performance of prognostic tests to select patients for lumbar spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Willems, Paul

    2013-02-01

    well as positively tested patients for fusion, will be needed. It was concluded that at present, best evidence does not support the use of any prognostic test in clinical practice. No subset of patients with low back pain could be identified, for whom spinal fusion is a reliable and effective treatment. In literature, several studies have reported that cognitive behavioural therapy or intensive exercise programs have treatment results similar to those of spinal fusion, but with considerably less complications, morbidity and costs. As the findings of the present thesis show that the currently used tests do not improve the results of fusion by better patient selection, these tests should not be recommended for surgical decision making in standard care. Moreover, spinal fusion should not be proposed as a standard treatment for chronic low back pain. Causality of nonspecific spinal pain is complex and CLBP should not be regarded as a diagnosis, but rather as a symptom in patients with different stages of impairment and disability. Patients should be evaluated in a multidisciplinary setting or Spine Centre according to the so-called biopsychosocial model, which aims to identify underlying psychosocial factors as well as biological factors. Treatment should occur in a stepwise fashion starting with the least invasive treatment. The current approach of CLBP, in which emphasis is laid on self-management and empowerment of patients to take an active course of treatment in order to prevent long-term disability and chronicity, is recommended.

  13. Skeletal muscle metabolic adaptations to endurance exercise training are attainable in mice with simvastatin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Southern, William M.; Nichenko, Anna S.; Shill, Daniel D.; Spencer, Corey C.; Jenkins, Nathan T.; McCully, Kevin K.

    2017-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that a 6-week regimen of simvastatin would attenuate skeletal muscle adaptation to low-intensity exercise. Male C57BL/6J wildtype mice were subjected to 6-weeks of voluntary wheel running or normal cage activities with or without simvastatin treatment (20 mg/kg/d, n = 7–8 per group). Adaptations in in vivo fatigue resistance were determined by a treadmill running test, and by ankle plantarflexor contractile assessment. The tibialis anterior, gastrocnemius, and plantaris muscles were evaluated for exercised-induced mitochondrial adaptations (i.e., biogenesis, function, autophagy). There was no difference in weekly wheel running distance between control and simvastatin-treated mice (P = 0.51). Trained mice had greater treadmill running distance (296%, P<0.001), and ankle plantarflexor contractile fatigue resistance (9%, P<0.05) compared to sedentary mice, independent of simvastatin treatment. At the cellular level, trained mice had greater mitochondrial biogenesis (e.g., ~2-fold greater PGC1α expression, P<0.05) and mitochondrial content (e.g., 25% greater citrate synthase activity, P<0.05), independent of simvastatin treatment. Mitochondrial autophagy-related protein contents were greater in trained mice (e.g., 40% greater Bnip3, P<0.05), independent of simvastatin treatment. However, Drp1, a marker of mitochondrial fission, was less in simvastatin treated mice, independent of exercise training, and there was a significant interaction between training and statin treatment (P<0.022) for LC3-II protein content, a marker of autophagy flux. These data indicate that whole body and skeletal muscle adaptations to endurance exercise training are attainable with simvastatin treatment, but simvastatin may have side effects on muscle mitochondrial maintenance via autophagy, which could have long-term implications on muscle health. PMID:28207880

  14. Evaluation of an exercise-based treatment for children with reading difficulties.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, David; Nicolson, Roderick I; Hambly, Helen

    2003-02-01

    An evaluation is reported of an exercise-based approach to remediation of dyslexia-related disorders. Pupils in three years of a Warwickshire junior school were screened for risk of literacy difficulty using the Dyslexia Screening Test (DST). The 35 children scoring 0.4 or over on the DST were divided randomly into two groups matched for age and DST score. One quarter of the participants had an existing diagnosis of dyslexia, dyspraxia or ADHD. Both groups received the same treatment at school but the intervention group used the DDAT exercise programme daily at home. Performance on the DST and specialist cerebellar/vestibular and eye movement tests were assessed initially and after six months. Cerebellar/vestibular signs were substantially alleviated following the exercise treatment whereas there were no significant changes for the control group. Even after allowing for the passage of time, there were significant improvements for the intervention group in postural stability, dexterity, phonological skill, and (one-tailed) for naming fluency and semantic fluency. Reading fluency showed a highly significant improvement for the intervention group, and nonsense passage reading was also improved significantly. Significantly greater improvements for the intervention group than the control group occurred for dexterity, reading, verbal fluency and semantic fluency. Substantial and significant improvements (compared with those in the previous year) also occurred for the exercise group on national standardized tests of reading, writing and comprehension. It is concluded that, in addition to its direct effects on balance, dexterity and eye movement control, the benefits of the DDAT exercise treatment transferred significantly to cognitive skills underlying literacy, to the reading process, and to standardized national literacy attainment tests.

  15. Does Scoliosis-Specific Exercise Treatment in Adolescence Alter Adult Quality of Life?

    PubMed Central

    Płaszewski, Maciej; Cieśliński, Igor; Kowalski, Paweł; Truszczyńska, Aleksandra; Nowobilski, Roman

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Health-related quality of life in adults, who in adolescence participated in a scoliosis-specific exercise program, was not previously studied. Design. Cross-sectional study, with retrospective data collection. Material and Methods. Homogenous groups of 68 persons (43 women) aged 30.10 (25–39) years, with mild or moderate scoliosis, and 76 (38 women) able-bodied persons, aged 30.11 (24–38) years, who 16.5 (12–26) years earlier had completed scoliosis-specific exercise or observation regimes, participated. Their respiratory characteristics did not differ from predicted values. The WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Questionnaire, and pain scale (VAS) were applied. Results. The transformed WHOQOL-BREF scores ranged from 54.6 ± 11.19 in the physical domain in the mild scoliotic subgroup to 77.1 ± 16.05 in the social domain in the able-bodied subgroup. The ODQ values did not generally exceed 5.3 ± 7.53. Inter- and intragroup differences were nonsignificant. Age, marital status, education, and gender were significantly associated with the ODQ scores. Significant association between the ODQ and WHOQOL-BREF social relationships domain scores with the participation in exercise treatment was found. Conclusions. Participants with the history of exercise treatment generally did not differ significantly from their peers who were only under observation. This study cannot conclude that scoliosis-specific exercise treatment in adolescence alters quality of life in adulthood. PMID:25436225

  16. Spinal cord stimulation for long-term treatment of severe angina pectoris: what does the evidence say?

    PubMed

    Börjesson, Mats; Andréll, Paulin; Mannheimer, Clas

    2011-11-01

    Patients who continue to suffer from severe and disabling angina pectoris, despite optimum treatment in terms of conventional pharmacological therapy and/or revascularization procedures, have been termed as having refractory angina pectoris. The future group of patients with refractory angina pectoris will be different from today's patients and represent a 'moving target' as risk factors, efficacy of treatment and indications continue to change. Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is today considered as first-line treatment of refractory angina pectoris, by the European Society of Cardiology, with an anti-ischemic effect. There is strong evidence for SCS giving symptomatic benefits (decrease in anginal attacks), improved quality of life and improvement of functional status. In addition, SCS seems to be cost effective with a 'break-even' after approximately 15-16 months.

  17. Neural plasticity after spinal cord injury☆

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Yang, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Lianying; Wang, Chunxin; Yang, Maoguang

    2012-01-01

    Plasticity changes of uninjured nerves can result in a novel neural circuit after spinal cord injury, which can restore sensory and motor functions to different degrees. Although processes of neural plasticity have been studied, the mechanism and treatment to effectively improve neural plasticity changes remain controversial. The present study reviewed studies regarding plasticity of the central nervous system and methods for promoting plasticity to improve repair of injured central nerves. The results showed that synaptic reorganization, axonal sprouting, and neurogenesis are critical factors for neural circuit reconstruction. Directed functional exercise, neurotrophic factor and transplantation of nerve-derived and non-nerve-derived tissues and cells can effectively ameliorate functional disturbances caused by spinal cord injury and improve quality of life for patients. PMID:25774179

  18. Treatment of holocord spinal epidural abscess via alternating side unilateral approach for bilateral laminectomy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Roy; Yung, Brian H; Sedney, Cara; Miele, Vincent J

    2015-01-01

    To date, this is the first reported case of the surgical management of a holocord epidural abscess done through level-skipping laminectomies. It is also the first reported case of these laminectomies being performed via an alternating side unilateral approach for this condition. A 51-year-old patient presenting with progressive lower extremity weakness secondary to a spinal epidural abscess extending from C4 to S1. A minimally disruptive method of relieving the spinal cord compression via evacuation of the abscess was employed successfully. This report demonstrates the efficacy of level skipping laminectomies via a unilateral approach for holocord epidural abscesses (extending 20 vertebral levels). Performing the laminectomies via a unilateral approach as well as alternating the side of the approach minimized iatrogenic instability risk. Both strategies were designed to minimize incision size, tissue disruption, and the amount of muscular weakness/imbalance postoperatively.

  19. Mass Spectrometry in Pharmacokinetic Studies of a Synthetic Compound for Spinal Cord Injury Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Lillo, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The studies of drugs that could constitute a palliative to spinal cord injury (SCI) are a continuous and increasing demand in biomedicine field from developed societies. Recently we described the chemical synthesis and antiglioma activity of synthetic glycosides. A synthetic sulfated glycolipid (here IG20) has shown chemical stability, solubility in polar solvents, and high inhibitory capacity over glioma growth. We have used mass spectrometry (MS) to monitor IG20 (m/z = 550.3) in cells and tissues of the central nervous system (CNS) that are involved in SCI recovery. IG20 was detected by MS in serum and homogenates from CNS tissue of rats, though in the latter a previous deproteinization step was required. The pharmacokinetic parameters of serum clearance at 24 h and half-life at 4 h were determined for synthetic glycoside in the adult rat using MS. A local administration of the drug near of spinal lesion site is proposed. PMID:26090386

  20. Regenerative medicine for the treatment of spinal cord injury: more than just promises?

    PubMed Central

    Pêgo, Ana Paula; Kubinova, Sarka; Cizkova, Dasa; Vanicky, Ivo; Mar, Fernando Milhazes; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Sykova, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury triggers a complex set of events that lead to tissue healing without the restoration of normal function due to the poor regenerative capacity of the spinal cord. Nevertheless, current knowledge about the intrinsic regenerative ability of central nervous system axons, when in a supportive environment, has made the prospect of treating spinal cord injury a reality. Among the range of strategies under investigation, cell-based therapies offer the most promising results, due to the multifactorial roles that these cells can fulfil. However, the best cell source is still a matter of debate, as are clinical issues that include the optimal cell dose as well as the timing and route of administration. In this context, the role of biomaterials is gaining importance. These can not only act as vehicles for the administered cells but also, in the case of chronic lesions, can be used to fill the permanent cyst, thus creating a more favourable and conducive environment for axonal regeneration in addition to serving as local delivery systems of therapeutic agents to improve the regenerative milieu. Some of the candidate molecules for the future are discussed in view of the knowledge derived from studying the mechanisms that facilitate the intrinsic regenerative capacity of central nervous system neurons. The future challenge for the multidisciplinary teams working in the field is to translate the knowledge acquired in basic research into effective combinatorial therapies to be applied in the clinic. PMID:22805417

  1. Regenerative medicine for the treatment of spinal cord injury: more than just promises?

    PubMed

    Pêgo, Ana Paula; Kubinova, Sarka; Cizkova, Dasa; Vanicky, Ivo; Mar, Fernando Milhazes; Sousa, Mónica Mendes; Sykova, Eva

    2012-11-01

    Spinal cord injury triggers a complex set of events that lead to tissue healing without the restoration of normal function due to the poor regenerative capacity of the spinal cord. Nevertheless, current knowledge about the intrinsic regenerative ability of central nervous system axons, when in a supportive environment, has made the prospect of treating spinal cord injury a reality. Among the range of strategies under investigation, cell-based therapies offer the most promising results, due to the multifactorial roles that these cells can fulfil. However, the best cell source is still a matter of debate, as are clinical issues that include the optimal cell dose as well as the timing and route of administration. In this context, the role of biomaterials is gaining importance. These can not only act as vehicles for the administered cells but also, in the case of chronic lesions, can be used to fill the permanent cyst, thus creating a more favourable and conducive environment for axonal regeneration in addition to serving as local delivery systems of therapeutic agents to improve the regenerative milieu. Some of the candidate molecules for the future are discussed in view of the knowledge derived from studying the mechanisms that facilitate the intrinsic regenerative capacity of central nervous system neurons. The future challenge for the multidisciplinary teams working in the field is to translate the knowledge acquired in basic research into effective combinatorial therapies to be applied in the clinic.

  2. Intravenous multipotent adult progenitor cell treatment decreases inflammation leading to functional recovery following spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    DePaul, Marc A.; Palmer, Marc; Lang, Bradley T.; Cutrone, Rochelle; Tran, Amanda P.; Madalena, Kathryn M.; Bogaerts, Annelies; Hamilton, Jason A.; Deans, Robert J.; Mays, Robert W.; Busch, Sarah A.; Silver, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    Following spinal cord injury (SCI), immune-mediated secondary processes exacerbate the extent of permanent neurological deficits. We investigated the capacity of adult bone marrow-derived stem cells, which exhibit immunomodulatory properties, to alter inflammation and promote recovery following SCI. In vitro, we show that human multipotent adult progenitor cells (MAPCs) have the ability to modulate macrophage activation, and prior exposure to MAPC secreted factors can reduce macrophage-mediated axonal dieback of dystrophic axons. Using a contusion model of SCI, we found that intravenous delivery of MAPCs one day, but not immediately, after SCI significantly improves urinary and locomotor recovery, which was associated with marked spinal cord tissue sparing. Intravenous MAPCs altered the immune response in the spinal cord and periphery, however biodistribution studies revealed that no MAPCs were found in the cord and instead preferentially homed to the spleen. Our results demonstrate that MAPCs exert their primary effects in the periphery and provide strong support for the use of these cells in acute human contusive SCI. PMID:26582249

  3. Various attitudes to the use of corrective exercises in conservative treatment of scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Nowotny, Janusz; Nowotny-Czupryna, Olga; Czupryna, Krzysztof

    2010-01-01

    In acquired scoliosis, the degree of the curve is initially low and its type becomes apparent only after it has progressed. The characteristics of scoliosis include an abnormal spatial arrangement of individual body segments, which the central nervous system (CNS) interprets as a defect and automatically launches compensatory mechanisms. Neglecting low-degree scoliosis poses a two-fold danger. It usually leads to the development of structural changes, while the child gets used to the abnormal body arrangement, thus reinforcing the poor postural habits. The basic aim of early rehabilitation is to manage the compensatory mechanisms and prevent the development of adverse secondary changes, rehabilitation in scoliosis being no exception.Some cases of scoliosis require surgery. The point is to minimise the changes resulting from the progression of scoliosis. The role of corrective exercises seems to be significant here. However, views on the usefulness of such exercises are sometimes extremely varied, even though both favourable and sceptical opinions are not fully supported by the literature. However, a number of reports indicate that corrective exercises are useful.
    The selection and of corrective exercises and how they should be performed are another question. A number of methods of conservative treatment of scoliosis have been devised. Currently, none of them is considered a comprehensive regimen since each patient requires an individual approach. The most difficult aspect is to ensure that local correction translates to the automatic maintenance of the corrected body posture in a standing position. This is facilitated by corrective exercises supported with biofeedback.
    The aim of this paper is to elucidate this complex issue that often leads to divergent and improper attitudes to the conservative treatment of scoliosis.

  4. Combined polymer-curcumin conjugate and ependymal progenitor/stem cell treatment enhances spinal cord injury functional recovery.

    PubMed

    Requejo-Aguilar, Raquel; Alastrue-Agudo, Ana; Cases-Villar, Marta; Lopez-Mocholi, Eric; England, Richard; Vicent, María J; Moreno-Manzano, Victoria

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) suffers from a lack of effective therapeutic strategies. Animal models of acute SCI have provided evidence that transplantation of ependymal stem/progenitor cells of the spinal cord (epSPCs) induces functional recovery, while systemic administration of the anti-inflammatory curcumin provides neuroprotection. However, functional recovery from chronic stage SCI requires additional enhancements in available therapeutic strategies. Herein, we report on a combination treatment for SCI using epSPCs and a pH-responsive polymer-curcumin conjugate. The incorporation of curcumin in a pH-responsive polymeric carrier mainchain, a polyacetal (PA), enhances blood bioavailability, stability, and provides a means for highly localized delivery. We find that PA-curcumin enhances neuroprotection, increases axonal growth, and can improve functional recovery in acute SCI. However, when combined with epSPCs, PA-curcumin also enhances functional recovery in a rodent model of chronic SCI. This suggests that combination therapy may be an exciting new therapeutic option for the treatment of chronic SCI in humans.

  5. Effects of acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill walking exercises in treating a patient with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation: a clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Ganiyu, Sokunbi Oluwaleke; Gujba, Kachalla Fatimah

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill 12-minute walking exercises in treating patients with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation. A 34-year-old woman with a history lumbar disc prolapse who had undergone lumbar disc surgery on two different occasions was treated using acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill walking exercises three times per week for 12 weeks. The outcome measures used in this study were pain intensity, spinal range of movement, and general health. After 12 weeks of treatment, the patient had made improvement in terms of pain, which was reduced from 9/10 to 1/10. In a similar vein, the patient's general health showed improvement of >100% after 12 weeks of treatment. Pre-treatment scores of spinal flexion and left-side flexion, which measured 20 cm and 12 cm, respectively, increased to 25 cm and 16 cm after 12 weeks of treatment. This study showed that acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill walking exercises were useful in relieving pain, increasing spinal range of movement, and improving the health of a patient with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation.

  6. Selected gene profiles of stressed NSC-34 cells and rat spinal cord following peripheral nerve reconstruction and minocycline treatment

    PubMed Central

    KEILHOFF, GERBURG; LUCAS, BENJAMIN; UHDE, KATJA; FANSA, HISHAM

    2016-01-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effects of minocycline on the expression of selected transcriptional and translational profiles in the rat spinal cord following sciatic nerve (SNR) transection and microsurgical coaptation. The mRNA and protein expression levels of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax), caspase-3, major histocompatibility complex I (MHC I), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), and growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) were monitored in the rat lumbar spinal cord following microsurgical reconstruction of the sciatic nerves and minocycline treatment. The present study used semi-quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. As a PCR analysis of spinal cord tissue enabled the examination of the expression patterns of all cell types including glia, the motorneuron-like NSC-34 cell line was used to investigate expression level changes in motorneurons. As stressors, oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment were performed. SNR did not induce significant degeneration of ventral horn motorneurons, whereas microglia activation and synaptic terminal retraction were detectable. All genes were constitutively expressed at the mRNA and protein levels in untreated spinal cord and control cells. SNR significantly increased the mRNA expression levels of all genes, albeit only temporarily. In all genes except MMP9 and GAP-43, the induction was seen ipsilaterally and contralaterally. The effects of minocycline were moderate. The expression levels of MMP9, TNF-α, MHC I, VEGF, and GAP-43 were reduced, whereas those of Bax and Bcl-2 were unaffected. OGD, but not LPS, was toxic for NSC-34 cells. No changes in the expression levels of Bax, caspase-3, MHC I or ATF3 were observed. These results indicated that motorneurons were not

  7. The effects of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, and exercise on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness.

    PubMed

    Isabell, W K; Durrant, E; Myrer, W; Anderson, S

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, and exercise on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Twenty-two subjects were randomly assigned to one of four groups. Preexercise measures were recorded for range of motion (ROM), strength, perceived soreness, and serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. Subjects performed up to 300 concentric/eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors with 90% of their 10 repetition maximum to induce muscle soreness. Dependent variables were assessed at 2, 4, 6, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours postexercise. Significant differences occurred in all variables with respect to time (ANOVA(p<.05)). However, no significant mode of treatment, or mode of treatment/assessment time interaction was present. Decreases in range of motion and flexion strength correspond with increases in perceived soreness. The nonsignificant mode of treatment/assessment time interaction suggests that the use of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, or exercise alone is not effective in significantly reducing the symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness. In fact, though not statistically significant, the pattern of the data suggested the use of ice in the treatment of DOMS may be contraindicated. Further investigation is recommended.

  8. The Effects of Ice Massage, Ice Massage with Exercise, and Exercise on the Prevention and Treatment of Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness

    PubMed Central

    Isabell, William Kirk; Durrant, Earlene; Myrer, William; Anderson, Shauna

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effects of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, and exercise on the prevention and treatment of delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). Twenty-two subjects were randomly assigned to one of four groups. Preexercise measures were recorded for range of motion (ROM), strength, perceived soreness, and serum creatine kinase (CK) levels. Subjects performed up to 300 concentric/eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors with 90% of their 10 repetition maximum to induce muscle soreness. Dependent variables were assessed at 2, 4, 6, 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours postexercise. Significant differences occurred in all variables with respect to time (ANOVA(p<.05)). However, no significant mode of treatment, or mode of treatment/assessment time interaction was present. Decreases in range of motion and flexion strength correspond with increases in perceived soreness. The nonsignificant mode of treatment/assessment time interaction suggests that the use of ice massage, ice massage with exercise, or exercise alone is not effective in significantly reducing the symptoms of delayed onset muscle soreness. In fact, though not statistically significant, the pattern of the data suggested the use of ice in the treatment of DOMS may be contraindicated. Further investigation is recommended. PMID:16558163

  9. We need to move more: Neurobiological hypotheses of physical exercise as a treatment for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Monteiro-Junior, Renato S; Cevada, Thais; Oliveira, Bruno R R; Lattari, Eduardo; Portugal, Eduardo M M; Carvalho, Alessandro; Deslandes, Andrea C

    2015-11-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases in the world. The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and chronic inflammation impair specific brain areas, which in turn result in lesser motor control, behavioral changes and cognitive decline. Nowadays, drug-treatments are the foremost approaches in treating PD. However, exercise has been shown to have powerful effects on PD, based on several neurobiological mechanisms. These effects may decrease the risk of developing PD by 33%. However, these mechanisms are unclear and little explored. Among several mechanisms, we propose two specific hypotheses: 1. Physical exercise reduces chronic oxidative stress and stimulates mitochondria biogenesis and up-regulation of authophagy in PD patients. Moreover, antioxidant enzymes (e.g. superoxide dismutase) become more active and effective in response to physical exercise. 2. Exercise stimulates neurotransmitter (e.g. dopamine) and trophic factors (BDNF, GDNF, FGF-2, IGF-1, among others) synthesis. These neurochemical phenomena promote neuroplasticity, which, in turn, decreases neural apoptosis and may delay the neurodegeneration process, preventing or decreasing PD development and symptoms, respectively.

