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Sample records for spline-based estimator muse

  1. MUlti-Dimensional Spline-Based Estimator (MUSE) for Motion Estimation: Algorithm Development and Initial Results

    PubMed Central

    Viola, Francesco; Coe, Ryan L.; Owen, Kevin; Guenther, Drake A.; Walker, William F.

    2008-01-01

    Image registration and motion estimation play central roles in many fields, including RADAR, SONAR, light microscopy, and medical imaging. Because of its central significance, estimator accuracy, precision, and computational cost are of critical importance. We have previously presented a highly accurate, spline-based time delay estimator that directly determines sub-sample time delay estimates from sampled data. The algorithm uses cubic splines to produce a continuous representation of a reference signal and then computes an analytical matching function between this reference and a delayed signal. The location of the minima of this function yields estimates of the time delay. In this paper we describe the MUlti-dimensional Spline-based Estimator (MUSE) that allows accurate and precise estimation of multidimensional displacements/strain components from multidimensional data sets. We describe the mathematical formulation for two- and three-dimensional motion/strain estimation and present simulation results to assess the intrinsic bias and standard deviation of this algorithm and compare it to currently available multi-dimensional estimators. In 1000 noise-free simulations of ultrasound data we found that 2D MUSE exhibits maximum bias of 2.6 × 10−4 samples in range and 2.2 × 10−3 samples in azimuth (corresponding to 4.8 and 297 nm, respectively). The maximum simulated standard deviation of estimates in both dimensions was comparable at roughly 2.8 × 10−3 samples (corresponding to 54 nm axially and 378 nm laterally). These results are between two and three orders of magnitude better than currently used 2D tracking methods. Simulation of performance in 3D yielded similar results to those observed in 2D. We also present experimental results obtained using 2D MUSE on data acquired by an Ultrasonix Sonix RP imaging system with an L14-5/38 linear array transducer operating at 6.6 MHz. While our validation of the algorithm was performed using ultrasound data, MUSE

  2. MUlti-Dimensional Spline-Based Estimator (MUSE) for motion estimation: algorithm development and initial results.

    PubMed

    Viola, Francesco; Coe, Ryan L; Owen, Kevin; Guenther, Drake A; Walker, William F

    2008-12-01

    Image registration and motion estimation play central roles in many fields, including RADAR, SONAR, light microscopy, and medical imaging. Because of its central significance, estimator accuracy, precision, and computational cost are of critical importance. We have previously presented a highly accurate, spline-based time delay estimator that directly determines sub-sample time delay estimates from sampled data. The algorithm uses cubic splines to produce a continuous representation of a reference signal and then computes an analytical matching function between this reference and a delayed signal. The location of the minima of this function yields estimates of the time delay. In this paper we describe the MUlti-dimensional Spline-based Estimator (MUSE) that allows accurate and precise estimation of multi-dimensional displacements/strain components from multi-dimensional data sets. We describe the mathematical formulation for two- and three-dimensional motion/strain estimation and present simulation results to assess the intrinsic bias and standard deviation of this algorithm and compare it to currently available multi-dimensional estimators. In 1000 noise-free simulations of ultrasound data we found that 2D MUSE exhibits maximum bias of 2.6 x 10(-4) samples in range and 2.2 x 10(-3) samples in azimuth (corresponding to 4.8 and 297 nm, respectively). The maximum simulated standard deviation of estimates in both dimensions was comparable at roughly 2.8 x 10(-3) samples (corresponding to 54 nm axially and 378 nm laterally). These results are between two and three orders of magnitude better than currently used 2D tracking methods. Simulation of performance in 3D yielded similar results to those observed in 2D. We also present experimental results obtained using 2D MUSE on data acquired by an Ultrasonix Sonix RP imaging system with an L14-5/38 linear array transducer operating at 6.6 MHz. While our validation of the algorithm was performed using ultrasound data, MUSE is

  3. Computationally Efficient Spline-Based Time Delay Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Viola, Francesco; Walker, William F.

