Science.gov

Sample records for spiritualism

  1. Spirituality

    Cancer.gov

    The sixteenth module of the EPEC-O (Education in Palliative and End-of-Life Care for Oncology) Self-Study: Cultural Considerations When Caring for African Americans explores the importance of spirituality in the lived experience of most African Americans, and how they utilize spirituality and religion to cope with serious stressors such as life-threatening illness.

  2. Spiritual abuse.

    PubMed

    Purcell, B C

    1998-01-01

    Spiritual abuse is the act of making people believe--whether by stating or merely implying--that they are going to be punished in this life and/or tormented in hell-fire forever for failure to live life good enough to please God and thus earn admission to heaven. Spiritual terrorism is the most extreme form of spiritual abuse and may cause serious mental health problems. Those people who have not been spiritually terrorized have not necessarily been spared from spiritual abuse and therefore may still be in need of competent, spiritual counseling. Spiritual abuse, which may be active or passive, can best be conceptualized on a continuum from terroristic to zero abuse. Severity is determined by intensity, age of onset, duration, and individual reaction. The underlying issue in all forms of abuse is control. PMID:9729974

  3. Spiritual terrorism.

    PubMed

    Purcell, B C

    1998-01-01

    Spiritual abuse is the act of making people believe--whether by stating or merely implying--that they are going to be punished in this life and/or tormented in hell-fire forever for failure to live a good enough life to earn admission to heaven. Spiritual terrorism is the most extreme form of spiritual abuse, which in itself is a serious mental health problem. The 12 steps of Alcoholics Anonymous can be a useful therapeutic modality for countering this problem, provided step two and three are reworded to facilitate cognitive restructuring, therefore enabling victims to develop a positive conception of God. Biblical symbolism can be cognitively helpful if interpreted metaphorically rather than literally. Thus, victims will be able to trust God to restore them to sanity and empower them to be survivors who experience peace of mind, joy of living and freedom from fear. PMID:9729963

  4. Embodied Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trousdale, Ann

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the concept of embodied spirituality from early Celtic traditions through the British medieval mystic Julian of Norwich to the present day. A "high theology" of the body in early Christianity and early Christian understandings of the relation among body, soul and spirit gave way to the influences of Greek thought with its…

  5. Spirituality in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Melanie; Wattis, John

    2015-05-27

    Spirituality is an important aspect of holistic care that is frequently overlooked. This is because of difficulties in conceptualising spirituality and confusion about how it should be integrated into nursing care. This article explores what is meant by spirituality and spiritually competent practice. It examines attitudes to spirituality, describes factors that might affect the integration of spirituality into nursing care and offers practical guidance to equip nurses to incorporate spirituality into their practice.

  6. On Spirituality and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    It is a mistake to ignore the scientific study of spirituality. Research examining the structure and function of concepts such as "spirit" and "spirituality" is likely to reveal new insights into the relationship between a functional spirituality and other thinking skills, including creativity. The study of spirituality should not stand alone as a…

  7. Recovery, spirituality and psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Drobin, Frederick

    2014-06-01

    This article concerns the relationship between addiction recovery, spirituality and psychotherapy. Since its founding, members of AA have been encouraged to pursue a spiritual life. They have also sought psychotherapy. A paradox obtains, because 51 % of therapists are atheists. Others have little awareness of the dynamics of the spiritual life. The developmental process of the spiritual life is discussed, and suggestions are made regarding how a therapist might be helpful in this process.

  8. Spiritual Development with Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponds, Kenneth T.

    2014-01-01

    Research on positive psychology indicates that spiritual strengths can be important in helping individuals overcome crisis and loss. Encounters with difficult challenges of life inspire people to think more deeply about their spiritual and religious beliefs and the meaning of life. Spirituality, faith, and religious roots have been shown to be…

  9. The Spiritual Competency Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Linda A.

    2010-01-01

    This study describes the development of the Spiritual Competency Scale, which was based on the Association for Spiritual, Ethical and Religious Values in Counseling's original Spiritual Competencies. Participants were 662 counseling students from religiously based and secular universities nationwide. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a 22-item,…

  10. Enhancing Spiritualism in Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dangwal, Kiran Lata; Singh, Shireesh Pal

    2012-01-01

    Spiritualism is one word which puts man on the highest plinth of life. Spirituality is the way we find meaning, hope, comfort and inner peace in life. Spirituality in the virtual World is generally known as Virtual Spirituality. A goldmine of wisdom from all kinds of religious and spiritual philosophies, traditions and practices can be found in…

  11. Perceptions of Spirituality and Spiritual Care in Religious Nurses.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Lynne; Kopis, Sharon; Moen, Carolyn; Pobanz, Angela; Volk, Fred

    2016-01-01

    This study explored nurses' perceptions of how they provide spiritual care, the barriers to delivering spiritual care, and the adequacy of their education and training on spiritual care. Past and current students from a faith-based university nursing program completed an online survey (N = 614). Participants reported varying definitions of spirituality and view spiritual care practices through a wide lens. The majority believed nurses do not receive sufficient spiritual education but reported they usually feel able to meet patients' spiritual needs. Time limitations were the most frequent obstacle to providing spiritual care.

  12. Spirituality in Cancer Care (PDQ)

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer, may cause spiritual distress. Religious and spiritual values are important to patients coping with cancer. Studies have shown that religious and spiritual values are important to Americans. Most American adults say that they ...

  13. A pathway to spirituality.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jon A

    2005-01-01

    The phenomenology of mystical experiences has been described throughout all the ages and in all religions. All mystical traditions identify some sense of union with the absolute as the ultimate spiritual goal. I assume that the pathway to both theistic and secular spirituality and our readiness to seek a solution in a psychological merger with something beyond the self evolves out of our human experience. Spirituality is one of man's strategies for dealing with the limitations of the life cycle, separation and loss, biological fragility, transience, and non-existence. Spirituality may serve as the affective component to a belief system or myth that is not rooted in scientific evidence but is lived as if it is true. Spirituality may take many forms, but I will suggest that in some instances it may serve as a reparative process in which one creates in the external world, through symbolic form, a nuance or facet of an internalized mental representation which has become lost or is no longer available to the self; or it may represent the continuity of the self-representation after death through a self-object merger. Lastly I will illustrate from the writings of two of our greatest poets, Dante Alighieri and William Wordsworth, how their poetry became interwoven with a profound spirituality. In Dante we will see the elaboration of a religious spirituality, while in the writings of Wordsworth a secular spirituality emerges interwoven with nature and belatedly his identification with "tragic man" as his mythos.

  14. Spirituality in Turbulent Times.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheatley, Margaret J.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the importance of spiritual leadership in turbulent, uncertain times. Describes several spiritual principles--for example, life is cyclical; all life is interconnected. Offers six suggestions for personal health: Start day peacefully, learn to be mindful, slow things down, create own measures, expect surprise, practice gratefulness. (PKP)

  15. Spirituality and holistic care.

    PubMed

    2016-09-01

    National and international professional health and nursing guidelines recommend that attention should be given to the spiritual and religious needs of patients. This suggests that spiritual care is an important aspect of holistic patient care that needs to be considered and supported, if relevant, in a healthcare context. PMID:27615352

  16. Spiritually oriented psychodynamic psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Shafranske, Edward P

    2009-02-01

    Spiritually oriented psychodynamic psychotherapy pays particular attention to the roles that religious and spiritual beliefs, practices, and experiences play in the psychological life of the client. Contemporary psychoanalytic theorists offer multiple approaches to understand the functions of religious experience. Spirituality provides a means to address existential issues and provide a context to form personal meaning. Religious narratives present schemas of relationship and models of experiences salient to mental health, such as hope. God images or other symbolic representations of the transcendent have the power to evoke emotions, which in turn, influence motivation and behavior. While employing theories and techniques derived from psychodynamic psychotherapy, this therapeutic approach encourages the analysis of the functions religion and spirituality serve, while respecting the client's act of believing in faith. Psychotherapists address a client's spirituality by exploring the psychological meaning of such personal commitments and experiences and refrain from entering into discussion of faith claims.

  17. Religion and spirituality.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Everett L; Hook, Joshua N; Davis, Don E; McDaniel, Michael A

    2011-02-01

    Many clients highly value religious and spiritual (R/S) commitments, and many psychotherapists have accommodated secular treatments to R/S perspectives. We meta-analyzed 51 samples from 46 studies (N = 3,290) that examined the outcomes of religious accommodative therapies and nonreligious spirituality therapies. Comparisons on psychological and spiritual outcomes were made to a control condition, an alternate treatment, or a subset of those studies that used a dismantling design (similar in theory and duration of treatment, but including religious contents). Patients in R/S psychotherapies showed greater improvement than those in alternate secular psychotherapies both on psychological (d =.26) and on spiritual (d = .41) outcomes. Religiously accommodated treatments outperformed dismantling-design alternative treatments on spiritual (d = .33) but not on psychological outcomes. Clinical examples are provided and therapeutic practices are recommended.

  18. Spirituality in childbearing women.

    PubMed

    Callister, Lynn Clark; Khalaf, Inaam

    2010-01-01

    Childbearing is the ideal context within which to enrich spirituality. The purpose of this study was to generate themes regarding spirituality and religiosity among culturally diverse childbearing women. A secondary analysis was performed, using existing narrative data from cross-cultural studies of childbearing women. The following themes emerged from the data: childbirth as a time to grow closer to God, the use of religious beliefs and rituals as powerful coping mechanisms, childbirth as a time to make religiosity more meaningful, the significance of a Higher Power in influencing birth outcomes, and childbirth as a spiritually transforming experience. In clinical settings, understanding the spiritual dimensions of childbirth is essential. Assessments of childbearing women may include the question, "Do you have any spiritual beliefs that will help us better care for you?" PMID:20498751

  19. Spiritual Competency Scale: Further Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dailey, Stephanie F.; Robertson, Linda A.; Gill, Carman S.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a follow-up analysis of the Spiritual Competency Scale, which initially validated ASERVIC's (Association for Spiritual, Ethical and Religious Values in Counseling) spiritual competencies. The study examined whether the factor structure of the Spiritual Competency Scale would be supported by participants (i.e., ASERVIC…

  20. Spirituality and the health professional.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Richard

    2013-09-01

    The inclusion of spirituality in addictions recovery began with the 12-steps program of Alcoholics Anonymous. Cofounded by Bill Wilson, the 12-steps' spiritual orientation is based on Wilson's own recovery from alcoholism that was associated with a spiritual experience. His correspondence with Carl Jung, who verified the importance of Wilson's experience, empowered Wilson to make spirituality central to the 12 steps. Spirituality remains a source of misunderstanding between the scientific, empirically informed mental health community, and the 12-step recovery movement. This article offers an outline of spiritual development, based on neuroscience, which the professional can utilize in the spiritual aspect of a patient's recovery.

  1. Nursing: a spiritual perspective.

    PubMed

    Long, A

    1997-11-01

    This article explores and examines the fundamental need for nurses to include the promotion of the spiritual dimension of the health of human beings as well as the physical, mental and social facets if they truly wish to engage in holistic care. The author attempts to define the phenomenon of spirituality, aware of the dilemma that many individuals face when thinking and reflecting on this very personal and intangible issue. To be spiritual is to become fully human, the article argues, and the reverse is also true. Spirituality in health is inextricable in each person's search for the discovery of the truth about self and the meaning and purpose of life. Healthy communities are the product of healthy individuals who sow spiritual seeds such as unconditional positive regard, acceptance, respect and dignity for the benefit and advancement of individuals and humankind as a whole. The global nature of the phenomenon of spirituality is also shown by using examples of people who demonstrate compassion and communion with other human beings, in other countries in times of suffering, war and disaster. Compassion and empathy is expressed and experienced for victims of earthquakes that happen miles from home and far removed from personal or religious beliefs. Yet at such times we are all connected in the tapestry of life by our own human spirituality and earthiness. Abstract themes like compassion and justice are treated in the text within the context of spirituality. The author argues that being just and fair means that all patients have the right to achieve spiritual healing regardless of their belief systems, culture or creed. The works of some spiritual philosophers are used to reflect on this integral aspect of human caregiving. Historical symbols of spirituality are examined. The need for nurses to explore and reflect on the paradoxical concepts involved in their own spirituality is highlighted. Nurses are the essential providers of care and, therefore, the paper argues

  2. Spirituality, healing and medicine.

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, D

    1991-01-01

    The natural science base of modern medicine influences the way in which medicine is delivered and may ignore the spiritual factors associated with illness. The history of spirituality in healing presented here reflects the growth of scientific knowledge, demands for religious renewal, and the shift in the understanding of the concept of health within a broader cultural context. General practitioners have been willing to entertain the idea of spiritual healing and include it in their daily practice, or referral network. Recognizing patients' beliefs in the face of suffering is an important factor in health care practice. PMID:1777299

  3. Formal and informal spiritual assessment.

    PubMed

    Puchalski, Christina Maria

    2010-01-01

    Spirituality is increasingly recognized as an essential element of health. A novel model of interprofessional spiritual care was developed by a national consensus conference of experts in spiritual care and palliative care. Integral to this model is a spiritual screening, history or assessment as part of the routine history of patients. Spiritual screening can be done by a clinician on an intake into a hospital setting. Clinicians who make diagnosis and assessments and plans, and make referrals to appropriate experts do spiritual histories. In spiritual care, board certified chaplains, spiritual directors and pastoral counselors are the typical spiritual care referrals. Board certified chaplain do a spiritual assessment that is a more detailed assessment of religious and spiritual beliefs and how those impact care or patient's healthcare decision-making. There are several screening and history tools. One history tool named FICA, was developed by a group of primary care physicians and recently validated at study at the City of Hope. This tool is widely used in a variety of clinical settings in the US and Canada. The spiritual history tools allow the clinician the opportunity to diagnose spiritual distress or identify patients' spiritual resources of strength and then integrate that information into the clinical treatment or care plan.

  4. Psychopharmacotherapy and spirituality.

    PubMed

    Ljubicić, Dulijano; Peitl, Marija Vucić; Vitezić, Dinko; Peitl, Vjekoslav; Grbac, Josip

    2007-09-01

    Although the connection between spiritual and physical has been acknowledged since the oldest of human civilizations and emphasized in almost all of religions, It has taken a lot of time for that connection to gradually recover its lost meaning. As it is evident that many diseases and illnesses can not be explained purely by physical causes nor treated with purely physical methods there is a growing interest in spirituality and its usability in the treatment of various diseases and states, as well as in everyday life. Despite the fact that a sense of positive, nourishing and healing power of faith is deeply rooted in every religion, objective and empirical research of that connection has been avoided for centuries, and those studies which were conducted are only rudimentary, on the outskirts of empirical science. Scientific literature regarding spirituality and mental health points to a conclusion that spirituality and faith are positively correlated with positive therapeutic outcome and the possible explanation for that can be found in the fact that spirituality and religiosity can satisfy some of the basic needs of psychiatric patients. Efficacy of psychiatric treatment improved with the introduction of psychotropic medicaments and psychotherapeutic techniques, but the outcome is still not satisfying because relapse, recidivation and discontinuation of therapy occur very often. On the other hand, spirituality and religiosity play a very significant role in the healing process because they provide people with strength and will to fight their problems and disease itself. Psychopharmaceuticals are evidently irreplaceable in the therapy of mental disorders, but they are only one of the segments of the overall therapy. In order to adequately answer to the spiritual and religious needs of their patients, psychiatrists, psychologists and related health care professionals are faced with the need for expanding scientific concepts which served as the basis for development

  5. Spiritual Awareness Pedagogy: The Classroom as Spiritual Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lisa; Athan, Aurelie

    2007-01-01

    Our theoretical orientation as educators is to teach with a spiritual foundation. Central to our perspective is that the classroom as an academic space is poised to facilitate profound spiritual evolution for students. A graduate course in psychotherapy using a Spiritual Awareness Pedagogy (SAP) offers students an opportunity to understand…

  6. Assessing spirituality. Healthcare organizations must address their employees' spiritual needs.

    PubMed

    Bazan, W; Dwyer, D

    1998-01-01

    Catholic institutions need to respond to their managers, physicians, and other employees experiencing deep pain about the meaning and purpose of life. Initial approaches to people in spiritual distress include "tough love", codependence, and assistance programs, along with prayer and compassion. But a different approach that gives people the space and freedom to pursue their spiritual search and ask questions to discover deeper meaning in life may be more effective. It allows them to accept that they are where they need to be on their spiritual journey, even if that place is painful. Healthcare organizations can, through their structures and culture, create environments that promote this spiritual work. The entire organization must be spiritually grounded. Organizations can develop specific programs to address employees' spiritual yearnings, including: Private spiritual direction or companionship Formal mentoring Renewal days or retreats Spirituality programs for professionals Organizations must consider spirituality in recruiting, uphold policies on spirituality, and ensure physicians receive the same spiritual support as other employees. Resources should be allocated for expanded spiritual services, quiet places for reflection, meditation and related classes, traditional retreats, and qualified personnel.

  7. Spirituality and Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Broeckaert, Bert

    2011-01-01

    This paper shows how palliative care developed as a reaction to the compartimentalized technical approach of modern medicine. But what does it mean if we say palliative care wants to treat patients as whole persons? A few pitfalls need to avoided. All disciplines involved in palliative care should act within the limits of their own specific professional role. Physicians and nurses should certainly not force patients into spiritual or religious discussions or practices. They should understand that religion and spirituality also influence the ethical (and thus medical) choices people make, respect their own conscience and worldview too and cultivate conscious compassion. PMID:21811369

  8. Teaching Spiritual Care to Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Linda A.

    1996-01-01

    Spiritual care that enhances patient well-being should be taught to nurses, but it is unclear how or if it is being taught, according to a survey of 685 Scottish nurses. Nurses should be aware of the spiritual dimension of their own lives, have experience and learning from crises, and collaborate with clergy in meeting patients' spiritual needs.…

  9. Spiritual Bypass: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashwell, Craig S.; Glosoff, Harriet L.; Hammond, Cheree

    2010-01-01

    The phenomenon of spiritual bypass has received limited attention in the transpersonal psychology and counseling literature and has not been subjected to empirical inquiry. This study examines the phenomenon of spiritual bypass by considering how spirituality, mindfulness, alexithymia (emotional restrictiveness), and narcissism work together to…

  10. Sexual Trauma, Spirituality, and Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krejci, Mark J.; Thompson, Kevin M.; Simonich, Heather; Crosby, Ross D.; Donaldson, Mary Ann; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Mitchell, James E.

    2004-01-01

    This study assessed the association between spirituality and psychopathology in a group of sexual abuse victims and controls with a focus on whether spirituality moderated the association between sexual trauma and psychopathology. Seventy-one sexual trauma victims were compared to 25 control subjects on spiritual well-being, the Eating Disorder…

  11. Spiritual wellbeing, Attitude toward Spiritual Care and its Relationship with Spiritual Care Competence among Critical Care Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Azarsa, Tagie; Davoodi, Arefeh; Khorami Markani, Abdolah; Gahramanian, Akram; Vargaeei, Afkham

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Nurses’ spiritual wellbeing and their attitude toward spirituality and competence of nurses in providing of spiritual care can affect the quality of care in nursing. The aim of this study was to evaluate spiritual wellbeing, attitude toward spiritual care and its relationship with the spiritual care competence among nurses. Methods: This was a correlational descriptive study conducted on 109 nurses working in the Intensive Care Units of Imam Reza and Madani hospitals in 2015, Tabriz, Iran. Data collection tools were a demographic data form and three standard questionnaires including Spiritual Wellbeing Scale, Spirituality and Spiritual Results: The mean score of the spiritual wellbeing was 94.45 (14.84), the spiritual care perspective was 58.77 (8.67), and the spiritual care competence was 98.51 (15.44). The linear regression model showed 0.42 variance between the spiritual care competence scores which were explained by the two aspects of spiritual wellbeing (religious health, existential health) and three aspects of spiritual care perspective (spirituality, spiritual care, personalized care). The spiritual care competence had a positive relationship with spiritual wellbeing and spiritual care perspective. Conclusion: Because of the nature of nursing and importance of close interaction of nurses with patients in ICUs, the higher nurses’ SW and the more their positive attitude toward spiritual care, the more they can provide spiritual care to their patients. PMID:26744730

  12. Spirituality in nursing: nurses' perceptions about providing spiritual care.

    PubMed

    Ruder, Shirley

    2013-01-01

    Providing spiritual care is an important foundation of nursing and is a requirement mandated by accreditation organizations. Spiritual care is essential in all clinical areas but particularly in home care and hospice. Clinicians may be unable to respond to spiritual needs because of inadequate education or the assumption that spiritual needs should be addressed by clergy, chaplains, or other "spiritual" care providers. In reality, clinicians in the home may be in the best position to offer spiritual support when caring for patients at home at end of life. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine relationships between spirituality and nurses' providing spiritual care. Professional nurses (n = 69) working in 2 large healthcare organizations completed the Perceptions of Spiritual Care Questionnaire. Approximately, 33% of the nurses worked in home care. Significant correlations were found among those nurses whose reported nursing education programs adequately prepared them to meet spiritual needs and taught ways to incorporate spiritual care into practice and those who did not.

  13. Incorporating Spirituality in Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Isaac, Kathleen S; Hay, Jennifer L; Lubetkin, Erica I

    2016-06-01

    Addressing cultural competency in health care involves recognizing the diverse characteristics of the patient population and understanding how they impact patient care. Spirituality is an aspect of cultural identity that has become increasingly recognized for its potential to impact health behaviors and healthcare decision-making. We consider the complex relationship between spirituality and health, exploring the role of spirituality in primary care, and consider the inclusion of spirituality in existing models of health promotion. We discuss the feasibility of incorporating spirituality into clinical practice, offering suggestions for physicians. PMID:26832335

  14. Integrating Spirituality Into Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wax, Seth

    2008-01-01

    School leaders do work that is both demanding and draining. Amid the day-to-day pressures of managing their school districts, many are seeking inspiration and deeper meaning. As a result, some are increasingly looking to integrate their spirituality and their work. In this article, the author describes three individuals interviewed as part of the…

  15. Spirituality and the physician executive.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, L R

    2000-01-01

    The "s" word can now be spoken without flinching in health care organizations. Spirituality is becoming a common topic in management conferences around the world. Many U.S. corporations are recognizing the role of spirituality in creating a new humanistic capitalism that manages beyond the bottom line. Spirituality refers to a broad set of principles that transcend all religions. It is the relationship between yourself and something larger, such as the good of your patient or the welfare of the community. Spirituality means being in right relationship to all that is and understanding the mutual interdependence of all living beings. Physician executives should be primary proponents of spirituality in their organizations by: Modeling the power of spirituality in their own lives; integrating spiritual methodologies into clinical practice; fostering an integrative approach to patient care; encouraging the organization to tithe its profits for unmet community health needs; supporting collaborative efforts to improve the health of the community; and creating healing environments.

  16. Spirituality and religion in oncology.

    PubMed

    Peteet, John R; Balboni, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Despite the difficulty in clearly defining and measuring spirituality, a growing literature describes its importance in oncology and survivorship. Religious/spiritual beliefs influence patients' decision-making with respect to both complementary therapies and aggressive care at the end of life. Measures of spirituality and spiritual well-being correlate with quality of life in cancer patients, cancer survivors, and caregivers. Spiritual needs, reflective of existential concerns in several domains, are a source of significant distress, and care for these needs has been correlated with better psychological and spiritual adjustment as well as with less aggressive care at the end of life. Studies show that while clinicians such as nurses and physicians regard some spiritual care as an appropriate aspect of their role, patients report that they provide it infrequently. Many clinicians report that their religious/spiritual beliefs influence their practice, and practices such as mindfulness have been shown to enhance clinician self-care and equanimity. Challenges remain in the areas of conceptualizing and measuring spirituality, developing and implementing training for spiritual care, and coordinating and partnering with chaplains and religious communities.

  17. MEETING Spiritual Needs: A STUDY USING THE SPIRITUAL CARE COMPETENCE SCALE.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Ann N; Williams, Wesley E; Hurley, Shelia

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare literature suggests that many nurses fail to address patients' spiritual needs and/or identify signs of spiritual distress. A study was conducted to explore whether nurses in a medical center possessed the knowledge to assess patients' spirituality and design and implement a plan of spiritual care. The Spiritual Care Competence Scale was used to assess competence in spiritual care assessment and implementation; professionalization and improving quality; personal support and patient counseling; referral; attitude toward patient spirituality; and communication of spiritual needs.

  18. Religion and spirituality: assessment and intervention.

    PubMed

    Doka, Kenneth J

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the ways that an individual's spirituality influences responses to life-threatening illness and dying. He begins by differentiating between religion and spirituality, and then delineates the spiritual issues that arise in a life-threatening illness including the spiritual needs that arise in the final phases of illness. Recommendations for spiritual assessments and interventions are offered.

  19. Integrating spirituality into alcohol treatment.

    PubMed

    Delaney, Harold D; Forcehimes, Alyssa A; Campbell, William P; Smith, Bruce W

    2009-02-01

    Spirituality is presumed by millions of Americans to be directly relevant to problems of alcohol abuse. We summarize findings regarding the role of religion and spirituality in the prevention and treatment of substance abuse and present a case illustration. We also consider mechanisms responsible for these effects. We offer advice about why, by whom, and how religion and spirituality should be discussed with clients with substance use disorders. In a recent clinical trial, therapists trained in a client-centered approach to facilitate exploration of spirituality fostered clients' use of spiritual practices. We suggest that the therapist's ability to skillfully engage clients in a discussion of spirituality is largely determined by how the therapist balances the dual roles of authoritative expert and evocative facilitator.

  20. Spiritual Borderlands: A Black Gay Male College Student's Spiritual Journey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Means, Darris R.; Jaeger, Audrey J.

    2015-01-01

    This case study explored the spiritual journey and spaces of one Black gay male college student. Data collection included semi-structured interviews, field observations, and photovoice. Findings indicate that the student experienced tension during his spiritual journey because of his racial and sexual orientation identities but was able to…

  1. Spirituality Matters: Spirituality and the Community College Leader

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Monica Windley; McPhail, Christine Johnson

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore community college president and chancellor perceptions of the phenomenon of spirituality and the role of spirituality in their leadership style. A hermeneutic phenomenological research design guided this study. A total of 14 community college presidents and chancellors were purposely selected and…

  2. Spiritual Weapons: Black Female Principals and Religio-Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witherspoon, Noelle; Taylor, Dianne L.

    2010-01-01

    The historic connection of religion and spirituality to women, education, advocacy, and leadership is prevalent in Black American histories in general and the role of the religion and spirit in promoting education and socialisation. Important in this history is the intersection of spirituality and leadership for Black American women. This research…

  3. The Spiritual Life of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Ruth A.

    2010-01-01

    A misconception about spirituality is that it is tied to religion (i.e., belief in and reverence for a supernatural power). Yet, the term "spirituality" is derived from the word "spirit"--often defined as the vital principle or animating force within living things. This definition may reflect some overlap with what is generally covered in…

  4. Spirituality, School Leadership, and Islam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sayani, Anish

    2005-01-01

    This article begins with two nonfiction narratives that are used throughout the article to defend and nuance the rationale for educational leaders to create dialogical spaces in schools for students to explore their spiritualities. The reasons for the inclusion of spirituality in schools are clustered into four categories for the sake of…

  5. Spirituality, Religion, and Peace Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brantmeier, Edward J., Ed.; Lin, Jing, Ed.; Miller, John P., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Spirituality, Religion, and Peace Education" attempts to deeply explore the universal and particular dimensions of education for inner and communal peace. This co-edited book contains fifteen chapters on world spiritual traditions, religions, and their connections and relevance to peacebuilding and peacemaking. This book examines the teachings…

  6. Christian School Leaders and Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banke, Susan; Maldonado, Nancy; Lacey, Candace H.

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the spiritual experiences of Christian school leaders who are the spiritual leaders of their schools. A purposeful, nominated sample of 12 Christian school leaders was selected. In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted, audio taped, and then transcribed verbatim. Data analysis was based on Rudestam and…

  7. [Religiosity, spirituality and psychotherapy].

    PubMed

    Kioulos, K

    2010-01-01

    The quest for existential meaning constitutes a universal phenomenon traditionally manifested in official religions (religiosity) or personal modes of transcendence (spirituality). Throughout the greater part of the twentieth century, the tendency among mental health professionals was a failure to recognize or a denial of the religious experience which was frequently regarded as dated or even pathological. Over the last decades there has been an increasing number of publications pertaining to the relationship between religiosity, mental health and psychotherapy, yielding quite interesting results on both theoretical and clinical level. Consequently, it is essential that psychiatrists and psychotherapists become familiarized and sufficiently trained in managing these issues, in assessing their contribution to the development and treatment of psychopathology, as well as in the recognition of the spiritual, religious and correlated psychological needs of their clients. In this context, cognitive behavioral therapy has been the first to incorporate this set of questions, introducing modified therapeutic models which endeavor to integrate therapy through the worldview of the religious subject.

  8. Joining Forces: Working with Spirituality in Organisations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snell, Robin; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Includes "Joining Forces" (Lindamood); "Spiritual Dimension of the Learning Organisation" (Hawkins); "Management--A 'Spiritual' Foundation?" (Nevard); "Hermit in Organisations" (Murray); "Towards a Spiritual Perspective on Behavior at Work" (Henson); "On Uncertainty" (Adlam); "Spirituality in Organisations" (Lee); "Ecological Organisation" (Conn);…

  9. Acute care nurses' spiritual care practices.

    PubMed

    Gallison, Barry S; Xu, Yan; Jurgens, Corrine Y; Boyle, Suzanne M

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify barriers in providing spiritual care to hospitalized patients. A convenience sample (N = 271) was recruited at an academic medical center in New York City for an exploratory, descriptive questionnaire. The Spiritual Care Practice (SCP) questionnaire assesses spiritual care practices and perceived barriers to spiritual care. The SCP determines the percentage that provides spiritual support and perceived barriers inhibiting spiritual care. The participation rate was 44.3% (N = 120). Most (61%) scored less than the ideal mean on the SCP. Although 96% (N = 114) believe addressing patients spiritual needs are within their role, nearly half (48%) report rarely participating in spiritual practices. The greatest perceived barriers were belief that patient's spirituality is private, insufficient time, difficulty distinguishing proselytizing from spiritual care, and difficulty meeting needs when spiritual beliefs were different from their own. Although nurses identify themselves as spiritual, results indicate spirituality assessments are inadequate. Addressing barriers will provide nurses opportunities to address spirituality. Education is warranted to improve nurses' awareness of the diversity of our society to better meet the spiritual needs of patients. Understanding these needs provide the nurse with opportunities to address spirituality and connect desires with actions to strengthen communication and the nurse-patient relationship.

  10. A Measure of Spiritual Sensitivity for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoyles, Gerard John; Stanford, Bonnie; Caputi, Peter; Keating, Alysha-Leigh; Hyde, Brendan

    2012-01-01

    Spirituality is an essential influence in a child's development. However, an age-appropriate measure of child's spiritual sensitivity is not currently available in the literature. This paper describes the development of a measure of children's spiritual sensitivity, the Spiritual Sensitivity Scale for Children (SSSC). Statistical analyses…

  11. Treating Spiritual Issues in Secular Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helminiak, Daniel A.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses spirituality as a spiritual phenomenon that is independent of, yet open to, matters of personal religion and belief in God. Proposes that an elaborated psychology of spirituality helps therapists focus the psychotherapeutically relevant and spiritual issues in the client's presentation; build on the client's healthy commitments; and…

  12. The Critical Spirituality of Paulo Freire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Darrell

    2012-01-01

    Starting from the premise that Paulo Freire's capacity for hope in the face of personal struggle and exile issued from his spirituality, this paper examines Freire's spirituality through the lens of Michael Dantley's concept of critical spirituality. The concept of spirituality as discussed in the literature is explored, followed by an explication…

  13. Secret Wisdom: Spiritual Intelligence in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilcup, Charmayne

    2016-01-01

    Current models of spiritual development suggest that adolescents have limited capacity for spirituality and spiritual experiences. Adolescents are seen to have immature moral and ethical judgment and be incapable of deep spiritual experience due to lack of cognitive development. This mixed-methods study explored the existence of spiritual…

  14. Developing Curricula in Spirituality and Medicine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puchalski, Christina M.; Larson, David B.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses one approach to achieving compassionate medical caregiving, the study of spirituality and medicine. Examines the relationship between spirituality and healing and describes studies indicating that patients want to have spiritual issues addressed by their physicians, and noting potential health benefits of spiritual beliefs. Outlines…

  15. Spirituality, mindfulness and substance abuse.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Janis; Bowen, Sarah; Marlatt, G Alan

    2005-08-01

    A growing body of research suggests that mindfulness-based therapies may be effective in treating a variety of disorders including stress, chronic pain, depression and anxiety. However, there are few valid and reliable measures of mindfulness. Furthermore, mindfulness is often thought to be related to spirituality, given its roots in Buddhist tradition, but empirical studies on this relationship are difficult to find. The present study: (1) tested the reliability and validity of a new mindfulness measure, the Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory (FMI), (2) explored the relationship between mindfulness and spirituality, and (3) investigated the relationship between mindfulness and/or spirituality and alcohol and tobacco use in an undergraduate college population (N=196). Results support the reliability of the FMI and suggest that spirituality and mindfulness may be separate constructs. In addition, smoking and frequent binge-drinking were negatively correlated with spirituality scores; as spirituality scores increased the use of alcohol and tobacco decreased. Thus, spirituality may be related to decreased substance use. In contrast, a positive relationship between mindfulness and smoking/frequent binge-drinking behavior was uncovered, and warrants further investigation.

  16. Aspects of spirituality concerning illness.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, René; Tiesinga, Lucas J; Jochemsen, Henk; Jochemasen, Henk; Post, Doeke

    2007-12-01

    The spiritual dimension of illness, health and care may be seen as a unique aspect in addition to the physical, mental and social dimension. This contribution describes experiences of patients, nurses and hospital chaplains in relation to the spiritual aspects of being ill. Qualitative research was performed with the design of a focus group study, consisting of 13 focus groups with a total of 67 participants. A purposive sample was used comprising patients, nurses and hospital chaplains working in oncology, cardiology and neurology in different institutions and regions in the Netherlands. The qualitative analysis consisted of open coding and the determining of topics, followed by the subsequent attachment of substantial dimensions and characteristic fragments. Data were analysed by using the computer program KWALITAN. Spirituality play various roles in patients lives during their illness. There is a wide range of topics that may have an individual effect on patients. Despite differences in emphasis, the topics play a role in different patient categories. Although the spiritual topics seem to manifest themselves more clearly in long-term care relationships, they may also play a role during brief admittance periods (such as treatment decisions). The spiritual topics that arise from this study offer caregivers a framework for signalling the spiritual needs of patients. The question is not whether spirituality is a relevant focus area in care, but how and to what degree it plays a role with individual patients. Follow up research should aim at further exploration of spiritual aspects in care, the relationship between spirituality and health and at effective training of caregivers.

  17. Neurobiology of spirituality.

    PubMed

    Mohandas, E

    2008-01-01

    Spiritual practices have been proposed to have many beneficial effects as far as mental health is concerned. The exact neural basis of these effects is slowly coming to light and different imaging techniques have elucidated the neural basis of meditative practices. The evidence though preliminary and based on studies replete with methodological constraints, points toward the involvement of the prefrontal and parietal cortices. The available data on meditation focus on activated frontal attentional network. Neuroimaging studies have shown that meditation results in an activation of the prefrontal cortex, activation of the thalamus and the inhibitory thalamic reticular nucleus and a resultant functional deafferentation of the parietal lobe. The neurochemical change as a result of meditative practices involves all the major neurotransmitter systems. The neurotransmitter changes contribute to the amelioration of anxiety and depressive symptomatology and in part explain the psychotogenic property of meditation. This overview highlights the involvement of multiple neural structures, the neurophysiological and neurochemical alterations observed in meditative practices.

  18. Depression: dispirited or spiritually deprived?

    PubMed

    Hassed, C S

    2000-11-20

    The 20th century has seen a widespread decline in mental health in Western society. One important factor may be the lack of meaning and spiritual fulfilment that is part of our increasingly secular and materialistic society. In medical education and practice, religious issues are often marginalised or 'pathologised", despite consistent evidence from the literature of the protective effect of "religiosity" or "spirituality" on mental and physical health.

  19. Spirituality in childhood cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Nádia Nara Rolim; do Nascimento, Vânia Barbosa; de Carvalho, Sionara Melo Figueiredo; Neto, Modesto Leite Rolim; Moreira, Marcial Moreno; Brasil, Aline Quental; Junior, Francisco Telésforo Celestino; de Oliveira, Gislene Farias; Reis, Alberto Olavo Advíncula

    2013-01-01

    To deal with the suffering caused by childhood cancer, patients and their families use different coping strategies, among which, spirituality appears a way of minimizing possible damage. In this context, the purpose of the present study was to analyze the influence of spirituality in childhood cancer care, involving biopsychosocial aspects of the child, the family, and the health care team facing the disease. To accomplish this purpose, a nonsystematic review of literature of articles on national and international electronic databases (Scientific Electronic Library Online [SciELO], PubMed, and Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature [LILACS]) was conducted using the search terms “spirituality,” “child psychology,” “child,” and “cancer,” as well as on other available resources. After the search, 20 articles met the eligibility criteria and were included in the final sample. Our review showed that the relation between spirituality and health has lately become a subject of growing interest among researchers, as a positive influence of spirituality in the people’s welfare was noted. Studies that were retrieved using the mentioned search strategy in electronic databases, independently assessed by the authors according to the systematic review, showed that spirituality emerges as a driving force that helps pediatric patients and their families in coping with cancer. Health care workers have been increasingly attentive to this dimension of care. However, it is necessary to improve their knowledge regarding the subject. The search highlighted that spirituality is considered a source of comfort and hope, contributing to a better acceptance of his/her chronic condition by the child with cancer, as well as by the family. Further up-to-date studies facing the subject are, thus, needed. It is also necessary to better train health care practitioners, so as to provide humanized care to the child with cancer. PMID:24133371

  20. Factors Influencing the Spiritual Competency of Predoctoral Psychology Interns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haasz, Christine A.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship among spiritual competencies, personal spiritual beliefs, and clinical supervision in spirituality with professional psychology predoctoral interns. It was hypothesized personal spiritual beliefs and supervision in spirituality would be predictors of spiritual competencies in clinical practice. Social…

  1. ASSET: A Model for Actioning Spirituality and Spiritual Care Education and Training in Nursing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narayanasamy, Aru

    1999-01-01

    A model for improving nurses' preparation in spiritual care includes development of spiritual self-awareness, knowledge of varied traditions of spirituality, and ability to implement a spiritual dimension in nursing practice using the skills of communication, trust building, and giving hope. (SK)

  2. Science, Spirituality and Truth: Acknowledging Difference for Spiritual Dialogue and Human Well-Being

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    This article seeks to explain why spiritual education must be clear about the nature of spiritual knowledge and truth and how it differs from the knowledge and truth generated by science. The author argues this is important in order that spirituality and science are equally valued, and in order that spiritual pedagogy appropriately reflects the…

  3. Autobiography as a spiritual practice.

    PubMed

    Staude, John-Raphael

    2005-01-01

    In this article autobiography is defined as a dialogue of the self with itself in the present about the past for the sake of self-understanding. Spirituality involves connectedness to oneself, others, nature and to a larger meaning. It is associated with creativity, play, wisdom, faith, and a sense of oneness. Writing and reflecting on one's autobiography enhances spiritual growth and can be therapeutic freeing people from outlived roles and self-imposed images. After discussing the history of spiritual autobiography as a genre, the author compares and contrasts four approaches to autobiography: the structured life review, the guided autobiography, the intensive journal workbook, and autobiographical work in twelve step programs. For those who work with older persons these techniques should prove very useful. PMID:16172074

  4. Addressing spiritual leadership: an organizational model.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Lisa; Solari-Twadell, P Ann; Haas, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Commission requires health systems to address spiritual care. Research indicates that spirituality is associated with better physical, psychological, and social health and that culturally diverse populations and individuals at end-of-life often request spiritual care. The authors report the results of a consensus conference of 21 executives representing 10 large faith-based health systems who discussed the input, process, and outcomes of a corporate model for spiritual leadership. Specific initiatives are highlighted.

  5. Spiritual Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Kyllo, D O

    1996-01-01

    The person who experiences a stroke realizes a change in every area of life. The spiritual life of each individual is affected by stroke and goes through a period of adjustment. It is also the area of life that gives support and strength to cope and hope through the changes, allowing feelings and frustrations to be expressed without recourse. The perceived presence of the Divine gives a sense of love, purpose, power, and belongingness. The spiritual is an integral part in recovery from and rehabilitation following a stroke. PMID:27620151

  6. Spiritual leadership: a new model.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Emily J

    2004-01-01

    Recent unethical business practices of some corporations and the overall loss of confidence by the public in corporate leadership have given rise to a unique leadership model--one that focuses on spirituality. "Ninety percent of our diverse American population and health-care workforce have spiritual and religious beliefs. While these beliefs may be mystical, religious, or secular, there are many common patterns that influence change and leadership within our organizations." So says Gary Strack, CHE, president and chief executive officer of Boca Raton (FL) Community Hospital. Strack presented a seminar on the topic at ACHE's 2003 Congress on Healthcare Management.

