Science.gov

Sample records for spine disease focusing

  1. Degenerative disease of the spine.

    PubMed

    Gallucci, Massimo; Limbucci, Nicola; Paonessa, Amalia; Splendiani, Alessandra

    2007-02-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine is a definition that includes a wide spectrum of degenerative abnormalities. Degeneration involves bony structures and the intervertebral disk, although many aspects of spine degeneration are strictly linked because the main common pathogenic factor is identified in chronic overload. During life the spine undergoes continuous changes as a response to physiologic axial load. These age-related changes are similar to pathologic degenerative changes and are a common asymptomatic finding in adults and elderly persons. A mild degree of degenerative changes is paraphysiologic and should be considered pathologic only if abnormalities determine symptoms. Imaging allows complete evaluation of static and dynamic factors related to degenerative disease of the spine and is useful in diagnosing the different aspects of spine degeneration.

  2. Baastrup's disease in the pediatric spine

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Suryapratap

    2016-01-01

    Baastrup's disease is an uncommon entity in the elderly spine and it is very rare in the pediatric age group. There are only few case reports in the literature containing Baastrup's disease in pediatric spine. Baastrup's disease is also known as kissing spine because the posterior spinous processes touch or “kiss” one another, characterized by enlarged posterior spinous projections with normal neuroforamina and normal spinal disk height. There are various pathological and etiological hypotheses behind Baastrup's disease. Backache is one of the most common causes of morbidity in these patients and but sometimes patient can be asymptomatic with or without swelling on the back. Here, we present a case of 10-year-old female child with silent swelling on low back region diagnose as Baastrup's disease.

  3. Baastrup's disease in the pediatric spine

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Suryapratap

    2016-01-01

    Baastrup's disease is an uncommon entity in the elderly spine and it is very rare in the pediatric age group. There are only few case reports in the literature containing Baastrup's disease in pediatric spine. Baastrup's disease is also known as kissing spine because the posterior spinous processes touch or “kiss” one another, characterized by enlarged posterior spinous projections with normal neuroforamina and normal spinal disk height. There are various pathological and etiological hypotheses behind Baastrup's disease. Backache is one of the most common causes of morbidity in these patients and but sometimes patient can be asymptomatic with or without swelling on the back. Here, we present a case of 10-year-old female child with silent swelling on low back region diagnose as Baastrup's disease. PMID:27695557

  4. Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery for Degenerative Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    SUGAWARA, Taku

    Anterior cervical spine surgery is an established surgical intervention for cervical degenerative disease and high success rate with excellent long-term outcomes have been reported. However, indications of surgical procedures for certain conditions are still controversial and severe complications to cause neurological dysfunction or deaths may occur. This review is focused mainly on five widely performed procedures by anterior approach for cervical degenerative disease; anterior cervical discectomy, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, anterior cervical foraminotomy, and arthroplasty. Indications, procedures, outcomes, and complications of these surgeries are discussed. PMID:26119899

  5. Rheumatic diseases of the spine: imaging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Narváez, J A; Hernández-Gañán, J; Isern, J; Sánchez-Fernández, J J

    2016-04-01

    Spinal involvement is common both in the spondyloarthritides and in rheumatoid arthritis, in which the cervical segment is selectively affected. Rheumatoid involvement of the cervical spine has characteristic radiologic manifestations, fundamentally different patterns of atlantoaxial instability. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for evaluating the possible repercussions of atlantoaxial instability on the spinal cord and/or nerve roots in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as for evaluating parameters indicative of active inflammation, such as bone edema and synovitis. Axial involvement is characteristic in the spondyloarthritides and has distinctive manifestations on plain-film X-rays, which reflect destructive and reparative phenomena. The use of MRI has changed the conception of spondyloarthritis because it is able to directly detect the inflammatory changes that form part of the disease, making it possible to establish the diagnosis early in the disease process, when plain-film X-ray findings are normal (non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis), to assess the prognosis of the disease, and to contribute to treatment planning.

  6. Surgical treatment in spine Paget's disease: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Jorge-Mora, Alberto; Amhaz-Escanlar, Samer; Lois-Iglesias, Ana; Leborans-Eiris, Susana; Pino-Minguez, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is a disease characterized by a disorder in the bone metabolism. The spine is the second region affected after the pelvis. Surgical treatment is reserved for cases refractory to medical treatment. We performed a systematic review of patients with Paget disease of bone affecting the spine, treated surgically in the last 30 years. The main objective of the review is to find out indications for surgery, outcomes of these patients and also the standard perioperative management.

  7. Accountable disease management of spine pain.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew J

    2011-09-01

    The health care landscape has changed with new legislation addressing the unsustainable rise in costs in the US system. Low-value service lines caring for expensive chronic conditions have been targeted for reform; for better or worse, the treatment of spine pain has been recognized as a representative example. Examining the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and existing pilot studies can offer a preview of how chronic care of spine pain will be sustained. Accountable care in an organization capable of collecting, analyzing, and reporting clinical data and operational compliance is forthcoming. Interdisciplinary spine pain centers integrating surgical and medical management, behavioral medicine, physical reconditioning, and societal reintegration represent the model of high-value care for patients with chronic spine pain.

  8. Vertebroplasty in the Treatment of Spine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosanio, G.; Lavanga, A.; Vassallo, P.; Izzo, R.; Diano, A.A.; Muto, M.

    2005-01-01

    Summary We report our experience in the treatment of thoracic and lumbosacral spinal pain due to vertebral bone fractures. This pathology can be related to osteoporosis but also to metastatic disease and less frequently vertebral haemangioma. From April 2001 through December 2004 we treated 238 patients for a total of 455 vertebral bodies. 175 patients had osteoporosis, 70 had metastasis and 13 had vertebral haemangioma. Sacroplasty was performed in six patients to obtain a cement filling of sacral metastasis. The procedures were mostly performed under fluoroscopy and only in cases of metastasis or sacroplasty was CT/fluoroscopy guidance preferred for optimal filling of the area of osteolysis. We evaluated the results at six and 18 months follow-up and analysed the incidence of new vertebral fractures, vascular and disk leakage and the incidence of major and minor complications. Biopsy was performed only in doubtful cases. We obtained different results considering the etiology of the disease. We obtained a 92% success rate at six months follow-up and 89% success at 18 months follow-up in osteoporosis, a 77% and 72% success rate at six and 18 months follow-up in metastastic patients, and no change at six and 18 months follow-up in patients with vertebral haemangioma in which the success rate was of 95%. We noted extravertebral leakage in 41% of vertebral bodies of which 31 % were treated at the level of the vascular space and only 10% at the level of the disk space, and symptomatic in only two cases (acute compressive radiculitis, medically treated and resolved within a month). Six patients presented new fractures in the adjacent vertebral body and 30% had a partial recovery in the height of the vertebral body with kyphosis curve reduction. Vertebroplasty is a good technique to obtain spine pain relief and has a low incidence of side effects. Good quality equipment is important to obtain these results. PMID:20584443

  9. Destructive discovertebral degenerative disease of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Charran, A K; Tony, G; Lalam, R; Tyrrell, P N M; Tins, B; Singh, J; Eisenstein, S M; Balain, B; Trivedi, J M; Cassar-Pullicino, V N

    2012-09-01

    The uncommon variant of degenerative hip joint disease, termed rapidly progressive osteoarthritis, and highlighted by severe joint space loss and osteochondral disintegration, is well established. We present a similar unusual subset in the lumbar spine termed destructive discovertebral degenerative disease (DDDD) with radiological features of vertebral malalignment, severe disc resorption, and "bone sand" formation secondary to vertebral fragmentation. Co-existing metabolic bone disease is likely to promote the development of DDDD of the lumbar spine, which presents with back pain and sciatica due to nerve root compression by the "bone sand" in the epidural space. MRI and CT play a complimentary role in making the diagnosis.

  10. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Isolated to the Thoracic Epidural Spine.

    PubMed

    Kozak, Benjamin; Talbott, Jason; Uzelac, Alina; Rehani, Bhavya

    2015-11-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare benign histiocytic disease that infrequently presents in the spine. We report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease isolated to the epidural thoracic spine in a 26-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the 15th reported case of isolated spinal disease and only the fourth case of isolated thoracic epidural disease. Given its rarity as well as non-specific symptoms and imaging findings, Rosai-Dorfman disease is often not considered and misdiagnosed on imaging studies. To help improve awareness of Rosai-Dorfman spinal disease, we review the literature and discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment considerations for this condition. PMID:27252790

  11. Pathogenesis and treatment of spine disease in the mucopolysaccharidoses.

    PubMed

    Peck, Sun H; Casal, Margret L; Malhotra, Neil R; Ficicioglu, Can; Smith, Lachlan J

    2016-08-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are a family of lysosomal storage disorders characterized by deficient activity of enzymes that degrade glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Skeletal disease is common in MPS patients, with the severity varying both within and between subtypes. Within the spectrum of skeletal disease, spinal manifestations are particularly prevalent. Developmental and degenerative abnormalities affecting the substructures of the spine can result in compression of the spinal cord and associated neural elements. Resulting neurological complications, including pain and paralysis, significantly reduce patient quality of life and life expectancy. Systemic therapies for MPS, such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and enzyme replacement therapy, have shown limited efficacy for improving spinal manifestations in patients and animal models. Therefore, there is a pressing need for new therapeutic approaches that specifically target this debilitating aspect of the disease. In this review, we examine how pathological abnormalities affecting the key substructures of the spine - the discs, vertebrae, odontoid process and dura - contribute to the progression of spinal deformity and symptomatic compression of neural elements. Specifically, we review current understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of spine disease in MPS, how the tissues of the spine respond to current clinical and experimental treatments, and discuss future strategies for improving the efficacy of these treatments. PMID:27296532

  12. The 100 most cited articles in metastatic spine disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathan; Alan, Nima; Zhou, James; Kojo Hamilton, D

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Despite the growing neurosurgical literature, a subset of pioneering studies have significantly impacted the field of metastatic spine disease. The purpose of this study was to identify and analyze the 100 most frequently cited articles in the field. METHODS A keyword search using the Thomson Reuters Web of Science was conducted to identify articles relevant to the field of metastatic spine disease. The results were filtered based on title and abstract analysis to identify the 100 most cited articles. Statistical analysis was used to characterize journal frequency, past and current citations, citation distribution over time, and author frequency. RESULTS The total number of citations for the final 100 articles ranged from 74 to 1169. Articles selected for the final list were published between 1940 and 2009. The years in which the greatest numbers of top-100 studies were published were 1990 and 2005, and the greatest number of citations occurred in 2012. The majority of articles were published in the journals Spine (15), Cancer (11), and the Journal of Neurosurgery (9). Forty-four individuals were listed as authors on 2 articles, 9 were listed as authors on 3 articles, and 2 were listed as authors on 4 articles in the top 100 list. The most cited article was the work by Batson (1169 citations) that was published in 1940 and described the role of the vertebral veins in the spread of metastases. The second most cited article was Patchell's 2005 study (594 citations) discussing decompressive resection of spinal cord metastases. The third most cited article was the 1978 study by Gilbert that evaluated treatment of epidural spinal cord compression due to metastatic tumor (560 citations). CONCLUSIONS The field of metastatic spine disease has witnessed numerous milestones and so it is increasingly important to recognize studies that have influenced the field. In this bibliographic study the authors identified and analyzed the most influential articles in the

  13. The use of spine stereotactic radiosurgery for oligometastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jennifer C; Tang, Chad; Deegan, Brian J; Allen, Pamela K; Jonasch, Eric; Amini, Behrang; Wang, Xin A; Li, Jing; Tatsui, Claudio E; Rhines, Laurence D; Brown, Paul D; Ghia, Amol J

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors investigated the outcomes following spine stereotactic radiosurgery (SSRS) for patients with oligometastatic disease of the spine. METHODS The study was a secondary analysis of 38 of 209 patients enrolled in 2 separate institutional Phase I/II prospective protocols and treated with SSRS between 2002 and 2011. Of these 38 patients, 33 (87%) were treated for a solitary spine metastasis, with no other history of metastatic disease. SSRS was prescribed to 24 Gy in 1 fraction (8%), 18 Gy in 1 fraction (18%), 16 Gy in 1 fraction (11%), 27 Gy in 3 fractions (53%), 30 Gy in 5 fractions (8%), or 20 Gy in 5 fractions (3%). Seventeen patients (45%) received prior conventional external beam radiation therapy. RESULTS The median overall survival (OS) was 75.7 months, and the 2- and 5-year OS rates were 84% and 60%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, patients who had prior spine surgery and a better Karnofsky Performance Scale score had an improved OS (HR 0.16, 95% CI 0.05-0.52, p < 0.01, and HR 0.33, 95% CI 0.13%-0.84%, p = 0.02, respectively), and those who had undergone prior radiation therapy had a worse OS (HR 3.6, 95% CI 1.2%-10%, p = 0.02). The 1-, 2-, and 5-year local progression-free survival rates were 85%, 82%, and 78%, respectively. The median time to systemic therapy modification was 41 months. Two patients (5%) experienced late Grade 3-4 toxicity. CONCLUSIONS Patients with oligometastatic disease of the spine treated with SSRS can experience long-term survival and a long time before needing a modification in systemic therapy. In addition, SSRS leads to excellent local control and minimal late toxicity. PMID:27035507

  14. Evidence-based medicine in metastatic spine disease.

    PubMed

    Dea, Nicolas; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-06-01

    Treatment modalities for metastatic spine disease have significantly expanded over the last two decades. This expansion occurred in many different fields. Improvement in surgical techniques and instrumentation now allow the oncologic spine surgeons to effectively circumferentially decompress the neural elements without compromising stability. Percutaneous techniques, both vertebral augmentation and pre-operative endovascular embolization procedures, also greatly benefit patients suffering from spinal column metastasis. Imaging technology advances has contributed to better pre-operative planning and the development of highly conformational radiation techniques, thus permitting the delivery of high-dose radiation to tumors, while avoiding radiotoxicity to the spinal cord and other vital structures. These new developments, combined with evidence-based stability and disease-specific quality of life scores now allow not only better treatment, but also a solid foundation for high-quality research. Spine oncology literature currently suffers from a lack of high-quality evidence due to low prevalence of the disease and complex methodological issues. However, when following evidence-based medicine principles, which incorporate best available evidence, clinical expertise and patient preference, sound, evidence-based recommendations can be made regarding the abovementioned treatment modalities.

  15. Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, F M; Arana, E

    2016-04-01

    In the last 25 years, scientific research has brought about drastic changes in the concept of low back pain and its management. Most imaging findings, including degenerative changes, reflect anatomic peculiarities or the normal aging process and turn out to be clinically irrelevant; imaging tests have proven useful only when systemic disease is suspected or when surgery is indicated for persistent spinal cord or nerve root compression. The radiologic report should indicate the key points of nerve compression, bypassing inconsequential findings. Many treatments have proven inefficacious, and some have proven counterproductive, but they continue to be prescribed because patients want them and there are financial incentives for doing them. Following the guidelines that have proven effective for clinical management improves clinical outcomes, reduces iatrogenic complications, and decreases unjustified and wasteful healthcare expenditures. PMID:26872873

  16. Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, F M; Arana, E

    2016-04-01

    In the last 25 years, scientific research has brought about drastic changes in the concept of low back pain and its management. Most imaging findings, including degenerative changes, reflect anatomic peculiarities or the normal aging process and turn out to be clinically irrelevant; imaging tests have proven useful only when systemic disease is suspected or when surgery is indicated for persistent spinal cord or nerve root compression. The radiologic report should indicate the key points of nerve compression, bypassing inconsequential findings. Many treatments have proven inefficacious, and some have proven counterproductive, but they continue to be prescribed because patients want them and there are financial incentives for doing them. Following the guidelines that have proven effective for clinical management improves clinical outcomes, reduces iatrogenic complications, and decreases unjustified and wasteful healthcare expenditures.

  17. Visuo-proprioceptive interactions in degenerative cervical spine diseases requiring surgery.

    PubMed

    Freppel, S; Bisdorff, A; Colnat-Coulbois, S; Ceyte, H; Cian, C; Gauchard, G; Auque, J; Perrin, P

    2013-01-01

    Cervical proprioception plays a key role in postural control, but its specific contribution is controversial. Postural impairment was shown in whiplash injuries without demonstrating the sole involvement of the cervical spine. The consequences of degenerative cervical spine diseases are underreported in posture-related scientific literature in spite of their high prevalence. No report has focused on the two different mechanisms underlying cervicobrachial pain: herniated discs and spondylosis. This study aimed to evaluate postural control of two groups of patients with degenerative cervical spine diseases with or without optokinetic stimulation before and after surgical treatment. Seventeen patients with radiculopathy were recruited and divided into two groups according to the spondylotic or discal origin of the nerve compression. All patients and a control population of 31 healthy individuals underwent a static posturographic test with 12 recordings; the first four recordings with the head in 0° position: eyes closed, eyes open without optokinetic stimulation, with clockwise and counter clockwise optokinetic stimulations. These four sensorial situations were repeated with the head rotated 30° to the left and to the right. Patients repeated these 12 recordings 6weeks postoperatively. None of the patients reported vertigo or balance disorders before or after surgery. Prior to surgery, in the eyes closed condition, the herniated disc group was more stable than the spondylosis group. After surgery, the contribution of visual input to postural control in a dynamic visual environment was reduced in both cervical spine diseases whereas in a stable visual environment visual contribution was reduced only in the spondylosis group. The relative importance of visual and proprioceptive inputs to postural control varies according to the type of pathology and surgery tends to reduce visual contribution mostly in the spondylosis group.

  18. Degenerative spine disease : pathologic findings in 985 surgical specimens.

    PubMed

    Pytel, Peter; Wollmann, Robert L; Fessler, Richard G; Krausz, Thomas N; Montag, Anthony G

    2006-02-01

    A number of pathologic changes have been reported in spinal surgery specimens. The frequency of many of these is not well defined. We retrospectively reviewed the histologic features of 985 extradural spinal surgery specimens. Of the cases, 1.6% were identified clinically as synovial cysts. In addition, synovial tissue was seen in another 5.3% of cases, often embedded within disk material. Neovascularization of disk tissue was present in 8.1% of cases, chondrocyte clusters in 18.3%, and calcium pyrophosphate crystals in 2.8%, predominantly within disk material. With the exception of crystal deposits, all of these changes were significantly more common in the lumbar spine. A better understanding of cell-based degenerative changes will become essential with increasing research into cell-based therapies for spinal disk disease. We report data on the frequency of different pathologic changes and describe synovial metaplasia as a reactive change not previously reported.

  19. Relative Contribution of Upper and Lower Lumbar Spinal Segments to Flexion/Extension: Comparison between Normal Spines and Spines with Disc Disease in Asian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Malhar N.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose To evaluate the contribution of upper and lower lumbar segments to flexion and extension of the lumbar spine in normal and diseased spines. Overview of Literature The specific contributions of upper and lower lumbar segments during flexion/extension have rarely been reported. Furthermore, no comparisons between the flexion/extension behaviors of normal and diseased spines have been reported until now. Methods Flexion and extension lateral radiographs of 52 adult, asymptomatic volunteers, and 67 adult patients with lumbar spine disc disease were measured using software for total lumbar lordosis, upper lumbar lordosis and lower lumbar lordosis and the intervertebral angles of all segments. Results In asymptomatic volunteers, the range of movement between flexion and extension was a mean of only 4.2° in the lower lumbar spine and a mean of 19.4° in the upper lumbar spine. In patients with disc degeneration, the range of movement between flexion and extension was an average 6.5° for lower lumbar spine and 15.6° for the upper lumbar spine. Conclusions The results showed that upper lumbar spine contributes more to the range of motion in flexion and extension than the lower lumbar spine in asymptomatic individuals without lumbar disc disease, as well as in patients with disc degeneration. PMID:26435797

  20. [Algorithm of the diagnostics of trauma and degenerative diseases of the spine].

    PubMed

    Shchedrenok, V V; Sebelev, K I; Anikeev, N V; Tiul'kin, O N; Kaurova, T A; Moguchaia, O V

    2011-01-01

    Clinico-radial data were compared in 583 patients with trauma and degenerative diseases of the spine. The clinico-diagnostic complex included radiography of the spine (round-up and functional), magnetic resonance imaging, computerized helical tomography of the spine with spondylometric measurements. Indices of the measurements of the cross-section area of the vertebral artery canal at the level of C3-C6 vertebrae and the volume of the intervertebral canal at different levels in health among men and women are presented. An algorithm of radiation diagnostics in pathology of the spine is proposed.

  1. Adjacent level disease following lumbar spine surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Instrumented lumbar spine surgery is associated with an increased risk of adjacent segment disease (ASD). Multiple studies have explored the various risk factors contributing to ASD that include; fusion length (especially, three or more levels), sagittal malalignment, facet injury, advanced age, and prior cephalad degenerative disease. Methods: In this selective review of ASD, following predominantly instrumented fusions for lumbar degenerative disease, patients typically underwent open versus minimally invasive surgery (MIS), transforaminal lumbar interbody fusions (TLIFs), posterior lumbar interbody fusions (PLIFs), or rarely posterolateral lumbar instrumented or noninstrumented fusions (posterolateral lumbar fusion). Results: The incidence of ASD, following open or MI lumbar instrumented fusions, ranged up to 30%; notably, the addition of instrumentation in different series did not correlate with improved outcomes. Alternatively, in one series, at 164 postoperative months, noninstrumented lumbar fusions reduced the incidence of ASD to 5.6% versus 18.5% for ASD performed with instrumentation. Of interest, dynamic instrumented/stabilization techniques did not protect patients from ASD. Furthermore, in a series of 513 MIS TLIF, there was a 15.6% incidence of perioperative complications that included; a 5.1% frequency of durotomy and a 2.3% instrumentation failure rate. Conclusions: The incidence of postoperative ASD (up to 30%) is greater following either open or MIS instrumented lumbar fusions (e.g., TLIF/PLIF), while decompressions with noninstrumented fusions led to a much smaller 5.6% risk of ASD. Other findings included: MIS instrumented fusions contributed to higher perioperative complication rates, and dynamic stabilization did not protect against ASD. PMID:26693387

  2. Perioperative use of botulinum toxin for movement disorder-induced cervical spine disease.

    PubMed

    Adler, C H; Zimmerman, R S; Lyons, M K; Simeone, F; Brin, M F

    1996-01-01

    Patients with cervical dystonia or tics of the nuchal muscles can develop serious cervical spine disease. We report a series of four patients who received botulinum toxin injections to control their movement disorders prior to their required surgery. One patient with cervical tic-induced radiculomyelopathy required botulinum toxin injection postoperatively to facilitate stabilization of the cervical fusion. Two patients with torticollis-induced cervical radiculomyelopathy, and one patient with dystonia-induced C5 fracture, had botulinum toxin injected preoperatively to facilitate postoperative recovery. Botulinum toxin appears to be a useful adjunct in the treatment of cervical movement disorders prior to or following surgery for associated cervical spine disease.

  3. National trends in outpatient surgical treatment of degenerative cervical spine disease.

    PubMed

    Baird, Evan O; Egorova, Natalia N; McAnany, Steven J; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Hecht, Andrew C; Cho, Samuel K

    2014-08-01

    Study Design Retrospective population-based observational study. Objective To assess the growth of cervical spine surgery performed in an outpatient setting. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using the United States Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's State Inpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Databases for California, New York, Florida, and Maryland from 2005 to 2009. Current Procedural Terminology, fourth revision (CPT-4) and International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify operations for degenerative cervical spine diseases in adults (age > 20 years). Disposition and complication rates were examined. Results There was an increase in cervical spine surgeries performed in an ambulatory setting during the study period. Anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion accounted for 68% of outpatient procedures; posterior decompression made up 21%. Younger patients predominantly underwent anterior fusion procedures, and patients in the eighth and ninth decades of life had more posterior decompressions. Charlson comorbidity index and complication rates were substantially lower for ambulatory cases when compared with inpatients. The majority (>99%) of patients were discharged home following ambulatory surgery. Conclusions Recently, the number of cervical spine surgeries has increased in general, and more of these procedures are being performed in an ambulatory setting. The majority (>99%) of patients are discharged home but the nature of analyzing administrative data limits accurate assessment of postoperative complications and thus patient safety. This increase in outpatient cervical spine surgery necessitates further discussion of its safety.

  4. Ultrasound Examination of Pediatric Musculoskeletal Diseases and Neonatal Spine.

    PubMed

    Karnik, Alka Sudhir; Karnik, Alpana; Joshi, Alpana

    2016-06-01

    Ultrasound (US) is a simple, non-invasive imaging modality which allows high-resolution imaging of the musculoskeletal (MSK) system. Its increasing popularity in pediatrics is due to the fact that it does not involve radiation, has an ability to visualize non-ossified cartilaginous and vascular structures, allows dynamic imaging and quick contralateral comparison. US is the primary imaging modality in some pediatric MSK conditions like infant hip in developmental dysplasia (DDH), hip joint effusion, epiphyseal trauma and evaluation of the neonatal spine. US is the modality of choice in infants with DDH, both in the initial evaluation and post-treatment follow-up. US has a sensitivity equivalent to MRI in evaluation of the neonatal spine in experienced hands and is a good screening modality in neonates with suspected occult neural tube defects. In other MSK applications, it is often used for the initial diagnosis or in addition to other imaging modalities. In trauma and infections, US can often detect early and subtle soft tissue abnormalities and a quick comparison with the contralateral side aids in diagnoses. Dynamic imaging is crucial in evaluating congenital instabilities and dislocations, soft tissue and ligamentous injuries, epiphyseal injuries and fracture separations. High-resolution imaging along with color Doppler (CD) is useful in the characterization of soft tissue masses. This article reviews the applications of US in pediatric MSK with emphasis on conditions where it is a primary modality. Limitations of US include inability to penetrate bone, hence, limited diagnosis of intraosseous pathology and operator dependency. PMID:26830280

  5. A prospective study of the radiological changes in the cervical spine in early rheumatoid disease.

    PubMed Central

    Winfield, J; Cooke, D; Brook, A S; Corbett, M

    1981-01-01

    The cervical spine radiographs of 100 patients with early rheumatoid disease were studied annually, on a prospective basis, for a mean follow-up period of 7 years 2 months. Atlantoaxial subluxation developed in 12 patients. The subluxation was more frequent in females, more severe in patients with progressive, seropositive, erosive rheumatoid disease, and more marked in patients treated with oral corticosteroids. Subaxial subluxation, affecting upper cervical disc levels, occurred in a further 20 patients. Three patients developed vertical subluxation. The mobility of the cervical spine affects the degree of subluxation achieved, and when assessing serial films for subluxation it may be necessary to measure the cervical spine flexion before deciding whether subluxation has progressed or not. Over 80% of the patients with subluxation developed the first evidence of subluxation within 2 years of disease onset. Subluxation in the cervical spine is not, therefore, a late complication of rheumatoid disease. During the follow-up period none of the patients developed neurological signs. PMID:7224682

  6. No publication bias in industry funded clinical trials of degenerative diseases of the spine.

    PubMed

    Son, Colin; Tavakoli, Samon; Bartanusz, Viktor

    2016-03-01

    Industry sponsorship of clinical research of degenerative diseases of the spine has been associated with excessive positive published results as compared to research carried out without industry funding. We sought the rates of publication of clinical trials of degenerative diseases of the spine based on funding source as a possible explanation for this phenomenon. We reviewed all clinical trials registered at clinicaltrials.gov relating to degenerative diseases of the spine as categorized under six medical subject heading terms (spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, spondylolysis, spondylosis, failed back surgery syndrome, intervertebral disc degeneration) and with statuses of completed or terminated. These collected studies were categorized as having, or not having, industry funding. Published results for these studies were then sought within the clinicaltrials.gov database itself, PubMed and Google Scholar. One hundred sixty-one clinical trials met these criteria. One hundred nineteen of these trials had industry funding and 42 did not. Of those with industry funding, 45 (37.8%) had identifiable results. Of those without industry funding, 17 (40.5%) had identifiable results. There was no difference in the rates of publication of results from clinical trials of degenerative diseases of the spine no matter the funding source.

  7. Automatic segmentation of the spine by means of a probabilistic atlas with a special focus on ribs suppression. Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Espana, Silvia; Domingo, Juan; Diaz-Parra, Antonio; Dura, Esther; D'Ocon-Alcaniz, Victor; Arana, Estanislao; Moratal, David

    2015-01-01

    Spine is a structure commonly involved in several prevalent diseases. In clinical diagnosis, therapy, and surgical intervention, the identification and segmentation of the vertebral bodies are crucial steps. However, automatic and detailed segmentation of vertebrae is a challenging task, especially due to the proximity of the vertebrae to the corresponding ribs and other structures such as blood vessels. In this study, to overcome these problems, a probabilistic atlas of the spine, including cervical, thoracic and lumbar vertebrae has been built to introduce anatomical knowledge in the segmentation process, aiming to deal with overlapping gray levels and the proximity to other structures. From a set of 3D images manually segmented by a physician (training data), a 3D volume indicating the probability of each voxel of belonging to the spine has been developed, being necessary the generation of a probability map and its deformation to adapt to each patient. To validate the improvement of the segmentation using the atlas developed in the testing data, we computed the Hausdorff distance between the manually-segmented ground truth and an automatic segmentation and also between the ground truth and the automatic segmentation refined with the atlas. The results are promising, obtaining a higher improvement especially in the thoracic region, where the ribs can be found and appropriately eliminated.

  8. Minimally Invasive Treatment of the Thoracic Spine Disease: Completely Percutaneous and Hybrid Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Francesco Ciro, Tamburrelli; Laura, Scaramuzzo; Maurizio, Genitiempo; Luca, Proietti

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of a limited invasive approach for the treatment of upper thoracic spine disease. Seven patients with type-A thoracic fractures and three with tumors underwent long thoracic stabilization through a minimally invasive approach. Four patients underwent a completely percutaneous approach while the other three underwent a modified hybrid technique, a combination of percutaneous and open approach. The hybrid constructs were realized using a percutaneous approach to the spine distally to the spinal lesion and by open approach proximally. In two patients, the stabilization was extended proximally up to the cervical spine. Clinical and radiographic assessment was performed during the first year after the operation at 3, 6, and 12 months. No technically related complications were seen. The postoperative recovery was rapid even in the tumor patients with neurologic impairment. Blood loss was irrelevant. At one-year follow-up there was no loosening or breakage of the screws or failure of the implants. When technically feasible a completely percutaneous approach has to be taken in consideration; otherwise, a combined open-percutaneous approach could be planned to minimize the invasivity of a completely open approach to the thoracic spine. PMID:24455233

  9. Minimally invasive treatment of the thoracic spine disease: completely percutaneous and hybrid approaches.

    PubMed

    Tamburrelli, Francesco Ciro; Francesco Ciro, Tamburrelli; Scaramuzzo, Laura; Laura, Scaramuzzo; Genitiempo, Maurizio; Maurizio, Genitiempo; Proietti, Luca; Luca, Proietti

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility of a limited invasive approach for the treatment of upper thoracic spine disease. Seven patients with type-A thoracic fractures and three with tumors underwent long thoracic stabilization through a minimally invasive approach. Four patients underwent a completely percutaneous approach while the other three underwent a modified hybrid technique, a combination of percutaneous and open approach. The hybrid constructs were realized using a percutaneous approach to the spine distally to the spinal lesion and by open approach proximally. In two patients, the stabilization was extended proximally up to the cervical spine. Clinical and radiographic assessment was performed during the first year after the operation at 3, 6, and 12 months. No technically related complications were seen. The postoperative recovery was rapid even in the tumor patients with neurologic impairment. Blood loss was irrelevant. At one-year follow-up there was no loosening or breakage of the screws or failure of the implants. When technically feasible a completely percutaneous approach has to be taken in consideration; otherwise, a combined open-percutaneous approach could be planned to minimize the invasivity of a completely open approach to the thoracic spine.

  10. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods: short-term results in lumbar spine degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Colangeli, S; Barbanti Brodàno, G; Gasbarrini, A; Bandiera, S; Mesfin, A; Griffoni, C; Boriani, S

    2015-06-01

    Pedicle screw and rod instrumentation has become the preferred technique for performing stabilization and fusion in the surgical treatment of lumbar spine degenerative disease. Rigid fixation leads to high fusion rates but may also contribute to stress shielding and adjacent segment degeneration. Thus, the use of semirigid rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has been proposed. Although the PEEK rods biomechanical properties, such as anterior load sharing properties, have been shown, there are few clinical studies evaluating their application in the lumbar spine surgical treatment. This study examined a retrospective cohort of patients who underwent posterior lumbar fusion for degenerative disease using PEEK rods, in order to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes and the incidence of complications.

  11. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) rods: short-term results in lumbar spine degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Colangeli, S; Barbanti Brodàno, G; Gasbarrini, A; Bandiera, S; Mesfin, A; Griffoni, C; Boriani, S

    2015-06-01

    Pedicle screw and rod instrumentation has become the preferred technique for performing stabilization and fusion in the surgical treatment of lumbar spine degenerative disease. Rigid fixation leads to high fusion rates but may also contribute to stress shielding and adjacent segment degeneration. Thus, the use of semirigid rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has been proposed. Although the PEEK rods biomechanical properties, such as anterior load sharing properties, have been shown, there are few clinical studies evaluating their application in the lumbar spine surgical treatment. This study examined a retrospective cohort of patients who underwent posterior lumbar fusion for degenerative disease using PEEK rods, in order to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcomes and the incidence of complications. PMID:25751575

  12. A Survey of Vitamin D Status in Patients with Degenerative Diseases of the Spine

    PubMed Central

    Zolfaghari, Farid; Faridmoayer, Alireza; Soleymani, Bahram; Mahabadi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Descriptive cross-sectional study. Purpose To determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with degenerative diseases of the spine about to undergo spinal surgery and the relations between such deficiency and potential risk factors. Overview of Literature Vitamin D has a major role in musculoskeletal system health maintenance. Recently, studies on degenerative diseases of the spine have shown a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients undergoing spine surgery. Methods Serum levels of 25(OH)D were determined by an electrochemiluminescence detection assay. The other variables were determined through relevant questionnaires, and the data was analyzed through analysis of variance, t-test, chi-square and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results A total of 110 patients were enrolled in the study. The mean serum level of 25(OH)D was 27.45±18.75 ng/mL, and 44.5% of patients showed vitamin D deficiency (25(OH)D<20 ng/mL), with an additional 17.3% of patients having a serum level of 25(OH)D that was insufficient (20≤25(OH)D<30 ng/mL). The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was significantly higher in the younger age group compared to the older age group (p<0.001) and the ones without a history of taking vitamin D supplements (p=0.013). Compared to men, women showed significantly higher levels of vitamin D (p=0.029). Conclusions A high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is seen in patients with degenerative diseases of the spine. On the other hand, the conventional risk factors such as old age or female sex alone did not seem to be sufficient in determining the likelihood of deficiency. Thus, it is recommended that vitamin D deficiency prevention strategies comprise a broader spectrum of the population through which such degenerative diseases and their consequences may be prevented or delayed. PMID:27790310

  13. Lyme disease in Canada: Focus on children.

    PubMed

    Onyett, Heather

    2014-08-01

    Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne infection in Canada and much of the United States, is caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. Peak incidence for Lyme disease is among children five to nine years of age and older adults (55 to 59 years of age). The bacteria are transmitted through the bite of infected black-legged ticks of the Ixodes species. The primary hosts of black-legged ticks are mice and other rodents, small mammals, birds (which are reservoirs for B burgdorferi) and white-tailed deer. Geographical distribution of Ixodes ticks is expanding in Canada and an increasing number of cases of Lyme disease are being reported. The present practice point reviews the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention of Lyme disease, with a focus on children. PMID:25332678

  14. Lyme disease in Canada: Focus on children

    PubMed Central

    Onyett, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne infection in Canada and much of the United States, is caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. Peak incidence for Lyme disease is among children five to nine years of age and older adults (55 to 59 years of age). The bacteria are transmitted through the bite of infected black-legged ticks of the Ixodes species. The primary hosts of black-legged ticks are mice and other rodents, small mammals, birds (which are reservoirs for B burgdorferi) and white-tailed deer. Geographical distribution of Ixodes ticks is expanding in Canada and an increasing number of cases of Lyme disease are being reported. The present practice point reviews the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention of Lyme disease, with a focus on children. PMID:25332678

  15. Lyme disease in Canada: Focus on children.

    PubMed

    Onyett, Heather

    2014-08-01

    Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne infection in Canada and much of the United States, is caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. Peak incidence for Lyme disease is among children five to nine years of age and older adults (55 to 59 years of age). The bacteria are transmitted through the bite of infected black-legged ticks of the Ixodes species. The primary hosts of black-legged ticks are mice and other rodents, small mammals, birds (which are reservoirs for B burgdorferi) and white-tailed deer. Geographical distribution of Ixodes ticks is expanding in Canada and an increasing number of cases of Lyme disease are being reported. The present practice point reviews the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention of Lyme disease, with a focus on children.

  16. The role of stem cell therapies in degenerative lumbar spine disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Oehme, David; Goldschlager, Tony; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Ghosh, Peter; Jenkin, Graham

    2015-07-01

    Degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine are extremely common. Ninety percent of people over the age of 60 years have degenerative change on imaging; however, only a small minority of people will require spine surgery (Hicks et al. Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 34(12):1301-1306, 2009). This minority, however, constitutes a core element of spinal surgery practice. Whilst the patient outcomes from spinal surgeries have improved in recent years, some patients will remain with pain and disability despite technically successful surgery. Advances in regenerative medicine and stem cell therapies, particularly the use of mesenchymal stem cells and allogeneic mesenchymal precursor cells, have led to numerous clinical trials utilising these cell-based therapies to treat degenerative spinal conditions. Through cartilage formation and disc regeneration, fusion enhancement or via modification of pain pathways, stem cells are well suited to enhance spinal surgery practice. This review will focus on the outcomes of lumbar spinal procedures and the role of stem cells in the treatment of degenerative lumbar conditions to enhance clinical practice. The current status of clinical trials utilising stem cell therapies will be discussed, providing clinicians with an overview of the various cell-based treatments likely to be available to patients in the near future.

  17. Intraneuronal APP and extracellular Aβ independently cause dendritic spine pathology in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chengyu; Montagna, Elena; Shi, Yuan; Peters, Finn; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Shi, Song; Filser, Severin; Dorostkar, Mario M; Herms, Jochen

    2015-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is thought to be caused by accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ), which is a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Transgenic mice overexpressing APP have been used to recapitulate amyloid-β pathology. Among them, APP23 and APPswe/PS1deltaE9 (deltaE9) mice are extensively studied. APP23 mice express APP with Swedish mutation and develop amyloid plaques late in their life, while cognitive deficits are observed in young age. In contrast, deltaE9 mice with mutant APP and mutant presenilin-1 develop amyloid plaques early but show typical cognitive deficits in old age. To unveil the reasons for different progressions of cognitive decline in these commonly used mouse models, we analyzed the number and turnover of dendritic spines as important structural correlates for learning and memory. Chronic in vivo two-photon imaging in apical tufts of layer V pyramidal neurons revealed a decreased spine density in 4-5-month-old APP23 mice. In age-matched deltaE9 mice, in contrast, spine loss was only observed on cortical dendrites that were in close proximity to amyloid plaques. In both cases, the reduced spine density was caused by decreased spine formation. Interestingly, the patterns of alterations in spine morphology differed between these two transgenic mouse models. Moreover, in APP23 mice, APP was found to accumulate intracellularly and its content was inversely correlated with the absolute spine density and the relative number of mushroom spines. Collectively, our results suggest that different pathological mechanisms, namely an intracellular accumulation of APP or extracellular amyloid plaques, may lead to spine abnormalities in young adult APP23 and deltaE9 mice, respectively. These distinct features, which may represent very different mechanisms of synaptic failure in AD, have to be taken into consideration when translating results from animal studies to the human disease. PMID:25862638

  18. Differential Striatal Spine Pathology in Parkinson’s disease and Cocaine Addiction: A Key Role of Dopamine?

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Rosa M.; Smith, Yoland

    2013-01-01

    In the striatum, the dendritic tree of the two main populations of projection neurons, called “Medium Spiny Neurons (MSNs)”, are covered with spines that receive glutamatergic inputs from the cerebral cortex and thalamus. In Parkinson’s disease (PD), striatal MSNs undergo an important loss of dendritic spines, whereas aberrant overgrowth of striatal spines occurs following chronic cocaine exposure. This review examines the possibility that opposite dopamine dysregulation is one of the key factors that underlies these structural changes. In PD, nigrostriatal dopamine degeneration results in a significant loss of dendritic spines in the dorsal striatum, while rodents chronically exposed to cocaine and other psychostimulants, display an increase in the density of “thin and immature” spines in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). In rodent models of PD, there is evidence that D2 dopamine receptor-containing MSNs are preferentially affected, while D1-positive cells are the main targets of increased spine density in models of addiction. However, such specificity remains to be established in primates. Although the link between the extent of striatal spine changes and the behavioral deficits associated with these disorders remains controversial, there is unequivocal evidence that glutamatergic synaptic transmission is significantly altered in both diseased conditions. Recent studies have suggested that opposite calcium-mediated regulation of the transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2) function induces these structural defects. In conclusion, there is strong evidence that dopamine is a major, but not the sole, regulator of striatal spine pathology in PD and addiction to psychostimulants. Further studies of the role of glutamate and other genes associated with spine plasticity in mediating these effects are warranted. PMID:23867772

  19. RanBP9 Overexpression Accelerates Loss of Dendritic Spines in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruizhi; Palavicini, Juan Pablo; Wang, Hongjie; Maiti, Panchanan; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Xu, Shaohua; Lloyd, BN; Dawson-Scully, Ken; Kang, David E; Lakshmana, Madepalli K.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that RanBP9 overexpression increased Aβ generation and amyloid plaque burden, subsequently leading to robust reductions in the levels of several synaptic proteins as well as deficits in the learning and memory skills in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we found striking reduction of spinophilin-immunoreactive puncta (52%, p<0.001) and spinophilin area (62.5%, p<0.001) in the primary cortical neurons derived from RanBP9 transgenic mice (RanBP9-Tg) compared to wild-type (WT) neurons. Similar results were confirmed in WT cortical neurons transfected with EGFP-RanBP9. At 6-months of age, the total spine density in the cortex of RanBP9 single transgenic, APΔE9 double transgenic and APΔE9/RanBP9 triple transgenic mice were similar to WT mice. However, in the hippocampus the spine density was significantly reduced (27%, p<0.05) in the triple transgenic mice compared to WT mice due to reduced number of thin spines (33%, p<0.05) and mushroom spines (22%, p<0.05). This suggests that RanBP9 overexpression in the APΔE9 mice accelerates loss of spines and that hippocampus is more vulnerable. At 12-months of age, cortex showed significant reductions in total spine density in the RanBP9 (22%, p<0.05), APΔE9 (19%, p<0.05) and APΔE9/RanBP9 (33%, p<0.01) mice compared to WT controls due to reductions in mushroom and thin spines. Similarly, in the hippocampus the total spine density was reduced in the RanBP9 (23%, p<0.05), APΔE9 (26%, p<0.05) and APΔE9/RanBP9 (39%, p<0.01) mice due to reductions in thin and mushroom spines. Most importantly, RanBP9 overexpression in the APΔE9 mice further exacerbated the reductions in spine density in both the cortex (14%, p<0.05) and the hippocampus (16%, p<0.05). Because dendritic spines are considered physical traces of memory, loss of spines due to RanBP9 provided the physical basis for the learning and memory deficits. Since RanBP9 protein levels are increased in AD brains, Ran

  20. RanBP9 overexpression accelerates loss of dendritic spines in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruizhi; Palavicini, Juan Pablo; Wang, Hongjie; Maiti, Panchanan; Bianchi, Elisabetta; Xu, Shaohua; Lloyd, B N; Dawson-Scully, Ken; Kang, David E; Lakshmana, Madepalli K

    2014-09-01

    We previously demonstrated that RanBP9 overexpression increased Aβ generation and amyloid plaque burden, subsequently leading to robust reductions in the levels of several synaptic proteins as well as deficits in the learning and memory skills in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In the present study, we found striking reduction of spinophilin-immunoreactive puncta (52%, p<0.001) and spinophilin area (62.5%, p<0.001) in the primary cortical neurons derived from RanBP9 transgenic mice (RanBP9-Tg) compared to wild-type (WT) neurons. Similar results were confirmed in WT cortical neurons transfected with EGFP-RanBP9. At 6-months of age, the total spine density in the cortex of RanBP9 single transgenic, APΔE9 double transgenic and APΔE9/RanBP9 triple transgenic mice was similar to WT mice. However, in the hippocampus the spine density was significantly reduced (27%, p<0.05) in the triple transgenic mice compared to WT mice due to reduced number of thin spines (33%, p<0.05) and mushroom spines (22%, p<0.05). This suggests that RanBP9 overexpression in the APΔE9 mice accelerates loss of spines and that the hippocampus is more vulnerable. At 12-months of age, the cortex showed significant reductions in total spine density in the RanBP9 (22%, p<0.05), APΔE9 (19%, p<0.05) and APΔE9/RanBP9 (33%, p<0.01) mice compared to WT controls due to reductions in mushroom and thin spines. Similarly, in the hippocampus the total spine density was reduced in the RanBP9 (23%, p<0.05), APΔE9 (26%, p<0.05) and APΔE9/RanBP9 (39%, p<0.01) mice due to reductions in thin and mushroom spines. Most importantly, RanBP9 overexpression in the APΔE9 mice further exacerbated the reductions in spine density in both the cortex (14%, p<0.05) and the hippocampus (16%, p<0.05). Because dendritic spines are considered physical traces of memory, loss of spines due to RanBP9 provided the physical basis for the learning and memory deficits. Since RanBP9 protein levels are increased in AD

  1. Hydatid disease of spine: Multiple meticulous surgeries and a long term followup

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Akshay; Prasad, Gautam; Rustagi, Tarush; Bhojraj, Shekhar Y

    2014-01-01

    We present a long term followup (13 years) of spinal hydatid disease with multiple recurrences and intradural dissemination of the disease at the last followup. Intradural extension of the disease in our case was supposedly through the dural rent which has not been reported in English literature. An early followup of the same case has been reported previously by the authors. A 53 year-old female came with progressive left leg pain and difficulty in walking since 2 months. On examination, she had grade four power of ankle and digit dorsiflexors (L4 and L5 myotomes) on the left side (Medical Research Council grade). There was no sensory loss, no myelopathy and sphincters were intact. Plain radiographs showed consolidation at D10-D11 (old operated levels) with stable anterior column and there were no implant related problems. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a cystic lesion at L3-L4, signal intensity same as of cerebrospinal fluid in T2 and T1, displacing the cauda equina roots. The proximal extent of the lesion could not be identified because of artifacts from previous stainless steel instrumentation. Computed tomography myelogram showed complete block at L3-L4 junction with “meniscus sign”. This is the longest followup of hydatid disease of the spine that has ever been reported. Hydatid disease should always be included in the differential diagnosis of destructive or infectious lesions of the spine. Aggressive radical resection whenever possible and chemotherapy is the key to good results. Recurrence is known to occur even after that. Disease can have long remission periods. Possibility of intradural dissemination through dural injury is highly likely. Hence, it should always be repaired whenever possible. PMID:25298565

  2. Hydatid disease of spine: Multiple meticulous surgeries and a long term followup.

    PubMed

    Jain, Akshay; Prasad, Gautam; Rustagi, Tarush; Bhojraj, Shekhar Y

    2014-09-01

    We present a long term followup (13 years) of spinal hydatid disease with multiple recurrences and intradural dissemination of the disease at the last followup. Intradural extension of the disease in our case was supposedly through the dural rent which has not been reported in English literature. An early followup of the same case has been reported previously by the authors. A 53 year-old female came with progressive left leg pain and difficulty in walking since 2 months. On examination, she had grade four power of ankle and digit dorsiflexors (L4 and L5 myotomes) on the left side (Medical Research Council grade). There was no sensory loss, no myelopathy and sphincters were intact. Plain radiographs showed consolidation at D10-D11 (old operated levels) with stable anterior column and there were no implant related problems. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a cystic lesion at L3-L4, signal intensity same as of cerebrospinal fluid in T2 and T1, displacing the cauda equina roots. The proximal extent of the lesion could not be identified because of artifacts from previous stainless steel instrumentation. Computed tomography myelogram showed complete block at L3-L4 junction with "meniscus sign". This is the longest followup of hydatid disease of the spine that has ever been reported. Hydatid disease should always be included in the differential diagnosis of destructive or infectious lesions of the spine. Aggressive radical resection whenever possible and chemotherapy is the key to good results. Recurrence is known to occur even after that. Disease can have long remission periods. Possibility of intradural dissemination through dural injury is highly likely. Hence, it should always be repaired whenever possible.

  3. Quantitative characterization of metastatic disease in the spine. Part II. Histogram-based analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Whyne, Cari; Hardisty, Michael; Wu, Florence; Skrinskas, Tomas; Clemons, Mark; Gordon, Lyle; Basran, Parminder S.

    2007-08-15

    Radiological imaging is essential to the appropriate management of patients with bone metastasis; however, there have been no widely accepted guidelines as to the optimal method for quantifying the potential impact of skeletal lesions or to evaluate response to treatment. The current inability to rapidly quantify the response of bone metastases excludes patients with cancer and bone disease from participating in clinical trials of many new treatments as these studies frequently require patients with so-called measurable disease. Computed tomography (CT) can provide excellent skeletal detail with a sensitivity for the diagnosis of bone metastases. The purpose of this study was to establish an objective method to quantitatively characterize disease in the bony spine using CT-based segmentations. It was hypothesized that histogram analysis of CT vertebral density distributions would enable standardized segmentation of tumor tissue and consequently allow quantification of disease in the metastatic spine. Thirty two healthy vertebral CT scans were first studied to establish a baseline characterization. The histograms of the trabecular centrums were found to be Gaussian distributions (average root-mean-square difference=30 voxel counts), as expected for a uniform material. Intrapatient vertebral level similarity was also observed as the means were not significantly different (p>0.8). Thus, a patient-specific healthy vertebral body histogram is able to characterize healthy trabecular bone throughout that individual's thoracolumbar spine. Eleven metastatically involved vertebrae were analyzed to determine the characteristics of the lytic and blastic bone voxels relative to the healthy bone. Lytic and blastic tumors were segmented as connected areas with voxel intensities between specified thresholds. The tested thresholds were {mu}-1.0{sigma}, {mu}-1.5{sigma}, and {mu}-2.0{sigma}, for lytic and {mu}+2.0{sigma}, {mu}+3.0{sigma}, and {mu}+3.5{sigma} for blastic tissue where

  4. The Impact of Obesity on Perioperative Resource Utilization after Elective Spine Surgery for Degenerative Disease.

    PubMed

    Planchard, Ryan F; Higgins, Dominique M; Mallory, Grant W; Puffer, Ross C; Jacob, Jeffrey T; Curry, Timothy B; Kor, Daryl J; Clarke, Michelle J

    2015-08-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective To determine the effect of obesity on the resource utilization and cost in 3270 consecutive patients undergoing elective noninstrumented decompressive surgeries for degenerative spine disease at Mayo Clinic Rochester between 2005 and 2012. Methods Groups were assessed for baseline differences (age, gender, and American Society of Anesthesiologists [ASA] classification, procedure type, and number of operative levels). Outcome variables included the transfusion requirements during surgery, the total anesthesia and surgical times, intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, standardized costs, as well as the ICU and hospital length of stay (LOS). Regression analysis was used to evaluate for strength of association between obesity and outcome variables. Results Baseline differences between the groups (nonobese: n = 1,853; obese: n = 1,417) were found with respect to age, ASA class, gender, procedure type, and number of operative levels. After correcting for differences, we found significant associations between obesity and surgical (p < 0.0001) and anesthesia times (p < 0.0001) and hospital LOS (p < 0.0001). Additionally, ICU admission rates (p = 0.02) and requirement for postoperative ventilation (p = 0.048) were significantly higher in obese patients. Finally, mean difference in total cost ($1,632, p < 0.0001) was significantly higher for the obese cohort. Conclusion Obesity is associated with increased resource utilization and cost in patients undergoing a noninstrumented decompressive surgery for degenerative spine disease.

  5. Controversies about Interspinous Process Devices in the Treatment of Degenerative Lumbar Spine Diseases: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Galarza, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    A large number of interspinous process devices (IPD) have been recently introduced to the lumbar spine market as an alternative to conventional decompressive surgery in managing symptomatic lumbar spinal pathology, especially in the older population. Despite the fact that they are composed of a wide range of different materials including titanium, polyetheretherketone, and elastomeric compounds, the aim of these devices is to unload spine, restoring foraminal height, and stabilize the spine by distracting the spinous processes. Although the initial reports represented the IPD as a safe, effective, and minimally invasive surgical alternative for relief of neurological symptoms in patients with low back degenerative diseases, recent studies have demonstrated less impressive clinical results and higher rate of failure than initially reported. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview on interspinous implants, their mechanisms of action, safety, cost, and effectiveness in the treatment of lumbar stenosis and degenerative disc diseases. PMID:24822224

  6. Controversies about interspinous process devices in the treatment of degenerative lumbar spine diseases: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Galarza, Marcelo; Alfieri, Alex

    2014-01-01

    A large number of interspinous process devices (IPD) have been recently introduced to the lumbar spine market as an alternative to conventional decompressive surgery in managing symptomatic lumbar spinal pathology, especially in the older population. Despite the fact that they are composed of a wide range of different materials including titanium, polyetheretherketone, and elastomeric compounds, the aim of these devices is to unload spine, restoring foraminal height, and stabilize the spine by distracting the spinous processes. Although the initial reports represented the IPD as a safe, effective, and minimally invasive surgical alternative for relief of neurological symptoms in patients with low back degenerative diseases, recent studies have demonstrated less impressive clinical results and higher rate of failure than initially reported. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview on interspinous implants, their mechanisms of action, safety, cost, and effectiveness in the treatment of lumbar stenosis and degenerative disc diseases.

  7. Hepatosplenic Abscesses and Osteomyelitis of the Spine in an Immunocompetent Adult with Cat Scratch Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knafl, D.; Lötsch, F.; Burgmann, H.; Goliasch, G.; Poeppl, W.; Ramharter, M.; Thalhammer, F.; Schuster, C.

    2015-01-01

    We present an 18-year-old, immunocompetent Austrian military conscript with cervical lymphadenopathy, fever, back-pain, and persistent inflammation markers despite two weeks of antimicrobial therapy with ampicillin/sulbactam. All specific laboratory investigations for identification of a specific etiology, including blood cultures and autoantibodies, were inconspicuous. Abdominal computed tomography showed multiple hypodense hepatosplenic lesions and osteomyelitis of the thoracic and lumbar spine with base plate fracture. Based on the patient's history, clinical presentation, and radiological findings, serology for cat scratch disease (CSD) was performed and high B. henselae specific IgM and IgG antibodies were detected. Due to its variety of clinical presentations, diagnosis of CSD is challenging, especially in the absence of a history of specific exposure. This case report shall remind the physician that cat scratch disease is a common disease, mainly presenting with fever and lymphadenopathy in young patients. Nevertheless CSD has many different and rare forms of presentations, including hepatosplenic lesions and bone involvement as shown in this case. PMID:26576306

  8. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 1: introduction and methodology.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Michael G; Eck, Jason C; Groff, Michael W; Watters, William C; Dailey, Andrew T; Resnick, Daniel K; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Sharan, Alok; Wang, Jeffrey C; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Dhall, Sanjay S; Ghogawala, Zoher

    2014-07-01

    Fusion procedures are an accepted and successful management strategy to alleviate pain and/or neurological symptoms associated with degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. In 2005, the first version of the "Guidelines for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine" was published in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine. In an effort to incorporate evidence obtained since the original publication of these guidelines, an expert panel of neurosurgical and orthopedic spine specialists was convened in 2009. Topics reviewed were essentially identical to the original publication. Selected manuscripts from the first iteration of these guidelines as well as relevant publications between 2005 through 2011 were reviewed. Several modifications to the methodology of guideline development were adopted for the current update. In contrast to the 2005 guidelines, a 5-tiered level of evidence strategy was employed, primarily allowing a distinction between lower levels of evidence. The qualitative descriptors (standards/guidelines/options) used in the 2005 recommendations were abandoned and replaced with grades to reflect the strength of medical evidence supporting the recommendation. Recommendations that conflicted with the original publication, if present, were highlighted at the beginning of each chapter. As with the original guideline publication, the intent of this update is to provide a foundation from which an appropriate treatment strategy can be formulated.

  9. An overview of the role of cancer stem cells in spine tumors with a special focus on chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Safari, Mojdeh; Khoshnevisan, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the spine are relatively rare, less than 5% of all spinal column tumors. However, these lesions are often among the most difficult to treat and encompass challenging pathologies such as chordoma and a variety of invasive sarcomas. The mechanisms of tumor recurrence after surgical intervention, as well as resistance to radiation and chemotherapy, remain a pervasive and costly problem. Recent evidence has emerged supporting the hypothesis that solid tumors contain a sub-population of cancer cells that possess characteristics normally associated with stem cells. Particularly, the potential for long-term proliferation appears to be restricted to subpopulations of cancer stem cells (CSCs) functionally defined by their capacity to self-renew and give rise to differentiated cells that phenotypically recapitulate the original tumor, thereby causing relapse and patient death. These cancer stem cells present a unique opportunity to better understand the biology of solid tumors in general, as well as targets for future therapeutics. The general objective of the current study is to discuss the fundamental concepts for understanding the role of CSCs with respect to chemoresistance, radioresistance, special cell surface markers, cancer recurrence and metastasis in tumors of the osseous spine. This discussion is followed by a specific review of what is known about the role of CSCs in chordoma, the most common primary malignant osseous tumor of the spine. PMID:24567788

  10. Resveratrol: A Focus on Several Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tellone, Ester; Galtieri, Antonio; Russo, Annamaria; Giardina, Bruno; Ficarra, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Molecules of the plant world are proving their effectiveness in countering, slowing down, and regressing many diseases. The resveratrol for its intrinsic properties related to its stilbene structure has been proven to be a universal panacea, especially for a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases. This paper evaluates (in vivo and in vitro) the various molecular targets of this peculiar polyphenol and its ability to effectively counter several neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. What emerges is that, in the deep heterogeneity of the pathologies evaluated, resveratrol through a convergence on the protein targets is able to give therapeutic responses in neuronal cells deeply diversified not only in morphological structure but especially in their function performed in the anatomical district to which they belong. PMID:26180587

  11. Role of Diffusion Tensor MR Imaging in Degenerative Cervical Spine Disease: a Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Banaszek, A; Bladowska, J; Podgórski, P; Sąsiadek, M J

    2016-09-01

    In the article we review the current role of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a modern magnetic resonance (MR) technique, in the diagnosis and the management of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), the most serious complication of degenerative cervical spine disease (DCSD). The pathogenesis of DCSD is presented first with an emphasis placed on the pathological processes leading to myelopathy development. An understanding of the pathophysiological background of DCSD is necessary for appropriate interpretation of MR images, both plain and DTI. Conventional MRI is currently the imaging modality of choice in DCSD and provides useful information concerning the extent of spondylotic changes and degree of central spinal canal stenosis; however its capability in myelopathy detection is limited. DTI is a state of the art imaging method which recently has emerged in spinal cord investigations and has the potential to detect microscopic alterations which are beyond the capability of plain MRI. In the article we present the physical principles underlying DTI which determine its sensitivity, followed by an overview of technical aspects of DTI acquisition with a special consideration of spinal cord imaging. Finally, the scientific reports concerning DTI utility in DSCD are also reviewed. DTI detects spinal cord injury in the course of DCSD earlier than any other method and could be useful in predicting surgical outcomes in CMS patients, however technical and methodology improvement as well as standardization of acquisition protocols and postprocessing methods among the imaging centers are needed before its implementation in clinical practice.

  12. Pharmacological reversion of sphingomyelin-induced dendritic spine anomalies in a Niemann Pick disease type A mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Ana I; Camoletto, Paola G; Morando, Laura; Sassoe-Pognetto, Marco; Giustetto, Maurizio; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Schuchman, Edward H; Ledesma, Maria D

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the role of lipids in synapses and the aberrant molecular mechanisms causing the cognitive deficits that characterize most lipidosis is necessary to develop therapies for these diseases. Here we describe sphingomyelin (SM) as a key modulator of the dendritic spine actin cytoskeleton. We show that increased SM levels in neurons of acid sphingomyelinase knock out mice (ASMko), which mimic Niemann Pick disease type A (NPA), result in reduced spine number and size and low levels of filamentous actin. Mechanistically, SM accumulation decreases the levels of metabotropic glutamate receptors type I (mGluR1/5) at the synaptic membrane impairing membrane attachment and activity of RhoA and its effectors ROCK and ProfilinIIa. Pharmacological enhancement of the neutral sphingomyelinase rescues the aberrant molecular and morphological phenotypes in vitro and in vivo and improves motor and memory deficits in ASMko mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate the influence of SM and its catabolic enzymes in dendritic spine physiology and contribute to our understanding of the cognitive deficits of NPA patients, opening new perspectives for therapeutic interventions. Subject Categories Genetics, Gene Therapy & Genetic Disease; Neuroscience PMID:24448491

  13. Pharmacological reversion of sphingomyelin-induced dendritic spine anomalies in a Niemann Pick disease type A mouse model.

    PubMed

    Arroyo, Ana I; Camoletto, Paola G; Morando, Laura; Sassoe-Pognetto, Marco; Giustetto, Maurizio; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Schuchman, Edward H; Ledesma, Maria D

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the role of lipids in synapses and the aberrant molecular mechanisms causing the cognitive deficits that characterize most lipidosis is necessary to develop therapies for these diseases. Here we describe sphingomyelin (SM) as a key modulator of the dendritic spine actin cytoskeleton. We show that increased SM levels in neurons of acid sphingomyelinase knock out mice (ASMko), which mimic Niemann Pick disease type A (NPA), result in reduced spine number and size and low levels of filamentous actin. Mechanistically, SM accumulation decreases the levels of metabotropic glutamate receptors type I (mGluR1/5) at the synaptic membrane impairing membrane attachment and activity of RhoA and its effectors ROCK and ProfilinIIa. Pharmacological enhancement of the neutral sphingomyelinase rescues the aberrant molecular and morphological phenotypes in vitro and in vivo and improves motor and memory deficits in ASMko mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate the influence of SM and its catabolic enzymes in dendritic spine physiology and contribute to our understanding of the cognitive deficits of NPA patients, opening new perspectives for therapeutic interventions.