    2008-01-01

    We have previously presented a highly accurate, spline-based time delay estimator (TDE) that directly determines sub-sample time delay estimates from sampled data. The algorithm uses cubic splines to produce a continuous time representation of a reference signal, then computes an analytical matching function between this reference and a delayed signal. The location of the minima of this function yields estimates of the time delay. In this paper we present more computationally efficient formulations of this algorithm. We present the results of computer simulations and ultrasound experiments which indicate that the bias and the standard deviation of the proposed algorithms are comparable to those of the original method, and thus superior to other published algorithms. PMID:18986905

  4. Computationally efficient spline-based time delay estimation.

    PubMed

    Viola, Francesco; Walker, William F

    2008-09-01

    We previously presented a highly accurate, spline-based time delay estimator that directly determines subsample time delay estimates from sampled data. The algorithm uses cubic splines to produce a continuous time representation of a reference signal, and then computes an analytical matching function between this reference and a delayed signal. The location of the minima of this function yields estimates of the time delay. In this paper we present more computationally efficient formulations of this algorithm. We present the results of computer simulations and ultrasound experiments which indicate that the bias and the standard deviation of the proposed algorithms are comparable to those of the original method, and thus superior to other published algorithms.

  5. A comparison between spline-based and phase-domain time-delay estimators.

    PubMed

    Viola, Francesco; Walker, William F

    2006-03-01

    We previously presented a novel time-delay estimator that uses cubic splines to estimate continuous time delays from sampled data. Previous simulation results showed that the spline-based algorithm yields superior performance when compared to the normalized correlation and the sum squared differences (SSD) algorithms implementing a variety of subsample interpolators. In this short communication, we present additional simulation results that compare the spline-based time-delay estimator to well-known phase-domain estimators. Under comparable conditions, spline-based methods exhibit biases approximately one tenth and standard deviation only one hundredth of those observed for the phase-based approaches.

  6. Item Response Theory with Estimation of the Latent Population Distribution Using Spline-Based Densities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, Carol M.; Thissen, David

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new method for fitting item response theory models with the latent population distribution estimated from the data using splines. A spline-based density estimation system provides a flexible alternative to existing procedures that use a normal distribution, or a different functional form, for the…

  7. A spline-based parameter estimation technique for static models of elastic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutt, P.; Ta'asan, S.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of identifying the spatially varying coefficient of elasticity using an observed solution to the forward problem is considered. Under appropriate conditions this problem can be treated as a first order hyperbolic equation in the unknown coefficient. Some continuous dependence results are developed for this problem and a spline-based technique is proposed for approximating the unknown coefficient, based on these results. The convergence of the numerical scheme is established and error estimates obtained.

  8. A spline-based parameter estimation technique for static models of elastic structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dutt, P.; Taasan, S.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of identifying the spatially varying coefficient of elasticity using an observed solution to the forward problem is considered. Under appropriate conditions this problem can be treated as a first order hyperbolic equation in the unknown coefficient. Some continuous dependence results are developed for this problem and a spline-based technique is proposed for approximating the unknown coefficient, based on these results. The convergence of the numerical scheme is established and error estimates obtained.

  9. Spline-Based Parameter Estimation Techniques for Two-Dimensional Convection and Diffusion Equations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-07-01

    Bolling Air Force Base 12. NUMBER Of PAGES ’P4.SW% AENCY. &MNAME A AOORESSIf dii*ffru be= COai1001I1ud OCR..) to. SIECURI CLASS. (of Wel 00110") c5*~~L ?S...PAGE (SIIII Dots 8-0 20. Abstract A general approximation framework based on bicubic splines is developed for estimating temporally and spatially...Unannounced Justification By Distribution/ Availability Codes Avail and/or Dist Special ....., AFQR.h.87-0799 SPLINE- BASED PARAMETER ESTIMATION TECHNIQUES

  10. Monotone spline-based least squares estimation for panel count data with informative observation times.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shirong; Liu, Li; Zhao, Xingqiu

    2015-09-01

    This article discusses the statistical analysis of panel count data when the underlying recurrent event process and observation process may be correlated. For the recurrent event process, we propose a new class of semiparametric mean models that allows for the interaction between the observation history and covariates. For inference on the model parameters, a monotone spline-based least squares estimation approach is developed, and the resulting estimators are consistent and asymptotically normal. In particular, our new approach does not rely on the model specification of the observation process. The proposed inference procedure performs well through simulation studies, and it is illustrated by the analysis of bladder tumor data.