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is "Braingate" research? What is the status of stem-cell research? How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? When can we ...

  11. Spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Katherine G

    2013-09-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare bacterial infection located within the spinal canal. Early diagnosis and rapid treatment are important because of its potential to cause rapidly progressive spinal cord compression and irreversible paralysis. A staphylococcus bacterial infection is the cause in most cases. Treatment includes antibiotics and possible surgical drainage of the abscess. A favorable neurologic outcome correlates with the severity and duration of neurologic deficits before surgery and the timeliness of the chosen intervention. It is important for the critical care nurse to monitor the patient's neurologic status and provide appropriate interventions.

  12. Clinical values of control over pain and pain coping strategies in surgical treatment for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Control over pain and pain coping strategies are associated with pain intensity as well as psychological status and subjective disability in patients experiencing pain. The present study assessed the clinical values of control over pain and pain coping strategies in surgical treatment for patients with lumbar spinal stenosis using mediation analysis. Methods Sixty-two patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (median age, 70 years; 34 men, 28 women) were evaluated before surgery. The pain intensity and area, psychological status/subjective disability (Japanese Orthopaedic Association Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire), and control over pain/pain coping strategies (Coping Strategies Questionnaire) were assessed. Mediation analysis, which consisted of serial regression analyses, mainly tested whether (1) control over pain/pain coping strategies were predicted by pain characteristics and (2) control over pain/pain coping strategies predicted psychological status/subjective disability after controlling for pain characteristics. Results Control over pain was predicted by pain intensity (regression coefficient, -0.33; p = 0.01); moreover, it predicted walking ability (standardized partial regression coefficient, 0.31; p = 0.01) and social function (0.38; p = 0.00) after controlling for pain intensity. Although increasing activity level, one pain coping strategy, was predicted by pain intensity (regression coefficient, -0.30; p = 0.02), it did not predict walking ability (standardized partial regression coefficient, 0.07; p = 0.53) or social function (0.13; p = 0.33) when considering pain intensity. Conclusions In this cohort, mediation analysis demonstrated that pain intensity did not directly affect perceived walking ability or social function, but did affect control over pain; moreover, control over pain affected walking ability and social function. Clinical relevance These findings are useful for a deep understanding of the relationships between pain and

  13. Effect of different phenylephrine bolus doses for treatment of hypotension during spinal anaesthesia in patients undergoing elective caesarean section.

    PubMed

    Mohta, M; Harisinghani, P; Sethi, A K; Agarwal, D

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of phenylephrine might be improved by giving doses higher than that traditionally used (100 µg). This study compared the effects of three initial bolus doses of intravenous phenylephrine; 100 µg (group P100), 125 µg (group P125) and 150 µg (group P150), for the treatment of post-spinal hypotension in patients undergoing elective caesarean delivery. If hypotension was not corrected by this dose, additional boluses of 25 µg were given every minute. Further hypotensive episodes were treated with half the initial bolus dose, followed by 25 µg boluses, as required. Umbilical arterial and venous blood samples were obtained for blood gas analysis and Apgar scores recorded. One hundred and twenty subjects (40 per group) who developed post-spinal hypotension (75%) were included in this randomised, double blind trial. Although systolic blood pressure was higher at certain time-points after 150 µg phenylephrine, there were no statistically significant differences in the effectiveness of the first bolus of phenylephrine to treat hypotension (85%, 95% and 95% in groups P100, P125 and P150, respectively, P=0.215); the additional dose of phenylephrine after the first bolus (P=0.810); the number of additional boluses (P=0.318) or of hypotensive episodes (P=0.118). There were no significant differences in the number of patients developing reactive hypertension or bradycardia, in maternal side-effects or in neonatal outcomes. Although the study may have been underpowered, initial phenylephrine bolus doses of 100 µg, 125 µg and 150 µg did not significantly differ in efficacy to treat post-spinal hypotension in these patients.

  14. The Effects of Combined Treatment with Naringin and Treadmill Exercise on Osteoporosis in Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaolei; Li, Fengbo; Ma, Xinlong; Ma, Jianxiong; Zhao, Bin; Zhang, Yang; Li, Yanjun; Lv, Jianwei; Meng, Xinmin

    2015-08-11

    Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass and progressive destruction of bone microstructure, resulting in increased the risk of fracture. Previous studies have demonstrated the effect of naringin (NG) or treadmill exercise (EX) on osteoporosis, however, reports about effects of NG plus EX on osteoporosis are limited. This study was designed to investigate the impact of combined treatment with naringin and treadmill exercise on osteoporosis in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Three months after bilateral ovariectomy, Seventy-five rats were randomly assigned to the following treatment groups: OVX, sham-operated (SHAM), NG, EX, or NG plus EX treatment. Treatments were administered for 60 days. Bone metabolism, bone mineral density, trabecular bone parameters, immunohistochemistry, and the bone strength were evaluated. Compared to the OVX groups, all treatments increased bone volume (BV/TV), trabecula number (Tb.N), trabecula thickness (Tb.Th), bone mineral density (BMD), and mechanical strength. NG + EX showed the strongest effects on BV/TV, Tb.Th, and biomechanical strength. Additionally, decreased C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX-1) and enhanced osteocalcin (OCN) expression were observed in the NG + EX group. The present study demonstrates that the NG + EX may have a therapeutic advantage over each monotherapy for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  15. The Effects of Combined Treatment with Naringin and Treadmill Exercise on Osteoporosis in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    SUN, Xiaolei; Fengbo, LI; Xinlong, MA; Jianxiong, MA; ZHAO, Bin; ZHANG, Yang; Yanjun, LI; Jianwei, LV; MENG, Xinmin

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a disease characterized by low bone mass and progressive destruction of bone microstructure, resulting in increased the risk of fracture. Previous studies have demonstrated the effect of naringin (NG) or treadmill exercise (EX) on osteoporosis, however, reports about effects of NG plus EX on osteoporosis are limited. This study was designed to investigate the impact of combined treatment with naringin and treadmill exercise on osteoporosis in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Three months after bilateral ovariectomy, Seventy-five rats were randomly assigned to the following treatment groups: OVX, sham-operated (SHAM), NG, EX, or NG plus EX treatment. Treatments were administered for 60 days. Bone metabolism, bone mineral density, trabecular bone parameters, immunohistochemistry, and the bone strength were evaluated. Compared to the OVX groups, all treatments increased bone volume (BV/TV), trabecula number (Tb.N), trabecula thickness (Tb.Th), bone mineral density (BMD), and mechanical strength. NG + EX showed the strongest effects on BV/TV, Tb.Th, and biomechanical strength. Additionally, decreased C-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen (CTX-1) and enhanced osteocalcin (OCN) expression were observed in the NG + EX group. The present study demonstrates that the NG + EX may have a therapeutic advantage over each monotherapy for the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:26260240

  16. Endourethral prosthesis for treatment of detrusor sphincter dyssynergia: impact on quality of life for persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Joseph, A C; Juma, S; Niku, S D

    1994-12-01

    Neurogenic bladders with detrusor sphincter dyssynergia (DSD) are common in persons with spinal cord injury and with multiple sclerosis. Treatment options such as sphincterotomy, urethral foley and suprapubic catheters are not without complications or failure; however, they are recommended for patients who are unable to do intermittent catheterization. An endourethral prosthesis for DSD has been developed for experimental use in the United States. We report one year results of the clinical trials with endourethral prostheses implanted in ten patients. Initial subjective and objective results show an 80% success rate. At present, preliminary data show that an endourethral prosthesis, which is simple to insert and has few complications, appears to offer an alternative to conventional treatment. A key to success is to prepare for changes in life style that impact the patient's quality of life. Both patient and staff education are necessary pre-operatively to achieve successful outcomes post-operatively.

  17. Carbohydrate and lipid disorders and relevant considerations in persons with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed Central

    Wilt, Timothy J; Carlson, Kathleen F; Goldish, Gary D; MacDonald, Roderick; Niewoehner, Catherine; Rutks, Indulis; Shamliyan, Tatyana; Tacklind, James; Taylor, Brent C; Kane, Robert L

    2008-01-01

    pharmacologic therapies on these disorders. CONCLUSIONS The available evidence does not support incorporating SCI status as an independent variable to assess risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality or to alter diagnostic/treatment thresholds compared to able-bodied adults. Furthermore, individuals with SCI may have unique physiologic differences compared to able-bodied individuals. As a result, it is uncertain that findings from studies conducted in able-bodied adults evaluating efficacy and harms of interventions to improve carbohydrate, lipid disorders, and subsequent CVD can be extrapolated to individuals with SCI. The role of exercise in individuals with spinal cord injuries represents a unique challenge and requires further exploration into the benefits, harms, and resource implications of broad-based spinal cord injury exercise programs. PMID:18457480

  18. Exercise-mimicking treatment fails to increase Fndc5 mRNA & irisin secretion in primary human myotubes.

    PubMed

    Kurdiova, Timea; Balaz, Miroslav; Mayer, Alexander; Maderova, Denisa; Belan, Vitazoslav; Wolfrum, Christian; Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcova, Barbara

    2014-06-01

    Irisin, myokine secreted by skeletal muscle, was suggested to mediate some of exercise health benefits via "browning" of white adipose tissue. However, mounting evidence contradicts the regulatory role of exercise for muscle irisin production/secretion in humans. Thus, we explored the direct effect of exercise-mimicking treatment on irisin in human primary muscle cells in vitro. Human primary muscle cell cultures were established from lean, obese prediabetic and type-2-diabetic individuals. Complex metabolic phenotyping included assessment of insulin sensitivity (euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp) and adiposity content&distribution (MRI&MRS). In vitro exercise-mimicking treatment (forskolin+ionomycin) was delivered in 1-h pulse/day during differentiation. Fndc5 mRNA (qRT-PCR) and secreted irisin (ELISA) were determined in cells and media. Exercise-mimicking treatment more than doubled Pgc1α mRNA in differentiated muscle cells. Nevertheless, Fndc5 mRNA was reduced by 18% and irisin in media by 20%. Moreover, Fncd5 mRNA was increased in myotubes derived from individuals with type-2-diabetes, independent on exercise-mimicking treatment. Fndc5 mRNA in cells was positively related to fasting glycemia (p=0.0001) and negatively to whole-body insulin sensitivity (p<0.05). Collectively, our data do not support the role of exercise-related signaling pathways in irisin regulation in human skeletal muscle and confirm our previous observations on increased Fndc5 expression in muscle cells from individuals with type-2-diabetes.

  19. Systems biology investigation of cAMP modulation to increase SMN levels for the treatment of spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Mack, Sean G; Cook, Daniel J; Dhurjati, Prasad; Butchbach, Matthew E R

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a leading genetic cause of infant death worldwide, is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by the loss of SMN1 (survival motor neuron 1), which encodes the protein SMN. The loss of SMN1 causes a deficiency in SMN protein levels leading to motor neuron cell death in the anterior horn of the spinal cord. SMN2, however, can also produce some functional SMN to partially compensate for loss of SMN1 in SMA suggesting increasing transcription of SMN2 as a potential therapy to treat patients with SMA. A cAMP response element was identified on the SMN2 promoter, implicating cAMP activation as a step in the transcription of SMN2. Therefore, we investigated the effects of modulating the cAMP signaling cascade on SMN production in vitro and in silico. SMA patient fibroblasts were treated with the cAMP signaling modulators rolipram, salbutamol, dbcAMP, epinephrine and forskolin. All of the modulators tested were able to increase gem formation, a marker for SMN protein in the nucleus, in a dose-dependent manner. We then derived two possible mathematical models simulating the regulation of SMN2 expression by cAMP signaling. Both models fit well with our experimental data. In silico treatment of SMA fibroblasts simultaneously with two different cAMP modulators resulted in an additive increase in gem formation. This study shows how a systems biology approach can be used to develop potential therapeutic targets for treating SMA.

  20. Differential effects of anti-Nogo-A antibody treatment and treadmill training in rats with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Maier, Irin C; Ichiyama, Ronaldo M; Courtine, Grégoire; Schnell, Lisa; Lavrov, Igor; Edgerton, V Reggie; Schwab, Martin E

    2009-06-01

    Locomotor training on treadmills can improve recovery of stepping in spinal cord injured animals and patients. Likewise, lesioned rats treated with antibodies against the myelin associated neurite growth inhibitory protein, Nogo-A, showed increased regeneration, neuronal reorganization and behavioural improvements. A detailed kinematic analysis showed that the hindlimb kinematic patterns that developed in anti-Nogo-A antibody treated versus treadmill trained spinal cord injured rats were significantly different. The synchronous combined treatment group did not show synergistic effects. This lack of synergistic effects could not be explained by an increase in pain perception, sprouting of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) positive fibres or by interference of locomotor training with anti-Nogo-A antibody induced regeneration and sprouting of descending fibre tracts. The differential mechanisms leading to behavioural recovery during task-specific training and in regeneration or plasticity enhancing therapies have to be taken into account in designing combinatorial therapies so that their potential positive interactive effects can be fully expressed.

  1. Targeting Translational Successes through CANSORT-SCI: Using Pet Dogs To Identify Effective Treatments for Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Moore, Sarah A; Granger, Nicolas; Olby, Natasha J; Spitzbarth, Ingo; Jeffery, Nick D; Tipold, Andrea; Nout-Lomas, Yvette S; da Costa, Ronaldo C; Stein, Veronika M; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J; Blight, Andrew R; Grossman, Robert G; Basso, D Michele; Levine, Jonathan M

    2017-03-22

    Translation of therapeutic interventions for spinal cord injury (SCI) from laboratory to clinic has been historically challenging, highlighting the need for robust models of injury that more closely mirror the human condition. The high prevalence of acute, naturally occurring SCI in pet dogs provides a unique opportunity to evaluate expeditiously promising interventions in a population of animals that receive diagnoses and treatment clinically in a manner similar to persons with SCI, while adhering to National Institutes of Health guidelines for scientific rigor and transparent reporting. In addition, pet dogs with chronic paralysis are often maintained long-term by their owners, offering a similarly unique population for study of chronic SCI. Despite this, only a small number of studies have used the clinical dog model of SCI. The Canine Spinal Cord Injury Consortium (CANSORT-SCI) was recently established by a group of veterinarians and basic science researchers to promote the value of the canine clinical model of SCI. The CANSORT-SCI group held an inaugural meeting November 20 and 21, 2015 to evaluate opportunities and challenges to the use of pet dogs in SCI research. Key challenges identified included lack of familiarity with the model among nonveterinary scientists and questions about how and where in the translational process the canine clinical model would be most valuable. In light of these, we review the natural history, outcome, and available assessment tools associated with canine clinical SCI with emphasis on their relevance to human SCI and the translational process.

  2. Neuromodulation of the cervical spinal cord in the treatment of chronic intractable neck and upper extremity pain: a case series and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vallejo, Ricardo; Kramer, Jeffery; Benyamin, Ramsin

    2007-03-01

    Electrical spinal neuromodulation in the form of spinal cord stimulation is currently used for treating chronic painful conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome, diabetic neuropathy, postherpetic neuralgia, peripheral ischemia, low back pain, and other conditions refractory to more conservative treatments. To date, there are very few published reports documenting the use of spinal cord stimulation in the treatment of head/neck and upper limb pain. This paper reports a case series of 5 consecutive patients outlining the use of spinal cord stimulation to treat upper extremity pain. All subjects had previously undergone cervical fusion surgery to treat chronic neck and upper limb pain. Patients were referred following failure of the surgery to manage their painful conditions. Spinal cord stimulators were placed in the cervical epidural space through a thoracic needle placement. Stimulation parameters were adjusted to capture as much of the painful area(s) as possible. In total, 4 out of 5 patients moved to implantation. In all cases, patients reported significant (70-90%) reductions in pain, including axial neck pain and upper extremity pain. Interestingly, 2 patients with associated headache and lower extremity pain obtained relief after paresthesia-steering reportedly covered those areas. Moreover, 2 patients reported that cervical spinal cord stimulation significantly improved axial low back pain. Patients continue to report excellent pain relief up to 9 months following implantation. This case series documents the successful treatment of neck and upper extremity pain following unsuccessful cervical spine fusion surgery. Given this initial success, prospective, controlled studies are warranted to more adequately assess the long term utility and cost effectiveness of electrical neuromodulation treatment of chronic neck and upper extremity pain.

  3. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of complete and chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Dai, Guanghui; Liu, Xuebin; Zhang, Zan; Yang, Zhijun; Dai, Yiwu; Xu, Ruxiang

    2013-10-02

    Neuronal injuries have been a challenging problem for treatment, especially in the case of complete and chronic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). Recently, particular attention is paid to the potential of stem cell in treating SCI, but there are only few clinical studies and insufficient data. This study explored the efficacy of autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) transplantation in the treatment of SCI. Forty patients with complete and chronic cervical SCI were selected and randomly assigned to one of the two experimental groups, treatment group and control group. The treatment group received BMMSCs transplantation to the area surrounding injury, while the control group was not treated with any cell transplantation. Both the transplant recipients and the control group were followed up to 6 months, postoperatively. Preoperative and postoperative neurological functions were evaluated with AIS grading, ASIA score, residual urine volume and neurophysiological examination. Results showed that in the treatment group 10 patients had a significant clinical improvement in terms of motor, light touch, pin prick sensory and residual urine volume, while nine patients showed changes in AIS grade. Neurophysiological examination was consistent with clinical observations. No sign of tumor was evident until 6 months postoperatively. In the control group, no improvement was observed in any of the neurological functions specified above. BMMSCs transplantation improves neurological function in patients with complete and chronic cervical SCI, providing valuable information on applications of BMMSCs for the treatment of SCI.

  4. Predictive Factors for Subjective Improvement in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Patients with Nonsurgical Treatment: A 3-Year Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Matsudaira, Ko; Hara, Nobuhiro; Oka, Hiroyuki; Kunogi, Junichi; Yamazaki, Takashi; Takeshita, Katsushi; Atsushi, Seichi; Tanaka, Sakae

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the predictive factors for subjective improvement with nonsurgical treatment in consecutive patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Materials and Methods Patients with LSS were enrolled from 17 medical centres in Japan. We followed up 274 patients (151 men; mean age, 71 ± 7.4 years) for 3 years. A multivariable logistic regression model was used to assess the predictive factors for subjective symptom improvement with nonsurgical treatment. Results In 30% of patients, conservative treatment led to a subjective improvement in the symptoms; in 70% of patients, the symptoms remained unchanged, worsened, or required surgical treatment. The multivariable analysis of predictive factors for subjective improvement with nonsurgical treatment showed that the absence of cauda equina symptoms (only radicular symptoms) had an odds ratio (OR) of 3.31 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.50–7.31); absence of degenerative spondylolisthesis/scoliosis had an OR of 2.53 (95% CI: 1.13–5.65); <1-year duration of illness had an OR of 3.81 (95% CI: 1.46–9.98); and hypertension had an OR of 2.09 (95% CI: 0.92–4.78). Conclusions The predictive factors for subjective symptom improvement with nonsurgical treatment in LSS patients were the presence of only radicular symptoms, absence of degenerative spondylolisthesis/scoliosis, and an illness duration of <1 year. PMID:26863214

  5. Sulforaphane treatment protects skeletal muscle against damage induced by exhaustive exercise in rats.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Marco; Angeloni, Cristina; Garatachea, Nuria; Baldini, Marta; Leoncini, Emanuela; Collado, Pilar S; Teti, Gabriella; Falconi, Mirella; Gonzalez-Gallego, Javier; Hrelia, Silvana

    2009-10-01

    Sulforaphane (SF), one of the most important isothiocyanates in the human diet, present in cruciferous vegetables, is known to have chemopreventive activities in different tissues. No data are available on its effects in the prevention of skeletal muscle damage. In this study, we investigated the potential protective effects of SF treatment on muscle damage and oxidative stress induced by an acute bout of exhaustive exercise in rats. Male Wistar rats were treated with SF (25 mg/kg body wt ip) for 3 days before undergoing an acute exhaustive exercise protocol in a treadmill (+7% slope and 24 m/min). Acute exercise resulted in a significant increase in plasma lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activities. It also resulted in a significant increase in thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances, in a significant decrease in tissue total antioxidant capacity, and in a significant decrease in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) expression and activity in vastus lateralis muscle. SF treatment significantly increased muscle NQO1, glutathione-S-transferase, and glutathione reductase expression and activity, with no effect on glutathione peroxidase and thioredoxin reductase. The observed SF-induced upregulation of phase II enzymes was accompanied by a significant increase in nuclear erythroid 2 p45-related factor 2 expression and correlated with a significant increase in total antioxidant capacity and a decrease in plasma LDH and CPK activities. Our data demonstrate that SF acts as an indirect antioxidant in skeletal muscle and could play a critical role in the modulation of the muscle redox environment, leading to the prevention of exhaustive exercise-induced muscle damage.