  14. Emerging Roles of Filopodia and Dendritic Spines in Motoneuron Plasticity during Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kanjhan, Refik; Noakes, Peter G.; Bellingham, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Motoneurons develop extensive dendritic trees for receiving excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to perform a variety of complex motor tasks. At birth, the somatodendritic domains of mouse hypoglossal and lumbar motoneurons have dense filopodia and spines. Consistent with Vaughn's synaptotropic hypothesis, we propose a developmental unified-hybrid model implicating filopodia in motoneuron spinogenesis/synaptogenesis and dendritic growth and branching critical for circuit formation and synaptic plasticity at embryonic/prenatal/neonatal period. Filopodia density decreases and spine density initially increases until postnatal day 15 (P15) and then decreases by P30. Spine distribution shifts towards the distal dendrites, and spines become shorter (stubby), coinciding with decreases in frequency and increases in amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic currents with maturation. In transgenic mice, either overexpressing the mutated human Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (hSOD1G93A) gene or deficient in GABAergic/glycinergic synaptic transmission (gephyrin, GAD-67, or VGAT gene knockout), hypoglossal motoneurons develop excitatory glutamatergic synaptic hyperactivity. Functional synaptic hyperactivity is associated with increased dendritic growth, branching, and increased spine and filopodia density, involving actin-based cytoskeletal and structural remodelling. Energy-dependent ionic pumps that maintain intracellular sodium/calcium homeostasis are chronically challenged by activity and selectively overwhelmed by hyperactivity which eventually causes sustained membrane depolarization leading to excitotoxicity, activating microglia to phagocytose degenerating neurons under neuropathological conditions. PMID:26843990

  15. The role of cumulative physical work load in lumbar spine disease: risk factors for lumbar osteochondrosis and spondylosis associated with chronic complaints

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, A; Bolm-Audorff, U; Heiskel, H; Henkel, N; Roth-Kuver, B; Kaiser, U; Bickeboller, R; Willingstorfer, W; Beck, W; Elsner, G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To investigate the relation with a case-control study between symptomatic osteochondrosis or spondylosis of the lumbar spine and cumulative occupational exposure to lifting or carrying and to working postures with extreme forward bending.
METHODS—From two practices and four clinics were recruited 229 male patients with radiographically confirmed osteochondrosis or spondylosis of the lumbar spine associated with chronic complaints. Of these 135 had additionally had acute lumbar disc herniation. A total of 197 control subjects was recruited: 107 subjects with anamnestic exclusion of lumbar spine disease were drawn as a random population control group and 90 patients admitted to hospital for urolithiasis who had no osteochondrosis or spondylosis of the lumbar spine radiographically were recruited as a hospital based control group. Data were gathered in a structured personal interview and analysed using logistic regression to control for age, region, nationality, and other diseases affecting the lumbar spine. To calculate cumulative forces to the lumbar spine over the entire working life, the Mainz-Dortmund dose model (MDD), which is based on an overproportional weighting of the lumbar disc compression force relative to the respective duration of the lifting process was applied with modifications: any objects weighing ⩾5 kg were included in the calculation and no minimum daily exposure limits were established. Calculation of forces to the lumbar spine was based on self reported estimates of occupational lifting, trunk flexion, and duration.
RESULTS—For a lumbar spine dose >9×106 Nh (Newton×hours), the risk of having radiographically confirmed osteochondrosis or spondylosis of the lumbar spine as measured by the odds ratio (OR) was 8.5 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 4.1 to 17.5) compared with subjects with a load of 0 Nh. To avoid differential bias, forces to the lumbar spine were also calculated on the basis of an internal job

  16. SU-E-J-32: Dosimetric Evaluation Based On Pre-Treatment Cone Beam CT for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: Does Region of Interest Focus Matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Magnelli, A; Xia, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy requires very conformal dose distributions and precise delivery. Prior to treatment, a KV cone-beam CT (KV-CBCT) is registered to the planning CT to provide image-guided positional corrections, which depend on selection of the region of interest (ROI) because of imperfect patient positioning and anatomical deformation. Our objective is to determine the dosimetric impact of ROI selections. Methods: Twelve patients were selected for this study with the treatment regions varied from C-spine to T-spine. For each patient, the KV-CBCT was registered to the planning CT three times using distinct ROIs: one encompassing the entire patient, a large ROI containing large bony anatomy, and a small target-focused ROI. Each registered CBCT volume, saved as an aligned dataset, was then sent to the planning system. The treated plan was applied to each dataset and dose was recalculated. The tumor dose coverage (percentage of target volume receiving prescription dose), maximum point dose to 0.03 cc of the spinal cord, and dose to 10% of the spinal cord volume (V10) for each alignment were compared to the original plan. Results: The average magnitude of tumor coverage deviation was 3.9%±5.8% with external contour, 1.5%±1.1% with large ROI, 1.3%±1.1% with small ROI. Spinal cord V10 deviation from plan was 6.6%±6.6% with external contour, 3.5%±3.1% with large ROI, and 1.2%±1.0% with small ROI. Spinal cord max point dose deviation from plan was: 12.2%±13.3% with external contour, 8.5%±8.4% with large ROI, and 3.7%±2.8% with small ROI. Conclusion: A small ROI focused on the target results in the smallest deviation from planned dose to target and cord although rotations at large distances from the targets were observed. It is recommended that image fusion during CBCT focus narrowly on the target volume to minimize dosimetric error. Improvement in patient setups may further reduce residual errors.

  17. [The development of organization of medical care to patients with degenerative dystrophic diseases of lumbosacral section of spine].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with issues of development of organizational technologies in the field of medical care of patients with degenerative dystrophic diseases of lumbosacral section of spine. The comprehensive evaluation of the process of medical care provision to this category of patients revealed the need in measures concerning the reconstruction and development of effectiveness of process. The model is elaborated concerning medical cary of patients with backache with the purpose to establish the succession between various stages of medical care provision. The issues of rational distribution of manpower resources and exclusion of duplication of activities on different stages of the process are considered.

  18. Identifying factors likely to influence compliance with diagnostic imaging guideline recommendations for spine disorders among chiropractors in North America: a focus group study using the Theoretical Domains Framework

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) was developed to investigate determinants of specific clinical behaviors and inform the design of interventions to change professional behavior. This framework was used to explore the beliefs of chiropractors in an American Provider Network and two Canadian provinces about their adherence to evidence-based recommendations for spine radiography for uncomplicated back pain. The primary objective of the study was to identify chiropractors’ beliefs about managing uncomplicated back pain without x-rays and to explore barriers and facilitators to implementing evidence-based recommendations on lumbar spine x-rays. A secondary objective was to compare chiropractors in the United States and Canada on their beliefs regarding the use of spine x-rays. Methods Six focus groups exploring beliefs about managing back pain without x-rays were conducted with a purposive sample. The interview guide was based upon the TDF. Focus groups were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by two independent assessors using thematic content analysis based on the TDF. Results Five domains were identified as likely relevant. Key beliefs within these domains included the following: conflicting comments about the potential consequences of not ordering x-rays (risk of missing a pathology, avoiding adverse treatment effects, risks of litigation, determining the treatment plan, and using x-ray-driven techniques contrasted with perceived benefits of minimizing patient radiation exposure and reducing costs; beliefs about consequences); beliefs regarding professional autonomy, professional credibility, lack of standardization, and agreement with guidelines widely varied ( social/professional role & identity); the influence of formal training, colleagues, and patients also appeared to be important factors ( social influences); conflicting comments regarding levels of confidence and comfort in managing patients without x-rays ( belief

  19. Focused extracorporeal shockwave therapy in Dupuytren's disease--a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Knobloch, Karsten; Kuehn, Marie; Vogt, Peter M

    2011-05-01

    Dupuytren's disease is a progressive disease due to unknown causal agents or genetics. An epidemiological analysis of 566 cases in North Germany estimated that around 1.9 million Germans are suffering from Dupuytren's disease. Beside Dupuytren's disease, there are a number of further less common forms of progressive fibromatosis, such as knuckle pads, plantar fibromatosis or Peyronie's disease. Surgery in plantar fasciectomy yields to a 60% recurrence rate depending on the extent of the plantar fasciectomy. Peyronie's disease of the penis affects middle-aged men between 40 and 60 years with penile pain, curvature during erection and potential erectile dysfunction. In a clinical randomized-controlled trial in Peyronie's disease 2000 focused extracorporeal shock waves reduced pain significantly and improved erectile function and quality of life. We hypothesize that focused extracorporeal shock wave therapy is able to reduce Dupuytren's contracture, a fibromatosis of the palm and improve function. Given the fact that recurrence rate in Dupuytren's disease is high und unpredictable extracorporeal shockwave therapy as a non-invasive tool might be applicable both, in primary and secondary prevention of the progression as well as for treatment. As such we have planned a randomized-controlled trial (ClinicialTrials.gov, NCT01184586) studying the effect of high-energy focused extracorporeal shockwave therapy on patients suffering Dupuytren's disease with patient-related outcome measures such as the DASH score and the Michigan Hand Outcome Questionnaire (MHQ) as primary outcome parameters.

  20. [Cervical spine instability in the surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Barbeito, A; Guerri-Guttenberg, R A

    2014-03-01

    Many congenital and acquired diseases, including trauma, may result in cervical spine instability. Given that airway management is closely related to the movement of the cervical spine, it is important that the anesthesiologist has detailed knowledge of the anatomy, the mechanisms of cervical spine instability, and of the effects that the different airway maneuvers have on the cervical spine. We first review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine in the context of airway management and the concept of cervical spine instability. In the second part, we review the protocols for the management of cervical spine instability in trauma victims and some of the airway management options for these patients.

  1. [State of local immunity in patients with inflammatory diseases of the spine].

    PubMed

    Shenderova, R I; Oleĭnik, V V; Iakunova, O A

    2001-01-01

    The paper presents the results of examination of spinal fluid in tuberculous spondylitis (n = 83), its sequelae (n = 58), spinal osteomyelitis (n = 25) for the levels of tuberculosis antibodies (TAb) by applying the routine enzyme immunoassay, specially adapted to this biological object, and immunoglobulins. A relationship was found between TAb detection and the rate of the process and the severity of a spinal cord lesion. Forty one patients had severe spinal cord disorders (paraplegia and deep paraparesis). To detect TAb in CF is shown to be of differential diagnostic value. There is new evidence for impaired blood-brain and immunological barriers in active tuberculosis in the spine with spinal cord compression.

  2. Mid-range outcomes in 64 consecutive cases of multilevel fusion for degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Röllinghoff, Marc; Schlüter-Brust, Klaus; Groos, Daniel; Sobottke, Rolf; Michael, Joern William-Patrick; Eysel, Peer; Delank, Karl Stefan

    2010-01-01

    In the treatment of multilevel degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine, spondylodesis plays a controversial role. Most patients can be treated conservatively with success. Multilevel lumbar fusion with instrumentation is associated with severe complications like failed back surgery syndrome, implant failure, and adjacent segment disease (ASD). This retrospective study examines the records of 70 elderly patients with degenerative changes or instability of the lumbar spine treated between 2002 and 2007 with spondylodesis of more than two segments. Sixty-four patients were included; 5 patients had died and one patient was lost to follow-up. We evaluated complications, clinical/radiological outcomes, and success of fusion. Flexion-extension and standing X-rays in two planes, MRI, and/or CT scans were obtained pre-operatively. Patients were assessed clinically using the Oswestry disability index (ODI) and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Surgery performed was dorsolateral fusion (46.9%) or dorsal fusion with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF; 53.1%). Additional decompression was carried out in 37.5% of patients. Mean follow-up was 29.4±5.4 months. Average patient age was 64.7±4.3 years. Clinical outcomes were not satisfactory for all patients. VAS scores improved from 8.6±1.3 to 5.6±3.0 pre- to post-operatively, without statistical significance. ODI was also not significantly improved (56.1±22.3 pre- and 45.1±26.4 post-operatively). Successful fusion, defined as adequate bone mass with trabeculation at the facets and transverse processes or in the intervertebral segments, did not correlate with good clinical outcomes. Thirty-five of 64 patients (54%) showed signs of pedicle screw loosening, especially of the screws at S1. However, only 7 of these 35 (20%) complained of corresponding back pain. Revision surgery was required in 24 of 64 patients (38%). Of these, indications were adjacent segment disease (16 cases), pedicle screw loosening (7 cases), and

  3. Osteoporosis and Your Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Movement › Osteoporosis and Your Spine Osteoporosis and Your Spine Your spine is made up of small bones ... called kyphosis. Kyphosis and Bone Breaks in the Spine The bones in the spine are called vertebrae. ...

  4. Clinical experiences of dynamic stabilizers: Dynesys and Dynesys top loading system for lumbar spine degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Cheng-Ta; Chang, Chih-Ju; Su, I-Chang; Lin, Li-Ying

    2016-04-01

    Dynesys (Dynamic Neutralization System) was designed to overcome the shortcomings of fusion. The Dynesys top loading (DTL) system is a new alternative Dynesys system that can be applied via a minimally invasive procedure. This study aimed to ascertain whether DTL is a suitable device for motion preservation and prevention of instability, and to compare the clinical and radiological outcomes between DTL and Dynesys. In this study, 12 patients were treated with Dynesys and 21 patients were treated with DTL. Back and leg pain were evaluated using the visual analog scale. The Oswestry Disability Index was used to evaluate the patients' function. Range of motion (ROM) at the operative level and for the whole lumbar spine was measured pre- and postoperatively. The length of wound, blood loss, length of hospital stay, and operation duration were also compared. All patients were followed up for 12-76 months. Scores on the visual analog scale and Oswestry Disability Index were significantly improved postoperatively. The median ROM of the whole spine and index level ROM in all patients showed 12.5% and 79.6% loss, respectively. The DTL group exhibited significantly better results in terms of blood loss, wound length, and operation duration, in addition to early ambulation. In conclusion, Dynesys and DTL are semirigid fixation systems that can significantly improve clinical symptoms and signs. Our results suggested that DTL was better than Dynesys as a result of it being a minimally invasive procedure. However, further study with large sample sizes and longer follow-up durations is required to validate the effects of these dynamic stabilizers.

  5. The Degenerative Spine.

    PubMed

    Clarençon, Frédéric; Law-Ye, Bruno; Bienvenot, Peggy; Cormier, Évelyne; Chiras, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine is a leading cause of back pain and radiculopathy, and is a frequent indication for spine MR imaging. Disc degeneration, disc protrusion/herniation, discarhtrosis, spinal canal stenosis, and facet joint arthrosis, as well as interspinous processes arthrosis, may require an MR imaging workup. This review presents the MR imaging patterns of these diseases and describes the benefit of the MR imaging in these indications compared with the other imaging modalities like plain radiographs or computed tomography scan. PMID:27417397

  6. Neuronal Store-Operated Calcium Entry and Mushroom Spine Loss in Amyloid Precursor Protein Knock-In Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Wu, Lili; Pchitskaya, Ekaterina; Zakharova, Olga; Saito, Takashi; Saido, Takaomi; Bezprozvanny, Ilya

    2015-09-30

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common reason for elderly dementia in the world. We proposed that memory loss in AD is related to destabilization of mushroom postsynaptic spines involved in long-term memory storage. We demonstrated previously that stromal interaction molecule 2 (STIM2)-regulated neuronal store-operated calcium entry (nSOC) in postsynaptic spines play a key role in stability of mushroom spines by maintaining activity of synaptic Ca(2+)/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII). Furthermore, we demonstrated previously that the STIM2-nSOC-CaMKII pathway is downregulated in presenilin 1 M146V knock-in (PS1-M146V KI) mouse model of AD, leading to loss of hippocampal mushroom spines in this model. In the present study, we demonstrate that hippocampal mushroom postsynaptic spines are also lost in amyloid precursor protein knock-in (APPKI) mouse model of AD. We demonstrated that loss of mushroom spines occurs as a result of accumulation of extracellular β-amyloid 42 in APPKI culture media. Our results indicate that extracellular Aβ42 acts by overactivating mGluR5 receptor in APPKI neurons, leading to elevated Ca(2+) levels in endoplasmic reticulum, compensatory downregulation of STIM2 expression, impaired synaptic nSOC, and reduced CaMKII activity. Pharmacological inhibition of mGluR5 or overexpression of STIM2 rescued synaptic nSOC and prevented mushroom spine loss in APPKI hippocampal neurons. Our results indicate that downregulation of synaptic STIM2-nSOC-CaMKII pathway causes loss of mushroom synaptic spines in both presenilin and APPKI mouse models of AD. We propose that modulators/activators of this pathway may have a potential therapeutic value for treatment of memory loss in AD. Significance statement: A direct connection between amyloid-induced synaptic mushroom spine loss and neuronal store-operated calcium entry pathway is shown. These results provide strong support for the calcium hypothesis of neurodegeneration and further validate the synaptic

  7. Averting the legacy of kidney disease - Focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-03-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, while only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:26997373

  8. Averting the legacy of kidney diseasefocus on childhood

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group amongst children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for-date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely to help to detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, whilst only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policymakers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:27247150

  9. Averting the legacy of kidney disease - focus on childhood

    PubMed Central

    Ingelfinger, J.R.; Kalantar-Zadeh, K.; Schaefer, F.

    2016-01-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, in that the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease as a consequence of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for-date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, although only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that the World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:27096201

  10. Extracellular matrix control of dendritic spine and synapse structure and plasticity in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Aaron D.; Omar, Mitchell H.; Koleske, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the receptive contacts at most excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. Spines are dynamic in the developing brain, changing shape as they mature as well as appearing and disappearing as they make and break connections. Spines become much more stable in adulthood, and spine structure must be actively maintained to support established circuit function. At the same time, adult spines must retain some plasticity so their structure can be modified by activity and experience. As such, the regulation of spine stability and remodeling in the adult animal is critical for normal function, and disruption of these processes is associated with a variety of late onset diseases including schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. The extracellular matrix (ECM), composed of a meshwork of proteins and proteoglycans, is a critical regulator of spine and synapse stability and plasticity. While the role of ECM receptors in spine regulation has been extensively studied, considerably less research has focused directly on the role of specific ECM ligands. Here, we review the evidence for a role of several brain ECM ligands and remodeling proteases in the regulation of dendritic spine and synapse formation, plasticity, and stability in adults. PMID:25368556

  11. The degenerative cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management. PMID:26878769

  12. The degenerative cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management.

  13. Immunotherapy for neurodegenerative diseases: focus on α-synucleinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Elvira; Masliah, Eliezer

    2013-01-01

    Immunotherapy is currently being intensively explored as much-needed disease-modifying treatment for neurodegenerative diseases. While Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been the focus of numerous immunotherapeutic studies, less attention has been paid to Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other neurodegenerative disorders. The reason for this difference is that the amyloid beta (Aβ) protein in AD is a secreted molecule that circulates in blood and is readably recognized by antibodies. In contrast, α-synuclein (α-syn), tau, huntingtin and other proteins involved in neurodegenerative diseases have been considered to be exclusively of intracellular nature. However, the recent discovery that toxic oligomeric versions of α-syn and tau accumulate in the membrane and can be excreted to the extracellular environment has provided a rationale for the development of immunotherapeutic approaches for PD, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia, and other neurodegenerative disorders characterized by the abnormal accumulation of these proteins. Active immunization, passive immunization, and T cell-mediated cellular immunotherapeutic approaches have been developed targeting Aβ, α-syn and tau. Most advanced studies, including results from phase III clinical trials for passive immunization in AD, have been recently reported. Results suggest that immunotherapy might be a promising therapeutic approach for neurodegenerative diseases that progress with the accumulation and propagation of toxic protein aggregates. In this manuscript we provide an overview on immunotherapeutic advances for neurodegenerative disorders, with special emphasis on α-synucleinopathies. PMID:23384597

  14. Nutraceuticals and amyloid neurodegenerative diseases: a focus on natural phenols.

    PubMed

    Rigacci, Stefania; Stefani, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    A common molecular feature of amyloid neurodegenerative diseases is the unfolding/misfolding of specific proteins/peptides which consequently become prone to aggregate into toxic assemblies and deposits that are the key histopathological trait of these pathologies. Apart from the rare early-onset familiar forms, these neurodegenerative diseases are age-associated disorders whose symptoms appear in aged people after long incubation periods. This makes the therapeutic approach particularly compelling and boosts the search for both early diagnostic tools and preventive approaches. In this last respect, natural compounds commonly present in foods and beverages are considered promising molecules, at least on the bench side. The so-called 'nutraceutical approach' suggests life-long healthy diets, particularly focusing on food molecules that are candidates to enter clinical trials as such or following a targeted molecular engineering. Natural phenols abundant in 'healthy' foods such as extra virgin olive oil, red wine, green tea, red berries and spices, appear particularly promising. PMID:25418871

  15. Multimodality Imaging in Coronary Artery Disease: Focus on Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Han, Donghee; Danad, Ibrahim; Hartaigh, Bríain ó; Lin, Fay Y.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide, and various cardiovascular imaging modalities have been introduced for the purpose of diagnosing and determining the severity of CAD. More recently, advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have contributed to the widespread clinical application of cardiac CT for accurate and noninvasive evaluation of CAD. In this review, we focus on imaging assessment of CAD based upon CT, which includes coronary artery calcium screening, coronary CT angiography, myocardial CT perfusion, and fractional flow reserve CT. Further, we provide a discussion regarding the potential implications, benefits and limitations, as well as the possible future directions according to each modality. PMID:27081438

  16. Environment, epigenetics and neurodegeneration: Focus on nutrition in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nicolia, Vincenzina; Lucarelli, Marco; Fuso, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Many different environmental factors (nutrients, pollutants, chemicals, physical activity, lifestyle, physical and mental stress) can modulate epigenetic markers in the developing and adult organism. Epigenetics, in turn, can cause and is associated with several neurodegenerative and aging-dependent human diseases. Alzheimer's disease certainly represents one of the most relevant neurodegenerative disorders due to its incidence and its huge socio-economic impact. Therefore, it is easy to understand why recent literature focuses on the epigenetic modifications associated with Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. One of the most intriguing and, at the same time, worrying evidence is that even "mild" environmental factors (such as behavioral or physical stress) as well as the under-threshold exposure to pollutants and chemicals, can be effective. Finally, even mild nutrients disequilibria can result in long-lasting and functional alterations of many epigenetic markers, although they don't have an immediate acute effect. Therefore, we will probably have to re-define the current risk threshold for many factors, molecules and stresses. Among the many different environmental factors affecting the epigenome, nutrition represents one of the most investigated fields; the reasons are probably that each person interacts with nutrients and that, in turn, nutrients can modulate at molecular level the epigenetic biochemical pathways. The role that nutrition can exert in modulating epigenetic modifications in Alzheimer's disease will be discussed with particular emphasis on the role of B vitamins and DNA methylation.

  17. Recent Findings in Alzheimer Disease and Nutrition Focusing on Epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, Dimitrios; Karagiannis, George; Tsolaki, Magda

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease with no effective cure so far. The current review focuses on the epigenetic mechanisms of AD and how nutrition can influence the course of this disease through regulation of gene expression, according to the latest scientific findings. The search strategy was the use of scientific databases such as PubMed and Scopus in order to find relative research or review articles published in the years 2012-2015. By showing the latest data of various nutritional compounds, this study aims to stimulate the scientific community to recognize the value of nutrition in this subject. Epigenetics is becoming a very attractive subject for researchers because it can shed light on unknown aspects of complex diseases like AD. DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNAs are the principal epigenetic mechanisms involved in AD pathophysiology. Nutrition is an environmental factor that is related to AD through epigenetic pathways. Vitamin B-12, for instance, can alter the one-carbon metabolism and thus interfere in the DNA methylation process. The research results might seem ambiguous about the clinical role of nutrition, but there is strengthening evidence that proper nutrition can not only change epigenetic biomarker levels but also prevent the development of late-onset AD and attenuate cognition deficit. Nutrition might grow to become a preventive and even therapeutic alternative against AD, especially if combined with other antidementia interventions, brain exercise, physical training, etc. Epigenetic biomarkers can be a very helpful tool to help researchers find the exact nutrients needed to create specific remedies, and perhaps the same biomarkers can be used even in patient screening in the future. PMID:27633107

  18. Imaging of degenerative spine disease--the state of the art.

    PubMed

    Sasiadek, Marek J; Bladowska, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    The authors review the current state of imaging of degenerative spinal disease (DSD), which is one of the most common disorders in humans. The most important definitions as well as short descriptions of the etiopathology and clinical presentation of DSD are provided first, followed by an overview of conventional and advanced imaging methods that are used in DSD. The authors then discuss in detail the imaging patterns of particular types of degenerative changes. Finally, the current imaging algorithm in DSD is presented. The imaging method of choice is magnetic resonance, including advanced techniques--especially diffusion tensor imaging. Other imaging methods (plain radiography, computed tomography, vascular studies, scintigraphy, positron emission tomography, discography) play a supplementary role ).

  19. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 5: correlation between radiographic outcome and function.

    PubMed

    Dhall, Sanjay S; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Eck, Jason C; Groff, Michael W; Ghogawala, Zoher; Watters, William C; Dailey, Andrew T; Resnick, Daniel K; Sharan, Alok; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Wang, Jeffrey C; Kaiser, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    In an effort to diminish pain or progressive instability, due to either the pathological process or as a result of surgical decompression, one of the primary goals of a fusion procedure is to achieve a solid arthrodesis. Assuming that pain and disability result from lost mechanical integrity of the spine, the objective of a fusion across an unstable segment is to eliminate pathological motion and improve clinical outcome. However, conclusive evidence of this correlation, between successful fusion and clinical outcome, remains elusive, and thus the necessity of documenting successful arthrodesis through radiographic analysis remains debatable. Although a definitive cause and effect relationship has not been demonstrated, there is moderate evidence that demonstrates a positive association between radiographic presence of fusion and improved clinical outcome. Due to this growing body of literature, it is recommended that strategies intended to enhance the potential for radiographic fusion are considered when performing a lumbar arthrodesis for degenerative spine disease.

  20. Probiotics in digestive diseases: focus on Lactobacillus GG.

    PubMed

    Pace, F; Pace, M; Quartarone, G

    2015-12-01

    Probiotics are becoming increasingly important in basic and clinical research, but they are also a subject of considerable economic interest due to their expanding popularity. They are live micro-organisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit to the host. From this very well-known definition, it is clear that, unlike drugs, probiotics might be useful in healthy subjects to reduce the risk of developing certain diseases or to optimise some physiological functions. They also may offer some advantages in already ill persons in relieving symptoms and signs, e.g. people with acute diarrhea. According to current definitions, probiotics should survive both gastric acid and bile to reach the small intestine and colon, where they exert their effects. Many of these are available in a lyophilized (freeze-dried) pill form, though some are available in yogurt or as packets (sachets), which can be mixed into non-carbonated drinks. The present review focuses on three main issues: 1) understanding why, at present, probiotics are so interesting for doctors and consumers; 2) reviewing the available data on probiotic use in digestive diseases, in particular irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), (prevention of) infectious diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and colorectal cancer (CRC); 3) highlighting the individual profile of Lactobacillus GG (LGG) in the above contexts, providing an assessment as well as recommendations on its use in gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) disorders. Research studies conducted in animals and humans with the main probiotics strains for GIT diseases, and published from the early 1990s to 2014 have been considered. PubMed, Medline and Ovid were the main sources adopted for data retrieving. The increasing attention on probiotics is a direct consequence of the improvement in the techniques for studying microbiota. Until recently, its composition has been analysed by culture-based methods

  1. Probiotics in digestive diseases: focus on Lactobacillus GG.

    PubMed

    Pace, F; Pace, M; Quartarone, G

    2015-12-01

    Probiotics are becoming increasingly important in basic and clinical research, but they are also a subject of considerable economic interest due to their expanding popularity. They are live micro-organisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit to the host. From this very well-known definition, it is clear that, unlike drugs, probiotics might be useful in healthy subjects to reduce the risk of developing certain diseases or to optimise some physiological functions. They also may offer some advantages in already ill persons in relieving symptoms and signs, e.g. people with acute diarrhea. According to current definitions, probiotics should survive both gastric acid and bile to reach the small intestine and colon, where they exert their effects. Many of these are available in a lyophilized (freeze-dried) pill form, though some are available in yogurt or as packets (sachets), which can be mixed into non-carbonated drinks. The present review focuses on three main issues: 1) understanding why, at present, probiotics are so interesting for doctors and consumers; 2) reviewing the available data on probiotic use in digestive diseases, in particular irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), (prevention of) infectious diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and colorectal cancer (CRC); 3) highlighting the individual profile of Lactobacillus GG (LGG) in the above contexts, providing an assessment as well as recommendations on its use in gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) disorders. Research studies conducted in animals and humans with the main probiotics strains for GIT diseases, and published from the early 1990s to 2014 have been considered. PubMed, Medline and Ovid were the main sources adopted for data retrieving. The increasing attention on probiotics is a direct consequence of the improvement in the techniques for studying microbiota. Until recently, its composition has been analysed by culture-based methods

  2. Sagittal balance of the pelvis-spine complex and lumbar degenerative diseases. A comparative study about 85 cases.

    PubMed

    Barrey, Cédric; Jund, Jérôme; Noseda, Olivier; Roussouly, Pierre

    2007-09-01

    Retrospective analysis of the spino-pelvic alignment in a population of 85 patients with a lumbar degenerative disease. Several previous publications reported the analysis of spino-pelvic alignment in the normal and low back pain population. Data suggested that patients with lumbar diseases have variations of sagittal alignment such as less distal lordosis, more proximal lumbar lordosis and a more vertical sacrum. Nevertheless most of these variations have been reported without reference to the pelvis shape which is well-known to strongly influence spino-pelvic alignment. The objective of this study was to analyse spino-pelvic parameters, including pelvis shape, in a population of 85 patients with a lumbar degenerative disease and compare these patients with a control group of normal volunteers. We analysed three different lumbar degenerative diseases: disc herniation (DH), n = 25; degenerative disc disease (DDD), n = 32; degenerative spondylolisthesis (DSPL), n = 28. Spino-pelvic alignment was analysed pre-operatively on full spine radiographs. Spino-pelvic parameters were measured as following: pelvic incidence, sacral slope, pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, spino-sacral angle and positioning of C7 plumb line. For each group of patients the sagittal profile was compared with a control population of 154 asymptomatic adults that was the subject of a previous study. In order to understand variations of spino-pelvic parameters in the patients' population a stratification (matching) according to the pelvic incidence was done between the control group and each group of patients. Concerning first the pelvis shape, patients with DH and those with DDD demonstrated to have a mean pelvic incidence equal to 49.8 degrees and 51.6 degrees, respectively, versus 52 degrees for the control group (no significant difference). Only young patients, less than 45 years old, with a disc disease (DH or DDD) demonstrated to have a pelvic incidence significantly lower (48

  3. Sagittal balance of the pelvis-spine complex and lumbar degenerative diseases. A comparative study about 85 cases

    PubMed Central

    Jund, Jérôme; Noseda, Olivier; Roussouly, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the spino-pelvic alignment in a population of 85 patients with a lumbar degenerative disease. Several previous publications reported the analysis of spino-pelvic alignment in the normal and low back pain population. Data suggested that patients with lumbar diseases have variations of sagittal alignment such as less distal lordosis, more proximal lumbar lordosis and a more vertical sacrum. Nevertheless most of these variations have been reported without reference to the pelvis shape which is well-known to strongly influence spino-pelvic alignment. The objective of this study was to analyse spino-pelvic parameters, including pelvis shape, in a population of 85 patients with a lumbar degenerative disease and compare these patients with a control group of normal volunteers. We analysed three different lumbar degenerative diseases: disc herniation (DH), n = 25; degenerative disc disease (DDD), n = 32; degenerative spondylolisthesis (DSPL), n = 28. Spino-pelvic alignment was analysed pre-operatively on full spine radiographs. Spino-pelvic parameters were measured as following: pelvic incidence, sacral slope, pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, spino-sacral angle and positioning of C7 plumb line. For each group of patients the sagittal profile was compared with a control population of 154 asymptomatic adults that was the subject of a previous study. In order to understand variations of spino-pelvic parameters in the patients’ population a stratification (matching) according to the pelvic incidence was done between the control group and each group of patients. Concerning first the pelvis shape, patients with DH and those with DDD demonstrated to have a mean pelvic incidence equal to 49.8° and 51.6°, respectively, versus 52° for the control group (no significant difference). Only young patients, less than 45 years old, with a disc disease (DH or DDD) demonstrated to have a pelvic incidence significantly lower (48.3°) than

  4. Sisyphi Spine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    26 June 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a spine of material exposed in the Sisyphi Planum region of Mars. Gullies can be seen on the deeply-shadowed ridge slope. Mass movement (landsliding) has contributed to the erosion of this ridge and the creation of the apron of talus that surrounds it.

    Location near: 70.7oS, 357.0oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  5. Xanthoceras sorbifolia extracts ameliorate dendritic spine deficiency and cognitive decline via upregulation of BDNF expression in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinjie; Xu, Jikai; Xu, Pu; Song, Shijie; Liu, Peng; Chi, Tianyan; Ji, Xuefei; Jin, Ge; Qiu, Shimeng; Hou, Yapeng; Zheng, Chen; Wang, Lili; Meng, Dali; Zou, Libo

    2016-08-26

    Xanthoceras sorbifolia, a traditional Chinese folk medicine with anti-inflammatory effects, has been used for a long time in China, especially in the Inner Mongolian area for the treatment of rheumatism. Inflammation is one of the main causes of Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is characterized by aggregation of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) plaques, neurofibrillary tangle formation, synaptic dysfunction and neuronal loss. To investigate whether Xanthoceras sorbifolia extracts (XSE) improve cognition and protect dendritic spines, we performed behavioral tests to investigate learning and memory in an Aβ25-35-induced dementia animal model of AD as well as Golgi staining to observe dendritic spine formation in CA1 pyramidal neurons and western blots to test the expression levels of PSD95, BDNF and downstream signaling pathways. Our results indicated that oral treatment with XSE significantly reduced cognitive impairments in behavioral tests (passive avoidance test, novel object recognition test, Y-maze test and Morris water maze test). Golgi staining results revealed that XSE ameliorated dendritic spine density deficits in CA1 pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus. Western blot analysis suggested that XSE upregulated PSD95, which is the major scaffolding protein in synapses. BDNF levels and the ratio of p-TrkB/TrkB increased, and the expression of the RhoA, a member of the Rho-GTPase family, and its downstream target protein ROCK2 decreased in the dementia animal model following treatment with XSE. Therefore, the cognition-improving effects of XSE probably resulted from dendritic spine protection effects through regulation of BDNF signaling pathways. PMID:27412235

  6. Management of Tuberculous Infection of the Spine.

    PubMed

    Kandwal, Pankaj; G, Vijayaraghavan; Jayaswal, Arvind

    2016-08-01

    Spinal tuberculosis accounts for nearly half of all cases of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. It is primarily a medical disease and treatment consists of a multidrug regimen for 9-12 months. Surgery is reserved for select cases of progressive deformity or where neurological deficit is not improved by anti-tubercular treatment. Technology refinements and improved surgical expertise have improved the operative treatment of spinal tuberculosis. The infected spine can be approached anteriorly or posteriorly, in a minimally invasive way. We review the various surgical techniques used in the management of spinal tuberculosis with focus on their indications and contraindications. PMID:27559464

  7. Management of Tuberculous Infection of the Spine

    PubMed Central

    G., Vijayaraghavan; Jayaswal, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis accounts for nearly half of all cases of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. It is primarily a medical disease and treatment consists of a multidrug regimen for 9–12 months. Surgery is reserved for select cases of progressive deformity or where neurological deficit is not improved by anti-tubercular treatment. Technology refinements and improved surgical expertise have improved the operative treatment of spinal tuberculosis. The infected spine can be approached anteriorly or posteriorly, in a minimally invasive way. We review the various surgical techniques used in the management of spinal tuberculosis with focus on their indications and contraindications. PMID:27559464

  8. The relationships between cardiovascular disease and diabetes: focus on pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Jason C; Castellano, Jose M; Farkouh, Michael E; Fuster, Valentin

    2014-03-01

    There is a looming global epidemic of obesity and diabetes. Of all the end-organ effects caused by diabetes, the cardiovascular system is particularly susceptible to the biologic perturbations caused by this disease, and many patients may die from diabetes-related cardiovascular complications. Substantial progress has been made in understanding the pathobiology of the diabetic vasculature and heart. Clinical studies have illuminated the optimal way to treat patients with cardiovascular manifestations of this disease. This article reviews these aspects of diabetes and the cardiovascular system, broadly classified into diabetic vascular disease, diabetic cardiomyopathy, and the clinical management of the diabetic cardiovascular disease patient.

  9. Magnetic resonance of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Enzmann, D.R.; De La Paz, R.L.; Rubin, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Three chapters discuss principles of cerebrospinal fluid flow, spinal imaging techniques, and the physical basis and anatomic correlates of signal intensity in the spine. There are chapters on normal anatomy, congenital anomalies, trauma, tumors, infection, demyelinating disease, degenerative disease, vascular conditions, and syringomyelia.

  10. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Focus on Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Calvo, Ana C.; Manzano, Raquel; Mendonça, Deise M. F.; Muñoz, María J.; Zaragoza, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Since amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) was discovered and described in 1869 as a neurodegenerative disease in which motor neuron death is induced, a wide range of biomarkers have been selected to identify therapeutic targets. ALS shares altered molecular pathways with other neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's, and Parkinson's diseases. However, the molecular targets that directly influence its aggressive nature remain unknown. What is the first link in the neurodegenerative chain of ALS that makes this disease so peculiar? In this review, we will discuss the progression of the disease from the viewpoint of the potential biomarkers described to date in human and animal model samples. Finally, we will consider potential therapeutic strategies for ALS treatment and future, innovative perspectives. PMID:25157374

  11. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  12. Ischemic Heart Disease in Women: A Focus on Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Puja K.; Wei, Janet; Wenger, Nanette K.

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease remains a major contributor to morbidity and mortality in women in the United States and worldwide. This review highlights known and emerging risk factors for ischemic heart disease (IHD) in women. Traditional Framingham risk factors such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, smoking, as well as lifestyle habits such as unhealthy diet and sedentary lifestyle are all modifiable. Health care providers should be aware of emerging cardiac risk factors in women such as adverse pregnancy outcomes, systemic autoimmune disorders, obstructive sleep apnea, and radiation-induced heart disease; psychosocial factors such as mental stress, depression, anxiety, low socioeconomic status, and work and marital stress play an important role in IHD in women. Appropriate recognition and management of an array of risk factors is imperative given the growing burden of IHD and need to deliver cost-effective, quality care for women. PMID:25453985

  13. SPECT/CT for imaging of the spine and pelvis in clinical routine: a physician's perspective of the adoption of SPECT/CT in a clinical setting with a focus on trauma surgery.

    PubMed

    Scheyerer, Max J; Pietsch, Carsten; Zimmermann, Stefan M; Osterhoff, Georg; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Werner, Clement M L

    2014-05-01

    Injuries of the axial skeleton are an important field of work within orthopaedic surgery and traumatology. Most lesions following trauma may be diagnosed by means of conventional plain radiography, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. However, for some aspects SPECT/ CT can be helpful even in a trauma setting. In particular, the combination of highly sensitive but nonspecific scintigraphy with nonsensitive but highly specific computed tomography makes it particularly useful in anatomically complex regions such as the pelvis and spine. From a trauma surgeon's point of view, the four main indications for nuclear medicine imaging are the detection of (occult) fractures, and the imaging of inflammatory bone and joint diseases, chronic diseases and postoperative complications such as instability of instrumentation or implants. The aim of the present review was to give an overview of the adoption of SPECT/CT in a clinical setting.

  14. Casting a Net on Dendritic Spines: The Extracellular Matrix and its Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dansie, Lorraine E.; Ethell, Iryna M.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic spines are dynamic structures that accommodate the majority of excitatory synapses in the brain and are influenced by extracellular signals from presynaptic neurons, glial cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM surrounds dendritic spines and extends into the synaptic cleft, maintaining synapse integrity as well as mediating trans-synaptic communications between neurons. Several scaffolding proteins and glycans that compose the ECM form a lattice-like network, which serves as an attractive ground for various secreted glycoproteins, lectins, growth factors and enzymes. ECM components can control dendritic spines through the interactions with their specific receptors or by influencing the functions of other synaptic proteins. In this review, we focus on ECM components and their receptors that regulate dendritic spine development and plasticity in the normal and diseased brain. PMID:21834084

  15. Increasing Incidence of Degenerative Spinal Diseases in Japan during 25 Years: The Registration System of Spinal Surgery in Tohoku University Spine Society.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Toshimi; Kokubun, Shoichi; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Kusakabe, Takashi; Tanaka, Yasuhisa; Hoshikawa, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Ko; Kanno, Haruo; Morozumi, Naoki; Koizumi, Yutaka; Sato, Tetsuro; Hyodo, Hironori; Kasama, Fumio; Ogawa, Shinji; Murakami, Eiichi; Kawahara, Chikashi; Yahata, Jun-Ichiro; Ishii, Yushin; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Spinal disorders affect mainly older people and cause pain, paralysis and/or deformities of the trunk and/or extremities, which could eventually disturb locomotive functions. For ensuring safe and high-quality treatment of spinal disorders, in 1987, the Tohoku University Spine Society (TUSS) was established by orthopedic departments in Tohoku University School of Medicine and its affiliated hospitals in and around Miyagi Prefecture. All spine surgeries have been enrolled in the TUSS Spine Registry since 1988. Using the data from this registration system between 1988 and 2012, we demonstrate here the longitudinal changes in surgical trends for spinal disorders in Japan that has rushed into the most advanced "aging society" in the world. In total, data on 56,744 surgeries were retrieved. The number of spinal surgeries has annually increased approximately 4-fold. There was a particular increase among patients aged ≥ 70 years and those aged ≥ 80 years, with a 20- to 90-fold increase. Nearly 90% of the spinal operations were performed for degenerative disorders, with their number increasing approximately 5-fold from 705 to 3,448. The most common disease for surgery was lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) (35.9%), followed by lumbar disc herniation (27.7%) and cervical myelopathy (19.8%). In 2012, approximately half of the patients with LSS and cervical myelopathy were ≥ 70 years of age. In conclusion, the number of spinal operations markedly increased during the 25-year period, particularly among older patients. As Japan has a notably aged population, the present study could provide a near-future model for countries with aging population.

  16. Increasing Incidence of Degenerative Spinal Diseases in Japan during 25 Years: The Registration System of Spinal Surgery in Tohoku University Spine Society.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Toshimi; Kokubun, Shoichi; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Kusakabe, Takashi; Tanaka, Yasuhisa; Hoshikawa, Takeshi; Hashimoto, Ko; Kanno, Haruo; Morozumi, Naoki; Koizumi, Yutaka; Sato, Tetsuro; Hyodo, Hironori; Kasama, Fumio; Ogawa, Shinji; Murakami, Eiichi; Kawahara, Chikashi; Yahata, Jun-Ichiro; Ishii, Yushin; Itoi, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Spinal disorders affect mainly older people and cause pain, paralysis and/or deformities of the trunk and/or extremities, which could eventually disturb locomotive functions. For ensuring safe and high-quality treatment of spinal disorders, in 1987, the Tohoku University Spine Society (TUSS) was established by orthopedic departments in Tohoku University School of Medicine and its affiliated hospitals in and around Miyagi Prefecture. All spine surgeries have been enrolled in the TUSS Spine Registry since 1988. Using the data from this registration system between 1988 and 2012, we demonstrate here the longitudinal changes in surgical trends for spinal disorders in Japan that has rushed into the most advanced "aging society" in the world. In total, data on 56,744 surgeries were retrieved. The number of spinal surgeries has annually increased approximately 4-fold. There was a particular increase among patients aged ≥ 70 years and those aged ≥ 80 years, with a 20- to 90-fold increase. Nearly 90% of the spinal operations were performed for degenerative disorders, with their number increasing approximately 5-fold from 705 to 3,448. The most common disease for surgery was lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) (35.9%), followed by lumbar disc herniation (27.7%) and cervical myelopathy (19.8%). In 2012, approximately half of the patients with LSS and cervical myelopathy were ≥ 70 years of age. In conclusion, the number of spinal operations markedly increased during the 25-year period, particularly among older patients. As Japan has a notably aged population, the present study could provide a near-future model for countries with aging population. PMID:26876801

  17. Therapeutic options in coronary artery disease: Focusing on the guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Leonard

    2009-01-01

    There are three options for the treatment of patients with coronary artery disease: coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and optimal medical treatment alone. While there has been an active interface between CABG and PCI, medical treatment has not been as vociferously advocated. However, it performs well in randomized trials and is still a treatment arm in studies such as the Bypass Angioplasty Revascularization Investigation 2 Diabetes (BARI 2D) trial. The present review compares these options in acute and chronic coronary syndromes, including the indications for each as summarized by recent American College of Cardiology and American Heart Association guidelines. While the landscape in Canada is changing for CABG and PCI, with an increase in the latter procedure for patients with multivessel disease, optimal medical treatment alone is very effective. There are few subsets, particularly in chronic syndromes, in which revascularization is indicated for prognosis alone. PMID:19148338

  18. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases: Focus on mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Korczyn, Amos D

    2016-01-01

    The mild cognitive impairment (MCI) concept was developed to identify the earliest stages of cognitive impairment. MCI and, more specifically, amnestic MCI were initially proposed as transitional states that ultimately progress to full blown Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, MCI subjects do not uniformly progress to dementia (either AD or another) and may revert back to normal cognitive state. The MCI as concept has been borrowed from AD to other neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson's disease (PD). However the operational definition of MCI may not adequately convey the intended concept. Additional modifications to the concept and its operationalization are needed in order to better identify patients with incipient cognitive impairment and to guide clinical and research practices. Patients with PD have a very high likelihood of developing dementia, insidiously over many years. Cognitive impairment may start even before other symptoms. No constellation of cognitive symptoms in an otherwise healthy individual will herald development of AD or indeed will progress to dementia, including PD-dementia, in high likelihood. At present, identification of subtle cognitive dysfunction even in a person with diagnosed PD does not benefit the patient and should be avoided, except for research purposes. PMID:26516060

  19. Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases: Focus on mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Korczyn, Amos D

    2016-01-01

    The mild cognitive impairment (MCI) concept was developed to identify the earliest stages of cognitive impairment. MCI and, more specifically, amnestic MCI were initially proposed as transitional states that ultimately progress to full blown Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, MCI subjects do not uniformly progress to dementia (either AD or another) and may revert back to normal cognitive state. The MCI as concept has been borrowed from AD to other neurodegenerative diseases, particularly Parkinson's disease (PD). However the operational definition of MCI may not adequately convey the intended concept. Additional modifications to the concept and its operationalization are needed in order to better identify patients with incipient cognitive impairment and to guide clinical and research practices. Patients with PD have a very high likelihood of developing dementia, insidiously over many years. Cognitive impairment may start even before other symptoms. No constellation of cognitive symptoms in an otherwise healthy individual will herald development of AD or indeed will progress to dementia, including PD-dementia, in high likelihood. At present, identification of subtle cognitive dysfunction even in a person with diagnosed PD does not benefit the patient and should be avoided, except for research purposes.

  20. Angina pectoris in women: focus on microvascular disease.

    PubMed

    Zuchi, Cinzia; Tritto, Isabella; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2013-02-20

    Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is the leading cause of death among women in Western countries, and it is associated with higher morbidity and mortality than in men. Nevertheless, IHD in women remains underdiagnosed and undertreated, and the misperception that females are "protected" against cardiovascular disease leads to underestimation of their cardiovascular risk; instead, women with chest pain have a high risk of cardiovascular events. Women suffering from angina pectoris tend to have different characteristics compared to men, with a high prevalence of non-significant coronary artery disease. Angina in women is more commonly microvascular in origin than in men, and therefore standard diagnostic algorithms may be suboptimal for women. This different pathophysiology impacts clinical management of IHD in women. While response to medical therapy may differ in women, they are scarcely represented in clinical trials. Therefore, solid data in terms of gender efficacy of antianginal drugs are lacking, and particularly when angina is microvascular in origin women often continue to be symptomatic despite maximal therapy with classical antianginal drugs. Recently, new molecules have shown promising results in women. In conclusion, women with angina are a group of patients in whom it seems appropriate to concentrate efforts aimed at reducing morbidity and improving quality of life.

  1. CaMKII-dependent dendrite ramification and spine generation promote spatial training-induced memory improvement in a rat model of sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xia; Chai, Gao-Shang; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Hu, Yu; Li, Xiao-Guang; Ma, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Qun; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2015-02-01

    Participation in cognitively stimulating activities can preserve memory capacities in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we used a rat model with hyperhomocysteinemia, an independent risk factor of AD, to study whether spatial training could remodel the synaptic and/or dendritic plasticity and the key molecular target(s) involved. We found that spatial training in water maze remarkably improved the subsequent short-term and long-term memory performance in contextual fear conditioning and Barnes maze. The trained rats showed an enhanced dendrite ramification, spine generation and plasticity in dentate gyrus (DG) neurons, and stimulation of long-term potentiation between perforant path and DG circuit. Spatial training also increased the levels of postsynaptic GluA1, GluN2A, GluN2B, and PSD93 with selective activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), although inhibition of CaMKII by stereotaxic injection of KN93 into hippocampal DG, abolished the training-induced cognitive improvement, dendrite ramification, and spine generation. We conclude that spatial training can preserve the cognitive function by CaMKII-dependent remodeling of dendritic plasticity in hyperhomocysteinemia-induced sporadic AD-like rats.

  2. Metformin and metabolic diseases: a focus on hepatic aspects

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Shih-Lung; Hu, Xiang; Botchlett, Rachel; Chen, Lulu; Huo, Yuqing

    2015-01-01

    Metformin has been widely used as a first-line anti-diabetic medicine for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). As a drug that primarily targets the liver, metformin suppresses hepatic glucose production (HGP), serving as the main mechanism by which metformin improves hyperglycemia of T2D. Biochemically, metformin suppresses gluconeogenesis and stimulates glycolysis. Metformin also inhibits glycogenolysis, which is a pathway that critically contributes to elevated HGP. While generating beneficial effects on hyperglycemia, metformin also improves insulin resistance and corrects dyslipidemia in patients with T2D. These beneficial effects of metformin implicate a role for metformin in managing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. As supported by the results from both human and animal studies, metformin improves hepatic steatosis and suppresses liver inflammation. Mechanistically, the beneficial effects of metformin on hepatic aspects are mediated through both adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent and AMPK-independent pathways. In addition, metformin is generally safe and may also benefit patients with other chronic liver diseases. PMID:25676019

  3. Probiotics and gut health: A special focus on liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Silvia Wilson; Mykkanen, Hannu; El-Nezami, Hani S

    2010-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria have well-established beneficial effects in the management of diarrhoeal diseases. Newer evidence suggests that probiotics have the potential to reduce the risk of developing inflammatory bowel diseases and intestinal bacterial overgrowth after gut surgery. In liver health, the main benefits of probiotics might occur through preventing the production and/or uptake of lipopolysaccharides in the gut, and therefore reducing levels of low-grade inflammation. Specific immune stimulation by probiotics through processes involving dendritic cells might also be beneficial to the host immunological status and help prevent pathogen translocation. Hepatic fat metabolism also seems to be influenced by the presence of commensal bacteria, and potentially by probiotics; although the mechanisms by which probiotic might act on the liver are still unclear. However, this might be of major importance in the future because low-grade inflammation, hepatic fat infiltration, and hepatitis might become more prevalent as a result of high fat intake and the increased prevalence of obesity. PMID:20101763

  4. Passive ventricular remodeling in cardiac disease: focus on heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Elise L.; Boulaksil, Mohamed; van Rijen, Harold V. M.; Vos, Marc A.; van Veen, Toon A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Passive ventricular remodeling is defined by the process of molecular ventricular adaptation to different forms of cardiac pathophysiology. It includes changes in tissue architecture, such as hypertrophy, fiber disarray, alterations in cell size and fibrosis. Besides that, it also includes molecular remodeling of gap junctions, especially those composed by Connexin43 proteins (Cx43) in the ventricles that affect cell-to-cell propagation of the electrical impulse, and changes in the sodium channels that modify excitability. All those alterations appear mainly in a heterogeneous manner, creating irregular and inhomogeneous electrical and mechanical coupling throughout the heart. This can predispose to reentry arrhythmias and adds to a further deterioration into heart failure. In this review, passive ventricular remodeling is described in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM), Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM), Ischemic Cardiomyopathy (ICM), and Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy (ACM), with a main focus on the heterogeneity of those alterations mentioned above. PMID:25566084

  5. Pharmacogenomics of multifactorial diseases: a focus on psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cascella, Raffaella; Strafella, Claudia; Longo, Giuliana; Maccarone, Mara; Borgiani, Paola; Sangiuolo, Federica; Novelli, Giuseppe; Giardina, Emiliano

    2016-06-01

    This review will outline the current pharmacogenomics knowledge about psoriatic arthritis with a special attention to the perspectives and the challenges for its implementation in the clinical practice. To date, different drugs have been developed to contrast the symptoms and the progression of psoriatic arthritis. However, patients have shown high variability of drug response in relation to their genetic makeup. In this context, the advances made in the knowledge and the potentialities of genome-drugs associations paved the path for the development of a precision medicine. In fact, these associations may be successfully combined with the environment information to provide new strategies able to prevent and improve the disease management as well as to enhance the patients quality of life.

  6. Pharmacogenomics of multifactorial diseases: a focus on psoriatic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cascella, Raffaella; Strafella, Claudia; Longo, Giuliana; Maccarone, Mara; Borgiani, Paola; Sangiuolo, Federica; Novelli, Giuseppe; Giardina, Emiliano

    2016-06-01

    This review will outline the current pharmacogenomics knowledge about psoriatic arthritis with a special attention to the perspectives and the challenges for its implementation in the clinical practice. To date, different drugs have been developed to contrast the symptoms and the progression of psoriatic arthritis. However, patients have shown high variability of drug response in relation to their genetic makeup. In this context, the advances made in the knowledge and the potentialities of genome-drugs associations paved the path for the development of a precision medicine. In fact, these associations may be successfully combined with the environment information to provide new strategies able to prevent and improve the disease management as well as to enhance the patients quality of life. PMID:27269419

  7. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This is an illustrated text on computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine with an emphasis on the role and value of multiplanar imaging for helping determine diagnoses. The book has adequate discussion of scanning techniques for the different regions, interpretations of various abnormalities, degenerative disk disease, and different diagnoses. There is a 50-page chapter on detailed sectional anatomy of the spine and useful chapters on the postoperative spine and the planning and performing of spinal surgery with CT multiplanar reconstruction. There are comprehensive chapters on spinal tumors and trauma. The final two chapters of the book are devoted to CT image processing using digital networks and CT applications of medical computer graphics.

  8. Neuroimmunomodulation in the Gut: Focus on Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal immunity is finely regulated by several concomitant and overlapping mechanisms, in order to efficiently sense external stimuli and mount an adequate response of either tolerance or defense. In this context, a complex interplay between immune and nonimmune cells is responsible for the maintenance of normal homeostasis. However, in certain conditions, the disruption of such an intricate network may result in intestinal inflammation, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is believed to result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors acting in concert with an inappropriate immune response, which in turn interacts with nonimmune cells, including nervous system components. Currently, evidence shows that the interaction between the immune and the nervous system is bidirectional and plays a critical role in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. Recently, the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis has been shown to be under the reciprocal control of the microbiota by immune mechanisms, whereas intestinal microorganisms can modulate mucosal immunity. Therefore, in addition to presenting the mechanisms underlying the interaction between immune and nervous systems in the gut, here we discuss the role of the microbiota also in the regulation of neuroimmune crosstalk involved in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation, with potential implications to IBD pathogenesis. PMID:27471349

  9. Neuroimmunomodulation in the Gut: Focus on Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

    PubMed

    Bernardazzi, Claudio; Pêgo, Beatriz; de Souza, Heitor Siffert P

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal immunity is finely regulated by several concomitant and overlapping mechanisms, in order to efficiently sense external stimuli and mount an adequate response of either tolerance or defense. In this context, a complex interplay between immune and nonimmune cells is responsible for the maintenance of normal homeostasis. However, in certain conditions, the disruption of such an intricate network may result in intestinal inflammation, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is believed to result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors acting in concert with an inappropriate immune response, which in turn interacts with nonimmune cells, including nervous system components. Currently, evidence shows that the interaction between the immune and the nervous system is bidirectional and plays a critical role in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. Recently, the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis has been shown to be under the reciprocal control of the microbiota by immune mechanisms, whereas intestinal microorganisms can modulate mucosal immunity. Therefore, in addition to presenting the mechanisms underlying the interaction between immune and nervous systems in the gut, here we discuss the role of the microbiota also in the regulation of neuroimmune crosstalk involved in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation, with potential implications to IBD pathogenesis. PMID:27471349

  10. Quantitative characterization of metastatic disease in the spine. Part I. Semiautomated segmentation using atlas-based deformable registration and the level set method

    SciTech Connect

    Hardisty, M.; Gordon, L.; Agarwal, P.; Skrinskas, T.; Whyne, C.

    2007-08-15

    Quantitative assessment of metastatic disease in bone is often considered immeasurable and, as such, patients with skeletal metastases are often excluded from clinical trials. In order to effectively quantify the impact of metastatic tumor involvement in the spine, accurate segmentation of the vertebra is required. Manual segmentation can be accurate but involves extensive and time-consuming user interaction. Potential solutions to automating segmentation of metastatically involved vertebrae are demons deformable image registration and level set methods. The purpose of this study was to develop a semiautomated method to accurately segment tumor-bearing vertebrae using the aforementioned techniques. By maintaining morphology of an atlas, the demons-level set composite algorithm was able to accurately differentiate between trans-cortical tumors and surrounding soft tissue of identical intensity. The algorithm successfully segmented both the vertebral body and trabecular centrum of tumor-involved and healthy vertebrae. This work validates our approach as equivalent in accuracy to an experienced user.

  11. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 2: assessment of functional outcome following lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Ghogawala, Zoher; Resnick, Daniel K; Watters, William C; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Dailey, Andrew T; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Eck, Jason C; Sharan, Alok; Groff, Michael W; Wang, Jeffrey C; Dhall, Sanjay S; Kaiser, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    Assessment of functional patient-reported outcome following lumbar spinal fusion continues to be essential for comparing the effectiveness of different treatments for patients presenting with degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. When assessing functional outcome in patients being treated with lumbar spinal fusion, a reliable, valid, and responsive outcomes instrument such as the Oswestry Disability Index should be used. The SF-36 and the SF-12 have emerged as dominant measures of general health-related quality of life. Research has established the minimum clinically important difference for major functional outcomes measures, and this should be considered when assessing clinical outcome. The results of recent studies suggest that a patient's pretreatment psychological state is a major independent variable that affects the ability to detect change in functional outcome.

  12. Lumbar spine chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Hatem, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare tumor arising from notochord remnants in the spine. It is slow-growing, which makes it difficult to diagnose and difficult to follow up after treatment. Typically, it occurs in the base of the skull and sacrococcygeal spine; it rarely occurs in other parts of the spine. CT-guided biopsy of a suspicious mass enabled diagnosis of lumbar spine chordoma. PMID:27186250

  13. Divergent Associations of Antecedent- and Response-Focused Emotion Regulation Strategies with Midlife Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    PubMed Central

    Loucks, Eric B.; Buka, Stephen L.; Kubzansky, Laura D.

    2014-01-01

    Background It is not known whether various forms of emotion regulation are differentially related to cardiovascular disease risk. Purpose The purpose of this study is to assess whether antecedent and response-focused emotion regulation would have divergent associations with likelihood of developing cardiovascular disease. Methods Two emotion regulation strategies were examined: reappraisal (antecedent-focused) and suppression (response-focused). Cardiovascular disease risk was assessed with a validated Framingham algorithm that estimates the likelihood of developing CVD in 10 years. Associations were assessed among 373 adults via multiple linear regression. Pathways and gender-specific associations were also considered. Results One standard deviation increases in reappraisal and suppression were associated with 5.9 % lower and 10.0 % higher 10-year cardiovascular disease risk, respectively, in adjusted analyses. Conclusions Divergent associations of antecedent and response-focused emotion regulation with cardiovascular disease risk were observed. Effective emotion regulation may promote cardiovascular health. PMID:24570218

  14. [New progress on three-dimensional movement measurement analysis of human spine].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Xiao-wen; He, Xi-jing; Huang, Si-hua; Liang, Bao-bao; Yu, Zi-rui

    2015-05-01

    Spinal biomechanics, especially the range of spine motion,has close connection with spinal surgery. The change of the range of motion (ROM) is an important indicator of diseases and injuries of spine, and the essential evaluating standards of effect of surgeries and therapies to spine. The analysis of ROM can be dated to the time of the invention of X-ray and even that before it. With the development of science and technology as well as the optimization of various types of calculation methods, diverse measuring methods have emerged, from imaging methods to non-imaging methods, from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, from measuring directly on the X-ray films to calculating automatically by computer. Analysis of ROM has made great progress, but there are some older methods cannot meet the needs of the times and disappear, some classical methods such as X-ray still have vitality. Combining different methods, three dimensions and more vivo spine research are the trend of analysis of ROM. And more and more researchers began to focus on vivo spine research. In this paper, the advantages and disadvantages of the methods utilized recently are presented through viewing recent literatures, providing reference and help for the movement analysis of spine. PMID:26193733

  15. Image-guided Spine Stabilization for Traumatic or Osteoporotic Spine Injury: Radiological Accuracy and Neurological Outcome

    PubMed Central

    SHIMOKAWA, Nobuyuki; ABE, Junya; SATOH, Hidetoshi; ARIMA, Hironori; TAKAMI, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in image-guided surgery (IGS) over the last few decades. IGS can be effectively applied to spinal instrumentation surgery. In the present study, we focused our attention on the feasibility and safety of image-guided spine stabilization for traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury. The IGS spine fixation with or without minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques such as percutaneous screw placement, balloon kyphoplasty (BKP), or vertebroplasty (VP) were accomplished in 80 patients with traumatic or osteoprotic spine injury between 2007 and 2015. The injured vertebral levels included the following: cervical spine, 41; thoracic spine, 22; and lumbar spine, 17. Neurological condition before and after surgery was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS). A total of 419 pedicle, lateral mass, or laminar screws were placed, and 399 screws (95.2%) were found to be placed correctly based on postoperative computed tomography scan. Although 20 screws (4.8%) were found to be unexpectedly placed incorrectly, no neural or vascular complications closely associated with screw placement were encountered. Neurological outcomes appeared to be acceptable or successful based on AIS. The IGS is a promising technique that can improve the accuracy of screw placement and reduce potential injury to critical neurovascular structures. The integration of MIS and IGS has proved feasible and safe in the treatment of traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury, although a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, spine biomechanics, and basic technique remain the most essential aspects for a successful surgery. PMID:27063144

  16. Spine injuries in dancers.

    PubMed

    Gottschlich, Laura M; Young, Craig C

    2011-01-01

    Care of a dancer calls for a unique balance between athlete and artist. The physician must familiarize himself or herself with dance terminology, common moves, correct technique, and dancer's mentality. The goal is to work intimately with the dancer to care for the injury and, if possible, continue to participate in portions of dance class to limit anxiety and increase compliance to treatment. The spine is the second most injured area of the body in dancers, and many issues stem from poor technique and muscle imbalance. This often leads to hyperlordosis, spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis, lumbar facet sprain, discogenic back pain, and muscle spasm and piriformis syndrome. This article reviews these causes of low back pain with a focus on dance-related presentation and treatment issues.

  17. Focus issue articles on emerging and re-emerging plant diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review sums up the key findings of seventeen articles on emerging and re-emerging plant diseases that are designated for the July focus issue in Phytopathology. The emerging and re-emerging diseases discussed include those caused by three viral, six fungal, five oomycete, and four bacterial pa...

  18. 78 FR 66747 - Sickle Cell Disease Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... published a notice (78 FR 21613) in the Federal Register announcing the disease areas for meetings in fiscal... published in the Federal Register on September 24, 2012 (77 FR 58849), and through a public meeting held on... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Sickle Cell Disease Public Meeting on Patient-Focused...

  19. Cactus spine injuries.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, D; Lindsey, W E

    1988-07-01

    Cactus spines produce injuries whose clinical significance is loosely in inverse proportion to the dimensions of the spine. Long and medium spines of saguaro and barrel cacti seldom result in embedded fragments, but when they do they are difficult to locate and remove. Other medium spines, those of prickly pear and cholla, are a nuisance but they can be removed readily by traction, as can the smaller spines (glochids) of the prickly pear. The very small spines (also glochids) of the polka dot or bunny's ear cactus (Opuntia microdasys) and the beavertail cactus (Opuntia basilaris) offer the most frustrating problem of all, but can be peeled off with a dried film of a professional facial gel. PMID:3390256

  20. [Catheter ablation of focus triggering ventricular fibrillation in patients with structural heart disease].

    PubMed

    Kautzner, Josef; Peichl, Petr

    2014-12-01

    First experiences with ablation of focus triggering ventricular fibrillation were reported in isolated cases of idiopathic ventricular fibrillation. Later, there were described the options in management of an electrical instability triggered by ectopic activity in patients after myocardial infarction. In both cases it was shown that the sources of extrasystoles originate almost exclusively from conducting system of chambers. Subsequently, isolated cases were also reported in other structural diseases. It is important that the urgent catheter ablation is able to remove focus which triggers electric instability. In many cases it is a lifesaving procedure. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the catheter ablation of focus triggering ventricular fibrillation with structural heart disease.

  1. Spine and sacroiliac joints on magnetic resonance imaging in patients with early axial spondyloarthritis: prevalence of lesions and association with clinical and disease activity indices from the Italian group of the SPACE study.