  7. Spiritual uncertainty: exemplars of 2 hospice patients.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, Pamela Shockey

    2014-01-01

    Spirituality is important to persons approaching the end of life. The ambiguous nature of dying and spirituality creates many opportunities for uncertainty. This article presents 2 exemplars from hospice patients about the different ways that spiritual uncertainty affected their dying experience. PMID:24919092

  8. Multicultural Training in Spirituality: An Interdisciplinary Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hage, Sally M.; Hopson, Amy; Siegel, Matthew; Payton, Gregory; DeFanti, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Is spiritual diversity a neglected dimension in preparation for multicultural competency? The authors present an interdisciplinary overview of research related to multicultural training in spirituality and religion to address this issue. Findings indicate that counseling program leaders have minimal preparation in spiritual and religious diversity…

  9. Spiritual Challenges to Children Facing Violent Trauma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbarino, James; Bedard, Claire

    1996-01-01

    Reviews research dealing with the intersection of the developmental psychology of trauma and spirituality. Examines the role of religion in spiritual development and asserts the need to study life paths of violent youth to see role of spirituality in preventing social problems. Uses research with street children and children in war zones. (BGC)

  10. Spiritual Formation within Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Patrick; Harrington, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Christian university has a distinct responsibility to provide an environment devoted to the spiritual formation of students. Spiritual formation is not to be viewed as the only important goal of the university, thereby sacrificing intellectual or relational development, but rather spiritual formation is the aggregate "product" of the…

  11. Spirituals: A Historical and Linguistic Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sirinides, Thomas W.

    A study of Black American spirituals focuses on African linguistic patterns that have persisted in them. The analysis begins with a brief account of the history and nature of Black spirituals, the sacred songs created by Americans of African descent during the time of slavery (1619-1864). Six elements of spirituals are identified and discussed,…

  12. Canadian Children's Perceptions of Spirituality: Diverse Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Kelsey; Talwar, Victoria; Bosacki, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    Few researchers have explored children's understandings of spirituality. Thus, Canadian children from different religious, spiritual and cultural backgrounds were asked open-ended questions concerning their spiritual thoughts, beliefs and experiences. Parents of participants completed a demographic questionnaire and reported children's religious…

  13. Lessons in Spiritual Leadership from Kenyan Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ngunjiri, Faith Wambura

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explicate spiritual leadership lessons of beneficence, courage, hope and ubuntu/humanness that are derived from the experiences of women leaders in Kenya. The paper seeks to connect African data with existing literature on spiritual leadership, to demonstrate where African spiritual leadership is similar…

  14. Holistic Flow Model of Spiritual Wellness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purdy, Melanie; Dupey, Peggy

    2005-01-01

    The Holistic Flow Model of Spiritual Wellness is a conceptualization of spiritual health and well-being that has implications for clinical practice and research. The model is unique in its placement of the spirit at the center of Life and in its fluid vision of the spirit. The authors present the model after a discussion of spirituality and the…

  15. Why Is Music a Language of Spirituality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yob, Iris M.

    2010-01-01

    The basic thesis explored in this paper is that rather than seeing spirituality as a byproduct of music, the other arts, and religion, music, the other arts, and religion might be seen as a byproduct of spirituality--hence, the proposition that music is a language of spirituality. If that is the case, there are twin dangers: talk of "wholism" can…

  16. The use of dreams in spiritual care.

    PubMed

    Stranahan, Susan

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the use of dreams in the context of pastoral care. Although many people dream and consider their dreams to hold some significant spiritual meaning, spiritual care providers have been reluctant to incorporate patients' dreams into the therapeutic conversation. Not every dream can be considered insightful, but probing the meaning of some dreams can enhance spiritual care practice. Hill's Cognitive-Experimental Dream Interpretation Model is applied in the current article as a useful framework for exploring dreams, gaining insight about spiritual problems, and developing a therapeutic plan of action. Bulkeley's criteria for dream interpretation were used to furnish safeguards against inappropriate application of dream interpretation to spiritual assessment and interventions.

  17. Spirituality and Health for Women of Color

    PubMed Central

    Musgrave, Catherine F.; Allen, Carol Easley; Allen, Gregory J.

    2002-01-01

    Spirituality among African American and Hispanic women has been associated with a variety of positive health outcomes. The purposes of this commentary are (1) to define spirituality, comparing it with religiosity, and briefly examine the historical, cultural, and contextual roots of spirituality among women of color; (2) to explore research data that support a relationship between spirituality and health, particularly among women of color; and (3) to present several examples of how spirituality may enhance public health interventions designed to promote health and prevention. PMID:11919051

  18. Intellectual Disability and Spiritual Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watts, Graeme

    2011-01-01

    Linking the concepts of intellectual disability and spiritual development creates a challenging mixture of sociological and theological issues. Formal definitions of the concepts can be less than conclusive but it remains a fundamental issue to consider if there may be some minimal level of intellectual competence below which it is not feasible to…

  19. Aspects of Spirituality in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussing, Arndt; Foller-Mancini, Axel; Gidley, Jennifer; Heusser, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper analyses which aspects of spirituality are valued by adolescents, and how they are interconnected with youths' life satisfaction and "self-centeredness". The participants were 254 adolescents (11th grade) of four different high schools from west Germany. After re-validation of the 6-factorial student's version of the ASP questionnaire…

  20. Teenage Boys, Spirituality and Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engebretson, Kath

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on a pilot study concerning adolescent boys and spirituality, and specifically on data gathered from interviews with 20 boys of 15-17 years. The data from these interviews will inform the development of a questionnaire to be used more widely in the next stage of the research. The paper also explains and justifies the analytical…

  1. The Spirituality of Young Australians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Michael; Singleton, Andrew; Webber, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    A research project conducted in 2003-2006, the Spirit of Generation Y, using both extended interviews and a nationwide survey, revealed three main strands in the spirituality of young Australians: traditional, alternative and humanist. Their involvement in traditional religions was declining, like that of their parents, and although some adopted…

  2. Relational Spirituality and Social Caregiving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faver, Catherine A.

    2004-01-01

    Relational spirituality suggests that strengthening one's relatedness to other people and to sources of meaning beyond self-interest produces joy and vitality, which sustain the capacity to care. This perspective informs a qualitative study of 50 female services providers and social reformers. The interviews revealed that the women's caregiving…

  3. Leo Tolstoy the Spiritual Educator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulin, Dan

    2008-01-01

    This paper considers the often overlooked religious and educational works of the Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910). After outlining Tolstoy's life, religious and educational views, it is argued that Tolstoy has much to offer spiritual educators today. In particular, it suggests Tolstoy's insistence on the absolute and eternal nature of…

  4. [Spirituality and ethics in psychosomatic medicine].

    PubMed

    Irmiš, Felix

    2015-01-01

    A patient has to cope with an illness on a physical, mental and spiritual level. There exists a difference between religiousness and spirituality even though the approach has a common foundation. Nonreligious spirituality relates to an inner experience, transcendent states of consciousness, meaningfulness, responsibility, sympathy, ethics, humanisation, faith. We encounter the spiritual point of view in humanistic psychotherapy, pastoral medicine, work of hospital chaplains, New Age, psychotherapies with religious and alternative aspects, transpersonal psychotherapy, psycho-spiritual crises, unusual states of consciousness, in meditation, Yoga, relaxation, kinesiology, ethicotherapy, reincarnation therapy, positive motivation, holotropic breathing, etc. There is description of different degrees of spiritual development, rational and irrational feeling of spirituality, Quantum Physics, spiritual intelligence, neuro-theology, physiological change, effects on improving adaptation during stress, drugs addiction, etc. Spirituality in relation with ethics is discussed in terms of socio-biology, evolution, emotions, aggressivity, genetics and social influence. The work analyses the effect of stressful situations on the deterioration of moral attitudes: during lack of time, obedience to authority and order. It is described how temperament and personality disorders can affect perception of spirituality, guilt feeling and conscience. Stressful situations, lack of time, relying only on the auxiliary objective methods leads to alienation of physician with a patient. Spirituality can partially improve the doctor-patient relationship, communication and sense of responsibility. PMID:26311026

  5. [Spirituality and ethics in psychosomatic medicine].

    PubMed

    Irmiš, Felix

    2015-01-01

    A patient has to cope with an illness on a physical, mental and spiritual level. There exists a difference between religiousness and spirituality even though the approach has a common foundation. Nonreligious spirituality relates to an inner experience, transcendent states of consciousness, meaningfulness, responsibility, sympathy, ethics, humanisation, faith. We encounter the spiritual point of view in humanistic psychotherapy, pastoral medicine, work of hospital chaplains, New Age, psychotherapies with religious and alternative aspects, transpersonal psychotherapy, psycho-spiritual crises, unusual states of consciousness, in meditation, Yoga, relaxation, kinesiology, ethicotherapy, reincarnation therapy, positive motivation, holotropic breathing, etc. There is description of different degrees of spiritual development, rational and irrational feeling of spirituality, Quantum Physics, spiritual intelligence, neuro-theology, physiological change, effects on improving adaptation during stress, drugs addiction, etc. Spirituality in relation with ethics is discussed in terms of socio-biology, evolution, emotions, aggressivity, genetics and social influence. The work analyses the effect of stressful situations on the deterioration of moral attitudes: during lack of time, obedience to authority and order. It is described how temperament and personality disorders can affect perception of spirituality, guilt feeling and conscience. Stressful situations, lack of time, relying only on the auxiliary objective methods leads to alienation of physician with a patient. Spirituality can partially improve the doctor-patient relationship, communication and sense of responsibility.

  6. Weaving spirituality into organizational life. Suggestions for processes and programs.

    PubMed

    Craigie, F C

    1998-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated a clear link between spirituality and health, but it remains a challenge for many organizations to weave spirituality into organizational life and make it an integral component of clinical care. Three dimensions of spirituality work together in healthcare: spiritual well-being of patients and families, spiritual well-being of workers, and spiritual well-being of the organization. To cultivate these dimensions in the life of healthcare organizations, several strategies may be employed. First, the definition of "spirituality" must be clear. Consider spirituality at the core of providing healthcare, instead of parallel to or part of clinical approaches. Separate spirituality from chaplaincy, since nurturing spiritual values is the responsibility of everyone in the organization. It is important to affirm what people already do spiritually, focus on what they have to offer instead of on deficiencies, and cultivate spirituality individual by individual. Organizational leaders must demonstrate spirituality in their personal and professional lives, and keep the organizational mission to the fore. When working to enhance organizational spirituality, create a vision within the organization of its spirituality and emphasize peer support and collaboration. Programs to help organizations inculcate spirituality include retreats or renewal programs for employees, forums to explore employees' spirituality, inclusion of spiritual issues in training and orientation programs, educational and development programs for working groups, regular review of spiritual well-being, training selected employees as spiritual facilitators, and supporting research on spirituality, health, and healthcare. PMID:10178083

  7. Spirituality: an overlooked predictor of placebo effects?

    PubMed Central

    Kohls, Nikola; Sauer, Sebastian; Offenbächer, Martin; Giordano, James

    2011-01-01

    Empirical findings have identified spirituality as a potential health resource. Whereas older research has associated such effects with the social component of religion, newer conceptualizations propose that spiritual experiences and the intrapersonal effects that are facilitated by regular spiritual practice might be pivotal to understanding potential salutogenesis. Ongoing studies suggest that spiritual experiences and practices involve a variety of neural systems that may facilitate neural ‘top-down’ effects that are comparable if not identical to those engaged in placebo responses. As meaningfulness seems to be both a hallmark of spirituality and placebo reactions, it may be regarded as an overarching psychological concept that is important to engaging and facilitating psychophysiological mechanisms that are involved in health-related effects. Empirical evidence suggests that spirituality may under certain conditions be a predictor of placebo response and effects. Assessment of patients' spirituality and making use of various resources to accommodate patients' spiritual needs reflect our most current understanding of the physiological, psychological and socio-cultural aspects of spirituality, and may also increase the likelihood of eliciting self-healing processes. We advocate the position that a research agenda addressing responses and effects of both placebo and spirituality could therefore be (i) synergistic, (ii) valuable to each phenomenon on its own, and (iii) contributory to an extended placebo paradigm that is centred around the concept of meaningfulness. PMID:21576141

  8. Spirituality as a Positive Youth Development Construct: A Conceptual Review

    PubMed Central

    Shek, Daniel T. L.

    2012-01-01

    The concept of spirituality as a positive youth development construct is reviewed in this paper. Both broad and narrow definitions of spirituality are examined and a working definition of spirituality is proposed. Regarding theories of spirituality, different models pertinent to spiritual development and the relationship between spirituality and positive youth development are highlighted. Different ecological factors, particularly family and peer influences, were found to influence spirituality. Research on the influence of spirituality on adolescent developmental outcomes is examined. Finally, ways to promote adolescent spirituality are discussed. PMID:22654611

  9. Spirituality and reductionism: three replies.

    PubMed

    Paley, John

    2010-07-01

    Several authors have commented on my reductionist account of spirituality in nursing, describing it variously as naïve, disrespectful, demeaning, paternalistic, arrogant, reifying, indicative of a closed mind, akin to positivism, a procrustean bed, a perpetuation of fraud, a matter of faith, an attempt to secure ideological power, and a perspective that puritanically forbids interesting philosophical topics. In responding to this list of felonies and misdemeanours, I try to justify my excesses by arguing that the critics have not really understood what reductionism involves; that rejecting reductionism is not the same as providing arguments against it; that the ethical dilemmas allegedly associated with reductionist views are endemic to health care; that 'reifying' is what believers in the spiritual realm do; and that the closed minds belong to those who dismiss reductionist science without having studied its achievements. PMID:20536767

  10. Discerning lived spirituality: the reception of otherness.

    PubMed

    Walton, Martin Neal

    2013-06-01

    A previous article focused on an analysis of prominent conceptualizations of spirituality in health care. The encompassing character of those approaches was viewed as problematic because too little attention is paid to the distinctiveness and particularities of spiritual experience. This article argues that the criteria gleaned from the prior analysis provide an impetus for a constructive discernment proposal of lived spirituality. The experience of otherness is provides a central clue to an understanding of spirituality particularly by two key terms, receptivity and transformation, as central characterizations of lived spirituality. These terms are investigated as they embrace operational potential for chaplaincy care. The article concludes with a reflection on chaplaincy care as it relates to spiritual practice. PMID:24040742

  11. Why spirituality is essential for nurses.

    PubMed

    Wright, Stephen; Neuberger, Julia

    This article presents the case for 'engaged spirituality' as the key to improving nurses' ability to cope under pressure and remain compassionate towards patients. The authors argue that it is not a luxury addition to care, but just as important as skills and resources. A seven-point manifesto for spirituality in nursing sets out the place for spirituality in health care, and calls for changes in education and training to allow all nurses to see themselves and patients as one.

  12. The Development of Nursing Students' Spirituality and Spiritual Care-Giving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesut, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    In a survey of 35 first-year and 18 fourth-year nursing students, most expressed strong awareness of personal spirituality and spiritual health and were able to identify behaviors that facilitated spiritual nursing care. Fourth-year students were more patient centered, focusing on supporting patients' beliefs. (Contains 26 references.) (SK)

  13. Earthing Spiritual Literacy: How to Link Spiritual Development and Education to a New Earth Consciousness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Ursula

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the development of spiritual literacy in relation to a new consciousness of the Earth and what Thomas Berry calls "Earth literacy". It draws on the metaphor of "earthing" to argue for a close link between spiritual literacy and Earth literacy, considered of great importance for both personal spiritual development and the…

  14. Spirituality and Multimodal Therapy: A Practical Approach To Incorporating Spirituality in Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Russell C.; Davis, Keith M.

    1999-01-01

    Describes how the dimension of spirituality can be added to an existing counseling theory, multimodal therapy (MMT), to provide counselors with a practical approach to incorporating clients' religious and spiritual beliefs in the counseling process. Discusses the context of spirituality in counseling and explains the process by which it can be…

  15. The Intersection of Race and Spirituality: Underrepresented Students' Spiritual Development at Predominantly White Evangelical Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paredes-Collins, Kristin; Collins, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    Although a great deal of research assesses the value of both diversity and spirituality in the university setting, little research addresses the experience of underrepresented students and their spiritual development in an environment that is defined by a mission committed to spiritual growth. Utilizing data from the College Students' Beliefs and…

  16. Nurses' spiritual care practices: becoming less religious?

    PubMed

    Delgado, Cheryl

    2015-01-01

    Research indicates that nurses do not consistently provide spiritual care, feel ill equipped to do so, and there is a lack of information as to the type of spiritual care practices nurses use. This exploratory descriptive study surveyed nurses (N = 123) about their spiritual care practices and perceptions of effectiveness, followed by qualitative interviews with volunteers (n = 5) from the surveyed group. The nurses favored spiritual interventions that are not overtly religious, but conveyed concern and support, such as listening and providing comforting touch.

  17. Contemporary Perspectives on Spirituality and Mental Health

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pulkit; Charak, Ruby; Sharma, Vibha

    2009-01-01

    The paper strives to elucidate the complex yet intimate relation between spirituality and mental health from contemporary perspectives. The diverse and constantly evolving views that spiritualists and mental health professionals have held toward each other over last century are discussed with special accent on the transpersonal spiritual framework within psychology. The role of spirituality in promoting mental health and alleviating mental illness is highlighted. The paper is concluded with an increasing need to integrate spirituality within the mental health field albeit there are several impediments in achieving the same, which need to be worked through circumspectly. PMID:21938086

  18. [Spirituality and Resilience in Psychiatric Medicine].

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuo; Yamada, Kazue

    2015-01-01

    At the end of the twentieth century, the WHO tried to change the definition of health. Until then, the health of a person comprised biological, psychological, and social aspects. At the conclusion of the twentieth century, we understood that happiness required more than just these 3 aspects of health. So, the WHO discussed the addition of a spiritual aspect for the new definition of health. It is difficult to translate spirituality into Japanese. However, spirituality is very important in psychiatric care. For example, people who have spiritual pain or grief of loss experience a need for spiritual care. In the recovery process, the importance of resilience has been reported numerous times. Doctor Mieko Kamiya was an excellent psychiatrist and poet. After she contracted tuberculosis and recuperated alone, she fell into a deep depressive state and spent days of distress. In extreme situations, she had the mysterious experience of having her whole body bathed in light. She felt the presence of a great, natural power. Her spirituality and resilience awakened. So, she recovered to strong health through resilience and spirituality. Strong resilience was induced by spirituality. Spiritual care is important in disasters. PMID:26642727

  19. Spirituality, drugs, and alcohol: a philosophical analysis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Robert; Godlaski, Theodore M; Staton-Tindall, Michele

    2013-09-01

    Spirituality has long been associated with recovery from the socially constructed "addictive disease." Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) and its analogs have enjoyed widespread acceptance as a spiritual approach for achieving recovery. AA or its derivatives are the predominant approaches in treatment programs even though a wide array of evidence-based approaches are now promoted by governmental sources in the United States. This philosophical analysis contrasts the state of science about addictive disorders with the reliance on a spiritual approach that is heavily grounded in Christian theology. We present four problems that need consideration before accepting the applicability of 12-step spiritual practices as the backbone of addiction treatment or recovery.

  20. Hospice and the politics of spirituality.

    PubMed

    Garces-Foley, Kathleen

    2006-01-01

    Within the hospice literature, spirituality and religion are usually defined in opposition to one another, with religion negatively associated with the external, authoritarian doctrines of Christianity and spirituality positively associated with the free search for truth, meaning, and authenticity. According to survey data, however, most Americans integrate spirituality and traditional religious commitments. The hospice literature is promoting spirituality to its own detriment by alienating potential patients and depriving religious patients of the resources that religious traditions and their affiliated religious communities have to offer. PMID:17165229

  1. Assessing spirituality in mentally ill African Americans.

    PubMed

    Perdue, Bobbie; Johnson, Deanna; Singley, Doretha; Jackson, Cheylon

    2006-01-01

    The case scenario illustrates the advantage of using spirituality as a tool for recovery when working with mentally ill African American clients. Often spiritual and clinical perspectives are seen as contradictory. But for African Americans, these perspectives can be mutually reinforcing. Spirituality can serve as a resource of strength. It can provide emotional consolation, inspiration, guidance, and security. It can foster personal responsibility, identity, respect for ethical codes and community building. Mental Health professionals who use spirituality as a tool for recovery can expect to have better client outcomes when working with African Americans than those who do not.

  2. Assessing spiritual growth and spiritual decline following a diagnosis of cancer: reliability and validity of the spiritual transformation scale.

    PubMed

    Cole, Brenda S; Hopkins, Clare M; Tisak, John; Steel, Jennifer L; Carr, Brian I

    2008-02-01

    This study assessed the factor structure, reliability, and validity of an instrument designed to assess spiritual transformations following a diagnosis of cancer-the Spiritual Transformation Scale (STS). The instrument was administering to 253 people diagnosed with cancer within the previous 2 years. Two underlying factors emerged (spiritual growth (SG) and spiritual decline (SD)) with adequate internal reliability (alpha = 0.98 and 0.86, respectively) and test-retest reliability (r = 0.85 and 0.73, respectively). Validity was supported by correlations between SG and the Positive and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS) Positive Affect Subscale (r = 0.23, p < 0.001), the Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale (r = 0.57, p < 0.001), and the Post-traumatic Growth Inventory (r = 0.68, p < 0.001). SD was associated with higher scores on the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression scale (r = 0.38, p < 0.001) and PANAS-Negative Affect Subscale (r = 0.40, p < 0.001), and lower scores on the PANAS-Positive Affect Subscale (r = -0.23, p < 0.001), and the Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale (r = -0.30, p < 0.001). Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that the subscales uniquely predicted adjustment beyond related constructs (intrinsic religiousness, spiritual coping, and general post-traumatic growth). The results indicate that the STS is psychometrically sound, with SG predicting better, and SD predicting poorer, mental and spiritual well-being following a diagnosis of cancer. PMID:17458862

  3. Spirituality and attempted suicide among American Indians.

    PubMed

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Goldberg, Jack; Beals, Janette; Herrell, Richard; Manson, Spero M

    2003-04-01

    American Indians exhibit suicide-related behaviors at rates much higher than the general population. This study examines the relation of spirituality to the lifetime prevalence of attempted suicide in a probability sample of American Indians. Data were derived from a cross-sectional sample of 1456 American Indian tribal members (age range 15-57yr) who were living on or near their Northern Plains reservations between 1997 and 1999. Data were collected by personal interviews. Commitment to Christianity was assessed using a measure of beliefs. Commitment to tribal cultural spirituality (or forms of spirituality deriving from traditions that predate European contact) was assessed using separate measures for beliefs and spiritual orientations. Results indicated that neither commitment to Christianity nor to cultural spirituality, as measured by beliefs, was significantly associated with suicide attempts (p(trend) for Christianity=0.22 and p(trend) for cultural spirituality=0.85). Conversely, commitment to cultural spirituality, as measured by an index of spiritual orientations, was significantly associated with a reduction in attempted suicide (p(trend)=0.01). Those with a high level of cultural spiritual orientation had a reduced prevalence of suicide compared with those with low level of cultural spiritual orientation. (OR=0.5, 95% CI=0.3, 0.9). This result persisted after simultaneous adjustment for age, gender, education, heavy alcohol use, substance abuse and psychological distress. These results are consistent with anecdotal reports suggesting the effectiveness of American Indian suicide-prevention programs emphasizing orientations related to cultural spirituality.

  4. Spiritual Assessment in Counseling: Methods and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakes, K. Elizabeth; Raphel, Mary M.

    2008-01-01

    Given the widely expanding professional and empirical support for integrating spirituality into counseling, the authors present a practical discussion for raising counselors' general awareness and skill in the critical area of spiritual assessment. A discussion of rationale, measurement, and clinical practice is provided along with case examples.…

  5. Enhancing the Spiritual Development of Adolescent Girls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Mary Alice; Cockreham, Debbie

    2004-01-01

    Spirituality is an important force during a period when institutional religion seems to be losing its hold on adolescents. To enhance the spiritual development of adolescent girls in the school setting, the group experience described addresses authentic identity, relationships and boundaries, managing pain experienced in life, and discovering and…

  6. Sport and Children's Spirituality: An Australian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Micheline Wyn

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of sport and physical activity are endorsed by a number of professionals as a means of improving children's health and their sense of well-being, and their unity with the natural world, other people and the Transcendent. For children, sport is a spiritual source of joy and wonder. Using Champagne's "spiritual modes of being", my…

  7. Secular Schools, Spirituality and Maori Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Deborah

    2004-01-01

    New Zealand has had free, state, secular education since 1877, but just what is meant by secularism is changing. Since the 1980s the growth of Maori education initiatives has mushroomed and these place emphasis on Maori values and beliefs, including spirituality. In addition, in 1999 a definition and statement on spirituality appeared in the…

  8. The Assessment of Spiritual Issues in Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, J. Scott; Fuller, James O.

    By using carefully developed questions during the early stages of counseling, counselors can "open the door" for clients to feel comfortable discussing spiritual or religious themes in counseling. This process of incorporating spirituality into counseling may involve a paradigm shift and additional training for counselors; thus, guidelines are…

  9. Spiritual and Psychosocial Life Cycle Tapestry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leean, Constance

    1988-01-01

    Proposes three understandings of spirituality and examines how they challenge religious educators. Stating that spirituality can be understood as a common human yearning and experience, as a developmental reality, and as a discipline involving the whole person, the author concludes that people cannot ignore their relationship to nature and to the…

  10. Ethical and Spiritual Values in Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Mary Thomas, Ed.; Miranti, Judith G., Ed.

    This book presents a compilation of articles previously published in the journal "Counseling and Values." The follwing articles are included: (1) "Ethics and Spirituality: The Prevailing Forces Influencing the Counseling Profession" (Judith Miranti, Mary Thomas Burke); (2) "Three Contributions of a Spiritual Perspective to Counseling,…

  11. Enacting the Spiritual Dimension in Physical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lodewyk, Ken; Lu, Chunlei; Kentel, Jeanne

    2009-01-01

    Spirituality is a fundamental, everyday life process involving a joy of living, sacrifice and love for others, and a connection to self, others, nature, and to a larger meaning or purpose. Distinct from moral or religious beliefs, spirituality engages interactively with the psyche, body, and sociocultural setting to influence human functioning,…

  12. Saving the Spiritual for Your Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    Spirituals are religious folk songs that were created and sung by enslaved African Americans to express the emotions and thoughts of a people in bondage. The spiritual conveyed deep religious convictions and the desire for freedom brought on by two centuries' worth of oppression, as slavery was legal in the United States from approximately 1650…

  13. Migraines and meditation: does spirituality matter?

    PubMed

    Wachholtz, Amy B; Pargament, Kenneth I

    2008-08-01

    Migraine headaches are associated with symptoms of depression and anxiety (Waldie and Poulton Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry 72: 86-92, 2002) and feelings of low self-efficacy (French et al. Headache, 40: 647-656, 2000). Previous research suggests that spiritual meditation may ameliorate some of the negative traits associated with migraine headaches (Wachholtz and Pargament Journal of behavioral Medicine, 30: 311-318, 2005). This study examined two primary questions: (1) Is spiritual meditation more effective in enhancing pain tolerance and reducing migraine headache related symptoms than secular meditation and relaxation? and, (2) Does spiritual meditation create better mental, physical, and spiritual health outcomes than secular meditation and relaxation techniques? Eighty-three meditation naïve, frequent migraineurs were taught Spiritual Meditation, Internally Focused Secular Meditation, Externally Focused Secular Meditation, or Muscle Relaxation which participants practiced for 20 min a day for one month. Pre-post tests measured pain tolerance (with a cold pressor task), headache frequency, and mental and spiritual health variables. Compared to the other three groups, those who practiced spiritual meditation had greater decreases in the frequency of migraine headaches, anxiety, and negative affect, as well as greater increases in pain tolerance, headache-related self-efficacy, daily spiritual experiences, and existential well being.

  14. Souldrama[R]: Spirituality in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Connie

    2008-01-01

    Souldrama[R] is a therapeutic, psychospiritual group action model that leads participants through seven sequential stages of spiritual development with the goal of accessing their spiritual intelligence. It can help group members move past resistance and recognize and move on to their higher purpose. Psychodramatically based, it is intended to be…

  15. Metamorphosis: Play, Spirituality and the Animal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bone, Jane

    2010-01-01

    Animal- and bird-becoming is an aspect of play as metamorphosis connected to spirituality in early childhood settings. The reconceptualisation of play presented here is supported by research that explored the spiritual experiences of young children in different early childhood contexts. Qualitative case study research carried out in Aotearoa New…

  16. Adult Learning Projects Related to Spiritual Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wickett, R.E.Y.

    A study examined significant deliberate learning activities (as demonstrated in learning projects) which were related to spiritual growth. (Spiritual growth was defined in broad terms within which each interviewee interpreted his or her own concept.) Fifty persons between the ages of thirty-five and fifty-five and representing five groups (three…

  17. Nursing textbooks need to inform about spirituality.

    PubMed

    2016-09-21

    Considering the spiritual needs of patients is an important aspect of holistic patient care. However, many nurses lack knowledge and awareness of the subject, and spirituality is not strongly featured as a key part of holistic care in core nursing textbooks. The author argues that guidance given by nursing textbooks needs to be more applicable to practice. PMID:27654568

  18. Counseling Muslim Americans: Cultural and Spiritual Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ibrahim, Farah A.; Dykeman, Cass

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors identify the cultural and spiritual assessments needed to conduct counseling with Muslim Americans and Muslim immigrants to the United States. Assessment processes are outlined that include cultural identity (which subsumes several variables); worldview; spiritual assessment along with acculturation level and migration…

  19. Spiritual care and chronically ill clients.

    PubMed

    Sterling-Fisher, C E

    1998-04-01

    Today's high-technology, fast-paced healthcare system has left many providers and consumers feeling a void in the care provided. Home care nurses play pivotal roles in the delivery of spiritual care for chronically ill clients, who are usually confined to their homes. This article provides the nurse with interventions and techniques to integrate spiritual care into daily practice. PMID:9592425

  20. On the Spiritual Element in Arts Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbs, Peter

    1995-01-01

    Attempts a redefinition of spirituality and an incorporation of this into art education. Argues that symbolic and spiritual consciousness plays a crucial role in the works of artists as disparate as William Blake and Frida Kahlo. Criticizes the preeminence of scientific theory as a modern belief system. (MJP)

  1. An Awareness of Spirituality from Two Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zweiback, Yoshi; Kaplan, Sandra N.; Manzone, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of spirituality in a religious setting, and prayer as an expression of ultimate values, as a discipline which inspires empathy, as an instrument for connecting us with nature, and as a compass pointing us toward God, meaning, and purpose. Spirituality in the general education setting will also be discussed, as…

  2. A Spiritual Framework in Incest Survivors Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beveridge, Kelli; Cheung, Monit

    2004-01-01

    Through an examination of recent incest treatment development, this article emphasizes the theoretical concept of "integration" within the treatment process for female adult incest survivors. Spirituality as a therapeutic foundation is discussed with examples of therapeutic techniques. A case study illustrates the psycho-spiritual process of…

  3. Daily Spiritual Experiences and Prosocial Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einolf, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines how the Daily Spiritual Experiences Scale (DSES) relates to range of prosocial behaviors, using a large, nationally representative U.S. data set. It finds that daily spiritual experiences are a statistically and substantively significant predictor of volunteering, charitable giving, and helping individuals one knows personally.…

  4. Religiousity, Spirituality and Adolescents' Self-Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Japar, Muhammad; Purwati

    2014-01-01

    Religiuosity, spirituality, and adolescents' self-adjustment. The objective of this study is to test the correlation among religiosity, spirituality and adolescents' self-adjustment. A quantitative approach was employed in this study. Data were collected from 476 junior high schools students of 13 State Junior High Schools and one Junior High…

  5. Textbook coverage of holistic spiritual care.

    PubMed

    2016-09-12

    Nursing guidelines recommend that attention should be given to the spiritual and religious needs of patients. This suggests that meeting the spiritual needs of patients is an important aspect of holistic care, and that it should be considered and supported wherever relevant. PMID:27615589

  6. Does Education Cause Spiritual Belief Change?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markle, D. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Currently, little is known about the influence classroom learning has on the spiritual beliefs of students. Despite this fact, decisions on educational policy, parental home schooling, and even whether to bring legal actions against school districts, often rest on the assumption that education can induce spiritual belief change. To begin the…

  7. Religion, Spirituality, and Schizophrenia: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Davuluri, Triveni; Chakrabarti, Subho

    2014-01-01

    Religion and spirituality exert a significant role in the lives of many individuals, including people with schizophrenia. However, the contribution of religion and spirituality to various domains (psychopathology, explanatory models, treatment seeking, treatment adherence, outcome, etc.) has not received much attention. In this article, we review the exiting data with regards to the relationship of religion, spirituality, and various domains in patients with schizophrenia. Available evidence suggests that for some patients, religion instills hope, purpose, and meaning in their lives, whereas for others, it induces spiritual despair. Patients with schizophrenia also exhibit religious delusions and hallucinations. Further, there is some evidence to suggest that religion influences the level of psychopathology. Religion and religious practices also influence social integration, risk of suicide attempts, and substance use. Religion and spirituality also serves as an effective method of coping with the illness. Religion also influences the treatment compliance and outcome in patients with schizophrenia. PMID:24860209

  8. Religion, spirituality and therapy: implications for training.

    PubMed

    Elkonin, Diane; Brown, Ottilia; Naicker, Samantha

    2014-02-01

    Religion and spirituality are recognized coping resources but are neglected in psychological training and practice. However, religion and spirituality can be successfully used to cope with psychological disorders, prevent unhealthy behaviors and promote resilience. This study explored and described two questions regarding the concepts of the terminology religion and spirituality, and the perceptions of the use of religion and spirituality in therapy. Purposive sampling was utilized in a qualitative study of 15 registered psychologists, and data were analyzed using Tesch's model of qualitative content analysis. The concepts religion and spirituality appear difficult to define but the importance of their use as coping mechanisms in their own and their clients' lives was recognized. These findings have implications for professional training.

  9. Women's Spirituality across the Life Span: Implications for Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Michele Kielty; Dixon, Andrea L.

    2013-01-01

    Women's spirituality has unique characteristics that are often ignored within the spirituality literature. The authors review the literature on women's spirituality to reveal the major themes women have identified as relevant to their spiritual journeys across the life span. Implications for counseling and ideas for practice are included after…

  10. Spiritual Needs and Practices of Counselor Education Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborn, Debra; Street, Sue; Bradham-Cousar, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the self-reported value of spirituality, types of spiritual practices, and values of 69 counselor education students. It also examined counseling students' ideas for how to increase their comfort with incorporating spirituality into counseling practice. Implications for implementing spirituality training in counselor education…

  11. Spirituality and Young Women in Transition: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livingston, Kimberly A.; Cummings, Anne L.

    2009-01-01

    This study contributes to the growing body of knowledge about spirituality and life transitions. Through qualitative investigation, 9 young women in professional education programs described their definition of spirituality, their spiritual activities, and how they used their spirituality to cope with life transitions as they prepared to enter the…

  12. Spirituality in Counseling: What Do Counseling Students Think about It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Souza, Katherine Z.

    2002-01-01

    The author discusses graduate students' reactions to four seminars, one-hour each, on the topic of spirituality in counseling. Several issues emerged that have implications for training of counselors on spiritual issues, including students' level of comfort with spiritual issues, the difficulty of defining spirituality, and training issues in the…

  13. Midlife Transition and Women's Spirituality Groups: A Preliminary Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geertsma, Elisabeth J.; Cummings, Anne L.

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to describe midlife transition, spirituality, and healing of relationships for members of women's spirituality groups. Ten women completed the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (R. Paloutzian & C. Ellison, 1982) and a 45-minute interview about spirituality, religion, life transitions, relationships, and…

  14. Spirituality in survivors of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Momennasab, Marzieh; Moattari, Marzieh; Abbaszade, Abbas; Shamshiri, Babak

    2012-01-01

    Background: Life-threatening and stressful events, such as myocardial infarction (MI) can lead to an actual crisis, which affects the patients spiritually as well as physically, psychologically, and socially. However, the focus of health care providers is on physical needs. Furthermore, the spirituality of the patients experiencing heart attack in the light of our cultural context is not well addressed in the literature. This study is aimed at exploring the spiritual experiences of the survivors of the MI. Materials and Methods: In this qualitative research a grounded theory approach was used. Key informants were 9 MI patients hospitalized in the coronary care units of 3 hospitals in Shiraz. In addition, 7 nurses participated in the study. In-depth interviews and a focus group were used to generate data. Data analysis was done based on Strauss and Corbin method. Constant comparison analysis was performed until data saturation. Results: Five main categories emerged from the data, including perceived threat, seeking spiritual support, referring to religious values, increasing faith, and realization. The latter with its 3 subcategories was recognized as core category and represents a deep understanding beyond knowing. At the time of encountering MI, spirituality provided hope, strength, and peace for the participants. Conclusion: Based on the results we can conclude that connecting to God, religious values, and interconnectedness to others are the essential components of the participants’ spiritual experience during the occurrence of MI. Spirituality helps patients to overcome this stressful life-threatening situation. PMID:23853646

  15. Nurses’ Perceptions of Spirituality and Spiritual Care Giving: A Comparison Study Among All Health Care Sectors in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Melhem, Ghaith Ahmad Bani; Zeilani, Ruqayya S; Zaqqout, Ossama Abed.; Aljwad, Ashraf Ismail; Shawagfeh, Mohammed Qasim; Al- Rahim, Maysoon Abd

    2016-01-01

    Aims: This study aimed to describe nurses’ perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care in Jordan, and to investigate the relationship between their perceptions and their demographic variables. Methods: The study used a cross-sectional descriptive design and recruited a convenience sample of 408 Jordanian registered nurses to complete the spiritual care giving scale. Results: The findings of the study demonstrated that most of the participating nurses had a high level of spirituality and spiritual care perception. Significant differences were found between male and female nurses’ perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care (P < 0.05); previous attendance of courses on spiritual care also made a significant difference to perceptions (P < 0.05). Conclusions: The research findings suggest that, Jordanian nurses’ gender made a difference in their perceptions of spirituality and spiritual care. They had satisfactory levels of perception of spirituality and spiritual care. Moreover, spiritual care courses appeared to have a positive impact on their perception of spirituality and spiritual care. Enhancing nursing care by integrating standardized spiritual care into the current nursing care, training, and education should also be emphasized. PMID:26962280

  16. The Relationship between Spirituality, Spiritual Intelligence, and Leadership Practices in Student Leaders in the BYU-Idaho Student Activities Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dougherty, Troy J.

    2011-01-01

    Very little research exists to empirically support a spiritual component to leadership. Most of the literature connecting spirituality to leadership is either theory based or anecdotal. Even less research exists involving college students and the contribution of spirituality to their attitudes and behaviors as leaders. Spiritual intelligence has…

  17. The dean as spiritual leader.

    PubMed

    Evans, C

    1998-06-01

    These are hard times for medical school deans--high turnover among deans, the fiscal distress of many medical schools, the gap between what deans expect the job will be and what is required of them, the stark differences between what the job of dean is today and what it was in the past, and the threats to the academic missions of education and research. Using stories, anecdotes, and parables, the authors illustrates how these very difficulties might be an opportunity to rethink the role of deans and to re-examine the attributes and skills required of successful deans today. The ultimate goals of medical education have not changed, but the drastic nature of the changes taking place all around, and within, medical education make it more critical than ever to keep in mind what is really important. Deans must be exquisitely attuned to what is really important and they must make sure that the academic medical community never loses sight of what that is. To do that, deans must be deeply rooted personally in the enduring values and commitments that inform medicine as a profession and a vocation and in the fundamental values of medical education and scholarship; they must personify and embody these values; and they must remind us of these values and inspire us to embrace them and be guided by them. This is the sense in which deans must be "spiritual" leaders--that is, through their personal example, they must rekindle and engage the spirit of those working on behalf of the academic mission. While the need for fiscal expertise, management skills, and diplomatic and interpersonal skills in deans is widely acknowledged, the need for sensitivity to the spiritual dimensions of the work of deans has not received the attention it deserves.