  6. Treatment of anaemia in haemodialysis patients with erythropoietin: long-term effects on exercise capacity.

    PubMed

    Bárány, P; Freyschuss, U; Pettersson, E; Bergström, J

    1993-04-01

    1. The effects of correcting anaemia on exercise capacity were evaluated in 21 haemodialysis patients (aged 39 +/- 12 years) before starting treatment with recombinant human erythropoietin (Hb concentration, 73 +/- 10 g/l; total Hb, 59 +/- 12% of expected), after correction of the anaemia to a Hb concentration of 108 +/- 7 g/l and a total Hb 82 +/- 10% of expected, and in 13 of the patients after 12 months on maintenance recombinant human erythropoietin treatment (Hb concentration 104 +/- 14 g/l, total Hb 79 +/- 17% of expected). Fifteen healthy subjects (aged 41 +/- 9 years), who took no regular exercise, constituted the control group. Maximal exercise capacity was determined on a bicycle ergometer. Oxygen uptake, respiratory quotient, blood lactate concentration, heart rate and blood pressure were measured at rest and at maximal workload. 2. After 6 +/- 3 months on recombinant human erythropoietin, maximal exercise capacity increased from 108 +/- 27 W to 130 +/- 36W (P < 0.001) and the maximal oxygen uptake increased from 1.24 +/- 0.39 litres/min to 1.50 +/- 0.45 litres/min (P < 0.001). No significant changes in respiratory quotient (1.16 +/- 0.13 versus 1.18 +/- 0.13) and blood lactate concentration (4.0 +/- 1.8 versus 3.6 +/- 1.1 mmol/l) at maximal workload were observed, but the blood lactate concentration in the patients was significantly lower than that in the control subjects (6.7 +/- 2.3 mmol/l, P < 0.01). After the correction of anaemia, the aerobic power was still 38% lower in the patients than in the control subjects and 17% lower than the reference values.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Lipoprotein(a)-hyperlipoproteinemia as cause of chronic spinal cord ischemia resulting in progressive myelopathy - successful treatment with lipoprotein apheresis.

    PubMed

    Heigl, Franz; Hettich, Reinhard; Mauch, Erich; Klingel, Reinhard; Fassbender, Cordula

    2017-03-01

    High concentrations of lipoprotein(a) (Lp(a)) represent an important independent and causal risk factor associated with adverse outcome in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD). Effective Lp(a) lowering drug treatment is not available. Lipoprotein apheresis (LA) has been proven to prevent cardiovascular events in patients with Lp(a)-hyperlipoproteinemia (Lp(a)-HLP) and progressive CVD. Here we present the course of a male patient with established peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD) at the early age of 41 and coronary artery disease (CAD), who during follow-up developed over 2 years a progressive syndrome of cerebellar and spinal cord deficits against the background of multifactorial cardiovascular risk including positive family history of CVD. Spastic tetraplegia and dependency on wheel chair and nursing care represented the nadir of neurological deficits. All conventional risk factors including LDL-cholesterol had already been treated and after exclusion of other causes, genetically determined Lp(a)-HLP was considered as the major underlying etiologic factor of ischemic vascular disease in this patient including spinal cord ischemia with vascular myelopathy. Treatment with an intensive regimen of chronic LA over 4.5 years now was successful to stabilize PAOD and CAD and led to very impressive neurologic and overall physical rehabilitation and improvement of quality of life.Measurement of Lp(a) concentration must be recommended to assess individual cardiovascular risk. Extracorporeal clearance of Lp(a) by LA should be considered as treatment option for select patients with progressive Lp(a)-associated ischemic syndromes.

  8. Spinal Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the open spaces within your spine, which can put pressure on ... stenosis, doctors may recommend surgery to create additional space for the spinal cord or nerves. Many people ...

  9. Spinal stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... stenosis; Foraminal spinal stenosis; Degenerative spine disease; Back pain - spinal stenosis; Low back pain - stenosis; LBP - stenosis ... involve both legs. Symptoms include: Numbness , cramping, or pain in the back, buttocks, thighs, or calves, or ...

  10. Spinal injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... and drive. Do not dive into pools, lakes, rivers, and other bodies of water, particularly if you cannot determine the depth of the ... Central nervous system Spinal cord injury Spinal anatomy Two person roll - ...

  11. The effects of habituation and gaze-stability exercises in the treatment of unilateral vestibular hypofunction – preliminary results

    PubMed Central

    Clendaniel, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Background and Purpose The efficacy of both habituation and adaptation exercise interventions in the treatment of unilateral vestibular hypofunction has been demonstrated by prior studies. The purpose of this paper is to describe the preliminary results of an ongoing study that compares the effects of these two different exercise approaches on outcomes related to vestibular function. Methods Seven participants with unilateral vestibular hypofunction have completed a 6-week exercise intervention after randomize assignment to either habituation (H) exercises, or gaze-stability (GS) adaptation exercises. The following measures were taken pre-treatment and post-treatment: Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) to measure the symptom impact, motion sensitivity quotient (MSQ) to assess sensitivity to head movements, and the dynamic visual acuity test (DVA) as a measure of gaze-stability during head movements. Results Following the 6-week intervention there was an overall improvement in the DHI, the MSQ, and both the active and passive DVA. The H and GS intervention group participants each demonstrated similar improvements in both the MSQ, as well as the active and passive DVA measures. Discussion and Conclusions The improvement in the MSQ for the GS group and the improvement in the DVA measures for the H group were unexpected findings. Head movement, which is required by both exercise interventions, rather than the specific type of exercise may be the critical factor underlying the observed improvements in motion sensitivity and dynamic visual acuity. PMID:20588098

  12. [Therapeutic exercise as treatment for migraine and tension-type headaches: a systematic review of randomised clinical trials].

    PubMed

    Gil-Martínez, Alfonso; Kindelan-Calvo, Paula; Agudo-Carmona, Diego; Muñoz-Plata, Rosa; López-de-Uralde-Villanueva, Ibai; La Touche, Roy

    2013-11-16

    AIM. To analyse the effectiveness of therapeutic exercise on migraines and tension-type headaches (TTH). MATERIALS AND METHODS. Electronic databases were used to search the literature for relevant articles. Eligibility criteria were: controlled randomised clinical trials (RCT), conducted on patients with migraine or TTH, in which the therapeutic intervention was based on therapeutic exercise, and the papers had been published in English and Spanish. Two independent reviewers performed the analysis of the methodological quality using the Delphi scale. RESULTS. Ten RCT were selected, seven of which offered good methodological quality. According to all the studies analysed, the intensity and frequency of pain diminished in comparison to the situation prior to establishing therapeutic exercise, and in five studies the effect was higher than in the control group. The qualitative analysis showed strong evidence of the absence of adverse events following the application of therapeutic exercise. Furthermore, strong evidence was also found of the effect of physiotherapeutic treatment, including therapeutic exercise, in lowering the intensity, frequency and duration of pain in patients with TTH. Limited evidence was also found of the effectiveness of aerobic exercise in patients with migraine, although it was not better than the effects derived from other forms of treatment. CONCLUSIONS. Results show that therapeutic exercise is a safe treatment that provides beneficial effects on migraines or TTH. Further RCT are required in the future with appropriate methodological designs to confirm these results.

  13. Effect of Voluntary Ethanol Consumption Combined with Testosterone Treatment on Cardiovascular Function in Rats: Influence of Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Engi, Sheila A.; Planeta, Cleopatra S.; Crestani, Carlos C.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of voluntary ethanol consumption combined with testosterone treatment on cardiovascular function in rats. Moreover, we investigated the influence of exercise training on these effects. To this end, male rats were submitted to low-intensity training on a treadmill or kept sedentary while concurrently being treated with ethanol for 6 weeks. For voluntary ethanol intake, rats were given access to two bottles, one containing ethanol and other containing water, three 24-hour sessions per week. In the last two weeks (weeks 5 and 6), animals underwent testosterone treatment concurrently with exercise training and exposure to ethanol. Ethanol consumption was not affected by either testosterone treatment or exercise training. Also, drug treatments did not influence the treadmill performance improvement evoked by training. However, testosterone alone, but not in combination with ethanol, reduced resting heart rate. Moreover, combined treatment with testosterone and ethanol reduced the pressor response to the selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. Treatment with either testosterone or ethanol alone also affected baroreflex activity and enhanced depressor response to acetylcholine, but these effects were inhibited when drugs were coadministrated. Exercise training restored most cardiovascular effects evoked by drug treatments. Furthermore, both drugs administrated alone increased pressor response to phenylephrine in trained animals. Also, drug treatments inhibited the beneficial effects of training on baroreflex function. In conclusion, the present results suggest a potential interaction between toxic effects of testosterone and ethanol on cardiovascular function. Data also indicate that exercise training is an important factor influencing the effects of these substances. PMID:26760038

  14. Exercise as an add-on strategy for the treatment of major depressive disorder: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Mura, Gioia; Moro, Maria Francesca; Patten, Scott B; Carta, Mauro G

    2014-12-01

    Antidepressants are currently the treatment of choice for major depressive disorder (MDD). Nevertheless, a high percentage of patients do not respond to a first-line antidepressant drug, and combination treatments and augmentation strategies increase the risk of side effects. Moreover, a significant proportion of patients are treatment-resistant. In the last 30 years, a number of studies have sought to establish whether exercise could be regarded as an alternative to antidepressants, but so far no specific analysis has examined the efficacy of exercise as an adjunctive treatment in combination with antidepressants. We carried out a systematic review to evaluate the effectiveness of exercise as an adjunctive treatment with antidepressants on depression. A search of relevant papers was carried out in PubMed/Medline, Google Scholar, and Scopus with the following keywords: "exercise," "physical activity," "physical fitness," "depressive disorder," "depression," "depressive symptoms," "add-on," "augmentation," "adjunction," and "combined therapy." Twenty-two full-text articles were retrieved by the search. Among the 13 papers that fulfilled our inclusion criteria, we found methodological weaknesses in the majority. However, the included studies showed a strong effectiveness of exercise combined with antidepressants. Further analyses and higher quality studies are needed; nevertheless, as we have focused on a particular intervention (exercise in adjunction to antidepressants) that better reflects clinical practice, we can hypothesize that this strategy could be appropriately and safely translated into real-world practice.

  15. Discovery and Optimization of Small Molecule Splicing Modifiers of Survival Motor Neuron 2 as a Treatment for Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Woll, Matthew G; Qi, Hongyan; Turpoff, Anthony; Zhang, Nanjing; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Guangming; Li, Chunshi; Huang, Song; Yang, Tianle; Moon, Young-Choon; Lee, Chang-Sun; Choi, Soongyu; Almstead, Neil G; Naryshkin, Nikolai A; Dakka, Amal; Narasimhan, Jana; Gabbeta, Vijayalakshmi; Welch, Ellen; Zhao, Xin; Risher, Nicole; Sheedy, Josephine; Weetall, Marla; Karp, Gary M

    2016-07-14

    The underlying cause of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a deficiency of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. Starting from hits identified in a high-throughput screening campaign and through structure-activity relationship investigations, we have developed small molecules that potently shift the alternative splicing of the SMN2 exon 7, resulting in increased production of the full-length SMN mRNA and protein. Three novel chemical series, represented by compounds 9, 14, and 20, have been optimized to increase the level of SMN protein by >50% in SMA patient-derived fibroblasts at concentrations of <160 nM. Daily administration of these compounds to severe SMA Δ7 mice results in an increased production of SMN protein in disease-relevant tissues and a significant increase in median survival time in a dose-dependent manner. Our work supports the development of an orally administered small molecule for the treatment of patients with SMA.

  16. Spinal tuberculosis: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Mohammad R; Mirkoohi, Maryam; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Yarandi, Kourosh Karimi; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa

    2012-12-01

    The spinal column is involved in less than 1% of all cases of tuberculosis (TB). Spinal TB is a very dangerous type of skeletal TB as it can be associated with neurologic deficit due to compression of adjacent neural structures and significant spinal deformity. Therefore, early diagnosis and management of spinal TB has special importance in preventing these serious complications. In order to extract current trends in diagnosis and medical or surgical treatment of spinal TB we performed a narrative review with analysis of all the articles available for us which were published between 1990 and 2011. Althoug h the development of more accurate imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging and advanced surgical techniques have made the early diagnosis and management of spinal TB much easier, these are still very challenging topics. In this review we aim to discuss the diagnosis and management of spinal TB based on studies with acceptable design, clearly explained results and justifiable conclusions.

  17. Holospinal epidural abscess of the spinal axis: two illustrative cases with review of treatment strategies and surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gabriel A; Kochar, Arshneel S; Manjila, Sunil; Onwuzulike, Kaine; Geertman, Robert T; Anderson, James S; Steinmetz, Michael P

    2014-08-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of spinal infections, the subcategory of holospinal epidural abscesses (HEAs) is extremely infrequent and requires unique management. Panspinal imaging (preferably MRI), modern aggressive antibiotic therapy, and prompt surgical intervention remain the standard of care for all spinal axis infections including HEAs; however, the surgical decision making on timing and extent of the procedure still remain ill defined for HEAs. Decompression including skip laminectomies or laminoplasties is described, with varied clinical outcomes. In this review the authors present the illustrative cases of 2 patients with HEAs who were treated using skip laminectomies and epidural catheter irrigation techniques. The discussion highlights different management strategies including the role of conservative (nonsurgical) management in these lesions, especially with an already identified pathogen and the absence of mass effect on MRI or significant neurological defects. Among fewer than 25 case reports of HEA published in the past 25 years, the most important aspect in deciding a role for surgery is the neurological examination. Nearly 20% were treated successfully with medical therapy alone if neurologically intact. None of the reported cases had an associated cranial infection with HEA, because the dural adhesion around the foramen magnum prevented rostral spread of infection. Traditionally a posterior approach to the epidural space with irrigation is performed, unless an extensive focal ventral collection is causing cord compression. Surgical intervention for HEA should be an adjuvant treatment strategy for all acutely deteriorating patients, whereas aspiration of other infected sites like a psoas abscess can determine an infective pathogen, and appropriate antibiotic treatment may avoid surgical intervention in the neurologically intact patient.

  18. Cervical spinal cord compression caused by cryptococcosis in a dog: successful treatment with surgery and fluconazole.

    PubMed

    Kerwin, S C; McCarthy, R J; VanSteenhouse, J L; Partington, B P; Taboada, J

    1998-01-01

    A six-year-old, male Doberman pinscher was presented for acute onset of upper motor neuron tetraparesis. An extradural compressive lesion compatible with intervertebral disk rupture at the sixth to seventh cervical (C6-C7) disk space was evident on myelography. A large, gelatinous mass of pure cryptococcal organisms causing spinal cord compression was identified upon exploratory surgery. Removal of the mass caused relief of clinical signs. No evidence of involvement of other organ systems was found; however, serum and cerebrospinal fluid titers were positive for cryptococcal infection. The dog was treated with fluconazole (5.5 mg/kg body weight, per os sid) until serum titers for cryptococcal infection were negative at seven months postsurgery. To the authors' knowledge, this is the only report of a dog with cryptococcosis treated successfully using fluconazole as a sole agent.

  19. Targeting Neurotrophins to Specific Populations of Neurons: NGF, BDNF, and NT-3 and Their Relevance for Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Keefe, Kathleen M.; Sheikh, Imran S.; Smith, George M.

    2017-01-01

    Neurotrophins are a family of proteins that regulate neuronal survival, synaptic function, and neurotransmitter release, and elicit the plasticity and growth of axons within the adult central and peripheral nervous system. Since the 1950s, these factors have been extensively studied in traumatic injury models. Here we review several members of the classical family of neurotrophins, the receptors they bind to, and their contribution to axonal regeneration and sprouting of sensory and motor pathways after spinal cord injury (SCI). We focus on nerve growth factor (NGF), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and their effects on populations of neurons within diverse spinal tracts. Understanding the cellular targets of neurotrophins and the responsiveness of specific neuronal populations will allow for the most efficient treatment strategies in the injured spinal cord. PMID:28273811

  20. First spinal axis segment irradiation with spot-scanning proton beam delivered in the treatment of a lumbar primitive neuroectodermal tumour. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Weber, D C; Rutz, H P; Lomax, A J; Schneider, U; Lombriser, N; Zenhausern, R; Goitein, G

    2004-08-01

    Primary intraspinal primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET) is a rare tumour entity. The optimal therapeutic management is unclear but, in general, this tumour is treated with surgery followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Proton beam radiation therapy (PT) offers superior dose distributional qualities compared with X- or gamma rays, as the dose deposition occurs in a modulated narrow zone called the Bragg peak. As a result, organs at risk are optimally speared. Here, we present a patient treated with the first spinal axis segment irradiation using spot-scanning PT with a single field, combined with conventional cranio-spinal axis radiotherapy after surgery and chemotherapy, and an extensive review of the literature outlining the clinical features and treatment modality of spinal PNET.

  1. Targeting Neurotrophins to Specific Populations of Neurons: NGF, BDNF, and NT-3 and Their Relevance for Treatment of Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Keefe, Kathleen M; Sheikh, Imran S; Smith, George M

    2017-03-03

    Neurotrophins are a family of proteins that regulate neuronal survival, synaptic function, and neurotransmitter release, and elicit the plasticity and growth of axons within the adult central and peripheral nervous system. Since the 1950s, these factors have been extensively studied in traumatic injury models. Here we review several members of the classical family of neurotrophins, the receptors they bind to, and their contribution to axonal regeneration and sprouting of sensory and motor pathways after spinal cord injury (SCI). We focus on nerve growth factor (NGF), brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), and their effects on populations of neurons within diverse spinal tracts. Understanding the cellular targets of neurotrophins and the responsiveness of specific neuronal populations will allow for the most efficient treatment strategies in the injured spinal cord.

  2. An injectable, calcium responsive composite hydrogel for the treatment of acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    McKay, Christopher A; Pomrenke, Rebecca D; McLane, Joshua S; Schaub, Nicholas J; DeSimone, Elise K; Ligon, Lee A; Gilbert, Ryan J

    2014-02-12

    Immediately following spinal cord injury, further injury can occur through several secondary injury cascades. As a consequence of cell lysis, an increase in extracellular Ca(2+) results in additional neuronal loss by inducing apoptosis. Thus, hydrogels that reduce extracellular Ca(2+) concentration may reduce secondary injury severity. The goal of this study was to develop composite hydrogels consisting of alginate, chitosan, and genipin that interact with extracellular Ca(2+) to enable in situ gelation while maintaining an elastic modulus similar to native spinal cord (∼1000 Pa). It was hypothesized that incorporation of genipin and chitosan would regulate hydrogel electrostatic characteristics and influence hydrogel porosity, degradation, and astrocyte behavior. Hydrogel composition was varied to create hydrogels with statistically similar mechanical properties (∼1000 Pa) that demonstrated tunable charge characteristics (6-fold range in free amine concentration) and degradation rate (complete degradation between 7 and 28 days; some blends persist after 28 days). Hydrogels demonstrate high sensitivity to Ca(2+) concentration, as a 1 mM change during fabrication induced a significant change in elastic modulus. Additionally, hydrogels incubated in a Ca(2+)-containing solution exhibited an increased linear viscoelastic limit (LVE) and an increased elastic modulus above the LVE limit in a time dependent manner. An extension of the LVE limit implies a change in hydrogel cross-linking structure. Attachment assays demonstrated that addition of chitosan/genipin to alginate hydrogels induced up to a 4-fold increase in the number of attached astrocytes and facilitated astrocyte clustering on the hydrogel surface in a composition dependent manner. Furthermore, Western blots demonstrated tunable glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) expression in astrocytes cultured on hydrogel blends, with some hydrogel compositions demonstrating no significant increase in GFAP expression

  3. An Injectable, Calcium Responsive Composite Hydrogel for the Treatment of Acute Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Immediately following spinal cord injury, further injury can occur through several secondary injury cascades. As a consequence of cell lysis, an increase in extracellular Ca2+ results in additional neuronal loss by inducing apoptosis. Thus, hydrogels that reduce extracellular Ca2+ concentration may reduce secondary injury severity. The goal of this study was to develop composite hydrogels consisting of alginate, chitosan, and genipin that interact with extracellular Ca2+ to enable in situ gelation while maintaining an elastic modulus similar to native spinal cord (∼1000 Pa). It was hypothesized that incorporation of genipin and chitosan would regulate hydrogel electrostatic characteristics and influence hydrogel porosity, degradation, and astrocyte behavior. Hydrogel composition was varied to create hydrogels with statistically similar mechanical properties (∼1000 Pa) that demonstrated tunable charge characteristics (6-fold range in free amine concentration) and degradation rate (complete degradation between 7 and 28 days; some blends persist after 28 days). Hydrogels demonstrate high sensitivity to Ca2+ concentration, as a 1 mM change during fabrication induced a significant change in elastic modulus. Additionally, hydrogels incubated in a Ca2+-containing solution exhibited an increased linear viscoelastic limit (LVE) and an increased elastic modulus above the LVE limit in a time dependent manner. An extension of the LVE limit implies a change in hydrogel cross-linking structure. Attachment assays demonstrated that addition of chitosan/genipin to alginate hydrogels induced up to a 4-fold increase in the number of attached astrocytes and facilitated astrocyte clustering on the hydrogel surface in a composition dependent manner. Furthermore, Western blots demonstrated tunable glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) expression in astrocytes cultured on hydrogel blends, with some hydrogel compositions demonstrating no significant increase in GFAP expression compared

  4. Growth hormone treatment in growth hormone-deficient adults. II. Effects on exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Cuneo, R C; Salomon, F; Wiles, C M; Hesp, R; Sönksen, P H

    1991-02-01

    Growth hormone (GH) treatment in adults with GH deficiency increases lean body mass and thigh muscle cross-sectional area. The functional significance of this was examined by incremental cycle ergometry in 24 GH-deficient adults treated in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial with recombinant DNA human GH (rhGH) for 6 mo (0.07 U/kg body wt daily). Compared with placebo, the rhGH group increased mean maximal O2 uptake (VO2max) (+406 +/- 71 vs. +133 +/- 84 ml/min; P = 0.016) and maximal power output (+24.6 +/- 4.3 vs. +9.7 +/- 4.8 W; P = 0.047), without differences in maximal heart rate or ventilation. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s, vital capacity, and corrected CO gas transfer were within normal limits and did not change with treatment. Mean predicted VO2max, based on height and age, increased from 78.9 to 96.0% in the rhGH group (compared with 78.5 and 85.0% for placebo; P = 0.036). The anaerobic ventilatory threshold increased in the rhGH group (+159 +/- 39 vs. +1 +/- 51 ml/min; P = 0.02). The improvement in VO2max was noted when expressed per kilogram body weight but not lean body mass or thigh muscle area. We conclude that rhGH treatment in adults with GH deficiency improves and normalizes maximal exercise performance and improves submaximal exercise performance and that these changes are related to increases in lean body mass and muscle mass. Improved cardiac output may also contribute to the effect of rhGH on exercise performance.