    PubMed

    Lorenzin, M; Ortolan, A; Frallonardo, P; Vio, S; Lacognata, C; Oliviero, F; Punzi, L; Ramonda, R

    2016-01-01

    Our aim was to determine the prevalence of spine and sacroiliac joint (SIJ) lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with early axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA) and their correlation with disease activity indices. Sixty patients with low back pain (LBP) (≥3 months, ≤2 years, onset ≤45 years), attending the SpA-clinic of the Unità Operativa Complessa Reumatologia of Padova [SpondyloArthritis-Caught-Early (SPACE) study], were studied following a protocol including physical examination, questionnaires, laboratory tests, X-rays and spine and SIJ MRI. Positive spine and SIJ MRI and X-rays images were scored independently by 2 readers using the SPARCC method, modified Stoke ankylosing spondylitis spine score and New York criteria. The axial pain and localization of MRI-lesions were referred to 4 sites: cervical/thoracic/lumbar spine and SIJ. All patients were classified into three groups: patients with signs of radiographic sacroiliitis (r-axSpA), patients without signs of r-axSpA but with signs of sacroiliitis on MRI (nr-axSpA MRI SIJ+), patients without signs of sacroiliitis on MRI and X-rays (nr-axSpA MRI SIJ-). The median age at LBP onset was 29.05±8.38 years; 51.6% of patients showed bone marrow edema (BME) in spine-MRI and 56.7% of patients in SIJ-MRI. Signs of enthesitis were found in 55% of patients in the thoracic district. Of the 55% of patients with BME on spine-MRI, 15% presented presented a negative SIJMRI. There was a significant difference between these cohorts with regard to the prevalence of radiographic sacroiliitis, active sacroiliitis on MRI and SPARCC SIJ score. The site of pain correlated statistically with BME lesions in thoracic and buttock districts. Since positive spine-MRI images were observed in absence of sacroiliitis, we can hypothesize that this finding could have a diagnostic significance in axSpA suspected axSpA. PMID:27608795

  2. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  3. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 14: brace therapy as an adjunct to or substitute for lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Andrew T; Ghogawala, Zoher; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Watters, William C; Resnick, Daniel K; Sharan, Alok; Eck, Jason C; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Wang, Jeffrey C; Groff, Michael W; Dhall, Sanjay S; Kaiser, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    The utilization of orthotic devices for lumbar degenerative disease has been justified from both a prognostic and therapeutic perspective. As a prognostic tool, bracing is applied prior to surgery to determine if immobilization of the spine leads to symptomatic relief and thus justify the performance of a fusion. Since bracing does not eliminate motion, the validity of this assumption is questionable. Only one low-level study has investigated the predictive value of bracing prior to surgery. No correlation between response to bracing and fusion outcome was observed; therefore a trial of preoperative bracing is not recommended. Based on low-level evidence, the use of bracing is not recommended for the prevention of low-back pain in a general working population, since the incidence of low-back pain and impact on productivity were not reduced. However, in laborers with a history of back pain, a positive impact on lost workdays was observed when bracing was applied. Bracing is recommended as an option for treatment of subacute low-back pain, as several higher-level studies have demonstrated an improvement in pain scores and function. The use of bracing following instrumented posterolateral fusion, however, is not recommended, since equivalent outcomes have been demonstrated with or without the application of a brace. PMID:24980591

  4. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 14: brace therapy as an adjunct to or substitute for lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Dailey, Andrew T; Ghogawala, Zoher; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Watters, William C; Resnick, Daniel K; Sharan, Alok; Eck, Jason C; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Wang, Jeffrey C; Groff, Michael W; Dhall, Sanjay S; Kaiser, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    The utilization of orthotic devices for lumbar degenerative disease has been justified from both a prognostic and therapeutic perspective. As a prognostic tool, bracing is applied prior to surgery to determine if immobilization of the spine leads to symptomatic relief and thus justify the performance of a fusion. Since bracing does not eliminate motion, the validity of this assumption is questionable. Only one low-level study has investigated the predictive value of bracing prior to surgery. No correlation between response to bracing and fusion outcome was observed; therefore a trial of preoperative bracing is not recommended. Based on low-level evidence, the use of bracing is not recommended for the prevention of low-back pain in a general working population, since the incidence of low-back pain and impact on productivity were not reduced. However, in laborers with a history of back pain, a positive impact on lost workdays was observed when bracing was applied. Bracing is recommended as an option for treatment of subacute low-back pain, as several higher-level studies have demonstrated an improvement in pain scores and function. The use of bracing following instrumented posterolateral fusion, however, is not recommended, since equivalent outcomes have been demonstrated with or without the application of a brace.

  5. Tumors of the spine

    PubMed Central

    Ciftdemir, Mert; Kaya, Murat; Selcuk, Esref; Yalniz, Erol

    2016-01-01

    Spine tumors comprise a small percentage of reasons for back pain and other symptoms originating in the spine. The majority of the tumors involving the spinal column are metastases of visceral organ cancers which are mostly seen in older patients. Primary musculoskeletal system sarcomas involving the spinal column are rare. Benign tumors and tumor-like lesions of the musculoskeletal system are mostly seen in young patients and often cause instability and canal compromise. Optimal diagnosis and treatment of spine tumors require a multidisciplinary approach and thorough knowledge of both spine surgery and musculoskeletal tumor surgery. Either primary or metastatic tumors involving the spine are demanding problems in terms of diagnosis and treatment. Spinal instability and neurological compromise are the main and critical problems in patients with tumors of the spinal column. In the past, only a few treatment options aiming short-term control were available for treatment of primary and metastatic spine tumors. Spine surgeons adapted their approach for spine tumors according to orthopaedic oncologic principles in the last 20 years. Advances in imaging, surgical techniques and implant technology resulted in better diagnosis and surgical treatment options, especially for primary tumors. Also, modern chemotherapy drugs and regimens with new radiotherapy and radiosurgery options caused moderate to long-term local and systemic control for even primary sarcomas involving the spinal column. PMID:26925382

  6. The ageing spine

    SciTech Connect

    Hukins, D.W.L. Nelson, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contain 15 selections. Some of the titles are: Effects of age on the appearance of magnetic resonance images of the spine; Potential for image analysis in quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the aging spine; Potential of x-ray diffraction computed tomography for discriminating between normal and osteoporotic bone; and Spinal fusion in the elderly.

  7. Tuberculosis of spine

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vinod; Patgaonkar, P. R.; Nagariya, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the spine is one of the most common spine pathology in India. Over last 4 decades a lot has changed in the diagnosis, medical treatment and surgical procedures to treat this disorder. Further developments in diagnosis using molecular genetic techniques, more effective antibiotics and more aggressive surgical protocols have become essential with emergence of multidrug resistant TB. Surgical procedures such as single stage anterior and posterior stabilization, extrapleral dorsal spine anterior stabilization and endoscopic thoracoscopic surgeries have reduced the mortality and morbidity of the surgical procedures. is rapidly progressing. It is a challenge to treat MDR-TB Spine with late onset paraplegia and progressive deformity. Physicians must treat tuberculosis of spine on the basis of Culture and sensitivity. PMID:21572628

  8. Financial stability in biobanking: unique challenges for disease-focused foundations and patient advocacy organizations.

    PubMed

    Bromley, Russell L

    2014-10-01

    In the last decade, many disease-focused foundations and patient advocacy organizations that support biomedical research have created patient registries and biobanks. This article reviews the motivations behind the creation of those biobanks and how they are different from biobanks sponsored by government or industry. It also discusses some of the different funding models being employed by these organizations. Finally, it highlights some of the unique challenges faced by disease-focused foundations and advocacy organizations that sponsor biobanks, and how they are overcoming those challenges to achieve both financial and operational sustainability.

  9. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Early Prevention of Inflammatory Neurodegenerative Disease: A Focus on Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J; Thomas, C J; Radcliffe, J; Itsiopoulos, C

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Furthermore, AD has provided the most positive indication to support the fact that inflammation contributes to neurodegenerative disease. The exact etiology of AD is unknown, but environmental and genetic factors are thought to contribute, such as advancing age, family history, presence of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, and poor diet and lifestyle. It is hypothesised that early prevention or management of inflammation could delay the onset or reduce the symptoms of AD. Normal physiological changes to the brain with ageing include depletion of long chain omega-3 fatty acids and brains of AD patients have lower docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels. DHA supplementation can reduce markers of inflammation. This review specifically focusses on the evidence in humans from epidemiological, dietary intervention, and supplementation studies, which supports the role of long chain omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention or delay of cognitive decline in AD in its early stages. Longer term trials with long chain omega-3 supplementation in early stage AD are warranted. We also highlight the importance of overall quality and composition of the diet to protect against AD and dementia.

  10. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Early Prevention of Inflammatory Neurodegenerative Disease: A Focus on Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J; Thomas, C J; Radcliffe, J; Itsiopoulos, C

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Furthermore, AD has provided the most positive indication to support the fact that inflammation contributes to neurodegenerative disease. The exact etiology of AD is unknown, but environmental and genetic factors are thought to contribute, such as advancing age, family history, presence of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, and poor diet and lifestyle. It is hypothesised that early prevention or management of inflammation could delay the onset or reduce the symptoms of AD. Normal physiological changes to the brain with ageing include depletion of long chain omega-3 fatty acids and brains of AD patients have lower docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels. DHA supplementation can reduce markers of inflammation. This review specifically focusses on the evidence in humans from epidemiological, dietary intervention, and supplementation studies, which supports the role of long chain omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention or delay of cognitive decline in AD in its early stages. Longer term trials with long chain omega-3 supplementation in early stage AD are warranted. We also highlight the importance of overall quality and composition of the diet to protect against AD and dementia. PMID:26301243

  11. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Early Prevention of Inflammatory Neurodegenerative Disease: A Focus on Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J.; Thomas, C. J.; Radcliffe, J.; Itsiopoulos, C.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Furthermore, AD has provided the most positive indication to support the fact that inflammation contributes to neurodegenerative disease. The exact etiology of AD is unknown, but environmental and genetic factors are thought to contribute, such as advancing age, family history, presence of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, and poor diet and lifestyle. It is hypothesised that early prevention or management of inflammation could delay the onset or reduce the symptoms of AD. Normal physiological changes to the brain with ageing include depletion of long chain omega-3 fatty acids and brains of AD patients have lower docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels. DHA supplementation can reduce markers of inflammation. This review specifically focusses on the evidence in humans from epidemiological, dietary intervention, and supplementation studies, which supports the role of long chain omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention or delay of cognitive decline in AD in its early stages. Longer term trials with long chain omega-3 supplementation in early stage AD are warranted. We also highlight the importance of overall quality and composition of the diet to protect against AD and dementia. PMID:26301243

  12. Triad of metabolic syndrome, chronic kidney disease, and coronary heart disease with a focus on microalbuminuria death by overeating.

    PubMed

    Gobal, Freij; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Shah, Sudhir; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2011-06-01

    Coronary heart disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, and its incidence is rising worldwide. Because atherosclerosis is a chronic process, and it is often associated with certain lifestyle and risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance, much emphasis is being placed on lifestyle modification and control of risk factors. It is being recognized that some lifestyle patterns such as overeating result in metabolic syndrome, which may play a role in the development of chronic kidney disease and coronary heart disease. Here, we focus on an important relationship between these 3 conditions, and we provide evidence that microalbuminuria develops in many patients with metabolic syndrome, may be an important correlate of chronic kidney disease and coronary heart disease, and may represent an important prognostic marker. Although the pathogenesis of microalbuminuria in metabolic syndrome is not clear, we suggest that microalbuminuria, chronic kidney disease, and coronary heart disease share common pathways involving inflammation and oxidative stress. We also discuss that a healthy lifestyle is essential for preventing and treating chronic kidney disease and coronary heart disease seen in patients with metabolic syndrome.

  13. Transplantation-based gene therapy for inflammatory diseases: focus on glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Yokoo, T; Ohashi, T

    2001-07-01

    Over the past decade, bone marrow transplantation has come to be considered an ideal therapeutic strategy for the treatment of certain diseases affecting the hematopoietic system such as hemophilia, and several clinical trials have been performed. Although traditionally used for the treatment of lethal diseases, it is speculated that this approach could also be used in the treatment of non-lethal but much more common diseases, which are resistant to conventional therapies, and affect a large number of patients physically and even financially. Inflammation may be one target for transplantation-based gene therapy, since macrophages and neutrophils, which are basically derived from hematopoietic stem cells, have been identified as key determinants in the development of diseases. This article focuses on the glomerulonephritis as a model of local inflammation and reviews recent investigations on transplantation-based gene therapy for inflammatory diseases.

  14. Vascular disease modeling using induced pluripotent stem cells: Focus in Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pitrez, P R; Rosa, S C; Praça, C; Ferreira, L

    2016-05-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) represent today an invaluable tool to create disease cell models for modeling and drug screening. Several lines of iPSCs have been generated in the last 7 years that changed the paradigm for studying diseases and the discovery of new drugs to treat them. In this article we focus our attention to vascular diseases in particular Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), a devastating premature aging disease caused by a mutation in the lamin A gene. In general, patients die because of myocardial infarction or stroke. Because the patients are fragile the isolation of a particular type of cells is very difficult. Therefore in the last 5 years, researchers have used cells derived from iPSCs to model aspects of the HGPS and to screen libraries of chemicals to retard or treat the disease.

  15. Interactive Introductory Nutrition Course Focusing on Disease Prevention Increased Whole-Grain Consumption by College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ha, Eun-Jeong; Caine-Bish, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To estimate current consumption of whole grains in college students and determine whether there would be an increase in whole-grain consumption after the students completed an interactive introductory nutrition course focusing on disease prevention. Methods: Eighty college students, 18-24 years old, participated in the study. Grain and…

  16. BIOTECHNOLOGIES AND BIOMATERIALS IN SPINE SURGERY.

    PubMed

    Vadala', G; Russo, F; Ambrosio, L; Di Martino, A; Papalia, R; Denaro, V

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, spine disorders have become a major health concern and the number of spinal surgical procedures has been rising significantly. Several biotechnologies and biomaterials are often used in spine surgery to increase the effectiveness of the treatment. In the degenerative spine, when conservative treatment is ineffective the most recommended surgical procedure is decompression followed by spinal fusion. Success rates of spine fusion extensively rely on bone grafts peculiar properties. Autograft has been considered the gold standard to achieve a solid fusion but current research is focused on the development of new biomaterials. Osteoporosis is the main cause of vertebral compression fractures that are significantly associated with pain and disability, especially in the aging population. Vertebral augmentation is a minimally invasive approach in which cement is injected into the vertebral body to stabilize the fracture. New cements are being developed in the clinical scenario with reabsorbable properties and biomechanical features more similar to the native bone. The development of disc regeneration strategies such as nucleus pulposus restoration and annulus fibrosus repair may represent a minimally invasive procedure towards regeneration rather than fusion. Therefore, biomaterials and tissue engineering are fields of growing interest among both surgeons and manufacturing companies, with a major involvement in spine surgery. This review discusses current and novel biotechnologies and biomaterial used in spine surgery employing fusion, augmentation and regeneration.

  17. On What Diseases and Health Conditions Should New Economic Research on Health and Development Focus?

    PubMed Central

    Behrman, Jere R.; Behrman, Julia A.; Perez, Nykia M.

    2010-01-01

    Given the public goods nature of research, economic research on health in developing countries is likely to have the highest returns by focusing, inter alia, on diseases and health conditions that are relatively widespread and costly and that are relatively rapidly growing. This article first summarizes the time patterns in economic research on diseases and health in developing countries for 1990–2005. It then compares those time patterns with the distribution of DALYS for diseases and health conditions in developing countries estimated for 2005 and for 2030. These comparisons suggest relatively overemphasis on HIV/AIDS and underemphasis on noncommunicable diseases. This opens the possibility for individuals or organizations initiating, re-evaluating or increasing their economic research on health and development to make a significant contribution by focusing particularly on the analysis of behaviour and policy choices related to non-communicable diseases. Careful consideration must, of course, be given to other demands, but on the basis of these two criteria, potential contributions are likely to be greatest from research with such a focus. PMID:19294633

  18. Analysis of Postoperative Thoracolumbar Spine Infections in a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial Using the Centers for Disease Control Surgical Site Infection Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Richelle C.; Lonner, Baron S.; Andres, Tate M.; Park, Justin J.; Ricart-Hoffiz, Pedro A.; Bendo, John A.; Goldstein, Jeffrey A.; Spivak, Jeffrey M.; Errico, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wound infections following spinal surgery place a high toll on both the patient and the healthcare system. Although several large series studies have examined the incidence and distribution of spinal wound infection, the applicability of these studies varies greatly since nearly every study is either retrospective and/or lacks standard inclusion criteria for defining surgical site infection. To address this void, we present results from prospectively gathered thoracolumbar spine surgery data for which the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria were stringently applied to define a surgical site infection (SSI). Methods A prospective randomized trial of 314 patients who underwent multilevel thoracolumbar spinal surgery with instrumentation followed by postoperative drain placement was completed (Takemoto et al., 2015). The trial consisted of two antibiotic arms: one for 24-hours, and the other for the duration of the drain; no differences were found between the arms. All infections meeting CDC criteria for SSI were included. Results A total of 40 infections met CDC criteria for SSI, for an overall incidence of 12.7%. Of these, 20 (50%) were culture-positive. The most common organism was Staphylococcus aureus (4 total: methicillin-sensitive=2; methicillin-resistant=2), followed by coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (3 cases), Propionibacterium acnes and Escherichia coli (2 cases each). Six infections grew multiple organisms, most commonly involving coagulase-negative staphylococcus and enterococcus. Conclusions Our findings indicate that thoracolumbar SSI occurs at the higher end of the range cited in the literature (2-13%), which is largely based on retrospective data not subjected to the inclusivity of SSI as defined by the CDC. The three most common organisms in our analysis (S. aureus, P. acnes, E. coli) are consistent with previous reports. Staphylococcus aureus continues to be the most common causative organism and continued vigilance and

  19. Multiple noncontiguous spine fractures.

    PubMed

    Henderson, R L; Reid, D C; Saboe, L A

    1991-02-01

    The data from a prospective study of 508 spine injuries were reviewed to determine the incidence of multiple noncontiguous spine fractures. All patients were examined at admission and at 1 and 2 years postinjury. This series identified 77 (15.2%) multilevel fractures. Motor vehicle accidents were the primary cause of these fractures. The incidence of neurologic injury was not significantly different between multiple noncontiguous and single fractures. Failure to use seat belts and ejection from the vehicle were the main factors associated with multiple noncontiguous spine injuries. Seven major fracture patterns were identified, which accounted for 60% of these injuries. The prognosis for multilevel spine fractures was not significantly worse that that for single-level injuries. PMID:2011766

  20. North American Spine Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... top spine care professionals from around the world starts here. Become a Member Now. Spinal injections and stimulation techniques. Didactics, hands-on training and discussions. Register Now A new way for patients to search, filter, and make ...

  1. Clinical radiology of the spine and spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Banna, M.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a source of information about aspects of radiology of the spine and spinal column. It presents coverage of both normal and abnormal conditions. Contents: Spinal fractures and dislocations. Degenerative diseases of the spine. Gross anatomy of the spinal cord and meninges. Intraspinal mass lesions. Spinal dysraphism. Congenital anomalies. Tumors of the vertebral column, and more.

  2. Systemic transthyretin amyloidosis in a patient with bent spine syndrome.

    PubMed

    Rezania, Kourosh; Pytel, Peter; Smit, Laurel J; Mastrianni, James; Dina, Michelle A; Highsmith, W Edward; Dogan, Ahmet

    2013-06-01

    Wild-type and mutant transthyretin (TTR) are implicated in systemic amyloidosis (ATTR). Myopathy is a rare complication of ATTR amyloidosis, however no patient with bent spine syndrome secondary to ATTR amyloidosis has been reported so far. We present the first case of bent spine syndrome in a patient with wild-type ATTR amyloidosis who also had concomitant Alzheimer's disease.

  3. A Comprehensive Fluid Dynamic-Diffusion Model of Blood Microcirculation with Focus on Sickle Cell Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floch, Francois; Harris, Wesley L.

    2009-11-01

    A novel methodology has been developed to address sickle cell disease, based on highly descriptive mathematical models for blood flow in the capillaries. Our investigations focus on the coupling between oxygen delivery and red blood cell dynamics, which is crucial to understanding sickle cell crises and is unique to this blood disease. The main part of our work is an extensive study of blood dynamics through simulations of red cells deforming within the capillary vessels, and relies on the use of a large mathematical system of equations describing oxygen transfer, blood plasma dynamics and red cell membrane mechanics. This model is expected to lead to the development of new research strategies for sickle cell disease. Our simulation model could be used not only to assess current researched remedies, but also to spur innovative research initiatives, based on our study of the physical properties coupled in sickle cell disease.

  4. World Kidney Day 2016: averting the legacy of kidney disease-focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-04-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, while only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood.

  5. World Kidney Day 2016: Averting the legacy of kidney disease-focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-03-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early, or who are small-for-date newborns, have a relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, while only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy-makers, and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:26884120

  6. Editorial: World Kidney Day 2016: Averting the Legacy of Kidney Disease--Focus on Childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for-date newborns have a relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, although only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers, and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:27085729

  7. Role of Haptoglobin in Health and Disease: A Focus on Diabetes.

    PubMed

    MacKellar, Mark; Vigerust, David J

    2016-07-01

    In Brief Prospective identification of individuals with diabetes who are at greatest risk for developing complications would have considerable public health importance by allowing appropriate resources to be focused on those who would benefit most from aggressive intervention. Haptoglobin (Hp) is an acute-phase protein that is crucial for the elimination of free hemoglobin and the neutralization of oxidative damage. In the past two decades, associations have been made between polymorphisms in Hp and complications arising from diabetes. Individuals with polymorphism in Hp have been shown to have significantly higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes the current literature on the role of Hp in health and disease, with a focus on diabetes.

  8. Role of Haptoglobin in Health and Disease: A Focus on Diabetes.

    PubMed

    MacKellar, Mark; Vigerust, David J

    2016-07-01

    In Brief Prospective identification of individuals with diabetes who are at greatest risk for developing complications would have considerable public health importance by allowing appropriate resources to be focused on those who would benefit most from aggressive intervention. Haptoglobin (Hp) is an acute-phase protein that is crucial for the elimination of free hemoglobin and the neutralization of oxidative damage. In the past two decades, associations have been made between polymorphisms in Hp and complications arising from diabetes. Individuals with polymorphism in Hp have been shown to have significantly higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease. This review summarizes the current literature on the role of Hp in health and disease, with a focus on diabetes. PMID:27621532

  9. Dysphagia associated with cervical spine and postural disorders.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Soultana; Exarchakos, Georgios; Beris, Alexander; Ploumis, Avraam

    2013-12-01

    Difficulties with swallowing may be both persistent and life threatening for the majority of those who experience it irrespective of age, gender, and race. The purpose of this review is to define oropharyngeal dysphagia and describe its relationship to cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances due to either congenital or acquired disorders. The etiology and diagnosis of dysphagia are analyzed, focusing on cervical spine pathology associated with dysphagia as severe cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances largely have been held accountable for deglutition disorders. Scoliosis, kyphosis–lordosis, and osteophytes are the primary focus of this review in an attempt to elucidate the link between cervical spine disorders and dysphagia. It is important for physicians to be knowledgeable about what triggers oropharyngeal dysphagia in cases of cervical spine and postural disorders. Moreover, the optimum treatment for dysphagia, including the use of therapeutic maneuvers during deglutition, neck exercises, and surgical treatment, is discussed.

  10. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, Tasso J. Kramer, Mark A.; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2013-12-15

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases.

  11. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaper, Tasso J.; Kramer, Mark A.; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2013-12-01

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases.

  12. Urine Proteome Biomarkers in Kidney Diseases. I. Limits, Perspectives, and First Focus on Normal Urine

    PubMed Central

    Santucci, Laura; Bruschi, Maurizio; Candiano, Giovanni; Lugani, Francesca; Petretto, Andrea; Bonanni, Alice; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2016-01-01

    Urine proteome is a potential source of information in renal diseases, and it is considered a natural area of investigation for biomarkers. Technology developments have markedly increased the power analysis on urinary proteins, and it is time to confront methodologies and results of major studies on the topics. This is a first part of a series of reviews that will focus on the urine proteome as a site for detecting biomarkers of renal diseases; the theme of the first review concerns methodological aspects applied to normal urine. Main issues are techniques for urine pretreatment, separation of exosomes, use of combinatorial peptide ligand libraries, mass spectrometry approaches, and analysis of data sets. Available studies show important differences, suggesting a major confounding effect of the technologies utilized for analysis. The objective is to obtain consensus about which approaches should be utilized for studying urine proteome in renal diseases. PMID:26997865

  13. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Kaper, Tasso J.; Kramer, Mark A.; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2013-01-01

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases. PMID:24387579

  14. Morphological change tracking of dendritic spines based on structural features.

    PubMed

    Son, J; Song, S; Lee, S; Chang, S; Kim, M

    2011-03-01

    Identification and tracking of dendritic spine morphology from two-dimensional time-lapsed images plays an important role in neurobiological research. Such analysis can enable us to derive a correlation between morphological characteristics and molecular mechanism of dendritic spine development and remodelling. Moreover, Neuronal morphology of hippocampal Cornu Ammonis 1 region is critical for understanding the Alzheimer's disease. Therefore, we need to extract and trace the dendritic spines accurately for examining their development and remodelling processes, which are related to functions of hippocampal Cornu Ammonis 1. There are some problems to be solved in related researches. Noise due to the properties of optical microscopes makes it difficult to identify and trace dendritic spines accurately. To solve these problems, in this paper we present a local spine detection technique minimizing noise influence in two-dimensional optical microscopy images. Also, we suggest an efficient mapping method for tracking the dynamics of dendritic spines to measure their morphological changes quantitatively. First, to utilize structural feature of spines, which are small protrusions of tree-like dendrites, we extract the tips of each dendritic branch and use this position as an initial contour position for a deformable model-based segmentation. We then use a geodesic active contour model to detect the spines accurately. Secondly, we apply an optical flow method, which takes into account both structure and movement of objects, to map every time-series image frame. Proposed method provides accurate measurements of dendritic spine length, volume, shape classification for time-lapse images of dendrites of hippocampal neurons. We compared the proposed spine detection algorithm with manual method performed by biologists and noncommercial software NeuronIQ. In particular, this method is able to segment dendritic spines better than existing methods with high sensitivity in adjacent

  15. Minimally invasive procedures on the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Gilligan, Jeffrey; Cutler, Holt S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is a common and increasingly prevalent condition that is often implicated as the primary reason for chronic low back pain and the leading cause of disability in the western world. Surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease has historically been approached by way of open surgical procedures aimed at decompressing and/or stabilizing the lumbar spine. Advances in technology and surgical instrumentation have led to minimally invasive surgical techniques being developed and increasingly used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to the traditional open spine surgery, minimally invasive techniques require smaller incisions and decrease approach-related morbidity by avoiding muscle crush injury by self-retaining retractors, preventing the disruption of tendon attachment sites of important muscles at the spinous processes, using known anatomic neurovascular and muscle planes, and minimizing collateral soft-tissue injury by limiting the width of the surgical corridor. The theoretical benefits of minimally invasive surgery over traditional open surgery include reduced blood loss, decreased postoperative pain and narcotics use, shorter hospital length of stay, faster recover and quicker return to work and normal activity. This paper describes the different minimally invasive techniques that are currently available for the treatment of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:25610845

  16. Cervical spine trauma

    PubMed Central

    Torretti, Joel A; Sengupta, Dilip K

    2007-01-01

    Cervical spine trauma is a common problem with a wide range of severity from minor ligamentous injury to frank osteo-ligamentous instability with spinal cord injury. The emergent evaluation of patients at risk relies on standardized clinical and radiographic protocols to identify injuries; elucidate associated pathology; classify injuries; and predict instability, treatment and outcomes. The unique anatomy of each region of the cervical spine demands a review of each segment individually. This article examines both upper cervical spine injuries, as well as subaxial spine trauma. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the broad topic of cervical spine trauma with reference to the classic literature, as well as to summarize all recently available literature on each topic. Identification of References for Inclusion: A Pubmed and Ovid search was performed for each topic in the review to identify recently published articles relevant to the review. In addition prior reviews and classic references were evaluated individually for inclusion of classic papers, classifications and previously unidentified references. PMID:21139776

  17. Motion preservation surgery in the spine.

    PubMed

    Murtagh, Ryan; Castellvi, Antonio E

    2014-05-01

    The primary goal of motion preservation surgery in the spine is to maintain normal or near normal motion in an attempt to prevent adverse outcomes commonly seen with conventional spinal fusion, most notably the development of adjacent-level degenerative disc disease. Several different surgical approaches have been developed to preserve motion in the lumbar spine, including total disc replacement, partial disc (nucleus) replacement, interspinous spacers, dynamic stabilization devices, and total facet replacement devices. The design of devices varies greatly. The devices are created using a similar rationale but are unique in design relative to their lumbar counterparts. PMID:24792608

  18. Spine development for the Echidna fiber positioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Anna M.; Gillingham, Peter R.; Griesbach, Jason S.; Akiyama, Masayuki

    2003-03-01

    The Echidna multi-object fiber positioner is part of the Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph (FMOS) project for the prime focus of the Subaru telescope. Given the physical size of the focal plane and the required number of fibers (400), a positioning system based on the Anglo-Australian Observatory's 2dF instrument, that incorporates the placement of magnetic buttons by a single X/Y/Z robot, was considered impractical. Instead, a solution has been developed in which each fiber is mounted on a tilting spine that allows the fiber to be positioned anywhere in a circle of radius 7 mm. Each of the 400 fibers therefore has a fixed "patrol" area in the field of view, with a significant overlap between neighboring spines. A description of a single Echidna spine is presented. Each spine is driven by a quadrant tube piezoelectric actuator (QTP) that, by a ratcheting mechanism, is able to position the fiber to within 10 μm of any coordinate in the corresponding patrol area. Results of positioning tests for eight of the twenty prototype spines reveal better than specification performance, as well as a durability far in excess of the specified lifetime of the instrument.

  19. Ultrastructure of Dendritic Spines: Correlation Between Synaptic and Spine Morphologies

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, Jon I.; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Yuste, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic spines are critical elements of cortical circuits, since they establish most excitatory synapses. Recent studies have reported correlations between morphological and functional parameters of spines. Specifically, the spine head volume is correlated with the area of the postsynaptic density (PSD), the number of postsynaptic receptors and the ready-releasable pool of transmitter, whereas the length of the spine neck is proportional to the degree of biochemical and electrical isolation of the spine from its parent dendrite. Therefore, the morphology of a spine could determine its synaptic strength and learning rules. To better understand the natural variability of neocortical spine morphologies, we used a combination of gold-toned Golgi impregnations and serial thin-section electron microscopy and performed three-dimensional reconstructions of spines from layer 2/3 pyramidal cells from mouse visual cortex. We characterized the structure and synaptic features of 144 completed reconstructed spines, and analyzed their morphologies according to their positions. For all morphological parameters analyzed, spines exhibited a continuum of variability, without clearly distinguishable subtypes of spines or clear dependence of their morphologies on their distance to the soma. On average, the spine head volume was correlated strongly with PSD area and weakly with neck diameter, but not with neck length. The large morphological diversity suggests an equally large variability of synaptic strength and learning rules. PMID:18982124

  20. Dorsal spine osteoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Pranshu; Singh, Rahul; Garg, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign osteoblastoma is a rare primary neoplasm comprising less than 1% of primary bone tumors.[1] We report a case of a 20-year-old female patient presenting with progressive paraparesis over one year and back pain over the dorsal spine gradually increasing in severity over a year. Computerised tomomography (CT) of the spine revealed a well-defined 3.5 × 3.0 cm mass heterodense expansile bony lesion arising from the lamina of the D12 vertebra, having lytic and sclerotic component and causing compromise of the bony spinal canal. D12 laminectomy and total excision of the tumor was done. PMID:27057242

  1. Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain More than 40 million people in the United States have osteoporosis (a decrease in the amount ...

  2. Diversify or focus? Spending to combat infectious diseases when budgets are tight.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Soren T; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Salant, Stephen W

    2012-07-01

    We consider a health authority seeking to allocate annual budgets optimally over time to minimize the discounted social cost of infection(s) evolving in a finite set of groups. This optimization problem is challenging since the standard SIS epidemiological model describing the spread of the disease contains a nonconvexity. Neither optimal control nor standard discrete-time dynamic programming can be used to identify the optimal policy. We modify the standard dynamic programming algorithm and show how familiar, elementary arguments can be used to reach conclusions about the optimal policy. We show that under certain conditions it is optimal to focus the entire annual budget on one group at a time rather than divide it among several groups, as is often done in practice. We also show that under certain conditions it remains optimal to focus on one group when faced with a wealth constraint instead of an annual budget.

  3. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children: focus on nutritional interventions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Gong, Sitang; Ye, Shui Qing; Lyman, Beth; Geng, Lanlan; Chen, Peiyu; Li, Ding-You

    2014-10-28

    With increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the most common cause of liver disease among children and adolescents in industrialized countries. It is generally recognized that both genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Recently, there has been a growing body of evidence to implicate altered gut microbiota in the development of NAFLD through the gut-liver axis. The first line of prevention and treatment of NAFLD in children should be intensive lifestyle interventions such as changes in diet and physical activity. Recent advances have been focused on limitation of dietary fructose and supplementation of antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics. Convincing evidences from both animal models and human studies have shown that reduction of dietary fructose and supplement of vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics improve NAFLD.

  4. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children: Focus on Nutritional Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Gong, Sitang; Ye, Shui Qing; Lyman, Beth; Geng, Lanlan; Chen, Peiyu; Li, Ding-You

    2014-01-01

    With increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the most common cause of liver disease among children and adolescents in industrialized countries. It is generally recognized that both genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Recently, there has been a growing body of evidence to implicate altered gut microbiota in the development of NAFLD through the gut-liver axis. The first line of prevention and treatment of NAFLD in children should be intensive lifestyle interventions such as changes in diet and physical activity. Recent advances have been focused on limitation of dietary fructose and supplementation of antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics. Convincing evidences from both animal models and human studies have shown that reduction of dietary fructose and supplement of vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics improve NAFLD. PMID:25353664

  5. New areas of focus at workshop on human diseases involving DNA repair deficiency and premature aging.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, Kenneth H; Sander, Miriam; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2007-02-01

    Researchers and clinicians interested in human diseases of DNA repair deficiency and premature aging gathered at the National Conference Center in Lansdowne, Virginia on 5-8 September 2006 to attend a workshop co-organized by Vilhelm Bohr (National Institute of Aging) and Kenneth Kraemer (National Cancer Institute). An important feature of this workshop was the participation of representatives from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), Cockayne Syndrome (CS) and trichothiodystrophy (TTD) family support groups. Studies presented at the workshop described important new insights into the phenotypic complexity of XP, CS and TTD, renewed focus on the neurological manifestations of each of these diseases, as well as keen interest in the role of oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative processes and normal and/or premature aging. This workshop report summarizes some of the presentations and outcomes of the workshop.

  6. Are Endothelial Progenitor Cells the Real Solution for Cardiovascular Diseases? Focus on Controversies and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Balistreri, Carmela R; Buffa, Silvio; Pisano, Calogera; Lio, Domenico; Ruvolo, Giovanni; Mazzesi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Advanced knowledge in the field of stem cell biology and their ability to provide a cue for counteracting several diseases are leading numerous researchers to focus their attention on "regenerative medicine" as possible solutions for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, the lack of consistent evidence in this arena has hampered the clinical application. The same condition affects the research on endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), creating more confusion than comprehension. In this review, this aspect is discussed with particular emphasis. In particular, we describe biology and physiology of EPCs, outline their clinical relevance as both new predictive, diagnostic, and prognostic CVD biomarkers and therapeutic agents, discuss advantages, disadvantages, and conflicting data about their use as possible solutions for vascular impairment and clinical applications, and finally underline a very crucial aspect of EPCs "characterization and definition," which seems to be the real cause of large heterogeneity existing in literature data on this topic. PMID:26509164

  7. Physiologic Assessment of Coronary Artery Disease: Focus on Fractional Flow Reserve

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Doyeon; Lee, Joo Myung

    2016-01-01

    The presence of myocardial ischemia is the most important prognostic factor in patients with ischemic heart disease. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a gold standard invasive method used to detect the stenosis-specific myocardial ischemia. FFR-guided revascularization strategy is superior to angiography-guided strategy. The recently developed hyperemia-free index, instantaneous wave free ratio is being actively investigated. A non-invasive FFR derived from coronary CT angiography is now used in clinical practice. Due to rapid expansion of invasive and non-invasive physiologic assessment, comprehensive understanding of the role and potential pitfalls of each modality are required for its application. In this review, we focus on the basic and clinical aspects of physiologic assessment in ischemic heart disease. PMID:27134520

  8. Are Endothelial Progenitor Cells the Real Solution for Cardiovascular Diseases? Focus on Controversies and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Balistreri, Carmela R; Buffa, Silvio; Pisano, Calogera; Lio, Domenico; Ruvolo, Giovanni; Mazzesi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Advanced knowledge in the field of stem cell biology and their ability to provide a cue for counteracting several diseases are leading numerous researchers to focus their attention on "regenerative medicine" as possible solutions for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, the lack of consistent evidence in this arena has hampered the clinical application. The same condition affects the research on endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), creating more confusion than comprehension. In this review, this aspect is discussed with particular emphasis. In particular, we describe biology and physiology of EPCs, outline their clinical relevance as both new predictive, diagnostic, and prognostic CVD biomarkers and therapeutic agents, discuss advantages, disadvantages, and conflicting data about their use as possible solutions for vascular impairment and clinical applications, and finally underline a very crucial aspect of EPCs "characterization and definition," which seems to be the real cause of large heterogeneity existing in literature data on this topic.

  9. Modulation of the glutamatergic transmission by Dopamine: a focus on Parkinson, Huntington and Addiction diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gardoni, Fabrizio; Bellone, Camilla

    2015-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) plays a major role in motor and cognitive functions as well as in reward processing by regulating glutamatergic inputs. In particular in the striatum the release of DA rapidly influences synaptic transmission modulating both AMPA and NMDA receptors. Several neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders, including Parkinson, Huntington and addiction-related diseases, manifest a dysregulation of glutamate and DA signaling. Here, we will focus our attention on the mechanisms underlying the modulation of the glutamatergic transmission by DA in striatal circuits. PMID:25784855

  10. A Technological Review of the Instrumented Footwear for Rehabilitation with a Focus on Parkinson's Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Maculewicz, Justyna; Kofoed, Lise Busk; Serafin, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    In this review article, we summarize systems for gait rehabilitation based on instrumented footwear and present a context of their usage in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients' auditory and haptic rehabilitation. We focus on the needs of PD patients, but since only a few systems were made with this purpose, we go through several applications used in different scenarios when gait detection and rehabilitation are considered. We present developments of the designs, possible improvements, and software challenges and requirements. We conclude that in order to build successful systems for PD patients' gait rehabilitation, technological solutions from several studies have to be applied and combined with knowledge from auditory and haptic cueing.

  11. Extracellular Vesicles in Alzheimer’s Disease: Friends or Foes? Focus on Aβ-Vesicle Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pooja; Benussi, Luisa; Furlan, Roberto; Ghidoni, Roberta; Verderio, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The intercellular transfer of amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau proteins has received increasing attention in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Among other transfer modes, Aβ and tau dissemination has been suggested to occur through release of Extracellular Vesicles (EVs), which may facilitate delivery of pathogenic proteins over large distances. Recent evidence indicates that EVs carry on their surface, specific molecules which bind to extracellular Aβ, opening the possibility that EVs may also influence Aβ assembly and synaptotoxicity. In this review we focus on studies which investigated the impact of EVs in Aβ-mediated neurodegeneration and showed either detrimental or protective role for EVs in the pathology. PMID:25741766

  12. Targeting nanomedicines in the treatment of Crohn's disease: focus on certolizumab pegol (CDP870).

    PubMed

    Dinesen, Lotte; Travis, Simon

    2007-01-01

    A variety of targets for therapeutic intervention are based upon advances in understanding of the immunopathogenesis of Crohn's disease. Crohn's disease is initiated by an innate immune response, which eventuates in a T-cell driven process, characterized by a T-helper cell 1 type cytokine profile. Several new treatments now focus on suppressing T-cell differentiation or T-cell inflammation. Since inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) represents a state of dysregulated inflammation, drugs that augment the anti-inflammatory response have the potential to downregulate inflammation and thereby hopefully modify the disease. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a major target of research and clinical investigation. TNF has proinflammatory effects in the intestinal mucosa and is a pivotal cytokine in the inflammatory cascade. Certolizumab pegol (CDP870) is a PEGylated, Fab' fragment of a humanized anti-TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody. PEGylation increases the half-life, reduces the requirement for frequent dosing, and possibly reduces antigenicity as well. Certolizumab has been shown in Phase III trials to achieve and maintain clinical response and remission in Crohn's disease patients. It improves the quality of life. Certolizumab pegol will be indicated for moderately to severely active Crohn's disease, but it is not yet licensed in Europe or the US. It is not possible to construct an algorithm for treatment, but when compared with infliximab the two principal advantages are likely to be lower immunogenicity (as shown by anti-drug antibodies, absence of infusion reactions, and low rate of antinuclear antibodies), and a subcutaneous route of administration. These two factors may be sufficient to promote it up the pecking order of anti-TNF agents.

  13. Gut microbiota in health and disease: an overview focused on metabolic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, R; Kumar, M; Yadav, A K; Hemalatha, R; Yadav, H; Marotta, F; Yamashiro, Y

    2016-01-01

    In concern to the continuously rising global prevalence of obesity, diabetes and associated diseases, novel preventive and therapeutic approaches are urgently required. However, to explore and develop such innovative strategies, a meticulous comprehension of the biological basis of these diseases is extremely important. Past decade has witnessed an enormous amount of research investigation and advancement in the field of obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome, with the gut microbiota receiving a special focus in the triangle of nutrition, health and diseases. In particular, the role of gut microbiota in health and diseases has been one of the most vigorous and intriguing field of recent research; however, much still remains to be elucidated about its precise role in host metabolism and immune functions and its implication in the onset, progression as well as in the amelioration of metabolic ailments. Recent investigations have suggested a significant contribution of the gut microbiota in the regulation and impairment of energy homeostasis, thereby causing metabolic disorders, such as metabolic endotoxemia, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Numerous inflammatory biomarkers have been found to be associated with obesity, diabetes and risk of other associated adverse outcomes, thereby suggesting that a persistent low-grade inflammatory response is a potential risk factor. In this milieu, this review intends to discuss potential evidences supporting the disturbance of the gut microbiota balance and the intestinal barrier permeability as a potential triggering factor for systemic inflammation in the onset and progression of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. PMID:26645350

  14. Focus on emerging drugs for the treatment of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Federico, Alessandro; Zulli, Claudio; de Sio, Ilario; Del Prete, Anna; Dallio, Marcello; Masarone, Mario; Loguercio, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common liver disorder in Western countries and is increasingly being recognized in developing nations. Fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of hepatic pathology, ranging from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and end-stage liver disease. Moreover, NAFLD is often associated with other metabolic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus type 2, dyslipidemia and visceral obesity. The most recent guidelines suggest the management and treatment of patients with NAFLD considering both the liver disease and the associated metabolic co-morbidities. Diet and physical exercise are considered the first line of treatment for patients with NAFLD, but their results on therapeutic efficacy are often contrasting. Behavior therapy is necessary most of the time to achieve a sufficient result. Pharmacological therapy includes a wide variety of classes of molecules with different therapeutic targets and, often, little evidence supporting the real efficacy. Despite the abundance of clinical trials, NAFLD therapy remains a challenge for the scientific community, and there are no licensed therapies for NAFLD. Urgently, new pharmacological approaches are needed. Here, we will focus on the challenges facing actual therapeutic strategies and the most recent investigated molecules. PMID:25492998

  15. Harvey Cushing, the Spine Surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Bydon, Ali; Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H.; Pendleton, Courtney; McGirt, Matthew J.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Review of historical archival records. Objective Describe Harvey Cushing's patients with spinal pathology. Summary of Background Data Harvey Cushing was a pioneer of modern surgery but his work on spine remains largely unknown. Methods Review of the Chesney Medical Archives of the Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1896 to 1912. Results This is the first time that Cushing's spinal cases while he was at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, including those with Pott disease, have been described. Cushing treated three young men with psoas abscesses secondary to Pott disease during his residency: he drained the abscesses, debrided any accompanying necrotic vertebral bodies, irrigated the cavity with salt, and left the incision open to close by secondary intention. Although Cushing used Koch's “tuberculin therapy” (of intravenous administration of isolated tubercular bacilli) in one patient, he did not do so in the other two, likely because of the poor response of this first patient. Later in his tenure, Cushing performed a laminectomy on a patient with kyphosis and paraplegia secondary to Pott disease. Conclusion These cases provide a view of Cushing early in his career, pointing to the extraordinary degree of independence that he had during his residency under William Steward Halsted; these cases may have been important in the surgical upbringing both of Cushing and his coresident, William Stevenson Baer, who became the first professor of Orthopedics at Johns Hopkins Hospital. At the turn of the last century, Pott disease was primarily treated by immobilization with bed rest, braces, and plaster-of-paris jackets; some surgeons also employed gradual correction of the deformity by hyperextension. Patients who failed a trial of conservative therapy (of months to years) were treated with a laminectomy. However, the limitations of these strategies led to the development of techniques that form the basis of contemporary spine surgery—instrumentation and fusion. PMID

  16. Spine Conditioning Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... which exercises will best help you meet your rehabilitation goals. Strength: Strengthening the muscles that support your spine will help keep your back and upper body stable. Keeping these muscles strong can relieve back pain and prevent further injury. Flexibility: Stretching the muscles ...

  17. Neuroimaging of spine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Nandor K; Pfiffner, Thomas J; Mechtler, Laszlo L

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary, intradural/extramedullary, and extradural spine tumors comprise a wide range of neoplasms with an even wider range of clinical symptoms and prognostic features. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), commonly used to evaluate the spine in patients presenting with pain, can further characterize lesions that may be encountered on other imaging studies, such as bone scintigraphy or computed tomography (CT). The advantage of the MRI is its multiplane capabilities, superior contrast agent resolution, and flexible protocols that play an important role in assessing tumor location, extent in directing biopsy, in planning proper therapy, and in evaluating therapeutic results. A multimodality approach can be used to fully characterize the lesion and the combination of information obtained from the different modalities usually narrows the diagnostic possibilities significantly. The diagnosis of spinal tumors is based on patient age, topographic features of the tumor, and lesion pattern, as seen at CT and MRI. The shift to high-end imaging incorporating diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, whole-body short tau inversion recovery, positron emission tomography, intraoperative and high-field MRI as part of the mainstream clinical imaging protocol has provided neurologists, neuro-oncologists, and neurosurgeons a window of opportunity to assess the biologic behavior of spine neoplasms. This chapter reviews neuroimaging of spine tumors, primary and secondary, discussing routine and newer modalities that can reduce the significant morbidity associated with these neoplasms. PMID:27430436

  18. An isoelectric focusing overlay study of the humoral immune response in Theiler's virus demyelinating disease.

    PubMed

    Roos, R P; Nalefski, E A; Nitayaphan, S; Variakojis, R; Singh, K K

    1987-01-01

    Oligoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) bands are a frequent feature of inflammatory diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). In multiple sclerosis (MS), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) oligoclonal IgG bands are a potential clue to the pathogenesis of the disease; however, their particular antigenic target is unknown. We sought to characterize the IgG response in an experimental CNS persistent demyelinating infection by isoelectric focusing (IEF) studies of serum and CSF from mice infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). Following IEF, we used a new technique in order to identify TMEV-specific antibodies; focused immunoglobulins were blotted onto nitrocellulose paper which was then overlaid with radiolabeled virus. Autoradiograms showed that most of the TMEV antibody was locally synthesized within the CNS since CSF, but not serum, TMEV antibody had an anodal distribution. CSF IEF TMEV antibody spectrotypes were very similar, presumably because the CSFs were collected from the same inbred mouse strain. CSF TMEV antibody displayed less restricted heterogeneity than the very restricted cathodal CSF oligoclonal IgG bands seen in MS. The new IEF immunoblotting antigen overlay technique will be a powerful detection system to probe for the antigenic target against which MS CSF IgG may be directed.

  19. Lung involvement in connective tissue diseases: a comprehensive review and a focus on rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Marigliano, Benedetta; Soriano, Alessandra; Margiotta, Domenico; Vadacca, Marta; Afeltra, Antonella

    2013-09-01

    The lungs are frequently involved in Connective Tissue Diseases (CTDs). Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is one of the most common pleuropulmonary manifestations that affects prognosis significantly. In practice, rheumatologists and other physicians tend to underestimate the impact of CTD-ILDs and diagnose respiratory impairment when it has reached an irreversible fibrotic stage. Early investigation, through clinical evidence, imaging and - in certain cases - lung biopsy, is therefore warranted in order to detect a possible ILD at a reversible initial inflammatory stage. In this review, we focus on lung injury during CTDs, with particular attention to ILDs, and examine their prevalence, clinical manifestations and histological patterns, as well as therapeutic approaches and known complications till date. Although several therapeutic agents have been approved, the best treatment is still not certain and additional trials are required, which demand more knowledge of pulmonary involvement in CTDs. Our central aim is therefore to document the impact that lung damage has on CTDs. We will mainly focus on Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), which - unlike other rheumatic disorders - resembles Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) in numerous aspects.

  20. Ambient particulate matter exposure and cardiovascular diseases: a focus on progenitor and stem cells.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yuqi; Sun, Qinghua; Liu, Zhenguo

    2016-05-01

    Air pollution is a major challenge to public health. Ambient fine particulate matter (PM) is the key component for air pollution, and associated with significant mortality. The majority of the mortality following PM exposure is related to cardiovascular diseases. However, the mechanisms for the adverse effects of PM exposure on cardiovascular system remain largely unknown and under active investigation. Endothelial dysfunction or injury is considered one of the major factors that contribute to the development of cardiovascular diseases such as atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) play a critical role in maintaining the structural and functional integrity of vasculature. Particulate matter exposure significantly suppressed the number and function of EPCs in animals and humans. However, the mechanisms for the detrimental effects of PM on EPCs remain to be fully defined. One of the important mechanisms might be related to increased level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inflammation. Bone marrow (BM) is a major source of EPCs. Thus, the number and function of EPCs could be intimately associated with the population and functional status of stem cells (SCs) in the BM. Bone marrow stem cells and other SCs have the potential for cardiovascular regeneration and repair. The present review is focused on summarizing the detrimental effects of PM exposure on EPCs and SCs, and potential mechanisms including ROS formation as well as clinical implications.

  1. Focused ultrasound as a non-invasive intervention for neurological disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Piper, Rory J; Hughes, Mark A; Moran, Carmel M; Kandasamy, Jothy

    2016-06-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) is an incision-less intervention that is a Food and Drug Association (FDA) approved surgical treatment for various pathologies including uterine fibroids and bone metastases. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging thermometry and ability to use FUS across the intact calvarium have re-opened interest in the use of FUS in the treatment of neurological diseases. FUS currently has a European CE mark for use in movement disorders. However, it shows potential in the treatment of other neuropathologies including tumours and as a lesional tool in epilepsy. FUS may exert its therapeutic effect through thermal or mechanical fragmentation of intracranial lesions, or by enhancing delivery of pharmaceutical agents across the blood-brain barrier. In this review, we summarise the mechanisms, clinical applications and potential future of FUS for the treatment of neurological disease. We have searched for and described the recently completed and on-going clinical trials investigating FUS for the treatment of neurological disorders. We identified phase one trials investigating utility of FUS in: movement disorders (including essential tremor and Parkinson's disease), chronic pain, obsessive-compulsive disorder and cerebral tumours. Current literature also reports pre-clinical work exploring utility in epilepsy, neurodegenerative conditions (such as Alzheimer's disease) and thrombolysis. Safety and early efficacy data are now emerging, suggesting that transcalvarial FUS is a feasible and safe intervention. Further evidence is required to determine whether FUS is an effective alternative in comparison to current neurosurgical interventions. The cost of requisite hardware is currently a barrier to widespread uptake in UK neurosurgical centres. PMID:27101792

  2. Focused ultrasound as a non-invasive intervention for neurological disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Piper, Rory J; Hughes, Mark A; Moran, Carmel M; Kandasamy, Jothy

    2016-06-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) is an incision-less intervention that is a Food and Drug Association (FDA) approved surgical treatment for various pathologies including uterine fibroids and bone metastases. Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging thermometry and ability to use FUS across the intact calvarium have re-opened interest in the use of FUS in the treatment of neurological diseases. FUS currently has a European CE mark for use in movement disorders. However, it shows potential in the treatment of other neuropathologies including tumours and as a lesional tool in epilepsy. FUS may exert its therapeutic effect through thermal or mechanical fragmentation of intracranial lesions, or by enhancing delivery of pharmaceutical agents across the blood-brain barrier. In this review, we summarise the mechanisms, clinical applications and potential future of FUS for the treatment of neurological disease. We have searched for and described the recently completed and on-going clinical trials investigating FUS for the treatment of neurological disorders. We identified phase one trials investigating utility of FUS in: movement disorders (including essential tremor and Parkinson's disease), chronic pain, obsessive-compulsive disorder and cerebral tumours. Current literature also reports pre-clinical work exploring utility in epilepsy, neurodegenerative conditions (such as Alzheimer's disease) and thrombolysis. Safety and early efficacy data are now emerging, suggesting that transcalvarial FUS is a feasible and safe intervention. Further evidence is required to determine whether FUS is an effective alternative in comparison to current neurosurgical interventions. The cost of requisite hardware is currently a barrier to widespread uptake in UK neurosurgical centres.

  3. Medical management of chronic liver diseases in children (part I): focus on curable or potentially curable diseases.

    PubMed

    El-Shabrawi, Mortada H F; Kamal, Naglaa M

    2011-12-01

    The management of children with chronic liver disease (CLD) mandates a multidisciplinary approach. CLDs can be classified into 'potentially' curable, treatable non-curable, and end-stage diseases. Goals pertaining to the management of CLDs can be divided into prevention or minimization of progressive liver damage in curable CLD by treating the primary cause; prevention or control of complications in treatable CLD; and prediction of the outcome in end-stage CLD in order to deliver definitive therapy by surgical procedures, including liver transplantation. Curative, specific therapies aimed at the primary causes of CLDs are, if possible, best considered by a pediatric hepatologist. Medical management of CLDs in children will be reviewed in two parts, with part I (this article) specifically focusing on 'potentially' curable CLDs. Dietary modification is the cornerstone of management for galactosemia, hereditary fructose intolerance, and certain glycogen storage diseases, as well as non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. It is also essential in tyrosinemia, in addition to nitisinone [2-(nitro-4-trifluoromethylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione] therapy, as well as in Wilson disease along with copper-chelating agents such as D-penicillamine, triethylenetetramine dihydrochloride, and ammonium tetrathiomolybdate. Zinc and antioxidants are adjuvant drugs in Wilson disease. New advances in chronic viral hepatitis have been made with the advent of oral antivirals. In children, currently available drugs for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B virus infection are standard interferon (IFN)-α-2, pegylated IFN-α-2 (PG-IFN), and lamivudine. In adults, adefovir and entecavir have also been licensed, whereas telbivudine, emtricitabine, tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, clevudine, and thymosin α-1 are currently undergoing clinical testing. For chronic hepatitis C virus infection, the most accepted treatment is PG-IFN plus ribavirin. Corticosteroids, with or without azathioprine, remain the basic

  4. Relational Issues Within Couples Coping With Parkinson's Disease: Implications and Ideas for Family-Focused Care.

    PubMed

    Martin, Summer C

    2016-05-01

    The ways in which Parkinson's disease (PD) impacts, and is experienced by, the couple (i.e., the individual with PD and his or her spouse or other romantic partner) have not been fully elucidated. Such research is strongly warranted because when one member of a couple is chronically ill, it can cause major distress for not only the patient but also for his or her partner and their relationship. Therefore, the goal of this study was to examine how PD affects a couple's relationship. Data from 44 individual, in-depth interviews (with 21 persons with PD and 23 partners) revealed several challenges that PD commonly invokes in the patient-partner relationship, though most participants reported that PD had not decreased their overall relational closeness. The findings have significant practical implications for family-focused care.

  5. The Potentials and Pitfalls of Microarrays in Neglected Tropical Diseases: A Focus on Human Filarial Infections.

    PubMed

    Kwarteng, Alexander; Ahuno, Samuel Terkper

    2016-01-01

    Data obtained from expression microarrays enables deeper understanding of the molecular signatures of infectious diseases. It provides rapid and accurate information on how infections affect the clustering of gene expression profiles, pathways and networks that are transcriptionally active during various infection states compared to conventional diagnostic methods, which primarily focus on single genes or proteins. Thus, microarray technologies offer advantages in understanding host-parasite interactions associated with filarial infections. More importantly, the use of these technologies can aid diagnostics and helps translate current genomic research into effective treatment and interventions for filarial infections. Studying immune responses via microarray following infection can yield insight into genetic pathways and networks that can have a profound influence on the development of anti-parasitic vaccines. PMID:27600086

  6. Breakthroughs in Cell Therapy for Heart Disease: Focus on Cardiosphere-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marbán, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The clinical reality of cell therapy for heart disease dates back to the 1990s, when autologous skeletal myoblasts were first transplanted into failing hearts during open-chest surgery. Since then, the focus has shifted to bone marrow-derived cells and, more recently, cells extracted from the heart itself. While progress has been nonlinear and often disheartening, the field has nevertheless made remarkable progress. Six major breakthroughs are notable: 1) The establishment of safety with intracoronary delivery; 2) The demonstration that therapeutic regeneration is possible; 3) The rise of allogeneic cell therapy; 4) The impact of increasing mechanistic insights; 5) Glimmers of clinical efficacy; and 6) The progression to phase 2&3 studies. Here I review these landmark developments individually in some detail. Collectively, I conclude that the field has reached a new phase of maturity where the prospect of clinical impact is increasingly imminent. PMID:24943699

  7. The Potentials and Pitfalls of Microarrays in Neglected Tropical Diseases: A Focus on Human Filarial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kwarteng, Alexander; Ahuno, Samuel Terkper

    2016-01-01

    Data obtained from expression microarrays enables deeper understanding of the molecular signatures of infectious diseases. It provides rapid and accurate information on how infections affect the clustering of gene expression profiles, pathways and networks that are transcriptionally active during various infection states compared to conventional diagnostic methods, which primarily focus on single genes or proteins. Thus, microarray technologies offer advantages in understanding host-parasite interactions associated with filarial infections. More importantly, the use of these technologies can aid diagnostics and helps translate current genomic research into effective treatment and interventions for filarial infections. Studying immune responses via microarray following infection can yield insight into genetic pathways and networks that can have a profound influence on the development of anti-parasitic vaccines. PMID:27600086

  8. Postoperative Spine Infections.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Abhijit Yuvaraj; Biswas, Samar Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection increases the morbidity of the patient and the cost of healthcare. Despite the development of prophylactic antibiotics and advances in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patient outcome after spinal surgery. Spinal instrumentation also has an important role in the development of postoperative infections. This review analyses the risk factors that influence the development of postoperative infection. Classification and diagnosis of postoperative spinal infection is also discussed to facilitate the choice of treatment on the basis of infection severity. Preventive measures to avoid surgical site (SS) infection in spine surgery and methods for reduction of all the changeable risk factors are discussed in brief. Management protocols to manage SS infections in spine surgery are also reviewed. PMID:26949475

  9. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Samar Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection increases the morbidity of the patient and the cost of healthcare. Despite the development of prophylactic antibiotics and advances in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patient outcome after spinal surgery. Spinal instrumentation also has an important role in the development of postoperative infections. This review analyses the risk factors that influence the development of postoperative infection. Classification and diagnosis of postoperative spinal infection is also discussed to facilitate the choice of treatment on the basis of infection severity. Preventive measures to avoid surgical site (SS) infection in spine surgery and methods for reduction of all the changeable risk factors are discussed in brief. Management protocols to manage SS infections in spine surgery are also reviewed. PMID:26949475

  10. Treating the Aging Spine.

    PubMed

    Choma, Theodore J; Rechtine, Glenn; McGuire, Robert A; Brodke, Darrel S

    2016-01-01

    Demographic trends make it incumbent on orthopaedic spine surgeons to recognize the special challenges involved in caring for older patients with spine pathology. Unique pathologies, such as osteoporosis and degenerative deformities, must be recognized and treated. Recent treatment options and recommendations for the medical optimization of bone health include vitamin D and calcium supplementation, diphosphonates, and teriparatide. Optimizing spinal fixation in elderly patients who have osteoporosis is critical; cement augmentation of pedicle screws is promising. In the management of geriatric odontoid fractures, nonsurgical support with a collar may be considered for low-demand patients, whereas surgical fixation is favored for high-demand patients. Management of degenerative deformity must address sagittal plane balance, which includes consideration of pelvic incidence. Various osteotomies may prove helpful in this setting. PMID:27049195

  11. Treating the Aging Spine.

    PubMed

    Choma, Theodore J; Rechtine, Glenn R; McGuire, Robert A; Brodke, Darrel S

    2015-12-01

    Demographic trends make it incumbent on orthopaedic spine surgeons to recognize the special challenges involved in caring for older patients with spine pathology. Unique pathologies, such as osteoporosis and degenerative deformities, must be recognized and dealt with. Recent treatment options and recommendations for the medical optimization of bone health include vitamin D and calcium supplementation, diphosphonates, and teriparatide. Optimizing spinal fixation in elderly patients with osteoporosis is critical; cement augmentation of pedicle screws is promising. In the management of geriatric odontoid fractures, nonsurgical support with a collar may be considered for the low-demand patient, whereas surgical fixation is favored for high-demand patients. Management of degenerative deformity must address sagittal plane balance, including consideration of pelvic incidence. Various osteotomies may prove helpful in this setting. PMID:26510625

  12. The aging spine in sports.

    PubMed

    Borg-Stein, Joanne; Elson, Lauren; Brand, Erik

    2012-07-01

    1. Masters athletes may experience low back pain from multiple sources. Masters athletes with discogenic back pain should avoid or modify sports with combined rotational and compressive forces; individuals with facet-mediated pain should avoid or modify sports with excessive extension and rotation. 2. Optimization of flexibility, strength, endurance, and core control is critical. Sports specific training, realistic goal setting, and counseling are of maximal importance. 3. Overall, the health benefits of continued sports and athletic participation outweigh the potential risks of spinal degeneration in middle-aged athletes. There is little correlation between radiographic appearance of the spine and symptoms; therefore, symptoms should serve as the primary guide when determining activity modifications. Overall, masters athletes should be encouraged to remain active and fit to enhance their quality of life and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  13. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 9: lumbar fusion for stenosis with spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Resnick, Daniel K; Watters, William C; Sharan, Alok; Mummaneni, Praveen V; Dailey, Andrew T; Wang, Jeffrey C; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Eck, Jason; Ghogawala, Zoher; Groff, Michael W; Dhall, Sanjay S; Kaiser, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    Patients presenting with stenosis associated with a spondylolisthesis will often describe signs and symptoms consistent with neurogenic claudication, radiculopathy, and/or low-back pain. The primary objective of surgery, when deemed appropriate, is to decompress the neural elements. As a result of the decompression, the inherent instability associated with the spondylolisthesis may progress and lead to further misalignment that results in pain or recurrence of neurological complaints. Under these circumstances, lumbar fusion is considered appropriate to stabilize the spine and prevent delayed deterioration. Since publication of the original guidelines there have been a significant number of studies published that continue to support the utility of lumbar fusion for patients presenting with stenosis and spondylolisthesis. Several recently published trials, including the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial, are among the largest prospective randomized investigations of this issue. Despite limitations of study design or execution, these trials have consistently demonstrated superior outcomes when patients undergo surgery, with the majority undergoing some type of lumbar fusion procedure. There is insufficient evidence, however, to recommend a standard approach to achieve a solid arthrodesis. When formulating the most appropriate surgical strategy, it is recommended that an individualized approach be adopted, one that takes into consideration the patient's unique anatomical constraints and desires, as well as surgeon's experience.

  14. Rendering the Topological Spines

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves-Rivera, D.