  11. Spline-based semiparametric projected generalized estimating equation method for panel count data.

    PubMed

    Hua, Lei; Zhang, Ying

    2012-07-01

    We propose to analyze panel count data using a spline-based semiparametric projected generalized estimating equation (GEE) method with the proportional mean model E(N(t)|Z) = Λ(0)(t) e(β(0)(T)Z). The natural logarithm of the baseline mean function, logΛ(0)(t), is approximated by a monotone cubic B-spline function. The estimates of regression parameters and spline coefficients are obtained by projecting the GEE estimates into the feasible domain using a weighted isotonic regression (IR). The proposed method avoids assuming any parametric structure of the baseline mean function or any stochastic model for the underlying counting process. Selection of the working covariance matrix that accounts for overdispersion improves the estimation efficiency and leads to less biased variance estimations. Simulation studies are conducted using different working covariance matrices in the GEE to investigate finite sample performance of the proposed method, to compare the estimation efficiency, and to explore the performance of different variance estimates in presence of overdispersion. Finally, the proposed method is applied to a real data set from a bladder tumor clinical trial.

  12. A spline-based parameter and state estimation technique for static models of elastic surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Daniel, P. L.; Armstrong, E. S.

    1983-01-01

    Parameter and state estimation techniques for an elliptic system arising in a developmental model for the antenna surface in the Maypole Hoop/Column antenna are discussed. A computational algorithm based on spline approximations for the state and elastic parameters is given and numerical results obtained using this algorithm are summarized.

  13. B-spline based image tracking by detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, Bhashyam; Sithiravel, Rajiv; Damini, Anthony; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam; Rajan, Sreeraman

    2016-05-01

    Visual image tracking involves the estimation of the motion of any desired targets in a surveillance region using a sequence of images. A standard method of isolating moving targets in image tracking uses background subtraction. The standard background subtraction method is often impacted by irrelevant information in the images, which can lead to poor performance in image-based target tracking. In this paper, a B-Spline based image tracking is implemented. The novel method models the background and foreground using the B-Spline method followed by a tracking-by-detection algorithm. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated.

  14. On the spline-based wavelet differentiation matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Leland

    1993-01-01

    The differentiation matrix for a spline-based wavelet basis is constructed. Given an n-th order spline basis it is proved that the differentiation matrix is accurate of order 2n + 2 when periodic boundary conditions are assumed. This high accuracy, or superconvergence, is lost when the boundary conditions are no longer periodic. Furthermore, it is shown that spline-based bases generate a class of compact finite difference schemes.

  15. Spline-based distributed system identification with application to large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Lamm, P. K.; Armstrong, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    A parameter and state estimation technique for distributed models is demonstrated through the solution of a problem generic to large space antenna system identification. Assuming the position of the reflective surface of the maypole (hoop/column) antenna to be approximated by the static two-dimensional, stretched-membrane partial differential equation with variable-stiffness coefficient functions, a spline-based approximation procedure is described that estimates the shape and stiffness functions from data set observations. For given stiffness functions, the Galerkin projection with linear spline-based functions is applied to project the distributed problem onto a finite-dimensional subspace wherein algebraic equations exist for determining a static shape (state) prediction. The stiffness functions are then parameterized by cubic splines and the parameters estimated by an output error technique. Numerical results are presented for data descriptive of a 100-m-diameter maypole antenna.

  16. Spline-based distributed system identification with application to large space antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Lamm, P. K.; Armstrong, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    A parameter and state estimation technique for distributed models is demonstrated through the solution of a problem generic to large space antenna system identification. Assuming the position of the reflective surface of the maypole (hoop/column) antenna to be approximated by the static two-dimensional, stretched-membrane partial differential equation with variable-stiffness coefficient functions, a spline-based approximation procedure is described that estimates the shape and stiffness functions from data set observations. For given stiffness functions, the Galerkin projection with linear spline-based functions is applied to project the distributed problem onto a finite-dimensional subspace wherein algebraic equations exist for determining a static shape (state) prediction. The stiffness functions are then parameterized by cubic splines and the parameters estimated by an output error technique. Numerical results are presented for data descriptive of a 100-m-diameter maypole antenna.