  5. Nedocromil sodium versus sodium cromoglycate in treatment of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kelly, K D; Spooner, C H; Rowe, B H

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this review was to compare the effects of prophylactic doses of nedocromil sodium (NCS) and sodium cromoglycate (SCG) on postexercise lung function, in persons diagnosed with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Randomized controlled trials were identified from the Cochrane Airways Review Group Asthma Register, plus hand searching for trials in journals, bibliographies of relevant studies and review articles. Randomized controlled trials comparing NCS to SCG in prophylactic treatment of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction were eligible. Studies were pooled using odds ratios (OR) for dichotomous outcomes or weighted mean differences (WMD) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for continuous outcomes. No significant differences were noted between NCS and SCG with respect to the maximum per cent decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second (WMD=-0.88; 95% CI -4.50-2.74), complete protection (OR=0.95; 95% CI 0.50-1.81), clinical protection (OR=0.71; 95% CI 0.36-1.39), unpleasant taste (OR=6.85; 95% CI 0.77-60.73), or sore throat (OR=3.46; 95% CI 0.32-37.48). Subgroup analyses based on age, dosages of medications and timing of exercise postinhalation were consistent with the overall pooled analyses. No significant differences were evident between the effects of nedocromil sodium and sodium cromoglycate during the immediate postexercise period in adults and children with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, with regards to maximum per cent decrease in forced expiratory volume in one second, complete protection, or clinical protection. Side-effect profiles were similar.

  6. Effectiveness of ultrasound-guided injections combined with shoulder exercises in the treatment of subacromial adhesive bursitis.

    PubMed

    Gasparre, Giuseppe; Fusaro, Isabella; Galletti, Stefano; Volini, Silvia; Benedetti, Maria Grazia

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the association of exercises for the shoulder with ultrasound-guided injection into the bursa significantly improves the treatment outcome in adhesive bursitis. Two groups of 35 patients, one treated with ultrasound-guided injection (UGI) and the other one with ultrasound-guided injection and home exercise program (UGI-exercise) for 1 month, were assessed for pain and shoulder function before treatment, 1 and 3 months post-treatment. Fourteen patients in UGI group and 23 patients in the UGI-exercises group were completely free of pain after 1 month (p = 0.031). At 3 months' follow-up, patients in the UGI-exercise group showed a significant improvement with respect to the other group (p = 0.005). No differences were found in function assessment. The UGI combined with shoulder exercises in the treatment of subacromial adhesive bursitis is effective to ensure a more frequent complete pain relief in the medium term.

  7. The Role of microRNA Markers in the Diagnosis, Treatment, and Outcome Prediction of Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Martirosyan, Nikolay L.; Carotenuto, Alessandro; Patel, Arpan A.; Kalani, M. Yashar S.; Yagmurlu, Kaan; Lemole, G. Michael; Preul, Mark C.; Theodore, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition that affects many people worldwide. Treatment focuses on controlling secondary injury cascade and improving regeneration. It has recently been suggested that both the secondary injury cascade and the regenerative process are heavily regulated by microRNAs (miRNAs). The measurement of specific biomarkers could improve our understanding of the disease processes, and thereby provide clinicians with the opportunity to guide treatment and predict clinical outcomes after SCI. A variety of miRNAs exhibit important roles in processes of inflammation, cell death, and regeneration. These miRNAs can be used as diagnostic tools for predicting outcome after SCI. In addition, miRNAs can be used in the treatment of SCI and its symptoms. Significant laboratory and clinical evidence exist to show that miRNAs could be used as robust diagnostic and therapeutic tools for the treatment of patients with SCI. Further clinical studies are warranted to clarify the importance of each subtype of miRNA in SCI management. PMID:27878119

  8. Zonisamide-loaded triblock copolymer nanomicelles as a novel drug delivery system for the treatment of acute spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, JingLun; Deng, JiaoJiao; Yuan, JinXian; Fu, Jie; Li, XiaoLing; Tong, AiPing; Wang, YueLong; Chen, YangMei; Guo, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) commonly leads to lifelong disability due to the limited regenerative capacity of the adult central nervous system. Nanomicelles can be used as therapeutic systems to provide effective treatments for SCI. In this study, a novel triblock monomethyl poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(l-lactide)-poly(trimethylene carbonate) copolymer was successfully synthesized. Next, polymeric nanomicelles loaded with zonisamide (ZNS), a Food and Drug Administration-approved antiepileptic drug, were prepared and characterized. The ZNS-loaded micelles (ZNS-M) were further utilized for the treatment of SCI in vitro and in vivo. The obtained ZNS-M were ~50 nm in diameter with good solubility and dispersibility. Additionally, these controlled-release micelles showed significant antioxidative and neuron-protective effects in vitro. Finally, our results indicated that ZNS-M treatment could promote motor function recovery and could increase neuron and axon density in a hemisection SCI model. In summary, these results may provide an experimental basis for the use of ZNS-M as a clinically applicable therapeutic drug for the treatment of SCI in the future.

  9. Minimal walking distance following exercise treatment in patients with arterial occlusive disease.

    PubMed

    Rosetzsky, A; Struckmann, J; Mathiesen, F R

    1985-01-01

    79 patients with intermittent claudication were tested with peripheral blood pressure measurement and determination of minimal walking distance before and after a 3 months' period with scheduled walking exercises under supervision. No change in peripheral blood pressure was observed following the treatment whereas the minimum walking distance was increased with statistical significance. The gain was most pronounced in patients with an initial combination of high peripheral pressures and short walking distances. A graphic presentation allows for the estimation of the expected gain in individual patients with claudication.

  10. [Meningitis after spinal anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Mouchrif, Issam; Berdaii, Adnane; Labib, Ismail; Harrandou, Moustapha

    2016-01-01

    Meningitis is a rare but serious complication of epidural and spinal anesthesia. Bacterial meningitis is mainly caused by Gram-positive cocci, implying an exogenous contamination which suggests a lack of asepsis. The evolution is usually favorable after treatment, but at the expense of increased health care costs and, sometimes, of significant neurological sequelae. We report a case of bacterial meningitis after spinal anesthesia for caesarean section.

  11. Astym treatment vs. eccentric exercise for lateral elbow tendinopathy: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Stegink-Jansen, Caroline W.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Patients with chronic lateral elbow (LE) tendinopathy, commonly known as tennis elbow, often experience prolonged symptoms and frequent relapses. Astym treatment, evidenced in animal studies to promote the healing and regeneration of soft tissues, is hypothesized to improve outcomes in LE tendinopathy patients. This study had two objectives: (1) to compare the efficacy of Astym treatment to an evidence-based eccentric exercise program (EE) for patients with chronic LE tendinopathy, and (2) to quantify outcomes of subjects non-responsive to EE who were subsequently treated with Astym treatment. Study Design. Prospective, two group, parallel, randomized controlled trial completed at a large orthopedic center in Indiana. Inclusion criteria: age range of 18–65 years old, with clinical indications of LE tendinopathy greater than 12 weeks, with no recent corticosteriod injection or disease altering comorbidities. Methods. Subjects with chronic LE tendinopathy (107 subjects with 113 affected elbows) were randomly assigned using computer-generated random number tables to 4 weeks of Astym treatment (57 elbows) or EE treatment (56 elbows). Data collected at baseline, 4, 8, 12 weeks, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcome measure: DASH; secondary outcome measures: pain with activity, maximum grip strength and function. The treating physicians and the rater were blinded; subjects and treating clinicians could not be blinded due to the nature of the treatments. Results. Resolution response rates were 78.3% for the Astym group and 40.9% for the EE group. Astym subjects showed greater gains in DASH scores (p = 0.047) and in maximum grip strength (p = 0.008) than EE subjects. Astym therapy also resolved 20/21 (95.7%) of the EE non-responders, who showed improvements in DASH scores (p < 0.005), pain with activity (p = 0.002), and function (p = 0.004) following Astym treatment. Gains continued at 6 and 12 months. No adverse effects were reported. Conclusion. This study

  12. Human inflammatory and resolving lipid mediator responses to resistance exercise and ibuprofen treatment

    PubMed Central

    Markworth, James F.; Vella, Luke; Lingard, Benjamin S.; Tull, Dedreia L.; Rupasinghe, Thusitha W.; Sinclair, Andrew J.; Maddipati, Krishna Rao

    2013-01-01

    Classical proinflammatory eicosanoids, and more recently discovered lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory and proresolving bioactivity, exert a complex role in the initiation, control, and resolution of inflammation. Using a targeted lipidomics approach, we investigated circulating lipid mediator responses to resistance exercise and treatment with the NSAID ibuprofen. Human subjects undertook a single bout of unaccustomed resistance exercise (80% of one repetition maximum) following oral ingestion of ibuprofen (400 mg) or placebo control. Venous blood was collected during early recovery (0–3 h and 24 h postexercise), and serum lipid mediator composition was analyzed by LC-MS-based targeted lipidomics. Postexercise recovery was characterized by elevated levels of cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and 2-derived prostanoids (TXB2, PGE2, PGD2, PGF2α, and PGI2), lipooxygenase (5-LOX, 12-LOX, and 15-LOX)-derived hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs), and leukotrienes (e.g., LTB4), and epoxygenase (CYP)-derived epoxy/dihydroxy eicosatrienoic acids (EpETrEs/DiHETrEs). Additionally, we detected elevated levels of bioactive lipid mediators with anti-inflammatory and proresolving properties, including arachidonic acid-derived lipoxins (LXA4 and LXB4), and the EPA (E-series) and DHA (D-series)-derived resolvins (RvD1 and RvE1), and protectins (PD1 isomer 10S, 17S-diHDoHE). Ibuprofen treatment blocked exercise-induced increases in COX-1 and COX-2-derived prostanoids but also resulted in off-target reductions in leukotriene biosynthesis, and a diminished proresolving lipid mediator response. CYP pathway product metabolism was also altered by ibuprofen treatment, as indicated by elevated postexercise serum 5,6-DiHETrE and 8,9-DiHETrE only in those receiving ibuprofen. These findings characterize the blood inflammatory lipid mediator response to unaccustomed resistance exercise in humans and show that acute proinflammatory signals are mechanistically linked to the induction of a

  13. Treatment of Dyslipidemia with Statins and Physical Exercises: Recent Findings of Skeletal Muscle Responses.

    PubMed

    Bonfim, Mariana Rotta; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Amaral, Sandra Lia do; Monteiro, Henrique Luiz

    2015-02-13

    Statin treatment in association with physical exercise practice can substantially reduce cardiovascular mortality risk of dyslipidemic individuals, but this practice is associated with myopathic event exacerbation. This study aimed to present the most recent results of specific literature about the effects of statins and its association with physical exercise on skeletal musculature. Thus, a literature review was performed using PubMed and SciELO databases, through the combination of the keywords "statin" AND "exercise" AND "muscle", restricting the selection to original studies published between January 1990 and November 2013. Sixteen studies evaluating the effects of statins in association with acute or chronic exercises on skeletal muscle were analyzed. Study results indicate that athletes using statins can experience deleterious effects on skeletal muscle, as the exacerbation of skeletal muscle injuries are more frequent with intense training or acute eccentric and strenuous exercises. Moderate physical training, in turn, when associated to statins does not increase creatine kinase levels or pain reports, but improves muscle and metabolic functions as a consequence of training. Therefore, it is suggested that dyslipidemic patients undergoing statin treatment should be exposed to moderate aerobic training in combination to resistance exercises three times a week, and the provision of physical training prior to drug administration is desirable, whenever possible.A associação do tratamento medicamentoso por estatinas com a prática de exercícios físicos pode reduzir substancialmente o risco de mortalidade cardiovascular de indivíduos dislipidêmicos, porém sua realização vem sendo associada à exacerbação de quadros miopáticos. O presente trabalho teve como objetivo apresentar os resultados mais recentes da literatura específica sobre os efeitos da associação de estatinas ao exercício físico na musculatura esquelética. Para tanto, realizou

  14. Predictive screening of M1 and M2 macrophages reveals the immunomodulatory effectiveness of post spinal cord injury azithromycin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Gensel, John C.; Kopper, Timothy J.; Zhang, Bei; Orr, Michael B.; Bailey, William M.

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) triggers a heterogeneous macrophage response that when experimentally polarized toward alternative forms of activation (M2 macrophages) promotes tissue and functional recovery. There are limited pharmacological therapies that can drive this reparative inflammatory state. In the current study, we used in vitro systems to comprehensively defined markers of macrophages with known pathological (M1) and reparative (M2) properties in SCI. We then used these markers to objectively define the macrophage activation states after SCI in response to delayed azithromycin treatment. Mice were subjected to moderate-severe thoracic contusion SCI. Azithromycin or vehicle was administered beginning 30 minutes post-SCI and then daily for 3 or 7 days post injury (dpi). We detected a dose-dependent polarization toward purportedly protective M2 macrophages with daily AZM treatment. Specifically, AZM doses of 10, 40, or 160 mg/kg decreased M1 macrophage gene expression at 3 dpi while the lowest (10 mg/kg) and highest (160 mg/kg) doses increased M2 macrophage gene expression at 7 dpi. Azithromycin has documented immunomodulatory properties and is commonly prescribed to treat infections in SCI individuals. This work demonstrates the utility of objective, comprehensive macrophage gene profiling for evaluating immunomodulatory SCI therapies and highlights azithromycin as a promising agent for SCI treatment. PMID:28057928

  15. Spinal synovial cysts: pathogenesis, diagnosis and surgical treatment in a series of seven cases and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Staurinou, Lampis C.; Kouyialis, Andreas T.; Gavra, Maria M.; Stavrinou, Pantelis C.; Themistokleous, Marios; Selviaridis, Panayiotis; Sakas, Damianos E.

    2008-01-01

    This study is designed based on the retrospective analysis of patients treated in the Neurosurgical Department of two major hospitals and review of the literature. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of surgery and address controversial issues in the treatment of symptomatic lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts. Spinal juxtafacet cysts (synovial and ganglion cysts) are a rare cause of low back and radicular leg pain. Although the relevant reports in the international literature are increasing, the controversy about conservative versus surgical treatment and the need for concomitant fusion still exists. Data from seven patients (age range 58–69 years, mean age 61 years) with low back and radicular leg pain due to a lumbar facet joint cyst were retrospectively analyzed. Demographic data, cyst level, presence of concomitant local pathology, treatment and results of treatment were recorded. A follow-up of at least 6 months (range 6–48 months) was conducted and results were noted. All patients had back pain, while five also experienced unilateral radicular leg pain and one had bilateral leg pain. One patient had neurogenic claudication. MRI identified the cyst and highlighted underlying pathology in all cases. All patients underwent surgical cyst excision. No fusion was performed. Post-operatively, all patients showed a total resolution of symptoms with sustained benefit at final evaluation. Review of the literature revealed a trend towards surgery, as this is correlated to a more favorable outcome compared with conservative treatment. Fusion should be performed on a case-by-case basis only. Surgery is a safe and effective treatment choice in this increasingly appearing ailment. A prospective, randomized trial should clarify issues under debate. PMID:18389295

  16. Conspicuous effect on treatment of mild-to-moderate COPD by combining deep-breathing exercise with oxygen inhalation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Qiang; Yan, Ling-Xian; Zhang, Li-Yan; Song, Qing-Hua; Xu, Rong-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can lead to respiratory failure, but current pharmacological treatments focus on symptom relief or slowing disease progression. Here, the effectiveness of an alternative therapy combining deep-breathing exercises and oxygen inhalation therapy was assessed in mild-to-moderate COPD patients. Forty-two male mild-to-moderate COPD patients were randomly divided into a deep-breathing training group, an oxygen inhalation group, and a combination group (n=14 in each). In the deep-breathing training group, the patients were treated only by the deep-breathing exercise; in the oxygen inhalation group, the patients were treated only by oxygen inhalation; in the combination group, the patients were treated by combining the deep-breathing exercises with oxygen inhalation. Before treatment, there were no statistical differences in the general characteristics or lung function indexes between the three groups of patients (P > 0.05). However, after treatment, patients in the combination group had significantly better lung function indexes than they did before treatment, and their improvement was also superior to that of patients from the deep-breathing training group and the oxygen inhalation group (P < 0.01 and P < 0.05, respectively). Thus, a treatment method combining deep-breathing exercise with oxygen inhalation offers more significant lung function improvement in COPD patients than either the deep-breathing exercise or oxygen inhalation alone. This approach should be further explored for use in the clinic.

  17. Effects of different cooling treatments on water diffusion, microcirculation, and water content within exercised muscles: evaluation by magnetic resonance T2-weighted and diffusion-weighted imaging.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Osamu; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Fukubayashi, Toru

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of different cooling treatments on exercised muscles. Seven adults underwent four post-exercise treatments (20-min ice-bag application, 60-min gel-pack application at 10 degrees C and 17 degrees C, and non-cooling treatment) with at least 1 week between treatments. Magnetic resonance diffusion- and T2-weighted images were obtained to calculate the apparent diffusion coefficients (apparent diffusion coefficient 1, which reflects intramuscular water diffusion and microcirculation, and apparent diffusion coefficient 2, which is approximately equal to the true diffusion coefficient that excludes as much of the effect of intramuscular microcirculation as possible) and the T2 values (intramuscular water content level) of the ankle dorsiflexors, respectively, before and after ankle dorsiflexion exercise and after post-exercise treatment. The T2 values increased significantly after exercise and returned to pre-exercise values after each treatment; no significant differences were observed among the four post-exercise treatments. Both apparent diffusion coefficients also increased significantly after exercise and decreased significantly after the three cooling treatments; no significant difference was detected among the three cooling treatments. Local cooling suppresses both water diffusion and microcirculation within exercised muscles. Moreover, although the treatment time was longer, adequate cooling effects could be achieved using the gel-pack applications at relatively mild cooling temperatures.

  18. Comparative study of the clinical effect and safety of anterior surgical approach and posterior surgical approach in the treatment of thoracolumbar spinal fracture

    PubMed Central

    Dengfeng, Zhang; Haojie, Wu; Xiao, Wang

    2015-01-01

    The clinical effect and safety of the anterior surgical approach and posterior surgical approach in the treatment of thoracolumbar spinal fracture was compared. Retrospective analyses of clinical data for 91 patients observed from March 2010 to September 2014 were made. The pre-operation and post-operation comparisons between two sets of Cobb’s angle, affected vertebra height, Frankel’s classification of spinal nerves, motion functions, and tactile functions showed statistically significant differences (P<0.05). After having the operation, the Cobb’s angle and affected vertebra height of the patient in the anterior approach group were both significantly higher than that of patients in the posterior approach group (P<0.05). The bone graft fusion rate of the patients in the anterior approach group 3 months after operation was higher than that of patients in the control group while the status of complications was worse than that of patients in the posterior approach group, both with a remarkable difference (P<0.05). Both the anterior surgical approach and posterior surgical approach have good clinical outcome for spinal fractures but they all have their respective adaption diseases. The key in the treatment of thoracolumbar spinal fractures lies in choosing proper operative approach. PMID:28352728

  19. Repeated Baclofen treatment ameliorates motor dysfunction, suppresses reflex activity and decreases the expression of signaling proteins in reticular nuclei and lumbar motoneurons after spinal trauma in rats.

    PubMed

    Kucharíková, Andrea; Schreiberová, Andrea; Závodská, Monika; Gedrová, Štefánia; Hricová, Ľudmila; Pavel, Jaroslav; Gálik, Ján; Maršala, Martin; Lukáčová, Nadežda

    2014-03-01

    The interruption of supraspinal input to the spinal cord leads to motor dysfunction and the development of spasticity. Clinical studies have shown that Baclofen (a GABAB agonist), while effective in modulating spasticity is associated with side-effects and the development of tolerance. The aim of the present study was to assess if discontinued Baclofen treatment and its repeated application leads antispasticity effects, and whether such changes affect neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in the brainstem, nNOS and parvalbumin (PV) in lumbar α-motoneurons and glial fibrillary acidic protein in the ventral horn of the spinal cord. Adult male Wistar rats were exposed to Th9 spinal cord transection. Baclofen (30mg/b.w.) diluted in drinking water, was administered for 6 days, starting at week 1 after injury and then repeated till week 4 after injury. The behavior of the animals was tested (tail-flick test, BBB locomotor score) from 1 to 8 weeks. Our results clearly indicate the role of nitric oxide, produced by nNOS in the initiation and the maintenance of spasticity states 1, 6 and 8 weeks after spinal trauma. A considerable decrease of nNOS staining after Baclofen treatment correlates with improvement of motor dysfunction. The findings also show that parvalbumin and astrocytes participate in the regulation of ion concentrations in the sub-acute phase after the injury.

  20. Spinal arteriovenous shunts in children.

    PubMed

    Davagnanam, Indran; Toma, Ahmed K; Brew, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Pediatric spinal arteriovenous shunts are rare and, in contrast to those in adults, are often congenital or associated with underlying genetic disorders. These are thought to be a more severe and complete phenotypic spectrum of all spinal arteriovenous shunts seen in the overall spinal shunt population. The pediatric presentation thus accounts for its association with significant morbidity and, in general, a more challenging treatment process compared with the adult presentation.