    2015-05-05

    Many tools to analyze and represent high dimensional data already exits yet most of them are not flexible, informative and intuitive enough to help the scientists make the corresponding analysis and predictions, understand the structure and complexity of scientific data, get a complete picture of it and explore a greater number of hypotheses. With this in mind, N-Dimensional Data Analysis and Visualization (ND²AV) is being developed to serve as an interactive visual analysis platform with the purpose of coupling together a number of these existing tools that range from statistics, machine learning, and data mining, with new techniques, in particular with new visualization approaches. My task is to create the rendering and implementation of a new concept called topological spines in order to extend ND²AV's scope. Other existing visualization tools create a representation preserving either the topological properties or the structural (geometric) ones because it is challenging to preserve them both simultaneously. Overcoming such challenge by creating a balance in between them, the topological spines are introduced as a new approach that aims to preserve them both. Its render using OpenGL and C++ and is currently being tested to further on be implemented on ND²AV. In this paper I will present what are the Topological Spines and how they are rendered.

  15. Recent advances in managing chronic HCV infection: focus on therapy in patients with severe liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Maan, Raoel; van der Meer, Adriaan J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection still represents a major public health problem, as it is thought to be responsible for more than 350,000 deaths around the globe on a yearly basis. Fortunately, successful eradication of the virus has been associated with improved clinical outcome and reduced mortality rates. In the past few years, treatment has improved considerably by the implementation of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). From 2014 onwards, sofosbuvir, simeprevir, daclatasvir, ledipasvir, paritaprevir, ombitasvir, and dasabuvir have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Regimens with various combinations of these new drugs, without the use of interferon (IFN), proved to be very effective and well tolerated, even among patients with advanced liver disease. Moreover, treatment duration could be shortened to 12 weeks in the majority of patients. The high costs of these DAAs, however, limit the availability of IFN-free therapy worldwide. Even in wealthy countries, it is deemed necessary to prioritize DAA treatment in order to limit the immediate impact on the health budget. As patients with advanced liver disease are in most need of HCV clearance, many countries decided to treat those patients first. In the current review, we focus on the currently available IFN-free treatment options for patients with cirrhosis. We discuss the virological efficacy as well as the clinical relevance of these regimens among this specific patient population. PMID:27006761

  16. Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease Risk in Peripheral Tissues; Focus on Buccal Cells

    PubMed Central

    François, Maxime; Leifert, Wayne; Martins, Ralph; Thomas, Philip; Fenech, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive degenerative disorder of the brain and is the most common form of dementia. To-date no simple, inexpensive and minimally invasive procedure is available to confirm with certainty the early diagnosis of AD prior to the manifestations of symptoms characteristic of the disease. Therefore, if population screening of individuals is to be performed, more suitable, easily accessible tissues would need to be used for a diagnostic test that would identify those who exhibit cellular pathology indicative of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and AD risk so that they can be prioritized for primary prevention. This need for minimally invasive tests could be achieved by targeting surrogate tissues, since it is now well recognized that AD is not only a disorder restricted to pathology and biomarkers within the brain. Human buccal cells for instance are accessible in a minimally invasive manner, and exhibit cytological and nuclear morphologies that may be indicative of accelerated ageing or neurodegenerative disorders such as AD. However, to our knowledge there is no review available in the literature covering the biology of buccal cells and their applications in AD biomarker research. Therefore, the aim of this review is to summarize some of the main findings of biomarkers reported for AD in peripheral tissues, with a further focus on the rationale for the use of the buccal mucosa (BM) for biomarkers of AD and the evidence to date of changes exhibited in buccal cells with AD. PMID:24938500

  17. Cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD): focus on hypoxemia, secondary erythrocytosis, and coagulation alterations.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Luis M; Guzzetta, Nina A

    2015-10-01

    Children with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) have complex alterations in their whole blood composition and coagulation profile due to long-standing hypoxemia. Secondary erythrocytosis is an associated physiological response intended to increase circulating red blood cells and oxygen carrying capacity. However, this response is frequently offset by an increase in whole blood viscosity that paradoxically reduces blood flow and tissue perfusion. In addition, the accompanying reduction in plasma volume leads to significant deficiencies in multiple coagulation proteins including platelets, fibrinogen and other clotting factors. On the one hand, these patients may suffer from severe hyperviscosity and subclinical 'sludging' in the peripheral vasculature with an increased risk of thrombosis. On the other hand, they are at an increased risk for postoperative hemorrhage due to a complex derangement in their hemostatic profile. Anesthesiologists caring for children with CCHD and secondary erythrocytosis need to understand the pathophysiology of these alterations and be aware of available strategies that lessen the risk of bleeding and/or thrombosis. The aim of this review is to provide an updated analysis of the systemic effects of long-standing hypoxemia in children with primary congenital heart disease with a specific focus on secondary erythrocytosis and hemostasis.

  18. Adult idiopathic scoliosis: the tethered spine.

    PubMed

    Whyte Ferguson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on an observational and treatment study using three case histories to describe common patterns of muscle and fascial asymmetry in adults with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) who have significant scoliotic curvatures that were not surgically corrected and who have chronic pain. Rather than being located in the paraspinal muscles, the myofascial trigger points (TrPs) apparently responsible for the pain were located at some distance from the spine, yet referred pain to locations throughout the thoracolumbar spine. Asymmetries in these muscles appear to tether the spine in such a way that they contribute to scoliotic curvatures. Evaluation also showed that each of these individuals had major ligamentous laxity and this may also have contributed to development of scoliotic curvatures. Treatment focused on release of TrPs found to refer pain into the spine, release of related fascia, and correction of related joint dysfunction. Treatment resulted in substantial relief of longstanding chronic pain. Treatment thus validated the diagnostic hypothesis that myofascial and fascial asymmetries were to some extent responsible for pain in adults with significant scoliotic curvatures. Treatment of these patterns of TrPs and muscle and fascial asymmetries and related joint dysfunction was also effective in relieving pain in each of these individuals after they were injured in auto accidents. Treatment of myofascial TrPs and asymmetrical fascial tension along with treatment of accompanying joint dysfunction is proposed as an effective approach to treating both chronic and acute pain in adults with scoliosis that has not been surgically corrected.

  19. Imaging of trauma of the spine.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Flanders, Adam E

    2016-01-01

    The goal of imaging in spine trauma is to gauge the extent of bony, vascular, and neurologic compromise. Neurologic and mechanical stability are key pieces of information that must be efficiently communicated to the referring clinician. From immobilization and steroid therapy, to vascular repair and emergent surgical intervention, clinical outcomes of spine-injured patients depend on timely and well-chosen imaging studies. Multidetector computed tomography (CT) has essentially replaced radiography in clearance of the spine and is the gold standard in evaluation of the bony spinal column. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is typically reserved for patients with neurologic deficits or for obtunded/impaired patients in whom the neurologic exam is not reliable, even in the absence of osseous injury on CT. MRI is the only available imaging modality that is able to clearly depict the internal architecture of the spinal cord, and, as such, has a central role in depicting parenchymal changes resulting from injury. Intramedullary edema and hemorrhage have been shown to correlate with the degree of neurologic deficit and prognosis. Moreover, advanced MRI techniques, such as diffusion and diffusion tensor imaging, have shifted the focus to determining structural and functional integrity of neural structures. Here, we review the role of imaging in spine trauma, as well as the key radiologic features of injury to the spinal column and spinal cord. PMID:27430440

  20. The Burden of Clostridium difficile after Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Javier Z; Skovrlj, Branko; Rothenberg, Edward S; Lu, Young; McAnany, Steven; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective database analysis. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate incidence, comorbidities, and impact on health care resources of Clostridium difficile infection after cervical spine surgery. Methods A total of 1,602,130 cervical spine surgeries from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2002 to 2011 were included. Patients were included for study based on International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedural codes for cervical spine surgery for degenerative spine diagnoses. Baseline patient characteristics were determined. Multivariable analyses assessed factors associated with increased incidence of C. difficile and risk of mortality. Results Incidence of C. difficile infection in postoperative cervical spine surgery hospitalizations is 0.08%, significantly increased since 2002 (p < 0.0001). The odds of postoperative C. difficile infection were significantly increased in patients with comorbidities such as congestive heart failure, renal failure, and perivascular disease. Circumferential cervical fusion (odds ratio [OR] = 2.93, p < 0.0001) increased the likelihood of developing C. difficile infection after degenerative cervical spine surgery. C. difficile infection after cervical spine surgery results in extended length of stay (p < 0.0001) and increased hospital costs (p < 0.0001). Mortality rate in patients who develop C. difficile after cervical spine surgery is nearly 8% versus 0.19% otherwise (p < 0.0001). Moreover, multivariate analysis revealed C. difficile to be a significant predictor of inpatient mortality (OR = 3.99, p < 0.0001). Conclusions C. difficile increases the risk of in-hospital mortality and costs approximately $6,830,695 per year to manage in patients undergoing elective cervical spine surgery. Patients with comorbidities such as renal failure or congestive heart failure have increased probability of developing infection

  1. The Burden of Clostridium difficile after Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Javier Z; Skovrlj, Branko; Rothenberg, Edward S; Lu, Young; McAnany, Steven; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective database analysis. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate incidence, comorbidities, and impact on health care resources of Clostridium difficile infection after cervical spine surgery. Methods A total of 1,602,130 cervical spine surgeries from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2002 to 2011 were included. Patients were included for study based on International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedural codes for cervical spine surgery for degenerative spine diagnoses. Baseline patient characteristics were determined. Multivariable analyses assessed factors associated with increased incidence of C. difficile and risk of mortality. Results Incidence of C. difficile infection in postoperative cervical spine surgery hospitalizations is 0.08%, significantly increased since 2002 (p < 0.0001). The odds of postoperative C. difficile infection were significantly increased in patients with comorbidities such as congestive heart failure, renal failure, and perivascular disease. Circumferential cervical fusion (odds ratio [OR] = 2.93, p < 0.0001) increased the likelihood of developing C. difficile infection after degenerative cervical spine surgery. C. difficile infection after cervical spine surgery results in extended length of stay (p < 0.0001) and increased hospital costs (p < 0.0001). Mortality rate in patients who develop C. difficile after cervical spine surgery is nearly 8% versus 0.19% otherwise (p < 0.0001). Moreover, multivariate analysis revealed C. difficile to be a significant predictor of inpatient mortality (OR = 3.99, p < 0.0001). Conclusions C. difficile increases the risk of in-hospital mortality and costs approximately $6,830,695 per year to manage in patients undergoing elective cervical spine surgery. Patients with comorbidities such as renal failure or congestive heart failure have increased probability of developing infection

  2. Cell therapy for ischaemic heart disease: focus on the role of resident cardiac stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chamuleau, S A J; Vrijsen, K R; Rokosh, D G; Tang, X L; Piek, J J; Bolli, R

    2009-05-01

    Myocardial infarction results in loss of cardiomyocytes, scar formation, ventricular remodelling, and eventually heart failure. In recent years, cell therapy has emerged as a potential new strategy for patients with ischaemic heart disease. This includes embryonic and bone marrow derived stem cells. Recent clinical studies showed ostensibly conflicting results of intracoronary infusion of autologous bone marrow derived stem cells in patients with acute or chronic myocardial infarction. Anyway, these results have stimulated additional clinical and pre-clinical studies to further enhance the beneficial effects of stem cell therapy. Recently, the existence of cardiac stem cells that reside in the heart itself was demonstrated. Their discovery has sparked intense hope for myocardial regeneration with cells that are obtained from the heart itself and are thereby inherently programmed to reconstitute cardiac tissue. These cells can be detected by several surface markers (e.g. c-kit, Sca-1, MDR1, Isl-1). Both in vitro and in vivo differentiation into cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells has been demonstrated, and animal studies showed promising results on improvement of left ventricular function. This review will discuss current views regarding the feasibility of cardiac repair, and focus on the potential role of the resident cardiac stem and progenitor cells. (Neth Heart J 2009;17:199-207.).

  3. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: focus on glucagon-like peptide-1 based therapies

    PubMed Central

    Stranges, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a well known risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). While glycemic control has consistently been shown to prevent microvascular complications, large randomized trials have not demonstrated the same consistent beneficial effects of intensive glycemic control in improving cardiovascular (CV) outcomes. Thus, optimal glucose control alone is not sufficient to reduce CV risk. Aggressive management of CV risk factors such as blood pressure, lipids, and body weight is also necessary. A growing body of evidence suggests that the recently available glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have beneficial CV effects beyond glucose control. Studies have demonstrated beneficial effects in the myocardium, endothelium, vasculature and various markers of cardiovascular risk such as body weight, blood pressure and dyslipidemia. Despite the growing evidence, large, randomized, blinded clinical trials with hard CV endpoints have not been performed. Most human studies have been small, and have focused on surrogate endpoints. The findings need to be confirmed by prospective, randomized cardiovascular outcomes trials. In this review we examine the GLP-1R agonist data on weight reduction, blood pressure lowering, beneficial changes in dyslipidemia, and improvements in myocardial and endothelial function. The safety as well as potential role of these agents in treatment regimens for type 2 diabetes is also addressed. PMID:25083236

  4. Dendritic Spines as Tunable Regulators of Synaptic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tønnesen, Jan; Nägerl, U. Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are perpetually receiving vast amounts of information in the form of synaptic input from surrounding cells. The majority of input occurs at thousands of dendritic spines, which mediate excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain, and is integrated by the dendritic and somatic compartments of the postsynaptic neuron. The functional role of dendritic spines in shaping biochemical and electrical signals transmitted via synapses has long been intensely studied. Yet, many basic questions remain unanswered, in particular regarding the impact of their nanoscale morphology on electrical signals. Here, we review our current understanding of the structure and function relationship of dendritic spines, focusing on the controversy of electrical compartmentalization and the potential role of spine structural changes in synaptic plasticity. PMID:27340393

  5. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  6. Multisystemic diseases and ethnicity: a focus on lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, sarcoidosis and Behçet disease.

    PubMed

    Petit, A; Dadzie, O E

    2013-10-01

    We present an overview of the association between ethnicity and the clinical and epidemiological aspects of four multisystemic diseases: lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, sarcoidosis and Behçet disease. In particular, we highlight observed ethnic differences in cutaneous manifestations of these diseases. This article should help guide clinical management, as well as serve to highlight future areas for research.

  7. Giant cell tumor of the spine.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Toshifumi; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Halm, Henry; Hillmann, Axel; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried

    2002-08-01

    Six patients with giant cell tumor of the spine had surgery between 1981 and 1995. Three lesions were located in the scrum, two lesions were in the thoracic spine, and one lesion was in the lumbar spine. Preoperatively, all patients had local pain and neurologic symptoms. Two patients had cement implanted after curettage or intralesional excision of the sacral tumor; one patient had a local relapse. After the second curettage and cement implantation, the tumor was controlled. One patient with a sacral lesion had marginal excision and spondylodesis; no relapse developed. Two patients with thoracic lesions had planned marginal excision and spondylodesis; the margins finally became intralesional, but no relapse developed. One patient with a lumbar lesion had incomplete removal of the tumor and received postoperative irradiation. At the final followup (median, 69 months), five of six patients were disease-free and one patient died of disease progression. Two of the five surviving patients had pain after standing or neurologic problems. Although some contamination occurred, planning a marginal excision of the lesion seems beneficial for vertebral lesions above the sacrum. Total sacrectomy of a sacral lesion seems to be too invasive when cement implantation can control the lesion. PMID:12151896

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Segal, Menahem; Korkotian, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the role of calcium stores in dendritic spines structure, function and plasticity is still debated. The reasons for this may have to do with the multitude of overlapping calcium handling machineries in the neuron, including stores, voltage and ligand gated channels, pumps and transporters. Also, different cells in the brain are endowed with calcium stores that are activated by different receptor types, and their differential compartmentalization in dendrites, spines and presynaptic terminals complicates their analysis. In the present review we address several key issues, including the role of calcium stores in synaptic plasticity, their role during development, in stress and in neurodegenerative diseases. Apparently, there is increasing evidence for a crucial role of calcium stores, especially of the ryanodine species, in synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival. PMID:25071469

  9. Lipid dynamics at dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Dotti, Carlos Gerardo; Esteban, Jose Antonio; Ledesma, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic changes in the structure and composition of the membrane protrusions forming dendritic spines underlie memory and learning processes. In recent years a great effort has been made to characterize in detail the protein machinery that controls spine plasticity. However, we know much less about the involvement of lipids, despite being major membrane components and structure determinants. Moreover, protein complexes that regulate spine plasticity depend on specific interactions with membrane lipids for proper function and accurate intracellular signaling. In this review we gather information available on the lipid composition at dendritic spine membranes and on its dynamics. We pay particular attention to the influence that spine lipid dynamism has on glutamate receptors, which are key regulators of synaptic plasticity.

  10. Fractures of the cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, Raphael Martus; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Teixeira, William Jacobsen; Narasaki, Douglas Kenji; Oliveira, Reginaldo Perilo; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to review the literature on cervical spine fractures. METHODS: The literature on the diagnosis, classification, and treatment of lower and upper cervical fractures and dislocations was reviewed. RESULTS: Fractures of the cervical spine may be present in polytraumatized patients and should be suspected in patients complaining of neck pain. These fractures are more common in men approximately 30 years of age and are most often caused by automobile accidents. The cervical spine is divided into the upper cervical spine (occiput-C2) and the lower cervical spine (C3-C7), according to anatomical differences. Fractures in the upper cervical spine include fractures of the occipital condyle and the atlas, atlanto-axial dislocations, fractures of the odontoid process, and hangman's fractures in the C2 segment. These fractures are characterized based on specific classifications. In the lower cervical spine, fractures follow the same pattern as in other segments of the spine; currently, the most widely used classification is the SLIC (Subaxial Injury Classification), which predicts the prognosis of an injury based on morphology, the integrity of the disc-ligamentous complex, and the patient's neurological status. It is important to correctly classify the fracture to ensure appropriate treatment. Nerve or spinal cord injuries, pseudarthrosis or malunion, and postoperative infection are the main complications of cervical spine fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Fractures of the cervical spine are potentially serious and devastating if not properly treated. Achieving the correct diagnosis and classification of a lesion is the first step toward identifying the most appropriate treatment, which can be either surgical or conservative. PMID:24270959

  11. Control of Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease and Bluetongue in Cervids with a Focus on Vector Management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Arthropod-borne diseases are a threat to the cervid livestock industry. These diseases can be restricted to a region of the USA or in some cases threaten the industry in all of the lower 48 states. The agents of these diseases include filarial nematodes, bacteria, rickettsiae, and viruses. Epizoo...

  12. The spine problem: finding a function for dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Malanowski, Sarah; Craver, Carl F

    2014-01-01

    Why do neurons have dendritic spines? This question-the heart of what Yuste calls "the spine problem"-presupposes that why-questions of this sort have scientific answers: that empirical findings can favor or count against claims about why neurons have spines. Here we show how such questions can receive empirical answers. We construe such why-questions as questions about how spines make a difference to the behavior of some mechanism that we take to be significant. Why-questions are driven fundamentally by the effort to understand how some item, such as the dendritic spine, is situated in the causal structure of the world (the causal nexus). They ask for a filter on that busy world that allows us to see a part's individual contribution to a mechanism, independent of everything else going on. So understood, answers to why-questions can be assessed by testing the claims these answers make about the causal structure of a mechanism. We distinguish four ways of making a difference to a mechanism (necessary, modulatory, component, background condition), and we sketch their evidential requirements. One consequence of our analysis is that there are many spine problems and that any given spine problem might have many acceptable answers. PMID:25309340

  13. The spine problem: finding a function for dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Malanowski, Sarah; Craver, Carl F.

    2014-01-01

    Why do neurons have dendritic spines? This question—the heart of what Yuste calls “the spine problem”—presupposes that why-questions of this sort have scientific answers: that empirical findings can favor or count against claims about why neurons have spines. Here we show how such questions can receive empirical answers. We construe such why-questions as questions about how spines make a difference to the behavior of some mechanism that we take to be significant. Why-questions are driven fundamentally by the effort to understand how some item, such as the dendritic spine, is situated in the causal structure of the world (the causal nexus). They ask for a filter on that busy world that allows us to see a part’s individual contribution to a mechanism, independent of everything else going on. So understood, answers to why-questions can be assessed by testing the claims these answers make about the causal structure of a mechanism. We distinguish four ways of making a difference to a mechanism (necessary, modulatory, component, background condition), and we sketch their evidential requirements. One consequence of our analysis is that there are many spine problems and that any given spine problem might have many acceptable answers. PMID:25309340

  14. Functional anatomy of the spine.

    PubMed

    Bogduk, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    Among other important features of the functional anatomy of the spine, described in this chapter, is the remarkable difference between the design and function of the cervical spine and that of the lumbar spine. In the cervical spine, the atlas serves to transmit the load of the head to the typical cervical vertebrae. The axis adapts the suboccipital region to the typical cervical spine. In cervical intervertebrtal discs the anulus fibrosus is not circumferential but is crescentic, and serves as an interosseous ligament in the saddle joint between vertebral bodies. Cervical vertebrae rotate and translate in the sagittal plane, and rotate in the manner of an inverted cone, across an oblique coronal plane. The cervical zygapophysial joints are the most common source of chronic neck pain. By contrast, lumbar discs are well designed to sustain compression loads, but rely on posterior elements to limit axial rotation. Internal disc disruption is the most common basis for chronic low-back pain. Spinal muscles are arranged systematically in prevertebral and postvertebral groups. The intrinsic elements of the spine are innervated by the dorsal rami of the spinal nerves, and by the sinuvertebral nerves. Little modern research has been conducted into the structure of the thoracic spine, or the causes of thoracic spinal pain.

  15. Diet, Genetics, and Disease: A Focus on the Middle East and North Africa Region

    PubMed Central

    Fahed, Akl C.; El-Hage-Sleiman, Abdul-Karim M.; Farhat, Theresa I.; Nemer, Georges M.

    2012-01-01

    The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region suffers a drastic change from a traditional diet to an industrialized diet. This has led to an unparalleled increase in the prevalence of chronic diseases. This review discusses the role of nutritional genomics, or the dietary signature, in these dietary and disease changes in the MENA. The diet-genetics-disease relation is discussed in detail. Selected disease categories in the MENA are discussed starting with a review of their epidemiology in the different MENA countries, followed by an examination of the known genetic factors that have been reported in the disease discussed, whether inside or outside the MENA. Several diet-genetics-disease relationships in the MENA may be contributing to the increased prevalence of civilization disorders of metabolism and micronutrient deficiencies. Future research in the field of nutritional genomics in the MENA is needed to better define these relationships. PMID:22536488

  16. Communication and Huntington's Disease: Qualitative Interviews and Focus Groups with Persons with Huntington's Disease, Family Members, and Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartelius, Lena; Jonsson, Maria; Rickeberg, Anneli; Laakso, Katja

    2010-01-01

    Background: As an effect of the cognitive, emotional and motor symptoms associated with Huntington's disease, communicative interaction is often dramatically changed. No study has previously included the subjective reports on this subject from individuals with Huntington's disease. Aims: To explore the qualitative aspects of how communication is…

  17. Reelin Regulates the Maturation of Dendritic Spines, Synaptogenesis and Glial Ensheathment of Newborn Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Carles; Masachs, Nuria; Exposito-Alonso, David; Martínez, Albert; Teixeira, Cátia M.; Fernaud, Isabel; Pujadas, Lluís; Ulloa, Fausto; Comella, Joan X.; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The Reelin pathway is essential for both neural migration and for the development and maturation of synaptic connections. However, its role in adult synaptic formation and remodeling is still being investigated. Here, we investigated the impact of the Reelin/Dab1 pathway on the synaptogenesis of newborn granule cells (GCs) in the young-adult mouse hippocampus. We show that neither Reelin overexpression nor the inactivation of its intracellular adapter, Dab1, substantially alters dendritic spine numbers in these neurons. In contrast, 3D-electron microscopy (focused ion beam milling/scanning electron microscope) revealed that dysregulation of the Reelin/Dab1 pathway leads to both transient and permanent changes in the types and morphology of dendritic spines, mainly altering mushroom, filopodial, and branched GC spines. We also found that the Reelin/Dab1 pathway controls synaptic configuration of presynaptic boutons in the dentate gyrus, with its dysregulation leading to a substantial decrease in multi-synaptic bouton innervation. Lastly, we show that the Reelin/Dab1 pathway controls astroglial ensheathment of synapses. Thus, the Reelin pathway is a key regulator of adult-generated GC integration, by controlling dendritic spine types and shapes, their synaptic innervation patterns, and glial ensheathment. These findings may help to better understanding of hippocampal circuit alterations in neurological disorders in which the Reelin pathway is implicated. Significance Statement The extracellular protein Reelin has an important role in neurological diseases, including epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease and psychiatric diseases, targeting hippocampal circuits. Here we address the role of Reelin in the development of synaptic contacts in adult-generated granule cells (GCs), a neuronal population that is crucial for learning and memory and implicated in neurological and psychiatric diseases. We found that the Reelin pathway controls the shapes, sizes, and types of dendritic

  18. Clinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Josef S; Collaud Basset, Sabine; Boers, Maarten; Breedveld, Ferdinand; Edwards, Christopher J; Kvien, Tore K; Miossec, Pierre; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Abadie, Eric C; Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Mäkinen, Heidi; Thomas, Thierry; Tugwell, Peter; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-07-01

    The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft 'Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for the treatment of RA' released by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Special emphasis was placed by the group on the development of new drugs for the treatment of early RA. In the absence of a clear definition of early RA, it was suggested that clinical investigations in this condition were conducted in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs naïve patients with no more than 1 year disease duration. The expert group recommended using an appropriate improvement in disease activity (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or Simplified/Clinical Disease Activity Index (SDAI/CDAI) response criteria) or low disease activity (by any score) as primary endpoints, with ACR/European League Against Rheumatism remission as a secondary endpoint. Finally, as compelling evidence showed that the Disease Acrivity Score using 28-joint counts (DAS28) might not provide a reliable definition of remission, or sometimes even low disease activity, the group suggested replacing DAS28 as a measurement instrument to evaluate disease activity in RA clinical trials. Proposed alternatives included SDAI, CDAI and Boolean criteria. PMID:27037326

  19. Clinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease

    PubMed Central

    Collaud Basset, Sabine; Boers, Maarten; Breedveld, Ferdinand; Edwards, Christopher J; Kvien, Tore K; Miossec, Pierre; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Abadie, Eric C; Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Mäkinen, Heidi; Thomas, Thierry; Tugwell, Peter; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft ‘Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for the treatment of RA’ released by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Special emphasis was placed by the group on the development of new drugs for the treatment of early RA. In the absence of a clear definition of early RA, it was suggested that clinical investigations in this condition were conducted in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs naïve patients with no more than 1 year disease duration. The expert group recommended using an appropriate improvement in disease activity (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or Simplified/Clinical Disease Activity Index (SDAI/CDAI) response criteria) or low disease activity (by any score) as primary endpoints, with ACR/European League Against Rheumatism remission as a secondary endpoint. Finally, as compelling evidence showed that the Disease Acrivity Score using 28-joint counts (DAS28) might not provide a reliable definition of remission, or sometimes even low disease activity, the group suggested replacing DAS28 as a measurement instrument to evaluate disease activity in RA clinical trials. Proposed alternatives included SDAI, CDAI and Boolean criteria. PMID:27037326

  20. The 100 Most Influential Articles in Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Steinberger, Jeremy; Guzman, Javier Z; Overley, Samuel C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Caridi, John M; Cho, Samuel K

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To identify and analyze the top 100 cited articles in cervical spine surgery. Methods The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all articles relevant to cervical spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each article. Results The most cited article was the classic from 1991 by Vernon and Mior that described the Neck Disability Index. The second most cited was Smith's 1958 article describing the anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion procedure. The third most cited article was Hilibrand's 1999 publication evaluating the incidence, prevalence, and radiographic progression of symptomatic adjacent segment disease following anterior cervical arthrodesis. The majority of the articles originated in the United States (65), and most were published in Spine (39). Most articles were published in the 1990s (34), and the three most common topics were cervical fusion (17), surgical complications (9), and biomechanics (9), respectively. Author Abumi had four articles in the top 100 list, and authors Goffin, Panjabi, and Hadley had three each. The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan, had five articles in the top 100 list. Conclusion This report identifies the top 100 articles in cervical spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the cervical spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in cervical spine surgery today.

  1. Fear Recognition Impairment in Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease: When Focusing on the Eyes Region Improves Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hot, Pascal; Klein-Koerkamp, Yanica; Borg, Celine; Richard-Mornas, Aurelie; Zsoldos, Isabella; Adeline, Adeline Paignon; Anterion, Catherine Thomas; Baciu, Monica

    2013-01-01

    A decline in the ability to identify fearful expression has been frequently reported in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In patients with severe destruction of the bilateral amygdala, similar difficulties have been reduced by using an explicit visual exploration strategy focusing on gaze. The current study assessed the possibility of…

  2. Adult idiopathic scoliosis: the tethered spine.

    PubMed

    Whyte Ferguson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on an observational and treatment study using three case histories to describe common patterns of muscle and fascial asymmetry in adults with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) who have significant scoliotic curvatures that were not surgically corrected and who have chronic pain. Rather than being located in the paraspinal muscles, the myofascial trigger points (TrPs) apparently responsible for the pain were located at some distance from the spine, yet referred pain to locations throughout the thoracolumbar spine. Asymmetries in these muscles appear to tether the spine in such a way that they contribute to scoliotic curvatures. Evaluation also showed that each of these individuals had major ligamentous laxity and this may also have contributed to development of scoliotic curvatures. Treatment focused on release of TrPs found to refer pain into the spine, release of related fascia, and correction of related joint dysfunction. Treatment resulted in substantial relief of longstanding chronic pain. Treatment thus validated the diagnostic hypothesis that myofascial and fascial asymmetries were to some extent responsible for pain in adults with significant scoliotic curvatures. Treatment of these patterns of TrPs and muscle and fascial asymmetries and related joint dysfunction was also effective in relieving pain in each of these individuals after they were injured in auto accidents. Treatment of myofascial TrPs and asymmetrical fascial tension along with treatment of accompanying joint dysfunction is proposed as an effective approach to treating both chronic and acute pain in adults with scoliosis that has not been surgically corrected. PMID:24411157

  3. Incentives for Starting Small Companies Focused on Rare and Neglected Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Wood, Jill

    2016-04-01

    Starting biotech or pharmaceutical companies is traditionally thought to be based around a scientist, their technology platform or a clinical candidate spun out from another company. Between us we have taken a different approach and formed two small early stage companies after initially leveraging the perspective of a parent with a child with a life-threatening rare disease. Phoenix Nest ( http://www.phoenixnestbiotech.com/ ) was co-founded to work on treatments for Sanfilippo syndrome a devastating neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder. In the space of just over 3 years we have built up collaborations with leading scientists in academia and industry and been awarded multiple NIH small business grants. The second company, Collaborations Pharmaceuticals Inc. ( http://www.collaborationspharma.com/ ) was founded to address some of the other 7000 or so rare diseases as well as neglected infectious diseases. The Rare Pediatric Disease Priority Review Voucher is likely the most important incentive for companies working on rare diseases with very small populations. This may also be partially responsible for the recent acquisitions of rare disease companies with late stage candidates. Lessons learned in the process of starting our companies are that rare disease parents or patients can readily partner with a scientist and fund research through NIH grants rather than venture capital or angel investors initially. This process may be slow so patience and perseverance is key. We would encourage other pharmaceutical scientists to meet rare disease parents, patients or advocates and work with them to further the science on their diseases and create a source of future drugs.

  4. Incentives for Starting Small Companies Focused on Rare and Neglected Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Wood, Jill

    2016-04-01

    Starting biotech or pharmaceutical companies is traditionally thought to be based around a scientist, their technology platform or a clinical candidate spun out from another company. Between us we have taken a different approach and formed two small early stage companies after initially leveraging the perspective of a parent with a child with a life-threatening rare disease. Phoenix Nest ( http://www.phoenixnestbiotech.com/ ) was co-founded to work on treatments for Sanfilippo syndrome a devastating neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder. In the space of just over 3 years we have built up collaborations with leading scientists in academia and industry and been awarded multiple NIH small business grants. The second company, Collaborations Pharmaceuticals Inc. ( http://www.collaborationspharma.com/ ) was founded to address some of the other 7000 or so rare diseases as well as neglected infectious diseases. The Rare Pediatric Disease Priority Review Voucher is likely the most important incentive for companies working on rare diseases with very small populations. This may also be partially responsible for the recent acquisitions of rare disease companies with late stage candidates. Lessons learned in the process of starting our companies are that rare disease parents or patients can readily partner with a scientist and fund research through NIH grants rather than venture capital or angel investors initially. This process may be slow so patience and perseverance is key. We would encourage other pharmaceutical scientists to meet rare disease parents, patients or advocates and work with them to further the science on their diseases and create a source of future drugs. PMID:26666772

  5. Transitional coordinator nurses focus on at-risk patients with chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    2016-03-01

    Tucson Medical Center keeps its readmission rates low by having transitional coordinators work closely for patients with chronic disease who are at risk for readmissions. An analysis of readmitted patients determined that many who were rehospitalized were elderly with chronic diseases. The transitional coordinators are three experienced nurses with knowledge of chronic disease who work closely with the care team and follow patients for up to 30 days after discharge. The hospital arranges for post-acute providers to come to the hospital to see the patients referred to them for services.

  6. Transmission-Blocking Vaccines: Focus on Anti-Vector Vaccines against Tick-Borne Diseases.

    PubMed

    Neelakanta, Girish; Sultana, Hameeda

    2015-06-01

    Tick-borne diseases are a potential threat that account for significant morbidity and mortality in human population worldwide. Vaccines are not available to treat several of the tick-borne diseases. With the emergence and resurgence of several tick-borne diseases, emphasis on the development of transmission-blocking vaccines remains increasing. In this review, we provide a snap shot on some of the potential candidates for the development of anti-vector vaccines (a form of transmission-blocking vaccines) against wide range of hard and soft ticks that include Ixodes, Haemaphysalis, Dermacentor, Amblyomma, Rhipicephalus and Ornithodoros species.

  7. Radiology of the spine: Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanmart, L.

    1986-01-01

    This book deals with tumors of the spinal cord and various aspects of primary and secondary osseous tumors of the spine. Included in discussion are tumors, chordoma hemangioma, vascular malformation and the terms angioma and hemangiomas.

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... uses radio waves, a magnetic field and a computer to produce detailed pictures of the spine and ... powerful magnetic field, radio frequency pulses and a computer to produce detailed pictures of organs, soft tissues, ...

  9. Heart disease education and prevention program targeting immigrant Latinos: using focus group responses to develop effective interventions.

    PubMed

    Moreno, C; Alvarado, M; Balcazar, H; Lane, C; Newman, E; Ortiz, G; Forrest, M

    1997-12-01

    Although research has provided considerable knowledge concerning the positive effects of behavioral change on morbidity and mortality from heart disease and related risk factors, some segments of the population have not benefited equitably from this information. In April 1995, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) conducted seven focus groups to determine knowledge and attitudes about heart disease and associated risk factors, identify media usage and preferences, and assess publications usage and preferences among Spanish-speaking Latino immigrants residing in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. This information was gathered to assist in the development of key messages and strategies for the NHLBI Latino Community Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Outreach Initiative, Salud para su Corazón--a heart disease prevention and education campaign. Findings from these focus groups indicate that Latinos may not benefit from heart disease prevention messages developed for the general population because of language and cultural differences. The researchers concluded that health education and disease prevention programs targeting the Latino community should develop educational materials and interventions that address language preferences and cultural values. Furthermore, to be effective, these programs should show people how to make positive behavioral changes based on their current circumstances, while remaining sensitive to the fact that Latino immigrants face major life adjustments and many are still greatly influenced by their country of origin.

  10. The microbiome and childhood diseases: Focus on brain-gut axis.

    PubMed

    O' Mahony, Siobhain M; Stilling, Roman M; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2015-12-01

    Many childhood diseases such as autism spectrum disorders, allergic disease, and obesity are on the increase. Although environmental factors are thought to play a role in this increase. The mechanisms at play are unclear but increasing evidence points to an interaction with the gastrointestinal microbiota as being potentially important. Recently this community of bacteria and perturbation of its colonization in early life has been linked to a number of diseases. Many factors are capable of influencing this colonization and ultimately leading to an altered gut microbiota which is known to affect key systems within the body. The impact of the microbial composition of our gastrointestinal tract on systems outside the gut is also becoming apparent. Here we highlight the factors that are capable of impacting on microbiota colonization in early-life and the developing systems that are affected and finally how this may be involved in the manifestation of childhood diseases.

  11. Disease management in the genomics era - Summaries of focus issue papers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genomics revolution has contributed enormously to research and disease management applications in plant pathology. This development has rapidly increased our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning pathogenesis and resistance, contributed novel markers for rapid pathogen detectio...

  12. Iron deficiency anemia: focus on infectious diseases in lesser developed countries.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Julia G; Friedman, Jennifer F

    2011-01-01

    Iron deficiency anemia is thought to affect the health of more than one billion people worldwide, with the greatest burden of disease experienced in lesser developed countries, particularly women of reproductive age and children. This greater disease burden is due to both nutritional and infectious etiologies. Individuals in lesser developed countries have diets that are much lower in iron, less access to multivitamins for young children and pregnant women, and increased rates of fertility which increase demands for iron through the life course. Infectious diseases, particularly parasitic diseases, also lead to both extracorporeal iron loss and anemia of inflammation, which decreases bioavailability of iron to host tissues. This paper will address the unique etiologies and consequences of both iron deficiency anemia and the alterations in iron absorption and distribution seen in the context of anemia of inflammation. Implications for diagnosis and treatment in this unique context will also be discussed.

  13. Bucking conventional wisdom and focusing on disparities to address kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Carmen A

    2012-12-01

    Physician and clinical researcher Carmen A. Peralta devised a breakthrough testing strategy for detecting those at risk of developing end-stage renal disease-a condition that afflicts disproportionate numbers of blacks and Hispanics.

  14. Pathogenesis of coronary artery disease: focus on genetic risk factors and identification of genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Sayols-Baixeras, Sergi; Lluís-Ganella, Carla; Lucas, Gavin; Elosua, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, and its prevalence is expected to increase in the coming years. CAD events are caused by the interplay of genetic and environmental factors, the effects of which are mainly mediated through cardiovascular risk factors. The techniques used to study the genetic basis of these diseases have evolved from linkage studies to candidate gene studies and genome-wide association studies. Linkage studies have been able to identify genetic variants associated with monogenic diseases, whereas genome-wide association studies have been more successful in determining genetic variants associated with complex diseases. Currently, genome-wide association studies have identified approximately 40 loci that explain 6% of the heritability of CAD. The application of this knowledge to clinical practice is challenging, but can be achieved using various strategies, such as genetic variants to identify new therapeutic targets, personal genetic information to improve disease risk prediction, and pharmacogenomics. The main aim of this narrative review is to provide a general overview of our current understanding of the genetics of coronary artery disease and its potential clinical utility. PMID:24520200

  15. Catastrophic spine injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Boden, Barry P; Prior, Chris

    2005-02-01

    Catastrophic spine injuries in sports are rare but tragic events. The sports with the highest risk of catastrophic spinal injuries are football, ice hockey, wrestling, diving, skiing and snowboarding, rugby, cheerleading, and baseball. A common mechanism of injury for all at-risk sports is an axial compression force to the top of the head with the neck slightly flexed. We review common mechanisms of injury and prevention strategies for spine injuries in the at-risk sports.

  16. A focus on the prognosis and management of ischemic heart disease in patients without evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Scalone, Giancarla; Niccoli, Giampaolo

    2015-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease without evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease is a common phenotype comprising different coronary syndromes with either stable or unstable clinical presentation. In this context, the clinical outcome and management appear extremely variable, due to different etiologies. Of note, coronary microvascular dysfunction is the pathogenetic mechanism linking different clinical scenarios in most of the cases. Hence, in this article, we aim to provide a systematic approach of reviewing the prognosis and management of angina or myocardial infarction without evidence of obstructive coronary artery disease. Moreover, we will propose a new scheme of classification by distinguishing between angina with normal coronary artery and myocardial infarction with normal coronary artery in order to facilitate clinicians to perform a proper management workflow.

  17. The degenerative spine: pattern recognition and guidelines to image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Parizel, P M; Van Hoyweghen, A J L; Bali, A; Van Goethem, J; Van Den Hauwe, L

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine, in the form of intervertebral disc degeneration and bony growth, causing osteophytes and impinging upon the spinal canal and neural foramina, is the most frequent disorder affecting the spine. In this chapter we first discuss briefly the indications for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging in suspected degenerative spine disease. We then describe changes of disc height, signal intensity, and disc contour with aging and repeated microtrauma, as well as the imaging techniques most appropriate to image them. A grading system for lumbar disc changes is provided. Stenosis of the canal and neural foramina is reviewed next, concluding with a description of degenerative changes affecting the vertebral endplates and bone marrow.

  18. The degenerative spine: pattern recognition and guidelines to image interpretation.

    PubMed

    Parizel, P M; Van Hoyweghen, A J L; Bali, A; Van Goethem, J; Van Den Hauwe, L

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine, in the form of intervertebral disc degeneration and bony growth, causing osteophytes and impinging upon the spinal canal and neural foramina, is the most frequent disorder affecting the spine. In this chapter we first discuss briefly the indications for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging in suspected degenerative spine disease. We then describe changes of disc height, signal intensity, and disc contour with aging and repeated microtrauma, as well as the imaging techniques most appropriate to image them. A grading system for lumbar disc changes is provided. Stenosis of the canal and neural foramina is reviewed next, concluding with a description of degenerative changes affecting the vertebral endplates and bone marrow. PMID:27430442

  19. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods.

    PubMed

    Benezech, Jacques; Garlenq, Bruno; Larroque, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK(®)-Optima system (Innov'Spine, France) composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA(®) polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK) without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%), quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%), and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones. PMID:26981285

  20. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods

    PubMed Central

    Benezech, Jacques; Garlenq, Bruno; Larroque, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK®-Optima system (Innov'Spine, France) composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA® polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK) without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%), quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%), and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones. PMID:26981285

  1. Surgical Site Infections After Pediatric Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Floccari, Lorena V; Milbrandt, Todd A

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after spinal deformity surgery is a complication in the pediatric population resulting in high morbidity and cost. Despite modern surgical techniques and preventative strategies, the incidence remains substantial, especially in the neuromuscular population. This review focuses on recent advancements in identification of risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment strategies for acute and delayed pediatric spine infections. It reviews recent literature, including the best practice guidelines for infection prevention in high-risk patients. Targets of additional research are highlighted to assess efficacy of current practices to further reduce risk of SSI in pediatric patients with spinal deformity. PMID:26772947

  2. The postsurgical spine.

    PubMed

    Santos Armentia, E; Prada González, R; Silva Priegue, N

    2016-04-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome is the persistence or reappearance of pain after surgery on the spine. This term encompasses both mechanical and nonmechanical causes. Imaging techniques are essential in postoperative follow-up and in the evaluation of potential complications responsible for failed back surgery syndrome. This review aims to familiarize radiologists with normal postoperative changes and to help them identify the pathological imaging findings that reflect failed back surgery syndrome. To interpret the imaging findings, it is necessary to know the type of surgery performed in each case and the time elapsed since the intervention. In techniques used to fuse the vertebrae, it is essential to evaluate the degree of bone fusion, the material used (both its position and its integrity), the bone over which it lies, the interface between the implant and bone, and the vertebral segments that are adjacent to metal implants. In decompressive techniques it is important to know what changes can be expected after the intervention and to be able to distinguish them from peridural fibrosis and the recurrence of a hernia. It is also crucial to know the imaging findings for postoperative infections. Other complications are also reviewed, including arachnoiditis, postoperative fluid collections, and changes in the soft tissues adjacent to the surgical site. PMID:26767541

  3. Postoperative Spine Infections

    PubMed Central

    Evangelisti, Gisberto; Andreani, Lorenzo; Girardi, Federico; Darren, Lebl; Sama, Andrew; Lisanti, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative spinal wound infection is a potentially devastating complication after operative spinal procedures. Despite the utilization of perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in recent years and improvements in surgical technique and postoperative care, wound infection continues to compromise patients’ outcome after spinal surgery. In the modern era of pending health care reform with increasing financial constraints, the financial burden of post-operative spinal infections also deserves consideration. The aim of our work is to give to the reader an updated review of the latest achievements in prevention, risk factors, diagnosis, microbiology and treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. A review of the scientific literature was carried out using electronic medical databases Pubmed, Google Scholar, Web of Science and Scopus for the years 1973-2012 to obtain access to all publications involving the incidence, risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, treatment of postoperative spinal wound infections. We initially identified 119 studies; of these 60 were selected. Despite all the measures intended to reduce the incidence of surgical site infections in spine surgery, these remain a common and potentially dangerous complication. PMID:26605028

  4. The postsurgical spine.

    PubMed

    Santos Armentia, E; Prada González, R; Silva Priegue, N

    2016-04-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome is the persistence or reappearance of pain after surgery on the spine. This term encompasses both mechanical and nonmechanical causes. Imaging techniques are essential in postoperative follow-up and in the evaluation of potential complications responsible for failed back surgery syndrome. This review aims to familiarize radiologists with normal postoperative changes and to help them identify the pathological imaging findings that reflect failed back surgery syndrome. To interpret the imaging findings, it is necessary to know the type of surgery performed in each case and the time elapsed since the intervention. In techniques used to fuse the vertebrae, it is essential to evaluate the degree of bone fusion, the material used (both its position and its integrity), the bone over which it lies, the interface between the implant and bone, and the vertebral segments that are adjacent to metal implants. In decompressive techniques it is important to know what changes can be expected after the intervention and to be able to distinguish them from peridural fibrosis and the recurrence of a hernia. It is also crucial to know the imaging findings for postoperative infections. Other complications are also reviewed, including arachnoiditis, postoperative fluid collections, and changes in the soft tissues adjacent to the surgical site.

  5. How calorie-focused thinking about obesity and related diseases may mislead and harm public health. An alternative.

    PubMed

    Lucan, Sean C; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2015-03-01

    Prevailing thinking about obesity and related diseases holds that quantifying calories should be a principal concern and target for intervention. Part of this thinking is that consumed calories - regardless of their sources - are equivalent; i.e. 'a calorie is a calorie'. The present commentary discusses various problems with the idea that 'a calorie is a calorie' and with a primarily quantitative focus on food calories. Instead, the authors argue for a greater qualitative focus on the sources of calories consumed (i.e. a greater focus on types of foods) and on the metabolic changes that result from consuming foods of different types. In particular, the authors consider how calorie-focused thinking is inherently biased against high-fat foods, many of which may be protective against obesity and related diseases, and supportive of starchy and sugary replacements, which are likely detrimental. Shifting the focus to qualitative food distinctions, a central argument of the paper is that obesity and related diseases are problems due largely to food-induced physiology (e.g. neurohormonal pathways) not addressable through arithmetic dieting (i.e. calorie counting). The paper considers potential harms of public health initiatives framed around calorie balance sheets - targeting 'calories in' and/or 'calories out' - that reinforce messages of overeating and inactivity as underlying causes, rather than intermediate effects, of obesity. Finally, the paper concludes that public health should work primarily to support the consumption of whole foods that help protect against obesity-promoting energy imbalance and metabolic dysfunction and not continue to promote calorie-directed messages that may create and blame victims and possibly exacerbate epidemics of obesity and related diseases. PMID:25416919

  6. How calorie-focused thinking about obesity and related diseases may mislead and harm public health. An alternative.

    PubMed

    Lucan, Sean C; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2015-03-01

    Prevailing thinking about obesity and related diseases holds that quantifying calories should be a principal concern and target for intervention. Part of this thinking is that consumed calories - regardless of their sources - are equivalent; i.e. 'a calorie is a calorie'. The present commentary discusses various problems with the idea that 'a calorie is a calorie' and with a primarily quantitative focus on food calories. Instead, the authors argue for a greater qualitative focus on the sources of calories consumed (i.e. a greater focus on types of foods) and on the metabolic changes that result from consuming foods of different types. In particular, the authors consider how calorie-focused thinking is inherently biased against high-fat foods, many of which may be protective against obesity and related diseases, and supportive of starchy and sugary replacements, which are likely detrimental. Shifting the focus to qualitative food distinctions, a central argument of the paper is that obesity and related diseases are problems due largely to food-induced physiology (e.g. neurohormonal pathways) not addressable through arithmetic dieting (i.e. calorie counting). The paper considers potential harms of public health initiatives framed around calorie balance sheets - targeting 'calories in' and/or 'calories out' - that reinforce messages of overeating and inactivity as underlying causes, rather than intermediate effects, of obesity. Finally, the paper concludes that public health should work primarily to support the consumption of whole foods that help protect against obesity-promoting energy imbalance and metabolic dysfunction and not continue to promote calorie-directed messages that may create and blame victims and possibly exacerbate epidemics of obesity and related diseases.

  7. Management of Thrombocytopenia in Chronic Liver Disease: Focus on Pharmacotherapeutic Strategies.

    PubMed

    Maan, Raoel; de Knegt, Robert J; Veldt, Bart J

    2015-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia (platelet count <150 × 10(9)/L) often complicates chronic liver disease, impeding optimal management of these patients. The prevalence of this manifestation ranges from 6% among non-cirrhotic patients with chronic liver disease to 70% among patients with liver cirrhosis. It has also been shown that the severity of liver disease is associated with both prevalence and level of thrombocytopenia. Its development is often multifactorial, although thrombopoietin is thought to be a major factor. The discovery of and ability to clone thrombopoietin led to new treatment opportunities for this clinical manifestation. This review discusses data on the three most important thrombopoietin receptor agonists: eltrombopag, avatrombopag, and romiplostim. Currently, only eltrombopag is approved for usage among patients with thrombocytopenia and chronic hepatitis C virus infection in order to initiate and maintain interferon-based antiviral treatment. Nevertheless, the optimal management of hematologic abnormalities among patients with chronic liver disease, and its risk for bleeding complications, is still a matter of discussion. Thrombocytopenia definitely contributes to hemostatic defects but is often counterbalanced by the enhanced presence of procoagulant factors. Therefore, a thorough assessment of the patient's risk for thrombotic events is essential when the use of thrombopoietin receptor agonists is considered among patients with chronic liver disease and thrombocytopenia.

  8. Focused cardiac ultrasound is feasible in the general practice setting and alters diagnosis and management of cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Yates, James; Royse, Colin Forbes; Royse, Carolyn; Royse, Alistair George

    2016-01-01

    Background Ultrasound-assisted examination of the cardiovascular system with focused cardiac ultrasound by the treating physician is non-invasive and changes diagnosis and management of patient’s with suspected cardiac disease. This has not been reported in a general practice setting. Aim To determine whether focused cardiac ultrasound performed on patients aged over 50 years changes the diagnosis and management of cardiac disease by a general practitioner. Design and setting A prospective observational study of 80 patients aged over 50years and who had not received echocardiography or chest CT within 12months presenting to a general practice. Method Clinical assessment and management of significant cardiac disorders in patients presenting to general practitioners were recorded before and after focused cardiac ultrasound. Echocardiography was performed by a medical student with sufficient training, which was verified by an expert. Differences in diagnosis and management between conventional and ultrasound-assisted assessment were recorded. Results and conclusion Echocardiography and interpretation were acceptable in all patients. Significant cardiac disease was detected in 16 (20%) patients, including aortic stenosis in 9 (11%) and cardiac failure in 7 (9%), which were missed by clinical examination in 10 (62.5%) of these patients. Changes in management occurred in 12 patients (15% overall and 75% of those found to have significant cardiac disease) including referral for diagnostic echocardiography in 8 (10%), commencement of heart failure treatment in 3 (4%) and referral to a cardiologist in 1 patient (1%). Routine focused cardiac ultrasound is feasible and frequently alters the diagnosis and management of cardiac disease in patients aged over 50years presenting to a general practice. PMID:27457967

  9. [Health care of refugees - A short review with focus on infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Lange, Berit; Stete, Katarina; Bozorgmehr, Kayvan; Camp, Johannes; Kranzer, Katharina; Kern, Winfried; Rieg, Siegbert

    2016-06-01

    Few guidelines for health care of refugees exist in Germany. Screening as a part of initial health checks as well as general organisation of early health care for refugees is very heterogenous across different regions. Current experience will be relevant to develop integrated health care models. Prevention and care of infectious diseases are an important part of early health care for refugees, even if non-communicable diseases and mental health conditions should also be considered in every effort to design early health care models. We are presenting a pragmatic review of current evidence for prevention and care of tuberculosis, HIV, chronic viral hepatitis and other infectious diseases. More evidence is needed to assess morbidity and efficacy of early health care interventions and integrated care models in refugees. PMID:27254625

  10. Extracellular Vesicles in Molecular Diagnostics: An Overview with a Focus on CNS Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hirshman, B R; Kras, R T; Akers, J C; Carter, B S; Chen, C C

    2016-01-01

    All known cells continuously release nanoscale lipid membrane-enclosed packets. These packets, termed extracellular vesicles (EVs), bear the signature of their cells of origin. These vesicles can be detected in just about every type of biofluid tested, including blood, urine, and cerebrospinal fluid. The majority comes from normal cells, but disease cells also release them. There is a great interest in collecting and analyzing EVs in biofluids as diagnostics for a wide spectrum of central nervous system diseases. Here, we will review the state of central nervous system EV research in terms of molecular diagnostics and biomarkers. PMID:27645815

  11. New strategies and paradigm for drug target discovery: a special focus on infectious diseases tuberculosis, malaria, leishmaniasis, trypanosomiasis and gastritis.

    PubMed

    Neelapu, Nageswara R R; Srimath-Tirumala-Peddinti, Ravi C P K; Nammi, Deepthi; Pasupuleti, Amita C M

    2013-10-01

    The discovery and exploitation of new drug targets is a key focus for both the pharmaceutical industry and academic research. To provide an insight into trends in the exploitation of new drug targets, we have analysed different methods during the past six decades and advances made in drug target discovery. A special focus remains on different methods used for drug target discovery on infectious diseases such as Tuberculosis, Gastritis, Malaria, Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis. We herewith provide a paradigm that is can be used for drug target discovery in the near future.

  12. Focused Attention Deficits in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinoff, E.J.; Saumier, D.; Chertkow, H.

    2005-01-01

    Reaction time (RT) tasks take various forms, and can assess psychomotor speed, (i.e., simple reaction time task), and focused attention (i.e., choice reaction time (CRT) task). If cues are provided before stimulus presentation (i.e., cued choice reaction time (CCRT) task), then a cueing effect can also be assessed. A limited number of studies have…

  13. Potential Therapies by Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes in CNS Diseases: Focusing on the Neurogenic Niche.

    PubMed

    Luarte, Alejandro; Bátiz, Luis Federico; Wyneken, Ursula; Lafourcade, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the leading causes of death and disability and one of the biggest burdens on health care systems. Novel approaches using various types of stem cells have been proposed to treat common neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, or stroke. Moreover, as the secretome of these cells appears to be of greater benefit compared to the cells themselves, the extracellular components responsible for its therapeutic benefit have been explored. Stem cells, as well as most cells, release extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, which are nanovesicles able to target specific cell types and thus to modify their function by delivering proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Exosomes have recently been tested in vivo and in vitro as therapeutic conveyors for the treatment of diseases. As such, they could be engineered to target specific populations of cells within the CNS. Considering the fact that many degenerative brain diseases have an impact on adult neurogenesis, we discuss how the modulation of the adult neurogenic niches may be a therapeutic target of stem cell-derived exosomes. These novel approaches should be examined in cellular and animal models to provide better, more effective, and specific therapeutic tools in the future.

  14. Potential Therapies by Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes in CNS Diseases: Focusing on the Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Luarte, Alejandro; Bátiz, Luis Federico; Wyneken, Ursula; Lafourcade, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the leading causes of death and disability and one of the biggest burdens on health care systems. Novel approaches using various types of stem cells have been proposed to treat common neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, or stroke. Moreover, as the secretome of these cells appears to be of greater benefit compared to the cells themselves, the extracellular components responsible for its therapeutic benefit have been explored. Stem cells, as well as most cells, release extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, which are nanovesicles able to target specific cell types and thus to modify their function by delivering proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Exosomes have recently been tested in vivo and in vitro as therapeutic conveyors for the treatment of diseases. As such, they could be engineered to target specific populations of cells within the CNS. Considering the fact that many degenerative brain diseases have an impact on adult neurogenesis, we discuss how the modulation of the adult neurogenic niches may be a therapeutic target of stem cell-derived exosomes. These novel approaches should be examined in cellular and animal models to provide better, more effective, and specific therapeutic tools in the future. PMID:27195011

  15. Wildlife health in a rapidly changing North: focus on avian disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Pearce, John M.; Handel, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Climate-related environmental changes have increasingly been linked to emerging infectious diseases in wildlife. The Arctic is facing a major ecological transition that is expected to substantially affect animal and human health. Changes in phenology or environmental conditions that result from climate warming may promote novel species assemblages as host and pathogen ranges expand to previously unoccupied areas. Recent evidence from the Arctic and subarctic suggests an increase in the spread and prevalence of some wildlife diseases, but baseline data necessary to detect and verify such changes are still lacking. Wild birds are undergoing rapid shifts in distribution and have been implicated in the spread of wildlife and zoonotic diseases. Here, we review evidence of current and projected changes in the abundance and distribution of avian diseases and outline strategies for future research. We discuss relevant climatic and environmental factors, emerging host–pathogen contact zones, the relationship between host condition and immune function, and potential wildlife and human health outcomes in northern regions.

  16. A focus on inflammation as a major risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Gregersen, Ida; Holm, Sverre; Dahl, Tuva B; Halvorsen, Bente; Aukrust, Pål

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a dynamic, pathogenic process in the artery wall, with potential adverse outcome for the host. Acute events such as myocardial infarction and ischemic stroke often result from rupture of unstable atherosclerotic lesions. Understanding the underlying pathology of such lesions and why and when they rupture, is therefore of great interest for the development of new diagnostics and treatment. Inflammation is one of the key drivers of atherosclerotic plaque development and the interplay between inflammation and lipids constitutes the hallmark of atherosclerotic disease. This review summarizes the role of inflammation in atherosclerosis and presents some of the latest discoveries as well as unmet needs regarding the role of inflammation as major risk factor in atherosclerotic disease.

  17. Very early-onset inflammatory bowel disease: gaining insight through focused discovery.

    PubMed

    Moran, Christopher J; Klein, Christoph; Muise, Aleixo M; Snapper, Scott B

    2015-05-01

    The pathogenesis of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is only partially understood. Strong evidence implicates a strong genetic component including high monozygotic twin concordance and familial disease phenotype concordance rates. Genome-wide association studies have identified associations between >160 genetic loci and the risk for developing IBD. The roles of implicated genes are largely immune-mediated, although other functions include cellular migration, oxidative stress, and carbohydrate metabolism. Additionally, growing literature describes monogenic causes of IBD that frequently present as infantile or very early-onset IBD. The interplay between IBD risk single nucleotide polymorphisms and rare genetic variants has yet to be determined. Studying patients with very early-onset IBD may elicit genetic factors that could be applied to broader populations of IBD. This review describes what is known about the genetic causes of very early-onset IBD and genetic strategies that may unravel more of the genetic causes of IBD.

  18. Managing dialysis patients who develop anemia caused by chronic kidney disease: focus on peginesatide

    PubMed Central

    Valliant, Amanda; Hofmann, R Michael

    2013-01-01

    Anemia in chronic kidney disease is a prevalent and expensive problem in the United States, and it is well documented that anemia worsens as glomerular filtration rates decline. The complications of severe anemia in this patient population contribute significantly to their overall morbidity with increased cardiovascular complications, decreased quality of life, and increased dependence on transfusions to maintain adequate hemoglobin levels. Erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs) have revolutionized the treatment of anemia in this population, but there has been a great deal of controversy surrounding the quest for the ideal hemoglobin target. In addition, there are economic and practice management implications where anemia treatment is concerned, with ongoing refinement of Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services-bundled payments. One of the newest additions to the arsenal used to fight anemia in end-stage renal disease patients is peginesatide (Omontys), a synthetic, PEGylated, peptide-based ESA that acts by stimulating the erythropoietin receptor. The role of peginesatide in the future treatment of anemia in chronic kidney disease remains uncertain, with new safety concerns being brought to attention as it emerges on the market, prompting a national recall. PMID:24023516

  19. Thyroid Hormones and Antioxidant Systems: Focus on Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Antonio; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Di Segni, Chantal; Persano, Mariasara; Gadotti, Giovanni; Silvestrini, Andrea; Festa, Roberto; Tiano, Luca; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Meucci, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    In previous works we demonstrated an inverse correlation between plasma Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and thyroid hormones; in fact, CoQ10 levels in hyperthyroid patients were found among the lowest detected in human diseases. On the contrary, CoQ10 is elevated in hypothyroid subjects, also in subclinical conditions, suggesting the usefulness of this index in assessing metabolic status in thyroid disorders. A Low-T3 syndrome is a condition observed in several chronic diseases: it is considered an adaptation mechanism, where there is a reduction in pro-hormone T4 conversion. Low T3-Syndrome is not usually considered to be corrected with replacement therapy. We review the role of thyroid hormones in regulation of antioxidant systems, also presenting data on total antioxidant capacity and Coenzyme Q10. Published studies suggest that oxidative stress could be involved in the clinical course of different heart diseases; our data could support the rationale of replacement therapy in low-T3 conditions. PMID:24351864

  20. The role of the mini-open thoracoscopic-assisted approach in the management of metastatic spine disease at the thoracolumbar junction.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Brock, Andrea; Awad, Al-Wala; Kalra, Ricky; Schmidt, Meic H

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Treatment advances have resulted in improved survival for many cancer types, and this, in turn, has led to an increased incidence of metastatic disease, specifically to the vertebral column. Surgical decompression and stabilization prior to radiation therapy have been shown to improve functional outcomes, but anterior access to the thoracolumbar junction may involve open thoracotomy, which can cause significant morbidity. The authors describe the treatment of 12 patients in whom a mini-open thoracoscopic-assisted approach (mini-open TAA) to the thoracolumbar junction was used to treat metastatic disease, with an analysis of outcomes. METHODS The authors reviewed a retrospective cohort of patients treated for thoracolumbar junction metastatic disease with mini-open TAA between 2004 and 2016. Data collection included operative time, estimated blood loss, length of stay, follow-up duration, and pre- and postoperative visual analog scale scores and Frankel grades. RESULTS Twelve patients underwent a mini-open TAA procedure for metastatic disease at the thoracolumbar junction. The mean age of patients was 59 years (range 53-77 years), mean estimated blood loss was 613 ml, and the mean duration of the mini-open TAA procedure was 234 minutes (3.8 hours). The median length of stay in the hospital was 7.5 days (range 5-21 days). All 12 patients had significant improvement in their postoperative pain scores in comparison with their preoperative pain scores (p < 0.001). No patients suffered from worsening neurological function after surgery, and of 7 patients who presented with neurological dysfunction, 6 (86%) had an improvement in their Frankel grade after surgery. No patients experienced delayed hardware failure requiring reoperation over a mean follow-up of 10 months (range 1-45 months). CONCLUSIONS The mini-open TAA to the thoracolumbar junction for metastatic disease is a durable procedure that has a reduced morbidity rate compared with traditional open

  1. The role of the mini-open thoracoscopic-assisted approach in the management of metastatic spine disease at the thoracolumbar junction.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Brock, Andrea; Awad, Al-Wala; Kalra, Ricky; Schmidt, Meic H

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Treatment advances have resulted in improved survival for many cancer types, and this, in turn, has led to an increased incidence of metastatic disease, specifically to the vertebral column. Surgical decompression and stabilization prior to radiation therapy have been shown to improve functional outcomes, but anterior access to the thoracolumbar junction may involve open thoracotomy, which can cause significant morbidity. The authors describe the treatment of 12 patients in whom a mini-open thoracoscopic-assisted approach (mini-open TAA) to the thoracolumbar junction was used to treat metastatic disease, with an analysis of outcomes. METHODS The authors reviewed a retrospective cohort of patients treated for thoracolumbar junction metastatic disease with mini-open TAA between 2004 and 2016. Data collection included operative time, estimated blood loss, length of stay, follow-up duration, and pre- and postoperative visual analog scale scores and Frankel grades. RESULTS Twelve patients underwent a mini-open TAA procedure for metastatic disease at the thoracolumbar junction. The mean age of patients was 59 years (range 53-77 years), mean estimated blood loss was 613 ml, and the mean duration of the mini-open TAA procedure was 234 minutes (3.8 hours). The median length of stay in the hospital was 7.5 days (range 5-21 days). All 12 patients had significant improvement in their postoperative pain scores in comparison with their preoperative pain scores (p < 0.001). No patients suffered from worsening neurological function after surgery, and of 7 patients who presented with neurological dysfunction, 6 (86%) had an improvement in their Frankel grade after surgery. No patients experienced delayed hardware failure requiring reoperation over a mean follow-up of 10 months (range 1-45 months). CONCLUSIONS The mini-open TAA to the thoracolumbar junction for metastatic disease is a durable procedure that has a reduced morbidity rate compared with traditional open

  2. Outpatient surgery in the cervical spine: is it safe?

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael J; Kalfas, Iain; Holmer, Haley; Skelly, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Study Rationale As the length of stay after cervical spine surgery has decreased substantially, the feasibility and safety of outpatient cervical spine surgery come into question. Although minimal length of stay is a targeted metric for quality and costs for medical centers, the safety of outpatient cervical spine surgery has not been clearly defined. Objective The objective of this article is to evaluate the safety of inpatient versus outpatient surgery in the cervical spine for adult patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic degenerative disc disease. Methods A systematic review of the literature was undertaken for articles published through February 19, 2014. Electronic databases and the bibliographies of key articles were searched to identify comparative studies evaluating the safety of inpatient versus outpatient surgery in the cervical spine. Spinal cord stimulation, spinal injections, and diagnostic procedures were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed the strength of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system, and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results Five studies that met the inclusion criteria were identified. One study reported low risk of hematoma (0% of outpatients and 1.6% of inpatients). Two studies reported on mortality and both reported no deaths in either group following surgery. Dysphagia risks ranged from 0 to 10% of outpatients and 1.6 to 5% of inpatients, and infection risks ranged from 0 to 1% of outpatients and 2 to 2.8% of inpatients. One study reported that no (0) outpatients were readmitted to the hospital due to a complication, compared with four inpatients (7%). The overall strength of evidence was insufficient for all safety outcomes examined. Conclusion Though the studies in our systematic review did not suggest an increased risk of complication with outpatient cervical spine surgery, the strength of evidence to

  3. Musculoskeletal rehabilitation and sports medicine. 1. Head and spine injuries.

    PubMed

    Sherman, A L; Young, J L

    1999-05-01

    This self-directed learning module focuses on head, neck, and spine injuries that are frequent occurrences in sporting activity. It is part of the chapter on musculoskeletal rehabilitation and sports medicine in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. The physiatrist must be able to recognize not only the cause of the acute injury but also the functional consequences of the impairment. This article will discuss some of the more common head, neck, and spine injuries in patients engaged in sports activity and will suggest typical management options for these patients.