  18. Spirituality Moderates Hopelessness, and Suicidal Ideation among Iranian Depressed Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Abdollahi, Abbas; Abu Talib, Mansor

    2015-01-01

    To examine the moderating role of spirituality between hopelessness, spirituality, and suicidal ideation, 202 Iranian depressed adolescent inpatients completed measures of patient health, suicidal ideation, hopelessness, and core spiritual experience. Structural equation modelling indicated that depressed inpatients high in hopelessness, but also high in spirituality, had less suicidal ideation than others. These findings reinforce the importance of spirituality as a protective factor against hopelessness and suicidal ideation. PMID:25924082

  19. Offering Spiritual Support for Family or Friends

    MedlinePlus

    ... that are meaningful for me? b What books, music, prayers, readings, art are meaningful for me? It ... experience with the person, offer prayer, spiritual readings, music or sacred rituals as appropriate or requested. b ...

  20. Continuing Professional Education: A Spiritually Based Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lynda W.

    2000-01-01

    Parish nursing is a health promotion ministry that links faith and health. A continuing education course to prepare nurses for it addresses spiritual, emotional, physical, mental, cultural, and social dimensions. It includes reflective and self-assessment activities. (SK)

  1. Business leadership as a spiritual discipline.

    PubMed

    Leigh-Taylor, C

    2000-01-01

    What motivates organizational leaders in their search for spirituality? They seek to integrate their inner journey with their day-to-day professional roles. This article describes how a course in spirituality for executives has provided tools to analyze and clarify intentions, avoid the traps of excessive greed and power, and make decisions that are both compassionate and effective. André L. Delbecq, DBA, the Thomas J. and Kathleen L. McCarthy Professor at the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University in California, offers seminars in spirituality for organizational leadership through the MBA program and the Center for Executive Development. Delbecq is the first to admit his surprise at the number of executives who have repeatedly asked for courses in spirituality. He talks about how his seminars have helped CEOs and other top executives achieve greater effectiveness in leading organizations.

  2. Psychiatry, religion, positive emotions and spirituality.

    PubMed

    Vaillant, George E

    2013-12-01

    This paper proposes that eight positive emotions: awe, love/attachment, trust/faith, compassion, gratitude, forgiveness, joy and hope constitute what we mean by spirituality. These emotions have been grossly ignored by psychiatry. The two sciences that I shall employ to demonstrate this definition of spirituality will be ethology and neuroscience. They are both very new. I will argue that spirituality is not about ideas, sacred texts and theology. Rather, spirituality is all about emotion and social connection that are more dependent on the limbic system than the cortex. Specific religions, for all their limitations, are often the portal through which positive emotions are brought into conscious attention. Neither Freud nor psychiatric textbooks ever mention emotions like joy and gratitude. Hymns and psalms give these emotions pride of place. Our whole concept of psychotherapy might change, if clinicians set about enhancing positive emotions, rather than focusing only on the negative ones.

  3. Transcendence, religion and spirituality in medicine

    PubMed Central

    Rassoulian, Anahita; Seidman, Charles; Löffler-Stastka, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To explore how medical students—the doctors of tomorrow—reflect upon meeting the spiritual needs of their patients, and whether they have reflected on their own religious or spiritual beliefs, or not. The study also investigates to what extent the students feel comfortable with addressing spiritual issues in their patient care, and whether they feel this is beyond their role as medical doctors. A self-administered questionnaire was developed. The survey was administered in teaching classes at the medical university of Vienna. One thousand four hundred (836 women and 564 men) students responded, laying the foundation for a thorough statistical analysis. 59.5% of the students had reflected on their own belief concepts, 21.9% consider themselves religious, and 20.1% see themselves as spiritual individuals. 75.6% of the students agreed with the statement that religious conviction/spirituality might have an effect on how cancer patients cope. 85.9% would consider talking with their patients about religious/spiritual issues if patients wish to do so. 86.3% would involve chaplains if they feel it is necessary. The results of this study suggest that future doctors want to see the patient in a wider scope than the bio-psycho-social one, by including the meta-dimension of transcendence. PMID:27661053

  4. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric chemical dominance, and spirituality.

    PubMed

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-03-01

    The isoprenoid pathway was assessed in atheistic and spiritually inclined individuals. The pathway was also assessed in individuals with differing hemispheric dominance to assess whether hemispheric dominance has a correlation with spiritual and atheistic tendency. HMG CoA reductase activity, serum digoxin, RBC membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, serum magnesium, and tyrosine/tryptophan catabolic patterns were assessed in spiritual/atheistic individuals and in those differing hemispheric dominance. In spiritually-inclined individuals, there was increased digoxin synthesis, decreased membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, increased tryptophan catabolites (serotonin, quinolinic acid, and nicotine), and decreased tyrosine catabolites (dopamine, noradrenaline, and morphine). The pattern in spiritually-inclined individuals correlated with right hemispheric chemical dominance. In atheistic individuals there was decreased digoxin synthesis, increased membrane Na(+)-K+ ATPase activity, decreased tryptophan catabolities (serotonin, quinolinic acid, and nicotine), and increased tyrosine catabolites (dopamine, noradrenaline, and morphine). This pattern in atheistic individuals correlated with that obtained in left hemispheric chemical dominance. Hemispheric chemical dominance and hypothalamic digoxin could regulate the predisposition to spirituality or atheism.

  5. Spiritual Pain in Meals on Wheels’ Clients

    PubMed Central

    Boss, Lisa; Branson, Sandy; Cron, Stanley; Kang, Duck-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Background: Meals on Wheels’ clients are at risk for spiritual pain due to advanced age, social isolation, and failing health. They are also prone to stress, depression, and loneliness, placing them at risk for adverse biological disruptions and health outcomes. The purpose of the study was to examine associations of spiritual pain with psychosocial factors (stress, depression, loneliness, religious coping) and salivary biomarkers of stress and inflammation (cortisol, IL-1β) in Meals on Wheels’ clients. Methods: Data were collected cross-sectionally from 88 elderly (mean age 75.4). Spiritual pain, stress, depression, loneliness, and religious coping were measured with standardized instruments, and salivary biomarkers were assessed with enzyme immunoassays. Results: Spiritual pain was significantly and positively correlated with stress (r = 0.35, p ≤ 0.001), depression (r = 0.27, p = 0.01), and negative religious coping (r = 0.27, p = 0.01). Correlations with loneliness, positive religious coping, and salivary biomarkers were non-significant. Conclusion: Spiritual pain is an important concept in this population. Research should be expanded to understand the significance of spiritual pain in conjunction with psychosocial and biological variables and its potential impact on physical, mental, and cognitive health outcomes in the elderly. PMID:27417804

  6. Tanzanian Nurses Understanding and Practice of Spiritual Care

    PubMed Central

    Dhamani, Khairunnisa Aziz; Paul, Pauline; Olson, Joanne Kaye

    2011-01-01

    Spirituality, as a basic characteristic of humans and a contributor to human health, is regarded as part of nursing practice. The purpose of this study was to examine how Tanzanian nurses understand spirituality and spiritual care. Using the qualitative method of interpretive description, fifteen registered nurses engaged in clinical practice in a Tanzanian hospital were recruited to participate in this study. In-depth interviews using open-ended questions were carried out, tape-recorded, and transcribed verbatim. Data collection and inductive analysis occurred concurrently. In this paper, key findings are grouped under the following headings: meaning of spiritual care, recognition of spiritual needs, and interventions to respond to spiritual needs. Although there were some differences, overall participants' understanding of spirituality and spiritual care was similar to what is found in the literature about nurses in other countries. The provision of spiritual care also included some unique elements that may reflect the African context. PMID:22007322

  7. Transformative Learning and Spirituality: A Heuristic Inquiry into the Experience of Spiritual Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Karen P.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this heuristic study was to explore the ways in which spirituality informed and impacted educators' own experience of learning as a transformative inner encounter. It inquired into the experience of learning from a spiritual perspective in order to determine the extent to which transformative learning could be described as a…

  8. Toward a Spiritual Praxis: The Role of Spirituality among Faculty of Color Teaching for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahjahan, Riyad Ahmed

    2010-01-01

    There is scant research literature on the interconnection between spirituality and the practices of faculty of color teaching social justice in the higher education classroom. This paper is based on a qualitative study that examined 15 spiritually minded activist scholars (who are all racially minoritized) in Canadian universities. The analysis…

  9. Promotion of Spiritual Development: Exploration of the Self and Spiritualism through the Practice of Chinese Calligraphy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hue, Ming-Tak

    2009-01-01

    Promotion of students' spiritual development is one of the goals of pastoral care in schools. The heritage of Chinese calligraphy is traditionally used as a way to enhance an individual's self-reflection and cultivation, and has an educational value in spiritual development. This study aims to examine the cultural meaning of Chinese calligraphy…

  10. Spirituality and meaning in supportive care: spirituality- and meaning-centered group psychotherapy interventions in advanced cancer.

    PubMed

    Breitbart, William

    2002-05-01

    Existential and spiritual issues are at the frontier of new clinical and research focus in palliative and supportive care of cancer patients. As concepts of adequate supportive care expand beyond a focus on pain and physical symptom control, existential and spiritual issues such as meaning, hope and spirituality in general have received increased attention from supportive care clinicians and clinical researchers. This paper reviews the topics of spirituality and end-of-life care, defines spirituality, and suggests measures of spirituality that deal with two of its main components: faith/religious beliefs and meaning/spiritual well-being. These two constructs of spirituality are reviewed in terms of their role in supportive care. Finally, a review of existing psychotherapeutic interventions for spiritual suffering are reviewed and a novel meaning-centered group psychotherapy for advanced cancer patients is described.

  11. Association of spirituality and sobriety during a behavioral spirituality intervention for Twelve Step (TS) recovery.

    PubMed

    Brown, Anthony E; Pavlik, Valory N; Shegog, Ross; Whitney, Simon N; Friedman, Lois C; Romero, Catherine; Davis, George Christopher; Cech, Irina; Kosten, Thomas R; Volk, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Twelve-Step (TS) recovery utilizes spirituality to promote sobriety, yet there are no proven programs designed to facilitate spiritual involvement. We developed a seven-week behavioral spirituality intervention titled "Knowing Your Higher Power" for implementation along with usual TS care. Twenty-six participants from a recovery center enrolled. We assessed behavior at baseline, 7-week, and 12-week follow-up. The sample showed significant increase in spiritual involvement and beliefs over the 12-week measurement period and a significantly greater spirituality score in those maintaining total sobriety compared to those that relapsed. These findings encourage a controlled trial to determine if this work has efficacy for practitioners in substance abuse treatment.

  12. Multidimensional Approach Toward Spiritual Coping: Construction and Validation of the Spiritual Coping Questionnaire (SCQ).

    PubMed

    Charzyńska, Edyta

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the research was to construct the Spiritual Coping Questionnaire (SCQ). Two studies have been carried out: the first on the sample of 1,296 persons facing stressful situations, and the second, on 352 persons undergoing alcohol addiction therapy. The first study provided data for PCA and CFA, calculation of internal consistency, test-retest reliability and descriptive statistics of the questionnaire. The second study allowed the author to verify the construct and criterion validity of the tool. The final version of the SCQ is composed of 32 items constituting two scales: positive and negative spiritual coping. The scale of positive spiritual coping includes four subscales-domains (personal, social, environmental and religious), and the scale of negative spiritual coping, three subscales (personal, social and religious). The validity and reliability of the tool are satisfactory. The questionnaire can be used to measure spiritual coping, both among religious and non-religious people. PMID:24898542

  13. Learning to Learn about Spirituality: A Categorical Approach To Introducing the Topic into Management Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Carole K.; Krell, Terence C.; Sendry, Jeanette

    2000-01-01

    Presents a typology of approaches to spiritual development based on spiritual path type (mystical, personal, ritual, group-participative, ecstatic). Includes a classroom exercise that enables students to identify their spiritual path and learn how to learn about spirituality. (SK)

  14. Religion and spirituality along the suicidal path.

    PubMed

    Colucci, Erminia; Martin, Graham

    2008-04-01

    The inner experience of spiritual and religious feelings is an integral part of the everyday lives of many individuals. For over 100 years the role of religion as a deterrent to suicidal behavior has been studied in various disciplines. We attempt to systematize the existing literature investigating the relationship between religion/spirituality and suicide in this paper. After an overview of the attitudes of the dominant religions (e.g., Catholicism, Islam, and Buddhism) toward suicide, the three main theories that have speculated regarding the link between religion and suicide are presented: "integration theory" (Durkheim, 1897/1997), "religious commitment theory" (Stack, 1983a; Stark, 1983), and "network theory" (Pescosolido & Georgianna, 1989). Subsequent to this theoretical introduction, we report on studies on religion/spirituality keeping the suicidal path as a reference: from suicidal ideation to nonlethal suicidal behavior to lethal suicidal behavior. Studies presenting indications of religious beliefs as a possible risk factor for suicidal behavior are also presented. The last section reviews possible intervention strategies for suicidal patients and suicide survivors. Indications for future research, such as more studies on nonreligious forms of spirituality and the use of qualitative methodology to achieve a better and deeper understanding of the spiritual dimension of suicidal behavior and treatment, are offered.

  15. Ayurveda: Between Religion, Spirituality, and Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kessler, C.; Wischnewsky, M.; Michalsen, A.; Eisenmann, C.; Melzer, J.

    2013-01-01

    Ayurveda is playing a growing part in Europe. Questions regarding the role of religion and spirituality within Ayurveda are discussed widely. Yet, there is little data on the influence of religious and spiritual aspects on its European diffusion. Methods. A survey was conducted with a new questionnaire. It was analysed by calculating frequency variables and testing differences in distributions with the χ2-Test. Principal Component Analyses with Varimax Rotation were performed. Results. 140 questionnaires were analysed. Researchers found that individual religious and spiritual backgrounds influence attitudes and expectations towards Ayurveda. Statistical relationships were found between religious/spiritual backgrounds and decisions to offer/access Ayurveda. Accessing Ayurveda did not exclude the simultaneous use of modern medicine and CAM. From the majority's perspective Ayurveda is simultaneously a science, medicine, and a spiritual approach. Conclusion. Ayurveda seems to be able to satisfy the individual needs of therapists and patients, despite worldview differences. Ayurvedic concepts are based on anthropologic assumptions including different levels of existence in healing approaches. Thereby, Ayurveda can be seen in accordance with the prerequisites for a Whole Medical System. As a result of this, intimate and individual therapist-patient relationships can emerge. Larger surveys involving bigger participant numbers with fully validated questionnaires are warranted to support these results. PMID:24368928

  16. The neuroscientific study of spiritual practices

    PubMed Central

    Newberg, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper will be to provide a perspective on the current state of the research evaluating the neurobiological correlates of spiritual practices and review the methodological issues that confront this research field. There are many types of spiritual practices that might be studied including prayer and meditation, as well as unusual practices such as mediumistic trance states, speaking in tongues, and also drug-induced experiences. Current studies have utilized neuroimaging techniques including functional magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computed tomography, and positron emission tomography. These studies have helped elucidate the neurobiological mechanisms associated with spiritual practices. Such studies confront unique challenges for scientific methodology including determining the most appropriate objective measures such as neuroimaging studies and physiological parameters, and correlating them with subjective measures that help capture states of spiritual significance. Overall, a neuroscientific study of spiritual practices and experiences has the potential to provide fascinating data to further our understanding of the relationship between the brain and such phenomena. PMID:24672504

  17. Spiritual nursing care: A concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Monareng, Lydia V

    2012-01-01

    Although the concept 'spiritual nursing care' has its roots in the history of the nursing profession, many nurses in practice have difficulty integrating the concept into practice. There is an ongoing debate in the empirical literature about its definition, clarity and application in nursing practice. The study aimed to develop an operational definition of the concept and its application in clinical practice. A qualitative study was conducted to explore and describe how professional nurses render spiritual nursing care. A purposive sampling method was used to recruit the sample. Individual and focus group interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Trustworthiness was ensured through strategies of truth value, applicability, consistency and neutrality. Data were analysed using the NUD*IST power version 4 software, constant comparison, open, axial and selective coding. Tech's eight steps of analysis were also used, which led to the emergence of themes, categories and sub-categories. Concept analysis was conducted through a comprehensive literature review and as a result 'caring presence' was identified as the core variable from which all the other characteristics of spiritual nursing care arise. An operational definition of spiritual nursing care based on the findings was that humane care is demonstrated by showing caring presence, respect and concern for meeting the needs not only of the body and mind of patients, but also their spiritual needs of hope and meaning in the midst of health crisis, which demand equal attention for optimal care from both religious and nonreligious nurses. PMID:23327772

  18. Spiritual nursing care: A concept analysis.

    PubMed

    Monareng, Lydia V

    2012-10-08

    Although the concept 'spiritual nursing care' has its roots in the history of the nursing profession, many nurses in practice have difficulty integrating the concept into practice. There is an ongoing debate in the empirical literature about its definition, clarity and application in nursing practice. The study aimed to develop an operational definition of the concept and its application in clinical practice. A qualitative study was conducted to explore and describe how professional nurses render spiritual nursing care. A purposive sampling method was used to recruit the sample. Individual and focus group interviews were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Trustworthiness was ensured through strategies of truth value, applicability, consistency and neutrality. Data were analysed using the NUD*IST power version 4 software, constant comparison, open, axial and selective coding. Tech's eight steps of analysis were also used, which led to the emergence of themes, categories and sub-categories. Concept analysis was conducted through a comprehensive literature review and as a result 'caring presence' was identified as the core variable from which all the other characteristics of spiritual nursing care arise. An operational definition of spiritual nursing care based on the findings was that humane care is demonstrated by showing caring presence, respect and concern for meeting the needs not only of the body and mind of patients, but also their spiritual needs of hope and meaning in the midst of health crisis, which demand equal attention for optimal care from both religious and nonreligious nurses.

  19. The Only Way out Is through: The Peril of Spiritual Bypass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashwell, Craig S.; Bentley, Paige B.; Yarborough, J. Preston

    2007-01-01

    Given the increased attention to spirituality in the counseling literature, with a primary emphasis on helping clients find their spiritual path, it is important for counselors to be aware of one potential pitfall of the spiritual path, namely spiritual bypass. Spiritual bypass occurs when clients seek to use their spiritual beliefs, practices,…

  20. Providing spiritual support: a job for all hospice professionals.

    PubMed

    Millison, M; Dudley, J R

    1992-01-01

    This research examines spirituality as an aspect of professional practice. A questionnaire on spirituality was sent in 1991 to the hospice directors in New York, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania. The findings strongly indicate that spirituality is important in the hospice setting and plays a prominent role in the treatment of patients. Also, hospice programs were found to be supportive of the spiritual component of care. The spiritual approaches used by the respondents were the more traditionally religious ones such as listening to the patient talk about God or referring to clergy. Approaches such as meditation or guided imagery, which are not necessarily related to religion, were used less frequently. Clergy in the study placed greater importance on spirituality in hospice work and used more traditionally religious approaches than did non-clergy. While some professional caregivers choose to leave spiritual matters to clergy, the findings reveal that many non-clergy hospice professionals are assisting patients with spiritual concerns.

  1. Experiences of Spirituality and Spiritual Values in the Context of Nursing – An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Rudolfsson, Gudrun; Berggren, Ingela; da Silva, António Barbosa

    2014-01-01

    Spirituality is often mistakenly equated with religion but is in fact a far broader concept. The aim of this integrative review was to describe experiences of the positive impact of spirituality and spiritual values in the context of nursing. The analysis was guided by Whittemore and Knafl’s integrative review method. The findings revealed seven themes: ‘Being part of a greater wholeness’, ‘Togetherness − value based relationships’, ‘Developing inner strength’, ‘Ministering to patients’, ‘Maintaining one’s sense of humanity’, ‘Viewing life as a gift evokes a desire to ‘give back’’ and ‘Achieving closure − life goes on’. It is difficult to draw definite conclusions, as spirituality involves many perspectives on various levels of awareness. However, spirituality was considered more inclusive, fluid and personal. Furthermore, it emerged that spirituality and spiritual values in the context of nursing are closely intertwined with the concept of caring. PMID:25598856

  2. Iranian nurses’ perception of spirituality and spiritual care: a qualitative content analysis study

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodishan, Gholamreza; Alhani, Fatemeh; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to explore nurses’ perception about spirituality and spiritual care. A qualitative content analysis approach was conducted on 20 registered nurses interviewed using unstructured strategy in 2009. Three themes emerged from the data analysis: 1) “meaning and purpose of work and life” including ‘spiritualistic view to profession’, ‘commitment and professional responsibility’, and ‘positive attitude’; 2) “religious attitude” including ‘God approval’, ‘spiritual reward’, ‘taking advice’, ‘inner belief in the Supreme Being’, ‘faith-based interactions and altruism’; 3) “transcendence-seeking” including ‘need for respect’ and ‘personal–professional transcendence’. Therefore, the spirituality produces maintenance, harmony and balance in nurses in relation to God. Spiritual care focuses on respecting patients, friendly and sympathetic interactions, sharing in rituals and strengthening patients and nurses’ inner energy. This type of spirituality gives a positive perspective to life and profession, peaceful interactions, a harmonious state of mind, and acts as a motivator among nurses to promote nursing care and spirituality. PMID:23908741

  3. Spiritually and religiously oriented health interventions.

    PubMed

    Harris, A H; Thoresen, C E; McCullough, M E; Larson, D B

    1999-05-01

    Controlled intervention studies offer considerable promise to better understand relationships and possible mechanisms between spiritual and religious factors and health. Studies examining spiritually augmented cognitive-behavioral therapies, forgiveness interventions, different meditation approaches, 12-step fellowships, and prayer have provided some evidence, albeit modest, of efficacy in improving health under specific conditions. Researchers need to describe spiritual and religious factors more clearly and precisely, as well as demonstrate that such factors independently influence treatment efficacy. Inclusion of potential moderating and mediating variables (e.g. extent of religious commitment, intrinsic religiousness, specific religious coping strategy) in intervention designs could help explain relationships and outcomes. Using a variety of research designs (e.g. randomized clinical trials, single-subject experimental designs) and assessment methods (e.g. daily self-monitoring, ambulatory physiological measures, in-depth structured interviews) would avoid current limitations of short-term studies using only questionnaires.

  4. Leadership in turbulent times is spiritual.

    PubMed

    Wheatley, Margaret J

    2002-01-01

    In the past decade, two formerly estranged domains, spirituality and work, have been increasingly linked. Why has this happened? This articles posits that this strange union is an unavoidable consequence of living in a turbulent time. As our world grows more chaotic and unpredictable, leaders must respond to questions that have historically only been answered through spiritual traditions: How do I cope with incertainty? How do I help others find meaning in their lives? What are my values? How can I act with courage and integrity? Leaders also play a key role in helping people recognize that life is cyclical, unpredictable, and unstable and that they must engage it as such. This is well-explored in spiritual traditions, but not in traditional management literature. Several organizational and personal practices are offered as simple ways to develop leadership capacity for leading in turbulence.

  5. Fibromyalgia, Spirituality, Coping and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Biccheri, Eliane; Roussiau, Nicolas; Mambet-Doué, Constance

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the impact of spirituality on coping strategies and on the quality of life of fibromyalgia patients. The study was carried out on 590 people suffering from fibromyalgia. The data were collected with the French version of the WCC-R (The Ways of Coping Checklist: Cousson et al. 1996), the questionnaire of spirituality (Evaluation de La Spiritualité: Renard and Roussiau, 2016) and Diener's Satisfaction with Life Scale questionnaire, translated into French (Blais et al. 1989). An analysis carried out with the software SPSS and Hayes' models showed that both problem-focused coping and coping through social support seeking are mediating variables that enable an indirect link between spirituality and quality of life.

  6. Shoshone Spirituality Archaeological Interpretation in Southeast Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Dean, P. A.; Marler, Clayton Fay

    2001-03-01

    Tribal people in southeast Idaho sincerely desire that archaeologists include Shoshone concepts of spirituality when investigating archaeological materials and sites. However, most archaeologists and resource managers have little understanding about these concepts and this creates difficulties. We examine two important aspects of the Shoshone soul, Mugua’ and Nabushi’aipe, and discuss how understanding these attributes aid in explaining why certain archaeological remains are considered sacred. A greater understanding of Shoshone spirituality will begin to bridge the needs of both tribal people and archaeologists.

  7. Daily Spiritual Experiences and Adolescent Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    LEE, MATTHEW T.; VETA, PAIGE S.; JOHNSON, BYRON R.; PAGANO, MARIA E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore changes in belief orientation during treatment and the impact of increased daily spiritual experiences (DSE) on adolescent treatment response. One-hundred ninety-five adolescents court-referred to a 2-month residential treatment program were assessed at intake and discharge. Forty percent of youth who entered treatment as agnostic or atheist identified themselves as spiritual or religious at discharge. Increased DSE was associated with greater likelihood of abstinence, increased prosocial behaviors, and reduced narcissistic behaviors. Results indicate a shift in DSE that improves youth self-care and care for others that may inform intervention approaches for adolescents with addiction. PMID:25525291

  8. Spiritual journeys in aging: A buddhist view.

    PubMed

    Nakasone, R Y

    1994-09-01

    The spiritual journey of a Buddhist devotee is a continual exploration of the truth of interdependence which Siddhartha Gautama realized to become the Buddha, "the Enlightened One." On the morning of the enlightenment, the Buddha apprehended the truth that all things and all beings are interconnected and mutually dependent in time and space. One measure of the spiritual maturity of the Buddhist devotee is his or her appreciation for the profound responsibilities and gratitude we share for all things. To illustrate the significance of interdependence in our lives, the author turns to the wisdom contained inVital Involvement in Old Age by Erik and Joan Erikson and Helen Q. Kivnick.

  9. Dream telling: a means of spiritual awareness.

    PubMed

    Dombeck, M T

    1995-01-01

    The article describes how a dream-sharing group facilitated by a nurse therapist can become the means by which the participants gain spiritual awareness. First, the characteristics of spiritual awareness are identified and discussed. Second, the practice, structure, and process of a dream-sharing group are described, with dream narratives and interactions from a particular group being used as illustrations. Finally, the attributes of a sensitive and caring listener and the leadership qualities of a nurse facilitator of such a group are outlined in the hope that nurses in different settings will be enabled and encouraged to provide this important aspect of nursing care.

  10. Spiritual journeys in aging: A buddhist view.

    PubMed

    Nakasone, R Y

    1994-09-01

    The spiritual journey of a Buddhist devotee is a continual exploration of the truth of interdependence which Siddhartha Gautama realized to become the Buddha, "the Enlightened One." On the morning of the enlightenment, the Buddha apprehended the truth that all things and all beings are interconnected and mutually dependent in time and space. One measure of the spiritual maturity of the Buddhist devotee is his or her appreciation for the profound responsibilities and gratitude we share for all things. To illustrate the significance of interdependence in our lives, the author turns to the wisdom contained inVital Involvement in Old Age by Erik and Joan Erikson and Helen Q. Kivnick. PMID:24264030

  11. Learning Spiritual Dimensions of Care from a Historical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narayanasamy, Aru

    1999-01-01

    Looks at the spiritual dimensions of nursing at various historical periods: ancient civilizations, the Middle Ages, Renaissance, and the 18th and 19th centuries. Reviews contemporary perspectives on spirituality and nursing and suggests how nurses can be equipped to deal with patients' spiritual needs. (SK)

  12. Ethical considerations of integrating spiritual direction into psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Riggs, Billy J

    2006-01-01

    Integrating spirituality and religion into clinical practice or psychotherapy has become a significant area of interest in the mental health field today. This article focuses more specifically on integrating spiritual direction into psychotherapy, discusses ethical issues involved, and suggests ethical guidelines for the appropriate and helpful use of spiritual direction in the context of psychotherapy and counseling.

  13. Cognitive Spirituality and Hope in Catholic High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Bruce B.; Pedrotti, Jennifer Teramoto; Edwards, Lisa M.; McDermott, Diane

    2004-01-01

    This study explores the validity of a construct of cognitive spirituality as measured by a recent measure, the "Spirituality Index of Well-Being," in a sample of Catholic high school students. Spirituality on this scale is conceptualized as a composite of life scheme (having meaning in one's life) and generalized self-efficacy. Construct-based…

  14. Religion, Spirituality, and Sport: From "Religio Athletae" toward "Spiritus Athletae"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jirásek, Ivo

    2015-01-01

    We are living in a time of increasing interest in the religious and spiritual aspects of sport and human movement activities. A strict distinction between religion and spirituality is, however, still missing in much of the literature. After delimiting religious and spiritual modes of experience, this article addresses Coubertin's "religio…

  15. Holism in Psychotherapy and Spiritual Direction: A Course Correction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Len; Mansager, Erik

    2004-01-01

    The authors offer a course correction for understanding the term holism as used in spiritually oriented psychotherapy literature. This is done to allow the relationship between psychotherapy and spirituality to expand beyond limited dualistic conceptualizations, They first address numerous sources from which spiritually oriented psychotherapy…

  16. Spirituality and Academic Performance among African American College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Katrina L.; Dixon, Vicki

    2002-01-01

    Investigated spirituality and religious participation among African American and European American college students. Student surveys indicated that African Americans had higher levels of spiritual beliefs and religious participation than did European Americans. Correlation analysis indicated that spiritual beliefs and religious participation were…

  17. Adventure Programming and Spirituality: Integration Models, Methods, and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson-Hanley, Cay

    1997-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the relationship of adventure education and experiential learning to spiritual experiences and development. Discusses definitions of spirituality, religion, and related terms; two frameworks for integration of psychology and spirituality and their application to experiential education; specific strategies for integrating…

  18. Utilization of Spiritual Values in Counseling: An Ignored Dimension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theodore, Robert M.

    1984-01-01

    Charges that psychologists have denied spiritual values as a legitimate part of life and suggests a new model for incorporating spirituality which includes physical, psychological, and spiritual aspects of human behavior. Encourages counselors to be sensitive to clients' religious backgrounds and personal values. (JAC)

  19. Spirituality and Early Childhood Special Education: Exploring a "Forgotten" Dimension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Kaili

    2012-01-01

    Spirituality is recognised by many to be an inherent property of the human being. Empirical studies and theoretical literature both suggest that spirituality affects one's quality of life in terms of emotional and physical well-being, relationships, and social inclusion. However, the importance of the spiritual dimension of life is rarely…

  20. Backcountry Adventure as Spiritual Development: A Means-End Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marsh, Paul E.

    2008-01-01

    What do people mean when they describe backcountry adventure experiences as being "spiritual"? Spiritual aspects of adventure experiences in the wilderness have been recounted anecdotally and recognized in research. This body of research, however, has left the definition of the term spiritual to the individual participants, and has not yet…

  1. Perspectives on Spiritual Development as Part of Youth Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Speaking to the issue of spiritual development from her extensive experience as a youth work practitioner, the author notes several ideas she finds particularly compelling, among them that spiritual development interacts with, yet is distinct from, moral and religious development; that spiritual development is a core construct of identity…

  2. Spiritual and Religious Concerns of the Hospitalized Adolescent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silber, Tomas J.; Reilly, Mary

    1985-01-01

    Examined the spiritual and religious concerns of 114 hospitalized adolescents using the Spiritual and Religous Concerns questionnaire. Results showed the majority believed in God, and half the seriously ill patients experienced a marked change in spiritual concerns. Sex, race, religion, and type of school were other variables. (BH)

  3. Religious and Spiritual Education in Disability Situations in Italy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friso, Valeria; Caldin, Roberta

    2014-01-01

    In this short article, the authors focus on religious and spiritual education's potential to offer social and spiritual inclusion for students with a disability. They take the view that the religious and spiritual education teacher in such situations is positioned better when seeing such teaching as a special vocation. They use Italy as the…

  4. Siblings or foes: what now in spiritual care research?

    PubMed

    Hilsman, Gordon J

    2002-01-01

    This article uses a sibling metaphor to outline the relationship between science and spirituality. This metaphor forms the backdrop for exploring several directions in spiritual care research. It argues that science and functional spirituality were born as siblings and need to dance now without either estrangement or incest, intent on measuring the material effects of excellent pastoral care.

  5. Spiritual Beliefs among Chinese Junior High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lili, Tian; Shenghua, Jin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the characteristics of the spiritual beliefs among junior high school students. Method: 431 junior high school students are measured by Students' Basic Information Questionnaire (SBIQ) and Middle School Students' Spiritual Beliefs Questionnaire (MSSSBQ). Results: (1) The overall characteristics of the spiritual beliefs among…

  6. Physical and Spiritual Education within the Framework of Pure Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagheri Noaparast, Khosrow

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims at showing the dimensions of spirituality in childhood education by suggesting a new analysis of the concept of "pure life" used in the Qur'an. Putting spirituality in the framework of the pure life provides us with a rich framework in dealing with spirituality as the latter will be extended to all dimensions of a life. In the…

  7. Research to Develop Spiritual Pedagogy, Awareness and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swinton, Valda

    2016-01-01

    A co-operative inquiry group consisting of 8 counsellors met for 11 months to explore their experience of spirituality in their training and in their work with clients [Swinton, V. (2010). The spiritual in counselling training (Unpublished Thesis). The University of Manchester; Swinton, V. (2015). The spiritual in counselling training. In G. Nolan…

  8. Spiritual Knowing and Transformative Learning. NALL Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dei, George J. Sefa

    The roles of spirituality and spiritual learning in transformative learning are discussed. The discussion was initiated from an anti-colonial perspective on engaging spiritually in the political project of transformative learning, and it is grounded in issues of African education and in the principle of teaching critically so that education serves…

  9. School Counseling Programs as Spiritual and Religious Safe Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stloukal, Merit E.; Wickman, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a model for creating spiritual and religious safe zones in school counseling programs that implements the Association for Spiritual, Ethical and Religious Values in Counseling's (ASERVIC; 2009) "Competencies for Addressing Spiritual and Religious Issues in Counseling" in a school setting. The authors frame the model within the…

  10. Integrating Religion and Spirituality into Counselor Education: Barriers and Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Christopher M.; Puig, Ana; Baggs, Adrienne; Wolf, Cheryl Pence

    2015-01-01

    Despite a professionally recognized need for training in religion/spirituality, literature indicates that religious and spirituality issues continue to be inconsistently addressed in counselor education. Ten experts were asked to identify potential barriers to integrating religion and spirituality into counselor education and indicate strategies…

  11. Integrating Spirituality into Counselling and Psychotherapy: Theoretical and Clinical Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Carla; Fitzpatrick, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, spirituality has become a prominent focus of psychological inquiry. As research begins to elucidate the role of spiritual beliefs and behaviours in mental health and the influences of spirituality in psychotherapy, developing therapist competency in this domain has increased in importance. This article will first situate…

  12. Spiritually Modified Cognitive Therapy: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, David R.

    2006-01-01

    A paucity of research exists on the effectiveness of spiritual interventions, despite their wide use by practitioners and the acknowledged importance of evidence-based practice. To assist practitioners in their selection of spiritual interventions, the author reviewed research on the effectiveness of spiritually modified cognitive therapy. The…

  13. Spiritual Development with Marginalized Youth: A Status Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Melanie; Nicholson, Kristal S.

    2008-01-01

    In the past several years, social services agencies that work with marginalized youth have reported increased interest in using spiritual activities as one tool in a more standard array of therapeutic interventions. Where it has occurred, the use of spirituality in such settings tends to reflect the agencies' belief that spiritual concepts have a…

  14. Spirituality in Music Education: Transcending Culture, Exploration III

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Anthony J.

    2010-01-01

    Spirituality and religion are not synonymous and, in fact, require not only different definitions but also appropriate vocabulary. A deeper discussion of the issues concerning spirituality ensues in several sections: 1) fundamental differences between spirituality and religion; 2) brain operations relative to transcendent states; 3) a definition…

  15. New Zealand Children's Spirituality in Catholic Schools: Teachers' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Anne; Duncan, Judith

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the findings of a small-scale study undertaken with a sample of 10 teachers in Catholic schools in New Zealand. Spirituality is recognised as an important dimension of Catholic schools and this study explored the teachers' perspectives of their own understanding of spirituality, of children's spirituality and the influence…

  16. Unusual but sound minds: mental health indicators in spiritual individuals.

    PubMed

    Farias, Miguel; Underwood, Raphael; Claridge, Gordon

    2013-08-01

    Previous research has linked certain types of modern spirituality, including New Age and Pagan, with either benign schizotypy or insecure attachment. While the first view emphasizes a positive aspect of spiritual believers' mental health (benign schizotypy), the second view emphasizes a negative aspect, namely the unhealthy emotional compensation associated with an insecure attachment style. This study addresses these two conflicting views by comparing a sample of modern spiritual individuals (N = 114) with a contrast group of traditional religious believers (N = 86). Measures of schizotypy and attachment style were combined with mental health scales of anxiety and depression. We further assessed death anxiety to determine whether modern spiritual beliefs fulfilled a similar function as traditional religious beliefs in the reduction of existential threat. Our results support a psychological contiguity between traditional and modern spiritual believers and reinforce the need to de-stigmatize spiritual ideas and experiences. Using hierarchical regression, we showed that unusual experiences and ideas are the major predictor of engagement in modern spiritual practices. Anxiety, depression variables, and insecure attachment were not significant predictors of spirituality or correlated with them; on the other hand, the results show that spiritual believers report high social support satisfaction and this variable predicts involvement in modern spirituality. Further, spiritual practices were negatively correlated with and negatively predicted by death anxiety scores. Overall, the results strengthen the association between modern spirituality, good mental health, and general well-being. PMID:23848387

  17. A Pilot Study of Nurses' Experience of Giving Spiritual Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deal, Belinda

    2010-01-01

    Using spiritual and religious resources gives patients and families strength to cope during a crisis, but nurses often do not offer spiritual care (Kloosterhouse & Ames, 2002). The purpose of this phenomenological study was to explore nurses" lived experience of giving spiritual care. A descriptive phenomenological approach was used to interview 4…

  18. Counselors, Communities, and Spirituality: Ethical and Multicultural Considerations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonborg, Susan D.; Bowen, Neal

    2004-01-01

    Counselors as individuals may be on their own spiritual journeys; however, as school professionals, their challenge is to find ways to live out their own spiritual traditions and beliefs while carrying out their important responsibilities to a school community that likely enjoys tremendous spiritual and religious diversity. The ethical…

  19. A Yearning for Wholeness: Spirituality in Educational Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurley, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Numerous popular figures currently espouse the importance of spirituality. Some prominent voices, such as Deepak Chopra, Marianne Williamson, and Eckhart Tolle, advocate a more spiritual existence, warning that the earth and humanity are engaged in a seismic change. The shift of spiritual leaders from fringe to fairly mainline attention is…

  20. Spirituality and Multicultural Counseling: A Generic Model and Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemire, David

    Spirituality is an important aspect of counseling. This paper identifies spirituality as a task that is a journey universal to human beings. It presents a taxonomy of spirituality/consciousness developed by Render and Lemire, postulating five levels of taxonomy: self, others, groups, the world, and cosmic. These levels apply across cultural,…

  1. Hidden Treasures in Theological Education: The Writing Tutor, the Spiritual Director, and Practices of Academic and Spiritual Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yaghjian, Lucretia B.

    2013-01-01

    Mentoring is an important but often overlooked resource in theological education and students' academic and spiritual formation. This essay profiles the mentoring practices and postures of the writing tutor and the spiritual director as exemplars of academic and spiritual mentoring. An extended probe of this analogy affirms the integration of…

  2. Personal Integrative Spirituality, Relational Christian Spirituality, and College Student Identity Development, with a Focus on Gender Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corry, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    The question explored in this research from the literature is: Regarding college student identity development, what is known about personal integrative spirituality and relational Christian spirituality, with a particular focus on gender differences? Spirituality is included as an aspect of identity development by theorists Erikson, Marcia,…

  3. Employee Spirituality in the Workplace: A Cross-Cultural View for the Management of Spiritual Employees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jeffrey S.; Geroy, Gary D.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses six entry points to initiate discussion of employee spirituality in management education: cross-cultural management, workplace diversity, leadership, team management, organizational culture, and human resource development. (SK)

  4. Spirituality as a universal concept: student experience of learning about spirituality through the medium of art.

    PubMed

    Mooney, Bróna; Timmins, Fiona

    2007-09-01

    Precise definitions of spirituality can be elusive (McSherry, 2000). This factor together with the increasing class sizes for undergraduate nursing students render the teaching and learning of spirituality in nursing a challenge for both lecturers and students alike (McSherry, 2000). This paper reports on the design, delivery and evaluation of an innovative spirituality program for second year nursing students attending a Bachelor of Science degree at a university in the Republic of Ireland. This teaching program was introduced in 2005 to enhance nursing students' engagement with the concept of spirituality. The program consisted of a series of lectures on the topic, followed by a visit to the National Gallery of Ireland. The latter involved a structured visit, whereby the students (n=100) were divided into ten small groups and asked to wander through a section of the gallery and choose a piece of art work that they perceived to be spiritual in nature. Students were then asked to write their subjective impressions and reasons for their choice of painting. A list of themes related to spirituality was provided to the students as a prompt. Students later visited the paintings with both a lecturer and an art gallery guide and their chosen paintings were discussed within the group. Later that day, purposive sampling was used, whereby a selection of nursing students participating in the Gallery visit (n=21) partook in four recorded focus group interviews following the Gallery visit. Themes emerging from the interviews pertained to the universal and individual nature of spirituality. In keeping with Mc Sherry's (2000:27) definition of spirituality as a "universal concept relevant to all individuals", students in the study revealed their surprise at the uniqueness of their colleague's interpretations. The teaching methodology offered them an opportunity to reflect upon their own understandings and develop a deeper awareness of the meaning of spirituality. It also allowed

  5. Object-relations and spirituality: revisiting a clinical dialogue.

    PubMed

    Gurney, Andrea G; Rogers, Steven A

    2007-10-01

    Antagonism and separateness has characterized the relationship between psychotherapy and religion/spirituality throughout the history of psychology, beginning with Freudian psychoanalytic theory. Recently, however, spirituality, broadly defined as a transcendent relationship with a higher being, has begun to reemerge as a central concept in therapeutic work. There is fertile ground for exploring how spirituality can be enfolded into psychotherapeutic practice, particularly from an object-relations standpoint. The purpose of this article, therefore, is to examine points of convergence and divergence between spirituality and object-relations theory and explore the integration of spirituality with object-relations therapy, with the hope of replacing historical antagonism with thoughtful and intentional integration.