  1. SU-C-17A-07: The Development of An MR Accelerator-Enabled Planning-To-Delivery Technique for Stereotactic Palliative Radiotherapy Treatment of Spinal Metastases

    SciTech Connect

    Hoogcarspel, S J; Kontaxis, C; Velden, J M van der; Bol, G H; Vulpen, M van; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an MR accelerator-enabled online planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases. The technical challenges include; automated stereotactic treatment planning, online MR-based dose calculation and MR guidance during treatment. Methods: Using the CT data of 20 patients previously treated at our institution, a class solution for automated treatment planning for spinal bone metastases was created. For accurate dose simulation right before treatment, we fused geometrically correct online MR data with pretreatment CT data of the target volume (TV). For target tracking during treatment, a dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR sequence was developed. An in house developed GPU based IMRT optimization and dose calculation algorithm was used for fast treatment planning and simulation. An automatically generated treatment plan developed with this treatment planning system was irradiated on a clinical 6 MV linear accelerator and evaluated using a Delta4 dosimeter. Results: The automated treatment planning method yielded clinically viable plans for all patients. The MR-CT fusion based dose calculation accuracy was within 2% as compared to calculations performed with original CT data. The dynamic T2-weighted TSE MR Sequence was able to provide an update of the anatomical location of the TV every 10 seconds. Dose calculation and optimization of the automatically generated treatment plans using only one GPU took on average 8 minutes. The Delta4 measurement of the irradiated plan agreed with the dose calculation with a 3%/3mm gamma pass rate of 86.4%. Conclusions: The development of an MR accelerator-enabled planning-todelivery technique for stereotactic palliative radiotherapy treatment of spinal metastases was presented. Future work will involve developing an intrafraction motion adaptation strategy, MR-only dose calculation, radiotherapy quality-assurance in a magnetic field, and streamlining the entire treatment

  2. Neuromuscular interaction is required for neurotrophins-mediated locomotor recovery following treadmill training in rat spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qinfeng; Cao, Yana; Dong, Chuanming; Wang, Hongxing; Wang, Qinghua; Tong, Weifeng; Li, Xiangzhe

    2016-01-01

    Recent results have shown that exercise training promotes the recovery of injured rat distal spinal cords, but are still unclear about the function of skeletal muscle in this process. Herein, rats with incomplete thoracic (T10) spinal cord injuries (SCI) with a dual spinal lesion model were subjected to four weeks of treadmill training and then were treated with complete spinal transection at T8. We found that treadmill training allowed the retention of hind limb motor function after incomplete SCI, even with a heavy load after complete spinal transection. Moreover, treadmill training alleviated the secondary injury in distal lumbar spinal motor neurons, and enhanced BDNF/TrkB expression in the lumbar spinal cord. To discover the influence of skeletal muscle contractile activity on motor function and gene expression, we adopted botulinum toxin A (BTX-A) to block the neuromuscular activity of the rat gastrocnemius muscle. BTX-A treatment inhibited the effects of treadmill training on motor function and BDNF/TrKB expression. These results indicated that treadmill training through the skeletal muscle-motor nerve-spinal cord retrograde pathway regulated neuralplasticity in the mammalian central nervous system, which induced the expression of related neurotrophins and promoted motor function recovery. PMID:27190721

  3. The Outcomes of Manipulation or Mobilization Therapy Compared with Physical Therapy or Exercise for Neck Pain: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Josh; Kaplan, Leon; Fischer, Dena J.; Skelly, Andrea C.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Study Rationale Neck pain is a prevalent condition. Spinal manipulation and mobilization procedures are becoming an accepted treatment for neck pain. However, data on the effectiveness of these treatments have not been summarized. Objective To compare manipulation or mobilization of the cervical spine to physical therapy or exercise for symptom improvement in patients with neck pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed using PubMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse Database, and bibliographies of key articles, which compared spinal manipulation or mobilization therapy with physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. Articles were included based on predetermined criteria and were appraised using a predefined quality rating scheme. Results From 197 citations, 7 articles met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. There were no differences in pain improvement when comparing spinal manipulation to exercise, and there were inconsistent reports of pain improvement in subjects who underwent mobilization therapy versus physical therapy. No disability improvement was reported between treatment groups in studies of acute or chronic neck pain patients. No functional improvement was found with manipulation therapy compared with exercise treatment or mobilization therapy compared with physical therapy groups in patients with acute pain. In chronic neck pain subjects who underwent spinal manipulation therapy compared to exercise treatment, results for short-term functional improvement were inconsistent. Conclusion The data available suggest that there are minimal short- and long-term treatment differences in pain, disability, patient-rated treatment improvement, treatment satisfaction, health status, or functional improvement when comparing manipulation or mobilization therapy to physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. This systematic review is limited by the variability of

  4. The outcomes of manipulation or mobilization therapy compared with physical therapy or exercise for neck pain: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Josh; Kaplan, Leon; Fischer, Dena J; Skelly, Andrea C

    2013-04-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Study Rationale Neck pain is a prevalent condition. Spinal manipulation and mobilization procedures are becoming an accepted treatment for neck pain. However, data on the effectiveness of these treatments have not been summarized. Objective To compare manipulation or mobilization of the cervical spine to physical therapy or exercise for symptom improvement in patients with neck pain. Methods A systematic review of the literature was performed using PubMed, the National Guideline Clearinghouse Database, and bibliographies of key articles, which compared spinal manipulation or mobilization therapy with physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. Articles were included based on predetermined criteria and were appraised using a predefined quality rating scheme. Results From 197 citations, 7 articles met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. There were no differences in pain improvement when comparing spinal manipulation to exercise, and there were inconsistent reports of pain improvement in subjects who underwent mobilization therapy versus physical therapy. No disability improvement was reported between treatment groups in studies of acute or chronic neck pain patients. No functional improvement was found with manipulation therapy compared with exercise treatment or mobilization therapy compared with physical therapy groups in patients with acute pain. In chronic neck pain subjects who underwent spinal manipulation therapy compared to exercise treatment, results for short-term functional improvement were inconsistent. Conclusion The data available suggest that there are minimal short- and long-term treatment differences in pain, disability, patient-rated treatment improvement, treatment satisfaction, health status, or functional improvement when comparing manipulation or mobilization therapy to physical therapy or exercise in patients with neck pain. This systematic review is limited by the variability of

  5. Physical exercises in the treatment of idiopathic scoliosis at risk of brace treatment – SOSORT consensus paper 2005

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Hans-Rudolf; Negrini, Stefano; Hawes, Martha C; Rigo, Manuel; Kotwicki, Tomasz; Grivas, Theodoros B; Maruyama, Toru

    2006-01-01

    Background Based on a recognized need for research to examine the premise that nonsurgical approaches can be used effectively to treat signs and symptoms of scoliosis, a scientific society on scoliosis orthopaedic and rehabilitation treatment (SOSORT) was established in Barcelona in 2004. SOSORT has a primary goal of implementing multidisciplinary research to develop quantitative, objective data to address the role of conservative therapies in the treatment of scoliosis. This international working group of clinicians and scientists specializing in treatment of scoliosis met in Milan, Italy in January 2005. Methods As a baseline for developing a consensus for language and goals for proposed multicenter clinical studies, we developed questionnaires to examine current beliefs, before and after the meeting, regarding (1) the aims of physical exercises; (2) standards of treatment; and (3) the impact of such treatment performed by specialists in the field. Results The responses to the questionnaires show that, in principle, specialists in scoliosis physiotherapy do not disagree and that several features can be regarded, currently, as standard features in the rehabilitation of scoliosis patients. These features include autocorrection in 3D, training in ADL, stabilizing the corrected posture, and patient education. PMID:16759360

  6. Voluntary exercise and clomipramine treatment elevate prepro-galanin mRNA levels in the locus coeruleus in rats.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Philip V; Yoo, Ho Sang; Dishman, Rod K

    2006-11-06

    Exercise exerts antidepressant effects in humans and rodent models of affective disorders. These effects may be mediated by the upregulation of endogenous factors that exert antidepressant actions. The physiological functions and behavioral actions of the neuropeptide galanin (GAL) suggest antidepressant activity. Previous studies have shown that various modes of exercise elevate GAL gene expression in the locus coeruleus (LC) in rats. The present experiments examined the interaction between voluntary exercise and antidepressant pharmacotherapy. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were provided access to activity wheels (exercise condition) or inoperative wheels (sedentary condition) for 28 days. Rats in each group were injected with clomipramine (10mg/kg/day) or vehicle throughout this period (for 3 weeks). Prepro-GAL mRNA in the LC was measured by in situ hybridization histochemistry. Exercise and clomipramine treatment significantly elevated GAL gene expression, though prepro-GAL mRNA levels in rats receiving both interventions did not differ from sedentary controls that received vehicle. Prepro-GAL mRNA levels were significantly correlated with running distance. The results further implicate a role for GAL in the antidepressant effects of exercise and pharmacotherapy, though the mechanisms through which these treatments influence GAL gene expression appear to differ significantly.

  7. Effects of chronic exercise and treatment with the antipsychotic drug olanzapine on hippocampal volume in adult female rats.

    PubMed

    Barr, A M; Wu, C H; Wong, C; Hercher, C; Töpfer, E; Boyda, H N; Procyshyn, R M; Honer, W G; Beasley, C L

    2013-01-01

    Numerous studies have reported that the hippocampus in schizophrenia patients is reduced in volume compared to the normal population. Antipsychotic medications have had mixed benefits in maintaining hippocampal volume or reversing volume loss. Recent evidence indicates that routine aerobic exercise represents a promising intervention for reversing hippocampal loss and cognitive deficits. In the present study, we measured the effects of chronic treatment with olanzapine and daily exercise on the hippocampal volumes of rats. Adult female rats were treated during the week with either olanzapine (10mg/kg) or vehicle for 9 consecutive weeks. Subgroups of animals were provided access to exercise running wheels for 1 or 3h per day during the same period, or were sedentary. Metabolic indices, including glucose tolerance, were measured on a weekly basis. At the conclusion of the study, brains were perfused and hippocampal sections were Nissl stained. Total hippocampal volume was measured using the Cavalieri estimator. Treatment with olanzapine caused a significant decrease in hippocampal volume in sedentary rats. However, exercise was able to reverse most of this volume loss. The hippocampal sub-regions of the dentate gyrus and CA1 were most strongly affected by olanzapine and exercise. Of interest, there was a strong and highly significant negative correlation between glucose intolerance and hippocampal volume, whereby greater glucose intolerance was associated with a smaller hippocampal volume. These findings indicate that exercise may have beneficial effects on the hippocampus when antipsychotic medication can contribute to changes in volume.

  8. [Therapy progress of spinal cord compression by metastatic spinal tumor].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yao-sheng; He, Qi-zhen; Liu, Shu-bin; Jiang, Wei-gang; Lei, Ming-xing

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic epidural compression of the spinal cord is a significant source of morbidity in patients with systemic cancer. With improvment of oncotheray, survival period in the patients is improving and metastatic cord compression is en- countered increasingly often. Surgical management performed for early circumferential decompression for the spinal cord com- pression with spine instability, and spine reconstruction performed. Patients with radiosensitive tumours without spine instabili- ty, radiotherapy is an effective therapy. Spinal stereotactic radiosurgery and minimally invasive techniques, such as vertebro- plasty and kyphoplasty, percutaneous pedicle screw fixation, radiofrequency ablation are promising options for treatment of cer- tain selected patients with spinal metastases.

  9. Complications incidence in the treatment of early onset scoliosis with growing spinal implants.

    PubMed

    Greggi, T; Lolli, F; Di Silvestre, M; Martikos, K; Vommaro, F; Maredi, E; Giacomini, S; Baioni, A; Cioni, A

    2012-01-01

    Early onset scoliosis (EOS) surgery based on growing spinal implants can lead to several complications. Aim of the study was to identify strategies to prevent those complications. A retrospective review was conducted to identify all pediatric patients affected by EOS surgically treated with growing rod or Vertical Expandable Prosthetic Titanium Rib (VEPTR) at our division between 2006 and 2011. Nineteen consecutive patients (8 males, 11 females; mean age 6.8 years) were included. The scoliosis was: idiopathic in 7 cases, congenital in 5, associated with congenital heart disease in 2, with syringomyelia and Arnold Chiari syndrome in 1, with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) in 1, with Prader Willi syndrome in 1, with trisomy 8 in 1, with arthrogryposis in 1. Instrumentation used was: growing rod in 9 patients (dual rod construct in 8 cases, single rod in 1), VEPTR in 10 (always rib to spine construct). At a mean follow-up of 28 months (range, 12 to 55) 12 mechanical complications occurred in 8 of 19 patients treated (42.1%). Among cases treated with growing rod (9) 6 complications occurred in 4 patients (44.4%): revision was performed in 4 cases due to proximal anchors migration, in 2 cases due to a rod breakage. Among cases treated with VEPTR (10) 6 complications occurred in 4 patients (40%): revision was performed in 4 cases due to rib fracture with anchors migration, in 1 case due to vertebral anchor migration and in 1 case due to proximal and distal anchor migration. So, in our series mechanical complications rate was 42.1%. Our strategy to prevent these complications is to use hooks as proximal anchors, to avoid single rod construct and to use a brace as external support until final surgery is performed. If it's possible, is better to substitute VEPTR with a dual Growing Rod implant when patient's age and anatomy permits this.

  10. Effects of aquatic exercise and CES treatment on the changes of cognitive function, BDNF, IGF-1, and VEGF of persons with intellectual disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Lee, In Ho; Seo, Eun Jung; Lim, In Soo

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aquatic exercise and CES treatment on the cognitive function by using K-WAB and BDNF, IGF-1, and VEGF of persons with intellectual disabilities. [Methods] All subjects were 15 male with intellectual disabilities who were participating in the aquatic training program and CES treatment during 12 weeks at rehabilitation center. The subjects were divided into control group, exercise group, and exercise+CES group. Blood samples for BDNF, IGF-1, and VEGF were taken from brachial vein at rest between before and after treatment. [Results] The results are summarized as follows: Cognitive function level increased significantly in the exercise+CES group compared to those in the exercise and control group. The changes of blood IGF-1 concentration were no significant difference among groups. The changes of blood BDNF and VEGF concentration were significantly increased in exercise group and exercise+CES group than control group. However, blood BDNF and VEGF concentration were significantly difference between exercise group and exercise+CES group. [Conclusion] In conclusion, it can be concluded that CES treatment with exercise can amend cognitive function of persons with intellectual disabilities more effectively and increase of BDNF and VEGF by exercise can explain the cognitive function improvement of persons with intellectual disabilities. PMID:25566435

  11. Combining metformin and aerobic exercise training in the treatment of type 2 diabetes and NAFLD in OLETF rats

    PubMed Central

    Linden, Melissa A.; Fletcher, Justin A.; Morris, E. Matthew; Meers, Grace M.; Kearney, Monica L.; Crissey, Jacqueline M.; Laughlin, M. Harold; Booth, Frank W.; Sowers, James R.; Ibdah, Jamal A.; Thyfault, John P.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we sought to compare the efficacy of combining exercise and metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in hyperphagic, obese, type 2 diabetic Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats. OLETF rats (age: 20 wk, hyperglycemic and hyperinsulinemic; n = 10/group) were randomly assigned to sedentary (O-SED), SED plus metformin (O-SED + M; 300 mg·kg−1·day−1), moderate-intensity exercise training (O-EndEx; 20 m/min, 60 min/day, 5 days/wk treadmill running), or O-EndEx + M groups for 12 wk. Long-Evans Tokushima Otsuka (L-SED) rats served as nonhyperphagic controls. O-SED + M, O-EndEx, and O-EndEx + M were effective in the management of type 2 diabetes, and all three treatments lowered hepatic steatosis and serum markers of liver injury; however, O-EndEx lowered liver triglyceride content and fasting hyperglycemia more than O-SED + M. In addition, exercise elicited greater improvements compared with metformin alone on postchallenge glycemic control, liver diacylglycerol content, hepatic mitochondrial palmitate oxidation, citrate synthase, and β-HAD activities and in the attenuation of markers of hepatic fatty acid uptake and de novo fatty acid synthesis. Surprisingly, combining metformin and aerobic exercise training offered little added benefit to these outcomes, and in fact, metformin actually blunted exercise-induced increases in complete mitochondrial palmitate oxidation and β-HAD activity. In conclusion, aerobic exercise training was more effective than metformin administration in the management of type 2 diabetes and NAFLD outcomes in obese hyperphagic OLETF rats. Combining therapies offered little additional benefit beyond exercise alone, and findings suggest that metformin potentially impairs exercise-induced hepatic mitochondrial adaptations. PMID:24326426

  12. The role of stereotactic radiosurgery in the treatment of intramedullary spinal cord neoplasms: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Durán, Silvia; Hanft, Simon; Komotar, Ricardo J; Manzano, Glen R

    2016-04-01

    Advances in imaging technology and microsurgical techniques have made microsurgical resection the treatment of choice in cases of symptomatic intramedullary tumors. The use of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for spinal tumors is a recent development, and its application to intramedullary lesions is debated. We conducted a literature search through PubMed's MeSH system, compiling information regarding intramedullary neoplasms treated by SRS. We compiled histology, tumor location and size, treatment modality, radiation dose, fractionation, radiation-induced complications, follow-up, and survival. Ten papers reporting on 52 patients with 70 tumors were identified. Metastatic lesions accounted for 33%, while 67% were primary ones. Tumor location was predominantly cervical (53%), followed by thoracic (33%). Mean volume was 0.55 cm(3) (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.26-0.83). Preferred treatment modality was CyberKnife® (87%), followed by Novalis® (7%) and linear particle accelerator (LINAC) (6%). Mean radiation dose was 22.14 Gy (95% CI, 20.75-23.53), with mean fractionation of 4 (95% CI, 3-5). Three hemangioblastomas showed cyst enlargement. Symptom improvement or stabilization was seen in all but two cases. Radionecrotic spots adjacent to treated areas were seen at autopsy in four lesions, without clinical manifestations. Overall, clinical and radiological outcomes were favorable. Although surgery remains the treatment of choice for symptomatic intramedullary lesions, SRS can be a safe and effective option in selected cases. While this review suggests the overall safety and efficacy of SRS in the management of intramedullary tumors, future studies need randomized, homogeneous patient populations followed over a longer period to provide more robust evidence in its favor.

  13. Tolerability and efficacy of erythropoietin (EPO) treatment in traumatic spinal cord injury: a preliminary randomized comparative trial vs. methylprednisolone (MP).

    PubMed

    Costa, Davide Dalla; Beghi, Ettore; Carignano, Paola; Pagliacci, Cristina; Faccioli, Franco; Pupillo, Elisabetta; Messina, Paolo; Gorio, Alfredo; Redaelli, Tiziana

    2015-09-01

    The only available treatment of traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI) is high-dose methylprednisolone (MP) administered acutely after injury. However, as the efficacy of MP is controversial, we assessed the superiority of erythropoietin (EPO) versus MP in improving clinical outcome of acute TSCI. Patients aged 18 to 65 years after C5-T12 injury, and grade A or B of the ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS), admitted within 8 h, hemodynamically stable, were randomized to MP according to the NASCIS III protocol or EPO iv (500 UI/kg, repeated at 24 and 48 h). Patients were assessed by an investigator blind to treatment assignment at baseline and at day 3, 7, 14, 30, 60 and 90. Primary end point: number of responders (reduction of at least one AIS grade). Secondary end points: treatment safety and the effects of drugs on a number of disability measures. Frequentistic and post hoc Bayesian analyses were performed. Eight patients were randomized to MP and 11 to EPO. Three patients (27.3 %) on EPO and no patients on MP reached the primary end point (p = 0.17). No significant differences were found for the other disability measures. No adverse events or serious adverse events were reported in both groups. The Bayesian analysis detected a 91.8 % chance of achieving higher success rates on the primary end point with EPO in the intention-to-treat population with a 95 % chance the difference between EPO and MP falling in the range (-0.10, 0.51) and a median value of 0.2. The results of Bayesian analysis favored the experimental treatment.

  14. Does surgical treatment within 4 hours after trauma have an influence on neurological remission in patients with acute spinal cord injury?

    PubMed Central

    Biglari, Bahram; Child, Christopher; Yildirim, Timur Mert; Swing, Tyler; Reitzel, Tim; Moghaddam, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Background The proper timing for surgery in patients with acute spinal cord injury is controversial. This study was conducted to detect if there is an advantage in early (within the first 4 hours after trauma) compared to late (between 4 and 24 hours after trauma) surgery on neurological outcome. Methods In this single institution prospective cohort study, data were analyzed from 51 spinal cord injured patients with an average age of 43.4 (±19.2) years. The influence of early (29 patients within the first 4 hours) as opposed to late (22 patients between 4 and 24 hours) decompression was evaluated by comparing data for neurological outcome. Patients of the study collectively suffered acute spinal fractures from C2 to L3 (cervical 39.2%, thoracic 29.4%, and lumbal 21.6%) or nonosseous lesions (9.8%). American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS) grades were assessed at time of admission and 6 months after trauma or longer depending on the time of release. Surgical treatment included early stabilization and decompression within 24 hours. Results No significant difference between improved neurological function, measured with the AIS, and an early or late surgery time can be seen (P=0.402). Furthermore, binary logistic regression shows no significant difference between sex or age, and AIS improvement as possible confounders. Conclusion In our study, all patients with spinal cord injury were treated with spine stabilization and decompression within the first 24 hours after trauma. Surgical decompression within the first 4 hours after trauma was not associated with improved neurological outcome compared to treatment between 4 and 24 hours. In a clinical context, this indicates that there is a time frame of at least 1 day in which optimal care is possible. PMID:27621643

  15. Treatment of inoperable coronary disease and refractory angina: spinal stimulators, epidurals, gene therapy, transmyocardial laser, and counterpulsation.