  4. [History of the German Spine Society].

    PubMed

    Wilke, H-J; Carstens, C

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this article is to summarize the history of the German Spine Society (DWG). This society resulted in the year 2006 after several attempts from the fusion of two established German societies, which were dealing with topics around the spine, der "German Society for Spine Research" founded in the year 1958 and the "German Society for Spine Surgery" founded in the year 1987. This fusion was the beginning of a success story, as from this time on the annual membership increased so much that the DWG became the largest spine society in Europe and one of all spine societies worldwide.

  5. Advances in the understanding of cervical spine deformity.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Alok D; Krystal, Jonathan D; Singla, Amit; Nassr, Ahmad; Kang, James D; Riew, K Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cervical spine deformities pose substantial challenges for spine surgeons. The anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine play an important role in the decision-making process regarding treatment. The etiology of cervical deformities can be congenital, developmental, iatrogenic, degenerative, or inflammatory. Dropped head syndrome has been recently described but is poorly understood. Patients have variable presentations ranging from neck pain to an inability to maintain head position and neural compromise. Radiographic angles are important to monitor the deformity and plan the surgical correction. Treatment is focused on relieving pain, preventing and improving neurologic compromise, and improving overall spinal alignment and balance. The surgical approach and the level of fusion should be individualized on a case-by-case basis. The surgeon can greatly improve a patient's quality of life by understanding the nature of the patient's deformity and fully considering all treatment options. PMID:25745925

  6. Musical representation of dendritic spine distribution: a new exploratory tool.

    PubMed

    Toharia, Pablo; Morales, Juan; de Juan, Octavio; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Dendritic spines are small protrusions along the dendrites of many types of neurons in the central nervous system and represent the major target of excitatory synapses. For this reason, numerous anatomical, physiological and computational studies have focused on these structures. In the cerebral cortex the most abundant and characteristic neuronal type are pyramidal cells (about 85 % of all neurons) and their dendritic spines are the main postsynaptic target of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. Thus, our understanding of the synaptic organization of the cerebral cortex largely depends on the knowledge regarding synaptic inputs to dendritic spines of pyramidal cells. Much of the structural data on dendritic spines produced by modern neuroscience involves the quantitative analysis of image stacks from light and electron microscopy, using standard statistical and mathematical tools and software developed to this end. Here, we present a new method with musical feedback for exploring dendritic spine morphology and distribution patterns in pyramidal neurons. We demonstrate that audio analysis of spiny dendrites with apparently similar morphology may "sound" quite different, revealing anatomical substrates that are not apparent from simple visual inspection. These morphological/music translations may serve as a guide for further mathematical analysis of the design of the pyramidal neurons and of spiny dendrites in general.

  7. Musical representation of dendritic spine distribution: a new exploratory tool.

    PubMed

    Toharia, Pablo; Morales, Juan; de Juan, Octavio; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Dendritic spines are small protrusions along the dendrites of many types of neurons in the central nervous system and represent the major target of excitatory synapses. For this reason, numerous anatomical, physiological and computational studies have focused on these structures. In the cerebral cortex the most abundant and characteristic neuronal type are pyramidal cells (about 85 % of all neurons) and their dendritic spines are the main postsynaptic target of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. Thus, our understanding of the synaptic organization of the cerebral cortex largely depends on the knowledge regarding synaptic inputs to dendritic spines of pyramidal cells. Much of the structural data on dendritic spines produced by modern neuroscience involves the quantitative analysis of image stacks from light and electron microscopy, using standard statistical and mathematical tools and software developed to this end. Here, we present a new method with musical feedback for exploring dendritic spine morphology and distribution patterns in pyramidal neurons. We demonstrate that audio analysis of spiny dendrites with apparently similar morphology may "sound" quite different, revealing anatomical substrates that are not apparent from simple visual inspection. These morphological/music translations may serve as a guide for further mathematical analysis of the design of the pyramidal neurons and of spiny dendrites in general. PMID:24395057

  8. Lack of Widespread BBB Disruption in Alzheimer's Disease Models: Focus on Therapeutic Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bien-Ly, Nga; Boswell, C Andrew; Jeet, Surinder; Beach, Thomas G; Hoyte, Kwame; Luk, Wilman; Shihadeh, Vera; Ulufatu, Sheila; Foreman, Oded; Lu, Yanmei; DeVoss, Jason; van der Brug, Marcel; Watts, Ryan J

    2015-10-21

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits brain uptake of therapeutic antibodies. It is believed that the BBB is disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD), potentially increasing drug permeability de facto. Here we compared active versus passive brain uptake of systemically dosed antibodies (anti-transferrin receptor [TfR] bispecific versus control antibody) in mouse models of AD. We first confirmed BBB disruption in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis as a positive control. Importantly, we found that BBB permeability was vastly spared in mouse models of AD, including PS2-APP, Tau transgenics, and APOE4 knockin mice. Brain levels of TfR in mouse models or in human cases of AD resembled controls, suggesting target engagement of TfR bispecific is not limited. Furthermore, infarcts from human AD brain showed similar occurrences compared to age-matched controls. These results question the widely held view that the BBB is largely disrupted in AD, raising concern about assumptions of drug permeability in disease.

  9. Venous thromboembolism in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: focus on prevention and treatment.

    PubMed

    Papa, Alfredo; Gerardi, Viviana; Marzo, Manuela; Felice, Carla; Rapaccini, Gian Lodovico; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2014-03-28

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which represents a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The most common sites of VTE in IBD patients are the deep veins of the legs and pulmonary system, followed by the portal and mesenteric veins. However, other sites may also be involved, such as the cerebrovascular and retinal veins. The aetiology of VTE is multifactorial, including both inherited and acquired risk factors that, when simultaneously present, multiply the risk to the patient. VTE prevention involves correcting modifiable risk factors, such as disease activity, vitamin deficiency, dehydration and prolonged immobilisation. The role of mechanical and pharmacological prophylaxis against VTE using anticoagulants is also crucial. However, although guidelines recommend thromboprophylaxis for IBD patients, this method is still poorly implemented because of concerns about its safety and a lack of awareness of the magnitude of thrombotic risk in these patients. Further efforts are required to increase the rate of pharmacological prevention of VTE in IBD patients to avoid preventable morbidity and mortality.

  10. Lack of Widespread BBB Disruption in Alzheimer's Disease Models: Focus on Therapeutic Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bien-Ly, Nga; Boswell, C Andrew; Jeet, Surinder; Beach, Thomas G; Hoyte, Kwame; Luk, Wilman; Shihadeh, Vera; Ulufatu, Sheila; Foreman, Oded; Lu, Yanmei; DeVoss, Jason; van der Brug, Marcel; Watts, Ryan J

    2015-10-21

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits brain uptake of therapeutic antibodies. It is believed that the BBB is disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD), potentially increasing drug permeability de facto. Here we compared active versus passive brain uptake of systemically dosed antibodies (anti-transferrin receptor [TfR] bispecific versus control antibody) in mouse models of AD. We first confirmed BBB disruption in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis as a positive control. Importantly, we found that BBB permeability was vastly spared in mouse models of AD, including PS2-APP, Tau transgenics, and APOE4 knockin mice. Brain levels of TfR in mouse models or in human cases of AD resembled controls, suggesting target engagement of TfR bispecific is not limited. Furthermore, infarcts from human AD brain showed similar occurrences compared to age-matched controls. These results question the widely held view that the BBB is largely disrupted in AD, raising concern about assumptions of drug permeability in disease. PMID:26494278

  11. Neurological deterioration during intubation in cervical spine disorders

    PubMed Central

    Durga, Padmaja; Sahu, Barada Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Anaesthesiologists are often involved in the management of patients with cervical spine disorders. Airway management is often implicated in the deterioration of spinal cord function. Most evidence on neurological deterioration resulting from intubation is from case reports which suggest only association, but not causation. Most anaesthesiologists and surgeons probably believe that the risk of spinal cord injury (SCI) during intubation is largely due to mechanical compression produced by movement of the cervical spine. But it is questionable that the small and brief deformations produced during intubation can produce SCI. Difficult intubation, more frequently encountered in patients with cervical spine disorders, is likely to produce greater movement of spine. Several alternative intubation techniques are shown to improve ease and success, and reduce cervical spine movement but their role in limiting SCI is not studied. The current opinion is that most neurological injuries during anaesthesia are the result of prolonged deformation, impaired perfusion of the cord, or both. To prevent further neurological injury to the spinal cord and preserve spinal cord function, minimizing movement during intubation and positioning for surgery are essential. The features that diagnose laryngoscopy induced SCI are myelopathy present on recovery, short period of unconsciousness, autonomic disturbances following laryngoscopy, cranio-cervical junction disease or gross instability below C3. It is difficult to accept or refute the claim that neurological deterioration was induced by intubation. Hence, a record of adequate care at laryngoscopy and also perioperative period are important in the event of later medico-legal proceedings. PMID:25624530

  12. Input transformation by dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, most inputs received by a neuron are formed on the dendritic tree. In the neocortex, the dendrites of pyramidal neurons are covered by thousands of tiny protrusions known as dendritic spines, which are the major recipient sites for excitatory synaptic information in the brain. Their peculiar morphology, with a small head connected to the dendritic shaft by a slender neck, has inspired decades of theoretical and more recently experimental work in an attempt to understand how excitatory synaptic inputs are processed, stored and integrated in pyramidal neurons. Advances in electrophysiological, optical and genetic tools are now enabling us to unravel the biophysical and molecular mechanisms controlling spine function in health and disease. Here I highlight relevant findings, challenges and hypotheses on spine function, with an emphasis on the electrical properties of spines and on how these affect the storage and integration of excitatory synaptic inputs in pyramidal neurons. In an attempt to make sense of the published data, I propose that the raison d'etre for dendritic spines lies in their ability to undergo activity-dependent structural and molecular changes that can modify synaptic strength, and hence alter the gain of the linearly integrated sub-threshold depolarizations in pyramidal neuron dendrites before the generation of a dendritic spike. PMID:25520626

  13. Normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage development

    PubMed Central

    Canavese, Federico; Dimeglio, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Development of the spine and thoracic cage consists of a complex series of events involving multiple metabolic processes, genes and signaling pathways. During growth, complex phenomena occur in rapid succession. This succession of events, this establishment of elements, is programmed according to a hierarchy. These events are well synchronized to maintain harmonious limb, spine and thoracic cage relationships, as growth in the various body segments does not occur simultaneously at the same magnitude or rate. In most severe cases of untreated progressive early-onset spinal deformities, respiratory insufficiency and pulmonary and cardiac hypertension (cor pulmonale), which characterize thoracic insufficiency syndrome (TIS), can develop, sometimes leading to death. TIS is the inability of the thorax to ensure normal breathing. This clinical condition can be linked to costo-vertebral malformations (e.g., fused ribs, hemivertebrae, congenital bars), neuromuscular diseases (e.g., expiratory congenital hypotonia), Jeune or Jarcho-Levin syndromes or to 50% to 75% fusion of the thoracic spine before seven years of age. Complex spinal deformities alter normal growth plate development, and vertebral bodies become progressively distorted, perpetuating the disorder. Therefore, many scoliotic deformities can become growth plate disorders over time. This review aims to provide a comprehensive review of how spinal deformities can affect normal spine and thoracic cage growth. Previous conceptualizations are integrated with more recent scientific data to provide a better understanding of both normal and abnormal spine and thoracic cage growth. PMID:24147251

  14. Input transformation by dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Araya, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, most inputs received by a neuron are formed on the dendritic tree. In the neocortex, the dendrites of pyramidal neurons are covered by thousands of tiny protrusions known as dendritic spines, which are the major recipient sites for excitatory synaptic information in the brain. Their peculiar morphology, with a small head connected to the dendritic shaft by a slender neck, has inspired decades of theoretical and more recently experimental work in an attempt to understand how excitatory synaptic inputs are processed, stored and integrated in pyramidal neurons. Advances in electrophysiological, optical and genetic tools are now enabling us to unravel the biophysical and molecular mechanisms controlling spine function in health and disease. Here I highlight relevant findings, challenges and hypotheses on spine function, with an emphasis on the electrical properties of spines and on how these affect the storage and integration of excitatory synaptic inputs in pyramidal neurons. In an attempt to make sense of the published data, I propose that the raison d'etre for dendritic spines lies in their ability to undergo activity-dependent structural and molecular changes that can modify synaptic strength, and hence alter the gain of the linearly integrated sub-threshold depolarizations in pyramidal neuron dendrites before the generation of a dendritic spike.

  15. Micromechanics of Sea Urchin Spines

    PubMed Central

    Tsafnat, Naomi; Fitz Gerald, John D.; Le, Hai N.; Stachurski, Zbigniew H.

    2012-01-01

    The endoskeletal structure of the Sea Urchin, Centrostephanus rodgersii, has numerous long spines whose known functions include locomotion, sensing, and protection against predators. These spines have a remarkable internal microstructure and are made of single-crystal calcite. A finite-element model of the spine’s unique porous structure, based on micro-computed tomography (microCT) and incorporating anisotropic material properties, was developed to study its response to mechanical loading. Simulations show that high stress concentrations occur at certain points in the spine’s architecture; brittle cracking would likely initiate in these regions. These analyses demonstrate that the organization of single-crystal calcite in the unique, intricate morphology of the sea urchin spine results in a strong, stiff and lightweight structure that enhances its strength despite the brittleness of its constituent material. PMID:22984468

  16. Trimethylamine N-Oxide From Gut Microbiota in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: Focus on Diet.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Cristiane; Fouque, Denis; Amaral, Ana Claudia F; Mafra, Denise

    2015-11-01

    Low-protein diet is the recommended nutritional intervention for nondialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients because excess protein intake can damage kidney function and produce uremic toxins. Some of these toxins are generated from amino acids breakdown by gut microbiota as p-cresyl sulfate and indoxyl sulfate that have been clearly associated with cardiovascular mortality in CKD patients. Another uremic toxin, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a degradation product of choline and L-carnitine (which come mainly from animal protein such as red meat and eggs) is now considered as a proatherogenic metabolite. In the present review, we will highlight the relationship between TMAO, diet and cardiovascular aspects, and the potential concerns about TMAO in nondialysis CKD patients.

  17. Trimethylamine N-Oxide From Gut Microbiota in Chronic Kidney Disease Patients: Focus on Diet.

    PubMed

    Moraes, Cristiane; Fouque, Denis; Amaral, Ana Claudia F; Mafra, Denise

    2015-11-01

    Low-protein diet is the recommended nutritional intervention for nondialysis chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients because excess protein intake can damage kidney function and produce uremic toxins. Some of these toxins are generated from amino acids breakdown by gut microbiota as p-cresyl sulfate and indoxyl sulfate that have been clearly associated with cardiovascular mortality in CKD patients. Another uremic toxin, trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a degradation product of choline and L-carnitine (which come mainly from animal protein such as red meat and eggs) is now considered as a proatherogenic metabolite. In the present review, we will highlight the relationship between TMAO, diet and cardiovascular aspects, and the potential concerns about TMAO in nondialysis CKD patients. PMID:26235933

  18. FOCUS: Future of fecal calprotectin utility study in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Greg; Greenup, Astrid-Jane; Round, Andrew; Takach, Oliver; Halparin, Lawrence; Saadeddin, Abid; Ho, Jin Kee; Lee, Terry; Enns, Robert; Bressler, Brian

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the perspective of gastroenterologists regarding the impact of fecal calprotectin (FC) on the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS Patients with known IBD or symptoms suggestive of IBD for whom the physician identified that FC would be clinically useful were recruited. Physicians completed an online “pre survey” outlining their rationale for the test. After receipt of the test results, the physicians completed an online “post survey” to portray their perceived impact of the test result on patient management. Clinical outcomes for a subset of patients with follow-up data available beyond the completion of the “post survey” were collected and analyzed. RESULTS Of 373 test kits distributed, 290 were returned, resulting in 279 fully completed surveys. One hundred and ninety patients were known to have IBD; 147 (77%) with Crohn’s Disease, 43 (21%) Ulcerative Colitis and 5 (2%) IBD unclassified. Indications for FC testing included: 90 (32.2%) to differentiate a new diagnosis of IBD from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), 85 (30.5%) to distinguish symptoms of IBS from IBD in those known to have IBD and 104 (37.2%) as an objective measure of inflammation. FC levels resulted in a change in management 51.3% (143/279) of the time which included a significant reduction in the number of colonoscopies (118) performed (P < 0.001). Overall, 97.5% (272/279) of the time, the physicians found the test sufficiently useful that they would order it again in similar situations. Follow-up data was available for 172 patients with further support for the clinical utility of FC provided. CONCLUSION The FC test effected a change in management 51.3% of the time and receipt of the result was associated with a reduction in the number of colonoscopies performed.

  19. FOCUS: Future of fecal calprotectin utility study in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Greg; Greenup, Astrid-Jane; Round, Andrew; Takach, Oliver; Halparin, Lawrence; Saadeddin, Abid; Ho, Jin Kee; Lee, Terry; Enns, Robert; Bressler, Brian

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the perspective of gastroenterologists regarding the impact of fecal calprotectin (FC) on the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS Patients with known IBD or symptoms suggestive of IBD for whom the physician identified that FC would be clinically useful were recruited. Physicians completed an online “pre survey” outlining their rationale for the test. After receipt of the test results, the physicians completed an online “post survey” to portray their perceived impact of the test result on patient management. Clinical outcomes for a subset of patients with follow-up data available beyond the completion of the “post survey” were collected and analyzed. RESULTS Of 373 test kits distributed, 290 were returned, resulting in 279 fully completed surveys. One hundred and ninety patients were known to have IBD; 147 (77%) with Crohn’s Disease, 43 (21%) Ulcerative Colitis and 5 (2%) IBD unclassified. Indications for FC testing included: 90 (32.2%) to differentiate a new diagnosis of IBD from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), 85 (30.5%) to distinguish symptoms of IBS from IBD in those known to have IBD and 104 (37.2%) as an objective measure of inflammation. FC levels resulted in a change in management 51.3% (143/279) of the time which included a significant reduction in the number of colonoscopies (118) performed (P < 0.001). Overall, 97.5% (272/279) of the time, the physicians found the test sufficiently useful that they would order it again in similar situations. Follow-up data was available for 172 patients with further support for the clinical utility of FC provided. CONCLUSION The FC test effected a change in management 51.3% of the time and receipt of the result was associated with a reduction in the number of colonoscopies performed. PMID:27688663

  20. Role of by-products of lipid oxidation in Alzheimer's disease brain: a focus on acrolein.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manjeet; Dang, Thanh Nam; Arseneault, Madeleine; Ramassamy, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Abundant data consistently support the idea that oxidative stress occurs and is a constant feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Some recent evidence indicated that phenomenon is an early event and might be implicated in the pathogenesis of this disease. Lipid peroxidation leads to the formation of a number of aldehydes by-products, including malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), and acrolein. The most abundant aldehydes are HNE and MDA while acrolein is the most reactive. Increased levels of specific HNE-histidine and glutathione-HNE Michael adducts in AD brain has been reported. Proteomic analysis demonstrated a large number of protein-bound HNE in AD brain. F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) levels and neuroprostanes were also significantly increased in mild cognitive impairment (MCI) patients and in late-stage AD. In brain from patients with AD, acrolein has been found to be elevated in hippocampus and temporal cortex where oxidative stress is high. Due to its high reactivity, acrolein is not only a marker of lipid peroxidation but also an initiator of oxidative stress by adducting cellular nucleophilic groups found on proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Interestingly, data indicates that lipid peroxidation occurs in the brain of MCI and also in preclinical AD patients suggesting that oxidative damage may play an early role in the pathogenesis of AD. In this review, we will summarize some mechanisms implicated in the toxicity of by-products of lipid peroxidation such as IsoPs, HNE, and acrolein and their implication in AD.

  1. Disease related knowledge and quality of life: a descriptive study focusing on hypertensive population in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Fahad; Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Shafie, Asrul Akmal; Atif, Muhammad; ul Haq, Noman; Aljadhey, Hisham

    2012-01-01

    Objective: This study aims to evaluate association between Health related quality of lifeand disease state knowledge among hypertensive population of Pakistan. Methods: A cross sectional descriptive study was undertaken with a representative cohort of hypertension patients. Using prevalence based sampling technique, a total of 385 hypertensive patients were selected from two public hospitals of Quetta city, Pakistan. Hypertension Fact Questionnaire (HFQ) and European Quality of Life scale (EQ-5D) were used for data collection. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 16.0 was used to compute descriptive analysis of patients’ demographic and disease related information. Categorical variables were described as percentages while continuous variables were expressed as mean ± standard deviation (SD). Spearman’s rho correlation was used to identify the association between study variables. Results: The mean (SD) age of the patients was 39.02 (6.59), with 68.8% males (n=265). The mean (SD) duration of hypertension was 3.01 (0.93) years. Forty percent (n=154) had bachelor degree with 34.8% (n=134) working in private sector. Almost forty one percent (n=140) had monthly income of more than 15000 Pakistan rupees per month with 75.1% (n=289) having urban residency. The mean EQ-5D descriptive score (0.46±0.28) and EQ-VAS score (63.97±6.62) indicated lower HRQoL in our study participants. Mean knowledge score was 8.03 ± 0.42. Correlation coefficient between HRQoL and knowledge was 0.208 (p< 0.001), indicating a week positive association. Conclusion: Results of this study highlight hypertension knowledge to be weakly associated with HRQoL suggesting that imparting knowledge to patients do not necessarily improve HRQoL. More attention should be given to identify individualized factors affecting HRQoL. PMID:23093899

  2. Manipulating Autophagic Processes in Autoimmune Diseases: A Special Focus on Modulating Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy, an Emerging Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fengjuan; Muller, Sylviane

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy, a constitutive intracellular degradation pathway, displays essential role in the homeostasis of immune cells, antigen processing and presentation, and many other immune processes. Perturbation of autophagy has been shown to be related to several autoimmune syndromes, including systemic lupus erythematosus. Therefore, modulating autophagy processes appears most promising for therapy of such autoimmune diseases. Autophagy can be said non-selective or selective; it is classified into three main forms, namely macroautophagy, microautophagy, and chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), the former process being by far the most intensively investigated. The role of CMA remains largely underappreciated in autoimmune diseases, even though CMA has been claimed to play pivotal functions into major histocompatibility complex class II-mediated antigen processing and presentation. Therefore, hereby, we give a special focus on CMA as a therapeutic target in autoimmune diseases, based in particular on our most recent experimental results where a phosphopeptide modulates lupus disease by interacting with CMA regulators. We propose that specifically targeting lysosomes and lysosomal pathways, which are central in autophagy processes and seem to be altered in certain autoimmune diseases such as lupus, could be an innovative approach of efficient and personalized treatment. PMID:26042127

  3. Dendritic spine alterations in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Moyer, Caitlin E; Shelton, Micah A; Sweet, Robert A

    2015-08-01

    Schizophrenia is a chronic illness affecting approximately 0.5-1% of the world's population. The etiology of schizophrenia is complex, including multiple genes, and contributing environmental effects that adversely impact neurodevelopment. Nevertheless, a final common result, present in many subjects with schizophrenia, is impairment of pyramidal neuron dendritic morphology in multiple regions of the cerebral cortex. In this review, we summarize the evidence of reduced dendritic spine density and other dendritic abnormalities in schizophrenia, evaluate current data that informs the neurodevelopment timing of these impairments, and discuss what is known about possible upstream sources of dendritic spine loss in this illness.

  4. [Injury of upper cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Ryba, Luděk; Cienciala, Jan; Chaloupka, Richard; Repko, Martin; Vyskočil, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Injuries of the upper cervical spine represent 1/3 of all cervical spine injuries and approximately 40 % result by the death. Every level of the cervical spine can be injured - fractures of condyles of the occipital bone (CO), atlantooccipital dislocation (AOD), fractures of the Atlas (C1), atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) and fractures of the axis (C2). Most of cases in younger patients are caused by high-energy trauma, while by elderly people, because of the osteoporosis, is needed much less energy and even simple falls can cause the injury of the cervical spine. That´s why the etiology of injuries can be different. In younger patients are caused mainly by car accidents, motorcycle and bicycle accidents and pedestrian crashes by car and in elderly populations are the main reason falls. The mechanism of the injury is axial force, hyperflexion, hyperextension, latero-flexion, rotation and combination of all. The basic diagnostic examination is X ray in AP, lateral and transoral projection. But in the most of cases is CT examination necessary and in the suspicion of the ligamentous injury and neurological deterioration must be MRI examination added. Every injury of the upper cervical spine has its own classification. Clinical symptoms can vary from the neck pain, restricted range of motion, antalgic position of the head, injury of the cranial nerves and different neurologic symptoms from the irritation of nerves to quadriplegia. A large percentage of deaths is at the time of the injury. Therapy is divided to conservative treatment, which is indicated in bone injuries with minimal dislocation. In more severe cases, with the dislocation and ligamentous injury, when is high chance of the instability, is indicated the surgical treatment. We can use anterior or posterior approach, make the osteosynthesis, stabilisation and fusion of the spine. Complex fractures and combination of different types of injuries are often present in this part of the spine. Correct and early

  5. Cervical spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of contrast given into a vein contains iodine. If a person with an iodine allergy is given this type of contrast, nausea ... steroids before the test. The kidneys help remove iodine out of the body. People with kidney disease ...

  6. Spine Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... They include Infections Injuries Tumors Conditions, such as ankylosing spondylitis and scoliosis Bone changes that come with age, such as spinal stenosis and herniated disks Spinal diseases often cause pain when bone changes put pressure ...

  7. Biomechanics of the flexion of spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, H. K.; Aurora, T. S.

    1991-03-01

    Low back pain is a common problem and it involves different kinds of injury to the spine. In this article the forces and torques experienced by the spine are examined in order to understand, and possibly avoid, low back pain.

  8. Ambulatory spine surgery: a survey study.

    PubMed

    Baird, Evan O; Brietzke, Sasha C; Weinberg, Alan D; McAnany, Steven J; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C

    2014-08-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Objective To assess the current practices of spine surgeons performing ambulatory surgery in the United States. Methods An electronic survey was distributed to members of the International Society for the Advancement of Spine Surgery. Data were initially examined in a univariate manner; variables with a p value < 0.25 were entered into a multiple logistic regression model. All statistical analyses were performed using the SAS System software Version 9.2 (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, North Carolina, United States). Results Overall, 84.2% of respondents performed some manner of ambulatory spine surgery, and 49.1% were investors in an ambulatory surgery center. Surgeon investors in ambulatory surgery centers were more likely to perform procedures of increased complexity than noninvestors, though limited data precluded a statistical correlation. Surgeons in private practice were more likely to perform ambulatory surgery (94.3%; p = 0.0176), and nonacademic surgeons were both more likely to invest in ambulatory surgery centers (p = 0.0024) and perform surgery at least part of the time in a surgery center (p = 0.0039). Conclusions Though the numbers were too few to calculate statistical significance, there was a trend toward the performance of high-risk procedures on an ambulatory basis being undertaken by those with investment status in an ambulatory center. It is possible that this plays a role in the decision to perform these procedures in this setting versus that of a hospital, where a patient may have better access to care should a complication arise requiring emergent assessment and treatment by a physician. This decision should divest itself of financial incentives and focus entirely on patient safety. PMID:25083356

  9. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2–4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7–10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7–10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed – hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in

  10. Ambulatory spine surgery: a survey study.

    PubMed

    Baird, Evan O; Brietzke, Sasha C; Weinberg, Alan D; McAnany, Steven J; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C

    2014-08-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Objective To assess the current practices of spine surgeons performing ambulatory surgery in the United States. Methods An electronic survey was distributed to members of the International Society for the Advancement of Spine Surgery. Data were initially examined in a univariate manner; variables with a p value < 0.25 were entered into a multiple logistic regression model. All statistical analyses were performed using the SAS System software Version 9.2 (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, North Carolina, United States). Results Overall, 84.2% of respondents performed some manner of ambulatory spine surgery, and 49.1% were investors in an ambulatory surgery center. Surgeon investors in ambulatory surgery centers were more likely to perform procedures of increased complexity than noninvestors, though limited data precluded a statistical correlation. Surgeons in private practice were more likely to perform ambulatory surgery (94.3%; p = 0.0176), and nonacademic surgeons were both more likely to invest in ambulatory surgery centers (p = 0.0024) and perform surgery at least part of the time in a surgery center (p = 0.0039). Conclusions Though the numbers were too few to calculate statistical significance, there was a trend toward the performance of high-risk procedures on an ambulatory basis being undertaken by those with investment status in an ambulatory center. It is possible that this plays a role in the decision to perform these procedures in this setting versus that of a hospital, where a patient may have better access to care should a complication arise requiring emergent assessment and treatment by a physician. This decision should divest itself of financial incentives and focus entirely on patient safety.

  11. Emergence of nonmotor symptoms as the focus of research and treatment of Parkinson's disease: introduction to the special section on nonmotor dysfunctions in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cronin-Golomb, Alice

    2013-04-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is traditionally characterized by the cardinal motor symptoms of tremor, rigidity, slowness of movement, and impairments of posture, gait, and balance. A relatively new focus of research and treatment is the nonmotor symptoms of the disease, following from recent understanding of the neuropathological stages. Disruptions of arousal, mood, sleep, and autonomic function before the first motor signs of PD implicate the lower brainstem, which is affected before the substantia nigra and dopaminergic system. In later stages of the disease, the pathology extends to the cortex, accompanied by impairments in cognition and perception. The articles in this special section advance our knowledge of the brain bases of the nonmotor symptoms of PD, including disrupted visual perception, impaired cognition across a range of domains, and psychiatric and artistic manifestations. Subtypes under investigation include those described by side of disease onset (left or right body side), predominant cognitive profile, and gender. Taken together, the articles in this special section reflect the field's growing focus on the nonmotor symptoms of PD, their brain bases, and the corresponding potential for their treatment.

  12. Drug discovery strategies that focus on the endocannabinoid signaling system in psychiatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Wyrofsky, Ryan; McGonigle, Paul; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The endocannabinoid (eCB) system plays an important role in the control of mood, and its dysregulation has been implicated in several psychiatric disorders. Targeting the eCB system appears to represent an attractive and novel approach to the treatment of depression and other mood disorders. However, several failed clinical trials have diminished enthusiasm for the continued development of eCB-targeted therapeutics for psychiatric disorders, despite of the encouraging preclinical data and promising preliminary results obtained with the synthetic cannabinoid nabilone for treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Areas covered This review describes the eCB system’s role in modulating cell signaling within the brain. There is a specific focus on eCB’s regulation of monoamine neurotransmission and the stress axis, as well as how dysfunction of this interaction can contribute to the development of psychiatric disorders. Additionally, the review provides discussion on compounds and drugs that target this system and might prove to be successful for the treatment of mood-related psychiatric disorders. Expert opinion The discovery of increasingly selective modulators of CB receptors should enable the identification of optimal therapeutic strategies. It should also maximize the likelihood of developing safe and effective treatments for debilitating psychiatric disorders. PMID:25488672

  13. Development and Implementation of Worksite Health and Wellness Programs: A Focus on Non-Communicable Disease.

    PubMed

    Cahalin, Lawrence P; Kaminsky, Leonard; Lavie, Carl J; Briggs, Paige; Cahalin, Brendan L; Myers, Jonathan; Forman, Daniel E; Patel, Mahesh J; Pinkstaff, Sherry O; Arena, Ross

    2015-01-01

    The development and implementation of worksite health and wellness programs (WHWPs) in the United States (US) hold promise as a means to improve population health and reverse current trends in non-communicable disease incidence and prevalence. However, WHWPs face organizational, economic, systematic, legal, and logistical challenges which have combined to impact program availability and expansion. Even so, there is a burgeoning body of evidence indicating WHWPs can significantly improve the health profile of participating employees in a cost effective manner. This foundation of scientific knowledge justifies further research inquiry to elucidate optimal WHWP models. It is clear that the development, implementation and operation of WHWPs require a strong commitment from organizational leadership, a pervasive culture of health and availability of necessary resources and infrastructure. Since organizations vary significantly, there is a need to have flexibility in creating a customized, effective health and wellness program. Furthermore, several key legal issues must be addressed to facilitate employer and employee needs and responsibilities; the US Affordable Care Act will play a major role moving forward. The purposes of this review are to: 1) examine currently available health and wellness program models and considerations for the future; 2) highlight key legal issues associated with WHWP development and implementation; and 3) identify challenges and solutions for the development and implementation of as well as adherence to WHWPs.

  14. Development and Implementation of Worksite Health and Wellness Programs: A Focus on Non-Communicable Disease.

    PubMed

    Cahalin, Lawrence P; Kaminsky, Leonard; Lavie, Carl J; Briggs, Paige; Cahalin, Brendan L; Myers, Jonathan; Forman, Daniel E; Patel, Mahesh J; Pinkstaff, Sherry O; Arena, Ross

    2015-01-01

    The development and implementation of worksite health and wellness programs (WHWPs) in the United States (US) hold promise as a means to improve population health and reverse current trends in non-communicable disease incidence and prevalence. However, WHWPs face organizational, economic, systematic, legal, and logistical challenges which have combined to impact program availability and expansion. Even so, there is a burgeoning body of evidence indicating WHWPs can significantly improve the health profile of participating employees in a cost effective manner. This foundation of scientific knowledge justifies further research inquiry to elucidate optimal WHWP models. It is clear that the development, implementation and operation of WHWPs require a strong commitment from organizational leadership, a pervasive culture of health and availability of necessary resources and infrastructure. Since organizations vary significantly, there is a need to have flexibility in creating a customized, effective health and wellness program. Furthermore, several key legal issues must be addressed to facilitate employer and employee needs and responsibilities; the US Affordable Care Act will play a major role moving forward. The purposes of this review are to: 1) examine currently available health and wellness program models and considerations for the future; 2) highlight key legal issues associated with WHWP development and implementation; and 3) identify challenges and solutions for the development and implementation of as well as adherence to WHWPs. PMID:25936908

  15. Focusing Brain Therapeutic Interventions in Space and Time for Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Little, S.; Brown, P.

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has seen major progress at all levels of neuroscience, from genes and molecules up to integrated systems-level models of brain function. In particular, there have been advances in the understanding of cell-type-specific contributions to function, together with a clearer account of how these contributions are coordinated from moment to moment to organise behavior. A major current endeavor is to leverage this knowledge to develop new therapeutic approaches. In Parkinson’s disease, there are a number of promising emerging treatments. Here, we will highlight three ambitious novel therapeutic approaches for this condition, each robustly driven by primary neuroscience. Pharmacogenetics genetically re-engineers neurons to produce neurotrophins that are neuroprotective to vulnerable dopaminergic cells or to directly replace dopamine through enzyme transduction. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is undergoing a transformation, with adaptive DBS controlled by neural signals resulting in better motor outcomes and significant reductions in overall stimulation that could reduce side effects. Finally, optogenetics presents the opportunity to achieve cell-type-specific control with a high temporal specification on a large enough scale to effectively repair network-level dysfunction. PMID:25247369

  16. Focusing brain therapeutic interventions in space and time for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Little, S; Brown, P

    2014-09-22

    The last decade has seen major progress at all levels of neuroscience, from genes and molecules up to integrated systems-level models of brain function. In particular, there have been advances in the understanding of cell-type-specific contributions to function, together with a clearer account of how these contributions are coordinated from moment to moment to organise behavior. A major current endeavor is to leverage this knowledge to develop new therapeutic approaches. In Parkinson's disease, there are a number of promising emerging treatments. Here, we will highlight three ambitious novel therapeutic approaches for this condition, each robustly driven by primary neuroscience. Pharmacogenetics genetically re-engineers neurons to produce neurotrophins that are neuroprotective to vulnerable dopaminergic cells or to directly replace dopamine through enzyme transduction. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is undergoing a transformation, with adaptive DBS controlled by neural signals resulting in better motor outcomes and significant reductions in overall stimulation that could reduce side effects. Finally, optogenetics presents the opportunity to achieve cell-type-specific control with a high temporal specification on a large enough scale to effectively repair network-level dysfunction.

  17. Does neuroinflammation turn on the flame in Alzheimer's disease? Focus on astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Steardo, Luca; Bronzuoli, Maria R.; Iacomino, Aniello; Esposito, Giuseppe; Steardo, Luca; Scuderi, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    Data from animal models and Alzheimer's disease (AD) subjects provide clear evidence for an activation of inflammatory pathways during the pathogenetic course of such illness. Biochemical and neuropathological studies highlighted an important cause/effect relationship between inflammation and AD progression, revealing a wide range of genetic, cellular, and molecular changes associated with the pathology. In this context, glial cells have been proved to exert a crucial role. These cells, in fact, undergo important morphological and functional changes and are now considered to be involved in the onset and progression of AD. In particular, astrocytes respond quickly to pathology with changes that have been increasingly recognized as a continuum, with potentially beneficial and/or negative consequences. Although it is now clear that activated astrocytes trigger the neuroinflammatory process, however, the precise mechanisms have not been completely elucidated. Neuroinflammation is certainly a multi-faceted and complex phenomenon and, especially in the early stages, exerts a reparative intent. However, for reasons not yet all well known, this process goes beyond the physiologic control and contributes to the exacerbation of the damage. Here we scrutinize some evidence supporting the role of astrocytes in the neuroinflammatory process and the possibility that these cells could be considered a promising target for future AD therapies. PMID:26283900

  18. Non-synaptic dendritic spines in neocortex.

    PubMed

    Arellano, J I; Espinosa, A; Fairén, A; Yuste, R; DeFelipe, J

    2007-03-16

    A long-held assumption states that each dendritic spine in the cerebral cortex forms a synapse, although this issue has not been systematically investigated. We performed complete ultrastructural reconstructions of a large (n=144) population of identified spines in adult mouse neocortex finding that only 3.6% of the spines clearly lacked synapses. Nonsynaptic spines were small and had no clear head, resembling dendritic filopodia, and could represent a source of new synaptic connections in the adult cerebral cortex.

  19. Methods to Prevent or Treat Refractory Diseases by Focusing on Intestinal Microbes Using LPS and Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Soma, Gen-Ichiro; Inagawa, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal microbes are known to influence host homeostasis by producing various substances. Recently, the presence of a diverse range of intestinal microbiota has been shown to play a key role in the maintenance of health, along with influencing the host's innate immunity towards various diseases. For example, fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from healthy individuals was remarkably effective in cases of refractory Clostridium difficile colitis. Conversely, decreased number of intestinal microbes resulting from the oral administration of antibiotics reportedly suppressed the antitumor effects of immunotherapy or anticancer drugs. Furthermore, it has been shown that a change in the intestinal environment triggered by oral administration of antibiotics resulted in increased number of drug-resistant microbes causing nosocomial infections. Intestinal microbes are also shown to be effective in cancer treatment as they activate macrophages at the site of cancer. One of the effects of intestinal microbes on hosts that has been gaining increasing attention is the biological regulation caused by the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) produced by Gram-negative bacteria. Among the intestinal microbiota present in the host, Gram-negative bacteria form the most dominant flora. The administration of antibiotics leads to a decreased number of intestinal microbes, as well as to suppression of cancer immunotherapy effects or anticancer drug effects, and this deterioration has been shown to be improved by oral administration of LPS. In this article, we discuss the functions of intestinal microbiota, that is currently undergoing a paradigm shift in relation to maintenance of health and the validity of LPS as a possible target for bio-treatment in the future.

  20. Comparison of Models for Predicting Outcomes in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease Focusing on Microsimulation

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Masoud; Kelishadi, Roya

    2012-01-01

    Background: Physicians have difficulty to subjectively estimate the cardiovascular risk of their patients. Using an estimate of global cardiovascular risk could be more relevant to guide decisions than using binary representation (presence or absence) of risk factors data. The main aim of the paper is to compare different models of predicting the progress of a coronary artery diseases (CAD) to help the decision making of physician. Methods: There are different standard models for predicting risk factors such as models based on logistic regression model, Cox regression model, dynamic logistic regression model, and simulation models such as Markov model and microsimulation model. Each model has its own application which can or cannot use by physicians to make a decision on treatment of each patient. Results: There are five main common models for predicting of outcomes, including models based on logistic regression model (for short-term outcomes), Cox regression model (for intermediate-term outcomes), dynamic logistic regression model, and simulation models such as Markov and microsimulation models (for long-term outcomes). The advantages and disadvantages of these models have been discussed and summarized. Conclusion: Given the complex medical decisions that physicians face in everyday practice, the multiple interrelated factors that play a role in choosing the optimal treatment, and the continuously accumulating new evidence on determinants of outcome and treatment options for CAD, physicians may potentially benefit from a clinical decision support system that accounts for all these considerations. The microsimulation model could provide cardiologists, researchers, and medical students a user-friendly software, which can be used as an intelligent interventional simulator. PMID:22973481

  1. MR-guided focused ultrasound: a new generation treatment of Parkinson's disease, essential tremor and neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Dobrakowski, Pawel Piotr; Machowska-Majchrzak, Agnieszka Kamila; Labuz-Roszak, Beata; Majchrzak, Krzysztof Grzegorz; Kluczewska, Ewa; Pierzchała, Krystyna Barbara

    2014-01-01

    The application of high intense focused ultrasound (HIFU) is currently the subject of many experimental and clinical trials. The combination of HIFU with MRI guidance known as MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) appears to be particularly promising to ablate tissues located deep in the brain. The method can be the beginning of interventional neurology and an important alternative to neurosurgery. Studies conducted to date show the effectiveness of the method both in chronic diseases and in emergency cases. The safety and effectiveness of this method have been observed in parkinsonian and essential tremor as well as in neuropathic pain. The procedure does not require anaesthesia. Ionizing radiation is not used and there is no risk of cumulative dose. Such advantages may result in low complication rates and medical justification for further development of MRgFUS.

  2. Guideline update for the performance of fusion procedures for degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. Part 11: interbody techniques for lumbar fusion.

    PubMed

    Mummaneni, Praveen V; Dhall, Sanjay S; Eck, Jason C; Groff, Michael W; Ghogawala, Zoher; Watters, William C; Dailey, Andrew T; Resnick, Daniel K; Choudhri, Tanvir F; Sharan, Alok; Wang, Jeffrey C; Kaiser, Michael G

    2014-07-01

    Interbody fusion techniques have been promoted as an adjunct to lumbar fusion procedures in an effort to enhance fusion rates and potentially improve clinical outcome. The medical evidence continues to suggest that interbody techniques are associated with higher fusion rates compared with posterolateral lumbar fusion (PLF) in patients with degenerative spondylolisthesis who demonstrate preoperative instability. There is no conclusive evidence demonstrating improved clinical or radiographic outcomes based on the different interbody fusion techniques. The addition of a PLF when posterior or anterior interbody lumbar fusion is performed remains an option, although due to increased cost and complications, it is not recommended. No substantial clinical benefit has been demonstrated when a PLF is included with an interbody fusion. For lumbar degenerative disc disease without instability, there is moderate evidence that the standalone anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) has better clinical outcomes than the ALIF plus instrumented, open PLF. With regard to type of interbody spacer used, frozen allograft is associated with lower pseudarthrosis rates compared with freeze-dried allograft; however, this was not associated with a difference in clinical outcome.

  3. The Transfection of BDNF to Dopamine Neurons Potentiates the Effect of Dopamine D3 Receptor Agonist Recovering the Striatal Innervation, Dendritic Spines and Motor Behavior in an Aged Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Razgado-Hernandez, Luis F.; Espadas-Alvarez, Armando J.; Reyna-Velazquez, Patricia; Sierra-Sanchez, Arturo; Anaya-Martinez, Veronica; Jimenez-Estrada, Ismael; Bannon, Michael J.; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Aceves-Ruiz, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The progressive degeneration of the dopamine neurons of the pars compacta of substantia nigra and the consequent loss of the dopamine innervation of the striatum leads to the impairment of motor behavior in Parkinson’s disease. Accordingly, an efficient therapy of the disease should protect and regenerate the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra and the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Nigral neurons express Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) and dopamine D3 receptors, both of which protect the dopamine neurons. The chronic activation of dopamine D3 receptors by their agonists, in addition, restores, in part, the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Here we explored whether the over-expression of BDNF by dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of the activation of D3 receptors restoring nigrostriatal innervation. Twelve-month old Wistar rats were unilaterally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine into the striatum. Five months later, rats were treated with the D3 agonist 7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propy1-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) administered i.p. during 4½ months via osmotic pumps and the BDNF gene transfection into nigral cells using the neurotensin-polyplex nanovector (a non-viral transfection) that selectively transfect the dopamine neurons via the high-affinity neurotensin receptor expressed by these neurons. Two months after the withdrawal of 7-OH-DPAT when rats were aged (24 months old), immunohistochemistry assays were made. The over-expression of BDNF in rats receiving the D3 agonist normalized gait and motor coordination; in addition, it eliminated the muscle rigidity produced by the loss of dopamine. The recovery of motor behavior was associated with the recovery of the nigral neurons, the dopamine innervation of the striatum and of the number of dendritic spines of the striatal neurons. Thus, the over-expression of BDNF in dopamine neurons associated with the chronic activation of the D3 receptors appears to be a promising strategy for restoring

  4. Contemporary medical management of peripheral arterial disease: a focus on risk reduction and symptom relief for intermittent claudication.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Kush; Eberhardt, Robert T

    2015-02-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is primarily caused by progressive systemic atherosclerosis manifesting in the lower extremities. This review addresses the epidemiology, clinical presentation and evaluation, and medical management of PAD, with a focus on intermittent claudication. Key advances in the recognition of cardiovascular risk in asymptomatic individuals with mildly abnormal ankle-brachial index, newer reflections on exercise therapy, and a review of established and investigational agents for the treatment of symptomatic PAD, such as cilostazol, statins, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, are highlighted.

  5. Concept of Gunshot Wound Spine

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2013-01-01

    Gunshot wound (GSW) to the spine which was earlier common in the military population is now being increasingly noted in civilians due to easy availability of firearms of low velocity either licensed or illegal combined with an increased rate of violence in the society. Contributing to 13% to 17% of all spinal injuries, the management of complex injury to the spine produced by a GSW remains controversial. Surgery for spinal cord injuries resulting from low velocity GSWs is reserved for patients with progressive neurologic deterioration, persistent cerebrospinal fluid fistulae, and sometimes for incomplete spinal cord injuries. Surgery may also be indicated to relieve active neural compression from a bullet, bone, intervertebral disk, or a hematoma within the spinal canal. Spinal instability rarely results from a civilian GSW. Cauda equina injuries from low velocity GSWs have a better overall outcome after surgery. In general, the decision to perform surgery should be made on consideration of multiple patient factors that can vary over a period of time. Although there have been plenty of individual case reports regarding GSW to the spine, a thorough review of unique mechanical and biological factors that affect the final outcome has been lacking. We review the key concepts of pathogenesis and management of GSW to the spine and propose an algorithm to guide decision making in such cases. PMID:24353856

  6. The cervical spine in patients with psoriatic arthritis: a clinical, radiological and immunogenetic study.

    PubMed Central

    Salvarani, C; Macchioni, P; Cremonesi, T; Mantovani, W; Battistel, B; Rossi, F; Capozzoli, N; Baricchi, R; Portioli, I

    1992-01-01

    The radiological changes of the cervical spine were evaluated in 57 patients with psoriatic arthritis and were correlated with clinical, radiological, and immunogenetic features of the disease. Forty patients (70%) showed radiological evidence of the cervical spine being affected by the disease. Two patterns of cervical spine abnormalities were noted. Fifteen patients (26%) had erosive and/or subluxing cervical rheumatoid like lesions; 25 patients (44%) had a more frequently reported pattern similar to ankylosing spondylitis. Although subaxial subluxations were the most frequently observed cervical abnormalities (53%) in the inflammatory subgroup, none of the patients studied had cord compression. Ankylosing cervical spine disease was the only form of axial involvement in nine (36%) of 25 patients with the ankylosing form of psoriatic arthritis. All of these patients had peripheral disease and were B27 negative. Predictors of cervical spine disease patterns were considered using clinical, demographic, and radiological features and HLA antigens. The results of a multivariate analysis showed that the best predictors of inflammatory cervical spine disease are the presence of HLA-B39 and HLA-DR4 antigens, radiocarpal erosions, and the absence of the HLA-DR5 antigen. PMID:1540041

  7. A skin disease, a blood disease or something in between? An exploratory focus group study of patients' experiences with porphyria cutanea tarda*

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, J; Gjengedal, E; Sandberg, S; Råheim, M

    2015-01-01

    Background Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is characterized by fragile skin with blistering on sun-exposed areas. Symptoms typically develop in late adulthood and can be triggered by iron overload, alcohol intake, oestrogens and various liver diseases. Treatment consists of phlebotomy to reduce iron, or increasing urinary porphyrin excretion by administering chlorochin. To optimize patient care, health personnel need to understand the subjective experiences of PCT. Objectives To explore the experiences of persons with PCT with regard to symptoms, treatment, follow-up and prevention of the disease. Methods Interpretive description was used as a qualitative approach. Twenty-one participants attended three focus groups. All participants had experienced PCT symptoms during the last 5 years. Results Participants' experiences varied from trivializing symptoms and fragile skin to what was described as a desperate situation, with huge blisters, skin falling off and feeling as if one was in a ‘horror movie’. For some, itching was very troublesome, preventing sleep and delaying skin healing. In managing PCT a shift in focus from skin to blood was described. PCT was perceived as a chronic and systemic disease causing a range of health problems. Strategies for preventing symptoms ranged from doing nothing to frequent controls and check-ups. Conclusions Participants had a systemic perception of PCT, and a tendency to attribute a range of health problems to the condition. This study adds insight into the experiences patients have with PCT. PMID:24958197

  8. Plasticity of Dendritic Spines: Subcompartmentalization of Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Colgan, Lesley A.; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2014-01-01

    The ability to induce and study neuronal plasticity in single dendritic spines has greatly advanced our understanding of the signaling mechanisms that mediate long-term potentiation. It is now clear that in addition to compartmentalization by the individual spine, subcompartmentalization of biochemical signals occurs at specialized microdomains within the spine. The spatiotemporal coordination of these complex cascades allows for the concomitant remodeling of the postsynaptic density actin spinoskeleton and for the regulation of membrane traffic to express functional and structural plasticity. Here, we highlight recent findings in the signaling cascades at spine microdomains as well as the challenges and approaches to studying plasticity at the spine level. PMID:24215443

  9. Cervical spine in Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pun, Amy Hoi-Ying; Clark, Bruce Eric; David, David John; Anderson, Peter John

    2012-05-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is a congenital syndrome with characteristic craniofacial malformations, which are well described in the literature. However, the presence of cervical spine dysmorphology in this syndrome has been minimally described. This study reviews cervical spine radiographs of 40 patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. In this sample, 7 of 40 patients displayed cervical spine anomalies, with 3 of these patients displaying multiple cervical spine anomalies. The patterns of spinal anomalies were variable, suggesting that the underlying genetic mutation has variable expressivity in cervical spine development as it does elsewhere in the craniofacial skeleton.

  10. A brief history of endoscopic spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Telfeian, Albert E; Veeravagu, Anand; Oyelese, Adetokunbo A; Gokaslan, Ziya L

    2016-02-01

    Few neurosurgeons practicing today have had training in the field of endoscopic spine surgery during residency or fellowship. Nevertheless, over the past 40 years individual spine surgeons from around the world have worked to create a subfield of minimally invasive spine surgery that takes the point of visualization away from the surgeon's eye or the lens of a microscope and puts it directly at the point of spine pathology. What follows is an attempt to describe the story of how endoscopic spine surgery developed and to credit some of those who have been the biggest contributors to its development. PMID:26828883

  11. The 100 Most Influential Articles in Cervical Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Steinberger, Jeremy; Guzman, Javier Z.; Overley, Samuel C.; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Caridi, John M.; Cho, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To identify and analyze the top 100 cited articles in cervical spine surgery. Methods The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all articles relevant to cervical spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each article. Results The most cited article was the classic from 1991 by Vernon and Mior that described the Neck Disability Index. The second most cited was Smith's 1958 article describing the anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion procedure. The third most cited article was Hilibrand's 1999 publication evaluating the incidence, prevalence, and radiographic progression of symptomatic adjacent segment disease following anterior cervical arthrodesis. The majority of the articles originated in the United States (65), and most were published in Spine (39). Most articles were published in the 1990s (34), and the three most common topics were cervical fusion (17), surgical complications (9), and biomechanics (9), respectively. Author Abumi had four articles in the top 100 list, and authors Goffin, Panjabi, and Hadley had three each. The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan, had five articles in the top 100 list. Conclusion This report identifies the top 100 articles in cervical spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the cervical spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in cervical spine surgery today. PMID:26835204

  12. Generating a focused view of disease ontology cancer terms for pan-cancer data integration and analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Jung; Schriml, Lynn M; Chen, Qing-Rong; Colbert, Maureen; Crichton, Daniel J; Finney, Richard; Hu, Ying; Kibbe, Warren A; Kincaid, Heather; Meerzaman, Daoud; Mitraka, Elvira; Pan, Yang; Smith, Krista M; Srivastava, Sudhir; Ward, Sari; Yan, Cheng; Mazumder, Raja

    2015-01-01

    Bio-ontologies provide terminologies for the scientific community to describe biomedical entities in a standardized manner. There are multiple initiatives that are developing biomedical terminologies for the purpose of providing better annotation, data integration and mining capabilities. Terminology resources devised for multiple purposes inherently diverge in content and structure. A major issue of biomedical data integration is the development of overlapping terms, ambiguous classifications and inconsistencies represented across databases and publications. The disease ontology (DO) was developed over the past decade to address data integration, standardization and annotation issues for human disease data. We have established a DO cancer project to be a focused view of cancer terms within the DO. The DO cancer project mapped 386 cancer terms from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), International Cancer Genome Consortium, Therapeutically Applicable Research to Generate Effective Treatments, Integrative Oncogenomics and the Early Detection Research Network into a cohesive set of 187 DO terms represented by 63 top-level DO cancer terms. For example, the COSMIC term 'kidney, NS, carcinoma, clear_cell_renal_cell_carcinoma' and TCGA term 'Kidney renal clear cell carcinoma' were both grouped to the term 'Disease Ontology Identification (DOID):4467 / renal clear cell carcinoma' which was mapped to the TopNodes_DOcancerslim term 'DOID:263 / kidney cancer'. Mapping of diverse cancer terms to DO and the use of top level terms (DO slims) will enable pan-cancer analysis across datasets generated from any of the cancer term sources where pan-cancer means including or relating to all or multiple types of cancer. The terms can be browsed from the DO web site (http://www.disease-ontology.org) and downloaded from the DO's Apache Subversion or GitHub repositories. Database URL: http://www.disease-ontology.org

  13. Generating a focused view of disease ontology cancer terms for pan-cancer data integration and analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Jung; Schriml, Lynn M; Chen, Qing-Rong; Colbert, Maureen; Crichton, Daniel J; Finney, Richard; Hu, Ying; Kibbe, Warren A; Kincaid, Heather; Meerzaman, Daoud; Mitraka, Elvira; Pan, Yang; Smith, Krista M; Srivastava, Sudhir; Ward, Sari; Yan, Cheng; Mazumder, Raja

    2015-01-01

    Bio-ontologies provide terminologies for the scientific community to describe biomedical entities in a standardized manner. There are multiple initiatives that are developing biomedical terminologies for the purpose of providing better annotation, data integration and mining capabilities. Terminology resources devised for multiple purposes inherently diverge in content and structure. A major issue of biomedical data integration is the development of overlapping terms, ambiguous classifications and inconsistencies represented across databases and publications. The disease ontology (DO) was developed over the past decade to address data integration, standardization and annotation issues for human disease data. We have established a DO cancer project to be a focused view of cancer terms within the DO. The DO cancer project mapped 386 cancer terms from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), International Cancer Genome Consortium, Therapeutically Applicable Research to Generate Effective Treatments, Integrative Oncogenomics and the Early Detection Research Network into a cohesive set of 187 DO terms represented by 63 top-level DO cancer terms. For example, the COSMIC term 'kidney, NS, carcinoma, clear_cell_renal_cell_carcinoma' and TCGA term 'Kidney renal clear cell carcinoma' were both grouped to the term 'Disease Ontology Identification (DOID):4467 / renal clear cell carcinoma' which was mapped to the TopNodes_DOcancerslim term 'DOID:263 / kidney cancer'. Mapping of diverse cancer terms to DO and the use of top level terms (DO slims) will enable pan-cancer analysis across datasets generated from any of the cancer term sources where pan-cancer means including or relating to all or multiple types of cancer. The terms can be browsed from the DO web site (http://www.disease-ontology.org) and downloaded from the DO's Apache Subversion or GitHub repositories. Database URL: http://www.disease-ontology.org PMID:25841438

  14. Generating a focused view of disease ontology cancer terms for pan-cancer data integration and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tsung-Jung; Schriml, Lynn M.; Chen, Qing-Rong; Colbert, Maureen; Crichton, Daniel J.; Finney, Richard; Hu, Ying; Kibbe, Warren A.; Kincaid, Heather; Meerzaman, Daoud; Mitraka, Elvira; Pan, Yang; Smith, Krista M.; Srivastava, Sudhir; Ward, Sari; Yan, Cheng; Mazumder, Raja

    2015-01-01

    Bio-ontologies provide terminologies for the scientific community to describe biomedical entities in a standardized manner. There are multiple initiatives that are developing biomedical terminologies for the purpose of providing better annotation, data integration and mining capabilities. Terminology resources devised for multiple purposes inherently diverge in content and structure. A major issue of biomedical data integration is the development of overlapping terms, ambiguous classifications and inconsistencies represented across databases and publications. The disease ontology (DO) was developed over the past decade to address data integration, standardization and annotation issues for human disease data. We have established a DO cancer project to be a focused view of cancer terms within the DO. The DO cancer project mapped 386 cancer terms from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), International Cancer Genome Consortium, Therapeutically Applicable Research to Generate Effective Treatments, Integrative Oncogenomics and the Early Detection Research Network into a cohesive set of 187 DO terms represented by 63 top-level DO cancer terms. For example, the COSMIC term ‘kidney, NS, carcinoma, clear_cell_renal_cell_carcinoma’ and TCGA term ‘Kidney renal clear cell carcinoma’ were both grouped to the term ‘Disease Ontology Identification (DOID):4467 / renal clear cell carcinoma’ which was mapped to the TopNodes_DOcancerslim term ‘DOID:263 / kidney cancer’. Mapping of diverse cancer terms to DO and the use of top level terms (DO slims) will enable pan-cancer analysis across datasets generated from any of the cancer term sources where pan-cancer means including or relating to all or multiple types of cancer. The terms can be browsed from the DO web site (http://www.disease-ontology.org) and downloaded from the DO’s Apache Subversion or GitHub repositories. Database URL: http://www.disease-ontology.org PMID

  15. Thoracic spine sports-related injuries.

    PubMed

    Menzer, Heather; Gill, G Keith; Paterson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Although sports-related injuries to the thoracic spine are relatively uncommon, they are among the most feared due to the potential for catastrophic neurologic injury. The increased biomechanical support of the thoracic spine makes injuries in this region particularly rare compared with the cervical and lumbar spine. As a result, thoracic spine injuries can be missed easily, difficult to diagnose, and problematic to treat. Recognition of mechanism and awareness of injury patterns help physicians determine a diagnosis and create an index of suspicion for unstable thoracic spine injuries. Aggressive full-contact sports receive the most attention for spinal injury; however several sports with repetitive loading of the spine can cause severe injuries, including rowing, gymnastics, and golf. The goal of this article was to provide an overview of the unique anatomic and biomechanical features of the thoracic spine and to discuss some of the more common thoracic injuries that can affect athletes. PMID:25574880

  16. Cervical Spine Injuries in the Athlete.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-09-01

    Cervical spine injuries are extremely common and range from relatively minor injuries, such as cervical muscle strains, to severe, life-threatening cervical fractures with spinal cord injuries. Although cervical spine injuries are most common in athletes who participate in contact and collision sports, such as American football and rugby, they also have been reported in athletes who participate in noncontact sports, such as baseball, gymnastics, and diving. Cervical spine injuries in athletes are not necessarily the result of substantial spine trauma; some athletes have chronic conditions, such as congenital stenosis, that increase their risk for a serious cervical spine injury after even minor trauma. Therefore, physicians who cover athletic events must have a thorough knowledge of cervical spine injures and the most appropriate ways in which they should be managed. Although cervical spine injuries can be career-ending injuries, athletes often are able to return to play after appropriate treatment if the potential for substantial re-injury is minimized.

  17. History of spine biomechanics: part I--the pre-Greco-Roman, Greco-Roman, and medieval roots of spine biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Sait; Andalkar, Niteen; Benzel, Edward C

    2007-02-01

    The roots of spine biomechanics reside in the Antiquity and the Medieval and Renaissance periods. A review of historical treatises reveals detailed information regarding this often historically neglected discipline. Ancient medical, philosophical, and physical documents were reviewed, as they pertained to the historical foundation of spine biomechanics. These included medical case reports and observations of nature and motion by ancient philosophers and scientists. These documents heavily influenced the portion of the scientific literature that we now regard as "spine biomechanics" up through the Renaissance. The focus of Part I of this two-part series is placed on the ancient and medieval biomechanics-related literature and on associated literature that influenced the development of the field of modern spine biomechanics.

