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  1. Charcot Spine and Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Loriaut, Philippe; Rozenberg, Sylvie; Boyer, Patrick; Dallaudière, Benjamin; Khiami, Frederic; Sariali, Elhadi; Pascal-Moussellard, Hugues

    2014-01-01

    Charcot spine is rare condition whose association with Parkinson's disease (PD) has not been reported yet. The authors reported the cases of two patients with PD who developed Charcot spine. Both patients presented with a history of back pain and bilateral radicular leg pain. They had complete clinical and radiological assessment. Lumbar spine was involved in both patients. Clinical features and response to treatment were described. In the first case, circumferential fusion and stabilization were performed on the dislocated vertebral levels. A solid and stable fusion of the spine was obtained with satisfactory clinical outcome. Surgical treatment has been recommended to the other patient. In both cases, no other neurological etiology was found to account for Charcot spine. In conclusion, Charcot spine is associated with several neurological affections but has not previously been reported in association with Parkinson's disease. PMID:25165591

  2. Diagnostic pitfalls in spine surgery: masqueraders of surgical spine disease.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Coumans, Jean-Valery C E; Kahle, Kristopher T

    2011-10-01

    Disorders of the spine are common in clinical medicine, and spine surgery is being performed with increasing frequency in the US. Although many patients with an established diagnosis of a true surgically treatable lesion are referred to a neurosurgeon, the evaluation of patients with spinal disorders can be complex and fraught with diagnostic pitfalls. While "common conditions are common," astute clinical acumen and vigilance are necessary to identify lesions that masquerade as surgically treatable spine disease that can lead to erroneous diagnosis and treatment. In this review, the authors discuss musculoskeletal, peripheral nerve, metabolic, infectious, inflammatory, and vascular conditions that mimic the syndromes produced by surgical lesions. It is possible that nonsurgical and surgical conditions coexist at times, complicating treatment plans and natural histories. Awareness of these diagnoses can help reduce diagnostic error, thereby avoiding the morbidity and expense associated with an unnecessary operation.

  3. Baastrup's disease in the pediatric spine

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Suryapratap

    2016-01-01

    Baastrup's disease is an uncommon entity in the elderly spine and it is very rare in the pediatric age group. There are only few case reports in the literature containing Baastrup's disease in pediatric spine. Baastrup's disease is also known as kissing spine because the posterior spinous processes touch or “kiss” one another, characterized by enlarged posterior spinous projections with normal neuroforamina and normal spinal disk height. There are various pathological and etiological hypotheses behind Baastrup's disease. Backache is one of the most common causes of morbidity in these patients and but sometimes patient can be asymptomatic with or without swelling on the back. Here, we present a case of 10-year-old female child with silent swelling on low back region diagnose as Baastrup's disease. PMID:27695557

  4. Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery for Degenerative Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    SUGAWARA, Taku

    Anterior cervical spine surgery is an established surgical intervention for cervical degenerative disease and high success rate with excellent long-term outcomes have been reported. However, indications of surgical procedures for certain conditions are still controversial and severe complications to cause neurological dysfunction or deaths may occur. This review is focused mainly on five widely performed procedures by anterior approach for cervical degenerative disease; anterior cervical discectomy, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, anterior cervical foraminotomy, and arthroplasty. Indications, procedures, outcomes, and complications of these surgeries are discussed. PMID:26119899

  5. Rheumatic diseases of the spine: imaging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Narváez, J A; Hernández-Gañán, J; Isern, J; Sánchez-Fernández, J J

    2016-04-01

    Spinal involvement is common both in the spondyloarthritides and in rheumatoid arthritis, in which the cervical segment is selectively affected. Rheumatoid involvement of the cervical spine has characteristic radiologic manifestations, fundamentally different patterns of atlantoaxial instability. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for evaluating the possible repercussions of atlantoaxial instability on the spinal cord and/or nerve roots in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as for evaluating parameters indicative of active inflammation, such as bone edema and synovitis. Axial involvement is characteristic in the spondyloarthritides and has distinctive manifestations on plain-film X-rays, which reflect destructive and reparative phenomena. The use of MRI has changed the conception of spondyloarthritis because it is able to directly detect the inflammatory changes that form part of the disease, making it possible to establish the diagnosis early in the disease process, when plain-film X-ray findings are normal (non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis), to assess the prognosis of the disease, and to contribute to treatment planning.

  6. Epac2-mediated dendritic spine remodeling: implications for disease

    PubMed Central

    Woolfrey, Kevin M.; Srivastava, Deepak P.

    2010-01-01

    of dendritic spines under normal conditions, the mechanisms that underlie these effects, and the implications these disease-associated variants have on our understanding of the pathophysiology of ASD. PMID:21115118

  7. Accountable disease management of spine pain.

    PubMed

    Smith, Matthew J

    2011-09-01

    The health care landscape has changed with new legislation addressing the unsustainable rise in costs in the US system. Low-value service lines caring for expensive chronic conditions have been targeted for reform; for better or worse, the treatment of spine pain has been recognized as a representative example. Examining the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act and existing pilot studies can offer a preview of how chronic care of spine pain will be sustained. Accountable care in an organization capable of collecting, analyzing, and reporting clinical data and operational compliance is forthcoming. Interdisciplinary spine pain centers integrating surgical and medical management, behavioral medicine, physical reconditioning, and societal reintegration represent the model of high-value care for patients with chronic spine pain.

  8. Rosai-Dorfman Disease Isolated to the Thoracic Epidural Spine

    PubMed Central

    Kozak, Benjamin; Talbott, Jason; Uzelac, Alina; Rehani, Bhavya

    2015-01-01

    Rosai-Dorfman disease is a rare benign histiocytic disease that infrequently presents in the spine. We report a case of Rosai-Dorfman disease isolated to the epidural thoracic spine in a 26-year-old male. To our knowledge, this is the 15th reported case of isolated spinal disease and only the fourth case of isolated thoracic epidural disease. Given its rarity as well as non-specific symptoms and imaging findings, Rosai-Dorfman disease is often not considered and misdiagnosed on imaging studies. To help improve awareness of Rosai-Dorfman spinal disease, we review the literature and discuss the epidemiology, clinical presentation, imaging features, and treatment considerations for this condition. PMID:27252790

  9. Automated 4D analysis of dendritic spine morphology: applications to stimulus-induced spine remodeling and pharmacological rescue in a disease model.

    PubMed

    Swanger, Sharon A; Yao, Xiaodi; Gross, Christina; Bassell, Gary J

    2011-10-07

    Uncovering the mechanisms that regulate dendritic spine morphology has been limited, in part, by the lack of efficient and unbiased methods for analyzing spines. Here, we describe an automated 3D spine morphometry method and its application to spine remodeling in live neurons and spine abnormalities in a disease model. We anticipate that this approach will advance studies of synapse structure and function in brain development, plasticity, and disease.

  10. The 100 most cited articles in metastatic spine disease.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathan; Alan, Nima; Zhou, James; Kojo Hamilton, D

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Despite the growing neurosurgical literature, a subset of pioneering studies have significantly impacted the field of metastatic spine disease. The purpose of this study was to identify and analyze the 100 most frequently cited articles in the field. METHODS A keyword search using the Thomson Reuters Web of Science was conducted to identify articles relevant to the field of metastatic spine disease. The results were filtered based on title and abstract analysis to identify the 100 most cited articles. Statistical analysis was used to characterize journal frequency, past and current citations, citation distribution over time, and author frequency. RESULTS The total number of citations for the final 100 articles ranged from 74 to 1169. Articles selected for the final list were published between 1940 and 2009. The years in which the greatest numbers of top-100 studies were published were 1990 and 2005, and the greatest number of citations occurred in 2012. The majority of articles were published in the journals Spine (15), Cancer (11), and the Journal of Neurosurgery (9). Forty-four individuals were listed as authors on 2 articles, 9 were listed as authors on 3 articles, and 2 were listed as authors on 4 articles in the top 100 list. The most cited article was the work by Batson (1169 citations) that was published in 1940 and described the role of the vertebral veins in the spread of metastases. The second most cited article was Patchell's 2005 study (594 citations) discussing decompressive resection of spinal cord metastases. The third most cited article was the 1978 study by Gilbert that evaluated treatment of epidural spinal cord compression due to metastatic tumor (560 citations). CONCLUSIONS The field of metastatic spine disease has witnessed numerous milestones and so it is increasingly important to recognize studies that have influenced the field. In this bibliographic study the authors identified and analyzed the most influential articles in the

  11. Evidence-based medicine in metastatic spine disease.

    PubMed

    Dea, Nicolas; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-06-01

    Treatment modalities for metastatic spine disease have significantly expanded over the last two decades. This expansion occurred in many different fields. Improvement in surgical techniques and instrumentation now allow the oncologic spine surgeons to effectively circumferentially decompress the neural elements without compromising stability. Percutaneous techniques, both vertebral augmentation and pre-operative endovascular embolization procedures, also greatly benefit patients suffering from spinal column metastasis. Imaging technology advances has contributed to better pre-operative planning and the development of highly conformational radiation techniques, thus permitting the delivery of high-dose radiation to tumors, while avoiding radiotoxicity to the spinal cord and other vital structures. These new developments, combined with evidence-based stability and disease-specific quality of life scores now allow not only better treatment, but also a solid foundation for high-quality research. Spine oncology literature currently suffers from a lack of high-quality evidence due to low prevalence of the disease and complex methodological issues. However, when following evidence-based medicine principles, which incorporate best available evidence, clinical expertise and patient preference, sound, evidence-based recommendations can be made regarding the abovementioned treatment modalities.

  12. Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Kovacs, F M; Arana, E

    2016-04-01

    In the last 25 years, scientific research has brought about drastic changes in the concept of low back pain and its management. Most imaging findings, including degenerative changes, reflect anatomic peculiarities or the normal aging process and turn out to be clinically irrelevant; imaging tests have proven useful only when systemic disease is suspected or when surgery is indicated for persistent spinal cord or nerve root compression. The radiologic report should indicate the key points of nerve compression, bypassing inconsequential findings. Many treatments have proven inefficacious, and some have proven counterproductive, but they continue to be prescribed because patients want them and there are financial incentives for doing them. Following the guidelines that have proven effective for clinical management improves clinical outcomes, reduces iatrogenic complications, and decreases unjustified and wasteful healthcare expenditures.

  13. Infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases affecting the athlete's spine.

    PubMed

    Metz, Lionel N; Wustrack, Rosanna; Lovell, Alberto F; Sawyer, Aenor J

    2012-07-01

    Sports and weight-bearing activities can have a positive effect on bone health in the growing, mature, or aging athlete. However, certain athletic activities and training regimens may place the athlete at increased risk for stress fractures in the spine. In addition, some athletes have an underlying susceptibility to fracture due to either systemic or focal abnormalities. It is important to identify and treat these athletes in order to prevent stress fractures and reduce the risk of osteoporosis in late adulthood. Therefore, the pre-participation physical examination offers a unique opportunity to screen athletes for metabolic bone disease through the history and physical examination. Positive findings warrant a thorough workup including a metabolic bone laboratory panel, and possibly a DEXA scan, which includes a lateral spine view.

  14. Hospital for joint diseases participates in international spine registry Spine Tango after successful pilot study.

    PubMed

    Röder, Christoph; Errico, Thomas J; Spivak, Jeffrey M; Murray, M; Protopsaltis, T; Lis, A; Nordin, Margareta; Bendo, John

    2012-01-01

    Spine Tango is currently the only international spine registry in existence. It was developed under the auspices of Eurospine, the Spine Society of Europe, and is hosted at the University of Bern, Switzerland. The HJD Spine Center successfully tested Spine Tango during a 3-month pilot study and has since expanded documentation activities to more surgeons. Workflow integration and dedicated research staff are key factors for such an endeavor. Participation enables benchmarking against national and international peers and outcome research and quality assurance of surgical and non-surgical treatments.

  15. Degenerative disease in lumbar spine of military parachuting instructors.

    PubMed

    Bar-Dayan, Y; Weisbort, M; Bar-Dayan, Y; Velan, G J; Ravid, M; Hendel, D; Shemer, J

    2003-12-01

    Parachuting, be it static line or skydiving, places enormous stresses on the human spine. It is, therefore, important to determine the prevalence and severity of degenerative changes in the lumbar spine of subjects who practice this sport activity. Seventy four parachuting instructors, mean age 33 years and with an average of 410 static line and skydiving jumps, were included in the study. Past radiographs were examined and compared to current anterolateral and lateral views of the lumbar spine, in order to determine the prevalence of degenerative changes and document possible progression. Doubtful radiographic changes in the lumbar spine were identified in 47.4 percent of the parachuting instructors, mild degeneration in 9.6 percent, moderate degenerative disease in 10.9 percent and severe radiographic changes in 5.5 percent. Schmorll nodes were found in 8.1 percent of the subjects. Traction spurs--osteophytes were identified in 6.8 percent. The degenerative changes correlated with age and the number of jumps. Spondylolysis of L5-S1 and L3-L4 segments were observed in 12.2 and 1.4 percent respectively. Progressive spondylolisthesis was found in 2 subjects. No correlation was found between the severity of radiographic changes and either the prevalence and the severity of low back pain. The present findings provide a rational for considering repeated sheer stress as an etiology of degenerative changes in the spinal cord, and as a possible contributing factor to the pathogenesis of spondylolysis. Further study has to be done comparing parachuting instructors to a non-parachuting group, or equivalent physically active individuals, in order to assess the effect of sport-background on the development of degenerative changes.

  16. Adjacent Segment Disease in the Cervical and Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Tobert, Daniel G; Antoci, Valentin; Patel, Shaun P; Saadat, Ehsan; Bono, Christopher M

    2017-04-01

    Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is disappointing long-term outcome for both the patient and clinician. In contrast to adjacent segment degeneration, which is a common radiographic finding, ASD is less common. The incidence of ASD in both the cervical and lumbar spine is between 2% and 4% per year, and ASD is a significant contributor to reoperation rates after spinal arthrodesis. The etiology of ASD is multifactorial, stemming from existing spondylosis at adjacent levels, predisposed risk to degenerative changes, and altered biomechanical forces near a previous fusion site. Numerous studies have sought to identify both patient and surgical risk factors for ASD, but a consistent, sole predictor has yet to be found. Spinal arthroplasty techniques seek to preserve physiological biomechanics, thereby minimizing the risk of ASD, and long-term clinical outcome studies will help quantify its efficacy. Treatment strategies for ASD are initially nonoperative, provided a progressive neurological deficit is not present. The spine surgeon is afforded many surgical strategies once operative treatment is elected. The goal of this manuscript is to consider the etiologies of ASD, review its manifestations, and offer an approach to treatment.

  17. Automated Remote Focusing, Drift Correction, and Photostimulation to Evaluate Structural Plasticity in Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Paul R.; Garrett, Tavita R.; Yan, Long; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2017-01-01

    Long-term structural plasticity of dendritic spines plays a key role in synaptic plasticity, the cellular basis for learning and memory. The biochemical step is mediated by a complex network of signaling proteins in spines. Two-photon imaging techniques combined with two-photon glutamate uncaging allows researchers to induce and quantify structural plasticity in single dendritic spines. However, this method is laborious and slow, making it unsuitable for high throughput screening of factors necessary for structural plasticity. Here we introduce a MATLAB-based module built for Scanimage to automatically track, image, and stimulate multiple dendritic spines. We implemented an electrically tunable lens in combination with a drift correction algorithm to rapidly and continuously track targeted spines and correct sample movements. With a straightforward user interface to design custom multi-position experiments, we were able to adequately image and produce targeted plasticity in multiple dendritic spines using glutamate uncaging. Our methods are inexpensive, open source, and provides up to a five-fold increase in throughput for quantifying structural plasticity of dendritic spines. PMID:28114380

  18. Restoration of Thoracolumbar Spine Stability and Alignment in Elderly Patients Using Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery (MISS). A Safe and Feasible Option in Degenerative and Traumatic Spine Diseases.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, Giuseppe M V; Raudino, Giuseppe; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Alobaid, A Abdulrazzaq; Al-Mutair, A Abdulaziz; Naveen, Thomas; Certo, Francesco

    2017-01-01

    Minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS), including percutaneous pedicle-screw fixation (PPSF), mini-open transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (m-open TLIF), vertebroplasty, and stentoplasty, allows the preservation of neurological function and the restoration of spine stability, while reducing associated risks and complications. This study aimed to analyze the safety and efficacy of MISS in elderly patients suffering from degenerative or traumatic thoracolumbar diseases. Forty-five patients (28 females), with a mean age of 73 years (range 65-89), suffering from osteoporotic vertebral fractures (24), degenerative spondylolisthesis (15), and lumbar canal stenosis with instability and/or de novo scoliosis (6) were included.Twenty-one patients underwent PPSF and m-open TLIF. The remaining patients received PPSF without interbody fusion, and in six of these fenestrated screws were used for vertebral body cement augmentation.Functional evaluation was obtained with a visual analog scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) pre- and postoperatively. Preoperative imaging included X-rays, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Patients were followed-up with X-rays, and a CT scan was also obtained at the last follow-up. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 59 months (mean 28 months). Follow-up CT scan documented intersomatic fusion in only 14 % of patients treated with m-open TLIF. Despite the high incidence of non-union, mean VAS and ODI scores showed a significant improvement, with a reduction of mean VAS from 9 to 4 and a reduction of mean ODI from 76.33 to 38.15 %. Only three patients developed postoperative complications. No patients showed neurological deficits.Minimally invasive spine surgery for degenerative and traumatic spinal diseases is a safe and effective treatment also in elderly patients.

  19. Are hemipenial spines related to limb reduction? A spiny discussion focused on gymnophthalmid lizards (Squamata: Gymnophthalmidae).

    PubMed

    Sales Nunes, Pedro M; Curcio, Felipe F; Roscito, Juliana G; Rodrigues, Miguel T

    2014-03-01

    Calcified spines in the hemipenial surface occur convergently in several gymnophthalmid lizard species and in advanced snakes. Based on the pronounced degrees of limb reduction in these distantly related lineages, such hemipenial structures were suggested to play a functional role in couple-anchoring during copulation, partly assuming the function of the limbs during mating. Herein, we assessed the hemipenial morphology of virtually all the valid genera of the family Gymnophthalmidae to test for a phylogenetic correlation between limb reduction and the presence of calcified hemipenial spines. The occurrence of calcified structures was mapped on the two most comprehensive phylogenies of the family. We concluded that spiny hemipenes are by no means necessarily associated with reduction of limbs. Conversely, the presence of well-developed hemipenial spines in specific limb-reduced taxa does not allow one to disregard the possibility that in some instances such structures might indeed be functionally associated with couple-anchoring, improving the success of mating.

  20. National Trends in Outpatient Surgical Treatment of Degenerative Cervical Spine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Evan O.; Egorova, Natalia N.; McAnany, Steven J.; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Hecht, Andrew C.; Cho, Samuel K.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective population-based observational study. Objective To assess the growth of cervical spine surgery performed in an outpatient setting. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using the United States Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's State Inpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Databases for California, New York, Florida, and Maryland from 2005 to 2009. Current Procedural Terminology, fourth revision (CPT-4) and International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify operations for degenerative cervical spine diseases in adults (age > 20 years). Disposition and complication rates were examined. Results There was an increase in cervical spine surgeries performed in an ambulatory setting during the study period. Anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion accounted for 68% of outpatient procedures; posterior decompression made up 21%. Younger patients predominantly underwent anterior fusion procedures, and patients in the eighth and ninth decades of life had more posterior decompressions. Charlson comorbidity index and complication rates were substantially lower for ambulatory cases when compared with inpatients. The majority (>99%) of patients were discharged home following ambulatory surgery. Conclusions Recently, the number of cervical spine surgeries has increased in general, and more of these procedures are being performed in an ambulatory setting. The majority (>99%) of patients are discharged home but the nature of analyzing administrative data limits accurate assessment of postoperative complications and thus patient safety. This increase in outpatient cervical spine surgery necessitates further discussion of its safety. PMID:25083354

  1. Automatic segmentation of the spine by means of a probabilistic atlas with a special focus on ribs suppression. Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Espana, Silvia; Domingo, Juan; Diaz-Parra, Antonio; Dura, Esther; D'Ocon-Alcaniz, Victor; Arana, Estanislao; Moratal, David

    2015-01-01

    Spine is a structure commonly involved in several prevalent diseases. In clinical diagnosis, therapy, and surgical intervention, the identification and segmentation of the vertebral bodies are crucial steps. However, automatic and detailed segmentation of vertebrae is a challenging task, especially due to the proximity of the vertebrae to the corresponding ribs and other structures such as blood vessels. In this study, to overcome these problems, a probabilistic atlas of the spine, including cervical, thoracic and lumbar vertebrae has been built to introduce anatomical knowledge in the segmentation process, aiming to deal with overlapping gray levels and the proximity to other structures. From a set of 3D images manually segmented by a physician (training data), a 3D volume indicating the probability of each voxel of belonging to the spine has been developed, being necessary the generation of a probability map and its deformation to adapt to each patient. To validate the improvement of the segmentation using the atlas developed in the testing data, we computed the Hausdorff distance between the manually-segmented ground truth and an automatic segmentation and also between the ground truth and the automatic segmentation refined with the atlas. The results are promising, obtaining a higher improvement especially in the thoracic region, where the ribs can be found and appropriately eliminated.

  2. No publication bias in industry funded clinical trials of degenerative diseases of the spine.

    PubMed

    Son, Colin; Tavakoli, Samon; Bartanusz, Viktor

    2016-03-01

    Industry sponsorship of clinical research of degenerative diseases of the spine has been associated with excessive positive published results as compared to research carried out without industry funding. We sought the rates of publication of clinical trials of degenerative diseases of the spine based on funding source as a possible explanation for this phenomenon. We reviewed all clinical trials registered at clinicaltrials.gov relating to degenerative diseases of the spine as categorized under six medical subject heading terms (spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, spondylolysis, spondylosis, failed back surgery syndrome, intervertebral disc degeneration) and with statuses of completed or terminated. These collected studies were categorized as having, or not having, industry funding. Published results for these studies were then sought within the clinicaltrials.gov database itself, PubMed and Google Scholar. One hundred sixty-one clinical trials met these criteria. One hundred nineteen of these trials had industry funding and 42 did not. Of those with industry funding, 45 (37.8%) had identifiable results. Of those without industry funding, 17 (40.5%) had identifiable results. There was no difference in the rates of publication of results from clinical trials of degenerative diseases of the spine no matter the funding source.

  3. Lyme disease in Canada: Focus on children.

    PubMed

    Onyett, Heather

    2014-08-01

    Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne infection in Canada and much of the United States, is caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. Peak incidence for Lyme disease is among children five to nine years of age and older adults (55 to 59 years of age). The bacteria are transmitted through the bite of infected black-legged ticks of the Ixodes species. The primary hosts of black-legged ticks are mice and other rodents, small mammals, birds (which are reservoirs for B burgdorferi) and white-tailed deer. Geographical distribution of Ixodes ticks is expanding in Canada and an increasing number of cases of Lyme disease are being reported. The present practice point reviews the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention of Lyme disease, with a focus on children.

  4. Lyme disease in Canada: Focus on children

    PubMed Central

    Onyett, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease, the most common tick-borne infection in Canada and much of the United States, is caused by the bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi. Peak incidence for Lyme disease is among children five to nine years of age and older adults (55 to 59 years of age). The bacteria are transmitted through the bite of infected black-legged ticks of the Ixodes species. The primary hosts of black-legged ticks are mice and other rodents, small mammals, birds (which are reservoirs for B burgdorferi) and white-tailed deer. Geographical distribution of Ixodes ticks is expanding in Canada and an increasing number of cases of Lyme disease are being reported. The present practice point reviews the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, management and prevention of Lyme disease, with a focus on children. PMID:25332678

  5. A Survey of Vitamin D Status in Patients with Degenerative Diseases of the Spine

    PubMed Central

    Zolfaghari, Farid; Faridmoayer, Alireza; Soleymani, Bahram; Mahabadi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Descriptive cross-sectional study. Purpose To determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients with degenerative diseases of the spine about to undergo spinal surgery and the relations between such deficiency and potential risk factors. Overview of Literature Vitamin D has a major role in musculoskeletal system health maintenance. Recently, studies on degenerative diseases of the spine have shown a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in patients undergoing spine surgery. Methods Serum levels of 25(OH)D were determined by an electrochemiluminescence detection assay. The other variables were determined through relevant questionnaires, and the data was analyzed through analysis of variance, t-test, chi-square and multivariate logistic regression analysis. Results A total of 110 patients were enrolled in the study. The mean serum level of 25(OH)D was 27.45±18.75 ng/mL, and 44.5% of patients showed vitamin D deficiency (25(OH)D<20 ng/mL), with an additional 17.3% of patients having a serum level of 25(OH)D that was insufficient (20≤25(OH)D<30 ng/mL). The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency was significantly higher in the younger age group compared to the older age group (p<0.001) and the ones without a history of taking vitamin D supplements (p=0.013). Compared to men, women showed significantly higher levels of vitamin D (p=0.029). Conclusions A high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency is seen in patients with degenerative diseases of the spine. On the other hand, the conventional risk factors such as old age or female sex alone did not seem to be sufficient in determining the likelihood of deficiency. Thus, it is recommended that vitamin D deficiency prevention strategies comprise a broader spectrum of the population through which such degenerative diseases and their consequences may be prevented or delayed. PMID:27790310

  6. [Does lead contribute to the pathogenesis of spine disease?].

    PubMed

    Stöfen, D

    1975-02-01

    Statistical data of a public insurance office of West Germany show a drastic increase of the carriage impairments in juveniles. A plausible explanation of this phenomenon is presented by the lead quantities in auto exhaust. Present levels of environmentall lead produce a measurable biochemical alteration in the population of industrialized countries (inhibition of the activity of the enzyme ALAD). By disturbing the synthesis of nucleics acids and porteins lead impairs fundamental processes of life. Epidemiological and biochemical evidence for an influence of lead on the vertebral column and its diseases are brought forward.

  7. Congenital stenosis and adjacent segment disease in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Jason David; Belding, Jon; Schnaser, Erik; Rowan, Andrew; Moffitt, Gable; Weaver, John; Reich, Michael S; Bechtel, Chris; Xie, Ke; Gande, Abhiram; Hohl, Justin; Braly, Brett; Hilibrand, Alan; Kang, James D

    2013-10-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment disease (ASD) after anterior cervical fusion (ACF) is reported in 25% of patients at 10 years postoperatively. Debate continues as to whether this degeneration is due to the natural history of the disk or the changed biomechanics after ACF. This study explored whether congenital stenosis predisposes patients to an increased incidence of ASD after ACF. A retrospective review of 635 patients with myelopathy or radiculopathy was performed; 364 patients had complete records for review. Patients underwent 1- to 5-level ACF (94 one-level, 145 two-level, 79 three-level, 45 four-level, and 1 five-level). Radiographs were evaluated for bony congenital stenosis using validated parameters, and ASD was measured according to Hilibrand's criteria and correlated with symptomatic ASD. Congenital stenosis was found in 21.7% of patients and radiographic ASD in 33.5%, with a significant association between these parameters. However, symptomatic ASD occurred in 11.8% of patients; no association between congenital stenosis and symptomatic ASD or myelopathy and ASD was found. Clinical results demonstrated excellent or good Robinson scores in 86.2% of patients and Odom scores in 87% of patients. Despite mostly excellent to good outcomes, symptomatic ASD is common after ACF. Although congenital stenosis appears to increase the incidence of radiographic ASD, it does not appear to predict symptomatic ASD.

  8. Intraneuronal APP and extracellular Aβ independently cause dendritic spine pathology in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chengyu; Montagna, Elena; Shi, Yuan; Peters, Finn; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Shi, Song; Filser, Severin; Dorostkar, Mario M; Herms, Jochen

    2015-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is thought to be caused by accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ), which is a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Transgenic mice overexpressing APP have been used to recapitulate amyloid-β pathology. Among them, APP23 and APPswe/PS1deltaE9 (deltaE9) mice are extensively studied. APP23 mice express APP with Swedish mutation and develop amyloid plaques late in their life, while cognitive deficits are observed in young age. In contrast, deltaE9 mice with mutant APP and mutant presenilin-1 develop amyloid plaques early but show typical cognitive deficits in old age. To unveil the reasons for different progressions of cognitive decline in these commonly used mouse models, we analyzed the number and turnover of dendritic spines as important structural correlates for learning and memory. Chronic in vivo two-photon imaging in apical tufts of layer V pyramidal neurons revealed a decreased spine density in 4-5-month-old APP23 mice. In age-matched deltaE9 mice, in contrast, spine loss was only observed on cortical dendrites that were in close proximity to amyloid plaques. In both cases, the reduced spine density was caused by decreased spine formation. Interestingly, the patterns of alterations in spine morphology differed between these two transgenic mouse models. Moreover, in APP23 mice, APP was found to accumulate intracellularly and its content was inversely correlated with the absolute spine density and the relative number of mushroom spines. Collectively, our results suggest that different pathological mechanisms, namely an intracellular accumulation of APP or extracellular amyloid plaques, may lead to spine abnormalities in young adult APP23 and deltaE9 mice, respectively. These distinct features, which may represent very different mechanisms of synaptic failure in AD, have to be taken into consideration when translating results from animal studies to the human disease.

  9. The Impact of Lumbar Spine Disease and Deformity on Total Hip Arthroplasty Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Blizzard, Daniel J; Nickel, Brian T; Seyler, Thorsten M; Bolognesi, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Concurrent spine and hip disease is common. Spinal deformities can restrict lumbar range of motion and lumbar lordosis, leading to pelvic obliquity and increased pelvic tilt. A comprehensive preoperative workup and component templating ensure appropriate compensation for altered pelvic parameters for implantation of components according to functional positioning. Pelvic obliquity from scoliosis must be measured to calculate appropriate leg length. Cup positioning should be templated on standing radiograph to limit impingement from cup malposition. In spinal deformity, the optimal position of the cup that accommodates pelvic parameters and limits impingement may lie outside the classic parameters of the safe zone.

  10. Quantitative characterization of metastatic disease in the spine. Part II. Histogram-based analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Whyne, Cari; Hardisty, Michael; Wu, Florence; Skrinskas, Tomas; Clemons, Mark; Gordon, Lyle; Basran, Parminder S.

    2007-08-15

    Radiological imaging is essential to the appropriate management of patients with bone metastasis; however, there have been no widely accepted guidelines as to the optimal method for quantifying the potential impact of skeletal lesions or to evaluate response to treatment. The current inability to rapidly quantify the response of bone metastases excludes patients with cancer and bone disease from participating in clinical trials of many new treatments as these studies frequently require patients with so-called measurable disease. Computed tomography (CT) can provide excellent skeletal detail with a sensitivity for the diagnosis of bone metastases. The purpose of this study was to establish an objective method to quantitatively characterize disease in the bony spine using CT-based segmentations. It was hypothesized that histogram analysis of CT vertebral density distributions would enable standardized segmentation of tumor tissue and consequently allow quantification of disease in the metastatic spine. Thirty two healthy vertebral CT scans were first studied to establish a baseline characterization. The histograms of the trabecular centrums were found to be Gaussian distributions (average root-mean-square difference=30 voxel counts), as expected for a uniform material. Intrapatient vertebral level similarity was also observed as the means were not significantly different (p>0.8). Thus, a patient-specific healthy vertebral body histogram is able to characterize healthy trabecular bone throughout that individual's thoracolumbar spine. Eleven metastatically involved vertebrae were analyzed to determine the characteristics of the lytic and blastic bone voxels relative to the healthy bone. Lytic and blastic tumors were segmented as connected areas with voxel intensities between specified thresholds. The tested thresholds were {mu}-1.0{sigma}, {mu}-1.5{sigma}, and {mu}-2.0{sigma}, for lytic and {mu}+2.0{sigma}, {mu}+3.0{sigma}, and {mu}+3.5{sigma} for blastic tissue where

  11. A deconvolution method to improve automated 3D-analysis of dendritic spines: application to a mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Heck, Nicolas; Betuing, Sandrine; Vanhoutte, Peter; Caboche, Jocelyne

    2012-04-01

    Dendritic spines are postsynaptic structures the morphology of which correlates with the strength of synaptic efficacy. Measurements of spine density and spine morphology are achievable using recent imaging and bioinformatics tools. The three-dimensional automated analysis requires optimization of image acquisition and treatment. Here, we studied the critical steps for optimal confocal microscopy imaging of dendritic spines. We characterize the deconvolution process and show that it improves spine morphology analysis. With this method, images of dendritic spines from medium spiny neurons are automatically detected by the software Neuronstudio, which retrieves spine density as well as spine diameter and volume. This approach is illustrated with three-dimensional analysis of dendritic spines in a mouse model of Huntington's disease: the transgenic R6/2 mice. In symptomatic mutant mice, we confirm the decrease in spine density, and the method brings further information and show a decrease in spine volume and dendrite diameter. Moreover, we show a significant decrease in spine density at presymptomatic age which so far has gone unnoticed.

  12. Alzheimer disease: focus on computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most common type of dementia, affecting approximately 5.3 million Americans. This debilitating disease is marked by memory loss, confusion, and loss of cognitive ability. The exact cause of Alzheimer disease is unknown although research suggests that it might result from a combination of factors. The hallmarks of Alzheimer disease are the presence of beta-amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles in the brain. Radiologic imaging can help physicians detect these structural characteristics and monitor disease progression and brain function. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are considered first-line imaging modalities for the routine evaluation of Alzheimer disease.

  13. Controversies about Interspinous Process Devices in the Treatment of Degenerative Lumbar Spine Diseases: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Galarza, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    A large number of interspinous process devices (IPD) have been recently introduced to the lumbar spine market as an alternative to conventional decompressive surgery in managing symptomatic lumbar spinal pathology, especially in the older population. Despite the fact that they are composed of a wide range of different materials including titanium, polyetheretherketone, and elastomeric compounds, the aim of these devices is to unload spine, restoring foraminal height, and stabilize the spine by distracting the spinous processes. Although the initial reports represented the IPD as a safe, effective, and minimally invasive surgical alternative for relief of neurological symptoms in patients with low back degenerative diseases, recent studies have demonstrated less impressive clinical results and higher rate of failure than initially reported. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive overview on interspinous implants, their mechanisms of action, safety, cost, and effectiveness in the treatment of lumbar stenosis and degenerative disc diseases. PMID:24822224

  14. Altered sensory experience exacerbates stable dendritic spine and synapse loss in a mouse model of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Murmu, Reena Prity; Li, Wen; Szepesi, Zsuzsanna; Li, Jia-Yi

    2015-01-07

    A key question in Huntington's disease (HD) is what underlies the early cognitive deficits that precede the motor symptoms and the characteristic neuronal death observed in HD. The mechanisms underlying cognitive symptoms in HD remain unknown. Postmortem HD brain and animal model studies demonstrate pathologies in dendritic spines and abnormal synaptic plasticity before motor symptoms and neurodegeneration. Experience-dependent synaptic plasticity caused by mechanisms such as LTP or novel sensory experience potentiates synaptic strength, enhances new dendritic spine formation and stabilization, and may contribute to normal cognitive processes, such as learning and memory. We have previously reported that under baseline conditions (without any sensory manipulation) neuronal circuitry in HD (R6/2 mouse model) was highly unstable, which led to a progressive loss of persistent spines in these mice, and that mutant huntingtin was directly involved in the process. Here, we investigated whether pathological processes of HD interfere with the normal experience-dependent plasticity of dendritic spines in the R6/2 model. Six weeks of two-photon in vivo imaging before and after whisker trimming revealed that sensory deprivation exacerbates loss of persistent-type, stable spines in R6/2 mice compared with wild-type littermates. In addition, sensory deprivation leads to impaired transformation of newly generated spines into persistent spines in R6/2 mice. As a consequence, reduced synaptic density and decreased PSD-95 protein levels are evident in their barrel cortical neurons. These data suggest that mutant huntingtin is implicated in maladaptive synaptic plasticity, which could be one of the plausible mechanisms underlying early cognitive deficits in HD.

  15. Resveratrol: A Focus on Several Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Tellone, Ester; Galtieri, Antonio; Russo, Annamaria; Giardina, Bruno; Ficarra, Silvana

    2015-01-01

    Molecules of the plant world are proving their effectiveness in countering, slowing down, and regressing many diseases. The resveratrol for its intrinsic properties related to its stilbene structure has been proven to be a universal panacea, especially for a wide range of neurodegenerative diseases. This paper evaluates (in vivo and in vitro) the various molecular targets of this peculiar polyphenol and its ability to effectively counter several neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. What emerges is that, in the deep heterogeneity of the pathologies evaluated, resveratrol through a convergence on the protein targets is able to give therapeutic responses in neuronal cells deeply diversified not only in morphological structure but especially in their function performed in the anatomical district to which they belong. PMID:26180587

  16. Hepatosplenic Abscesses and Osteomyelitis of the Spine in an Immunocompetent Adult with Cat Scratch Disease.

    PubMed

    Knafl, D; Lötsch, F; Burgmann, H; Goliasch, G; Poeppl, W; Ramharter, M; Thalhammer, F; Schuster, C

    2015-01-01

    We present an 18-year-old, immunocompetent Austrian military conscript with cervical lymphadenopathy, fever, back-pain, and persistent inflammation markers despite two weeks of antimicrobial therapy with ampicillin/sulbactam. All specific laboratory investigations for identification of a specific etiology, including blood cultures and autoantibodies, were inconspicuous. Abdominal computed tomography showed multiple hypodense hepatosplenic lesions and osteomyelitis of the thoracic and lumbar spine with base plate fracture. Based on the patient's history, clinical presentation, and radiological findings, serology for cat scratch disease (CSD) was performed and high B. henselae specific IgM and IgG antibodies were detected. Due to its variety of clinical presentations, diagnosis of CSD is challenging, especially in the absence of a history of specific exposure. This case report shall remind the physician that cat scratch disease is a common disease, mainly presenting with fever and lymphadenopathy in young patients. Nevertheless CSD has many different and rare forms of presentations, including hepatosplenic lesions and bone involvement as shown in this case.

  17. Hepatosplenic Abscesses and Osteomyelitis of the Spine in an Immunocompetent Adult with Cat Scratch Disease

    PubMed Central

    Knafl, D.; Lötsch, F.; Burgmann, H.; Goliasch, G.; Poeppl, W.; Ramharter, M.; Thalhammer, F.; Schuster, C.

    2015-01-01

    We present an 18-year-old, immunocompetent Austrian military conscript with cervical lymphadenopathy, fever, back-pain, and persistent inflammation markers despite two weeks of antimicrobial therapy with ampicillin/sulbactam. All specific laboratory investigations for identification of a specific etiology, including blood cultures and autoantibodies, were inconspicuous. Abdominal computed tomography showed multiple hypodense hepatosplenic lesions and osteomyelitis of the thoracic and lumbar spine with base plate fracture. Based on the patient's history, clinical presentation, and radiological findings, serology for cat scratch disease (CSD) was performed and high B. henselae specific IgM and IgG antibodies were detected. Due to its variety of clinical presentations, diagnosis of CSD is challenging, especially in the absence of a history of specific exposure. This case report shall remind the physician that cat scratch disease is a common disease, mainly presenting with fever and lymphadenopathy in young patients. Nevertheless CSD has many different and rare forms of presentations, including hepatosplenic lesions and bone involvement as shown in this case. PMID:26576306

  18. The influence of phospho-tau on dendritic spines of cortical pyramidal neurons in patients with Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Merino-Serrais, Paula; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Rábano, Alberto; Avila, Jesús

    2013-01-01

    The dendritic spines on pyramidal cells represent the main postsynaptic elements of cortical excitatory synapses and they are fundamental structures in memory, learning and cognition. In the present study, we used intracellular injections of Lucifer yellow in fixed tissue to analyse over 19 500 dendritic spines that were completely reconstructed in three dimensions along the length of the basal dendrites of pyramidal neurons in the parahippocampal cortex and CA1 of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Following intracellular injection, sections were immunostained for anti-Lucifer yellow and with tau monoclonal antibodies AT8 and PHF-1, which recognize tau phosphorylated at Ser202/Thr205 and at Ser396/404, respectively. We observed that the diffuse accumulation of phospho-tau in a putative pre-tangle state did not induce changes in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons, whereas the presence of tau aggregates forming intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles was associated with progressive alteration of dendritic spines (loss of dendritic spines and changes in their morphology) and dendrite atrophy, depending on the degree of tangle development. Thus, the presence of phospho-tau in neurons does not necessarily mean that they suffer severe and irreversible effects as thought previously but rather, the characteristic cognitive impairment in Alzheimer’s disease is likely to depend on the relative number of neurons that have well developed tangles. PMID:23715095

  19. The influence of phospho-τ on dendritic spines of cortical pyramidal neurons in patients with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Merino-Serrais, Paula; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Kastanauskaite, Asta; Rábano, Alberto; Avila, Jesús; DeFelipe, Javier

    2013-06-01

    The dendritic spines on pyramidal cells represent the main postsynaptic elements of cortical excitatory synapses and they are fundamental structures in memory, learning and cognition. In the present study, we used intracellular injections of Lucifer yellow in fixed tissue to analyse over 19 500 dendritic spines that were completely reconstructed in three dimensions along the length of the basal dendrites of pyramidal neurons in the parahippocampal cortex and CA1 of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Following intracellular injection, sections were immunostained for anti-Lucifer yellow and with tau monoclonal antibodies AT8 and PHF-1, which recognize tau phosphorylated at Ser202/Thr205 and at Ser396/404, respectively. We observed that the diffuse accumulation of phospho-tau in a putative pre-tangle state did not induce changes in the dendrites of pyramidal neurons, whereas the presence of tau aggregates forming intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles was associated with progressive alteration of dendritic spines (loss of dendritic spines and changes in their morphology) and dendrite atrophy, depending on the degree of tangle development. Thus, the presence of phospho-tau in neurons does not necessarily mean that they suffer severe and irreversible effects as thought previously but rather, the characteristic cognitive impairment in Alzheimer's disease is likely to depend on the relative number of neurons that have well developed tangles.

  20. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 16 chapters. Some of the topics are: CT of the Sacrum, The Postoperative Spine, Film Organizations and Case Reporting, Degeneration and Disc Disease of the Intervertebral Joint, Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, and Cervical and Thoracic Spine.

  1. Lumbo-sacral spine disease due to bovine tuberculosis in a patient with concurrent pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Nawaid; Srinivasan, Koottalai; Panayi, Jeannette; Moudgil, Harmesh

    2011-12-01

    Lumbo-sacral spinal disease due to bovine tuberculosis (TB) in a patient with concurrent pulmonary disease is rare. We report this unpredicted finding in an immunocompetent patient and discuss the natural history in an area of low prevalence.

  2. Spine injuries in the sport of gymnastics.

    PubMed

    Kruse, David; Lemmen, Brooke

    2009-01-01

    Injury in gymnastics is not an uncommon occurrence, and an injury of the spine frequently is a source of pain in a gymnast. Because of the unique demands of this sport, which repetitively place significant forces across the spine, it becomes clear why the spine commonly is injured. Potential causes of back pain in a gymnast include spondylolysis, Scheuermann's disease, intervertebral disc pathology, and mechanical sources of pain. Much of the diagnostic workup and management of spondylolysis lesions remains controversial, but a successful management strategy can be developed for the safe return of a gymnast to the mat. Mechanical sources of pain are common and should be addressed. Psychosocial etiologies of back pain also exist in these athletes. Rehabilitation strategies should focus on improvement in the strength and function of the trunk and lumbar spine and the correction of biomechanical deficits with a goal of pain-free transition back to gymnastic-specific activities.

  3. Pharmacological reversion of sphingomyelin-induced dendritic spine anomalies in a Niemann Pick disease type A mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo, Ana I; Camoletto, Paola G; Morando, Laura; Sassoe-Pognetto, Marco; Giustetto, Maurizio; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Schuchman, Edward H; Ledesma, Maria D

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the role of lipids in synapses and the aberrant molecular mechanisms causing the cognitive deficits that characterize most lipidosis is necessary to develop therapies for these diseases. Here we describe sphingomyelin (SM) as a key modulator of the dendritic spine actin cytoskeleton. We show that increased SM levels in neurons of acid sphingomyelinase knock out mice (ASMko), which mimic Niemann Pick disease type A (NPA), result in reduced spine number and size and low levels of filamentous actin. Mechanistically, SM accumulation decreases the levels of metabotropic glutamate receptors type I (mGluR1/5) at the synaptic membrane impairing membrane attachment and activity of RhoA and its effectors ROCK and ProfilinIIa. Pharmacological enhancement of the neutral sphingomyelinase rescues the aberrant molecular and morphological phenotypes in vitro and in vivo and improves motor and memory deficits in ASMko mice. Altogether, these data demonstrate the influence of SM and its catabolic enzymes in dendritic spine physiology and contribute to our understanding of the cognitive deficits of NPA patients, opening new perspectives for therapeutic interventions. Subject Categories Genetics, Gene Therapy & Genetic Disease; Neuroscience PMID:24448491

  4. Emerging Roles of Filopodia and Dendritic Spines in Motoneuron Plasticity during Development and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kanjhan, Refik; Noakes, Peter G.; Bellingham, Mark C.

    2016-01-01

    Motoneurons develop extensive dendritic trees for receiving excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to perform a variety of complex motor tasks. At birth, the somatodendritic domains of mouse hypoglossal and lumbar motoneurons have dense filopodia and spines. Consistent with Vaughn's synaptotropic hypothesis, we propose a developmental unified-hybrid model implicating filopodia in motoneuron spinogenesis/synaptogenesis and dendritic growth and branching critical for circuit formation and synaptic plasticity at embryonic/prenatal/neonatal period. Filopodia density decreases and spine density initially increases until postnatal day 15 (P15) and then decreases by P30. Spine distribution shifts towards the distal dendrites, and spines become shorter (stubby), coinciding with decreases in frequency and increases in amplitude of excitatory postsynaptic currents with maturation. In transgenic mice, either overexpressing the mutated human Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (hSOD1G93A) gene or deficient in GABAergic/glycinergic synaptic transmission (gephyrin, GAD-67, or VGAT gene knockout), hypoglossal motoneurons develop excitatory glutamatergic synaptic hyperactivity. Functional synaptic hyperactivity is associated with increased dendritic growth, branching, and increased spine and filopodia density, involving actin-based cytoskeletal and structural remodelling. Energy-dependent ionic pumps that maintain intracellular sodium/calcium homeostasis are chronically challenged by activity and selectively overwhelmed by hyperactivity which eventually causes sustained membrane depolarization leading to excitotoxicity, activating microglia to phagocytose degenerating neurons under neuropathological conditions. PMID:26843990

  5. SU-E-J-32: Dosimetric Evaluation Based On Pre-Treatment Cone Beam CT for Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy: Does Region of Interest Focus Matter?

    SciTech Connect

    Magnelli, A; Xia, P

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Spine stereotactic body radiotherapy requires very conformal dose distributions and precise delivery. Prior to treatment, a KV cone-beam CT (KV-CBCT) is registered to the planning CT to provide image-guided positional corrections, which depend on selection of the region of interest (ROI) because of imperfect patient positioning and anatomical deformation. Our objective is to determine the dosimetric impact of ROI selections. Methods: Twelve patients were selected for this study with the treatment regions varied from C-spine to T-spine. For each patient, the KV-CBCT was registered to the planning CT three times using distinct ROIs: one encompassing the entire patient, a large ROI containing large bony anatomy, and a small target-focused ROI. Each registered CBCT volume, saved as an aligned dataset, was then sent to the planning system. The treated plan was applied to each dataset and dose was recalculated. The tumor dose coverage (percentage of target volume receiving prescription dose), maximum point dose to 0.03 cc of the spinal cord, and dose to 10% of the spinal cord volume (V10) for each alignment were compared to the original plan. Results: The average magnitude of tumor coverage deviation was 3.9%±5.8% with external contour, 1.5%±1.1% with large ROI, 1.3%±1.1% with small ROI. Spinal cord V10 deviation from plan was 6.6%±6.6% with external contour, 3.5%±3.1% with large ROI, and 1.2%±1.0% with small ROI. Spinal cord max point dose deviation from plan was: 12.2%±13.3% with external contour, 8.5%±8.4% with large ROI, and 3.7%±2.8% with small ROI. Conclusion: A small ROI focused on the target results in the smallest deviation from planned dose to target and cord although rotations at large distances from the targets were observed. It is recommended that image fusion during CBCT focus narrowly on the target volume to minimize dosimetric error. Improvement in patient setups may further reduce residual errors.

  6. Identifying factors likely to influence compliance with diagnostic imaging guideline recommendations for spine disorders among chiropractors in North America: a focus group study using the Theoretical Domains Framework

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) was developed to investigate determinants of specific clinical behaviors and inform the design of interventions to change professional behavior. This framework was used to explore the beliefs of chiropractors in an American Provider Network and two Canadian provinces about their adherence to evidence-based recommendations for spine radiography for uncomplicated back pain. The primary objective of the study was to identify chiropractors’ beliefs about managing uncomplicated back pain without x-rays and to explore barriers and facilitators to implementing evidence-based recommendations on lumbar spine x-rays. A secondary objective was to compare chiropractors in the United States and Canada on their beliefs regarding the use of spine x-rays. Methods Six focus groups exploring beliefs about managing back pain without x-rays were conducted with a purposive sample. The interview guide was based upon the TDF. Focus groups were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by two independent assessors using thematic content analysis based on the TDF. Results Five domains were identified as likely relevant. Key beliefs within these domains included the following: conflicting comments about the potential consequences of not ordering x-rays (risk of missing a pathology, avoiding adverse treatment effects, risks of litigation, determining the treatment plan, and using x-ray-driven techniques contrasted with perceived benefits of minimizing patient radiation exposure and reducing costs; beliefs about consequences); beliefs regarding professional autonomy, professional credibility, lack of standardization, and agreement with guidelines widely varied ( social/professional role & identity); the influence of formal training, colleagues, and patients also appeared to be important factors ( social influences); conflicting comments regarding levels of confidence and comfort in managing patients without x-rays ( belief

  7. Focusing on rare diseases in China: are we there yet?

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Su, Chang; Lee, Ashley M; Bai, Harrison X

    2015-11-02

    The Chinese researchers have made significant progress in studying rare diseases in the recent years. From 2000 to 2014, 269 out of 1892 clinically relevant original research papers published on high impact journals by Chinese institutions, and 2678 out of 6040 clinical trials conducted by Chinese institutions and registered at ClinicalTrial.gov are focused on rare diseases. The number of research papers and of clinical trials has shown a steady trend of increase. Creating public databases for rare disease will escalate progress in rare disease and enable multicenter studies.

  8. Lung Infections in Systemic Rheumatic Disease: Focus on Opportunistic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Di Franco, Manuela; Lucchino, Bruno; Spaziante, Martina; Iannuccelli, Cristina; Valesini, Guido; Iaiani, Giancarlo

    2017-01-01

    Systemic rheumatic diseases have significant morbidity and mortality, due in large part to concurrent infections. The lung has been reported among the most frequent sites of infection in patients with rheumatic disease, who are susceptible to developing pneumonia sustained both by common pathogens and by opportunistic microorganisms. Patients with rheumatic disease show a peculiar vulnerability to infectious complications. This is due in part to intrinsic disease-related immune dysregulation and in part to the immunosuppressive treatments. Several therapeutic agents have been associated to a wide spectrum of infections, complicating the management of rheumatic diseases. This review discusses the most frequent pulmonary infections encountered in rheumatic diseases, focusing on opportunistic agents, consequent diagnostic challenges and appropriate therapeutic strategies. PMID:28146077

  9. Averting the legacy of kidney disease--focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-03-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and chronic kidney disease in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for-date newborns have a relatively increased risk for the development of chronic kidney disease later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced chronic kidney disease in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplant, whereas only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers, and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood.

  10. Neuronal profilins in health and disease: Relevance for spine plasticity and Fragile X syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Michaelsen-Preusse, Kristin; Zessin, Sabine; Grigoryan, Gayane; Scharkowski, Franziska; Feuge, Jonas; Remus, Anita; Korte, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Learning and memory, to a large extent, depend on functional changes at synapses. Actin dynamics orchestrate the formation of synapses, as well as their stabilization, and the ability to undergo plastic changes. Hence, profilins are of key interest as they bind to G-actin and enhance actin polymerization. However, profilins also compete with actin nucleators, thereby restricting filament formation. Here, we provide evidence that the two brain isoforms, profilin1 (PFN1) and PFN2a, regulate spine actin dynamics in an opposing fashion, and that whereas both profilins are needed during synaptogenesis, only PFN2a is crucial for adult spine plasticity. This finding suggests that PFN1 is the juvenile isoform important during development, whereas PFN2a is mandatory for spine stability and plasticity in mature neurons. In line with this finding, only PFN1 levels are altered in the mouse model of the developmental neurological disorder Fragile X syndrome. This finding is of high relevance because Fragile X syndrome is the most common monogenetic cause for autism spectrum disorder. Indeed, the expression of recombinant profilins rescued the impairment in spinogenesis, a hallmark in Fragile X syndrome, thereby linking the regulation of actin dynamics to synapse development and possible dysfunction. PMID:26951674

  11. [Cervical spine instability in the surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Barbeito, A; Guerri-Guttenberg, R A

    2014-03-01

    Many congenital and acquired diseases, including trauma, may result in cervical spine instability. Given that airway management is closely related to the movement of the cervical spine, it is important that the anesthesiologist has detailed knowledge of the anatomy, the mechanisms of cervical spine instability, and of the effects that the different airway maneuvers have on the cervical spine. We first review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine in the context of airway management and the concept of cervical spine instability. In the second part, we review the protocols for the management of cervical spine instability in trauma victims and some of the airway management options for these patients.

  12. Averting the legacy of kidney disease: focus on childhood

    PubMed Central

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, while only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:28031959

  13. Averting the legacy of kidney diseasefocus on childhood

    PubMed Central

    Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group amongst children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for-date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely to help to detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, whilst only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policymakers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:27247150

  14. Averting the legacy of kidney disease - focus on childhood

    PubMed Central

    Ingelfinger, J.R.; Kalantar-Zadeh, K.; Schaefer, F.

    2016-01-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, in that the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease as a consequence of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for-date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, although only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that the World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood. PMID:27096201

  15. Averting the Legacy of Kidney Disease--Focus on Childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, while only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention. Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood.

  16. Mid-range outcomes in 64 consecutive cases of multilevel fusion for degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine

    PubMed Central

    Röllinghoff, Marc; Schlüter-Brust, Klaus; Groos, Daniel; Sobottke, Rolf; Michael, Joern William-Patrick; Eysel, Peer; Delank, Karl Stefan

    2010-01-01

    In the treatment of multilevel degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine, spondylodesis plays a controversial role. Most patients can be treated conservatively with success. Multilevel lumbar fusion with instrumentation is associated with severe complications like failed back surgery syndrome, implant failure, and adjacent segment disease (ASD). This retrospective study examines the records of 70 elderly patients with degenerative changes or instability of the lumbar spine treated between 2002 and 2007 with spondylodesis of more than two segments. Sixty-four patients were included; 5 patients had died and one patient was lost to follow-up. We evaluated complications, clinical/radiological outcomes, and success of fusion. Flexion-extension and standing X-rays in two planes, MRI, and/or CT scans were obtained pre-operatively. Patients were assessed clinically using the Oswestry disability index (ODI) and a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). Surgery performed was dorsolateral fusion (46.9%) or dorsal fusion with anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF; 53.1%). Additional decompression was carried out in 37.5% of patients. Mean follow-up was 29.4±5.4 months. Average patient age was 64.7±4.3 years. Clinical outcomes were not satisfactory for all patients. VAS scores improved from 8.6±1.3 to 5.6±3.0 pre- to post-operatively, without statistical significance. ODI was also not significantly improved (56.1±22.3 pre- and 45.1±26.4 post-operatively). Successful fusion, defined as adequate bone mass with trabeculation at the facets and transverse processes or in the intervertebral segments, did not correlate with good clinical outcomes. Thirty-five of 64 patients (54%) showed signs of pedicle screw loosening, especially of the screws at S1. However, only 7 of these 35 (20%) complained of corresponding back pain. Revision surgery was required in 24 of 64 patients (38%). Of these, indications were adjacent segment disease (16 cases), pedicle screw loosening (7 cases), and

  17. Does degenerative disease of the lumbar spine cause arachnoiditis? A magnetic resonance study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jackson, A; Isherwood, I

    1994-09-01

    The magnetic resonance appearances in 165 patients with symptoms suggestive of degenerative lumbar spine disease were reviewed. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between abnormalities of nerve root distribution and degenerative disease of the lumbar spine in the absence of other known risk factors for arachnoiditis. Central clumping of nerve roots was present in 16 patients (9.7%) and was associated with spinal stenosis at one of the affected levels in all (p < 0.001). Spinal stenosis was present in 44 patients giving an incidence of abnormal nerve root distribution of 36% in this group. Nerve root clumping occurred in association with pure spinal stenosis (10 cases), stenosis secondary to disc prolapse (four cases) and degenerative spondylolisthesis (two cases). Nerve root clumping was confined to one vertebral level in nine cases and extended over two to four levels in seven. In five of the latter spinal stenosis was present at multiple levels. The appearance of nerve root clumping described here may result entirely from mechanical apposition of nerve roots but is indistinguishable from the central pattern of nerve root adhesions which occurs in adhesive lumbar arachnoiditis. No abnormalities of nerve root distribution were seen in association with any indicator of degenerative disk disease in the absence of stenosis. We have been unable to demonstrate the previously reported relationship between lumbar disk degeneration and arachnoiditis and discuss this with a critical review of the literature. Abnormal central clumping of nerve roots as described in arachnoiditis may occur in association with spinal stenosis in the absence of other risk factors although the cause for this appearance remains unexplained. Arachnoiditis-like changes extending over more than one vertebral level are rare (7%) except in the presence of spinal stenosis at multiple levels (29%). Awareness of this appearance may avoid a possibly incorrect diagnosis of arachnoiditis

  18. Osteoporosis and Your Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Movement › Osteoporosis and Your Spine Osteoporosis and Your Spine Your spine is made up of small bones ... called kyphosis. Kyphosis and Bone Breaks in the Spine The bones in the spine are called vertebrae. ...

  19. Focused Ultrasound: An Emerging Therapeutic Modality for Neurologic Disease.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Paul S; Frenkel, Victor

    2017-02-27

    Therapeutic ultrasound is only beginning to be applied to neurologic conditions, but the potential of this modality for a wide spectrum of brain applications is high. Engineering advances now allow sound waves to be targeted through the skull to a brain region selected with real time magnetic resonance imaging and thermography, using a commercial array of focused emitters. High intensities of sonic energy can create a coagulation lesion similar to that of older radiofrequency stereotactic methods, but without opening the skull. This has led to the recent Food and Drug Administration approval of focused ultrasound (FUS) thalamotomy for unilateral treatment of essential tremor. Clinical studies of stereotactic FUS for aspects of Parkinson's disease, chronic pain, and refractory psychiatric indications are underway, with promising results. Moderate-intensity FUS has the potential to safely open the blood-brain barrier for localized delivery of therapeutics, while low levels of sonic energy can be used as a form of neuromodulation.

  20. Carbon nanotubes in drug delivery: focus on infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Yitzhak; Elman, Noel M

    2009-05-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to address the challenges of combating infectious agents by both minimizing toxicity by dose reduction of standard therapeutics and allowing a multiple payload capacity to achieve both targeted activity and combating infectious strains, resistant strains in particular. One of their unique characteristics is the network of carbon atoms in the nanometer scale, allowing the creation of nano-channels via cellular membranes. This review focuses on the characterization, development, integration and application of carbon nanotubes as nanocarrier-based delivery systems and their appropriate design for achieving the desired drug delivery results in the different areas of infectious diseases. While a more extensive toxicological and pharmacological profile must be obtained, this review will focus on existing research and pre-clinical data concerning the potential use of carbon nanotubes.

  1. Multimodality Imaging in Coronary Artery Disease: Focus on Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Han, Donghee; Danad, Ibrahim; Hartaigh, Bríain ó; Lin, Fay Y.

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide, and various cardiovascular imaging modalities have been introduced for the purpose of diagnosing and determining the severity of CAD. More recently, advances in computed tomography (CT) technology have contributed to the widespread clinical application of cardiac CT for accurate and noninvasive evaluation of CAD. In this review, we focus on imaging assessment of CAD based upon CT, which includes coronary artery calcium screening, coronary CT angiography, myocardial CT perfusion, and fractional flow reserve CT. Further, we provide a discussion regarding the potential implications, benefits and limitations, as well as the possible future directions according to each modality. PMID:27081438

  2. Environment, epigenetics and neurodegeneration: Focus on nutrition in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nicolia, Vincenzina; Lucarelli, Marco; Fuso, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Many different environmental factors (nutrients, pollutants, chemicals, physical activity, lifestyle, physical and mental stress) can modulate epigenetic markers in the developing and adult organism. Epigenetics, in turn, can cause and is associated with several neurodegenerative and aging-dependent human diseases. Alzheimer's disease certainly represents one of the most relevant neurodegenerative disorders due to its incidence and its huge socio-economic impact. Therefore, it is easy to understand why recent literature focuses on the epigenetic modifications associated with Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. One of the most intriguing and, at the same time, worrying evidence is that even "mild" environmental factors (such as behavioral or physical stress) as well as the under-threshold exposure to pollutants and chemicals, can be effective. Finally, even mild nutrients disequilibria can result in long-lasting and functional alterations of many epigenetic markers, although they don't have an immediate acute effect. Therefore, we will probably have to re-define the current risk threshold for many factors, molecules and stresses. Among the many different environmental factors affecting the epigenome, nutrition represents one of the most investigated fields; the reasons are probably that each person interacts with nutrients and that, in turn, nutrients can modulate at molecular level the epigenetic biochemical pathways. The role that nutrition can exert in modulating epigenetic modifications in Alzheimer's disease will be discussed with particular emphasis on the role of B vitamins and DNA methylation.

  3. Intravital imaging of dendritic spine plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sau Wan Lai, Cora

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic part of most excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Recent works have suggested that the structural and functional plasticity of dendritic spines have been associated with information coding and memories. Advances in imaging and labeling techniques enable the study of dendritic spine dynamics in vivo. This perspective focuses on intravital imaging studies of dendritic spine plasticity in the neocortex. I will introduce imaging tools for studying spine dynamics and will further review current findings on spine structure and function under various physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:28243511

  4. Extracellular matrix control of dendritic spine and synapse structure and plasticity in adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Aaron D.; Omar, Mitchell H.; Koleske, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the receptive contacts at most excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. Spines are dynamic in the developing brain, changing shape as they mature as well as appearing and disappearing as they make and break connections. Spines become much more stable in adulthood, and spine structure must be actively maintained to support established circuit function. At the same time, adult spines must retain some plasticity so their structure can be modified by activity and experience. As such, the regulation of spine stability and remodeling in the adult animal is critical for normal function, and disruption of these processes is associated with a variety of late onset diseases including schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. The extracellular matrix (ECM), composed of a meshwork of proteins and proteoglycans, is a critical regulator of spine and synapse stability and plasticity. While the role of ECM receptors in spine regulation has been extensively studied, considerably less research has focused directly on the role of specific ECM ligands. Here, we review the evidence for a role of several brain ECM ligands and remodeling proteases in the regulation of dendritic spine and synapse formation, plasticity, and stability in adults. PMID:25368556

  5. Airway management for cervical spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Farag, Ehab

    2016-03-01

    Cervical spine surgery is one of the most commonly performed spine surgeries in the United States, and 90% of the cases are related to degenerative cervical spine disease (the rest to cervical spine trauma and/or instability). The airway management for cervical spine surgery represents a crucial step in the anesthetic management to avoid injury to the cervical cord. The crux for upper airway management for cervical spine surgery is maintaining the neck in a neutral position with minimal neck movement during endotracheal intubation. Therefore, the conventional direct laryngoscopy (DL) can be unsuitable for securing the upper airway in cervical spine surgery, especially in cases of cervical spine instability and myelopathy. This review discusses the most recent evidence-based facts of the main advantages and limitations of different techniques available for upper airway management for cervical spine surgery.

  6. The degenerative cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management.

  7. Distal bimelic amyotrophy (DBMA): Phenotypically distinct but identical on cervical spine MR imaging with brachial monomelic amyotrophy/Hirayama disease.

    PubMed

    Preethish-Kumar, Veeramani; Nalini, Atchayaram; Singh, Ravinder-Jeet; Saini, Jitender; Prasad, Chandrajit; Polavarapu, Kiran; Thennarasu, Kandavel

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to characterize the MR imaging features in a large and distinct series of distal bimelic amyotrophy (DBMA) from India. We utilized a retrospective and prospective study on 26 cases. Results demonstrated that upper limb distal muscle wasting and weakness was predominantly symmetrical in onset. Mean age at onset was 20.9 ± 7.0 years, mean duration 83.0 ± 102.6 months. MRI carried out in 22 patients with flexion studies showed forward displacement of posterior dura in 19 (86.4%). Crescent shaped epidural enhancement on contrast was seen in 20/24 cases (83.3%), and bilateral T2W hyperintensities of cord in17 (65.4%) - symmetrical in15 cases. Maximum hyperintensity was noted at C5-C6, C6-C7 levels. Cord atrophy was noted in 24 (92.3%) cases (most affected: C5-C6, C6-C7) - symmetrical atrophy in 21cases. Cervical spine straightening occurred in six (23.1%) cases and reversal of lordosis in 15 (57.7%). In conclusion, this study confirms that DBMA is phenotypically distinct but pathophysiologically the same as brachial monomelic amyotrophy (BMMA) on MR imaging. Typical MRI features were seen in all. It is important to differentiate this disorder from ALS, which could present at a younger age as often seen among Indians. The clinical and MR imaging features are highly suggestive that DBMA, as with BMMA/Hirayama disease, occurs due to dynamic alterations at the cervical spine level.