  6. Psychotherapy with religious and spiritual clients: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Worthington, Everett L; Aten, Jamie D

    2009-02-01

    This invited issue of the Journal of Clinical Psychology: In Session is devoted to psychotherapy with religious and spiritual clients. After offering definitions of religion and spirituality, noting areas of potential convergence and differentiating nuances, the authors highlight the prevalence and types of spirituality among both clients and mental health professionals. They describe the historical and current context for examining approaches to psychotherapy with clients who endorse religion, experience spirituality within their religion, or define themselves as spiritual even if not religious. They then summarize the subsequent articles in this issue, which offer practical guidance for practitioners.

  7. Conceptualising spirituality for medical research and health service provision

    PubMed Central

    King, Michael B; Koenig, Harold G

    2009-01-01

    The need to take account of spirituality in research and health services provision is assuming ever greater importance. However the field has long been hampered by a lack of conceptual clarity about the nature of spirituality itself. We do not agree with the sceptical claim that it is impossible to conceptualise spirituality within a scientific paradigm. Our aims are to 1) provide a brief over-view of critical thinking that might form the basis for a useful definition of spirituality for research and clinical work and 2) demystify the language of spirituality for clinical practice and research. PMID:19594903

  8. Exploring the spiritual needs of families with seriously ill children.

    PubMed

    Ferrell, Betty; Wittenberg, Elaine; Battista, Vanessa; Walker, Gay

    2016-08-01

    Although we know that families of seriously ill children experience spiritual distress, especially at the end of the child's life, there is little information on the specific spiritual needs of families. In order to develop further training for nurses in paediatrics and help nurses develop skills for communicating about spirituality, this research examined the spiritual needs of families based on nurses' experiences with families of seriously ill children. Nurses' experiences revealed that families' anger with God, blame/regret, forgiveness, and ritual and cultural traditions are salient spiritual needs requiring effective nurse communication skills to support families of ill children. PMID:27568778

  9. Relational mindfulness, spirituality, and the therapeutic bond.

    PubMed

    Falb, Melissa D; Pargament, Kenneth I

    2012-12-01

    Mindfulness training, which emphasizes deliberate non-judgmental attention to present moment experiences, has become increasingly mainstream over the past several decades. With accumulating evidence for the physical and mental health benefits of mindfulness, it has been integrated into medical and psychological treatments and is increasingly accepted in the fields of psychology and psychiatry. However, several elements of mindfulness practice which potentially contribute to its benefits have been largely neglected. These include the connections between mindfulness, interpersonal relationships, spirituality, and the psychotherapeutic alliance. The emerging concept of "relational mindfulness" focuses attention on the oft-neglected interpersonal aspects of mindfulness practices. Relational mindfulness is potentially relevant to the psychotherapeutic process, due to its cultivation of the types of qualities that enhance the therapeutic relationship, including warmth, empathy, curiosity, acceptance, self-attunement, and emotional intelligence. In addition, mindfulness practices, especially relational ones, can contribute to the development of spiritual qualities, such as transcendence, boundlessness, ultimacy, and interconnectedness. Several recent studies suggest that meditation/mindfulness interventions may be explained and or enhanced by an emphasis on spiritual components. In this paper, we suggest that focusing on the oft-neglected relational and spiritual aspects of mindfulness practice has the potential to deepen its benefits, especially within the context of the psychotherapeutic relationship.

  10. Journalling and the Teaching of Spirituality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bush, Tony

    1999-01-01

    A teacher developing a method to teach spiritual care to nursing students over age 25 used a journal to record and reflect on experiences. The importance of a safe and open learning environment, use of adult-learning principles, and immediate recording of journal entries was underscored. (SK)

  11. Evolutionary origins of human brain and spirituality.

    PubMed

    Henneberg, Maciej; Saniotis, Arthur

    2009-12-01

    Evolving brains produce minds. Minds operate on imaginary entities. Thus they can create what does not exist in the physical world. Spirits can be deified. Perception of spiritual entities is emotional--organic. Spirituality is a part of culture while culture is an adaptive mechanism of human groups as it allows for technology and social organization to support survival and reproduction. Humans are not rational, they are emotional. Most of explanations of the world, offered by various cultures, involve an element of "fiat", a will of a higher spiritual being, or a reference to some ideal. From this the rules of behaviour are deduced. These rules are necessary to maintain social peace and allow a complex unit consisting of individuals of both sexes and all ages to function in a way ensuring their reproductive success and thus survival. There is thus a direct biological benefit of complex ideological superstructure of culture. This complex superstructure most often takes a form of religion in which logic is mixed with appeals to emotions based on images of spiritual beings. God is a consequence of natural evolution. Whether a deity is a cause of this evolution is difficult to discover, but existence of a deity cannot be questioned.

  12. Spiritual Quest in Young Adult Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radley, Gail

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how religion and fiction can be a troublesome blend in literature for young people. Notes that many writers have found it simpler to avoid spiritual issues altogether, to stay with the safe and secular. Describes that one solution a number of writers have grasped is to portray protagonists as learning to seek the answers within…

  13. African American Women Counselors, Wellness, and Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knowles, Debora; Bryant, Rhonda M.

    2011-01-01

    Given their tremendous professional responsibilities, professional counselors face daunting challenges to remaining healthy and avoiding role stress and overload. This article explores the intersection of race, gender, wellness, and spirituality in the self-care of African American women counselors. The authors give particular attention to…

  14. Teaching Spirituality in the Interpersonal Communication Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, H. Carolyn

    Attention to teaching and developing spirituality in interpersonal communication is timely. Today's technology usurps the "human" in human being. Humankind is displaced by computers, e-mail, and various websites which substitute for the "person" in interpersonal communication. This technology, combined with the emergence of widespread cultural…

  15. Counseling and Spirituality: A Historical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Robin

    2005-01-01

    Evolution of the relationship between counseling and spirituality since 1840 is examined in terms of the number of publications that have appeared over time that include these terms. The author retrieved the data using the American Psychological Association's PsycINFO database. A similar search was done adding the term training. The rise of…

  16. Religion and Spirituality Along the Suicidal Path

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colucci, Erminia; Martin, Graham

    2008-01-01

    The inner experience of spiritual and religious feelings is an integral part of the everyday lives of many individuals. For over 100 years the role of religion as a deterrent to suicidal behavior has been studied in various disciplines. We attempt to systematize the existing literature investigating the relationship between religion/spirituality…

  17. Mixed Methodology Approaches to Exploring Spiritual Transformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mehl-Madrona, Lewis; Mainguy, Barbara; Valenti, Michael Pickren

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that spiritual transformation, a change in the way a person considers the sacred, can change medical outcome (Pargament, 2006). Psychometric studies have failed to identify specific factors, but qualitative reports detail an experience that can be reliably shown to have an impact. We report on the development of a rubric for…

  18. Spirituality and Mental Health among Homeless Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, David R.; Moser, Stephanie E.; Shafer, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Mothers are one of the fastest growing segments of the homeless population in the United States. Although mental health problems often contribute to homelessness, little is known about the factors that affect mothers' mental health. To help identify protective factors, this longitudinal study examined the relationship between spirituality and…

  19. Toward a Pedagogy Grounded in Christian Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimabukuro, Gini

    2008-01-01

    Church documents, theology, leadership theory, and sociology come together in this article to present a pedagogy for Catholic schools that is deeply rooted in a personal faith and a contemporary understanding of the person. In order to construct a conceptual model of a pedagogy grounded in Christian spirituality, the meaning of the term "pedagogy"…

  20. The Spirituality of Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Baxter

    2006-01-01

    Parallels between the reconstruction of self in Alcoholics Anonymous and the reconstruction of self in second language acquisition are drawn out and examined in three areas: ego deflation, identification at depth, and mutual assistance. These spiritual principles are shown to be theoretically and empirically supported in SLA literature and…

  1. Introducing Spirituality to Professional School Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sink, Christopher A.; Richmond, Lee J.

    2004-01-01

    Although school counselors recognize that students and school personnel possess some type of spirituality, regrettably, this topic has garnered little attention in the school counseling literature. With the publication of this issue, this noticeable gap in the literature and the much delayed dialogue about this topic begins. By way of introduction…

  2. Relational mindfulness, spirituality, and the therapeutic bond.

    PubMed

    Falb, Melissa D; Pargament, Kenneth I

    2012-12-01

    Mindfulness training, which emphasizes deliberate non-judgmental attention to present moment experiences, has become increasingly mainstream over the past several decades. With accumulating evidence for the physical and mental health benefits of mindfulness, it has been integrated into medical and psychological treatments and is increasingly accepted in the fields of psychology and psychiatry. However, several elements of mindfulness practice which potentially contribute to its benefits have been largely neglected. These include the connections between mindfulness, interpersonal relationships, spirituality, and the psychotherapeutic alliance. The emerging concept of "relational mindfulness" focuses attention on the oft-neglected interpersonal aspects of mindfulness practices. Relational mindfulness is potentially relevant to the psychotherapeutic process, due to its cultivation of the types of qualities that enhance the therapeutic relationship, including warmth, empathy, curiosity, acceptance, self-attunement, and emotional intelligence. In addition, mindfulness practices, especially relational ones, can contribute to the development of spiritual qualities, such as transcendence, boundlessness, ultimacy, and interconnectedness. Several recent studies suggest that meditation/mindfulness interventions may be explained and or enhanced by an emphasis on spiritual components. In this paper, we suggest that focusing on the oft-neglected relational and spiritual aspects of mindfulness practice has the potential to deepen its benefits, especially within the context of the psychotherapeutic relationship. PMID:23174445

  3. [Religion and spirituality, definitions and challenges].

    PubMed

    de Quercize, Anne-Sophie; Pian, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Understanding religious teachings and the religious dimension in our societies is not made any easier with a discourse that is often lacking in rigor for dealing with this reality. Some basic notions need to be clarified to better define the religious and the spiritual.

  4. Sacramental and spiritual use of hallucinogenic drugs.

    PubMed

    Móró, Levente; Noreika, Valdas

    2011-12-01

    Arguably, the religious use of hallucinogenic drugs stems from a human search of metaphysical insight rather than from a direct need for cognitive, emotional, social, physical, or sexual improvement. Therefore, the sacramental and spiritual intake of hallucinogenic drugs goes so far beyond other biopsychosocial functions that it deserves its own category in the drug instrumentalization list.

  5. Wisdomkeepers: Meetings with Native American Spiritual Elders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arden, Harvey; Wall, Steve

    This book documents meetings with Native American elders who shared their tribal stories of origin, sacred traditions, social life and customs, and traditional wisdom. The idea for the book began when a Cherokee medicine man requested that his tribal knowledge be documented for future generations. For the past 10 years, the spiritual elders of…

  6. Religious and Spiritual Markers in Community Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arthur, James

    2011-01-01

    This article reports on some of the research findings of a major, multi-site case study of character formation in young people in England. Religion was not the focus of this research, but emerged as significant in each case study. In particular, the religious and spiritual beliefs and practices of young people were positively connected with their…

  7. Spiritual Intelligence: Developing Higher Consciousness Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sisk, Dorothy A.

    2016-01-01

    This article will share the intellectual journey E. Paul Torrance and I traveled in 2001, in which we explored psychology, science and ancient wisdom and traditions, including Native American and indigenous traditions, to establish a foundation for spiritual intelligence. This section will be followed by ways to develop and nurture spiritual…

  8. Dying, mourning, and spirituality: a psychological perspective.

    PubMed

    Marrone, R

    1999-09-01

    Based in an unfortunate tradition that stretches back in time to Watson's behaviorism and Freud's psychoanalysis, psychology has tended to reject and to pathologize matters of the spirit. In the past 30 years, however, with the advent of what has been termed the cognitive revolution, psychology has greatly expanded the scope of its subject matter. Psychologists and thanatologists have begun to unravel the cognitive underpinnings of our assumptive world and the transformation of those underpinnings in times of crisis and stress. This article examines the cognitive basis of the spiritual experience and the use of cognitive assimilation, accommodation strategies during the process of mourning the death of a loved one, as well as during the process of living our own dying. Of special importance to mental health professionals and clergy, new research on dying, mourning, and spirituality suggests that the specific ways in which people rediscover meaning--such as belief in traditional religious doctrine, the afterlife, reincarnation, philanthropy, or a spiritual order to the universe--may be less important than the process itself. In other words, in the midst of dealing with profound loss in our lives, the ability to reascribe meaning to a changed world through spiritual transformation, religious conversion, or existential change may be more significant than the specific content by which that need is filled.

  9. Spirituality and hearing voices: considering the relation

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy-Jones, Simon; Waegeli, Amanda; Watkins, John

    2013-01-01

    For millennia, some people have heard voices that others cannot hear. These have been variously understood as medical, psychological and spiritual phenomena. In this article we consider the specific role of spirituality in voice-hearing in two ways. First, we examine how spirituality may help or hinder people who hear voices. Benefits are suggested to include offering an alternative meaning to the experience which can give more control and comfort, enabling the development of specific coping strategies, increasing social support, and encouraging forgiveness. Potential drawbacks are noted to include increased distress and reduced control resulting from placing frightening or coercive constructions on voices, social isolation, the development of dysfunctional beliefs, and missed/delayed opportunities for successful mental health interventions. After examining problems surrounding classifying voices as either spiritual or psychotic, we move beyond an essentialist position to examine how such a classification is likely to be fluid, and how a given voice may move between these designations. We also highlight tensions between modernist and postmodernist approaches to voice-hearing. PMID:24273597

  10. Is spirituality a critical ingredient of meditation? Comparing the effects of spiritual meditation, secular meditation, and relaxation on spiritual, psychological, cardiac, and pain outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wachholtz, Amy B; Pargament, Kenneth I

    2005-08-01

    This study compared secular and spiritual forms of meditation to assess the benefits of a spiritual intervention. Participants were taught a meditation or relaxation technique to practice for 20 min a day for two weeks. After two weeks, participants returned to the lab, practiced their technique for 20 min, and placed their hand in a cold-water bath of 2 degrees C for as long as they could endure it. The length of time that individuals kept their hand in the water bath was measured. Pain, anxiety, mood, and the spiritual health were assessed following the two-week intervention. Significant interactions occurred (time x group); the Spiritual Meditation group had greater decreases in anxiety and more positive mood, spiritual health, and spiritual experiences than the other two groups. They also tolerated pain almost twice as long as the other two groups.

  11. Spirituality as experienced by Muslim oncology nurses in Iran.

    PubMed

    Khorami Markani, Abdolah; Yaghmaei, Farideh; Khodayari Fard, Mohammad

    Spirituality, as an essential part of holistic care, is concerned with faith and meaning, and is usually conceptualised as a 'higher' experience or a transcendence of oneself. A resurgence of interest in this area is evident in post modern culture because of the effects that spirituality and religious beliefS may have on health. Up until the last two decades, spirituality and spiritual care, although vital, were invisible aspects of nursing. However, now that these concepts have made their way into the mainstream, literature in this area has burgeoned. In addition, modern nursing grew out of spiritual roots, and spiritual care is a component of holistic care. In the Islamic Republic of Iran,little information exists documenting the expressed spirituality of nurses in general and of oncology nurses in particular. This article presents spirituality as it is experienced by Muslim oncology nurses.The investigation involved a qualitative analysis of the spirituality of 24 participants, using semi-structured interviews. Participants were oncology nurses at 12 hospitals in two educational universities of medical sciences in Tehran. The main categories of spirituality as experienced by oncology nurses included religious and existential dimensions in an Iranian Muslim context. Findings are consistent with the holistic view of Islam, that considers all dimensions of personhood simultaneously. This study is important to transcultural nursing because of the benefits of increasing nursing knowledge through research that examines nurses' spirituality in diverse cultures.

  12. Occupational Therapy Students' Perceptions of Spirituality in Training.

    PubMed

    Mthembu, Thuli Godfrey; Ahmed, Firdous; Nkuna, Thembi; Yaca, Khalipha

    2015-12-01

    Spirituality is recognized as an essential and integral component of a holistic approach in occupational therapy practice. However, little is known about occupational therapy students' perceptions regarding spirituality in learning context. This study used qualitative exploratory, descriptive design to explore the occupational therapy students' perceptions about spirituality in training. Using purposive sampling, four semi-structured interviews were conducted with two students, a lecturer and an occupational therapist. In addition, two focus groups were conducted with students in order to collect data. Data collected were audio-taped; transcribed and thematic analysis was used to identify themes. The analysis resulted in emergence of four themes: "Unique to every individual," "Spirituality in occupational therapy," "To be or not to be taught," and "The Real world." Participants perceived spirituality as an individually experienced. The study contributes to the body of knowledge base of occupational therapy education regarding spirituality. However, there is a need for guidelines to integrate spirituality in occupational therapy training.

  13. The relationship of spirituality to coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Morris, E L

    2001-01-01

    Several studies suggest that religious involvement or spiritual well-being may affect health outcomes. This study was designed to investigate whether the scores from a questionnaire measuring spiritual well-being correlated with progression or regression of coronary heart disease as measured with computerized cardiac catheterization data. Participants in Dr Dean Ornish's Lifestyle Heart Trial were given the "Spiritual Orientation Inventory." A significant difference was found in the spirituality scores between a control group and a research group that practiced daily meditation. The spirituality scores were significantly correlated with the degree of progression or regression of coronary artery obstruction over a 4-year time period. The lowest scores of spiritual well-being had the most progression of coronary obstruction and the highest scores had the most regression. This study suggests that the degree of spiritual well-being may be an important factor in the development of coronary artery disease.

  14. "A beacon of light". Spirituality in the heart transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Walton, J; St Clair, K

    2000-03-01

    For the cardiac transplant recipients in this study, spirituality was like a beacon of light, providing illumination and sustaining hope while enduring illness. Spirituality was nurtured by Developing Faith and by the Presence of significant others, health care providers, and the Divine to sustain hope. Spirituality throughout the transplantation process was described by concepts of faith, presence, enduring illness, and sustaining hope. The four dynamic phases of Enduring Illness can assist health care providers in understanding what spirituality means to transplant patients. This conceptual model of spirituality demonstrates the important role that spirituality plays in recovery. Clinical application of this model will allow health care providers involved in the care of cardiac transplant patients to integrate spirituality into their patients' plan of care. With future research, this model can be easily modified and built upon to meet the needs of cardiac transplant patients in all phases of transplantation.

  15. Re-examining Definitions of Spirituality in Nursing Research

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Katia; KOENIG, Harold G.

    2013-01-01

    Aim This article presents a discussion of the definition of spirituality and its limitations for nursing research. It proposes a definition that will capture more accurately the role of spirituality in health outcomes. Background Studies have increasingly examined spirituality in nursing research as a coping mechanism attenuating the negative impact of traumatic stress on mental health. Existing definitions of spirituality in nursing research include elements of positive emotional states (meaning, purpose, general well-being) which confound mental health outcomes. Data sources Medline and CINAHL databases were searched from 2007–2011 for research articles examining spirituality definitions and measures used by nurse researchers. Discussion An analysis of the definitions of spirituality in nursing research reveals inconsistencies and confounding mental health concepts. The authors propose defining spirituality in the context of religious involvement when conducting research, while using a broader definition of spirituality when providing spiritual care. They argue such definition provides a more appropriate method of measuring this concept in research aimed at evaluating mental health outcomes while preserving the currently used patient- defined definition of spirituality when providing spiritual care. Nursing Implications A consistent definition of spirituality in nursing research evaluating mental health outcomes, distinct from ‘spiritual care’ in a clinical setting, is essential to avoid tautological results that are meaningless. Appropriate definitions will enable nursing researchers to more clearly identify resilience mechanisms and improved health outcomes in those exposed to traumatic stress. Conclusion A definition of spirituality that focuses on religious involvement provides a more uniform and consistent measure for evaluating mental health outcomes in nursing research. PMID:23600849

  16. Neuroanatomical Correlates of Religiosity and Spirituality

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lisa; Bansal, Ravi; Wickramaratne, Priya; Hao, Xuejun; Tenke, Craig E.; Weissman, Myrna M.; Peterson, Bradley S.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE We previously reported a 90% decreased risk in major depression, assessed prospectively, in adult offspring of depressed probands who reported that religion or spirituality was highly important to them. Frequency of church attendance was not significantly related to depression risk. Our previous brain imaging findings in adult offspring in these high-risk families also revealed large expanses of cortical thinning across the lateral surface of the right cerebral hemisphere. OBJECTIVE To determine whether high-risk adults who reported high importance of religion or spirituality had thicker cortices than those who reported moderate or low importance of religion or spirituality and whether this effect varied by family risk status. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Longitudinal, retrospective cohort, familial study of 103 adults (aged 18–54 years) who were the second- or third-generation offspring of depressed (high familial risk) or nondepressed (low familiar risk) probands (first generation). Religious or spiritual importance and church attendance were assessed at 2 time points during 5 years, and cortical thickness was measured on anatomical images of the brain acquired with magnetic resonance imaging at the second time point. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Cortical thickness in the parietal regions by risk status. RESULTS Importance of religion or spirituality, but not frequency of attendance, was associated with thicker cortices in the left and right parietal and occipital regions, the mesial frontal lobe of the right hemisphere, and the cuneus and precuneus in the left hemisphere, independent of familial risk. In addition, the effects of importance on cortical thickness were significantly stronger in the high-risk than in the low-risk group, particularly along the mesial wall of the left hemisphere, in the same region where we previously reported a significant thinner cortex associated with a familial risk of developing depressive illness. We note that

  17. Spirituality, Social Support, and Survival in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Spinale, Joann; Cohen, Scott D.; Khetpal, Prashant; Peterson, Rolf A.; Clougherty, Brenna; Puchalski, Christina M.; Patel, Samir S.; Kimmel, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: No studies have evaluated the relationship among spirituality, social support, and survival in patients with ESRD. This study assessed whether spirituality was an independent predictor of survival in dialysis patients with ESRD after controlling for age, diabetes, albumin, and social support. Design, setting, participants, & measurements: A total of 166 patients who had ESRD and were treated with hemodialysis completed questionnaires on psychosocial variables, quality of life, and religious and spiritual beliefs. The religious variables were categorized into three scores on a 0 to 20 scale (low to high levels): Spirituality, religious involvement, and religion as coping. Social support was assessed using the Multidimensional Scale for Perceived Social Support. Analyses were also performed including and excluding patients with HIV infection. Religious variables were categorized on the basis of means, medians, and tertiles. Results: In analyses that used religious variables, only the responses on the spirituality scale split at the mean were associated with survival. The association of other religious variables with survival did not reach significance. Social support correlated with spirituality, religion as coping, and religious involvement measures. Only social support and age were associated with survival when controlling for diabetes, albumin concentration, HIV infection, and spirituality. Conclusions: These data suggest that the effects of spirituality may be mediated by social support. Larger, multicenter, prospective studies that use well-validated tools to measure religiosity and spirituality are needed to determine whether there is an independent association of spirituality variables with survival in patients with ESRD. PMID:18922991

  18. An inquiry about clinical death--considering spiritual pain.

    PubMed

    Deeken, Alfons

    2009-06-01

    According to a paper published by the International Work Group on Death, Dying and Bereavement, "Each person has a spiritual dimension." That means each person has spiritual energy and spiritual needs. In facing death, a patient suffers spiritual pain and needs spiritual care. This paper describes what spirituality and spiritual pain mean. It identifies nine types of fears and anxieties about death which become a source of spiritual pain: 1. Fear of pain; 2. Fear of loneliness; 3. Fear of unpleasant experiences; 4. Fear of becoming a burden to the family and to society; 5. Anxiety towards the unknown; 6. Fear of death resulting from fear of life; 7. Fear of death as a feeling that one's life task is still incomplete; 8. Fear of death as fear of personal extinction; 9. Fear of death as fear of judgment and punishment after death. Five types of spiritual pain that seem to be frequent among patients facing death are discussed: 1. Loss of self-determination; 2. Loss of meaning; 3. Guilt feelings; 4. Loneliness and isolation; 5. Loss of hope. Three ways of preventing or reducing excessive fear of death and of lowering the various types of spiritual pain are suggested: 1. Death education; 2. Presence at the bedside; 3. Humor as an expression of love. PMID:19597307

  19. Predictors of spirituality at the end of life

    PubMed Central

    Mystakidou, Kyriaki; Tsilika, Eleni; Prapa, Efi; Smyrnioti, Marilena; Pagoropoulou, Anna; Lambros, Vlahos

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To assess the relationship between spirituality and hopelessness, desire for hastened death, and clinical and disease-related characteristics among patients with advanced cancer, and to investigate predictors of spirituality. Spiritual well-being is thought to have a beneficial effect on patients’ response to illness. DESIGN Patients were asked to complete 4 questionnaires: the Greek version of the Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale, the Greek version of the Schedule of Attitudes toward Hastened Death, the Beck Hopelessness Scale, and a questionnaire on demographics. SETTING A palliative care unit in Athens, Greece. PARTICIPANTS A total of 91 patients with advanced cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Associations between scores on the Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs scale and scores on the Schedule of Attitudes toward Hastened Death scale and the Beck Hopelessness scale, and demographic characteristics. RESULTS Statistically significant associations were found between spirituality and sex of patients (P = .001) and spirituality and stronger hopelessness (r = 0.252, P = .016). In multivariate analyses, stronger hopelessness, male sex, younger age, and receiving chemotherapy were found to be the strongest predictors of being spiritual. CONCLUSION Demographic and clinical characteristics and stronger hopelessness appeared to have statistically significant relationships with spirituality. Interventions to improve patients’ spiritual well-being should take these relationships into account. PMID:19074719

  20. Questionnaires Measuring Patients’ Spiritual Needs: A Narrative Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Seddigh, Ruohollah; Keshavarz-Akhlaghi, Amir-Abbas; Azarnik, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Context The objective of the present review was to collect published spiritual needs questionnaires and to present a clear image of the research condition of this domain. Evidence Acquisition First, an electronic search was conducted with no limits on time span (until June 2015) or language in the following databases: PubMed, Scopus, Ovid, ProQuest and Google Scholar. All derivations of the keywords religion and spiritual alongside need and its synonyms were included in the search. Researches that introduced new tools was then selected and included in the study. Due to the limited quantity of questionnaires in this domain and with no consideration given to the existence or lack of exact standardization information, all of the questionnaires were included in the final report. Results Eight questionnaires were found: patients spiritual needs assessment scale (PSNAS), spiritual needs inventory (SNI), spiritual interests related to illness tool (SpIRIT), spiritual needs questionnaire (SpNQ), spiritual needs assessment for patients (SNAP), spiritual needs scale (SNS), spiritual care needs inventory (SCNI), and spiritual needs questionnaire for palliative care. Conclusions These questionnaires have been designed from a limited medical perspective and often involve cultural concepts which complicate their cross-cultural applicability. PMID:27284281

  1. An inquiry about clinical death--considering spiritual pain.

    PubMed

    Deeken, Alfons

    2009-06-01

    According to a paper published by the International Work Group on Death, Dying and Bereavement, "Each person has a spiritual dimension." That means each person has spiritual energy and spiritual needs. In facing death, a patient suffers spiritual pain and needs spiritual care. This paper describes what spirituality and spiritual pain mean. It identifies nine types of fears and anxieties about death which become a source of spiritual pain: 1. Fear of pain; 2. Fear of loneliness; 3. Fear of unpleasant experiences; 4. Fear of becoming a burden to the family and to society; 5. Anxiety towards the unknown; 6. Fear of death resulting from fear of life; 7. Fear of death as a feeling that one's life task is still incomplete; 8. Fear of death as fear of personal extinction; 9. Fear of death as fear of judgment and punishment after death. Five types of spiritual pain that seem to be frequent among patients facing death are discussed: 1. Loss of self-determination; 2. Loss of meaning; 3. Guilt feelings; 4. Loneliness and isolation; 5. Loss of hope. Three ways of preventing or reducing excessive fear of death and of lowering the various types of spiritual pain are suggested: 1. Death education; 2. Presence at the bedside; 3. Humor as an expression of love.

  2. Between spiritual wellbeing and spiritual distress: possible related factors in elderly patients with cancer

    PubMed Central

    Caldeira, Sílvia; de Carvalho, Emilia Campos; Vieira, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Objective this article describes the assessment of the spiritual wellbeing of elderly patients with cancer submitted to chemotherapy and possible predictive factors of the spiritual distress diagnosis. Methodology this is a methodological study for clinical validation of a nursing diagnosis, using interviews to assist in completing the form. Results 45 elderly patients participated in this study, Catholics, mostly female, diagnosed with breast cancer, average age of 70.3 years. The prevalence of spiritual distress was of 42%; 24.4% of the elderly patients were under anti-depressant medication. A significant association was noted between spiritual distress, anti-depressant medication and level of education; an increase (not significant) was acknowledged at the start of the treatment. Conclusion these results emphasize the relevance of clarifying this diagnosis and the responsibility of nurses to provide spiritual care to patients. Interventions should be planned appropriately every time a nursing diagnosis is identified as a complex answer and for which pharmacological treatment is not sufficient. PMID:24553700

  3. Spirituality and medical practice: a Christian perspective.

    PubMed

    Igboin, Benson O

    2015-01-01

    Everyday experience shows that there is a commonality between spirituality and medical practice. A text message I received from a friend recently read, "Please pray for me. I've been getting a mysterious headache for some days now. I will be seeing the doctor today." This clearly speaks of a relationship: asking for prayer so as to be relieved of a "mysterious headache", yet going to see a doctor whose job is not to cure mysterious headaches. Even though both areas of human experience have their peculiar and largely unrelated methodologies, this paper argues that any extreme separation of the two is injurious to the teleology of both disciplines in relation to human well-being, which forms the core of spirituality and medicine. PMID:26592781

  4. Spirituality and risk: toward an understanding.

    PubMed

    Robinson, A

    1994-01-01

    To be fully healthy is to risk encountering and embracing the complex substrate of mysterious life-giving and life-denying spiritual forces, the hidden wholeness of God. Risky health behavior may paradoxically arise from the psychospiritual need to both probe and avoid probing the deeper understandings of health reflected in the tensions between good and evil. Avoidance of the painful truths of poverty, racism, sexism, and classism among other evils in our society results in the prevalence of high-risk life styles, addictions, and violent behaviors. Spiritual paradigms from holistic community care are needed to enable communities to more fully respond to the health empowering potential of the hidden wholeness rather than hiding from it.

  5. Spiritual aspects of death and dying.

    PubMed Central

    Mermann, A. C.

    1992-01-01

    Dying is an event beyond our comprehension, an experience that can only be imagined. Patients with cancer have a gift denied many others: some time to prepare for the approaching end of life. This time can be used to bring old conflicts to a close, to say goodbye and seek forgiveness from others, to express love and gratitude for the gifts of a life. Physicians can help patients by being aware of the spiritual dimensions to life that many patients have. In major religious traditions, death is accepted as the natural end of the gift of life and as a point of transition to another, yet unknown, existence. For many patients, it is not death that is feared, but abandonment. The physician's awareness of the spiritual needs of patients can make care of the dying more rewarding and fulfilling for all concerned. PMID:1519377

  6. Spiritual aspects of death and dying.

    PubMed

    Mermann, A C

    1992-01-01

    Dying is an event beyond our comprehension, an experience that can only be imagined. Patients with cancer have a gift denied many others: some time to prepare for the approaching end of life. This time can be used to bring old conflicts to a close, to say goodbye and seek forgiveness from others, to express love and gratitude for the gifts of a life. Physicians can help patients by being aware of the spiritual dimensions to life that many patients have. In major religious traditions, death is accepted as the natural end of the gift of life and as a point of transition to another, yet unknown, existence. For many patients, it is not death that is feared, but abandonment. The physician's awareness of the spiritual needs of patients can make care of the dying more rewarding and fulfilling for all concerned.

  7. Spirituality, schizophrenia, and state hospitals: program description and characteristics of self-selected attendees of a spirituality therapeutic group.

    PubMed

    Revheim, Nadine; Greenberg, William M; Citrome, Leslie

    2010-12-01

    Spiritual matters can be an important part in the recovery process of patients with schizophrenia. A spirituality-based therapeutic group was developed for patients hospitalized on a research specialty unit jointly operated by a state hospital and a research institute. This report offers a description of this program and examines potential associations between spirituality and coping in patients with schizophrenia who either attended or did not attend the inpatient spirituality group. We compared group attendees (n = 20) with non-attendees (n = 20) cross-sectionally, using measures of spirituality, self-efficacy (i.e. the confidence in one's ability), quality of life, and hopefulness, and religious/personal demographic profiles. For the total sample, spirituality status was significantly correlated with self-efficacy for both social functioning and negative symptoms. Significant differences were found between group attendees and non-attendees for spirituality status, but not for self-efficacy or quality of life. For group attendees, spirituality status was significantly correlated with self-efficacy for positive symptoms, negative symptoms and social functioning. Group attendees were significantly more hopeful than non-attendees and hopefulness was significantly associated with degree of spirituality status. These findings lend support for offering spirituality groups and positive coping during recovery from psychiatric disabilities.

  8. Confident spiritual care in a postmodern world.

    PubMed

    Salladay, Susan A

    2011-01-01

    Aostmodern thinking that embraces tolerance and suggests there is no absolute truth may make Christian nurses feel uncertain or uncomfortable in giving spiritual care, especially care consistent wtih their beliefs. Christian nurses can be guided by the example of Jesus Christ and the Apostles Peter and Paul in the bible, being sensitive to postmodern perceptions without being intimidated by them and feeling neither obliated to share their faith, nor afraid to do so if a patient asks and gives consent.

  9. Eating disorders and spirituality in college students.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Lauren; Kemppainen, Jeanne K; Mechling, Brandy M; MacKain, Sally; Kim-Godwin, Yeounsoo; Leopard, Louisa

    2015-01-01

    Associations were examined between eating disorder symptoms and spiritual well-being in a convenience sample of college students. Undergraduate nursing students at a university in a Mid-Atlantic coastal beach community were recruited for the study. A total of 115 students completed the Spiritual Well-Being Scale (SWBS); the Sick, Control, One Stone, Fat, Food (SCOFF) screening questionnaire; and the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26). Approximately one quarter of students had positive screens for an eating disorder, and 40% admitted to binging/purging. SWBS scores reflected low life satisfaction and a lack of clarity and purpose among students. A significant association was found between EAT-26 scores and SWBS Existential Well-Being (EWB) sub-scale scores (p = 0.014). SCOFF scores were significantly associated with SWBS EWB scores (p = 0.001). Symptoms of eating disorders were pervasive. Future research that assesses the impact of spiritual factors on eating disorders may help health care providers better understand the unique contributions to the development of eating disorders. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 53(1), 30-37.]. PMID:25490775

  10. Spiritual Needs in Patients Suffering from Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Offenbaecher, M.; Kohls, N.; Toussaint, L. L.; Sigl, C.; Winkelmann, A.; Hieblinger, R.; Walther, A.; Büssing, A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess spiritual needs of patients with fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and to evaluate correlations with disease and health associated variables. Using a set of standardized questionnaires (i.e., Spiritual Needs Questionnaire, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire, SF-36's Quality of Life, Brief Multidimensional Life Satisfaction Scale, etc.), we enrolled 141 patients (95% women, mean age 58 ± 10 years). Here, needs for inner peace and giving/generativity scored the highest, while existential needs and religious needs scored lowest. Particularly inner peace needs and existential needs correlated with different domains of reduced mental health, particularly with anxiety, the intention to escape from illness, and psychosocial restrictions. Thirty-eight percent of the patients stated needs to be forgiven and nearly half to forgive someone from their past life. Therefore, the specific spiritual needs of patients with chronic diseases should be addressed in clinical care in order to identify potential therapeutic avenues to support and stabilize their psychoemotional situation. PMID:24348691

  11. Spirituality: Everyone has it, but what is it?

    PubMed

    Lepherd, Laurence

    2015-10-01

    Spirituality has been the subject of discussion over many years, yet understanding its nature, and usefulness during illness, can be elusive. Nurses and other health-care practitioners can often be in the position to help patients discuss spiritual matters because of their direct contact on a frequent basis, but might not feel confident to do so because the subject can appear to be overly complex. This paper summarizes some of the essential elements of spirituality as synthesized from literature that refers to it. The literature draws attention to spirit as the core of a person's being, and the notion that spirituality comprises multiple dimensions that exist internally or become externally manifest through behaviours. The presence and use of spirituality can lead to such outcomes as peace of mind, self-fulfilment and alleviation of suffering. Underpinning all spirituality is the concept of transcendence where a person can be 'lifted up' above the challenges of illness.

  12. The spiritual encounter within a complementary therapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Foster, Elizabeth

    2006-05-01

    Interest in both spirituality and complementary therapies is growing, with their inclusion in both daily life and in health care. The concept of spirituality and the delivery of a therapy have a certain synergy as they both espouse a view of the world that recognises the importance of the whole person. Increasingly, clients want their values and beliefs attended to, perhaps choosing a therapy as a pathway to nourish their sense of the spiritual. Consequently working in a holistic way the complementary therapist needs to acknowledge the spiritual dimension of the client. Integral to this is how the therapeutic encounter facilitates this engagement and how important it is that the therapist develops and explores their own spirituality and life values. This article is an exploration of how spirituality and complementary therapies can legitimately work together, creating a sacred space for both therapist and client. PMID:16648095

  13. Spiritually Integrated Treatment of Depression: A Conceptual Framework

    PubMed Central

    Peteet, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have found an inverse correlation between religious/spiritual involvement and depression. Yet several obstacles impede spiritually integrated treatment of depressed individuals. These include specialization and fragmentation of care, inexperience of clinicians and spiritual care providers, ideological bias, boundary and ethical concerns, and the lack of an accepted conceptual framework for integrated treatment. Here I suggest a framework for approaching these obstacles, constructed from a unified view of human experience (having emotional, existential, and spiritual dimensions); spirituality seen as a response to existential concerns (in domains such as identity, hope, meaning/purpose, morality, and autonomy in relation to authority, which are frequently distorted and amplified in depression); a rationale for locating spiritually oriented approaches within a clinician's assessment, formulation, and treatment plan; and recognition of the challenges and potential pitfalls of integrated treatment. PMID:22577530

  14. Hope for the future: intensifying spirituality in the workplace.

    PubMed

    Batcheller, Joyce; Davis, James; Yoder-Wise, Patricia S

    2013-01-01

    Healthy workplaces address various issues. Work focused on ergonomics addresses physical issues, satisfaction surveys reveal psychosocial issues; and other approaches address spirituality issues. Spirituality in the workplace contributes to holistic care and to the worth of the individual. Incorporating the concept of spirituality, in its broad sense, into the workplace enriches leadership practice and contributes to a holistic work environment. Spirituality is core to the servant leader approach to leadership and beneficial to other approaches. Followers benefit from a holistic approach to leadership; and some specific practices can exhibit the belief an organization holds related to the worth of the individual. Incorporating spirituality into an organization reflects the same values nursing holds for person-centered care, a view of integration of physical, psychological, and spiritual needs.

  15. Near-death experiences and spiritual well-being.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Surbhi; Greyson, Bruce

    2014-12-01

    People who have near-death experiences often report a subsequently increased sense of spirituality and a connection with their inner self and the world around them. In this study, we examined spiritual well-being, using Paloutzian and Ellison's Spiritual Well-Being Scale, among 224 persons who had come close to death. Participants who reported having near-death experiences reported greater spiritual well-being than those who did not, and depth of spiritual well-being was positively correlated with depth of near-death experience. We discussed the implications of these findings in light of other reported aftereffects of near-death experiences and of spiritual well-being among other populations.

  16. The spiritual encounter within a complementary therapy treatment.

    PubMed

    Foster, Elizabeth

    2006-05-01

    Interest in both spirituality and complementary therapies is growing, with their inclusion in both daily life and in health care. The concept of spirituality and the delivery of a therapy have a certain synergy as they both espouse a view of the world that recognises the importance of the whole person. Increasingly, clients want their values and beliefs attended to, perhaps choosing a therapy as a pathway to nourish their sense of the spiritual. Consequently working in a holistic way the complementary therapist needs to acknowledge the spiritual dimension of the client. Integral to this is how the therapeutic encounter facilitates this engagement and how important it is that the therapist develops and explores their own spirituality and life values. This article is an exploration of how spirituality and complementary therapies can legitimately work together, creating a sacred space for both therapist and client.