  18. Tophaceous pseudogout of the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Vasisht; Kesler, Henry; Johnson, Mahlon; Dorfman, Howard; Walter, Kevin

    2012-04-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPDD, tophaceous pseudogout) is a rare crystal arthropathy characterized by pyrophosphate crystal deposition in joints, synovitis and chondrocalcinosis on imaging. We present the case of a 72-year-old man with 6 months of left chest pain; magnetic resonance imaging revealed a T9/T10 herniated disc. Intraoperatively, the material was sent for pathological analysis revealing pseudogout. Axial calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition is rare but reported in the literature and found at the craniocervical junction and skull. Spinal calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition is rare in the thoracic spine. It is often asymptompatic and can involve the disc or ligaments. This case demonstrates a unique presentation of CPDD.

  19. Computed tomography of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Haughton, V.M.; Williams, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The book describes the computed tomographic (CT) techniques for imaging the different elements comprising the spinal column and canal. The use of intravenous and intrathecal contrast enhancement and of xenon enhancement is briefly mentioned. Reconstruction techniques and special problems regarding CT of the spine are presented. CT of the spinal cord, meninges and subarachnoid space, epidural space, intervertebral discs, facet joints, and vertebrae present normal anatomy, and several common pathologic conditions. (KRM)

  20. Osteoporotic Hip and Spine Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Hip and spine fractures represent just a portion of the burden of osteoporosis; however, these fractures require treatment and often represent a major change in lifestyle for the patient and their family. The orthopedic surgeon plays a crucial role, not only in the treatment of these injuries but also providing guidance in prevention of future osteoporotic fractures. This review provides a brief epidemiology of the fractures, details the surgical techniques, and outlines the current treatment guidelines for orthopedic surgeons. PMID:26246944

  1. Spine Immobilizer for Accident Victims

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vykukal, H. C.; Lampson, K.

    1983-01-01

    Proposed conformal bladder filled with tiny spheres called "microballoons," enables spine of accident victim to be rapidly immobilized and restrained and permit victim to be safely removed from accident scene in extremely short time after help arrives. Microballoons expand to form rigid mass when pressure within bladder is less than ambient. Bladder strapped to victim is also strapped to rescue chair. Void between bladder and chair is filled with cloth wedges.

  2. Thromboembolic Complications Following Spine Surgery Assessed with Spiral CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han Jo; Walcott-Sapp, Sarah; Adler, Ronald S.; Pavlov, Helene; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba

    2010-01-01

    Spine surgery is associated with a significant risk of postoperative pulmonary embolism (PE) and/or deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The goal of this study was to determine which symptoms and risk factors were associated with spiral CT scans positive for PE and/or DVT in the postoperative spine surgery patient. We conducted a retrospective review of all spine patients who underwent a postoperative CT to rule out PE during the period of March 2004–February 2006. The type of surgical procedure, risk factors, symptoms prompting scan ordering, anticoagulation, and treatment were recorded. Logistic regression models were used to determine significant predictors of a positive CT in this patient population. Of the 3,331 patients that had spine surgery during the study period, 130 (3.9%) had a spiral CT scan to rule out PE and/or proximal DVT. Thirty-three of the 130 (25.4%) CT scans were positive for PE only, five (3.8%) for PE and DVT, and three (2.3%) for DVT only. Only 24.5% (32) patients had risk factors for thromboembolic disease, and of these, a history of PE and/or DVT was the only significant risk factor for a positive scan (p = 0.03). No presenting symptoms or demographic variables were noted to have a significant association with PE and/or DVT. The type of surgical procedure (i.e., anterior, posterior, and percutaneous) was not associated with an increased risk for PE and/or DVT. Patients who are undergoing spine surgery with a history of thromboembolic disease should be carefully monitored postoperatively and may benefit from more aggressive prophylaxis. PMID:22294955

  3. Arf4 Determines Dentate Gyrus-Mediated Pattern Separation by Regulating Dendritic Spine Development

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sachi; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Zhu, Lei; Brodbeck, Jens; Dai, Jessica; Walker, David; Huang, Yadong

    2012-01-01

    The ability to distinguish between similar experiences is a critical feature of episodic memory and is primarily regulated by the dentate gyrus (DG) region of the hippocampus. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying such pattern separation tasks are poorly understood. We report a novel role for the small GTPase ADP ribosylation factor 4 (Arf4) in controlling pattern separation by regulating dendritic spine development. Arf4+/− mice at 4–5 months of age display severe impairments in a pattern separation task, as well as significant dendritic spine loss and smaller miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) in granule cells of the DG. Arf4 knockdown also decreases spine density in primary neurons, whereas Arf4 overexpression promotes spine development. A constitutively active form of Arf4, Arf4-Q71L, promotes spine density to an even greater extent than wildtype Arf4, whereas the inactive Arf4-T31N mutant does not increase spine density relative to controls. Arf4′s effects on spine development are regulated by ASAP1, a GTPase-activating protein that modulates Arf4 GTPase activity. ASAP1 overexpression decreases spine density, and this effect is partially rescued by concomitant overexpression of wildtype Arf4 or Arf4-Q71L. In addition, Arf4 overexpression rescues spine loss in primary neurons from an Alzheimer's disease-related apolipoprotein (apo) E4 mouse model. Our findings suggest that Arf4 is a critical modulator of DG-mediated pattern separation by regulating dendritic spine development. PMID:23050017

  4. A Technological Review of the Instrumented Footwear for Rehabilitation with a Focus on Parkinson’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Maculewicz, Justyna; Kofoed, Lise Busk; Serafin, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    In this review article, we summarize systems for gait rehabilitation based on instrumented footwear and present a context of their usage in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients’ auditory and haptic rehabilitation. We focus on the needs of PD patients, but since only a few systems were made with this purpose, we go through several applications used in different scenarios when gait detection and rehabilitation are considered. We present developments of the designs, possible improvements, and software challenges and requirements. We conclude that in order to build successful systems for PD patients’ gait rehabilitation, technological solutions from several studies have to be applied and combined with knowledge from auditory and haptic cueing. PMID:26834696

  5. Reference measurement procedures for Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers: definitions and approaches with focus on amyloid β42.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Zegers, Ingrid; Andreasson, Ulf; Bjerke, Maria; Blankenstein, Marinus A; Bowser, Robert; Carrillo, Maria C; Gobom, Johan; Heath, Theresa; Jenkins, Rand; Jeromin, Andreas; Kaplow, June; Kidd, Daniel; Laterza, Omar F; Lockhart, Andrew; Lunn, Michael P; Martone, Robert L; Mills, Kevin; Pannee, Josef; Ratcliffe, Marianne; Shaw, Leslie M; Simon, Adam J; Soares, Holly; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Verbeek, Marcel M; Umek, Robert M; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Portelius, Erik

    2012-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) are increasingly used in clinical settings, research and drug trials. However, their broad-scale use on different technology platforms is hampered by the lack of standardization at the level of sample handling, determination of concentrations of analytes and the absence of well-defined performance criteria for in vitro diagnostic or companion diagnostic assays, which influences the apparent concentration of the analytes measured and the subsequent interpretation of the data. There is a need for harmonization of CSF AD biomarker assays that can reliably, across centers, quantitate CSF biomarkers with high analytical precision, selectivity and stability over long time periods. In this position paper, we discuss reference procedures for the measurement of CSF AD biomarkers, especially amyloid β42 and tau. We describe possible technical approaches, focusing on a selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry assay as a candidate reference method for quantification of CSF amyloid β42. PMID:22917143

  6. Current trends in reducing cardiovascular disease risk factors from around the world: focus on cardiac rehabilitation in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Mendes, Renata Gonçalves; Trimer, Renata; Cipriano, Gerson

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in Brazil. Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is a program composed of structured exercise training, comprehensive education and counseling to positively impact functional, psychological, social, and quality of life aspects in these patients. However, the delivery of formal CR programs is limited to major metropolitan centers in Brazil and does not exist in much of the national territory, specifically in the North and Northeast regions. Barriers to the inclusion of qualified patients are lack of referral by the health professionals, as well as transportation difficulties, low income, lack of insurance coverage, and low educational level. Government efforts to implement CR programs on a broader scale, to reach a larger portion of the CVD population, are imperative. Additional research must be focused on the assessment of CR referral and adherence patterns as well as the effectiveness of different CR delivery models.

  7. Spine MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Bowen, B C; Pattany, P M

    1997-01-01

    The use of MR angiography to evaluate spinal vessels is in an early stage of development. Both time-of-flight (3D) and phase-contrast (2D and 3D) techniques have been applied, and for both types of techniques, the vessels are best visualized following intravenous gadolinium administration. The vessels of interest are the millimeter-sized intradural arteries and veins, which are located on the cord surface and travel from the cord to the epidural space. Only the post gadolinium 3D TOF technique has been shown to display normal intradural vessels (thoracolumbar region), principally veins. Both TOF and PC techniques provide better delineation of enlarged intradural vessels associated with spinal vascular malformations than standard MR imaging alone. PC techniques are much less sensitive in detecting the arterial supply to dural arteriovenous fistula than intramedullary arteriovenous malformation. The TOF technique can predict the foraminal level of a dural fistula when an enlarged medullary vein, resulting from retrograde drainage, is present. MR angiography, in conjunction with MR imaging, is now suggested for screening of suspected spinal vascular malformation. Other applications such as vascular tumors and arterial or venous occlusive disease are under investigation.

  8. Cervical spine manifestations in patients with inflammatory arthritides.

    PubMed

    Cha, Thomas D; An, Howard S

    2013-07-01

    The cervical spine can frequently become involved in patients with rheumatologic disorders, as a result of either the rheumatologic disease itself or age-associated degenerative processes that can also occur in the rest of the population. Awareness of the increased risk of cervical spine manifestations in patients with rheumatologic disorders enables early recognition and initiation of the appropriate treatment regimen. For example, patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often have spinal instability which, if left untreated, can lead to neurological deficits. Biologic agents are effective in slowing the progression of the skeletal abnormality as well as for treating the RA, and this approach is often sufficient. However, early surgical intervention is recommended for patients with RA who develop neurologic deficits, as conservative approaches have limited effectiveness in this group. Spinal stability should be the primary surgical objective. For patients with ankylosing spondylitis, cervical spine surgery might be required either for fracture repair or to correct severe kyphosis. Understanding each condition's specific cervical spine manifestation and its natural history can help to clarify the appropriate indications for and timing of surgery to maximize patients' outcomes and limit complications. PMID:23528639

  9. Stem cells for spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Joshua; Kueper, Janina; Leon, Kaplan; Liebergall, Meir

    2015-01-26

    In the past few years, stem cells have become the focus of research by regenerative medicine professionals and tissue engineers. Embryonic stem cells, although capable of differentiating into cell lineages of all three germ layers, are limited in their utilization due to ethical issues. In contrast, the autologous harvest and subsequent transplantation of adult stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue or blood have been experimentally utilized in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases ranging from myocardial infarction to Alzheimer's disease. The physiologic consequences of stem cell transplantation and its impact on functional recovery have been studied in countless animal models and select clinical trials. Unfortunately, the bench to bedside translation of this research has been slow. Nonetheless, stem cell therapy has received the attention of spinal surgeons due to its potential benefits in the treatment of neural damage, muscle trauma, disk degeneration and its potential contribution to bone fusion.

  10. Avian and mammalian hosts for spirochete-infected ticks and insects in a Lyme disease focus in Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J F; Magnarelli, L A

    1984-01-01

    Spirochetes and their vectors and reservoirs were studied in a Lyme disease focus in East Haddam, Connecticut, from mid-May through September 1983. Ixodes dammini subadults were comparable in number on white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus) (means = 2.9 +/- 3.6 SD) to those on 27 different species of birds (means = 2.3 +/- 4.2 SD) representing 11 families within the order Passeriformes. Less commonly found ticks on birds (means less than or equal to 0.1) were immature Ixodes dentatus and Haemaphysalis leporispalustris. Although spirochete-infected I. dammini larvae and nymphs were taken off eight and nine different species of birds, respectively, significantly fewer positive larvae were removed from birds than from white-footed mice. Spirochetes were detected in the midguts of I. dammini, Dermacentor variabilis, and H. leporispalustris and two species of insects (Cuterebra fontinella and Orchopeas leucopus). Possibly, arthropods other than I. dammini vector these spirochetes in northeastern United States. Spirochetes grew in a cell-free medium inoculated with bloods from four white-footed mice, one woodland jumping mouse (Napaeozapus insignis), one northern mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos), one gray catbird (Dumetella carolinensis), two prairie warblers (Dendroica discolor), one orchard oriole (Icterus spurius), one common yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas), and one American robin (Turdus migratorius). We suggest that avian hosts, like mammals, develop spirochetemias of the causative agent of Lyme disease. Erythematous tissues from a white-footed mouse were infected with spirochetes.

  11. Rehabilitation of the spine following sports injury.

    PubMed

    Sampsell, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The spine plays an essential role in the contribution toward athletic performance. As the central pillar of the body, the structures of the spine are susceptible to injury related with sports participation. This article identifies many of the most commonly seen sports-related injuries to the spine, and discusses practical rehabilitative interventions to manage such injuries. Anatomic considerations, biomechanical movements, and tissue properties are explained to better understand the clinical expectations associated with each of the injuries described.

  12. Minimally invasive spine stabilisation with long implants

    PubMed Central

    Logroscino, Carlo Ambrogio; Proietti, Luca

    2009-01-01

    Originally aimed at treating degenerative syndromes of the lumbar spine, percutaneous minimally invasive posterior fixation is nowadays even more frequently used to treat some thoracolumbar fractures. According to the modern principles of saving segment of motion, a short implant (one level above and one level below the injured vertebra) is generally used to stabilise the injured spine. Although the authors generally use a short percutaneous fixation in treating thoracolumbar fractures with good results, they observed some cases in which the high fragmentation of the vertebral body and the presence of other associated diseases (co-morbidities) did not recommend the use of a short construct. The authors identified nine cases, in which a long implant (two levels above and two levels below the injured vertebra) was performed by a percutaneous minimally invasive approach. Seven patients (five males/two females) were affected by thoracolumbar fractures. T12 vertebra was involved in three cases, L1 in two cases, T10 and L2 in one case, respectively. Two fractures were classified as type A 3.1, two as A 3.2, two as A 3.3 and one as B 2.3, according to Magerl. In the present series, there were also two patients affected by a severe osteolysis of the spine (T9 and T12) due to tumoral localisation. All patients operated on with long instrumentation had a good outcome with prompt and uneventful clinical recovery. At the 1-year follow-up, all patients except one, who died 11 months after the operation, did not show any radiologic signs of mobilisation or failure of the implant. Based on the results of the present series, the long percutaneous fixation seems to represent an effective and safe system to treat particular cases of vertebral lesions. In conclusion, the authors believe that a long implant might be an alternative surgical method compared to more aggressive or demanding procedures, which in a few patients could represent an overtreatment. PMID:19399530

  13. The myth of the "vulnerable plaque": transitioning from a focus on individual lesions to atherosclerotic disease burden for coronary artery disease risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Fuster, Valentin

    2015-03-01

    The cardiovascular science community has pursued the quest to identify vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque in patients for decades, hoping to prevent acute coronary events. However, despite major advancements in imaging technology that allow visualization of rupture-prone plaques, clinical studies have not demonstrated improved risk prediction compared with traditional approaches. Considering the complex relationship between plaque rupture and acute coronary event risk suggested by pathology studies and confirmed by clinical investigations, these results are not surprising. This review summarizes the evidence supporting a multifaceted hypothesis of the natural history of atherosclerotic plaque rupture. Managing patients at risk of acute coronary events mandates a greater focus on the atherosclerotic disease burden rather than on features of individual plaques. PMID:25601032

  14. Diagnostic Approach to Pediatric Spine Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea; Martinetti, Carola; Morana, Giovanni; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the developmental features of the pediatric spine and spinal cord, including embryologic steps and subsequent growth of the osteocartilaginous spine and contents is necessary for interpretation of the pathologic events that may affect the pediatric spine. MR imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients suspected of harboring spinal abnormalities, whereas computed tomography and ultrasonography play a more limited, complementary role. This article discusses the embryologic and developmental anatomy features of the spine and spinal cord, together with some technical points and pitfalls, and the most common indications for pediatric spinal MR imaging.

  15. Biochemical computation for spine structural plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Jun; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2015-01-01

    The structural plasticity of dendritic spines is considered to be essential for various forms of synaptic plasticity, learning and memory. The process is mediated by a complex signaling network consisting of numerous species of molecules. Furthermore, the spatiotemporal dynamics of the biochemical signaling is regulated in a complicated manner due to geometrical restrictions from the unique morphology of the dendritic branches and spines. Recent advances in optical techniques have enabled the exploration of the spatiotemporal aspects of the signal regulations in spines and dendrites and have provided many insights into the principle of the biochemical computation that underlies spine structural plasticity. PMID:26139370

  16. Funding research to achieve the Spine "10 × 25" goal.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Back and neck pain are among the top causes of burden-of-illness, both in the US and globally. The North American Spine Foundation aims to reduce US spine-related disability 10% by 2025. New kinds of research will be needed in the spine field to achieve this goal. The vast majority of investigator-initiated medical research in the US is funded by the National Institutes of Health. Unfortunately, current NIH funding is heavily skewed away from spine research. Although back and neck pain account for 6.9% of all burden-of-illness in America, it appears certain that NIH devotes less than 1% of its budget to research on back and neck pain. While the total average NIH funding per unit of burden-of-illness for all diseases is 343 dollars per disability-adjusted life year, back and neck pain appear to receive, at most, only 48 dollars per disability-adjusted life year. In order to reduce the burden-of-illness of spine disorders enough to achieve the Spine 10 × 25 goal, the spine community and general public need to lobby Congress to increase research funding for back and neck pain.

  17. Dose conformation to the spine during palliative treatments using dynamic wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Ormsby, Matthew A.; Herndon, R. Craig; Kaczor, Joseph G.

    2013-07-01

    Radiation therapy is commonly used to alleviate pain associated with metastatic disease of the spine. Often, isodose lines are manipulated using dynamic or physical wedges to encompass the section of spine needing treatment while minimizing dose to normal tissue. We will compare 2 methods used to treat the entire thoracic spine. The first method treats the thoracic spine with a single, nonwedged posterior-anterior (PA) field. Dose is prescribed to include the entire spine. Isodose lines tightly conform to the top and bottom vertebrae, but vertebrae between these 2 received more than enough coverage. The second method uses a combination of wedges to create an isodose line that mimics the curvature of the thoracic spine. This “C”-shaped curvature is created by overlapping 2 fields with opposing dynamic wedges. Machine constraints limit the treatment length and therefore 2 isocenters are used. Each of the 2 PA fields contributes a portion of the total daily dose. This technique creates a “C”-shaped isodose line that tightly conforms to the thoracic spine, minimizing normal tissue dose. Spinal cord maximum dose is reduced, as well as mean dose to the liver, esophagus, and heart.

  18. Cervical spine surgery in professional athletes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Joaquim, Andrei F; Hsu, Wellington K; Patel, Alpesh A

    2016-04-01

    Cervical surgery is one of the most common surgical spinal procedures performed around the world. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature reporting the outcomes of cervical spine surgery in high-level athletes in order to better understand the nuances of cervical spine pathology in this population. A search of the MEDLINE database using the search terms "cervical spine" AND "surgery" AND "athletes" yielded 54 abstracts. After exclusion of publications that did not meet the criteria for inclusion, a total of 8 papers reporting the outcome of cervical spine surgery in professional or elite athletes treated for symptoms secondary to cervical spine pathology (focusing in degenerative conditions) remained for analysis. Five of these involved the management of cervical disc herniation, 3 were specifically about traumatic neurapraxia. The majority of the patients included in this review were American football players. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was commonly performed in high-level athletes for the treatment of cervical disc herniation. Most of the studies suggested that return to play is safe for athletes who are asymptomatic after ACDF for cervical radiculopathy due to disc herniation. Surgical treatment may provide a higher rate of return to play for these athletes than nonsurgical treatment. Return to play after cervical spinal cord contusion may be possible in asymptomatic patients. Cervical cord signal changes on MRI may not be an absolute contraindication for return to play in neurologically intact patients, according to some authors. Cervical contusions secondary to cervical stenosis may be associated with a worse outcome and a higher recurrence rate than those those secondary to disc herniation. The evidence is low (Level IV) and individualized treatment must be recommended.

  19. Cervical spine surgery in professional athletes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Joaquim, Andrei F; Hsu, Wellington K; Patel, Alpesh A

    2016-04-01

    Cervical surgery is one of the most common surgical spinal procedures performed around the world. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature reporting the outcomes of cervical spine surgery in high-level athletes in order to better understand the nuances of cervical spine pathology in this population. A search of the MEDLINE database using the search terms "cervical spine" AND "surgery" AND "athletes" yielded 54 abstracts. After exclusion of publications that did not meet the criteria for inclusion, a total of 8 papers reporting the outcome of cervical spine surgery in professional or elite athletes treated for symptoms secondary to cervical spine pathology (focusing in degenerative conditions) remained for analysis. Five of these involved the management of cervical disc herniation, 3 were specifically about traumatic neurapraxia. The majority of the patients included in this review were American football players. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was commonly performed in high-level athletes for the treatment of cervical disc herniation. Most of the studies suggested that return to play is safe for athletes who are asymptomatic after ACDF for cervical radiculopathy due to disc herniation. Surgical treatment may provide a higher rate of return to play for these athletes than nonsurgical treatment. Return to play after cervical spinal cord contusion may be possible in asymptomatic patients. Cervical cord signal changes on MRI may not be an absolute contraindication for return to play in neurologically intact patients, according to some authors. Cervical contusions secondary to cervical stenosis may be associated with a worse outcome and a higher recurrence rate than those those secondary to disc herniation. The evidence is low (Level IV) and individualized treatment must be recommended. PMID:27032913

  20. Use of high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of both benign and malignant prostatic disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernen, Kenneth M.; Miles, Brian J.

    2000-05-01

    Prostate cancer, the most common malignancy in men in the United States, accounts for more than 29% of all male cancers diagnosed and 13% of all cancer deaths. This translates into approximately 200,000 men diagnosed and 37,000 men who will die from the disease this year in this country. A significant number of patients ultimately choose external beam radiation or interstitial radioactive implants (brachytherapy) combined with external beam radiotherapy as their primary treatment. Approximately 25 - 35% of external beam irradiation patients and 20 - 30% of interstitial implants combined with external beam radiotherapy will fail within 10 years. The treatment options for patients with localized radiorecurrent disease include watchful waiting, endocrine therapy, salvage radiotherapy, and salvage radical prostatectomy, cryotherapy and now high intensity focused ultrasound therapy (HIFU). Although some studies regarding watchful waiting demonstrated comparable results to formal treatment for early prostate cancer, other studies have shown metastatic and mortality rates that are significantly higher, and that radiorecurrent patients would have even greater rates of metastasis and progression to death. Prostate cancer cure by means of endocrine therapy is highly unlikely and its role is still one of palliation with a side effect profile which includes hot flashes, osteoporosis, fatigue, loss of muscle mass, anemia, loss of libido and potency. The role of salvage radiotherapy may offer local control, however long term efficacy has yet to be determined. In a recent series, only 50% of the patients were controlled for a mean of four years with salvage radiotherapy. Salvage prostatectomy has the advantage of providing excellent local control and even a cure if the cancer is confined to the prostate or within the surrounding periprostatic tissue. Historically, salvage prostatectomy is technically demanding and fraught with higher complications. In one large series

  1. The impact of social disadvantage in moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease: an equity-focused systematic review.

    PubMed

    Morton, Rachael Lisa; Schlackow, Iryna; Mihaylova, Borislava; Staplin, Natalie Dawn; Gray, Alastair; Cass, Alan

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether a social gradient in health outcomes exists for people with moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease (CKD). We critically review the literature for evidence of social gradients in health and investigate the 'suitability' of statistical analyses in the primary studies. In this equity-focused systematic review among adults with moderate-to-severe CKD, factors of disadvantage included gender, race/ethnicity, religion, education, socio-economic status or social capital, occupation and place of residence. Outcomes included access to healthcare, kidney disease progression, cardiovascular events, all-cause mortality and suitability of analyses. Twenty-four studies in the pre-dialysis population and 34 in the dialysis population representing 8.9 million people from 10 countries were included. In methodologically suitable studies among pre-dialysis patients, a significant social gradient was observed in access to healthcare for those with no health insurance and no home ownership. Low income and no home ownership were associated with higher cardiovascular event rates and higher mortality [HR 1.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.27-2.98; HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04-1.58], respectively. In methodologically suitable studies among dialysis patients, females, ethnic minorities, those with low education, no health insurance, low occupational level or no home ownership were significantly less likely to access cardiovascular healthcare than their more advantaged dialysis counterparts. Low education level and geographic remoteness were associated with higher cardiovascular event rates and higher mortality (HR 1.54, 95% CI 1.01-2.35; HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.08-1.37), respectively. Socially disadvantaged pre-dialysis and dialysis patients experience poorer access to specialist cardiovascular health services, and higher rates of cardiovascular events and mortality than their more advantaged counterparts.

  2. Effects of an invasive forest pathogen on abundance of ticks and their vertebrate hosts in a California Lyme disease focus.

    PubMed

    Swei, Andrea; Ostfeld, Richard S; Lane, Robert S; Briggs, Cheryl J

    2011-05-01

    Invasive species, including pathogens, can have important effects on local ecosystems, including indirect consequences on native species. This study focuses on the effects of an invasive plant pathogen on a vertebrate community and Ixodes pacificus, the vector of the Lyme disease pathogen (Borrelia burgdorferi) in California. Phytophthora ramorum, the causative agent of sudden oak death, is a non-native pathogen killing trees in California and Oregon. We conducted a multi-year study using a gradient of SOD-caused disturbance to assess the impact on the dusky-footed woodrat (Neotoma fuscipes) and the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), two reservoir hosts of B. burgdorferi, as well as the impact on the Columbian black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) and the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis), both of which are important hosts for I. pacificus but are not pathogen reservoirs. Abundances of P. maniculatus and S. occidentalis were positively correlated with greater SOD disturbance, whereas N. fuscipes abundance was negatively correlated. We did not find a change in space use by O. hemionus. Our data show that SOD has a positive impact on the density of nymphal ticks, which is expected to increase the risk of human exposure to Lyme disease all else being equal. A positive correlation between SOD disturbance and the density of nymphal ticks was expected given increased abundances of two important hosts: deer mice and western fence lizards. However, further research is needed to integrate the direct effects of SOD on ticks, for example via altered abiotic conditions with host-mediated indirect effects. PMID:20941513

  3. Effects of an invasive forest pathogen on abundance of ticks and their vertebrate hosts in a California Lyme disease focus.

    PubMed

    Swei, Andrea; Ostfeld, Richard S; Lane, Robert S; Briggs, Cheryl J

    2011-05-01

    Invasive species, including pathogens, can have important effects on local ecosystems, including indirect consequences on native species. This study focuses on the effects of an invasive plant pathogen on a vertebrate community and Ixodes pacificus, the vector of the Lyme disease pathogen (Borrelia burgdorferi) in California. Phytophthora ramorum, the causative agent of sudden oak death, is a non-native pathogen killing trees in California and Oregon. We conducted a multi-year study using a gradient of SOD-caused disturbance to assess the impact on the dusky-footed woodrat (Neotoma fuscipes) and the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus), two reservoir hosts of B. burgdorferi, as well as the impact on the Columbian black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) and the western fence lizard (Sceloporus occidentalis), both of which are important hosts for I. pacificus but are not pathogen reservoirs. Abundances of P. maniculatus and S. occidentalis were positively correlated with greater SOD disturbance, whereas N. fuscipes abundance was negatively correlated. We did not find a change in space use by O. hemionus. Our data show that SOD has a positive impact on the density of nymphal ticks, which is expected to increase the risk of human exposure to Lyme disease all else being equal. A positive correlation between SOD disturbance and the density of nymphal ticks was expected given increased abundances of two important hosts: deer mice and western fence lizards. However, further research is needed to integrate the direct effects of SOD on ticks, for example via altered abiotic conditions with host-mediated indirect effects.

  4. The impact of social disadvantage in moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease: an equity-focused systematic review.

    PubMed

    Morton, Rachael Lisa; Schlackow, Iryna; Mihaylova, Borislava; Staplin, Natalie Dawn; Gray, Alastair; Cass, Alan

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear whether a social gradient in health outcomes exists for people with moderate-to-severe chronic kidney disease (CKD). We critically review the literature for evidence of social gradients in health and investigate the 'suitability' of statistical analyses in the primary studies. In this equity-focused systematic review among adults with moderate-to-severe CKD, factors of disadvantage included gender, race/ethnicity, religion, education, socio-economic status or social capital, occupation and place of residence. Outcomes included access to healthcare, kidney disease progression, cardiovascular events, all-cause mortality and suitability of analyses. Twenty-four studies in the pre-dialysis population and 34 in the dialysis population representing 8.9 million people from 10 countries were included. In methodologically suitable studies among pre-dialysis patients, a significant social gradient was observed in access to healthcare for those with no health insurance and no home ownership. Low income and no home ownership were associated with higher cardiovascular event rates and higher mortality [HR 1.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.27-2.98; HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.04-1.58], respectively. In methodologically suitable studies among dialysis patients, females, ethnic minorities, those with low education, no health insurance, low occupational level or no home ownership were significantly less likely to access cardiovascular healthcare than their more advantaged dialysis counterparts. Low education level and geographic remoteness were associated with higher cardiovascular event rates and higher mortality (HR 1.54, 95% CI 1.01-2.35; HR 1.21, 95% CI 1.08-1.37), respectively. Socially disadvantaged pre-dialysis and dialysis patients experience poorer access to specialist cardiovascular health services, and higher rates of cardiovascular events and mortality than their more advantaged counterparts. PMID:25564537

  5. Dural tears in spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Espiritu, Michael T; Rhyne, Alfred; Darden, Bruce V

    2010-09-01

    Dural tears are among the most commonly seen complications in spine surgery. Most studies in the literature indicate that long-term outcomes are not negatively affected, provided that the tears are diagnosed early and managed appropriately. Direct suture repair remains the preferred method for the management of durotomy caused by or found during surgery. However, recent literature reports encouraging results with sutureless repair. Understanding dural anatomy, dural healing, and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics is helpful in choosing among the available management options for dural tear.

  6. Osteotomies in the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Nemani, Venu M.; Derman, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Rigid cervical deformities are difficult problems to treat. The goals of surgical treatment include deformity correction, achieving a rigid fusion, and performing a thorough neural decompression. In stiff and ankylosed cervical spines, osteotomies are required to restore sagittal and coronal balance. In this chapter, we describe the clinical and radiographic workup for patients with cervical deformities, and delineate the various factors that must be considered when planning surgical treatment. We also describe in detail the various types of cervical osteotomies, along with their surgical technique, advantages, and potential complications. PMID:26949476

  7. Optical imaging in vivo with a focus on paediatric disease: technical progress, current preclinical and clinical applications and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Napp, Joanna; Mathejczyk, Julia E.

    2011-01-01

    To obtain information on the occurrence and location of molecular events as well as to track target-specific probes such as antibodies or peptides, drugs or even cells non-invasively over time, optical imaging (OI) technologies are increasingly applied. Although OI strongly contributes to the advances made in preclinical research, it is so far, with the exception of optical coherence tomography (OCT), only very sparingly applied in clinical settings. Nevertheless, as OI technologies evolve and improve continuously and represent relatively inexpensive and harmful methods, their implementation as clinical tools for the assessment of children disease is increasing. This review focuses on the current preclinical and clinical applications as well as on the future potential of OI in the clinical routine. Herein, we summarize the development of different fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging techniques for microscopic and macroscopic visualization of microstructures and biological processes. In addition, we discuss advantages and limitations of optical probes with distinct mechanisms of target-detection as well as of different bioluminescent reporter systems. Particular attention has been given to the use of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes enabling observation of molecular events in deeper tissue. PMID:21221568

  8. G protein-coupled receptor signalling in astrocytes in health and disease: a focus on metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Sophie J; Challiss, R A John

    2012-08-01

    Work published over the past 10-15 years has caused the neuroscience community to engage in a process of constant re-evaluation of the roles of glial cells in the mammalian central nervous system. Recent emerging evidence suggests that, in addition to carrying out various homeostatic functions within the CNS, astrocytes can also engage in a two-way dialogue with neurons. Astrocytes possess many of the receptors, and some of the ion channels, present in neurons endowing them with an ability to sense and respond to an array of neuronal signals. In addition, an expanding number of small molecules and proteins have been shown to be released by astrocytes in both health and disease. In this commentary we will highlight advances in our understanding of G protein-coupled receptor signalling in astrocytes, with a particular emphasis on metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. Discussion will focus on the major mGlu receptors expressed in astrocytes, mGlu3 and mGlu5, how these receptors can influence different aspects of astrocyte physiology, and how signalling by these G protein-coupled receptors might change under pathophysiological circumstances. PMID:22531220

  9. Detection of Dendritic Spines Using Wavelet-Based Conditional Symmetric Analysis and Regularized Morphological Shared-Weight Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuihua; Chen, Mengmeng; Li, Yang; Zhang, Yudong; Han, Liangxiu; Wu, Jane; Du, Sidan

    2015-01-01

    Identification and detection of dendritic spines in neuron images are of high interest in diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's diseases, and autism). In this paper, we have proposed a novel automatic approach using wavelet-based conditional symmetric analysis and regularized morphological shared-weight neural networks (RMSNN) for dendritic spine identification involving the following steps: backbone extraction, localization of dendritic spines, and classification. First, a new algorithm based on wavelet transform and conditional symmetric analysis has been developed to extract backbone and locate the dendrite boundary. Then, the RMSNN has been proposed to classify the spines into three predefined categories (mushroom, thin, and stubby). We have compared our proposed approach against the existing methods. The experimental result demonstrates that the proposed approach can accurately locate the dendrite and accurately classify the spines into three categories with the accuracy of 99.1% for “mushroom” spines, 97.6% for “stubby” spines, and 98.6% for “thin” spines. PMID:26692046

  10. Mef2 promotes spine elimination in absence of δ-catenin.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yang; Singh, Dipika; Arikkath, Jyothi

    2013-03-01

    δ-Catenin is a component of the cadherin-catenin cell adhesion complex and its loss has been implicated in the mental retardation associated with the Cri du chat syndrome. We have previously demonstrated that loss of δ-catenin in a murine model during development results in excessive spine and synaptic density and function. In order to examine the role of potential molecules that might cooperate with δ-catenin to regulate spine density, we focused on Mef2. Our data demonstrate that while loss of δ-catenin does not alter the expression levels of endogenous Mef2, expression of Mef2 in neurons that are knocked down for δ-catenin promotes spine elimination. These results establish a molecular mechanism by which excessive spines in the absence of δ-catenin may be eliminated and may point toward pharmacological therapy for the Cri du chat syndrome. PMID:23328440

  11. Voxel-based morphometry predicts shifts in dendritic spine density and morphology with auditory fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Keifer, O P; Hurt, R C; Gutman, D A; Keilholz, S D; Gourley, S L; Ressler, K J

    2015-07-07

    Neuroimaging has provided compelling data about the brain. Yet the underlying mechanisms of many neuroimaging techniques have not been elucidated. Here we report a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) study of Thy1-YFP mice following auditory fear conditioning complemented by confocal microscopy analysis of cortical thickness, neuronal morphometric features and nuclei size/density. Significant VBM results included the nuclei of the amygdala, the insula and the auditory cortex. There were no significant VBM changes in a control brain area. Focusing on the auditory cortex, confocal analysis showed that fear conditioning led to a significantly increased density of shorter and wider dendritic spines, while there were no spine differences in the control area. Of all the morphology metrics studied, the spine density was the only one to show significant correlation with the VBM signal. These data demonstrate that learning-induced structural changes detected by VBM may be partially explained by increases in dendritic spine density.

  12. Focus on Inclusive Education: The Educational and Social Challenges of Children with Celiac Disease: What Educators Should Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Kay A.

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease is a genetic autoimmune disease in which gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, barley, and contaminated oats, attacks the lining of the small intestine. Children with this disease must eliminate gluten from their diet. This article provides educators with essential information on celiac disease and the federal laws that protect the…

  13. Ratfish (Chimaera) spine injuries in fishermen.

    PubMed

    Hayes, A J; Sim, A J W

    2011-08-01

    An occupational hazard peculiar to fishermen, is an injury from a sharp fish spine. Such spines can cause envenomation injury, infectious sequelae or trauma to anatomical structures. The management of two fishermen with penetrating ratfish (Chimaera) spine injuries to the lower limb is described. Both were managed by removal of the spine under general anaesthesia. In the second patient, the spine was embedded adjacent to the left femoral artery, highlighting the potential for major haemorrhage and supporting the use of surgical wound exploration when important structures may be involved. Herein, we describe the first report in English of Chimaera spine injury. In addition, we surveyed nine northeast Atlantic deep-sea fishermen to gain information on exposure to, and injuries from, this type of fish. The most commonly identified species was Chimaera monstrosa. Five fishermen reported injuries to their feet or hands from Chimaera spines and two had sought medical attention. The evidence indicates that deep-sea trawler fishermen of the northeast Atlantic frequently encounter Chimaera species and can suffer dangerous penetrating wounds from its dorsal spine.

  14. Cervical Spine MRI in Abused Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This study attempted to use cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect cord injury in 12 dead children with head injury from child abuse. Eighty percent of children autopsied had small cervical spine hemorrhages; MRI did not identify them and did not identify cord injury in any child studied, indicating that MRI scans are probably…

  15. The dendritic spine story: an intriguing process of discovery

    PubMed Central

    DeFelipe, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are key components of a variety of microcircuits and they represent the majority of postsynaptic targets of glutamatergic axon terminals in the brain. The present article will focus on the discovery of dendritic spines, which was possible thanks to the application of the Golgi technique to the study of the nervous system, and will also explore the early interpretation of these elements. This discovery represents an interesting chapter in the history of neuroscience as it shows us that progress in the study of the structure of the nervous system is based not only on the emergence of new techniques but also on our ability to exploit the methods already available and correctly interpret their microscopic images. PMID:25798090

  16. Mass flows in a prominence spine as observed in EUV

    SciTech Connect

    Kucera, T. A.; Gilbert, H. R.

    2014-07-20

    We analyze a quiescent prominence observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) with a focus on mass and energy flux in the spine, measured using Lyman continuum absorption. This is the first time this type of analysis has been applied with an emphasis on individual features and fluxes in a quiescent prominence. The prominence, observed on 2010 September 28, is detectable in most AIA wavebands in absorption and/or emission. Flows along the spine exhibit horizontal bands 5''-10'' wide and kinetic energy fluxes on the order of a few times 10{sup 5} erg s{sup –1}cm{sup –2}, consistent with quiet sun coronal heating estimates. For a discrete moving feature we estimate a mass of a few times 10{sup 11} g. We discuss the implications of our derived properties for a model of prominence dynamics, the thermal non-equilibrium model.

  17. [Rehabilitation of radiculopathy of the spine lumbosacral region complicated with herniated disc depending on the type of hernia].

    PubMed

    Dovhyĭ, I L

    2012-01-01

    The article presents the results of treatment of 168 patients with radiculopathy lumbosacral spine, complicated hernias of intervertebral disc nucleus on the developed technique. The results show high efficacy of the treatment of this disease.

  18. [Rehabilitation of radiculopathy of the spine lumbosacral region complicated with herniated disc depending on the type of hernia].

    PubMed

    Dovhyĭ, I L

    2012-01-01

    The article presents the results of treatment of 168 patients with radiculopathy lumbosacral spine, complicated hernias of intervertebral disc nucleus on the developed technique. The results show high efficacy of the treatment of this disease. PMID:23350123

  19. Automated fetal spine detection in ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolay, Paresh; Vajinepalli, Pallavi; Bhattacharya, Puranjoy; Firtion, Celine; Sisodia, Rajendra Singh

    2009-02-01

    A novel method is proposed for the automatic detection of fetal spine in ultrasound images along with its orientation in this paper. This problem presents a variety of challenges, including robustness to speckle noise, variations in the visible shape of the spine due to orientation of the ultrasound probe with respect to the fetus and the lack of a proper edge enclosing the entire spine on account of its composition out of distinct vertebra. The proposed method improves robustness and accuracy by making use of two independent techniques to estimate the spine, and then detects the exact location using a cross-correlation approach. Experimental results show that the proposed method is promising for fetal spine detection.

  20. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in Autism Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Mary; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    The activity-dependent structural and functional plasticity of dendritic spines has led to the long-standing belief that these neuronal compartments are the subcellular sites of learning and memory. Of relevance to human health, central neurons in several neuropsychiatric illnesses, including autism related disorders, have atypical numbers and morphologies of dendritic spines. These so-called dendritic spine dysgeneses found in individuals with autism related disorders are consistently replicated in experimental mouse models. Dendritic spine dysgenesis reflects the underlying synaptopathology that drives clinically relevant behavioral deficits in experimental mouse models, providing a platform for testing new therapeutic approaches. By examining molecular signaling pathways, synaptic deficits, and spine dysgenesis in experimental mouse models of autism related disorders we find strong evidence for mTOR to be a critical point of convergence and promising therapeutic target. PMID:25578949

  1. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in autism related disorders.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Mary; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2015-08-01

    The activity-dependent structural and functional plasticity of dendritic spines has led to the long-standing belief that these neuronal compartments are the subcellular sites of learning and memory. Of relevance to human health, central neurons in several neuropsychiatric illnesses, including autism related disorders, have atypical numbers and morphologies of dendritic spines. These so-called dendritic spine dysgeneses found in individuals with autism related disorders are consistently replicated in experimental mouse models. Dendritic spine dysgenesis reflects the underlying synaptopathology that drives clinically relevant behavioral deficits in experimental mouse models, providing a platform for testing new therapeutic approaches. By examining molecular signaling pathways, synaptic deficits, and spine dysgenesis in experimental mouse models of autism related disorders we find strong evidence for mTOR to be a critical point of convergence and promising therapeutic target. PMID:25578949

  2. Use of high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of both benign and malignant prostatic disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernen, Kenneth M.; Miles, Brian J.

    2000-05-01

    Prostate cancer, the most common malignancy in men in the United States, accounts for more than 29% of all male cancers diagnosed and 13% of all cancer deaths. This translates into approximately 200,000 men diagnosed and 37,000 men who will die from the disease this year in this country. A significant number of patients ultimately choose external beam radiation or interstitial radioactive implants (brachytherapy) combined with external beam radiotherapy as their primary treatment. Approximately 25 - 35% of external beam irradiation patients and 20 - 30% of interstitial implants combined with external beam radiotherapy will fail within 10 years. The treatment options for patients with localized radiorecurrent disease include watchful waiting, endocrine therapy, salvage radiotherapy, and salvage radical prostatectomy, cryotherapy and now high intensity focused ultrasound therapy (HIFU). Although some studies regarding watchful waiting demonstrated comparable results to formal treatment for early prostate cancer, other studies have shown metastatic and mortality rates that are significantly higher, and that radiorecurrent patients would have even greater rates of metastasis and progression to death. Prostate cancer cure by means of endocrine therapy is highly unlikely and its role is still one of palliation with a side effect profile which includes hot flashes, osteoporosis, fatigue, loss of muscle mass, anemia, loss of libido and potency. The role of salvage radiotherapy may offer local control, however long term efficacy has yet to be determined. In a recent series, only 50% of the patients were controlled for a mean of four years with salvage radiotherapy. Salvage prostatectomy has the advantage of providing excellent local control and even a cure if the cancer is confined to the prostate or within the surrounding periprostatic tissue. Historically, salvage prostatectomy is technically demanding and fraught with higher complications. In one large series

  3. Disease Management: The Need for a Focus on Broader Self-Management Abilities and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The study objective was to investigate long-term effects of disease management programs (DMPs) on (1) health behaviors (smoking, physical exercise); (2) self-management abilities (self-efficacy, investment behavior, initiative taking); and (3) physical and mental quality of life among chronically ill patients. The study also examined whether (changes in) health behaviors and self-management abilities predicted quality of life. Questionnaires were sent to all 5076 patients participating in 18 Dutch DMPs in 2010 (T0; 2676 [53%] respondents). Two years later (T1), questionnaires were sent to 4350 patients still participating in DMPs (1722 [40%] respondents). Structured interviews were held with the 18 DMP project leaders. DMP implementation improved patients' health behavior and physical quality of life, but mental quality of life and self-management abilities declined over time. Changes in patients' investment behavior predicted physical quality of life at T1 (P<.001); physical activity, investment behavior (both P<.05), and self-efficacy (P<.01) at T0, and changes in self-efficacy and investment behavior (both P<.001) predicted patients' mental quality of life at T1. The long-term benefits of these DMPs include successful improvement of chronically ill patients' health behaviors and physical quality of life. However, these programs were not able to improve or maintain broader self-management abilities or mental quality of life, highlighting the need to focus on these abilities and overall quality of life. As coproducers of care, patients should be stimulated and enabled to manage their health and quality of life. (Population Health Management 2015;18:246–255) PMID:25607246

  4. Disease Management: The Need for a Focus on Broader Self-Management Abilities and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2015-08-01

    The study objective was to investigate long-term effects of disease management programs (DMPs) on (1) health behaviors (smoking, physical exercise); (2) self-management abilities (self-efficacy, investment behavior, initiative taking); and (3) physical and mental quality of life among chronically ill patients. The study also examined whether (changes in) health behaviors and self-management abilities predicted quality of life. Questionnaires were sent to all 5076 patients participating in 18 Dutch DMPs in 2010 (T0; 2676 [53%] respondents). Two years later (T1), questionnaires were sent to 4350 patients still participating in DMPs (1722 [40%] respondents). Structured interviews were held with the 18 DMP project leaders. DMP implementation improved patients' health behavior and physical quality of life, but mental quality of life and self-management abilities declined over time. Changes in patients' investment behavior predicted physical quality of life at T1 (P<.001); physical activity, investment behavior (both P<.05), and self-efficacy (P<.01) at T0, and changes in self-efficacy and investment behavior (both P<.001) predicted patients' mental quality of life at T1. The long-term benefits of these DMPs include successful improvement of chronically ill patients' health behaviors and physical quality of life. However, these programs were not able to improve or maintain broader self-management abilities or mental quality of life, highlighting the need to focus on these abilities and overall quality of life. As coproducers of care, patients should be stimulated and enabled to manage their health and quality of life.

  5. Camptocormia: the bent spine syndrome, an update

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Thibaut; Boulu, Philippe; Guigui, Pierre; Benoist, Michel

    2010-01-01

    Camptocormia, also referred to as bent spine syndrome (BSS) is defined as an abnormal flexion of the trunk, appearing in standing position, increasing during walking and abating in supine position. BSS was initially considered, especially in wartime, as a psychogenic disorder. It is now recognized that in addition to psychiatric syndromes, many cases of reducible BSS have a somatic origin related to a number of musculo-skeletal or neurological disorders. The majority of BSS of muscular origin is related to a primary idiopathic axial myopathy of late onset, appearing progressively in elderly patients. Diagnosis of axial myopathy first described by Laroche et al. is based upon CT/MRI examination demonstrating massive fatty infiltration of paravertebral muscles. The non-specific histological aspect includes an extensive endomysial fibrosis and fat tissue with irregular degenerated fibers. Weakness of the paravertebral muscles can be secondary to a wide variety of diseases generating diffuse pathologic changes in the muscular tissue. BSS can be the predominant and sometimes revealing symptom of a more generalized muscular disorder. Causes of secondary BSS are numerous. They must be carefully assessed and ruled out before considering the diagnosis of primary axial myopathy. The principal etiologies include on the one hand inflammatory myopathies, muscular dystrophies of late onset, myotonic myopathies, endocrine and metabolic myopathies, and on the other hand neurological disorders, principally Parkinson’s disease. Camptocormia in Parkinsonism is caused by axial dystonia, which is the hallmark of Parkinson’s disease. There is no specific pharmacologic treatment for primary axial myopathy. General activity, walking with a cane, physiotherapy, and exercises should be encouraged. Treatment of secondary forms of BSS is dependent upon the variety of the disorder generating the muscular pathology. Pharmacologic and general management of camptocormia in Parkinson

  6. Spatial and Working Memory Is Linked to Spine Density and Mushroom Spines

    PubMed Central

    Aher, Yogesh D.; Sase, Ajinkya; Gröger, Marion; Mokhtar, Maher; Höger, Harald; Lubec, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Background Changes in synaptic structure and efficacy including dendritic spine number and morphology have been shown to underlie neuronal activity and size. Moreover, the shapes of individual dendritic spines were proposed to correlate with their capacity for structural change. Spine numbers and morphology were reported to parallel memory formation in the rat using a water maze but, so far, there is no information on spine counts or shape in the radial arm maze (RAM), a frequently used paradigm for the evaluation of complex memory formation in the rodent. Methods 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups, 8 were trained, 8 remained untrained in the RAM and 8 rats served as cage controls. Dendritic spine numbers and individual spine forms were counted in CA1, CA3 areas and dentate gyrus of hippocampus using a DIL dye method with subsequent quantification by the Neuronstudio software and the image J program. Results Working memory errors (WME) and latency in the RAM were decreased along the training period indicating that animals performed the task. Total spine density was significantly increased following training in the RAM as compared to untrained rats and cage controls. The number of mushroom spines was significantly increased in the trained as compared to untrained and cage controls. Negative significant correlations between spine density and WME were observed in CA1 basal dendrites and in CA3 apical and basal dendrites. In addition, there was a significant negative correlation between spine density and latency in CA3 basal dendrites. Conclusion The study shows that spine numbers are significantly increased in the trained group, an observation that may suggest the use of this method representing a morphological parameter for memory formation studies in the RAM. Herein, correlations between WME and latency in the RAM and spine density revealed a link between spine numbers and performance in the RAM. PMID:26469788

  7. Cervical Spine Injuries in the Athlete.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-09-01

    Cervical spine injuries are extremely common and range from relatively minor injuries, such as cervical muscle strains, to severe, life-threatening cervical fractures with spinal cord injuries. Although cervical spine injuries are most common in athletes who participate in contact and collision sports, such as American football and rugby, they also have been reported in athletes who participate in noncontact sports, such as baseball, gymnastics, and diving. Cervical spine injuries in athletes are not necessarily the result of substantial spine trauma; some athletes have chronic conditions, such as congenital stenosis, that increase their risk for a serious cervical spine injury after even minor trauma. Therefore, physicians who cover athletic events must have a thorough knowledge of cervical spine injures and the most appropriate ways in which they should be managed. Although cervical spine injuries can be career-ending injuries, athletes often are able to return to play after appropriate treatment if the potential for substantial re-injury is minimized. PMID:27479833

  8. Echidna: a multifiber positioner for the Subaru prime focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillingham, Peter R.; Miziarski, Stan; Akiyama, Masayuki; Klocke, Volker

    2000-08-01

    The aim for a spectrograph feed from the Subaru prime focus is to have 400 fibers. Since the are of the field is only approximately 1/10 that of the 400 fiber two degree field system on the Anglo-Australian Telescope, placement of magnetic buttons by a robot, as done for 2df, was not considered applicable. Instead, a concept has been developed in which each fiber is held on a spine which can be tilted to position its tip anywhere within a circle. With targets randomly scattered over the field and the radial range for each spine equal to the spine pitch, the success rate in reaching targets is acceptably high. At the f/2 focus, a spine tilt of 1/20 radian is just acceptable and requires the spines be 140 mm long. Two basic mechanisms for tilting and holding such a spine have been investigated experimentally. The first uses three commercial miniature linear actuators set parallel and linked to the base of the spine through simple flexures. A prototype has been built and demonstrated to perform satisfactorily. Another approach is to mount the spine ona ball joint and drive it directly in tip and tilt using a bending piezo impact drive. A prototype of this from has been built; initial test are promising.

  9. Demoralization, Patient Activation, and the Outcome of Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Block, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that psychosocial factors can adversely impact the outcome of spine surgery. This article discusses in detail one such recently-identified “risk” factor: demoralization. Several studies conducted by the author indicate that demoralization, an emotional construct distinct from depression, is associated with poorer pain reduction, less functional improvement and decreased satisfaction among spine surgery patients. However, there are indications that the adverse impact of risk factors such as demoralization can be mitigated by psychosocial “maximizing” factors—characteristics that propel the patient towards positive surgical results. One of these maximizing factors, patient activation, is discussed in depth. The patient activation measure (PAM), an inventory assessing the extent to which patients are active and engaged in their health care, is associated not only with improved spine surgery results, but with better outcomes across a broad range of medical conditions. Other maximizing factors are discussed in this article. The author concludes that the past research focus on psychosocial risk factors has limited the value of presurgical psychological screening, and that future research, as well as clinical assessment, should recognize that the importance of evaluating patients’ strengths as well as their vulnerabilities. PMID:27417599

  10. Access related complications during anterior exposure of the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Fantini, Gary A; Pawar, Abhijit Y

    2013-01-01

    The new millennium has witnessed the emergence of minimally invasive, non-posterior based surgery of the lumbar spine, in particular via lateral based methodologies to discectomy and fusion. In contrast, and perhaps for a variety of reasons, anterior motion preservation (non-fusion) technologies are playing a comparatively lesser, though incompletely defined, role at present. Lateral based motion preservation technologies await definition of their eventual role in the armamentarium of minimally invasive surgical therapies of the lumbar spine. While injury to the major vascular structures remains the most serious and feared complication of the anterior approach, this occurrence has been nearly eliminated by the use of lateral based approaches for discectomy and fusion cephalad to L5-S1. Whether anterior or lateral based, non-posterior approaches to the lumbar spine share certain access related pitfalls and complications, including damage to the urologic and neurologic structures, as well as gastrointestinal and abdominal wall issues. This review will focus on the recognition, management and prevention of these anterior and lateral access related complications. PMID:23362471

  11. Thoracolumbar spine model with articulated ribcage for the prediction of dynamic spinal loading.

    PubMed

    Ignasiak, Dominika; Dendorfer, Sebastian; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2016-04-11

    Musculoskeletal modeling offers an invaluable insight into the spine biomechanics. A better understanding of thoracic spine kinetics is essential for understanding disease processes and developing new prevention and treatment methods. Current models of the thoracic region are not designed for segmental load estimation, or do not include the complex construct of the ribcage, despite its potentially important role in load transmission. In this paper, we describe a numerical musculoskeletal model of the thoracolumbar spine with articulated ribcage, modeled as a system of individual vertebral segments, elastic elements and thoracic muscles, based on a previously established lumbar spine model and data from the literature. The inverse dynamics simulations of the model allow the prediction of spinal loading as well as costal joints kinetics and kinematics. The intradiscal pressure predicted by the model correlated well (R(2)=0.89) with reported intradiscal pressure measurements, providing a first validation of the model. The inclusion of the ribcage did not affect segmental force predictions when the thoracic spine did not perform motion. During thoracic motion tasks, the ribcage had an important influence on the predicted compressive forces and muscle activation patterns. The compressive forces were reduced by up to 32%, or distributed more evenly between thoracic vertebrae, when compared to the predictions of the model without ribcage, for mild thoracic flexion and hyperextension tasks, respectively. The presented musculoskeletal model provides a tool for investigating thoracic spine loading and load sharing between vertebral column and ribcage during dynamic activities. Further validation for specific applications is still necessary. PMID:26684431

  12. Cervical spine pain in the competitive athlete.

    PubMed

    Krabak, Brian J; Kanarek, Samantha L

    2011-08-01

    Cervical pain is a common complaint in both the well-conditioned athlete and the weekend warrior. Some injuries are mild in nature, responding to conservative treatment, including rest, medication, physical therapy, and time. However, more serious injuries, especially those involving the cervical spine, can have devastating consequences. Having a comprehensive understanding of the evaluation and management of cervical pain and cervical spine emergencies is crucial for physicians providing coverage for organized athletic events or for those who serve as team physicians. This article reviews the common causes of cervical spine pain in the competitive athlete.

  13. Trauma: Conventional radiologic study in spine injury

    SciTech Connect

    Dosch, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book includes a discussion of the anatomy of the spinal cord and descriptions of methods for tailored radiologic investigation of spine trauma. Most of the text is devoted to the analysis and classification of spinal injury by radiologic signs and mode of injury. The author addresses injury to the entire spine but emphasizes the cervical spine. Plain radiography and conventional tomography are the only imaging methods discussed. The author stresses the active role of the attending radiologist in directing every phase of the x-ray study. Many subtle variations in patient positioning plus beam direction and angulation are described.

  14. Evaluating the effect of Focus Farms on Ontario dairy producers' knowledge, attitudes, and behavior toward control of Johne's disease.

    PubMed

    Roche, S M; Jones-Bitton, A; Meehan, M; Von Massow, M; Kelton, D F

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated a participatory-based, experiential learning program, Ontario Focus Farms (FF), which aimed to change dairy producer behavior to control Johne's disease (JD) in Ontario, Canada. The goals were to (1) assess the effect of FF on participating dairy producers' knowledge, attitudes, and behavior with regard to JD control; (2) compare changes in these factors among FF participants to changes among a group of nonparticipating dairy producers; and (3) describe the characteristics of producers who made at least one on-farm management change. Pre- and post-FF intervention questionnaires collected data on respondents' knowledge, attitudes, behavior, herd production, and demographic information; before and after JD-risk assessments were used to assess respondents' on-farm risk of JD transmission. Overall, 176 dairy producers participated in the FF process; 39.8% (70/176) of FF and 14.6% (52/357) of control participants responded to both the pre- and postintervention questionnaires. Upon comparison, FF respondents were more likely to be younger, have larger herds, and have higher management scores. The proportion of FF participants who reported making at least one on-farm change (81%) was significantly higher than that of control respondents (38%). Overall, FF respondents significantly changed their risk score in 4 out of 5 risk areas and had an average reduction of 13 points in their overall risk score between before and after risk assessments. Control respondents' risk assessment scores did not significantly change during the study period. In a JD knowledge assessment, FF and control respondents exhibited a moderate knowledge score before the intervention period, with median scores of 75.9% (22/29) in each group. The FF respondents significantly increased their score at the postintervention assessment, with a median of 82.8% (24/29); control-respondent scores did not significantly change. Both FF and control respondents held strong positive attitudes

  15. Evaluating the effect of Focus Farms on Ontario dairy producers' knowledge, attitudes, and behavior toward control of Johne's disease.

    PubMed

    Roche, S M; Jones-Bitton, A; Meehan, M; Von Massow, M; Kelton, D F

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated a participatory-based, experiential learning program, Ontario Focus Farms (FF), which aimed to change dairy producer behavior to control Johne's disease (JD) in Ontario, Canada. The goals were to (1) assess the effect of FF on participating dairy producers' knowledge, attitudes, and behavior with regard to JD control; (2) compare changes in these factors among FF participants to changes among a group of nonparticipating dairy producers; and (3) describe the characteristics of producers who made at least one on-farm management change. Pre- and post-FF intervention questionnaires collected data on respondents' knowledge, attitudes, behavior, herd production, and demographic information; before and after JD-risk assessments were used to assess respondents' on-farm risk of JD transmission. Overall, 176 dairy producers participated in the FF process; 39.8% (70/176) of FF and 14.6% (52/357) of control participants responded to both the pre- and postintervention questionnaires. Upon comparison, FF respondents were more likely to be younger, have larger herds, and have higher management scores. The proportion of FF participants who reported making at least one on-farm change (81%) was significantly higher than that of control respondents (38%). Overall, FF respondents significantly changed their risk score in 4 out of 5 risk areas and had an average reduction of 13 points in their overall risk score between before and after risk assessments. Control respondents' risk assessment scores did not significantly change during the study period. In a JD knowledge assessment, FF and control respondents exhibited a moderate knowledge score before the intervention period, with median scores of 75.9% (22/29) in each group. The FF respondents significantly increased their score at the postintervention assessment, with a median of 82.8% (24/29); control-respondent scores did not significantly change. Both FF and control respondents held strong positive attitudes

  16. Radiographic Morphometry of the Lumbar Spine in Munich Miniature Pigs.

    PubMed

    Engelke, Elisabeth C; Post, Christina; Pfarrer, Christiane D; Sager, Martin; Waibl, Helmut R

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of human spinal column disease remains high, and animal models still play important roles in prophylactic, diagnostic, and therapeutic research. Because of their similar size to humans, pigs remain an important spine model. For pigs to serve as a model for the human spine, basic similarities and differences must be understood. In this study, morphometric data of the lumbar spine of Munich miniature pigs (Troll) were recorded radiologically, evaluated, and compared with recorded human data. Whereas humans have a constant number of 5 lumbar vertebrae, Munich minipigs had 5 or 6 lumbar vertebrae. Compared with their human counterparts, the lumbar vertebral bodies of the minipigs were remarkably larger in the craniocaudal (superior-inferior) direction and considerably smaller in the dorsoventral and laterolateral directions. The porcine vertebral canal was smaller than the human vertebral canal. The spinal cord extended into the caudal part of the porcine lumbar vertebral canal and thus did not terminate as cranial, as seen in humans. The lumbar intervertebral spaces of the pig were narrower in craniocaudal direction than human intervertebral spaces. These differences need to be considered when planning surgical actions, not only to avoid pain and irreversible damage to the minipigs but also to achieve accurate scientific results. PMID:27177570

  17. [Biomechanics of whiplash injuries of the cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, G

    1989-07-01

    1. The whiplash injury of the cervical spine is a typical, but not very often observed injury of occupants of automotive vehicles involved in moderate collisions. 2. There still exist great uncertainties in the elaboration of expertises concerning the minor whiplash injury, so that the great part of the disturbances cannot be objectivated under a clinical point of view. And on the other hand, serious whiplash injuries often are superposed or veiled by secondary injuries. 3. Thus, the aim of the present paper was to point out injury mechanisms, to give a rough scaling of the whiplash severity under biomechanical aspects and finally to set these injury mechanisms in correlation to the following criteria of accident: a) vehicle velocity change (energy equivalent speed--EES); b) deformation of vehicles on the impact-exposed structure; c) loading of occupants by acceleration or deceleration. 4. The tolerance limit of the cervical spine generally decreases to a lower limit, if the cervical spine is changed in a pathological way, e.g. by preexisting diseases. 5. It is evident and important, that the difficult work of giving an expert's opinion on this field must be performed in an interdisciplinary collaboration of engineers for collision-analysis and physicians experienced in accident-traumatology. PMID:2669311

  18. Alaska Native and Rural Youths' Views of Sexual Health: A Focus Group Project on Sexually Transmitted Diseases, HIV/AIDS, and Unplanned Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leston, Jessica D.; Jessen, Cornelia M.; Simons, Brenna C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The disparity in rates of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), HIV/AIDS, and unplanned pregnancy between Alaska Native (AN) and non-AN populations, particularly among young adults and females, is significant and concerning. Focus groups were conducted to better understand the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of rural Alaska youth…

  19. Dendritic spine detection using curvilinear structure detector and LDA classifier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Xiaobo; Witt, Rochelle M; Sabatini, Bernardo L; Adjeroh, Donald; Wong, Stephen T C

    2007-06-01

    Dendritic spines are small, bulbous cellular compartments that carry synapses. Biologists have been studying the biochemical pathways by examining the morphological and statistical changes of the dendritic spines at the intracellular level. In this paper a novel approach is presented for automated detection of dendritic spines in neuron images. The dendritic spines are recognized as small objects of variable shape attached or detached to multiple dendritic backbones in the 2D projection of the image stack along the optical direction. We extend the curvilinear structure detector to extract the boundaries as well as the centerlines for the dendritic backbones and spines. We further build a classifier using Linear Discriminate Analysis (LDA) to classify the attached spines into valid and invalid types to improve the accuracy of the spine detection. We evaluate the proposed approach by comparing with the manual results in terms of backbone length, spine number, spine length, and spine density.