  8. Recent Findings in Alzheimer Disease and Nutrition Focusing on Epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, Dimitrios; Karagiannis, George; Tsolaki, Magda

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease with no effective cure so far. The current review focuses on the epigenetic mechanisms of AD and how nutrition can influence the course of this disease through regulation of gene expression, according to the latest scientific findings. The search strategy was the use of scientific databases such as PubMed and Scopus in order to find relative research or review articles published in the years 2012-2015. By showing the latest data of various nutritional compounds, this study aims to stimulate the scientific community to recognize the value of nutrition in this subject. Epigenetics is becoming a very attractive subject for researchers because it can shed light on unknown aspects of complex diseases like AD. DNA methylation, histone modifications, and microRNAs are the principal epigenetic mechanisms involved in AD pathophysiology. Nutrition is an environmental factor that is related to AD through epigenetic pathways. Vitamin B-12, for instance, can alter the one-carbon metabolism and thus interfere in the DNA methylation process. The research results might seem ambiguous about the clinical role of nutrition, but there is strengthening evidence that proper nutrition can not only change epigenetic biomarker levels but also prevent the development of late-onset AD and attenuate cognition deficit. Nutrition might grow to become a preventive and even therapeutic alternative against AD, especially if combined with other antidementia interventions, brain exercise, physical training, etc. Epigenetic biomarkers can be a very helpful tool to help researchers find the exact nutrients needed to create specific remedies, and perhaps the same biomarkers can be used even in patient screening in the future.

  9. Nutrition and AGE-ing: Focusing on Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Abate, Giulia; Marziano, Mariagrazia; Rungratanawanich, Wiramon; Memo, Maurizio; Uberti, Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the role of food and nutrition in preventing or delaying chronic disability in the elderly population has received great attention. Thanks to their ability to influence biochemical and biological processes, bioactive nutrients are considered modifiable factors capable of preserving a healthy brain status. A diet rich in vitamins and polyphenols and poor in saturated fatty acids has been recommended. In the prospective of a healthy diet, cooking methods should be also considered. In fact, cooking procedures can modify the original dietary content, contributing not only to the loss of healthy nutrients, but also to the formation of toxins, including advanced glycation end products (AGEs). These harmful compounds are adsorbed at intestinal levels and can contribute to the ageing process. The accumulation of AGEs in ageing ("AGE-ing") is further involved in the exacerbation of neurodegenerative and many other chronic diseases. In this review, we discuss food's dual role as both source of bioactive nutrients and reservoir for potential toxic compounds-paying particular attention to the importance of proper nutrition in preventing/delaying Alzheimer's disease. In addition, we focus on the importance of a good education in processing food in order to benefit from the nutritional properties of an optimal diet.

  10. Nutrition and AGE-ing: Focusing on Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Marziano, Mariagrazia; Rungratanawanich, Wiramon; Memo, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the role of food and nutrition in preventing or delaying chronic disability in the elderly population has received great attention. Thanks to their ability to influence biochemical and biological processes, bioactive nutrients are considered modifiable factors capable of preserving a healthy brain status. A diet rich in vitamins and polyphenols and poor in saturated fatty acids has been recommended. In the prospective of a healthy diet, cooking methods should be also considered. In fact, cooking procedures can modify the original dietary content, contributing not only to the loss of healthy nutrients, but also to the formation of toxins, including advanced glycation end products (AGEs). These harmful compounds are adsorbed at intestinal levels and can contribute to the ageing process. The accumulation of AGEs in ageing (“AGE-ing”) is further involved in the exacerbation of neurodegenerative and many other chronic diseases. In this review, we discuss food's dual role as both source of bioactive nutrients and reservoir for potential toxic compounds—paying particular attention to the importance of proper nutrition in preventing/delaying Alzheimer's disease. In addition, we focus on the importance of a good education in processing food in order to benefit from the nutritional properties of an optimal diet. PMID:28168012

  11. Vanishing bone disease of chest wall and spine with kyphoscoliosis and neurological deficit: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sudhir Kumar; Aggarwal, Rishi Anil; Nemade, Pradip Sharad; Bhoale, Sunil Krishna

    2017-01-01

    Vanishing bone disease is an extremely rare disorder of unknown etiology characterized by idiopathic osteolysis of bone. We describe a case of vanishing bone disease of chest wall and spine with kyphoscoliosis and neurological deficit. A 17-year-old male presented with gradually progressive deformity of back and dorsal compressive myelopathy with nonambulatory power in lower limbs. Radiographs revealed absent 4th–7th ribs on the right side with dorsal kyphoscoliosis and severe canal narrowing at the apex. The patient was given localized radiotherapy and started on a monthly infusion of 4 mg zoledronic acid. Posterior instrumented fusion with anterior reconstruction via posterolateral approach was performed. The patient had a complete neurological recovery at 5 weeks following surgery. At 1 year, anterior nonunion was noted for which transthoracic tricortical bone grafting was done. Bone graft from the patient's mother was used both times. At 7 months following anterior grafting, the alignment was maintained and the patient was asymptomatic; however, fusion at graft-host interface was not achieved. Bisphosphonates and radiotherapy were successful in halting the progress of osteolysis. PMID:28216760

  12. Lumbar spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    CAT scan - lumbar spine; Computed axial tomography scan - lumbar spine; Computed tomography scan - lumbar spine; CT - lower back ... stopping.) A computer creates separate images of the spine area, called slices. These images can be stored, ...

  13. Spine osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Laplante, Ben L; DePalma, Michael J

    2012-05-01

    Osteoarthritis of the spine develops as a consequence of the natural aging process and is associated with significant morbidity and health care expenditures. Effective diagnosis and treatment of the resultant pathologic conditions can be clinically challenging. Recent evidence has emerged to aid the investigating clinician in formulating an accurate diagnosis and in implementing a successful treatment algorithm. This article details the degenerative cascade that results in the osteoarthritic spine, reviews prevalence data for common painful spinal disorders, and discusses evidence-based treatment options for management of zygapophysial and sacroiliac joint arthrosis.

  14. 78 FR 66747 - Sickle Cell Disease Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Sickle Cell Disease Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug... public comment on Patient-Focused Drug Development for sickle cell disease. Patient-Focused Drug... impact of sickle cell disease on daily life and on available therapies for sickle cell disease....

  15. Probiotics in digestive diseases: focus on Lactobacillus GG.

    PubMed

    Pace, F; Pace, M; Quartarone, G

    2015-12-01

    Probiotics are becoming increasingly important in basic and clinical research, but they are also a subject of considerable economic interest due to their expanding popularity. They are live micro-organisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit to the host. From this very well-known definition, it is clear that, unlike drugs, probiotics might be useful in healthy subjects to reduce the risk of developing certain diseases or to optimise some physiological functions. They also may offer some advantages in already ill persons in relieving symptoms and signs, e.g. people with acute diarrhea. According to current definitions, probiotics should survive both gastric acid and bile to reach the small intestine and colon, where they exert their effects. Many of these are available in a lyophilized (freeze-dried) pill form, though some are available in yogurt or as packets (sachets), which can be mixed into non-carbonated drinks. The present review focuses on three main issues: 1) understanding why, at present, probiotics are so interesting for doctors and consumers; 2) reviewing the available data on probiotic use in digestive diseases, in particular irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), (prevention of) infectious diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and colorectal cancer (CRC); 3) highlighting the individual profile of Lactobacillus GG (LGG) in the above contexts, providing an assessment as well as recommendations on its use in gastro-intestinal tract (GIT) disorders. Research studies conducted in animals and humans with the main probiotics strains for GIT diseases, and published from the early 1990s to 2014 have been considered. PubMed, Medline and Ovid were the main sources adopted for data retrieving. The increasing attention on probiotics is a direct consequence of the improvement in the techniques for studying microbiota. Until recently, its composition has been analysed by culture-based methods

  16. Diversity of Spine Synapses in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ya-Xian; Mattson, Mark P.; Yao, Pamela J.

    2016-01-01

    Here we examine the structure of the various types of spine synapses throughout the animal kingdom. Based on available evidence, we suggest that there are two major categories of spine synapses: invaginating and non-invaginating, with distributions that vary among different groups of animals. In the simplest living animals with definitive nerve cells and synapses, the cnidarians and ctenophores, most chemical synapses do not form spine synapses. But some cnidarians have invaginating spine synapses, especially in photoreceptor terminals of motile cnidarians with highly complex visual organs, and also in some mainly sessile cnidarians with rapid prey capture reflexes. This association of invaginating spine synapses with complex sensory inputs is retained in the evolution of higher animals in photoreceptor terminals and some mechanoreceptor synapses. In contrast to invaginating spine synapse, non-invaginating spine synapses have been described only in animals with bilateral symmetry, heads and brains, associated with greater complexity in neural connections. This is apparent already in the simplest bilaterians, the flatworms, which can have well-developed non-invaginating spine synapses in some cases. Non-invaginating spine synapses diversify in higher animal groups. We also discuss the functional advantages of having synapses on spines and more specifically, on invaginating spines. And finally we discuss pathologies associated with spine synapses, concentrating on those systems and diseases where invaginating spine synapses are involved. PMID:27230661

  17. Contiguous haemangioblastomas of the brain and spine in a patient of Von Hippel-Lindau disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Asifur; Hoque, Saif Ul; Bhandari, Paawan Bahadur; Alam, Shamsul

    2013-01-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease is an inherited, autosomal-dominant syndrome caused by heterozygous germline mutations in the VHL gene, and predisposing to the development of benign and malignant tumours and cysts in multiple organ systems involving eyes, kidneys, pancreas, liver and central nervous system. The responsible tumour suppressor gene for VHL disease is in chromosome 3p25. We are presenting a case of a patient with both cerebellar as well as spinal haemangioblastoma in addition to polycystic pancreas. We operated on both the spinal and the cerebellar haemangioblastomas and the patient had made a very good recovery. We present this case for its rarity along with the literature review. PMID:23345492

  18. Pediatric Magnetic Resonance Enterography: Focused on Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So Mi; Choi, Young Hun

    2015-01-01

    Crohn's disease is a chronic idiopathic inflammatory disease of the intestines characterized by frequent relapse and remission. It often develops in children and adolescents, who are vulnerable to repeated exposure to ionizing radiations. Magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) is an increasingly important radiation-free imaging modality that is used to evaluate pediatric patients with Crohn's disease. MRE can evaluate extraluminal and extraintestinal abnormalities as well as the status of the bowel wall. In addition, MRE has an advantage in the evaluation of the small bowel involvement. MRE can be used for the initial diagnosis of Crohn's disease, and can aid in the assessment of disease activity and complications such as penetrating and fibrostenotic diseases. The aims of this article are to review the MRE technique for obtaining diagnostic and high-quality images and to discuss interpretations of imaging findings in patients with Crohn's disease. PMID:26473134

  19. Cell reprogramming and neuronal differentiation applied to neurodegenerative diseases: Focus on Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wenker, Shirley D; Casalía, Mariana; Candedo, Verónica Cavaliere; Casabona, Juan Cruz; Pitossi, Fernando J

    2015-11-14

    Adult cells from patients can be reprogrammed to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) which successively can be used to obtain specific cells such as neurons. This remarkable breakthrough represents a new way of studying diseases and brought new therapeutic perspectives in the field of regenerative medicine. This is particular true in the neurology field, where few techniques are amenable to study the affected tissue of the patient during illness progression, in addition to the lack of neuroprotective therapies for many diseases. In this review we discuss the advantages and unresolved issues of cell reprogramming and neuronal differentiation. We reviewed evidence using iPSCs-derived neurons from neurological patients. Focusing on data obtained from Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, we show that iPSC-derived neurons possess morphological and functional characteristics of this disease and build a case for the use of this technology to study PD and other neuropathologies while disease is in progress. These data show the enormous impact that this new technology starts to have on different purposes such as the study and design of future therapies of neurological disease, especially PD.

  20. Sagittal balance of the pelvis-spine complex and lumbar degenerative diseases. A comparative study about 85 cases

    PubMed Central

    Jund, Jérôme; Noseda, Olivier; Roussouly, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    Retrospective analysis of the spino-pelvic alignment in a population of 85 patients with a lumbar degenerative disease. Several previous publications reported the analysis of spino-pelvic alignment in the normal and low back pain population. Data suggested that patients with lumbar diseases have variations of sagittal alignment such as less distal lordosis, more proximal lumbar lordosis and a more vertical sacrum. Nevertheless most of these variations have been reported without reference to the pelvis shape which is well-known to strongly influence spino-pelvic alignment. The objective of this study was to analyse spino-pelvic parameters, including pelvis shape, in a population of 85 patients with a lumbar degenerative disease and compare these patients with a control group of normal volunteers. We analysed three different lumbar degenerative diseases: disc herniation (DH), n = 25; degenerative disc disease (DDD), n = 32; degenerative spondylolisthesis (DSPL), n = 28. Spino-pelvic alignment was analysed pre-operatively on full spine radiographs. Spino-pelvic parameters were measured as following: pelvic incidence, sacral slope, pelvic tilt, lumbar lordosis, thoracic kyphosis, spino-sacral angle and positioning of C7 plumb line. For each group of patients the sagittal profile was compared with a control population of 154 asymptomatic adults that was the subject of a previous study. In order to understand variations of spino-pelvic parameters in the patients’ population a stratification (matching) according to the pelvic incidence was done between the control group and each group of patients. Concerning first the pelvis shape, patients with DH and those with DDD demonstrated to have a mean pelvic incidence equal to 49.8° and 51.6°, respectively, versus 52° for the control group (no significant difference). Only young patients, less than 45 years old, with a disc disease (DH or DDD) demonstrated to have a pelvic incidence significantly lower (48.3°) than

  1. Laparoscopic Spine Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Opportunities Exhibit Opportunities Sponsorship Opportunities Log In Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Patient Information from SAGES Download PDF Find a SAGES Surgeon Laparoscopic Spine Surgery Your spine surgeon has determined that you ...

  2. Probiotics and gut health: a special focus on liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Gratz, Silvia Wilson; Mykkanen, Hannu; El-Nezami, Hani S

    2010-01-28

    Probiotic bacteria have well-established beneficial effects in the management of diarrhoeal diseases. Newer evidence suggests that probiotics have the potential to reduce the risk of developing inflammatory bowel diseases and intestinal bacterial overgrowth after gut surgery. In liver health, the main benefits of probiotics might occur through preventing the production and/or uptake of lipopolysaccharides in the gut, and therefore reducing levels of low-grade inflammation. Specific immune stimulation by probiotics through processes involving dendritic cells might also be beneficial to the host immunological status and help prevent pathogen translocation. Hepatic fat metabolism also seems to be influenced by the presence of commensal bacteria, and potentially by probiotics; although the mechanisms by which probiotic might act on the liver are still unclear. However, this might be of major importance in the future because low-grade inflammation, hepatic fat infiltration, and hepatitis might become more prevalent as a result of high fat intake and the increased prevalence of obesity.

  3. Inflammatory Bowel Disease Drugs: A Focus on Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, Kirsty M.; Barlow, Peter G.; Stevens, Craig; Henderson, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease [IBD] is characterized by chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. Medications such as corticosteroids, thiopurines, immunomodulators and biologic agents are used to induce and maintain remission; however, response to these drugs is variable and can diminish over time. Defective autophagy has been strongly linked to IBD pathogenesis, with evidence showing that enhancing autophagy may be therapeutically beneficial by regulating inflammation and clearing intestinal pathogens. It is plausible that the therapeutic effects of some IBD drugs are mediated in part through modulation of the autophagy pathway, with studies investigating a wide range of diseases and cell types demonstrating autophagy pathway regulation by these agents. This review will highlight the current evidence, both in vitro and in vivo, for the modulation of autophagy by drugs routinely used in IBD. A clearer understanding of their mechanisms of action will be invaluable to utilize these drugs in a more targeted and personalized manner in this diverse and often complex group of patients. PMID:27381462

  4. Angina pectoris in women: focus on microvascular disease.

    PubMed

    Zuchi, Cinzia; Tritto, Isabella; Ambrosio, Giuseppe

    2013-02-20

    Ischemic heart disease (IHD) is the leading cause of death among women in Western countries, and it is associated with higher morbidity and mortality than in men. Nevertheless, IHD in women remains underdiagnosed and undertreated, and the misperception that females are "protected" against cardiovascular disease leads to underestimation of their cardiovascular risk; instead, women with chest pain have a high risk of cardiovascular events. Women suffering from angina pectoris tend to have different characteristics compared to men, with a high prevalence of non-significant coronary artery disease. Angina in women is more commonly microvascular in origin than in men, and therefore standard diagnostic algorithms may be suboptimal for women. This different pathophysiology impacts clinical management of IHD in women. While response to medical therapy may differ in women, they are scarcely represented in clinical trials. Therefore, solid data in terms of gender efficacy of antianginal drugs are lacking, and particularly when angina is microvascular in origin women often continue to be symptomatic despite maximal therapy with classical antianginal drugs. Recently, new molecules have shown promising results in women. In conclusion, women with angina are a group of patients in whom it seems appropriate to concentrate efforts aimed at reducing morbidity and improving quality of life.

  5. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tan, Andrew M; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-08-05

    Neuropathic pain is a significant unmet medical need in patients with variety of injury or disease insults to the nervous system. Neuropathic pain often presents as a painful sensation described as electrical, burning, or tingling. Currently available treatments have limited effectiveness and narrow therapeutic windows for safety. More powerful analgesics, e.g., opioids, carry a high risk for chemical dependence. Thus, a major challenge for pain research is the elucidation of the mechanisms that underlie neuropathic pain and developing targeted strategies to alleviate pathological pain. The mechanistic link between dendritic spine structure and circuit function could explain why neuropathic pain is difficult to treat, since nociceptive processing pathways are adversely "hard-wired" through the reorganization of dendritic spines. Several studies in animal models of neuropathic pain have begun to reveal the functional contribution of dendritic spine dysgenesis in neuropathic pain. Previous reports have demonstrated three primary changes in dendritic spine structure on nociceptive dorsal horn neurons following injury or disease, which accompany chronic intractable pain: (I) increased density of dendritic spines, particularly mature mushroom-spine spines, (II) redistribution of spines toward dendritic branch locations close to the cell body, and (III) enlargement of the spine head diameter, which generally presents as a mushroom-shaped spine. Given the important functional implications of spine distribution, density, and shape for synaptic and neuronal function, the study of dendritic spine abnormality may provide a new perspective for investigating pain, and the identification of specific molecular players that regulate spine morphology may guide the development of more effective and long-lasting therapies.

  6. Gut barrier in health and disease: focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, D; Ianiro, G; Vanella, G; Bibbò, S; Bruno, G; Simeone, G; Mele, G

    2015-01-01

    The gut barrier is a functional unit, organized as a multi-layer system, made up of two main components: a physical barrier surface, which prevents bacterial adhesion and regulates paracellular diffusion to the host tissues, and a deep functional barrier, that is able to discriminate between pathogens and commensal microorganisms, organizing the immune tolerance and the immune response to pathogens. Other mechanisms, such as gastric juice and pancreatic enzymes (which both have antibacterial properties) participate in the luminal integrity of the gut barrier. From the outer layer to the inner layer, the physical barrier is composed of gut microbiota (that competes with pathogens to gain space and energy resources, processes the molecules necessary to mucosal integrity and modulates the immunological activity of deep barrier), mucus (which separates the intraluminal content from more internal layers and contains antimicrobial products and secretory IgA), epithelial cells (which form a physical and immunological barrier) and the innate and adaptive immune cells forming the gut-associated lymphoid tissue (which is responsible for antigen sampling and immune responses). Disruption of the gut barrier has been associated with many gastrointestinal diseases, but also with extra-intestinal pathological condition, such as type 1 diabetes mellitus, allergic diseases or autism spectrum disorders. The maintenance of a healthy intestinal barrier is therefore of paramount importance in children, for both health and economic reasons. Many drugs or compounds used in the treatment of gastrointestinal disorders act through the restoration of a normal intestinal permeability. Several studies have highlighted the role of probiotics in the modulation and reduction of intestinal permeability, considering the strong influence of gut microbiota in the modulation of the function and structure of gut barrier, but also on the immune response of the host. To date, available weapons for the

  7. Metformin and metabolic diseases: a focus on hepatic aspects.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Juan; Woo, Shih-Lung; Hu, Xiang; Botchlett, Rachel; Chen, Lulu; Huo, Yuqing; Wu, Chaodong

    2015-06-01

    Metformin has been widely used as a first-line anti-diabetic medicine for the treatment of type 2 diabetes (T2D). As a drug that primarily targets the liver, metformin suppresses hepatic glucose production (HGP), serving as the main mechanism by which metformin improves hyperglycemia of T2D. Biochemically, metformin suppresses gluconeogenesis and stimulates glycolysis. Metformin also inhibits glycogenolysis, which is a pathway that critically contributes to elevated HGP. While generating beneficial effects on hyperglycemia, metformin also improves insulin resistance and corrects dyslipidemia in patients with T2D. These beneficial effects of metformin implicate a role for metformin in managing non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. As supported by the results from both human and animal studies, metformin improves hepatic steatosis and suppresses liver inflammation. Mechanistically, the beneficial effects of metformin on hepatic aspects are mediated through both adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-dependent and AMPK-independent pathways. In addition, metformin is generally safe and may also benefit patients with other chronic liver diseases.

  8. Probiotics and gut health: A special focus on liver diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Silvia Wilson; Mykkanen, Hannu; El-Nezami, Hani S

    2010-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria have well-established beneficial effects in the management of diarrhoeal diseases. Newer evidence suggests that probiotics have the potential to reduce the risk of developing inflammatory bowel diseases and intestinal bacterial overgrowth after gut surgery. In liver health, the main benefits of probiotics might occur through preventing the production and/or uptake of lipopolysaccharides in the gut, and therefore reducing levels of low-grade inflammation. Specific immune stimulation by probiotics through processes involving dendritic cells might also be beneficial to the host immunological status and help prevent pathogen translocation. Hepatic fat metabolism also seems to be influenced by the presence of commensal bacteria, and potentially by probiotics; although the mechanisms by which probiotic might act on the liver are still unclear. However, this might be of major importance in the future because low-grade inflammation, hepatic fat infiltration, and hepatitis might become more prevalent as a result of high fat intake and the increased prevalence of obesity. PMID:20101763

  9. Passive ventricular remodeling in cardiac disease: focus on heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, Elise L.; Boulaksil, Mohamed; van Rijen, Harold V. M.; Vos, Marc A.; van Veen, Toon A. B.

    2014-01-01

    Passive ventricular remodeling is defined by the process of molecular ventricular adaptation to different forms of cardiac pathophysiology. It includes changes in tissue architecture, such as hypertrophy, fiber disarray, alterations in cell size and fibrosis. Besides that, it also includes molecular remodeling of gap junctions, especially those composed by Connexin43 proteins (Cx43) in the ventricles that affect cell-to-cell propagation of the electrical impulse, and changes in the sodium channels that modify excitability. All those alterations appear mainly in a heterogeneous manner, creating irregular and inhomogeneous electrical and mechanical coupling throughout the heart. This can predispose to reentry arrhythmias and adds to a further deterioration into heart failure. In this review, passive ventricular remodeling is described in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM), Dilated Cardiomyopathy (DCM), Ischemic Cardiomyopathy (ICM), and Arrhythmogenic Cardiomyopathy (ACM), with a main focus on the heterogeneity of those alterations mentioned above. PMID:25566084

  10. Parasitic diseases in travelers: a focus on therapy.

    PubMed

    Showler, Adrienne J; Wilson, Mary E; Kain, Kevin C; Boggild, Andrea K

    2014-04-01

    Parasitic infections are an important cause of illness among returned travelers, and can lead to considerable morbidity and, in some cases, mortality. The complexity of parasitic life cycles and geographic specificities can present diagnostic challenges, particularly in non-endemic settings to which most travelers return for care. Clinical manifestations reflect the diverse taxonomy and pathogenesis of parasites, and appropriate diagnosis and management therefore necessitate a high index of suspicion of parasitic illnesses. Much of our knowledge surrounding management of parasitic infections in travelers is extrapolated from evidence derived in endemic populations, or is based on expert opinion and case series. We herein provide an overview of parasitic diseases of short-term travelers, and summarize current therapeutic strategies for each illness.

  11. Red cell exchange: special focus on sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haewon C

    2014-12-05

    The primary function of red blood cells (RBCs) is to deliver oxygen from the lungs to tissues. Tissue hypoxia occurs when the oxygen-carrying capacity of RBCs is compromised due primarily to 3 causes: (1) a reduction in circulating RBC mass, (2) an increase in circulating RBC mass, or (3) abnormal hemoglobin (Hb) that either does not sufficiently release oxygen to tissues (high-oxygen-affinity hemoglobin) or occludes the microvasculature due to deformed RBCs (sickled RBCs). To improve oxygenation in patients with reduced or increased RBC mass, RBC administration (simple transfusion) or RBC removal (RBC depletion) is performed, respectively. However, for patients with abnormal Hb, RBCs containing abnormal Hb are removed and replaced by healthy volunteer donor RBCs by red cell exchange (RCE). RCE can be performed by manual exchange or by automated exchange using a blood cell separator (erythrocytapheresis). In this review, indications for RCE in sickle cell disease using the evidence-based American Society for Apheresis categories(1) are presented and the rationale for RCE in each disorder are discussed. Simple transfusion versus RCE and manual RCE versus automated RCE are compared. Finally, this review briefly presents some of the challenges of performing erythrocytapheresis in small children and discusses various choices for central venous access during RCE.(2.)

  12. Neuroimmunomodulation in the Gut: Focus on Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Intestinal immunity is finely regulated by several concomitant and overlapping mechanisms, in order to efficiently sense external stimuli and mount an adequate response of either tolerance or defense. In this context, a complex interplay between immune and nonimmune cells is responsible for the maintenance of normal homeostasis. However, in certain conditions, the disruption of such an intricate network may result in intestinal inflammation, including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). IBD is believed to result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors acting in concert with an inappropriate immune response, which in turn interacts with nonimmune cells, including nervous system components. Currently, evidence shows that the interaction between the immune and the nervous system is bidirectional and plays a critical role in the regulation of intestinal inflammation. Recently, the maintenance of intestinal homeostasis has been shown to be under the reciprocal control of the microbiota by immune mechanisms, whereas intestinal microorganisms can modulate mucosal immunity. Therefore, in addition to presenting the mechanisms underlying the interaction between immune and nervous systems in the gut, here we discuss the role of the microbiota also in the regulation of neuroimmune crosstalk involved in intestinal homeostasis and inflammation, with potential implications to IBD pathogenesis. PMID:27471349

  13. Casting a Net on Dendritic Spines: The Extracellular Matrix and its Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dansie, Lorraine E.; Ethell, Iryna M.

    2011-01-01

    Dendritic spines are dynamic structures that accommodate the majority of excitatory synapses in the brain and are influenced by extracellular signals from presynaptic neurons, glial cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM surrounds dendritic spines and extends into the synaptic cleft, maintaining synapse integrity as well as mediating trans-synaptic communications between neurons. Several scaffolding proteins and glycans that compose the ECM form a lattice-like network, which serves as an attractive ground for various secreted glycoproteins, lectins, growth factors and enzymes. ECM components can control dendritic spines through the interactions with their specific receptors or by influencing the functions of other synaptic proteins. In this review, we focus on ECM components and their receptors that regulate dendritic spine development and plasticity in the normal and diseased brain. PMID:21834084

  14. Brachioradial pruritus and cervical spine manipulation.

    PubMed

    Tait, C P; Grigg, E; Quirk, C J

    1998-08-01

    Brachioradial pruritus (BRP) causes significant morbidity in the majority of patients for whom no effective treatment is found. Chronic ultraviolet radiation exposure has usually been cited as the cause, but nerve damage from cervical spine disease has also been implicated. We report on a small retrospective exploratory study, conducted by questionnaire, of a group of patients who were treated with a specific cervical spine manipulation. Ten of 14 patients reported resolution of symptoms following manipulative treatment. All six patients who had had previous cervical spine disease responded to manipulation, as did half the remaining eight patients who had no previous history of neck symptoms. Although patients with BRP, by definition, share similar symptoms, the aetiology is almost certainly multifactorial. Prospective studies looking for cervical spine disease, as well as assessment of this particular method of cervical spine manipulation as a treatment modality for BRP, should be considered.

  15. Factors predicting venous thromboembolism after spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Yang, Si-Dong; Huang, Wen-Zheng; Liu, Feng-Yu; Wang, Hui; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: A meta-analysis was performed to explore predicted factors of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after surgery in the treatment for spine degeneration diseases. Summary of background data: Many scholars have focused on VTE after spine surgery, but as for the risk factors of VTE have not reached a consensus. Methods: An extensive search of literature, “spine or spinal,” “degeneration,” “after surgery or postoperation,” and “venous thromboembolism” as key words, was performed in PubMed/MEDLINE, Embase, the Cochrane library, CNKI, and WANFANG databases. The following variables were extracted: wearing elastic stocking, hypertension (HT), heart disease, diabetes, drinking, anticoagulant therapy, walking disability preoperation, smoking, sex, age, surgical duration, fusion versus nonfusion (lumbar fusion vs lumbar discectomy), surgical site (cervical vs lumbar), blood loss, and body mass index. Data analysis was conducted with RevMan 5.3 and STATA 12.0. Results: A total of 12 studies were identified, including 34,597 patients of whom 624 patients had VTE, and the incidence of VTE was 2% in all patients who underwent spine surgery. The incidence of VTE for Asian patients was 7.5%, compared with 1% VTE for Occidental patients; the difference was significant (P < 0.0001). The pooled analysis showed that there were significant differences regarding wearing elastic stocking (odds ratio [OR] = 11.71, 95% confidence interval [CI] [1.46, 94.00], P = 0.02), walking disability preoperation (OR = 4.80, 95% CI [2.53, 9.12], P < 0.00001), surgical site (lumbar surgery) (OR = 0.23, 95% CI [0.20, 0.27], P < 0.00001), HT (OR = 1.59, 95% CI [1.21, 2.10], P = 0.001), and diabetes (OR = 2.12, 95% CI [1.09, 4.10], P = 0.03). However, there were no significant differences in blood loss, heart disease, smoking, sex, surgical duration, body mass index, surgical duration, anticoagulant therapy, wearing elastic stocking

  16. CaMKII-dependent dendrite ramification and spine generation promote spatial training-induced memory improvement in a rat model of sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xia; Chai, Gao-Shang; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Hu, Yu; Li, Xiao-Guang; Ma, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Qun; Wang, Jian-Zhi; Liu, Gong-Ping

    2015-02-01

    Participation in cognitively stimulating activities can preserve memory capacities in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the mechanism is not fully understood. Here, we used a rat model with hyperhomocysteinemia, an independent risk factor of AD, to study whether spatial training could remodel the synaptic and/or dendritic plasticity and the key molecular target(s) involved. We found that spatial training in water maze remarkably improved the subsequent short-term and long-term memory performance in contextual fear conditioning and Barnes maze. The trained rats showed an enhanced dendrite ramification, spine generation and plasticity in dentate gyrus (DG) neurons, and stimulation of long-term potentiation between perforant path and DG circuit. Spatial training also increased the levels of postsynaptic GluA1, GluN2A, GluN2B, and PSD93 with selective activation of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), although inhibition of CaMKII by stereotaxic injection of KN93 into hippocampal DG, abolished the training-induced cognitive improvement, dendrite ramification, and spine generation. We conclude that spatial training can preserve the cognitive function by CaMKII-dependent remodeling of dendritic plasticity in hyperhomocysteinemia-induced sporadic AD-like rats.

  17. Brilliant Blue G improves cognition in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease and inhibits amyloid-β-induced loss of filopodia and dendrite spines in hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Chen, X; Hu, J; Jiang, L; Xu, S; Zheng, B; Wang, C; Zhang, J; Wei, X; Chang, L; Wang, Q

    2014-10-24

    Deposits of amyloid-β (Aβ) protein are one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Numerous studies report that the Aβ peptide, especially in the oligomeric form, causes memory decline and other cognitive deficits. However, there have been very few effective interventions for termination or even delay of AD progression. Brilliant Blue G (BBG), a safe triphenylmethane dye and P2X7 antagonist, has been reported to have protective effects on neuroinflammation, ischemia, spinal injury and neurodegenerative disorders. Here we report that systematic administration of BBG diminishes spatial memory impairment and cognitive deficits in a mouse AD model produced by injecting soluble Aβ peptide into the hippocampal CA1 region. In addition, we show that Aβ-induced loss of filopodia and spine density in cultured hippocampal neurons was prevented by administration of BBG. We conclude that BBG prevents the learning and memory impairment and cognitive deficits induced by the toxicity of soluble Aβ, and improves the development of dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons in an AD model mouse. Considering the safety and blood-brain-barrier (BBB)-permeability of BBG, our data suggest a potential for BBG as a new therapy for AD.

  18. An Injectable Method for Posterior Lateral Spine Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    spine area but is also used to treat diseases in the cervical and thoracic spine regions [2]. Spinal fusion has been developed with the bone...Lateral Spine Fusion PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Elizabeth Olmsted-Davis CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Baylor College of Medicine...Method for Posterior Lateral Spine Fusion 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0475 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr. Elizabeth A

  19. San Pablo Avenue Green Stormwater Spine

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP San Pablo Avenue Green Stormwater Spine Project project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  20. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This is an illustrated text on computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine with an emphasis on the role and value of multiplanar imaging for helping determine diagnoses. The book has adequate discussion of scanning techniques for the different regions, interpretations of various abnormalities, degenerative disk disease, and different diagnoses. There is a 50-page chapter on detailed sectional anatomy of the spine and useful chapters on the postoperative spine and the planning and performing of spinal surgery with CT multiplanar reconstruction. There are comprehensive chapters on spinal tumors and trauma. The final two chapters of the book are devoted to CT image processing using digital networks and CT applications of medical computer graphics.

  1. Spine Injuries and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Your backbone, or spine, is made up of 26 bone discs called vertebrae. The vertebrae protect your spinal cord and allow you to ... of problems can change the structure of the spine or damage the vertebrae and surrounding tissue. They ...

  2. Quantitative characterization of metastatic disease in the spine. Part I. Semiautomated segmentation using atlas-based deformable registration and the level set method

    SciTech Connect

    Hardisty, M.; Gordon, L.; Agarwal, P.; Skrinskas, T.; Whyne, C.

    2007-08-15

    Quantitative assessment of metastatic disease in bone is often considered immeasurable and, as such, patients with skeletal metastases are often excluded from clinical trials. In order to effectively quantify the impact of metastatic tumor involvement in the spine, accurate segmentation of the vertebra is required. Manual segmentation can be accurate but involves extensive and time-consuming user interaction. Potential solutions to automating segmentation of metastatically involved vertebrae are demons deformable image registration and level set methods. The purpose of this study was to develop a semiautomated method to accurately segment tumor-bearing vertebrae using the aforementioned techniques. By maintaining morphology of an atlas, the demons-level set composite algorithm was able to accurately differentiate between trans-cortical tumors and surrounding soft tissue of identical intensity. The algorithm successfully segmented both the vertebral body and trabecular centrum of tumor-involved and healthy vertebrae. This work validates our approach as equivalent in accuracy to an experienced user.

  3. FocusHeuristics - expression-data-driven network optimization and disease gene prediction.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Mathias; Du, Yang; Warsow, Gregor; Hamed, Mohamed; Endlich, Nicole; Endlich, Karlhans; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Sklarz, Lisa-Madeleine; Sender, Sina; Junghanß, Christian; Möller, Steffen; Fuellen, Georg; Struckmann, Stephan

    2017-02-16

    To identify genes contributing to disease phenotypes remains a challenge for bioinformatics. Static knowledge on biological networks is often combined with the dynamics observed in gene expression levels over disease development, to find markers for diagnostics and therapy, and also putative disease-modulatory drug targets and drugs. The basis of current methods ranges from a focus on expression-levels (Limma) to concentrating on network characteristics (PageRank, HITS/Authority Score), and both (DeMAND, Local Radiality). We present an integrative approach (the FocusHeuristics) that is thoroughly evaluated based on public expression data and molecular disease characteristics provided by DisGeNet. The FocusHeuristics combines three scores, i.e. the log fold change and another two, based on the sum and difference of log fold changes of genes/proteins linked in a network. A gene is kept when one of the scores to which it contributes is above a threshold. Our FocusHeuristics is both, a predictor for gene-disease-association and a bioinformatics method to reduce biological networks to their disease-relevant parts, by highlighting the dynamics observed in expression data. The FocusHeuristics is slightly, but significantly better than other methods by its more successful identification of disease-associated genes measured by AUC, and it delivers mechanistic explanations for its choice of genes.

  4. FocusHeuristics – expression-data-driven network optimization and disease gene prediction

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Mathias; Du, Yang; Warsow, Gregor; Hamed, Mohamed; Endlich, Nicole; Endlich, Karlhans; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Sklarz, Lisa-Madeleine; Sender, Sina; Junghanß, Christian; Möller, Steffen; Fuellen, Georg; Struckmann, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    To identify genes contributing to disease phenotypes remains a challenge for bioinformatics. Static knowledge on biological networks is often combined with the dynamics observed in gene expression levels over disease development, to find markers for diagnostics and therapy, and also putative disease-modulatory drug targets and drugs. The basis of current methods ranges from a focus on expression-levels (Limma) to concentrating on network characteristics (PageRank, HITS/Authority Score), and both (DeMAND, Local Radiality). We present an integrative approach (the FocusHeuristics) that is thoroughly evaluated based on public expression data and molecular disease characteristics provided by DisGeNet. The FocusHeuristics combines three scores, i.e. the log fold change and another two, based on the sum and difference of log fold changes of genes/proteins linked in a network. A gene is kept when one of the scores to which it contributes is above a threshold. Our FocusHeuristics is both, a predictor for gene-disease-association and a bioinformatics method to reduce biological networks to their disease-relevant parts, by highlighting the dynamics observed in expression data. The FocusHeuristics is slightly, but significantly better than other methods by its more successful identification of disease-associated genes measured by AUC, and it delivers mechanistic explanations for its choice of genes. PMID:28205611

  5. Does Disease Matter? Incorporating Solution-Focused Brief Therapy in Alcoholism Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Cynthia J.

    1997-01-01

    Surveyed alcoholism counselors (N=284) to determine whether the disease concept of alcoholism precludes acceptance and use of Solution-Focused Brief Therapy (SFBT) in alcoholism treatment. Results suggest that SFBT may be feasible for alcoholism treatment and that endorsement of the disease concept is compatible with the principles of SFBT. (EMK)

  6. Focus issue articles on emerging and re-emerging plant diseases

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This review sums up the key findings of seventeen articles on emerging and re-emerging plant diseases that are designated for the July focus issue in Phytopathology. The emerging and re-emerging diseases discussed include those caused by three viral, six fungal, five oomycete, and four bacterial pa...

  7. [Status and future focus of the national control program on parasitic diseases].

    PubMed

    Xiao-Nong, Zhou

    2011-10-01

    The achievements and challenges in the national control program on parasitic diseases in PR China were presented after trend analysis of the national and international control activities and programs. The future focus on research and control of parasitic diseases in PR China was put forward in order to achieve the long-term goal of eliminating the parasitic diseases as public health problem in the country.

  8. Lumbar spine after surgery for herniated disk: imaging findings in the early postoperative period.

    PubMed

    Dina, T S; Boden, S D; Davis, D O

    1995-03-01

    Imaging the lumbar spine after surgery for disk herniation is all too often an unrewarding challenge. A constellation of findings is inevitable, and determining their significance is often impossible. The challenge is greatest during the first few months following surgery, when the rules of scar enhancement, deformity, and mass effect do not apply to differentiation of the abnormal from the normal. A clear understanding of normal postoperative healing is necessary to avoid overreaction to misleading findings. This report reviews imaging of the lumbar spine in the early postoperative period (i.e., the first 6 months after surgery), focusing on the normal healing process that so often mimics complicating or recurrent disease.

  9. Spine injuries in dancers.

    PubMed

    Gottschlich, Laura M; Young, Craig C

    2011-01-01

    Care of a dancer calls for a unique balance between athlete and artist. The physician must familiarize himself or herself with dance terminology, common moves, correct technique, and dancer's mentality. The goal is to work intimately with the dancer to care for the injury and, if possible, continue to participate in portions of dance class to limit anxiety and increase compliance to treatment. The spine is the second most injured area of the body in dancers, and many issues stem from poor technique and muscle imbalance. This often leads to hyperlordosis, spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis, lumbar facet sprain, discogenic back pain, and muscle spasm and piriformis syndrome. This article reviews these causes of low back pain with a focus on dance-related presentation and treatment issues.

  10. Osteoarthritis of the wrist and hand, and spine.

    PubMed

    Feydy, Antoine; Pluot, Etienne; Guerini, Henri; Drapé, Jean-Luc

    2009-07-01

    Although osteoarthritis (OA) of the wrist and fingers is routinely diagnosed using plain film, a thorough assessment of cartilage injuries using CT-arthrography, MR imaging, or MR-arthrography remains necessary before any surgical procedure. MR imaging is ideally suited for delineating the presence, extent, and complications of degenerative spinal disease, including OA of the spine involving the disk space, vertebral endplates, facet joints, or supportive and surrounding soft tissues. Other imaging modalities such as CT, dynamic radiography, myelography, and discography may provide complimentary information in selected cases. This article focuses on imaging of OA of the wrist and hand and the lumbar spine, with an emphasis on current MR imaging grading systems available for the assessment of discovertebral lesions.

  11. Trends in hospital admissions and surgical procedures for degenerative lumbar spine disease in England: a 15-year time-series study

    PubMed Central

    Sivasubramaniam, Vinothan; Patel, Hitesh C; Ozdemir, Baris A; Papadopoulos, Marios C

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Low back pain (LBP), from degenerative lumbar spine disease, represents a significant burden on healthcare resources. Studies worldwide report trends attributable to their country's specific demographics and healthcare system. Considering England's specific medico-socioeconomic conditions, we investigate recent trends in hospital admissions and procedures for LBP, and discuss the implications for the allocation of healthcare resources. Design Retrospective cohort study using Hospital Episode Statistics data relating to degenerative lumbar spine disease in England, between 1999 and 2013. Regression models were used to analyse trends. Outcome measures Trends in the number of admissions and procedures for LBP, mean patient age, gender and length of stay. Results Hospital admissions and procedures have increased significantly over the study period, from 127.09 to 216.16 and from 24.5 to 48.83 per 100 000, respectively, (p<0.001). The increase was most marked in the oldest age groups with a 1.9 and 2.33-fold increase in admissions for patients aged 60–74 and ≥75 years, respectively, and a 2.8-fold increase in procedures for those aged ≥60 years. Trends in hospital admissions were characterised by a widening gender gap, increasing mean patient age, and decreasing mean hospital stay (p<0.001). Trends in procedures were characterised by a narrowing gender gap, increasing mean patient age (p=0.014) and decreasing mean hospital stay (p<0.001). Linear regression models estimate that each hospital admission translates to 0.27 procedures, per 100 000 (95% CI 0.25 to 0.30, r 0.99, p<0.001; r, Pearson's correlation coefficient). Hospital admissions are increasing at 3.5 times the rate of surgical procedures (regression gradient 7.63 vs 2.18 per 100 000/year). Conclusions LBP represents a significant and increasing workload for hospitals in England. These trends demonstrate an increasing demand for specialists involved in the surgical and non

  12. Vitamin D and spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Mabey, Thomas; Singhatanadgige, Weerasak; Yingsakmongkol, Wicharn; Limthongkul, Worawat; Honsawek, Sittisak

    2016-01-01

    Vitamin D is crucial for musculoskeletal health, maintenance, and function. Vitamin D insufficiency is common among patients undergoing spine surgery and the ideal vitamin D level for spine surgery has yet to be investigated. There is a high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in patients with musculoskeletal pain regardless of surgical intervention. With the frequency and costs of spine surgery increasing, it is imperative that efforts are continued to reduce the impact on patients and healthcare services. Studies into vitamin D and its associations with orthopaedic surgery have yielded alarming findings with regards to the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. Importantly, altered vitamin D status also contributes to a wide range of disease conditions. Therefore, future investigations are still essential for better understanding the relationship between vitamin D and spine surgery outcomes. Whilst further research is required to fully elucidate the extent of the effects of hypovitaminosis D has on surgical outcomes, it is strongly advisable to reduce the impacts by appropriate vitamin D supplementation of deficient and at-risk patients. PMID:27900269

  13. New pharmacological strategies for treatment of Alzheimer's disease: focus on disease modifying drugs.

    PubMed

    Salomone, Salvatore; Caraci, Filippo; Leggio, Gian Marco; Fedotova, Julia; Drago, Filippo

    2012-04-01

    Current approved drug treatments for Alzheimer disease (AD) include cholinesterase inhibitors (donepezil, rivastigmine, galantamine) and the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine. These drugs provide symptomatic relief but poorly affect the progression of the disease. Drug discovery has been directed, in the last 10 years, to develop 'disease modifying drugs' hopefully able to counteract the progression of AD. Because in a chronic, slow progressing pathological process, such as AD, an early start of treatment enhances the chance of success, it is crucial to have biomarkers for early detection of AD-related brain dysfunction, usable before clinical onset. Reliable early biomarkers need therefore to be prospectively tested for predictive accuracy, with specific cut off values validated in clinical practice. Disease modifying drugs developed so far include drugs to reduce β amyloid (Aβ) production, drugs to prevent Aβ aggregation, drugs to promote Aβ clearance, drugs targeting tau phosphorylation and assembly and other approaches. Unfortunately none of these drugs has demonstrated efficacy in phase 3 studies. The failure of clinical trials with disease modifying drugs raises a number of questions, spanning from methodological flaws to fundamental understanding of AD pathophysiology and biology. Recently, new diagnostic criteria applicable to presymptomatic stages of AD have been published. These new criteria may impact on drug development, such that future trials on disease modifying drugs will include populations susceptible to AD, before clinical onset. Specific problems with completed trials and hopes with ongoing trials are discussed in this review.

  14. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Early Prevention of Inflammatory Neurodegenerative Disease: A Focus on Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, J; Thomas, C J; Radcliffe, J; Itsiopoulos, C

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Furthermore, AD has provided the most positive indication to support the fact that inflammation contributes to neurodegenerative disease. The exact etiology of AD is unknown, but environmental and genetic factors are thought to contribute, such as advancing age, family history, presence of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, and poor diet and lifestyle. It is hypothesised that early prevention or management of inflammation could delay the onset or reduce the symptoms of AD. Normal physiological changes to the brain with ageing include depletion of long chain omega-3 fatty acids and brains of AD patients have lower docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels. DHA supplementation can reduce markers of inflammation. This review specifically focusses on the evidence in humans from epidemiological, dietary intervention, and supplementation studies, which supports the role of long chain omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention or delay of cognitive decline in AD in its early stages. Longer term trials with long chain omega-3 supplementation in early stage AD are warranted. We also highlight the importance of overall quality and composition of the diet to protect against AD and dementia.

  15. Omega-3 Fatty Acids in Early Prevention of Inflammatory Neurodegenerative Disease: A Focus on Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, J.; Thomas, C. J.; Radcliffe, J.; Itsiopoulos, C.

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia and the most common neurodegenerative disease in the elderly. Furthermore, AD has provided the most positive indication to support the fact that inflammation contributes to neurodegenerative disease. The exact etiology of AD is unknown, but environmental and genetic factors are thought to contribute, such as advancing age, family history, presence of chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes, and poor diet and lifestyle. It is hypothesised that early prevention or management of inflammation could delay the onset or reduce the symptoms of AD. Normal physiological changes to the brain with ageing include depletion of long chain omega-3 fatty acids and brains of AD patients have lower docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) levels. DHA supplementation can reduce markers of inflammation. This review specifically focusses on the evidence in humans from epidemiological, dietary intervention, and supplementation studies, which supports the role of long chain omega-3 fatty acids in the prevention or delay of cognitive decline in AD in its early stages. Longer term trials with long chain omega-3 supplementation in early stage AD are warranted. We also highlight the importance of overall quality and composition of the diet to protect against AD and dementia. PMID:26301243

  16. Perspectives of People with a Chronic Disease on Participating in Work: A Focus Group Study.

    PubMed

    Vooijs, Marloes; Leensen, Monique C J; Hoving, Jan L; Wind, Haije; Frings-Dresen, Monique H W

    2017-01-18

    Purpose To explore solutions that people with a chronic disease use to overcome difficulties they experience regarding participating in work, and the support they require to identify or implement these solutions. Methods Focus groups were held to explore solutions and support requirements of people with a chronic disease. Participants were recruited through a research institution's patient panel, a patient federation and personal networks. Analysis was conducted by means of open and selective coding, using the MAXQDA software package. Results Five focus groups were held with 19 participants with different chronic diseases. Solutions that were identified included learning to accept and cope with the disease, which is frequently supported by family and friends. Disclosing the disease to employers and colleagues, identifying active ways to help with duties, and implementing adaptations to the work environment were all effective solutions with the help, empathy and understanding of people in the work environment. Solutions mostly supported by patient associations included providing sufficient information about the disease, relevant help and protective legal regulations regarding work participation. Finally, health professionals could support solutions such as incorporating periods of rest, promoting self-efficacy and gaining insight into an individual's ability to participate in work. Conclusions People with a chronic disease suggested various solutions that can help overcome difficulties surrounding participating in work. Support from friends and family, patient associations, employers, colleagues and occupational health professionals is needed to help identify and implement suitable solutions.

  17. Alzheimer disease therapeutics: focus on the disease and not just plaques and tangles.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2014-04-15

    The bulk of AD research during the last 25 years has been Aβ-centric based on a strong faith in the Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis which is not supported by the data on humans. To date, Aβ-based therapeutic clinical trials on sporadic cases of AD have been negative. Although most likely the major reason for the failure is that Aβ is not an effective therapeutic target for sporadic AD, initiation of the treatment at mild to moderate stages of the disease is blamed as too late to be effective. Clinical trials on presymptomatic familial AD cases have been initiated with the logic that Aβ is a trigger of the disease and hence initiation of the Aβ immunotherapies several years before any clinical symptoms would be effective. There is an urgent need to explore targets other than Aβ. There is now increasing interest in inhibiting tau pathology, which does have a far more compelling rationale than Aβ. AD is multifactorial and over 99% of the cases are the sporadic form of the disease. Understanding of the various etiopathogenic mechanisms of sporadic AD and generation of the disease-relevant animal models are required to develop rational therapeutic targets and therapies. Treatment of AD will require both inhibition of neurodegeneration and regeneration of the brain.

  18. Alzheimer Disease Therapeutics: Focus on the Disease and Not Just Plaques and Tangles

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Khalid; Liu, Fei; Gong, Cheng-Xin

    2014-01-01

    The bulk of AD research during the last twenty-five years has been Aβ-centric based on a strong faith in the Amyloid Cascade Hypothesis which is not supported by the data on humans. To date, Aβ-based therapeutic clinical trials on sporadic cases of AD have been negative. Although most likely the major reason for the failure is that Aβ is not an effective therapeutic target for sporadic AD, initiation of the treatment at mild to moderate stages of the disease is blamed as too late to be effective. Clinical trials on presymptomatic familial AD cases have been initiated with the logic that Aβ is a trigger of the disease and hence initiation of the Aβ immunotherapies several years before any clinical symptoms would be effective. There is an urgent need to explore targets other than Aβ. There is now increasing interest in inhibiting tau pathology, which does have a far more compelling rationale than Aβ. AD is multifactorial and over 99% of the cases are the sporadic form of the disease. Understanding of the various etiopathogenic mechanisms of sporadic AD and generation of the disease-relevant animal models are required to develop rational therapeutic targets and therapies. Treatment of AD will require both inhibition of neurodegeneration and regeneration of the brain. PMID:24418409

  19. Doing "It" Differently: Relinquishing the Disease and Pregnancy Prevention Focus in Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Louisa

    2007-01-01

    Despite policy provision enabling sexuality education to address more than disease and pregnancy prevention, this focus continues to permeate many school programmes. This paper problematises the danger prevention emphasis in sexuality education, examines school's investment in it and asks how useful it is. The ways this kind of sexuality education…

  20. Interactive Introductory Nutrition Course Focusing on Disease Prevention Increased Whole-Grain Consumption by College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ha, Eun-Jeong; Caine-Bish, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To estimate current consumption of whole grains in college students and determine whether there would be an increase in whole-grain consumption after the students completed an interactive introductory nutrition course focusing on disease prevention. Methods: Eighty college students, 18-24 years old, participated in the study. Grain and…

  1. Minimally invasive spine surgery in spinal infections. An up-date.

    PubMed

    Verdú López, Francisco; Vanaclocha Vanaclocha, Vicente; Mayorga-Villa, Juan D

    2016-10-27

    Although spinal infections have always been present recently their incidence has increased, in partly fostered by the advances in medicine (i.e. compromised 10 immunity, chronic diseases, increasingly complex spinal procedures...) and increased life expectancy. Using PubMed for this systematic review, the main spine infections types will be addressed focusing in the minimally invasive surgical techniques that can be used in their treatment. Spontaneous and iatrogenic pyogenic and non-pyogenic spine infections can be treated in many different ways depending on their extension and 15 location as well as on their causative microorganisms. The indications of percutaneous image-guided, endoscopic and microsurgical treatment techniques will be updated. In spine infections minimally invasive surgical techniques show a great potential as to be safe, effective, with low surgical morbidity and fast patients' recovery.

  2. Tumors of the spine

    PubMed Central

    Ciftdemir, Mert; Kaya, Murat; Selcuk, Esref; Yalniz, Erol

    2016-01-01

    Spine tumors comprise a small percentage of reasons for back pain and other symptoms originating in the spine. The majority of the tumors involving the spinal column are metastases of visceral organ cancers which are mostly seen in older patients. Primary musculoskeletal system sarcomas involving the spinal column are rare. Benign tumors and tumor-like lesions of the musculoskeletal system are mostly seen in young patients and often cause instability and canal compromise. Optimal diagnosis and treatment of spine tumors require a multidisciplinary approach and thorough knowledge of both spine surgery and musculoskeletal tumor surgery. Either primary or metastatic tumors involving the spine are demanding problems in terms of diagnosis and treatment. Spinal instability and neurological compromise are the main and critical problems in patients with tumors of the spinal column. In the past, only a few treatment options aiming short-term control were available for treatment of primary and metastatic spine tumors. Spine surgeons adapted their approach for spine tumors according to orthopaedic oncologic principles in the last 20 years. Advances in imaging, surgical techniques and implant technology resulted in better diagnosis and surgical treatment options, especially for primary tumors. Also, modern chemotherapy drugs and regimens with new radiotherapy and radiosurgery options caused moderate to long-term local and systemic control for even primary sarcomas involving the spinal column. PMID:26925382

  3. Disease Management in the Genomics Era-Summaries of Focus Issue Papers.

    PubMed

    Klosterman, S J; Rollins, J R; Sudarshana, M R; Vinatzer, B A

    2016-10-01

    The genomics revolution has contributed enormously to research and disease management applications in plant pathology. This development has rapidly increased our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning pathogenesis and resistance, contributed novel markers for rapid pathogen detection and diagnosis, and offered further insights into the genetics of pathogen populations on a larger scale. The availability of whole genome resources coupled with next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies has helped fuel genomics-based approaches to improve disease resistance in crops. NGS technologies have accelerated the pace at which whole plant and pathogen genomes have become available, and made possible the metagenomic analysis of plant-associated microbial communities. Furthermore, NGS technologies can now be applied routinely and cost effectively to rapidly generate plant and/or pathogen genome or transcriptome marker sequences associated with virulence phenotypes in the pathogen or resistance phenotypes in the plant, potentially leading to improvements in plant disease management. In some systems, investments in plant and pathogen genomics have led to immediate, tangible benefits. This focus issue covers some of the systems. The articles in this focus issue range from overall perspective articles to research articles describing specific genomics applications for detection and control of diseases caused by nematode, viral, bacterial, fungal, and oomycete pathogens. The following are representative short summaries of the articles that appear in this Focus Issue .

  4. Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources Drugs, Procedures & Devices Procedures & Devices Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain Drugs, Procedures & DevicesProcedures & DevicesYour Health Resources ...

  5. A Comprehensive Fluid Dynamic-Diffusion Model of Blood Microcirculation with Focus on Sickle Cell Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Floch, Francois; Harris, Wesley L.

    2009-11-01

    A novel methodology has been developed to address sickle cell disease, based on highly descriptive mathematical models for blood flow in the capillaries. Our investigations focus on the coupling between oxygen delivery and red blood cell dynamics, which is crucial to understanding sickle cell crises and is unique to this blood disease. The main part of our work is an extensive study of blood dynamics through simulations of red cells deforming within the capillary vessels, and relies on the use of a large mathematical system of equations describing oxygen transfer, blood plasma dynamics and red cell membrane mechanics. This model is expected to lead to the development of new research strategies for sickle cell disease. Our simulation model could be used not only to assess current researched remedies, but also to spur innovative research initiatives, based on our study of the physical properties coupled in sickle cell disease.

  6. European Guidelines on Pericardial Diseases: a Focused Review of Novel Aspects.

    PubMed

    Fardman, Alexander; Charron, Philippe; Imazio, Massimo; Adler, Yehuda

    2016-05-01

    Pericardial diseases are not uncommon in daily clinical practice. The spectrum of these syndromes includes acute and chronic pericarditis, pericardial effusion, constrictive pericarditis, congenital defects, and neoplasms. The extent of the high-quality evidence on pericardial diseases has expanded significantly since the first international guidelines on pericardial disease management were published by the European Society of Cardiology in 2004. The clinical practice guidelines provide a useful reference for physicians in selecting the best management strategy for an individual patient by summarizing the current state of knowledge in a particular field. The new clinical guidelines on the diagnosis and management of pericardial diseases that have been published by the European Society of Cardiology in 2015 represent such a tool and focus on assisting the physicians in their daily clinical practice. The aim of this review is to outline and emphasize the most clinically relevant new aspects of the current guidelines as compared with its previous version published in 2004.

  7. Tuberculosis of spine

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vinod; Patgaonkar, P. R.; Nagariya, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the spine is one of the most common spine pathology in India. Over last 4 decades a lot has changed in the diagnosis, medical treatment and surgical procedures to treat this disorder. Further developments in diagnosis using molecular genetic techniques, more effective antibiotics and more aggressive surgical protocols have become essential with emergence of multidrug resistant TB. Surgical procedures such as single stage anterior and posterior stabilization, extrapleral dorsal spine anterior stabilization and endoscopic thoracoscopic surgeries have reduced the mortality and morbidity of the surgical procedures. is rapidly progressing. It is a challenge to treat MDR-TB Spine with late onset paraplegia and progressive deformity. Physicians must treat tuberculosis of spine on the basis of Culture and sensitivity. PMID:21572628

  8. Vaccination of the immune-compromised patients with focus on patients with autoimmune-inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Bijl, M; Kallenberg, C G M; van Assen, S

    2011-01-01

    Among immunocompromised patients morbidity and mortality due to vaccine-preventable infections is high. Although vaccination seems indicated, controversy exists about which vaccines should be offered, at what moment, and to whom. Guidelines are needed as the number of immunocompromised individuals increases due to the wider use of immunosuppressive drugs and, in particular, because since the introduction of biological agents, the spectrum of immunosuppressive drugs is rapidly expanding. In this review we will highlight controversies about vaccination in immunocompromised patients and will discuss indications for the several vaccines available to prevent infectious diseases with the focus on patients with autoimmune-inflammatory diseases.

  9. Pathogenesis and prevention of rheumatic disease: focus on preclinical RA and SLE

    PubMed Central

    and, Kevin D. Deane; El-Gabalawy, Hani

    2014-01-01

    Established and emerging data demonstrate that a ‘preclinical’ period of disease precedes the onset of clinical rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), as well as other autoimmune rheumatic diseases (ARDs).This preclinical stage of development of disease is characterized by abnormalities in disease-related biomarkers before the onset of the clinically apparent signs and symptoms. Numerous genetic and environmental risk factors for ARDs have also been identified, and many of these factors are likely to act before the clinical appearance of tissue injury to initiate and/or propagate autoimmunity and autoimmune disease. Thus, biomarkers representative of these autoimmune processes could potentially be used in conjunction with other clinical parameters during the preclinical period of ARDs to predict the future development of clinically apparent disease. This Review focuses on the preclinical stages of RA and SLE, as our current understanding of these diseases can be used to present an overall model of the development of ARDs that might ultimately be used to develop screening programmes and preventive strategies. Important considerations for the future development of such approaches, in particular, the issues that require additional research and how they might be addressed, are also discussed. PMID:24514912

  10. World Kidney Day 2016: averting the legacy of kidney disease-focus on childhood.

    PubMed

    Ingelfinger, Julie R; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Schaefer, Franz

    2016-04-01

    World Kidney Day 2016 focuses on kidney disease in childhood and the antecedents of adult kidney disease that can begin in earliest childhood. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in childhood differs from that in adults, as the largest diagnostic group among children includes congenital anomalies and inherited disorders, with glomerulopathies and kidney disease in the setting of diabetes being relatively uncommon. In addition, many children with acute kidney injury will ultimately develop sequelae that may lead to hypertension and CKD in later childhood or in adult life. Children born early or who are small-for date newborns have relatively increased risk for the development of CKD later in life. Persons with a high-risk birth and early childhood history should be watched closely in order to help detect early signs of kidney disease in time to provide effective prevention or treatment. Successful therapy is feasible for advanced CKD in childhood; there is evidence that children fare better than adults, if they receive kidney replacement therapy including dialysis and transplantation, while only a minority of children may require this ultimate intervention Because there are disparities in access to care, effort is needed so that those children with kidney disease, wherever they live, may be treated effectively, irrespective of their geographic or economic circumstances. Our hope is that World Kidney Day will inform the general public, policy makers and caregivers about the needs and possibilities surrounding kidney disease in childhood.

  11. Postnatal sellar spine growth

    PubMed Central

    Hosokawa, Takahiro; Yamada, Yoshitake; Sato, Yumiko; Tanami, Yutaka; Kurihara, Jun; Oguma, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: A sellar spine is a bony spur protruding anteriorly from the central portion of the dorsum sellae. Its etiology is an ossified notochordal remnant of the cephalic end of the notochord. It is presumed to be a congenital malformation based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of sellar spine in a 4-year-old boy. A sellar spine should therefore be detectable at birth with or without ossification, and the posterior pituitary lobe should be displaced. Methods and Results: Here we review the literature and report the first case of typical sellar spine in an 8-year-old girl who presented with precocious puberty, but her MRI taken at age 4 months for a febrile convulsion did not show a sellar spine or posterior pituitary lobe deformation. T1-weighted sagittal images at 8 years old showed a bony structure protruding anteriorly from the central portion of the dorsum sellae. The length of this lesion was 3.8 mm on computed tomography (CT) scanning at 9 years old, and it elongated to 4.7 mm on CT at 12 years old. Conclusions: Based on the present case, we speculate that the sellar spine would be too small to detect early in development and would grow in size after birth. In this case, a sellar spine and precocious puberty were potentially associated due to deformation of the growing pituitary gland. PMID:27537588

  12. Urine Proteome Biomarkers in Kidney Diseases. I. Limits, Perspectives, and First Focus on Normal Urine

    PubMed Central

    Santucci, Laura; Bruschi, Maurizio; Candiano, Giovanni; Lugani, Francesca; Petretto, Andrea; Bonanni, Alice; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco

    2016-01-01

    Urine proteome is a potential source of information in renal diseases, and it is considered a natural area of investigation for biomarkers. Technology developments have markedly increased the power analysis on urinary proteins, and it is time to confront methodologies and results of major studies on the topics. This is a first part of a series of reviews that will focus on the urine proteome as a site for detecting biomarkers of renal diseases; the theme of the first review concerns methodological aspects applied to normal urine. Main issues are techniques for urine pretreatment, separation of exosomes, use of combinatorial peptide ligand libraries, mass spectrometry approaches, and analysis of data sets. Available studies show important differences, suggesting a major confounding effect of the technologies utilized for analysis. The objective is to obtain consensus about which approaches should be utilized for studying urine proteome in renal diseases. PMID:26997865

  13. Genetic mouse models of Huntington’s disease: focus on electrophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Cepeda, Carlos; Cummings, Damian M; André, Véronique M; Holley, Sandra M; Levine, Michael S

    2010-01-01

    The discovery of the HD (Huntington’s disease) gene in 1993 led to the creation of genetic mouse models of the disease and opened the doors for mechanistic studies. In particular, the early changes and progression of the disease could be followed and examined systematically. The present review focuses on the contribution of these genetic mouse models to the understanding of functional changes in neurons as the HD phenotype progresses, and concentrates on two brain areas: the striatum, the site of most conspicuous pathology in HD, and the cortex, a site that is becoming increasingly important in understanding the widespread behavioural abnormalities. Mounting evidence points to synaptic abnormalities in communication between the cortex and striatum and cell–cell interactions as major determinants of HD symptoms, even in the absence of severe neuronal degeneration and death. PMID:20396376

  14. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaper, Tasso J.; Kramer, Mark A.; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2013-12-01

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases.

  15. Introduction to Focus Issue: Rhythms and Dynamic Transitions in Neurological Disease: Modeling, Computation, and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kaper, Tasso J. Kramer, Mark A.; Rotstein, Horacio G.

    2013-12-15

    Rhythmic neuronal oscillations across a broad range of frequencies, as well as spatiotemporal phenomena, such as waves and bumps, have been observed in various areas of the brain and proposed as critical to brain function. While there is a long and distinguished history of studying rhythms in nerve cells and neuronal networks in healthy organisms, the association and analysis of rhythms to diseases are more recent developments. Indeed, it is now thought that certain aspects of diseases of the nervous system, such as epilepsy, schizophrenia, Parkinson's, and sleep disorders, are associated with transitions or disruptions of neurological rhythms. This focus issue brings together articles presenting modeling, computational, analytical, and experimental perspectives about rhythms and dynamic transitions between them that are associated to various diseases.