  17. Spirituality in Renal Supportive Care: A Thematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Richard; Wood, Sarah; MacLeod, Rod; Walker, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is marked by a reduced life expectancy and a high symptom burden. For those who reach end-stage renal disease, the prognosis is poor, and this combined with the growing prevalence of the disease necessitates supportive and palliative care programmes that will address people’s psychosocial, cultural and spiritual needs. While there is variation between countries, research reveals that many renal specialist nurses and doctors are reluctant to address spirituality, initiate end-of-life conversations or implement conservative treatment plans early. Yet, other studies indicate that the provision of palliative care services, which includes the spiritual dimension, can reduce symptom burden, assist patients in making advanced directives/plans and improve health-related quality of life. This review brings together the current literature related to renal supportive care and spirituality under the following sections and themes. The introduction and background sections situate spirituality in both healthcare generally and chronic kidney disease. Gaps in the provision of chronic kidney disease spiritual care are then considered, followed by a discussion of the palliative care model related to chronic kidney disease and spirituality. Chronic kidney disease spiritual needs and care approaches are discussed with reference to advanced care planning, hope, grief and relationships. A particular focus on quality of life is developed, with spirituality named as a key dimension. Finally, further challenges, such as culture, training and limitations, are explicated. PMID:27417819

  18. Introduction to the special issue on spirituality and psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pargament, Kenneth I; Saunders, Stephen M

    2007-10-01

    Religion and spirituality have been topics of interest to psychologists since the inception of the field, and this special issue devoted to spirituality and psychotherapy reflects the maturation of decades of research. Psychotherapy clients would like to discuss religious or spiritual issues with therapists, but therapists feel poorly prepared to do so. This special issue hopefully represents a step towards bridging the needs of clients and the expertise of providers. The seven articles in this issue reflect the progress psychologists have made toward understanding religion and spirituality, and they represent state-of-the-art attempts at integrating these dimensions into treatment.

  19. Spirituality in Renal Supportive Care: A Thematic Review.

    PubMed

    Egan, Richard; Wood, Sarah; MacLeod, Rod; Walker, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease is marked by a reduced life expectancy and a high symptom burden. For those who reach end-stage renal disease, the prognosis is poor, and this combined with the growing prevalence of the disease necessitates supportive and palliative care programmes that will address people's psychosocial, cultural and spiritual needs. While there is variation between countries, research reveals that many renal specialist nurses and doctors are reluctant to address spirituality, initiate end-of-life conversations or implement conservative treatment plans early. Yet, other studies indicate that the provision of palliative care services, which includes the spiritual dimension, can reduce symptom burden, assist patients in making advanced directives/plans and improve health-related quality of life. This review brings together the current literature related to renal supportive care and spirituality under the following sections and themes. The introduction and background sections situate spirituality in both healthcare generally and chronic kidney disease. Gaps in the provision of chronic kidney disease spiritual care are then considered, followed by a discussion of the palliative care model related to chronic kidney disease and spirituality. Chronic kidney disease spiritual needs and care approaches are discussed with reference to advanced care planning, hope, grief and relationships. A particular focus on quality of life is developed, with spirituality named as a key dimension. Finally, further challenges, such as culture, training and limitations, are explicated.

  20. Social workers' use of spiritual practices in palliative care.

    PubMed

    Dane, Barbara; Moore, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined client use of spiritual and/or religious practices to cope with illness and adversity. This study explores social workers' use of spiritual practices as reflected in their work with palliative care clients. Survey results (n = 327) indicated significant relationships of spiritual practices such as yoga, prayer and meditation to working with palliative care clients. The total number of these approaches is predicted by factors such as theoretical orientation and the social workers' own struggles with palliative care and other issues. Our study supports the need for additional investigation of spiritual issues in practice.

  1. Spiritual Exploration in the Prenatal Genetic Counseling Session.

    PubMed

    Sagaser, Katelynn G; Shahrukh Hashmi, S; Carter, Rebecca D; Lemons, Jennifer; Mendez-Figueroa, Hector; Nassef, Salma; Peery, Brent; Singletary, Claire N

    2016-10-01

    Religion and spirituality (R/S) are important components of many individuals' lives, and spirituality is often employed by women coping with pregnancy complications. To characterize how prenatal genetic counselors might address spiritual issues with patients, 283 English and Spanish speaking women receiving prenatal genetic counseling in Houston, Texas were surveyed post-counseling using both the Brief RCope and questions regarding interest in spiritual exploration. Genetic counselors were concurrently surveyed to identify religious/spiritual language used within sessions and perceived importance of R/S. Genetic counselors were significantly more likely to identify R/S as important to a patient when patients used religious/spiritual language (p < 0.001). Conversely, when no religious/spiritual terms were present, the counselor felt uncertain about the importance of R/S 63 % of the time. However, 67 % of patients reported that they felt comfortable sharing their faith as it relates to their pregnancy, and 93 % reported using positive religious coping. Less than 25 % reported a desire for overt religious actions such as prayer or scripture exploration. Therefore, most patients' desires for spiritual exploration center in the decision making and coping processes that are in line with the genetic counseling scope of practice. Thus, counselors should feel empowered to incorporate spiritual exploration into their patient conversations.

  2. Strategies for Providing Spiritual Care & Support to Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Milner, Kerry A; Foito, Kim; Watson, Sherylyn

    2016-01-01

    Nurse educators need to equip nursing students with suitable resources and education so they can develop their own spiritual care, as well as recognize spiritual care needs in patients. There is a paucity of literature on teaching strategies for spiritual care and prayer in undergraduate nursing programs. This article describes how one faith-based school implemented strategies to facilitate spiritual development in students, which are integrated throughout the curriculum and utilized in the U.S. and a study-abroad program in Ireland. PMID:27610908

  3. Strategies for Providing Spiritual Care & Support to Nursing Students.

    PubMed

    Milner, Kerry A; Foito, Kim; Watson, Sherylyn

    2016-01-01

    Nurse educators need to equip nursing students with suitable resources and education so they can develop their own spiritual care, as well as recognize spiritual care needs in patients. There is a paucity of literature on teaching strategies for spiritual care and prayer in undergraduate nursing programs. This article describes how one faith-based school implemented strategies to facilitate spiritual development in students, which are integrated throughout the curriculum and utilized in the U.S. and a study-abroad program in Ireland.

  4. Cultural differences in spiritual care: findings of an Israeli oncologic questionnaire examining patient interest in spiritual care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background As professional spiritual care (chaplaincy) is introduced to new cultures worldwide, it bears examining which elements of screening and care are universal and, for those elements showing cultural difference, to study them in each culture. No quantitative spiritual care patient study had previously been done in Israel. Our objectives were twofold: 1) to examine who wants spiritual care in Israel, including demographic and clinical variables, and to compare against other results worldwide to further develop universal screening protocols 2) to see what patients want from spiritual care specifically in the Israeli setting. Methods Self-administered patient questionnaire examining spirituality/religiosity, interest in spiritual care (subdivided by type of care), and key demographic, social, and clinical data. The study setting was an Israeli oncology center at which spiritual care had been recently introduced. Results Data from 364 oncology patient questionnaires found 41% interest in spiritual care, as compared to 35%-54% in American studies. Having previously been visited by a spiritual caregiver predicted patient interest in further spiritual care (AOR 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.6), suggesting that the new service is being well-received. Multivariate stepwise logistic regression analysis identified additional predictors of openness to receiving spiritual care: self-describing as somewhat/very spiritual vs. not spiritual (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 3.9 and 6.3, 95% CI 1.8-8.6 and 2.6-15.1) or traditional/religious vs. secular (AOR 2.2 and 2.1, 95% CI 1.3-3.6 and 1.1-4.0); and receiving one visit a week or less from family and friends (AOR 5.6, 95% CI 2.1-15.1). These findings are in line with previous American studies, suggesting universality across cultures that could be utilized in screening. Differences in demographic data and medical condition were not significant predictors of patient interest, suggesting a cultural difference, where age and education were

  5. Spirituality and Counselling: Are Counsellors Prepared to Integrate Religion and Spirituality into Therapeutic Work with Clients?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plumb, Alison M.

    2011-01-01

    An online survey of 341 Registered Clinical Counsellors in British Columbia was used to understand how therapists view and integrate spirituality and religion in their practice. Therapists were asked about their education and training in this realm, and about their perceived abilities, comfort, and competence when working with religious and/or…

  6. Adolescent Spiritual Exemplars: Exploring Spirituality in the Lives of Diverse Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Pamela Ebstyne; Clardy, Casey E.; Ramos, Jenel Sánchez

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to develop theory about psychological constructs relevant to spiritual development in diverse adolescents. Exemplar and Consensual Qualitative Research methods were used to explore 30 interviews of adolescents aged 12 to 21 years ("M" = 17.73 years) representing eight religions and six countries from around…

  7. Easing chronic pain with spiritual resources.

    PubMed

    Mandziuk, P A

    1993-03-01

    Chronic pain is noted as a growing problem among Americans, often misunderstood and untreated. Frequently, a spiritual crisis accompanies the condition. Pastoral caregivers have a unique role in bringing to bear the expertise of their profession as well as the traditions of prayer and meditation to contribute to the easing of the person's suffering. Pastoral attending can be a key component for relational support and coping with the pain. A brief case study highlights the effectiveness of using the skills of pastoral care for holistic care of the person.

  8. Spiritual Darkness: Reflections on a Medical Mission.

    PubMed

    Jimenez, Rosalinda Ramirez

    2016-01-01

    This is a reflective analysis on the lived experience of a medical mission in a third world country, where young women are abused and trafficked for sex. Practices of Scripture study, Lectio Divina, and contemplative prayer enabled me to deal with the spiritual darkness we encountered. Opening a dialogue with community members to view males and females in a different manner and battling alongside the local mission and ministers against sex trafficking, are not easy tasks. The perseverance found in the Bible gives us hope to be witnesses and healers in our broken world, and a small part in change that can take root with prayer. PMID:27610905

  9. Spiritual care illustrated: creating a shared language.

    PubMed

    Nieuwenhuizen, Louis

    2007-01-01

    In an attempt to schematically illustrate the pastoral care intervention to scientifically minded professionals and colleagues the author developed a model that can be used as an interdisciplinary teaching tool. Within the setting of hospital ministry, the tool also provides insights into the stages of "crisis experience" and illustrates the transformational process involved in The Healing Journey. These change-processes are explained against the background of a multi-level anthropology. This approach births a Healing Journey diagram, a spiritual pain assessment tool, and a seven-phase intervention model that may be helpful in Clinical Pastoral Education.

  10. [Spiritual themes in mental pathology. Methodical approach].

    PubMed

    Marchais, P; Randrup, A

    1994-10-01

    The meaning of the themes with spiritual connotations poses complex problems for psychiatry, because these themes induce the observer to project his own convictions and frames of references on his investigations. A double detachment (objectivation) concerning both the object of study and the observer is implied. This makes it possible to study these phenomena by a more rigorous method, to investigate the conditions of their formation and to demonstrate objectifiable correlates (experienced space and time, the various levels of psychic experience, factors in the environment...). In consequence the appropriate medical behaviour can be more precisely delineated. PMID:7818230

  11. Experiences of patients with cancer and their nurses on the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in oncology units

    PubMed Central

    Rassouli, Maryam; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Ghahramanian, Akram; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Nikanfar, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although nurses acknowledge that spiritual care is part of their role, in reality, it is performed to a lesser extent. The purpose of the present study was to explore nurses’ and patients’ experiences about the conditions of spiritual care and spiritual interventions in the oncology units of Tabriz. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted with a qualitative conventional content analysis approach in the oncology units of hospitals in Tabriz. Data were collected through purposive sampling by conducting unstructured interviews with 10 patients and 7 nurses and analyzed simultaneously. Robustness of data analysis was evaluated by the participants and external control. Results: Three categories emerged from the study: (1) “perceived barriers for providing spiritual care” including “lack of preparation for spiritual care,” “time and space constraints,” “unprofessional view,” and “lack of support”; (2) “communication: A way for Strengthening spirituality despite the limitations” including “manifestation of spirituality in the appearances and communicative behaviors of nurses” and “communication: Transmission of spiritual energy”; and (3) “religion-related spiritual experiences” including “life events as divine will and divine exam,” “death as reincarnation,” “trust in God,” “prayer/recourse to Holy Imams,” and “acceptance of divine providence.” Although nurses had little skills in assessing and responding to the patients’ spiritual needs and did not have the organizational and clergymen's support in dealing with the spiritual distress of patients, they were the source of energy, joy, hope, and power for patients by showing empathy and compassion. The patients and nurses were using religious beliefs mentioned in Islam to strengthen the patients’ spiritual dimension. Conclusions: According to the results, integration of spiritual care in the curriculum of nursing is recommended. Patients and

  12. Supervision and Religious/Spiritual Issues: Toward a Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isakson, Richard L; Worthen, Vaughn E.; Dougher, M. Kirk

    An attempt was made to determine whether counseling doctoral programs allow or encourage a discussion of religion and spirituality as part of the counselor client relationship. Several arguments are presented that support therapists attending to clients' religious and spiritual beliefs. The types of problems or disorders that can be aided by…

  13. "Let Freedom Ring!" Black Women's Spirituality Shaping Prophetic Christian Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Yolanda Y.

    2012-01-01

    The author believes that a deep sense of spirituality together with effective Christian education can be a powerful resource for equipping individuals and communities to play an active role in transforming their lives as well as oppressive systems that have impacted their communities. In her discussion of spirituality, womanist ethicist Emilie…

  14. Religion, Spirituality, and Health Status in Geriatric Outpatients

    PubMed Central

    Daaleman, Timothy P.; Perera, Subashan; Studenski, Stephanie A.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND Religion and spirituality remain important social and psychological factors in the lives of older adults, and there is continued interest in examining the effects of religion and spirituality on health status. The purpose of this study was to examine the interaction of religion and spirituality with self-reported health status in a community-dwelling geriatric population. METHODS We performed a cross-sectional analysis of 277 geriatric outpatients participating in a cohort study in the Kansas City area. Patients underwent a home assessment of multiple health status and functional indicators by trained research assistants. A previously validated 5-item measure of religiosity and 12-item spirituality instrument were embedded during the final data collection. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine the relationship between each factor and self-reported health status. RESULTS In univariate analyses, physical functioning (P <.01), quality of life (P <.01), race (P <.01), depression (P <.01), age (P = .01), and spirituality (P <.01) were all associated with self-reported health status, but religiosity was not (P = .12). In a model adjusted for all covariates, however, spirituality remained independently associated with self-appraised good health (P = .01). CONCLUSIONS Geriatric outpatients who report greater spirituality, but not greater religiosity, are more likely to appraise their health as good. Spirituality may be an important explanatory factor of subjective health status in older adults. PMID:15053283

  15. Women scientists' scientific and spiritual ways of knowing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffington, Angela Cunningham

    While science education aims for literacy regarding scientific knowledge and the work of scientists, the separation of scientific knowing from other knowing may misrepresent the knowing of scientists. The majority of science educators K-university are women. Many of these women are spiritual and integrate their scientific and spiritual ways of knowing. Understanding spiritual women of science would inform science education and serve to advance the scientific reason and spirituality debate. Using interviews and grounded theory, this study explores scientific and spiritual ways of knowing in six women of science who hold strong spiritual commitments and portray science to non-scientists. From various lived experiences, each woman comes to know through a Passive knowing of exposure and attendance, an Engaged knowing of choice, commitment and action, an Mindful/Inner knowing of prayer and meaning, a Relational knowing with others, and an Integrated lifeworld knowing where scientific knowing, spiritual knowing, and other ways of knowing are integrated. Consequences of separating ways of knowing are discussed, as are connections to current research, implications to science education, and ideas for future research. Understanding women scientists' scientific/ spiritual ways of knowing may aid science educators in linking academic science to the life-worlds of students.

  16. Step by Step: Avoiding Spiritual Bypass in 12-Step Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashwell, Craig S.; Clarke, Philip B.; Graves, Elizabeth G.

    2009-01-01

    With spirituality as a cornerstone, 12-step groups serve a vital role in the recovery community. It is important for counselors to be mindful, however, of the potential for clients to be in spiritual bypass, which likely will undermine the recovery process.

  17. EMPLOYEE SPIRITUAL CARE: Supporting Those Who Care for Others.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    In order to provide whole-person care for patients and families, Loma Linda University Health recognizes the importance of supporting employee wholeness. The Employee Spiritual Care department helps create and support an environment that nurtures the spiritual health and wholeness of employees, and provides employees tools and knowledge about providing whole-person care to patients and colleagues.

  18. Religion, spirituality, and cancer: the question of individual empowerment.

    PubMed

    Vonarx, Nicolas; Hyppolite, Shelley-Rose

    2013-01-01

    It has often been noted that people with a severe illness endeavor to deepen their religious and spiritual practice and knowledge. It is generally accepted that spiritual and religious factors help sick people confront their suffering. The authors conducted a qualitative research on the role of religious and spiritual practices and knowledge among 10 cancer patients in Québec, Canada. Individual interviews focused on their illness experience confirmed that religion and spirituality can be present and contribute to coping when life is threatened. More precisely, the analyses of the place and use of these resources during the patient's illness showed that these resources contributed to an individual empowerment process that was undertaken in response to a biographic and existential disruption induced by the illness diagnosis. The sick people took advantage of religious and spiritual content in their quest for meaning and a cure, progressing from a stage of despair and powerlessness to a stage of hope, a critical analysis of the disease, and a better management and control of it and its evolution. This article describes how people suffering from cancer use and participate in religious and spiritual content. It demonstrates the contribution of this content to an individual empowerment process. The use of religion and spirituality constitutes a quest for self-mastery, an acquiring of power and control. We understand that religious and spiritual phenomena do not always prevent people from fighting against their suffering, limit their freedom, or systematically reduce people's viewpoints and worldviews.

  19. Religion/Spirituality and Adolescent Psychiatric Symptoms: A Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dew, Rachel Elizabeth; Daniel, Stephanie S.; Armstrong, Tonya D.; Goldston, David B.; Triplett, Mary Frances; Koenig, Harold G.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the current article is to review the literature on religion and spirituality as it pertains to adolescent psychiatric symptoms. One hundred and fifteen articles were reviewed that examined relationships between religion/spirituality and adolescent substance use, delinquency, depression, suicidality, and anxiety. Ninety-two percent of…

  20. Children's Spiritual Development in Forced Displacement: A Human Rights Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ojalehto, Bethany; Wang, Qi

    2008-01-01

    This article provides a synthesis of current research and theories of spiritual development in forced displacement from a human rights perspective. Spirituality, understood as a cognitive-cultural construct, has shown positive impact on children's development through both collective and individual processes and across ecological domains of the…

  1. In Spirituality: A Perspective from a Traditionally Latin Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, Zenita; Németh-Torres, Geovani

    2016-01-01

    The concept of spirituality is influenced by culture and the values and mores of Brazil, and though not directly linked to religion it actually grows from the same roots. This paper examines spirituality in education from the perspective of a humanistic psychology framework expressed as an ideal of the adequate personality or healthy personality.…

  2. EMPLOYEE SPIRITUAL CARE: Supporting Those Who Care for Others.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    In order to provide whole-person care for patients and families, Loma Linda University Health recognizes the importance of supporting employee wholeness. The Employee Spiritual Care department helps create and support an environment that nurtures the spiritual health and wholeness of employees, and provides employees tools and knowledge about providing whole-person care to patients and colleagues. PMID:27119805

  3. Integrating Religion and Spirituality in Marriage and Family Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Chelsea T.; Stevens, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Examined integrating religion and spirituality with marriage and family counseling. Explored potential obstacles and negative consequences for this integration, as well as clinical implications. The positive impact of incorporating a religious or spiritual perspective into clinical practice is discussed. Ethical considerations, techniques, and…

  4. Catalysts to Spiritual Care Delivery: A Content Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ramezani, Monir; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Mohammadi, Eesa; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite the paramount importance and direct relationship of spirituality and spiritual care with health and well-being, they are relatively neglected aspects of nursing care. Objectives: The aim of this study is to explore Iranian nurses’ perceptions and experiences of the facilitators of spiritual care delivery. Materials and Methods: For this qualitative content analysis study, a purposive maximum-variation sample of 17 nurses was recruited from teaching and private hospitals in Tehran, Iran. Data were collected from 19 individual, unstructured interviews. The conventional content-analysis approach was applied in data analysis. Results: The facilitators of spiritual care delivery fall into two main themes: living to achieve cognizance of divinity and adherence to professional ethics. These two main themes are further divided into eight categories: spiritual self-care, active learning, professional belonging, personal and professional competencies, gradual evolution under divine guidance, awareness of the spiritual dimension of human beings, occurrence of awakening flashes and incidents during life, and congruence between patients’ and healthcare providers’ religious beliefs. Conclusions: The study findings suggest that the facilitators of spiritual care delivery are more personal than organizational. Accordingly, strategies to improve the likelihood and quality of spiritual care delivery should be developed and implemented primarily at the personal level. PMID:27247787

  5. Towards a Spiritual Pedagogy of Pastoral Welfare and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trotman, Dave

    2016-01-01

    This paper considers the role of spirituality in the practice of pastoral welfare and care in English state schools. Set against an educational landscape of increasingly aggressive neoliberal interests combined with growing public disquiet over the mental welfare of young people, the author examines how spirituality might in response contribute to…

  6. Spirituality and Health: Implications for Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vazin, Dara

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to establish among health educators a consensus in the definition of spirituality and health that would ultimately guide effective development of a curriculum or program in spirituality and health for undergraduate programs in college health science departments. Methodology. This mixed-methods research study…

  7. Pastoral care, spirituality, and religion in palliative care journals.

    PubMed

    Hermsen, Maaike A; ten Have, Henk A M J

    2004-01-01

    With the growth and development of palliative care, interest in pastoral care, spirituality, and religion also seems to be growing. The aim of this article is to review the topic of pastoral care, spirituality, and religion appearing in the journals of palliative care, between January 1984 and January 2002.

  8. Defining Spiritual Health: A Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bensley, Robert J.

    1991-01-01

    Literature review explores various components of spiritual health, defining and categorizing existing definitions identified in the literature into six perspectives: sense of fulfillment in life; values and beliefs of community and self; wholeness in life; a factor in well-being; a controlling higher power; and human/spiritual interaction. (SM)

  9. "Ayeli": Centering Technique Based on Cherokee Spiritual Traditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrett, Michael Tlanusta; Garrett, J. T.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a centering technique called "Ayeli," based on Cherokee spiritual traditions as a way of incorporating spirituality into counseling by helping clients identify where they are in their journey, where they want to be, and how they can get there. Relevant Native cultural traditions and meanings are explored. (Contains 25 references.) (GCP)

  10. Emotional Eating and Spiritual Well-Being: A Possible Connection?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawks, Steven R.; Goudy, Marylynn B.; Gast, Julie A.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to evaluate the relationship between emotional eating and spiritual well-being. It was found that among college women lower levels of spiritual well-being correlated with higher levels of emotional eating (r = -0.22, p = 0.0015). In other studies emotional eating has been found to contribute to higher…

  11. A Heuristic Study of Religious Spirituality and Meaningful Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Keight Tucker

    2016-01-01

    Spirituality in the workplace has received increased focus over the past two decades. This heuristic study examined how religious spirituality informs and/or influences individual perceptions of meaningful work experiences. A literature review on the subject found a dearth of research. The primary research question was the following: What is the…

  12. Spiritual Development Differences between Online and on Campus College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comeaux, Russell Mark

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to explore spiritual development differences between online and on-campus students. For this study, spiritual maturation was measured by the locus of authority and view of self and others, primarily as measured by the God Image Scales. The assumption was that development is marked by a shift in locus of…

  13. Interrogating Our Practices of Integrating Spirituality into Workplace Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Leona M.; Fenwick, Tara J.; Parsons, Jim

    2005-01-01

    Workplace education's interest in spirituality is examined, with an emphasis placed on why this interest might be increasing and what challenges it presents. This article interrogates commonplace strategies to integrate spirituality in workplace education,--providing holistic education, creating sacred spaces and mentoring--questions each approach…

  14. Spirituality and the Events of September 11: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briggs, Michele Kielty; Apple, Kevin J.; Aydlett, Ann E.

    2004-01-01

    Personal crises have been associated with spiritual growth. Sparked by the global response to the crisis of September 11, 2001, this study examined the relationship of spirituality and the September 11 tragedy using a sample of convenience from a college student population. This preliminary study used an experimental design to examine various…

  15. Perceptions of Clients and Counseling Professionals regarding Spirituality in Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrison, Julie Q.; Clutter, Stacy M.; Pritchett, Elaine M.; Demmitt, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Although current research indicates that psychotherapeutic change both affects and is affected by spiritual concerns, relatively little is known about the degree to which spirituality is used as an intervention in counseling and how it is perceived by clients and mental health professionals. The purpose of this study was to examine the perceptions…

  16. Breaking Bread: Spirituality, Food and Early Childhood Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bone, Jane

    2005-01-01

    The spiritual aspect of early childhood education is supported by the early childhood curriculum in Aotearoa New Zealand, "Te Whariki". Research in three different early childhood settings presents new perspectives on the everyday experiences of children in terms of spirituality. Each setting formed a case study that included the voices of…

  17. A Narrative Study of Counsellors' Understandings of Inuit Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wihak, Christine; Merali, Noorfarah

    2005-01-01

    Eight non-Indigenous counsellors who temporarily lived in Nunavut to serve Inuit clients were interviewed regarding what they learned about Inuit spirituality during their cultural immersion experience. They were also asked about how they applied their understandings of the Inuit spiritual worldview in their professional practice. Counsellors'…

  18. Spiritual vs. Religious: Perspectives from Today's Undergraduate Catholics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overstreet, Dawn V.

    2010-01-01

    Contemporary American college students simultaneously express both increased interest in spirituality and declining interest in traditional religion. Recent research recognizes the trend of young adults separating spirituality from religion, but utilizes varied definitions of each term developed by the researchers. This study asks students…

  19. Attending to the Spiritual Dimension to Enhance Curriculum Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Michael T.

    2010-01-01

    In an educational environment it was recently found that some faculty leaders of religious education managed curriculum change by paying attention to the spiritual dimension in order to help teachers to engage in implementing change. Attention to the spiritual dimension in this context provided opportunities for those likely to be alienated by…

  20. Spiritual Formation for Catholic Educators: Understanding the Need

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Earl, Patricia Helene

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the need for thoughtful programs of spiritual formation for lay educators who staff Catholic schools. The importance of teacher formation in spiritual growth and in knowledge of the Catholic faith and daily living of the Gospel is highlighted. Relevant theory related to the real-world problems of maintaining and developing…

  1. Spiritual development in youth worker preparation: a matter of resolve.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Elisabeth M

    2008-01-01

    Once we are convinced that attentiveness to spiritual development has the potential to enrich and improve youth work practice, equipping youth workers with the necessary skills and capacities can proceed. A model for such preparation begins with youth workers' reflecting on their own spiritual autobiographies.

  2. Invoking the Spiritual in Campus Life and Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Judy L.; Dantley, Michael E.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the implications of the spirituality in the workplace movement for leadership and campus life in colleges and universities. Describes how student affairs leadership, informed by spiritual intelligence, can create campus environments that support and enhance the sense of wholeness, connection, and community for students, faculty, and…

  3. Outcomes of a Spiritually Focused Wilderness Orientation Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bobilya, Andrew J.; Akey, Lynn D.; Mitchell, Donald, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Higher education often supports new student transition through various orientation programs. Recently a greater focus on student spiritual growth has emerged as an important aspect. The wilderness orientation program in this study is unique because of its length (12-14 days) and its focus on students' spiritual development. The purpose of this…

  4. A Phenomenological Analysis of College Students' Spiritual Struggles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockenbach, Alyssa Bryant; Walker, Coretta Roseboro; Luzader, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    Through in-depth interviews with ten diverse participants, this phenomenological study explored the meaning, dimensions, and processes of spiritual struggle in college students' lives. The findings revealed that encountering contrast was the unifying dimension underlying students' spiritual struggle narratives. Contrast was apparent in students'…

  5. Christian School Leaders and Spirituality: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banke, Susan; Maldonado, Nancy; Lacey, Candace H.

    2011-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the spiritual experiences of Christian school leaders who are the spiritual leaders of their schools. A purposeful, nominated sample of 12 Christian school leaders was selected. In-depth, open-ended interviews were conducted, audio taped, and then transcribed verbatim. Data analysis was based on Rudestam and…

  6. How Do Finnish Pre-Adolescents Perceive Religion and Spirituality?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ubani, Martin; Tirri, Kirsi

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how Finnish pre-adolescents perceive religion and spirituality. The participants of the study are 12- to 13-year-old Grade 6 pupils (N=102). The pupils were asked to give their meanings of religion and spirituality. The data includes over 700 written expressions on the two concepts. The qualitative…

  7. A Conceptualization of Children's Spirituality Arising out of Recent Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriarty, Micheline Wyn

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a model of children's spirituality which provided a structure for conducting some recent research and for analysing the findings. The model consisted of four dimensions of spirituality derived from the literature, namely consciousness, relationality, roadmap and identity, with a central integrating concept of worldview. The…

  8. Spirituality, Religion, and Career Development: Current Status and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Ryan D.

    2006-01-01

    The growing interest in the role that spirituality and religion play in mental health has spawned research investigating the relationships between spirituality, religion, and career development. To date, only a limited number of studies have explored these variables in tandem, but generally these investigations have found aspects of spirituality…

  9. Spiritual Evolution of Bereavement Counselors: An Exploratory Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puterbaugh, Dolores T.

    2008-01-01

    This article draws from a phenomenological study on the experience of being a bereavement counselor. Ten bereavement counselors shared their experiences in bereavement counseling. Spiritual and emotional aspects of bereavement counseling with grieving and dying persons are discussed as well as the spiritual effects on and growth processes of the…

  10. Influence of Familial Spirituality: Implications for School Counseling Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Keith M.; Lambie, Glenn W.; Ieva, Kara P.

    2011-01-01

    This article (a) addresses the importance of familial spirituality on students' holistic development; (b) explores professional ethical codes, standards, and counseling competencies relating to students' familial spirituality; (c) introduces educational activities to assist school counselors in increasing their understanding and appreciation of…

  11. Student Spirituality and School Counseling: Issues, Opportunities, and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sink, Christopher A.; Devlin, James M.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the professional school counseling community is introduced to the value of addressing student spirituality as a way to foster personal and social growth. Prior to discussing the robust theoretical and research foundation for this endeavor, 3 workable definitional strands of spirituality are summarized and applied to educational…

  12. Spirituality: Implications for Professional School Counselors' Ethical Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambie, Glenn W.; Davis, Keith M.; Miller, Geri

    2008-01-01

    The separation between church and state (e.g., public education) is contentious. Furthermore, schools and many professional school counselors (PSCs) may choose to disregard and/or discount spirituality. This article (a) presents the importance of spirituality in counseling, (b) explores legal statutes and ethical standards relating to spirituality…

  13. Spiritually and religiously integrated group psychotherapy: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Viftrup, Dorte Toudal; Hvidt, Niels Christian; Buus, Niels

    2013-01-01

    WE SYSTEMATICALLY REVIEWED THE RESEARCH LITERATURE ON SPIRITUALLY AND RELIGIOUSLY INTEGRATED GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY TO ANSWER THE FOLLOWING THREE QUESTIONS: first, how are spirituality and religiosity defined; second, how are spiritual and religious factors characterized and integrated into group psychotherapy; and, third, what is the outcome of the group psychotherapies? We searched in two databases: PsycINFO and PubMed. Inclusion and exclusion criteria and checklists from standardized assessment tools were applied to the research literature. Qualitative and quantitative papers were included. In total, 8 articles were considered eligible for the review. Findings from the evaluation suggested that the concepts of spirituality and religiosity were poorly conceptualized and the way in which spiritual and religious factors were integrated into such group psychotherapies, which distinguished it from other types of group psychotherapies, was not fully conceptualized or understood either. However, clear and delimited conceptualization of spiritual and religious factors is crucial in order to be able to conclude the direct influences of spiritual or religious factors on outcomes. Implications for spiritually or religiously integrated group psychotherapy and conducting research in this field are propounded. PMID:24288557

  14. Spirituality and Loss: Approaches for Counseling Grieving Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muselman, Dannette M.; Wiggins, Marsha I.

    2012-01-01

    The death of a loved one has serious implications for adolescent growth and development. The authors review relevant research on the grief process and spirituality in adolescence, and they give a rationale for integrating spirituality into adolescent grief work. By way of a case illustration, they draw implications for counselors' use of…

  15. Spiritually and Religiously Integrated Group Psychotherapy: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We systematically reviewed the research literature on spiritually and religiously integrated group psychotherapy to answer the following three questions: first, how are spirituality and religiosity defined; second, how are spiritual and religious factors characterized and integrated into group psychotherapy; and, third, what is the outcome of the group psychotherapies? We searched in two databases: PsycINFO and PubMed. Inclusion and exclusion criteria and checklists from standardized assessment tools were applied to the research literature. Qualitative and quantitative papers were included. In total, 8 articles were considered eligible for the review. Findings from the evaluation suggested that the concepts of spirituality and religiosity were poorly conceptualized and the way in which spiritual and religious factors were integrated into such group psychotherapies, which distinguished it from other types of group psychotherapies, was not fully conceptualized or understood either. However, clear and delimited conceptualization of spiritual and religious factors is crucial in order to be able to conclude the direct influences of spiritual or religious factors on outcomes. Implications for spiritually or religiously integrated group psychotherapy and conducting research in this field are propounded. PMID:24288557

  16. Young Children Manifest Spiritualities in Their Hip-Hop Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Nadjwa E. L.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author combines multicultural feminist critical theories with the voices of Black and Latina/Latino young spiritual children to extend culturally responsive teaching. The author illuminates how children use their hip-hop writing to construct themselves as people who communicate with God, choose spiritual content for their…

  17. Religion and Spirituality in Adjustment Following Bereavement: An Integrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wortmann, Jennifer H.; Park, Crystal L.

    2008-01-01

    Surprisingly little research has examined the widely held assumption that religion and spirituality are generally helpful in adjusting to bereavement. A systematic literature search located 73 empirical articles that examined religion/spirituality in the context of bereavement. The authors describe the multidimensional nature of…

  18. The Correlates of Spiritual Struggle During the College Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryant, Alyssa N.; Astin, Helen S.

    2008-01-01

    This study explored factors associated with students' experience of spiritual struggles during college. Data indicate that spiritual struggle is associated with experiences in college that challenge and disorient students, affecting psychological well-being negatively but increasing students' acceptance of individuals of different faith…

  19. Adolescent Spirituality and Resilience: Theory, Research, and Educational Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Sangwon; Esquivel, Giselle B.

    2011-01-01

    Spirituality is a universal phenomenon and an inherent aspect of human nature that unfolds during adolescence as the individual searches for transcendence, meaning, and purpose in life. Recently, spirituality has received attention as a source of resilience for adolescents. Theoretical perspectives and empirical research suggest that spirituality…

  20. Preadolescents' Gendered Spiritual Identities and Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosacki, Sandra Leanne; Moore, Kelsey; Talwar, Victoria; Park-Saltzman, Jeeseon

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that self-control or self-regulation may play a role in the connections among spirituality, health, well-being, and social behavior. Within the framework of social-cognitive developmental theory, we explore the question of how do children and adolescents learn to think of themselves as gendered and spiritual beings within the…

  1. The Spiritual Component of Children's Lives: The Role of Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosacki, Sandra; Elliott, Anne; Akseer, Spogmai; Bajovic, Mira

    2010-01-01

    Drawn from a larger study of Canadian children's sense of self and media habits, this study explores the role of religiosity and/or spirituality within 535 children's (281 girls, 254 boys; 5-13 years of age) self-reported media preferences and habits over a three-year period. Results indicate that the theme of spirituality and/or religiosity…

  2. Recovery Based on Spirituality in Substance Abusers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shamsalinia, Abbas; Norouzi, Kiyan; Khoshknab, Masoud Fallahi; Farhoudian, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Spirituality is an important factor influencing the decrease of substance abuse severity and maintenance of the recovery phase. This research, investigates the effect of spiritual experiences in the recovery of substance abusers. Material and Methods: Qualitative data was collected from 16 men and 6 women, selected through purposeful sampling to ensure an equilibrated gender representation and data from different recovery periods. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews. Results: Data showed two main categories: “Mutual relationship between spirituality and recovery,” divided into four subcategories: religious background, religious teachings, experience exchange, and support of family and society; and “A new perspective toward life” subdivided into access to calmness and spiritual development. A factor “spirituality meaning religion” arose repeatedly throughout the study. Conclusion: The results of this study can be useful for policy makers, care providers, families, and drug addicts. The promotion of spirituality in substance abusers can help in their struggle with temptation. Effective strategies to ensure drug abstinence and maintenance of the recovery phase are encouraging substance abusers and their families to participate in spirituality-based psychotherapy sessions held in addiction treatment centers, multi-disciplinary cooperation among the organizations involved in the addiction phenomenon, and training the families regarding the importance of spirituality in the mental health of their children through mass media. PMID:25363097

  3. Exploring Spiritual Beliefs in Relation to Adlerian Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polanski, Patricia J.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes one counselor's exploration of her spiritual beliefs in relation to Adler's theory of counseling and human development in an effort to move toward ideological consistency and to enhance competence in addressing spiritual dimensions of clients' development. (Contains 34 references.) (GCP)

  4. Teenagers' Perceptions of Spirituality--A Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wintersgill, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    This research investigates teenagers' perceptions of spirituality. The author considers how far teenage ideas mirrored the many academic theories of spirituality-in-education that have influenced policy makers. Comparisons are made particularly with the theories of four scholars who have dominated the debate over the last twenty years: Jack…

  5. Spiritual Expressions of African Americans and Whites in Cancer Pain

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Harleah G.; Meghani, Salimah H.

    2014-01-01

    Background Spiritual practices are one way that individuals cope with cancer pain. Purpose Describe and contrast expressions and values about the use of spirituality for pain in African American (AA) and White (WH) oncology patients. Methods Six groups (3 AA; 3 WH; n=42; mean age 58) were conducted. Focus group and qualitative methodology with a cultural interpretive lens was utilized. The Model of Integrated Spirituality provided the conceptual framework for understanding the narratives. Findings AAs and WHs did not differ on demographics, pain status, or integrative therapies. Three spirituality themes emerged: 1) pain and distress as antecedents to the use of spirituality; 2) active and existential attributes of the use of spirituality; and 3) mobilization of internal and external resources as outcomes. There were commonalities between AAs and WHs but greater frequency of certain subthemes and keywords in AAs. Conclusions Future studies should examine whether differences in overt expressions translate into different types and levels of spiritual usage. Implications for Practice Clinicians should recognizing similar as well as different uses and descriptions of spirituality between African Americans and Whites. PMID:22024953

  6. Spirituality in the Workplace. Trends and Issues Alerts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Susan

    The "spirituality in the workplace" movement serves a range of interests, including personal fulfillment on the job, a growing need to reconcile personal values with those of the corporation, and corporate desires to help individuals achieve more balanced lives. In addition to being the theme at a growing number of conferences, spirituality has…

  7. The Shiver-Shimmer Factor: Musical Spirituality, Emotion, and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bogdan, Deanne

    2010-01-01

    This article offers one approach to exploring the question of in what sense music educators can speak of music and its moving power as spiritual by inquiring into what might count as a "musical spiritual experience" in emotional terms. The essay's analytic framework employs the distinction between two related concepts which I call the "shiver" and…

  8. [The role of spirituality in nursing care: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Gaillard, Desmedt Sandra; Shaha, Maya

    2013-12-01

    Spirituality addresses the need to give meaning to life events and is characterized by the relationship with oneself, others and the universe. This article aims to provide an overview of the empirical knowledge, and the prevailing thoughts about spirituality in nursing and suggest perspectives for future directions. The literature review was conducted using the main databases; 36 articles, published between 2008-2013, were selected. The themes covered include the definitions of the spirituality, the spiritual care and the spiritual well-being. Spirituality differs from, yet is not opposed to religion and takes different forms in multicultural and secular societies. Cancer incites existential questions and impacts quality of life, and spiritual well-being is recognized as a good indicator of quality of life for people living with cancer. Professional caregivers are concerned about the needs and spiritual well-being of their patients and often consider interventions to address them. This article reflects the depth of thought and research in nursing and touches on both discipline-specific and interdisciplinary issues.