  20. Biostratigraphy of Echinoid spines, Cretaceous of Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkland, P.L.

    1984-04-01

    Echinoid (sea urchin) spines from Cretaceous strata have widely varying morphology. They are common, and most are small enough to be recovered from well cuttings. Many forms have restricted ranges; consequently, echinoid spine have substantial biostratigraphic utility. There have been established 115 form taxa of echinoid spines and 14 form taxa of ophiuroid-asteroid spines for the Cretaceous of Texas. The specimens used for establishing the form taxa were processed from 533 outcrop samples (78 localities) from 30 Cretaceous formations, each with a well-defined age based on faunal zones of ammonites and Foraminifera. A dichotomous key in 9 parts and a catalog of scanning electron micrographs (87 plates) have been set up to assist identification of the form taxa. Range charts for the echinoid and ophiuroid-asteroid form taxa have utility through the Cretaceous of much of the Gulf Coastal area. The most precise zonation has been possible for the Albian.

  1. Traumatic cervical spine fractures in the adult.

    PubMed

    Copley, Phillip; Tilliridou, Vicky; Jamjoom, Aimun

    2016-09-01

    This article reviews fractures of the cervical spine, highlighting the pertinent goals of initial management, the indications for different imaging modalities and the different fracture patterns. Basic principles of management of these different fracture patterns are outlined. PMID:27640656

  2. THE SPINE OF THE COSMIC WEB

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Platen, Erwin; Van de Weygaert, Rien

    2010-11-01

    We present the SpineWeb framework for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its walls, filaments, and cluster nodes. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the SpineWeb method invokes the local adjacency properties of the boundaries between the watershed basins to trace the critical points in the density field and the separatrices defined by them. The separatrices are classified into walls and the spine, the network of filaments and nodes in the matter distribution. Testing the method with a heuristic Voronoi model yields outstanding results. Following the discussion of the test results, we apply the SpineWeb method to a set of cosmological N-body simulations. The latter illustrates the potential for studying the structure and dynamics of the Cosmic Web.

  3. Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment | View Video Back About Video Struggling with Low Back Pain? Many people are surprised to learn that carefully selected exercise can actually reduce back pain. Some exercises can ...

  4. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Miller, Eric C.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Spines are small cytoplasmic extensions of dendrites that form the postsynaptic compartment of the majority of excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Alterations in the numerical density, size, and shape of dendritic spines have been correlated with neuronal dysfunction in several neurological and neurodevelopmental disorders associated with intellectual disability, including Rett syndrome (RTT). RTT is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability that is caused by loss of function mutations in the transcriptional regulator methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Here, we review the evidence demonstrating that principal neurons in RTT individuals and Mecp2-based experimental models exhibit alterations in the number and morphology of dendritic spines. We also discuss the exciting possibility that signaling pathways downstream of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is transcriptionally regulated by MeCP2, offer promising therapeutic options for modulating dendritic spine development and plasticity in RTT and other MECP2-associated neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:25309341

  5. A review of tibial spine fractures in bicycle injury.

    PubMed

    Nichols, J N; Tehranzadeh, J

    1987-01-01

    Nine tibial spine fractures were studied. Three of these nine cases included younger patients who fell from a bicycle and sustained an isolated avulsion fracture of the tibial spine. In all three cases, the medial tibial spines of the right knees were fractured. The other remaining five medial tibial fractures included two motorcycle and two automobile accidents, together with one basketball injury. One of the nine tibial spine fractures involved the lateral tibial spine.

  6. Thalamic pathology and memory loss in early Alzheimer's disease: moving the focus from the medial temporal lobe to Papez circuit.

    PubMed

    Aggleton, John P; Pralus, Agathe; Nelson, Andrew J D; Hornberger, Michael

    2016-07-01

    It is widely assumed that incipient protein pathology in the medial temporal lobe instigates the loss of episodic memory in Alzheimer's disease, one of the earliest cognitive deficits in this type of dementia. Within this region, the hippocampus is seen as the most vital for episodic memory. Consequently, research into the causes of memory loss in Alzheimer's disease continues to centre on hippocampal dysfunction and how disease-modifying therapies in this region can potentially alleviate memory symptomology. The present review questions this entrenched notion by bringing together findings from post-mortem studies, non-invasive imaging (including studies of presymptomatic, at-risk cases) and genetically modified animal models. The combined evidence indicates that the loss of episodic memory in early Alzheimer's disease reflects much wider neurodegeneration in an extended mnemonic system (Papez circuit), which critically involves the limbic thalamus. Within this system, the anterior thalamic nuclei are prominent, both for their vital contributions to episodic memory and for how these same nuclei appear vulnerable in prodromal Alzheimer's disease. As thalamic abnormalities occur in some of the earliest stages of the disease, the idea that such changes are merely secondary to medial temporal lobe dysfunctions is challenged. This alternate view is further strengthened by the interdependent relationship between the anterior thalamic nuclei and retrosplenial cortex, given how dysfunctions in the latter cortical area provide some of the earliest in vivo imaging evidence of prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Appreciating the importance of the anterior thalamic nuclei for memory and attention provides a more balanced understanding of Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, this refocus on the limbic thalamus, as well as the rest of Papez circuit, would have significant implications for the diagnostics, modelling, and experimental treatment of cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Thalamic pathology and memory loss in early Alzheimer's disease: moving the focus from the medial temporal lobe to Papez circuit.

    PubMed

    Aggleton, John P; Pralus, Agathe; Nelson, Andrew J D; Hornberger, Michael

    2016-07-01

    It is widely assumed that incipient protein pathology in the medial temporal lobe instigates the loss of episodic memory in Alzheimer's disease, one of the earliest cognitive deficits in this type of dementia. Within this region, the hippocampus is seen as the most vital for episodic memory. Consequently, research into the causes of memory loss in Alzheimer's disease continues to centre on hippocampal dysfunction and how disease-modifying therapies in this region can potentially alleviate memory symptomology. The present review questions this entrenched notion by bringing together findings from post-mortem studies, non-invasive imaging (including studies of presymptomatic, at-risk cases) and genetically modified animal models. The combined evidence indicates that the loss of episodic memory in early Alzheimer's disease reflects much wider neurodegeneration in an extended mnemonic system (Papez circuit), which critically involves the limbic thalamus. Within this system, the anterior thalamic nuclei are prominent, both for their vital contributions to episodic memory and for how these same nuclei appear vulnerable in prodromal Alzheimer's disease. As thalamic abnormalities occur in some of the earliest stages of the disease, the idea that such changes are merely secondary to medial temporal lobe dysfunctions is challenged. This alternate view is further strengthened by the interdependent relationship between the anterior thalamic nuclei and retrosplenial cortex, given how dysfunctions in the latter cortical area provide some of the earliest in vivo imaging evidence of prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Appreciating the importance of the anterior thalamic nuclei for memory and attention provides a more balanced understanding of Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, this refocus on the limbic thalamus, as well as the rest of Papez circuit, would have significant implications for the diagnostics, modelling, and experimental treatment of cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease

  8. The discovery of dendritic spines by Cajal.

    PubMed

    Yuste, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines were considered an artifact of the Golgi method until a brash Spanish histologist, Santiago Ramón y Cajal, bet his scientific career arguing that they were indeed real, correctly deducing their key role in mediating synaptic connectivity. This article reviews the historical context of the discovery of spines and the reasons behind Cajal's obsession with them, all the way till his deathbed. PMID:25954162

  9. Posteroanterior versus anteroposterior lumbar spine radiology

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuno, M.M.; Shu, G.J. )

    1990-03-01

    The posteroanterior view of the lumbar spine has important features including radiation protection and image quality; these have been studied by various investigators. Investigators have shown that sensitive tissues receive less radiation dosage in the posteroanterior view of the spine for scoliosis screening and intracranial tomography without altering the image quality. This paper emphasizes the importance of the radiation safety aspect of the posteroanterior view and shows the improvement in shape distortion in the lumbar vertebrae.

  10. The art and science of chronic disease management come together in a lifestyle-focused approach to primary care.

    PubMed

    Egger, G; Katz, D; Sagner, M; Dixon, J; Stevens, J

    2014-12-01

    Changes in patterns of living result in changes in the nature and causes of disease. The industrial revolution of the late 18th century, and the technological revolution of the late 20th century are cases in point. The former was associated with a decline in infectious diseases; the latter with an increase in lifestyle and environmentally induced chronic diseases . Health practices are typically modified to deal with such changes, hence the recent rise in interest in lifestyle-oriented forms of clinical practice.

  11. Outcomes and Complications of Diabetes Mellitus on Patients Undergoing Degenerative Lumbar Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Guzman, Javier Z.; Iatridis, James C.; Skovrlj, Branko; Cutler, Holt; Hecht, Andrew C.; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Cho, Samuel K.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective database analysis. Objective To assess the effect glycemic control has on perioperative morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing elective degenerative lumbar spine surgery. Summary of background data Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a prevalent disease of glucose dysregulation that has been demonstrated to increase morbidity and mortality following spine surgery. However, there is limited understanding of whether glycemic control influences surgical outcomes in DM patients undergoing lumbar spine procedures for degenerative conditions. Methods The Nationwide Inpatient Sample was analyzed from 2002 to 2011. Hospitalizations were isolated based on International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedural codes for lumbar spine surgery and diagnoses codes for degenerative conditions of the lumbar spine. Patients were then classified into three cohorts: controlled diabetics, uncontrolled diabetics and non-diabetics. Patient demographic data, acute complications and hospitalization outcomes were determined for each cohort. Results A total of 403,629 (15.7%) controlled diabetics and 19,421(0.75%) uncontrolled diabetics underwent degenerative lumbar spine surgery from 2002-2011. Relative to non-diabetics, uncontrolled diabetics had significantly increased odds of cardiac complications, deep venous thrombosis and post-operative shock; additionally, uncontrolled diabetics also had an increased mean length of stay (approximately 2.5 days), greater costs (1.3-fold) and a greater risk of inpatient mortality (odds ratio=2.6, 95% confidence interval=1.5-4.8, p < .0009). Controlled diabetics also had increased risk of acute complications and inpatient mortality when compared to non-diabetics, but not nearly to the same magnitude as uncontrolled diabetics. Conclusion Suboptimal glycemic control in diabetic patients undergoing degenerative lumbar spine surgery leads to increased risk of acute complications and poor outcomes

  12. Cellular source-specific effects of apolipoprotein (apo) E4 on dendrite arborization and dendritic spine development.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sachi; Yoon, Seo Yeon; Leung, Laura; Knoferle, Johanna; Huang, Yadong

    2013-01-01

    Apolipoprotein (apo) E4 is the leading genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and it has a gene dose-dependent effect on the risk and age of onset of AD. Although apoE4 is primarily produced by astrocytes in the brain, neurons can also produce apoE4 under stress conditions. ApoE4 is known to inhibit neurite outgrowth and spine development in vitro and in vivo, but the potential influence of apoE4's cellular source on dendritic arborization and spine development has not yet been investigated. In this study, we report impairments in dendritic arborization and a loss of spines, especially thin (learning) and mushroom (memory) spines, in the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex of 19-21-month-old female neuron-specific-enolase (NSE)-apoE4 and apoE4-knockin (KI) mice compared to their respective apoE3-expressing counterparts. In general, NSE-apoE4 mice had more severe and widespread deficits in dendritic arborization as well as spine density and morphology than apoE4-KI mice. The loss of dendritic spines, especially mushroom spines, occurred in NSE-apoE4 mice as early as 7-8 months of age. In contrast, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-apoE4 mice, which express apoE4 solely in astrocytes, did not have impairments in their dendrite arborization or spine density and morphology compared to GFAP-apoE3 mice at both ages. These results indicate that the effects of apoE4 on dendrite arborization, spine density, and spine morphology depend critically on its cellular source, with neuronal apoE4 having more detrimental effects than astrocytic apoE4.

  13. Alzheimer Disease in a Mouse Model: MR Imaging–guided Focused Ultrasound Targeted to the Hippocampus Opens the Blood-Brain Barrier and Improves Pathologic Abnormalities and Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Sonam; Yeung, Sharon; Hough, Olivia; Eterman, Naomi; Aubert, Isabelle; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To validate whether repeated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging–guided focused ultrasound treatments targeted to the hippocampus, a brain structure relevant for Alzheimer disease (ADAlzheimer disease), could modulate pathologic abnormalities, plasticity, and behavior in a mouse model. Materials and Methods All animal procedures were approved by the Animal Care Committee and are in accordance with the Canadian Council on Animal Care. Seven-month-old transgenic (TgCRND8) (Tg) mice and their nontransgenic (non-Tg) littermates were entered in the study. Mice were treated weekly with MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound in the bilateral hippocampus (1.68 MHz, 10-msec bursts, 1-Hz burst repetition frequency, 120-second total duration). After 1 month, spatial memory was tested in the Y maze with the novel arm prior to sacrifice and immunohistochemical analysis. The data were compared by using unpaired t tests and analysis of variance with Tukey post hoc analysis. Results Untreated Tg mice spent 61% less time than untreated non-Tg mice exploring the novel arm of the Y maze because of spatial memory impairments (P < .05). Following MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound, Tg mice spent 99% more time exploring the novel arm, performing as well as their non-Tg littermates. Changes in behavior were correlated with a reduction of the number and size of amyloid plaques in the MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound–treated animals (P < .01). Further, after MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound treatment, there was a 250% increase in the number of newborn neurons in the hippocampus (P < .01). The newborn neurons had longer dendrites and more arborization after MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound, as well (P < .01). Conclusion Repeated MR imaging–guided focused ultrasound treatments led to spatial memory improvement in a Tg mouse model of ADAlzheimer disease. The behavior changes may be mediated by decreased amyloid pathologic abnormalities and increased neuronal

  14. 78 FR 21613 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act Patient-Focused Drug Development; Announcement of Disease Areas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ..., amyloidosis, myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, chronic... proton-pump inhibitors; lung cancer; myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome; narcolepsy... Register notice (77 FR 58849) that announced an opportunity for public comment on potential disease...

  15. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: Changing the focus from glycemic control to improving the long-term survival

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Cecilia C. Low; Reusch, Jane EB

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is the fifth leading cause of death worldwide and contributes to leading causes of death, cancer and cardiovascular disease including coronary heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease and other vascular disease. While glycemic management remains a cornerstone of diabetes care, the co-management of hypertension, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular risk reduction and prevention of long-term consequences associated with diabetes are now well recognized as essential to improve long-term survival. Clinical trial evidence substantiates the importance of glycemic control, LDL-cholesterol lowering therapy, blood-pressure lowering, control of albuminuria, and comprehensive approaches targeting multiple risk factors to reduce cardiovascular risk. This article presents a review of the role of diabetes in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiac dysfunction, recent evidence regarding degree of glycemic control and mortality, and available evidence for a multi-faceted approach to improve long-term outcomes for patients. PMID:23062569

  16. Comparison of risk factors for cervical spine, head, serious, and fatal injury in rollover crashes.

    PubMed

    Funk, James R; Cormier, Joseph M; Manoogian, Sarah J

    2012-03-01

    Previous epidemiological studies of rollover crashes have focused primarily on serious and fatal injuries in general, while rollover crash testing has focused almost exclusively on cervical spine injury. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the risk factors for cervical spine, head, serious, and fatal injury in real world rollover crashes. Rollover crashes from 1995-2008 in the National Automotive Sampling System-Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) were investigated. A large data set of 6015 raw cases (2.5 million weighted) was generated. Nonparametric univariate analyses, univariate logistic regression, and multivariate logistic regression were conducted. Complete or partial ejection, a lack of seatbelt use, a greater number of roof inversions, and older occupant age significantly increased the risk of all types of injuries studied (p<0.05). Far side seating position increased the risk of fatal, head, and cervical spine injury (p<0.05), but not serious injury in general. Higher BMI was associated with an increased risk of fatal, serious, and cervical spine injury (p<0.05), but not head injury. Greater roof crush was associated with a higher rate of fatal and cervical spine injury (p<0.05). Vehicle type, occupant height, and occupant gender had inconsistent and generally non-significant effects on injury. This study demonstrates both common and unique risk factors for different types of injuries in rollover crashes. PMID:22269486

  17. Spine problems in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Sucato, Daniel J; Micheli, Lyle J; Estes, A Reed; Tolo, Vernon T

    2012-01-01

    As the number of young people involved in sports activities increases, acute and chronic back pain has become more common. With a careful medical history and physical examination, along with the judicious use of imaging modalities, the causes of back pain can be correctly diagnosed and treated so that young athletes can quickly return to sports participation. Although most back pain in these young patients is muscular in origin, findings that should trigger increased concern include night pain, marked hamstring tightness, pain with lumbar spine hyperextension, or any neurologic finding. When recently developed vague back pain is present, a delay in radiographic imaging is warranted. With new back pain after trauma, AP and lateral radiographs of the symptomatic spinal area are indicated. CT, bone scans, and MRI should be reserved for special circumstances. Spondylolysis is the most common bony cause of back pain in young athletes. Spondylolysis can be treated with activity limitation, a specific exercise program, a thoracolumbar orthosis, and/or surgery. Treatment should be based on the amount of pain as well as the desire of the young athlete to continue in the sports activity that caused the pain. Other significant causes of back pain that require more extensive treatment in these young athletes include spondylolisthesis, lumbar disk disorders, and sacral stress fractures. It is anticipated that nearly all young athletes can return to sports activity after successful treatment. Even if surgical treatment is needed, return to all sports is expected, with the occasional exception of collision sports. PMID:22301257

  18. CHMP2B mutants linked to frontotemporal dementia impair maturation of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Belly, Agnès; Bodon, Gilles; Blot, Béatrice; Bouron, Alexandre; Sadoul, Rémy; Goldberg, Yves

    2010-01-01

    Summary The highly conserved ESCRT-III complex is responsible for deformation and cleavage of membranes during endosomal trafficking and other cellular activities. In humans, dominant mutations in the ESCRT-III subunit CHMP2B cause fronto-temporal dementia (FTD). The decade-long process leading to this cortical degeneration is not well understood. One possibility is that, akin to other neurodegenerative diseases, the pathogenic protein affects the integrity of dendritic spines and synapses before any neuronal death. Using confocal microscopy and 3D reconstruction, we examined whether expressing the FTD-linked mutants CHMP2Bintron5 and CHMP2BΔ10 in cultured hippocampal neurones modified the number or structure of spines. Both mutants induced a significant decrease in the proportion of large spines with mushroom morphology, without overt degeneration. Furthermore, CHMP2BΔ10 induced a drop in frequency and amplitude of spontaneous excitatory post-synaptic currents, suggesting that the more potent synapses were lost. These effects seemed unrelated to changes in autophagy. Depletion of endogenous CHMP2B by RNAi resulted in morphological changes similar to those induced by mutant CHMP2B, consistent with dominant negative activity of pathogenic mutants. Thus, CHMP2B is required for spine growth. Taken together, these results demonstrate that a mutant ESCRT-III subunit linked to a human neurodegenerative disease can disrupt the normal pattern of spine development. PMID:20699355

  19. Governmental designation of spine specialty hospitals, their characteristics, performance and designation effects: a longitudinal study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sun Jung; Yoo, Ji Won; Lee, Sang Gyu; Kim, Tae Hyun; Han, Kyu-Tae; Park, Eun-Cheol

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study compares the characteristics and performance of spine specialty hospitals versus other types of hospitals for inpatients with spinal diseases in South Korea. We also assessed the effect of the government's specialty hospital designation on hospital operating efficiency. Setting We used data of 823 hospitals including 17 spine specialty hospitals in Korea. Participants All spine disease-related inpatient claims nationwide (N=645 449) during 2010–2012. Interventions No interventions were made. Outcome measures Using a multilevel generalised estimating equation and multilevel modelling, this study compared inpatient charges, length of stay (LOS), readmission within 30 days of discharge and in-hospital death within 30 days of admission in spine specialty versus other types of hospitals. Results Spine specialty hospitals had higher inpatient charges per day (27.4%) and a shorter LOS (23.5%), but per case charges were similar after adjusting for patient-level and hospital-level confounders. After government designation, spine specialty hospitals had 8.8% lower per case charges, which was derived by reduced per day charge (7.6%) and shorter LOS (1.0%). Rates of readmission also were lower in spine specialty hospitals (OR=0.796). Patient-level and hospital-level factors both played important roles in determining outcome measures. Conclusions Spine specialty hospitals had higher per day inpatient charges but a much shorter LOS than other types of hospitals due to their specialty volume and experience. In addition, their readmission rate was lower. Spine specialty hospitals also endeavoured to be more efficient after governmental ‘specialty’ designation. PMID:25394819

  20. BrightFocus Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alzheimer’s Disease Research Program Macular Degeneration Research Program National Glaucoma Research Program Molecular Neurodegeneration ... Foundation BrightFocus Foundation 22512 Gateway Center Drive Clarksburg, MD ...

  1. Evidence and practice in spine registries

    PubMed Central

    van Hooff, Miranda L; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Willems, Paul C; Wouters, Michel W J M; de Kleuver, Marinus; Peul, Wilco C; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Fritzell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose We performed a systematic review and a survey in order to (1) evaluate the evidence for the impact of spine registries on the quality of spine care, and with that, on patient-related outcomes, and (2) evaluate the methodology used to organize, analyze, and report the “quality of spine care” from spine registries. Methods To study the impact, the literature on all spinal disorders was searched. To study methodology, the search was restricted to degenerative spinal disorders. The risk of bias in the studies included was assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Additionally, a survey among registry representatives was performed to acquire information about the methodology and practice of existing registries. Results 4,273 unique references up to May 2014 were identified, and 1,210 were eligible for screening and assessment. No studies on impact were identified, but 34 studies were identified to study the methodology. Half of these studies (17 of the 34) were judged to have a high risk of bias. The survey identified 25 spine registries, representing 14 countries. The organization of these registries, methods used, analytical approaches, and dissemination of results are presented. Interpretation We found a lack of evidence that registries have had an impact on the quality of spine care, regardless of whether intervention was non-surgical and/or surgical. To improve the quality of evidence published with registry data, we present several recommendations. Application of these recommendations could lead to registries showing trends, monitoring the quality of spine care given, and ultimately improving the value of the care given to patients with degenerative spinal disorders. PMID:25909475

  2. Three-dimensional Quantification of Dendritic Spines from Pyramidal Neurons Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Gouder, Laura; Tinevez, Jean-Yves; Goubran-Botros, Hany; Benchoua, Alexandra; Bourgeron, Thomas; Cloëz-Tayarani, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are small protrusions that correspond to the post-synaptic compartments of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. They are distributed along the dendrites. Their morphology is largely dependent on neuronal activity, and they are dynamic. Dendritic spines express glutamatergic receptors (AMPA and NMDA receptors) on their surface and at the levels of postsynaptic densities. Each spine allows the neuron to control its state and local activity independently. Spine morphologies have been extensively studied in glutamatergic pyramidal cells of the brain cortex, using both in vivo approaches and neuronal cultures obtained from rodent tissues. Neuropathological conditions can be associated to altered spine induction and maturation, as shown in rodent cultured neurons and one-dimensional quantitative analysis (1). The present study describes a protocol for the 3D quantitative analysis of spine morphologies using human cortical neurons derived from neural stem cells (late cortical progenitors). These cells were initially obtained from induced pluripotent stem cells. This protocol allows the analysis of spine morphologies at different culture periods, and with possible comparison between induced pluripotent stem cells obtained from control individuals with those obtained from patients with psychiatric diseases. PMID:26484791

  3. Conspicuous and aposematic spines in the animal kingdom.

    PubMed

    Inbar, Moshe; Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2005-04-01

    Spines serve as a common physical defence mechanism in both the plant and animal kingdoms. Here we argue that as in plants, defensive animal spines are often conspicuous (shape and colour) and should be considered aposematic. Conspicuous spines may evolve as signals or serve as a cue for potential predators. Spine conspicuousness in animals has evolved independently across and within phyla occupying aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, indicating that this convergent phenomenon is highly adaptive. Still, many spines are cryptic, suggesting that conspicuity is not simply constrained by developmental factors such as differences in the chemical composition of the integument. Aposematism does not preclude the signalling role of conspicuous spines in the sexual arena.

  4. Management of thoracolumbar spine trauma: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, S; Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Thoracolumbar spine fractures are common injuries that can result in significant disability, deformity and neurological deficit. Controversies exist regarding the appropriate radiological investigations, the indications for surgical management and the timing, approach and type of surgery. This review provides an overview of the epidemiology, biomechanical principles, radiological and clinical evaluation, classification and management principles. Literature review of all relevant articles published in PubMed covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with or without neurologic deficit was performed. The search terms used were thoracolumbar, thoracic, lumbar, fracture, trauma and management. All relevant articles and abstracts covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with and without neurologic deficit were reviewed. Biomechanically the thoracolumbar spine is predisposed to a higher incidence of spinal injuries. Computed tomography provides adequate bony detail for assessing spinal stability while magnetic resonance imaging shows injuries to soft tissues (posterior ligamentous complex [PLC]) and neurological structures. Different classification systems exist and the most recent is the AO spine knowledge forum classification of thoracolumbar trauma. Treatment includes both nonoperative and operative methods and selected based on the degree of bony injury, neurological involvement, presence of associated injuries and the integrity of the PLC. Significant advances in imaging have helped in the better understanding of thoracolumbar fractures, including information on canal morphology and injury to soft tissue structures. The ideal classification that is simple, comprehensive and guides management is still elusive. Involvement of three columns, progressive neurological deficit, significant kyphosis and canal compromise with neurological deficit are accepted indications for surgical stabilization through anterior, posterior or combined approaches. PMID:25593358

  5. Management of osteoporosis in spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Lehman, Ronald A; Kang, Daniel Gene; Wagner, Scott Cameron

    2015-04-01

    Osteoporosis is a burgeoning clinical problem that is characterized by decreased bone strength and density. It predisposes patients to fragility fractures and debilitating spine deformities. Several complications are associated with spine surgery in patients with osteoporosis, and there is currently no treatment algorithm to guide the spine surgeon. A multidisciplinary approach to treatment of patients with osteoporosis and spine deformity or fracture is encouraged, and preoperative planning is crucial for successful surgical outcomes. Several surgical techniques have been developed to treat osteoporosis-related deformities, including posterior instrumentation with fusion. However, achieving fixation and fusion in these patients can be difficult secondary to poor bone stock. Augmentation methods to improve pedicle screw fixation have evolved, including instrumentation at multiple levels, bioactive cement augmentation, and fenestrated or expandable pedicle screws, but their impact on clinical outcomes remains unknown. Management of osteoporosis in patients undergoing spine surgery is challenging, but with appropriate patient selection, medical optimization, and surgical techniques, these patients can experience pain relief, deformity correction, and improved function. PMID:25808687

  6. The emerging role of Notch pathway in ageing: Focus on the related mechanisms in age-related diseases.

    PubMed

    Balistreri, Carmela Rita; Madonna, Rosalinda; Melino, Gerry; Caruso, Calogero

    2016-08-01

    Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway, which is fundamental for the development of all tissues, organs and systems of human body. Recently, a considerable and still growing number of studies have highlighted the contribution of Notch signaling in various pathological processes of the adult life, such as age-related diseases. In particular, the Notch pathway has emerged as major player in the maintenance of tissue specific homeostasis, through the control of proliferation, migration, phenotypes and functions of tissue cells, as well as in the cross-talk between inflammatory cells and the innate immune system, and in onset of inflammatory age-related diseases. However, until now there is a confounding evidence about the related mechanisms. Here, we discuss mechanisms through which Notch signaling acts in a very complex network of pathways, where it seems to have the crucial role of hub. Thus, we stress the possibility to use Notch pathway, the related molecules and pathways constituting this network, both as innovative (predictive, diagnostic and prognostic) biomarkers and targets for personalised treatments for age-related diseases. PMID:27328278

  7. Focus on lipids: high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and its associated lipoproteins in cardiac and renal disease.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hyun Joon; McCullough, Peter A

    2014-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) contains dozens of apoproteins that participate in normal cholesterol metabolism with a reliance on renal catabolism for clearance from the body. The plasma pool of HDL-C has been an excellent inverse predictor of cardiovascular events. However, when HDL-C concentrations have been manipulated with the use of niacin, fibric acid derivatives, and cholesteryl ester transferase protein inhibitors, there has been no improvement in outcomes in patients where the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol has been well treated with statins. Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) is one of the minor apoproteins of HDL-C, newly discovered in 1997. Circulating APOL1 is a 43-kDa protein mainly found in the HDL3 subfraction. In patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), mutant forms of APOL1 have been associated with rapidly progressive CKD and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Because mutant forms of APOL1 are more prevalent in African Americans compared to Caucasians, it may explain some of the racial disparities seen in the pool of patients with ESRD in the United States. Thus, HDL-C is an important lipoprotein carrying apoproteins that play roles in vascular and kidney disease. PMID:25343842

  8. Sustaining a Focus on Health Equity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Through Organizational Structures and Functions.

    PubMed

    Dean, Hazel D; Roberts, George W; Bouye, Karen E; Green, Yvonne; McDonald, Marian

    2016-01-01

    The public health infrastructure required for achieving health equity is multidimensional and complex. The infrastructure should be responsive to current and emerging priorities and capable of providing the foundation for developing, planning, implementing, and evaluating health initiatives. This article discusses these infrastructure requirements by examining how they are operationalized in the organizational infrastructure for promoting health equity at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, utilizing the nation's premier public health agency as a lens. Examples from the history of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's work in health equity from its centers, institute, and offices are provided to identify those structures and functions that are critical to achieving health equity. Challenges and facilitators to sustaining a health equity organizational infrastructure, as gleaned from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's experience, are noted. Finally, we provide additional considerations for expanding and sustaining a health equity infrastructure, which the authors hope will serve as "food for thought" for practitioners in state, tribal, or local health departments, community-based organizations, or nongovernmental organizations striving to create or maintain an impactful infrastructure to achieve health equity.

  9. Developmental origins of health and disease: brief history of the approach and current focus on epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Pathik D; Buss, Claudia; Entringer, Sonja; Swanson, James M

    2009-09-01

    "Barker's hypothesis" emerged almost 25 years ago from epidemiological studies of birth and death records that revealed a high geographic correlation between rates of infant mortality and certain classes of later adult deaths as well as an association between birthweight and rates of adult death from ischemic heart disease. These observations led to a theory that undernutrition during gestation was an important early origin of adult cardiac and metabolic disorders due to fetal programming that permanently shaped the body's structure, function, and metabolism and contributed to adult disease. This theory stimulated interest in the fetal origins of adult disorders, which expanded and coalesced approximately 5 years ago with the formation of an international society for developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD). Here we review a few examples of the many emergent themes of the DOHaD approach, including theoretical advances related to predictive adaptive responses of the fetus to a broad range of environmental cues, empirical observations of effects of overnutrition and stress during pregnancy on outcomes in childhood and adulthood, and potential epigenetic mechanisms that may underlie these observations and theory. Next, we discuss the relevance of the DOHaD approach to reproductive medicine. Finally, we consider the next steps that might be taken to apply, evaluate, and extend the DOHaD approach.

  10. The evolving role of dendritic spines and memory: interaction(s) with estradiol

    PubMed Central

    Frankfurt, Maya; Luine, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Memory processing is presumed to depend on synaptic plasticity, which appears to have a role in mediating the acquisition, consolidation, and retention of memory. We have studied the relationship between estrogen, recognition memory, and dendritic spine density in the hippocampus and medial prefrontal cortex, areas critical for memory, across the lifespan in female rodents. The present paper reviews the literature on dendritic spine plasticity in mediating both short and long term memory, as well as the decreased memory that occurs with aging and Alzheimer's Disease. It also addresses the role of acute and chronic estrogen treatment in these processes. PMID:25993604

  11. Statistical analysis of dendritic spine distributions in rat hippocampal cultures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dendritic spines serve as key computational structures in brain plasticity. Much remains to be learned about their spatial and temporal distribution among neurons. Our aim in this study was to perform exploratory analyses based on the population distributions of dendritic spines with regard to their morphological characteristics and period of growth in dissociated hippocampal neurons. We fit a log-linear model to the contingency table of spine features such as spine type and distance from the soma to first determine which features were important in modeling the spines, as well as the relationships between such features. A multinomial logistic regression was then used to predict the spine types using the features suggested by the log-linear model, along with neighboring spine information. Finally, an important variant of Ripley’s K-function applicable to linear networks was used to study the spatial distribution of spines along dendrites. Results Our study indicated that in the culture system, (i) dendritic spine densities were "completely spatially random", (ii) spine type and distance from the soma were independent quantities, and most importantly, (iii) spines had a tendency to cluster with other spines of the same type. Conclusions Although these results may vary with other systems, our primary contribution is the set of statistical tools for morphological modeling of spines which can be used to assess neuronal cultures following gene manipulation such as RNAi, and to study induced pluripotent stem cells differentiated to neurons. PMID:24088199

  12. VCP and ATL1 regulate endoplasmic reticulum and protein synthesis for dendritic spine formation.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Imbalanced protein homeostasis, such as excessive protein synthesis and protein aggregation, is a pathogenic hallmark of a range of neurological disorders. Here, using expression of mutant proteins, a knockdown approach and disease mutation knockin mice, we show that VCP (valosin-containing protein), together with its cofactor P47 and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology regulator ATL1 (Atlastin-1), regulates tubular ER formation and influences the efficiency of protein synthesis to control dendritic spine formation in neurons. Strengthening the significance of protein synthesis in dendritic spinogenesis, the translation blocker cyclohexamide and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduce dendritic spine density, while a leucine supplement that increases protein synthesis ameliorates the dendritic spine defects caused by Vcp and Atl1 deficiencies. Because VCP and ATL1 are the causative genes of several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, we suggest that impaired ER formation and inefficient protein synthesis are significant in the pathogenesis of multiple neurological disorders. PMID:26984393

  13. VCP and ATL1 regulate endoplasmic reticulum and protein synthesis for dendritic spine formation

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Imbalanced protein homeostasis, such as excessive protein synthesis and protein aggregation, is a pathogenic hallmark of a range of neurological disorders. Here, using expression of mutant proteins, a knockdown approach and disease mutation knockin mice, we show that VCP (valosin-containing protein), together with its cofactor P47 and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology regulator ATL1 (Atlastin-1), regulates tubular ER formation and influences the efficiency of protein synthesis to control dendritic spine formation in neurons. Strengthening the significance of protein synthesis in dendritic spinogenesis, the translation blocker cyclohexamide and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduce dendritic spine density, while a leucine supplement that increases protein synthesis ameliorates the dendritic spine defects caused by Vcp and Atl1 deficiencies. Because VCP and ATL1 are the causative genes of several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, we suggest that impaired ER formation and inefficient protein synthesis are significant in the pathogenesis of multiple neurological disorders. PMID:26984393

  14. VCP and ATL1 regulate endoplasmic reticulum and protein synthesis for dendritic spine formation.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-03-17

    Imbalanced protein homeostasis, such as excessive protein synthesis and protein aggregation, is a pathogenic hallmark of a range of neurological disorders. Here, using expression of mutant proteins, a knockdown approach and disease mutation knockin mice, we show that VCP (valosin-containing protein), together with its cofactor P47 and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology regulator ATL1 (Atlastin-1), regulates tubular ER formation and influences the efficiency of protein synthesis to control dendritic spine formation in neurons. Strengthening the significance of protein synthesis in dendritic spinogenesis, the translation blocker cyclohexamide and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduce dendritic spine density, while a leucine supplement that increases protein synthesis ameliorates the dendritic spine defects caused by Vcp and Atl1 deficiencies. Because VCP and ATL1 are the causative genes of several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, we suggest that impaired ER formation and inefficient protein synthesis are significant in the pathogenesis of multiple neurological disorders.

  15. Effect of the Degenerative State of the Intervertebral Disk on the Impact Characteristics of Human Spine Segments

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sara E.; Alkalay, Ron N.; Myers, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Models of the dynamic response of the lumbar spine have been used to examine vertebral fractures (VFx) during falls and whole body vibration transmission in the occupational setting. Although understanding the viscoelastic stiffness or damping characteristics of the lumbar spine are necessary for modeling the dynamics of the spine, little is known about the effect of intervertebral disk degeneration on these characteristics at high loading rates. We hypothesize that disk degeneration significantly affects the viscoelastic response of spinal segments to high loading rate. We additionally hypothesize the lumbar spine stiffness and damping characteristics are a function of the degree of preload. A custom, pendulum impact tester was used to impact 19 L1–L3 human spine segments with an end mass of 20.9 kg under increasing preloads with the resulting force response measured. A Kelvin–Voigt model, fitted to the frequency and decay response of the post-impact oscillations was used to compute stiffness and damping constants. The spine segments exhibited a second-order, under-damped response with stiffness and damping values of 17.9–754.5 kN/m and 133.6–905.3 Ns/m respectively. Regression models demonstrated that stiffness, but not damping, significantly correlated with preload (p < 0.001). Degenerative disk disease, reflected as reduction in magnetic resonance T2 relaxation time, was weakly correlated with change in stiffness at low preloads. This study highlights the need to incorporate the observed non-linear increase in stiffness of the spine under high loading rates in dynamic models of spine investigating the effects of a fall on VFx and those investigating the response of the spine to vibration. PMID:25024122

  16. Dopamine facilitates dendritic spine formation by cultured striatal medium spiny neurons through both D1 and D2 dopamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Fasano, Caroline; Bourque, Marie-Josée; Lapointe, Gabriel; Leo, Damiana; Thibault, Dominic; Haber, Michael; Kortleven, Christian; Desgroseillers, Luc; Murai, Keith K; Trudeau, Louis-Éric

    2013-04-01

    Variations of dopamine (DA) levels induced by drugs of abuse or in the context of Parkinson's disease modulate the number of dendritic spines in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the striatum, showing that DA plays a major role in the structural plasticity of MSNs. However, little is presently known regarding early spine development in MSNs occurring before the arrival of cortical inputs and in particular about the role of DA and D1 (D1R) and D2 (D2R) DA receptors. A cell culture model reconstituting early cellular interactions between MSNs, intrinsic cholinergic interneurons and DA neurons was used to study the role of DA in spine formation. After 5 or 10 days in vitro, the presence of DA neurons increased the number of immature spine-like protrusions. In MSN monocultures, chronic activation of D1R or D2R also increased the number of spines and spinophilin expression in MSNs, suggesting a direct role for these receptors. In DA-MSN cocultures, chronic blockade of D1R or D2R reduced the number of dendritic spines. Interestingly, the combined activation or blockade of both D1R and D2R failed to elicit more extensive spine formation, suggesting that both receptors act through a mechanism that is not additive. Finally, we found increased ionotropic glutamate receptor responsiveness and miniature excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC) frequency in DA-MSN co-cultures, in parallel with a higher number of spines containing PSD-95, suggesting that the newly formed spines present functional post-synaptic machinery preparing the MSNs to receive additional glutamatergic contacts. These results represent a first step in the understanding of how dopamine neurons promote the structural plasticity of MSNs during the development of basal ganglia circuits.

  17. Airway management in cervical spine injury

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Naola; Krishnamoorthy, Vijay; Dagal, Arman

    2014-01-01

    To minimize risk of spinal cord injury, airway management providers must understand the anatomic and functional relationship between the airway, cervical column, and spinal cord. Patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury may require emergent intubation for airway protection and ventilatory support or elective intubation for surgery with or without rigid neck stabilization (i.e., halo). To provide safe and efficient care in these patients, practitioners must identify high-risk patients, be comfortable with available methods of airway adjuncts, and know how airway maneuvers, neck stabilization, and positioning affect the cervical spine. This review discusses the risks and benefits of various airway management strategies as well as specific concerns that affect patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury. PMID:24741498

  18. Studying Signal Transduction in Single Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Ryohei

    2012-01-01

    Many forms of synaptic plasticity are triggered by biochemical signaling that occurs in small postsynaptic compartments called dendritic spines, each of which typically houses the postsynaptic terminal associated with a single glutamatergic synapse. Recent advances in optical techniques allow investigators to monitor biochemical signaling in single dendritic spines and thus reveal the signaling mechanisms that link synaptic activity and the induction of synaptic plasticity. This is mostly in the study of Ca2+-dependent forms of synaptic plasticity for which many of the steps between Ca2+ influx and changes to the synapse are now known. This article introduces the new techniques used to investigate signaling in single dendritic spines and the neurobiological insights that they have produced. PMID:22843821

  19. Viscoelastic creep induced by repetitive spine flexion and its relationship to dynamic spine stability.

    PubMed

    Howarth, Samuel J; Kingston, David C; Brown, Stephen H M; Graham, Ryan B

    2013-08-01

    Repetitive trunk flexion elicits passive tissue creep, which has been hypothesized to compromise spine stability. The current investigation determined if increased spine flexion angle at the onset of flexion relaxation (FR) in the lumbar extensor musculature was associated with altered dynamic stability of spine kinematics. Twelve male participants performed 125 consecutive cycles of full forward trunk flexion. Spine kinematics and lumbar erector spinae (LES) electromyographic (EMG) activity were obtained throughout the repetitive trunk flexion trial. Dynamic stability was evaluated with maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponents over five sequential blocks of 25cycles. Spine flexion angle at FR onset, and peak LES EMG activity were determined at baseline and every 25th cycle. Spine flexion angle at FR increased on average by 1.7° after baseline with significant increases of 1.7° and 2.4° at the 50th and 100th cycles. Maximum finite-time Lyapunov exponents demonstrated a transient, non-statistically significant, increase between cycles 26 and 50 followed by a recovery to baseline over the remainder of the repetitive trunk flexion cycles. Recovery of dynamic stability may be the consequence of increased active spine stiffness demonstrated by the non-significant increase in peak LES EMG that occurred as the repetitive trunk flexion progressed.

  20. Overview of noncommunicable diseases in Korean children and adolescents: focus on obesity and its effect on metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Ah; Park, Hyesook

    2013-07-01

    Obesity during childhood is a dominant risk factor for noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), and is itself considered a disease that needs to be treated. Recently, the growth in childhood obesity in Korea has become stagnant; however, two in every ten children are still overweight. In addition, 60% or more of overweight children have at least one metabolic syndrome risk factor. Thus, childhood obesity should be controlled through lifestyle modification. This paper reviews studies of the modifiable risk factors of obesity in Korean children. According to the life-course approach, preschool-aged children (<5 years) are influenced by their parents rather than individual habits because they are under mostly parental care. Elementary school-aged children (6 to 11 years) are affected by overlapping individual and parental effects. This may mean that the establishment of individual behavior patterns begins during this period. The conditions of poor eating habits such as skipping meals, eating out, and high fat intake, along with low physical activity, facilitate increased obesity among adolescents (12 to 18 years). Notably, adolescent girls show high rates of both underweight and obesity, which may lead to the development of NCDs in their offspring. Therefore, the problem of NCDs is no longer limited to adults, but is also prevalent among children. In addition, early intervention offers cost-effective opportunities for preventing NCDs. Thus, children need primary consideration, adequate monitoring, diagnosis, and treatment to reduce the burden of NCDs later in adulthood.

  1. Revisiting the vicious circle of dry eye disease: a focus on the pathophysiology of meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Baudouin, Christophe; Messmer, Elisabeth M; Aragona, Pasquale; Geerling, Gerd; Akova, Yonca A; Benítez-del-Castillo, José; Boboridis, Kostas G; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Rolando, Maurizio; Labetoulle, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is the most frequent cause of dry eye disease (DED). Eyelid inflammation, microbial growth, associated skin disorders as well as potentially severe corneal complications culminate to make MGD a complex multifactorial disorder. It is probable that MGD is a heterogeneous condition arising from any combination of the following five separate pathophysiological mechanisms: eyelid inflammation, conjunctival inflammation, corneal damage, microbiological changes and DED resulting from tear film instability. The pathogenesis of both MGD and DED can be described in terms of a 'vicious circle': the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of DED and MGD interact, resulting in a double vicious circle. The MGD vicious circle is self-stimulated by microbiological changes, which results in increased melting temperature of meibum and subsequent meibomian gland blockage, reinforcing the vicious circle of MGD. Meibomian gland blockage, dropout and inflammation directly link the two vicious circles. MGD-associated tear film instability provides an entry point into the vicious circle of DED and leads to hyperosmolarity and inflammation, which are both a cause and consequence of DED. Here we propose a new pathophysiological scheme for MGD in order to better identify the pathological mechanisms involved and to allow more efficient targeting of therapeutics. Through better understanding of this scheme, MGD may gain true disease status rather than being viewed as a mere dysfunction.

  2. Interplay of Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction in Bone Marrow Transplantation: Focus on Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease.

    PubMed

    Vion, Anne-Clémence; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Durand, François; Boulanger, Chantal M; Valla, Dominique C

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial cells are unique multifunctional cells with basal and inducible metabolic and synthetic functions. Various stimuli can induce physiological or pathological changes in endothelial cell biology. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) requires high-dose irradiation and/or chemotherapy and is associated with increased risk of bacterial infections and immune reactions. These factors can affect endothelial cells. This review provides an overview of the effects of HSCT on endothelial cells, based on findings observed in cultured cells as well as in patients. We first describe to what extent irradiation and chemotherapy constitute direct and indirect triggers for endothelial cell activation and injury. Then, we highlight the role of the endothelium in several complications of HSCT, including capillary leak syndrome, engraftment syndrome, transplant-associated microangiopathy, graft-versus-host disease, and diffuse alveolar hemorrhages. We also analyze in detail available data on sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, previously known as veno-occlusive disease of the liver, where liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are first injured and eventually lead to sinusoid occlusion and liver cell damage. Finally, we open the question of the possible contribution of endothelial damage to cardiovascular events occurring long after HSCT.

  3. Therapeutic potential of melatonin and its analogs in Parkinson’s disease: focus on sleep and neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Venkatramanujam; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Srinivasan, Uddanapalli S.; Kaur, Charanjit; Brown, Gregory M.; Spence, D. Warren; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disorders constitute major nonmotor features of Parkinson’s disease (PD) that have a substantial effect on patients’ quality of life and can be related to the progression of the neurodegenerative disease. They can also serve as preclinical markers for PD, as it is the case for rapid eye movement (REM)-associated sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Although the etiology of sleep disorders in PD remains undefined, the assessment of the components of the circadian system, including melatonin secretion, could give therapeutically valuable insight on their pathophysiopathology. Melatonin is a regulator of the sleep/wake cycle and also acts as an effective antioxidant and mitochondrial function protector. A reduction in the expression of melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors has been documented in the substantia nigra of PD patients. The efficacy of melatonin for preventing neuronal cell death and for ameliorating PD symptoms has been demonstrated in animal models of PD employing neurotoxins. A small number of controlled trials indicate that melatonin is useful in treating disturbed sleep in PD, in particular RBD. Whether melatonin and the recently developed melatonergic agents (ramelteon, tasimelteon, agomelatine) have therapeutic potential in PD is also discussed. PMID:22010042

  4. Revisiting the vicious circle of dry eye disease: a focus on the pathophysiology of meibomian gland dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Baudouin, Christophe; Messmer, Elisabeth M; Aragona, Pasquale; Geerling, Gerd; Akova, Yonca A; Benítez-del-Castillo, José; Boboridis, Kostas G; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Rolando, Maurizio; Labetoulle, Marc

    2016-03-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is the most frequent cause of dry eye disease (DED). Eyelid inflammation, microbial growth, associated skin disorders as well as potentially severe corneal complications culminate to make MGD a complex multifactorial disorder. It is probable that MGD is a heterogeneous condition arising from any combination of the following five separate pathophysiological mechanisms: eyelid inflammation, conjunctival inflammation, corneal damage, microbiological changes and DED resulting from tear film instability. The pathogenesis of both MGD and DED can be described in terms of a 'vicious circle': the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of DED and MGD interact, resulting in a double vicious circle. The MGD vicious circle is self-stimulated by microbiological changes, which results in increased melting temperature of meibum and subsequent meibomian gland blockage, reinforcing the vicious circle of MGD. Meibomian gland blockage, dropout and inflammation directly link the two vicious circles. MGD-associated tear film instability provides an entry point into the vicious circle of DED and leads to hyperosmolarity and inflammation, which are both a cause and consequence of DED. Here we propose a new pathophysiological scheme for MGD in order to better identify the pathological mechanisms involved and to allow more efficient targeting of therapeutics. Through better understanding of this scheme, MGD may gain true disease status rather than being viewed as a mere dysfunction. PMID:26781133

  5. Revisiting the vicious circle of dry eye disease: a focus on the pathophysiology of meibomian gland dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Baudouin, Christophe; Messmer, Elisabeth M; Geerling, Gerd; Akova, Yonca A; Benítez-del-Castillo, José; Boboridis, Kostas G; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Rolando, Maurizio; Labetoulle, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is the most frequent cause of dry eye disease (DED). Eyelid inflammation, microbial growth, associated skin disorders as well as potentially severe corneal complications culminate to make MGD a complex multifactorial disorder. It is probable that MGD is a heterogeneous condition arising from any combination of the following five separate pathophysiological mechanisms: eyelid inflammation, conjunctival inflammation, corneal damage, microbiological changes and DED resulting from tear film instability. The pathogenesis of both MGD and DED can be described in terms of a ‘vicious circle’: the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of DED and MGD interact, resulting in a double vicious circle. The MGD vicious circle is self-stimulated by microbiological changes, which results in increased melting temperature of meibum and subsequent meibomian gland blockage, reinforcing the vicious circle of MGD. Meibomian gland blockage, dropout and inflammation directly link the two vicious circles. MGD-associated tear film instability provides an entry point into the vicious circle of DED and leads to hyperosmolarity and inflammation, which are both a cause and consequence of DED. Here we propose a new pathophysiological scheme for MGD in order to better identify the pathological mechanisms involved and to allow more efficient targeting of therapeutics. Through better understanding of this scheme, MGD may gain true disease status rather than being viewed as a mere dysfunction. PMID:26781133

  6. Care for chronic illness in Australian general practice – focus groups of chronic disease self-help groups over 10 years: implications for chronic care systems reforms

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Carmel M; Peterson, Chris; Robinson, Rowena; Sturmberg, Joachim P

    2009-01-01

    Background Chronic disease is a major global challenge. However, chronic illness and its care, when intruding into everyday life, has received less attention in Asia Pacific countries, including Australia, who are in the process of transitioning to chronic disease orientated health systems. Aim The study aims to examine experiences of chronic illness before and after the introduction of Australian Medicare incentives for longer consultations and structured health assessments in general practice. Methods Self-help groups around the conditions of diabetes, epilepsy, asthma and cancer identified key informants to participate in 4 disease specific focus groups. Audio taped transcripts of the focus groups were coded using grounded theory methodology. Key themes and lesser themes identified using a process of saturation until the study questions on needs and experiences of care were addressed. Thematic comparisons were made across the 2002/3 and 1992/3 focus groups. Findings At times of chronic illness, there was need to find and then ensure access to 'the right GP'. The 'right GP or specialist' committed to an in-depth relationship of trust, personal rapport and understanding together with clinical and therapeutic competence. The 'right GP', the main specialist, the community nurse and the pharmacist were key providers, whose success depended on interprofessional communication. The need to trust and rely on care providers was balanced by the need for self-efficacy 'to be in control of disease and treatment' and 'to be your own case manager'. Changes in Medicare appeared to have little penetration into everyday perceptions of chronic illness burden or time and quality of GP care. Inequity of health system support for different disease groupings emerged. Diabetes, asthma and certain cancers, like breast cancer, had greater support, despite common experiences of disease burden, and a need for research and support programs. Conclusion Core themes around chronic illness

  7. Philosophy and concepts of modern spine surgery.

    PubMed

    José-Antonio, Soriano-Sánchez; Baabor-Aqueveque, Marcos; Silva-Morales, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of improving pain and neurological deficit in the practice of spine surgery is changing for a more ambitious goal, namely to improve the overall quality of life and the future of patients through three major actions (1) preserving the vertebral anatomical structures; (2) preserving the paravertebral anatomical structures; and (3) preserving the functionality of the segment. Thus, three new concepts have emerged (a) minimal surgery; (b) minimal access surgery; and (c) motion preservation surgery. These concepts are covered in a new term, minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) The term "MISS" is not about one or several particular surgical techniques, but a new way of thinking, a new philosophy. Although the development of minimally invasive spine surgery is recent, its application includes all spine segments and almost all the existing conditions, including deformities.Evidence-based medicine (EBM), a term coined by Alvan Feinstein in the 1960s (Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 564-579; Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 757-781; Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 944-965; Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 1162-1193.), emphasizes the possibility of combining art and science following the strict application of scientific methods in the treatment of patients (Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 944-965; Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 1162-1193.), which may represent the advantages of objectivity and rationality in the use of different treatments (Fig. 11). However, EBM has many obvious defects, especially in spine surgery it is almost impossible to develop double-blind protocols (Andersson G, Bridwell K, Danielsson A, et al (2007) Spine 32: S64-S65.). In most cases, the only evidence one can find in the literature is the lack of evidence (Resnick D (2007) Spine 32:S15-S19.), however, the lack of evidence does not mean its absence. Only then, with a

  8. Guidelines for use of lumbar spine radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kelen, G.D.; Noji, E.K.; Doris, P.E.

    1986-03-01

    In deciding whether to obtain lumbosacral spine films, the emergency physician must not ask whether a diagnosis can be established, but whether obtaining films will affect management. Low back pain is a considerable problem for society with cost in billions of dollars. Gonadal radiation from lumbosacral radiographs is significant, and thus ordering films should be minimized. Plain radiographs are rarely indicated in otherwise healthy patients 20 to 50 years old with mechanical or root pain on initial presentation. In other patients alternative diagnostic methodologies such as computed tomography may be superior, with less radiation risk. Specific recommendations for emergency radiographic evaluation of the lumbosacral spine are offered.68 references.

  9. Cervical spine injuries in rugby players.

    PubMed

    Sovio, O M; Van Peteghem, P K; Schweigel, J F

    1984-03-15

    Nine patients with serious cervical spine injuries that occurred while they were playing rugby were seen in a British Columbia acute spinal cord injury unit during the period 1975-82. All the injuries had occurred during the "scrum" or the "tackle". Two of the patients were rendered permanently quadriplegic, and one patient died. There is a need for a central registry that would record all cervical spine injuries in rugby players as well as for changes in the rules of the game. PMID:6697282

  10. Philosophy and concepts of modern spine surgery.

    PubMed

    José-Antonio, Soriano-Sánchez; Baabor-Aqueveque, Marcos; Silva-Morales, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of improving pain and neurological deficit in the practice of spine surgery is changing for a more ambitious goal, namely to improve the overall quality of life and the future of patients through three major actions (1) preserving the vertebral anatomical structures; (2) preserving the paravertebral anatomical structures; and (3) preserving the functionality of the segment. Thus, three new concepts have emerged (a) minimal surgery; (b) minimal access surgery; and (c) motion preservation surgery. These concepts are covered in a new term, minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) The term "MISS" is not about one or several particular surgical techniques, but a new way of thinking, a new philosophy. Although the development of minimally invasive spine surgery is recent, its application includes all spine segments and almost all the existing conditions, including deformities.Evidence-based medicine (EBM), a term coined by Alvan Feinstein in the 1960s (Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 564-579; Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 757-781; Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 944-965; Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 1162-1193.), emphasizes the possibility of combining art and science following the strict application of scientific methods in the treatment of patients (Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 944-965; Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 1162-1193.), which may represent the advantages of objectivity and rationality in the use of different treatments (Fig. 11). However, EBM has many obvious defects, especially in spine surgery it is almost impossible to develop double-blind protocols (Andersson G, Bridwell K, Danielsson A, et al (2007) Spine 32: S64-S65.). In most cases, the only evidence one can find in the literature is the lack of evidence (Resnick D (2007) Spine 32:S15-S19.), however, the lack of evidence does not mean its absence. Only then, with a

  11. Super resolution microscopy is poised to reveal new insights into the formation and maturation of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Cristina M.; Patel, Mikin R.; Webb, Donna J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines and synapses are critical for neuronal communication, and they are perturbed in many neurological disorders; however, the study of these structures in living cells has been hindered by their small size. Super resolution microscopy, unlike conventional light microscopy, is diffraction unlimited and thus is well suited for imaging small structures, such as dendritic spines and synapses. Super resolution microscopy has already revealed important new information about spine and synapse morphology, actin remodeling, and nanodomain composition in both healthy cells and diseased states. In this review, we highlight the advancements in probes that make super resolution more amenable to live-cell imaging of spines and synapses. We also discuss recent data obtained by super resolution microscopy that has advanced our knowledge of dendritic spine and synapse structure, organization, and dynamics in both healthy and diseased contexts. Finally, we propose a series of critical questions for understanding spine and synapse formation and maturation that super resolution microscopy is poised to answer. PMID:27408691

  12. A New Endemic Focus of Chagas Disease in the Northern Region of Veraguas Province, Western Half Panama, Central America

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, Azael; Pineda, Vanessa; Martinez, Inri; Santamaria, Giovanna; Santamaria, Ana Maria; Miranda, Aracelis; Calzada, Jose E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas disease was originally reported in Panama in 1931. Currently, the best knowledge of this zoonosis is restricted to studies done in historically endemic regions. However, little is known about the distribution and epidemiology of Chagas disease in other rural areas of the country. Methods and Findings A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out between May 2005 – July 2008 in four rural communities of the Santa Fe District, Veraguas Province. The study included an entomologic search to collect triatomines, bloodmeal type identification and infection rate with trypanosomes in collected vectors using a dot- blot and PCR analysis, genotyping of circulating Trypanosoma cruzi (mini-exon gene PCR analysis) and the detection of chagasic antibodies among inhabitants. The vector Rhodnius pallescens was more frequently found in La Culaca and El Pantano communities (788 specimens), where it was a sporadic household visitor. These triatomines presented darker coloration and larger sizescompared with typical specimens collected in Central Panama. Triatoma dimidiata was more common in Sabaneta de El Macho (162 specimens). In one small sub-region (El Macho), 60% of the houses were colonized by this vector. Of the examined R. pallescens, 54.7.0% (88/161) had fed on Didelphis marsupialis, and 24.6% (34/138) of T. dimidiata specimens collected inside houses were positive for human blood. R. pallescens presented an infection index with T. cruzi of 17.7% (24/136), with T. rangeli of 12.5% (17/136) and 50.7% (69/136) were mixed infections. In 117 T. dimidiata domestic specimens the infection index with T. cruzi was 21.4%. Lineage I of T. cruzi was confirmed circulating in these vectors. A T. cruzi infection seroprevalence of 2.3% (24/1,056) was found in this population. Conclusions This is the first report of Chagas disease endemicity in Santa Fe District, and it should be considered a neglected public health problem in this area of Panama. PMID:22558095

  13. Conspicuous carotenoid-based pelvic spine ornament in three-spined stickleback populations—occurrence and inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, CR; Gjøen, HM; Larsen, B; Egeland, ES

    2015-01-01

    Reports on reddish carotenoid-based ornaments in female three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) are few, despite the large interest in the species’ behaviour, ornamentation, morphology and evolution. We sampled sticklebacks from 17 sites in north-western Europe in this first extensive study on the occurrence of carotenoid-based female pelvic spines and throat ornaments. The field results showed that females, and males, with reddish spines were found in all 17 populations. Specimens of both sexes with conspicuous red spines were found in several of the sites. The pelvic spines of males were more intensely red compared to the females’ spines, and large specimens were more red than small ones. Fish infected with the tapeworm (Schistocephalus solidus) had drabber spines than uninfected fish. Both sexes had red spines both during and after the spawning period, but the intensity of the red colour was more exaggerated during the spawning period. As opposed to pelvic spines, no sign of red colour at the throat was observed in any female from any of the 17 populations. A rearing experiment was carried out to estimate a potential genetic component of the pelvic spine ornament by artificial crossing and rearing of 15 family groups during a 12 months period. The results indicated that the genetic component of the red colour at the spines was low or close to zero. Although reddish pelvic spines seem common in populations of stickleback, the potential adaptive function of the reddish pelvic spines remains largely unexplained. PMID:25861558

  14. Conspicuous carotenoid-based pelvic spine ornament in three-spined stickleback populations-occurrence and inheritance.

    PubMed

    Amundsen, C R; Nordeide, J T; Gjøen, H M; Larsen, B; Egeland, E S

    2015-01-01

    Reports on reddish carotenoid-based ornaments in female three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) are few, despite the large interest in the species' behaviour, ornamentation, morphology and evolution. We sampled sticklebacks from 17 sites in north-western Europe in this first extensive study on the occurrence of carotenoid-based female pelvic spines and throat ornaments. The field results showed that females, and males, with reddish spines were found in all 17 populations. Specimens of both sexes with conspicuous red spines were found in several of the sites. The pelvic spines of males were more intensely red compared to the females' spines, and large specimens were more red than small ones. Fish infected with the tapeworm (Schistocephalus solidus) had drabber spines than uninfected fish. Both sexes had red spines both during and after the spawning period, but the intensity of the red colour was more exaggerated during the spawning period. As opposed to pelvic spines, no sign of red colour at the throat was observed in any female from any of the 17 populations. A rearing experiment was carried out to estimate a potential genetic component of the pelvic spine ornament by artificial crossing and rearing of 15 family groups during a 12 months period. The results indicated that the genetic component of the red colour at the spines was low or close to zero. Although reddish pelvic spines seem common in populations of stickleback, the potential adaptive function of the reddish pelvic spines remains largely unexplained. PMID:25861558

  15. [Nursing Care of Lumbar Spine Fusion Surgery Using a Semi-Rigid Device (ISOBAR)].

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Shan; Su, Shu-Fen

    2016-04-01

    Aging frequently induces degenerative changes in the spine. Patients who suffer from lumbar degenerative disease tend to have lower back pain, neurological claudication, and neuropathy. Furthermore, incontinence may be an increasing issue as symptoms become severe. Lumbar spine fusion surgery is necessary if clinical symptoms continue to worsen or if the patient fails to respond to medication, physical therapy, or alternative treatments. However, this surgical procedure frequently induces adjacent segment disease (ASD), which is evidenced by the appearance of pathological changes in the upper and lower sections of the spinal surgical sites. In 1997, ISOBAR TTL dynamic rod stabilization was developed for application in spinal fusion surgery to prevent ASD-related complications. The device has proven effective in reducing pain in the lower back and legs, decreasing functional disability, improving quality of life, and retarding disc degeneration. However, the effectiveness of this intervention in decreasing the incidence of ASD requires further research investigation, and relevant literature and research in Taiwan is still lacking. This article discusses lumbar degenerative disease, its indications, the contraindications of lumbar spine fusion surgery using ISOBAR, and related postoperative nursing care. We hope this article provides proper and new knowledge to clinical nurses for the care of patients undergoing lumbar spine fusion surgery with ISOBAR. PMID:27026564

  16. Utility of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for the Study and Treatment of Genetic Diseases: Focus on Childhood Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Barral, Serena; Kurian, Manju A

    2016-01-01

    The study of neurological disorders often presents with significant challenges due to the inaccessibility of human neuronal cells for further investigation. Advances in cellular reprogramming techniques, have however provided a new source of human cells for laboratory-based research. Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can now be robustly differentiated into specific neural subtypes, including dopaminergic, inhibitory GABAergic, motorneurons and cortical neurons. These neurons can then be utilized for in vitro studies to elucidate molecular causes underpinning neurological disease. Although human iPSC-derived neuronal models are increasingly regarded as a useful tool in cell biology, there are a number of limitations, including the relatively early, fetal stage of differentiated cells and the mainly two dimensional, simple nature of the in vitro system. Furthermore, clonal variation is a well-described phenomenon in iPSC lines. In order to account for this, robust baseline data from multiple control lines is necessary to determine whether a particular gene defect leads to a specific cellular phenotype. Over the last few years patient-derived neural cells have proven very useful in addressing several mechanistic questions related to central nervous system diseases, including early-onset neurological disorders of childhood. Many studies report the clinical utility of human-derived neural cells for testing known drugs with repurposing potential, novel compounds and gene therapies, which then can be translated to clinical reality. iPSCs derived neural cells, therefore provide great promise and potential to gain insight into, and treat early-onset neurological disorders. PMID:27656126

  17. Utility of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for the Study and Treatment of Genetic Diseases: Focus on Childhood Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Barral, Serena; Kurian, Manju A.