  16. Analysis of Postoperative Thoracolumbar Spine Infections in a Prospective Randomized Controlled Trial Using the Centers for Disease Control Surgical Site Infection Criteria

    PubMed Central

    Takemoto, Richelle C.; Lonner, Baron S.; Andres, Tate M.; Park, Justin J.; Ricart-Hoffiz, Pedro A.; Bendo, John A.; Goldstein, Jeffrey A.; Spivak, Jeffrey M.; Errico, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wound infections following spinal surgery place a high toll on both the patient and the healthcare system. Although several large series studies have examined the incidence and distribution of spinal wound infection, the applicability of these studies varies greatly since nearly every study is either retrospective and/or lacks standard inclusion criteria for defining surgical site infection. To address this void, we present results from prospectively gathered thoracolumbar spine surgery data for which the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) criteria were stringently applied to define a surgical site infection (SSI). Methods A prospective randomized trial of 314 patients who underwent multilevel thoracolumbar spinal surgery with instrumentation followed by postoperative drain placement was completed (Takemoto et al., 2015). The trial consisted of two antibiotic arms: one for 24-hours, and the other for the duration of the drain; no differences were found between the arms. All infections meeting CDC criteria for SSI were included. Results A total of 40 infections met CDC criteria for SSI, for an overall incidence of 12.7%. Of these, 20 (50%) were culture-positive. The most common organism was Staphylococcus aureus (4 total: methicillin-sensitive=2; methicillin-resistant=2), followed by coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (3 cases), Propionibacterium acnes and Escherichia coli (2 cases each). Six infections grew multiple organisms, most commonly involving coagulase-negative staphylococcus and enterococcus. Conclusions Our findings indicate that thoracolumbar SSI occurs at the higher end of the range cited in the literature (2-13%), which is largely based on retrospective data not subjected to the inclusivity of SSI as defined by the CDC. The three most common organisms in our analysis (S. aureus, P. acnes, E. coli) are consistent with previous reports. Staphylococcus aureus continues to be the most common causative organism and continued vigilance and

  17. Developmental Origins of Chronic Kidney Disease: Should We Focus on Early Life?

    PubMed

    Tain, You-Lin; Hsu, Chien-Ning

    2017-02-11

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming a global burden, despite recent advances in management. CKD can begin in early life by so-called "developmental programming" or "developmental origins of health and disease" (DOHaD). Early-life insults cause structural and functional changes in the developing kidney, which is called renal programming. Epidemiological and experimental evidence supports the proposition that early-life adverse events lead to renal programming and make subjects vulnerable to developing CKD and its comorbidities in later life. In addition to low nephron endowment, several mechanisms have been proposed for renal programming. The DOHaD concept opens a new window to offset the programming process in early life to prevent the development of adult kidney disease, namely reprogramming. Here, we review the key themes on the developmental origins of CKD. We have particularly focused on the following areas: evidence from human studies support fetal programming of kidney disease; insight from animal models of renal programming; hypothetical mechanisms of renal programming; alterations of renal transcriptome in response to early-life insults; and the application of reprogramming interventions to prevent the programming of kidney disease.

  18. Lumbosacral spine CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pinched nerve Tumor Vertebral fracture (broken spine bone) Risks The most common type of contrast given into ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  19. Thoracic spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Narrowing of the spine ( spinal stenosis ) Scoliosis Tumor Risks Risks of CT scans include: Exposure to radiation ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  20. New horizons for focused ultrasound (FUS) - therapeutic applications in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Miller, Diane B; O'Callaghan, James P

    2017-04-01

    Access to the CNS and delivery of therapeutics across the blood-brain barrier remains a challenge for most treatments of major neurological diseases such as AD or PD. Focused ultrasound represents a potential approach for overcoming these barriers to treating AD and PD and perhaps other neurological diseases. Ultrasound (US) is best known for its imaging capabilities of organs in the periphery, but various arrangements of the transducers producing the acoustic signal allow the energy to be precisely focused (F) within the skull. Using FUS in combination with MRI and contrast agents further enhances accuracy by providing clear information on location. Varying the acoustic power allows FUS to be used in applications ranging from imaging, stimulation of brain circuits, to ablation of tissue. In several transgenic mouse models of AD, the use of FUS with microbubbles reduces plaque load and improves cognition and suggests the need to investigate this technology for plaque removal in AD. In PD, FUS is being explored as a way to non-invasively ablate the brain areas responsible for the tremor and dyskinesia associated with the disease, but has yet to be utilized for non-invasive delivery of putative therapeutics. The FUS approach also greatly increases the range of possible CNS therapeutics as it overcomes the issues of BBB penetration. In this review we discuss how the characteristics and various applications of FUS may advance the therapeutics available for treating or preventing neurodegenerative disorders with an emphasis on treating AD and PD.

  1. Clinical radiology of the spine and spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Banna, M.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a source of information about aspects of radiology of the spine and spinal column. It presents coverage of both normal and abnormal conditions. Contents: Spinal fractures and dislocations. Degenerative diseases of the spine. Gross anatomy of the spinal cord and meninges. Intraspinal mass lesions. Spinal dysraphism. Congenital anomalies. Tumors of the vertebral column, and more.

  2. Periscopic Spine Surgery

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04-1-0078 TITLE: Periscopic Spine Surgery PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kevin R. Cleary, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Georgetown...2005 Annual (22 Dec 2003 - 21 Dec 2004) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS Periscopic Spine Surgery W81XWH-04-1-0078 6. AUTHOR(S) Kevin R. Cleary... Surgery -specific image acquisition, processing, and display are needed. The two- dimensional (2D) static images typically used today are not sufficient

  3. The "addicted" spine.

    PubMed

    Spiga, Saturnino; Mulas, Giovanna; Piras, Francesca; Diana, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Units of dendritic branches called dendritic spines represent more than simply decorative appendages of the neuron and actively participate in integrative functions of "spinous" nerve cells thereby contributing to the general phenomenon of synaptic plasticity. In animal models of drug addiction, spines are profoundly affected by treatments with drugs of abuse and represent important sub cellular markers which interfere deeply into the physiology of the neuron thereby providing an example of the burgeoning and rapidly increasing interest in "structural plasticity". Medium Spiny Neurons (MSNs) of the Nucleus Accumbens (Nacc) show a reduced number of dendritic spines and a decrease in TH-positive terminals upon withdrawal from opiates, cannabinoids and alcohol. The reduction is localized "strictly" to second order dendritic branches where dopamine (DA)-containing terminals, impinging upon spines, make synaptic contacts. In addition, long-thin spines seems preferentially affected raising the possibility that cellular learning of these neurons may be selectively hampered. These findings suggest that dendritic spines are affected by drugs widely abused by humans and provide yet another example of drug-induced aberrant neural plasticity with marked reflections on the physiology of synapses, system structural organization, and neuronal circuitry remodeling.

  4. Diversify or focus? Spending to combat infectious diseases when budgets are tight.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Soren T; Laxminarayan, Ramanan; Salant, Stephen W

    2012-07-01

    We consider a health authority seeking to allocate annual budgets optimally over time to minimize the discounted social cost of infection(s) evolving in a finite set of groups. This optimization problem is challenging since the standard SIS epidemiological model describing the spread of the disease contains a nonconvexity. Neither optimal control nor standard discrete-time dynamic programming can be used to identify the optimal policy. We modify the standard dynamic programming algorithm and show how familiar, elementary arguments can be used to reach conclusions about the optimal policy. We show that under certain conditions it is optimal to focus the entire annual budget on one group at a time rather than divide it among several groups, as is often done in practice. We also show that under certain conditions it remains optimal to focus on one group when faced with a wealth constraint instead of an annual budget.

  5. Extracellular Vesicles in Alzheimer’s Disease: Friends or Foes? Focus on Aβ-Vesicle Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pooja; Benussi, Luisa; Furlan, Roberto; Ghidoni, Roberta; Verderio, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The intercellular transfer of amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau proteins has received increasing attention in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Among other transfer modes, Aβ and tau dissemination has been suggested to occur through release of Extracellular Vesicles (EVs), which may facilitate delivery of pathogenic proteins over large distances. Recent evidence indicates that EVs carry on their surface, specific molecules which bind to extracellular Aβ, opening the possibility that EVs may also influence Aβ assembly and synaptotoxicity. In this review we focus on studies which investigated the impact of EVs in Aβ-mediated neurodegeneration and showed either detrimental or protective role for EVs in the pathology. PMID:25741766

  6. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in children: focus on nutritional interventions.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Gong, Sitang; Ye, Shui Qing; Lyman, Beth; Geng, Lanlan; Chen, Peiyu; Li, Ding-You

    2014-10-28

    With increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the most common cause of liver disease among children and adolescents in industrialized countries. It is generally recognized that both genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Recently, there has been a growing body of evidence to implicate altered gut microbiota in the development of NAFLD through the gut-liver axis. The first line of prevention and treatment of NAFLD in children should be intensive lifestyle interventions such as changes in diet and physical activity. Recent advances have been focused on limitation of dietary fructose and supplementation of antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics. Convincing evidences from both animal models and human studies have shown that reduction of dietary fructose and supplement of vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics improve NAFLD.

  7. Are Endothelial Progenitor Cells the Real Solution for Cardiovascular Diseases? Focus on Controversies and Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Balistreri, Carmela R; Buffa, Silvio; Pisano, Calogera; Lio, Domenico; Ruvolo, Giovanni; Mazzesi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Advanced knowledge in the field of stem cell biology and their ability to provide a cue for counteracting several diseases are leading numerous researchers to focus their attention on "regenerative medicine" as possible solutions for cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). However, the lack of consistent evidence in this arena has hampered the clinical application. The same condition affects the research on endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), creating more confusion than comprehension. In this review, this aspect is discussed with particular emphasis. In particular, we describe biology and physiology of EPCs, outline their clinical relevance as both new predictive, diagnostic, and prognostic CVD biomarkers and therapeutic agents, discuss advantages, disadvantages, and conflicting data about their use as possible solutions for vascular impairment and clinical applications, and finally underline a very crucial aspect of EPCs "characterization and definition," which seems to be the real cause of large heterogeneity existing in literature data on this topic.

  8. Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Children: Focus on Nutritional Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Min; Gong, Sitang; Ye, Shui Qing; Lyman, Beth; Geng, Lanlan; Chen, Peiyu; Li, Ding-You

    2014-01-01

    With increasing prevalence of childhood obesity, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has emerged as the most common cause of liver disease among children and adolescents in industrialized countries. It is generally recognized that both genetic and environmental risk factors contribute to the pathogenesis of NAFLD. Recently, there has been a growing body of evidence to implicate altered gut microbiota in the development of NAFLD through the gut-liver axis. The first line of prevention and treatment of NAFLD in children should be intensive lifestyle interventions such as changes in diet and physical activity. Recent advances have been focused on limitation of dietary fructose and supplementation of antioxidants, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics. Convincing evidences from both animal models and human studies have shown that reduction of dietary fructose and supplement of vitamin E, omega-3 fatty acids, and prebiotics/probiotics improve NAFLD. PMID:25353664

  9. Spreading of pathology in neurodegenerative diseases: a focus on human studies

    PubMed Central

    Brettschneider, Johannes; Del Tredici, Kelly; Lee, Virginia M.-Y.; Trojanowski, John Q.

    2015-01-01

    The progression of many neurodegenerative diseases is thought to be driven by the template-directed misfolding, seeded aggregation and cell–cell transmission of characteristic disease-related proteins, leading to the sequential dissemination of pathological protein aggregates. Recent evidence strongly suggests that the anatomical connections made by neurons — in addition to the intrinsic characteristics of neurons, such as morphology and gene expression profile — determine whether they are vulnerable to degeneration in these disorders. Notably, this common pathogenic principle opens up opportunities for pursuing novel targets for therapeutic interventions for these neurodegenerative disorders. We review recent evidence that supports the notion of neuron–neuron protein propagation, with a focus on neuropathological and positron emission tomography imaging studies in humans. PMID:25588378

  10. Physiologic Assessment of Coronary Artery Disease: Focus on Fractional Flow Reserve.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Doyeon; Lee, Joo Myung; Koo, Bon-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    The presence of myocardial ischemia is the most important prognostic factor in patients with ischemic heart disease. Fractional flow reserve (FFR) is a gold standard invasive method used to detect the stenosis-specific myocardial ischemia. FFR-guided revascularization strategy is superior to angiography-guided strategy. The recently developed hyperemia-free index, instantaneous wave free ratio is being actively investigated. A non-invasive FFR derived from coronary CT angiography is now used in clinical practice. Due to rapid expansion of invasive and non-invasive physiologic assessment, comprehensive understanding of the role and potential pitfalls of each modality are required for its application. In this review, we focus on the basic and clinical aspects of physiologic assessment in ischemic heart disease.

  11. Postoperative complications of spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Swann, Matthew C; Hoes, Kathryn S; Aoun, Salah G; McDonagh, David L

    2016-03-01

    A variety of surgical approaches are available for the treatment of spine diseases. Complications can arise intraoperatively, in the immediate postoperative period, or in a delayed fashion. These complications may lead to severe or even permanent morbidity if left unrecognized and untreated [1-4]. Here we review a range of complications in the early postoperative period from more benign complications such as postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) to more feared complications leading to permanent loss of neurological function or death [5]. Perioperative pain management is covered in a separate review (Chapter 8).

  12. Targeting nanomedicines in the treatment of Crohn’s disease: focus on certolizumab pegol (CDP870)

    PubMed Central

    Dinesen, Lotte; Travis, Simon

    2007-01-01

    A variety of targets for therapeutic intervention are based upon advances in understanding of the immunopathogenesis of Crohn’s disease. Crohn’s disease is initiated by an innate immune response, which eventuates in a T-cell driven process, characterized by a T-helper cell 1 type cytokine profile. Several new treatments now focus on suppressing T-cell differentiation or T-cell inflammation. Since inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) represents a state of dysregulated inflammation, drugs that augment the anti-inflammatory response have the potential to downregulate inflammation and thereby hopefully modify the disease. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is a major target of research and clinical investigation. TNF has proinflammatory effects in the intestinal mucosa and is a pivotal cytokine in the inflammatory cascade. Certolizumab pegol (CDP870) is a PEGylated, Fab' fragment of a humanized anti-TNF-alpha monoclonal antibody. PEGylation increases the half-life, reduces the requirement for frequent dosing, and possibly reduces antigenicity as well. Certolizumab has been shown in Phase III trials to achieve and maintain clinical response and remission in Crohn’s disease patients. It improves the quality of life. Certolizumab pegol will be indicated for moderately to severely active Crohn’s disease, but it is not yet licensed in Europe or the US. It is not possible to construct an algorithm for treatment, but when compared with infliximab the two principal advantages are likely to be lower immunogenicity (as shown by anti-drug antibodies, absence of infusion reactions, and low rate of antinuclear antibodies), and a subcutaneous route of administration. These two factors may be sufficient to promote it up the pecking order of anti-TNF agents. PMID:17722511

  13. Glucocorticoids and endothelial function in inflammatory diseases: focus on rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, Frank; Prati, Clément; Maguin-Gaté, Katy; Wendling, Daniel; Demougeot, Céline

    2016-11-05

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common systemic autoimmune disease characterized by articular and extra-articular manifestations involving cardiovascular (CV) diseases. RA increases the CV mortality by up to 50 % compared with the global population and CV disease is the leading cause of death in patients with RA. There is growing evidence that RA favors accelerated atherogenesis secondary to endothelial dysfunction (ED) that occurs early in the course of the disease. ED is a functional and reversible alteration of endothelial cells, leading to a shift of the actions of the endothelium towards reduced vasodilation, proinflammatory state, proliferative and prothrombotic properties. The mechanistic links between RA and ED have not been fully explained, but growing evidence suggests a role for traditional CV factors, auto-antibodies, genetic factors, oxidative stress, inflammation and iatrogenic interventions such as glucocorticoids (GCs) use. GCs have been used in RA for several decades. Whilst their deleterious CV side effects were described in the 1950s, their effect on CV risk associated with inflammatory arthritis remains subject for debate. GC might induce negative effects on endothelial function, via a direct effect on endothelium or via increasing CV risk factors. Conversely, they might actually improve endothelial function by decreasing systemic and/or vascular inflammation. The present review summarizes the available data on the impact of GCs on endothelial function, both in normal and inflammatory conditions, with a special focus on RA patients.

  14. Developmental Origins of Chronic Kidney Disease: Should We Focus on Early Life?

    PubMed Central

    Tain, You-Lin; Hsu, Chien-Ning

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is becoming a global burden, despite recent advances in management. CKD can begin in early life by so-called “developmental programming” or “developmental origins of health and disease” (DOHaD). Early-life insults cause structural and functional changes in the developing kidney, which is called renal programming. Epidemiological and experimental evidence supports the proposition that early-life adverse events lead to renal programming and make subjects vulnerable to developing CKD and its comorbidities in later life. In addition to low nephron endowment, several mechanisms have been proposed for renal programming. The DOHaD concept opens a new window to offset the programming process in early life to prevent the development of adult kidney disease, namely reprogramming. Here, we review the key themes on the developmental origins of CKD. We have particularly focused on the following areas: evidence from human studies support fetal programming of kidney disease; insight from animal models of renal programming; hypothetical mechanisms of renal programming; alterations of renal transcriptome in response to early-life insults; and the application of reprogramming interventions to prevent the programming of kidney disease. PMID:28208659

  15. Drosophila as a Model for Human Diseases-Focus on Innate Immunity in Barrier Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Bergman, P; Seyedoleslami Esfahani, S; Engström, Y

    2017-01-01

    Epithelial immunity protects the host from harmful microbial invaders but also controls the beneficial microbiota on epithelial surfaces. When this delicate balance between pathogen and symbiont is disturbed, clinical disease often occurs, such as in inflammatory bowel disease, cystic fibrosis, or atopic dermatitis, which all can be in part linked to impairment of barrier epithelia. Many innate immune receptors, signaling pathways, and effector molecules are evolutionarily conserved between human and Drosophila. This review describes the current knowledge on Drosophila as a model for human diseases, with a special focus on innate immune-related disorders of the gut, lung, and skin. The discovery of antimicrobial peptides, the crucial role of Toll and Toll-like receptors, and the evolutionary conservation of signaling to the immune systems of both human and Drosophila are described in a historical perspective. Similarities and differences between human and Drosophila are discussed; current knowledge on receptors, signaling pathways, and effectors are reviewed, including antimicrobial peptides, reactive oxygen species, as well as autophagy. We also give examples of human diseases for which Drosophila appears to be a useful model. In addition, the limitations of the Drosophila model are mentioned. Finally, we propose areas for future research, which include using the Drosophila model for drug screening, as a validation tool for novel genetic mutations in humans and for exploratory research of microbiota-host interactions, with relevance for infection, wound healing, and cancer.

  16. Focus on emerging drugs for the treatment of patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Federico, Alessandro; Zulli, Claudio; de Sio, Ilario; Del Prete, Anna; Dallio, Marcello; Masarone, Mario; Loguercio, Carmela

    2014-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become the most common liver disorder in Western countries and is increasingly being recognized in developing nations. Fatty liver disease encompasses a spectrum of hepatic pathology, ranging from simple steatosis to non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and end-stage liver disease. Moreover, NAFLD is often associated with other metabolic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus type 2, dyslipidemia and visceral obesity. The most recent guidelines suggest the management and treatment of patients with NAFLD considering both the liver disease and the associated metabolic co-morbidities. Diet and physical exercise are considered the first line of treatment for patients with NAFLD, but their results on therapeutic efficacy are often contrasting. Behavior therapy is necessary most of the time to achieve a sufficient result. Pharmacological therapy includes a wide variety of classes of molecules with different therapeutic targets and, often, little evidence supporting the real efficacy. Despite the abundance of clinical trials, NAFLD therapy remains a challenge for the scientific community, and there are no licensed therapies for NAFLD. Urgently, new pharmacological approaches are needed. Here, we will focus on the challenges facing actual therapeutic strategies and the most recent investigated molecules. PMID:25492998

  17. Gut microbiota in health and disease: an overview focused on metabolic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nagpal, R; Kumar, M; Yadav, A K; Hemalatha, R; Yadav, H; Marotta, F; Yamashiro, Y

    2016-01-01

    In concern to the continuously rising global prevalence of obesity, diabetes and associated diseases, novel preventive and therapeutic approaches are urgently required. However, to explore and develop such innovative strategies, a meticulous comprehension of the biological basis of these diseases is extremely important. Past decade has witnessed an enormous amount of research investigation and advancement in the field of obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome, with the gut microbiota receiving a special focus in the triangle of nutrition, health and diseases. In particular, the role of gut microbiota in health and diseases has been one of the most vigorous and intriguing field of recent research; however, much still remains to be elucidated about its precise role in host metabolism and immune functions and its implication in the onset, progression as well as in the amelioration of metabolic ailments. Recent investigations have suggested a significant contribution of the gut microbiota in the regulation and impairment of energy homeostasis, thereby causing metabolic disorders, such as metabolic endotoxemia, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Numerous inflammatory biomarkers have been found to be associated with obesity, diabetes and risk of other associated adverse outcomes, thereby suggesting that a persistent low-grade inflammatory response is a potential risk factor. In this milieu, this review intends to discuss potential evidences supporting the disturbance of the gut microbiota balance and the intestinal barrier permeability as a potential triggering factor for systemic inflammation in the onset and progression of obesity, type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome.

  18. Dysphagia associated with cervical spine and postural disorders.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Soultana; Exarchakos, Georgios; Beris, Alexander; Ploumis, Avraam

    2013-12-01

    Difficulties with swallowing may be both persistent and life threatening for the majority of those who experience it irrespective of age, gender, and race. The purpose of this review is to define oropharyngeal dysphagia and describe its relationship to cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances due to either congenital or acquired disorders. The etiology and diagnosis of dysphagia are analyzed, focusing on cervical spine pathology associated with dysphagia as severe cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances largely have been held accountable for deglutition disorders. Scoliosis, kyphosis–lordosis, and osteophytes are the primary focus of this review in an attempt to elucidate the link between cervical spine disorders and dysphagia. It is important for physicians to be knowledgeable about what triggers oropharyngeal dysphagia in cases of cervical spine and postural disorders. Moreover, the optimum treatment for dysphagia, including the use of therapeutic maneuvers during deglutition, neck exercises, and surgical treatment, is discussed.

  19. Role of imaging in spine, hand, and wrist osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Feydy, Antoine; Pluot, Etienne; Guerini, Henri; Drapé, Jean-Luc

    2009-08-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the wrist is mainly secondary to traumatic ligamentous or bone injuries. Involvement of the radiocarpal joint occurs early on in the disease, whereas the mediocarpal joint is involved at a later stage. Metabolic diseases may also involve the wrist and affect specific joints such as the scapho-trapezio-trapezoid joint. Although OA of the wrist is routinely diagnosed on plain films, a thorough assessment of cartilage injuries on computed tomographic arthrography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or MR arthrography remains necessary before any surgical procedure. OA of the fingers is frequently encountered in postmenopausal women. Distal interphalangeal joints and trapezio-metacarpal joint are the most frequently involved joints. Whereas the clinical diagnosis of OA of the wrist and hand is straightforward, the therapeutic management of symptomatic forms remains unclear, with no clear guidelines. OA of the spine is related to degenerative changes of the spine involving the disc space, vertebral endplates, the facet joints, or the supportive and surrounding soft tissues. The sequelae of disc degeneration are among the leading causes of functional incapacity in both sexes, and are a common source of chronic disability in the working years. Disc degeneration involves structural disruption and cell-mediated changes in composition. Radiography remains usually the first-line imaging method. MRI is ideally suited for delineating the presence, extent, and complications of degenerative spinal disease. Other imaging modalities such as computed tomography, dynamic radiography, myelography, and discography may provide complementary information in selected cases, especially before an imaging-guided percutaneous treatment or spinal surgery. The presence of degenerative changes on imaging examinations is by no means an indicator of symptoms, and there is a high prevalence of lesions in asymptomatic individuals. This article focuses on imaging of OA of the

  20. Impaired dual tasking in Parkinson's disease is associated with reduced focusing of cortico-striatal activity.

    PubMed

    Nieuwhof, Freek; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Reelick, Miriam F; Aarts, Esther; Maidan, Inbal; Mirelman, Anat; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M; Toni, Ivan; Helmich, Rick C

    2017-03-17

    Impaired dual tasking, namely the inability to concurrently perform a cognitive and a motor task (e.g. 'stops walking while talking'), is a largely unexplained and frequent symptom of Parkinson's disease. Here we consider two circuit-level accounts of how striatal dopamine depletion might lead to impaired dual tasking in patients with Parkinson's disease. First, the loss of segregation between striatal territories induced by dopamine depletion may lead to dysfunctional overlaps between the motor and cognitive processes usually implemented in parallel cortico-striatal circuits. Second, the known dorso-posterior to ventro-anterior gradient of dopamine depletion in patients with Parkinson's disease may cause a funnelling of motor and cognitive processes into the relatively spared ventro-anterior putamen, causing a neural bottleneck. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we measured brain activity in 19 patients with Parkinson's disease and 26 control subjects during performance of a motor task (auditory-cued ankle movements), a cognitive task (implementing a switch-stay rule), and both tasks simultaneously (dual task). The distribution of task-related activity respected the known segregation between motor and cognitive territories of the putamen in both groups, with motor-related responses in the dorso-posterior putamen and task switch-related responses in the ventro-anterior putamen. During dual task performance, patients made more motor and cognitive errors than control subjects. They recruited a striatal territory (ventro-posterior putamen) not engaged during either the cognitive or the motor task, nor used by controls. Relatively higher ventro-posterior putamen activity in controls was associated with worse dual task performance. These observations suggest that dual task impairments in Parkinson's disease are related to reduced spatial focusing of striatal activity. This pattern of striatal activity may be explained by a loss of functional segregation

  1. Effects of polyphenols on brain ageing and Alzheimer's disease: focus on mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Sebastian; Asseburg, Heike; Kuntz, Sabine; Muller, Walter E; Eckert, Gunter P

    2012-08-01

    The global trend of the phenomenon of population ageing has dramatic consequences on public health and the incidence of neurodegenerative diseases. Physiological changes that occur during normal ageing of the brain may exacerbate and initiate pathological processes that may lead to neurodegenerative disorders, especially Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hence, the risk of AD rises exponentially with age. While there is no cure currently available, sufficient intake of certain micronutrients and secondary plant metabolites may prevent disease onset. Polyphenols are highly abundant in the human diet, and several experimental and epidemiological evidences indicate that these secondary plant products have beneficial effects on AD risks. This study reviews current knowledge on the potential of polyphenols and selected polyphenol-rich diets on memory and cognition in human subjects, focusing on recent data showing in vivo efficacy of polyphenols in preventing neurodegenerative events during brain ageing and in dementia. Concentrations of polyphenols in animal brains following oral administration have been consistently reported to be very low, thus eliciting controversial discussion on their neuroprotective effects and potential mechanisms. Whether polyphenols exert any direct antioxidant effects in the brain or rather act by evoking alterations in regulatory systems of the brain or even the body periphery is still unclear. To understand the mechanisms behind the protective abilities of polyphenol-rich foods, an overall understanding of the biotransformation of polyphenols and identification of the various metabolites arising in the human body is also urgently needed.

  2. Reducing hypertensive cardiovascular disease risk of African Americans with diet: focus on the facts.

    PubMed

    Reusser, Molly E; McCarron, David A

    2006-04-01

    Hypertension is more common and more severe in African Americans than in other population groups in the United States, placing them at increased risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, and end-stage renal disease. Whereas past efforts to reduce blood pressure (BP) via the diet centered on manipulating isolated nutrients, there are now conclusive data demonstrating that it is not single dietary components but the overall dietary pattern that has the greatest influence on BP. A nutritionally complete diet rich in fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy foods has been clearly proven to significantly lower BP in all population groups. This diet, commonly referred to as the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet, has been tested in randomized, controlled trials emphasizing African American populations and documented the greatest beneficial effects in hypertensive African Americans. Improving diet quality has been shown to be simply implemented without adverse effects such as symptoms of lactose maldigestion. It is also known to beneficially affect other cardiovascular risk factors and is in keeping with dietary recommendations for prevention of some cancers and osteoporosis. This paper reviews the current data relating dietary patterns to BP control, and advocates dietary recommendations that can accomplish their intended objective of enhancing the health of Americans by promoting safe, feasible, and proven-effective means of doing so. In the case of hypertension prevention and treatment, and thus the reduction of cardiovascular disease risk, overall diet quality should be the primary focus of nutritional recommendations.

  3. Spine development for the Echidna fiber positioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Anna M.; Gillingham, Peter R.; Griesbach, Jason S.; Akiyama, Masayuki

    2003-03-01

    The Echidna multi-object fiber positioner is part of the Fiber Multi-Object Spectrograph (FMOS) project for the prime focus of the Subaru telescope. Given the physical size of the focal plane and the required number of fibers (400), a positioning system based on the Anglo-Australian Observatory's 2dF instrument, that incorporates the placement of magnetic buttons by a single X/Y/Z robot, was considered impractical. Instead, a solution has been developed in which each fiber is mounted on a tilting spine that allows the fiber to be positioned anywhere in a circle of radius 7 mm. Each of the 400 fibers therefore has a fixed "patrol" area in the field of view, with a significant overlap between neighboring spines. A description of a single Echidna spine is presented. Each spine is driven by a quadrant tube piezoelectric actuator (QTP) that, by a ratcheting mechanism, is able to position the fiber to within 10 μm of any coordinate in the corresponding patrol area. Results of positioning tests for eight of the twenty prototype spines reveal better than specification performance, as well as a durability far in excess of the specified lifetime of the instrument.

  4. Ultrastructure of Dendritic Spines: Correlation Between Synaptic and Spine Morphologies

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, Jon I.; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Yuste, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic spines are critical elements of cortical circuits, since they establish most excitatory synapses. Recent studies have reported correlations between morphological and functional parameters of spines. Specifically, the spine head volume is correlated with the area of the postsynaptic density (PSD), the number of postsynaptic receptors and the ready-releasable pool of transmitter, whereas the length of the spine neck is proportional to the degree of biochemical and electrical isolation of the spine from its parent dendrite. Therefore, the morphology of a spine could determine its synaptic strength and learning rules. To better understand the natural variability of neocortical spine morphologies, we used a combination of gold-toned Golgi impregnations and serial thin-section electron microscopy and performed three-dimensional reconstructions of spines from layer 2/3 pyramidal cells from mouse visual cortex. We characterized the structure and synaptic features of 144 completed reconstructed spines, and analyzed their morphologies according to their positions. For all morphological parameters analyzed, spines exhibited a continuum of variability, without clearly distinguishable subtypes of spines or clear dependence of their morphologies on their distance to the soma. On average, the spine head volume was correlated strongly with PSD area and weakly with neck diameter, but not with neck length. The large morphological diversity suggests an equally large variability of synaptic strength and learning rules. PMID:18982124

  5. Dorsal spine osteoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Pranshu; Singh, Rahul; Garg, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign osteoblastoma is a rare primary neoplasm comprising less than 1% of primary bone tumors.[1] We report a case of a 20-year-old female patient presenting with progressive paraparesis over one year and back pain over the dorsal spine gradually increasing in severity over a year. Computerised tomomography (CT) of the spine revealed a well-defined 3.5 × 3.0 cm mass heterodense expansile bony lesion arising from the lamina of the D12 vertebra, having lytic and sclerotic component and causing compromise of the bony spinal canal. D12 laminectomy and total excision of the tumor was done. PMID:27057242

  6. The Potentials and Pitfalls of Microarrays in Neglected Tropical Diseases: A Focus on Human Filarial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kwarteng, Alexander; Ahuno, Samuel Terkper

    2016-01-01

    Data obtained from expression microarrays enables deeper understanding of the molecular signatures of infectious diseases. It provides rapid and accurate information on how infections affect the clustering of gene expression profiles, pathways and networks that are transcriptionally active during various infection states compared to conventional diagnostic methods, which primarily focus on single genes or proteins. Thus, microarray technologies offer advantages in understanding host-parasite interactions associated with filarial infections. More importantly, the use of these technologies can aid diagnostics and helps translate current genomic research into effective treatment and interventions for filarial infections. Studying immune responses via microarray following infection can yield insight into genetic pathways and networks that can have a profound influence on the development of anti-parasitic vaccines. PMID:27600086

  7. Recent advances in managing chronic HCV infection: focus on therapy in patients with severe liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Maan, Raoel; van der Meer, Adriaan J.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection still represents a major public health problem, as it is thought to be responsible for more than 350,000 deaths around the globe on a yearly basis. Fortunately, successful eradication of the virus has been associated with improved clinical outcome and reduced mortality rates. In the past few years, treatment has improved considerably by the implementation of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). From 2014 onwards, sofosbuvir, simeprevir, daclatasvir, ledipasvir, paritaprevir, ombitasvir, and dasabuvir have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA). Regimens with various combinations of these new drugs, without the use of interferon (IFN), proved to be very effective and well tolerated, even among patients with advanced liver disease. Moreover, treatment duration could be shortened to 12 weeks in the majority of patients. The high costs of these DAAs, however, limit the availability of IFN-free therapy worldwide. Even in wealthy countries, it is deemed necessary to prioritize DAA treatment in order to limit the immediate impact on the health budget. As patients with advanced liver disease are in most need of HCV clearance, many countries decided to treat those patients first. In the current review, we focus on the currently available IFN-free treatment options for patients with cirrhosis. We discuss the virological efficacy as well as the clinical relevance of these regimens among this specific patient population. PMID:27006761

  8. Identifying proteins that bind to specific RNAs - focus on simple repeat expansion diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jazurek, Magdalena; Ciesiolka, Adam; Starega-Roslan, Julia; Bilinska, Katarzyna; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.

    2016-01-01

    RNA–protein complexes play a central role in the regulation of fundamental cellular processes, such as mRNA splicing, localization, translation and degradation. The misregulation of these interactions can cause a variety of human diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Recently, many strategies have been developed to comprehensively analyze these complex and highly dynamic RNA–protein networks. Extensive efforts have been made to purify in vivo-assembled RNA–protein complexes. In this review, we focused on commonly used RNA-centric approaches that involve mass spectrometry, which are powerful tools for identifying proteins bound to a given RNA. We present various RNA capture strategies that primarily depend on whether the RNA of interest is modified. Moreover, we briefly discuss the advantages and limitations of in vitro and in vivo approaches. Furthermore, we describe recent advances in quantitative proteomics as well as the methods that are most commonly used to validate robust mass spectrometry data. Finally, we present approaches that have successfully identified expanded repeat-binding proteins, which present abnormal RNA–protein interactions that result in the development of many neurological diseases. PMID:27625393

  9. When, where and how? Focus on neuronal calcium dysfunctions in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Agostini, Mario; Fasolato, Cristina

    2016-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), since its characterization as a precise form of dementia with its own pathological hallmarks, has captured scientists' attention because of its complexity. The last 30 years have been filled with discoveries regarding the elusive aetiology of this disease and, thanks to advances in molecular biology and live imaging techniques, we now know that an important role is played by calcium (Ca(2+)). Ca(2+), as ubiquitous second messenger, regulates a vast variety of cellular processes, from neuronal excitation and communication, to muscle fibre contraction and hormone secretion, with its action spanning a temporal scale that goes from microseconds to hours. It is therefore very challenging to conceive a single hypothesis that can integrate the numerous findings on this issue with those coming from the classical fields of AD research such as amyloid-beta (Aβ) and tau pathology. In this contribution, we will focus our attention on the Ca(2+) hypothesis of AD, dissecting it, as much as possible, in its subcellular localization, where the Ca(2+) signal meets its specificity. We will also follow the temporal evolution of the Ca(2+) hypothesis, providing some of the most updated discoveries. Whenever possible, we will link the findings regarding Ca(2+) dysfunction to the other players involved in AD pathogenesis, hoping to provide a crossover body of evidence, useful to amplify the knowledge that will lead towards the discovery of an effective therapy.

  10. Cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD): focus on hypoxemia, secondary erythrocytosis, and coagulation alterations.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Luis M; Guzzetta, Nina A

    2015-10-01

    Children with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) have complex alterations in their whole blood composition and coagulation profile due to long-standing hypoxemia. Secondary erythrocytosis is an associated physiological response intended to increase circulating red blood cells and oxygen carrying capacity. However, this response is frequently offset by an increase in whole blood viscosity that paradoxically reduces blood flow and tissue perfusion. In addition, the accompanying reduction in plasma volume leads to significant deficiencies in multiple coagulation proteins including platelets, fibrinogen and other clotting factors. On the one hand, these patients may suffer from severe hyperviscosity and subclinical 'sludging' in the peripheral vasculature with an increased risk of thrombosis. On the other hand, they are at an increased risk for postoperative hemorrhage due to a complex derangement in their hemostatic profile. Anesthesiologists caring for children with CCHD and secondary erythrocytosis need to understand the pathophysiology of these alterations and be aware of available strategies that lessen the risk of bleeding and/or thrombosis. The aim of this review is to provide an updated analysis of the systemic effects of long-standing hypoxemia in children with primary congenital heart disease with a specific focus on secondary erythrocytosis and hemostasis.

  11. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... The test is done in a hospital radiology department or in the health care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  12. Harvey Cushing, the Spine Surgeon

    PubMed Central

    Bydon, Ali; Dasenbrock, Hormuzdiyar H.; Pendleton, Courtney; McGirt, Matthew J.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Review of historical archival records. Objective Describe Harvey Cushing's patients with spinal pathology. Summary of Background Data Harvey Cushing was a pioneer of modern surgery but his work on spine remains largely unknown. Methods Review of the Chesney Medical Archives of the Johns Hopkins Hospital from 1896 to 1912. Results This is the first time that Cushing's spinal cases while he was at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, including those with Pott disease, have been described. Cushing treated three young men with psoas abscesses secondary to Pott disease during his residency: he drained the abscesses, debrided any accompanying necrotic vertebral bodies, irrigated the cavity with salt, and left the incision open to close by secondary intention. Although Cushing used Koch's “tuberculin therapy” (of intravenous administration of isolated tubercular bacilli) in one patient, he did not do so in the other two, likely because of the poor response of this first patient. Later in his tenure, Cushing performed a laminectomy on a patient with kyphosis and paraplegia secondary to Pott disease. Conclusion These cases provide a view of Cushing early in his career, pointing to the extraordinary degree of independence that he had during his residency under William Steward Halsted; these cases may have been important in the surgical upbringing both of Cushing and his coresident, William Stevenson Baer, who became the first professor of Orthopedics at Johns Hopkins Hospital. At the turn of the last century, Pott disease was primarily treated by immobilization with bed rest, braces, and plaster-of-paris jackets; some surgeons also employed gradual correction of the deformity by hyperextension. Patients who failed a trial of conservative therapy (of months to years) were treated with a laminectomy. However, the limitations of these strategies led to the development of techniques that form the basis of contemporary spine surgery—instrumentation and fusion. PMID

  13. Anatomical distribution of vertebral fractures: comparison of pediatric and adult spines

    PubMed Central

    Lee, K-C.; Jen, H.; Warshawski, R.; Matzinger, M-A.; Shenouda, N.; Charron, M.; Coblentz, C.; Dubois, J.; Kloiber, R.; Nadel, H.; O’Brien, K.; Reed, M.; Sparrow, K.; Webber, C.; Lentle, B.; Ward, L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction We hypothesized that the anatomical distribution of vertebral fractures (VF) would be different in children compared with adults. Methods We compared the distribution of VF defined using the Genant semi-quantitative method (GSQ method) in adults (N=221; 545 fractures) and in children early in the course of glucocorticoid therapy (N = 44; 94 fractures). Results The average age in the adult cohort was 62.9 years (SD, 13.4 yrs), 26% were male, the mean lumbar spine Z-score was −1.0 (SD, 1.5), and the corresponding T-score was −2.4 (SD, 1.4). The pediatric cohort median age was 7.7 years (range, 2.1–16.6 years), the mean lumbar spine Z-score was −1.7 (SD, 1.5), 52% were male, and disease categories were acute lymphoblastic leukemia (66%), rheumatological conditions (21%), and nephrotic syndrome (14%). The VF distribution was biphasic in both populations, but the peaks differed in location. In adults, the peaks were at T7/T8 and at T12/L1. In children, the focus was higher in the thoracic spine, at T6/T7, and lower in the lumbar spine, at L1/L2. When children were assessed in two age-defined sub-groups, a biphasic VF distribution was seen in both, but the upward shift of the thoracic focus to T6 was observed only in the older group, with the highest rates of fracture present between ages 7 and 10 years. Conclusions These results suggest that the anatomical distribution of VF differs between children and adults, perhaps relating to the different shape of the immature spine, notably the changing ratio of kyphosis to lordosis. PMID:22109742

  14. Spine surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... symptoms should get better in a few weeks. Recovery after laminectomy and fusion surgery is longer. You will not be able ... discharge; Anterior spinal fusion - discharge; Spine surgery - spinal fusion - discharge Images Spinal surgery -- cervical - series References Agrawal BM, Zeidman SM, Rhines L, ...

  15. 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone, a Small Molecule TrkB Agonist, Improves Spatial Memory and Increases Thin Spine Density in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer Disease-Like Neuronal Loss

    PubMed Central

    Castello, Nicholas A.; Nguyen, Michael H.; Tran, Jenny D.; Cheng, David; Green, Kim N.; LaFerla, Frank M.

    2014-01-01

    Augmenting BDNF/TrkB signaling has been demonstrated to be a promising strategy for reversing cognitive deficits in preclinical models of Alzheimer disease (AD). Although these studies highlight the potential of targeting BDNF/TrkB signaling, this strategy has not yet been tested in a model that develops the disease features that are most closely associated with cognitive decline in AD: severe synaptic and neuronal loss. In the present study, we investigated the impact of 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (DHF), a TrkB agonist, in CaM/Tet-DTA mice, an inducible model of severe neuronal loss in the hippocampus and cortex. Systemic 7,8-DHF treatment significantly improved spatial memory in lesioned mice, as measured by water maze. Analysis of GFP-labeled neurons in CaM/Tet-DTA mice revealed that 7,8-DHF induced a significant and selective increase in the density of thin spines in CA1 of lesioned mice, without affecting mushroom or stubby spines. These findings suggest chronic upregulation of TrkB signaling with 7,8-DHF may be an effective and practical strategy for improving function in AD, even after substantial neuronal loss has occurred. PMID:24614170

  16. Symptomatic pseudarthrosis in ochronotic spine: case report.

    PubMed

    Rahimizadeh, Abolfazl; Soufiani, Housain; Hassani, Valliolah; Rahimizadeh, Ava

    2017-02-01

    In this study the authors report the first example of spinal pseudarthrosis in a patient with ochronosis, and they describe the application of posterior-only 360° surgery as an alternative approach to combined anterior-posterior surgery in the management of pseudarthrosis of an ankylosed spine, regardless of its etiology. Spinal involvement in ochronosis produces loss of flexibility and ankylosis of thoracic and lumbar segments. Pseudarthrosis is a serious complication of the diseases that present with ankylosis of the spine. However, its occurrence in ochronotic spine has not been reported previously. Evaluation of progressive paraparesis in a 68-year-old man with ochronosis revealed pseudarthrosis at the T11-12 level. Circumferential dural sac decompression, debridement of the disc space, interbody fusion, and screw-rod fixation were all done via a posterior-only approach. Postoperatively the patient exhibited a marked recovery in terms of pain and neurological status. At the 3-month follow-up, he was able to walk independently. Ochronosis should be included in the etiology of pseudarthrosis. With aggravation of back pain and the appearance of neurological deficits in an already stable patient with any ankylosing disease, pseudarthrosis should be suspected. Furthermore, single-stage, 360°, posterior-only surgery may obviate the need for single-stage or staged anterior-posterior surgical intervention in patients with pseudarthrosis of the thoracic and lumbar spine.

  17. A positive influence of vision on motor symptoms during sensory attention focused exercise for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Sage, Michael D; Almeida, Quincy J

    2010-01-15

    This study evaluated the effect of increased attention to sensory feedback during exercise. Two 12-week exercise programs that differed only in the presence (PD SAFEx) or absence (non-SAFE control group) of increased attention focused on sensory feedback were compared. Participants were assessed symptomatically using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) before the start of the exercise program, immediately following the 12-week program and after a 6-week nonexercise washout period. Secondary outcome measures included the Timed-Up-and-Go (TUG), Grooved Pegboard (GP) and velocity and step length of self-paced gait. Both groups significantly improved on the TUG, GP, velocity, and step length, and this was maintained after a 6-week washout period. Of additional interest, only the PD SAFEx program significantly improved motor symptoms (UPDRS). These gains were maintained in the PD SAFEx group 6 weeks after the exercise was stopped, while motor symptoms significantly worsened in the non-SAFE group. These results suggest that increasing awareness of sensory feedback may be a critical factor that specifically impacts motor symptoms. Future work should strive to uncover the underlying neurophysiological mechanism behind this effect.

  18. Kidney stones diseases and glycaemic statuses: focus on the latest clinical evidences.

    PubMed

    Spatola, Leonardo; Angelini, Claudio; Badalamenti, Salvatore; Maringhini, Silvio; Gambaro, Giovanni

    2016-12-05

    Diabetes and obesity are already recognized as potential risk factors for nephrolithiasis, especially for uric acid stones. Insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia actively contribute to impaired ability to excrete an acid load and altered ammonium production, leading to a lower urinary pH compared to non-diabetic controls. All these electrolytic disorders play an important role in stone formation and aggregation, especially in uric acid stones. There are still missing points in scientific evidence if the increased risk in stone formation is already existing even in the prediabetic statuses (isolated impaired glucose tolerance, isolated impaired fasting glucose, and associated impaired glucose tolerance/impaired fasting glucose) as well as it is worth to consider the same level of risk. Urolithiasis is the most frequent urological cause of hospitalization in diabetic patients and its cost is usually higher compared to non-diabetic patients, but less is known in others altered glycaemic diseases. The aim of this review article is to focus on the association between stone formation and altered glycaemic statuses, beyond the already known link between nephrolithiasis and diabetes mellitus.

  19. Neuropsychiatric Symptoms, Endophenotypes, and Syndromes in Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease: Focus on APOE Gene

    PubMed Central

    Panza, Francesco; Seripa, Davide; D'Onofrio, Grazia; Frisardi, Vincenza; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Mecocci, Patrizia; Pilotto, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms, previously denominated as behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, are common features of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and are one of the major risk factors for institutionalization. At present, the role of the apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene in the development of neuropsychiatric symptoms in AD patients is unclear. In this paper, we summarized the findings of the studies of neuropsychiatric symptoms and neuropsychiatric syndromes/endophenotypes in AD in relation to APOE genotypes, with special attention to the possible underlying mechanisms. While some studies failed to find a significant association between APOE and neuropsychiatric symptoms in late-onset AD, other studies reported a significant association between the APOE ε4 allele and an increase in agitation/aggression, hallucinations, delusions, and late-life depression or anxiety. Furthermore, some negative studies that focused on the distribution of APOE genotypes between AD patients with or without neuropsychiatric symptoms further emphasized the importance of subgrouping neuropsychiatric symptoms in distinct neuropsychiatric syndromes. Explanations for the variable findings in the existing studies included differences in patient populations, differences in the assessment of neuropsychiatric symptomatology, and possible lack of statistical power to detect associations in the negative studies. PMID:21559196

  20. Foetal Cell Transplantation for Parkinson's Disease: Focus on Graft-Induced Dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Tronci, Elisabetta; Fidalgo, Camino; Carta, Manolo

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of dopamine- (DA-) rich foetal ventral mesencephalic cells emerged as a promising therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD), as it allowed significant improvement of motor symptoms in several PD patients in open-label studies. However, double-blind clinical trials have been largely disappointing. The general agreement in the field is that the lack of standardization of tissue collection and preparation, together with the absence of postsurgical immunosuppression, played a key role in the failure of these studies. Moreover, a further complication that emerged in previous studies is the appearance of the so-called graft-induced dyskinesia (GID), in a subset of grafted patients, which resembles dyskinesia induced by L-DOPA but in the absence of medication. Preclinical evidence pointed to the serotonin neurons as possible players in the appearance of GID. In agreement, clinical investigations have shown that grafted tissue may contain a large number of serotonin neurons, in the order of half of the DA cells; moreover, the serotonin 5-HT1A receptor agonist buspirone has been found to produce significant dampening of GID in grafted patients. In this paper, we will review the recent preclinical and clinical studies focusing on cell transplantation for PD and on the mechanisms underlying GID.

  1. Classification and Management of Pediatric Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries.

    PubMed

    Madura, Casey J; Johnston, James M

    2017-01-01

    Appropriate management of subaxial spine injury in children requires an appreciation for the differences in anatomy, biomechanics, injury patterns, and treatment options compared with adult patients. Increased flexibility, weak neck muscles, and cranial disproportion predispose younger children to upper cervical injuries and spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality. A majority of subaxial cervical spine injuries can be treated nonoperatively. Surgical instrumentation options for children have significantly increased in recent years. Future studies of outcomes for children with subaxial cervical spine injury should focus on injury classification and standardized outcome measures to ensure continued improvement in quality of care for this patient population.

  2. The use of stabilization exercises and movement reeducation to manage pain and improve function in a dancer with focal degenerative joint disease of the spine.

    PubMed

    Hagins, Marshall

    2011-09-01

    Little has been written about rehabilitation of low back pain (LBP) specific to the professional dancer. However, there is a rapidly increasing amount of rehabilitation research related to the care of LBP in the general population that may be applied to the dancer population. The purpose of this case report is to describe the physical therapy management of a 37-year-old female professional dancer with a 5-year history of spinal pain and loss of function in the presence of degenerative joint disease at a single segment (T12-L1). Patient interventions focused on stabilization exercises and movement reeducation. The dancer returned to limited dance performance at 6 weeks. At 5 months she had returned to complete dance function, with pain and functional (Oswestry) levels improved from initial values of 7/10 and 48%, respectively, to 1/10 and 26%.

  3. Adult idiopathic scoliosis: the tethered spine.

    PubMed

    Whyte Ferguson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on an observational and treatment study using three case histories to describe common patterns of muscle and fascial asymmetry in adults with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) who have significant scoliotic curvatures that were not surgically corrected and who have chronic pain. Rather than being located in the paraspinal muscles, the myofascial trigger points (TrPs) apparently responsible for the pain were located at some distance from the spine, yet referred pain to locations throughout the thoracolumbar spine. Asymmetries in these muscles appear to tether the spine in such a way that they contribute to scoliotic curvatures. Evaluation also showed that each of these individuals had major ligamentous laxity and this may also have contributed to development of scoliotic curvatures. Treatment focused on release of TrPs found to refer pain into the spine, release of related fascia, and correction of related joint dysfunction. Treatment resulted in substantial relief of longstanding chronic pain. Treatment thus validated the diagnostic hypothesis that myofascial and fascial asymmetries were to some extent responsible for pain in adults with significant scoliotic curvatures. Treatment of these patterns of TrPs and muscle and fascial asymmetries and related joint dysfunction was also effective in relieving pain in each of these individuals after they were injured in auto accidents. Treatment of myofascial TrPs and asymmetrical fascial tension along with treatment of accompanying joint dysfunction is proposed as an effective approach to treating both chronic and acute pain in adults with scoliosis that has not been surgically corrected.

  4. Rendering the Topological Spines

    SciTech Connect

    Nieves-Rivera, D.

    2015-05-05

    Many tools to analyze and represent high dimensional data already exits yet most of them are not flexible, informative and intuitive enough to help the scientists make the corresponding analysis and predictions, understand the structure and complexity of scientific data, get a complete picture of it and explore a greater number of hypotheses. With this in mind, N-Dimensional Data Analysis and Visualization (ND²AV) is being developed to serve as an interactive visual analysis platform with the purpose of coupling together a number of these existing tools that range from statistics, machine learning, and data mining, with new techniques, in particular with new visualization approaches. My task is to create the rendering and implementation of a new concept called topological spines in order to extend ND²AV's scope. Other existing visualization tools create a representation preserving either the topological properties or the structural (geometric) ones because it is challenging to preserve them both simultaneously. Overcoming such challenge by creating a balance in between them, the topological spines are introduced as a new approach that aims to preserve them both. Its render using OpenGL and C++ and is currently being tested to further on be implemented on ND²AV. In this paper I will present what are the Topological Spines and how they are rendered.

  5. Applications of animal models of infectious arthritis in drug discovery: a focus on alphaviral disease.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Lara; Nelson, Michelle; Bettadapura, Jayaram; Gahan, Michelle E; Mahalingam, Suresh

    2011-06-01

    Animal models, which mimic human disease, are invaluable tools for understanding the mechanisms of disease pathogenesis and development of treatment strategies. In particular, animal models play important roles in the area of infectious arthritis. Alphaviruses, including Ross River virus (RRV), o'nyong-nyong virus, chikungunya virus (CHIKV), mayaro virus, Semliki Forest virus and sindbis virus, are globally distributed and cause transient illness characterized by fever, rash, myalgia, arthralgia and arthritis in humans. Severe forms of the disease result in chronic incapacitating arthralgia and arthritis. The mechanisms of how these viruses cause musculoskeletal disease are ill defined. In recent years, the use of a mouse model for RRV-induced disease has assisted in unraveling the pathobiology of infection and in discovering novel drugs to ameliorate disease. RRV as an infection model has the potential to provide key insights into such disease processes, particularly as many viruses, other than alphaviruses, are known to cause infectious arthritides. The emergence and outbreak of CHIKV in many parts of the world has necessitated the need to develop animal models of CHIKV disease. The development of non-human primate models of CHIKV disease has given insights into viral tropism and disease pathogenesis and facilitated the development of new treatment strategies. This review highlights the application of animal models of alphaviral diseases in the fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that contribute to disease and for defining the role that the immune response may have on disease pathogenesis, with the view of providing the foundation for new treatments.

  6. The international spine registry SPINE TANGO: status quo and first results.

    PubMed

    Melloh, Markus; Staub, Lukas; Aghayev, Emin; Zweig, Thomas; Barz, Thomas; Theis, Jean-Claude; Chavanne, Albert; Grob, Dieter; Aebi, Max; Roeder, Christoph

    2008-09-01

    With an official life time of over 5 years, Spine Tango can meanwhile be considered the first international spine registry. In this paper we present an overview of frequency statistics of Spine Tango for demonstrating the genesis of questionnaire development and the constantly increasing activity in the registry. Results from two exemplar studies serve for showing concepts of data analysis applied to a spine registry. Between 2002 and 2006, about 6,000 datasets were submitted by 25 centres. Descriptive analyses were performed for demographic, surgical and follow-up data of three generations of the Spine Tango surgery and follow-up forms. The two exemplar studies used multiple linear regression models to identify potential predictor variables for the occurrence of dura lesions in posterior spinal fusion, and to evaluate which covariates influenced the length of hospital stay. Over the study period there was a rise in median patient age from 52.3 to 58.6 years in the Spine Tango data pool and an increasing percentage of degenerative diseases as main pathology from 59.9 to 71.4%. Posterior decompression was the most frequent surgical measure. About one-third of all patients had documented follow-ups. The complication rate remained below 10%. The exemplar studies identified "centre of intervention" and "number of segments of fusion" as predictors of the occurrence of dura lesions in posterior spinal fusion surgery. Length of hospital stay among patients with posterior fusion was significantly influenced by "centre of intervention", "surgeon credentials", "number of segments of fusion", "age group" and "sex". Data analysis from Spine Tango is possible but complicated by the incompatibility of questionnaire generations 1 and 2 with the more recent generation 3. Although descriptive and also analytic studies at evidence level 2++ can be performed, findings cannot yet be generalised to any specific country or patient population. Current limitations of Spine Tango include

  7. Diet, Genetics, and Disease: A Focus on the Middle East and North Africa Region

    PubMed Central

    Fahed, Akl C.; El-Hage-Sleiman, Abdul-Karim M.; Farhat, Theresa I.; Nemer, Georges M.

    2012-01-01

    The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region suffers a drastic change from a traditional diet to an industrialized diet. This has led to an unparalleled increase in the prevalence of chronic diseases. This review discusses the role of nutritional genomics, or the dietary signature, in these dietary and disease changes in the MENA. The diet-genetics-disease relation is discussed in detail. Selected disease categories in the MENA are discussed starting with a review of their epidemiology in the different MENA countries, followed by an examination of the known genetic factors that have been reported in the disease discussed, whether inside or outside the MENA. Several diet-genetics-disease relationships in the MENA may be contributing to the increased prevalence of civilization disorders of metabolism and micronutrient deficiencies. Future research in the field of nutritional genomics in the MENA is needed to better define these relationships. PMID:22536488

  8. Immunogenomics for identification of disease resistance genes in pigs: a review focusing on Gram-negative bacilli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Over the past years, infectious disease has caused enormous economic loss in pig industry. Among the pathogens, gram negative bacteria not only cause inflammation, but also cause different diseases and make the pigs more susceptible to virus infection. Vaccination, medication and elimination of sick pigs are major strategies of controlling disease. Genetic methods, such as selection of disease resistance in the pig, have not been widely used. Recently, the completion of the porcine whole genome sequencing has provided powerful tools to identify the genome regions that harboring genes controlling disease or immunity. Immunogenomics, which combines DNA variations, transcriptome, immune response, and QTL mapping data to illustrate the interactions between pathogen and host immune system, will be an effective genomics tool for identification of disease resistance genes in pigs. These genes will be potential targets for disease resistance in breeding programs. This paper reviewed the progress of disease resistance study in the pig focusing on Gram-negative bacilli. Major porcine Gram-negative bacilli and diseases, suggested candidate genes/pathways against porcine Gram-negative bacilli, and distributions of QTLs for immune capacity on pig chromosomes were summarized. Some tools for immunogenomics research were described. We conclude that integration of sequencing, whole genome associations, functional genomics studies, and immune response information is necessary to illustrate molecular mechanisms and key genes in disease resistance. PMID:23137309

  9. Clinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease.

    PubMed

    Smolen, Josef S; Collaud Basset, Sabine; Boers, Maarten; Breedveld, Ferdinand; Edwards, Christopher J; Kvien, Tore K; Miossec, Pierre; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Abadie, Eric C; Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Mäkinen, Heidi; Thomas, Thierry; Tugwell, Peter; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-07-01

    The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft 'Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for the treatment of RA' released by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Special emphasis was placed by the group on the development of new drugs for the treatment of early RA. In the absence of a clear definition of early RA, it was suggested that clinical investigations in this condition were conducted in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs naïve patients with no more than 1 year disease duration. The expert group recommended using an appropriate improvement in disease activity (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or Simplified/Clinical Disease Activity Index (SDAI/CDAI) response criteria) or low disease activity (by any score) as primary endpoints, with ACR/European League Against Rheumatism remission as a secondary endpoint. Finally, as compelling evidence showed that the Disease Acrivity Score using 28-joint counts (DAS28) might not provide a reliable definition of remission, or sometimes even low disease activity, the group suggested replacing DAS28 as a measurement instrument to evaluate disease activity in RA clinical trials. Proposed alternatives included SDAI, CDAI and Boolean criteria.

  10. Clinical trials of new drugs for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis: focus on early disease

    PubMed Central

    Collaud Basset, Sabine; Boers, Maarten; Breedveld, Ferdinand; Edwards, Christopher J; Kvien, Tore K; Miossec, Pierre; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; van Vollenhoven, Ronald F; Abadie, Eric C; Bruyère, Olivier; Cooper, Cyrus; Mäkinen, Heidi; Thomas, Thierry; Tugwell, Peter; Reginster, Jean-Yves

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases convened a task force of experts in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and clinical trial methodology to comment on the new draft ‘Guideline on clinical investigation of medicinal products for the treatment of RA’ released by the European Medicines Agency (EMA). Special emphasis was placed by the group on the development of new drugs for the treatment of early RA. In the absence of a clear definition of early RA, it was suggested that clinical investigations in this condition were conducted in disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs naïve patients with no more than 1 year disease duration. The expert group recommended using an appropriate improvement in disease activity (American College of Rheumatology (ACR) or Simplified/Clinical Disease Activity Index (SDAI/CDAI) response criteria) or low disease activity (by any score) as primary endpoints, with ACR/European League Against Rheumatism remission as a secondary endpoint. Finally, as compelling evidence showed that the Disease Acrivity Score using 28-joint counts (DAS28) might not provide a reliable definition of remission, or sometimes even low disease activity, the group suggested replacing DAS28 as a measurement instrument to evaluate disease activity in RA clinical trials. Proposed alternatives included SDAI, CDAI and Boolean criteria. PMID:27037326

  11. Communication and Huntington's Disease: Qualitative Interviews and Focus Groups with Persons with Huntington's Disease, Family Members, and Carers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartelius, Lena; Jonsson, Maria; Rickeberg, Anneli; Laakso, Katja

    2010-01-01

    Background: As an effect of the cognitive, emotional and motor symptoms associated with Huntington's disease, communicative interaction is often dramatically changed. No study has previously included the subjective reports on this subject from individuals with Huntington's disease. Aims: To explore the qualitative aspects of how communication is…

  12. Fear Recognition Impairment in Early-Stage Alzheimer's Disease: When Focusing on the Eyes Region Improves Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hot, Pascal; Klein-Koerkamp, Yanica; Borg, Celine; Richard-Mornas, Aurelie; Zsoldos, Isabella; Adeline, Adeline Paignon; Anterion, Catherine Thomas; Baciu, Monica

    2013-01-01

    A decline in the ability to identify fearful expression has been frequently reported in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). In patients with severe destruction of the bilateral amygdala, similar difficulties have been reduced by using an explicit visual exploration strategy focusing on gaze. The current study assessed the possibility of…

  13. Dendritic Spines as Tunable Regulators of Synaptic Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tønnesen, Jan; Nägerl, U. Valentin

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are perpetually receiving vast amounts of information in the form of synaptic input from surrounding cells. The majority of input occurs at thousands of dendritic spines, which mediate excitatory synaptic transmission in the brain, and is integrated by the dendritic and somatic compartments of the postsynaptic neuron. The functional role of dendritic spines in shaping biochemical and electrical signals transmitted via synapses has long been intensely studied. Yet, many basic questions remain unanswered, in particular regarding the impact of their nanoscale morphology on electrical signals. Here, we review our current understanding of the structure and function relationship of dendritic spines, focusing on the controversy of electrical compartmentalization and the potential role of spine structural changes in synaptic plasticity. PMID:27340393

  14. Fatigue in neuromuscular disorders: focus on Guillain-Barré syndrome and Pompe disease.

    PubMed

    de Vries, J M; Hagemans, M L C; Bussmann, J B J; van der Ploeg, A T; van Doorn, P A

    2010-03-01

    Fatigue accounts for an important part of the burden experienced by patients with neuromuscular disorders. Substantial high prevalence rates of fatigue are reported in a wide range of neuromuscular disorders, such as Guillain-Barré syndrome and Pompe disease. Fatigue can be subdivided into experienced fatigue and physiological fatigue. Physiological fatigue in turn can be of central or peripheral origin. Peripheral fatigue is an important contributor to fatigue in neuromuscular disorders, but in reaction to neuromuscular disease fatigue of central origin can be an important protective mechanism to restrict further damage. In most cases, severity of fatigue seems to be related with disease severity, possibly with the exception of fatigue occurring in a monophasic disorder like Guillain-Barré syndrome. Treatment of fatigue in neuromuscular disease starts with symptomatic treatment of the underlying disease. When symptoms of fatigue persist, non-pharmacological interventions, such as exercise and cognitive behavioral therapy, can be initiated.

  15. Targeting cytokines in inflammatory diseases: focus on interleukin-1-mediated autoinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kalliolias, George D

    2009-01-01

    In this commentary, we summarize the most recent advances in the cytokine-targeting therapies. We focus on new aspects of interleukin-1 (IL-1)-mediated autoinflammation and novel strategies to target IL-1. PMID:20948617

  16. De novo spine surgery as a predictor of additional spine surgery at the same or distant spine regions

    PubMed Central

    Walid, M. Sami; Robinson, Joe Sam; Abbara, Moataz; Tolaymat, Abdullah; Robinson, Joe Sam

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Degenerative spine disorders are steadily increasing parallel to the aging of the population with considerable impact on cost and productivity. In this paper we study the prevalence and risk factors for multiple spine surgery and its impact on cost. Methods: Data on 1,153 spine surgery inpatients operated between October 2005 and September 2008 (index spine surgery) in regard to the number of previous spine surgeries and location of surgeries (cervical or lumbar) were retrospectively collected. Additionally, prospective follow-up over a period of 2-5 years was conducted. Results: Retrospectively, 365 (31.7%) patients were recurrent spine surgery patients while 788 (68.3%) were de novo spine surgery patients. Nearly half of those with previous spine surgery (51.5%) were on different regions of the spine. There were no significant differences in length of stay or hospital charges except in lumbar decompression and fusion (LDF) patients with multiple interventions on the same region of the spine. Significant differences (P<.05) in length of stay (5.4 days vs. 7.4 days) and hospital charges ($55,477 vs. $74,878) between LDF patients with one previous spine versus those with ≥3 previous spine surgeries on the same region were noted. Prospectively, the overall reoperation rate was 10.4%. The risk of additional spine surgery increased from 8.0% in patients with one previous spine surgery (index surgery) to 25.6% in patients with ≥4 previous spine surgeries on different regions of the spine (including index surgery). After excluding patients with previous spine surgeries on different regions of the spine, 17.2% of reoperated patients had additional spine surgery on a different spine region. The percentage of additional spine surgery on a distant spine region increased from 14.0% in patients with one spine surgery to 33.0% in patients with two spine surgeries on the same region. However, in patients with three or more spine surgeries on the same spine

  17. Ethnic differences in cardiovascular risk in rheumatic disease: focus on Asians.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Kai-Hang; Tse, Hung-Fat; Mok, Mo-Yin; Lau, Chak-Sing

    2011-09-13

    Rheumatic diseases are associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Considerable differences exist in the frequency of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors and events among people of different ethnic origins, but little is known of the ethnic variations in the relative distribution of CVD risk factors and the degree of atherosclerosis in patients with rheumatic diseases. Understanding this variation will provide insight into the underlying pathogenesis of CVD in patients with rheumatic diseases, and aid in future studies of the detection and management of this complication. In general, although Asian patients seem to have fewer background CVD risk factors and are less affected by metabolic syndrome (MetS) than their non-Asian counterparts, those with rheumatic disease are equally as susceptible to CVD. Furthermore, it seems that systemic inflammation and mechanisms that do not involve conventional CVD risk factors and MetS have an important role in the development of atherosclerosis in patients with rheumatic diseases. Here we examine the frequency of conventional CVD risk factors and the prevalence of MetS in both Asian and non-Asian patients with selected rheumatic diseases. We also discuss the burden of CVD, as evaluated using various surrogate markers in these patients, and their overall CVD mortality rate.

  18. [Pathophysiology and Assessment of IgG4-Related Disease--Focus on Autoimmune Pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Uehara, Takeshi

    2015-10-01

    IgG4-related disease is well-known, and while the functions of cytokines which affect IgG4 production are being clarified, it remains unclear what causes it. There are many clinicopathological characteristics of IgG4-related disease and, therefore, comprehensive criteria are used for diagnosis. Notably, histopathological findings are the most important of these, with which we cannot make a definite diagnosis. The model disease of an IgG4-related disease is autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP). Currently, AIP is classified into type 1 (AIP1) and type 2 (AIP2). AIP1 is IgG4-related while AIP2 is not. AIP1 sometimes has localized mass formation, making it difficult to distinguish between AIP1 and pancreatic cancer. Thus, upon biochemical and immunological examination, the IgG4 level is the most useful for the diagnosis, although the levels of IL-2R, β2MG, C4, and monoclonal rheumatoid factor are also useful for the assessment of disease. In addition, histopathological findings are also important to diagnose AIP1. Typical AIP1 cases show lymphoplasmacytic infiltration including IgG4-positive plasma cells with storiform fibrosis. A careful analysis of cases with the typical features of IgG4-related disease will lead to the elucidation of the mechanism behind IgG4-related disease.