  9. Spiritual Maturation and Religious Behaviors in Christian University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Ronald D.; Mellberg, Kimberlee

    2008-01-01

    Spiritual maturation processes of internalization and questing were assessed at a Christian university to determine their relationship to year in school and certain religious behaviors. This was a first step toward the development of a new model of Christian higher education that will intentionally facilitate spiritual maturation. A group of 179…

  10. The Role of Spirituality in Coping with Visual Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yampolsky, Maya A.; Wittich, Walter; Webb, Gail; Overbury, Olga

    2008-01-01

    Spirituality and coping behaviors were measured in 85 individuals with visual impairments aged 23 to 97. A regression analysis indicated that the religious well-being subscale of the Spiritual Well-Being Scale is a significant predictor of adaptive coping behaviors, indicating that higher religious well-being facilitates adaptive coping. (Contains…

  11. Alcoholism, Spiritual Well-Being and the Need for Transcendence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Geraldine A.; Russo, Thomas J.

    When assessing quality of life satisfaction in relation to an individual's recovery from an addiction, such as alcoholism, the expressed need for spiritual well-being is frequently a significant aspect of the psychotherapeutic encounter. Some of the quantitative and qualitative aspects of spiritual well-being in recovering alcoholics are examined.…

  12. Spiritual and Religious Considerations of Michigan Counseling Association Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langeland, Jennifer M.; Anderson, Mary L.; Bischof, Gary H.; Will, Bradley

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated Michigan Counseling Association members' perceptions of spirituality and religion in the therapeutic process. Specifically, this study sought to find out if spirituality and religion were important in the lives of counselors; how they define these concepts; if they have received training in working with these issues in…

  13. Asian Shades of Spirituality: Implications for Multicultural School Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Fred J.; Green, Alan

    2004-01-01

    In the current practice of school counseling, little consideration is given to the spiritual background of students of Asian cultures. Although there is a body of literature on Asian culture in counseling, the authors could find remarkably few articles pertaining to counseling students in the context of Asian religious and spiritual traditions. In…

  14. Promoting Spiritual Ideals through Design Thinking in Public Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tan, Charlene; Wong, Yew-Leong

    2012-01-01

    Against a backdrop of the debates on religious education in public or state schools, we argue for the introduction of "spiritual ideals" into the public school curriculum. We distinguish our notion of spiritual ideals from "religious ideals" as conceptualised by De Ruyter and Merry. While we agree with De Ruyter and Merry that ideas drawn from…

  15. Surprising results regarding MASCC members' beliefs about spiritual care

    PubMed Central

    Ramondetta, Lois M.; Sun, Charlotte; Surbone, Antonella; Olver, Ian; Ripamonti, Carla; Konishi, Tatsuya; Baider, Lea; Johnson, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was to better understand the practice and meaning of spiritual care among cancer care professionals and ultimately provide a rationale for developing internationally focused spiritual care guidelines. Methods We developed a 16-question survey to assess the spiritual care practices. We sent 635 MASCC members 4 e-mails each inviting them to complete the survey via an online survey service. Demographic information was collected. The results were tabulated, and summary statistics were used to describe the results. Results Two hundred seventy-one MASCC members (42.7%) from 41 countries completed the survey. Of the respondents, 50.5% were age ≤50 years, 161 (59.4%) were women and 123 (45.4%) had ≥20 years of cancer care experience. The two most common definitions of spiritual care the respondents specified were “offering emotional support as part of addressing psychosocial needs” (49.8%) and “alleviating spiritual/existential pain/suffering” (42.4%). Whether respondents considered themselves to be “spiritual” correlated with how they rated the importance of spiritual care (P≤0.001). One hundred six respondents (39.1%) reported that they believe it is their role to explore the spiritual concerns of their cancer patients, and 33 respondents (12.2%) reported that they do not feel it is their role. Ninety-one respondents (33.6%) reported that they seldom provide adequate spiritual care, and 71 respondents (26.2%) reported that they did not feel they could adequately provide spiritual care. Conclusions The majority of MASCC members who completed the survey reported that spiritual care plays an important role in the total care of cancer patients, but few respondents from this supportive care focused organization actually provide spiritual care. However, in order to be able to provide a rationale for developing spiritual care guidelines, we need to understand how to emphasize the importance of spiritual care and at minimum

  16. Developments in spiritual care education in German - speaking countries

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This article examines spiritual care training provided to healthcare professionals in Germany, Austria and Switzerland. The paper reveals the current extent of available training while defining the target group(s) and teaching aims. In addition to those, we will provide an analysis of delivered competencies, applied teaching and performance assessment methods. Methods In 2013, an anonymous online survey was conducted among the members of the International Society for Health and Spiritual Care. The survey consisted of 10 questions and an open field for best practice advice. SPSS21 was used for statistical data analysis and the MAXQDA2007 for thematic content analysis. Results 33 participants participated in the survey. The main providers of spiritual care training are hospitals (36%, n = 18). 57% (n = 17) of spiritual care training forms part of palliative care education. 43% (n = 13) of spiritual care education is primarily bound to the Christian tradition. 36% (n = 11) of provided trainings have no direct association with any religious conviction. 64% (n = 19) of respondents admitted that they do not use any specific definition for spiritual care. 22% (n = 14) of available spiritual care education leads to some academic degree. 30% (n = 19) of training form part of an education programme leading to a formal qualification. Content analysis revealed that spiritual training for medical students, physicians in paediatrics, and chaplains take place only in the context of palliative care education. Courses provided for multidisciplinary team education may be part of palliative care training. Other themes, such as deep listening, compassionate presence, bedside spirituality or biographical work on the basis of logo-therapy, are discussed within the framework of spiritual care. Conclusions Spiritual care is often approached as an integral part of grief management, communication/interaction training, palliative care, (medical) ethics

  17. [Assessment of the spiritual needs of patients in palliative care].

    PubMed

    Hajnová Fukasová, E; Bužgová, R; Feltl, D

    2015-01-01

    The appraisal and the right diagnostics of all needs and problems of patients, including the spiritual needs, are unavoidable for increase of the quality of the all-embracing nursing care. In the case of satisfying of the needs of the patients, it is important to have view the person as a unity of thebody and the soul. Identification and satisfying of the spiritual needs are not uncomplicated; moreover, spirituality does not have a target--ed and clear definition. In the palliative care, the solution and saturation of spiritual needs have a great priority, and it can be the key aspect of psychological activity. Also, medical experts are becoming aware of the meaning of spirituality as the part of psychological contentment more and more. Smaller importance is attached to measurement of spiritual needs, and in many medical institutions ends at the case history with the questions: "Are you a believer?", "Do you have any spiritual needs?". Spirituality and religion are very personal matters of every human. Many patients turn to religion to find answers to difficult questions while others find support through the spiritual beliefs outside the scope of organized religion. Mistaking of meanings of the spirituality and religionism can lead to many misunderstandings. The basic condition for the right diagnostics and satisfaction of spiritual needs are the definition of the used terms and using of standardized measurement devices in the clinical praxis. The target of summarizing study was to define the term of spirituality, to describe a lot of measurement devices these are suitable for the evaluation of human spiritual needs. For methodology for acquiring of the results of research works that are concerned with the questions of spiritual needs in case of the incurable patients, the following databases were used (2005-2013): EBSCO, Bibliographia Medica Čechoslovaca, Google Scholar, Solen - www.solen.cz, Profese on-line as the source of the data. The choice of studies were

  18. Assessment and response to spiritual pain: part I.

    PubMed

    Millspaugh, Chaplain Dick

    2005-10-01

    Spiritual pain or suffering is common. Cicely Saunders described persons with "total pain" including the physical, psychological, social, and spiritual dimensions. Yet, a construct for what it is, and how to respond, is not so common. In this paper, I hypothesize that the components of spiritual pain can be summarized in the following manner. Spiritual pain or Suffering = ((Awareness of death + Loss of Relationships + Loss of Purpose + Loss of Control))/(Life affirming and transcending Purpose + Internal Sense of Control). Thus, an assessment of spiritual pain or suffering should examine the degree to which the individual is experiencing each of these components and their relationship to each other. Further, each of these components is dynamic, always in process, both within and between the components. A second paper will examine the sufferer's religious responses and suggested pastoral responses. PMID:16238504

  19. Spirituality and Religion in Pain and Pain Management

    PubMed Central

    Dedeli, Ozden; Kaptan, Gulten

    2013-01-01

    Pain relief is a management problem for many patients, their families, and the medical professionals caring for them. Although everyone experiences pain to some degree, responses to it vary from one person to another. Recognizing and specifying someone else’s pain is clinically a well know challenge. Research on the biology and neurobiology of pain has given us a relationship between spirituality and pain. There is growing recognition that persistent pain is a complex and multidimensional experience stemming from the interrelations among biological, psychological, social, and spiritual factors. Patients with pain use a number of cognitive and behavioral strategies to cope with their pain, including religious/spiritual factors, such as prayers, and seeking spiritual support to manage their pain. This article provides an overview of the complex phenomenon of pain, with a focus on spiritual and religious issues in pain management. PMID:26973914

  20. Spiritual Care and CPE: 2nd Year Experience.

    PubMed

    Luft, John Paul

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this article is to provide the experience of one chaplain resident in a clinical pastoral education program specializing in women and infants health and the intersection of professional spiritual care for this particular patient population. Spiritual care can be an elusive, non-tangible form of professional healthcare, and so within the clinical setting the chaplain is called to act as spiritual care provider, emotions facilitator, grief counselor, cultural and religious expert and administrative specialist in decedent care. Gaining a better perspective on the contributions the clinical chaplain makes in healthcare allows other clinicians (nurses and physicians) to better serve and provide quality holistic care to patients and their families during moments of great emotional, spiritual and psychosocial loss and grief. Both nursing and physician staff must be aware of the relevance, importance and complementary role of the spiritual care provider (clinical chaplain) in the provision of quality holistic healthcare. PMID:26956749

  1. Religious and Spiritual Dimensions of the Vietnamese Dementia Caregiving Experience

    PubMed Central

    Hinton, Ladson; Tran, Jane NhaUyen; Tran, Cindy; Hinton, Devon

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the role of religion and spirituality in dementia caregiving among Vietnamese refugee families. In-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with nine Vietnamese caregivers of persons with dementia, then tape-recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for emergent themes. Caregivers related their spirituality/religion to three aspects of caregiving: (1) their own suffering, (2) their motivations for providing care, and (3) their understanding of the nature of the illness. Key terms or idioms were used to articulate spiritual/religious dimensions of the caregivers’ experience, which included sacrifice, compassion, karma, blessings, grace and peace of mind. In their narratives, the caregivers often combined multiple strands of different religions and/or spiritualities: Animism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism and Catholicism. Case studies are presented to illustrate the relationship between religion/spirituality and the domains of caregiving. These findings have relevance for psychotherapeutic interventions with ethnically diverse populations. PMID:20930949

  2. Spiritual Direction in Addiction Treatment: Two Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Miller, William R.; Forcehimes, Alyssa; O'Leary, Mary; LaNoue, Marnie D.

    2008-01-01

    Spirituality has long been regarded as an important component of recovery from addiction. This article reports the findings of two controlled trials of spiritual direction as an adjunct in addiction treatment. In Study 1, 60 participants were randomly assigned to receive or not receive a 12-session manual-guided spiritual guidance (SG) intervention during and after inpatient treatment, in addition to treatment as usual (TAU). In Study 2, two cohorts of 40 each received TAU without or with SG during their inpatient stay. In both trials, contrary to prediction, SG had no effect on spiritual practices or substance use outcomes at any follow-up point. At the first follow-up in Study 1 only, those randomly assigned to spiritual direction unexpectedly showed significantly less improvement on depression and anxiety, relative to TAU controls. Limitations and implications for treatment are discussed. PMID:18657945

  3. Strength and vulnerability: spirituality in abused American Muslim women's lives.

    PubMed

    Hassouneh-Phillips, Dena

    2003-01-01

    The importance of spirituality for individuals coping with and recovering from trauma has been widely recognized. Despite this recognition, little information is available addressing the influence of spirituality on the abuse experiences of women surviving intimate partner violence (IPV). This paper begins to amend this gap in knowledge by examining the influence of spirituality on the abuse experiences of American Muslim women, a large and growing population. Findings from this qualitative study indicate that spirituality provided participants with an important means of coping with ongoing violence while in many instances also creating barriers to safety. These findings underscore the complex role spirituality may play as a source of both strength and vulnerability in American Muslim women's response to IPV.

  4. Using a "Spiritual Listening Tool" to Investigate How Children Describe Spiritual and Philosophical Meaning in Their Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipscomb, Anna; Gersch, Irvine

    2012-01-01

    Developing meaningful ways of listening to children's views has been reinforced through legislation and this has led to new approaches, such as "spiritual listening", being developed. "Spiritual listening" aims to listen to children's views on philosophical concepts such as "drive," "destiny," "happiness" and "purpose". The authors believe that…

  5. "Spiritual Friends": An Investigation of Children's Spirituality in the Context of British Urban Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birkinshaw, Steve

    2015-01-01

    This article argues relational consciousness of Self and Other is influenced by multiple significant relationships--what are termed "Spiritual Friends". The research on which this article is based explores the spirituality of children within the context of British urban secondary education, and identifies significant relationships in…

  6. Aging, Spirituality, and Time: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Black, Helen K.; Hannum, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    We examined the concepts of aging, time, spirituality, and future care needs in four randomly selected informants from a group of 54 never-married childless older women. Using data from the Generativity and Lifestyles of Older Women (GLOW) study, we questioned how women’s perceptions of these concepts came together in current older age. We employed cultural theory, (our theoretical framework), ethnography, (our methodological framework), and phenomenology, (our philosophical foundation) to produce a portrait of each woman interviewed. Through a three-session interview process, we elicited the women’s life stories, reasons for childlessness, and topics that emerged as significant to the women, including aging, a sense of time remaining, and spirituality. A key finding was that the context of each woman’s life, both biographical and historical, transpired as a foundation for these concepts. That is, a woman’s “place in time” shaped their experiences of aging, as well as her reasons for childlessness and perceptions of finitude. PMID:26539067

  7. Contemporary spirituality: a call to wholeness.

    PubMed

    Coleman, H

    1986-06-01

    Our society and thus our health care organizations are beset by a dualistic perspective that identifies some groups as embodying "masculine" characteristics that are desirable, implying that other groups are less valuable. This perspective, visible in ageism, sexism, and racism, threatens the call to live and heal as Jesus lived and healed, which is the cornerstone of the Catholic health care ministry. A contemporary wholistic spirituality must be articulated that emphasizes individual responsibility for living as a person who believes in the dignity of all persons created by God. Modifying the language of health care is one way to better reflect a wholistic orientation. Two expressions that require special attention are "health care provider" and "patient." Substituting "health care promoter" and "client" for these terms would emphasize the health care ministry's role in helping persons with health care needs to be involved in the healing process. Since a health care organization's effectiveness depends on its members' commitment to healing, it is imperative that the organization's values be modeled and communicated to the members through the organization's decisions and activities. It likewise is important that those involved in the healing ministry reflect on their spirituality, their relationships with self, God, and others, to monitor those values that affect their relationships and experiences.

  8. Spiritually Competent Practice with Individuals and Families Dealing with Medical Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sperry, Len

    2011-01-01

    Counselors and psychotherapists are increasingly expected to provide services that are spiritually competent. Those counseling individuals and families where medical concerns are a focus would do well to consider the implications of spiritual competence in their work. The article defines spiritual competence, describes spiritual competencies, and…

  9. A Spirituality of the Desert for Education: The Call of Justice beyond the Individual or Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joldersma, Clarence W.

    2009-01-01

    This paper argues for an alternative notion of spirituality for education, based on Theo de Boer's idea of a spirituality of the desert. Rather than depicting an inner, additional region named the spiritual, spirituality here is thought of as a discourse that depicts the everyday world in a particular way. In dialogue with David Purpel's analysis,…

  10. Teaching Theology as a Christian Spiritual Practice: The Example of Stanley J. Grenz

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellinger, Laurie A.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation explores the recent work on spiritual practices in the academic discipline of Christian spirituality, gathering together the strengths of various conceptions of practice from the literature and developing a rigorous definition of a Christian spiritual practice: Christian spiritual practices are things God enables Christian people…

  11. The Spiritual Potential of Childhood: Awakening to the Fullness of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    To study children's spirituality at the beginning of the twenty-first century provides a prime opportunity for exploring the personal, social and global interconnections in the understanding and practice of spirituality. Countless definitions of spirituality have been suggested, yet it has also been said that spirituality escapes definition…

  12. Portrait of Olivia: A Case Study of a Spiritually Gifted Student

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalske, Kristy

    2016-01-01

    This article examines spiritual giftedness and the spiritual development of a recent high school graduate. The framework of the investigation was to explore teachers' perspectives on spiritual giftedness and what traits students display in the classroom. The concept of spiritual giftedness has gained increasing attention over the years and is…

  13. Spirituality among College Freshmen: Relationships To Self-Esteem, Body Image, and Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayman, Jessie Wetherbe; Kurpius, Sharon Robinson; Befort, Christy; Nicpon, Megan Foley; Hull-Blanks, Elva; Sollenberger, Sonja; Huser, Laura

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated the relationships between spirituality, body image, self-esteem, and stress in 204 college freshmen who identified themselves as being highly spiritual. A positive relationship was found between spirituality and self-esteem. Although self-esteem was found to be negatively related to stress, spirituality served as a buffer…

  14. Identifying the Categories of Spiritual Experience Encountered by Therapists in Their Clinical Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    Spirituality has replaced religion in popular culture and its presence is being felt in the therapeutic world. Using a questionnaire completed by 104 people utilising six descriptive definitions of spirituality and 36 categories of spiritual experience, three meta-themes of forms of spirituality emerged through a thematic analysis. These are…

  15. Why the cognitive science of religion cannot rescue 'spiritual care'.

    PubMed

    Paley, John

    2015-10-01

    Peter Kevern believes that the cognitive science of religion (CSR) provides a justification for the idea of spiritual care in the health services. In this paper, I suggest that he is mistaken on two counts. First, CSR does not entail the conclusions Kevern wants to draw. His treatment of it consists largely of nonsequiturs. I show this by presenting an account of CSR, and then explaining why Kevern's reasons for thinking it rescues 'spirituality' discourse do not work. Second, the debate about spirituality-in-health is about classification: what shall count as a 'spiritual need' and what shall count as 'spiritual care'. It is about the politics of meaning, an exercise in persuasive definition. The function of 'spirituality' talk in health care is to change the denotation of 'spiritual', and attach its indelibly religious connotations to as many health-related concepts and practices as possible. CSR, however plausible it may be as a theory of the origins and pervasiveness of religious belief, is irrelevant to this debate.

  16. Spirituality and religion among HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Szaflarski, Magdalena

    2013-12-01

    Spirituality and religion are important to many people living with HIV (PLWH). Recent research has focused on special populations (ethnic-minorities, women, and youth), spirituality/religion measurement, mediating/moderating mechanisms, and individual and community-level interventions. Spirituality/religion in PLWH has been refined as a multidimensional phenomenon, which improves health/quality of life directly and through mediating factors (healthy behaviors, optimism, social support). Spirituality/religion helps people to cope with stressors, especially stigma/discrimination. Spiritual interventions utilizing the power of prayer and meditation and addressing spiritual struggle are under way. Faith-based community interventions have focused on stigma and could improve individual outcomes through access to spiritual/social support and care/treatment for PLWA. Community engagement is necessary to design/implement effective and sustainable programs. Future efforts should focus on vulnerable populations; utilize state-of-the-art methods (randomized clinical trials, community-based participatory research); and, address population-specific interventions at individual and community levels. Clinical and policy implications across geographic settings also need attention.

  17. Why the cognitive science of religion cannot rescue 'spiritual care'.

    PubMed

    Paley, John

    2015-10-01

    Peter Kevern believes that the cognitive science of religion (CSR) provides a justification for the idea of spiritual care in the health services. In this paper, I suggest that he is mistaken on two counts. First, CSR does not entail the conclusions Kevern wants to draw. His treatment of it consists largely of nonsequiturs. I show this by presenting an account of CSR, and then explaining why Kevern's reasons for thinking it rescues 'spirituality' discourse do not work. Second, the debate about spirituality-in-health is about classification: what shall count as a 'spiritual need' and what shall count as 'spiritual care'. It is about the politics of meaning, an exercise in persuasive definition. The function of 'spirituality' talk in health care is to change the denotation of 'spiritual', and attach its indelibly religious connotations to as many health-related concepts and practices as possible. CSR, however plausible it may be as a theory of the origins and pervasiveness of religious belief, is irrelevant to this debate. PMID:26308949

  18. Spiritual Care Training Provided to Healthcare Professionals: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Paal, Piret; Helo, Yousef; Frick, Eckhard

    2015-03-01

    This systematic review was conducted to assess the outcomes of spiritual care training. It outlines the training outcomes based on participants' oral/written feedback, course evaluation and performance assessment. Intervention was defined as any form of spiritual care training provided to healthcare professionals studying/working in an academic and/or clinical setting. An online search was conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, ERIC, PsycINFO, ASSIA, CSA, ATLA and CENTRAL up to Week 27 of 2013 by two independent investigators to reduce errors in inclusion. Only peer-reviewed journal articles reporting on training outcomes were included. A primary keyword-driven search found 4912 articles; 46 articles were identified as relevant for final analysis. The narrative synthesis of findings outlines the following outcomes: (1) acknowledging spirituality on an individual level, (2) success in integrating spirituality in clinical practice, (3) positive changes in communication with patients. This study examines primarily pre/post-effects within a single cohort. Due to an average study quality, the reported findings in this review are to be seen as indicators at most. Nevertheless, this review makes evident that without attending to one'the repeliefs and needs, addressing spirituality in patients will not be forthcoming. It also demonstrates that spiritual care training may help to challenge the spiritual vacuum in healthcare institutions. PMID:26162203

  19. Spirituality Concept by Health Professionals in Iran: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Memaryan, Nadereh; Rassouli, Maryam; Mehrabi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background. For years, researchers have sought to provide a clear definition of spirituality and its features and consequences, but the definitions provided of this concept still lack transparency. The present qualitative research was conducted to clarify this concept within the religious-cultural context of Iran. Materials and Methods. The present conventional qualitative content analysis was conducted with an inductive approach. Data were collected through semistructured interviews with 17 spiritual health experts and activists selected through purposive sampling. Results. Three themes emerged from the analysis of the data, including (1) the structure of spirituality, (2) defects in the conceptualization of spirituality, and (3) spirituality in practice, which are explained in this paper with their relevant subthemes and codes. The definition which this study proposes for this concept is that "spirituality is the sublime aspect of human existence bestowed on all humans in order for them to traverse the path of transcendence that is closeness to God (Allah)." Conclusion. The definition provided by this study is similar to the previous definitions of this concept in its main part (transcendence) and in incorporating a God-centered view of spirituality within the context of an Islamic society. This definition has implications for health services' education, research, and practice in similar societies. PMID:27493675

  20. Wading in the waters: spirituality and older black Katrina survivors.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Erma Jean; Thomas, Cecelia

    2007-05-01

    Hurricane Katrina has drawn increased interest in coping strategies, spirituality, and mental health among low-income Blacks. Given the paucity of information available regarding the role of spirituality in surviving Hurricane Katrina, this qualitative study explores active coping strategies of older Blacks. Older respondents who were evacuated to a Texas retirement apartment complex participated in a series of three in-depth interviews (starting approximately three weeks after their arrival in the host state and continuing weekly). Without exception, the findings indicate that this population coped with Katrina and its aftermath through reliance on a Higher Power. The relationship to a Higher Power did not necessarily translate into church membership. The conclusions of the respondents' spiritual coping mechanisms revealed the following themes: 1) regular communication with a supernatural power; 2) miracles of faith through this source of guidance and protection; 3) daily reading of the Bible and various spiritual and devotional materials; and 4) helping others as a consequence of faith and devotion to a supreme being. This study indicates that spirituality promotes emotional resilience in the aftermath of traumatic events such as Hurricane Katrina. These findings also point to the need for researchers to reconsider expressions of spirituality based solely on church membership/attendance and prayer, and to consider redefining spiritual coping as a form of cultural capital.

  1. Spirituality Concept by Health Professionals in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. For years, researchers have sought to provide a clear definition of spirituality and its features and consequences, but the definitions provided of this concept still lack transparency. The present qualitative research was conducted to clarify this concept within the religious-cultural context of Iran. Materials and Methods. The present conventional qualitative content analysis was conducted with an inductive approach. Data were collected through semistructured interviews with 17 spiritual health experts and activists selected through purposive sampling. Results. Three themes emerged from the analysis of the data, including (1) the structure of spirituality, (2) defects in the conceptualization of spirituality, and (3) spirituality in practice, which are explained in this paper with their relevant subthemes and codes. The definition which this study proposes for this concept is that “spirituality is the sublime aspect of human existence bestowed on all humans in order for them to traverse the path of transcendence that is closeness to God (Allah).” Conclusion. The definition provided by this study is similar to the previous definitions of this concept in its main part (transcendence) and in incorporating a God-centered view of spirituality within the context of an Islamic society. This definition has implications for health services' education, research, and practice in similar societies. PMID:27493675

  2. Modern health worries - the dark side of spirituality?

    PubMed

    Köteles, Ferenc; Simor, Péter; Czető, Márton; Sárog, Noémi; Szemerszky, Renáta

    2016-08-01

    Modern health worries (MHWs) are widespread in modern societies. MHWs were connected to both negative and positive psychological characteristics in previous studies. The study aimed to investigate the relationships among intuitive-experiential information processing style, spirituality, MHWs, and psychological well-being. Members of the Hungarian Skeptic Society (N = 128), individuals committed to astrology (N = 601), and people from a non-representative community sample (N = 554) completed questionnaires assessing intuitive-experiential information processing style, spirituality, modern health worries (MHWs), and psychological well-being. Astrologers showed higher levels of spirituality, intuitive-experiential thinking, and modern health worries than individuals from the community sample; and skeptics scored even lower than the latter group with respect to all three constructs. Within the community sample, medium level connections between measures of spirituality and the experiential thinking style, and weak to medium level correlations between spirituality and MHWs were found. The connection between MHWs and experiential thinking style was completely mediated by spirituality. Individuals with higher levels of spirituality are particularly vulnerable to overgeneralized messages on health related risks. Official communication of potential risks based on rational scientific reasoning is not appropriate to persuade them as it has no impact on the intuitive-experiential system. PMID:27231809

  3. Sleep Quality and Spiritual Well-Being in Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Eslami, Ahmad Ali; Rabiei, Leili; Khayri, Freidoon; Rashidi Nooshabadi, Mohammad Reza; Masoudi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: Sleep disorders are considered as one of the most important problems in hemodialysis patients, making their everyday life a serious hazard. Sleep quality of hemodialysis patients and consequences of sleep disorders on other aspects of health such as spiritual well-being are important issues. Objectives: This study examined the relationship between spiritual well-being and quality of sleep in hemodialysis patients in Isfahan, Iran. Patients and Methods: This study was a correlation research, carried out on 190 hemodialysis patients. Data collection Questionnaires included demographic forms, Pittsburgh sleep quality index (PSQI), and Ellison and Paloutzian spiritual well-being scale. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics (Pearson correlation and linear regression analysis) at P < 0.05 significance level, by SPSS software version 18. Results: Of 190 study participants, 163 (85.78%) with scores more than five index had sleep disturbances and 27 (14.12%) had no sleep disturbance; 3 (1.52%) had mild, 163 (85.78%) moderate, and 24 (12.30%) good spiritual health conditions. Pearson correlation test showed significant relationship between the sleep quality items of Pittsburg and spiritual well-being (P < 0.04, r = 0.149). Through the regression analyses of spiritual health, family, education, financial status, marital status, occupation, and use of sleep medication, the predictive power of these variables was found 0.417% and prediction of spiritual well-being was more than others (ß = 0.209). Conclusions: Considering bed as one of the most vital physical, mental, and emotional needs, it is very important in mental and spiritual well-being of hemodialysis patients as an influencing factor in mental relaxation and reducing disease tensions. Paying attention to sleep quality and spiritual well-being components of hemodialysis patients in formulating and promoting healthcare programs is recommended. PMID:25237580

  4. Asking patients about their religious and spiritual beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Lee-Poy, Michael; Stewart, Moira; Ryan, Bridget L.; Brown, Judith Belle

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine family physicians’ practices in and opinions on asking patients about their religious and spiritual beliefs, as well as physicians’ comfort levels in asking. Design Cross-sectional study using self-administered questionnaires. Setting Kitchener-Waterloo, Ont. Participants A total of 155 family physicians with office practices. Main outcome measures Frequency of asking patients about their religious and spiritual beliefs and physicians’ comfort levels in asking. Separate multiple linear regression analyses were conducted for each of these outcomes. Results A total of 139 questionnaires were returned for a response rate of 89.7 %. Of the respondents, 51.8 % stated that they asked patients about their religious and spiritual beliefs sometimes. Physician opinion that it was important to ask patients about religious and spiritual beliefs (P = .001) and physician comfort level with asking (P < .001) were significantly associated with physicians’ frequency of asking patients about their religious and spiritual beliefs. Comfort level with asking patients about their religious and spiritual beliefs was significantly associated with the opinions that it was important to ask (P = .004) and that it was their business to ask (P = .003), as well as with lack of training as the reason for not asking (P = .007). Conclusion This study found that family physicians were more likely to ask patients about their religious and spiritual beliefs if they had higher comfort levels in asking or if they believed that asking was important. Further, this study found that family physicians’ comfort level with asking was higher if they believed that it was important to ask and that it was their business to ask about religious and spiritual beliefs. Physician comfort levels with asking patients about religious and spiritual beliefs can be addressed through adequate training and education. PMID:27629691

  5. Spirituality matters: creating a time and place for hope.

    PubMed

    Revheim, Nadine; Greenberg, William M

    2007-01-01

    Individuals with serious psychiatric disabilities may become demoralized or hopeless consequent to longstanding disability and stigma. Potential antidotes are social support from the religious community and use of personal spiritual resources as coping mechanisms. The "Spirituality Matters Group" offers comfort and hope through structured and innovative exercises focusing on spiritual beliefs and coping. Activities facilitate verbal expression and appropriate social interaction, and build a sense of community. Activities and themes from selected group sessions are discussed within a recovery-oriented "emotion-focused coping" framework.

  6. Integration of spirituality into health care practice by nurse practitioners.

    PubMed

    Treloar, L L

    2000-07-01

    Although conceptualizations of mind, body, and spirit are ancient, spiritual aspects have not been readily integrated into health care. Western medicine's mechanistic model, with its "fix-broken-parts" paradigm, focuses on the physical body, with occasional consideration given to emotional and mental aspects. One's view of self in relation to a Supreme Being, and one's existence and purpose for life is central to health at all levels, e.g., spiritual, physical, emotional, and cognitive. The purpose of this article is to describe the role that nurse practitioners can and should take with patients and their families in integrating spirituality into health care practice.

  7. Spirituality group with female prisoners: impacting hope.

    PubMed

    Nedderman, A Barbara; Underwood, Lee A; Hardy, Veronica L

    2010-04-01

    Female offenders are showing a dramatic increase and presenting with several challenges to emotional stability. Current research literature notes the disadvantaged state of these women and psychological profiles reflecting depression, anxiety, trauma, shame, low self-worth, and substance abuse. The instillation of hope has been identified as a therapeutic factor and motivating energy that promotes goal development, reduction of negative emotions, and coping ability. This investigation assessed the impact of hope on female prisoners through the use of a psychoeducational group based on Christian spirituality. Data from the Herth Hope Index were analyzed using a series of t tests to measure group differences. Analysis of the data indicated positive change in the therapy group but did not support statistical significance for every factor analyzed, yet it does provide several implications for practice and future research.

  8. Caritas, spirituality and religiosity in nurses' coping.

    PubMed

    Ekedahl, M A; Wengström, Y

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate registered nurses' coping processes when working with terminally ill and dying cancer patients, with special focus on religious aspects of coping resources. What religious components can be identified as coping resources in oncology nurses' orienting system and what function has religiosity in the nurse's work? The theoretical reference is care philosophy and the psychology of religion and coping. The material consists of interviews with 15 Swedish registered oncology nurses. The results highlight different dynamic aspects of the nurses' life orientation such as caritas, religiosity, spirituality and atheism and demonstrate that religiosity can have a protective function that facilitates coping, as the nurse has something to turn to. Religious coping dominated by basic trust where prayer is used as a coping strategy may support the nurse.

  9. A Cross-Sectional Descriptive Study of Occupational Therapy Students' Perceptions and Attitudes Towards Spirituality and Spiritual Care in Occupational Therapy Education.

    PubMed

    Mthembu, Thuli Godfrey; Roman, Nicolette Vanessa; Wegner, Lisa

    2016-10-01

    Spirituality and spiritual care both have received increased attention over the course of this past decade from different disciplines. However, for many years, in the occupational therapy profession, the importance of spirituality and spiritual care seems to be controversial because it is unclear how these concepts are integrated in occupational therapy education. Although occupational therapy students are being educated to consider a holistic and client-centred approach, spirituality is not regarded within this framework which diminishes the integrity of holistic approach. In South African occupational therapy education, it is unclear whether any single course on teaching and learning of spirituality and spiritual care exists. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe occupational therapy students' perceptions and attitudes regarding spirituality and spiritual care in occupational therapy education. A cross-sectional descriptive study design of undergraduate occupational therapy students from one educational institution was used. Data included demographic characteristics, responses on Spiritual Care-Giving Scale (SCGS), Spiritual and Spiritual Care Rating Scale (SSCRS) and Spirituality in Occupational Therapy Scale (SOTS). A response rate of 50.5 % (n = 100 out of 198) was achieved. In the SCGS, among the factors only factor 1 had the highest mean value score showing consistent agreement about spirituality, whereas in the SSCRS only three factors were found to have highest mean score and one with lowest mean score. In SOTS, participants had a highest score mean in relation to formal education and training about spirituality. Thus, in the integration of spirituality and spiritual care a holistic approach needs to be considered in education to enhance students' knowledge of how to address mind, body and spirit needs.

  10. A Cross-Sectional Descriptive Study of Occupational Therapy Students' Perceptions and Attitudes Towards Spirituality and Spiritual Care in Occupational Therapy Education.

    PubMed

    Mthembu, Thuli Godfrey; Roman, Nicolette Vanessa; Wegner, Lisa

    2016-10-01

    Spirituality and spiritual care both have received increased attention over the course of this past decade from different disciplines. However, for many years, in the occupational therapy profession, the importance of spirituality and spiritual care seems to be controversial because it is unclear how these concepts are integrated in occupational therapy education. Although occupational therapy students are being educated to consider a holistic and client-centred approach, spirituality is not regarded within this framework which diminishes the integrity of holistic approach. In South African occupational therapy education, it is unclear whether any single course on teaching and learning of spirituality and spiritual care exists. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe occupational therapy students' perceptions and attitudes regarding spirituality and spiritual care in occupational therapy education. A cross-sectional descriptive study design of undergraduate occupational therapy students from one educational institution was used. Data included demographic characteristics, responses on Spiritual Care-Giving Scale (SCGS), Spiritual and Spiritual Care Rating Scale (SSCRS) and Spirituality in Occupational Therapy Scale (SOTS). A response rate of 50.5 % (n = 100 out of 198) was achieved. In the SCGS, among the factors only factor 1 had the highest mean value score showing consistent agreement about spirituality, whereas in the SSCRS only three factors were found to have highest mean score and one with lowest mean score. In SOTS, participants had a highest score mean in relation to formal education and training about spirituality. Thus, in the integration of spirituality and spiritual care a holistic approach needs to be considered in education to enhance students' knowledge of how to address mind, body and spirit needs. PMID:26374135

  11. Hmong shamanism. Animist spiritual healing in Minnesota.

    PubMed

    Plotnikoff, Gregory A; Numrich, Charles; Wu, Chu; Yang, Deu; Xiong, Phua

    2002-06-01

    Hmong cultural attitudes, values, and behaviors influence when, where, why, and with whom a Hmong person will use Western medicine. Understanding the practices and importance of Hmong healing traditions will help majority-culture physicians provide respectful and effective health care to Hmong patients. The foremost Hmong traditional healer is the shaman (tu txiv neeb, pronounced "too tse neng"). There is no equivalent health professional in Western biomedicine, and the scope of the shaman as a healer extends beyond the capacities and expertise of physicians. Despite 25 years of Hmong acculturation in the United States and conversion to Christianity, Hmong shamanism maintains its traditional role in health and healing. Many Hmong who see physicians also rely on shamans for restoring health and balance to their body and soul. Thus, the Hmong shaman can be considered a powerful complement to Western health care professionals. This article presents the results of semistructured interviews with 11 Hmong shamans (5 males, 6 females, ranging in age from 35 to 85) and 32 nonrandomly selected Hmong patients (14 males, 18 females ranging in age from 21 to 85). The shamans described their spiritual perspectives, training and skills, and professional activities. Patients described their beliefs about spiritual healing and health care. These interviews suggest that Shamanism is considered effective care by many Hmong, irrespective of age, gender, or degree of acculturation. The article also includes summary charts of Hmong healing practices and concludes with a set of questions designed to help practicing physicians access the assumptions and beliefs of their Hmong patients so that they can provide efficient, effective, and satisfactory care.

  12. Effectiveness of Spiritual Group Therapy on Quality of Life and Spiritual Well-Being among Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zamaniyan, Sakineh; Bolhari, Jafar; Naziri, Ghasem; Akrami, Majid; Hosseini, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is deemed the century’s major health problem, and its increasing growth during the last decades has made experts concerned more than ever. Of all types of cancer, breast cancer is regarded as the second most common disease among women. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of spiritual group therapy on quality of life and spiritual well-being among patients suffering from breast cancer. The present research was carried out between March and June 2011. The sample consisted of 24 participants randomly assigned to 2 groups: an experimental group (n, 12) and a control group (n, 12). All the subjects completed questionnaires on quality of life and spiritual well-being in pretest and posttest. The experimental group received 12 sessions of spiritual group therapy. The results demonstrated improvement in quality of life and spiritual well-being in the experimental group. In conclusion, spiritual group therapy can be used to improve quality of life and spiritual well-being (religious health and existential health) among patients with breast cancer. PMID:26989285

  13. Attributes of Spirituality Described by Survivors of Sexual Violence

    PubMed Central

    Knapik, Gregory P.; Martsolf, Donna S.; Draucker, Claire B.; Strickland, Karen D.

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on what aspects of attributes of spirituality as defined by Martsolf and Mickley (1998) are most salient for female and male survivors of sexual violence. Content analysis of secondary narrative data, provided by 50 participants in a study of women’s and men’s responses to sexual violence, was coded to the five attributes of spirituality as defined by Martsolf and Mickley. The attribute aspects of connecting with others in spiritual ways and with God/higher power were particularly significant. The attribute of transcendence was found less important, and the attributes of value, becoming, and meaning were not found important. The Martsolf and Mickley framework helped organize narrative data for a content analysis of spirituality in survivors of sexual violence. PMID:21850278

  14. Assessment of spirituality and its relevance to addiction treatment.

    PubMed

    Galanter, Marc; Dermatis, Helen; Bunt, Gregory; Williams, Caroline; Trujillo, Manuel; Steinke, Paul

    2007-10-01

    The prominence of Twelve-Step programs has led to increased attention on the putative role of spirituality in recovery from addictive disorders. We developed a 6-item Spirituality Self-Rating Scale designed to reflect a global measure of spiritual orientation to life, and we demonstrated here its internal consistency reliability in substance abusers on treatment and in nonsubstance abusers. This scale and the measures related to recovery from addiction and treatment response were applied in three diverse treatment settings: a general hospital inpatient psychiatry service, a residential therapeutic community, and methadone maintenance programs. Findings on these patient groups were compared to responses given by undergraduate college students, medical students, addiction faculty, and chaplaincy trainees. These suggest that, for certain patients, spiritual orientation is an important aspect of their recovery. Furthermore, the relevance of this issue may be underestimated in the way treatment is framed in a range of clinical facilities.

  15. Spirituality and nursing: an Ismaili perspective on holistic nursing care.

    PubMed

    Dhamani, Khairunnisa Aziz

    2014-12-01

    This article seeks to describe a professional, personal, and cultural understanding of spirituality in nursing care. It revisits and refines the many concept clarifications of spirituality in our practice discipline, while reflecting on the potential meanings and learnings from Ismaili tenets and principles within a personal nursing practice. Through a review of mainstream literature in conjunction with nontraditional literature, the implicit is made explicit in terms of similarities and differences, as well as opportunities for further exploration. The summary brings forward the persistent gaps and questions on critical areas such as creating the "place" and "operationalizing" of spirituality. These continue to challenge and intrigue nurses seeking spiritual comfort for both themselves and their clients.