  17. Spline-based procedures for dose-finding studies with active control.

    PubMed

    Helms, Hans-Joachim; Benda, Norbert; Zinserling, Jörg; Kneib, Thomas; Friede, Tim

    2015-01-30

    In a dose-finding study with an active control, several doses of a new drug are compared with an established drug (the so-called active control). One goal of such studies is to characterize the dose-response relationship and to find the smallest target dose concentration d(*), which leads to the same efficacy as the active control. For this purpose, the intersection point of the mean dose-response function with the expected efficacy of the active control has to be estimated. The focus of this paper is a cubic spline-based method for deriving an estimator of the target dose without assuming a specific dose-response function. Furthermore, the construction of a spline-based bootstrap CI is described. Estimator and CI are compared with other flexible and parametric methods such as linear spline interpolation as well as maximum likelihood regression in simulation studies motivated by a real clinical trial. Also, design considerations for the cubic spline approach with focus on bias minimization are presented. Although the spline-based point estimator can be biased, designs can be chosen to minimize and reasonably limit the maximum absolute bias. Furthermore, the coverage probability of the cubic spline approach is satisfactory, especially for bias minimal designs. © 2014 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Spline-based procedures for dose-finding studies with active control

    PubMed Central

    Helms, Hans-Joachim; Benda, Norbert; Zinserling, Jörg; Kneib, Thomas; Friede, Tim

    2015-01-01

    In a dose-finding study with an active control, several doses of a new drug are compared with an established drug (the so-called active control). One goal of such studies is to characterize the dose–response relationship and to find the smallest target dose concentration d*, which leads to the same efficacy as the active control. For this purpose, the intersection point of the mean dose–response function with the expected efficacy of the active control has to be estimated. The focus of this paper is a cubic spline-based method for deriving an estimator of the target dose without assuming a specific dose–response function. Furthermore, the construction of a spline-based bootstrap CI is described. Estimator and CI are compared with other flexible and parametric methods such as linear spline interpolation as well as maximum likelihood regression in simulation studies motivated by a real clinical trial. Also, design considerations for the cubic spline approach with focus on bias minimization are presented. Although the spline-based point estimator can be biased, designs can be chosen to minimize and reasonably limit the maximum absolute bias. Furthermore, the coverage probability of the cubic spline approach is satisfactory, especially for bias minimal designs. © 2014 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:25319931

  19. Spline-based self-controlled case series method.

    PubMed

    Ghebremichael-Weldeselassie, Yonas; Whitaker, Heather J; Farrington, C Paddy

    2017-08-30

    The self-controlled case series (SCCS) method is an alternative to study designs such as cohort and case control methods and is used to investigate potential associations between the timing of vaccine or other drug exposures and adverse events. It requires information only on cases, individuals who have experienced the adverse event at least once, and automatically controls all fixed confounding variables that could modify the true association between exposure and adverse event. Time-varying confounders such as age, on the other hand, are not automatically controlled and must be allowed for explicitly. The original SCCS method used step functions to represent risk periods (windows of exposed time) and age effects. Hence, exposure risk periods and/or age groups have to be prespecified a priori, but a poor choice of group boundaries may lead to biased estimates. In this paper, we propose a nonparametric SCCS method in which both age and exposure effects are represented by spline functions at the same time. To avoid a numerical integration of the product of these two spline functions in the likelihood function of the SCCS method, we defined the first, second, and third integrals of I-splines based on the definition of integrals of M-splines. Simulation studies showed that the new method performs well. This new method is applied to data on pediatric vaccines. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. MUSE alignment onto VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dupuy, Christophe; Jarno, Aurélien; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Migniau, Jean-Emmanuel; Nicklas, Harald; Piqueras, Laure

    2014-07-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation Very Large Telescope (VLT) integral field spectrograph developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO). It combines a 1' x 1' field of view sampled at 0.2 arcsec for its Wide Field Mode (WFM) and a 7.5"x7.5" field of view for its Narrow Field Mode (NFM). Both modes will operate with the improved spatial resolution provided by GALACSI (Ground Atmospheric Layer Adaptive Optics for Spectroscopic Imaging), that will use the VLT deformable secondary mirror and 4 Laser Guide Stars (LGS) foreseen in 2015. MUSE operates in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently commissioning MUSE in the Very Large Telescope for the Preliminary Acceptance in Chile, scheduled for September, 2014. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2012 and 2013, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested to the P.I. institute at Lyon. After successful PAE in September 2013, MUSE instrument was shipped to the Very Large Telescope in Chile where that was aligned and tested in ESO integration hall at Paranal. After, MUSE was directly transported, fully aligned and without any optomechanical dismounting, onto VLT telescope where the first light was overcame the 7th of February, 2014. This paper describes the alignment procedure of the whole MUSE instrument with respect to the Very Large Telescope (VLT). It describes how 6 tons could be move with accuracy better than 0.025mm and less than 0.25 arcmin in order to reach alignment requirements. The success