  19. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  20. Incentives for Starting Small Companies Focused on Rare and Neglected Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ekins, Sean; Wood, Jill

    2016-04-01

    Starting biotech or pharmaceutical companies is traditionally thought to be based around a scientist, their technology platform or a clinical candidate spun out from another company. Between us we have taken a different approach and formed two small early stage companies after initially leveraging the perspective of a parent with a child with a life-threatening rare disease. Phoenix Nest ( http://www.phoenixnestbiotech.com/ ) was co-founded to work on treatments for Sanfilippo syndrome a devastating neurodegenerative lysosomal storage disorder. In the space of just over 3 years we have built up collaborations with leading scientists in academia and industry and been awarded multiple NIH small business grants. The second company, Collaborations Pharmaceuticals Inc. ( http://www.collaborationspharma.com/ ) was founded to address some of the other 7000 or so rare diseases as well as neglected infectious diseases. The Rare Pediatric Disease Priority Review Voucher is likely the most important incentive for companies working on rare diseases with very small populations. This may also be partially responsible for the recent acquisitions of rare disease companies with late stage candidates. Lessons learned in the process of starting our companies are that rare disease parents or patients can readily partner with a scientist and fund research through NIH grants rather than venture capital or angel investors initially. This process may be slow so patience and perseverance is key. We would encourage other pharmaceutical scientists to meet rare disease parents, patients or advocates and work with them to further the science on their diseases and create a source of future drugs.

  1. Giant cell tumor of the spine.

    PubMed

    Ozaki, Toshifumi; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Halm, Henry; Hillmann, Axel; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried

    2002-08-01

    Six patients with giant cell tumor of the spine had surgery between 1981 and 1995. Three lesions were located in the scrum, two lesions were in the thoracic spine, and one lesion was in the lumbar spine. Preoperatively, all patients had local pain and neurologic symptoms. Two patients had cement implanted after curettage or intralesional excision of the sacral tumor; one patient had a local relapse. After the second curettage and cement implantation, the tumor was controlled. One patient with a sacral lesion had marginal excision and spondylodesis; no relapse developed. Two patients with thoracic lesions had planned marginal excision and spondylodesis; the margins finally became intralesional, but no relapse developed. One patient with a lumbar lesion had incomplete removal of the tumor and received postoperative irradiation. At the final followup (median, 69 months), five of six patients were disease-free and one patient died of disease progression. Two of the five surviving patients had pain after standing or neurologic problems. Although some contamination occurred, planning a marginal excision of the lesion seems beneficial for vertebral lesions above the sacrum. Total sacrectomy of a sacral lesion seems to be too invasive when cement implantation can control the lesion.

  2. Transmission-Blocking Vaccines: Focus on Anti-Vector Vaccines against Tick-Borne Diseases.

    PubMed

    Neelakanta, Girish; Sultana, Hameeda

    2015-06-01

    Tick-borne diseases are a potential threat that account for significant morbidity and mortality in human population worldwide. Vaccines are not available to treat several of the tick-borne diseases. With the emergence and resurgence of several tick-borne diseases, emphasis on the development of transmission-blocking vaccines remains increasing. In this review, we provide a snap shot on some of the potential candidates for the development of anti-vector vaccines (a form of transmission-blocking vaccines) against wide range of hard and soft ticks that include Ixodes, Haemaphysalis, Dermacentor, Amblyomma, Rhipicephalus and Ornithodoros species.

  3. Heart disease education and prevention program targeting immigrant Latinos: using focus group responses to develop effective interventions.

    PubMed

    Moreno, C; Alvarado, M; Balcazar, H; Lane, C; Newman, E; Ortiz, G; Forrest, M

    1997-12-01

    Although research has provided considerable knowledge concerning the positive effects of behavioral change on morbidity and mortality from heart disease and related risk factors, some segments of the population have not benefited equitably from this information. In April 1995, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) conducted seven focus groups to determine knowledge and attitudes about heart disease and associated risk factors, identify media usage and preferences, and assess publications usage and preferences among Spanish-speaking Latino immigrants residing in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area. This information was gathered to assist in the development of key messages and strategies for the NHLBI Latino Community Cardiovascular Disease Prevention and Outreach Initiative, Salud para su Corazón--a heart disease prevention and education campaign. Findings from these focus groups indicate that Latinos may not benefit from heart disease prevention messages developed for the general population because of language and cultural differences. The researchers concluded that health education and disease prevention programs targeting the Latino community should develop educational materials and interventions that address language preferences and cultural values. Furthermore, to be effective, these programs should show people how to make positive behavioral changes based on their current circumstances, while remaining sensitive to the fact that Latino immigrants face major life adjustments and many are still greatly influenced by their country of origin.

  4. Micromechanics of Sea Urchin spines.

    PubMed

    Tsafnat, Naomi; Fitz Gerald, John D; Le, Hai N; Stachurski, Zbigniew H

    2012-01-01

    The endoskeletal structure of the Sea Urchin, Centrostephanus rodgersii, has numerous long spines whose known functions include locomotion, sensing, and protection against predators. These spines have a remarkable internal microstructure and are made of single-crystal calcite. A finite-element model of the spine's unique porous structure, based on micro-computed tomography (microCT) and incorporating anisotropic material properties, was developed to study its response to mechanical loading. Simulations show that high stress concentrations occur at certain points in the spine's architecture; brittle cracking would likely initiate in these regions. These analyses demonstrate that the organization of single-crystal calcite in the unique, intricate morphology of the sea urchin spine results in a strong, stiff and lightweight structure that enhances its strength despite the brittleness of its constituent material.

  5. Disease management in the genomics era - Summaries of focus issue papers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genomics revolution has contributed enormously to research and disease management applications in plant pathology. This development has rapidly increased our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underpinning pathogenesis and resistance, contributed novel markers for rapid pathogen detectio...

  6. Analysis of dendritic spine morphology in cultured CNS neurons.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Deepak P; Woolfrey, Kevin M; Penzes, Peter

    2011-07-13

    Dendritic spines are the sites of the majority of excitatory connections within the brain, and form the post-synaptic compartment of synapses. These structures are rich in actin and have been shown to be highly dynamic. In response to classical Hebbian plasticity as well as neuromodulatory signals, dendritic spines can change shape and number, which is thought to be critical for the refinement of neural circuits and the processing and storage of information within the brain. Within dendritic spines, a complex network of proteins link extracellular signals with the actin cyctoskeleton allowing for control of dendritic spine morphology and number. Neuropathological studies have demonstrated that a number of disease states, ranging from schizophrenia to autism spectrum disorders, display abnormal dendritic spine morphology or numbers. Moreover, recent genetic studies have identified mutations in numerous genes that encode synaptic proteins, leading to suggestions that these proteins may contribute to aberrant spine plasticity that, in part, underlie the pathophysiology of these disorders. In order to study the potential role of these proteins in controlling dendritic spine morphologies/number, the use of cultured cortical neurons offers several advantages. Firstly, this system allows for high-resolution imaging of dendritic spines in fixed cells as well as time-lapse imaging of live cells. Secondly, this in vitro system allows for easy manipulation of protein function by expression of mutant proteins, knockdown by shRNA constructs, or pharmacological treatments. These techniques allow researchers to begin to dissect the role of disease-associated proteins and to predict how mutations of these proteins may function in vivo.

  7. Can focusing on UPDRS Part II make assessments of Parkinson disease progression more efficient?

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Cristina

    2009-03-01

    Harrison et al. have attempted to validate Part II of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS II) as a medication-independent measure of disease progression. The authors collected cross-sectional data from a cohort of 888 patients with idiopathic Parkinson disease, and they found a robust association between UPDRS II scores and disease duration. Other variables considered were the patients' levodopa status, age at disease onset, and scores on UPDRS I, II and III. The results suggest that a single UPDRS II measurement might be a good indicator of progression at a given time point, irrespective of the current disease-related circumstances. This concept is attractive in its simplicity and patient-centeredness. However, this evidence came from a single-center, retrospective study, the statistical model was constructed using a nonvalidated surrogate as an independent variable, and no external replication was conducted. Until further confirmation, therefore, Harrison et al.'s proposal can only be considered to be a working hypothesis.

  8. Pathogenesis of coronary artery disease: focus on genetic risk factors and identification of genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Sayols-Baixeras, Sergi; Lluís-Ganella, Carla; Lucas, Gavin; Elosua, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, and its prevalence is expected to increase in the coming years. CAD events are caused by the interplay of genetic and environmental factors, the effects of which are mainly mediated through cardiovascular risk factors. The techniques used to study the genetic basis of these diseases have evolved from linkage studies to candidate gene studies and genome-wide association studies. Linkage studies have been able to identify genetic variants associated with monogenic diseases, whereas genome-wide association studies have been more successful in determining genetic variants associated with complex diseases. Currently, genome-wide association studies have identified approximately 40 loci that explain 6% of the heritability of CAD. The application of this knowledge to clinical practice is challenging, but can be achieved using various strategies, such as genetic variants to identify new therapeutic targets, personal genetic information to improve disease risk prediction, and pharmacogenomics. The main aim of this narrative review is to provide a general overview of our current understanding of the genetics of coronary artery disease and its potential clinical utility. PMID:24520200

  9. Fractures of the cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, Raphael Martus; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Teixeira, William Jacobsen; Narasaki, Douglas Kenji; Oliveira, Reginaldo Perilo; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to review the literature on cervical spine fractures. METHODS: The literature on the diagnosis, classification, and treatment of lower and upper cervical fractures and dislocations was reviewed. RESULTS: Fractures of the cervical spine may be present in polytraumatized patients and should be suspected in patients complaining of neck pain. These fractures are more common in men approximately 30 years of age and are most often caused by automobile accidents. The cervical spine is divided into the upper cervical spine (occiput-C2) and the lower cervical spine (C3-C7), according to anatomical differences. Fractures in the upper cervical spine include fractures of the occipital condyle and the atlas, atlanto-axial dislocations, fractures of the odontoid process, and hangman's fractures in the C2 segment. These fractures are characterized based on specific classifications. In the lower cervical spine, fractures follow the same pattern as in other segments of the spine; currently, the most widely used classification is the SLIC (Subaxial Injury Classification), which predicts the prognosis of an injury based on morphology, the integrity of the disc-ligamentous complex, and the patient's neurological status. It is important to correctly classify the fracture to ensure appropriate treatment. Nerve or spinal cord injuries, pseudarthrosis or malunion, and postoperative infection are the main complications of cervical spine fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Fractures of the cervical spine are potentially serious and devastating if not properly treated. Achieving the correct diagnosis and classification of a lesion is the first step toward identifying the most appropriate treatment, which can be either surgical or conservative. PMID:24270959

  10. How calorie-focused thinking about obesity and related diseases may mislead and harm public health. An alternative.

    PubMed

    Lucan, Sean C; DiNicolantonio, James J

    2015-03-01

    Prevailing thinking about obesity and related diseases holds that quantifying calories should be a principal concern and target for intervention. Part of this thinking is that consumed calories - regardless of their sources - are equivalent; i.e. 'a calorie is a calorie'. The present commentary discusses various problems with the idea that 'a calorie is a calorie' and with a primarily quantitative focus on food calories. Instead, the authors argue for a greater qualitative focus on the sources of calories consumed (i.e. a greater focus on types of foods) and on the metabolic changes that result from consuming foods of different types. In particular, the authors consider how calorie-focused thinking is inherently biased against high-fat foods, many of which may be protective against obesity and related diseases, and supportive of starchy and sugary replacements, which are likely detrimental. Shifting the focus to qualitative food distinctions, a central argument of the paper is that obesity and related diseases are problems due largely to food-induced physiology (e.g. neurohormonal pathways) not addressable through arithmetic dieting (i.e. calorie counting). The paper considers potential harms of public health initiatives framed around calorie balance sheets - targeting 'calories in' and/or 'calories out' - that reinforce messages of overeating and inactivity as underlying causes, rather than intermediate effects, of obesity. Finally, the paper concludes that public health should work primarily to support the consumption of whole foods that help protect against obesity-promoting energy imbalance and metabolic dysfunction and not continue to promote calorie-directed messages that may create and blame victims and possibly exacerbate epidemics of obesity and related diseases.

  11. Management of Thrombocytopenia in Chronic Liver Disease: Focus on Pharmacotherapeutic Strategies.

    PubMed

    Maan, Raoel; de Knegt, Robert J; Veldt, Bart J

    2015-11-01

    Thrombocytopenia (platelet count <150 × 10(9)/L) often complicates chronic liver disease, impeding optimal management of these patients. The prevalence of this manifestation ranges from 6% among non-cirrhotic patients with chronic liver disease to 70% among patients with liver cirrhosis. It has also been shown that the severity of liver disease is associated with both prevalence and level of thrombocytopenia. Its development is often multifactorial, although thrombopoietin is thought to be a major factor. The discovery of and ability to clone thrombopoietin led to new treatment opportunities for this clinical manifestation. This review discusses data on the three most important thrombopoietin receptor agonists: eltrombopag, avatrombopag, and romiplostim. Currently, only eltrombopag is approved for usage among patients with thrombocytopenia and chronic hepatitis C virus infection in order to initiate and maintain interferon-based antiviral treatment. Nevertheless, the optimal management of hematologic abnormalities among patients with chronic liver disease, and its risk for bleeding complications, is still a matter of discussion. Thrombocytopenia definitely contributes to hemostatic defects but is often counterbalanced by the enhanced presence of procoagulant factors. Therefore, a thorough assessment of the patient's risk for thrombotic events is essential when the use of thrombopoietin receptor agonists is considered among patients with chronic liver disease and thrombocytopenia.

  12. Radiologic features of lumbar spine in ochronosis in late stages.

    PubMed

    Bayindir, Petek; Yilmaz Ovali, Gülgün; Pabuşçu, Yüksel; Temiz, Cüneyt; Duruoz, Tuncay

    2006-07-01

    Ochronosis is a rare hereditary disorder of tyrosine metabolism. Severe degenerative arthritis and spondylosis occur in the later stages of this disease. Radiologic examinations may reveal changes considered almost pathognomonic for ochronosis. We present the radiologic features of the lumbar spine in two ochronotic patients who were diagnosed after radiologic examinations in the late stages of the disease.

  13. Focused Attention Deficits in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinoff, E.J.; Saumier, D.; Chertkow, H.

    2005-01-01

    Reaction time (RT) tasks take various forms, and can assess psychomotor speed, (i.e., simple reaction time task), and focused attention (i.e., choice reaction time (CRT) task). If cues are provided before stimulus presentation (i.e., cued choice reaction time (CCRT) task), then a cueing effect can also be assessed. A limited number of studies have…

  14. Diabetes and cardiovascular disease: changing the focus from glycemic control to improving long-term survival.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cecilia C Low; Reusch, Jane E B

    2012-11-06

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the fifth-leading cause of death worldwide and contributes to leading causes of death, cancer and cardiovascular disease, including CAD, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, and other vascular disease. While glycemic management remains a cornerstone of DM care, the co-management of hypertension, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular risk reduction, and prevention of long-term consequences associated with DM are now well recognized as essential to improve long-term survival. Clinical trial evidence substantiates the importance of glycemic control, low-density cholesterol-lowering therapy, blood pressure lowering, control of albuminuria, and comprehensive approaches targeting multiple risk factors to reduce cardiovascular risk. This article presents a review of the role of DM in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and cardiac dysfunction, recent evidence on the degree of glycemic control and mortality, and available evidence for a multifaceted approach to improve long-term outcomes for patients.

  15. [Health care of refugees - A short review with focus on infectious diseases].

    PubMed

    Lange, Berit; Stete, Katarina; Bozorgmehr, Kayvan; Camp, Johannes; Kranzer, Katharina; Kern, Winfried; Rieg, Siegbert

    2016-06-01

    Few guidelines for health care of refugees exist in Germany. Screening as a part of initial health checks as well as general organisation of early health care for refugees is very heterogenous across different regions. Current experience will be relevant to develop integrated health care models. Prevention and care of infectious diseases are an important part of early health care for refugees, even if non-communicable diseases and mental health conditions should also be considered in every effort to design early health care models. We are presenting a pragmatic review of current evidence for prevention and care of tuberculosis, HIV, chronic viral hepatitis and other infectious diseases. More evidence is needed to assess morbidity and efficacy of early health care interventions and integrated care models in refugees.

  16. Early renal failure as a cardiovascular disease: Focus on lipoprotein(a) and prothrombotic state.

    PubMed

    Catena, Cristiana; Colussi, GianLuca; Nait, Francesca; Pezzutto, Francesca; Martinis, Flavia; Sechi, Leonardo A

    2015-07-06

    Patients with renal failure are at increased risk of cardiovascular events even at the earliest stages of disease. In addition to many classic cardiovascular risk factors, many conditions that are commonly identified as emerging risk factors might contribute to occurrence of cardiovascular disease. Changes in circulating levels of many of these emerging risk factors have been demonstrated in patients with early stages of renal failure caused by different types of renal disease and have been associated with detection of cardiovascular complications. However, for most of these factors evidence of benefits of correction on cardiovascular outcome is missing. In this article, we comment on the role of lipoprotein(a) and prothrombotic factors as potential contributors to cardiovascular events in patients with early renal failure.

  17. New strategies and paradigm for drug target discovery: a special focus on infectious diseases tuberculosis, malaria, leishmaniasis, trypanosomiasis and gastritis.

    PubMed

    Neelapu, Nageswara R R; Srimath-Tirumala-Peddinti, Ravi C P K; Nammi, Deepthi; Pasupuleti, Amita C M

    2013-10-01

    The discovery and exploitation of new drug targets is a key focus for both the pharmaceutical industry and academic research. To provide an insight into trends in the exploitation of new drug targets, we have analysed different methods during the past six decades and advances made in drug target discovery. A special focus remains on different methods used for drug target discovery on infectious diseases such as Tuberculosis, Gastritis, Malaria, Trypanosomiasis and Leishmaniasis. We herewith provide a paradigm that is can be used for drug target discovery in the near future.

  18. Strategies to control costs and quality: a focus on outcomes research for disease management.

    PubMed

    Villagra, Victor

    2004-04-01

    Rapid adoption of disease management has outpaced systematic evaluation of its net value in improving health outcomes and mitigating healthcare cost. This article identifies areas in which outcomes research in disease management is needed to demonstrate its value or to enhance its performance. Patient identification for disease management relies on administrative database queries but the trade-offs in sensitivity, specificity, and predictive value of alternative queries are not well known. Large-scale deployment, rapid patient engagement, and repeated interactions between patients and nurses could be important attributes for attaining measurable improvements in quality and cost reduction over short periods of time, but these hypothesis need to be tested. There is a trend toward integration of multiple chronic disease management programs onto a single platform. To support this trend, there is a need for a corresponding set of integrated clinical guidelines or "meta-guidelines" that combine the contents of individual practice guidelines. The relative contribution of various disease management interventions in improving clinical results, lowering costs, and their respective ease of implementation is not known. Research leading to a better understanding of tradeoffs could lead to more rational resource allocation and better overall outcomes. Coordination between disease management programs and physician practices is lacking. Research aimed at defining operational and technical interfaces and cultural and behavioral professional adjustments necessary to achieve integration and coordination is needed. The lack of a consistent analytical framework for evaluating clinical and financial outcomes has made comparisons of reported results impossible and has rendered many reports unreliable. Theoretical work on a standard methodology that integrates clinical and financial outcomes and empiric validation is needed.

  19. Cortical regulation of dopamine depletion-induced dendritic spine loss in striatal medium spiny neurons.

    PubMed

    Neely, M D; Schmidt, D E; Deutch, A Y

    2007-10-26

    The proximate cause of Parkinson's disease is striatal dopamine depletion. Although no overt toxicity to striatal neurons has been reported in Parkinson's disease, one of the consequences of striatal dopamine loss is a decrease in the number of dendritic spines on striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs). Dendrites of these neurons receive cortical glutamatergic inputs onto the dendritic spine head and dopaminergic inputs from the substantia nigra onto the spine neck. This synaptic arrangement suggests that dopamine gates corticostriatal glutamatergic drive onto spines. Using triple organotypic slice cultures composed of ventral mesencephalon, striatum, and cortex of the neonatal rat, we examined the role of the cortex in dopamine depletion-induced dendritic spine loss in MSNs. The striatal dopamine innervation was lesioned by treatment of the cultures with the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) or by removing the mesencephalon. Both MPP+ and mesencephalic ablation decreased MSN dendritic spine density. Analysis of spine morphology revealed that thin spines were preferentially lost after dopamine depletion. Removal of the cortex completely prevented dopamine depletion-induced spine loss. These data indicate that the dendritic remodeling of MSNs seen in parkinsonism occurs secondary to increases in corticostriatal glutamatergic drive, and suggest that modulation of cortical activity may be a useful therapeutic strategy in Parkinson's disease.

  20. Reelin Regulates the Maturation of Dendritic Spines, Synaptogenesis and Glial Ensheathment of Newborn Granule Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, Carles; Masachs, Nuria; Exposito-Alonso, David; Martínez, Albert; Teixeira, Cátia M.; Fernaud, Isabel; Pujadas, Lluís; Ulloa, Fausto; Comella, Joan X.; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The Reelin pathway is essential for both neural migration and for the development and maturation of synaptic connections. However, its role in adult synaptic formation and remodeling is still being investigated. Here, we investigated the impact of the Reelin/Dab1 pathway on the synaptogenesis of newborn granule cells (GCs) in the young-adult mouse hippocampus. We show that neither Reelin overexpression nor the inactivation of its intracellular adapter, Dab1, substantially alters dendritic spine numbers in these neurons. In contrast, 3D-electron microscopy (focused ion beam milling/scanning electron microscope) revealed that dysregulation of the Reelin/Dab1 pathway leads to both transient and permanent changes in the types and morphology of dendritic spines, mainly altering mushroom, filopodial, and branched GC spines. We also found that the Reelin/Dab1 pathway controls synaptic configuration of presynaptic boutons in the dentate gyrus, with its dysregulation leading to a substantial decrease in multi-synaptic bouton innervation. Lastly, we show that the Reelin/Dab1 pathway controls astroglial ensheathment of synapses. Thus, the Reelin pathway is a key regulator of adult-generated GC integration, by controlling dendritic spine types and shapes, their synaptic innervation patterns, and glial ensheathment. These findings may help to better understanding of hippocampal circuit alterations in neurological disorders in which the Reelin pathway is implicated. Significance Statement The extracellular protein Reelin has an important role in neurological diseases, including epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease and psychiatric diseases, targeting hippocampal circuits. Here we address the role of Reelin in the development of synaptic contacts in adult-generated granule cells (GCs), a neuronal population that is crucial for learning and memory and implicated in neurological and psychiatric diseases. We found that the Reelin pathway controls the shapes, sizes, and types of dendritic

  1. Review of genitourinary tuberculosis with focus on end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Lima, Neiberg A; Vasconcelos, Carol C; Filgueira, Pedro Henrique O; Kretzmann, Meissa; Sindeaux, Ticiano A S; Feitosa Neto, Beni; Silva Junior, Geraldo B; Daher, Elizabeth F

    2012-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a current public health problem, remaining the most common worldwide cause of mortality from infectious disease. Recent studies indicate that genitourinary TB is the third most common form of extra-pulmonary disease. The diagnosis of renal TB can be hypothesized in a non-specific bacterial cystitis associated with a therapeutic failure or a urinalysis with a persistent leukocyturia in the absence of bacteriuria. We report on the case of a 33-year-old man who presented on admission end stage renal disease (ESRD) secondary to renal TB and a past history of pulmonary TB with important radiologic findings. The diagnosis was based on clinical findings despite all cultures being negative. Empiric treatment with tuberculostatic drugs was started and the patient became stable. He was discharged with no symptom, but without renal function recovery. He is on maintenance hemodialysis three times a week. TB is an important cause of kidney disease and can lead to irreversible renal function loss.

  2. Potential Therapies by Stem Cell-Derived Exosomes in CNS Diseases: Focusing on the Neurogenic Niche

    PubMed Central

    Luarte, Alejandro; Bátiz, Luis Federico; Wyneken, Ursula; Lafourcade, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are one of the leading causes of death and disability and one of the biggest burdens on health care systems. Novel approaches using various types of stem cells have been proposed to treat common neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, or stroke. Moreover, as the secretome of these cells appears to be of greater benefit compared to the cells themselves, the extracellular components responsible for its therapeutic benefit have been explored. Stem cells, as well as most cells, release extracellular vesicles such as exosomes, which are nanovesicles able to target specific cell types and thus to modify their function by delivering proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. Exosomes have recently been tested in vivo and in vitro as therapeutic conveyors for the treatment of diseases. As such, they could be engineered to target specific populations of cells within the CNS. Considering the fact that many degenerative brain diseases have an impact on adult neurogenesis, we discuss how the modulation of the adult neurogenic niches may be a therapeutic target of stem cell-derived exosomes. These novel approaches should be examined in cellular and animal models to provide better, more effective, and specific therapeutic tools in the future. PMID:27195011

  3. Wildlife health in a rapidly changing North: focus on avian disease

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Hemert, Caroline R.; Pearce, John M.; Handel, Colleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Climate-related environmental changes have increasingly been linked to emerging infectious diseases in wildlife. The Arctic is facing a major ecological transition that is expected to substantially affect animal and human health. Changes in phenology or environmental conditions that result from climate warming may promote novel species assemblages as host and pathogen ranges expand to previously unoccupied areas. Recent evidence from the Arctic and subarctic suggests an increase in the spread and prevalence of some wildlife diseases, but baseline data necessary to detect and verify such changes are still lacking. Wild birds are undergoing rapid shifts in distribution and have been implicated in the spread of wildlife and zoonotic diseases. Here, we review evidence of current and projected changes in the abundance and distribution of avian diseases and outline strategies for future research. We discuss relevant climatic and environmental factors, emerging host–pathogen contact zones, the relationship between host condition and immune function, and potential wildlife and human health outcomes in northern regions.

  4. Recurrent Falls in People with Parkinson's Disease without Cognitive Impairment: Focusing on Modifiable Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Lorena R S; Valença, Guilherme T; Negreiros, Nádja N; Pinto, Elen B; Oliveira-Filho, Jamary

    2014-01-01

    Falls can be considered a disabling feature in Parkinson's disease. We aimed to identify risk factors for falling, testing simultaneously the ability of disease-specific and balance-related measures. We evaluated 171 patients, collecting demographic and clinical data, including standardized assessments with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), activities of daily living (ADL) and motor sections, modified Hoehn and Yahr Scale, Schwab and England, eight-item Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire, Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I), Berg Balance Scale, Dynamic Gait Index, Functional Reach, and Timed Up and Go. ROC curves were constructed to determine the cutoff scores for all measures. Variables with P < 0.1 entered a logistic regression model. The prevalence of recurrent falls was 30% (95% CI 24%-38%). In multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for recurrent falls were (P < 0.05) levodopa equivalent dose (OR = 1.283 per 100 mg increase; 95% CI = 1.092-1.507), UPDRS-ADL > 16 points (OR = 10.0; 95% CI = 3.6-28.3), FES-I > 30 points (OR = 6.0; 95% CI = 1.6-22.6), and Berg ≤ 48 points (OR = 3.9; 95% CI = 1.2-12.7).We encourage the utilization of these modifiable risk factors in the screening of fall risk.

  5. Pregnancy and cardiovascular risk: A review focused on women with heart disease undergoing fertility treatment.

    PubMed

    Rossberg, Nora; Stangl, Karl; Stangl, Verena

    2016-10-17

    A growing number of women with heart disease are considering pregnancy with the help of assisted reproductive technology (ART). Although an ever-increasing amount of knowledge exists on pregnancy in both congenital and acquired heart disease patients, little information is available on fertility treatments specifically in these women. This review seeks to provide an overview of the existing data and explores areas in need of research in this field. Changes in the hormonal environment seen in ART patients initially entail an increase then a decrease in blood pressure and peripheral vascular resistance. A shift in the thrombotic-thrombolytic balance towards coagulation is observed. Compared to normal pregnancy, ART-conceived pregnancies exhibit an increased adverse event rate for both the mother and foetus, including a higher incidence of hypertensive disorders and an increase in thromboembolic events during the first trimester. Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome in particular can cause dramatic haemodynamic changes and an increase in upper body thrombosis. Viewing these findings within the context of women with an underlying heart disease reveals indications that maternal and neonatal complications after fertility treatments are higher. Pre-pregnancy risk assessment is essential to identifying women with heart disease for whom ART may be dangerous and therefore inappropriate.

  6. Functional anatomy of the spine.

    PubMed

    Bogduk, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    Among other important features of the functional anatomy of the spine, described in this chapter, is the remarkable difference between the design and function of the cervical spine and that of the lumbar spine. In the cervical spine, the atlas serves to transmit the load of the head to the typical cervical vertebrae. The axis adapts the suboccipital region to the typical cervical spine. In cervical intervertebrtal discs the anulus fibrosus is not circumferential but is crescentic, and serves as an interosseous ligament in the saddle joint between vertebral bodies. Cervical vertebrae rotate and translate in the sagittal plane, and rotate in the manner of an inverted cone, across an oblique coronal plane. The cervical zygapophysial joints are the most common source of chronic neck pain. By contrast, lumbar discs are well designed to sustain compression loads, but rely on posterior elements to limit axial rotation. Internal disc disruption is the most common basis for chronic low-back pain. Spinal muscles are arranged systematically in prevertebral and postvertebral groups. The intrinsic elements of the spine are innervated by the dorsal rami of the spinal nerves, and by the sinuvertebral nerves. Little modern research has been conducted into the structure of the thoracic spine, or the causes of thoracic spinal pain.

  7. Perioperative visual loss after spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Nickels, Travis J; Manlapaz, Mariel R; Farag, Ehab

    2014-04-18

    Perioperative visual loss (POVL) is an uncommon, but devastating complication that remains primarily associated with spine and cardiac surgery. The incidence and mechanisms of visual loss after surgery remain difficult to determine. According to the American Society of Anesthesiologists Postoperative Visual Loss Registry, the most common causes of POVL in spine procedures are the two different forms of ischemic optic neuropathy: anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and posterior ischemic optic neuropathy, accounting for 89% of the cases. Retinal ischemia, cortical blindness, and posterior reversible encephalopathy are also observed, but in a small minority of cases. A recent multicenter case control study has identified risk factors associated with ischemic optic neuropathy for patients undergoing prone spinal fusion surgery. These include obesity, male sex, Wilson frame use, longer anesthetic duration, greater estimated blood loss, and decreased percent colloid administration. These risk factors are thought to contribute to the elevation of venous pressure and interstitial edema, resulting in damage to the optic nerve by compression of the vessels that feed the optic nerve, venous infarction or direct mechanical compression. This review will expand on these findings as well as the recently updated American Society of Anesthesiologists practice advisory on POVL. There are no effective treatment options for POVL and the diagnosis is often irreversible, so efforts must focus on prevention and risk factor modification. The role of crystalloids versus colloids and the use of α-2 agonists to decrease intraocular pressure during prone spine surgery will also be discussed as a potential preventative strategy.

  8. MRI-guided focused ultrasound surgery in musculoskeletal diseases: the hot topics

    PubMed Central

    Napoli, Alessandro; Sacconi, Beatrice; Battista, Giuseppe; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Catalano, Carlo; Albisinni, Ugo

    2016-01-01

    MRI-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is a minimally invasive treatment guided by the most sophisticated imaging tool available in today's clinical practice. Both the imaging and therapeutic sides of the equipment are based on non-ionizing energy. This technique is a very promising option as potential treatment for several pathologies, including musculoskeletal (MSK) disorders. Apart from clinical applications, MRgFUS technology is the result of long, heavy and cumulative efforts exploring the effects of ultrasound on biological tissues and function, the generation of focused ultrasound and treatment monitoring by MRI. The aim of this article is to give an updated overview on a “new” interventional technique and on its applications for MSK and allied sciences. PMID:26607640

  9. The 100 Most Influential Articles in Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Steinberger, Jeremy; Guzman, Javier Z; Overley, Samuel C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Caridi, John M; Cho, Samuel K

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To identify and analyze the top 100 cited articles in cervical spine surgery. Methods The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all articles relevant to cervical spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each article. Results The most cited article was the classic from 1991 by Vernon and Mior that described the Neck Disability Index. The second most cited was Smith's 1958 article describing the anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion procedure. The third most cited article was Hilibrand's 1999 publication evaluating the incidence, prevalence, and radiographic progression of symptomatic adjacent segment disease following anterior cervical arthrodesis. The majority of the articles originated in the United States (65), and most were published in Spine (39). Most articles were published in the 1990s (34), and the three most common topics were cervical fusion (17), surgical complications (9), and biomechanics (9), respectively. Author Abumi had four articles in the top 100 list, and authors Goffin, Panjabi, and Hadley had three each. The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan, had five articles in the top 100 list. Conclusion This report identifies the top 100 articles in cervical spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the cervical spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in cervical spine surgery today.

  10. Immunology in clinic review series; focus on autoinflammatory diseases: role of inflammasomes in autoinflammatory syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ozkurede, V U; Franchi, L

    2012-01-01

    Autoinflammatory syndromes are disorders characterized by the hyperactivation of the innate immune system in the absence of microbial infection or autoantibody production. Some autoinflammatory syndromes are associated with recurrent episodes of fever and systemic inflammation that are caused by dysregulated activation of inflammasomes, molecular platforms responsible for the activation of caspase-1 and the production of interleukin (IL)-1β. In this review we will discuss the role of IL-1β and the inflammasomes in host defence and how mutations of two genes, NLRP3 and PYRIN, leads to the autoinflammatory syndromes, cryopyrin-associated periodic syndromes (CAPS) and familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). Both CAPS and FMF are characterized by increased inflammasome activity and overproduction of IL-1β which is ultimately responsible for disease manifestations. Importantly, understanding the molecular mechanisms of these syndromes has led to effective treatment for these rare diseases with biological drugs that target IL-1β-mediated signalling. PMID:22288581

  11. Recent advances in biomarkers for Parkinson's disease focusing on biochemicals, omics and neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Ren, Rutong; Sun, Yi; Zhao, Xin; Pu, Xiaoping

    2015-09-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative disorders, involving progressive loss of the nigro-striatal dopaminergic neurons. Cardinal symptoms including tremors, muscle rigidity, drooping posture, drooping, walking difficulty, and autonomic symptoms appear when a significant number of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons have already been destroyed. Hence, reliable biomarkers are needed for early and accurate diagnosis to measure disease progression and response to therapy. We review the current status of protein and small molecule biomarkers involved in oxidative stress, protein aggregation and inflammation etc. which are present in cerebrospinal fluid, human blood, urine or saliva. In recent years, advances in genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and functional brain imaging techniques have led to new insights into the pathoetiology of PD. Further studies in the novel discovery of PD biomarkers will provide avenues to treat PD patients more effectively with few or no side effects.

  12. The potential utility of tight junction regulation in celiac disease: focus on larazotide acetate.

    PubMed

    Khaleghi, Shahryar; Ju, Josephine M; Lamba, Abhinav; Murray, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a common chronic immune disease triggered by gluten. Gliadin peptides pass through the epithelial layers, either paracellularly or transcellularly, to launch a potent adaptive immune response in the lamina propria. This aberrant immune response leads to diverse gastrointestinal and extra-gastrointestinal symptoms. Currently, the only treatment for CD is a strict lifelong adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD), which can be challenging. An early effect of gluten in CD is an increase in gut permeability. Larazotide acetate, also known as AT-1001, is a synthetic peptide developed as a permeability regulator primarily targeting CD. In vitro studies indicate that larazotide acetate is capable of inhibiting the actin rearrangement caused by gliadin and clinical studies have been conducted using this peptide as a therapy for CD.

  13. Thyroid Hormones and Antioxidant Systems: Focus on Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Antonio; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Di Segni, Chantal; Persano, Mariasara; Gadotti, Giovanni; Silvestrini, Andrea; Festa, Roberto; Tiano, Luca; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Meucci, Elisabetta

    2013-01-01

    In previous works we demonstrated an inverse correlation between plasma Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) and thyroid hormones; in fact, CoQ10 levels in hyperthyroid patients were found among the lowest detected in human diseases. On the contrary, CoQ10 is elevated in hypothyroid subjects, also in subclinical conditions, suggesting the usefulness of this index in assessing metabolic status in thyroid disorders. A Low-T3 syndrome is a condition observed in several chronic diseases: it is considered an adaptation mechanism, where there is a reduction in pro-hormone T4 conversion. Low T3-Syndrome is not usually considered to be corrected with replacement therapy. We review the role of thyroid hormones in regulation of antioxidant systems, also presenting data on total antioxidant capacity and Coenzyme Q10. Published studies suggest that oxidative stress could be involved in the clinical course of different heart diseases; our data could support the rationale of replacement therapy in low-T3 conditions. PMID:24351864

  14. Cell-specific blood–brain barrier regulation in health and disease: a focus on hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Engelhardt, S; Patkar, S; Ogunshola, O O

    2014-01-01

    The blood–brain barrier (BBB) is a complex vascular structure consisting of microvascular endothelial cells that line the vessel wall, astrocyte end-feet, pericytes, as well as the basal lamina. BBB cells act in concert to maintain the characteristic impermeable and low paracellular flux of the brain vascular network, thus ensuring a homeostatic neuronal environment. Alterations in BBB stability that occur during injury have dire consequences on disease progression and it is clear that BBB cell-specific responses, positive or negative, must make a significant contribution to injury outcome. Reduced oxygenation, or hypoxia, is a characteristic of many brain diseases that significantly increases barrier permeability. Recent data suggest that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1), the master regulator of the hypoxic response, probably mediates many hypoxic effects either directly or indirectly via its target genes. This review discusses current knowledge of physiological cell-specific regulation of barrier function, their responses to hypoxia as well as consequences of hypoxic-and HIF-1-mediated mechanisms on barrier integrity during select brain diseases. In the final sections, the potential of current advances in targeting HIF-1 as a therapeutic strategy will be overviewed. PMID:24641185

  15. Global burden of CVD: focus on secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Bansilal, Sameer; Castellano, José M; Fuster, Valentín

    2015-12-01

    Despite encouraging advances in prevention and treatment of atherothrombosis, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains a major cause of deaths and disability worldwide and will continue to grow mainly due to the increase in incidence in low and middle income countries (LMIC). In Europe and the United States of America (USA), coronary heart disease (CHD) mortality rates have decreased since the mid-1990s due to improvements in acute care, however the prevalence of CHD is increasing largely in part due to the overall aging of the population, increased prevalence of cardiovascular (CV) risk factors, and improved survival of patients after a CV event. Data from clinical trials has consistently proven the efficacy of pharmacologic interventions with aspirin, statins, and blood pressure (BP)-lowering agents in reducing the risk of CV events and total mortality in the ever growing pool of patients in secondary prevention. However, large gaps between indicated therapy and prescribed medication can be observed worldwide, with very low rates of use of effective therapies in LMIC countries. Adherence to medication is very poor in chronic patients, especially those treated with multiple pharmacologic agents, and has been directly correlated to a greater incidence of recurrent CV events and increase in direct and indirect healthcare costs. In this article, we review the global burden of CV disease, status of secondary prevention therapy and major barriers for treatment adherence.

  16. What does "a gene for heart disease" mean? A focus group study of public understandings of genetic risk factors.

    PubMed

    Bates, Benjamin R; Templeton, Alan; Achter, Paul J; Harris, Tina M; Condit, Celeste M

    2003-06-01

    There is growing concern in the medical community about potential genetic determinism in the patient population. Limited information about the public understanding of genetic factors in disease formation is available. To access public perceptions of potentially deterministic phrasing of genetic risk factors, we sought to establish interpretations of the phrase, "a gene for heart disease." Focus groups in urban, suburban, and rural communities were conducted from July through October, 2001 in Georgia. A total of 108 participants were recruited. Participants were recruited to balance sex and racial representation. We used three outcome measures for participants understandings of the phrase: (1) participants' statements of the meaning of the phrase; (2) the level of determinism assigned to genetic factors by participants; and (3) participant reports of the health consequences of having "a gene for heart disease." Participants did not report a single interpretation of the phrase. There were dominant participant interpretations under each outcome measure: (1) "a gene for heart disease" was interpreted as meaning genetic and environmental factors both played roles in disease formation; (2) genetic predisposition was perceived as heightened, not absolute, risk; (3) the perceived health impact was a greater risk of becoming sick. Minority interpretations were found under each measure. Overall, naming "a gene for heart disease" does not appear to have a deterministic impact on a plurality of participants' perceptions of risks associated with genetic factors. Genetic fatalism in patient populations may be confined to a sizable minority. Important considerations for provider intervention and patient education are indicated.

  17. [Neuroprotective subthalamotomy in Parkinson's disease. The role of magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound in early surgery].

    PubMed

    Guridi, Jorge; Marigil, Miguel; Becerra, Victoria; Parras, Olga

    Subthalamic nucleus hyperactivity in Parkinson's disease may be a very early phenomenon. Its start is not well known, and it may occur during the pre-symptomatic disease stage. Glutamatergic hyperactivity may be neurotoxic over the substantia nigra compacta dopaminergic neurons. If this occurred, the excitatory neurotransmitter, glutamate, should affect the neurons that maintain a high turnover as a compensatory mechanism. Would a subthalamic nucleus lesion decrease this hyperactivity and thus be considered as a neuroprotective mechanism for dopaminergic neurons? The authors hypothesise about the possibility to perform surgery on a subthalamic nucleus lesion at a very early stage in order to avoid the neurotoxic glutamatergic effect over the dopaminergic neurons, and therefore be considered as a neuroprotective surgery able to alter the progress of the disease during early motor symptoms. In this regard, magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound techniques open a new window in the stereotactic armamentarium.

  18. The Year in Cardiology 2013: valvular heart disease (focus on catheter-based interventions).

    PubMed

    Grube, Eberhard; Sinning, Jan-Malte; Vahanian, Alec

    2014-02-01

    2013 was the year of transcatheter heart valve interventions. Not least because of the 2012 European guidelines on the management of valvular heart disease (VHD), the multidisciplinary heart team approach became an established concept. Decision-making, when a patient is too 'sick' for surgery and too 'healthy' for catheter-based interventions, is complex, since VHD is often seen at an older age and, as a consequence, there is a higher frequency of co-morbidity and frailty. However, before TAVI and other transcatheter heart valve interventions can be expanded to intermediate-risk patients, evidence in favour of this less invasive treatment has to be provided by upcoming randomized clinical trials.

  19. [Pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment of asthma: focusing on a chronic disease].

    PubMed

    Wäsche, Anja; Schreiber, Jens

    2016-06-01

    Bronchial asthma is one of the most common chronic diseases. Its pathogenesis is still not fully understood and its progression is still not predictable. There are individual differences in frequency, severity and duration of symptoms and progression as well as in the response to therapy. The diagnosis is based on a detailed medical history and physical examination, on lung function tests and allergy tests. In recent years great improvements in medical treatment and patient care have been achieved. This article summarizes the pathogenesis, clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment of bronchial asthma.

  20. Cervical spine injuries in football.

    PubMed

    Breslow, M J; Rosen, J E

    2000-01-01

    The game of football, as it is played today, poses serious risk of injury for players of all ages. Injury may occur to any structure of the spinal column, including its bony, ligamentous and soft tissue components. The majority of cervical spine injuries occurring in football are self limited, and a full recovery can be expected. While these injuries are relatively uncommon, cervical spine injuries represent a significant proportion of athletic injuries that can produce permanent disability. The low incidence of cervical spine injuries has lead to a lack of emergency management experience of on-site medical staff. This paper will review the numerous injuries sustained by the cervical spine in football players and provide insights into prevention and guidelines for return to play.

  1. Radiology of the spine: Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Jeanmart, L.

    1986-01-01

    This book deals with tumors of the spinal cord and various aspects of primary and secondary osseous tumors of the spine. Included in discussion are tumors, chordoma hemangioma, vascular malformation and the terms angioma and hemangiomas.

  2. Venous thromboembolism in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: Focus on prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Alfredo; Gerardi, Viviana; Marzo, Manuela; Felice, Carla; Rapaccini, Gian Lodovico; Gasbarrini, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients have an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE), which represents a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The most common sites of VTE in IBD patients are the deep veins of the legs and pulmonary system, followed by the portal and mesenteric veins. However, other sites may also be involved, such as the cerebrovascular and retinal veins. The aetiology of VTE is multifactorial, including both inherited and acquired risk factors that, when simultaneously present, multiply the risk to the patient. VTE prevention involves correcting modifiable risk factors, such as disease activity, vitamin deficiency, dehydration and prolonged immobilisation. The role of mechanical and pharmacological prophylaxis against VTE using anticoagulants is also crucial. However, although guidelines recommend thromboprophylaxis for IBD patients, this method is still poorly implemented because of concerns about its safety and a lack of awareness of the magnitude of thrombotic risk in these patients. Further efforts are required to increase the rate of pharmacological prevention of VTE in IBD patients to avoid preventable morbidity and mortality. PMID:24695669

  3. Lack of Widespread BBB Disruption in Alzheimer's Disease Models: Focus on Therapeutic Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bien-Ly, Nga; Boswell, C Andrew; Jeet, Surinder; Beach, Thomas G; Hoyte, Kwame; Luk, Wilman; Shihadeh, Vera; Ulufatu, Sheila; Foreman, Oded; Lu, Yanmei; DeVoss, Jason; van der Brug, Marcel; Watts, Ryan J

    2015-10-21

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) limits brain uptake of therapeutic antibodies. It is believed that the BBB is disrupted in Alzheimer's disease (AD), potentially increasing drug permeability de facto. Here we compared active versus passive brain uptake of systemically dosed antibodies (anti-transferrin receptor [TfR] bispecific versus control antibody) in mouse models of AD. We first confirmed BBB disruption in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis as a positive control. Importantly, we found that BBB permeability was vastly spared in mouse models of AD, including PS2-APP, Tau transgenics, and APOE4 knockin mice. Brain levels of TfR in mouse models or in human cases of AD resembled controls, suggesting target engagement of TfR bispecific is not limited. Furthermore, infarcts from human AD brain showed similar occurrences compared to age-matched controls. These results question the widely held view that the BBB is largely disrupted in AD, raising concern about assumptions of drug permeability in disease.

  4. Chronic disease and the shifting focus of public health: is prevention still a political lightweight?

    PubMed

    Mayes, Rick; Oliver, Thomas R

    2012-04-01

    Why is it so politically difficult to obtain government investment in public health initiatives that are aimed at addressing chronic disease? This article examines the structural disadvantage faced by those who advocate for public health policies and practices to reduce chronic disease related to people's unhealthy lifestyles and physical environments. It identifies common features that make it difficult to establish and maintain initiatives to prevent or reduce costly illness and physical suffering: (1) public health benefits are generally dispersed and delayed; (2) benefactors of public health are generally unknown and taken for granted; (3) the costs of many public health initiatives are concentrated and generate opposition from those who would pay them; and (4) public health often clashes with moral values or social norms. The article concludes by discussing the importance of a new paradigm, "health in all policies," that targets the enormous health and economic burdens associated with chronic conditions and asserts a need for new policies, practices, and participation beyond the confines of traditional public health agencies and services.

  5. Fluoroquinolone resistance of Streptococcus pneumoniae isolates causing invasive disease: special focus on zabofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tark; Park, Su-Jin; Chong, Yong Pil; Park, Ki-Ho; Lee, Yu-Mi; Hong, Hyo-Lim; Kim, Hee Seung; Kim, Eun Sil; Lee, Sungkyoung; Choi, Dong Rack; Kim, Sung-Han; Jeong, Jin-Yong; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Woo, Jun Hee; Kim, Yang Soo

    2016-10-01

    The present study examined the in vitro activity of various antibiotics including zabofloxacin, against isolates responsible for invasive pneumococcal diseases. Between 1997 and 2008, a total of 208 isolates were collected from sterile fluids, including blood (n=196, 94.2%), pleural fluid (n=5, 2.4%), cerebrospinal fluid (n=5, 2.4%), and ascites (n=2, 1.0%). Zabofloxacin showed the lowest MIC50 (0.015μg/mL) and MIC90 (0.025μg/mL) values of all the tested antibiotics. Rates of isolates resistant to penicillin (MIC ≥8μg/mL), ceftriaxone (MIC ≥4μg/mL) and levofloxacin (MIC ≥8μg/mL) were 3.4%, 0.4% and 2.0%, respectively. Four isolates (2.0%) were resistant to levofloxacin, and zabofloxacin showed low MICs (range, 0.025-0.125μg/mL). Zabofloxacin shows potent in vitro activity against S. pneumoniae isolates that caused invasive disease, even strains that are resistant to levofloxacin.

  6. Managing peptic ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux disease in elderly Chinese patients--focus on esomeprazole.

    PubMed

    Tang, Raymond S Y; Wu, Justin C Y

    2013-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are not uncommon in elderly patients. Clinical presentations of these acid-related disorders may be atypical in the geriatric population. Older individuals are at increased risk for poor outcomes in complicated PUD and for development of GERD complications. Multiple risk factors (eg, Helicobacter pylori [HP], use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], aspirin) contribute to the development of PUD. Recent data has shown that HP-negative, NSAID-negative idiopathic peptic ulcers are on the rise and carry a higher risk of recurrent ulcer bleeding and mortality. Effective management of PUD in the geriatric population relies on identification and modification of treatable risk factors. Elderly patients with GERD often require long-term acid suppressive therapy. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) including esomeprazole are effective in the treatment of reflux esophagitis, maintenance of GERD symptomatic control, and management of PUD as well as its complications. Potential safety concerns of long-term PPI use have been reported in the literature. Clinicians should balance the risks and benefits before committing elderly patients to long-term PPI therapy.

  7. [Epidemiology of Minamata Disease--Focus on the Clinical Features Related to the 1977 Diagnostic Criteria].

    PubMed

    Futatsuka, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale food poisoning caused by methylmercury was identified in Minamata, Japan, in the 1950s (Minamata Disease). Although the diagnostic criteria for the disease was controversial and difficult during that time, we, the Kumamoto University Study Group, carried out a large-scale study to assess the clinical features in 1972-1973. The author tried to reassess the results of that study to appraise the diagnostic criteria established in 1977 on the basis of those results. A substantial number of residents in the exposed area exhibited neurologic signs, especially paresthesia of only the extremities, namely, the male residents of Minamata City showed a positive predictive value of 0.73 and a negative predictive value of 0.23. The relative risks of paresthesia only were 2.6 (2.0-3.3) and 1.2 (0.9-1.5), in Minamata and Goshonoura related to Ariake (control), respectively. At least until 1977, the diagnostic criteria remained valid, although it was inadequate. Nevertheless, presently, a follow-up study of the certified patients may lead to the development of efficient new diagnostic criteria.

  8. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods

    PubMed Central

    Benezech, Jacques; Garlenq, Bruno; Larroque, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK®-Optima system (Innov'Spine, France) composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA® polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK) without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%), quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%), and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones. PMID:26981285

  9. Flexible Stabilisation of the Degenerative Lumbar Spine Using PEEK Rods.

    PubMed

    Benezech, Jacques; Garlenq, Bruno; Larroque, Gilles

    2016-01-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using cages, titanium rods, and pedicle screws is considered today as the gold standard of surgical treatment of lumbar degenerative disease and has produced satisfying long-term fusion rates. However this rigid material could change the physiological distribution of load at the instrumental and adjacent segments, a main cause of implant failure and adjacent segment disease, responsible for a high rate of further surgery in the following years. More recently, semirigid instrumentation systems using rods made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK) have been introduced. This clinical study of 21 patients focuses on the clinical and radiological outcomes of patients with lumbar degenerative disease treated with Initial VEOS PEEK(®)-Optima system (Innov'Spine, France) composed of rods made from PEEK-OPTIMA(®) polymer (Invibio Biomaterial Solutions, UK) without arthrodesis. With an average follow-up of 2 years and half, the chances of reoperation were significantly reduced (4.8%), quality of life was improved (ODI = 16%), and the adjacent disc was preserved in more than 70% of cases. Based on these results, combined with the biomechanical and clinical data already published, PEEK rods systems can be considered as a safe and effective alternative solution to rigid ones.

  10. Role of post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA stability in renal pathophysiology: focus on chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Feigerlová, Eva; Battaglia-Hsu, Shyue-Fang

    2017-02-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) represents an important public health problem. Its progression to end-stage renal disease is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The determinants of renal function decline are not fully understood. Recent progress in the understanding of post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA stability has helped the identification of both the trans- and cis-acting elements of mRNA as potential markers and therapeutic targets for difficult-to-diagnose and -treat diseases, including CKDs such as diabetic nephropathy. Human antigen R (HuR), a trans-acting element of mRNA, is an RNA binding factor (RBF) best known for its ability to stabilize AU-rich-element-containing mRNAs. Deregulated HuR subcellular localization or expression occurs in a wide range of renal diseases, such as metabolic acidosis, ischemia, and fibrosis. Besides RBFs, recent evidence revealed that noncoding RNA, such as microRNA and long noncoding RNA, participates in regulating mRNA stability and that aberrant noncoding RNA expression accounts for many pathologic renal conditions. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of our current understanding of the post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA stability in renal pathophysiology and to offer perspectives for this class of diseases. We use examples of diverse renal diseases to illustrate different mRNA stability pathways in specific cellular compartments and discuss the roles and impacts of both the cis- and trans-activating factors on the regulation of mRNA stability in these diseases.-Feigerlová, E., Battaglia-Hsu, S.-F. Role of post-transcriptional regulation of mRNA stability in renal pathophysiology: focus on chronic kidney disease.

  11. Current advances in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease: focused on considerations targeting Aβ and tau

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that impairs mainly the memory and cognitive function in elderly. Extracellular beta amyloid deposition and intracellular tau hyperphosphorylation are the two pathological events that are thought to cause neuronal dysfunction in AD. Since the detailed mechanisms that underlie the pathogenesis of AD are still not clear, the current treatments are those drugs that can alleviate the symptoms of AD patients. Recent studies have indicated that these symptom-reliving drugs also have the ability of regulating amyloid precursor protein processing and tau phosphorylation. Thus the pharmacological mechanism of these drugs may be too simply-evaluated. This review summarizes the current status of AD therapy and some potential preclinical considerations that target beta amyloid and tau protein are also discussed. PMID:23210837

  12. Genetic correction of stem cells in the treatment of inherited diseases and focus on xeroderma pigmentosum.

    PubMed

    Rouanet, Sophie; Warrick, Emilie; Gache, Yannick; Scarzello, Sabine; Avril, Marie-Françoise; Bernerd, Françoise; Magnaldo, Thierry

    2013-10-09

    Somatic stem cells ensure tissue renewal along life and healing of injuries. Their safe isolation, genetic manipulation ex vivo and reinfusion in patients suffering from life threatening immune deficiencies (for example, severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)) have demonstrated the efficacy of ex vivo gene therapy. Similarly, adult epidermal stem cells have the capacity to renew epidermis, the fully differentiated, protective envelope of our body. Stable skin replacement of severely burned patients have proven life saving. Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a devastating disease due to severe defects in the repair of mutagenic DNA lesions introduced upon exposure to solar radiations. Most patients die from the consequences of budding hundreds of skin cancers in the absence of photoprotection. We have developed a safe procedure of genetic correction of epidermal stem cells isolated from XP patients. Preclinical and safety assessments indicate successful correction of XP epidermal stem cells in the long term and their capacity to regenerate a normal skin with full capacities of DNA repair.

  13. One-Carbon Metabolism and Alzheimer’s Disease: Focus on Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Coppedè, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) represents the most common form of dementia in the elderly, characterized by progressive loss of memory and cognitive capacity severe enough to interfere with daily functioning and the quality of life. Rare, fully penetrant mutations in three genes (APP, PSEN1 and PSEN2) are responsible for familial forms of the disease. However, more than 90% of AD is sporadic, likely resulting from complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. Increasing evidence supports a role for epigenetic modifications in AD pathogenesis. Folate metabolism, also known as one-carbon metabolism, is required for the production of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM), which is the major DNA methylating agent. AD individuals are characterized by decreased plasma folate values, as well as increased plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels, and there is indication of impaired SAM levels in AD brains. Polymorphisms of genes participating in one-carbon metabolism have been associated with AD risk and/or with increased Hcy levels in AD individuals. Studies in rodents suggest that early life exposure to neurotoxicants or dietary restriction of folate and other B vitamins result in epigenetic modifications of AD related genes in the animal brains. Similarly, studies performed on human neuronal cell cultures revealed that folate and other B vitamins deprivation from the media resulted in epigenetic modification of the PSEN1 gene. There is also evidence of epigenetic modifications in the DNA extracted from blood and brains of AD subjects. Here I review one-carbon metabolism in AD, with emphasis on possible epigenetic consequences. PMID:21119889

  14. FOCUS: Future of fecal calprotectin utility study in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Rosenfeld, Greg; Greenup, Astrid-Jane; Round, Andrew; Takach, Oliver; Halparin, Lawrence; Saadeddin, Abid; Ho, Jin Kee; Lee, Terry; Enns, Robert; Bressler, Brian

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the perspective of gastroenterologists regarding the impact of fecal calprotectin (FC) on the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). METHODS Patients with known IBD or symptoms suggestive of IBD for whom the physician identified that FC would be clinically useful were recruited. Physicians completed an online “pre survey” outlining their rationale for the test. After receipt of the test results, the physicians completed an online “post survey” to portray their perceived impact of the test result on patient management. Clinical outcomes for a subset of patients with follow-up data available beyond the completion of the “post survey” were collected and analyzed. RESULTS Of 373 test kits distributed, 290 were returned, resulting in 279 fully completed surveys. One hundred and ninety patients were known to have IBD; 147 (77%) with Crohn’s Disease, 43 (21%) Ulcerative Colitis and 5 (2%) IBD unclassified. Indications for FC testing included: 90 (32.2%) to differentiate a new diagnosis of IBD from Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS), 85 (30.5%) to distinguish symptoms of IBS from IBD in those known to have IBD and 104 (37.2%) as an objective measure of inflammation. FC levels resulted in a change in management 51.3% (143/279) of the time which included a significant reduction in the number of colonoscopies (118) performed (P < 0.001). Overall, 97.5% (272/279) of the time, the physicians found the test sufficiently useful that they would order it again in similar situations. Follow-up data was available for 172 patients with further support for the clinical utility of FC provided. CONCLUSION The FC test effected a change in management 51.3% of the time and receipt of the result was associated with a reduction in the number of colonoscopies performed. PMID:27688663

  15. The postsurgical spine.

    PubMed

    Santos Armentia, E; Prada González, R; Silva Priegue, N

    2016-04-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome is the persistence or reappearance of pain after surgery on the spine. This term encompasses both mechanical and nonmechanical causes. Imaging techniques are essential in postoperative follow-up and in the evaluation of potential complications responsible for failed back surgery syndrome. This review aims to familiarize radiologists with normal postoperative changes and to help them identify the pathological imaging findings that reflect failed back surgery syndrome. To interpret the imaging findings, it is necessary to know the type of surgery performed in each case and the time elapsed since the intervention. In techniques used to fuse the vertebrae, it is essential to evaluate the degree of bone fusion, the material used (both its position and its integrity), the bone over which it lies, the interface between the implant and bone, and the vertebral segments that are adjacent to metal implants. In decompressive techniques it is important to know what changes can be expected after the intervention and to be able to distinguish them from peridural fibrosis and the recurrence of a hernia. It is also crucial to know the imaging findings for postoperative infections. Other complications are also reviewed, including arachnoiditis, postoperative fluid collections, and changes in the soft tissues adjacent to the surgical site.

  16. Current Interventional and Surgical Management of Congenital Heart Disease: Specific Focus on Valvular Disease and Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Holst, Kimberly A; Said, Sameh M; Nelson, Timothy J; Cannon, Bryan C; Dearani, Joseph A

    2017-03-17

    Successful outcome in the care of patients with congenital heart disease depends on a comprehensive multidisciplinary team. Surgery is offered for almost every heart defect, despite complexity. Early mortality for cardiac surgery in the neonatal period is ≈10% and beyond infancy is <5%, with 90% to 95% of patients surviving with a good quality of life into the adult years. Advances in imaging have facilitated accurate diagnosis and planning of interventions and surgical procedures. Similarly, advances in the perioperative medical management of patients, particularly with intensive care, has also contributed to improving outcomes. Arrhythmias and heart failure are the most common late complications for the majority of defects, and reoperation for valvar problems is common. Lifelong surveillance for monitoring of recurrent or residual structural heart defects, as well as periodic assessment of cardiac function and arrhythmia monitoring, is essential for all patients. The field of congenital heart surgery is poised to incorporate new innovations such as bioengineered cells and scaffolds that will iteratively move toward bioengineered patches, conduits, valves, and even whole organs.

  17. Drug discovery strategies that focus on the endocannabinoid signaling system in psychiatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Wyrofsky, Ryan; McGonigle, Paul; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The endocannabinoid (eCB) system plays an important role in the control of mood, and its dysregulation has been implicated in several psychiatric disorders. Targeting the eCB system appears to represent an attractive and novel approach to the treatment of depression and other mood disorders. However, several failed clinical trials have diminished enthusiasm for the continued development of eCB-targeted therapeutics for psychiatric disorders, despite of the encouraging preclinical data and promising preliminary results obtained with the synthetic cannabinoid nabilone for treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Areas covered This review describes the eCB system’s role in modulating cell signaling within the brain. There is a specific focus on eCB’s regulation of monoamine neurotransmission and the stress axis, as well as how dysfunction of this interaction can contribute to the development of psychiatric disorders. Additionally, the review provides discussion on compounds and drugs that target this system and might prove to be successful for the treatment of mood-related psychiatric disorders. Expert opinion The discovery of increasingly selective modulators of CB receptors should enable the identification of optimal therapeutic strategies. It should also maximize the likelihood of developing safe and effective treatments for debilitating psychiatric disorders. PMID:25488672

  18. The transfection of BDNF to dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of dopamine D3 receptor agonist recovering the striatal innervation, dendritic spines and motor behavior in an aged rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Razgado-Hernandez, Luis F; Espadas-Alvarez, Armando J; Reyna-Velazquez, Patricia; Sierra-Sanchez, Arturo; Anaya-Martinez, Veronica; Jimenez-Estrada, Ismael; Bannon, Michael J; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Aceves-Ruiz, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The progressive degeneration of the dopamine neurons of the pars compacta of substantia nigra and the consequent loss of the dopamine innervation of the striatum leads to the impairment of motor behavior in Parkinson's disease. Accordingly, an efficient therapy of the disease should protect and regenerate the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra and the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Nigral neurons express Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) and dopamine D3 receptors, both of which protect the dopamine neurons. The chronic activation of dopamine D3 receptors by their agonists, in addition, restores, in part, the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Here we explored whether the over-expression of BDNF by dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of the activation of D3 receptors restoring nigrostriatal innervation. Twelve-month old Wistar rats were unilaterally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine into the striatum. Five months later, rats were treated with the D3 agonist 7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propy1-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) administered i.p. during 4½ months via osmotic pumps and the BDNF gene transfection into nigral cells using the neurotensin-polyplex nanovector (a non-viral transfection) that selectively transfect the dopamine neurons via the high-affinity neurotensin receptor expressed by these neurons. Two months after the withdrawal of 7-OH-DPAT when rats were aged (24 months old), immunohistochemistry assays were made. The over-expression of BDNF in rats receiving the D3 agonist normalized gait and motor coordination; in addition, it eliminated the muscle rigidity produced by the loss of dopamine. The recovery of motor behavior was associated with the recovery of the nigral neurons, the dopamine innervation of the striatum and of the number of dendritic spines of the striatal neurons. Thus, the over-expression of BDNF in dopamine neurons associated with the chronic activation of the D3 receptors appears to be a promising strategy for restoring

  19. [Analysis of Musculoskeletal Systems and Their Diseases. Genomic medicine of bone and joint diseases : present and future].

    PubMed

    Ikegawa, Shiro

    2015-08-01

    Susceptibility genes for various kinds of common diseases have been identified by the genome-wide association study (GWAS) and the outcome is changing the clinical medicine significantly. Musculoskeletal disease is no exception. In this paper, I review the current status and prospect of GWAS in musculoskeletal diseases in Japan by focusing on representative common musculoskeletal diseases : disc herniation, adolescent idiopathic scoliosis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine.

  20. Focusing Brain Therapeutic Interventions in Space and Time for Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Little, S.; Brown, P.

    2016-01-01

    The last decade has seen major progress at all levels of neuroscience, from genes and molecules up to integrated systems-level models of brain function. In particular, there have been advances in the understanding of cell-type-specific contributions to function, together with a clearer account of how these contributions are coordinated from moment to moment to organise behavior. A major current endeavor is to leverage this knowledge to develop new therapeutic approaches. In Parkinson’s disease, there are a number of promising emerging treatments. Here, we will highlight three ambitious novel therapeutic approaches for this condition, each robustly driven by primary neuroscience. Pharmacogenetics genetically re-engineers neurons to produce neurotrophins that are neuroprotective to vulnerable dopaminergic cells or to directly replace dopamine through enzyme transduction. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is undergoing a transformation, with adaptive DBS controlled by neural signals resulting in better motor outcomes and significant reductions in overall stimulation that could reduce side effects. Finally, optogenetics presents the opportunity to achieve cell-type-specific control with a high temporal specification on a large enough scale to effectively repair network-level dysfunction. PMID:25247369

  1. Development and Implementation of Worksite Health and Wellness Programs: A Focus on Non-Communicable Disease.

    PubMed

    Cahalin, Lawrence P; Kaminsky, Leonard; Lavie, Carl J; Briggs, Paige; Cahalin, Brendan L; Myers, Jonathan; Forman, Daniel E; Patel, Mahesh J; Pinkstaff, Sherry O; Arena, Ross

    2015-01-01

    The development and implementation of worksite health and wellness programs (WHWPs) in the United States (US) hold promise as a means to improve population health and reverse current trends in non-communicable disease incidence and prevalence. However, WHWPs face organizational, economic, systematic, legal, and logistical challenges which have combined to impact program availability and expansion. Even so, there is a burgeoning body of evidence indicating WHWPs can significantly improve the health profile of participating employees in a cost effective manner. This foundation of scientific knowledge justifies further research inquiry to elucidate optimal WHWP models. It is clear that the development, implementation and operation of WHWPs require a strong commitment from organizational leadership, a pervasive culture of health and availability of necessary resources and infrastructure. Since organizations vary significantly, there is a need to have flexibility in creating a customized, effective health and wellness program. Furthermore, several key legal issues must be addressed to facilitate employer and employee needs and responsibilities; the US Affordable Care Act will play a major role moving forward. The purposes of this review are to: 1) examine currently available health and wellness program models and considerations for the future; 2) highlight key legal issues associated with WHWP development and implementation; and 3) identify challenges and solutions for the development and implementation of as well as adherence to WHWPs.