    2016-01-01

    The study of neurological disorders often presents with significant challenges due to the inaccessibility of human neuronal cells for further investigation. Advances in cellular reprogramming techniques, have however provided a new source of human cells for laboratory-based research. Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can now be robustly differentiated into specific neural subtypes, including dopaminergic, inhibitory GABAergic, motorneurons and cortical neurons. These neurons can then be utilized for in vitro studies to elucidate molecular causes underpinning neurological disease. Although human iPSC-derived neuronal models are increasingly regarded as a useful tool in cell biology, there are a number of limitations, including the relatively early, fetal stage of differentiated cells and the mainly two dimensional, simple nature of the in vitro system. Furthermore, clonal variation is a well-described phenomenon in iPSC lines. In order to account for this, robust baseline data from multiple control lines is necessary to determine whether a particular gene defect leads to a specific cellular phenotype. Over the last few years patient-derived neural cells have proven very useful in addressing several mechanistic questions related to central nervous system diseases, including early-onset neurological disorders of childhood. Many studies report the clinical utility of human-derived neural cells for testing known drugs with repurposing potential, novel compounds and gene therapies, which then can be translated to clinical reality. iPSCs derived neural cells, therefore provide great promise and potential to gain insight into, and treat early-onset neurological disorders. PMID:27656126

  18. A mouse model of non-motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease: focus on pharmacological interventions targeting affective dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Bonito-Oliva, Alessandra; Masini, Débora; Fisone, Gilberto

    2014-01-01

    Non-motor symptoms, including psychiatric disorders, are increasingly recognized as a major challenge in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). These ailments, which often appear in the early stage of the disease, affect a large number of patients and are only partly resolved by conventional antiparkinsonian medications, such as L-DOPA. Here, we investigated non-motor symptoms of PD in a mouse model based on bilateral injection of the toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in the dorsal striatum. This model presented only subtle gait modifications, which did not affect horizontal motor activity in the open-field test. Bilateral 6-OHDA lesion also impaired olfactory discrimination, in line with the anosmia typically observed in early stage parkinsonism. The effect of 6-OHDA was then examined for mood-related dysfunctions. Lesioned mice showed increased immobility in the forced swim test and tail suspension test, two behavioral paradigms of depression. Moreover, the lesion exerted anxiogenic effects, as shown by reduced time spent in the open arms, in the elevated plus maze test, and by increased thigmotaxis in the open-field test. L-DOPA did not modify depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors, which were instead counteracted by the dopamine D2/D3 receptor agonist, pramipexole. Reboxetine, a noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor, was also able to revert the depressive and anxiogenic effects produced by the lesion with 6-OHDA. Interestingly, pre-treatment with desipramine prior to injection of 6-OHDA, which is commonly used to preserve noradrenaline neurons, did not modify the effect of the lesion on depressive- and anxiety-like behaviors. Thus, in the present model, mood-related conditions are independent of the reduction of noradrenaline caused by 6-OHDA. Based on these findings we propose that the anti-depressive and anxiolytic action of reboxetine is mediated by promoting dopamine transmission through blockade of dopamine uptake from residual noradrenergic terminals. PMID

  19. EVALUATION OF THE CERVICAL SPINE AMONG PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Passos Cardoso, André Luiz; Da Silva, Nilzio Antonio; Daher, Sérgio; De Moraes, Frederico Barra; Do Carmo, Humberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of cervical spine abnormalities among patients with rheumatoid arthritis and correlate the imaging findings with the clinical state. Methods: A cross-sectional study on 35 patients was carried out at the School of Medicine of the Federal University of Goiás (UFG) in 2004. The following were evaluated: age, use of medications and the clinical picture of pain and neurological characteristics. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and rheumatoid factor were tested, and radiographs of the cervical spine were produced in anteroposterior, lateral and dynamic views. To evaluate the influence of the variables on the emergence of instabilities, univariate and multivariate logistic regression tests were used (p < 0.05). Results: Among the 35 patients evaluated, 13 (37.1%) presented a stable cervical spine. Out of the 22 patients with instability, six presented more than one type. Atlantoaxial instability was found in 15 patients, with a mean anterior atlantodental distance of 3.40 mm in the neutral lateral radiographic view and 6.54 mm in the lateral view with flexion. Basilar invagination was found in five patients and subaxial subluxation in seven patients. Two thirds of the asymptomatic patients had instabilities. Bicipital hyperreflexia presented statistically significant correlations with atlantoaxial instability (p = 0.024) and subaxial instability (p = 0.01). Age at diagnosis correlated with subaxial instability (p = 0.02). Conclusions: The prevalence of cervical instability was 62.9 % (22/35). The most frequent instabilities were: atlantoaxial subluxation (42.9 %), subaxial subluxation (20%) and basilar invagination (14.3%). The correlation between instabilities and clinical signs and symptoms was poor. The patients with subaxial subluxation presented disease onset at a younger age. Dynamic radiography was important for diagnosing atlantoaxial subluxation. PMID:27022536

  20. Cervical spine abnormalities in institutionalized adults with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    MacLachlan, R A; Fidler, K E; Yeh, H; Hodgetts, P G; Pharand, G; Chau, M

    1993-06-01

    The prevalence of increased anterior atlanto-odontoid distance (AAOD), a risk factor for spinal cord compression, and degenerative disease of the cervical spine (DDCS) in a population of institutionalized adults with Down's syndrome (DS) was determined and compared with age- and sex-matched 'normals' presenting to a hospital emergency department. Radiographs of the cervical spines of 99 adults with DS and 198 'normals' were compared using a standardized rating scale. The prevalence of an AAOD of 3 mm or greater, the threshold of risk from the literature, was 8% for DS cases and 2% for controls (P < 0.01). The mean AAOD for DS cases was 2.0 +/- 1 mm and for controls 1.5 +/- 0.5 mm (P < 0.01). There was a negative correlation between AAOD and age of DS cases. The prevalence of any degree of DDCS among the DS cases was 64%, the controls 39% (P < 0.001); for moderate or severe DDCS the prevalence among DS cases was 45%, controls 12% (P < 0.001). The prevalence of DDCS increased with age in both groups, but the severity of DDCS was significantly increased with age in both groups, but the severity of DDCS was significantly greater for DS individuals in all age groups. The levels of the cervical spine affected ranged from C2 to C6; the most commonly affected level was C5-C6. While DS adults are at increased theoretical risk for spinal cord compression due to increased AAOD, its clinical significance would appear to be small and to decline with age.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Quantifying barcodes of dendritic spines using entropy-based metrics

    PubMed Central

    Viggiano, D.; Srivastava, D. P.; Speranza, L.; Perrone-Capano, C.; Bellenchi, G. C.; di Porzio, U.; Buckley, N. J.

    2015-01-01

    Spine motility analysis has become the mainstay for investigating synaptic plasticity but is limited in its versatility requiring complex, non automatized instrumentations. We describe an entropy-based method for determining the spatial distribution of dendritic spines that allows successful estimation of spine motility from still images. This method has the potential to extend the applicability of spine motility analysis to ex vivo preparations. PMID:26419702

  2. Glia selectively approach synapses on thin dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Medvedev, Nikolai; Popov, Victor; Henneberger, Christian; Kraev, Igor; Rusakov, Dmitri A.; Stewart, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the relationship between the morphological modality of 189 dendritic spines and the surrounding astroglia using full three-dimensional reconstructions of neuropil fragments. An integrative measure of three-dimensional glial coverage confirms that thin spine postsynaptic densities are more tightly surrounded by glia. This distinction suggests that diffusion-dependent synapse–glia communication near ‘learning’ synapses (associated with thin spines) could be stronger than that near ‘memory’ synapses (associated with larger spines). PMID:25225105

  3. Prostatic cancer surveillance following whole-gland high-intensity focused ultrasound: comparison of MRI and prostate-specific antigen for detection of residual or recurrent disease

    PubMed Central

    Punwani, S; Emberton, M; Walkden, M; Sohaib, A; Freeman, A; Ahmed, H; Allen, C; Kirkham, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective This retrospective study compares dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI with the serial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurement for detection of residual disease following whole-gland high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy of prostate cancer. Methods Patients in whom post-HIFU DCE-MRI was followed within 3 months by ultrasound-guided transrectal biopsy were selected from a local database. 26 patients met the study inclusion criteria. Serial PSA levels following HIFU and post-HIFU follow-up MRI were retrieved for each patient. Three radiologists unaware of other investigative results independently assessed post-HIFU MRI studies for the presence of cancer, scoring on a four-point scale (1, no disease; 2, probably no disease; 3, probably residual disease; and 4, residual disease). Sensitivity, specificity and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were performed for each reader, post-HIFU PSA nadir and pre-biopsy PSA level thresholds of >0.2 and >0.5 ng ml−1. Results The sensitivity of DCE-MRI for detection of residual disease for the three readers ranged between 73% and 87%, and the specificity between 73% and 82%. There was good agreement between readers (κ=0.69–0.77). The sensitivity and specificity of PSA thresholds was 60–87% and 73–100%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve was greatest for pre-biopsy PSA (0.95). Conclusion DCE-MRI performed following whole-gland HIFU has similar sensitivity and specificity and ROC performance to serial PSA measurements for detection of residual or recurrent disease. PMID:22253342

  4. [Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis of the spine : Children and adolescent].

    PubMed

    von der Höh, N H; Völker, A; Jeszenszky, D; Heyde, C-E

    2016-06-01

    Chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) in childhood and adolescence is a non-infectious autoinflammatory disease of the bone with partial involvement of adjacent joints and soft tissue. The etiology is unknown. The disease can occur singular or recurrent. Individual bones can be affected and multiple lesions can occur. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) shows the whole picture of CNO. Accompanying but temporally independent of the bouts of osteomyelitis, some patients show manifestations in the skin, eyes, lungs and the gastrointestinal tract. The article gives an overview of the clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures, and treatment options for CRMO involvement of the spine based on the current literature and our own cases. PMID:27221306

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spine

    SciTech Connect

    Atlas, S.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This book will be of use to neuroradiologists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, and all other clinicians who interact to discuss the results of MRI in patients with neurologic disease. It is hoped that this book will aid in this interaction by adding insight into the interpretation of scans and by promulgating a common language. Neuroradiologists and others who interpret MRI of the brain and spine will benefit from the detailed discussions concerning the basis of signal intensity derangements, whether on the fundamental level (i.e., physical or biochemical) or at the level of correlations with clinical and neuropathological findings. It is anticipated that all neuroscience personnel interested in clinical disease states and in neurological research will be able to utilize this text as a starting point and reference for proposed work utilizing MRI.

  6. 49 CFR 572.115 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.115 Section 572.115... 50th Percentile Male § 572.115 Lumbar spine and pelvis. The specifications and test procedure for the lumbar spine and pelvis are identical to those for the SID dummy as set forth in § 572.42 except that...

  7. 49 CFR 572.115 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.115 Section 572.115... 50th Percentile Male § 572.115 Lumbar spine and pelvis. The specifications and test procedure for the lumbar spine and pelvis are identical to those for the SID dummy as set forth in § 572.42 except that...

  8. 49 CFR 572.115 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.115 Section 572.115... 50th Percentile Male § 572.115 Lumbar spine and pelvis. The specifications and test procedure for the lumbar spine and pelvis are identical to those for the SID dummy as set forth in § 572.42 except that...

  9. 49 CFR 572.115 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.115 Section 572.115... 50th Percentile Male § 572.115 Lumbar spine and pelvis. The specifications and test procedure for the lumbar spine and pelvis are identical to those for the SID dummy as set forth in § 572.42 except that...

  10. 49 CFR 572.115 - Lumbar spine and pelvis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lumbar spine and pelvis. 572.115 Section 572.115... 50th Percentile Male § 572.115 Lumbar spine and pelvis. The specifications and test procedure for the lumbar spine and pelvis are identical to those for the SID dummy as set forth in § 572.42 except that...

  11. Populations of Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) are modulated by drought at a Lyme disease focus in Illinois.

    PubMed

    Jones, C J; Kitron, U D

    2000-05-01

    From 1990 through 1997, Ixodes scapularis Say larvae and nymphs were sampled between May and October along a 400-m segment of a nature trail in a Lyme disease endemic site in northern Illinois. Ticks were removed from Peromyscus leucopus mice and collected via tick drags at approximately 3-wk intervals. Mouse population estimates along the trail varied from 2, in the spring of 1996 following a year of drought, to > 200 in 1993, the wettest year on record. During the 8-yr period, there were major droughts during the summers of 1991 and 1995. Cumulative degree-days were positively correlated with the number of ticks collected on drags in the same year and negatively correlated with larval tick populations for the following year (P < 0.05). Cumulative rainfall was positively correlated with larval tick abundance for the following year. This was most readily apparent by examination of the larval density on captured mice. In the year following each of two drought years, larval densities were significantly depressed compared with the 8-yr average at the site. PMID:15535585

  12. G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Focus on BACE1 Related GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Juan; Deng, Yulin; Jiang, Zhaotan; Qing, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been considered as one of the largest families of validated drug targets, which involve in almost overall physiological functions and pathological processes. Meanwhile, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common type of dementia, affects thinking, learning, memory and behavior of elderly people, that has become the hotspot nowadays for its increasing risks and incurability. The above fields have been intensively studied, and the link between the two has been demonstrated, whereas the way how GPCRs perturb AD progress are yet to be further explored given their complexities. In this review, we summarized recent progress regarding the GPCRs interacted with β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), a key secretase in AD pathogenesis. Then we discussed the current findings on the regulatory roles of GPCRs on BACE1, and the possibility for pharmaceutical treatment of AD patients by the allosteric modulators and biased ligands of GPCRs. We hope this review can provide new insights into the understanding of mechanistic link between GPCRs and BACE1, and highlight the potential of GPCRs as therapeutic target for AD. PMID:27047374

  13. Jasmonate Signalling and Defence Responses in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula-A Focus on Responses to Fusarium Wilt Disease.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Louise F; Gao, Ling-Ling; Singh, Karam B

    2016-02-05

    Jasmonate (JA)-mediated defences play important roles in host responses to pathogen attack, in particular to necrotrophic fungal pathogens that kill host cells in order to extract nutrients and live off the dead plant tissue. The root-infecting fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum initiates a necrotrophic growth phase towards the later stages of its lifecycle and is responsible for devastating Fusarium wilt disease on numerous legume crops worldwide. Here we describe the use of the model legume Medicago truncatula to study legume-F. oxysporum interactions and compare and contrast this against knowledge from other model pathosystems, in particular Arabidopsis thaliana-F. oxysporum interactions. We describe publically-available genomic, transcriptomic and genetic (mutant) resources developed in M. truncatula that enable dissection of host jasmonate responses and apply aspects of these herein during the M. truncatula--F. oxysporum interaction. Our initial results suggest not all components of JA-responses observed in M. truncatula are shared with Arabidopsis in response to F. oxysporum infection.

  14. Jasmonate Signalling and Defence Responses in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula—A Focus on Responses to Fusarium Wilt Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thatcher, Louise F.; Gao, Ling-Ling; Singh, Karam B.

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA)-mediated defences play important roles in host responses to pathogen attack, in particular to necrotrophic fungal pathogens that kill host cells in order to extract nutrients and live off the dead plant tissue. The root-infecting fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum initiates a necrotrophic growth phase towards the later stages of its lifecycle and is responsible for devastating Fusarium wilt disease on numerous legume crops worldwide. Here we describe the use of the model legume Medicago truncatula to study legume–F. oxysporum interactions and compare and contrast this against knowledge from other model pathosystems, in particular Arabidopsis thaliana–F. oxysporum interactions. We describe publically-available genomic, transcriptomic and genetic (mutant) resources developed in M. truncatula that enable dissection of host jasmonate responses and apply aspects of these herein during the M. truncatula-–F. oxysporum interaction. Our initial results suggest not all components of JA-responses observed in M. truncatula are shared with Arabidopsis in response to F. oxysporum infection. PMID:27135231

  15. Laser therapy for the treatment of Hailey-Hailey disease: a systematic review with focus on carbon dioxide laser resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Falto-Aizpurua, L A; Griffith, R D; Yazdani Abyaneh, M A; Nouri, K

    2015-06-01

    Benign familial chronic pemphigus, or Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD), is a recurrent bullous dermatitis that tends to have a chronic course with frequent relapses. Long-term treatment options include surgery with skin grafting or dermabrasion. Both are highly invasive and carry significant risks and complications. More recently, 'laser-abrasion' has been described as a less invasive option with a better side-effect profile. In this article, we systematically review the safety and efficacy of carbon dioxide laser therapy as a long-term treatment option for HHD, as well as provide a review of other lasers that have been reported with this goal. A total of 23 patients who had been treated with a carbon dioxide laser were identified. After treatment, 10 patients (43%) had had no recurrence, 10 (43%) had greater than 50% improvement, 2 (8%) had less than 50% improvement and 1 (4%) patient had no improvement at all (follow-up period ranged from 4 to 144 months). Laser parameter variability was wide and adverse effects were minimal, including dyspigmentation and scarring. Reviewed evidence indicates this therapy offers a safe, effective treatment alternative for HHD with minimal risk of side-effects. Larger, well-designed studies are necessary to determine the optimal treatment parameters.

  16. Jasmonate Signalling and Defence Responses in the Model Legume Medicago truncatula-A Focus on Responses to Fusarium Wilt Disease.

    PubMed

    Thatcher, Louise F; Gao, Ling-Ling; Singh, Karam B

    2016-01-01

    Jasmonate (JA)-mediated defences play important roles in host responses to pathogen attack, in particular to necrotrophic fungal pathogens that kill host cells in order to extract nutrients and live off the dead plant tissue. The root-infecting fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum initiates a necrotrophic growth phase towards the later stages of its lifecycle and is responsible for devastating Fusarium wilt disease on numerous legume crops worldwide. Here we describe the use of the model legume Medicago truncatula to study legume-F. oxysporum interactions and compare and contrast this against knowledge from other model pathosystems, in particular Arabidopsis thaliana-F. oxysporum interactions. We describe publically-available genomic, transcriptomic and genetic (mutant) resources developed in M. truncatula that enable dissection of host jasmonate responses and apply aspects of these herein during the M. truncatula--F. oxysporum interaction. Our initial results suggest not all components of JA-responses observed in M. truncatula are shared with Arabidopsis in response to F. oxysporum infection. PMID:27135231

  17. New frontiers in fibrotic disease therapies: The focus of the Joan and Joel Rosenbloom Center for Fibrotic Diseases at Thomas Jefferson University.

    PubMed

    Rosenbloom, Joel; Ren, Shumei; Macarak, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Fibrotic diseases constitute a world-wide major health problem, but research support remains inadequate in comparison to the need. Although considerable understanding of the pathogenesis of fibrotic reactions has been attained, no completely effective therapies exist. Although fibrotic disorders are diverse, it is universally appreciated that a particular cell type with unique characteristics, the myofibroblast, is responsible for replacement of functioning tissue with non-functional scar tissue. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the creation of myofibroblasts and their activities is central to the development of therapies. Critical signaling cascades, initiated primarily by TGF-β, but also involving other cytokines which stimulate pro-fibrotic reactions in the myofibroblast, offer potential therapeutic targets. However, because of the multiplicity and complex interactions of these signaling pathways, it is very unlikely that any single drug will be successful in modifying a major fibrotic disease. Therefore, we have chosen to examine the effectiveness of administration of several drug combinations in a mouse pneumoconiosis model. Such treatment proved to be effective. Because fibrotic diseases that tend to be chronic, are difficult to monitor, and are patient variable, implementation of clinical trials is difficult and expensive. Therefore, we have made efforts to identify and validate non-invasive biomarkers found in urine and blood. We describe the potential utility of five such markers: (i) the EDA form of fibronectin (Fn(EDA)), (ii) lysyl oxidase (LOX), (iii) lysyl oxidase-like protein 2 (LoxL2), (iv) connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, CCNII), and (v) the N-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP).

  18. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lumbar spine. 572.187 Section 572.187 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES 2re Side Impact Crash...

  19. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lumbar spine. 572.187 Section 572.187 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) ANTHROPOMORPHIC TEST DEVICES ES-2re Side Impact...

  20. Anaesthetic implications of rigid spine syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jorgensen, B G; Laub, M; Knudsen, R H

    1999-01-01

    The perioperative management of a 14-year-old girl, suffering from the muscular disorder rigid spine syndrome, is presented. The anaesthetic implications with regard to possible difficult intubation, cardiac involvement, malignant hyperthermia, neuromuscular blocking agents, and postoperative recovery are discussed. PMID:10411775

  1. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... freely to achieve an impact velocity of 6.05 ±0.1 m/s measured at the center of the pendulum accelerometer (Figure 22) at the time the pendulum makes contact with its decelerating mechanism. The velocity... to paragraph (b)—ES-2re Lumbar Spine Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

  2. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... freely to achieve an impact velocity of 6.05 ±0.1 m/s measured at the center of the pendulum accelerometer (Figure 22) at the time the pendulum makes contact with its decelerating mechanism. The velocity... to paragraph (b)—ES-2re Lumbar Spine Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

  3. 49 CFR 572.187 - Lumbar spine.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... freely to achieve an impact velocity of 6.05 ±0.1 m/s measured at the center of the pendulum accelerometer (Figure 22) at the time the pendulum makes contact with its decelerating mechanism. The velocity... to paragraph (b)—ES-2re Lumbar Spine Certification Pendulum Velocity Corridor Upper boundary...

  4. Neglected Thoraco Lumbar Traumatic Spine Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Kavin; Sharma, Vijay; Gupta, Babita; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To outline the etiology, complications and management difficulties encountered in the management of neglected thoracolumbar spine injuries. Overview of Literature The English literature describes overlooked diagnosis as the most common cause of neglected spine injuries. However, the reasons differ in developing or under-developed nations. Moreover, there is scarcity of literature about the neglected spinal injuries. Methods Patients presenting with thoracolumbar traumatic injuries who had not received any form of treatment for more than three weeks were included in the study. The demographic details, operative procedure performed and complications encountered, along with American Spinal Injury Association grade and spinal cord independence measure score recorded on the history sheets were noted. The data were analyzed. Results Forty patients were included in the study. Inadequate treatment at the first contact hospital (45%) followed by late presentation (38%) and missed injury (17%) were the major etiological factors for the neglected traumatic injuries in the thoracolumbar spine. The most common complications seen in the management of these cases were pressure sores (58%), back pain (57%), urinary tract infection (42%) and residual kyphotic deformity (42%). Conclusions Management of neglected thoracolumbar injuries is challenging. The delay in presentation should not prevent spine surgeon in proceeding with operative intervention as good results can be expected. PMID:27559447

  5. Biomechanics of the Flexion of Spine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Harry K.; Aurora, T. S.

    1991-01-01

    The forces and torques experienced by the spine are examined to understand, and possibly avoid, low back pain. The structure, degrees of freedom, forces and torques when lifting objects, an experimental study, and other factors affecting the back are discussed. (KR)

  6. Stretching the Spines of Gymnasts: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sands, William A; McNeal, Jeni R; Penitente, Gabriella; Murray, Steven Ross; Nassar, Lawrence; Jemni, Monèm; Mizuguchi, Satoshi; Stone, Michael H

    2016-03-01

    Gymnastics is noted for involving highly specialized strength, power, agility and flexibility. Flexibility is perhaps the single greatest discriminator of gymnastics from other sports. The extreme ranges of motion achieved by gymnasts require long periods of training, often occupying more than a decade. Gymnasts also start training at an early age (particularly female gymnasts), and the effect of gymnastics training on these young athletes is poorly understood. One of the concerns of many gymnastics professionals is the training of the spine in hyperextension-the ubiquitous 'arch' seen in many gymnastics positions and movements. Training in spine hyperextension usually begins in early childhood through performance of a skill known as a back-bend. Does practising a back-bend and other hyperextension exercises harm young gymnasts? Current information on spine stretching among gymnasts indicates that, within reason, spine stretching does not appear to be an unusual threat to gymnasts' health. However, the paucity of information demands that further study be undertaken. PMID:26581832

  7. Implications of oral infections on systemic diseases in the institutionalized elderly with a special focus on pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Limeback, H

    1998-07-01

    Systemic infection in the elderly patient living in a chronic care setting presents a significant burden to the health care system. The extent to which oral organisms cause systemic infections through hematogenous dissemination in the institutionalized elderly is still unknown. A more likely and common route of systemic infection by oral microorganisms is through aspiration of oropharyngeal fluids containing oral pathogenic microorganisms, which colonize the lower respiratory tract and cause pneumonia. Respiratory pathogens emerge in the dental plaque of elderly patients with very poor oral hygiene and severe periodontal disease. In the chronic care setting, aspiration of oropharyngeal fluids contaminated with these bacteria occurs in patients with diminished host defenses, resulting in bacterial pneumonia. This is also a problem in intensive care units in the hospital setting. In one study, pre-rinsing with a 0.12% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash significantly lowered the mortality rate from postsurgical pneumonia in patients undergoing open heart surgery. Selective digestive decontamination, a technique involving the topical application of antimicrobials to reduce the risk of colonization of the respiratory tract, has been used to reduce the incidence of nosocomial pneumonia in the acute care setting of hospitals. This technique has not been employed in the nursing home setting. Whether improving oral hygiene would also lower the risk in either of these settings has not been studied. A number of obstacles must be overcome in designing studies to investigate the relationship between oral infections and lung infections in the institutionalized elderly. Ethical issues must be addressed, and full collaboration of the medical team is required. Future studies should establish whether reducing the risk for pneumonia in the institutionalized elderly is possible through improved oral health.

  8. Cortical Dendritic Spine Heads Are Not Electrically Isolated by the Spine Neck from Membrane Potential Signals in Parent Dendrites

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Marko A.; Gao, Xin; Carnevale, Nicholas T.; Zecevic, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    The evidence for an important hypothesis that cortical spine morphology might participate in modifying synaptic efficacy that underlies plasticity and possibly learning and memory mechanisms is inconclusive. Both theory and experiments suggest that the transfer of excitatory postsynaptic potential signals from spines to parent dendrites depends on the spine neck morphology and resistance. Furthermore, modeling of signal transfer in the opposite direction predicts that synapses on spine heads are not electrically isolated from voltages in the parent dendrite. In sharp contrast to this theoretical prediction, one of a very few measurements of electrical signals from spines reported that slow hyperpolarizing membrane potential changes are attenuated considerably by the spine neck as they spread from dendrites to synapses on spine heads. This result challenges our understanding of the electrical behavior of spines at a fundamental level. To re-examine the specific question of the transfer of dendritic signals to synapses of spines, we took advantage of a high-sensitivity Vm-imaging technique and carried out optical measurements of electrical signals from 4 groups of spines with different neck length and simultaneously from parent dendrites. The results show that spine neck does not filter membrane potential signals as they spread from the dendrites into the spine heads. PMID:23054810

  9. Principles of Long-Term Dynamics of Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Yasumatsu, Nobuaki; Matsuzaki, Masanori; Miyazaki, Takashi; Noguchi, Jun; Kasai, Haruo

    2008-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synapse strength requires enlargement of dendritic spines on cerebral pyramidal neurons. Long-term depression (LTD) is linked to spine shrinkage. Indeed, spines are dynamic structures: they form, change their shapes and volumes or can disappear in the space of hours. Do all such changes result from synaptic activity, or do some changes result from intrinsic processes? How do enlargement and shrinkage of spines relate to elimination and generation of spines, and how do these processes contribute to the stationary distribution of spine volumes? To answer these questions, we recorded the volumes of many individual spines daily for several days using two-photon imaging of CA1 pyramidal neurons in cultured slices of rat hippocampus between postnatal day 17 to 23. With normal synaptic transmission, spines often changed volume or were created or eliminated, thereby showing activity-dependent plasticity. However, we found that spines changed volume even after we blocked synaptic activity, reflecting a native instability of these small structures over the long term. Such “intrinsic fluctuations” showed unique dependence on spine volume. A mathematical model constructed from these data and the theory of random fluctuations explains population behaviors of spines, such as rates of elimination and generation, stationary distribution of volumes and the long-term persistence of large spines. Our study finds that generation and elimination of spines are more prevalent than previously believed, and spine volume shows significant correlation with its age and life expectancy. The population dynamics of spines also predict key psychological features of memory. PMID:19074033

  10. Characteristics of commercial and traditional village poultry farming in Mali with a focus on practices influencing the risk of transmission of avian influenza and Newcastle disease.

    PubMed

    Molia, Sophie; Traoré, Idrissa; Kamissoko, Badian; Diakité, Adama; Sidibé, Maimouna Sanogo; Sissoko, Kadiatou Diarra; Pfeiffer, Dirk Udo

    2015-10-01

    We aimed at characterizing commercial and traditional village poultry farming in Mali, with a focus on practices influencing the risk of transmission of avian influenza and Newcastle disease. Surveys were conducted in 2009-2011 in a study area covering approximately 98% of the Malian poultry population. Among the 282 commercial farms investigated, of which 64 had not been known by the government authorities, 83% were located within a 50km radius from the capitals of the country and regions and 54% had low biosecurity standard. Among the 152 randomly selected village household flocks investigated, characteristics were overall similar to those in other African countries but some differences were notable including a large flock size (median 44 poultry), a low presence of ducks and geese (11% and 1.1% of flocks, respectively), vaccination against Newcastle disease being common (49% of flocks), a low proportion of households selling sick and dead birds (0.7% and 0%, respectively) and limited cohabitation between poultry and humans at night. Our recommendations to limit the risk of disease transmission include (1) for commercial farms, to introduce compulsory farm registration and accreditation, to increase technical proficiency and access to credit for farms with low biosecurity, and to support poultry producer associations; (2) for village poultry, to promote better quarantine and management of sick and dead birds. Such detailed knowledge of country-specific characteristics of poultry production systems is essential to be able to develop more efficient disease risk management policies.

  11. Hepatitis B and immunosuppressive therapies for chronic inflammatory diseases: When and how to apply prophylaxis, with a special focus on corticosteroid therapy

    PubMed Central

    López-Serrano, Pilar; de la Fuente Briongos, Elsa; Alonso, Elisa Carrera; Pérez-Calle, Jose Lázaro; Rodríguez, Conrado Fernández

    2015-01-01

    Currently immunosuppressive and biological agents are used in a more extensive and earlier way in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatic or dermatologic diseases. Although these drugs have shown a significant clinical benefit, the safety of these treatments is a challenge. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) reactivations have been reported widely, even including liver failure and death, and it represents a deep concern in these patients. Current guidelines recommend to pre-emptive therapy in patients with immunosuppressants in general, but preventive measures focused in patients with corticosteroids and inflammatory diseases are scarce. Screening for HBV infection should be done at diagnosis. The patients who test positive for hepatitis B surface antigen, but do not meet criteria for antiviral treatment must receive prophylaxis before undergoing immunosuppression, including corticosteroids at higher doses than prednisone 20 mg/d during more than two weeks. Tenofovir and entecavir are preferred than lamivudine because of their better resistance profile in long-term immunosuppressant treatments. There is not a strong evidence, to make a general recommendation on the necessity of prophylaxis therapy in patients with inflammatory diseases that are taking low doses of corticosteroids in short term basis or low systemic bioavailability corticosteroids such as budesonide or beclomethasone dipropionate. In these cases regularly HBV DNA monitoring is recommended, starting early antiviral therapy if DNA levels begin to rise. In patients with occult or resolved hepatitis the risk of reactivation is much lower, and excepting for Rituximab treatment, the prophylaxis is not necessary. PMID:25848477

  12. Cervical spine immobilization in the elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Mobbs, Ralph J.; Wilson, David; Ball, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Background Immobilization of the cervical spine is a cornerstone of spinal injury management. In the context of suspected cervical spine injury, patients are immobilized in a ‘neutral position’ based on the head and trunk resting on a flat surface. It is hypothesized that the increased thoracic kyphosis and loss of cervical lordosis seen in elderly patients may require alternative cervical immobilization, compared with the ‘neutral position’. Methods To investigate this, an audit of pan-scan CT performed on consecutive major trauma patients aged over 65 years was carried out over a 6-month period. Utilizing the pan-CT’s localizing scout film, a novel measurement, the ‘chin-brow horizontal’ angle was independently measured by a senior spine surgeon (RJM) and a neurosurgeon (PJR) with the gantry used as a horizontal zero- degree reference. The benefit of the ‘chin-brow horizontal’ angle in the trauma setting is it can be assessed from the bedside whilst the patient is immobilized against a flat surface. Results During the 6-month study period, 58 patients were identified (30 male, 28 female), with an average age of 77.6 years (minimum 65, maximum 97). Results showed that ‘chin-brow horizontal’ angles varied widely, between +15.8 degrees in flexion to −30.5 degrees in extension (mean −12.4 degrees in extension, standard deviation 9.31 degrees. The interobserver correlation was 0.997 (95% CI: 0.995–0.998). Conclusions These findings suggest that, due to degenerative changes commonly seen in elderly patients, the routine use of the ‘neutral position’ adopted for cervical spine immobilization may not be appropriate in this population. We suggest that consideration be taken in cervical spine immobilization, with patients assessed on an individual basis including the fracture morphology, to minimize the risk of fracture displacement and worsened neurological deficit.

  13. [Symptoms. Localizations: knee, hip, hands, spine, other localizations].

    PubMed

    Pérez Martín, Álvaro

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of osteoarthritis vary widely from patient to patient, depending especially on the localization on the disease. There is a poor correlation between radiological involvement and pain. In general, symptom onset is gradual and symptoms increase slowly but progressively. The most commonly affected joints are the knees, hips, hands, and spine. The main signs and symptoms are pain, stiffness, joint deformity, and crepitus. Pain is mechanical and its causes are multifactorial; in the initial phases, pain usually manifests in self-limiting episodes but may subsequently be almost constant. The criteria of the American college of Rheumatology for the classification of osteoarthritis of the knee, hip and hands are an aid to classification and standardization but are not useful for diagnosis. Hip osteoarthritis usually produces inguinal pain in the internal and anterior sections of the muscle extending to the knee and, with progression, tends to limit mobility. Knee osteoarthritis is more frequent in women and is usually associated with hand osteoarthritis and obesity. In hand osteoarthritis, the most commonly affected joints are the distal interphalangeal joints, followed by the proximal interphalangeal joints and the trapeziometacarpal joints; the development of Heberden and Bouchard nodes is common; involvement of the trapeziometacarpal joint is called rhizarthrosis and is one of the forms of osteoarthritis that produces the greatest limitation on hand function. Osteoarthritis of the spine affects the facet joints and the vertebral bodies. Other, less frequent, localizations are the foot, elbow and shoulder, which are generally secondary forms of osteoarthritis.

  14. [Symptoms. Localizations: knee, hip, hands, spine, other localizations].

    PubMed

    Pérez Martín, Álvaro

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of osteoarthritis vary widely from patient to patient, depending especially on the localization on the disease. There is a poor correlation between radiological involvement and pain. In general, symptom onset is gradual and symptoms increase slowly but progressively. The most commonly affected joints are the knees, hips, hands, and spine. The main signs and symptoms are pain, stiffness, joint deformity, and crepitus. Pain is mechanical and its causes are multifactorial; in the initial phases, pain usually manifests in self-limiting episodes but may subsequently be almost constant. The criteria of the American college of Rheumatology for the classification of osteoarthritis of the knee, hip and hands are an aid to classification and standardization but are not useful for diagnosis. Hip osteoarthritis usually produces inguinal pain in the internal and anterior sections of the muscle extending to the knee and, with progression, tends to limit mobility. Knee osteoarthritis is more frequent in women and is usually associated with hand osteoarthritis and obesity. In hand osteoarthritis, the most commonly affected joints are the distal interphalangeal joints, followed by the proximal interphalangeal joints and the trapeziometacarpal joints; the development of Heberden and Bouchard nodes is common; involvement of the trapeziometacarpal joint is called rhizarthrosis and is one of the forms of osteoarthritis that produces the greatest limitation on hand function. Osteoarthritis of the spine affects the facet joints and the vertebral bodies. Other, less frequent, localizations are the foot, elbow and shoulder, which are generally secondary forms of osteoarthritis. PMID:24467955

  15. Retrolisthesis as a Compensatory Mechanism in Degenerative Lumbar Spine

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ikchan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Posterior vertebral translation as a type of spondylolisthesis, retrolisthesis is observed commonly in patients with degenerative spinal problems. Nevertheless, there is insufficient literature on retrolisthesis compared to anterolisthesis. The purpose of this study is to clarify the clinical features of retrolisthesis, and its developmental mechanism associated with a compensatory role in sagittal imbalance of the lumbar spine. Methods From 2003 to 2012, 230 Korean patients who underwent spinal surgery in our department under the impression of degenerative lumbar spinal disease were enrolled. All participants were divided into four groups : 35 patients with retrolisthesis (group R), 32 patients with simultaneous retrolisthesis and anterolisthesis (group R+A), 76 patients with anterolisthesis (group A), and 87 patients with non-translation (group N). The clinical features and the sagittal parameters related to retrolisthesis were retrospectively analyzed based on the patients' medical records. Results There were different clinical features and developmental mechanisms between retrolisthesis and anterolisthesis. The location of retrolisthesis was affected by the presence of simultaneous anterolisthesis, even though it predominantly manifest in L3. The relative lower pelvic incidence, pelvic tilt, and lumbar lordosis compared to anterolisthesis were related to the generation of retrolisthesis, with the opposite observations of patients with anterolisthesis. Conclusion Retrolisthesis acts as a compensatory mechanism for moving the gravity axis posteriorly for sagittal imbalance in the lumbar spine under low pelvic incidence and insufficient intra-spinal compensation. PMID:25810857

  16. The Michigan Spine Surgery Improvement Collaborative: a statewide Collaborative Quality Initiative.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor; Schwalb, Jason M; Nerenz, David R; Pietrantoni, Lisa; Jones, Sharon; Jankowski, Michelle; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bartol, Stephen; Abdulhak, Muwaffak

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Given the scrutiny of spine surgery by policy makers, spine surgeons are motivated to demonstrate and improve outcomes, by determining which patients will and will not benefit from surgery, and to reduce costs, often by reducing complications. Insurers are similarly motivated. In 2013, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan (BCBSM) and Blue Care Network (BCN) established the Michigan Spine Surgery Improvement Collaborative (MSSIC) as a Collaborative Quality Initiative (CQI). MSSIC is one of the newest of 21 other CQIs that have significantly improved-and continue to improve-the quality of patient care throughout the state of Michigan. METHODS MSSIC focuses on lumbar and cervical spine surgery, specifically indications such as stenosis, disk herniation, and degenerative disease. Surgery for tumors, traumatic fractures, deformity, scoliosis, and acute spinal cord injury are currently not within the scope of MSSIC. Starting in 2014, MSSIC consisted of 7 hospitals and in 2015 included another 15 hospitals, for a total of 22 hospitals statewide. A standardized data set is obtained by data abstractors, who are funded by BCBSM/BCN. Variables of interest include indications for surgery, baseline patient-reported outcome measures, and medical history. These are obtained within 30 days of surgery. Outcome instruments used include the EQ-5D general health state score (0 being worst and 100 being the best health one can imagine) and EQ-5D-3 L. For patients undergoing lumbar surgery, a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale for leg and back pain and the Oswestry Disability Index for back pain are collected. For patients undergoing cervical surgery, a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale for arm and neck pain, Neck Disability Index, and the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association score are collected. Surgical details, postoperative hospital course, and patient-reported outcome measures are collected at 90-day, 1-year, and 2-year intervals. RESULTS As of July 1, 2015, a total of 6397 cases

  17. A systematic review of the use of expandable cages in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Elder, Benjamin D; Lo, Sheng-Fu; Kosztowski, Thomas A; Goodwin, C Rory; Lina, Ioan A; Locke, John E; Witham, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    Expandable vertebral body replacement cages (VBRs) have been widely used for reconstruction of the thoracolumbar spine following corpectomy. However, their use in the cervical spine is less common, and currently, no expandable cages on the market are cleared or approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in the cervical spine. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review on the use of expandable cages in the treatment of cervical spine pathology with a focus on fusion rates, deformity correction, complications, and indications. A comprehensive Medline search was performed, and 24 applicable articles were identified and included in this review. The advantages of expandable cages include greater ease of implantation with less risk of damage to the end plate, less intraoperative manipulation of the device, and potentially greater control over lordosis. They may be particularly advantageous in cases with poor bone quality, such as patients with osteoporosis or metastatic tumors that have been radiated. However, there is a potential risk of overdistraction, which is increased in the cervical spine, their minimum height limits their use in cases with collapsed vertebra, and the amount of hardware in the expansion mechanism may limit the surface area available for fusion. The use of expandable VBRs are a valuable tool in the armamentarium for reconstruction of the anterior column of the cervical spine with an acceptable safety profile. Although expandable cervical cages are clearly beneficial in certain clinical situations, widespread use following all corpectomies is not justified due to their significantly greater cost compared to structural bone grafts or non-expandable VBRs, which can be utilized to achieve similar clinical outcomes. PMID:26212700

  18. Comparison of routes for achieving parenteral access with a focus on the management of patients with Ebola virus disease

    PubMed Central

    Ker, Katharine; Tansley, Gavin; Beecher, Deirdre; Perner, Anders; Shakur, Haleema; Harris, Tim; Roberts, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Background Dehydration is an important cause of death in patients with Ebola virus disease (EVD). Parenteral fluids are often required in patients with fluid requirements in excess of their oral intake. The peripheral intravenous route is the most commonly used method of parenteral access, but inserting and maintaining an intravenous line can be challenging in the context of EVD. Therefore it is important to consider the advantages and disadvantages of different routes for achieving parenteral access (e.g. intravenous, intraosseous, subcutaneous and intraperitoneal). Objectives To compare the reliability, ease of use and speed of insertion of different parenteral access methods. Search methods We ran the search on 17 November 2014. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), Ovid MEDLINE(R) In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE(R) Daily, Ovid MEDLINE(R) and Ovid OLDMEDLINE(R), Embase Classic + Embase (OvidSP), CINAHL (EBSCOhost), clinicaltrials.gov and screened reference lists. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials comparing different parenteral routes for the infusion of fluids or medication. Data collection and analysis Two review authors examined the titles and abstracts of records obtained by searching the electronic databases to determine eligibility. Two review authors extracted data from the included trials and assessed the risk of bias. Outcome measures of interest were success of insertion; time required for insertion; number of insertion attempts; number of dislodgements; time period with functional access; local site reactions; clinicians' perception of ease of administration; needlestick injury to healthcare workers; patients' discomfort; and mortality. For trials involving the administration of fluids we also collected data on the volume of fluid infused, changes in serum electrolytes and markers of renal function. We rated the

  19. First Confirmed Metastatic Adamantinoma of the Spine: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Morales Ciancio, Ruben A.; Gasbarrini, Alessandro; Boriani, Stefano; Gambarotti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report and literature review. Objective To present the first case of metastatic adamantinoma of the spine with immunohistochemical confirmation and an updated literature review. Summary of Background Data Spinal metastatic disease could be difficult to diagnose because of the multiple differential diagnoses involved. Spinal surgeons must be aware of unusual primary extra-axial tumors that metastasize to the spine because in certain cases the primary surgery must determine the prognosis of this lesion. Methods We present a fully documented case of a middle-aged man with tibial adamantinoma who developed spine metastasis, confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A literature review was done. Results Based on clinical, imaging, and pathology findings, we provide evidence for the first proven metastatic adamantinoma of the spine, adding this condition to the long list of differential diagnoses of secondary spinal disease. Conclusions Adamantinoma is a very rare bone tumor representing ∼1% of primary bone tumors. Spinal metastatic adamantinoma with immunohistochemical confirmation has not been described previously. Due to the lack of specific image findings or serum markers and multiple differential diagnoses, biopsy with immunohistochemical confirmation is mandatory, because “en block resection” might prove to be curative treatment. PMID:26225294

  20. Evaluation and management of 2 ferocactus spines in the orbit.

    PubMed

    Russell, David J; Kim, Tim I; Kubis, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman, who had fallen face first in a cactus 1 week earlier, presented with a small, mobile, noninflamed subcutaneous nodule at the rim of her right lateral orbit with no other functional deficits. A CT scan was obtained, which revealed a 4-cm intraorbital tubular-shaped foreign body resembling a large cactus spine. A second preoperative CT scan, obtained for an intraoperative guidance system, demonstrated a second cactus spine, which was initially not seen on the first CT scan. Both spines were removed surgically without complication. The authors discuss factors that can cause diagnosis delay, review the radiographic features of cactus spines, and discuss the often times benign clinical course of retained cactus spine foreign bodies. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report of cactus spines in the orbit. Health-care professionals should have a low threshold for imaging in cases of traumatic injuries involving cactus spines.

  1. Random positions of dendritic spines in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Morales, Juan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Dar, Mor; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-07-23

    Dendritic spines establish most excitatory synapses in the brain and are located in Purkinje cell's dendrites along helical paths, perhaps maximizing the probability to contact different axons. To test whether spine helixes also occur in neocortex, we reconstructed >500 dendritic segments from adult human cortex obtained from autopsies. With Fourier analysis and spatial statistics, we analyzed spine position along apical and basal dendrites of layer 3 pyramidal neurons from frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortex. Although we occasionally detected helical positioning, for the great majority of dendrites we could not reject the null hypothesis of spatial randomness in spine locations, either in apical or basal dendrites, in neurons of different cortical areas or among spines of different volumes and lengths. We conclude that in adult human neocortex spine positions are mostly random. We discuss the relevance of these results for spine formation and plasticity and their functional impact for cortical circuits.

  2. Random Positions of Dendritic Spines in Human Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Juan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Dar, Mor; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines establish most excitatory synapses in the brain and are located in Purkinje cell's dendrites along helical paths, perhaps maximizing the probability to contact different axons. To test whether spine helixes also occur in neocortex, we reconstructed >500 dendritic segments from adult human cortex obtained from autopsies. With Fourier analysis and spatial statistics, we analyzed spine position along apical and basal dendrites of layer 3 pyramidal neurons from frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortex. Although we occasionally detected helical positioning, for the great majority of dendrites we could not reject the null hypothesis of spatial randomness in spine locations, either in apical or basal dendrites, in neurons of different cortical areas or among spines of different volumes and lengths. We conclude that in adult human neocortex spine positions are mostly random. We discuss the relevance of these results for spine formation and plasticity and their functional impact for cortical circuits. PMID:25057209

  3. Random positions of dendritic spines in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Morales, Juan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Dar, Mor; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-07-23

    Dendritic spines establish most excitatory synapses in the brain and are located in Purkinje cell's dendrites along helical paths, perhaps maximizing the probability to contact different axons. To test whether spine helixes also occur in neocortex, we reconstructed >500 dendritic segments from adult human cortex obtained from autopsies. With Fourier analysis and spatial statistics, we analyzed spine position along apical and basal dendrites of layer 3 pyramidal neurons from frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortex. Although we occasionally detected helical positioning, for the great majority of dendrites we could not reject the null hypothesis of spatial randomness in spine locations, either in apical or basal dendrites, in neurons of different cortical areas or among spines of different volumes and lengths. We conclude that in adult human neocortex spine positions are mostly random. We discuss the relevance of these results for spine formation and plasticity and their functional impact for cortical circuits. PMID:25057209

  4. [Shift of focus in the financing of Hungarian drugs. Reimbursement for orphan drugs for treating rare diseases: financing of enzyme replacement therapy in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Szegedi, Márta; Molnár, Mária Judit; Boncz, Imre; Kosztolányi, György

    2014-11-01

    Focusing on the benefits of patients with rare disease the authors analysed the aspects of orphan medicines financed in the frame of the Hungarian social insurance system in 2012 in order to make the consumption more rational, transparent and predictable. Most of the orphan drugs were financed in the frame of compassionate use by the reimbursement system. Consequently, a great deal of crucial problems occurred in relation to the unconventional subsidized method, especially in the case of the highest cost enzyme replacement therapies. On the base of the findings, proposals of the authors are presented for access to orphan drugs, fitting to the specific professional, economical and ethical aspects of this unique field of the health care system. The primary goal is to provide a suitable subsidized method for the treatment of rare disease patients with unmet medical needs. The financial modification of orphans became indispensible in Hungary. Professionals from numerous fields dealing with rare disease patients' care expressed agreement on the issue. Transforming the orphan medicines' financial structure has been initiated according to internationally shared principles. PMID:25344850

  5. Gout in the Spine: Imaging, Diagnosis, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Toprover, Michael; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Pillinger, Michael H

    2015-12-01

    Gout is characterized by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals and by acute and chronic inflammation in response to crystals so deposited. Multiple case reports and series describe the deposition of monosodium urate in the spine as a rare manifestation of gout, but the actual prevalence of spinal involvement is unknown and likely to be higher than generally anticipated. Here we review the characteristics of 131 previously reported cases of spinal involvement in gout. We focus in particular on the use of imaging modalities and the extent to which they correlate with presenting symptoms and tissue diagnoses. The recent innovation of using dual-energy computerized tomography to identify urate crystal deposition holds promise for reducing the need for surgical intervention and for establishing a true prevalence rate for spinal gout.

  6. Primary bone tumors of the spine.

    PubMed

    Cañete, A Navas; Bloem, H L; Kroon, H M

    2016-04-01

    Primary bone tumors of the spine are less common than metastases or multiple myeloma. Based on the patient's age and the radiologic pattern and topography of the tumor, a very approximate differential diagnosis can be established for an osseous vertebral lesion. This article shows the radiologic manifestations of the principal primary bone tumors of the spine from a practical point of view, based on our personal experience and a review of the literature. If bone metastases, multiple myeloma, lymphomas, hemangiomas, and enostoses are excluded, only eight types of tumors account for 80% of all vertebral tumors. These are chordomas, osteoblastomas, chondrosarcomas, giant-cell tumors, osteoid osteomas, Ewing's sarcomas, osteosarcomas, and aneurysmal bone cysts. PMID:26917429

  7. Primary bone tumors of the spine.

    PubMed

    Cañete, A Navas; Bloem, H L; Kroon, H M

    2016-04-01

    Primary bone tumors of the spine are less common than metastases or multiple myeloma. Based on the patient's age and the radiologic pattern and topography of the tumor, a very approximate differential diagnosis can be established for an osseous vertebral lesion. This article shows the radiologic manifestations of the principal primary bone tumors of the spine from a practical point of view, based on our personal experience and a review of the literature. If bone metastases, multiple myeloma, lymphomas, hemangiomas, and enostoses are excluded, only eight types of tumors account for 80% of all vertebral tumors. These are chordomas, osteoblastomas, chondrosarcomas, giant-cell tumors, osteoid osteomas, Ewing's sarcomas, osteosarcomas, and aneurysmal bone cysts.

  8. Surgical Management of Spinal Conditions in the Elderly Osteoporotic Spine.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Christina L; Brodke, Darrel S; Choma, Theodore J

    2015-10-01

    Osteoporosis, the most common form of metabolic bone disease, leads to alterations in bone structure and density that have been shown to compromise the strength of spinal instrumentation. In addition, osteoporosis may contribute to high rates of fracture and instrumentation failure after long posterior spinal fusions, resulting in proximal junctional kyphosis and recurrent spinal deformity. As increasing numbers of elderly patients present for surgical intervention for degenerative and traumatic spinal pathologies, current and future generations of spine surgeons will increasingly be faced with the challenge of obtaining adequate fixation in osteoporotic bone. The purpose of this review is to familiarize the reader with the impact of osteoporosis on spinal instrumentation, the broad variety of techniques that have been developed for addressing these issues, and the biomechanical and clinical evidence in support of the use of these techniques. PMID:26378363

  9. Fractures of the articular processes of the cervical spine

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, J.H.; Goldstein, S.J.

    1982-08-01

    Fractures of the articular processes occurred in 16 (20.8%) of 77 patients with cervical spine fractures as demonstrated by multidirectional tomography. Plain films demonstrated the fractures in only two patients. Acute cervical radiculopathy occurred in five of the patients with articular process fractures (superior process, two cases; inferior process, three cases). Persistent neck pain occurred in one other patient without radiculopathy. Three patients suffered spinal cord damage at the time of injury, which was not the result of the articular process fracture itself. In the other seven cases, no definite sequelae occurred. However, disruption of the facet joint may predispose to early degenerative joint disease and chronic pain; unilateral or bilateral facet dislocation was present in five patients. In patients with cervical trauma who develop cervical radiculopathy, tomography should be performed to evaluate the articular processes.

  10. Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma of the spine. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Aquilina, Kristian; Lim, Christopher; Kamel, Mahmoud Hamdy; Marks, Charles J; O'Sullivan, Michael G; Keohane, Catherine

    2005-11-01

    Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EH) is a rare tumor of vascular origin. The authors describe two cases of spinal EH, one involving the T-10 vertebra and the second involving the upper cervical spine. In the first case the patient underwent resection of the tumor; this case represents the longest reported follow-up period for spinal EH. In the second case, extensive involvement of C-2, C-3, and C-4 as well as encasement of both vertebral arteries precluded safe tumor resection, and posterior occipitocervical stabilization was performed. The patient subsequently died of metastatic disease. The findings in these two cases underscore the difficulty in predicting the clinical behavior of spinal EH based solely on histological and clinical features as well as the uncertainty of the roles of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy in the oncological management of a spinal tumor for which clinical data are very limited.

  11. Choroid Melanoma Metastasis to Spine: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mandaliya, Hiren; Singh, Nandini; George, Sanila; George, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic choroid melanoma is a highly malignant disease with a limited life expectancy. The liver is the most common site for metastasis of uveal melanoma followed by lung, bone, skin, and subcutaneous tissue. Metastasis from choroidal melanoma usually occurs within the first five years of treatment for primary tumours. Metastatic choroid melanoma to the spine/vertebrae is extremely rare. We report the first case of spinal metastasis from choroid melanoma in a 61-year-old man who had been treated for primary ocular melanoma three years earlier with radioactive plaque brachytherapy. Synchronously, at the time of metastasis, he was also diagnosed as having a new primary lung adenocarcinoma as well. The only other case reported on vertebral metastasis from malignant melanoma of choroid in literature in which primary choroid melanoma was enucleated. PMID:26989537

  12. [Psoas abscess and lumbar spine osteomyelitis: case report].

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana M; Schmalbach, Lauwence A

    2016-10-01

    Psoas abscess is a common disease in children. It can have a nonspecific clinical presentation, insidious onset and sometimes fever. The most common type in children is the primary one; however, it can sometimes be of secondary origin and associated with severe infections such as osteomyelitis so a high index of suspicion is required to detect and treat it promptly. We present an unusual case of psoas abscess with infiltration of the vertebral body of L2 in a 14 year old male patient previously healthy with no history of trauma or fever on admission. X-ray and ultrasound were performed but the diagnosis was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. With positive blood cultures for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus he completed 2 weeks of intravenous antibiotic therapy and 4 weeks of oral antibiotic therapy with blood cultures negativization and resolution of symptoms.

  13. [Psoas abscess and lumbar spine osteomyelitis: case report].

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana M; Schmalbach, Lauwence A

    2016-10-01

    Psoas abscess is a common disease in children. It can have a nonspecific clinical presentation, insidious onset and sometimes fever. The most common type in children is the primary one; however, it can sometimes be of secondary origin and associated with severe infections such as osteomyelitis so a high index of suspicion is required to detect and treat it promptly. We present an unusual case of psoas abscess with infiltration of the vertebral body of L2 in a 14 year old male patient previously healthy with no history of trauma or fever on admission. X-ray and ultrasound were performed but the diagnosis was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. With positive blood cultures for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus he completed 2 weeks of intravenous antibiotic therapy and 4 weeks of oral antibiotic therapy with blood cultures negativization and resolution of symptoms. PMID:27606657

  14. [Modeling the spine and spinal cord].

    PubMed

    Dubousset, Jean; Lavaste, Françoise; Skalli, Wafa; Lafage, Virginie

    2011-11-01

    3D reconstruction of the spine may cover morphological, mechanical and functional aspects, among others. Since the computer era, rapid progress has been made in the development of practical applications, as well in the analysis of spinal pathophysiology during growth and aging. This technology is particularly usefulfor the planning, simulation and execution of corrective surgery, invention of new procedures, and therapeutic follow-up. PMID:22844745

  15. Guidelines to decortication in posterolateral spine fusion.

    PubMed

    Slappey, G; Toribatake, Y; Ganey, T M; Ogden, J A; Hutton, W C

    1998-04-01

    Despite the development of innovative approaches and the general success that has been achieved with spinal fusion, the rate of nonunion in some studies has been reported as high as 35%. Decortication has been shown to promote the fusion process and provides not only a rich source of vascular supply from the underlying cancellous bone, but also access to pluripotent stem cells within the marrow. Although the blood supply to the lumbar spine has been described, little attention has been paid to relevant areas of the spine most affected by decortication during the posterolateral fusion process. To assess these areas of the spine and attribute some potential importance to spinal fusion outcome, a perfusion study was designed to delineate the vascular anatomy involved in a decortication procedure. Cadaver spines were perfused with a radiopaque contrast material, fixed, decalcified, and cleared en bloc by the method of Spalteholz. Transverse, sagittal, and coronal slabs were made and the vascular supply was documented. The dominant intraosseous architecture of the vertebra reflected a cancellous bone structure, characterized by marrow and a sinusoidal blood distribution within a trabecular matrix. A contrasting architecture could be differentiated in the pars interarticularis that was more consistent with dense, cortical bone. Matrix from this region typified haversian lamellar bone and exhibited parallel osteons that contained a central vascular component. The relevance of this variance could have multiple implications, given the differences between cortical and cancellous bone in function, formation, healing, and remodeling. In posterolateral intertransverse process arthrodesis, the transverse processes and lateral facets are good areas to be decorticated, whereas the pars interarticularis is less attractive. PMID:9588465

  16. Tuberculosis of spine: An experience of 30 cases over two years

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Amey P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Tuberculosis of spine is still a very common condition in India. Here, the results of 30 cases of tuberculosis of spine treated in SSG Hospital, Vadodara, Gujarat, in the last two years, are reviewed. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients with tuberculosis of spine were treated in SSG Hospital in the last two years. They were classified into three groups, based on the GATA, GATA = Gulhane Askeri Tip Akademisi (Gulhane Military Medical Academy) classification for spinal tuberculosis, with few modifications. Their neurologic status was evaluated by the Frankel's grading. All the patients were started on four drug anti-tuberculosis medication given every alternate day as per the DOTS and RNTCP program of the Government of India for 6 months. Patients in group 1 were treated by bed rest, analgesics, and antituberculous drugs after confirmation of the diagnosis by CT-guided biopsy. Patients in group 2 were treated by surgical of USG-guided aspiration of abscesses followed by full course of antituberculous drugs. Twenty-one patients in group 3 underwent surgery. A single-stage anterior decompression and anterior fixation was done in all the cases. Results: All the nine patients in group I and 2 responded well to medical management and were cured of the disease. Out of the 21 operated patients, 19 had significant improvement in neurological status and return to their normal activities. The first operated patient died. The neurological status of one patient did not improve till 1 month after surgery and was lost to follow-up. Thus, 100% of group 1 and 2 patients were cured of the disease and 90% of group 3 patients had good neurological recovery. Conclusions: If treated timely and adequately, the outcome for tuberculosis of spine is relatively good. Anterolateral approach to the spine with decompression and fixation gives good result with respect to neurological function. PMID:27366249

  17. MR and CT image fusion of the cervical spine: a noninvasive alternative to CT-myelography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Mirza, Sohail K.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Haynor, David R.

    2005-04-01

    CT-Myelography (CTM) is routinely used for planning surgery for degenerative disease of the spine, but its invasive nature, significant potential morbidity, and high costs make a noninvasive substitute desirable. We report our work on evaluating CT and MR image fusion as an alternative to CTM. Because the spine is only piecewise rigid, a multi-rigid approach to the registration of spinal CT and MR images was developed (SPIE 2004), in which the spine on CT images is first segmented into separate vertebrae, each of which is then rigidly registered with the corresponding vertebra on MR images. The results are then blended to obtain fusion images. Since they contain information from both modalities, we hypothesized that fusion images would be equivalent to CTM. To test this we selected 34 patients who had undergone MRI and CTM for degenerative disease of the cervical spine, and used the multi-rigid approach to produce fused images. A clinical vignette for each patient was created and presented along with either CT/MR fusion images or CTM images. A group of spine surgeons are asked to formulate detailed surgical plans based on each set of images, and the surgical plans are compared. A similar study assessing diagnostic agreement is being performed with neuroradiologists, who also assess the accuracy of registration. Our work to date has demonstrated the feasibility of segmentation and multi-rigid fusion in clinical cases and the acceptability of the questionnaire to physicians. Preliminary analysis of one surgeon's and one neuroradiologist"s evaluation has been performed.

  18. mGluR5 Positive and Negative Allosteric Modulators Differentially Affect Dendritic Spine Density and Morphology in the Prefrontal Cortex.

    PubMed

    LaCrosse, Amber L; Taylor, Sara B; Nemirovsky, Natali E; Gass, Justin T; Olive, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Positive and negative allosteric modulators (PAMs and NAMs, respectively) of type 5 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR5) are currently being investigated as novel treatments for neuropsychiatric diseases including drug addiction, schizophrenia, and Fragile X syndrome. However, only a handful of studies have examined the effects of mGluR5 PAMs or NAMs on the structural plasticity of dendritic spines in otherwise naïve animals, particularly in brain regions mediating executive function. In the present study, we assessed dendritic spine density and morphology in pyramidal cells of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) after repeated administration of either the prototypical mGluR5 PAM 3-cyano-N-(1,3-diphenyl-1H-pyrazol-5- yl)benzamide (CDPPB, 20 mg/kg), the clinically utilized mGluR5 NAM 1-(3-chlorophenyl)-3-(3-methyl-5-oxo-4Himidazol- 2-yl)urea (fenobam, 20 mg/kg), or vehicle in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Following once daily treatment for 10 consecutive days, coronal brain sections containing the mPFC underwent diolistic labeling and 3D image analysis of dendritic spines. Compared to vehicle treated animals, rats administered fenobam exhibited significant increases in dendritic spine density and the overall frequency of spines with small (<0.2 μm) head diameters, decreases in frequency of spines with medium (0.2-0.4 μm) head diameters, and had no changes in frequency of spines with large head diameters (>0.4 μm). Administration of CDPPB had no discernable effects on dendritic spine density or morphology, and neither CDPPB nor fenobam had any effect on spine length or volume. We conclude that mGluR5 PAMs and NAMs differentially affect mPFC dendritic spine structural plasticity in otherwise naïve animals, and additional studies assessing their effects in combination with cognitive or behavioral tasks are needed.

  19. Paradoxical signaling regulates structural plasticity in dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Rangamani, Padmini; Levy, Michael G; Khan, Shahid; Oster, George

    2016-09-01

    Transient spine enlargement (3- to 5-min timescale) is an important event associated with the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Many of the molecular mechanisms associated with transient spine enlargement have been identified experimentally. Here, we use a systems biology approach to construct a mathematical model of biochemical signaling and actin-mediated transient spine expansion in response to calcium influx caused by NMDA receptor activation. We have identified that a key feature of this signaling network is the paradoxical signaling loop. Paradoxical components act bifunctionally in signaling networks, and their role is to control both the activation and the inhibition of a desired response function (protein activity or spine volume). Using ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based modeling, we show that the dynamics of different regulators of transient spine expansion, including calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), RhoA, and Cdc42, and the spine volume can be described using paradoxical signaling loops. Our model is able to capture the experimentally observed dynamics of transient spine volume. Furthermore, we show that actin remodeling events provide a robustness to spine volume dynamics. We also generate experimentally testable predictions about the role of different components and parameters of the network on spine dynamics. PMID:27551076

  20. Hippocampal Dendritic Spines Are Segregated Depending on Their Actin Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Calvo, María; Benoist, Marion; Esteban, José Antonio; Morales, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are mushroom-shaped protrusions of the postsynaptic membrane. Spines receive the majority of glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Their morphology, dynamics, and density have been related to synaptic plasticity and learning. The main determinant of spine shape is filamentous actin. Using FRAP, we have reexamined the actin dynamics of individual spines from pyramidal hippocampal neurons, both in cultures and in hippocampal organotypic slices. Our results indicate that, in cultures, the actin mobile fraction is independently regulated at the individual spine level, and mobile fraction values do not correlate with either age or distance from the soma. The most significant factor regulating actin mobile fraction was the presence of astrocytes in the culture substrate. Spines from neurons growing in the virtual absence of astrocytes have a more stable actin cytoskeleton, while spines from neurons growing in close contact with astrocytes show a more dynamic cytoskeleton. According to their recovery time, spines were distributed into two populations with slower and faster recovery times, while spines from slice cultures were grouped into one population. Finally, employing fast lineal acquisition protocols, we confirmed the existence of loci with high polymerization rates within the spine. PMID:26881098