    PubMed

    Svorkdal, Nelson

    2004-03-01

    Intractable angina from refractory coronary disease is a severe form of myocardial ischemia for which revascularization provides no prognostic benefit. Inoperable coronary disease is also accompanied by a "vicious cycle" of myocardial dystrophy from a chronic alteration of the cardiac sympathetic tone and sensitization of damaged cardiac tissues. Several adjunctive treatments have demonstrated efficacy when revascularization is either unsuccessful or contraindicated. Spinal cord stimulation modifies the neurologic input and output of the heart by delivering a very low dose of electrical current to the dorsal columns of the high thoracic spinal cord. Neural fibers then release CGRP and other endogenous peptides to the coronary circulation reducing myocardial oxygen demand and enhancing vasodilation of collaterals to improve the myocardial blood flow of the most diseased regions of the heart. Randomized study has shown the survival data at five years is comparable to bypass for high-risk patients. Transmyocardial laser revascularization creates small channels into ischemic myocardium in an effort to enhance flow though studies have shown no improvement in prognosis over medical therapy alone. Enhanced external counterpulsation uses noninvasive pneumatic compression of the legs to improve diastolic filling of the coronary vessels and promote development of collateral flow. The compressor regimen requires thirty-five hours of therapy over a seven-week treatment period. Therapeutic angiogenesis requires injection of cytokines to promote neovascularization and improve myocardial perfusion into the regions affected by chronic ischemia. Phase 3 trials are pending. High thoracic epidural blockade produces a rapid and potent sympatholysis, coronary vasodilation and reduced myocardial oxygen demand in refractory coronary disease. This technique can be used as an adjunct to bypass surgery or medical therapy in chronic or acute unstable angina. Epidurals are easy to perform and

  16. A Systematic Review on the Characteristics, Treatments and Outcomes of the Patients with Primary Spinal Glioblastomas or Gliosarcomas Reported in Literature until March 2015.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Stefanie; von Bueren, André O; Klautke, Gunther; Guckenberger, Matthias; Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Pietschmann, Sophie; Müller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the characteristics, treatments and outcomes of patients with primary spinal glioblastomas (GB) or gliosarcomas (GS) reported in literature until March 2015. PubMed and Web of Science were searched for peer-reviewed articles pertaining to cases of glioblastomas / gliosarcomas with primary spinal origin, using predefined search terms. Furthermore we performed hand searches tracking the references from the selected papers. Eighty-two articles published between 1938 and March 2015 were eligible. They reported on 157 patients. Median age at diagnosis was 22 years. The proportion of patients who received adjuvant chemo- or radiotherapy clearly increased from the time before 1980 until present. Median overall survival from diagnosis was 8.0 ± 0.9 months. On univariate analysis age influenced overall survival, whereas tumor location, gender and the extent of initial resection did not. Outcomes did not differ between children (< 18 years) and adults. However, the patients who were treated after 1980 achieved longer survival times than the patients treated before. On multivariable analysis only age (< 60 years) and the time period of treatment (≥ 1980) were confirmed as positive independent prognostic factors. In conclusion, primary spinal GB / GS mainly affect younger patients and are associated with a dismal prognosis. However, most likely due to the increasing use of adjuvant treatment, modest therapeutic progress has been achieved over recent decades. The characteristics and treatments of primary spinal glioblastomas should be entered into a central registry in order to gain more information about the ideal treatment approach in the future.

  17. Coexistence of osteopoikilosis with seronegative spondyloarthritis and spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Demir, Saliha Eroglu; Özaras, Nihal; Poyraz, Emine; Toprak, Hüseyin; Güler, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Osteopoikilosis is a rare hereditary bone disease that is usually asymptomatic. It is generally diagnosed incidentally on plain radiography. The coexistence of osteopoikilosis with seronegative spondyloarthritis or spinal stenosis is rarely reported. Here, we report the case of a 27-year-old male patient with osteopoikilosis, seronegative spondyloarthritis, and spinal stenosis. [Subject] A 27-year-old male patient with buttock pain and back pain radiating to the legs. [Methods] A plain anteroposterior radiograph of the pelvis revealed numerous round and oval sclerotic bone areas of varying size. Investigation of the knee joints showed similar findings, and the patient was diagnosed with osteopoikilosis. Lumbar magnetic resonance images showed spinal stenosis and degenerative changes in his lumbar facet joints. Magnetic resonance images of the sacroiliac joints showed bilateral involvement with narrowing of both sacroiliac joints, nodular multiple sclerotic foci, and contrast enhancement in both joint spaces and periarticular areas. HLA B-27 test was negative. [Results] The patient was diagnosed with osteopoikilosis, seronegative spondyloarthritis, and spinal stenosis. Treatment included asemetasin twice daily and exercise therapy. [Conclusion] Symptomatic patients with osteopoikilosis should be investigated for other possible coexisting medical conditions; this will shorten the times to diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26157277

  18. Three-dimensional aligned nanofibers-hydrogel scaffold for controlled non-viral drug/gene delivery to direct axon regeneration in spinal cord injury treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Lan Huong; Gao, Mingyong; Lin, Junquan; Wu, Wutian; Wang, Jun; Chew, Sing Yian

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) often lead to persistent neurological dysfunction due to failure in axon regeneration. Unfortunately, currently established treatments, such as direct drug administration, do not effectively treat SCI due to rapid drug clearance from our bodies. Here, we introduce a three-dimensional aligned nanofibers-hydrogel scaffold as a bio-functionalized platform to provide sustained non-viral delivery of proteins and nucleic acid therapeutics (small non-coding RNAs), along with synergistic contact guidance for nerve injury treatment. A hemi-incision model at cervical level 5 in the rat spinal cord was chosen to evaluate the efficacy of this scaffold design. Specifically, aligned axon regeneration was observed as early as one week post-injury. In addition, no excessive inflammatory response and scar tissue formation was triggered. Taken together, our results demonstrate the potential of our scaffold for neural tissue engineering applications. PMID:28169354

  19. Three-dimensional aligned nanofibers-hydrogel scaffold for controlled non-viral drug/gene delivery to direct axon regeneration in spinal cord injury treatment.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lan Huong; Gao, Mingyong; Lin, Junquan; Wu, Wutian; Wang, Jun; Chew, Sing Yian

    2017-02-07

    Spinal cord injuries (SCI) often lead to persistent neurological dysfunction due to failure in axon regeneration. Unfortunately, currently established treatments, such as direct drug administration, do not effectively treat SCI due to rapid drug clearance from our bodies. Here, we introduce a three-dimensional aligned nanofibers-hydrogel scaffold as a bio-functionalized platform to provide sustained non-viral delivery of proteins and nucleic acid therapeutics (small non-coding RNAs), along with synergistic contact guidance for nerve injury treatment. A hemi-incision model at cervical level 5 in the rat spinal cord was chosen to evaluate the efficacy of this scaffold design. Specifically, aligned axon regeneration was observed as early as one week post-injury. In addition, no excessive inflammatory response and scar tissue formation was triggered. Taken together, our results demonstrate the potential of our scaffold for neural tissue engineering applications.

  20. Modeling spinal cord biomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna, Carlos; Shah, Sameer; Cohen, Avis; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Regeneration after spinal cord injury is a serious health issue and there is no treatment for ailing patients. To understand regeneration of the spinal cord we used a system where regeneration occurs naturally, such as the lamprey. In this work, we analyzed the stress response of the spinal cord to tensile loading and obtained the mechanical properties of the cord both in vitro and in vivo. Physiological measurements showed that the spinal cord is pre-stressed to a strain of 10%, and during sinusoidal swimming, there is a local strain of 5% concentrated evenly at the mid-body and caudal sections. We found that the mechanical properties are homogeneous along the body and independent of the meninges. The mechanical behavior of the spinal cord can be characterized by a non-linear viscoelastic model, described by a modulus of 20 KPa for strains up to 15% and a modulus of 0.5 MPa for strains above 15%, in agreement with experimental data. However, this model does not offer a full understanding of the behavior of the spinal cord fibers. Using polymer physics we developed a model that relates the stress response as a function of the number of fibers.

  1. Canine spinal cord glioma.

    PubMed

    Rissi, Daniel R; Barber, Renee; Burnum, Annabelle; Miller, Andrew D

    2017-01-01

    Spinal cord glioma is uncommonly reported in dogs. We describe the clinicopathologic and diagnostic features of 7 cases of canine spinal cord glioma and briefly review the veterinary literature on this topic. The median age at presentation was 7.2 y. Six females and 1 male were affected and 4 dogs were brachycephalic. The clinical course lasted from 3 d to 12 wk, and clinical signs were progressive and associated with multiple suspected neuroanatomic locations in the spinal cord. Magnetic resonance imaging of 6 cases revealed T2-weighted hyperintense lesions with variable contrast enhancement in the spinal cord. All dogs had a presumptive clinical diagnosis of intraparenchymal neoplasia or myelitis based on history, advanced imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Euthanasia was elected in all cases because of poor outcome despite anti-inflammatory or immunosuppressive treatment or because of poor prognosis at the time of diagnosis. Tumor location during autopsy ranged from C1 to L6, with no clear predilection for a specific spinal cord segment. The diagnosis was based on histopathology and the immunohistochemistry expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein, oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2, 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase, neuron-specific enolase, synaptophysin, and Ki-67. Diagnoses consisted of 4 cases of oligodendroglioma, 2 cases of gliomatosis cerebri, and 1 astrocytoma. This case series further defines the clinicopathologic features of canine spinal glioma and highlights the need for comprehensive immunohistochemistry in addition to routine histopathology to confirm the diagnosis of these tumors.

  2. Cervical epidural hematoma after chiropractic spinal manipulation.

    PubMed

    Heiner, Jason D

    2009-10-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma is a rare but potentially devastating complication of spinal manipulation therapy. This is a case report of a healthy pregnant female who presented to the emergency department with a cervical epidural hematoma resulting from chiropractic spinal manipulation therapy that responded to conservative treatment rather than the more common route of surgical management.

  3. Evaluation of spinal cord injury animal models

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ning; Fang, Marong; Chen, Haohao; Gou, Fangming; Ding, Mingxing

    2014-01-01

    Because there is no curative treatment for spinal cord injury, establishing an ideal animal model is important to identify injury mechanisms and develop therapies for individuals suffering from spinal cord injuries. In this article, we systematically review and analyze various kinds of animal models of spinal cord injury and assess their advantages and disadvantages for further studies. PMID:25598784

  4. The effect of spinal cord-injury level on the outcome of neurogenic bladder treatment using OnabotulinumtoxinA

    PubMed Central

    Al Taweel, Waleed; Alzyoud, Khalil Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to report the effectiveness and safety OnabotulinumtoxinA (Botox, Allergan, Inc., Irvine, CA, USA) intradetrusor injections in spinal cord-injured (SCI) patients with refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity. And to assess the result based on SCI level. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the chart of 103 patients with neurogenic bladder secondary to SCI at the rehab center who received OnabotulinumtoxinA in our Neurourology Department for treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms between January 2007 and December 2013. All patients had a clinical examination, urinalysis, and an urodynamic study at baseline and 3 months after treatment as well as a visual analogue scale (VAS; range scale: 0–10) and a bladder diary checked for 3 days. 300 IU of OnabotulinumtoxinA, detrusor muscle injections were performed in 30 sites under cystoscopic guidance. Outcome measures included frequency of urge urinary incontinence collected by bladder diaries; changes in urodynamic parameters such as maximum cystometric bladder capacity, reflex volume, maximum detrusor pressure; side-effects; antimuscarinic drug consumption and quality of life (QOL) measured with VAS. Results: The study includes 32 female and 71 male with a mean patient age of 29 years (range: 18–56 year). The effect of Botox injection on bladder function was observed within 1–2 week after treatment. The urodynamic parameters were improved significantly after treatment compared with baseline values. There were significant reductions in the frequencies of incontinence episodes after treatment as seen in the voiding diary. A significant improvement in patient satisfaction was found after treatment which was expressed on the VAS assessment, with an improvement of the mean of 3 points. Patients with thoracic and lumbar injury have better result compare to cervical injury patients. The earliest recurrence of clinical symptoms was at 10 weeks. Overall, the mean duration of symptomatic improvement was 8

  5. A systematic review of electrical stimulation for pressure ulcer prevention and treatment in people with spinal cord injuries

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liang Qin; Moody, Julie; Traynor, Michael; Dyson, Sue; Gall, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Context Electrical stimulation (ES) can confer benefit to pressure ulcer (PU) prevention and treatment in spinal cord injuries (SCIs). However, clinical guidelines regarding the use of ES for PU management in SCI remain limited. Objectives To critically appraise and synthesize the research evidence on ES for PU prevention and treatment in SCI. Method Review was limited to peer-reviewed studies published in English from 1970 to July 2013. Studies included randomized controlled trials (RCTs), non-RCTs, prospective cohort studies, case series, case control, and case report studies. Target population included adults with SCI. Interventions of any type of ES were accepted. Any outcome measuring effectiveness of PU prevention and treatment was included. Methodological quality was evaluated using established instruments. Results Twenty-seven studies were included, 9 of 27 studies were RCTs. Six RCTs were therapeutic trials. ES enhanced PU healing in all 11 therapeutic studies. Two types of ES modalities were identified in therapeutic studies (surface electrodes, anal probe), four types of modalities in preventive studies (surface electrodes, ES shorts, sacral anterior nerve root implant, neuromuscular ES implant). Conclusion The methodological quality of the studies was poor, in particular for prevention studies. A significant effect of ES on enhancement of PU healing is shown in limited Grade I evidence. The great variability in ES parameters, stimulating locations, and outcome measure leads to an inability to advocate any one standard approach for PU therapy or prevention. Future research is suggested to improve the design of ES devices, standardize ES parameters, and conduct more rigorous trials. PMID:24969965

  6. The fascial system and exercise intolerance in patients with chronic heart failure: hypothesis of osteopathic treatment.

    PubMed

    Bordoni, Bruno; Marelli, F

    2015-01-01

    Chronic heart failure is a progressive, debilitating disease, resulting in a decline in the quality of life of the patient and incurring very high social economic costs. Chronic heart failure is defined as the inability of the heart to meet the demands of oxygen from the peripheral area. It is a multi-aspect complex disease which impacts negatively on all of the body systems. Presently, there are no texts in the modern literature that associate the symptoms of exercise intolerance of the patient with a dysfunction of the fascial system. In the first part of this article, we will discuss the significance of the disease, its causes, and epidemiology. The second part will explain the pathological adaptations of the myofascial system. The last section will outline a possible osteopathic treatment for patients with heart failure in order to encourage research and improve the general curative approach for the patient.

  7. Suicide gene therapy using reducible poly (oligo-D-arginine) for the treatment of spinal cord tumors.

    PubMed

    Won, Young-Wook; Kim, Kyung-Min; An, Sung Su; Lee, Minhyung; Ha, Yoon; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2011-12-01

    Suicide gene therapy based on a combination of herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) and ganciclovir (GCV) has obstacles to achieving a success in clinical use for the treatment of cancer due to inadequate thymidine kinase (TK) expression. The primary concern for improving anticancer efficacy of the suicide gene therapy is to develop an appropriate carrier that highly expresses TK in vivo. Despite great advances in the development of non-viral vectors, none has been used in cancer suicide gene therapy, not even in experimental challenge. Reducible poly (oligo-D-arginine) (rPOA), one of the effective non-viral carriers working in vivo, was chosen to deliver HSV-tk to spinal cord tumors which are appropriate targets for suicide gene therapy. Since the system exerts toxicity only in dividing cells, cells in the central nervous system, which are non-proliferative, are not sensitive to the toxic metabolites. In the present study, we demonstrated that the locomotor function of the model rat was maintained through the tumor suppression resulting from the tumor-selective suicide activity by co-administration of rPOA/HSV-tk and GCV. Thus, rPOA plays a crucial role in suicide gene therapy for cancer, and an rPOA/HSV-tk and GCV system could help promote in vivo trials of suicide gene therapy.

  8. Physical exercise as a preventive or disease-modifying treatment of dementia and brain aging.

    PubMed

    Ahlskog, J Eric; Geda, Yonas E; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Petersen, Ronald C

    2011-09-01

    A rapidly growing literature strongly suggests that exercise, specifically aerobic exercise, may attenuate cognitive impairment and reduce dementia risk. We used PubMed (keywords exercise and cognition) and manuscript bibliographies to examine the published evidence of a cognitive neuroprotective effect of exercise. Meta-analyses of prospective studies documented a significantly reduced risk of dementia associated with midlife exercise; similarly, midlife exercise significantly reduced later risks of mild cognitive impairment in several studies. Among patients with dementia or mild cognitive impairment, randomized controlled trials (RCTs) documented better cognitive scores after 6 to 12 months of exercise compared with sedentary controls. Meta-analyses of RCTs of aerobic exercise in healthy adults were also associated with significantly improved cognitive scores. One year of aerobic exercise in a large RCT of seniors was associated with significantly larger hippocampal volumes and better spatial memory; other RCTs in seniors documented attenuation of age-related gray matter volume loss with aerobic exercise. Cross-sectional studies similarly reported significantly larger hippocampal or gray matter volumes among physically fit seniors compared with unfit seniors. Brain cognitive networks studied with functional magnetic resonance imaging display improved connectivity after 6 to 12 months of exercise. Animal studies indicate that exercise facilitates neuroplasticity via a variety of biomechanisms, with improved learning outcomes. Induction of brain neurotrophic factors by exercise has been confirmed in multiple animal studies, with indirect evidence for this process in humans. Besides a brain neuroprotective effect, physical exercise may also attenuate cognitive decline via mitigation of cerebrovascular risk, including the contribution of small vessel disease to dementia. Exercise should not be overlooked as an important therapeutic strategy.

  9. Calprotectin levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis to assess and association with exercise treatment.

    PubMed

    Acar, Ayse; Guzel, Savas; Sarifakioglu, Banu; Guzel, Eda Celik; Guzelant, Aliye Yildirim; Karadag, Ceyda; Kiziler, Lebriz

    2016-11-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, inflammatory, and autoimmune disease that can cause permanent joint damage. In our study, we aim to analyze the change in calprotectin levels following the low-density exercise levels applied to the patients with RA. Twenty-eight patients with RA and 30 healthy controls were included in this study. To evaluate the activity of disease in RA, scores of disease activity that has increased (DAS-28) are figured. Calprotectin, nitric oxide (NO), white blood cell (WBC) count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and rheumatoid factor (RF) levels are tested as the laboratory evaluation. Calprotectin, NO, CRP, ESR, WBC, and RF levels were significantly higher in the patient group compared to the control group (p < 0.01, p < 0.001, p < 0.01, p < 0.01, p < 0.01, and p < 0.05, respectively). In correlation analysis applied to the patient group with RA, there has been determined a positive relation with calprotectin, and DAS-28, CRP, NO, RF, and WBC (p < 0.001, p < 0.05, p < 0.001, p < 0.05, and p < 0.05, respectively). In result of the low-density exercise treatment applied to patients with RA for 8 weeks, there has been determined a significant decrease in calprotectin, DAS-28, NO, CRP, ESR, and RF levels (p < 0.05, p < 0.001, p < 0.01, p < 0.05, p < 0.05, and p < 0.05, respectively). As a result, a significant relation is found between RA disease activity and calprotectin levels and other inflammatory parameters. At the same time, it shows that calprotectin which is a significant indicator of local inflammation can be used as a good identifier in following up exercise treatment.

  10. The effect of an extended source-to-skin distance in the treatment of the spinal field in children receiving craniospinal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Koshy, Mary; Paulino, Arnold C; Marcus, Robert B; Ting, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we compared a single extended source-to-skin difference (SSD) spinal field and the alternative 2-field gapped approach at 100 SSD on dose to surrounding normal tissues. Five female patients ranging in age from 3 to 20 years underwent computed tomography (CT) simulation for treatment planning of the craniospinal axis, which was treated in its entirety to 36 Gy. For each slice, the clinical target volume (thecal sac and contents), mandible, thyroid gland, esophagus, heart, lungs, liver, and ovaries were contoured. Technique A employed the use of a single posterior spinal field delivered at SSD = 140 cm (140 SSD), and Technique B employed the use of 2 gapped spinal fields using a traditional SSD of 100 cm (100 SSD). Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were obtained for each organ contoured and for each technique used. In all patients, the average mean dose to all surrounding structures was increased with the use of a single extended SSD (Technique A) when compared to the 2 spinal fields prescribed at 100 SSD (Technique B). The average mean doses to the mandible, thyroid gland, esophagus, and heart were 78%, 19%, 6%, and 16%, respectively, higher with Technique A as compared to Technique B. In addition, the average mean doses to the lungs, liver, and ovaries were 53%, 33% and 69%, respectively, higher as compared to Technique B. However, the clinical target volume at the spinal junction site received a less homogenous dose with Technique B as compared to Technique A. We conclude that although the use of a single-field extended SSD delivered a more homogenous dose to the spine, a higher dose to the ovaries, thyroid gland, mandible, lungs, liver, and heart was seen.

  11. The effect of an extended source-to-skin distance in the treatment of the spinal field in children receiving craniospinal irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Koshy, Mary; Paulino, Arnold C.; Marcus, Robert B.; Ting, Joseph

    2004-03-31

    In this study, we compared a single extended source-to-skin difference (SSD) spinal field and the alternative 2-field gapped approach at 100 SSD on dose to surrounding normal tissues. Five female patients ranging in age from 3 to 20 years underwent computed tomography (CT) simulation for treatment planning of the craniospinal axis, which was treated in its entirety to 36 Gy. For each slice, the clinical target volume (thecal sac and contents), mandible, thyroid gland, esophagus, heart, lungs, liver, and ovaries were contoured. Technique A employed the use of a single posterior spinal field delivered at SSD = 140 cm (140 SSD), and Technique B employed the use of 2 gapped spinal fields using a traditional SSD of 100 cm (100 SSD). Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were obtained for each organ contoured and for each technique used. In all patients, the average mean dose to all surrounding structures was increased with the use of a single extended SSD (Technique A) when compared to the 2 spinal fields prescribed at 100 SSD (Technique B). The average mean doses to the mandible, thyroid gland, esophagus, and heart were 78%, 19%, 6%, and 16%, respectively, higher with Technique A as compared to Technique B. In addition, the average mean doses to the lungs, liver, and ovaries were 53%, 33% and 69%, respectively, higher as compared to Technique B. However, the clinical target volume at the spinal junction site received a less homogenous dose with Technique B as compared to Technique A. We conclude that although the use of a single-field extended SSD delivered a more homogenous dose to the spine, a higher dose to the ovaries, thyroid gland, mandible, lungs, liver, and heart was seen.

  12. [The role of exercise in the treatment of type 1 diabetes].

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Ana Claudia R; Soares, Sabrina

    2008-03-01

    Although physical activity has been associated with cardiovascular mortality reduction in type-1 diabetes (DM1) patients, many points in the topic 'exercise' deserve a closer look. For example: contradictory data have been reported regarding the benefits of physical activity on metabolic control in these patients. Still contradictory is the type of exercise that brings more benefit in this group. Another issue is the best way of reducing insulin doses for exercise. This article intent to discuss these topics. The effect of exercise on metabolic control in DM1 is still contradictory. Some authors show a beneficial effect on glycated hemoglobin (A1c) and others do not. Another point to be analized is which type of exercise is better for these patients: aerobic or of resistance. There is a lack of information related to the effect of resistance exercises without the aerobic training on metabolic control in type-1 diabetes. The effect of exercise on lipid profile in DM1 is another issue. The intensity and duration of the exercises, the level of physical activity, the duration of the disease and the presence of cronic complications are some points that might be taken into consideration before starting an exercise program. Guidelines for the reduction in insulin dose or the use of carbohydrate are strategies to avoid hypoglycemia related to exercises. Hydration and self-monitored blood glucose levels are also very important topics. This article will also discuss the clinical evaluation before doing any exercise.