  2. Treatment of Parkinson's disease in rats by Nrf2 transfection using MRI-guided focused ultrasound delivery of nanomicrobubbles.

    PubMed

    Long, Ling; Cai, Xiaodong; Guo, Ruomi; Wang, Ping; Wu, Lili; Yin, Tinghui; Liao, Siyuan; Lu, Zhengqi

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a very common neurological disorder. However, effective therapy is lacking. Although the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) protects the brain, it prevents the delivery of about 90% of drugs and nucleotides into the brain, thereby hindering the development of gene therapy for PD. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound delivery of microbubbles enhances the delivery of gene therapy vectors across the BBB and improves transfection efficiency. In the present study, we delivered nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, NFE2L2) contained in nanomicrobubbles into the substantia nigra of PD rats by MRI-guided focused ultrasound, and we examined the effect of Nrf2 over-expression in this animal model of PD. The rat model of PD was established by injecting 6-OHDA in the right substantia nigra stereotactically. Plasmids (pDC315 or pDC315/Nrf2) were loaded onto nanomicrobubbles, and then injected through the tail vein with the assistance of MRI-guided focused ultrasound. MRI-guided focused ultrasound delivery of nanomicrobubbles increased gene transfection efficiency. Furthermore, Nrf2 gene transfection reduced reactive oxygen species levels, thereby protecting neurons in the target region.

  3. MR-Guided Focused Ultrasound: A New Generation Treatment of Parkinson's Disease, Essential Tremor and Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Dobrakowski, Pawel Piotr; Machowska-Majchrzak, Agnieszka Kamila; Łabuz-Roszak, Beata; Majchrzak, Krzysztof Grzegorz; Kluczewska, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Summary The application of high intense focused ultrasound (HIFU) is currently the subject of many experimental and clinical trials. The combination of HIFU with MRI guidance known as MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) appears to be particularly promising to ablate tissues located deep in the brain. The method can be the beginning of interventional neurology and an important alternative to neurosurgery. Studies conducted to date show the effectiveness of the method both in chronic diseases and in emergency cases. The safety and effectiveness of this method have been observed in parkinsonian and essential tremor as well as in neuropathic pain. The procedure does not require anaesthesia. Ionizing radiation is not used and there is no risk of cumulative dose. Such advantages may result in low complication rates and medical justification for further development of MRgFUS. PMID:24976088

  4. Prickly Pear Spine Keratoconjunctivitis

    PubMed Central

    Odat, Thabit Ali Mustafa; Al-Tawara, Mohammad Jebreel; Hammouri, Eman Hussein

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To study the ocular and extra-ocular features, clinical presentation, and treatment of prickly pear glochids. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study included 23 eyes of 21 patients with ocular prickly pear spines who were seen between August and October 2011 in the outpatient ophthalmic clinic at Prince Rashid Bin Al Hassan military hospital in Jordan. Medical records of patients including age, gender, history of exposure to prickly pear plants, and ocular examination were reviewed. All glochids were localized and removed with forceps under topical anesthesia with the patient at the slit lamp. Patients were followed up after one week. Results: The mean age of patients was 37.1 years with a male to female ratio of 1.6: 1. Involvement of the right eye was seen in 61.9% patients, left eye in 28.6% patients, and bilateral involvement in 9.5% patients. Glochids were most commonly found in the upper subtarsal conjunctival space (47.6%) followed by inferior palpebral conjunctiva in 23.8% eyes. The most common complaint was eye irritation in 95.2% patients. Pain was a complaint in 57.1% patients. Superior corneal epithelial erosions or ulcer were found in 33.3% patients, inferior corneal epithelial erosions in 19.1% patients, and diffuse epithelial erosions in 9.5% patients. Glochids were found in other parts of the body in 38.1% patients. Conclusion: Although prickly pear glochid ocular surface injury is not uncommon in the region during summer, it should be considered in patient with eye pain during that period. Farmers who are in close contact with prickly pears should use protective eyeglasses and gloves. PMID:24669148

  5. Postsynaptic PDLIM5 / Enigma Homolog binds SPAR and causes dendritic spine shrinkage

    PubMed Central

    Herrick, Scott; Evers, Danielle M.; Lee, Ji-Yun; Udagawa, Noriko; Pak, Daniel T.S.

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic spine morphology is thought to play important roles in synaptic development and plasticity, and morphological derangements in spines are correlated with several neurological disorders. Here, we identified an interaction between Spine-Associated RapGAP (SPAR), a postsynaptic protein that reorganizes actin cytoskeleton and drives dendritic spine head growth, and PDLIM5 / Enigma Homolog (ENH), a PDZ-LIM (postsynaptic density-95/Discs large/zona occludens 1-Lin11/Isl-1/Mec3) family member. PDLIM5 has been implicated in susceptibility to bipolar disorder, major depression and schizophrenia but its function in neurological disease is poorly understood. We show that PDLIM5 is present in the postsynaptic density, where it promotes decreased dendritic spine head size and longer, filopodia-like morphology. Conversely, RNA interference against PDLIM5 or loss of PDLIM5 interaction with SPAR caused increased spine head diameter. Furthermore, PKC activation promoted delivery of PDLIM5 into dendritic spines and increased its spine colocalization with SPAR. These data reveal new postsynaptic functions for PDLIM5 in shrinkage of dendritic spines that may be relevant to its association with psychiatric illness. PMID:19900557

  6. The role of the mini-open thoracoscopic-assisted approach in the management of metastatic spine disease at the thoracolumbar junction.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Brock, Andrea; Awad, Al-Wala; Kalra, Ricky; Schmidt, Meic H

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Treatment advances have resulted in improved survival for many cancer types, and this, in turn, has led to an increased incidence of metastatic disease, specifically to the vertebral column. Surgical decompression and stabilization prior to radiation therapy have been shown to improve functional outcomes, but anterior access to the thoracolumbar junction may involve open thoracotomy, which can cause significant morbidity. The authors describe the treatment of 12 patients in whom a mini-open thoracoscopic-assisted approach (mini-open TAA) to the thoracolumbar junction was used to treat metastatic disease, with an analysis of outcomes. METHODS The authors reviewed a retrospective cohort of patients treated for thoracolumbar junction metastatic disease with mini-open TAA between 2004 and 2016. Data collection included operative time, estimated blood loss, length of stay, follow-up duration, and pre- and postoperative visual analog scale scores and Frankel grades. RESULTS Twelve patients underwent a mini-open TAA procedure for metastatic disease at the thoracolumbar junction. The mean age of patients was 59 years (range 53-77 years), mean estimated blood loss was 613 ml, and the mean duration of the mini-open TAA procedure was 234 minutes (3.8 hours). The median length of stay in the hospital was 7.5 days (range 5-21 days). All 12 patients had significant improvement in their postoperative pain scores in comparison with their preoperative pain scores (p < 0.001). No patients suffered from worsening neurological function after surgery, and of 7 patients who presented with neurological dysfunction, 6 (86%) had an improvement in their Frankel grade after surgery. No patients experienced delayed hardware failure requiring reoperation over a mean follow-up of 10 months (range 1-45 months). CONCLUSIONS The mini-open TAA to the thoracolumbar junction for metastatic disease is a durable procedure that has a reduced morbidity rate compared with traditional open

  7. [FEATURES OF THE TREATMENT OF THE SPINE IN RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS].

    PubMed

    Selezneva, S; Sinyachenko, O; Zabara, А

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) refers to the most common inflammatory joint disease, which can lead to persistent disability and early mortality of patients, and one of the manifestations of RA is a frequent lesion of the spine, which significantly affects the quality of life of these patients.

  8. [History of the German Spine Society].

    PubMed

    Wilke, H-J; Carstens, C

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this article is to summarize the history of the German Spine Society (DWG). This society resulted in the year 2006 after several attempts from the fusion of two established German societies, which were dealing with topics around the spine, der "German Society for Spine Research" founded in the year 1958 and the "German Society for Spine Surgery" founded in the year 1987. This fusion was the beginning of a success story, as from this time on the annual membership increased so much that the DWG became the largest spine society in Europe and one of all spine societies worldwide.

  9. Robotic systems in spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Onen, Mehmet Resid; Naderi, Sait

    2014-01-01

    Surgical robotic systems have been available for almost twenty years. The first surgical robotic systems were designed as supportive systems for laparoscopic approaches in general surgery (the first procedure was a cholecystectomy in 1987). The da Vinci Robotic System is the most common system used for robotic surgery today. This system is widely used in urology, gynecology and other surgical disciplines, and recently there have been initial reports of its use in spine surgery, for transoral access and anterior approaches for lumbar inter-body fusion interventions. SpineAssist, which is widely used in spine surgery, and Renaissance Robotic Systems, which are considered the next generation of robotic systems, are now FDA approved. These robotic systems are designed for use as guidance systems in spine instrumentation, cement augmentations and biopsies. The aim is to increase surgical accuracy while reducing the intra-operative exposure to harmful radiation to the patient and operating team personnel during the intervention. We offer a review of the published literature related to the use of robotic systems in spine surgery and provide information on using robotic systems.

  10. Osteochondromas of the cervical spine in atypical location.

    PubMed

    Schomacher, M; Suess, O; Kombos, T

    2009-06-01

    In the current article we review the available English literature by pubmed search engine on the topic of osteochondromas and their location in the cervical spine. The focus is to investigate the location of the lesions in cervical spine and to analyze clinical presentations and symptoms of patients, the aetiology and histopathology examination of the masses. In addition we report a rare illustrative case of a 62 year-old man with an osteochondroma of the cervical spine. The mass developed at a very slow rate for many years and produced no clinical symptoms. The location of the extradural mass in the right atlanto-axial joint of C1 and C2 is extremely rare and was not been reported so far. After preoperative CT- and MRI-imaging the entire mass could be removed.

  11. Musical representation of dendritic spine distribution: a new exploratory tool.

    PubMed

    Toharia, Pablo; Morales, Juan; de Juan, Octavio; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Dendritic spines are small protrusions along the dendrites of many types of neurons in the central nervous system and represent the major target of excitatory synapses. For this reason, numerous anatomical, physiological and computational studies have focused on these structures. In the cerebral cortex the most abundant and characteristic neuronal type are pyramidal cells (about 85 % of all neurons) and their dendritic spines are the main postsynaptic target of excitatory glutamatergic synapses. Thus, our understanding of the synaptic organization of the cerebral cortex largely depends on the knowledge regarding synaptic inputs to dendritic spines of pyramidal cells. Much of the structural data on dendritic spines produced by modern neuroscience involves the quantitative analysis of image stacks from light and electron microscopy, using standard statistical and mathematical tools and software developed to this end. Here, we present a new method with musical feedback for exploring dendritic spine morphology and distribution patterns in pyramidal neurons. We demonstrate that audio analysis of spiny dendrites with apparently similar morphology may "sound" quite different, revealing anatomical substrates that are not apparent from simple visual inspection. These morphological/music translations may serve as a guide for further mathematical analysis of the design of the pyramidal neurons and of spiny dendrites in general.

  12. Development of the young spine questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Back pain in children is common and early onset of back pain has been shown to increase the risk of back pain significantly in adulthood. Consequently, preventive efforts must be targeted the young population but research relating to spinal problems in this age group is scarce. Focus has primarily been on the working age population, and therefore specific questionnaires to measure spinal pain and its consequences, specifically aimed at children and adolescents are absent. The purpose of this study was to develop a questionnaire for schoolchildren filling this gap. Methods The Young Spine Questionnaire (YSQ) was developed in three phases – a conceptualisation, development and testing phase. The conceptualisation phase followed the Wilson and Cleary model and included questions regarding spinal prevalence estimates, pain frequency and intensity, activity restrictions, care seeking behaviour and influence of parental back trouble. Items from existing questionnaires and the “Revised Faces Pain Scale” (rFPS) were included during the development phase. The testing phase consisted of a mixed quantitative and qualitative iterative method carried out in two pilot tests using 4th grade children and focusing on assessment of spinal area location and item validity. Results The testing phase resulted in omission of the pain drawings and the questions and answer categories were simplified in several questions. Agreement between the questionnaire prevalence estimates and the interviews ranged between 83.7% (cervical pain today) and 97.9% (thoracic pain today). To improve the understanding of the spinal boundaries we added bony landmarks to the spinal drawings after pilot test I. This resulted in an improved sense of spinal boundary location in pilot test II. Correlations between the rFPS and the interview pain score ranged between 0.67 (cervical spine) and 0.79 (lumbar spine). Conclusions The Young Spine Questionnaire contains questions that assess spinal pain

  13. A skin disease, a blood disease or something in between? An exploratory focus group study of patients' experiences with porphyria cutanea tarda*

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, J; Gjengedal, E; Sandberg, S; Råheim, M

    2015-01-01

    Background Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) is characterized by fragile skin with blistering on sun-exposed areas. Symptoms typically develop in late adulthood and can be triggered by iron overload, alcohol intake, oestrogens and various liver diseases. Treatment consists of phlebotomy to reduce iron, or increasing urinary porphyrin excretion by administering chlorochin. To optimize patient care, health personnel need to understand the subjective experiences of PCT. Objectives To explore the experiences of persons with PCT with regard to symptoms, treatment, follow-up and prevention of the disease. Methods Interpretive description was used as a qualitative approach. Twenty-one participants attended three focus groups. All participants had experienced PCT symptoms during the last 5 years. Results Participants' experiences varied from trivializing symptoms and fragile skin to what was described as a desperate situation, with huge blisters, skin falling off and feeling as if one was in a ‘horror movie’. For some, itching was very troublesome, preventing sleep and delaying skin healing. In managing PCT a shift in focus from skin to blood was described. PCT was perceived as a chronic and systemic disease causing a range of health problems. Strategies for preventing symptoms ranged from doing nothing to frequent controls and check-ups. Conclusions Participants had a systemic perception of PCT, and a tendency to attribute a range of health problems to the condition. This study adds insight into the experiences patients have with PCT. PMID:24958197

  14. Generating a focused view of disease ontology cancer terms for pan-cancer data integration and analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tsung-Jung; Schriml, Lynn M; Chen, Qing-Rong; Colbert, Maureen; Crichton, Daniel J; Finney, Richard; Hu, Ying; Kibbe, Warren A; Kincaid, Heather; Meerzaman, Daoud; Mitraka, Elvira; Pan, Yang; Smith, Krista M; Srivastava, Sudhir; Ward, Sari; Yan, Cheng; Mazumder, Raja

    2015-01-01

    Bio-ontologies provide terminologies for the scientific community to describe biomedical entities in a standardized manner. There are multiple initiatives that are developing biomedical terminologies for the purpose of providing better annotation, data integration and mining capabilities. Terminology resources devised for multiple purposes inherently diverge in content and structure. A major issue of biomedical data integration is the development of overlapping terms, ambiguous classifications and inconsistencies represented across databases and publications. The disease ontology (DO) was developed over the past decade to address data integration, standardization and annotation issues for human disease data. We have established a DO cancer project to be a focused view of cancer terms within the DO. The DO cancer project mapped 386 cancer terms from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer (COSMIC), The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), International Cancer Genome Consortium, Therapeutically Applicable Research to Generate Effective Treatments, Integrative Oncogenomics and the Early Detection Research Network into a cohesive set of 187 DO terms represented by 63 top-level DO cancer terms. For example, the COSMIC term 'kidney, NS, carcinoma, clear_cell_renal_cell_carcinoma' and TCGA term 'Kidney renal clear cell carcinoma' were both grouped to the term 'Disease Ontology Identification (DOID):4467 / renal clear cell carcinoma' which was mapped to the TopNodes_DOcancerslim term 'DOID:263 / kidney cancer'. Mapping of diverse cancer terms to DO and the use of top level terms (DO slims) will enable pan-cancer analysis across datasets generated from any of the cancer term sources where pan-cancer means including or relating to all or multiple types of cancer. The terms can be browsed from the DO web site (http://www.disease-ontology.org) and downloaded from the DO's Apache Subversion or GitHub repositories. Database URL: http://www.disease-ontology.org

  15. Early-life experiences and the development of adult diseases with a focus on mental illness: The Human Birth Theory.

    PubMed

    Maccari, Stefania; Polese, Daniela; Reynaert, Marie-Line; Amici, Tiziana; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Fagioli, Francesca

    2017-02-07

    In mammals, early adverse experiences, including mother-pup interactions, shape the response of an individual to chronic stress or to stress-related diseases during adult life. This has led to the elaboration of the theory of the developmental origins of health and disease, in particular adult diseases such as cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. In addition, in humans, as stated by Massimo Fagioli's Human Birth Theory, birth is healthy and equal for all individuals, so that mental illness develop exclusively in the postnatal period because of the quality of the relationship in the first year of life. Thus, this review focuses on the importance of programming during the early developmental period on the manifestation of adult diseases in both animal models and humans. Considering the obvious differences between animals and humans we cannot systematically move from animal models to humans. Consequently, in the first part of this review, we will discuss how animal models can be used to dissect the influence of adverse events occurring during the prenatal and postnatal periods on the developmental trajectories of the offspring, and in the second part, we will discuss the role of postnatal critical periods on the development of mental diseases in humans. Epigenetic mechanisms that cause reversible modifications in gene expression, driving the development of a pathological phenotype in response to a negative early postnatal environment, may lie at the core of this programming, thereby providing potential new therapeutic targets. The concept of the Human Birth Theory leads to a comprehension of the mental illness as a pathology of the human relationship immediately after birth and during the first year of life.

  16. Cutting Edge Imaging of THE Spine

    PubMed Central

    Vertinksy, A. Talia; Krasnokutsky, Michael V.; Augustin, Michael; Bammer, Roland

    2007-01-01

    Damage to the spinal cord may be caused by a wide range of pathologies and generally results in profound functional disability. Therefore, a reliable diagnostic workup of the spine is very important because even relatively small lesions in this part of the central nervous system can have a profound clinical impact. This is primarily due to the dense arrangement of long fiber tracts extending to and from the extremities within the spinal cord. Because of its inherent sensitivity to soft tissues and its capability of displaying long segments of the vertebral column in one examination, MRI has become the method of choice for the detection and diagnosis of many disorders in the spine. A variety of innovative MRI methods have been developed to improve neuroimaging. Nevertheless, the application of these new methods to the spinal cord is, compared to its cephalad cousin, still not used that frequently. These techniques include the development of better pulse sequences and new MR contrast parameters that offer a wider spectrum of biophysical parameters in deriving a diagnosis. Overall, these new “cutting-edge” technologies have the potential to profoundly impact the ease and confidence of spinal disease interpretation and offer a more efficient diagnostic work-up of patients suffering from spinal disease. PMID:17493543

  17. Input transformation by dendritic spines of pyramidal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, most inputs received by a neuron are formed on the dendritic tree. In the neocortex, the dendrites of pyramidal neurons are covered by thousands of tiny protrusions known as dendritic spines, which are the major recipient sites for excitatory synaptic information in the brain. Their peculiar morphology, with a small head connected to the dendritic shaft by a slender neck, has inspired decades of theoretical and more recently experimental work in an attempt to understand how excitatory synaptic inputs are processed, stored and integrated in pyramidal neurons. Advances in electrophysiological, optical and genetic tools are now enabling us to unravel the biophysical and molecular mechanisms controlling spine function in health and disease. Here I highlight relevant findings, challenges and hypotheses on spine function, with an emphasis on the electrical properties of spines and on how these affect the storage and integration of excitatory synaptic inputs in pyramidal neurons. In an attempt to make sense of the published data, I propose that the raison d'etre for dendritic spines lies in their ability to undergo activity-dependent structural and molecular changes that can modify synaptic strength, and hence alter the gain of the linearly integrated sub-threshold depolarizations in pyramidal neuron dendrites before the generation of a dendritic spike. PMID:25520626

  18. Transcriptional network analysis in frontal cortex in Lewy body diseases with focus on dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Santpere, Gabriel; Garcia-Esparcia, Paula; Andres-Benito, Pol; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Navarro, Arcadi; Ferrer, Isidro

    2017-03-21

    The present study investigates global transcriptional changes in frontal cortex area 8 in incidental Lewy Body disease (iLBD), Parkinson disease (PD) and Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). We identified different co-expressed gene sets associated with disease stages, and gene ontology categories enriched in gene modules and differentially expressed genes including modules or gene clusters correlated to iLBD comprising upregulated dynein genes and taste receptors, and down-regulated innate inflammation. Focusing on DLB, we found modules with genes significantly enriched in functions related to RNA and DNA production, mitochondria and energy metabolism, purine metabolism, chaperone and protein folding system, and synapses and neurotransmission (particularly the GABAergic system). The expression of more than fifty selected genes was assessed with RT-qPCR. Our findings provide, for the first time, evidence of molecular cortical alterations in iLBD and involvement of several key metabolic pathways and gene hubs in DLB which may underlie cognitive impairment and dementia. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2–4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7–10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7–10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed – hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in

  20. Chronic pain and the thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Schmidt, Stephen G

    2015-07-01

    In recent years there has been an increased interest in pain neuroscience in physical therapy.1,2 Emerging pain neuroscience research has challenged prevailing models used to understand and treat pain, including the Cartesian model of pain and the pain gate.2-4 Focus has shifted to the brain's processing of a pain experience, the pain neuromatrix and more recently, cortical reorganisation of body maps.2,3,5,6 In turn, these emerging theories have catapulted new treatments, such as therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE)7-10 and graded motor imagery (GMI),11,12 to the forefront of treating people suffering from persistent spinal pain. In line with their increased use, both of these approaches have exponentially gathered increasing evidence to support their use.4,10 For example, various randomised controlled trials and systematic reviews have shown that teaching patients more about the biology and physiology of their pain experience leads to positive changes in pain, pain catastrophization, function, physical movement and healthcare utilisation.7-10 Graded motor imagery, in turn, has shown increasing evidence to help pain and disability in complex pain states such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS).11,12 Most research using TNE and GMI has focussed on chronic low back pain (CLBP) and CRPS and none of these advanced pain treatments have been trialled on the thoracic spine. This lack of research and writings in regards to the thoracic spine is not unique to pain science, but also in manual therapy. There are, however, very unique pain neuroscience issues that skilled manual therapists may find clinically meaningful when treating a patient struggling with persistent thoracic pain. Utilising the latest understanding of pain neuroscience, three key clinical chronic thoracic issues will be discussed - hypersensitisation of intercostal nerves, posterior primary rami nerves mimicking Cloward areas and mechanical and sensitisation issues of the spinal dura in the

  1. [Injury of upper cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Ryba, Luděk; Cienciala, Jan; Chaloupka, Richard; Repko, Martin; Vyskočil, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Injuries of the upper cervical spine represent 1/3 of all cervical spine injuries and approximately 40 % result by the death. Every level of the cervical spine can be injured - fractures of condyles of the occipital bone (CO), atlantooccipital dislocation (AOD), fractures of the Atlas (C1), atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) and fractures of the axis (C2). Most of cases in younger patients are caused by high-energy trauma, while by elderly people, because of the osteoporosis, is needed much less energy and even simple falls can cause the injury of the cervical spine. That´s why the etiology of injuries can be different. In younger patients are caused mainly by car accidents, motorcycle and bicycle accidents and pedestrian crashes by car and in elderly populations are the main reason falls. The mechanism of the injury is axial force, hyperflexion, hyperextension, latero-flexion, rotation and combination of all. The basic diagnostic examination is X ray in AP, lateral and transoral projection. But in the most of cases is CT examination necessary and in the suspicion of the ligamentous injury and neurological deterioration must be MRI examination added. Every injury of the upper cervical spine has its own classification. Clinical symptoms can vary from the neck pain, restricted range of motion, antalgic position of the head, injury of the cranial nerves and different neurologic symptoms from the irritation of nerves to quadriplegia. A large percentage of deaths is at the time of the injury. Therapy is divided to conservative treatment, which is indicated in bone injuries with minimal dislocation. In more severe cases, with the dislocation and ligamentous injury, when is high chance of the instability, is indicated the surgical treatment. We can use anterior or posterior approach, make the osteosynthesis, stabilisation and fusion of the spine. Complex fractures and combination of different types of injuries are often present in this part of the spine. Correct and early

  2. Cervical spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of contrast given into a vein contains iodine. If a person with an iodine allergy is given this type of contrast, nausea ... steroids before the test. The kidneys help remove iodine out of the body. People with kidney disease ...

  3. Learning rules and persistence of dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Haruo; Hayama, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Motoko; Watanabe, Satoshi; Yagishita, Sho; Noguchi, Jun

    2010-07-01

    Structural plasticity of dendritic spines underlies learning, memory and cognition in the cerebral cortex. We here summarize fifteen rules of spine structural plasticity, or 'spine learning rules.' Together, they suggest how the spontaneous generation, selection and strengthening (SGSS) of spines represents the physical basis for learning and memory. This SGSS mechanism is consistent with Hebb's learning rule but suggests new relations between synaptic plasticity and memory. We describe the cellular and molecular bases of the spine learning rules, such as the persistence of spine structures and the fundamental role of actin, which polymerizes to form a 'memory gel' required for the selection and strengthening of spine synapses. We also discuss the possible link between transcriptional and translational regulation of structural plasticity. The SGSS mechanism and spine learning rules elucidate the integral nature of synaptic plasticity in neuronal network operations within the actual brain tissue.

  4. Biomechanics of the flexion of spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, H. K.; Aurora, T. S.

    1991-03-01

    Low back pain is a common problem and it involves different kinds of injury to the spine. In this article the forces and torques experienced by the spine are examined in order to understand, and possibly avoid, low back pain.

  5. Neutral spine control exercises in rehabilitation after lumbar spine fusion.

    PubMed

    Tarnanen, Sami P; Neva, Marko H; Häkkinen, Keijo; Kankaanpää, Markku; Ylinen, Jari; Kraemer, William J; Newton, Robert U; Häkkinen, Arja

    2014-07-01

    Lumbar spine fusion (LSF) has been reported to change the biomechanics of the spine and therefore the rehabilitation after LSF is important. In this study, the effect of selected neutral spine control exercises on activation of trunk muscles after LSF was evaluated. Muscle activity was measured by surface electromyography of the rectus abdominis, external oblique, longissimus, and multifidus muscles during 6 exercises in 22 LSF patients (mean age = 59 years; age range = 25-84 years; 50% women). Muscle activity concurrent with trunk flexion and extension during maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) was used as a reference value. Pain during the effort was assessed with a visual analog scale (VAS). The highest activity in the rectus abdominis muscles was measured during bilateral shoulder extension (51% of MVIC), and in the external oblique, it occurred during unilateral shoulder horizontal adduction (48% of MVIC) and unilateral hip extension (46% of MVIC) exercises. The highest activation of the multifidus and longissimus muscles (60-104%) was measured during bilateral shoulder flexion and modified Roman chair exercises. The mean (SD) self-reported back pain VAS scores during exercises varied from 3 (7) to 16 (26). Neutral spine control exercises activate trunk muscles and cause minimal pain and are therefore feasible exercises for home-based training to improve muscle endurance and postural control after LSF. In addition, the level of muscle activity during bilateral shoulder flexion and modified Roman chair exercises was over 60% of MVIC, justifying their use in training for strength of the trunk extensor muscles.

  6. [Minimally invasive spine surgery: past and present].

    PubMed

    Corniola, M V; Stienen, M N; Tessitore, E; Schaller, K; Gautschi, O P

    2015-11-18

    In the early twentieth century, the understanding of spine biomechanics and the advent of surgical techniques of the lumbar spine, led to the currently emerging concept of minimal invasive spine surgery, By reducing surgical access, blood loss, infection rate and general morbidity, functional prognosis of patients is improved. This is a real challenge for the spine surgeon, who has to maintain a good operative result by significantly reducing surgical collateral damages due to the relatively traumatic conventional access.

  7. Non-synaptic dendritic spines in neocortex.

    PubMed

    Arellano, J I; Espinosa, A; Fairén, A; Yuste, R; DeFelipe, J

    2007-03-16

    A long-held assumption states that each dendritic spine in the cerebral cortex forms a synapse, although this issue has not been systematically investigated. We performed complete ultrastructural reconstructions of a large (n=144) population of identified spines in adult mouse neocortex finding that only 3.6% of the spines clearly lacked synapses. Nonsynaptic spines were small and had no clear head, resembling dendritic filopodia, and could represent a source of new synaptic connections in the adult cerebral cortex.

  8. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine A A A What's in this article? What ... Radiografía: columna cervical What It Is A cervical spine X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  9. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine Print A A A What's in this article? ... Radiografía: columna cervical What It Is A cervical spine X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  10. A Technological Review of the Instrumented Footwear for Rehabilitation with a Focus on Parkinson’s Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Maculewicz, Justyna; Kofoed, Lise Busk; Serafin, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    In this review article, we summarize systems for gait rehabilitation based on instrumented footwear and present a context of their usage in Parkinson’s disease (PD) patients’ auditory and haptic rehabilitation. We focus on the needs of PD patients, but since only a few systems were made with this purpose, we go through several applications used in different scenarios when gait detection and rehabilitation are considered. We present developments of the designs, possible improvements, and software challenges and requirements. We conclude that in order to build successful systems for PD patients’ gait rehabilitation, technological solutions from several studies have to be applied and combined with knowledge from auditory and haptic cueing. PMID:26834696

  11. Reference measurement procedures for Alzheimer's disease cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers: definitions and approaches with focus on amyloid β42.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Niklas; Zegers, Ingrid; Andreasson, Ulf; Bjerke, Maria; Blankenstein, Marinus A; Bowser, Robert; Carrillo, Maria C; Gobom, Johan; Heath, Theresa; Jenkins, Rand; Jeromin, Andreas; Kaplow, June; Kidd, Daniel; Laterza, Omar F; Lockhart, Andrew; Lunn, Michael P; Martone, Robert L; Mills, Kevin; Pannee, Josef; Ratcliffe, Marianne; Shaw, Leslie M; Simon, Adam J; Soares, Holly; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Verbeek, Marcel M; Umek, Robert M; Vanderstichele, Hugo; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Portelius, Erik

    2012-08-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) are increasingly used in clinical settings, research and drug trials. However, their broad-scale use on different technology platforms is hampered by the lack of standardization at the level of sample handling, determination of concentrations of analytes and the absence of well-defined performance criteria for in vitro diagnostic or companion diagnostic assays, which influences the apparent concentration of the analytes measured and the subsequent interpretation of the data. There is a need for harmonization of CSF AD biomarker assays that can reliably, across centers, quantitate CSF biomarkers with high analytical precision, selectivity and stability over long time periods. In this position paper, we discuss reference procedures for the measurement of CSF AD biomarkers, especially amyloid β42 and tau. We describe possible technical approaches, focusing on a selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry assay as a candidate reference method for quantification of CSF amyloid β42.

  12. The Transfection of BDNF to Dopamine Neurons Potentiates the Effect of Dopamine D3 Receptor Agonist Recovering the Striatal Innervation, Dendritic Spines and Motor Behavior in an Aged Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Razgado-Hernandez, Luis F.; Espadas-Alvarez, Armando J.; Reyna-Velazquez, Patricia; Sierra-Sanchez, Arturo; Anaya-Martinez, Veronica; Jimenez-Estrada, Ismael; Bannon, Michael J.; Martinez-Fong, Daniel; Aceves-Ruiz, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    The progressive degeneration of the dopamine neurons of the pars compacta of substantia nigra and the consequent loss of the dopamine innervation of the striatum leads to the impairment of motor behavior in Parkinson’s disease. Accordingly, an efficient therapy of the disease should protect and regenerate the dopamine neurons of the substantia nigra and the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Nigral neurons express Brain Derived Neurotropic Factor (BDNF) and dopamine D3 receptors, both of which protect the dopamine neurons. The chronic activation of dopamine D3 receptors by their agonists, in addition, restores, in part, the dopamine innervation of the striatum. Here we explored whether the over-expression of BDNF by dopamine neurons potentiates the effect of the activation of D3 receptors restoring nigrostriatal innervation. Twelve-month old Wistar rats were unilaterally injected with 6-hydroxydopamine into the striatum. Five months later, rats were treated with the D3 agonist 7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propy1-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT) administered i.p. during 4½ months via osmotic pumps and the BDNF gene transfection into nigral cells using the neurotensin-polyplex nanovector (a non-viral transfection) that selectively transfect the dopamine neurons via the high-affinity neurotensin receptor expressed by these neurons. Two months after the withdrawal of 7-OH-DPAT when rats were aged (24 months old), immunohistochemistry assays were made. The over-expression of BDNF in rats receiving the D3 agonist normalized gait and motor coordination; in addition, it eliminated the muscle rigidity produced by the loss of dopamine. The recovery of motor behavior was associated with the recovery of the nigral neurons, the dopamine innervation of the striatum and of the number of dendritic spines of the striatal neurons. Thus, the over-expression of BDNF in dopamine neurons associated with the chronic activation of the D3 receptors appears to be a promising strategy for restoring

  13. Methods of dendritic spine detection: from Golgi to high-resolution optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Mancuso, J J; Chen, Y; Li, X; Xue, Z; Wong, S T C

    2013-10-22

    Dendritic spines, the bulbous protrusions that form the postsynaptic half of excitatory synapses, are one of the most prominent features of neurons and have been imaged and studied for over a century. In that time, changes in the number and morphology of dendritic spines have been correlated to the developmental process as well as the pathophysiology of a number of neurodegenerative diseases. Due to the sheer scale of synaptic connectivity in the brain, work to date has merely scratched the surface in the study of normal spine function and pathology. This review will highlight traditional approaches to the imaging of dendritic spines and newer approaches made possible by advances in microscopy, protein engineering, and image analysis. The review will also describe recent work that is leading researchers toward the possibility of a systematic and comprehensive study of spine anatomy throughout the brain.

  14. Concept of Gunshot Wound Spine

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Radhey Shyam

    2013-01-01

    Gunshot wound (GSW) to the spine which was earlier common in the military population is now being increasingly noted in civilians due to easy availability of firearms of low velocity either licensed or illegal combined with an increased rate of violence in the society. Contributing to 13% to 17% of all spinal injuries, the management of complex injury to the spine produced by a GSW remains controversial. Surgery for spinal cord injuries resulting from low velocity GSWs is reserved for patients with progressive neurologic deterioration, persistent cerebrospinal fluid fistulae, and sometimes for incomplete spinal cord injuries. Surgery may also be indicated to relieve active neural compression from a bullet, bone, intervertebral disk, or a hematoma within the spinal canal. Spinal instability rarely results from a civilian GSW. Cauda equina injuries from low velocity GSWs have a better overall outcome after surgery. In general, the decision to perform surgery should be made on consideration of multiple patient factors that can vary over a period of time. Although there have been plenty of individual case reports regarding GSW to the spine, a thorough review of unique mechanical and biological factors that affect the final outcome has been lacking. We review the key concepts of pathogenesis and management of GSW to the spine and propose an algorithm to guide decision making in such cases. PMID:24353856

  15. Social Media and Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPN)--Focus on Twitter and the Development of a Disease-specific Community: #MPNSM.

    PubMed

    Pemmaraju, Naveen; Gupta, Vikas; Mesa, Ruben; Thompson, Michael A

    2015-12-01

    The advent of social media has led to the ability for individuals all over the world to communicate with each other, in real time, about mutual topics of interest in an unprecedented manner. Recently, the use of social media has increased among people interested in healthcare and medical research, particularly in the field of hematology and oncology, a field which frequently experiences rapid shifts of information and novel, practice-changing discoveries. Among the many social media platforms available to cancer patients and providers, one platform in particular, Twitter, has become the focus for the creation of disease-specific communities, especially for those interested in, affected by, or those who perform research in the fields of rare cancers, which historically have had a dearth of reliable information available. This article will focus on the initiation and progress of one such Twitter hematology/oncology community, #mpnsm, which was originally created for the purpose of serving as a venue for improving the interaction among patients, providers, researchers, and organizations with interest in the myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and to further the availability of reliable up-to-date analysis; relevant expert commentary; and readily usable information for patients, providers, and other groups interested in this field.

  16. [Nosology of inflammatory diseases: lessons learned from the auto-inflammatory syndromes--a focus on skin manifestations].

    PubMed

    Lipsker, Dan; Ramot, Yuval; Ingber, Arieh

    2012-10-01

    Auto-inflammatory diseases were first described more than 10 years ago as inherited disorders, characterized by recurrent flares of inflammation due to an abnormality in the innate immune system. The understanding of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of these disorders, and especially the fact that they are mediated by IL-1 secretion by stimulated monocytes/macrophages, facilitated significant progress in patient management. IL-1 inhibitors are especially effective, and indeed, a brief and complete response to IL-1 inhibition is probably one of the best signs of auto-inflammation. Cutaneous manifestations are frequent in the monogenic auto-inflammatory syndromes, and a careful analysis of those findings reveals that they are almost always the consequence of neutrophilic skin infiltration. The neutrophilic dermatoses are, therefore, the cutaneous manifestations of those disorders. Even when the neutrophilic dermatoses occur outside the setting of genetically determined auto-inflammatory disorders, they probably also result from auto-inflammatory mechanisms. The distinction between auto-inflammation and autoimmunity is essential for the proper treatment of the patients. Auto-inflammation will almost always respond to IL-1 inhibition, while immunospressors will not be beneficial. The aim of the current paper is to review these two sub-groups of inflammatory diseases, focusing on their cutaneous manifestations, and highlighting the connection between these syndromes and inflammation in general.

  17. Osteoarthritis of the spine: the facet joints.

    PubMed

    Gellhorn, Alfred C; Katz, Jeffrey N; Suri, Pradeep

    2013-04-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) of the spine involves the facet joints, which are located in the posterior aspect of the vertebral column and, in humans, are the only true synovial joints between adjacent spinal levels. Facet joint osteoarthritis (FJ OA) is widely prevalent in older adults, and is thought to be a common cause of back and neck pain. The prevalence of facet-mediated pain in clinical populations increases with increasing age, suggesting that FJ OA might have a particularly important role in older adults with spinal pain. Nevertheless, to date FJ OA has received far less study than other important OA phenotypes such as knee OA, and other features of spine pathoanatomy such as degenerative disc disease. This Review presents the current state of knowledge of FJ OA, including relevant anatomy, biomechanics, epidemiology, and clinical manifestations. We present the view that the modern concept of FJ OA is consonant with the concept of OA as a failure of the whole joint, and not simply of facet joint cartilage.

  18. The 100 Most Influential Articles in Cervical Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Steinberger, Jeremy; Guzman, Javier Z.; Overley, Samuel C.; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Caridi, John M.; Cho, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To identify and analyze the top 100 cited articles in cervical spine surgery. Methods The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all articles relevant to cervical spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each article. Results The most cited article was the classic from 1991 by Vernon and Mior that described the Neck Disability Index. The second most cited was Smith's 1958 article describing the anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion procedure. The third most cited article was Hilibrand's 1999 publication evaluating the incidence, prevalence, and radiographic progression of symptomatic adjacent segment disease following anterior cervical arthrodesis. The majority of the articles originated in the United States (65), and most were published in Spine (39). Most articles were published in the 1990s (34), and the three most common topics were cervical fusion (17), surgical complications (9), and biomechanics (9), respectively. Author Abumi had four articles in the top 100 list, and authors Goffin, Panjabi, and Hadley had three each. The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan, had five articles in the top 100 list. Conclusion This report identifies the top 100 articles in cervical spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the cervical spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in cervical spine surgery today. PMID:26835204

  19. Aquatic antagonists: cutaneous sea urchin spine injury.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Clifford; Aronson, Erica R; Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Arlene M

    2016-11-01

    Injuries from sea urchin spines are commonly seen in coastal regions with high levels of participation in water activities. Although these injuries may seem minor, the consequences vary based on the location of the injury. Sea urchin spine injuries may cause arthritis and synovitis from spines in the joints. Nonjoint injuries have been reported, and dermatologic aspects of sea urchin spine injuries rarely have been discussed. We present a case of a patient with sea urchin spines embedded in the thigh who subsequently developed painful skin nodules. Tissue from the site of the injury demonstrated foreign-body type granulomas. Following the removal of the spines and granulomatous tissue, the patient experienced resolution of the nodules and associated pain. Extraction of sea urchin spines can attenuate the pain and decrease the likelihood of granuloma formation, infection, and long-term sequelae.

  20. Male and Female Cervical Spine Biomechanics and Anatomy: Implication for Scaling Injury Criteria.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Bass, Cameron R; Voo, Liming; Pintar, Frank A

    2017-05-01

    There is an increased need to develop female-specific injury criteria and anthropomorphic test devices (dummies) for military and automotive environments, especially as women take occupational roles traditionally reserved for men. Although some exhaustive reviews on the biomechanics and injuries of the human spine have appeared in clinical and bioengineering literatures, focus has been largely ignored on the difference between male and female cervical spine responses and characteristics. Current neck injury criteria for automotive dummies for assessing crashworthiness and occupant safety are obtained from animal and human cadaver experiments, computational modeling, and human volunteer studies. They are also used in the military. Since the average human female spines are smaller than average male spines, metrics specific to the female population may be derived using simple geometric scaling, based on the assumption that male and female spines are geometrically scalable. However, as described in this technical brief, studies have shown that the biomechanical responses between males and females do not obey strict geometric similitude. Anatomical differences in terms of the structural component geometry are also different between the two cervical spines. Postural, physiological, and motion responses under automotive scenarios are also different. This technical brief, focused on such nonuniform differences, underscores the need to conduct female spine-specific evaluations/experiments to derive injury criteria for this important group of the population.

  1. The Myth of “The Vulnerable Plaque”: Transitioning from a Focus on Individual Lesions to Atherosclerotic Disease Burden for Coronary Artery Disease Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Arbab-Zadeh, Armin; Fuster, Valentin

    2014-01-01

    The cardiovascular science community has pursued the quest to identify vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque in patients for decades, hoping to prevent acute coronary events. However, despite major advancements in imaging technology that allow visualization of rupture-prone plaques, clinical studies have not demonstrated improved risk prediction compared to traditional approaches. Considering the complex relationship between plaque rupture and acute coronary event risk suggested by pathology studies and confirmed by clinical investigations, these results are not surprising. This review summarizes the evidence supporting a multifaceted hypothesis of the natural history of atherosclerotic plaque rupture. Managing patients at risk of suffering acute coronary events mandates a greater focus on the atherosclerotic disease burden, rather than on features of individual plaques. PMID:25601032

  2. History of spine biomechanics: part I--the pre-Greco-Roman, Greco-Roman, and medieval roots of spine biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Naderi, Sait; Andalkar, Niteen; Benzel, Edward C

    2007-02-01

    The roots of spine biomechanics reside in the Antiquity and the Medieval and Renaissance periods. A review of historical treatises reveals detailed information regarding this often historically neglected discipline. Ancient medical, philosophical, and physical documents were reviewed, as they pertained to the historical foundation of spine biomechanics. These included medical case reports and observations of nature and motion by ancient philosophers and scientists. These documents heavily influenced the portion of the scientific literature that we now regard as "spine biomechanics" up through the Renaissance. The focus of Part I of this two-part series is placed on the ancient and medieval biomechanics-related literature and on associated literature that influenced the development of the field of modern spine biomechanics.

  3. The sleeping brain in Parkinson's disease: A focus on REM sleep behaviour disorder and related parasomnias for practicing neurologists.

    PubMed

    Bhidayasiri, Roongroj; Sringean, Jirada; Rattanachaisit, Watchara; Truong, Daniel D

    2017-03-15

    Sleep disorders are identified as common non-motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and recently this recognition has been expanded to include parasomnias, encompassing not only REM sleep behaviour disorder (RBD), but also other non-REM forms. RBD, a prototypical parasomnia in PD, exists even in the prodromal stage of the disease, and is characterized by the presence of dream enactment behaviours occurring alongside a loss of normal skeletal muscle atonia during REM sleep. In contrast, non-REM parasomnias are more frequently observed in the late stage PD. However, the development of these disorders often overlaps and it is not uncommon for PD patients to meet the criteria for more than one type of parasomnias, thus making a clinical distinction challenging for practicing neurologists who are not sleep specialists. Indeed, clinical recognition of the predominant form of parasomnia does not just depend on video-polysomnography, but also on an individual physician's clinical acumen in delineating pertinent clinical history to determine the most likely diagnosis and proceed accordingly. In this review article, we highlight the various forms of parasomnias that have been reported in PD, including, but not limited to, RBD, with a focus on clinical symptomatology and implications for clinical practice. In addition, we review the differences in PD-related parasomnias compared to those seen in general populations. With advances in sleep research and better technology for ambulatory home monitoring, it is likely that many unanswered questions on PD-related parasomnias will soon be resolved resulting in better management of this nocturnal challenge in PD.

  4. Pott's spine and paraplegia.

    PubMed

    Gautam, M P; Karki, P; Rijal, S; Singh, R

    2005-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis is usually secondary to lung or abdominal involvement and may also be the first manifestation of tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis (often called Pott's disease) is by definition, an advanced disease, requiring meticulous assessment and aggressive systemic therapy. Physicians should keep the diagnosis in mind, especially in a patient from a group with a high rate of tuberculosis infection. This review aims on updating the knowledge on spinal tuberculosis and its management. Skeletal involvement has been reported to occur in approximately 10% of all patents with extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and half of these patients develop infection within the spinal column. Symptoms of spinal tuberculosis are back pain, weakness, weight loss, fever, fatigue, and malaise. It is much more prone to develop neurological manifestation, paraplegia of varying degree. The palpation of spinous process in routine clinical examination is the most rewarding clinical method and is an invaluable measure for early recognition. Diagnosis of spinal tuberculosis is made on the basis of typical clinical presentation along with systemic constitutional manifestation and the evidence of past exposure to tuberculosis or concomitant visceral tuberculosis. Magnetic resonance imaging can define the extent of abscess formation and spinal cord compression. The diagnosis is confirmed through percutaneous or open biopsy of the spinal lesion. Surgery is necessary as an adjunct to antibiotic therapy if the vertebral infection produces an abscess, vertebral collapse, or neurologic compression. Some patents need aggressive supportive care owing to tuberculous meningitis or encephalopathy. Moreover, the importance of immediate commencement of appropriate treatment and its continuation for adequate duration along with the proper counseling of the patient and family members should not be underestimated for successful and desired outcome.

  5. 78 FR 21613 - Prescription Drug User Fee Act Patient-Focused Drug Development; Announcement of Disease Areas...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-11

    ... obstructive pulmonary disease, lysosomal storage disorders, peripheral neuropathy, dystonia, and fibromyalgia... Chagas disease; female sexual dysfunction; fibromyalgia; hemophilia A, hemophilia B, von...

  6. Computed tomography of the spine

    SciTech Connect

    Haughton, V.M.; Williams, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    The book describes the computed tomographic (CT) techniques for imaging the different elements comprising the spinal column and canal. The use of intravenous and intrathecal contrast enhancement and of xenon enhancement is briefly mentioned. Reconstruction techniques and special problems regarding CT of the spine are presented. CT of the spinal cord, meninges and subarachnoid space, epidural space, intervertebral discs, facet joints, and vertebrae present normal anatomy, and several common pathologic conditions. (KRM)

  7. Optical imaging in vivo with a focus on paediatric disease: technical progress, current preclinical and clinical applications and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Napp, Joanna; Mathejczyk, Julia E.

    2011-01-01

    To obtain information on the occurrence and location of molecular events as well as to track target-specific probes such as antibodies or peptides, drugs or even cells non-invasively over time, optical imaging (OI) technologies are increasingly applied. Although OI strongly contributes to the advances made in preclinical research, it is so far, with the exception of optical coherence tomography (OCT), only very sparingly applied in clinical settings. Nevertheless, as OI technologies evolve and improve continuously and represent relatively inexpensive and harmful methods, their implementation as clinical tools for the assessment of children disease is increasing. This review focuses on the current preclinical and clinical applications as well as on the future potential of OI in the clinical routine. Herein, we summarize the development of different fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging techniques for microscopic and macroscopic visualization of microstructures and biological processes. In addition, we discuss advantages and limitations of optical probes with distinct mechanisms of target-detection as well as of different bioluminescent reporter systems. Particular attention has been given to the use of near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes enabling observation of molecular events in deeper tissue. PMID:21221568

  8. Thromboembolic Complications Following Spine Surgery Assessed with Spiral CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Han Jo; Walcott-Sapp, Sarah; Adler, Ronald S.; Pavlov, Helene; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba

    2010-01-01

    Spine surgery is associated with a significant risk of postoperative pulmonary embolism (PE) and/or deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The goal of this study was to determine which symptoms and risk factors were associated with spiral CT scans positive for PE and/or DVT in the postoperative spine surgery patient. We conducted a retrospective review of all spine patients who underwent a postoperative CT to rule out PE during the period of March 2004–February 2006. The type of surgical procedure, risk factors, symptoms prompting scan ordering, anticoagulation, and treatment were recorded. Logistic regression models were used to determine significant predictors of a positive CT in this patient population. Of the 3,331 patients that had spine surgery during the study period, 130 (3.9%) had a spiral CT scan to rule out PE and/or proximal DVT. Thirty-three of the 130 (25.4%) CT scans were positive for PE only, five (3.8%) for PE and DVT, and three (2.3%) for DVT only. Only 24.5% (32) patients had risk factors for thromboembolic disease, and of these, a history of PE and/or DVT was the only significant risk factor for a positive scan (p = 0.03). No presenting symptoms or demographic variables were noted to have a significant association with PE and/or DVT. The type of surgical procedure (i.e., anterior, posterior, and percutaneous) was not associated with an increased risk for PE and/or DVT. Patients who are undergoing spine surgery with a history of thromboembolic disease should be carefully monitored postoperatively and may benefit from more aggressive prophylaxis. PMID:22294955

  9. Stem cells for spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Joshua; Kueper, Janina; Leon, Kaplan; Liebergall, Meir

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, stem cells have become the focus of research by regenerative medicine professionals and tissue engineers. Embryonic stem cells, although capable of differentiating into cell lineages of all three germ layers, are limited in their utilization due to ethical issues. In contrast, the autologous harvest and subsequent transplantation of adult stem cells from bone marrow, adipose tissue or blood have been experimentally utilized in the treatment of a wide variety of diseases ranging from myocardial infarction to Alzheimer’s disease. The physiologic consequences of stem cell transplantation and its impact on functional recovery have been studied in countless animal models and select clinical trials. Unfortunately, the bench to bedside translation of this research has been slow. Nonetheless, stem cell therapy has received the attention of spinal surgeons due to its potential benefits in the treatment of neural damage, muscle trauma, disk degeneration and its potential contribution to bone fusion. PMID:25621119

  10. Automated assessment of exclusion criteria for DXA lumbar spine scans.

    PubMed

    Barden, Howard S; Markwardt, Paul; Payne, Randy; Hawkins, Brent; Frank, Matt; Faulkner, Kenneth G

    2003-01-01

    Modern bone densitometry systems using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) automatically analyze lumbar spine scans and provide clinically important information concerning spine bone mineral density (BMD) and fracture risk. Lumbar spine BMD accurately reflects skeletal health and fracture risk in most cases, but degenerative diseases associated with aging may lead to the formation of reactive bone (osteophytes) and other confounding conditions that elevate BMD without a concomitant increase in bone strength or decrease in fracture risk. Automated densitometry software known as computer-aided densitometry (CAD) (GE Medical Systems Lunar) assists the user in identifying scans with common acquisition and analysis irregularities known to influence BMD values. Visual examination of 231 female spine scans measured with DXA found abnormal conditions that could influence BMD results in 29% of scans. The sensitivity and specificity of several criteria for identifying scans with conditions that could influence BMD were determined. A good criterion for identifying scans with abnormal conditions was a T-score difference of greater than 0.9 or 1.0 between L1-L4 mean and individual vertebrae. Criteria for excluding affected vertebrae were determined. Exclusion of affected vertebrae resulted in a mean BMD decrease of nearly 0.6 SD (T-score) among affected scans.

  11. Focus on Inclusive Education: The Educational and Social Challenges of Children with Celiac Disease: What Educators Should Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chick, Kay A.

    2014-01-01

    Celiac disease is a genetic autoimmune disease in which gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, barley, and contaminated oats, attacks the lining of the small intestine. Children with this disease must eliminate gluten from their diet. This article provides educators with essential information on celiac disease and the federal laws that protect the…

  12. Use of high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of both benign and malignant prostatic disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kernen, Kenneth M.; Miles, Brian J.

    2000-05-01

    Prostate cancer, the most common malignancy in men in the United States, accounts for more than 29% of all male cancers diagnosed and 13% of all cancer deaths. This translates into approximately 200,000 men diagnosed and 37,000 men who will die from the disease this year in this country. A significant number of patients ultimately choose external beam radiation or interstitial radioactive implants (brachytherapy) combined with external beam radiotherapy as their primary treatment. Approximately 25 - 35% of external beam irradiation patients and 20 - 30% of interstitial implants combined with external beam radiotherapy will fail within 10 years. The treatment options for patients with localized radiorecurrent disease include watchful waiting, endocrine therapy, salvage radiotherapy, and salvage radical prostatectomy, cryotherapy and now high intensity focused ultrasound therapy (HIFU). Although some studies regarding watchful waiting demonstrated comparable results to formal treatment for early prostate cancer, other studies have shown metastatic and mortality rates that are significantly higher, and that radiorecurrent patients would have even greater rates of metastasis and progression to death. Prostate cancer cure by means of endocrine therapy is highly unlikely and its role is still one of palliation with a side effect profile which includes hot flashes, osteoporosis, fatigue, loss of muscle mass, anemia, loss of libido and potency. The role of salvage radiotherapy may offer local control, however long term efficacy has yet to be determined. In a recent series, only 50% of the patients were controlled for a mean of four years with salvage radiotherapy. Salvage prostatectomy has the advantage of providing excellent local control and even a cure if the cancer is confined to the prostate or within the surrounding periprostatic tissue. Historically, salvage prostatectomy is technically demanding and fraught with higher complications. In one large series

  13. Development of Ultrasound to Measure In-vivo Dynamic Cervical Spine Intervertebral Disc Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    images of IVDs and dynamic vertebral motion in-vivo during simulated tasks relevant to acute and chronic cervical spine injury and disease. A semi...of cervical vertebrae. Dynamic IVD displacements of vertebrae C4-5 measured by US were consistent with direct measurements. For motion frequencies...We developed a diagnostic system that applies dynamic cyclic loads to cervical spine over a range of programmable frequencies and amplitudes that

  14. Disease Management: The Need for a Focus on Broader Self-Management Abilities and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2015-08-01

    The study objective was to investigate long-term effects of disease management programs (DMPs) on (1) health behaviors (smoking, physical exercise); (2) self-management abilities (self-efficacy, investment behavior, initiative taking); and (3) physical and mental quality of life among chronically ill patients. The study also examined whether (changes in) health behaviors and self-management abilities predicted quality of life. Questionnaires were sent to all 5076 patients participating in 18 Dutch DMPs in 2010 (T0; 2676 [53%] respondents). Two years later (T1), questionnaires were sent to 4350 patients still participating in DMPs (1722 [40%] respondents). Structured interviews were held with the 18 DMP project leaders. DMP implementation improved patients' health behavior and physical quality of life, but mental quality of life and self-management abilities declined over time. Changes in patients' investment behavior predicted physical quality of life at T1 (P<.001); physical activity, investment behavior (both P<.05), and self-efficacy (P<.01) at T0, and changes in self-efficacy and investment behavior (both P<.001) predicted patients' mental quality of life at T1. The long-term benefits of these DMPs include successful improvement of chronically ill patients' health behaviors and physical quality of life. However, these programs were not able to improve or maintain broader self-management abilities or mental quality of life, highlighting the need to focus on these abilities and overall quality of life. As coproducers of care, patients should be stimulated and enabled to manage their health and quality of life.

  15. Biomechanics of the spine. Part I: spinal stability.

    PubMed

    Izzo, Roberto; Guarnieri, Gianluigi; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Muto, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Biomechanics, the application of mechanical principles to living organisms, helps us to understand how all the bony and soft spinal components contribute individually and together to ensure spinal stability, and how traumas, tumours and degenerative disorders exert destabilizing effects. Spine stability is the basic requirement to protect nervous structures and prevent the early mechanical deterioration of spinal components. The literature reports a number of biomechanical and clinical definitions of spinal stability, but a consensus definition is lacking. Any vertebra in each spinal motion segment, the smallest functional unit of the spine, can perform various combinations of the main and coupled movements during which a number of bony and soft restraints maintain spine stability. Bones, disks and ligaments contribute by playing a structural role and by acting as transducers through their mechanoreceptors. Mechanoreceptors send proprioceptive impulses to the central nervous system which coordinates muscle tone, movement and reflexes. Damage to any spinal structure gives rise to some degree of instability. Instability is classically considered as a global increase in the movements associated with the occurrence of back and/or nerve root pain. The assessment of spinal instability remains a major challenge for diagnostic imaging experts. Knowledge of biomechanics is essential in view of the increasing involvement of radiologists and neuroradiologists in spinal interventional procedures and the ongoing development of new techniques and devices. Bioengineers and surgeons are currently focusing on mobile stabilization systems. These systems represent a new frontier in the treatment of painful degenerative spine and aim to neutralize noxious forces, restore the normal function of spinal segments and protect the adjacent segments. This review discusses the current concepts of spine stability.

  16. Cervical spine surgery in professional athletes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Joaquim, Andrei F; Hsu, Wellington K; Patel, Alpesh A

    2016-04-01

    Cervical surgery is one of the most common surgical spinal procedures performed around the world. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature reporting the outcomes of cervical spine surgery in high-level athletes in order to better understand the nuances of cervical spine pathology in this population. A search of the MEDLINE database using the search terms "cervical spine" AND "surgery" AND "athletes" yielded 54 abstracts. After exclusion of publications that did not meet the criteria for inclusion, a total of 8 papers reporting the outcome of cervical spine surgery in professional or elite athletes treated for symptoms secondary to cervical spine pathology (focusing in degenerative conditions) remained for analysis. Five of these involved the management of cervical disc herniation, 3 were specifically about traumatic neurapraxia. The majority of the patients included in this review were American football players. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was commonly performed in high-level athletes for the treatment of cervical disc herniation. Most of the studies suggested that return to play is safe for athletes who are asymptomatic after ACDF for cervical radiculopathy due to disc herniation. Surgical treatment may provide a higher rate of return to play for these athletes than nonsurgical treatment. Return to play after cervical spinal cord contusion may be possible in asymptomatic patients. Cervical cord signal changes on MRI may not be an absolute contraindication for return to play in neurologically intact patients, according to some authors. Cervical contusions secondary to cervical stenosis may be associated with a worse outcome and a higher recurrence rate than those those secondary to disc herniation. The evidence is low (Level IV) and individualized treatment must be recommended.

  17. The short-time structural plasticity of dendritic spines is altered in a model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Landi, Silvia; Putignano, Elena; Boggio, Elena Maria; Giustetto, Maurizio; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Ratto, Gian Michele

    2011-01-01

    The maturation of excitatory transmission comes about through a developmental period in which dendritic spines are highly motile and their number, form and size are rapidly changing. Surprisingly, although these processes are crucial for the formation of cortical circuitry, little is known about possible alterations of these processes in brain disease. By means of acute in vivo 2-photon imaging we show that the dynamic properties of dendritic spines of layer V cortical neurons are deeply affected in a mouse model of Rett syndrome (RTT) at a time around P25 when the neuronal phenotype of the disease is still mild. Then, we show that 24h after a subcutaneous injection of IGF-1 spine dynamics is restored. Our study demonstrates that spine dynamics in RTT mice is severely impaired early during development and suggest that treatments for RTT should be started very early in order to reestablish a normal period of spine plasticity.

  18. Diagnostic Approach to Pediatric Spine Disorders.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Andrea; Martinetti, Carola; Morana, Giovanni; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the developmental features of the pediatric spine and spinal cord, including embryologic steps and subsequent growth of the osteocartilaginous spine and contents is necessary for interpretation of the pathologic events that may affect the pediatric spine. MR imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients suspected of harboring spinal abnormalities, whereas computed tomography and ultrasonography play a more limited, complementary role. This article discusses the embryologic and developmental anatomy features of the spine and spinal cord, together with some technical points and pitfalls, and the most common indications for pediatric spinal MR imaging.

  19. Dose conformation to the spine during palliative treatments using dynamic wedges

    SciTech Connect

    Ormsby, Matthew A.; Herndon, R. Craig; Kaczor, Joseph G.

    2013-07-01

    Radiation therapy is commonly used to alleviate pain associated with metastatic disease of the spine. Often, isodose lines are manipulated using dynamic or physical wedges to encompass the section of spine needing treatment while minimizing dose to normal tissue. We will compare 2 methods used to treat the entire thoracic spine. The first method treats the thoracic spine with a single, nonwedged posterior-anterior (PA) field. Dose is prescribed to include the entire spine. Isodose lines tightly conform to the top and bottom vertebrae, but vertebrae between these 2 received more than enough coverage. The second method uses a combination of wedges to create an isodose line that mimics the curvature of the thoracic spine. This “C”-shaped curvature is created by overlapping 2 fields with opposing dynamic wedges. Machine constraints limit the treatment length and therefore 2 isocenters are used. Each of the 2 PA fields contributes a portion of the total daily dose. This technique creates a “C”-shaped isodose line that tightly conforms to the thoracic spine, minimizing normal tissue dose. Spinal cord maximum dose is reduced, as well as mean dose to the liver, esophagus, and heart.

  20. Dose conformation to the spine during palliative treatments using dynamic wedges.

    PubMed

    Ormsby, Matthew A; Herndon, R Craig; Kaczor, Joseph G

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy is commonly used to alleviate pain associated with metastatic disease of the spine. Often, isodose lines are manipulated using dynamic or physical wedges to encompass the section of spine needing treatment while minimizing dose to normal tissue. We will compare 2 methods used to treat the entire thoracic spine. The first method treats the thoracic spine with a single, nonwedged posterior-anterior (PA) field. Dose is prescribed to include the entire spine. Isodose lines tightly conform to the top and bottom vertebrae, but vertebrae between these 2 received more than enough coverage. The second method uses a combination of wedges to create an isodose line that mimics the curvature of the thoracic spine. This "C"-shaped curvature is created by overlapping 2 fields with opposing dynamic wedges. Machine constraints limit the treatment length and therefore 2 isocenters are used. Each of the 2 PA fields contributes a portion of the total daily dose. This technique creates a "C"-shaped isodose line that tightly conforms to the thoracic spine, minimizing normal tissue dose. Spinal cord maximum dose is reduced, as well as mean dose to the liver, esophagus, and heart.

  1. Osteotomies in the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Nemani, Venu M.; Derman, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Rigid cervical deformities are difficult problems to treat. The goals of surgical treatment include deformity correction, achieving a rigid fusion, and performing a thorough neural decompression. In stiff and ankylosed cervical spines, osteotomies are required to restore sagittal and coronal balance. In this chapter, we describe the clinical and radiographic workup for patients with cervical deformities, and delineate the various factors that must be considered when planning surgical treatment. We also describe in detail the various types of cervical osteotomies, along with their surgical technique, advantages, and potential complications. PMID:26949476

  2. Imaging dendritic spines of rat primary hippocampal neurons using structured illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schouten, Marijn; De Luca, Giulia M R; Alatriste González, Diana K; de Jong, Babette E; Timmermans, Wendy; Xiong, Hui; Krugers, Harm; Manders, Erik M M; Fitzsimons, Carlos P

    2014-05-04

    Dendritic spines are protrusions emerging from the dendrite of a neuron and represent the primary postsynaptic targets of excitatory inputs in the brain. Technological advances have identified these structures as key elements in neuron connectivity and synaptic plasticity. The quantitative analysis of spine morphology using light microscopy remains an essential problem due to technical limitations associated with light's intrinsic refraction limit. Dendritic spines can be readily identified by confocal laser-scanning fluorescence microscopy. However, measuring subtle changes in the shape and size of spines is difficult because spine dimensions other than length are usually smaller than conventional optical resolution fixed by light microscopy's theoretical resolution limit of 200 nm. Several recently developed super resolution techniques have been used to image cellular structures smaller than the 200 nm, including dendritic spines. These techniques are based on classical far-field operations and therefore allow the use of existing sample preparation methods and to image beyond the surface of a specimen. Described here is a working protocol to apply super resolution structured illumination microscopy (SIM) to the imaging of dendritic spines in primary hippocampal neuron cultures. Possible applications of SIM overlap with those of confocal microscopy. However, the two techniques present different applicability. SIM offers higher effective lateral resolution, while confocal microscopy, due to the usage of a physical pinhole, achieves resolution improvement at the expense of removal of out of focus light. In this protocol, primary neurons are cultured on glass coverslips using a standard protocol, transfected with DNA plasmids encoding fluorescent proteins and imaged using SIM. The whole protocol described herein takes approximately 2 weeks, because dendritic spines are imaged after 16-17 days in vitro, when dendritic development is optimal. After completion of the

  3. Dendritic spine density, morphology, and fibrillar actin content surrounding amyloid-β plaques in a mouse model of amyloid-β deposition.

    PubMed

    Kirkwood, Caitlin M; Ciuchta, Jennifer; Ikonomovic, Milos D; Fish, Kenneth N; Abrahamson, Eric E; Murray, Patrick S; Klunk, William E; Sweet, Robert A

    2013-08-01

    Dendritic spines are the site of most excitatory synapses, the loss of which correlates with cognitive impairment in patients with Alzheimer disease. Substantial evidence indicates that amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, either insoluble fibrillar Aβ deposited into plaques or soluble nonfibrillar Aβ species, can cause spine loss but the concurrent contributions of fibrillar Aβ and nonfibrillar Aβ to spine loss has not been previously assessed. We used multiple-label immunohistochemistry to measure spine density, size, and F-actin content surrounding plaques in the cerebral cortex in the PSAPP mouse model of Aβ deposition. Our approach allowed us to measure fibrillar Aβ plaque content and an index of nonfibrillar Aβ species concurrently. We found that spine density was reduced within 6 μm of the plaque perimeter, remaining spines were more compact, and F-actin content per spine was increased. Measures of fibrillar Aβ plaque content were associated with reduced spine density near plaques, whereas measures of nonfibrillar Aβ species were associated with reduced spine density and size but not altered F-actin content. These findings suggest that strategies to preserve dendritic spines in AD patients may need to address both nonfibrillar and fibrillar forms of Aβ and that nonfibrillar Aβ may exert spine toxicity through pathways not mediated by depolymerization of F-actin.