  16. Religion, spirituality, and genetics: mapping the terrain for research purposes.

    PubMed

    Churchill, Larry R

    2009-02-15

    Genetic diseases often raise issues of profound importance for human self-understanding, such as one's identity, the family or community to which one belongs, and one's future or destiny. These deeper questions have commonly been seen as the purview of religion and spirituality. This essay explores how religion and spirituality are understood in the current US context and defined in the scholarly literature over the past 100 years. It is argued that a pragmatic, functional approach to religion and spirituality is important to understanding how patients respond to genetic diagnoses and participate in genetic therapies. A pragmatic, functional approach requires broadening the inquiry to include anything that provides a framework of transcendent meaning for the fundamental existential questions of human life. This approach also entails suspending questions about the truth claims of any particular religious/spiritual belief or practice. Three implications of adopting this broad working definition will be presented.

  17. Religious and spiritual issues in psychotherapy practice: Training the trainer.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Eleonora

    2007-03-01

    Psychology's interest in religion and spirituality has greatly increased over the past few decades, and it has inspired the development of substantial scholarship in these areas. However, there continues to be a paucity of efforts to integrate this emerging scholarship into training programs. The author explores the historical and ideological context of psychotherapists' reluctance to address religious and spiritual issues in their academic programs and clinical practices. The article also offers seasoned psychotherapists concrete suggestions regarding how to enhance their religious and spiritual competencies with the aim of facilitating both the training of emerging psychotherapists and the treatment of religious and spiritual clients. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. A palliative care specific spiritual assessment: how this story evolved.

    PubMed

    Galchutt, Paul

    2013-01-01

    This article reflects a project to create, refine, and use a palliative care specific spiritual assessment, with the intent to implement its use for both an inpatient Palliative Consult Service (PCS) and a Spiritual Health Service (SHS) team. Extensive meetings with these services to confirm a shared understanding of the use of this spiritual assessment to facilitate communication with PCS through consistent language about the patient's story, suffering, spirit, and sense-making. Following a pilot phase of using this palliative care spiritual assessment, five presentations were shared with the SHS team to explore using this assessment. Although the SHS team decided not to use its content, these presentations spurred dialogue toward what was to become a SHS standardized documentation process, eventually called data, intervention, outcome, plan (DIOP).

  19. Drug tourism or spiritual healing? Ayahuasca seekers in Amazonia.

    PubMed

    Winkelman, Michael

    2005-06-01

    This research addresses the question of whether Westerners who seek traditional spiritual medicine known as ayahuasca can be best characterized as "drug tourists" or as people pursuing spiritual and therapeutic opportunities. Participants in an ayahuasca retreat in Amazonia were interviewed regarding their motivations for participation and the benefits they felt that they received. These findings from the interviews were organized to reveal common motivations and benefits. Contrary to the characterization as "drug tourists", the principal motivations can be characterized as: seeking spiritual relations and personal spiritual development; emotional healing; and the development of personal self-awareness, including contact with a sacred nature, God, spirits and plant and natural energies produced by the ayahuasca. The motivation and perceived benefits both point to transpersonal concerns, with the principal perceived benefits involving increased self awareness, insights and access to deeper levels of the self that enhanced personal development and the higher self, providing personal direction in life.

  20. My Ishvara is dead: spiritual care on the fringes.

    PubMed

    George, Titus

    2010-12-01

    Human suffering speaks differently to different lived contexts. In this paper, I have taken a metaphoric representation of suffering, Ishvara, from the lived context of a Hindu immigrant woman to show that suffering is experienced and expressed within one's lived context. Further, a dominant narrative from her world is presented to show that the same lived context can be a resource for spiritual care that could reconstruct her world that has fallen apart with a suffering experience. Having argued that suffering is experienced and expressed within one's lived context, and that lived context could be a resource, in this paper I present that spiritual care is an intervention into the predicaments of human suffering and its mandate is to facilitate certain direction and a meaningful order through which experiences and expectations are rejoined. Finally, I observe that spiritual care is an engagement between the lived context where suffering is experienced and the spiritual experience and orientation of the caregiver. PMID:19787453

  1. Religio-Spiritual Participation in Two American Indian Populations

    PubMed Central

    Garroutte, Eva Marie; Anderson, Heather Orton; Nez-Henderson, Patricia; Croy, Calvin; Beals, Janette; Henderson, Jeffrey A.; Thomas, Jacob; Manson, Spero M.

    2015-01-01

    Following a previous investigation of religio-spiritual beliefs in American Indians, this article examined prevalence and correlates of religio-spiritual participation in two tribes in the Southwest and Northern Plains (N = 3,084). Analysis suggested a “religious profile” characterized by strong participation across three traditions: aboriginal, Christian, and Native American Church. However, sociodemographic variables that have reliably predicted participation in the general American population, notably gender and age, frequently failed to achieve significance in multivariate analyses for each tradition. Religio-spiritual participation was strongly and significantly related to belief salience for all traditions. Findings suggest that correlates of religious participation may be unique among American Indians, consistent with their distinctive religious profile. Results promise to inform researchers’ efforts to understand and theorize about religio-spiritual behavior. They also provide tribal communities with practical information that might assist them in harnessing social networks to confront collective challenges through community-based participatory research collaborations. PMID:26582964

  2. It's all sacred: African American women's perspectives on spirituality.

    PubMed

    Banks-Wallace, JoAnne; Parks, Lennette

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we examined the meaning and function of spirituality for a group of African American women. Participants had been recruited for a focus group study exploring the significance of mother-daughter-sister relationships to the well being and health behavior choices of women. Women developed individually defined concepts of spirituality by combining Judeo-Christian traditions and African cosmology. Spirituality was a cornerstone of many participants' daily lives. It influenced women's decision-making and behavior across many realms. For example, many women came to the conclusion that domestic violence was not part of God's plan for their lives. Spiritual-based strategies may provide a rich foundation for innovative and efficacious health promotion interventions targeting African American women. Clinicians can assist in the co-creation of sacred spaces where women can connect with themselves and each other.

  3. Spiritual Health in Nursing From the Viewpoint of Islam

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Abbas; Khorashadizadeh, Fatemeh; Heshmati Nabavi, Fatemeh; Mazlom, Seyed Reza; Ebrahimi, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Context In order to gain a more detailed insight into the concept of spiritual health, a hybrid model of concept analysis was used to remove some of the ambiguity surrounding the conceptual meaning of spiritual health in Islamic and Iranian contexts. The purpose of this study was to clarify the meaning and nature of the spiritual health concept in the context of the practice of Islam among Iranian patients. Evidence Acquisition The current concept analysis was undertaken according to the modified traditional hybrid model, which consists of five phases: theoretical phase, initial fieldwork phase, initial analytical phase, and final fieldwork and final analytical phase. In the theoretical phases of the study, the concept of spiritual health was described based on a literature review of publications dealing with the Islamic viewpoint (years: from 2013 to 2014, Databases and search engines: Pubmed, SID, Magiran, Noormax, Google Scholar, Google and IranMex, Languages: English and Persian, Keywords: spiritual health AND (Islam OR Quran), spirituality AND (Islam OR Quran), complete human AND Islam, healthy heart (Galb Salim) AND Islam, healthy life (Hayat tayebeh) AND Islam, calm soul (Nafse motmaeneh) And Islam and healthy wisdom (Aghle Salim) AND Islam). Purposive sampling was conducted and nine participants were selected. Semi-structured interviews and observations were conducted periodically for data collection after obtaining informed consent. Observational, theoretical, and methodological notes were made. Then, using MAXQUDA 7 software, the data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results The relevant literature in the theoretical phase uncovered the attributes of the concept of spiritual health, including love of the Creator, duty-based life, religious rationality, psychological balance, and attention to afterlife. These attributes were explored in depth in later stages. Finally, the definition of spiritual health was developed. Conclusions Islam has

  4. Spiritual Health in Nursing From the Viewpoint of Islam

    PubMed Central

    Heydari, Abbas; Khorashadizadeh, Fatemeh; Heshmati Nabavi, Fatemeh; Mazlom, Seyed Reza; Ebrahimi, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Context In order to gain a more detailed insight into the concept of spiritual health, a hybrid model of concept analysis was used to remove some of the ambiguity surrounding the conceptual meaning of spiritual health in Islamic and Iranian contexts. The purpose of this study was to clarify the meaning and nature of the spiritual health concept in the context of the practice of Islam among Iranian patients. Evidence Acquisition The current concept analysis was undertaken according to the modified traditional hybrid model, which consists of five phases: theoretical phase, initial fieldwork phase, initial analytical phase, and final fieldwork and final analytical phase. In the theoretical phases of the study, the concept of spiritual health was described based on a literature review of publications dealing with the Islamic viewpoint (years: from 2013 to 2014, Databases and search engines: Pubmed, SID, Magiran, Noormax, Google Scholar, Google and IranMex, Languages: English and Persian, Keywords: spiritual health AND (Islam OR Quran), spirituality AND (Islam OR Quran), complete human AND Islam, healthy heart (Galb Salim) AND Islam, healthy life (Hayat tayebeh) AND Islam, calm soul (Nafse motmaeneh) And Islam and healthy wisdom (Aghle Salim) AND Islam). Purposive sampling was conducted and nine participants were selected. Semi-structured interviews and observations were conducted periodically for data collection after obtaining informed consent. Observational, theoretical, and methodological notes were made. Then, using MAXQUDA 7 software, the data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results The relevant literature in the theoretical phase uncovered the attributes of the concept of spiritual health, including love of the Creator, duty-based life, religious rationality, psychological balance, and attention to afterlife. These attributes were explored in depth in later stages. Finally, the definition of spiritual health was developed. Conclusions Islam has

  5. Spirituality, stress, and retention of nurses in critical care.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Duane

    2013-01-01

    Providing care to patients in critical care units generates stress. Helping the critical care nurse manage this stress can lead to better patient experiences and higher nursing retention. While providing holistic care to patients produces better outcomes, addressing the holistic needs of the caregiver must also be considered. Included in the holistic needs of the nurse is their spiritual well-being. A study that measures spiritual well-being, stress, and nursing retention is the focus of this review.

  6. Spiritual Care Education and Rural Systems in Swan River.

    PubMed

    Curry, Janel; McCallum, Margaret; Rodriguez V, Jorge Juan

    2016-03-01

    The provision of spiritual care, and the training of spiritual care providers, must be embedded within the larger systems (economic, social, generational, and environmental) and communities within which clients reside. This study analyzes the results of a systems approach to CPE training that focused on the rural context of Swan River, Manitoba. It addresses the need for new approaches to contextualizing CPE training and for understanding the uniqueness of rural contexts in particular. PMID:26956751

  7. Traditional and spiritual medicine among Sudanese children with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Babikir, Haydar E

    2013-01-01

    This cross sectional hospital based study, carried out simultaneously in Khartoum and in Wad Madani, Al Gezira State, aimed to study the impact of spiritual beliefs on explanation of the epilepsy etiology and the choices and methods of spiritual and traditional medicine used in the management of epilepsy in Sudan. The study included 180 care givers of whom 165 (91.7%) were mothers. Their ages ranged between 30–40 years. The majority (88.8%) were educated and 60 (33.3%) of them live in rural areas. Fifty eight (32.2%) attributed epilepsy to supernatural causes while 41 (22.8%) and 90 (50%) thought that epilepsy is an untreatable and contagious disorder, respectively. Traditional and spiritual medicine for the treatment of epilepsy was used by 70.5%. The common spiritual technique used was incantations (45.6%), spitting cure (37.2%) and ritual incensing (36.7%). Herbs, black cumin (Nigella sativa), honey and olive oil were mentioned among others as a traditional treatment for epilepsy. About two fifth (42.5%) started traditional or spiritual treatment before seeking any medical advice. Nevertheless, only 2.4% stopped the medical treatment as advised by the traditional healer. Fifty five (43.3%) thought that spiritual and/ or traditional treatment were effective in the management of epilepsy, 60(47.2%) found no difference while 12(9.45) got worse. The majority of patients with epilepsy, although on medical treatment, used traditional and spiritual methods as well. Traditional and spiritual healers may be involved positively in the management of epilepsy and extensive public educational programs are needed. PMID:27493355

  8. Chaplaincy placements will highlight role of patient spirituality.

    PubMed

    2014-11-27

    UNIVERSITY OF Hull nursing students are undertaking placements with chaplains to find out more about the importance of patient spirituality. Lead chaplain for Northern Lincolnshire and Goole NHS Foundation Trust, the Rev Charles Thody, is working with chaplains at Hull and East Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust to provide placements and run lectures and tutorials. 'Spiritual care is a huge element of palliative and end of life care,' he said. PMID:25428299

  9. Religion, spirituality and cancer: current status and methodological challenges.

    PubMed

    Stefanek, Michael; McDonald, Paige Green; Hess, Stephanie A

    2005-06-01

    The role of religion and spirituality in health has received increasing attention in the scientific and lay literature. While the scientific attention to this issue has expanded, there continue to be methodological and measurement concerns that often prevent firm conclusions about health and adjustment benefits. Limited attention has been provided to the role of spirituality and religion in cancer. This is true when both disease outcome and adjustment are considered. A recent 'levels of evidence' review examining the link between physical health and religion or spirituality found little overall support for the hypotheses that religion or spirituality impact cancer progression or mortality. Studies examining their impact on quality of life and adjustment are decidedly mixed. In sum, research specifically focusing on the role of religion or spirituality on cancer outcomes has been surprisingly sparse. Such research presents a number of methodological and measurement challenges. Due to these unmet challenges in the literature to date, it is premature to determine what role religion and spirituality play in disease, adjustment, or quality of life outcomes in cancer. A number of suggestions are made for continued research in this area.

  10. Measuring a Journey without Goal: Meditation, Spirituality, and Physiology.

    PubMed

    Buttle, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The secular practice of meditation is associated with a range of physiological and cognitive effects, including lower blood pressure, lower cortisol, cortical thickening, and activation of areas of the brain associated with attention and emotion regulation. However, in the context of spiritual practice, these benefits are secondary gains, as the primary aim is spiritual transformation. Despite obvious difficulties in trying to measure a journey without goal, spiritual aspects involved in the practice of meditation should also be addressed by experimental study. This review starts by considering meditation in the form of the relaxation response (a counterpart to the stress response), before contrasting mindfulness research that emphasizes the role of attention and alertness in meditation. This contrast demonstrates how reference to traditional spiritual texts (in this case Buddhist) can be used to guide research questions involving meditation. Further considerations are detailed, along with the proposal that research should triangulate spiritual textual sources, first person accounts (i.e., neurophenomenology), and physiological/cognitive measures in order to aid our understanding of meditation, not only in the secular context of health benefits, but also in the context of spiritual practice.

  11. Measuring a Journey without Goal: Meditation, Spirituality, and Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Buttle, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The secular practice of meditation is associated with a range of physiological and cognitive effects, including lower blood pressure, lower cortisol, cortical thickening, and activation of areas of the brain associated with attention and emotion regulation. However, in the context of spiritual practice, these benefits are secondary gains, as the primary aim is spiritual transformation. Despite obvious difficulties in trying to measure a journey without goal, spiritual aspects involved in the practice of meditation should also be addressed by experimental study. This review starts by considering meditation in the form of the relaxation response (a counterpart to the stress response), before contrasting mindfulness research that emphasizes the role of attention and alertness in meditation. This contrast demonstrates how reference to traditional spiritual texts (in this case Buddhist) can be used to guide research questions involving meditation. Further considerations are detailed, along with the proposal that research should triangulate spiritual textual sources, first person accounts (i.e., neurophenomenology), and physiological/cognitive measures in order to aid our understanding of meditation, not only in the secular context of health benefits, but also in the context of spiritual practice. PMID:26137495

  12. Measuring a Journey without Goal: Meditation, Spirituality, and Physiology.

    PubMed

    Buttle, Heather

    2015-01-01

    The secular practice of meditation is associated with a range of physiological and cognitive effects, including lower blood pressure, lower cortisol, cortical thickening, and activation of areas of the brain associated with attention and emotion regulation. However, in the context of spiritual practice, these benefits are secondary gains, as the primary aim is spiritual transformation. Despite obvious difficulties in trying to measure a journey without goal, spiritual aspects involved in the practice of meditation should also be addressed by experimental study. This review starts by considering meditation in the form of the relaxation response (a counterpart to the stress response), before contrasting mindfulness research that emphasizes the role of attention and alertness in meditation. This contrast demonstrates how reference to traditional spiritual texts (in this case Buddhist) can be used to guide research questions involving meditation. Further considerations are detailed, along with the proposal that research should triangulate spiritual textual sources, first person accounts (i.e., neurophenomenology), and physiological/cognitive measures in order to aid our understanding of meditation, not only in the secular context of health benefits, but also in the context of spiritual practice. PMID:26137495

  13. Study of Spirituality in Elderly With Subjective Memory Complaints.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Surbhi C; Subramanyam, Alka A; Kamath, Ravindra M; Pinto, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Subjective memory complaints are very common among elderly. They can be due to depression, cognitive decline, or be a part of normal aging process. Spirituality is another important dimension in elderly, and it is believed to help them cope with various adversities. This study was done to find out whether any relation exists between these 2 variables in elderly. A total of 120 elderly individuals, presenting with subjective memory complaints, were divided into 3 groups - controls, elderly with depression, and elderly with mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Spirituality in them was studied by dividing it into the subdomains of self-transcendence, presence of meaning in life, search for meaning in life, and locus of control. Spirituality was the highest in controls, followed by MCI group, and then depression group. Spirituality had a direct negative relationship with severity of depression, while relationship of spirituality with severity of cognitive decline was more complex. Relationship of spirituality with mental health status in elderly patients seemed bidirectional, that is, cause as well as effect relationship.

  14. Spirituality, Learning and Personalisation: Exploring the Relationship between Spiritual Development and Learning to Learn in a Faith-Based Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crick, Ruth Deakin; Jelfs, Helen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we explore the relationship between spirituality and learning how to learn in a faith-based secondary school. The development of a spiritually grounded pedagogy is a way of explicitly attending to spiritual development in teaching, learning and curriculum. The research described here comprises a personalised enquiry project in which…

  15. Assessing the spiritual needs and practices of oncology patients in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Dedeli, Ozden; Yildiz, Emel; Yuksel, Safak

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the oncology patients' spiritual needs and activities. Besides, the study was to provide clinical evaluation of the feasibility and usefulness of the Patients Spiritual Needs Assessment Scale. This descriptive and cross-sectional study was performed by using a demographic and spiritual practices questionnaire, the Turkish version of the Patients Spiritual Needs Assessment Scale. The results of our study demonstrated that the most common spiritual needs of patients with cancer were "to address issues before death and dying" (100%), "feel a sense of peace and contentment" (94.8%), and "for companionship" (93.5%). Spiritually assessing a patient with cancer requires knowledge of how spiritual needs may manifest and how to talk with a client about his or her spiritual needs. These findings can help nurses to begin this process of providing spiritual care for patients with cancer. PMID:25658933

  16. Neuro-ontological interpretation of spiritual experiences.

    PubMed

    Frecska, Ede; Luna, Luis Eduardo

    2006-10-01

    The prevailing neuroscientific paradigm considers information processing within the central nervous system as occurring through hierarchically organized and interconnected neural networks. The hierarchy of neural networks doesn't end at the neuroaxonal level; it incorporates subcellular mechanisms as well. When the size of the hierarchical components reaches the nanometer range and the number of elements exceeds that of the neuroaxonal system, an interface emerges for a possible transition between neurochemical and quantum physical events. "Signal nonlocality", accessed by means of quantum entanglement is an essential feature of the quantum physical domain. The presented interface may imply that some manifestations of altered states of consciousness, unconscious/conscious shifts have quantum origin with significant psychosomatic implications. Healing methods based on altered states of consciousness and common in spiritual or shamanic traditions escape neuroscientific explanations based on classical cognition denoted here as "perceptual-cognitive-symbolic" (characteristic of ordinary states of consciousness). Another channel of information processing, called "direct-intuitive-nonlocal" (characteristic of non-ordinary states of consciousness) is required to be introduced for interpretation. The first one is capable of modeling via symbolism and is more culturally bound due to its psycholinguistic features. The second channel lacks the symbolic mediation, therefore it has more transcultural similarity and practically ineffable for the first one, though culture specific transliteration may occur. Different traditional healing rituals pursue the same end: to destroy "profane" sensibility. The ritual use of hallucinogens, the monotonous drumming, the repeated refrains, the fatigue, the fasting, the dancing and so forth, create a sensory condition which is wide open to the so-called "supernatural". According to contemporary anthropological views, the breakdown of ordinary

  17. Neuro-ontological interpretation of spiritual experiences.

    PubMed

    Frecska, Ede; Luna, Luis Eduardo

    2006-10-01

    The prevailing neuroscientific paradigm considers information processing within the central nervous system as occurring through hierarchically organized and interconnected neural networks. The hierarchy of neural networks doesn't end at the neuroaxonal level; it incorporates subcellular mechanisms as well. When the size of the hierarchical components reaches the nanometer range and the number of elements exceeds that of the neuroaxonal system, an interface emerges for a possible transition between neurochemical and quantum physical events. "Signal nonlocality", accessed by means of quantum entanglement is an essential feature of the quantum physical domain. The presented interface may imply that some manifestations of altered states of consciousness, unconscious/conscious shifts have quantum origin with significant psychosomatic implications. Healing methods based on altered states of consciousness and common in spiritual or shamanic traditions escape neuroscientific explanations based on classical cognition denoted here as "perceptual-cognitive-symbolic" (characteristic of ordinary states of consciousness). Another channel of information processing, called "direct-intuitive-nonlocal" (characteristic of non-ordinary states of consciousness) is required to be introduced for interpretation. The first one is capable of modeling via symbolism and is more culturally bound due to its psycholinguistic features. The second channel lacks the symbolic mediation, therefore it has more transcultural similarity and practically ineffable for the first one, though culture specific transliteration may occur. Different traditional healing rituals pursue the same end: to destroy "profane" sensibility. The ritual use of hallucinogens, the monotonous drumming, the repeated refrains, the fatigue, the fasting, the dancing and so forth, create a sensory condition which is wide open to the so-called "supernatural". According to contemporary anthropological views, the breakdown of ordinary

  18. Spirituality: the basis for nurses' ethics.

    PubMed

    Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa; Lourenço, Maria Regina; de Godoy, Simone; Rodriguez, Eliana Llapa

    2004-01-01

    A social crisis in both the labor and ecological systems constitutes a problem that requires the formulation of a new ethics for humanity. The social crisis is a result of the organizational model used by modern societies in the production of wealth and its unequal distribution. This intense inequality in wealth distribution contributes to a schism between populations. On one side an opulent and privileged society exists, and on the other a poor and downtrodden humanity. This crisis in the labor system stems from automated production methods, which devalue man's work and exclude him from contemporary society. The ecological crisis emerges from the dominance with which men have subjugated the Earth and its resources. Man has not acknowledged Earth's permutations and, therefore, has not taken the necessary caution of such changeability nor respected its effects. Such crises affect all populations and cry out for attention. Contemporary societies demand solutions to these questions. Nursing is a part and parcel of this yearning. In this setting, the nurse should be able to offer collaboration and solidarity with a project of creating a world ethos based on a minimum consensus amongst humans. Understanding and believing that spirituality is invaluable in this process, the authors of this work aim at addressing it as an essential dimension for nurses' ethics.

  19. Physics and spirituality: the next grand unification?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josephson, Brian

    1987-01-01

    In what light should a scientist regard the assertions of a religion, or of religions in general? One extreme position is the atheistic one of regarding the assertions of religion as falsehoods. Such a position can be sustained only by regarding the experiences which individuals consider as validating their religious beliefs as being explicable in other ways and, in the absence of an adequate research programme to support it, must be considered more as falling within the field of opinion that as within that of science. The alternative to this atheistic position is that there exists an aspect of reality-that one may for convenience call transcendental-which embraces the subject matter of religion (or as some may prefer to term it, the spiritual aspect of life) and which is not at present encompassed by science. The question then arises whether some future science may be able to cope with this aspect of reality, or whether it will remain forever beyond the scope of science. The author attempts to explain the ways in which current scientific orthodoxies are being challenged and to convey some idea of the alternatives presently emerging. A number of important themes here include the questions of the validity of reductionism and the universality of quantum mechanics, as well as that of the relevance of mystical experience.

  20. Longitudinal spiritual coping with trauma in people with HIV: implications for health care.

    PubMed

    Kremer, Heidemarie; Ironson, Gail

    2014-03-01

    This 10-year study (N=177) examines how people with HIV use spirituality to cope with life's trauma on top of HIV-related stress (e.g., facing death, stigma, poverty, limited healthcare) usual events. Spirituality, defined as a connection to a higher presence, is independent from religion (institutionalized spirituality). As a dynamic adaptive process, coping requires longitudinal studying. Qualitative content-analysis of interviews/essays yielded a coding of specific aspects and a longitudinal rating of overall spiritual coping. Most participants were rated as spiritual, using spiritual practices, about half experienced comfort, empowerment, growth/transformation, gratitude, less than one-third meaning, community, and positive reframing. Up to one-fifth perceived spiritual conflict, struggle, or anger, triggering post-traumatic stress, which sometimes converted into positive growth/transformation later. Over time, 65% used spiritual coping positively, 7% negatively, and 28% had no significant use. Spirituality was mainly beneficial for women, heterosexuals, and African Americans (p<0.05). Results suggest that spirituality is a major source of positive and occasionally negative coping (e.g., viewing HIV as sin). We discuss how clinicians can recognize and prevent when spirituality is creating distress and barriers to HIV treatment, adding a literature review on ways of effective spiritual assessment. Spirituality may be a beneficial component of coping with trauma, considering socio-cultural contexts. PMID:24601735

  1. Longitudinal Spiritual Coping with Trauma in People with HIV: Implications for Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Ironson, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This 10-year study (N=177) examines how people with HIV use spirituality to cope with life's trauma on top of HIV-related stress (e.g., facing death, stigma, poverty, limited healthcare) usual events. Spirituality, defined as a connection to a higher presence, is independent from religion (institutionalized spirituality). As a dynamic adaptive process, coping requires longitudinal studying. Qualitative content-analysis of interviews/essays yielded a coding of specific aspects and a longitudinal rating of overall spiritual coping. Most participants were rated as spiritual, using spiritual practices, about half experienced comfort, empowerment, growth/transformation, gratitude, less than one-third meaning, community, and positive reframing. Up to one-fifth perceived spiritual conflict, struggle, or anger, triggering post-traumatic stress, which sometimes converted into positive growth/transformation later. Over time, 65% used spiritual coping positively, 7% negatively, and 28% had no significant use. Spirituality was mainly beneficial for women, heterosexuals, and African Americans (p<0.05). Results suggest that spirituality is a major source of positive and occasionally negative coping (e.g., viewing HIV as sin). We discuss how clinicians can recognize and prevent when spirituality is creating distress and barriers to HIV treatment, adding a literature review on ways of effective spiritual assessment. Spirituality may be a beneficial component of coping with trauma, considering socio-cultural contexts. PMID:24601735

  2. Religion, spirituality, and health: a review and update.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Harold G

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes research prior to 2010 and more recent research on religion, spirituality, and health, including some of the latest work being done by research teams at Columbia University, Harvard University, Duke University, and other academic medical centers. First, terms such as religion, humanism, and spirituality are defined. Second, based on his research team's previous systematic review of quantitative studies published in the peer-reviewed literature prior to 2010, the author discusses the findings from that research on the effects of religion and spirituality (R/S) on (1) mental health-well-being, purpose in life, hope, optimism, self-esteem, depression, anxiety, suicide, and substance abuse; (2) health behaviors-exercise, diet, cigarette smoking, and risky sexual activity; and (3) physical health-coronary artery disease, cancer, and all-cause mortality. Third, the author examines the latest research on the prevalence of spiritual needs among individuals with serious or terminal medical illnesses, the consequences of ignoring those needs, and the results of clinical trials that have examined the effects of spiritual assessments by physicians. Finally, the author reviews the research currently being conducted at Duke University on the efficacy of religious cognitive-behavioral therapies and on the effects of religious involvement on telomere length in stressed caregivers. Resources are provided that will assist seasoned researchers and clinicians who might be interested in doing research in this novel and expanding area of whole-person medicine. PMID:26026153

  3. Spiritual and religious aspects of skin and skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Shenefelt, Philip D; Shenefelt, Debrah A

    2014-01-01

    Skin and skin disorders have had spiritual aspects since ancient times. Skin, hair, and nails are visible to self and others, and touchable by self and others. The skin is a major sensory organ. Skin also expresses emotions detectable by others through pallor, coldness, "goose bumps", redness, warmth, or sweating. Spiritual and religious significances of skin are revealed through how much of the skin has been and continues to be covered with what types of coverings, scalp and beard hair cutting, shaving and styling, skin, nail, and hair coloring and decorating, tattooing, and intentional scarring of skin. Persons with visible skin disorders have often been stigmatized or even treated as outcasts. Shamans and other spiritual and religious healers have brought about healing of skin disorders through spiritual means. Spiritual and religious interactions with various skin disorders such as psoriasis, leprosy, and vitiligo are discussed. Religious aspects of skin and skin diseases are evaluated for several major religions, with a special focus on Judaism, both conventional and kabbalistic. PMID:25120377

  4. Spirituality in the natural sciences and nursing: an interdisciplinary perspective.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Indira D; Raynor, James E

    2006-01-01

    The Big Bang theory, a widely accepted theory of the origin of the universe, states that the universe was created between ten to twenty billion years ago from a cosmic explosion. Charles Darwin, a 19th century English naturalist, convinced the scientific community through his work that life evolved by natural selection over three and a half million years ago rather than through the influence of a Supreme Being or creator. Although there has been scientific data to support the claims of natural selection, there still remain many unanswered questions suggesting that other mechanisms contributed to the evolution of life. These unresolved findings greatly influenced mysticism and the development of the theological argument, which suggest the existence of a supreme being (God), who is believe to be an omnipotent healer, comforter, provider of salvation, and the center of mysticism spirituality. There has been consistent use of spiritual practices to address health concerns by individuals for thousands of years. There is increasing data that supports the implementation of spirituality in nursing for client care to enhance health outcome and patient wellbeing. Incorporating spiritual care into practice is an integral dimension of holistic care that is the crux of nursing practice in the 21st century. Holistic care of clients requires that nurses use the nursing process to implement spiritual care in practice.

  5. Attachment Theory and Spirituality: Two Threads Converging in Palliative Care?

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Jakob; Frick, Eckhard; Petersen, Yvonne; Mauer, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss and explore the interrelation between two concepts, attachment theory and the concept of spirituality, which are important to palliative care and to founding a multivariate understanding of the patient's needs and challenges. Both concepts have been treated by research in diverse and multiform ways, but little effort has yet been made to integrate them into one theoretical framework in reference to the palliative context. In this paper, we begin an attempt to close this scientific gap theoretically. Following the lines of thought in this paper, we assume that spirituality can be conceptualized as an adequate response of a person's attachment pattern to the peculiarity of the palliative situation. Spirituality can be seen both as a recourse to securely based relationships and as an attempt to explore the ultimate unknown, the mystery of one's own death. Thus, spirituality in the palliative context corresponds to the task of attachment behavior: to transcend symbiosis while continuing bonds and thus to explore the unknown environment independently and without fear. Spiritual activity is interpreted as a human attachment behavior option that receives special quality and importance in the terminal stage of life. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed in the final section of the paper. PMID:24319482

  6. Spiritual and religious aspects of skin and skin disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shenefelt, Philip D; Shenefelt, Debrah A

    2014-01-01

    Skin and skin disorders have had spiritual aspects since ancient times. Skin, hair, and nails are visible to self and others, and touchable by self and others. The skin is a major sensory organ. Skin also expresses emotions detectable by others through pallor, coldness, “goose bumps”, redness, warmth, or sweating. Spiritual and religious significances of skin are revealed through how much of the skin has been and continues to be covered with what types of coverings, scalp and beard hair cutting, shaving and styling, skin, nail, and hair coloring and decorating, tattooing, and intentional scarring of skin. Persons with visible skin disorders have often been stigmatized or even treated as outcasts. Shamans and other spiritual and religious healers have brought about healing of skin disorders through spiritual means. Spiritual and religious interactions with various skin disorders such as psoriasis, leprosy, and vitiligo are discussed. Religious aspects of skin and skin diseases are evaluated for several major religions, with a special focus on Judaism, both conventional and kabbalistic. PMID:25120377

  7. Spirituality in the natural sciences and nursing: an interdisciplinary perspective.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Indira D; Raynor, James E

    2006-01-01

    The Big Bang theory, a widely accepted theory of the origin of the universe, states that the universe was created between ten to twenty billion years ago from a cosmic explosion. Charles Darwin, a 19th century English naturalist, convinced the scientific community through his work that life evolved by natural selection over three and a half million years ago rather than through the influence of a Supreme Being or creator. Although there has been scientific data to support the claims of natural selection, there still remain many unanswered questions suggesting that other mechanisms contributed to the evolution of life. These unresolved findings greatly influenced mysticism and the development of the theological argument, which suggest the existence of a supreme being (God), who is believe to be an omnipotent healer, comforter, provider of salvation, and the center of mysticism spirituality. There has been consistent use of spiritual practices to address health concerns by individuals for thousands of years. There is increasing data that supports the implementation of spirituality in nursing for client care to enhance health outcome and patient wellbeing. Incorporating spiritual care into practice is an integral dimension of holistic care that is the crux of nursing practice in the 21st century. Holistic care of clients requires that nurses use the nursing process to implement spiritual care in practice. PMID:18402345

  8. Religion, spirituality, and health: a review and update.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Harold G

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes research prior to 2010 and more recent research on religion, spirituality, and health, including some of the latest work being done by research teams at Columbia University, Harvard University, Duke University, and other academic medical centers. First, terms such as religion, humanism, and spirituality are defined. Second, based on his research team's previous systematic review of quantitative studies published in the peer-reviewed literature prior to 2010, the author discusses the findings from that research on the effects of religion and spirituality (R/S) on (1) mental health-well-being, purpose in life, hope, optimism, self-esteem, depression, anxiety, suicide, and substance abuse; (2) health behaviors-exercise, diet, cigarette smoking, and risky sexual activity; and (3) physical health-coronary artery disease, cancer, and all-cause mortality. Third, the author examines the latest research on the prevalence of spiritual needs among individuals with serious or terminal medical illnesses, the consequences of ignoring those needs, and the results of clinical trials that have examined the effects of spiritual assessments by physicians. Finally, the author reviews the research currently being conducted at Duke University on the efficacy of religious cognitive-behavioral therapies and on the effects of religious involvement on telomere length in stressed caregivers. Resources are provided that will assist seasoned researchers and clinicians who might be interested in doing research in this novel and expanding area of whole-person medicine.

  9. Attachment theory and spirituality: two threads converging in palliative care?

    PubMed

    Loetz, Cécile; Müller, Jakob; Frick, Eckhard; Petersen, Yvonne; Hvidt, Niels Christian; Mauer, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss and explore the interrelation between two concepts, attachment theory and the concept of spirituality, which are important to palliative care and to founding a multivariate understanding of the patient's needs and challenges. Both concepts have been treated by research in diverse and multiform ways, but little effort has yet been made to integrate them into one theoretical framework in reference to the palliative context. In this paper, we begin an attempt to close this scientific gap theoretically. Following the lines of thought in this paper, we assume that spirituality can be conceptualized as an adequate response of a person's attachment pattern to the peculiarity of the palliative situation. Spirituality can be seen both as a recourse to securely based relationships and as an attempt to explore the ultimate unknown, the mystery of one's own death. Thus, spirituality in the palliative context corresponds to the task of attachment behavior: to transcend symbiosis while continuing bonds and thus to explore the unknown environment independently and without fear. Spiritual activity is interpreted as a human attachment behavior option that receives special quality and importance in the terminal stage of life. Implications for clinical practice and research are discussed in the final section of the paper.

  10. Depressive symptoms and spiritual wellbeing in asymptomatic heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Mills, Paul J; Wilson, Kathleen; Iqbal, Navaid; Iqbal, Fatima; Alvarez, Milagros; Pung, Meredith A; Wachmann, Katherine; Rutledge, Thomas; Maglione, Jeanne; Zisook, Sid; Dimsdale, Joel E; Lunde, Ottar; Greenberg, Barry H; Maisel, Alan; Raisinghani, Ajit; Natarajan, Loki; Jain, Shamini; Hufford, David J; Redwine, Laura

    2015-06-01

    Depression adversely predicts prognosis in individuals with symptomatic heart failure. In some clinical populations, spiritual wellness is considered to be a protective factor against depressive symptoms. This study examined associations among depressive symptoms, spiritual wellbeing, sleep, fatigue, functional capacity, and inflammatory biomarkers in 132 men and women with asymptomatic stage B heart failure (age 66.5 years ± 10.5). Approximately 32 % of the patients scored ≥10 on the Beck Depression Inventory, indicating potentially clinically relevant depressive symptoms. Multiple regression analysis predicting fewer depressive symptoms included the following significant variables: a lower inflammatory score comprised of disease-relevant biomarkers (p < 0.02), less fatigue (p < 0.001), better sleep (p < 0.04), and more spiritual wellbeing (p < 0.01) (overall model F = 26.6, p < 0.001, adjusted R square = 0.629). Further analyses indicated that the meaning (p < 0.01) and peace (p < 0.01) subscales, but not the faith (p = 0.332) subscale, of spiritual wellbeing were independently associated with fewer depressive symptoms. Interventions aimed at increasing spiritual wellbeing in patients lives, and specifically meaning and peace, may be a potential treatment target for depressive symptoms asymptomatic heart failure. PMID:25533643

  11. Religion and spirituality in psychotherapy: a practice-friendly review of research.

    PubMed

    Post, Brian C; Wade, Nathaniel G

    2009-02-01

    The role of religion and spirituality in psychotherapy has received growing attention in the last two decades, with a focus on understanding the ways that religion and spirituality relate to therapists, clients, and treatment methods. The authors reviewed recent empirical research on religion and spirituality in psychotherapy to inform practitioners about effective ways to incorporate the sacred into their clinical work. Three main areas are covered: religion/spirituality and therapists, religion/spirituality and clients, and religious/spiritual interventions. Research indicates that therapists are open to religious/spiritual issues, that clients want to discuss these matters in therapy, and that the use of religious/spiritual interventions for some clients can be an effective adjunct to traditional therapy interventions.

  12. A Synthesis of Spiritual Intelligence Themes from Islamic and Western Philosophical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Hanefar, Shamsiah Banu; Sa'ari, Che Zarrina; Siraj, Saedah

    2016-12-01

    Spiritual intelligence is an emerging term that is widely discussed and accepted as one of the main components that addresses and solves many life problems. Nonetheless there is no specific study being done to synthesize the spiritual intelligence themes from Western and Islamic philosophical perspectives. This research aimed to identify common spiritual intelligence themes from these two perspectives and elucidated its contents by the view of two well-known Islamic scholars; al-Ghazali and Hasan Langgulung. Seven spiritual intelligence themes were identified through thematic analysis; meaning/purpose of life, consciousness, transcendence, spiritual resources, self-determination, reflection-soul purification and spiritual coping with obstacles. These findings will be the groundwork for centered theory of spiritual intelligence themes that synthesize the Islamic and Western philosophical perspectives. It is hoped that this study will contribute significantly to the development of valid and reliable spiritual intelligence themes beyond the social and cultural boundaries.

  13. The Meaning of Spirituality and Spiritual Care within Nursing and Health Care Practice Wilfred McSherry The Meaning of Spirituality and Spiritual Care within Nursing and Health Care Practice Quay Books £24.99 318pp 9781856423410 9781856423410 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    2009-06-01

    MCSHERRY'S BOOK works on two levels. It is a fine example of how to research a subject as ethereal as spirituality but it is also a useful text that explores spirituality as an exciting component of care.

  14. Spiritual abuse: an additional dimension of abuse experienced by abused Haredi (ultraorthodox) Jewish wives.

    PubMed

    Dehan, Nicole; Levi, Zipi

    2009-11-01

    This article aims to conceptualize spiritual abuse as an additional dimension to physical, psychological, sexual, and economic abuse. Growing out of an interpretivist participatory action research study in a therapeutic Haredi (Jewish ultraorthodox) group of eight abused women, spiritual abuse has been defined as any attempt to impair the woman's spiritual life, spiritual self, or spiritual well-being, with three levels of intensity: (a) belittling her spiritual worth, beliefs, or deeds; (b) preventing her from performing spiritual acts; and (c) causing her to transgress spiritual obligations or prohibitions. The concept and its typology are illustrated by means of examples from the women's abusive experiences and may be of theoretical and therapeutic worldwide relevance.

  15. To describe or prescribe: assumptions underlying a prescriptive nursing process approach to spiritual care.

    PubMed

    Pesut, Barbara; Sawatzky, Rick

    2006-06-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to spirituality in nursing practice. Much of the literature on spiritual care uses the nursing process to describe this aspect of care. However, the use of the nursing process in the area of spirituality may be problematic, depending upon the understandings of the nature and intent of this process. Is it primarily a descriptive process meant to make visible the nursing actions to provide spiritual support, or is it a prescriptive process meant to guide nursing actions for intervening in the spirituality of patients? A prescriptive nursing process approach implies influencing, and in some cases reframing, the spirituality of patients and thereby extends beyond general notions of spiritual support. In this paper we discuss four problematic assumptions that form the basis for a prescriptive approach to spiritual care. We conclude that this approach extends the nursing role beyond appropriate professional boundaries, making it ethically problematic.