  13. [The treatment of vasospastic disease by chronic spinal cord stimulation. A case report].

    PubMed

    Barba, A; Escribano, J V; García-Alfageme, A

    1992-01-01

    In 1976, by first time, Cook used the chronic medullar stimulation (CMS) for the treatment of chronic arteriopathies at the limbs in patients with distal ischemic ulcerations. Up to now, some studies about this procedure have been published. Results, poor at first, have presented an important improvement with the time and the better choosing of patients. In 1981, Neglio used by first time CMS as a treatment of vasospastic disease, with excellent results. With this procedure, pain and vasospastic crisis disappeared and re-epithelialization of ischemic ulcerations is found. In this article, we presented a case interesting because it show the different possibilities of this method as a symptomatic treatment of such kind of disease. Patient, with a Raynaud syndrome secondary to an sclerodermia treated previously by medical and surgical procedures, was treated, in different times, with CMS because of digital ischemic ulcerations in both hands. Results were positives and ulcerations healed.

  14. Lumbar spinal stenosis.

    PubMed Central

    Ciricillo, S F; Weinstein, P R

    1993-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis, the results of congenital and degenerative constriction of the neural canal and foramina leading to lumbosacral nerve root or cauda equina compression, is a common cause of disability in middle-aged and elderly patients. Advanced neuroradiologic imaging techniques have improved our ability to localize the site of nerve root entrapment in patients presenting with neurogenic claudication or painful radiculopathy. Although conservative medical management may be successful initially, surgical decompression by wide laminectomy or an intralaminar approach should be done in patients with serious or progressive pain or neurologic dysfunction. Because the early diagnosis and treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis may prevent intractable pain and the permanent neurologic sequelae of chronic nerve root entrapment, all physicians should be aware of the different neurologic presentations and the treatment options for patients with spinal stenosis. Images PMID:8434469

  15. Overcoming limitations in previous research on exercise as a smoking cessation treatment: rationale and design of the "Quit for Health" trial.

    PubMed

    Williams, David M; Ussher, Michael; Dunsiger, Shira; Miranda, Robert; Gwaltney, Chad J; Monti, Peter M; Emerson, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic exercise has been proposed as a stand-alone or adjunct smoking cessation treatment, but findings have been mixed. Laboratory studies have shown that individual exercise sessions lead to decreases in withdrawal symptoms and cigarette cravings, but findings are limited by lack of follow-up and artificial settings. On the other hand, smoking cessation treatment RCTs have generally failed to show positive effects of exercise on smoking cessation, but have been plagued by poor and/or unverified compliance with exercise programs. This paper describes the rationale and design for Quit for Health (QFH)--an RCT designed to determine the efficacy of aerobic exercise as an adjunct smoking cessation treatment among women. To overcome limitations of previous research, compliance with the exercise (and wellness contact control) program is incentivized and directly observed, and ecological momentary assessment is used to examine change over time in withdrawal symptoms and cigarette cravings in participants' natural environments.

  16. Minimally Invasive 2D Navigation-Assisted Treatment of Thoracolumbar Spinal Fractures in East Africa: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Njoku, Innocent; Wanin, Othman; Assey, Anthony; Shabani, Hamisi; Ngerageza, Japhet G; Berlin, Connor D

    2016-01-01

    Spinal surgery under Eastern-African circumstances is technically demanding and associated with significant complications, such as blood loss, infection, and wound breakdown. We report a spinal trauma case that was performed using minimally invasive surgery (MIS) and navigation, and hypothesize that these newer techniques may enable surgeons to perform effective spinal surgery with minimal complications and good outcomes.  During the 2014 First Hands-on Neurotrauma Course held in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, we successfully performed three minimally invasive and two-dimensional (2D) navigated spinal surgeries to decompress and stabilize patients with complete and incomplete spinal injuries. In this report, we present a case of a paraplegic patient with a T12 burst fracture who tolerated MIS surgery with no intraoperative complications, and is doing well with no postoperative complications one year after surgery. Minimally invasive spinal surgery and 2D navigation may offer advantages in resource-poor countries. As part of the Weill Cornell Tanzania Neurosurgery project and in conjunction with the Foundation for International Education in Neurological Surgery (as well as other organizations), further experiences with 2D navigation and MIS surgery will be recorded in 2015. A neurotrauma registry has already been implemented to better understand the current management of neurotrauma in Eastern Africa. PMID:27026832

  17. Translating Empirically Supported Strategies into Accessible Interventions: The Potential Utility of Exercise for the Treatment of Panic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smits, Jasper A. J.; Powers, Mark B.; Berry, Angela C.; Otto, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    Many patients suffering from panic disorder do not receive adequate care. Advances in the conceptualization and treatment of panic disorder encourage innovative strategies for targeting core fears (fears of anxiety sensations) that underlie this disorder. In this article, we discuss the use of exercise as a potential strategy for therapeutic…

  18. Spinal Myoclonus After Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Calancie, Blair

    2006-01-01

    , or thigh; in 4 of these subjects, treatment of the pathology eliminated the involuntary movements. Conclusion: The timing, distribution, and reliance upon hip angle suggest that these movement patterns reflect some elements of a central pattern generator for stepping. Emergence of these movements in persons with chronic spinal cord injury is extremely rare and appears to depend upon a combination of the more rostrally placed injury and a pathologic process leading to a further enhancement of excitability in the caudal spinal cord. PMID:17044393

  19. Nelson's wound: treatment of spinal cord injury in 19th and early 20th century military conflicts.

    PubMed

    Hanigan, William C; Sloffer, Chris

    2004-01-15

    During the first half of the 19th century, warfare did not provide a background for a systematic analysis of spinal cord injury (SCI). Medical officers participating in the Peninsular and Crimean Wars emphasized the dismal prognosis of this injury, although authors of sketchy civil reports persuaded a few surgeons to operate on closed fractures. The American Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion was the first text to provide summary of results in 642 cases of gunshot wounds of the spine. The low incidence of this injury (0.26%) and the high mortality rate (55%) discouraged the use of surgery in these cases. Improvements in diagnoses and the introduction of x-ray studies in the latter half of the century enabled Sir G. H. Makins, during the Boer War, to recommend delayed intervention to remove bone or bullet fragments in incomplete injuries. The civil experiences of Elsberg and Frazier in the early 20th century promoted a meticulous approach to treatments, whereas efficient transport of injured soldiers during World War I increased the numbers of survivors. Open large wounds or cerebrospinal fluid leakage, signs of cord compression in recovering patients, delayed clinical deterioration, or intractable pain required surgical exploration. Wartime recommendations for urological and skin care prevented sepsis, and burgeoning pension systems provided specialized longterm rehabilitation. By the Armistice, the effective surgical treatment and postoperative care that had developed through decades of interaction between civil and military medicine helped reduce incidences of morbidity and dispel the hopelessness surrounding the combatant with an SCI.

  20. SU-E-T-197: Helical Cranial-Spinal Treatments with a Linear Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J; Bernard, D; Liao, Y; Templeton, A; Turian, J; Chu, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) of systemic disease requires a high level of beam intensity modulation to reduce dose to bone marrow and other critical structures. Current helical delivery machines can take 30 minutes or more of beam-on time to complete these treatments. This pilot study aims to test the feasibility of performing helical treatments with a conventional linear accelerator using longitudinal couch travel during multiple gantry revolutions. Methods: The VMAT optimization package of the Eclipse 10.0 treatment planning system was used to optimize pseudo-helical CSI plans of 5 clinical patient scans. Each gantry revolution was divided into three 120° arcs with each isocenter shifted longitudinally. Treatments requiring more than the maximum 10 arcs used multiple plans with each plan after the first being optimized including the dose of the others (Figure 1). The beam pitch was varied between 0.2 and 0.9 (couch speed 5- 20cm/revolution and field width of 22cm) and dose-volume histograms of critical organs were compared to tomotherapy plans. Results: Viable pseudo-helical plans were achieved using Eclipse. Decreasing the pitch from 0.9 to 0.2 lowered the maximum lens dose by 40%, the mean bone marrow dose by 2.1% and the maximum esophagus dose by 17.5%. (Figure 2). Linac-based helical plans showed dose results comparable to tomotherapy delivery for both target coverage and critical organ sparing, with the D50 of bone marrow and esophagus respectively 12% and 31% lower in the helical linear accelerator plan (Figure 3). Total mean beam-on time for the linear accelerator plan was 8.3 minutes, 54% faster than the tomotherapy average for the same plans. Conclusions: This pilot study has demonstrated the feasibility of planning pseudo-helical treatments for CSI targets using a conventional linac and dynamic couch movement, and supports the ongoing development of true helical optimization and delivery.

  1. N-Acetylcysteine treatment of dystrophic mdx mice results in protein thiol modifications and inhibition of exercise induced myofibre necrosis.

    PubMed

    Terrill, Jessica R; Radley-Crabb, Hannah G; Grounds, Miranda D; Arthur, Peter G

    2012-05-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated as a factor that increases necrosis of skeletal muscles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) and the dystrophic mdx mouse. Consequently, drugs that minimize oxidative stress are potential treatments for muscular dystrophy. This study examined the in vivo benefits to mdx mice of an antioxidant treatment with the cysteine precursor N-acetylcysteine (NAC), administered in drinking water. NAC was completely effective in preventing treadmill exercise-induced myofibre necrosis (assessed histologically) and the increased blood creatine kinase levels (a measure of sarcolemma leakiness) following exercise were significantly lower in the NAC treated mice. While NAC had no effect on malondialdehyde level or protein carbonylation (two indicators of irreversible oxidative damage), treatment with NAC for one week significantly decreased the oxidation of glutathione and protein thiols, and enhanced muscle protein thiol content. These data provide in vivo evidence for protective benefits of NAC treatment on dystropathology, potentially via protein thiol modifications.

  2. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone treatment improves locomotor activity, urinary function and neurofilament protein expression after spinal cord injury in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Vallejo, Denisse; Quintanar, J Luis

    2012-05-02

    It was reported that the hypothalamic decapeptide, gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) produces neurotrophic effects and that the spinal cord possesses GnRH receptors. The aim of the present study was to determine whether administration of GnRH improves locomotor activity, urinary function and neurofilament (NFs) protein expression after spinal cord injury (SCI) in ovariectomized rats. SCI was induced by balloon inflation model resulting in paraplegia. Locomotion was evaluated according to the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan Scale. Rats were subjected to bladder compression, twice daily until bladder reflex was established. NFs of 68, 160 and 200 kDa from spinal cords were analyzed by electrophoresis. GnRH (60 μg/kg) or physiologic NaCl solution was administered at 1 day after SCI and then daily for 15 days and the functional evaluation was realized for 5 weeks. Our results indicate that locomotor activity, restoration of urinary dysfunction and NFs expression of 160 and 200 kDa were improved in SCI animals given GnRH compared to those without treatment. These findings suggest that GnRH acts as a neurotrophic factor and may be used as a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of SCI.

  3. [Transdisciplinary Approach for Sarcopenia. Physical activity and exercise training for prevention and treatment of sarcopenia].

    PubMed

    Okura, Tomohiro

    2014-10-01

    The general outline of an exercise prescription for older adults with sarcopenia is aimed at improving their muscle strength and walking ability and increasing their muscle mass. Various types of resistance training (RT) can effectively increase muscle mass and strength even when the older individual's body weight is the only load and no special instruments such as expensive machines or heavy dumbbells are used. To effectively increase muscle mass and strength, individuals must perform at least one to two RT exercises on both the upper and lower extremities and the trunk two to three times per week for more than three months. Gait training is essential for improving walking ability. Although aerobic exercises typically contain gait training, they require an exercise intensity of greater than 60% of maximum oxygen uptake to effectively improve walking ability. In addition, we should remember that the effect of exercise training is maintained only by continuing the exercise program regularly over the long-term.

  4. Long-term voluntary exercise and the mouse hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis: impact of concurrent treatment with the antidepressant drug tianeptine.

    PubMed

    Droste, S K; Schweizer, M C; Ulbricht, S; Reul, J M H M

    2006-12-01

    We investigated whether voluntary exercise and concurrent antidepressant treatment (tianeptine; 20 mg/kg/day; 4 weeks) exert synergistic effects on the mouse hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. Animals had access to a running wheel, were treated with the antidepressant, or received both conditions combined. Control mice received no running wheel and no drug treatment. Exercise resulted in asymmetric changes in the adrenal glands. Whereas sedentary mice had larger left adrenals than right ones, this situation was abolished in exercising animals, mainly due to enlargement of the right adrenal cortex. However, antidepressant treatment alone was ineffective whereas the combination of antidepressant treatment and exercise resulted in an enlargement of both adrenal cortices. In these respective conditions, the levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA expression in the left and right adrenal medullas varied greatly in parallel to the changes observed in the adrenal cortex sizes. TH mRNA expression in the locus coeruleus of exercising mice was significantly increased irrespective of concomitant tianeptine treatment. Corticotrophin-releasing factor mRNA levels in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus were decreased after voluntary exercise but were unaffected by tianeptine. Exercise, particularly in combination with tianeptine treatment, resulted in decreased early morning baseline plasma levels of corticosterone. If animals were exposed to novelty (i.e. a mild psychological stressor), a decreased response in plasma corticosterone levels was observed in the exercising mice. By contrast, after restraint, a mixed physical and psychological stressor, exercising mice showed an enhanced response in plasma corticosterone compared to the controls; a response which was even further boosted in exercising mice concomitantly treated with tianeptine. Under either condition, plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone levels were not different between groups. Thus, voluntary

  5. Quality of life after different surgical procedures for the treatment of spinal metastases: results of a single-center prospective case series.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Godard C W; Nogarede, Claudine O; Wolfs, Jasper F C; Arts, Mark P

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The performance of surgery for spinal metastases is rapidly increasing. Different surgical procedures, ranging from stabilization alone to stabilization combined with corpectomy, are thereby performed for various indications. Little is known about the impact of these different procedures on patient quality of life (QOL), but this factor is crucial when discussing the various therapeutic options with patients and their families. Thus, the authors of this study investigated the effect of various surgical procedures for spinal metastases on patient QOL. METHODS The authors prospectively followed a cohort of 113 patients with spinal metastases who were referred to their clinic for surgical evaluation between July 2012 and July 2014. Quality of life was assessed using the EQ-5D at intake and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after treatment. RESULTS Nineteen patients were treated conservatively, 41 underwent decompressive surgery with or without stabilization, 47 underwent a piecemeal corpectomy procedure with stabilization and expandable cage reconstruction, and 6 had a stabilization procedure without decompression. Among all surgical patients, the mean EQ-5D score was significantly increased from 0.44 pretreatment to 0.59 at 3 months after treatment (p < 0.001). Mean EQ-5D scores at 1 year after surgery further increased to 0.84 following decompression with stabilization, 0.74 after corpectomy with stabilization, and 0.94 after stabilization without decompression. Frankel scores also improved after surgery. There were no significant differences in improvements in EQ-5D scores and Frankel grades among the different surgical procedures. In addition, mortality and complication rates were similar. CONCLUSIONS Quality of life can improve significantly after various extensive and less extensive surgical procedures in patients with spinal metastases. The relatively invasive corpectomy procedure, as compared with alternative less invasive techniques, does not negatively

  6. Spinal Fusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... concept of fusion is similar to that of welding in industry. Spinal fusion surgery, however, does not ... bone taken from the patient has a long history of use and results in predictable healing. Autograft ...

  7. Spinal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Livingstone; 2014:chap 49. Read More Brain tumor - children Hodgkin lymphoma Metastasis Spinal cord trauma Review Date 8/15/2016 Updated by: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida Cancer Specialists & Research Institute, Wellington, FL. Review ...

  8. Spinal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... spinal infection include fever, chills, headache, neck stiffness, pain, wound redness and tenderness, and wound drainage. In some cases, patients may notice new weakness, numbness or tingling sensations in the arms and/or legs. The symptoms ...

  9. Effect of Exercise Training on Striatal Dopamine D2/D3 Receptors in Methamphetamine Users during Behavioral Treatment.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Chelsea L; Ishibashi, Kenji; Chudzynski, Joy; Mooney, Larissa J; Rawson, Richard A; Dolezal, Brett A; Cooper, Christopher B; Brown, Amira K; Mandelkern, Mark A; London, Edythe D

    2016-05-01

    Methamphetamine use disorder is associated with striatal dopaminergic deficits that have been linked to poor treatment outcomes, identifying these deficits as an important therapeutic target. Exercise attenuates methamphetamine-induced neurochemical damage in the rat brain, and a preliminary observation suggests that exercise increases striatal D2/D3 receptor availability (measured as nondisplaceable binding potential (BPND)) in patients with Parkinson's disease. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether adding an exercise training program to an inpatient behavioral intervention for methamphetamine use disorder reverses deficits in striatal D2/D3 receptors. Participants were adult men and women who met DSM-IV criteria for methamphetamine dependence and were enrolled in a residential facility, where they maintained abstinence from illicit drugs of abuse and received behavioral therapy for their addiction. They were randomized to a group that received 1 h supervised exercise training (n=10) or one that received equal-time health education training (n=9), 3 days/week for 8 weeks. They came to an academic research center for positron emission tomography (PET) using [(18)F]fallypride to determine the effects of the 8-week interventions on striatal D2/D3 receptor BPND. At baseline, striatal D2/D3 BPND did not differ between groups. However, after 8 weeks, participants in the exercise group displayed a significant increase in striatal D2/D3 BPND, whereas those in the education group did not. There were no changes in D2/D3 BPND in extrastriatal regions in either group. These findings suggest that structured exercise training can ameliorate striatal D2/D3 receptor deficits in methamphetamine users, and warrants further evaluation as an adjunctive treatment for stimulant dependence.

  10. A Trial-Based Economic Evaluation Comparing Spinal Cord Stimulation With Best Medical Treatment in Painful Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Slangen, Rachel; Faber, Catharina G; Schaper, Nicolaas C; Joosten, Elbert A; van Dongen, Robert T; Kessels, Alfons G; van Kleef, Maarten; Dirksen, Carmen D

    2017-04-01

    The objective was to perform an economic evaluation comparing spinal cord stimulation (SCS) in combination with best medical treatment (BMT) with BMT in painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients. Alongside a prospective 2-center randomized controlled trial, involving 36 painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy patients with severe lower limb pain not responding to conventional therapy, an economic evaluation was performed. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were based on: 1) societal costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), and 2) direct health care costs and the number of successfully treated patients, respectively, both with a time horizon of 12 months. Bootstrap and secondary analyses were performed to address uncertainty. Total societal cost amounted to €26,539.18 versus €5,313.45 per patient in the SCS and BMT group, respectively. QALYs were .58 versus .36 and the number of successfully treated patients was 55% versus 7% for the SCS and BMT group, respectively. This resulted in incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of €94,159.56 per QALY and €34,518.85 per successfully treated patient, respectively. Bootstrap analyses showed that the probability of SCS being cost-effective ranges from 0 to 46% with willingness to pay threshold values ranging between €20,000 and €80,000 for a QALY. Secondary analyses showed that cost-effectiveness of SCS became more favorable after correcting for baseline cost imbalance between the 2 groups, extending the depreciation period of SCS material to 4 years, and extrapolation of the data up to 4 years. Although SCS was considerably more effective compared with BMT, the substantial initial investment that is required resulted in SCS not being cost-effective in the short term. Cost-effectiveness results were sensitive to baseline cost imbalances between the groups and the depreciation period of the SCS material.

  11. Changes in spinal alignment.

    PubMed

    Veintemillas Aráiz, M T; Beltrán Salazar, V P; Rivera Valladares, L; Marín Aznar, A; Melloni Ribas, P; Valls Pascual, R

    2016-04-01

    Spinal misalignments are a common reason for consultation at primary care centers and specialized departments. Misalignment has diverse causes and is influenced by multiple factors: in adolescence, the most frequent misalignment is scoliosis, which is idiopathic in 80% of cases and normally asymptomatic. In adults, the most common cause is degenerative. It is important to know the natural history and to detect factors that might predict progression. The correct diagnosis of spinal deformities requires specific imaging studies. The degree of deformity determines the type of treatment. The aim is to prevent progression of the deformity and to recover the flexibility and balance of the body.

  12. Incidence and Treatment Patterns in Hospitalizations for Malignant Spinal Cord Compression in the United States, 1998-2006

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, Kimberley S.; Lee, Leslie K.; Mak, Raymond H.; Wang, Shuang; Pile-Spellman, John; Abrahm, Janet L.; Prigerson, Holly G.; Balboni, Tracy A.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: To characterize patterns in incidence, management, and costs of malignant spinal cord compression (MSCC) hospitalizations in the United States, using population-based data. Methods and Materials: Using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, an all-payer healthcare database representative of all U.S. hospitalizations, MSCC-related hospitalizations were identified for the period 1998-2006. Cases were combined with age-adjusted Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results cancer death data to estimate annual incidence. Linear regression characterized trends in patient, treatment, and hospital characteristics, costs, and outcomes. Logistic regression was used to examine inpatient treatment (radiotherapy [RT], surgery, or neither) by hospital characteristics and year, adjusting for confounding. Results: We identified 15,367 MSCC-related cases, representing 75,876 hospitalizations. Lung cancer (24.9%), prostate cancer (16.2%), and multiple myeloma (11.1%) were the most prevalent underlying cancer diagnoses. The annual incidence of MSCC hospitalization among patients dying of cancer was 3.4%; multiple myeloma (15.0%), Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphomas (13.9%), and prostate cancer (5.5%) exhibited the highest cancer-specific incidence. Over the study period, inpatient RT for MSCC decreased (odds ratio [OR] 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.61-0.81), whereas surgery increased (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.17-1.84). Hospitalization costs for MSCC increased (5.3% per year, p < 0.001). Odds of inpatient RT were greater at teaching hospitals (OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.19-1.67), whereas odds of surgery were greater at urban institutions (OR 1.82, 95% CI 1.29-2.58). Conclusions: In the United States, patients dying of cancer have an estimated 3.4% annual incidence of MSCC requiring hospitalization. Inpatient management of MSCC varied over time and by hospital characteristics, with hospitalization costs increasing. Future studies are required to determine the impact of treatment patterns on MSCC

  13. Traumatic lumbar artery rupture after lumbar spinal fracture dislocation causing hypovolemic shock: An endovascular treatment.