  4. Degenerative Changes in the Spine: Is This Arthritis?

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor says I have degenerative changes in my spine. Does this mean I have arthritis? Answers from ... D. Yes. The phrase "degenerative changes" in the spine refers to osteoarthritis of the spine. Osteoarthritis is ...

  5. Voxel-based morphometry predicts shifts in dendritic spine density and morphology with auditory fear conditioning.

    PubMed

    Keifer, O P; Hurt, R C; Gutman, D A; Keilholz, S D; Gourley, S L; Ressler, K J

    2015-07-07

    Neuroimaging has provided compelling data about the brain. Yet the underlying mechanisms of many neuroimaging techniques have not been elucidated. Here we report a voxel-based morphometry (VBM) study of Thy1-YFP mice following auditory fear conditioning complemented by confocal microscopy analysis of cortical thickness, neuronal morphometric features and nuclei size/density. Significant VBM results included the nuclei of the amygdala, the insula and the auditory cortex. There were no significant VBM changes in a control brain area. Focusing on the auditory cortex, confocal analysis showed that fear conditioning led to a significantly increased density of shorter and wider dendritic spines, while there were no spine differences in the control area. Of all the morphology metrics studied, the spine density was the only one to show significant correlation with the VBM signal. These data demonstrate that learning-induced structural changes detected by VBM may be partially explained by increases in dendritic spine density.

  6. Detection of Dendritic Spines Using Wavelet-Based Conditional Symmetric Analysis and Regularized Morphological Shared-Weight Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuihua; Chen, Mengmeng; Li, Yang; Zhang, Yudong; Han, Liangxiu; Wu, Jane; Du, Sidan

    2015-01-01

    Identification and detection of dendritic spines in neuron images are of high interest in diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's diseases, and autism). In this paper, we have proposed a novel automatic approach using wavelet-based conditional symmetric analysis and regularized morphological shared-weight neural networks (RMSNN) for dendritic spine identification involving the following steps: backbone extraction, localization of dendritic spines, and classification. First, a new algorithm based on wavelet transform and conditional symmetric analysis has been developed to extract backbone and locate the dendrite boundary. Then, the RMSNN has been proposed to classify the spines into three predefined categories (mushroom, thin, and stubby). We have compared our proposed approach against the existing methods. The experimental result demonstrates that the proposed approach can accurately locate the dendrite and accurately classify the spines into three categories with the accuracy of 99.1% for "mushroom" spines, 97.6% for "stubby" spines, and 98.6% for "thin" spines.

  7. Detection of Dendritic Spines Using Wavelet-Based Conditional Symmetric Analysis and Regularized Morphological Shared-Weight Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shuihua; Chen, Mengmeng; Li, Yang; Zhang, Yudong; Han, Liangxiu; Wu, Jane; Du, Sidan

    2015-01-01

    Identification and detection of dendritic spines in neuron images are of high interest in diagnosis and treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's diseases, and autism). In this paper, we have proposed a novel automatic approach using wavelet-based conditional symmetric analysis and regularized morphological shared-weight neural networks (RMSNN) for dendritic spine identification involving the following steps: backbone extraction, localization of dendritic spines, and classification. First, a new algorithm based on wavelet transform and conditional symmetric analysis has been developed to extract backbone and locate the dendrite boundary. Then, the RMSNN has been proposed to classify the spines into three predefined categories (mushroom, thin, and stubby). We have compared our proposed approach against the existing methods. The experimental result demonstrates that the proposed approach can accurately locate the dendrite and accurately classify the spines into three categories with the accuracy of 99.1% for “mushroom” spines, 97.6% for “stubby” spines, and 98.6% for “thin” spines. PMID:26692046

  8. The dendritic spine story: an intriguing process of discovery.

    PubMed

    DeFelipe, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are key components of a variety of microcircuits and they represent the majority of postsynaptic targets of glutamatergic axon terminals in the brain. The present article will focus on the discovery of dendritic spines, which was possible thanks to the application of the Golgi technique to the study of the nervous system, and will also explore the early interpretation of these elements. This discovery represents an interesting chapter in the history of neuroscience as it shows us that progress in the study of the structure of the nervous system is based not only on the emergence of new techniques but also on our ability to exploit the methods already available and correctly interpret their microscopic images.

  9. Mass flows in a prominence spine as observed in EUV

    SciTech Connect

    Kucera, T. A.; Gilbert, H. R.

    2014-07-20

    We analyze a quiescent prominence observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) with a focus on mass and energy flux in the spine, measured using Lyman continuum absorption. This is the first time this type of analysis has been applied with an emphasis on individual features and fluxes in a quiescent prominence. The prominence, observed on 2010 September 28, is detectable in most AIA wavebands in absorption and/or emission. Flows along the spine exhibit horizontal bands 5''-10'' wide and kinetic energy fluxes on the order of a few times 10{sup 5} erg s{sup –1}cm{sup –2}, consistent with quiet sun coronal heating estimates. For a discrete moving feature we estimate a mass of a few times 10{sup 11} g. We discuss the implications of our derived properties for a model of prominence dynamics, the thermal non-equilibrium model.

  10. The dendritic spine story: an intriguing process of discovery

    PubMed Central

    DeFelipe, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are key components of a variety of microcircuits and they represent the majority of postsynaptic targets of glutamatergic axon terminals in the brain. The present article will focus on the discovery of dendritic spines, which was possible thanks to the application of the Golgi technique to the study of the nervous system, and will also explore the early interpretation of these elements. This discovery represents an interesting chapter in the history of neuroscience as it shows us that progress in the study of the structure of the nervous system is based not only on the emergence of new techniques but also on our ability to exploit the methods already available and correctly interpret their microscopic images. PMID:25798090

  11. Echidna: a multifiber positioner for the Subaru prime focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillingham, Peter R.; Miziarski, Stan; Akiyama, Masayuki; Klocke, Volker

    2000-08-01

    The aim for a spectrograph feed from the Subaru prime focus is to have 400 fibers. Since the are of the field is only approximately 1/10 that of the 400 fiber two degree field system on the Anglo-Australian Telescope, placement of magnetic buttons by a robot, as done for 2df, was not considered applicable. Instead, a concept has been developed in which each fiber is held on a spine which can be tilted to position its tip anywhere within a circle. With targets randomly scattered over the field and the radial range for each spine equal to the spine pitch, the success rate in reaching targets is acceptably high. At the f/2 focus, a spine tilt of 1/20 radian is just acceptable and requires the spines be 140 mm long. Two basic mechanisms for tilting and holding such a spine have been investigated experimentally. The first uses three commercial miniature linear actuators set parallel and linked to the base of the spine through simple flexures. A prototype has been built and demonstrated to perform satisfactorily. Another approach is to mount the spine ona ball joint and drive it directly in tip and tilt using a bending piezo impact drive. A prototype of this from has been built; initial test are promising.

  12. Corrective osteotomies in spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Gill, J Brian; Levin, Andrew; Burd, Tim; Longley, Michael

    2008-11-01

    Spinal deformities can result in increasing thoracic kyphosis or loss of lumbar lordosis, leading to imbalance in the sagittal plane. Such deformities can be functionally and psychologically debilitating. The Smith-Petersen osteotomy can achieve approximately 10 degrees of correction in the sagittal plane at each spinal level at which it is performed. This osteotomy is beneficial for patients who have a degenerative imbalance in the sagittal plane. The pedicle subtraction osteotomy can achieve approximately 30 degrees to 40 degrees of correction in the sagittal plane at each spinal level at which it is performed. It is the preferred osteotomy for patients with ankylosing spondylitis who have an imbalance of the spine in the sagittal plane. The cervical extension osteotomy is performed in the cervical spine, at the cervicothoracic junction, in patients who have a cervical flexion deformity that impedes their ability to look straight ahead while walking or who have difficulty swallowing. The vertebral column resection is used when the imbalance is severe enough that the other osteotomies cannot correct the deformity, especially in patients who have a combined sagittal and coronal spinal imbalance. Neurologic problems, whether transient or permanent, are the most commonly encountered complications following these procedures. Recent results have shown a high patient satisfaction rate and good functional outcomes after spinal osteotomies done to treat a variety of disorders.

  13. Retrograde intubation in a case of ankylosing spondylitis posted for correction of deformity of spine

    PubMed Central

    Raval, Chetankumar; Patel, Heena; Patel, Pranoti; Kharod, Utpala

    2010-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) patients are most challenging. These patient present the most serious array of intubation and difficult airway imaginable, secondary to decrease or no cervical spine mobility, fixed flexion deformity of thoracolumbar spine and possible temporomandibular joint disease. Sound clinical judgment is critical for timing and selecting the method for airway intervention. The retrograde intubation technique is an important option when fiberoptic bronchoscope is not available, and other method is not applicable for gaining airway access for surgery in prone position. We report a case of AS with fixed flexion deformity of thoracic and thoracolumbar spine, fusion of posterior elements of cervical spine posted for lumbar spinal osteotomy with anticipated difficult intubation. An awake retrograde oral intubation with light sedation and local block is performed. PMID:20668567

  14. Benign Spine Lesions: Advances in Techniques for Minimally Invasive Percutaneous Treatment.

    PubMed

    Tomasian, A; Wallace, A N; Jennings, J W

    2017-02-09

    Minimally invasive percutaneous imaging-guided techniques have been shown to be safe and effective for the treatment of benign tumors of the spine. Techniques available include a variety of tumor ablation technologies, including radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, alcohol ablation, and laser photocoagulation. Vertebral augmentation may be performed after ablation as part of the same procedure for fracture stabilization or prevention. Typically, the treatment goal in benign spine lesions is definitive cure. Painful benign spine lesions commonly encountered in daily practice include osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma, vertebral hemangioma, aneurysmal bone cyst, Paget disease, and subacute/chronic Schmorl node. This review discusses the most recent advancement and use of minimally invasive percutaneous therapeutic options for the management of benign spine lesions.

  15. Ratfish (Chimaera) spine injuries in fishermen.

    PubMed

    Hayes, A J; Sim, A J W

    2011-08-01

    An occupational hazard peculiar to fishermen, is an injury from a sharp fish spine. Such spines can cause envenomation injury, infectious sequelae or trauma to anatomical structures. The management of two fishermen with penetrating ratfish (Chimaera) spine injuries to the lower limb is described. Both were managed by removal of the spine under general anaesthesia. In the second patient, the spine was embedded adjacent to the left femoral artery, highlighting the potential for major haemorrhage and supporting the use of surgical wound exploration when important structures may be involved. Herein, we describe the first report in English of Chimaera spine injury. In addition, we surveyed nine northeast Atlantic deep-sea fishermen to gain information on exposure to, and injuries from, this type of fish. The most commonly identified species was Chimaera monstrosa. Five fishermen reported injuries to their feet or hands from Chimaera spines and two had sought medical attention. The evidence indicates that deep-sea trawler fishermen of the northeast Atlantic frequently encounter Chimaera species and can suffer dangerous penetrating wounds from its dorsal spine.

  16. Cervical Spine MRI in Abused Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This study attempted to use cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect cord injury in 12 dead children with head injury from child abuse. Eighty percent of children autopsied had small cervical spine hemorrhages; MRI did not identify them and did not identify cord injury in any child studied, indicating that MRI scans are probably…

  17. Implications of spinopelvic alignment for the spine surgeon.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vivek A; Amin, Anubhav; Omeis, Ibrahim; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Gottfried, Oren N

    2015-03-01

    The relation of the pelvis to the spine has previously been overlooked as a contributor to sagittal balance. However, it is now recognized that spinopelvic alignment is important to maintain an energy-efficient posture in normal and disease states. The pelvis is characterized by an important anatomic landmark, the pelvic incidence (PI). The PI does not change after adolescence, and it directly influences pelvic alignment, including the parameters of pelvic tilt (PT) and sacral slope (SS) (PI = PT 1 SS), overall sagittal spinal balance, and lumbar lordosis. In the setting of an elevated PI, the spineadapts with increased lumbar lordosis. To prevent or limit sagittal imbalance, the spine may also compensate with increased PT or pelvic retroversion to attempt to maintain anupright posture. Abnormal spinopelvic parameters contribute to multiple spinal conditions including isthmic spondylolysis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, deformity, and impact outcome after spinal fusion. Sagittal balance, pelvic incidence, and all spinopelvic parameters are easily and reliably measured on standing, full-spine (lateral) radiographs, and it is essential to accurately assess and measure these sagittal values to understand their potential role in the disease process, and to promote spinopelvic balance at surgery. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the literature regarding the implications of abnormal spinopelvic parameters and discuss surgical strategies for correction of sagittal balance. Additionally, the authors rate and critique the quality of the literature cited in a systematic review approach to give the reader an estimate of the veracity of the conclusions reached from these reports.

  18. Implications of spinopelvic alignment for the spine surgeon.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vivek A; Amin, Anubhav; Omeis, Ibrahim; Gokaslan, Ziya L; Gottfried, Oren N

    2012-03-01

    The relation of the pelvis to the spine has previously been overlooked as a contributor to sagittal balance. However, it is now recognized that spinopelvic alignment is important to maintain an energy-efficient posture in normal and disease states. The pelvis is characterized by an important anatomic landmark, the pelvic incidence (PI). The PI does not change after adolescence, and it directly influences pelvic alignment, including the parameters of pelvic tilt (PT) and sacral slope (SS) (PI = PT + SS), [corrected] overall sagittal spinal balance, and lumbar lordosis. In the setting of an elevated PI, the spineadapts with increased lumbar lordosis. To prevent or limit sagittal imbalance, the spine may also compensate with increased PT or pelvic retroversion to attempt to maintain anupright posture. Abnormal spinopelvic parameters contribute to multiple spinal conditions including isthmic spondylolysis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, deformity, and impact outcome after spinal fusion. Sagittal balance, pelvic incidence, and all spinopelvic parameters are easily and reliably measured on standing, full-spine (lateral) radiographs, and it is essential to accurately assess and measure these sagittal values to understand their potential role in the disease process, and to promote spinopelvic balance at surgery. In this article, we provide a comprehensive review of the literature regarding the implications of abnormal spinopelvic parameters and discuss surgical strategies for correction of sagittal balance. Additionally, the authors rate and critique the quality of the literature cited in a systematic review approach to give the reader an estimate of the veracity of the conclusions reached from these reports.

  19. Alaska Native and Rural Youths' Views of Sexual Health: A Focus Group Project on Sexually Transmitted Diseases, HIV/AIDS, and Unplanned Pregnancy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leston, Jessica D.; Jessen, Cornelia M.; Simons, Brenna C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The disparity in rates of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), HIV/AIDS, and unplanned pregnancy between Alaska Native (AN) and non-AN populations, particularly among young adults and females, is significant and concerning. Focus groups were conducted to better understand the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs of rural Alaska youth…

  20. Magnetic resonance-guided focused ultrasound thalamotomy for tremor: a report of 30 Parkinson's disease and essential tremor cases.

    PubMed

    Zaaroor, Menashe; Sinai, Alon; Goldsher, Dorith; Eran, Ayelet; Nassar, Maria; Schlesinger, Ilana

    2017-02-24

    OBJECTIVE Thalamotomy of the ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM) is effective in alleviating medication-resistant tremor in patients with essential tremor (ET) and Parkinson's disease (PD). MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) is an innovative technology that enables noninvasive thalamotomy via thermal ablation. METHODS Patients with severe medication-resistant tremor underwent unilateral VIM thalamotomy using MRgFUS. Effects on tremor were evaluated using the Clinical Rating Scale for Tremor (CRST) in patients with ET and by the motor part of the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) in patients with PD and ET-PD (defined as patients with ET who developed PD many years later). Quality of life in ET was measured by the Quality of Life in Essential Tremor (QUEST) questionnaire and in PD by the PD Questionnaire (PDQ-39). RESULTS Thirty patients underwent MRgFUS, including 18 with ET, 9 with PD, and 3 with ET-PD. The mean age of the study population was 68.9 ± 8.3 years (range 46-87 years) with a mean disease duration of 12.1 ± 8.9 years (range 2-30 years). MRgFUS created a lesion at the planned target in all patients, resulting in cessation of tremor in the treated hand immediately following treatment. At 1 month posttreatment, the mean CRST score of the patients with ET decreased from 40.7 ± 11.6 to 9.3 ± 7.1 (p < 0.001) and was 8.2 ± 5.0 six months after treatment (p < 0.001, compared with baseline). Average QUEST scores decreased from 44.8 ± 12.9 to 13.1 ± 13.2 (p < 0.001) and was 12.3 ± 7.2 six months after treatment (p < 0.001). In patients with PD, the mean score of the motor part of the UPDRS decreased from 24.9 ± 8.0 to 16.4 ± 11.1 (p = 0.042) at 1 month and was 13.4 ± 9.2 six months after treatment (p = 0.009, compared with baseline). The mean PDQ-39 score decreased from 38.6 ± 16.8 to 26.1 ± 7.2 (p = 0.036) and was 20.6 ± 8.8 six months after treatment (p = 0.008). During follow-up of 6-24 months (mean 11.5 ± 7.2 months, median 12

  1. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in Autism Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Mary; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2015-01-01

    The activity-dependent structural and functional plasticity of dendritic spines has led to the long-standing belief that these neuronal compartments are the subcellular sites of learning and memory. Of relevance to human health, central neurons in several neuropsychiatric illnesses, including autism related disorders, have atypical numbers and morphologies of dendritic spines. These so-called dendritic spine dysgeneses found in individuals with autism related disorders are consistently replicated in experimental mouse models. Dendritic spine dysgenesis reflects the underlying synaptopathology that drives clinically relevant behavioral deficits in experimental mouse models, providing a platform for testing new therapeutic approaches. By examining molecular signaling pathways, synaptic deficits, and spine dysgenesis in experimental mouse models of autism related disorders we find strong evidence for mTOR to be a critical point of convergence and promising therapeutic target. PMID:25578949

  2. Automated fetal spine detection in ultrasound images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolay, Paresh; Vajinepalli, Pallavi; Bhattacharya, Puranjoy; Firtion, Celine; Sisodia, Rajendra Singh

    2009-02-01

    A novel method is proposed for the automatic detection of fetal spine in ultrasound images along with its orientation in this paper. This problem presents a variety of challenges, including robustness to speckle noise, variations in the visible shape of the spine due to orientation of the ultrasound probe with respect to the fetus and the lack of a proper edge enclosing the entire spine on account of its composition out of distinct vertebra. The proposed method improves robustness and accuracy by making use of two independent techniques to estimate the spine, and then detects the exact location using a cross-correlation approach. Experimental results show that the proposed method is promising for fetal spine detection.

  3. [Cervicogenic dysphagia: swallowing difficulties caused by functional and organic disorders of the cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Grgić, Vjekoslav

    2013-01-01

    Cervical spine disorders which can cause swallowing difficulties (cervicogenic dysphagia; CD) are: chronic multisegmental/MS dysfunction (dysfunction=functional blockade) of the facet joints, changes in physiological curvature of the cervical spine, degenerative changes (anterior osteophytes, anterior disc herniation, osteochondrosis, osteoarthritis), inflammatory rheumatic diseases, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, injuries, conditions after anterior cervical spine surgery, congenital malformations and tumors. According to our clinical observations, degenerative changes in the cervical discs and facet joints and chronic MS dysfunction of the cervical spine facet joints are disorders which can cause swallowing difficulties. However, these disorders have not been recognized enough as the causes of dysphagia and they are not even mentioned in differential diagnosis. Because of the close anatomical relationship of cervical spine with the pharynx and cervical part of esophagus, the consequences of the degenerative changes in the cervical discs and facet joints and chronic MS dysfunction of the cervical spine facet joints such as the changes in the physiological curvature of the cervical spine, changes in elasticity and contractility in the neck muscles and decreased mobility of the cervical spine, adversely affect the dimensions of the pharynx and cervical part of esophagus, that is, swallowing capacity which can result in dysphagia. Degenerative changes in the cervical discs and facet joints are common additional cause of dysphagia in elderly people with disorders of the central control of swallowing (stroke, Parkinson's disease, senile dementia etc). The most important therapeutic options in patients with CD are: medicamentous therapy, physical therapy, manual therapy, kinesiotherapy and surgical treatment. The aim of the conservative therapy in patients with CD is to improve the swallowing capacity (for example, soft tissue techniques, stretching of the

  4. [Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis of the spine : Children and adolescent].

    PubMed

    von der Höh, N H; Völker, A; Jeszenszky, D; Heyde, C-E

    2016-06-01

    Chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) in childhood and adolescence is a non-infectious autoinflammatory disease of the bone with partial involvement of adjacent joints and soft tissue. The etiology is unknown. The disease can occur singular or recurrent. Individual bones can be affected and multiple lesions can occur. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) shows the whole picture of CNO. Accompanying but temporally independent of the bouts of osteomyelitis, some patients show manifestations in the skin, eyes, lungs and the gastrointestinal tract. The article gives an overview of the clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures, and treatment options for CRMO involvement of the spine based on the current literature and our own cases.

  5. Thalamic pathology and memory loss in early Alzheimer's disease: moving the focus from the medial temporal lobe to Papez circuit.

    PubMed

    Aggleton, John P; Pralus, Agathe; Nelson, Andrew J D; Hornberger, Michael

    2016-07-01

    It is widely assumed that incipient protein pathology in the medial temporal lobe instigates the loss of episodic memory in Alzheimer's disease, one of the earliest cognitive deficits in this type of dementia. Within this region, the hippocampus is seen as the most vital for episodic memory. Consequently, research into the causes of memory loss in Alzheimer's disease continues to centre on hippocampal dysfunction and how disease-modifying therapies in this region can potentially alleviate memory symptomology. The present review questions this entrenched notion by bringing together findings from post-mortem studies, non-invasive imaging (including studies of presymptomatic, at-risk cases) and genetically modified animal models. The combined evidence indicates that the loss of episodic memory in early Alzheimer's disease reflects much wider neurodegeneration in an extended mnemonic system (Papez circuit), which critically involves the limbic thalamus. Within this system, the anterior thalamic nuclei are prominent, both for their vital contributions to episodic memory and for how these same nuclei appear vulnerable in prodromal Alzheimer's disease. As thalamic abnormalities occur in some of the earliest stages of the disease, the idea that such changes are merely secondary to medial temporal lobe dysfunctions is challenged. This alternate view is further strengthened by the interdependent relationship between the anterior thalamic nuclei and retrosplenial cortex, given how dysfunctions in the latter cortical area provide some of the earliest in vivo imaging evidence of prodromal Alzheimer's disease. Appreciating the importance of the anterior thalamic nuclei for memory and attention provides a more balanced understanding of Alzheimer's disease. Furthermore, this refocus on the limbic thalamus, as well as the rest of Papez circuit, would have significant implications for the diagnostics, modelling, and experimental treatment of cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease.

  6. What are the priorities in Parkinson's disease clinical research? A focus on motor complications, gait and cognition.

    PubMed

    Yarnall, Alison J

    2014-01-01

    Motor complications, gait and balance disturbance, and cognitive impairment are problems frequently faced by patients with Parkinson's disease and by their treating physicians, and become more common as the disease progresses. Motor complications may be prevented or at least delayed by judicious use of levodopa, with other dopaminergic agents used for their levodopa-sparing effect. Increasingly, research has concentrated on nondopaminergic neurotransmitter systems, which may also have applicability in the management of gait and balance, and also in cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease. This review, therefore, tackles these issues and discusses possible future treatments that may be available for the management of these challenging comorbidities.

  7. The art and science of chronic disease management come together in a lifestyle-focused approach to primary care.

    PubMed

    Egger, G; Katz, D; Sagner, M; Dixon, J; Stevens, J

    2014-12-01

    Changes in patterns of living result in changes in the nature and causes of disease. The industrial revolution of the late 18th century, and the technological revolution of the late 20th century are cases in point. The former was associated with a decline in infectious diseases; the latter with an increase in lifestyle and environmentally induced chronic diseases . Health practices are typically modified to deal with such changes, hence the recent rise in interest in lifestyle-oriented forms of clinical practice.

  8. Ultrasound guided spine needle insertion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Elvis C. S.; Mousavi, Parvin; Gill, Sean; Fichtinger, Gabor; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2010-02-01

    An ultrasound (US) guided, CT augmented, spine needle insertion navigational system is introduced. The system consists of an electromagnetic (EM) sensor, an US machine, and a preoperative CT volume of the patient anatomy. Three-dimensional (3D) US volume is reconstructed intraoperatively from a set of two-dimensional (2D) freehand US slices, and is coregistered with the preoperative CT. This allows the preoperative CT volume to be used in the intraoperative clinical coordinate. The spatial relationship between the patient anatomy, surgical tools, and the US transducer are tracked using the EM sensor, and are displayed with respect to the CT volume. The pose of the US transducer is used to interpolate the CT volume, providing the physician with a 2D "x-ray vision" to guide the needle insertion. Many of the system software components are GPU-accelerated, allowing real-time performance of the guidance system in a clinical setting.

  9. Spatial and Working Memory Is Linked to Spine Density and Mushroom Spines

    PubMed Central

    Aher, Yogesh D.; Sase, Ajinkya; Gröger, Marion; Mokhtar, Maher; Höger, Harald; Lubec, Gert

    2015-01-01

    Background Changes in synaptic structure and efficacy including dendritic spine number and morphology have been shown to underlie neuronal activity and size. Moreover, the shapes of individual dendritic spines were proposed to correlate with their capacity for structural change. Spine numbers and morphology were reported to parallel memory formation in the rat using a water maze but, so far, there is no information on spine counts or shape in the radial arm maze (RAM), a frequently used paradigm for the evaluation of complex memory formation in the rodent. Methods 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups, 8 were trained, 8 remained untrained in the RAM and 8 rats served as cage controls. Dendritic spine numbers and individual spine forms were counted in CA1, CA3 areas and dentate gyrus of hippocampus using a DIL dye method with subsequent quantification by the Neuronstudio software and the image J program. Results Working memory errors (WME) and latency in the RAM were decreased along the training period indicating that animals performed the task. Total spine density was significantly increased following training in the RAM as compared to untrained rats and cage controls. The number of mushroom spines was significantly increased in the trained as compared to untrained and cage controls. Negative significant correlations between spine density and WME were observed in CA1 basal dendrites and in CA3 apical and basal dendrites. In addition, there was a significant negative correlation between spine density and latency in CA3 basal dendrites. Conclusion The study shows that spine numbers are significantly increased in the trained group, an observation that may suggest the use of this method representing a morphological parameter for memory formation studies in the RAM. Herein, correlations between WME and latency in the RAM and spine density revealed a link between spine numbers and performance in the RAM. PMID:26469788

  10. Degenerative Changes of Spine in Helicopter Pilots

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Joo Hyeon; Kim, Jung Won; Jeong, Ho Joong; Sim, Young Joo; Kim, Dong Kyu; Choi, Jong Kyoung; Im, Hyoung June

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine the relationship between whole body vibration (WBV) induced helicopter flights and degenerative changes of the cervical and lumbar spine. Methods We examined 186 helicopter pilots who were exposed to WBV and 94 military clerical workers at a military hospital. Questionnaires and interviews were completed for 164 of the 186 pilots (response rate, 88.2%) and 88 of the 94 clerical workers (response rate, 93.6%). Radiographic examinations of the cervical and the lumbar spines were performed after obtaining informed consent in both groups. Degenerative changes of the cervical and lumbar spines were determined using four radiographs per subject, and diagnosed by two independent, blinded radiologists. Results There was no significant difference in general and work-related characteristics except for flight hours and frequency between helicopter pilots and clerical workers. Degenerative changes in the cervical spine were significantly more prevalent in the helicopter pilots compared with control group. In the cervical spine multivariate model, accumulated flight hours (per 100 hours) was associated with degenerative changes. And in the lumbar spine multivariate model, accumulated flight hours (per 100 hours) and age were associated with degenerative changes. Conclusion Accumulated flight hours were associated with degenerative changes of the cervical and lumbar spines in helicopter pilots. PMID:24236259

  11. Demoralization, Patient Activation, and the Outcome of Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Block, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that psychosocial factors can adversely impact the outcome of spine surgery. This article discusses in detail one such recently-identified “risk” factor: demoralization. Several studies conducted by the author indicate that demoralization, an emotional construct distinct from depression, is associated with poorer pain reduction, less functional improvement and decreased satisfaction among spine surgery patients. However, there are indications that the adverse impact of risk factors such as demoralization can be mitigated by psychosocial “maximizing” factors—characteristics that propel the patient towards positive surgical results. One of these maximizing factors, patient activation, is discussed in depth. The patient activation measure (PAM), an inventory assessing the extent to which patients are active and engaged in their health care, is associated not only with improved spine surgery results, but with better outcomes across a broad range of medical conditions. Other maximizing factors are discussed in this article. The author concludes that the past research focus on psychosocial risk factors has limited the value of presurgical psychological screening, and that future research, as well as clinical assessment, should recognize that the importance of evaluating patients’ strengths as well as their vulnerabilities. PMID:27417599

  12. Computed tomography of the postoperative lumbar spine

    SciTech Connect

    Teplick, J.G.; Haskin, M.E.

    1983-11-01

    In the postoperative patient ordinary radiographs of the spine generally add very little information, revealing the usual postoperative bone changes and often postoperative narrowing of the intervertebral space. Myelography may sometimes be informative, showing evidence of focal arachnoiditis or a focal defect at the surgical site. However, the latter finding is difficult to interpret. As experience with high-resolution CT scanning of the lumbar spine has been increasing, it is becoming apparent that this noninvasive and easily performed study can give considerably more information about the postoperative spine than any of the other current imaging methods. About 750 patients with previous lumbar laminectomies had CT scanning within a 28 month period.

  13. Radiographic Morphometry of the Lumbar Spine in Munich Miniature Pigs†

    PubMed Central

    Engelke, Elisabeth C; Post, Christina; Pfarrer, Christiane D; Sager, Martin; Waibl, Helmut R

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of human spinal column disease remains high, and animal models still play important roles in prophylactic, diagnostic, and therapeutic research. Because of their similar size to humans, pigs remain an important spine model. For pigs to serve as a model for the human spine, basic similarities and differences must be understood. In this study, morphometric data of the lumbar spine of Munich miniature pigs (Troll) were recorded radiologically, evaluated, and compared with recorded human data. Whereas humans have a constant number of 5 lumbar vertebrae, Munich minipigs had 5 or 6 lumbar vertebrae. Compared with their human counterparts, the lumbar vertebral bodies of the minipigs were remarkably larger in the craniocaudal (superior–inferior) direction and considerably smaller in the dorsoventral and laterolateral directions. The porcine vertebral canal was smaller than the human vertebral canal. The spinal cord extended into the caudal part of the porcine lumbar vertebral canal and thus did not terminate as cranial, as seen in humans. The lumbar intervertebral spaces of the pig were narrower in craniocaudal direction than human intervertebral spaces. These differences need to be considered when planning surgical actions, not only to avoid pain and irreversible damage to the minipigs but also to achieve accurate scientific results. PMID:27177570

  14. Predictors of Relapse and End Stage Kidney Disease in Proliferative Lupus Nephritis: Focus on Children, Adolescents, and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gipson, Debbie S.; Massengill, Susan A.; Dooley, Mary Anne; Primack, William A.; Ferris, Maria A.; Hogan, Susan L.

    2009-01-01

    Background and objectives: The prevalence and significance of remission and relapse in children, adolescents, and young adults with lupus nephritis in the United States are poorly understood. Patterns and predictors of disease progression in a southeastern U.S. pediatric cohort with severe lupus nephritis are presented. Design, settings, participants, & measurements: Individuals age 21 or less with kidney biopsy-proven lupus nephritis followed in the Glomerular Disease Collaborative Network were included. Cox regression models were used to evaluate predictors of relapse and end stage kidney disease (ESKD). Results: Seventy-three subjects with a mean age of 15.6 ± 3.4 yr were included. Five-year kidney survival was 77%. Complete and partial remission rates within 1 yr of induction therapy were 25 and 64%, respectively. Relapse and ESKD rates were similar between complete and partial responders. Relapse occurred in 35% of responders (complete or partial) in 45 ± 32 mo. Disease relapse was a predictor of ESKD (HR = 10.12, P < 0.0001). Treatment resistance was documented in African Americans more often than non-African Americans (eight versus 0; P = 0.03). ESKD HR associated with treatment resistance was 6.25, P < 0.002. Conclusions: Remission whether complete or partial is associated with improved kidney survival in children with lupus nephritis. Nephritis relapse is a strong predictor of progression to ESKD. Treatment resistance portends a high risk of ESKD and disproportionately affects African American children with lupus nephritis. PMID:19820130

  15. Sea urchin spine arthritis in the foot.

    PubMed

    Schefflein, Javin; Umans, Hilary; Ellenbogen, David; Abadi, Maria

    2012-09-01

    We present a case of sea urchin spine arthritis (SUSA) in a 33-year-old woman who sustained penetrating trauma to the interphalangeal (IP) joint of the hallux while snorkeling in Japan. Serial radiographs and MRI were obtained over a period from 7 weeks to 10 months following injury. At 7 weeks radiographs revealed periarticular osteopenia and subtle marginal erosion, similar to the appearance of tuberculous arthritis. Over the ensuing months, radiographs and MRI documented progressive marginal and periarticular erosions with synovitis, despite preservation of cartilage space and restoration of bone mineral density. Delayed radiographs and imaging features mimic gouty arthropathy. Only the history points to the proper diagnosis, which was confirmed by histopathology, demonstrating necrobiotic granuloma with central fibrinoid necrosis following synovectomy and arthrodesis. The majority of previous case reports affected the hand, with few cases in the feet. In all, radiographic illustrations were limited and demonstrated only minimal osteolysis and periosteal reaction. No other report included MRI or serial radiographs over a long period to illustrate the natural progression of the disease.

  16. A computer touch-screen version of the North American Spine Society outcome assessment instrument for the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Schaeren, S; Bischoff-Ferrari, H A; Knupp, M; Dick, W; Huber, J F; Theiler, R

    2005-02-01

    We validated the North American Spine Society (NASS) outcome-assessment instrument for the lumbar spine in a computerised touch-screen format and assessed patients' acceptance, taking into account previous computer experience, age and gender. Fifty consecutive patients with symptomatic and radiologically-proven degenerative disease of the lumbar spine completed both the hard copy (paper) and the computerised versions of the NASS questionnaire. Statistical analysis showed high agreement between the paper and the touch-screen computer format for both subscales (intraclass correlation coefficient 0.94, 95% confidence interval (0.90 to 0.97)) independent of computer experience, age and gender. In total, 55% of patients stated that the computer format was easier to use and 66% preferred it to the paper version (p < 0.0001 among subjects expressing a preference). Our data indicate that the touch-screen format is comparable to the paper form. It may improve follow-up in clinical practice and research by meeting patients' preferences and minimising administrative work.

  17. [Impact on non-adherence to farmacologic treatment on quality and sustainability of healthcare. Focus on cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Francesco; Romeo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Adherence to drug treatment is key to successful therapeutic intervention, especially in chronic conditions. This holds particularly true in the setting of cardiovascular diseases, because poor adherence may have serious adverse effects in terms of morbidity and mortality. Many factors may contribute to poor adherence, which can be either patient-related or dependent on the healthcare system, the physician and the environment. The identification and appropriate correction of these factors may result in both clinical and economic benefits. In this setting it is also important to assess the implications of the increasing use of generic or equivalent drugs on adherence to pharmacological therapy. This topic has recently been addressed by an important Expert Consensus Document, endorsed by the Italian Societies of Cardiovascular Disease and Prevention, which was published in the Giornale Italiano di Cardiologia. The document addressed the relevance of the problem, potential determinants and possible solutions.

  18. THE SPINE OF THE COSMIC WEB

    SciTech Connect

    Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A.; Szalay, Alexander S.; Platen, Erwin; Van de Weygaert, Rien

    2010-11-01

    We present the SpineWeb framework for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its walls, filaments, and cluster nodes. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the SpineWeb method invokes the local adjacency properties of the boundaries between the watershed basins to trace the critical points in the density field and the separatrices defined by them. The separatrices are classified into walls and the spine, the network of filaments and nodes in the matter distribution. Testing the method with a heuristic Voronoi model yields outstanding results. Following the discussion of the test results, we apply the SpineWeb method to a set of cosmological N-body simulations. The latter illustrates the potential for studying the structure and dynamics of the Cosmic Web.

  19. Biostratigraphy of Echinoid spines, Cretaceous of Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkland, P.L.

    1984-04-01

    Echinoid (sea urchin) spines from Cretaceous strata have widely varying morphology. They are common, and most are small enough to be recovered from well cuttings. Many forms have restricted ranges; consequently, echinoid spine have substantial biostratigraphic utility. There have been established 115 form taxa of echinoid spines and 14 form taxa of ophiuroid-asteroid spines for the Cretaceous of Texas. The specimens used for establishing the form taxa were processed from 533 outcrop samples (78 localities) from 30 Cretaceous formations, each with a well-defined age based on faunal zones of ammonites and Foraminifera. A dichotomous key in 9 parts and a catalog of scanning electron micrographs (87 plates) have been set up to assist identification of the form taxa. Range charts for the echinoid and ophiuroid-asteroid form taxa have utility through the Cretaceous of much of the Gulf Coastal area. The most precise zonation has been possible for the Albian.

  20. Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

    MedlinePlus

    .org Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Page ( 1 ) Spinal fractures can vary widely in severity. While some fractures are very serious injuries that require emergency treatment, other fractures can ...

  1. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Miller, Eric C.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Spines are small cytoplasmic extensions of dendrites that form the postsynaptic compartment of the majority of excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Alterations in the numerical density, size, and shape of dendritic spines have been correlated with neuronal dysfunction in several neurological and neurodevelopmental disorders associated with intellectual disability, including Rett syndrome (RTT). RTT is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability that is caused by loss of function mutations in the transcriptional regulator methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Here, we review the evidence demonstrating that principal neurons in RTT individuals and Mecp2-based experimental models exhibit alterations in the number and morphology of dendritic spines. We also discuss the exciting possibility that signaling pathways downstream of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is transcriptionally regulated by MeCP2, offer promising therapeutic options for modulating dendritic spine development and plasticity in RTT and other MECP2-associated neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:25309341

  2. Cervical spine injuries in football players.

    PubMed

    Thomas, B E; McCullen, G M; Yuan, H A

    1999-01-01

    Cervical spine injuries have been estimated to occur in 10% to 15% of football players, most commonly in linemen, defensive ends, and linebackers. The overwhelming majority of such injuries are self-limited, and full recovery can be expected. However, the presenting symptoms of serious cervical spine injuries may closely resemble those of minor injuries. The orthopaedic surgeon frequently must make a judgment, on the field or later in the office, about the advisability of returning the athlete to the game. These decisions can have an enormous impact on the player and his family. Most severe cervical spine injuries share the common mechanism of application of an axial load to the straightened spine. Avoiding techniques that employ head-down "spear" tackling and wearing properly fitted equipment markedly reduce the risk of serious injury.

  3. Developmental origins of health and disease: brief history of the approach and current focus on epigenetic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Pathik D; Buss, Claudia; Entringer, Sonja; Swanson, James M

    2009-09-01

    "Barker's hypothesis" emerged almost 25 years ago from epidemiological studies of birth and death records that revealed a high geographic correlation between rates of infant mortality and certain classes of later adult deaths as well as an association between birthweight and rates of adult death from ischemic heart disease. These observations led to a theory that undernutrition during gestation was an important early origin of adult cardiac and metabolic disorders due to fetal programming that permanently shaped the body's structure, function, and metabolism and contributed to adult disease. This theory stimulated interest in the fetal origins of adult disorders, which expanded and coalesced approximately 5 years ago with the formation of an international society for developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD). Here we review a few examples of the many emergent themes of the DOHaD approach, including theoretical advances related to predictive adaptive responses of the fetus to a broad range of environmental cues, empirical observations of effects of overnutrition and stress during pregnancy on outcomes in childhood and adulthood, and potential epigenetic mechanisms that may underlie these observations and theory. Next, we discuss the relevance of the DOHaD approach to reproductive medicine. Finally, we consider the next steps that might be taken to apply, evaluate, and extend the DOHaD approach.

  4. The discovery of dendritic spines by Cajal

    PubMed Central

    Yuste, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines were considered an artifact of the Golgi method until a brash Spanish histologist, Santiago Ramón y Cajal, bet his scientific career arguing that they were indeed real, correctly deducing their key role in mediating synaptic connectivity. This article reviews the historical context of the discovery of spines and the reasons behind Cajal's obsession with them, all the way till his deathbed. PMID:25954162

  5. Outcomes and toxicities of stereotactic body radiation therapy for non-spine bone oligometastases

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Dawn; Laack, Nadia N.; Mayo, Charles S.; Garces, Yolanda I.; Park, Sean S.; Bauer, Heather J.; Nelson, Kathryn; Miller, Robert W.; Brown, Paul D.; Olivier, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is being applied more widely for oligometastatic disease. This technique is now being used for non-spine bony metastases in addition to liver, spine, and lung. However, there are few studies examining the toxicity and outcomes of SBRT for non-spine bone metastases. Methods and Materials Between 2008 and 2012, 74 subjects with oligometastatic non-spine bony metastases of varying histologies were treated at the Mayo Clinic with SBRT. A total of 85 non-spine bony sites were treated. Median local control, overall survival, and progression-free survival were described. Acute toxicity (defined as toxicity <90 days) and late toxicity (defined as toxicity ≥90 days) were reported and graded as per standardized Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events 4.0 criteria. Results The median age of patients treated was 60 years. The most common histology was prostate cancer (31%) and most patients had fewer than 3 sites of disease at the time of simulation (64%). Most of the non-spine bony sites lay within the pelvis (65%). Dose and fractionation varied but the most common prescription was 24 Gy/1 fraction. Local recurrence occurred in 7 patients with a median time to failure of 2.8 months. Local control was 91.8% at 1 year. With a median follow-up of 7.6 months, median SBRT specific overall survival and progression-free survival were 9.3 months and 9.7 months, respectively. Eighteen patients developed acute toxicity (mostly grade 1 and 2 fatigue and acute pain flare); 9 patients developed grade 1–2 late toxicities. Two patients developed pathologic fractures but both were asymptomatic. There were no late grade 3 or 4 toxicities. Conclusions Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a feasible and tolerable treatment for non-spine bony metastases. Longer follow-up will be needed to accurately determine late effects. PMID:24890360

  6. Assessment of corrosion in retrieved spine implants.

    PubMed

    Panagiotopoulou, V C; Hothi, H S; Anwar, H A; Molloy, S; Noordeen, H; Rezajooi, K; Sutcliffe, J; Skinner, J A; Hart, A J

    2017-03-09

    Recently the use of dissimilar metals in spine instrumentation has increased, especially in the case of adult deformities, where rods made from Cobalt Chrome alloys (CoCr) are used with Titanium (Ti) screws. The use of dissimilar metals increases the risk of galvanic corrosion and patients have required revision spine surgery due to severe metallosis that may have been caused by corrosion. We aimed to assess the presence of corrosion in spine implant retrievals from constructs with two types of material combinations: similar (Ti/Ti) and dissimilar (CoCr/Ti). First, we devised a grading score for corrosion of the rod-fixture junctions. Then, we applied this score to a collection of retrieved spine implants. Our proposed corrosion grading score was proven reliable (kappa > 0.7). We found no significant difference in the scores between 4 CoCr and 11 Ti rods (p = 0.0642). There was no indication that time of implantation had an effect on the corrosion score (p = 0.9361). We recommend surgeons avoid using implants designs with dissimilar metals to reduce the risk of corrosion whilst a larger scale study of retrieved spine implants is conducted. Future studies can now use our scoring system for spine implant corrosion. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017.

  7. Beneficial effects of the olive oil phenolic components oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol: focus on protection against cardiovascular and metabolic diseases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The overall health beneficial action of olive oil phenolic components is well established. Recent studies have elucidated the biological effects of two isolated compounds, namely oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol, with particular attention on their antioxidant activity. Thus, a protective action has been demonstrated in preclinical studies against several diseases, especially cardiovascular and metabolic disorders. The present review will describe the biological effects of oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol, with particular attention on the molecular mechanism underlying the protective action on cardiovascular and metabolic alterations, as demonstrated by in vitro and in vivo experimental studies performed with the isolated compounds. PMID:25086598

  8. Overview of Noncommunicable Diseases in Korean Children and Adolescents: Focus on Obesity and Its Effect on Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Ah

    2013-01-01

    Obesity during childhood is a dominant risk factor for noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), and is itself considered a disease that needs to be treated. Recently, the growth in childhood obesity in Korea has become stagnant; however, two in every ten children are still overweight. In addition, 60% or more of overweight children have at least one metabolic syndrome risk factor. Thus, childhood obesity should be controlled through lifestyle modification. This paper reviews studies of the modifiable risk factors of obesity in Korean children. According to the life-course approach, preschool-aged children (<5 years) are influenced by their parents rather than individual habits because they are under mostly parental care. Elementary school-aged children (6 to 11 years) are affected by overlapping individual and parental effects. This may mean that the establishment of individual behavior patterns begins during this period. The conditions of poor eating habits such as skipping meals, eating out, and high fat intake, along with low physical activity, facilitate increased obesity among adolescents (12 to 18 years). Notably, adolescent girls show high rates of both underweight and obesity, which may lead to the development of NCDs in their offspring. Therefore, the problem of NCDs is no longer limited to adults, but is also prevalent among children. In addition, early intervention offers cost-effective opportunities for preventing NCDs. Thus, children need primary consideration, adequate monitoring, diagnosis, and treatment to reduce the burden of NCDs later in adulthood. PMID:23946875

  9. Therapeutic potential of melatonin and its analogs in Parkinson’s disease: focus on sleep and neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Venkatramanujam; Cardinali, Daniel P.; Srinivasan, Uddanapalli S.; Kaur, Charanjit; Brown, Gregory M.; Spence, D. Warren; Hardeland, Rüdiger; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R.

    2011-01-01

    Sleep disorders constitute major nonmotor features of Parkinson’s disease (PD) that have a substantial effect on patients’ quality of life and can be related to the progression of the neurodegenerative disease. They can also serve as preclinical markers for PD, as it is the case for rapid eye movement (REM)-associated sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Although the etiology of sleep disorders in PD remains undefined, the assessment of the components of the circadian system, including melatonin secretion, could give therapeutically valuable insight on their pathophysiopathology. Melatonin is a regulator of the sleep/wake cycle and also acts as an effective antioxidant and mitochondrial function protector. A reduction in the expression of melatonin MT1 and MT2 receptors has been documented in the substantia nigra of PD patients. The efficacy of melatonin for preventing neuronal cell death and for ameliorating PD symptoms has been demonstrated in animal models of PD employing neurotoxins. A small number of controlled trials indicate that melatonin is useful in treating disturbed sleep in PD, in particular RBD. Whether melatonin and the recently developed melatonergic agents (ramelteon, tasimelteon, agomelatine) have therapeutic potential in PD is also discussed. PMID:22010042

  10. Overview of noncommunicable diseases in Korean children and adolescents: focus on obesity and its effect on metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye Ah; Park, Hyesook

    2013-07-01

    Obesity during childhood is a dominant risk factor for noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), and is itself considered a disease that needs to be treated. Recently, the growth in childhood obesity in Korea has become stagnant; however, two in every ten children are still overweight. In addition, 60% or more of overweight children have at least one metabolic syndrome risk factor. Thus, childhood obesity should be controlled through lifestyle modification. This paper reviews studies of the modifiable risk factors of obesity in Korean children. According to the life-course approach, preschool-aged children (<5 years) are influenced by their parents rather than individual habits because they are under mostly parental care. Elementary school-aged children (6 to 11 years) are affected by overlapping individual and parental effects. This may mean that the establishment of individual behavior patterns begins during this period. The conditions of poor eating habits such as skipping meals, eating out, and high fat intake, along with low physical activity, facilitate increased obesity among adolescents (12 to 18 years). Notably, adolescent girls show high rates of both underweight and obesity, which may lead to the development of NCDs in their offspring. Therefore, the problem of NCDs is no longer limited to adults, but is also prevalent among children. In addition, early intervention offers cost-effective opportunities for preventing NCDs. Thus, children need primary consideration, adequate monitoring, diagnosis, and treatment to reduce the burden of NCDs later in adulthood.

  11. Interplay of Inflammation and Endothelial Dysfunction in Bone Marrow Transplantation: Focus on Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease.

    PubMed

    Vion, Anne-Clémence; Rautou, Pierre-Emmanuel; Durand, François; Boulanger, Chantal M; Valla, Dominique C

    2015-09-01

    Endothelial cells are unique multifunctional cells with basal and inducible metabolic and synthetic functions. Various stimuli can induce physiological or pathological changes in endothelial cell biology. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) requires high-dose irradiation and/or chemotherapy and is associated with increased risk of bacterial infections and immune reactions. These factors can affect endothelial cells. This review provides an overview of the effects of HSCT on endothelial cells, based on findings observed in cultured cells as well as in patients. We first describe to what extent irradiation and chemotherapy constitute direct and indirect triggers for endothelial cell activation and injury. Then, we highlight the role of the endothelium in several complications of HSCT, including capillary leak syndrome, engraftment syndrome, transplant-associated microangiopathy, graft-versus-host disease, and diffuse alveolar hemorrhages. We also analyze in detail available data on sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, previously known as veno-occlusive disease of the liver, where liver sinusoidal endothelial cells are first injured and eventually lead to sinusoid occlusion and liver cell damage. Finally, we open the question of the possible contribution of endothelial damage to cardiovascular events occurring long after HSCT.

  12. Revisiting the vicious circle of dry eye disease: a focus on the pathophysiology of meibomian gland dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Baudouin, Christophe; Messmer, Elisabeth M; Geerling, Gerd; Akova, Yonca A; Benítez-del-Castillo, José; Boboridis, Kostas G; Merayo-Lloves, Jesús; Rolando, Maurizio; Labetoulle, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is the most frequent cause of dry eye disease (DED). Eyelid inflammation, microbial growth, associated skin disorders as well as potentially severe corneal complications culminate to make MGD a complex multifactorial disorder. It is probable that MGD is a heterogeneous condition arising from any combination of the following five separate pathophysiological mechanisms: eyelid inflammation, conjunctival inflammation, corneal damage, microbiological changes and DED resulting from tear film instability. The pathogenesis of both MGD and DED can be described in terms of a ‘vicious circle’: the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of DED and MGD interact, resulting in a double vicious circle. The MGD vicious circle is self-stimulated by microbiological changes, which results in increased melting temperature of meibum and subsequent meibomian gland blockage, reinforcing the vicious circle of MGD. Meibomian gland blockage, dropout and inflammation directly link the two vicious circles. MGD-associated tear film instability provides an entry point into the vicious circle of DED and leads to hyperosmolarity and inflammation, which are both a cause and consequence of DED. Here we propose a new pathophysiological scheme for MGD in order to better identify the pathological mechanisms involved and to allow more efficient targeting of therapeutics. Through better understanding of this scheme, MGD may gain true disease status rather than being viewed as a mere dysfunction. PMID:26781133

  13. En bloc spondylectomy in malignant tumors of the spine.

    PubMed

    Liljenqvist, Ulf; Lerner, Thomas; Halm, Henry; Buerger, Horst; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried

    2008-04-01

    En bloc spondylectomy is a technique that enables wide or marginal resection of malignant lesions of the spine. Both all posterior techniques as well as combined approaches are reported. Aim of the present study was to analyse the results of 21 patients with malignant lesions of the spine, all treated with en bloc excision in a combined posteroanterior (n = 19) or all posterior approach (n = 2). Twenty-one consecutive patients, operated between 1997 and 2005, were included into this retrospective study. Thirteen patients had primary malignant lesions, eight patients had solitary metastases, all located in the thoracolumbar spine. There were 16 single level, three two-level, one three-level and one four-level spondylectomy. The patients were followed clinically and radiographically (including CT studies) with an average follow-up of 4 years. Out of 11 patients with primary Ewing or osteosarcoma seven patients are alive without any evidence of disease. One patient died after 5 years from other causes and three are alive with evidence of disease. Latter had either a poor histologic response to the preoperative chemotherapy (n = 2) or an intralesional resection (n = 1). All three patients with solitary spinal metastases of Ewing or osteosarcoma died of the disease. Five patients with solitary metastases of mainly hypernephroma are alive. In total, six resections were intralesional, mainly due to large intraspinal tumor masses, with two patients having had previous surgery. In the remaining cases, wide (n = 10) or marginal (n = 5) resection was accomplished. There were one pseudarthrosis requiring extension of the fusion and two cases with local recurrences and repeated excisional surgery. At follow-up CT studies, all cages were fused. Health related quality of life analysis (SF-36) revealed only slightly decreased physical component and normal mental component scores compared to normals in those patients with no evidence of disease. En bloc spondylectomy enables wide

  14. En bloc spondylectomy in malignant tumors of the spine

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Thomas; Halm, Henry; Buerger, Horst; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried

    2008-01-01

    En bloc spondylectomy is a technique that enables wide or marginal resection of malignant lesions of the spine. Both all posterior techniques as well as combined approaches are reported. Aim of the present study was to analyse the results of 21 patients with malignant lesions of the spine, all treated with en bloc excision in a combined posteroanterior (n = 19) or all posterior approach (n = 2). Twenty-one consecutive patients, operated between 1997 and 2005, were included into this retrospective study. Thirteen patients had primary malignant lesions, eight patients had solitary metastases, all located in the thoracolumbar spine. There were 16 single level, three two-level, one three-level and one four-level spondylectomy. The patients were followed clinically and radiographically (including CT studies) with an average follow-up of 4 years. Out of 11 patients with primary Ewing or osteosarcoma seven patients are alive without any evidence of disease. One patient died after 5 years from other causes and three are alive with evidence of disease. Latter had either a poor histologic response to the preoperative chemotherapy (n = 2) or an intralesional resection (n = 1). All three patients with solitary spinal metastases of Ewing or osteosarcoma died of the disease. Five patients with solitary metastases of mainly hypernephroma are alive. In total, six resections were intralesional, mainly due to large intraspinal tumor masses, with two patients having had previous surgery. In the remaining cases, wide (n = 10) or marginal (n = 5) resection was accomplished. There were one pseudarthrosis requiring extension of the fusion and two cases with local recurrences and repeated excisional surgery. At follow-up CT studies, all cages were fused. Health related quality of life analysis (SF-36) revealed only slightly decreased physical component and normal mental component scores compared to normals in those patients with no evidence of disease. En bloc spondylectomy

  15. A New Endemic Focus of Chagas Disease in the Northern Region of Veraguas Province, Western Half Panama, Central America

    PubMed Central

    Saldaña, Azael; Pineda, Vanessa; Martinez, Inri; Santamaria, Giovanna; Santamaria, Ana Maria; Miranda, Aracelis; Calzada, Jose E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Chagas disease was originally reported in Panama in 1931. Currently, the best knowledge of this zoonosis is restricted to studies done in historically endemic regions. However, little is known about the distribution and epidemiology of Chagas disease in other rural areas of the country. Methods and Findings A cross-sectional descriptive study was carried out between May 2005 – July 2008 in four rural communities of the Santa Fe District, Veraguas Province. The study included an entomologic search to collect triatomines, bloodmeal type identification and infection rate with trypanosomes in collected vectors using a dot- blot and PCR analysis, genotyping of circulating Trypanosoma cruzi (mini-exon gene PCR analysis) and the detection of chagasic antibodies among inhabitants. The vector Rhodnius pallescens was more frequently found in La Culaca and El Pantano communities (788 specimens), where it was a sporadic household visitor. These triatomines presented darker coloration and larger sizescompared with typical specimens collected in Central Panama. Triatoma dimidiata was more common in Sabaneta de El Macho (162 specimens). In one small sub-region (El Macho), 60% of the houses were colonized by this vector. Of the examined R. pallescens, 54.7.0% (88/161) had fed on Didelphis marsupialis, and 24.6% (34/138) of T. dimidiata specimens collected inside houses were positive for human blood. R. pallescens presented an infection index with T. cruzi of 17.7% (24/136), with T. rangeli of 12.5% (17/136) and 50.7% (69/136) were mixed infections. In 117 T. dimidiata domestic specimens the infection index with T. cruzi was 21.4%. Lineage I of T. cruzi was confirmed circulating in these vectors. A T. cruzi infection seroprevalence of 2.3% (24/1,056) was found in this population. Conclusions This is the first report of Chagas disease endemicity in Santa Fe District, and it should be considered a neglected public health problem in this area of Panama. PMID:22558095

  16. Utility of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for the Study and Treatment of Genetic Diseases: Focus on Childhood Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Barral, Serena; Kurian, Manju A.

    2016-01-01

    The study of neurological disorders often presents with significant challenges due to the inaccessibility of human neuronal cells for further investigation. Advances in cellular reprogramming techniques, have however provided a new source of human cells for laboratory-based research. Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can now be robustly differentiated into specific neural subtypes, including dopaminergic, inhibitory GABAergic, motorneurons and cortical neurons. These neurons can then be utilized for in vitro studies to elucidate molecular causes underpinning neurological disease. Although human iPSC-derived neuronal models are increasingly regarded as a useful tool in cell biology, there are a number of limitations, including the relatively early, fetal stage of differentiated cells and the mainly two dimensional, simple nature of the in vitro system. Furthermore, clonal variation is a well-described phenomenon in iPSC lines. In order to account for this, robust baseline data from multiple control lines is necessary to determine whether a particular gene defect leads to a specific cellular phenotype. Over the last few years patient-derived neural cells have proven very useful in addressing several mechanistic questions related to central nervous system diseases, including early-onset neurological disorders of childhood. Many studies report the clinical utility of human-derived neural cells for testing known drugs with repurposing potential, novel compounds and gene therapies, which then can be translated to clinical reality. iPSCs derived neural cells, therefore provide great promise and potential to gain insight into, and treat early-onset neurological disorders. PMID:27656126

  17. Development of new therapeutic modalities for corneal endothelial disease focused on the proliferation of corneal endothelial cells using animal models.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Noriko; Okumura, Naoki; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2012-02-01

    This review describes our recent attempts to develop new therapeutic modalities for corneal endothelial disease using animal models including non-human primate model in which the proliferative ability of corneal endothelial cells is severely limited, as is the case in humans. First, we describe our attempt to develop new surgical treatments using cultivated corneal endothelial cells for advanced corneal endothelial dysfunction. It includes two different approaches; a "corneal endothelial cell sheet transplantation" with cells grown on a type-I collagen carrier, and a "cell-injection therapy" combined with the application of Rho-kinase (ROCK) inhibitor. Recently, it was reported that the selective ROCK inhibitor, Y-27632, promotes cell adhesion and proliferation and inhibits the apoptosis of primate corneal endothelial cells in culture. When cultivated corneal endothelial cells were injected into the anterior chamber of animal eyes in the presence of ROCK inhibitor, endothelial cell adhesion was promoted and the cells achieved a high cell density and a morphology similar to corneal endothelial cells in vivo. We are also trying to develop a novel medical treatment for the early phase of corneal endothelial disease by the use of ROCK inhibitor eye drops. In rabbit and monkey experiments using partial endothelial dysfunction models, corneal endothelial wound healing was accelerated by the topical application of ROCK inhibitor to the ocular surface, and resulted in the regeneration of a corneal endothelial monolayer with a high endothelial cell density. We are now trying to advance the clinical application of these new therapies for patients with corneal endothelial dysfunction.

  18. Evidence and practice in spine registries

    PubMed Central

    van Hooff, Miranda L; Jacobs, Wilco C H; Willems, Paul C; Wouters, Michel W J M; de Kleuver, Marinus; Peul, Wilco C; Ostelo, Raymond W J G; Fritzell, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose We performed a systematic review and a survey in order to (1) evaluate the evidence for the impact of spine registries on the quality of spine care, and with that, on patient-related outcomes, and (2) evaluate the methodology used to organize, analyze, and report the “quality of spine care” from spine registries. Methods To study the impact, the literature on all spinal disorders was searched. To study methodology, the search was restricted to degenerative spinal disorders. The risk of bias in the studies included was assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa scale. Additionally, a survey among registry representatives was performed to acquire information about the methodology and practice of existing registries. Results 4,273 unique references up to May 2014 were identified, and 1,210 were eligible for screening and assessment. No studies on impact were identified, but 34 studies were identified to study the methodology. Half of these studies (17 of the 34) were judged to have a high risk of bias. The survey identified 25 spine registries, representing 14 countries. The organization of these registries, methods used, analytical approaches, and dissemination of results are presented. Interpretation We found a lack of evidence that registries have had an impact on the quality of spine care, regardless of whether intervention was non-surgical and/or surgical. To improve the quality of evidence published with registry data, we present several recommendations. Application of these recommendations could lead to registries showing trends, monitoring the quality of spine care given, and ultimately improving the value of the care given to patients with degenerative spinal disorders. PMID:25909475

  19. Prostatic cancer surveillance following whole-gland high-intensity focused ultrasound: comparison of MRI and prostate-specific antigen for detection of residual or recurrent disease

    PubMed Central

    Punwani, S; Emberton, M; Walkden, M; Sohaib, A; Freeman, A; Ahmed, H; Allen, C; Kirkham, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective This retrospective study compares dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI with the serial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurement for detection of residual disease following whole-gland high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy of prostate cancer. Methods Patients in whom post-HIFU DCE-MRI was followed within 3 months by ultrasound-guided transrectal biopsy were selected from a local database. 26 patients met the study inclusion criteria. Serial PSA levels following HIFU and post-HIFU follow-up MRI were retrieved for each patient. Three radiologists unaware of other investigative results independently assessed post-HIFU MRI studies for the presence of cancer, scoring on a four-point scale (1, no disease; 2, probably no disease; 3, probably residual disease; and 4, residual disease). Sensitivity, specificity and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were performed for each reader, post-HIFU PSA nadir and pre-biopsy PSA level thresholds of >0.2 and >0.5 ng ml−1. Results The sensitivity of DCE-MRI for detection of residual disease for the three readers ranged between 73% and 87%, and the specificity between 73% and 82%. There was good agreement between readers (κ=0.69–0.77). The sensitivity and specificity of PSA thresholds was 60–87% and 73–100%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve was greatest for pre-biopsy PSA (0.95). Conclusion DCE-MRI performed following whole-gland HIFU has similar sensitivity and specificity and ROC performance to serial PSA measurements for detection of residual or recurrent disease. PMID:22253342

  20. Immunology in the Clinic Review Series; focus on metabolic diseases: development of islet autoimmune disease in type 2 diabetes patients: potential sequelae of chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Brooks-Worrell, B; Palmer, J P

    2012-01-01

    Historically, the development of type 2 diabetes has been considered not to have an autoimmune component, in contrast to the autoimmune pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. In this review we will discuss the accumulating data supporting the concept that islet autoreactivity and inflammation is present in type 2 diabetes pathogenesis, and the islet autoimmunity appears to be one of the factors associated with the progressive nature of the type 2 diabetes disease process.

  1. Role of Mitochondria in HIV Infection and Associated Metabolic Disorders: Focus on Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Lipodystrophy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Matute, P.; Pérez-Martínez, L.; Blanco, J. R.; Oteo, J. A.

    2013-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has considerably improved the prognosis of HIV-infected patients. However, prolonged use of HAART has been related to long-term adverse events that can compromise patient health such as HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome (HALS) and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). There is consistent evidence for a central role of mitochondrial dysfunction in these pathologies. Nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) have been described to be mainly responsible for mitochondrial dysfunction in adipose tissue and liver although nonnucleoside transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) or protease inhibitors (PIs) have also showed mitochondrial toxicity, which is a major concern for the selection and the long-term adherence to a particular therapy. Several mechanisms explain these deleterious effects of HAART on mitochondria, and evidence points to other mechanisms beyond the “Pol-γ hypothesis.” HIV infection has also direct effects on mitochondria. In addition to the negative effects described for HIV itself and/or HAART on mitochondria, HIV-infected patients are more prone to develop a premature aging and, therefore, to present an increased oxidative state that could lead to the development of these metabolic disturbances observed in HIV-infected patients. PMID:23970949

  2. G Protein-Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) in Alzheimer’s Disease: A Focus on BACE1 Related GPCRs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Juan; Deng, Yulin; Jiang, Zhaotan; Qing, Hong

    2016-01-01

    The G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been considered as one of the largest families of validated drug targets, which involve in almost overall physiological functions and pathological processes. Meanwhile, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common type of dementia, affects thinking, learning, memory and behavior of elderly people, that has become the hotspot nowadays for its increasing risks and incurability. The above fields have been intensively studied, and the link between the two has been demonstrated, whereas the way how GPCRs perturb AD progress are yet to be further explored given their complexities. In this review, we summarized recent progress regarding the GPCRs interacted with β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1), a key secretase in AD pathogenesis. Then we discussed the current findings on the regulatory roles of GPCRs on BACE1, and the possibility for pharmaceutical treatment of AD patients by the allosteric modulators and biased ligands of GPCRs. We hope this review can provide new insights into the understanding of mechanistic link between GPCRs and BACE1, and highlight the potential of GPCRs as therapeutic target for AD. PMID:27047374

  3. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease connections with fat-free tissues: A focus on bone and skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Poggiogalle, Eleonora; Donini, Lorenzo Maria; Lenzi, Andrea; Chiesa, Claudio; Pacifico, Lucia

    2017-01-01

    The estimates of global incidence and prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are worrisome, due to the parallel burden of obesity and its metabolic complications. Indeed, excess adiposity and insulin resistance represent two of the major risk factors for NAFLD; interestingly, in the last years a growing body of evidence tended to support a novel mechanistic perspective, in which the liver is at the center of a complex interplay involving organs and systems, other than adipose tissue and glucose homeostasis. Bone and the skeletal muscle are fat- free tissues which appeared to be independently associated with NAFLD in several cross-sectional studies. The deterioration of bone mineral density and lean body mass, leading to osteoporosis and sarcopenia, respectively, are age-related processes. The prevalence of NAFLD also increases with age. Beyond physiological aging, the three conditions share some common underlying mechanisms, and their elucidations could be of paramount importance to design more effective treatment strategies for the management of NAFLD. In this review, we provide an overview on epidemiological data as well as on potential contributors to the connections of NAFLD with bone and skeletal muscle. PMID:28348479

  4. Laser therapy for the treatment of Hailey-Hailey disease: a systematic review with focus on carbon dioxide laser resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Falto-Aizpurua, L A; Griffith, R D; Yazdani Abyaneh, M A; Nouri, K

    2015-06-01

    Benign familial chronic pemphigus, or Hailey-Hailey disease (HHD), is a recurrent bullous dermatitis that tends to have a chronic course with frequent relapses. Long-term treatment options include surgery with skin grafting or dermabrasion. Both are highly invasive and carry significant risks and complications. More recently, 'laser-abrasion' has been described as a less invasive option with a better side-effect profile. In this article, we systematically review the safety and efficacy of carbon dioxide laser therapy as a long-term treatment option for HHD, as well as provide a review of other lasers that have been reported with this goal. A total of 23 patients who had been treated with a carbon dioxide laser were identified. After treatment, 10 patients (43%) had had no recurrence, 10 (43%) had greater than 50% improvement, 2 (8%) had less than 50% improvement and 1 (4%) patient had no improvement at all (follow-up period ranged from 4 to 144 months). Laser parameter variability was wide and adverse effects were minimal, including dyspigmentation and scarring. Reviewed evidence indicates this therapy offers a safe, effective treatment alternative for HHD with minimal risk of side-effects. Larger, well-designed studies are necessary to determine the optimal treatment parameters.