  16. Integrating spirituality and psychotherapy: ethical issues and principles to consider.

    PubMed

    Plante, Thomas G

    2007-09-01

    Professional and scientific psychology appears to have rediscovered spirituality and religion during recent years, with a large number of conferences, seminars, workshops, books, and special issues in major professional journals on spirituality and psychology integration. The purpose of this commentary is to highlight some of the more compelling ethical principles and issues to consider in spirituality and psychology integration with a focus on psychotherapy. This commentary will use the American Psychological Association's (2002) Ethics Code and more specifically, the RRICC model of ethics that readily applies to various mental health ethics codes across the world. The RRICC model highlights the ethical values of respect, responsibility, integrity, competence, and concern. Being thoughtful about ethical principles and possible dilemmas as well as getting appropriate training and ongoing consultation can greatly help the professional better navigate these challenging waters.

  17. Spiritual interventions in psychotherapy: evaluations by highly religious clients.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Jennifer S; Smith, Timothy B; Barlow, Sally H

    2007-10-01

    Spiritual and religious interventions in psychotherapy have increasingly received research attention, particularly with highly religious clients. This study examined client opinions about and experiences with religious interventions in psychotherapy. A sample of 152 clients at a counseling center of a university sponsored by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (LDS) completed a survey with ratings of specific religious interventions concerning appropriateness, helpfulness, and prevalence. Out-of-session religious interventions were considered more appropriate by clients than in-session religious interventions, but in-session interventions were rated as more helpful. Specific interventions considered both appropriate and helpful by the LDS participants included referencing scriptural passages, teaching spiritual concepts, encouraging forgiveness, involving religious community resources, and conducting assessments of client spirituality. Some religious interventions were perceived as inappropriate or not helpful, and clients provided explanations for why religious interventions can be either effective or ineffective in psychotherapy.

  18. Assessment of religious and spiritual capital in African American communities.

    PubMed

    Holt, Cheryl L; Schulz, Emily; Williams, Beverly; Clark, Eddie M; Wang, Min Qi; Southward, Penny L

    2012-12-01

    African American faith communities are an important source of social capital. The present study adapted a theory-based social capital instrument to result in religious (e.g., from organized worship) and spiritual (e.g., from relationship with higher power) capital measures. Data from a national sample of 803 African Americans suggest the instruments have high internal reliability and are distinct from general religiosity. Measurement models confirmed factor structures. Religious capital was positively associated with self-rated health status. Religious and spiritual capital were negatively associated with depressive symptoms, but these associations largely became nonsignificant in multivariate models that controlled for demographic characteristics. An exception is for spiritual capital in the form of community participation, which retained a negative association with depressive symptoms. These instruments may have applied value for health promotion research and practice in African American communities.

  19. Intrinsicality: reconsidering spirituality, meaning(s) and mandates.

    PubMed

    Hammell, K W

    2001-06-01

    Canadian occupational therapists have placed spirituality as the central core of their theoretical Model, depicting inner and outer selves that contradict simultaneous declarations concerning the integration of mind/body/spirit. Even the word spirituality has discrepant meanings and failure to articulate one chosen meaning leads to ambiguity. This paper argues that occupational therapists must agree upon a single definition of spirituality that is congruent with our professional mandate and philosophical perspective; and that prevention of misunderstandings between and amongst clients and other health care professionals demands recourse to our own terminology. It is proposed that intrinsicality be employed to articulate the personal philosophy of meaning with which we interpret our lives. Influenced by environmental context and in homeostatic relationship with the body and mind, intrinsicality constitutes the essence of the self and informs occupational choices based upon personal values and priorities. Acknowledgement of intrinsicality respects the uniqueness of individuals' meanings. PMID:11433917

  20. Spiritual self-schema therapy, drug abuse, and HIV.

    PubMed

    Marcotte, David; Avants, S Kelly; Margolin, Arthur

    2003-01-01

    This case report describes the use of Spiritual Self-Schema (3-S) therapy in the treatment of an HIV-positive inner-city drug user maintained on methadone and referred for additional treatment due to unremitting cocaine use. 3-S therapy is a manual-guided intervention based on cognitive self-schema theory. Its goal is to help the patient create, elaborate, and make accessible a cognitive schema--the "spiritual" self-schema-that is incompatible with drug use and other HIV risk behaviors. 3-S therapy facilitates a cognitive shift from the habitual activation of the "addict" self-schema, with its drug-related cognitions, scripts and action plans, to the "spiritual" self-schema, with its associated repertoire of harm reduction beliefs and behaviors.

  1. Symbolic, ritual and social dynamics of spiritual healing.

    PubMed

    Glik, D C

    1988-01-01

    Participant observation among white, middle class spiritual healing groups in the Baltimore area (1981-1983) revealed distinct sociocultural and interpersonal patterns of action and influence among two types of groups found. Types of groups were (1) Christian, Pentecostal, neo-Pentecostal or 'charismatic' healing groups and (2) 'New Age', or 'metaphysical' healing groups. Qualitative findings highlight similarities and differences between these two types of groups through examination of organizational characteristics, leadership patterns, ideological systems, and ritual processes. Illness and social characteristics of participants are also compared. Analysis of characteristics of groups and participants shows how the incorporation of explanatory models, social roles, myths, and symbols into the social, ideational, and ritual context of spiritual healing is essential to its therapeutic effect, and that spiritual healing exemplifies a symbolic healing system. Finally, a substantive theoretical model for healing research is suggested.

  2. Spiritual Care For Jewish Patients Facing A Life Threatening Illness

    PubMed Central

    Bluman, Rabbi Olga F.; Klein, Linda; Thomas, Jay; Ferrell, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Providing biopsychosocial/spiritual care for patients facing a life threatening illness can be complex, and this complexity can be amplified when a patient identifies as Jewish. A common but incorrect assumption is that a person who identifies him or herself as Jewish abides by the tenets of the Jewish religion. However, many Jews consider themselves Jewish in an ethnic or cultural sense rather than connected to a religion or belief in God. This case report presents an ethnic/cultural Jew with a life threatening illness of advanced lung cancer. Despite evidence of spiritual/existential suffering, this patient declined spiritual care. From an analysis of this case and clinical experience, we suggest exploratory questions that clinicians can use in response to common questions or statements made by such patients. This exploration may lead to a chaplain referral and we highlight interventions that chaplains and clinicians may find helpful as they come alongside Jewish patients. PMID:23614173

  3. The spiritual dimensions of care in military nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Ormsby, Andrew; Harrington, Ann

    2003-10-01

    Spirituality has been the subject of numerous journal articles and books in recent years. Research into this topic has been conducted in many spheres of nursing practice with the notable exception of military nursing. This article goes a small way to addressing the apparent lack of research into spirituality in a military nursing setting by summarizing the findings of one study into this significant area of nursing care. The findings are derived from a mixed method quantitative/qualitative study of registered nurses in the Royal Australian Air Force. The major finding indicated that two distinct concepts of "family" define the way in which this small group of nurses perceive, assess and implement care for the spiritual needs of their patients. These concepts comprise a traditional family structure and an extended military family structure that includes the person's unit and comrades-in-arms.

  4. The spiritual experiences of patients with diabetes- related limb amputation

    PubMed Central

    Salehi, Shayesteh; Ghodousi, Arash; Ojaghloo, Khadijeh

    2012-01-01

    Background: Confrontation with the consequences of diabetes causes a crisis in physical, mental, and spiritual dimensions. Sometimes the spiritual crisis can be tremendous. Since spiritual health coordinates different aspects of human life, this study aimed to identify the spiritual health of patients with defects caused by diabetes. Materials and Methods: This was a qualitative-phenomenological and descriptive study and the participants were selected from rehabilitation centers in Isfahan and Valiasr Hospital in Zanjan. A purposive sample of 15 participants underwent deep interviews. Colaizzi’s method of analysis was used to analyze the data. Findings: outcome of this phase of the study was 173 codes and 2 groups that included hindering factors in spiritual health and the promotion of the relation with God. The concepts that patients had experienced as hindering factors of the treatment process were disappointment and hopelessness, guilt, feeling distant from God, quitting obligatory acts and knowing God as cruel. The concepts that patients had experienced as contributing factors to the healing process were resorting to Imams, God’s ordering the disease as a reward, fear of God’s punishment, believing in miracles, being closer to God, believing in the mercy of God, returning to religious practice, feeling of enjoying life and knowing that the disease is the atonement of sins. Conclusions: With regard to the importance of spiritual and religious care as one of the tasks of nurses, as the key members of health team, they should respect the patients’ beliefs and values in addition to considering their physical and mental conditions. PMID:23833617

  5. Spirituality and health: the development of a field.

    PubMed

    Puchalski, Christina M; Blatt, Benjamin; Kogan, Mikhail; Butler, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Spirituality has played a role in health care for centuries, but by the early 20th century, technological advances in diagnosis and treatment overshadowed the more human element of medicine. In response, a core group of medical academics and practitioners launched a movement to reclaim medicine's spiritual roots, defining spirituality broadly as a search for meaning, purpose, and connectedness. This commentary describes the history of the field of spirituality and health-its origins, its furtherance through the Medical School Objectives Project, and its ultimate incorporation into the curricula of over 75% of U.S. medical schools. The diverse efforts in developing this field within medical education and in national and international organizations created a need for a cohesive framework. The National Competencies in Spirituality and Health-created at a consensus conference of faculty from seven medical schools and reported here for the first time-answered that need.Also reported are some of the first applications of these competencies-competency-linked curricular projects. This issue of Academic Medicine features articles from three of the participating medical schools as well as one from an additional medical school. This commentary also describes another competency application: the George Washington Institute of Spirituality and Health-Templeton Reflection Rounds initiative, known as G-TRR, which has provided clerkship students with the opportunity, through reflection on their patient encounters, to develop their own inner resources to address the suffering of others. This commentary concludes with the authors' proposals for future directions for the field. PMID:24280839

  6. Religion and spirituality in psychiatric care: looking back, looking ahead.

    PubMed

    Boehnlein, James K

    2006-12-01

    Cultural psychiatry has been an important contributor to the enhanced dialogue between psychiatry and religion in the past couple of decades. During this time, religion and spirituality have become more prominent in mainstream psychiatry in a number of areas of study and clinical care, including refugee and immigrant health, trauma and loss, psychotherapy, collaboration with clergy, bioethics, and psychiatric research. In looking towards the future, there is a great deal of promise for future enhancement of the study of religion and spirituality in psychiatric education, research, and clinical care.

  7. [Assess spirituality with adolescent outpatients: taboo or necessity?].

    PubMed

    De Germond-Burquier, Véronique; Narring, Françoise; Entremont, Cécile; Basset, Lytta

    2016-06-01

    Spirituality affects adolescents' as well as adults' daily life. It is usually considered to be a protective factor in physical and psychological health outcomes, but might also be a cause of suffering. In the perspective of an holistic approach, health professional should assess this subject with tact and sensitivity. Until there is a suitable instrument adapted to this age group and European culture, the exploration of spirituality and religious practices can be evaluated while taking the clinical history. Nevertheless, resistance which is common in health professionals, could be overcome by appropriate training.

  8. Spirituality and addiction: a research and clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Galanter, Marc

    2006-01-01

    Spirituality is a construct that has recently gained currency among clinicians because of its close association with twelve-step modalities and its perceived role in the promotion of meaningfulness in recovery from addiction. This article draws on studies from physiology, psychology, and cross-cultural sources to examine its nature and its relationship to substance use disorders. Illustrations of its potential and limitations as a component of treatment in spiritually oriented recovery movements like Alcoholics Anonymous, meditative practices, and treatment systems for the dually diagnosed are given.

  9. [Assess spirituality with adolescent outpatients: taboo or necessity?].

    PubMed

    De Germond-Burquier, Véronique; Narring, Françoise; Entremont, Cécile; Basset, Lytta

    2016-06-01

    Spirituality affects adolescents' as well as adults' daily life. It is usually considered to be a protective factor in physical and psychological health outcomes, but might also be a cause of suffering. In the perspective of an holistic approach, health professional should assess this subject with tact and sensitivity. Until there is a suitable instrument adapted to this age group and European culture, the exploration of spirituality and religious practices can be evaluated while taking the clinical history. Nevertheless, resistance which is common in health professionals, could be overcome by appropriate training. PMID:27451512

  10. An appointment with god: AIDS, place, and spirituality.

    PubMed

    Miller, Robert L

    2005-02-01

    This article describes how an African American gay man living with AIDS used his spiritual, religious, and cultural strengths to resist internalized dislocation because of heterosexism and homophobia. He was able to experience a relocation of God from places that rejected him to places that were conducive to his healing. By using these strengths, he was able to reject his physician's prediction of death and to call on God in response to an end-stage AIDS crisis. The development of spiritual agency is addressed.

  11. Nurturing the Spiritual Well-Being of Children with Special Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Kaili Chen; Wu, Deirdra I-Hwey

    2012-01-01

    Spirituality is of acknowledged and profound importance to children from mainstream school populations, but has been overlooked in respect of children with special needs. This article explores the issues related to spirituality and disabilities, and the relationship between spirituality and education for students with special needs. The following…

  12. Reconciling Spiritual Values Conflicts for Counselors and Lesbian and Gay Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fallon, Kathleen M.; Dobmeier, Robert A.; Reiner, Summer M.; Casquarelli, Elaine J.; Giglia, Lauren A.; Goodwin, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Counselors and lesbian and gay clients experience parallel values conflicts between religious beliefs/spirituality and sexual orientation. This article uses critical thinking to assist counselors to integrate religious/spiritual beliefs with professional ethical codes. Clients are assisted to integrate religious/spiritual beliefs with sexual…

  13. Nursing Support of the Spiritual Needs of Older Adults Living With Dementia: A Narrative Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Toivonen, Kristiina; Stolt, Minna; Suhonen, Riitta

    2015-01-01

    Across this literature review (n = 10), supporting spirituality in the nursing care of older adults with dementia is concerned with supporting religious activity, enabling connections, nurses' reflections on their own spirituality, and nonverbal communication. The benefits from the support of spirituality were seen to be reciprocal and to occur in everyday nursing.

  14. Re-Conceptualizing Spirituality in the Light of Educating Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Kathleen I.

    2007-01-01

    What is meant by spirituality in relation to a young child? Palmer (2003) asserted that spirituality is an elusive word with a variety of definitions--some compelling, some witty, some downright dangerous. The spirituality of a young child involves actively living by being connected to a natural source within the moral universe and affectively…

  15. The Campus Spiritual Climate: Predictors of Satisfaction among Students with Diverse Worldviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockenbach, Alyssa Bryant; Mayhew, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Using data collected via the Campus Religious and Spiritual Climate Survey (CRSCS), we examined how dimensions of the campus spiritual climate shape student satisfaction. The findings reveal that structural worldview diversity, space for support and spiritual expression, and provocative experiences with worldview diversity positively relate to…

  16. Affirming Presence: Spiritual Life and Friendship with Adolescents with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conner, Benjamin T.

    2010-01-01

    If spirituality is, among other things, a matter of "connectedness", then how do we nurture spirituality in adolescents with developmental disabilities who seem largely disconnected? This article advocates the practice of friendship as one important Christian model of spiritual connectedness that finds its origins in the initiative of God and…

  17. Peering into the "Clouds of Glory": Explorations of a Newborn Child's Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surr, John

    2012-01-01

    This article seeks to understand spirituality in newborn children through an exploration of Wordsworth's clouds of glory. First the article explores adult reactions reflecting a newborn child's spirituality. Objective manifestations of spirituality in newborn children, such as love, presence and connection, wonder and meaning, and faith, are…

  18. The Straight Path to Healing: Using Motivational Interviewing to Address Spiritual Bypass

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Philip B.; Giordano, Amanda L.; Cashwell, Craig S.; Lewis, Todd F.

    2013-01-01

    Spiritual bypass is the avoidance of underlying emotional issues by focusing solely on spiritual beliefs, practices, and experiences. Motivational interviewing (MI) is a client-centered, compassionate approach to effectively addressing resistance among those who present with spiritual bypass. In this article, the authors provide background…

  19. A Metatheory of Spiritual Formation through Service-Learning in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Welch, Marshall; Koth, Kent

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a hybrid metatheory of spiritual formation that can be applied to understanding college students' spiritual development through service-learning experiences. A definition and overview of spirituality is presented and contrasted with religion, followed by a review of various theoretical models from developmental…

  20. A Noble Quest: Cultivating Christian Spirituality in Catholic Adolescents and the Usefulness of 12 Pastoral Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canales, Arthur David

    2009-01-01

    The essay considers the process of cultivating Christian spirituality in Catholic adolescents. It will integrate and document official Catholic Church teachings on the subject and also unofficial scholarly reflections. The expose briefly defines adolescent spirituality and situates the process of cultivating adolescent spirituality in Catholic…

  1. Bringing Faith to Campus: Religious and Spiritual Space, Time, and Practice at Stanford University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karlin-Neumann, Patricia; Sanders, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    This essay examines how Stanford University, secular in its origins, yet with a church at its center, addresses the religious and spiritual concerns of current students, whether from traditional or innovative religious backgrounds. Identified religious and spiritual needs prompt questions about the balance between the spiritual health and…

  2. Divorce and the Divine: The Role of Spirituality in Adjustment to Divorce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krumrei, Elizabeth J.; Mahoney, Annette; Pargament, Kenneth I.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the role of three spiritual responses to divorce for psychological adjustment: appraising the event as a sacred loss/desecration, engaging in adaptive spiritual coping, and experiencing spiritual struggles. A sample of 100 adults (55% female) was recruited through public divorce records. Most appraised their divorce as a sacred…

  3. Religious and Spiritual Beliefs and Practices of Persons with Chronic Pain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover-Graf, Noreen M.; Marini, Irmo; Baker, Jeff; Buck, Tina

    2007-01-01

    Ninety-five persons receiving treatment for chronic pain were surveyed using the Spirituality and Chronic Pain Survey (SCPS). The survey included a pain assessment, a spiritual/religious practices assessment, and questions related to spiritual/religious beliefs and attitudes. Most participants reported experiencing constant, higher-level pain. The…

  4. Spirituality as a Component of Holistic Student Development in the Practice of Student Affairs Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiessling, Marcia Kennard

    2010-01-01

    This quantitative research study measured self-reported spirituality of student affairs professionals, practices of student affairs professionals in regard to integration of spirituality into their work, and predictors of holistic, spiritually-infused practice of student affairs professionals. The independent variables were demographic and work…

  5. Impact of College Environments on the Spiritual Development of African American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weddle-West, Karen; Hagan, Waldon Joseph; Norwood, Kristie M.

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the impact of college environments on the spiritual development of African American students. Using the Armstrong Measure of Spirituality (AMOS) survey administered to 125 African American college students, the study sought to ascertain whether or not there were differences in spirituality as reported by African American…

  6. Alcohol Treatment and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy: Enhancing Effectiveness by Incorporating Spirituality and Religion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is an effective modality for the treatment of alcoholism. Given widespread interest in incorporating spirituality into professional treatment, this article orients practitioners to spiritually modified CBT, an approach that may enhance outcomes with some spiritually motivated clients. More specifically, by…

  7. Relationship between Spirituality and Depressive Symptoms among Inpatient Individuals Who Abuse Substances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaz, Naelys; Horton, E. Gail; Green, Diane; McIlveen, John; Weiner, Michael; Mullaney, Donald

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to examine the relationship between spirituality and believing in God's presence and depressive symptoms among 160 inpatient individuals who abuse substances. Findings indicated that both spirituality and believing in God's presence were significant predictors of depressive symptoms, whereby spirituality was inversely related to…

  8. Spirituality in Nursing: Filipino Elderly's Concept of, Distance from, and Involvement with God

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Guzman, Allan B.; Dalay, Naihra Jae Z.; De Guzman, Anthony Joe M.; de Jesus, Luigi Lauren E.; de Mesa, Jacqueline Barbara C.; Flores, Jan Derick D.

    2009-01-01

    Spirituality is an aspect of holistic care delivery by health team members. However, despite the established relationship of spirituality and health, there had been little evidence of ways of assessing spirituality for nurses' clinical practice in Asia, particularly in regard to geriatric patients. This study aimed to establish an eiditic…

  9. Spirituality and Psychological Adaptation among Women with HIV/AIDS: Implications for Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoni, Jane M.; Martone, Maria G.; Kerwin, Joseph F.

    2002-01-01

    Survey interviews with 230 predominantly African American and Puerto Rican low-income women who were living with HIV/AIDS in New York City revealed high levels of spirituality and spiritually based coping with HIV. Both spirituality indicators positively correlated with the frequency of receipt of HIV-related social support; they were negatively…

  10. The "Bigger Feeling": The Importance of Spiritual Experience in Educational Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Glenys

    2007-01-01

    This article reports findings from a study of headteachers and spirituality. It is intended to give some insight into the importance of spiritual experience as a phenomenon which enables leaders to be better resourced internally and find deeper meaning, and to provide evidence of the significance and influence of spiritual experience for…

  11. Leadership through Meaning-Making: An Empirical Exploration of Spirituality and Leadership in College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gehrke, Sean J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between spirituality and leadership in college students. Using a correlational research design, the strength and nature of the relationship between measures of spirituality and leadership is measured from data gathered from college students. Three measures of spirituality are used to measure…

  12. Putting Spiritual Development of Young People on the Map: An English Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Maxine

    2008-01-01

    Youth work in the United Kingdom is a profession requiring three years of training, and its beginnings are strongly rooted in a spiritual (often specifically Christian) context. Until the past few decades, spirituality was also integrated within the educational system. The author argues that intentionally bringing spirituality to the center of…

  13. The Role of Spirituality in the Anti-Oppressive Higher-Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahjahan, Riyad Ahmed

    2009-01-01

    There is scant research literature on the interconnection between spirituality and anti-oppressive pedagogy in the higher-education classroom. In this paper, based on a broader qualitative study that examined spiritually-minded activist scholars in the Canadian university context, I focus on how four such scholars integrate spirituality into their…

  14. Meeting the Holistic Needs of Students: A Proposal for Spiritual and Religious Competencies for School Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbel, Tyler M.; Schellenberg, Rita

    2014-01-01

    Authors discuss the importance of school counselors addressing spiritual and religious issues in ethically meeting the developmental and cultural needs of K-12 students. Domains of spiritual and religious competence for professional counselors, published by the Association for Spiritual, Ethical, and Religious Values in Counseling (ASERVIC, 2009),…

  15. Teaching with Spirit: Freire, Dialogue, and Spirituality in the Composition Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vidovic, Justin

    2010-01-01

    This ethnographic study examines the role of spirituality in the composition teaching process and in Paolo Freire's dialogic education specifically. Work to acquire some aspects of spiritual "Discourse," as the term is defined by James Gee, is needed in order to make this spiritual foundation visible and practicable. Through a series of…

  16. Spiritual Needs in Health Care Settings: A Qualitative Meta-Synthesis of Clients' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, David R.; Horvath, Violet E.

    2011-01-01

    Spiritual needs often emerge in the context of receiving health or behavioral health services. Yet, despite the prevalence and salience of spiritual needs in service provision, clients often report their spiritual needs are inadequately addressed. In light of research suggesting that most social workers have received minimal training in…

  17. Working with Clients Who Have Religious/Spiritual Issues: A Survey of University Counseling Center Therapists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kellems, Ian S.; Hill, Clara E.; Crook-Lyon, Rachel E.; Freitas, Gary

    2010-01-01

    University counseling center therapists (N = 220) completed an Internet survey about religion/spirituality in therapy, with 200 of these therapists describing therapy with a recent client whose issues involved religion/spirituality. Common client religion/spirituality issues were questioning one's childhood religion, exploring…

  18. Using Drama Therapy to Explore Religion and Spirituality in Counselor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Dixie D.

    2012-01-01

    Exploring spirituality and religion continues to be an important component when considering multicultural issues. However, understanding how to incorporate spiritual and religious diversity into counseling courses continues to be a challenge for educators. An exercise using drama therapy was developed to explore religion and spirituality.

  19. Religiosity and Spirituality among Persons with Spinal Cord Injury: Attitudes, Beliefs, and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marini, Irmo; Glover-Graf, Noreen M.

    2011-01-01

    A total of 157 persons with spinal cord injury completed the "Spirituality and Spinal Cord Injury Survey" in relation to their spiritual and/or religious attitudes, beliefs, and practices in terms of adapting to their disability. Factor analysis accounting for 69% of the variance revealed four factors related to Spiritual Help and Improvement…

  20. A Reflection on an Emergent Spirituality and the Practice of Adult Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lauzon, Allan C.

    2007-01-01

    The idea of spirituality is increasingly being used in the context of adult education. This paper will tentatively explore some of the implications of an emergent spirituality within the practice of adult education. It begins by situating our understanding of spirituality in an historical context. This is followed by a brief historical overview of…

  1. The Spiritual Potential of Otherness in Film: The Interplay of Scene and Narrative.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engnell, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the spiritual potential of scene, some spiritual implications of film narrative, and "Otherness" and the varieties of spirituality. Explores multiple ways in which film may manipulate scene and narrative to express Otherness by examining two films: "Places in the Heart" and "Tender Mercies." (SR)

  2. Drawing on the Spirit: Embracing Spirituality in Pediatrics and Pediatric Art Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepfer, Stephen R.

    2000-01-01

    Explores the role of children's religious and spiritual beliefs in pediatric medicine and healing. Also explores cultural variables, methods for addressing religious and spiritual concerns in treatment, and the importance of the therapist's own religious and spiritual sensitivity. Discusses how art therapy can help bridge the gap between medical…

  3. Walking a Path of Transformation: Using the Labyrinth as a Spiritual Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plugge, Carol; McCormick, Debby

    Personal and spiritual transformation is emerging as a great need. Numerous societal and health concerns are beginning to surface as spiritual issues in the eyes of many professionals. A better understanding of the relationship between psychosocial-biological issues and spirituality would enhance professional capabilities. Experiential skills and…

  4. The Spiritual History Scale in Four Dimensions (SHS-4): Validity and Reliability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Judith C.; Meador, Keith G.; Branch, Patricia S.; George, Linda K.

    2001-01-01

    Study seeks to develop a valid, reliable measure of lifetime religious and spiritual experience and to assess its value in explaining late-life health. Discusses the development of the Spiritual History Scale, a 23-item four-dimensional, retrospective summary measure of religious and spiritual practices and attributions over the life course.…

  5. Feeling Good, Living Life: A Spiritual Health Measure for Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, John

    2004-01-01

    Following previous work on the spiritual health of secondary students, the author wondered if it was possible to develop a spiritual health measure for younger children. Taking Fisher's model of spiritual health as the basis, items were developed to reflect relationships with self, with others, with the environment and with a god. The children's…

  6. If We Knew What Spirituality Was, We Would Teach for It

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yob, Iris M.

    2011-01-01

    Two extraordinary recent experiences that the author would call highly "spiritual" are explored against the background of ideas provided by writers such as Friedrich Schleiermacher, Rudolf Otto, Paul Tillich, and Abraham Maslow to unpack what spirituality is, with particular attention to the emotions and the insights involved in spirituality. The…

  7. Toward a meaningful spirituality for people of color: lessons for the counseling practitioner.

    PubMed

    Cervantes, Joseph M; Parham, Thomas A

    2005-02-01

    This article attempts to capture a significant aspect of the counseling process for people of color: the spiritual dimension. It is argued that spirit and spirituality are relevant dimensions that should be integrated in counseling because spirituality is a key ingredient in the cultural upbringing and socialization of many people of color. Further, religious and spiritual beliefs are affected by experiences of racism and oppression, which then affects psychological coping. Reflective guidelines are offered to understand the essence of spirituality and cultural diversity, and lessons for the practitioner are recommended.

  8. The effect of an educational session on pediatric nurses' perspectives toward providing spiritual care.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, Eileen R; Wallace, Meredith; Griffin, Mary Quinn; Fitzpatrick, Joyce J

    2011-02-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a spiritual education session on pediatric nurses' perspectives toward providing spiritual care. A one-group pretest and posttest design was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the educational session. Participants consisted of 41 pediatric and neonatal nurses that worked in a large university-affiliated children's hospital. Findings confirmed that the spiritual education session had a positive effect on nurses' perspectives toward providing spiritual care. In addition, a positive correlation was identified between the pediatric nurses' perception of their own spirituality and their perspective toward providing care.

  9. Education and the Soul. Toward a Spiritual Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, John P.

    This book addresses how the soul can be nourished in educational settings, exploring the nature of the soul and offering teaching/learning approaches that can be used to nurture the development of students' souls. The book also examines how institutions such as schools have souls and what can be done to care for a school's spiritual life. After a…

  10. Teaching Spiritual Synchronicity in a Business Leadership Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pielstick, C. Dean

    2005-01-01

    Business leaders and business workers are increasingly interested in bringing their whole selves to work, including the spiritual. Students, as prospective leaders, need to understand issues of reasonable accommodation, religious holidays, display of religious objects, religious practices at work, and so forth. Students may also benefit from…

  11. Attributes of Spirituality Described by Survivors of Sexual Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knapik, Gregory P.; Martsolf, Donna S.; Draucker, Claire B.; Strickland, Karen D.

    2010-01-01

    This study focuses on what aspects of attributes of spirituality as defined by Martsolf and Mickley (1998) are most salient for female and male survivors of sexual violence. Content analysis of secondary narrative data, provided by 50 participants in a study of women's and men's responses to sexual violence, was coded to the five attributes of…

  12. [Meaning and spirituality in patients with chronic somatic illness].

    PubMed

    Mehnert, A

    2006-08-01

    Issues of the meaning of life and spirituality are particularly important subjects given the threat of a serious illness and the confrontation with the finiteness of one's own life. Thus, addressing questions of meaning and spiritual domains of supportive care has been identified as essential by patients as well as by health care professionals. In recent years more research has focussed on theoretical conceptualization, empirical examination as well as on the development of meaning-centred interventions in somatically ill patients. Theoretical models for the understanding, development and adaptation of concepts and interventions addressing meaning and spirituality in the chronically ill are offered by the philosophical tradition of existentialism, logotherapy as well as by cognitive and developmental psychology, in particular studies on autobiographical memory and life story. However, the current state of empirical research focussing on the association between meaning, spirituality and physical as well as mental health and underlying mechanisms is not sufficient to draw reliable conclusions. With regard to psychosocial care, meaning-centred interventions have been developed in recent years primarily within the context of palliative care. These interventions are intended to support patients to find meaning in life in the face of a serious illness and to experience their life as fulfilled.

  13. Spiritual Learning Communities: Historical, Systematic, and Practical Observations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roebben, Bert

    2014-01-01

    Children and young people have the inalienable right to be part of a learning community. Nobody can learn on his/her own. Education is always a communal enterprise. In this article the concept of the "spiritual learning community" is developed as a contemporary answer to the socioeducational issues raised by Martin Buber and John Dewey…

  14. Compassionate, Spiritual, and Creative Listening in Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrison, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Background/Context: Listening is largely overlooked in cultures constituted on the basis of the freedom of speech, such as we find in the United States and elsewhere. Purpose/Objective/Research Question/Focus of Study: The article explores compassionate listening as a creative spiritual activity. Such listening recognizes the suffering of others…

  15. Intersections of Spirituality, Religion and Gender in Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trousdale, Ann M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the intersections of spirituality, religion and gender in contemporary children's books published in the United States. Background for the discussion includes a history of religion in children's literature and the history of women's roles in the Christian tradition. Representative works of realistic fiction--historical and…

  16. Reading Beyond: Children's Lived Spiritual Experiences of Fantasy Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posey, Catherine Ruth

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe four children's lived spiritual experiences of literary texts as generated through their responses to two toy fantasy novels for children, "The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane" by Kate DiCamillo (2006) and "The Mouse and his Child" by Russell Hoban (1967). The…

  17. Examining Transcultural Spiritual Literacies among Latino Children through Artifactual Mediations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peñalva, Stacy Lee; Coggin, Linda Skidmore; Medina, Carmen L.

    2014-01-01

    Although the notion of cultural capital (Bourdieu, 1986) has been well studied and affirmed as important in recognizing the strengths of children and developing inclusive pedagogical models (Albright & Luke, 2008), this article presents a study of transcultural spiritual literacy--an element of cultural capital that is often overlooked, seldom…

  18. Spiritual and Religious Supports: What Difference Do They Make?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaventa, Bill

    2008-01-01

    If one asks any family, or a group of families, to share their experience with religious communities or to talk about the impact of their child on their spirituality, the answers one gets are rarely lukewarm. If the trust is there, stories emerge about how incredibly important their faith or faith community has been, on the one hand, or perhaps…

  19. Spirituality in Career from a New Zealand Maori Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furbish, Dale S.; Reid, Lynette

    New Zealand Maori are the indigenous people of New Zealand Aotearoa, a relatively small nation of 4 million people. The juxtaposition of Maori and European cultures presents an opportunity to contrast the highly spiritual nature of Maori culture with European traditions of linearity and rationality. This contrast can be especially appreciated in…

  20. Religion, spirituality, and mental health: current controversies and future directions.

    PubMed

    Dein, Simon; Cook, Christopher C H; Koenig, Harold

    2012-10-01

    Although studies examining religion, spirituality, and mental health generally indicate positive associations, there is a need for more sophisticated methodology, greater discrimination between different cultures and traditions, more focus on situated experiences of individuals belonging to particular traditions, and, in particular, greater integration of theological contributions to this area. We suggest priorities for future research based on these considerations.

  1. The Socially Supportive Functions of Religion and Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clary, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Social support has been shown to be a significant protective factor in the lives of adolescents and has been linked to numerous health and psychological outcomes. Spirituality and religion have also been demonstrated to have similar effects on a host of outcomes. The current study further analyzed the link between these two constructs from a…

  2. Cultivating Diversity and Spirituality: A Compelling Interest for Institutional Priority

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paredes-Collins, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Historically, Christian colleges and universities have struggled to incorporate racial and ethnic diversity into White and homogenous campuses. Research indicates that a positive racial climate is essential to promote spiritual growth for students from diverse backgrounds. As a result, diversity is a compelling interest for Christian institutions.…

  3. Religious and Spiritual Issues in Counseling Psychology Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulte, Daniel L.; Skinner, Tad A.; Claibom, Charles D.

    2002-01-01

    To explore the kind of training counseling psychology programs provide with respect to religious and spiritual issues, surveys were distributed to training directors or designated representatives of 69 counseling psychology programs in the United States. Responses were received from 40, or 58%, of the programs. Results indicated that programs…

  4. Spirituality among a College Student Cohort: A Quantitative Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dennis, Dixie; Muller, Susan M.; Miller, Kim; Banerjee, Priya

    2004-01-01

    This study was designed to quantify indices of spirituality, the directing health dimension, which affects health and life satisfaction. Because college marks a time when life patterns are established, a college population was chosen. A cohort of 524 northeastern U.S. college students completed the 48-item Life Attitude Profile-Revised (LAP-R) in…

  5. Against (the Use of the Term) "Spiritual Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marples, Roger

    2006-01-01

    The paper argues that the term "spiritual education" is completely otiose. It tries to show that its application in both religious and secular contexts is deeply problematic. If there is any such form of knowledge or understanding, it is difficult to see how children are to be initiated into it without being indoctrinated. The paper focuses on a…

  6. Psychologists' Religious and Spiritual Orientations and Their Practice of Psychotherapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafranske, Edward P.; Malony, H. Newton

    The nature of clinical psychologists' religiosity, belief orientation, and practices in psychotherapy, including an assessment of ideology, non-doctrinal beliefs, attitudes toward clinical interventions, and a measure of dimensions of religiosity needs to be examined. To assess psychologists' religious and spiritual orientation in relation to…

  7. Religiosity, Spirituality, and Personal Distress among College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schafer, Walter E.

    1997-01-01

    Examines whether religiosity and spirituality are inversely associated with personal distress. Data taken from 282 upper division students produced mixed results. The importance of religion showed a positive association, belief in the existence of God a curvilinear relationship, and having a sense of meaning and direction an inverse association…

  8. The Spiritual and Moral Education of Russia's School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniliuk, A. Ia.; Kondakov, A. M.; Tishkov, V. A.

    2010-01-01

    This article discusses the new draft of the Federal State Standards of General Education which designates spiritual and moral upbringing as a key task of present-day education. In accordance with the Standards' requirements, the structure of the basic educational program shall, in addition to the fundamental nucleus of the content of the…

  9. Spirituality in Social Work Pedagogy: A Canadian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coholic, Diana

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses some results of a qualitative study that explored both student and educator viewpoints regarding the inclusion of spirituality in social work pedagogy. A grounded theory research methodology was used to analyze data obtained from semi-structured individual interviews completed with eighteen participants-eight educators and ten…

  10. Crossroads: Integrated Models for Teaching Ethics and Spirituality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Michael J., Ed.

    This anthology presents seven articles that focus on the integration of ethical and spiritual concerns into the academic curriculum. The argument is made for the inclusion of ethical and religious concerns in the study of subjects such as literature, history, foreign languages and cultures, and science. The articles include: "The Voice of the…

  11. Links between Early Attachment Experiences and Manifestations of Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Surr, John

    2011-01-01

    This essay reviews recent research about infant attachment, then discusses the implications of this research as they relate to the following specific manifestations of children's spirituality: faith, wonder, relational consciousness, flow (as in a sense of wholeness or unity), and compassion, in the light of other research on children's…

  12. Spiritual Reading and Its Effects on Human Growth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, James C.

    This research study sought to explore the relationship between spiritual reading and its effects on human growth. The emphasis of the study was how participants felt they had grown in their relationship with God through reading. Participants were clergypersons in the Tidewater, Virginia area. The 30 pastors interviewed for this study indicated…

  13. Integrating Shamanic Methodology into the Spirituality of Addictions Recovery Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Marcia L.

    2012-01-01

    Responding to an increased recognition of the importance of spirituality in the aetiology and treatment of addictions, this article provides an overview of the potential contributions of both transpersonal psychology and shamanic methodology for the addictions field. A case study is provided to illustrate the integration of conventional,…

  14. Children's Spirituality: Epistemology and Theory from Various Helping Professions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boynton, Heather Marie

    2011-01-01

    Children's spirituality is a rising area of importance in research within other helping disciplines, which social work should attend to. Epistemology is an important element of research that is often difficult to discern. This article discusses the different epistemological paradigms and identifies pertinent theories in relation to some of the…

  15. Spiritual Exchange in Pluralistic Contexts: Sharing Narratives across Worldview Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockenbach, Alyssa Bryant; Bachenheimer, Aaron; Conley, Abigail Holland; Grays, Shaefny

    2014-01-01

    Grounded in narrative inquiry, this study explored the ways in which graduate and undergraduate students representing different worldview identities come together in dyads to share stories that reflect their existential and spiritual development. The study revealed two contrasting types of exchange: (1) deep, personal exchanges that involved a…

  16. Colonizing and Decolonizing Projects of Re/covering Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhee, Jeong-eun; Subedi, Binaya

    2014-01-01

    In this postcolonial inquiry, we analyze how spirituality has been simultaneously appropriated/re-covered and re-appropriated/recovered for the purpose of (re)colonizing as well as decolonizing projects. By drawing from discrete yet interconnected literatures of decolonizing, (post)(anti)colonial, Indigenous, and ethnic studies based theories, we…

  17. Sexuality ... What's Spirituality Got to Do with It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGioia, Melissa Keyes

    2011-01-01

    Attitudes and beliefs about sexuality are informed by a variety of sources, including faith-based traditions. This lesson is designed for older adults to explore sexuality-related messages and values that are based on spiritual or faith perspectives. Participants will reflect upon their past learning, evaluate their present day attitudes about…

  18. Tarot Images and Spiritual Education: The Three I's Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Semetsky, Inna

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents education as a process of human development toward becoming our authentic Selves and posits the Tarot hermeneutic as one of the means of holistic, spiritual education. As a system of images and symbols, Tarot encompasses the three I's represented by intuition, insight and imagination in contrast to the three R's of traditional…

  19. Education towards Wholeness: Facilitating Spiritual Knowing in Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatmon, Anna

    2012-01-01

    This study focuses on documenting and analyzing the experience of eight adults as they engaged in an adult education program that focused on developing and enhancing their capacity for spiritual knowing. Situated in adult learning theory and practice, the methodological approach chosen for this study was qualitative instrumental case study. Four…

  20. A Model for Addressing Spiritual Issues in Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the hesitancy of counselors and psychotherapists to approach the spiritual concerns of clients. Proposes a counseling and psychotherapy training model that contains discrete yet continuous levels of learning. The holistic epistemology of Gregory Bateson is used to derive guiding theoretical principles for the training model. (Author/JAC)