    PubMed

    Eun, Jong-Pil; Oh, Young-Min

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we observed a case of lumbar artery injury after trauma, which was treated by endovascular embolization. A 67-year-old woman who was injured in a traffic accident was brought to the emergency room. She was conscious and her hemodynamic condition was stable, but she had paraplegia below L1 dermatome. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan of abdomen and pelvis revealed fracture dislocation of L3/4 along with retroperitoneal hematomas. However, there was no evidence of traumatic injury in both thoracic and abdominal cavity. At that time, her blood pressure suddenly decreased to 60/40 mmHg and her mental status deteriorated. Also, her hemoglobin level was 5.4 g/dl. While her hemodynamic condition stabilized with massive fluid resuscitation including blood transfusion, an angiography was immediately performed to look for and embolize site of retroperitoneal hemorrhage. On the angiographic images, there was an active extravasation from ruptured left 3rd lumbar artery, and we performed complete embolization with GELFOAM and coil. Lumbar artery injury after trauma is rare and endovascular treatment is useful in case of hemodynamic instability.

  14. Medicolegal cases for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    French, Keisha L; Daniels, Eldra W; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2013-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess are rare surgical emergencies resulting in significant neurologic deficits. Making the diagnosis for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess can be challenging; however, a delay in recognition and treatment can be devastating. The objective of this retrospective analysis study was to identify risk factors for an adverse outcome for the provider. The LexisNexis Academic legal search database was used to identify a total of 19 cases of spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess filed against medical providers. Outcome data on trial verdicts, age, sex, initial site of injury, time to consultation, time to appropriate imaging studies, time to surgery, and whether a rectal examination was performed or not were recorded. The results demonstrated a significant association between time to surgery more than 48 hours and an unfavorable verdict for the provider. The degree of permanent neurologic impairment did not appear to affect the verdicts. Fifty-eight percent of the cases did not present with an initial deficit, including loss of bowel or bladder control. All medical professionals must maintain a high level of suspicion and act quickly. Physicians who are able to identify early clinical features, appropriately image, and treat within a 48 hour time frame have demonstrated a more favorable medicolegal outcome compared with their counterparts in filed lawsuits for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess cases.

  15. Spinal fusion - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... vertebrae are the bones that make up the spinal column, which surrounds and protects the spinal cord. The ... cushions between vertebrae, and absorb energy while the spinal column flexes, extends, and twists. Nerves from the spinal ...

  16. Spinal Cord Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Spinal cord tumor Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A spinal tumor is a growth that develops within your ... as vertebral tumors. Tumors that begin within the spinal cord itself are called spinal cord tumors. There are ...

  17. Metabolic Consequences of Dieting and Exercise in the Treatment of Obesity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donahoe, Clyde P.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Investigated the effects of dieting and exercise on resting metabolic rate (RMR) in overweight women (N=10). Results showed that dieting lowered RMR by nearly double that expected on the basis of resulting weight loss; and that exercise caused RMR to rise to a level appropriate to prevailing body weight. (LLL)

  18. Exercise: An Alternative Approach to the Treatment of AD/HD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putnam, Steve; Copans, Stuart A.

    1998-01-01

    Suggests that the increase of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (AD/HD) cases in America and Canada may be due in part to decreased levels of children's physical activity. Research has shown that exercise helps to lessen the symptoms of AD/HD. Claims that the use of regular exercise programs in school and at home is beneficial for AD/HD…

  19. Biomechanical analysis of forces sustained by iliac screws in spinal instrumentation for deformity treatment: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Perrault, Frederique D; Aubin, Carl-Eric; Wang, Xiaoyu; Schwend, Richard M

    2012-01-01

    Iliac screws used in long instrumentation for deformity treatment are subject to large forces, which may sometimes lead to fixation failures (intra- and postoperatively). The objective of this study was to analyze the biomechanics of iliac screw fixations. The study was based on a patient-specific simulation of a neuromuscular scoliosis case with a long instrumentation to the pelvis. A multi body flexible model was created using a preoperative 3D reconstructed spine and pelvis. The side bending radiographs were used to personalize the mechanical properties. The instrumentation construct was modeled as rigid bodies and flexible beams connected by kinematic joints. Three instrumentation parameters were studied: the connector length, the inter rod connectors and the use of sacral screws. The simulations showed that the forces and torques at the iliac screws were lowered by 9% and 25% respectively by reducing the lateral connector length (from 20 to 10 mm). An inter rod connector did not significantly reduce the iliac screw loads. Sacral screws reduced the functional loads on the iliac screws, but hardware related problems may be shifted onto the sacral screws. Sacral screws in conjunction with inter rod connectors reduced the loads at iliac screws without overloading the sacral screws. The preliminary results showed that the forces at the iliac screws could be lowered through different instrumentation parameters. In the next step of the study, the model validation will be further completed and used to evaluate other instrumentation factors by means of an experimental design framework. The knowledge of loading biomechanics at the iliac screw fixation is important for finding solutions to reduce the risk of failure, such as improving preoperative planning, instrumentation techniques and iliac screw construct design.

  20. eIF5A1/RhoGDIα pathway: a novel therapeutic target for treatment of spinal cord injury identified by a proteomics approach

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Shang, Fei-Fei; Xu, Yang; Belegu, Visar; Xia, Lei; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Ran; Wang, Wei; Liu, Jin; Li, Chen-Yun; Wang, Ting-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is frequently accompanied by a degree of spontaneous functional recovery. The underlying mechanisms through which such recovery is generated remain elusive. In this study, we observed a significant spontaneous motor function recovery 14 to 28 days after spinal cord transection (SCT) in rats. Using a comparative proteomics approach, caudal to the injury, we detected difference in 20 proteins. Two of these proteins, are eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A1 (eIF5A1) that is involved in cell survival and proliferation, and Rho GDP dissociation inhibitor alpha (RhoGDIα), a member of Rho GDI family that is involved in cytoskeletal reorganization. After confirming the changes in expression levels of these two proteins following SCT, we showed that in vivo eIF5A1 up-regulation and down-regulation significantly increased and decreased, respectively, motor function recovery. In vitro, eIF5A1 overexpression in primary neurons increased cell survival and elongated neurite length while eIF5A1 knockdown reversed these results. We found that RhoGDIα up-regulation and down-regulation rescues the effect of eIF5A1 down-regulation and up-regulation both in vivo and in vitro. Therefore, we have identified eIF5A1/RhoGDIα pathway as a new therapeutic target for treatment of spinal cord injured patients. PMID:26593060

  1. The proposed use of cervical spinal cord stimulation for the treatment and prevention of cognitive decline in dementias and neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Tomycz, Nestor D

    2016-11-01

    Cervical spinal cord stimulation is a well-established treatment for intractable neuropathic upper extremity pain. More than 20years ago it was demonstrated that cervical spinal cord stimulation could engender an increase in cerebral blood flow. Cerebral blood flow has been shown to be decreased in many patients with dementia and in various neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Furthermore, there is evidence that reduced cerebral blood flow worsens neurodegenerative disease and may also predict which patients progress from mild cognitive impairment to full blown Alzheimer's disease. Thus, the identification of decreased cerebral blood flow in patients with early cognitive problems may offer clinicians a window of opportunity to intervene and prevent further brain damage. Further evidence that supports augmenting cerebral blood flow as an effective strategy for preventing and treating cognitive brain dysfunction comes from experimental studies with omental transposition. The author proposes cervical spinal cord stimulation as a titratable, programmable extracranial neuromodulation technique to increase cerebral blood flow for the purposes of improving cognitive function and preventing cognitive deterioration in patients with dementias and neurodegenerative disorders.

  2. Spinal epidural abscess treated with antibiotics alone.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ashish; Singh, Poonam; Gehlot, Prateek; Dhaneria, Mamta

    2013-04-30

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare clinical condition among children. Most patients do not present with classical signs. A 13-year-old boy without any predisposing factors presented with paraparesis, bladder and bowel involvement. MRI spine demonstrated an SEA at the C7 and D1 levels on both sides of the midline with cord oedema at the C2-3 to C6 level with minimal marrow oedema in the C6 vertebral body. We treated the patient with antibiotics (ceftriaxone and vancomycin) alone. The patient showed excellent response with only minimal residual gait disturbance at the end of 6 weeks of antibiotic therapy. This is the first paediatric report of complete recovery of a patient at clinical stage 4 following antibiotic treatment alone from India. However, caution should be exercised to closely monitor the patient's recovery as any progression in the neurological state warrants surgery.

  3. Thoracic Aortic Injury: Embolization of the Tenth Intercostal Artery and Endovascular Treatment in a Young Woman after Posterior Spinal Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Lagios, Konstantinos; Karaolanis, Georgios; Perdikides, Theodossios; Bazinas, Theodoros; Kouris, Nikolaos; Sfikas, Spiros; Paxinos, Odysseas

    2015-01-01

    Iatrogenic aortic injuries are rare and well-recognized complications of a variety of procedures, including spinal surgery. The placement of pedicle screws is sometimes associated with devastating consequences. Aortic perforation with rapid hematoma formation and delayed aortic trauma leading to pseudoaneurysm formation have been described in the literature. A case describing a significant time interval between iatrogenic aortic injury and diagnosis in the absence of pseudoaneurysm formation is described in this paper and, according to our knowledge, is unique in the literature. The aortic injury was successfully treated, selecting the appropriate graft and, as a consequence, normal spinal cord blood flow was achieved.

  4. The Felix-trial. Double-blind randomization of interspinous implant or bony decompression for treatment of spinal stenosis related intermittent neurogenic claudication

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Decompressive laminotomy is the standard surgical procedure in the treatment of patients with canal stenosis related intermittent neurogenic claudication. New techniques, such as interspinous process implants, claim a shorter hospital stay, less post-operative pain and equal long-term functional outcome. A comparative (cost-) effectiveness study has not been performed yet. This protocol describes the design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) on (cost-) effectiveness of the use of interspinous process implants versus conventional decompression surgery in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis. Methods/Design Patients (age 40-85) presenting with intermittent neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis lasting more than 3 months refractory to conservative treatment, are included. Randomization into interspinous implant surgery versus bony decompression surgery will take place in the operating room after induction of anesthesia. The primary outcome measure is the functional assessment of the patient measured by the Zurich Claudication Questionnaire (ZCQ), at 8 weeks and 1 year after surgery. Other outcome parameters include perceived recovery, leg and back pain, incidence of re-operations, complications, quality of life, medical consumption, absenteeism and costs. The study is a randomized multi-institutional trial, in which two surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurses are kept blinded of the allocated treatment during the follow-up period of 1 year. Discussion Currently decompressive laminotomy is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of lumbar spinal stenosis. Whether surgery with interspinous implants is a reasonable alternative can be determined by this trial. Trial register Dutch Trial register number: NTR1307 PMID:20507568

  5. Management of Chronic Spinal Cord Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Abrams, Gary M.; Ganguly, Karunesh

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of Review: Both acute and chronic spinal cord disorders present multisystem management problems to the clinician. This article highlights key issues associated with chronic spinal cord dysfunction. Recent Findings: Advances in symptomatic management for chronic spinal cord dysfunction include use of botulinum toxin to manage detrusor hyperreflexia, pregabalin for management of neuropathic pain, and intensive locomotor training for improved walking ability in incomplete spinal cord injuries. Summary: The care of spinal cord dysfunction has advanced significantly over the past 2 decades. Management and treatment of neurologic and non-neurologic complications of chronic myelopathies ensure that each patient will be able to maximize their functional independence and quality of life. PMID:25651225

  6. Neuroprotective Effect of Non-viral Gene Therapy Treatment Based on Tetanus Toxin C-fragment in a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Oliván, Sara; Calvo, Ana C; Rando, Amaya; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Manzano, Raquel; Zaragoza, Pilar; Tizzano, Eduardo F; Aquilera, Jose; Osta, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC), which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons "in vitro" and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3, and p62) and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild-type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln), TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease.

  7. Neuroprotective Effect of Non-viral Gene Therapy Treatment Based on Tetanus Toxin C-fragment in a Severe Mouse Model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Oliván, Sara; Calvo, Ana C.; Rando, Amaya; Herrando-Grabulosa, Mireia; Manzano, Raquel; Zaragoza, Pilar; Tizzano, Eduardo F.; Aquilera, Jose; Osta, Rosario

    2016-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN) protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC), which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons “in vitro” and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3, and p62) and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild-type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln), TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease. PMID:27605908

  8. Transplantation of Nogo-66 receptor gene-silenced cells in a poly(D,L-lactic-co-glycolic acid) scaffold for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong; Fan, Yuhong; Zhang, Jianjun

    2013-03-15

    Inhibition of neurite growth, which is in large part mediated by the Nogo-66 receptor, affects neural regeneration following bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation. The tissue engineering scaffold poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) has good histocompatibility and can promote the growth of regenerating nerve fibers. The present study used small interfering RNA to silence Nogo-66 receptor gene expression in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and Schwann cells, which were subsequently transplanted with poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) into the spinal cord lesion regions in rats. Simultaneously, rats treated with scaffold only were taken as the control group. Hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemistry revealed that at 4 weeks after transplantation, rats had good motor function of the hind limb after treatment with Nogo-66 receptor gene-silenced cells plus the poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) scaffold compared with rats treated with scaffold only, and the number of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and neuron-like cells was also increased. At 8 weeks after transplantation, horseradish peroxidase tracing and transmission electron microscopy showed a large number of unmyelinated and myelinated nerve fibers, as well as intact regenerating axonal myelin sheath following spinal cord hemisection injury. These experimental findings indicate that transplantation of Nogo-66 receptor gene-silenced bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and Schwann cells plus a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolic acid) scaffold can significantly enhance axonal regeneration of spinal cord neurons and improve motor function of the extremities in rats following spinal cord injury.

  9. Diabetic foot and exercise therapy: step by step the role of rigid posture and biomechanics treatment.

    PubMed

    Francia, Piergiorgio; Gulisano, Massimo; Anichini, Roberto; Seghieri, Giuseppe

    2014-03-01

    Lower extremity ulcers represent a serious and costly complication of diabetes mellitus. Many factors contribute to the development of diabetic foot. Peripheral neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are the main causes of foot ulceration and contribute in turn to the growth of additional risk factors such as limited joint mobility, muscular alterations and foot deformities. Moreover, a deficit of balance, posture and biomechanics can be present, in particular in patients at high risk for ulceration. The result of this process may be the development of a vicious cycle which leads to abnormal distribution of the foot's plantar pressures in static and dynamic postural conditions. This review shows that some of these risk factors significantly improve after a few weeks of exercise therapy (ET) intervention. Accordingly it has been suggested that ET can be an important weapon in the prevention of foot ulcer. The aim of ET can relate to one or more alterations typically found in diabetic patients, although greater attention should be paid to the evaluation and possible correction of body balance, rigid posture and biomechanics. Some of the most important limitations of ET are difficult access to therapy, patient compliance and the transitoriness of the results if the training stops. Many proposals have been made to overcome such limitations. In particular, it is important that specialized centers offer the opportunity to participate in ET and during the treatment the team should work to change the patient's lifestyle by improving the execution of appropriate daily physical activity.

  10. Endovascular treatment of chronic cerebro spinal venous insufficiency in patients with multiple sclerosis modifies circulating markers of endothelial dysfunction and coagulation activation: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Napolitano, Mariasanta; Bruno, Aldo; Mastrangelo, Diego; De Vizia, Marcella; Bernardo, Benedetto; Rosa, Buonagura; De Lucia, Domenico

    2014-10-01

    We performed a monocentric observational prospective study to evaluate coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction parameters in patients with multiple sclerosis undergoing endovascular treatment for cerebro-spinal-venous insufficiency. Between February 2011 and July 2012, 144 endovascular procedures in 110 patients with multiple sclerosis and chronical cerebro-spinal venous insufficiency were performed and they were prospectively analyzed. Each patient was included in the study according to previously published criteria, assessed by the investigators before enrollment. Endothelial dysfunction and coagulation activation parameters were determined before the procedure and during follow-up at 1, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15 and 18 months after treatment, respectively. After the endovascular procedure, patients were treated with standard therapies, with the addition of mesoglycan. Fifty-five percent of patients experienced a favorable outcome of multiple sclerosis within 1 month after treatment, 25% regressed in the following 3 months, 24.9% did not experience any benefit. In only 0.1% patients, acute recurrence was observed and it was treated with high-dose immunosuppressive therapy. No major complications were observed. Coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction parameters were shown to be reduced at 1 month and stable up to 12-month follow-up, and they were furthermore associated with a good clinical outcome. Endovascular procedures performed by a qualified staff are well tolerated; they can be associated with other currently adopted treatments. Correlations between inflammation, coagulation activation and neurodegenerative disorders are here supported by the observed variations in plasma levels of markers of coagulation activation and endothelial dysfunction.

  11. What Are the Key Statistics about Brain and Spinal Cord Cancers?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Adults What Are the Key Statistics About Brain and Spinal Cord Tumors? The American Cancer Society’s ... Spinal Cord Tumor Research and Treatment? More In Brain And Spinal Cord Tumors In Adults About Brain ...

  12. The surgical management of spinal deformity in children with a Fontan circulation: The development of an algorithm for treatment.

    PubMed

    Evans, S; Ramasamy, A; Marks, D S; Spilsbury, J; Miller, P; Tatman, A; Gardner, A C

    2014-01-01

    The management of spinal deformity in children with univentricular cardiac pathology poses significant challenges to the surgical and anaesthetic teams. To date, only posterior instrumented fusion techniques have been used in these children and these are associated with a high rate of complications. We reviewed our experience of both growing rod instrumentation and posterior instrumented fusion in children with a univentricular circulation. Six children underwent spinal corrective surgery, two with cavopulmonary shunts and four following completion of a Fontan procedure. Three underwent growing rod instrumentation, two had a posterior fusion and one had spinal growth arrest. There were no complications following surgery, and the children undergoing growing rod instrumentation were successfully lengthened. We noted a trend for greater blood loss and haemodynamic instability in those whose surgery was undertaken following completion of a Fontan procedure. At a median follow-up of 87.6 months (interquartile range (IQR) 62.9 to 96.5) the median correction of deformity was 24.2% (64.5° (IQR 46° to 80°) vs 50.5° (IQR 36° to 63°)). We believe that early surgical intervention with growing rod instrumentation systems allows staged correction of the spinal deformity and reduces the haemodynamic insult to these physiologically compromised children. Due to the haemodynamic changes that occur with the completed Fontan circulation, the initial scoliosis surgery should ideally be undertaken when in the cavopulmonary shunt stage.

  13. Exercise adherence in the elderly: Experience with abdominal aortic aneurysm simple treatment and prevention.

    PubMed

    McElrath, Mary; Myers, Jonathan; Chan, Khin; Fonda, Holly

    2017-03-01

    Poor adherence to health-related behaviors can have serious health consequences. Cardiac rehabilitation has been documented to have physiological and psychosocial benefits; however, optimizing adherence to exercise in patients with cardiovascular disease is a particular challenge. We recently completed a large, 6-year randomized trial of exercise training in elderly patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) disease (50-85 years), which provided an opportunity to describe adherence strategies in this unique group of elderly individuals. Patients were randomized to exercise therapy or usual care. Using a case-management approach, a combination of center and home-based training was used during which patients trained for up to 3 years. We observed that overall, 84% of subjects in the exercise group completed ≥1 year in the study, achieving a mean energy expenditure of 1,999 ± 1,030 kcals per week. Subjects in the exercise group were more likely to drop out of the study as compared with usual care, though none of the reasons for dropping out were associated with exercise participation (eg, exercise-related injury). Reasons for withdrawal included orthopedic problems, lost physician coverage, time constraints, and AAA repair. Although the groups were matched for AAA size at baseline, there was a trend for more AAA repairs among usual care subjects versus those in the exercise group (12 [17.6%] vs 5 [6.9%], P = 0.09). The case-managed approach to optimizing adherence used was reasonably successful in achieving a training response (ie, improvement in exercise capacity) in elderly patients with AAA, a group for whom little is previously known regarding the effects of rehabilitation.

  14. Accommodating planned exercise in type I diabetic patients on intensive treatment.

    PubMed

    Schiffrin, A; Parikh, S

    1985-01-01

    To achieve optimal metabolic control in type I diabetic patients treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) and multiple subcutaneous injections of insulin (MSI) appropriate adjustments of the insulin prescription should be made for exercise, which is a normal component of everyday life. The present study describes the responses of seven type I diabetic adolescents treated with CSII and six patients treated with MSI to specific insulin dose changes in anticipation of postprandial exercise. The effect of 45 min of cycle ergometer exercise at 55% VO2 on glucose regulation was studied 2 h after morning insulin and a breakfast meal. To quantify the potential benefit of modifying the insulin dose before exercise, the subjects were studied on five different days in a random order: resting control day, postprandial exercise preceded by the usual dose of insulin, postprandial exercise preceded by one-half of the usual dose of insulin, postprandial exercise preceded by two-thirds of the usual dose of insulin, and postprandial exercise without the usual dose of insulin. In all cases insulin was injected or infused subcutaneously in the anterior abdominal wall. When exercise was performed without changing the usual insulin dose, there was a significant fall in glycemia in both groups, with the nadir occurring after 45 min. In the CSII group, the +/- SEM plasma glucose was 57 +/- 5 mg/dl (P less than 0.05 versus rest) with hypoglycemia occurring in four patients. In the MSI group, the mean +/- SEM plasma glucose fell to 65 +/- 10 mg/dl (P less than 0.05 versus rest) and hypoglycemia occurred in three patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)