  5. Ablation of ErbB4 from excitatory neurons leads to reduced dendritic spine density in mouse prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Margaret A.; Koleske, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spine loss is observed in many psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, and likely contributes to the altered sense of reality, disruption of working memory, and attention deficits that characterize these disorders. ErbB4, a member of the EGF family of receptor tyrosine kinases, is genetically associated0020with schizophrenia, suggesting that alterations in ErbB4 function contribute to the disease pathology. Additionally, ErbB4 functions in synaptic plasticity, leading us to hypothesize that disruption of ErbB4 signaling may affect dendritic spine development. We show that dendritic spine density is reduced in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex of ErbB4 conditional whole-brain knockout mice. We find that ErbB4 localizes to dendritic spines of excitatory neurons in cortical neuronal cultures and is present in synaptic plasma membrane preparations. Finally, we demonstrate that selective ablation of ErbB4 from excitatory neurons leads to a decrease in the proportion of mature spines and an overall reduction in dendritic spine density in the prefrontal cortex of weanling (P21) mice that persists at 2 months of age. These results suggest that ErbB4 signaling in excitatory pyramidal cells is critical for the proper formation and maintenance of dendritic spines in excitatory pyramidal cells. PMID:24752666

  6. Review: cerebral amyloid angiopathy, prion angiopathy, CADASIL and the spectrum of protein elimination failure angiopathies (PEFA) in neurodegenerative disease with a focus on therapy.

    PubMed

    Carare, R O; Hawkes, C A; Jeffrey, M; Kalaria, R N; Weller, R O

    2013-10-01

    Failure of elimination of proteins from the brain is a major feature in many neurodegenerative diseases. Insoluble proteins accumulate in brain parenchyma and in walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries. Cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a descriptive term for amyloid in vessel walls. Here, we adopt the term protein elimination failure angiopathy (PEFA) to focus on mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of a spectrum of disorders that exhibit both unique and common features of protein accumulation in blood vessel walls. We review (a) normal pathways and mechanisms by which proteins and other soluble metabolites are eliminated from the brain along 100- to 150-nm-thick basement membranes in walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries that serve as routes for lymphatic drainage of the brain; (b) a spectrum of proteins involved in PEFA; and (c) changes that occur in artery walls and contribute to failure of protein elimination. We use accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ), prion protein and granular osmiophilic material (GOM) in cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) as examples of different factors involved in the aetiology and pathogenesis of PEFA. Finally, we discuss how knowledge of factors involved in PEFA may help to focus on new therapies for neurodegenerative diseases. When Aβ (following immunotherapy) and prion protein are released from brain parenchyma they deposit in walls of cerebral capillaries and arteries; GOM in CADASIL accumulates primarily in artery walls. Therefore, the focus of therapy for protein clearance in neurodegenerative disease should perhaps be on facilitating perivascular elimination of proteins and reducing PEFA.

  7. [MR Imaging of the spine and sacroiliac joints in ankylosing spondylitis].

    PubMed

    Feydy, A; Gossec, L; Bazeli, R; Pluot, E; Rousseau, J; Campagna, R; Guerini, H; Dougados, M; Drapé, J-L

    2010-01-01

    The new diagnostic criteria for spondyloarthropathy include MRI. MRI frequently allows early diagnosis of inflammatory lesions of the spine and sacroiliac joints in patients with normal plain films. Moreover, MRI is useful for the detection and quantification of inflammatory and structural lesions, and to assess disease activity.

  8. Conspicuous and aposematic spines in the animal kingdom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inbar, Moshe; Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2005-04-01

    Spines serve as a common physical defence mechanism in both the plant and animal kingdoms. Here we argue that as in plants, defensive animal spines are often conspicuous (shape and colour) and should be considered aposematic. Conspicuous spines may evolve as signals or serve as a cue for potential predators. Spine conspicuousness in animals has evolved independently across and within phyla occupying aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, indicating that this convergent phenomenon is highly adaptive. Still, many spines are cryptic, suggesting that conspicuity is not simply constrained by developmental factors such as differences in the chemical composition of the integument. Aposematism does not preclude the signalling role of conspicuous spines in the sexual arena.

  9. Conspicuous and aposematic spines in the animal kingdom.

    PubMed

    Inbar, Moshe; Lev-Yadun, Simcha

    2005-04-01

    Spines serve as a common physical defence mechanism in both the plant and animal kingdoms. Here we argue that as in plants, defensive animal spines are often conspicuous (shape and colour) and should be considered aposematic. Conspicuous spines may evolve as signals or serve as a cue for potential predators. Spine conspicuousness in animals has evolved independently across and within phyla occupying aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems, indicating that this convergent phenomenon is highly adaptive. Still, many spines are cryptic, suggesting that conspicuity is not simply constrained by developmental factors such as differences in the chemical composition of the integument. Aposematism does not preclude the signalling role of conspicuous spines in the sexual arena.

  10. New frontiers in fibrotic disease therapies: The focus of the Joan and Joel Rosenbloom Center for Fibrotic Diseases at Thomas Jefferson University.

    PubMed

    Rosenbloom, Joel; Ren, Shumei; Macarak, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Fibrotic diseases constitute a world-wide major health problem, but research support remains inadequate in comparison to the need. Although considerable understanding of the pathogenesis of fibrotic reactions has been attained, no completely effective therapies exist. Although fibrotic disorders are diverse, it is universally appreciated that a particular cell type with unique characteristics, the myofibroblast, is responsible for replacement of functioning tissue with non-functional scar tissue. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for the creation of myofibroblasts and their activities is central to the development of therapies. Critical signaling cascades, initiated primarily by TGF-β, but also involving other cytokines which stimulate pro-fibrotic reactions in the myofibroblast, offer potential therapeutic targets. However, because of the multiplicity and complex interactions of these signaling pathways, it is very unlikely that any single drug will be successful in modifying a major fibrotic disease. Therefore, we have chosen to examine the effectiveness of administration of several drug combinations in a mouse pneumoconiosis model. Such treatment proved to be effective. Because fibrotic diseases that tend to be chronic, are difficult to monitor, and are patient variable, implementation of clinical trials is difficult and expensive. Therefore, we have made efforts to identify and validate non-invasive biomarkers found in urine and blood. We describe the potential utility of five such markers: (i) the EDA form of fibronectin (Fn(EDA)), (ii) lysyl oxidase (LOX), (iii) lysyl oxidase-like protein 2 (LoxL2), (iv) connective tissue growth factor (CTGF, CCNII), and (v) the N-terminal propeptide of type III procollagen (PIIINP).

  11. Management of thoracolumbar spine trauma: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, S; Kanna, Rishi Mugesh; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Thoracolumbar spine fractures are common injuries that can result in significant disability, deformity and neurological deficit. Controversies exist regarding the appropriate radiological investigations, the indications for surgical management and the timing, approach and type of surgery. This review provides an overview of the epidemiology, biomechanical principles, radiological and clinical evaluation, classification and management principles. Literature review of all relevant articles published in PubMed covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with or without neurologic deficit was performed. The search terms used were thoracolumbar, thoracic, lumbar, fracture, trauma and management. All relevant articles and abstracts covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with and without neurologic deficit were reviewed. Biomechanically the thoracolumbar spine is predisposed to a higher incidence of spinal injuries. Computed tomography provides adequate bony detail for assessing spinal stability while magnetic resonance imaging shows injuries to soft tissues (posterior ligamentous complex [PLC]) and neurological structures. Different classification systems exist and the most recent is the AO spine knowledge forum classification of thoracolumbar trauma. Treatment includes both nonoperative and operative methods and selected based on the degree of bony injury, neurological involvement, presence of associated injuries and the integrity of the PLC. Significant advances in imaging have helped in the better understanding of thoracolumbar fractures, including information on canal morphology and injury to soft tissue structures. The ideal classification that is simple, comprehensive and guides management is still elusive. Involvement of three columns, progressive neurological deficit, significant kyphosis and canal compromise with neurological deficit are accepted indications for surgical stabilization through anterior, posterior or combined approaches. PMID:25593358

  12. Characteristics of commercial and traditional village poultry farming in Mali with a focus on practices influencing the risk of transmission of avian influenza and Newcastle disease.

    PubMed

    Molia, Sophie; Traoré, Idrissa; Kamissoko, Badian; Diakité, Adama; Sidibé, Maimouna Sanogo; Sissoko, Kadiatou Diarra; Pfeiffer, Dirk Udo

    2015-10-01

    We aimed at characterizing commercial and traditional village poultry farming in Mali, with a focus on practices influencing the risk of transmission of avian influenza and Newcastle disease. Surveys were conducted in 2009-2011 in a study area covering approximately 98% of the Malian poultry population. Among the 282 commercial farms investigated, of which 64 had not been known by the government authorities, 83% were located within a 50km radius from the capitals of the country and regions and 54% had low biosecurity standard. Among the 152 randomly selected village household flocks investigated, characteristics were overall similar to those in other African countries but some differences were notable including a large flock size (median 44 poultry), a low presence of ducks and geese (11% and 1.1% of flocks, respectively), vaccination against Newcastle disease being common (49% of flocks), a low proportion of households selling sick and dead birds (0.7% and 0%, respectively) and limited cohabitation between poultry and humans at night. Our recommendations to limit the risk of disease transmission include (1) for commercial farms, to introduce compulsory farm registration and accreditation, to increase technical proficiency and access to credit for farms with low biosecurity, and to support poultry producer associations; (2) for village poultry, to promote better quarantine and management of sick and dead birds. Such detailed knowledge of country-specific characteristics of poultry production systems is essential to be able to develop more efficient disease risk management policies.

  13. Osteoradionecrosis of the subaxial cervical spine following treatment for head and neck carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Khorsandi, A S; Mourad, W F; Urken, M L; Persky, M S; Lazarus, C L; Jacobson, A S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study MRI and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the subaxial cervical spine, a serious long-term complication of radiation therapy (RT) for head and neck cancers that can lead to pain, vertebral instability, myelopathy and cord compression. Methods: This is a single-institution retrospective review of patients diagnosed and treated for ORN of the subaxial cervical spine following surgery and radiation for head and neck cancer. Results: We report PET/CT imaging and MRI for four patients, each with extensive treatment for recurrent head and neck cancer. Osteomyelitis (OM) and discitis are the end-stage manifestations of ORN of the subaxial spine. Conclusion: ORN of the subaxial spine has variable imaging appearance and needs to be differentiated from recurrent or metastatic disease. Surgical violation of the posterior pharyngeal wall on top of the compromised vasculature in patients treated heavily with RT may pre-dispose the subaxial cervical vertebrae to ORN, with possible resultant OM and discitis. MRI and PET/CT imaging are complimentary in this setting. PET/CT images may be misinterpreted in view of the history of head and neck cancer. MRI should be utilized for definitive diagnosis of OM and discitis in view of its imaging specificity. Advances in knowledge: We identify the end-stage manifestation of ORN in the sub-axial spine on PET/CT and MRI to facilitate its correct diagnosis. PMID:25375626

  14. VCP and ATL1 regulate endoplasmic reticulum and protein synthesis for dendritic spine formation.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-03-17

    Imbalanced protein homeostasis, such as excessive protein synthesis and protein aggregation, is a pathogenic hallmark of a range of neurological disorders. Here, using expression of mutant proteins, a knockdown approach and disease mutation knockin mice, we show that VCP (valosin-containing protein), together with its cofactor P47 and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology regulator ATL1 (Atlastin-1), regulates tubular ER formation and influences the efficiency of protein synthesis to control dendritic spine formation in neurons. Strengthening the significance of protein synthesis in dendritic spinogenesis, the translation blocker cyclohexamide and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduce dendritic spine density, while a leucine supplement that increases protein synthesis ameliorates the dendritic spine defects caused by Vcp and Atl1 deficiencies. Because VCP and ATL1 are the causative genes of several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, we suggest that impaired ER formation and inefficient protein synthesis are significant in the pathogenesis of multiple neurological disorders.

  15. VCP and ATL1 regulate endoplasmic reticulum and protein synthesis for dendritic spine formation

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Imbalanced protein homeostasis, such as excessive protein synthesis and protein aggregation, is a pathogenic hallmark of a range of neurological disorders. Here, using expression of mutant proteins, a knockdown approach and disease mutation knockin mice, we show that VCP (valosin-containing protein), together with its cofactor P47 and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology regulator ATL1 (Atlastin-1), regulates tubular ER formation and influences the efficiency of protein synthesis to control dendritic spine formation in neurons. Strengthening the significance of protein synthesis in dendritic spinogenesis, the translation blocker cyclohexamide and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduce dendritic spine density, while a leucine supplement that increases protein synthesis ameliorates the dendritic spine defects caused by Vcp and Atl1 deficiencies. Because VCP and ATL1 are the causative genes of several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, we suggest that impaired ER formation and inefficient protein synthesis are significant in the pathogenesis of multiple neurological disorders. PMID:26984393

  16. Distinct Defects in Spine Formation or Pruning in Two Gene Duplication Mouse Models of Autism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Li, Huiping; Takumi, Toru; Qiu, Zilong; Xu, Xiu; Yu, Xiang; Bian, Wen-Jie

    2017-04-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) encompasses a complex set of developmental neurological disorders, characterized by deficits in social communication and excessive repetitive behaviors. In recent years, ASD is increasingly being considered as a disease of the synapse. One main type of genetic aberration leading to ASD is gene duplication, and several mouse models have been generated mimicking these mutations. Here, we studied the effects of MECP2 duplication and human chromosome 15q11-13 duplication on synaptic development and neural circuit wiring in the mouse sensory cortices. We showed that mice carrying MECP2 duplication had specific defects in spine pruning, while the 15q11-13 duplication mouse model had impaired spine formation. Our results demonstrate that spine pathology varies significantly between autism models and that distinct aspects of neural circuit development may be targeted in different ASD mutations. Our results further underscore the importance of gene dosage in normal development and function of the brain.

  17. Effect of the Degenerative State of the Intervertebral Disk on the Impact Characteristics of Human Spine Segments

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sara E.; Alkalay, Ron N.; Myers, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Models of the dynamic response of the lumbar spine have been used to examine vertebral fractures (VFx) during falls and whole body vibration transmission in the occupational setting. Although understanding the viscoelastic stiffness or damping characteristics of the lumbar spine are necessary for modeling the dynamics of the spine, little is known about the effect of intervertebral disk degeneration on these characteristics at high loading rates. We hypothesize that disk degeneration significantly affects the viscoelastic response of spinal segments to high loading rate. We additionally hypothesize the lumbar spine stiffness and damping characteristics are a function of the degree of preload. A custom, pendulum impact tester was used to impact 19 L1–L3 human spine segments with an end mass of 20.9 kg under increasing preloads with the resulting force response measured. A Kelvin–Voigt model, fitted to the frequency and decay response of the post-impact oscillations was used to compute stiffness and damping constants. The spine segments exhibited a second-order, under-damped response with stiffness and damping values of 17.9–754.5 kN/m and 133.6–905.3 Ns/m respectively. Regression models demonstrated that stiffness, but not damping, significantly correlated with preload (p < 0.001). Degenerative disk disease, reflected as reduction in magnetic resonance T2 relaxation time, was weakly correlated with change in stiffness at low preloads. This study highlights the need to incorporate the observed non-linear increase in stiffness of the spine under high loading rates in dynamic models of spine investigating the effects of a fall on VFx and those investigating the response of the spine to vibration. PMID:25024122

  18. Effect of the Degenerative State of the Intervertebral Disk on the Impact Characteristics of Human Spine Segments.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Sara E; Alkalay, Ron N; Myers, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Models of the dynamic response of the lumbar spine have been used to examine vertebral fractures (VFx) during falls and whole body vibration transmission in the occupational setting. Although understanding the viscoelastic stiffness or damping characteristics of the lumbar spine are necessary for modeling the dynamics of the spine, little is known about the effect of intervertebral disk degeneration on these characteristics at high loading rates. We hypothesize that disk degeneration significantly affects the viscoelastic response of spinal segments to high loading rate. We additionally hypothesize the lumbar spine stiffness and damping characteristics are a function of the degree of preload. A custom, pendulum impact tester was used to impact 19 L1-L3 human spine segments with an end mass of 20.9 kg under increasing preloads with the resulting force response measured. A Kelvin-Voigt model, fitted to the frequency and decay response of the post-impact oscillations was used to compute stiffness and damping constants. The spine segments exhibited a second-order, under-damped response with stiffness and damping values of 17.9-754.5 kN/m and 133.6-905.3 Ns/m respectively. Regression models demonstrated that stiffness, but not damping, significantly correlated with preload (p < 0.001). Degenerative disk disease, reflected as reduction in magnetic resonance T2 relaxation time, was weakly correlated with change in stiffness at low preloads. This study highlights the need to incorporate the observed non-linear increase in stiffness of the spine under high loading rates in dynamic models of spine investigating the effects of a fall on VFx and those investigating the response of the spine to vibration.

  19. Preoperative Embolization of Cervical Spine Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, Sylvia C.; Strecker, Ernst-Peter; Ackermann, Ludwig W.; Harms, Juergen

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the technical success rate, complications, and effect on intraoperative blood loss of preoperative transarterial embolization of cervical spine tumors. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 38 patients with tumors of the cervical spine; 69 vertebrae were affected. Polyvinyl alcohol particles, coils, gelfoam particles, either alone or in combination, were used for preoperative tumor embolization. After embolization a total of 57 corporectomies with titanium basket implantation were performed. Results: In 36 of 38 patients, complete (n= 27) or partial (n= 9) embolization was achieved. In 23 patients one vertebral artery was completely occluded by coil placement, and in one patient the ipsilateral internal and external carotid arteries were occluded in addition. No neurological complications could be directly related to the embolization, but two postoperative brain stem infarctions occurred. The mean intraoperative blood loss was 2.4 L. Conclusion: Transarterial embolization of cervical spine tumors is a safe and effective procedure to facilitate extensive surgery.

  20. Visualizing the spine using anatomical knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornelius, Craig W.; Fellingham, Linda L.

    1990-08-01

    In vivo anatomy is now routinely displayed as 2-D and 3-D images obtained from Computed X-ray Tomograpy (CT), Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), and other diagnostic modalities. Most current medical visualization methods rely on pixel intensities to segment the data into tissues. However, structural features must be differentiated by a human operator, and geometric measurements of the anatomy are tedious and error prone to compute. This paper describes processing and imaging methods to aid the interpretation of CT studies of the spine. These procedures incorporate knowledge of the symmetry, shapes, and spatial relationships of vertebrae to locate the spinal cord and major components of vertebral bone from CT slices of the spine and automatically compute anatomical measurements. Results of these methods are shown as applied to the cervical (neck) and lumbar (lower back) regions of the spine.

  1. Embryonic development of fin spines in Callorhinchus milii (Holocephali); implications for chondrichthyan fin spine evolution.

    PubMed

    Jerve, Anna; Johanson, Zerina; Ahlberg, Per; Boisvert, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Fin spines are commonly known from fossil gnathostomes (jawed vertebrates) and are usually associated with paired and unpaired fins. They are less common among extant gnathostomes, being restricted to the median fins of certain chondrichthyans (cartilaginous fish), including chimaerids (elephant sharks) and neoselachians (sharks, skates, and rays). Fin spine growth is of great interest and relevance but few studies have considered their evolution and development. We investigated the development of the fin spine of the chimaerid Callorhinchus milii using stained histological sections from a series of larval, hatchling, and adult individuals. The lamellar trunk dentine of the Callorhinchus spine first condenses within the mesenchyme, rather than at the contact surface between mesenchyme and epithelium, in a manner more comparable to dermal bone formation than to normal odontode development. Trabecular dentine forms a small component of the spine under the keel; it is covered externally with a thin layer of lamellar trunk dentine, which is difficult to distinguish in sectioned adult spines. We suggest that the distinctive characteristics of the trunk dentine may reflect an origin through co-option of developmental processes involved in dermal bone formation. Comparison with extant Squalus and a range of fossil chondrichthyans shows that Callorhinchus is more representative than Squalus of generalized chondrichthyan fin-spine architecture, highlighting its value as a developmental model organism.

  2. Developmental biomechanics of the human cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Nuckley, David J; Linders, David R; Ching, Randal P

    2013-04-05

    Head and neck injuries, the leading cause of death for children in the U.S., are difficult to diagnose, treat, and prevent because of a critical void in our understanding of the biomechanical response of the immature cervical spine. The objective of this study was to investigate the functional and failure biomechanics of the cervical spine across multiple axes of loading throughout maturation. A correlational study design was used to examine the relationships governing spinal maturation and biomechanical flexibility curves and tolerance data using a cadaver human in vitro model. Eleven human cadaver cervical spines from across the developmental spectrum (2-28 years) were dissected into segments (C1-C2, C3-C5, and C6-C7) for biomechanical testing. Non-destructive flexibility tests were performed in tension, compression, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. After measuring their intact biomechanical responses, each segment group was failed in different modes to measure the tissue tolerance in tension (C1-C2), compression (C3-C5), and extension (C5-C6). Classical injury patterns were observed in all of the specimens tested. Both the functional (p<0.014) and failure (p<0.0001) mechanics exhibited significant relationships with age. Nonlinear flexibility curves described the functional response of the cervical spine throughout maturation and elucidated age, spinal level, and mode of loading specificity. These data support our understanding of the child cervical spine from a developmental perspective and facilitate the generation of injury prevention or management schema for the mitigation of child spine injuries and their deleterious effects.

  3. Research articles published by Korean spine surgeons: Scientific progress and the increase in spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Eon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Kim, Hyun Jib; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu

    2017-02-01

    There has been a marked increase in spine surgery in the 21st century, but there are no reports providing quantitative and qualitative analyses of research by Korean spine surgeons. The study goal was to assess the status of Korean spinal surgery and research. The number of spine surgeries was obtained from the Korean National Health Insurance Service. Research articles published by Korean spine surgeons were reviewed by using the Medline/PubMed online database. The number of spine surgeries in Korea increased markedly from 92,390 in 2004 to 164,291 in 2013. During the 2000-2014 period, 1982 articles were published by Korean spine surgeons. The annual number of articles increased from 20 articles in 2000 to 293 articles in 2014. There was a positive correlation between the annual spine surgery and article numbers (p<0.001). There were 1176 original studies published, and there was an annual increase in articles with Oxford levels of evidence 1, 2, and 3. The mean five-year impact factor (IF) for article quality was 1.79. There was no positive correlation between the annual IF and article numbers. Most articles (65.9%) were authored by neurosurgical spine surgeons. But spinal deformity-related topics were dominant among articles authored by orthopedics. The results show a clear quantitative increase in Korean spinal surgery and research over the last 15years. The lack of a correlation between annual IF and published article numbers indicate that Korean spine surgeons should endeavor to increase research value.

  4. As the Nasal Spine Goes, So Goes the Septum

    PubMed Central

    Jagade, Mohan; Kale, Vitthal; Attakil, Anoop; Kar, Rajesh; Singhal, Arpita; Rao, Karthik; Gupta, Pallavi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction "As the septum goes, so goes the nose". A well-known phrase by Maurice Cottle forms the pillar of septoplasty. Since the inception of septal surgeries, numerous methods of septoplasty have been described. But, if not performed meticulously, may lead to deformity. For a successful surgery, understanding the anatomy and addressing the anterior nasal spine and maintaining the tip integrity is vital. Aim To study the outcomes of “ROUND ABOUT technique” to correct deviated nasal septum which focuses on the importance of anterior spine and hence maintain the tip integrity. Materials and Methods This was a prospective, single-centre outcome study of 35 patients with symptomatic nasal obstruction. Here, we describe a method of elevating the mucoperichondrial and mucoperiosteal flaps bilaterally, without transecting the quadrilateral cartilage of the septum. The Sino Nasal Outcome Test-22 (SNOT-22) Questionnaire was administered pre-operatively and after 3 months following surgery. The post-operative follow-up period ranged from 3 to 6 months (mean= 4.5 months) to evaluate the functional and aesthetic outcomes of the performed procedure. Results A total of 35 patients underwent surgery by this technique who presented with deviated nasal septum and variable degrees of nasal obstruction. To assess the statistical outcome, Paired t-test was applied. Mean SNOT-22 scores decreased significantly from 40.02 pre-operatively to 18.65 three months after surgery. The results sustained after 6 months (p-value <0.0001), 85% of these patients had improved breathing post-operatively and none of the patients complained any aesthetic criticisms. The patients were content and the requirement of medications post-operatively were minimal. Conclusion The ROUND ABOUT technique is a very effective and safe method in correcting the septal deviations especially the ones with caudal or dorsal deflections. It also helps in maintaining the tip integrity and addressing the anterior

  5. Rigid spine syndrome and fatal cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Colver, A F; Steer, C R; Godman, M J; Uttley, W S

    1981-01-01

    A 7 1/2-year-old girl had the clinical features of the rigid spine syndrome of Dubowitz. Muscle biopsy showed a predominance of type 2 fibres with neither myopathic features nor an increase in connective tissue. In addition, she had a hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with which she presented in heart failure and from which she died suddenly one month later. The association of rigid spine syndrome with cardiomyopathy has not been reported previously. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7193439

  6. Guidelines for use of lumbar spine radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kelen, G.D.; Noji, E.K.; Doris, P.E.

    1986-03-01

    In deciding whether to obtain lumbosacral spine films, the emergency physician must not ask whether a diagnosis can be established, but whether obtaining films will affect management. Low back pain is a considerable problem for society with cost in billions of dollars. Gonadal radiation from lumbosacral radiographs is significant, and thus ordering films should be minimized. Plain radiographs are rarely indicated in otherwise healthy patients 20 to 50 years old with mechanical or root pain on initial presentation. In other patients alternative diagnostic methodologies such as computed tomography may be superior, with less radiation risk. Specific recommendations for emergency radiographic evaluation of the lumbosacral spine are offered.68 references.

  7. Philosophy and concepts of modern spine surgery.

    PubMed

    José-Antonio, Soriano-Sánchez; Baabor-Aqueveque, Marcos; Silva-Morales, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of improving pain and neurological deficit in the practice of spine surgery is changing for a more ambitious goal, namely to improve the overall quality of life and the future of patients through three major actions (1) preserving the vertebral anatomical structures; (2) preserving the paravertebral anatomical structures; and (3) preserving the functionality of the segment. Thus, three new concepts have emerged (a) minimal surgery; (b) minimal access surgery; and (c) motion preservation surgery. These concepts are covered in a new term, minimally invasive spine surgery (MISS) The term "MISS" is not about one or several particular surgical techniques, but a new way of thinking, a new philosophy. Although the development of minimally invasive spine surgery is recent, its application includes all spine segments and almost all the existing conditions, including deformities.Evidence-based medicine (EBM), a term coined by Alvan Feinstein in the 1960s (Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 564-579; Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 757-781; Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 944-965; Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 1162-1193.), emphasizes the possibility of combining art and science following the strict application of scientific methods in the treatment of patients (Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 944-965; Feinstein A (1964) Annals of Internal Medicine 61: 1162-1193.), which may represent the advantages of objectivity and rationality in the use of different treatments (Fig. 11). However, EBM has many obvious defects, especially in spine surgery it is almost impossible to develop double-blind protocols (Andersson G, Bridwell K, Danielsson A, et al (2007) Spine 32: S64-S65.). In most cases, the only evidence one can find in the literature is the lack of evidence (Resnick D (2007) Spine 32:S15-S19.), however, the lack of evidence does not mean its absence. Only then, with a

  8. Intrawound Vancomycin Powder for Spine Tumor Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Okafor, Richard; Molinari, William; Molinari, Robert; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective evaluation of prospectively collected data. Objective To evaluate infection rates following intrawound vancomycin powder application during spine tumor surgery. Methods Patients ≥18 years old undergoing spine tumor surgery and receiving intrawound vancomycin powder at a single center between January 2008 and January 2015 were enrolled. Patient demographics (age, sex, body mass index [BMI]), tumor type (metastatic, primary) and location, surgical data (estimated blood loss [EBL], levels fused, type of decompression, length of surgery and hospitalization, discharge status from hospital), radiation therapy use, and infection rates (surgery to a minimum of 30 days postoperative) were evaluated. Results Forty patients (46 procedures) undergoing spine tumor surgery and intrawound vancomycin powder application were identified. Five were excluded because of death less than 30 days postoperatively, and 35 patients (41 procedures) were enrolled: 11 women and 24 men with an average age of 61.4 years (range 19 to 92) and average BMI of 27.3 (range 17.4 to 36.8). Three cases were primary spine tumors. Five were hematologic malignancies, and 27 were metastatic cancers. Twenty-one tumors were in the thoracic spine, 12 in the lumbar spine, and 8 in the cervical spine. Average EBL was 899 mL (range 25 to 3,500), average length of surgery was 241 minutes (range 78 to 495), and average hospital stay was 15.1 days (range 3 to 49). Two culture-proven infections (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter cloacae) were noted in 41 procedures (4.9%). Ten patients (28.6%) had preoperative radiation only; 14 (40%) had postoperative radiation only, 5 (14.3%) had both preoperative and postoperative radiation, and 6 (17.1%) had no radiation. There were no associations between radiation treatment and postsurgical infections (p = 0.19). Conclusion In this first study evaluating intrawound vancomycin powder for spine tumor surgery, we report an infection rate

  9. Intrawound Vancomycin Powder for Spine Tumor Surgery.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Richard; Molinari, William; Molinari, Robert; Mesfin, Addisu

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Retrospective evaluation of prospectively collected data. Objective To evaluate infection rates following intrawound vancomycin powder application during spine tumor surgery. Methods Patients ≥18 years old undergoing spine tumor surgery and receiving intrawound vancomycin powder at a single center between January 2008 and January 2015 were enrolled. Patient demographics (age, sex, body mass index [BMI]), tumor type (metastatic, primary) and location, surgical data (estimated blood loss [EBL], levels fused, type of decompression, length of surgery and hospitalization, discharge status from hospital), radiation therapy use, and infection rates (surgery to a minimum of 30 days postoperative) were evaluated. Results Forty patients (46 procedures) undergoing spine tumor surgery and intrawound vancomycin powder application were identified. Five were excluded because of death less than 30 days postoperatively, and 35 patients (41 procedures) were enrolled: 11 women and 24 men with an average age of 61.4 years (range 19 to 92) and average BMI of 27.3 (range 17.4 to 36.8). Three cases were primary spine tumors. Five were hematologic malignancies, and 27 were metastatic cancers. Twenty-one tumors were in the thoracic spine, 12 in the lumbar spine, and 8 in the cervical spine. Average EBL was 899 mL (range 25 to 3,500), average length of surgery was 241 minutes (range 78 to 495), and average hospital stay was 15.1 days (range 3 to 49). Two culture-proven infections (Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter cloacae) were noted in 41 procedures (4.9%). Ten patients (28.6%) had preoperative radiation only; 14 (40%) had postoperative radiation only, 5 (14.3%) had both preoperative and postoperative radiation, and 6 (17.1%) had no radiation. There were no associations between radiation treatment and postsurgical infections (p = 0.19). Conclusion In this first study evaluating intrawound vancomycin powder for spine tumor surgery, we report an infection rate

  10. Effect of Serotype on Focus and Mortality of Invasive Pneumococcal Disease: Coverage of Different Vaccines and Insight into Non-Vaccine Serotypes

    PubMed Central

    van Hoek, Albert Jan; Andrews, Nick; Waight, Pauline A.; George, Robert; Miller, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Background Differences in pathogenicity between pneumococcal serotypes are important when assessing the potential benefit of different valency vaccines. We investigated the effect of serotype on clinical presentation, outcome, and quality of life lost from invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in the context of the 7, 10, and 13 valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCV7, PCV10, PCV13). Method Serotyped IPD cases in England were linked to the national dataset of hospital admissions for April 2002 to March 2011. Based on patients’ diagnostic codes and vital status at the end of the admission, disease focus (meningitis, empyema, sepsis, or respiratory disease) and case fatality rates by serotype and age group (5, 5–64, and 65 years and over) were obtained. Using these data the quality adjusted life years (QALY) lost from the IPD remaining when use of PCV7 stopped in 2010 was estimated for the serotypes covered by higher valency vaccines. Results The linked dataset contained 23,688 cases with information on diagnosis, mortality, and serotype. There were significant differences between serotypes in the propensity to cause meningitis, death, and QALY loss in each of the investigated age groups. As a result, vaccines’ coverage of disease burden differed by endpoint. For example, in children under 5 years in 2009/10, PCV10 covered 39% of meningitis, 19% of deaths and 28% of the QALY loss of attributable to IPD, whereas the respective percentages for PCV13 were 65%, 67%, and 66%. The highest QALY loss per serotype in this age group was for 6A. Non-PCV serotypes causing the highest QALY loss were 22F and 33F in <5 year olds and 31 in older individuals. Conclusion Marked differences exist between serotypes in clinical presentation and outcome, and these should be considered when evaluating the potential impact of higher valency vaccines on overall disease burden and associated QALY loss. PMID:22815698

  11. Super resolution microscopy is poised to reveal new insights into the formation and maturation of dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Cristina M.; Patel, Mikin R.; Webb, Donna J.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines and synapses are critical for neuronal communication, and they are perturbed in many neurological disorders; however, the study of these structures in living cells has been hindered by their small size. Super resolution microscopy, unlike conventional light microscopy, is diffraction unlimited and thus is well suited for imaging small structures, such as dendritic spines and synapses. Super resolution microscopy has already revealed important new information about spine and synapse morphology, actin remodeling, and nanodomain composition in both healthy cells and diseased states. In this review, we highlight the advancements in probes that make super resolution more amenable to live-cell imaging of spines and synapses. We also discuss recent data obtained by super resolution microscopy that has advanced our knowledge of dendritic spine and synapse structure, organization, and dynamics in both healthy and diseased contexts. Finally, we propose a series of critical questions for understanding spine and synapse formation and maturation that super resolution microscopy is poised to answer. PMID:27408691

  12. Conspicuous carotenoid-based pelvic spine ornament in three-spined stickleback populations—occurrence and inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Amundsen, CR; Gjøen, HM; Larsen, B; Egeland, ES

    2015-01-01

    Reports on reddish carotenoid-based ornaments in female three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) are few, despite the large interest in the species’ behaviour, ornamentation, morphology and evolution. We sampled sticklebacks from 17 sites in north-western Europe in this first extensive study on the occurrence of carotenoid-based female pelvic spines and throat ornaments. The field results showed that females, and males, with reddish spines were found in all 17 populations. Specimens of both sexes with conspicuous red spines were found in several of the sites. The pelvic spines of males were more intensely red compared to the females’ spines, and large specimens were more red than small ones. Fish infected with the tapeworm (Schistocephalus solidus) had drabber spines than uninfected fish. Both sexes had red spines both during and after the spawning period, but the intensity of the red colour was more exaggerated during the spawning period. As opposed to pelvic spines, no sign of red colour at the throat was observed in any female from any of the 17 populations. A rearing experiment was carried out to estimate a potential genetic component of the pelvic spine ornament by artificial crossing and rearing of 15 family groups during a 12 months period. The results indicated that the genetic component of the red colour at the spines was low or close to zero. Although reddish pelvic spines seem common in populations of stickleback, the potential adaptive function of the reddish pelvic spines remains largely unexplained. PMID:25861558

  13. [Nursing Care of Lumbar Spine Fusion Surgery Using a Semi-Rigid Device (ISOBAR)].

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Shan; Su, Shu-Fen

    2016-04-01

    Aging frequently induces degenerative changes in the spine. Patients who suffer from lumbar degenerative disease tend to have lower back pain, neurological claudication, and neuropathy. Furthermore, incontinence may be an increasing issue as symptoms become severe. Lumbar spine fusion surgery is necessary if clinical symptoms continue to worsen or if the patient fails to respond to medication, physical therapy, or alternative treatments. However, this surgical procedure frequently induces adjacent segment disease (ASD), which is evidenced by the appearance of pathological changes in the upper and lower sections of the spinal surgical sites. In 1997, ISOBAR TTL dynamic rod stabilization was developed for application in spinal fusion surgery to prevent ASD-related complications. The device has proven effective in reducing pain in the lower back and legs, decreasing functional disability, improving quality of life, and retarding disc degeneration. However, the effectiveness of this intervention in decreasing the incidence of ASD requires further research investigation, and relevant literature and research in Taiwan is still lacking. This article discusses lumbar degenerative disease, its indications, the contraindications of lumbar spine fusion surgery using ISOBAR, and related postoperative nursing care. We hope this article provides proper and new knowledge to clinical nurses for the care of patients undergoing lumbar spine fusion surgery with ISOBAR.

  14. Robust MR spine detection using hierarchical learning and local articulated model.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Yiqiang; Maneesh, Dewan; Harder, Martin; Zhou, Xiang Sean

    2012-01-01

    A clinically acceptable auto-spine detection system, i.e., localization and labeling of vertebrae and inter-vertebral discs, is required to have high robustness, in particular to severe diseases (e.g., scoliosis) and imaging artifacts (e.g. metal artifacts in MR). Our method aims to achieve this goal with two novel components. First, instead of treating vertebrae/discs as either repetitive components or completely independent entities, we emulate a radiologist and use a hierarchial strategy to learn detectors dedicated to anchor (distinctive) vertebrae, bundle (non-distinctive) vertebrae and inter-vertebral discs, respectively. At run-time, anchor vertebrae are detected concurrently to provide redundant and distributed appearance cues robust to local imaging artifacts. Bundle vertebrae detectors provide candidates of vertebrae with subtle appearance differences, whose labels are mutually determined by anchor vertebrae to gain additional robustness. Disc locations are derived from a cloud of responses from disc detectors, which is robust to sporadic voxel-level errors. Second, owing to the non-rigidness of spine anatomies, we employ a local articulated model to effectively model the spatial relations across vertebrae and discs. The local articulated model fuses appearance cues from different detectors in a way that is robust to abnormal spine geometry resulting from severe diseases. Our method is validated by 300 MR spine scout scans and exhibits robust performance, especially to cases with severe diseases and imaging artifacts.

  15. EVALUATION OF THE CERVICAL SPINE AMONG PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Passos Cardoso, André Luiz; Da Silva, Nilzio Antonio; Daher, Sérgio; De Moraes, Frederico Barra; Do Carmo, Humberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of cervical spine abnormalities among patients with rheumatoid arthritis and correlate the imaging findings with the clinical state. Methods: A cross-sectional study on 35 patients was carried out at the School of Medicine of the Federal University of Goiás (UFG) in 2004. The following were evaluated: age, use of medications and the clinical picture of pain and neurological characteristics. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and rheumatoid factor were tested, and radiographs of the cervical spine were produced in anteroposterior, lateral and dynamic views. To evaluate the influence of the variables on the emergence of instabilities, univariate and multivariate logistic regression tests were used (p < 0.05). Results: Among the 35 patients evaluated, 13 (37.1%) presented a stable cervical spine. Out of the 22 patients with instability, six presented more than one type. Atlantoaxial instability was found in 15 patients, with a mean anterior atlantodental distance of 3.40 mm in the neutral lateral radiographic view and 6.54 mm in the lateral view with flexion. Basilar invagination was found in five patients and subaxial subluxation in seven patients. Two thirds of the asymptomatic patients had instabilities. Bicipital hyperreflexia presented statistically significant correlations with atlantoaxial instability (p = 0.024) and subaxial instability (p = 0.01). Age at diagnosis correlated with subaxial instability (p = 0.02). Conclusions: The prevalence of cervical instability was 62.9 % (22/35). The most frequent instabilities were: atlantoaxial subluxation (42.9 %), subaxial subluxation (20%) and basilar invagination (14.3%). The correlation between instabilities and clinical signs and symptoms was poor. The patients with subaxial subluxation presented disease onset at a younger age. Dynamic radiography was important for diagnosing atlantoaxial subluxation. PMID:27022536

  16. Salmonella spondylodiscitis of the thoracic vertebrae mimicking spine tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Muhamad Effendi, Ferdhany; Ibrahim, Mohd Ikraam; Mohd Miswan, Mohd Fairudz

    2016-07-05

    Extraintestinal Salmonella infection involving the thoracic spine is very rare. It commonly presents with non-specific chronic back pain and can occur with no gastrointestinal manifestation. Blood test results and imaging findings are often indistinguishable from more common chronic spine infections such as spine tuberculosis. Culture studies remain the key to establishing a definitive diagnosis and subsequently successful treatment. We report a case in which a patient presented with symptoms and signs suggestive of spine tuberculosis, yet the culture examination revealed otherwise.

  17. [Shift of focus in the financing of Hungarian drugs. Reimbursement for orphan drugs for treating rare diseases: financing of enzyme replacement therapy in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Szegedi, Márta; Molnár, Mária Judit; Boncz, Imre; Kosztolányi, György

    2014-11-02

    Focusing on the benefits of patients with rare disease the authors analysed the aspects of orphan medicines financed in the frame of the Hungarian social insurance system in 2012 in order to make the consumption more rational, transparent and predictable. Most of the orphan drugs were financed in the frame of compassionate use by the reimbursement system. Consequently, a great deal of crucial problems occurred in relation to the unconventional subsidized method, especially in the case of the highest cost enzyme replacement therapies. On the base of the findings, proposals of the authors are presented for access to orphan drugs, fitting to the specific professional, economical and ethical aspects of this unique field of the health care system. The primary goal is to provide a suitable subsidized method for the treatment of rare disease patients with unmet medical needs. The financial modification of orphans became indispensible in Hungary. Professionals from numerous fields dealing with rare disease patients' care expressed agreement on the issue. Transforming the orphan medicines' financial structure has been initiated according to internationally shared principles.

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and spine

    SciTech Connect

    Atlas, S.W. )

    1991-01-01

    This book will be of use to neuroradiologists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, and all other clinicians who interact to discuss the results of MRI in patients with neurologic disease. It is hoped that this book will aid in this interaction by adding insight into the interpretation of scans and by promulgating a common language. Neuroradiologists and others who interpret MRI of the brain and spine will benefit from the detailed discussions concerning the basis of signal intensity derangements, whether on the fundamental level (i.e., physical or biochemical) or at the level of correlations with clinical and neuropathological findings. It is anticipated that all neuroscience personnel interested in clinical disease states and in neurological research will be able to utilize this text as a starting point and reference for proposed work utilizing MRI.

  19. Synaptic amplification by dendritic spines enhances input cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Harnett, Mark T; Makara, Judit K; Spruston, Nelson; Kath, William L; Magee, Jeffrey C

    2012-11-22

    Dendritic spines are the nearly ubiquitous site of excitatory synaptic input onto neurons and as such are critically positioned to influence diverse aspects of neuronal signalling. Decades of theoretical studies have proposed that spines may function as highly effective and modifiable chemical and electrical compartments that regulate synaptic efficacy, integration and plasticity. Experimental studies have confirmed activity-dependent structural dynamics and biochemical compartmentalization by spines. However, there is a longstanding debate over the influence of spines on the electrical aspects of synaptic transmission and dendritic operation. Here we measure the amplitude ratio of spine head to parent dendrite voltage across a range of dendritic compartments and calculate the associated spine neck resistance (R(neck)) for spines at apical trunk dendrites in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. We find that R(neck) is large enough (~500 MΩ) to amplify substantially the spine head depolarization associated with a unitary synaptic input by ~1.5- to ~45-fold, depending on parent dendritic impedance. A morphologically realistic compartmental model capable of reproducing the observed spatial profile of the amplitude ratio indicates that spines provide a consistently high-impedance input structure throughout the dendritic arborization. Finally, we demonstrate that the amplification produced by spines encourages electrical interaction among coactive inputs through an R(neck)-dependent increase in spine head voltage-gated conductance activation. We conclude that the electrical properties of spines promote nonlinear dendritic processing and associated forms of plasticity and storage, thus fundamentally enhancing the computational capabilities of neurons.

  20. Computed tomography of the asymptomatic postsurgical lumbar spine: analysis of the physiologic scar

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, I.F.; Lin, J.P.; Benjamin, M.V.; Kricheff, I.I.

    1984-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT) has been shown to be an effective noninvasive means of imaging the lumbar spine in patients with suspected disk disease. The clinical and radiographic evaluation, however, of patients with new or recurrent symptoms after surgery for disk disease is fraught with difficulty. This report describes CT changes seen in seven asymptomatic volunteers scanned at various intervals after disk surgery and discusses the implications of these findings.

  1. Regulation of spine morphology and spine density by NMDA receptor signaling in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ultanir, Sila K.; Kim, Ji-Eun; Hall, Benjamin J.; Deerinck, Thomas; Ellisman, Mark; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the major sites of excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS, and their size and density influence the functioning of neuronal circuits. Here we report that NMDA receptor signaling plays a critical role in regulating spine size and density in the developing cortex. Genetic deletion of the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor in the cortex leads to a decrease in spine density and an increase in spine head size in cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons. This process is accompanied by an increase in the presynaptic axon bouton volume and the postsynaptic density area, as well as an increase in the miniature excitatory postsynaptic current amplitude and frequency. These observations indicate that NMDA receptors regulate synapse structure and function in the developing cortex. PMID:18048342

  2. Regulation of spine morphology and spine density by NMDA receptor signaling in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ultanir, Sila K; Kim, Ji-Eun; Hall, Benjamin J; Deerinck, Thomas; Ellisman, Mark; Ghosh, Anirvan

    2007-12-04

    Dendritic spines are the major sites of excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS, and their size and density influence the functioning of neuronal circuits. Here we report that NMDA receptor signaling plays a critical role in regulating spine size and density in the developing cortex. Genetic deletion of the NR1 subunit of the NMDA receptor in the cortex leads to a decrease in spine density and an increase in spine head size in cortical layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons. This process is accompanied by an increase in the presynaptic axon bouton volume and the postsynaptic density area, as well as an increase in the miniature excitatory postsynaptic current amplitude and frequency. These observations indicate that NMDA receptors regulate synapse structure and function in the developing cortex.

  3. Kinase regulation by hydrophobic spine assembly in cancer.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiancheng; Ahuja, Lalima G; Meharena, Hiruy S; Kannan, Natarajan; Kornev, Alexandr P; Taylor, Susan S; Shaw, Andrey S

    2015-01-01

    A new model of kinase regulation based on the assembly of hydrophobic spines has been proposed. Changes in their positions can explain the mechanism of kinase activation. Here, we examined mutations in human cancer for clues about the regulation of the hydrophobic spines by focusing initially on mutations to Phe. We identified a selected number of Phe mutations in a small group of kinases that included BRAF, ABL1, and the epidermal growth factor receptor. Testing some of these mutations in BRAF, we found that one of the mutations impaired ATP binding and catalytic activity but promoted noncatalytic allosteric functions. Other Phe mutations functioned to promote constitutive catalytic activity. One of these mutations revealed a previously underappreciated hydrophobic surface that functions to position the dynamic regulatory αC-helix. This supports the key role of the C-helix as a signal integration motif for coordinating multiple elements of the kinase to create an active conformation. The importance of the hydrophobic space around the αC-helix was further tested by studying a V600F mutant, which was constitutively active in the absence of the negative charge that is associated with the common V600E mutation. Many hydrophobic mutations strategically localized along the C-helix can thus drive kinase activation.

  4. Lumbar spine anomalies in a pycnodysostosis case.

    PubMed

    Beguiristain, J L; Arriola, F J; Leyes, M

    1995-01-01

    We report a case of pycnodysostosis in which several clefts in the laminas, interarticular parts, and pedicles of the whole lumbar spine were revealed for the first time on CT. We review similar findings in the literature, and discuss their pathogenesis.

  5. Cellular Therapy to Obtain Spine Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    paraspinous musculature. To prolong cell survival and insure cells are maintained at the target site, we have encapsulated them in a nondegradable...through encapsulation . Here we provide preliminary data; demonstrating spine fusion using this system at 6 weeks after induction. This is the first step

  6. Biomechanics of the Flexion of Spine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Harry K.; Aurora, T. S.

    1991-01-01

    The forces and torques experienced by the spine are examined to understand, and possibly avoid, low back pain. The structure, degrees of freedom, forces and torques when lifting objects, an experimental study, and other factors affecting the back are discussed. (KR)

  7. Neglected Thoraco Lumbar Traumatic Spine Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Khatri, Kavin; Sharma, Vijay; Gupta, Babita; Gamanagatti, Shivanand

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To outline the etiology, complications and management difficulties encountered in the management of neglected thoracolumbar spine injuries. Overview of Literature The English literature describes overlooked diagnosis as the most common cause of neglected spine injuries. However, the reasons differ in developing or under-developed nations. Moreover, there is scarcity of literature about the neglected spinal injuries. Methods Patients presenting with thoracolumbar traumatic injuries who had not received any form of treatment for more than three weeks were included in the study. The demographic details, operative procedure performed and complications encountered, along with American Spinal Injury Association grade and spinal cord independence measure score recorded on the history sheets were noted. The data were analyzed. Results Forty patients were included in the study. Inadequate treatment at the first contact hospital (45%) followed by late presentation (38%) and missed injury (17%) were the major etiological factors for the neglected traumatic injuries in the thoracolumbar spine. The most common complications seen in the management of these cases were pressure sores (58%), back pain (57%), urinary tract infection (42%) and residual kyphotic deformity (42%). Conclusions Management of neglected thoracolumbar injuries is challenging. The delay in presentation should not prevent spine surgeon in proceeding with operative intervention as good results can be expected. PMID:27559447

  8. Ion focusing

    DOEpatents

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Baird, Zane; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2017-01-17

    The invention generally relates to apparatuses for focusing ions at or above ambient pressure and methods of use thereof. In certain embodiments, the invention provides an apparatus for focusing ions that includes an electrode having a cavity, at least one inlet within the electrode configured to operatively couple with an ionization source, such that discharge generated by the ionization source is injected into the cavity of the electrode, and an outlet. The cavity in the electrode is shaped such that upon application of voltage to the electrode, ions within the cavity are focused and directed to the outlet, which is positioned such that a proximal end of the outlet receives the focused ions and a distal end of the outlet is open to ambient pressure.

  9. Ion focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Baird, Zane; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2015-11-10

    The invention generally relates to apparatuses for focusing ions at or above ambient pressure and methods of use thereof. In certain embodiments, the invention provides an apparatus for focusing ions that includes an electrode having a cavity, at least one inlet within the electrode configured to operatively couple with an ionization source, such that discharge generated by the ionization source is injected into the cavity of the electrode, and an outlet. The cavity in the electrode is shaped such that upon application of voltage to the electrode, ions within the cavity are focused and directed to the outlet, which is positioned such that a proximal end of the outlet receives the focused ions and a distal end of the outlet is open to ambient pressure.

  10. The Michigan Spine Surgery Improvement Collaborative: a statewide Collaborative Quality Initiative.

    PubMed

    Chang, Victor; Schwalb, Jason M; Nerenz, David R; Pietrantoni, Lisa; Jones, Sharon; Jankowski, Michelle; Oja-Tebbe, Nancy; Bartol, Stephen; Abdulhak, Muwaffak

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT Given the scrutiny of spine surgery by policy makers, spine surgeons are motivated to demonstrate and improve outcomes, by determining which patients will and will not benefit from surgery, and to reduce costs, often by reducing complications. Insurers are similarly motivated. In 2013, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan (BCBSM) and Blue Care Network (BCN) established the Michigan Spine Surgery Improvement Collaborative (MSSIC) as a Collaborative Quality Initiative (CQI). MSSIC is one of the newest of 21 other CQIs that have significantly improved-and continue to improve-the quality of patient care throughout the state of Michigan. METHODS MSSIC focuses on lumbar and cervical spine surgery, specifically indications such as stenosis, disk herniation, and degenerative disease. Surgery for tumors, traumatic fractures, deformity, scoliosis, and acute spinal cord injury are currently not within the scope of MSSIC. Starting in 2014, MSSIC consisted of 7 hospitals and in 2015 included another 15 hospitals, for a total of 22 hospitals statewide. A standardized data set is obtained by data abstractors, who are funded by BCBSM/BCN. Variables of interest include indications for surgery, baseline patient-reported outcome measures, and medical history. These are obtained within 30 days of surgery. Outcome instruments used include the EQ-5D general health state score (0 being worst and 100 being the best health one can imagine) and EQ-5D-3 L. For patients undergoing lumbar surgery, a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale for leg and back pain and the Oswestry Disability Index for back pain are collected. For patients undergoing cervical surgery, a 0 to 10 numeric rating scale for arm and neck pain, Neck Disability Index, and the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association score are collected. Surgical details, postoperative hospital course, and patient-reported outcome measures are collected at 90-day, 1-year, and 2-year intervals. RESULTS As of July 1, 2015, a total of 6397 cases

  11. Principles of Long-Term Dynamics of Dendritic Spines

    PubMed Central

    Yasumatsu, Nobuaki; Matsuzaki, Masanori; Miyazaki, Takashi; Noguchi, Jun; Kasai, Haruo

    2008-01-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) of synapse strength requires enlargement of dendritic spines on cerebral pyramidal neurons. Long-term depression (LTD) is linked to spine shrinkage. Indeed, spines are dynamic structures: they form, change their shapes and volumes or can disappear in the space of hours. Do all such changes result from synaptic activity, or do some changes result from intrinsic processes? How do enlargement and shrinkage of spines relate to elimination and generation of spines, and how do these processes contribute to the stationary distribution of spine volumes? To answer these questions, we recorded the volumes of many individual spines daily for several days using two-photon imaging of CA1 pyramidal neurons in cultured slices of rat hippocampus between postnatal day 17 to 23. With normal synaptic transmission, spines often changed volume or were created or eliminated, thereby showing activity-dependent plasticity. However, we found that spines changed volume even after we blocked synaptic activity, reflecting a native instability of these small structures over the long term. Such “intrinsic fluctuations” showed unique dependence on spine volume. A mathematical model constructed from these data and the theory of random fluctuations explains population behaviors of spines, such as rates of elimination and generation, stationary distribution of volumes and the long-term persistence of large spines. Our study finds that generation and elimination of spines are more prevalent than previously believed, and spine volume shows significant correlation with its age and life expectancy. The population dynamics of spines also predict key psychological features of memory. PMID:19074033

  12. [Symptoms. Localizations: knee, hip, hands, spine, other localizations].

    PubMed

    Pérez Martín, Álvaro

    2014-01-01

    The symptoms of osteoarthritis vary widely from patient to patient, depending especially on the localization on the disease. There is a poor correlation between radiological involvement and pain. In general, symptom onset is gradual and symptoms increase slowly but progressively. The most commonly affected joints are the knees, hips, hands, and spine. The main signs and symptoms are pain, stiffness, joint deformity, and crepitus. Pain is mechanical and its causes are multifactorial; in the initial phases, pain usually manifests in self-limiting episodes but may subsequently be almost constant. The criteria of the American college of Rheumatology for the classification of osteoarthritis of the knee, hip and hands are an aid to classification and standardization but are not useful for diagnosis. Hip osteoarthritis usually produces inguinal pain in the internal and anterior sections of the muscle extending to the knee and, with progression, tends to limit mobility. Knee osteoarthritis is more frequent in women and is usually associated with hand osteoarthritis and obesity. In hand osteoarthritis, the most commonly affected joints are the distal interphalangeal joints, followed by the proximal interphalangeal joints and the trapeziometacarpal joints; the development of Heberden and Bouchard nodes is common; involvement of the trapeziometacarpal joint is called rhizarthrosis and is one of the forms of osteoarthritis that produces the greatest limitation on hand function. Osteoarthritis of the spine affects the facet joints and the vertebral bodies. Other, less frequent, localizations are the foot, elbow and shoulder, which are generally secondary forms of osteoarthritis.

  13. First Confirmed Metastatic Adamantinoma of the Spine: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Morales Ciancio, Ruben A.; Gasbarrini, Alessandro; Boriani, Stefano; Gambarotti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report and literature review. Objective To present the first case of metastatic adamantinoma of the spine with immunohistochemical confirmation and an updated literature review. Summary of Background Data Spinal metastatic disease could be difficult to diagnose because of the multiple differential diagnoses involved. Spinal surgeons must be aware of unusual primary extra-axial tumors that metastasize to the spine because in certain cases the primary surgery must determine the prognosis of this lesion. Methods We present a fully documented case of a middle-aged man with tibial adamantinoma who developed spine metastasis, confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A literature review was done. Results Based on clinical, imaging, and pathology findings, we provide evidence for the first proven metastatic adamantinoma of the spine, adding this condition to the long list of differential diagnoses of secondary spinal disease. Conclusions Adamantinoma is a very rare bone tumor representing ∼1% of primary bone tumors. Spinal metastatic adamantinoma with immunohistochemical confirmation has not been described previously. Due to the lack of specific image findings or serum markers and multiple differential diagnoses, biopsy with immunohistochemical confirmation is mandatory, because “en block resection” might prove to be curative treatment. PMID:26225294

  14. First Confirmed Metastatic Adamantinoma of the Spine: Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Morales Ciancio, Ruben A; Gasbarrini, Alessandro; Boriani, Stefano; Gambarotti, Marco

    2015-08-01

    Study Design Case report and literature review. Objective To present the first case of metastatic adamantinoma of the spine with immunohistochemical confirmation and an updated literature review. Summary of Background Data Spinal metastatic disease could be difficult to diagnose because of the multiple differential diagnoses involved. Spinal surgeons must be aware of unusual primary extra-axial tumors that metastasize to the spine because in certain cases the primary surgery must determine the prognosis of this lesion. Methods We present a fully documented case of a middle-aged man with tibial adamantinoma who developed spine metastasis, confirmed by immunohistochemistry. A literature review was done. Results Based on clinical, imaging, and pathology findings, we provide evidence for the first proven metastatic adamantinoma of the spine, adding this condition to the long list of differential diagnoses of secondary spinal disease. Conclusions Adamantinoma is a very rare bone tumor representing ∼1% of primary bone tumors. Spinal metastatic adamantinoma with immunohistochemical confirmation has not been described previously. Due to the lack of specific image findings or serum markers and multiple differential diagnoses, biopsy with immunohistochemical confirmation is mandatory, because "en block resection" might prove to be curative treatment.

  15. Cortical regulation of striatal medium spiny neuron dendritic remodeling in parkinsonism: modulation of glutamate release reverses dopamine depletion-induced dendritic spine loss.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Bonnie G; Neely, M Diana; Deutch, Ariel Y

    2010-10-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) receive glutamatergic afferents from the cerebral cortex and dopaminergic inputs from the substantia nigra (SN). Striatal dopamine loss decreases the number of MSN dendritic spines. This loss of spines has been suggested to reflect the removal of tonic dopamine inhibitory control over corticostriatal glutamatergic drive, with increased glutamate release culminating in MSN spine loss. We tested this hypothesis in two ways. We first determined in vivo if decortication reverses or prevents dopamine depletion-induced spine loss by placing motor cortex lesions 4 weeks after, or at the time of, 6-hydroxydopamine lesions of the SN. Animals were sacrificed 4 weeks after cortical lesions. Motor cortex lesions significantly reversed the loss of MSN spines elicited by dopamine denervation; a similar effect was observed in the prevention experiment. We then determined if modulating glutamate release in organotypic cocultures prevented spine loss. Treatment of the cultures with the mGluR2/3 agonist LY379268 to suppress corticostriatal glutamate release completely blocked spine loss in dopamine-denervated cultures. These studies provide the first evidence to show that MSN spine loss associated with parkinsonism can be reversed and point to suppression of corticostriatal glutamate release as a means of slowing progression in Parkinson's disease.

  16. Rationale and Design for the Intramyocardial Injection of Autologous Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cells for Patients with Chronic Ischemic Heart Disease and Left Ventricular Dysfunction Trial (FOCUS)

    PubMed Central

    Willerson, James T.; Perin, Emerson C.; Ellis, Stephen G.; Pepine, Carl J.; Henry, Timothy D.; Zhao, David X.M.; Lai, Dejian; Penn, Marc S.; Byrne, Barry J.; Silva, G; Gee, Adrian; Traverse, Jay H.; Hatzopoulos, Antonis K.; Forder, John R.; Martin, Daniel; Kronenberg, Marvin; Taylor, Doris A.; Cogle, Christopher R.; Baraniuk, Sarah; Westbrook, Lynette; Sayre, Shelly L.; Vojvodic, Rachel W.; Gordon, David J.; Skarlatos, Sonia I.; Moyé, Lemuel A.; Simari, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    Background The increasing worldwide prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) continues to challenge the medical community. Management options include medical and revascularization therapy. Despite advances in these methods, CAD is a leading cause of recurrent ischemia and heart failure, posing significant morbidity and mortality risks along with increasing health costs in a large patient population worldwide. Trial Design The Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN) was established by the National Institutes of Health to investigate the role of cell therapy in the treatment of chronic cardiovascular disease. FOCUS is a CCTRN-designed randomized Phase II, placebo-controlled clinical trial that will assess the effect of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells delivered transendocardially to patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction and symptomatic heart failure or angina. All patients need to have limiting ischemia by reversible ischemia on SPECT assessment. Results After thoughtful consideration of both statistical and clinical principles, we will recruit 87 patients (58 cell treated and 29 placebo) to receive either bone marrow–derived stem cells or placebo. Myocardial perfusion, LV contractile performance, and maximal oxygen consumption are the primary outcome measures. Conclusions The designed clinical trial will provide a sound assessment of the effect of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells in improving blood flow and contractile function of the heart. The target population is patients with CAD and LV dysfunction with limiting angina or symptomatic heat failure. Patient safety is a central concern of the CCTRN, and patients will be followed for at least 5 years. PMID:20691824

  17. The impact on cardiac diagnosis and mortality of focused transthoracic echocardiography in hip fracture surgery patients with increased risk of cardiac disease: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Canty, D J; Royse, C F; Kilpatrick, D; Bowyer, A; Royse, A G

    2012-11-01

    Hip fracture surgery is associated with a high rate of mortality and morbidity; heart disease is the leading cause and is often unrecognised and inadequately treated. Pre-operative focused transthoracic echocardiography by anaesthetists frequently influences management, but mortality outcome studies have not been performed to date. Mortality over the 12 months after hip fracture surgery, in 64 patients at risk of cardiac disease who received pre-operative echocardiography, was compared with 66 randomised historical controls who did not receive echocardiography. Mortality was lower in the group that received echocardiography over the 30 days (4.7% vs 15.2%, log rank p=0.047) and 12 months after surgery (17.1% vs 33.3%, log rank p=0.031). Hazard of death was also reduced with pre-operative echocardiography over 12 months after adjustment for known risk factors (hazard ratio 0.41, 95% CI 0.2-0.85, p=0.016). Pre-operative echocardiography was not associated with a delay in surgery. These data support a randomised controlled trial to confirm these findings.

  18. Random positions of dendritic spines in human cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Morales, Juan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Dar, Mor; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-07-23

    Dendritic spines establish most excitatory synapses in the brain and are located in Purkinje cell's dendrites along helical paths, perhaps maximizing the probability to contact different axons. To test whether spine helixes also occur in neocortex, we reconstructed >500 dendritic segments from adult human cortex obtained from autopsies. With Fourier analysis and spatial statistics, we analyzed spine position along apical and basal dendrites of layer 3 pyramidal neurons from frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortex. Although we occasionally detected helical positioning, for the great majority of dendrites we could not reject the null hypothesis of spatial randomness in spine locations, either in apical or basal dendrites, in neurons of different cortical areas or among spines of different volumes and lengths. We conclude that in adult human neocortex spine positions are mostly random. We discuss the relevance of these results for spine formation and plasticity and their functional impact for cortical circuits.

  19. Random Positions of Dendritic Spines in Human Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Juan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Dar, Mor; Fernaud, Isabel; Rodríguez, Angel; Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; DeFelipe, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Dendritic spines establish most excitatory synapses in the brain and are located in Purkinje cell's dendrites along helical paths, perhaps maximizing the probability to contact different axons. To test whether spine helixes also occur in neocortex, we reconstructed >500 dendritic segments from adult human cortex obtained from autopsies. With Fourier analysis and spatial statistics, we analyzed spine position along apical and basal dendrites of layer 3 pyramidal neurons from frontal, temporal, and cingulate cortex. Although we occasionally detected helical positioning, for the great majority of dendrites we could not reject the null hypothesis of spatial randomness in spine locations, either in apical or basal dendrites, in neurons of different cortical areas or among spines of different volumes and lengths. We conclude that in adult human neocortex spine positions are mostly random. We discuss the relevance of these results for spine formation and plasticity and their functional impact for cortical circuits. PMID:25057209

  20. Evaluation and management of 2 ferocactus spines in the orbit.

    PubMed

    Russell, David J; Kim, Tim I; Kubis, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman, who had fallen face first in a cactus 1 week earlier, presented with a small, mobile, noninflamed subcutaneous nodule at the rim of her right lateral orbit with no other functional deficits. A CT scan was obtained, which revealed a 4-cm intraorbital tubular-shaped foreign body resembling a large cactus spine. A second preoperative CT scan, obtained for an intraoperative guidance system, demonstrated a second cactus spine, which was initially not seen on the first CT scan. Both spines were removed surgically without complication. The authors discuss factors that can cause diagnosis delay, review the radiographic features of cactus spines, and discuss the often times benign clinical course of retained cactus spine foreign bodies. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report of cactus spines in the orbit. Health-care professionals should have a low threshold for imaging in cases of traumatic injuries involving cactus spines.

  1. Gout in the Spine: Imaging, Diagnosis, and Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Toprover, Michael; Krasnokutsky, Svetlana; Pillinger, Michael H

    2015-12-01

    Gout is characterized by the deposition of monosodium urate crystals and by acute and chronic inflammation in response to crystals so deposited. Multiple case reports and series describe the deposition of monosodium urate in the spine as a rare manifestation of gout, but the actual prevalence of spinal involvement is unknown and likely to be higher than generally anticipated. Here we review the characteristics of 131 previously reported cases of spinal involvement in gout. We focus in particular on the use of imaging modalities and the extent to which they correlate with presenting symptoms and tissue diagnoses. The recent innovation of using dual-energy computerized tomography to identify urate crystal deposition holds promise for reducing the need for surgical intervention and for establishing a true prevalence rate for spinal gout.

  2. Congenital anomalies of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Klimo, Paul; Rao, Ganesh; Brockmeyer, Douglas

    2007-07-01

    There are numerous congenital anomalies of the cervical spine. They can be simple and clinically inconsequential to complex with serious neurologic and structural implications. They can occur in isolation or as one of several maldeveloped organs in the patients. Many are discovered incidentally. The more common anomalies seen by pediatric spine surgeons include defects of the anterior or posterior arches of C1, occipital assimilation of the atlas, basilar invagination or impression, os odontoideum, and Klippel-Feil syndrome. Management begins with a detailed history, physical examination, and imaging studies. In general, those lesions that are causing or have caused neurologic injury, chronic pain, or spinal deformity or place the patient at high risk for developing these require treatment.

  3. Primary bone tumors of the spine.

    PubMed

    Cañete, A Navas; Bloem, H L; Kroon, H M

    2016-04-01

    Primary bone tumors of the spine are less common than metastases or multiple myeloma. Based on the patient's age and the radiologic pattern and topography of the tumor, a very approximate differential diagnosis can be established for an osseous vertebral lesion. This article shows the radiologic manifestations of the principal primary bone tumors of the spine from a practical point of view, based on our personal experience and a review of the literature. If bone metastases, multiple myeloma, lymphomas, hemangiomas, and enostoses are excluded, only eight types of tumors account for 80% of all vertebral tumors. These are chordomas, osteoblastomas, chondrosarcomas, giant-cell tumors, osteoid osteomas, Ewing's sarcomas, osteosarcomas, and aneurysmal bone cysts.

  4. Choroid Melanoma Metastasis to Spine: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Mandaliya, Hiren; Singh, Nandini; George, Sanila; George, Mathew

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic choroid melanoma is a highly malignant disease with a limited life expectancy. The liver is the most common site for metastasis of uveal melanoma followed by lung, bone, skin, and subcutaneous tissue. Metastasis from choroidal melanoma usually occurs within the first five years of treatment for primary tumours. Metastatic choroid melanoma to the spine/vertebrae is extremely rare. We report the first case of spinal metastasis from choroid melanoma in a 61-year-old man who had been treated for primary ocular melanoma three years earlier with radioactive plaque brachytherapy. Synchronously, at the time of metastasis, he was also diagnosed as having a new primary lung adenocarcinoma as well. The only other case reported on vertebral metastasis from malignant melanoma of choroid in literature in which primary choroid melanoma was enucleated. PMID:26989537

  5. [Psoas abscess and lumbar spine osteomyelitis: case report].

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana M; Schmalbach, Lauwence A

    2016-10-01

    Psoas abscess is a common disease in children. It can have a nonspecific clinical presentation, insidious onset and sometimes fever. The most common type in children is the primary one; however, it can sometimes be of secondary origin and associated with severe infections such as osteomyelitis so a high index of suspicion is required to detect and treat it promptly. We present an unusual case of psoas abscess with infiltration of the vertebral body of L2 in a 14 year old male patient previously healthy with no history of trauma or fever on admission. X-ray and ultrasound were performed but the diagnosis was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. With positive blood cultures for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus he completed 2 weeks of intravenous antibiotic therapy and 4 weeks of oral antibiotic therapy with blood cultures negativization and resolution of symptoms.

  6. Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma of the spine. Report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Aquilina, Kristian; Lim, Christopher; Kamel, Mahmoud Hamdy; Marks, Charles J; O'Sullivan, Michael G; Keohane, Catherine

    2005-11-01

    Epithelioid hemangioendothelioma (EH) is a rare tumor of vascular origin. The authors describe two cases of spinal EH, one involving the T-10 vertebra and the second involving the upper cervical spine. In the first case the patient underwent resection of the tumor; this case represents the longest reported follow-up period for spinal EH. In the second case, extensive involvement of C-2, C-3, and C-4 as well as encasement of both vertebral arteries precluded safe tumor resection, and posterior occipitocervical stabilization was performed. The patient subsequently died of metastatic disease. The findings in these two cases underscore the difficulty in predicting the clinical behavior of spinal EH based solely on histological and clinical features as well as the uncertainty of the roles of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy in the oncological management of a spinal tumor for which clinical data are very limited.

  7. Fractures of the articular processes of the cervical spine

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, J.H.; Goldstein, S.J.

    1982-08-01

    Fractures of the articular processes occurred in 16 (20.8%) of 77 patients with cervical spine fractures as demonstrated by multidirectional tomography. Plain films demonstrated the fractures in only two patients. Acute cervical radiculopathy occurred in five of the patients with articular process fractures (superior process, two cases; inferior process, three cases). Persistent neck pain occurred in one other patient without radiculopathy. Three patients suffered spinal cord damage at the time of injury, which was not the result of the articular process fracture itself. In the other seven cases, no definite sequelae occurred. However, disruption of the facet joint may predispose to early degenerative joint disease and chronic pain; unilateral or bilateral facet dislocation was present in five patients. In patients with cervical trauma who develop cervical radiculopathy, tomography should be performed to evaluate the articular processes.

  8. Heritability of Thoracic Spine Curvature and Genetic Correlations With Other Spine Traits: The Framingham Study

    PubMed Central

    Yau, Michelle S; Demissie, Serkalem; Zhou, Yanhua; Anderson, Dennis E; Lorbergs, Amanda L; Kiel, Douglas P; Allaire, Brett T; Yang, Laiji; Cupples, L Adrienne; Travison, Thomas G; Bouxsein, Mary L; Karasik, David; Samelson, Elizabeth J

    2017-01-01

    Hyperkyphosis is a common spinal disorder in older adults, characterized by excessive forward curvature of the thoracic spine and adverse health outcomes. The etiology of hyperkyphosis has not been firmly established, but may be related to changes that occur with aging in the vertebrae, discs, joints, and muscles, which function as a unit to support the spine. Determining the contribution of genetics to thoracic spine curvature and the degree of genetic sharing among co-occurring measures of spine health may provide insight into the etiology of hyperkyphosis. The purpose of our study was to estimate heritability of thoracic spine curvature using T4–T12 kyphosis (Cobb) angle and genetic correlations between thoracic spine curvature and vertebral fracture, intervertebral disc height narrowing, facet joint osteoarthritis (OA), lumbar spine volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), and paraspinal muscle area and density, which were all assessed from computed tomography (CT) images. Participants included 2063 women and men in the second and third generation offspring of the original cohort of the Framingham Study. Heritability of kyphosis angle, adjusted for age, sex, and weight, was 54% (95% confidence interval [CI], 43% to 64%). We found moderate genetic correlations between kyphosis angle and paraspinal muscle area ( ρ^G, −0.46; 95% CI, −0.67 to −0.26), vertebral fracture ( ρ^G, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.18 to 0.61), vBMD ( ρ^G,−0.23; 95% CI, −0.41 to −0.04), and paraspinal muscle density ( ρ^G,−0.22; 95% CI, −0.48 to 0.03). Genetic correlations between kyphosis angle and disc height narrowing ( ρ^G, 0.17; 95% CI, −0.05 to 0.38) and facet joint OA ( ρ^G, 0.05; 95% CI, −0.15 to 0.24) were low. Thoracic spine curvature may be heritable and share genetic factors with other age-related spine traits including trunk muscle size, vertebral fracture, and bone mineral density. PMID:27455046

  9. [Serious thromboembolitic incidents during lumbar spine phlebography].

    PubMed

    Gatti, P; Valat, J P; Videgrain, M

    1983-02-01

    From a series of 400 cases of lumbar spine phlebography by selective catheterisation, 4 serious thrombo-embolic episodes were observed, including 2 cases of severe pulmonary embolism which responded favourably to medical treatment. In 3 cases, risk factors were found (prolonged immobilisation in bed, past history of phlebitis). One case developed severe phlebitis of the lower limbs despite prophylactic treatment with low dose calcium heparin. In the other cases, no anti-coagulant therapy was prescribed before or during the examination.

  10. Mesenchymal stem cells in regenerative medicine: Focus on articular cartilage and intervertebral disc regeneration.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Stephen M; Kalamegam, Gauthaman; Pushparaj, Peter N; Matta, Csaba; Memic, Adnan; Khademhosseini, Ali; Mobasheri, Reza; Poletti, Fabian L; Hoyland, Judith A; Mobasheri, Ali

    2016-04-15

    Musculoskeletal disorders represent a major cause of disability and morbidity globally and result in enormous costs for health and social care systems. Development of cell-based therapies is rapidly proliferating in a number of disease areas, including musculoskeletal disorders. Novel biological therapies that can effectively treat joint and spine degeneration are high priorities in regenerative medicine. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow (BM-MSCs), adipose tissue (AD-MSCs) and umbilical cord (UC-MSCs) show considerable promise for use in cartilage and intervertebral disc (IVD) repair. This review article focuses on stem cell-based therapeutics for cartilage and IVD repair in the context of the rising global burden of musculoskeletal disorders. We discuss the biology MSCs and chondroprogenitor cells and specifically focus on umbilical cord/Wharton's jelly derived MSCs and examine their potential for regenerative applications. We also summarize key components of the molecular machinery and signaling pathways responsible for the control of chondrogenesis and explore biomimetic scaffolds and biomaterials for articular cartilage and IVD regeneration. This review explores the exciting opportunities afforded by MSCs and discusses the challenges associated with cartilage and IVD repair and regeneration. There are still many technical challenges associated with isolating, expanding, differentiating, and pre-conditioning MSCs for subsequent implantation into degenerate joints and the spine. However, the prospect of combining biomaterials and cell-based therapies that incorporate chondrocytes, chondroprogenitors and MSCs leads to the optimistic view that interdisciplinary approaches will lead to significant breakthroughs in regenerating musculoskeletal tissues, such as the joint and the spine in the near future.

  11. Developmental steps of the human cervical spine: parameters for evaluation of skeletal maturation stages.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Marcos Fabio Henriques; de Lima, Rodrigo Lopes; De-Ary-Pires, Bernardo; Pires-Neto, Mário Ary; de Ary-Pires, Ricardo

    2010-06-01

    The central objective of this investigation was to focus on the development of the cervical spine observed by lateral cephalometric radiological images of children and adolescents (6-16 years old). A sample of 26 individuals (12 girls and 14 boys) was classified according to stages of cervical spine maturation in two subcategories: group I (initiation phase) and group II (acceleration phase). The morphology of the cervical spine was assessed by lateral cephalometric radiographs obtained in accordance with an innovative method for establishing a standardized head posture. A total of 29 linear variables and 5 angular variables were used to clarify the dimensions of the cervical vertebrae. The results suggest that a few measurements can be used as parameters of vertebral maturation both for males and females. The aforementioned measurements include the inferior depth of C2-C4, the inferior depth of C5, the anterior height of C4-C5, and the posterior height of C5. We propose original morphological parameters that may prove remarkably useful in the determination of bone maturational stages of the cervical spine in children and adolescents.

  12. Reelin Regulates the Maturation of Dendritic Spines, Synaptogenesis and Glial Ensheathment of Newborn Granule Cells.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Carles; Masachs, Nuria; Exposito-Alonso, David; Martínez, Albert; Teixeira, Cátia M; Fernaud, Isabel; Pujadas, Lluís; Ulloa, Fausto; Comella, Joan X; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel; Soriano, Eduardo

    2016-09-13

    The Reelin pathway is essential for both neural migration and for the development and maturation of synaptic connections. However, its role in adult synaptic formation and remodeling is still being investigated. Here, we investigated the impact of the Reelin/Dab1 pathway on the synaptogenesis of newborn granule cells (GCs) in the young-adult mouse hippocampus. We show that neither Reelin overexpression nor the inactivation of its intracellular adapter, Dab1, substantially alters dendritic spine numbers in these neurons. In contrast, 3D-electron microscopy (focused ion beam milling/scanning electron microscope) revealed that dysregulation of the Reelin/Dab1 pathway leads to both transient and permanent changes in the types and morphology of dendritic spines, mainly altering mushroom, filopodial, and branched GC spines. We also found that the Reelin/Dab1 pathway controls synaptic configuration of presynaptic boutons in the dentate gyrus, with its dysregulation leading to a substantial decrease in multi-synaptic bouton innervation. Lastly, we show that the Reelin/Dab1 pathway controls astroglial ensheathment of synapses. Thus, the Reelin pathway is a key regulator of adult-generated GC integration, by controlling dendritic spine types and shapes, their synaptic innervation patterns, and glial ensheathment. These findings may help to better understanding of hippocampal circuit alterations in neurological disorders in which the Reelin pathway is implicated.

  13. Tuberculosis of spine: An experience of 30 cases over two years

    PubMed Central

    Patankar, Amey P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Tuberculosis of spine is still a very common condition in India. Here, the results of 30 cases of tuberculosis of spine treated in SSG Hospital, Vadodara, Gujarat, in the last two years, are reviewed. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 patients with tuberculosis of spine were treated in SSG Hospital in the last two years. They were classified into three groups, based on the GATA, GATA = Gulhane Askeri Tip Akademisi (Gulhane Military Medical Academy) classification for spinal tuberculosis, with few modifications. Their neurologic status was evaluated by the Frankel's grading. All the patients were started on four drug anti-tuberculosis medication given every alternate day as per the DOTS and RNTCP program of the Government of India for 6 months. Patients in group 1 were treated by bed rest, analgesics, and antituberculous drugs after confirmation of the diagnosis by CT-guided biopsy. Patients in group 2 were treated by surgical of USG-guided aspiration of abscesses followed by full course of antituberculous drugs. Twenty-one patients in group 3 underwent surgery. A single-stage anterior decompression and anterior fixation was done in all the cases. Results: All the nine patients in group I and 2 responded well to medical management and were cured of the disease. Out of the 21 operated patients, 19 had significant improvement in neurological status and return to their normal activities. The first operated patient died. The neurological status of one patient did not improve till 1 month after surgery and was lost to follow-up. Thus, 100% of group 1 and 2 patients were cured of the disease and 90% of group 3 patients had good neurological recovery. Conclusions: If treated timely and adequately, the outcome for tuberculosis of spine is relatively good. Anterolateral approach to the spine with decompression and fixation gives good result with respect to neurological function. PMID:27366249

  14. MR and CT image fusion of the cervical spine: a noninvasive alternative to CT-myelography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Mirza, Sohail K.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Haynor, David R.

    2005-04-01

    CT-Myelography (CTM) is routinely used for planning surgery for degenerative disease of the spine, but its invasive nature, significant potential morbidity, and high costs make a noninvasive substitute desirable. We report our work on evaluating CT and MR image fusion as an alternative to CTM. Because the spine is only piecewise rigid, a multi-rigid approach to the registration of spinal CT and MR images was developed (SPIE 2004), in which the spine on CT images is first segmented into separate vertebrae, each of which is then rigidly registered with the corresponding vertebra on MR images. The results are then blended to obtain fusion images. Since they contain information from both modalities, we hypothesized that fusion images would be equivalent to CTM. To test this we selected 34 patients who had undergone MRI and CTM for degenerative disease of the cervical spine, and used the multi-rigid approach to produce fused images. A clinical vignette for each patient was created and presented along with either CT/MR fusion images or CTM images. A group of spine surgeons are asked to formulate detailed surgical plans based on each set of images, and the surgical plans are compared. A similar study assessing diagnostic agreement is being performed with neuroradiologists, who also assess the accuracy of registration. Our work to date has demonstrated the feasibility of segmentation and multi-rigid fusion in clinical cases and the acceptability of the questionnaire to physicians. Preliminary analysis of one surgeon's and one neuroradiologist"s evaluation has been performed.

  15. Paradoxical signaling regulates structural plasticity in dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Rangamani, Padmini; Levy, Michael G.; Khan, Shahid; Oster, George

    2016-01-01

    Transient spine enlargement (3- to 5-min timescale) is an important event associated with the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Many of the molecular mechanisms associated with transient spine enlargement have been identified experimentally. Here, we use a systems biology approach to construct a mathematical model of biochemical signaling and actin-mediated transient spine expansion in response to calcium influx caused by NMDA receptor activation. We have identified that a key feature of this signaling network is the paradoxical signaling loop. Paradoxical components act bifunctionally in signaling networks, and their role is to control both the activation and the inhibition of a desired response function (protein activity or spine volume). Using ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based modeling, we show that the dynamics of different regulators of transient spine expansion, including calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), RhoA, and Cdc42, and the spine volume can be described using paradoxical signaling loops. Our model is able to capture the experimentally observed dynamics of transient spine volume. Furthermore, we show that actin remodeling events provide a robustness to spine volume dynamics. We also generate experimentally testable predictions about the role of different components and parameters of the network on spine dynamics. PMID:27551076

  16. Dendritic spine geometry can localize GTPase signaling in neurons

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Samuel A.; Raghavachari, Sridhar; Lew, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the postsynaptic terminals of most excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Learning and memory are associated with long-lasting structural remodeling of dendritic spines through an actin-mediated process regulated by the Rho-family GTPases RhoA, Rac, and Cdc42. These GTPases undergo sustained activation after synaptic stimulation, but whereas Rho activity can spread from the stimulated spine, Cdc42 activity remains localized to the stimulated spine. Because Cdc42 itself diffuses rapidly in and out of the spine, the basis for the retention of Cdc42 activity in the stimulated spine long after synaptic stimulation has ceased is unclear. Here we model the spread of Cdc42 activation at dendritic spines by means of reaction-diffusion equations solved on spine-like geometries. Excitable behavior arising from positive feedback in Cdc42 activation leads to spreading waves of Cdc42 activity. However, because of the very narrow neck of the dendritic spine, wave propagation is halted through a phenomenon we term geometrical wave-pinning. We show that this can account for the localization of Cdc42 activity in the stimulated spine, and, of interest, retention is enhanced by high diffusivity of Cdc42. Our findings are broadly applicable to other instances of signaling in extreme geometries, including filopodia and primary cilia. PMID:26337387

  17. Focus-on-Teens, sexual risk-reduction intervention for high-school adolescents: impact on knowledge, change of risk-behaviours, and prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases.

    PubMed

    Gaydos, C A; Hsieh, Y-H; Galbraith, J S; Barnes, M; Waterfield, G; Stanton, B

    2008-10-01

    A community-based intervention, Focus-on-Kids (FOK) has demonstrated risk-behaviour reduction of urban youth. We modified FOK to Focus-on-Teens (FOT) for high schools. High school adolescents (n=1190) were enrolled over successive school semesters. The small-group sessions were presented during the school-lunch hours. Confidential surveys were conducted at baseline, immediate, six-, and 12-month postintervention for demographics, parental communication/monitoring, sexual risk behaviours and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)/HIV/condom-usage knowledge. Sexually active participants were encouraged to volunteer for urine-based STDs testing at the School-Based Health Centres. Many (47.4%) students reported having had sexual intercourse at baseline. Overall behaviours changed towards 'safer' sex behaviours (intent-to-use and using condoms, communicating with partner/parents about sex/condoms/STDs) with time (P<0.05). Proportion of students with complete correct knowledge of STDs/HIV increased to 88% at time 4 from 80% at baseline after adjusting for age, gender and sexual activity (P<0.05). High prevalence of STDs was detected in 875 participants who reported for urine testing at time 1: trichomonas, 11.8%; chlamydia, 10.1% and gonorrhoea, 4.1%. Prevalence decreased significantly for 310 participants who re-tested; chlamydia: 27.4% to 6.1% and gonorrhoea: 11.3% to 3.2%. FOT was successfully implemented as an STDs/HIV risk-reduction intervention. Sustained improvements of knowledge about STDs/HIV/condom usage, decreases in sexual risk behaviours supported the effectiveness of this intervention.

  18. Spine mineral change during osteoporosis therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, M.R.; Kolb, F.O.; Meier, K.A.; Schafer, S.A.

    1985-05-01

    Osteoporosis therapy has been handicapped by lack of means to quantitate the process. Dual photon absorptiometry (DPA) offers accurate (4%) and precise (2%) estimation of lumbar spine mineral. The authors followed 42 osteoporotics to determine response to therapy. There were 17 patients with normal menopause (NM), 4 with surgical menopause (SM), 3 with premature menopause (PM), and 18 with idiopathic osteoporoses (10). Intervals between DPA spine mineral estimation were 16.5 +- 5.2 mo. for NM, 14.3 +- 8.4 mo. for SM, 14.0 +- 7.5 mo. for PM and 16.7 +- 5.8 mo. for 10. Observed average percent change of spine mineral under therapy for those intervals was 5.2 +- 7.9% for NM, +7.3 +- 1.7% for SM, -2.4 +- 6.3% for PM and +1.8 +- 12.3% for 10. Therapy invariably was with Ca, low dose Premarin in NM and PM, often with phosphates in IO, sometimes with thiazides, often with Vitamin D and with occasional other modalities, including NaF. The authors find DPA is a cost-effective way to measure osteopenia in the osteoporeses, document response to therapy, identify need for therapy change when there is continued bone loss under therapy, and to encourage the patient's compliance with long-term, complex therapies.

  19. Astrocytes refine cortical connectivity at dendritic spines

    PubMed Central

    Risher, W Christopher; Patel, Sagar; Kim, Il Hwan; Uezu, Akiyoshi; Bhagat, Srishti; Wilton, Daniel K; Pilaz, Louis-Jan; Singh Alvarado, Jonnathan; Calhan, Osman Y; Silver, Debra L; Stevens, Beth; Calakos, Nicole; Soderling, Scott H; Eroglu, Cagla

    2014-01-01

    During cortical synaptic development, thalamic axons must establish synaptic connections despite the presence of the more abundant intracortical projections. How thalamocortical synapses are formed and maintained in this competitive environment is unknown. Here, we show that astrocyte-secreted protein hevin is required for normal thalamocortical synaptic connectivity in the mouse cortex. Absence of hevin results in a profound, long-lasting reduction in thalamocortical synapses accompanied by a transient increase in intracortical excitatory connections. Three-dimensional reconstructions of cortical neurons from serial section electron microscopy (ssEM) revealed that, during early postnatal development, dendritic spines often receive multiple excitatory inputs. Immuno-EM and confocal analyses revealed that majority of the spines with multiple excitatory contacts (SMECs) receive simultaneous thalamic and cortical inputs. Proportion of SMECs diminishes as the brain develops, but SMECs remain abundant in Hevin-null mice. These findings reveal that, through secretion of hevin, astrocytes control an important developmental synaptic refinement process at dendritic spines. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04047.001 PMID:25517933

  20. Surgery for blastomycosis of the spine.

    PubMed

    Dimar, John R; Puno, Rolando M; Nowacki, Michael R; Carreon, Leah Y

    2014-11-01

    Blastomycosis is a rare fungal infection that primarily produces acute lung infections but may disseminate to multiple sites, including the spine. Once vertebral involvement occurs, an untreated infection may result in vertebral body destruction and paraspinal and epidural abscess formation followed by neurologic injury and loss of structural integrity of the spine. We report the case of a 30-year-old man who had pulmonary blastomycosis (treated with oral itraconazole for 6 months) and presented with a 2-month history of mild thoracolumbar back pain and numbness and tingling in the lower extremities, but no neurologic deficits. Imaging revealed a destructive lesion of T11 with an extensive paravertebral and retropleural abscess tracking a spinal level above and below with extension into the spinal canal. The patient underwent incision and drainage, culture procurement and corpectomy of T11 with autogenous rib graft in a titanium cage, and, 1 week later, posterior fusion and instrumentation. Cultures were positive for Blastomycosis dermatitidis. Oral itraconazole was continued. Blastomycosis that disseminates to the spine may cause serious neurologic and structural complications. In most cases, long-term use of antifungal medication eradicates the infection. Should medical treatment fail, however, surgery is a useful option.

  1. Ten-year Biochemical Disease-free Survival After High-intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for Localized Prostate Cancer: Comparison with Four Different Generation Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, T.; Nakano, M.; Shoji, S.; Omata, T.; Harano, Y.; Nagata, Y.; Usui, Y.; Terachi, T.

    2010-03-09

    HIFU has been recognized as a minimally invasive treatment option for localized prostate cancer. The purpose of the study was to assess with a long-term outcome of HIFU for prostate cancer. From January 1999, a total of 657 patients who had HIFU with at least 2 year follow-up were treated with four different types of Sonablate registered (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, USA) devices. Thirty-three patients were treated with Sonablate registered 200 (S200) from 1999 to 2001, 406 patients with Sonablate registered 500 (S500) from 2001 to 2005, 200 patients with Sonablate registered 500 version 4 (V4) from 2005-2008 and 19 patients with Sonablate registered 500 TCM (TCM) from 2007. Biochemical disease-free survival rate (bDFS) in all patients was 59% in 8 years. bDFS in 8 years in patients with S200 and S500 groups were 55% and 56%, and bDFS in 4 and 2 years in patients with V4 and TCM group were 72% and 84%, respectively. bDFS in low, intermediate, and high risk groups were 75%, 54%, and 43% in S200/S500 and 93%, 72%, and 58% in V4/TCM group. Negative prostate biopsy rate after HIFU was 97% in S200, 79% in S500, 94% in V4 and 100% in TCM group. HIFU as primary therapy for prostate cancer is indicated in patients with low- and intermediate-risk (T1-T2b N0M0 disease, a Gleason score of <=7, a PSA level of <20 ng/mL) and a prostate volume of less than 40 mL. The rate of clinical outcome has significantly improved over the years due to technical improvements in the device.

  2. Seeding and transgenic overexpression of alpha-synuclein triggers dendritic spine pathology in the neocortex.

    PubMed

    Blumenstock, Sonja; Rodrigues, Eva F; Peters, Finn; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Schmidt, Felix; Giese, Armin; Herms, Jochen

    2017-03-28

    Although misfolded and aggregated α-synuclein (α-syn) is recognized in the disease progression of synucleinopathies, its role in the impairment of cortical circuitries and synaptic plasticity remains incompletely understood. We investigated how α-synuclein accumulation affects synaptic plasticity in the mouse somatosensory cortex using two distinct approaches. Long-term in vivo imaging of apical dendrites was performed in mice overexpressing wild-type human α-synuclein. Additionally, intracranial injection of preformed α-synuclein fibrils was performed to induce cortical α-syn pathology. We find that α-synuclein overexpressing mice show decreased spine density and abnormalities in spine dynamics in an age-dependent manner. We also provide evidence for the detrimental effects of seeded α-synuclein aggregates on dendritic architecture. We observed spine loss as well as dystrophic deformation of dendritic shafts in layer V pyramidal neurons. Our results provide a link to the pathophysiology underlying dementia associated with synucleinopathies and may enable the evaluation of potential drug candidates on dendritic spine pathology in vivo.

  3. Recurrent Laryngeal Edema Imitating Angioedema Caused by Dislocated Screw after Anterior Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wójtowicz, Piotr; Szafarowski, Tomasz; Migacz, Ewa; Krzeski, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The anterior cervical spine surgery is a common procedure to stabilize vertebrae damaged by various diseases. The plates and screws are usually used in the spine fixation. This kind of instrumentation may detach from the bones which is a rare but well-known complication. A 77-year-old male presented to the otorhinolaryngology department with throat pain, choking, and dysphagia. At first the angioedema was diagnosed and he was treated conservatively. The endoscopy revealed laryngeal edema, being more defined on the right side with right vocal fold paresis. CT scans showed the stabilizing plate with two screws attached tightly and the back-out of the third screw toward soft tissue of the neck. In the meantime, his condition deteriorated and he needed tracheotomy. In few days the surgical removal of the dislocated screw was performed successfully. Although two-month follow-up reported no obstruction of the larynx, the vocal folds paresis with gradual functional improvement was observed. Long-term complication of anterior spine surgery sometimes may suggest laryngeal angioedema at first. If the conservative treatment is ineffective and there is a history of anterior spine surgery, the clinicians should consider the displacement of the plate or screws in differential diagnosis. PMID:25755901

  4. Electrophoretic Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Robert S.

    2001-01-01

    Electrophoretic focusing is a new method of continuous flow electrophoresis that introduces precision flow control to achieve high resolution separations. The electric field is applied perpendicular to an incoming sample lamina and buffer but also perpendicular to the broad faces of the thin rectangular chamber. A uniform fluid cross-flow then enters and exits the separation chamber through the same broad faces which are porous. A balance is achieved by adjusting either the electric field or the cross-flow so the desired sample fraction with its specific migration velocity encounters an opposing flow of the same velocity. Applying an electric field transverse to the incoming sample lamina and opposing this field with a carefully configured buffer flow, a sample constituent can be selected and focused into a narrow stream for subsequent analysis. Monotonically changing either electric field or buffer cross-flow will yield a scan of all constituents of the sample. Stopping the scan increases the collection time for minor constituents to improve their analysis. Using the high voltage gradients and/or cross-flow to rapidly deflect extraneous sample through the porous screens and into either of the side (purge) chambers, the selected sample is focused in the center plane of the separation chamber and collected without contact or interaction with the separation chamber walls. Results will be presented on the separation of a range of materials including dyes, proteins, and monodisperse polystyrene latexes. Sources of sample dispersion inherent in other electrokinetic techniques will be shown to be negligible for a variety of sample concentrations, buffer properties and operating conditions.

  5. Cervical spine injuries in American football.

    PubMed

    Rihn, Jeffrey A; Anderson, David T; Lamb, Kathleen; Deluca, Peter F; Bata, Ahmed; Marchetto, Paul A; Neves, Nuno; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2009-01-01

    American football is a high-energy contact sport that places players at risk for cervical spine injuries with potential neurological deficits. Advances in tackling and blocking techniques, rules of the game and medical care of the athlete have been made throughout the past few decades to minimize the risk of cervical injury and improve the management of injuries that do occur. Nonetheless, cervical spine injuries remain a serious concern in the game of American football. Injuries have a wide spectrum of severity. The relatively common 'stinger' is a neuropraxia of a cervical nerve root(s) or brachial plexus and represents a reversible peripheral nerve injury. Less common and more serious an injury, cervical cord neuropraxia is the clinical manifestation of neuropraxia of the cervical spinal cord due to hyperextension, hyperflexion or axial loading. Recent data on American football suggest that approximately 0.2 per 100,000 participants at the high school level and 2 per 100,000 participants at the collegiate level are diagnosed with cervical cord neuropraxia. Characterized by temporary pain, paraesthesias and/or motor weakness in more than one extremity, there is a rapid and complete resolution of symptoms and a normal physical examination within 10 minutes to 48 hours after the initial injury. Stenosis of the spinal canal, whether congenital or acquired, is thought to predispose the athlete to cervical cord neuropraxia. Although quite rare, catastrophic neurological injury is a devastating entity referring to permanent neurological injury or death. The mechanism is most often a forced hyperflexion injury, as occurs when 'spear tackling'. The mean incidence of catastrophic neurological injury over the past 30 years has been approximately 0.5 per 100,000 participants at high school level and 1.5 per 100,000 at the collegiate level. This incidence has decreased significantly when compared with the incidence in the early 1970s. This decrease in the incidence of

  6. Rapid Loss of Dendritic Spines after Stress Involves Derangement of Spine Dynamics by Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuncai; Dubé, Céline M.; Rice, Courtney J.; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic stress causes dendritic regression and loss of dendritic spines in hippocampal neurons that is accompanied by deficits in synaptic plasticity and memory. However, the responsible mechanisms remain unresolved. Here, we found that within hours of the onset of stress, the density of dendritic spines declined in vulnerable dendritic domains. This rapid, stress-induced spine loss was abolished by blocking the receptor (CRFR1) of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), a hippocampal neuropeptide released during stress. Exposure to CRH provoked spine loss and dendritic regression in hippocampal organotypic cultures, and selective blockade of the CRFR1 receptor had the opposite effect. Live, time-lapse imaging revealed that CRH reduced spine density by altering dendritic spine dynamics: the peptide selectively and reversibly accelerated spine retraction, and this mechanism involved destabilization of spine F-actin. In addition, mice lacking the CRFR1 receptor had augmented spine density. These findings support a mechanistic role for CRH–CRFR1 signaling in stress-evoked spine loss and dendritic remodeling. PMID:18337421

  7. The role and structure of the multidisciplinary team in the management of advanced Parkinson's disease with a focus on the use of levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Stephen W; Suedmeyer, Martin; Liu, Louis W C; Domagk, Dirk; Forbes, Alison; Bergmann, Lars; Onuk, Koray; Yegin, Ashley; van Laar, Teus

    2017-01-01

    A multidisciplinary team (MDT) approach is increasingly recommended in Parkinson's disease (PD) treatment guidelines, but no standard of care exists for such an approach, and the guidelines do not provide clarification on how it should be implemented. This paper reviews evidence of MDT interventions in people with PD and provides expert clinical perspectives for an MDT approach, with a focus on advanced PD and levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (carbidopa-levodopa enteral suspension in the USA). The key recommendations are to enable the best possible treatment of people with PD locally by facilitating a close structured collaboration of different health care professionals working in a fixed network structure; to refer people with PD to established MDT centers in a timely manner; to establish regular meetings for the MDT enabling interdisciplinary exchange and learning; to optimize individual treatment and carefully evaluate available treatment options; to ensure treatment decisions are agreed jointly between people with PD, their caregivers, family, and health care professional; and to include specialists outside of neurology from adjuvant medical departments as necessary when implementing advanced therapies.

  8. Reducing the risk of heart disease among Indian Australians: knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs regarding food practices – a focus group study

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Ritin; Rolley, John X.; Rajaratnam, Rohan; Everett, Bronwyn; Davidson, Patricia M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Australia has a growing number of Asian Indian immigrants. Unfortunately, this population has an increased risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). Dietary adherence is an important strategy in reducing risk for CHD. This study aimed to gain greater understanding of the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs relating to food practices in Asian Indian Australians. Methods Two focus groups with six participants in each were recruited using a convenience sampling technique. Verbatim transcriptions were made and thematic content analysis undertaken. Results Four main themes that emerged from the data included: migration as a pervasive factor for diet and health; importance of food in maintaining the social fabric; knowledge and understanding of health and diet; and elements of effective interventions. Discussion Diet is a complex constructed factor in how people express themselves individually, in families and communities. There are many interconnected factors influencing diet choice that goes beyond culture and religion to include migration and acculturation. Conclusions Food and associated behaviors are an important aspect of the social fabric. Entrenched and inherent knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and traditions frame individuals’ point of reference around food and recommendations for an optimal diet. PMID:26051008

  9. An Automated Pipeline for Dendrite Spine Detection and Tracking of 3D Optical Microscopy Neuron Images of In Vivo Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jing; Zhou, Xiaobo; Dy, Jennifer G.; Zhang, Yong; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2009-01-01

    The variations in dendritic branch morphology and spine density provide insightful information about the brain function and possible treatment to neurodegenerative disease, for example investigating structural plasticity during the course of Alzheimer's disease. Most automated image processing methods aiming at analyzing these problems are developed for in vitro data. However, in vivo neuron images provide real time information and direct observation of the dynamics of a disease process in a live animal model. This paper presents an automated approach for detecting spines and tracking spine evolution over time with in vivo image data in an animal model of Alzheimer's disease. We propose an automated pipeline starting with curvilinear structure detection to determine the medial axis of the dendritic backbone and spines connected to the backbone. We, then, propose the adaptive local binary fitting (aLBF) energy level set model to accurately locate the boundary of dendritic structures using the central line of curvilinear structure as initialization. To track the growth or loss of spines, we present a maximum likelihood based technique to find the graph homomorphism between two image graph structures at different time points. We employ dynamic programming to search for the optimum solution. The pipeline enables us to extract dynamically changing information from real time in vivo data. We validate our proposed approach by comparing with manual results generated by neurologists. In addition, we discuss the performance of 3D based segmentation and conclude that our method is more accurate in identifying weak spines. Experiments show that our approach can quickly and accurately detect and quantify spines of in vivo neuron images and is able to identify spine elimination and formation. PMID:19434521

  10. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain.

    PubMed

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars.

  11. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-de-las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars. PMID:26309385

  12. Anatomy of large animal spines and its comparison to the human spine: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Hua-Zi; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Zhou, Yi-Fei

    2010-01-01

    Animal models have been commonly used for in vivo and in vitro spinal research. However, the extent to which animal models resemble the human spine has not been well known. We conducted a systematic review to compare the morphometric features of vertebrae between human and animal species, so as to give some suggestions on how to choose an appropriate animal model in spine research. A literature search of all English language peer-reviewed publications was conducted using PubMed, OVID, Springer and Elsevier (Science Direct) for the years 1980-2008. Two reviewers extracted data on the anatomy of large animal spines from the identified articles. Each anatomical study of animals had to include at least three vertebral levels. The anatomical data from all animal studies were compared with the existing data of the human spine in the literature. Of the papers retrieved, seven were included in the review. The animals in the studies involved baboon, sheep, porcine, calf and deer. Distinct anatomical differences of vertebrae were found between the human and each large animal spine. In cervical region, spines of the baboon and human are more similar as compared to other animals. In thoracic and lumbar regions, the mean pedicle height of all animals was greater than the human pedicles. There was similar mean pedicle width between animal and the human specimens, except in thoracic segments of sheep. The human spinal canal was wider and deeper in the anteroposterior plane than any of the animals. The mean human vertebral body width and depth were greater than that of the animals except in upper thoracic segments of the deer. However, the mean vertebral body height was lower than that of all animals. This paper provides a comprehensive review to compare vertebrae geometries of experimental animal models to the human vertebrae, and will help for choosing animal model in vivo and in vitro spine research. When the animal selected for spine research, the structural similarities and

  13. Stability of the lumbar spine. A study in mechanical engineering.

    PubMed

    Bergmark, A

    1989-01-01

    global system. Thus, roughly speaking, the global system appears to take care of different distributions of outer forces on the body, whereas the local system performs an action, which is essentially locally determined (i.e. by the posture of the lumbar spine). The present work focuses on the upright standing posture with different degree of lumbar lordosis. The outer load is assumed to consist of weights carried on the shoulders. By reduction of the number of unknown forces, which is done by using a few different principles, a unique determination of the total force distributions at static equilibrium is obtained.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  14. Superficial Siderosis of the Central Nervous System Originating from the Thoracic Spine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Sung Mo; Kim, Seung-Kook; Lee, Sun-Ho; Eoh, Whan

    2016-01-01

    Superficial siderosis of the central nervous system(SSCNS) is a rare disease characterized by hemosiderin deposition on the surface of the central nervous system. We report a case of SSCNS originating from the thoracic spine, presenting with neurological deficits including, sensorineuronal hearing loss, ataxia, and corticospinal and dorsal column tract signs. The patient underwent dural repair with an artificial dural patch. Clinical findings were elicited by neurological examination, imaging studies, and intraoperative findings, and these were addressed through literature review. PMID:27437021

  15. A sonographic approach to prenatal classification of congenital spine anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Meiri; Sia, Sock Bee

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To develop a classification system for congenital spine anomalies detected by prenatal ultrasound. Methods: Data were collected from fetuses with spine abnormalities diagnosed in our institution over a five‐year period between June 2005 and June 2010. The ultrasound images were analysed to determine which features were associated with different congenital spine anomalies. Findings of the prenatal ultrasound images were correlated with other prenatal imaging, post mortem findings, post mortem imaging, neonatal imaging, karyotype, and other genetic workup. Data from published case reports of prenatal diagnosis of rare congenital spine anomalies were analysed to provide a comprehensive work. Results: During the study period, eighteen cases of spine abnormalities were diagnosed in 7819 women. The mean gestational age at diagnosis was 18.8w ± 2.2 SD. While most cases represented open NTD, a spectrum of vertebral abnormalities were diagnosed prenatally. These included hemivertebrae, block vertebrae, cleft or butterfly vertebrae, sacral agenesis, and a lipomeningocele. The most sensitive features for diagnosis of a spine abnormality included flaring of the vertebral arch ossification centres, abnormal spine curvature, and short spine length. While reported findings at the time of diagnosis were often conservative, retrospective analysis revealed good correlation with radiographic imaging. 3D imaging was found to be a valuable tool in many settings. Conclusions: Analysis of the study findings showed prenatal ultrasound allowed detection of disruption to the normal appearances of the fetal spine. Using the three features of flaring of the vertebral arch ossification centres, abnormal spine curvature, and short spine length, an algorithm was devised to aid with the diagnosis of spine anomalies for those who perform and report prenatal ultrasound. PMID:28191204

  16. EPSPs Measured in Proximal Dendritic Spines of Cortical Pyramidal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Acker, Corey D; Hoyos, Erika; Loew, Leslie M

    2016-01-01

    EPSPs occur when the neurotransmitter glutamate binds to postsynaptic receptors located on small pleomorphic membrane protrusions called dendritic spines. To transmit the synaptic signal, these potentials must travel through the spine neck and the dendritic tree to reach the soma. Due to their small size, the electrical behavior of spines and their ability to compartmentalize electrical signals has been very difficult to assess experimentally. In this study, we developed a method to perform simultaneous two-photon voltage-sensitive dye recording with two-photon glutamate uncaging in order to measure the characteristics (amplitude and duration) of uncaging-evoked EPSPs in single spines on the basal dendrites of L5 pyramidal neurons in acute brain slices from CD1 control mice. We were able to record uncaging-evoked spine potentials that resembled miniature EPSPs at the soma from a wide range of spine morphologies. In proximal spines, these potentials averaged 13.0 mV (range, 6.5-30.8 mV; N = 20) for an average somatic EPSP of 0.59 mV, whereas the mean attenuation ratio (spine/soma) was found to be 25.3. Durations of spine EPSP waveforms were found to be 11.7 ms on average. Modeling studies demonstrate the important role that spine neck resistance (Rneck) plays in spine EPSP amplitudes. Simulations used to estimate Rneck by fits to voltage-sensitive dye measurements produced a mean of 179 MΩ (range, 23-420 MΩ; N = 19). Independent measurements based on fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of a cytosolic dye from spines of the same population of neurons produced a mean R eck estimate of 204 MΩ (range, 52-521 MΩ; N = 34).

  17. Effect of Load Carriage on Lumbar Spine Kinematics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    markers 14 – 16 , 18 and ground force plates 7 , 18 , 19 to measure body positioning and ground reac- tion forces . These methods approach...data obtained in this setting do not refl ect the state of the lumbar spine in the upright position due to alterations in bone- muscle interactions...lumbar spine might be related to the greater forces acting on inferior levels through the lumbar spine 38 and that IVDs of inferior levels undergo

  18. A Dynamic Model of the Cervical Spine and Head

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    neck associated with each motion segment and multiplying by a uniform density. Preliminary simulations have been made of Ox (frontal) and (lateral...Vertebral Column 18 Cervical Spine 23 Vertebrae 23 Ligaments of the Cervical Spine 31 Movement of the Cervical Spine 34 Muscles of the Neck 39 III...GEOMETRIC DATA 62 Vertebral Local and Global Data 62 Ligaments - Geometry 74 Geometry of Muscles 76 Inertial Properties of the Neck 80 APPENDIX B

  19. Head and Cervical Spine Evaluation for the Pediatric Surgeon.

    PubMed

    Arbuthnot, Mary K; Mooney, David P; Glenn, Ian C

    2017-02-01

    This article is designed to guide pediatric surgeons in the evaluation and stabilization of blunt head and cervical spine injuries in pediatric patients. Trauma remains the number one cause of morbidity and mortality among children, and the incidence of head injuries continues to rise. Cervical spine injuries, on the other hand, are unusual but can be devastating if missed. This article highlights the pathophysiology unique to pediatric head and cervical spine trauma as well as keys to clinical and diagnostic evaluation.

  20. Genomic study of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine

    PubMed Central

    IKEGAWA, Shiro

    2014-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (OPLL) is a common disease after the middle age. OPLL frequently causes serious neurological problems due to compression of the spinal cord and/or nerve roots. OPLL occurs in patients with monogenic metabolic diseases including rickets/osteomalacia and hypoparathyroidism; however most of OPLL is idiopathic and is considered as a multi-factorial (polygenic) disease influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Genomic studies for the genetic factors of OPLL have been conducted, mainly in Japan, including linkage and association studies. This paper reviews the recent progress in the genomic study of OPLL and comments on its future direction. PMID:25504229

  1. Computational Approach to Dendritic Spine Taxonomy and Shape Transition Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bokota, Grzegorz; Magnowska, Marta; Kuśmierczyk, Tomasz; Łukasik, Michał; Roszkowska, Matylda; Plewczynski, Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    The common approach in morphological analysis of dendritic spines of mammalian neuronal cells is to categorize spines into subpopulations based on whether they are stubby, mushroom, thin, or filopodia shaped. The corresponding cellular models of synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation, and long-term depression associate the synaptic strength with either spine enlargement or spine shrinkage. Although a variety of automatic spine segmentation and feature extraction methods were developed recently, no approaches allowing for an automatic and unbiased distinction between dendritic spine subpopulations and detailed computational models of spine behavior exist. We propose an automatic and statistically based method for the unsupervised construction of spine shape taxonomy based on arbitrary features. The taxonomy is then utilized in the newly introduced computational model of behavior, which relies on transitions between shapes. Models of different populations are compared using supplied bootstrap-based statistical tests. We compared two populations of spines at two time points. The first population was stimulated with long-term potentiation, and the other in the resting state was used as a control. The comparison of shape transition characteristics allowed us to identify the differences between population behaviors. Although some extreme changes were observed in the stimulated population, statistically significant differences were found only when whole models were compared. The source code of our software is freely available for non-commercial use1. Contact: d.plewczynski@cent.uw.edu.pl. PMID:28066226

  2. Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Outcomes in Patients with Concurrent Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Park, Henry S; Laurans, Maxwell S; Chiang, Veronica S; Yu, James B; Husain, Zain A

    2016-01-01

    study is limited by significant heterogeneity in tumor type within our series, future work should focus on the development of reliable survival prognosticators for patients undergoing spinal radiosurgery. Nearly half of the patients with CBM were diagnosed synchronously with their spine metastases, emphasizing the usefulness of obtaining a brain MRI for complete staging prior to spine SBRT. PMID:27563505

  3. Non-invasive, neuron-specific gene therapy by focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening in Parkinson's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Yin; Hsieh, Han-Yi; Chen, Chiung-Mei; Wu, Shang-Rung; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Hua, Mu-Yi; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-08-10

    Focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced with microbubbles (MBs) is a promising technique for noninvasive opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to allow targeted delivery of therapeutic substances into the brain and thus the noninvasive delivery of gene vectors for CNS treatment. We have previously demonstrated that a separated gene-carrying liposome and MBs administration plus FUS exposure can deliver genes into the brain, with the successful expression of the reporter gene and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene. In this study, we further modify the delivery system by conjugating gene-carrying liposomes with MBs to improve the GDNF gene-delivery efficiency, and to verify the possibility of using this system to perform treatment in the 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced animal disease model. FUS-BBB opening was verified by contrast-enhanced MRI, and GFP gene expression was verified via in vivo imaging system (IVIS). Western blots as well as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were conducted to measure protein expression, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) was conducted to test the Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-neuron distribution. Dopamine (DA) and its metabolites as well as dopamine active transporter (DAT) were quantitatively analyzed to show dopaminergic neuronal dopamine secretion/activity/metabolism. Motor performance was evaluated by rotarod test weekly. Results demonstrated that the LpDNA-MBs (gene-liposome-MBs) complexes successfully serve as gene carrier and BBB-opening catalyst, and outperformed the separated LpDNA/MBs administration both in terms of gene delivery and expression. TH-positive IHC and measurement of DA and its metabolites DOPAC and HVA confirmed improved neuronal function, and the proposed system also provided the best neuroprotective effect to retard the progression of motor-related behavioral abnormalities. Immunoblotting and histological staining further confirmed the expression of reporter genes in

  4. Ultrasound Imaging of Spine: State of the Art and Utility for Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Bouffard, Antonio J.; Garcia, Kathleen; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Ebert, Douglas J. W.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Ultrasound imaging (sonography) has been increasingly used for both primary diagnosis and monitoring of musculoskeletal injury, including fractures. In certain injuries, sonography has been shown to equal or surpass Magnetic Resonance Imaging in accuracy. Long-term exposure to reduced gravity may be expected to cause physiological and anatomical changes of the musculoskeletal system, which are not fully described or understood. In a limited-resource environment like space flight, sonography will likely remain the only imaging modality; therefore, further attention to its potential is warranted, including its ability to image anatomical deviations as well as irregularities of vertebrae and the spinal column. Methods: A thorough review of literature was conducted on the subject. A multipurpose ultrasound system was used to identify specific vertebrae, intervertebral disks, and other structures of the cervical spine in healthy volunteers, selected to represent various age, gender, and Body Mass Index (BMI) groups. Sonographic views were sought that would parallel radiographic views and signs used in the diagnosis of cervical spine injuries. Results: While using widely accepted radiographic signs of cervical spine injury, this sonographic protocol development effort resulted in successful identification of scanning planes and imaging protocols that could serve as alternatives for radiography. Some of these views are also applicable to diagnosing degenerative disk and bone disease, and other non-traumatic spine pathology. Strong, preliminary correlation has been demonstrated in a number of clinical cases between sonography and other imaging modalities. Conclusion: In the absence of radiography, sonography can be used to diagnose or rule out certain common types of cervical spine conditions including injury. Clinical validation of the findings appears to be realistic and would facilitate establishment of new sonographic protocols for special environments

  5. Interaction of high intensity focused ultrasound with biological materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.; Mal, A.; Feng, F.; Kabo, M.; Wang, J.

    2002-01-01

    This work is motivated by the possible medical application of focused ultrasound in minimally invasive treatment of a variety of disorders including those associated with soft tissue or disk element disruption in the vicinity of the spine causing impingement on the spinal cord.

  6. Towards standardized measurement of adverse events in spine surgery: conceptual model and pilot evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Sohail K; Deyo, Richard A; Heagerty, Patrick J; Turner, Judith A; Lee, Lorri A; Goodkin, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Background Independent of efficacy, information on safety of surgical procedures is essential for informed choices. We seek to develop standardized methodology for describing the safety of spinal operations and apply these methods to study lumbar surgery. We present a conceptual model for evaluating the safety of spine surgery and describe development of tools to measure principal components of this model: (1) specifying outcome by explicit criteria for adverse event definition, mode of ascertainment, cause, severity, or preventability, and (2) quantitatively measuring predictors such as patient factors, comorbidity, severity of degenerative spine disease, and invasiveness of spine surgery. Methods We created operational definitions for 176 adverse occurrences and established multiple mechanisms for reporting them. We developed new methods to quantify the severity of adverse occurrences, degeneration of lumbar spine, and invasiveness of spinal procedures. Using kappa statistics and intra-class correlation coefficients, we assessed agreement for the following: four reviewers independently coding etiology, preventability, and severity for 141 adverse occurrences, two observers coding lumbar spine degenerative changes in 10 selected cases, and two researchers coding invasiveness of surgery for 50 initial cases. Results During the first six months of prospective surveillance, rigorous daily medical record reviews identified 92.6% of the adverse occurrences we recorded, and voluntary reports by providers identified 38.5% (surgeons reported 18.3%, inpatient rounding team reported 23.1%, and conferences discussed 6.1%). Trained observers had fair agreement in classifying etiology of 141 adverse occurrences into 18 categories (kappa = 0.35), but agreement was substantial (kappa ≥ 0.61) for 4 specific categories: technical error, failure in communication, systems failure, and no error. Preventability assessment had moderate agreement (mean weighted kappa = 0.44). Adverse

  7. Two-photon microscopy for real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound-mediated drug delivery to the brain in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Alison; Eterman, Naomi; Aubert, Isabelle; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-02-01

    There is substantial evidence that focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with microbubble contrast agent can cause disruption of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to aid in drug delivery to the brain. We have previously demonstrated that FUS efficiently delivers antibodies against amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) through the BBB, leading to a reduction in amyloid pathology at 4 days in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. In the current study, we used two-photon microscopy to characterize the effect of FUS in real time on amyloid pathology in the mouse brain. Mice were anesthetized and a cranial window was made in the skull. A custom-built ultrasound transducer was fixed to a coverslip and attached to the skull, covering the cranial window. Methoxy-X04 [2-5mg/kg] delivered intravenously 1 hr prior to the experiment clearly labelled the Aβ surrounding the vessels and the amyloid plaques in the cortex. Dextran conjugated Texas Red (70kDa) administered intravenously, confirmed BBB disruption. BBB disruption occurred in transgenic and non-transgenic animals at similar ultrasound pressures tested. However, the time required for BBB closure following FUS was longer in the Tg mice. We have conjugated Aβ antibodies to the fluorescent molecule FITC for real time monitoring of the antibody distribution in the brain. Our current experiments are aimed at optimizing the parameters to achieve maximal fluorescent intensity of the BAM10 antibody at the plaque surface. Two-photon microscopy has proven to be a valuable tool for evaluating the efficacy of FUS mediated drug delivery, including antibodies, to the Alzheimer brain.

  8. Implementation of a consumer-focused eHealth intervention for people with moderate-to-high cardiovascular disease risk: protocol for a mixed-methods process evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Coorey, Genevieve M; Neubeck, Lis; Usherwood, Timothy; Peiris, David; Parker, Sharon; Lau, Annie Y S; Chow, Clara; Panaretto, Kathryn; Zwar, Nicholas; Redfern, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Technology-mediated strategies have potential to engage patients in modifying unhealthy behaviour and improving medication adherence to reduce morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD). Furthermore, electronic tools offer a medium by which consumers can more actively navigate personal healthcare information. Understanding how, why and among whom such strategies have an effect can help determine the requirements for implementing them at a scale. This paper aims to detail a process evaluation that will (1) assess implementation fidelity of a multicomponent eHealth intervention; (2) determine its effective features; (3) explore contextual factors influencing and maintaining user engagement; and (4) describe barriers, facilitators, preferences and acceptability of such interventions. Methods and analysis Mixed-methods sequential design to derive, examine, triangulate and report data from multiple sources. Quantitative data from 3 sources will help to inform both sampling and content framework for the qualitative data collection: (1) surveys of patients and general practitioners (GPs); (2) software analytics; (3) programme delivery records. Qualitative data from interviews with patients and GPs, focus groups with patients and field notes taken by intervention delivery staff will be thematically analysed. Concurrent interview data collection and analysis will enable a thematic framework to evolve inductively and inform theory building, consistent with a realistic evaluation perspective. Eligible patients are those at moderate-to-high CVD risk who were randomised to the intervention arm of a randomised controlled trial of an eHealth intervention and are contactable at completion of the follow-up period; eligible GPs are the primary healthcare providers of these patients. Ethics and dissemination Ethics approval has been received from the University of Sydney Human Research Ethics Committee and the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council

  9. The role of olive oil in disease prevention: a focus on the recent epidemiological evidence from cohort studies and dietary intervention trials.

    PubMed

    Buckland, Genevieve; Gonzalez, Carlos A

    2015-04-01

    Consumption of olive oil within the Mediterranean diet has been long known to have many health benefits. However, only over the last decade has epidemiological research confirmed its protective role against developing several chronic diseases. The objective of this review was to give an overview of the state of art epidemiological evidence concerning the relationship between olive oil and key public health outcomes including mortality, CVD, diabetes, metabolic syndrome (MetS), obesity and cancer, with a particular focus on recent results from cohort studies and dietary intervention trials. Recent epidemiological research has shown that regular consumption of olive oil is associated with increased longevity. This benefit is partly due to the olive oil's unequivocal cardio-protective role. There is converging evidence on the benefits of olive oil for preventing several CVD risk factors, including diabetes, MetS and obesity. Olive oil is also implicated in preventing certain cancers, with the most promising findings for breast and digestive tract cancers, although the data are still not entirely consistent and mainly from case-control studies. These health benefits are supported by strong mechanistic evidence from experimental studies, demonstrating that specific components of olive oil have antihypertensive, antithrombotic, antioxidant, antiinflammatory and anticarcinogenic action. Despite the accumulating epidemiological research, there is still a lack of consistent results from high-quality studies for many health outcomes (i.e. certain cancers and metabolism-related disorders). Further research is mandatory, above all from prospective studies and randomised dietary intervention trials when feasible, to confirm some of the still potential health benefits.

  10. Augmented reality visualization for thoracoscopic spine surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Frank; Vogt, Sebastian; Khamene, Ali; Heining, Sandro; Euler, Ekkehard; Schneberger, Marc; Zuerl, Konrad; Mutschler, Wolf

    2006-03-01

    We are developing an augmented reality (AR) image guidance system in which information derived from medical images is overlaid onto a video view of the patient. The centerpiece of the system is a head-mounted display custom fitted with two miniature color video cameras that capture the stereo view of the scene. Medical graphics is overlaid onto the video view and appears firmly anchored in the scene, without perceivable time lag or jitter. We have been testing the system for different clinical applications. In this paper we discuss minimally invasive thoracoscopic spine surgery as a promising new orthopedic application. In the standard approach, the thoracoscope - a rigid endoscope - provides visual feedback for the minimally invasive procedure of removing a damaged disc and fusing the two neighboring vertebrae. The navigation challenges are twofold. From a global perspective, the correct vertebrae on the spine have to be located with the inserted instruments. From a local perspective, the actual spine procedure has to be performed precisely. Visual feedback from the thoracoscope provides only limited support for both of these tasks. In the augmented reality approach, we give the surgeon additional anatomical context for the navigation. Before the surgery, we derive a model of the patient's anatomy from a CT scan, and during surgery we track the location of the surgical instruments in relation to patient and model. With this information, we can help the surgeon in both the global and local navigation, providing a global map and 3D information beyond the local 2D view of the thoracoscope. Augmented reality visualization is a particularly intuitive method of displaying this information to the surgeon. To adapt our augmented reality system to this application, we had to add an external optical tracking system, which works now in combination with our head-mounted tracking camera. The surgeon's feedback to the initial phantom experiments is very positive.

  11. Fundamental biomechanics of the spine--What we have learned in the past 25 years and future directions.

    PubMed

    Oxland, Thomas R

    2016-04-11

    Since the publication of the 2nd edition of White and Panjabi׳s textbook, Clinical Biomechanics of the Spine in 1990, there has been considerable research on the biomechanics of the spine. The focus of this manuscript will be to review what we have learned in regards to the fundamentals of spine biomechanics. Topics addressed include the whole spine, the functional spinal unit, and the individual components of the spine (e.g. vertebra, intervertebral disc, spinal ligaments). In these broad categories, our understanding in 1990 is reviewed and the important knowledge or understanding gained through the subsequent 25 years of research is highlighted. Areas where our knowledge is lacking helps to identify promising topics for future research. In this manuscript, as in the White and Panjabi textbook, the emphasis is on experimental research using human material, either in vivo or in vitro. The insights gained from mathematical models and animal experimentation are included where other data are not available. This review is intended to celebrate the substantial gains that have been made in the field over these past 25 years and also to identify future research directions.

  12. Novalis radiosurgery for metastatic spine tumors.

    PubMed

    Rock, Jack P; Ryu, Samuel; Yin, Fang-Fang

    2004-10-01

    It is logical to anticipate that the field of spinal radiosurgery will evolve in a fashion similar to that seen for intracranial radiosurgery. Given the frequency of various pathologic entities that affect the spine, including those that have proven to be largely intractable to surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy (eg, sarcomas), and the serious clinical, economic and quality-of-life consequences of paraplegia, radiosurgery offers new hope as an adjuvant or primary therapy. The meticulous application of well-designed investigations of relevant clinical outcomes will be critical to the appropriate and effective use of this technology.

  13. DEGENERATIVE STENOSIS OF THE LUMBAR SPINE

    PubMed Central

    Zylbersztejn, Sérgio; Spinelli, Leandro de Freitas; Rodrigues, Nilson Rodinei; Werlang, Pablo Mariotti; Kisaki, Yorito; Rios, Aldemar Roberto Mieres; Bello, Cesar Dall

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an update on degenerative stenosis of the lumbar spine, which is a common pathological condition among patients over the age of 65 years. The anamnesis and physical examination need to be precise, since radiography often only provides indirect signs. Magnetic resonance imaging is necessary if the symptoms persist. The treatment for lumbar stenosis is a matter of controversy. However, there seems to be some benefit from surgical treatment rather than conservative treatment, such that surgery brings improvements in symptoms and functions for a period of up to two years. PMID:27042635

  14. Organization of TNIK in dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Burette, Alain C; Phend, Kristen D; Burette, Susan; Lin, Qingcong; Liang, Musen; Foltz, Gretchen; Taylor, Noël; Wang, Qi; Brandon, Nicholas J; Bates, Brian; Ehlers, Michael D; Weinberg, Richard J

    2015-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 2 (TRAF2)- and noncatalytic region of tyrosine kinase (NCK)-interacting kinase (TNIK) has been identified as an interactor in the psychiatric risk factor, Disrupted in Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1). As a step toward deciphering its function in the brain, we performed high-resolution light and electron microscopic immunocytochemistry. We demonstrate here that TNIK is expressed in neurons throughout the adult mouse brain. In striatum and cerebral cortex, TNIK concentrates in dendritic spines, especially in the vicinity of the lateral edge of the synapse. Thus, TNIK is highly enriched at a microdomain critical for glutamatergic signaling.

  15. Spine oncology: Daedalus, Theseus, and the Minotaur.

    PubMed

    Donthineni, Rakesh; Ofluoglu, Onder

    2009-01-01

    Over the past three decades, progress has been dramatic in the management of spine tumors. For example, advanced imaging technologies made available at manageable costs have lowered the threshold for scanning. CT, MRI, and PET imaging modalities have greatly enhanced the ability of the surgeon to accurately delineate the extension of the lesion within the bone, the soft tissue, and the spinal canal. Such enhancements have led to great leaps forward in preoperative planning and postoperative evaluation, including improved reconstruction options are resulting in improved outcomes. This article introduces the theme of this volume.

  16. Aneurysmal bone cyst of the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Cugati, Goutham; Pande, Anil; Jain, Pradeep K; Symss, Nigel Peter; Ramamurthi, Ravi; Vasudevan, Chakravarthy M

    2015-01-01

    An aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a benign, locally proliferative vascular disorder of non-neoplastic osseous lesions in children and young adults. Seventy-five percent of ABCs occur before the age of 20 years. They comprise 1.4% of all primary bone tumors, and commonly occur in the long bones. Spinal ABCs are much rarer. We present to you one such rare case of ABC involving the lumbar spine which was successfully treated with surgery. The clinical pathological and radiological features are described. The treatment options available are discussed.

  17. 78 FR 65451 - Agency Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire... oira_submission@omb.eop.gov . Please refer to ``OMB Control No. 2900-- NEW (Neck (Cervical Spine...- ] NEW (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire).'' SUPPLEMENTARY...

  18. Synaptic amplification by dendritic spines enhances input cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Harnett, Mark T.; Makara, Judit K.; Spruston, Nelson; Kath, William L.; Magee, Jeffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the nearly ubiquitous site of excitatory synaptic input onto neurons1–2 and as such are critically positioned to influence diverse aspects of neuronal signaling. Decades of theoretical studies have proposed that spines may function as highly effective and modifiable chemical and electrical compartments that regulate synaptic efficacy, integration, and plasticity3–8. Experimental studies have confirmed activity-dependent structural dynamics and biochemical compartmentalization by spines9–12. However, a longstanding debate remains over the influence of spines on the electrical aspects of synaptic transmission and dendritic operation3–8,13–18. Here, we measured the amplitude ratio (AR) of spine head to parent dendrite voltage across a range of dendritic compartments and calculated the associated Rneck for spines at apical trunk dendrites in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons. We found that Rneck is large enough (~500 MΩ) to substantially amplify the spine head depolarization associated with a unitary synaptic input by ~1.5- to ~45-fold depending on parent dendritic impedance. A morphologically realistic compartmental model capable of reproducing the observed spatial profile of AR indicates that spines provide a consistently high impedance input structure throughout the dendritic arbor. Finally, we demonstrate that the amplification produced by spines encourages electrical interaction among coactive inputs through an Rneck-dependent increase in spine head voltage- dependent conductance activation. We conclude that the electrical properties of spines promote nonlinear dendritic processing and associated forms of plasticity and storage, thus fundamentally enhancing the computational capabilities of neurons19–21. PMID:23103868

  19. Complex Spine Pathology Simulator: An Innovative Tool for Advanced Spine Surgery Training.

    PubMed

    Gragnaniello, Cristian; Abou-Hamden, Amal; Mortini, Pietro; Colombo, Elena V; Bailo, Michele; Seex, Kevin A; Litvack, Zachary; Caputy, Anthony J; Gagliardi, Filippo

    2016-11-01

    Background Technical advancements in spine surgery have made possible the treatment of increasingly complex pathologies with less morbidity. Time constraints in surgeons' training have made it necessary to develop new training models for spine pathology. Objective To describe the application of a novel compound, Stratathane resin ST-504 derived polymer (SRSDP), that can be injected at different spinal target locations to mimic spinal epidural, subdural extra-axial, and intra-axial pathologies for the use in advanced surgical training. Material and Methods Fresh-frozen thoracolumbar and cervical spine segments of human and sheep cadavers were used to study the model. SRSDP is initially liquid after mixing, allowing it to be injected into target areas where it expands and solidifies, mimicking the entire spectrum of spinal pathologies. Results Different polymer concentrations have been codified to vary adhesiveness, texture, spread capability, deformability, and radiologic visibility. Polymer injection was performed under fluoroscopic guidance through pathology-specific injection sites that avoided compromising the surgical approach for subsequent excision of the artificial lesion. Inflation of a balloon catheter of the desired size was used to displace stiff cadaveric neurovascular structures to mimic pathology-related mass effect. Conclusion The traditional cadaveric training models principally only allow surgeons to practice the surgical approach. The complex spine pathology simulator is a no