  1. MUSE optical alignment procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Loupias, Magali; Kosmalski, Johan; Anwand, Heiko; Bacon, Roland; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dubois, Jean-Pierre; Dupuy, Christophe; Kelz, Andreas; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Nicklas, Harald; Parès, Laurent; Remillieux, Alban; Seifert, Walter; Valentin, Hervé; Xu, Wenli

    2012-09-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation VLT integral field spectrograph (1x1arcmin² Field of View) developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO), operating in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently assembling and testing MUSE in the Integration Hall of the Observatoire de Lyon for the Preliminary Acceptance in Europe, scheduled for 2013. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic instrument mechanical structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2011, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested independently in each institute. After validations, the systems were shipped to the P.I. institute at Lyon and were assembled in the Integration Hall This paper describes the end-to-end optical alignment procedure of the MUSE instrument. The design strategy, mixing an optical alignment by manufacturing (plug and play approach) and few adjustments on key components, is presented. We depict the alignment method for identifying the optical axis using several references located in pupil and image planes. All tools required to perform the global alignment between each subsystem are described. The success of this alignment approach is demonstrated by the good results for the MUSE image quality. MUSE commissioning at the VLT (Very Large Telescope) is planned for 2013.

  2. Multiquadric Spline-Based Interactive Segmentation of Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Meena, Sachin; Surya Prasath, V. B.; Kassim, Yasmin M.; Maude, Richard J.; Glinskii, Olga V.; Glinsky, Vladislav V.; Huxley, Virginia H.; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2016-01-01

    Commonly used drawing tools for interactive image segmentation and labeling include active contours or boundaries, scribbles, rectangles and other shapes. Thin vessel shapes in images of vascular networks are difficult to segment using automatic or interactive methods. This paper introduces the novel use of a sparse set of user-defined seed points (supervised labels) for precisely, quickly and robustly segmenting complex biomedical images. A multiquadric spline-based binary classifier is proposed as a unique approach for interactive segmentation using as features color values and the location of seed points. Epifluorescence imagery of the dura mater microvasculature are difficult to segment for quantitative applications due to challenging tissue preparation, imaging conditions, and thin, faint structures. Experimental results based on twenty epifluorescence images is used to illustrate the benefits of using a set of seed points to obtain fast and accurate interactive segmentation compared to four interactive and automatic segmentation approaches. PMID:28261011

  3. Multiquadric Spline-Based Interactive Segmentation of Vascular Networks.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sachin; Surya Prasath, V B; Kassim, Yasmin M; Maude, Richard J; Glinskii, Olga V; Glinsky, Vladislav V; Huxley, Virginia H; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2016-08-01

    Commonly used drawing tools for interactive image segmentation and labeling include active contours or boundaries, scribbles, rectangles and other shapes. Thin vessel shapes in images of vascular networks are difficult to segment using automatic or interactive methods. This paper introduces the novel use of a sparse set of user-defined seed points (supervised labels) for precisely, quickly and robustly segmenting complex biomedical images. A multiquadric spline-based binary classifier is proposed as a unique approach for interactive segmentation using as features color values and the location of seed points. Epifluorescence imagery of the dura mater microvasculature are difficult to segment for quantitative applications due to challenging tissue preparation, imaging conditions, and thin, faint structures. Experimental results based on twenty epifluorescence images is used to illustrate the benefits of using a set of seed points to obtain fast and accurate interactive segmentation compared to four interactive and automatic segmentation approaches.

  4. Fitting Cox Models with Doubly Censored Data Using Spline-Based Sieve Marginal Likelihood.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiguo; Owzar, Kouros

    2016-06-01

    In some applications, the failure time of interest is the time from an originating event to a failure event, while both event times are interval censored. We propose fitting Cox proportional hazards models to this type of data using a spline-based sieve maximum marginal likelihood, where the time to the originating event is integrated out in the empirical likelihood function of the failure time of interest. This greatly reduces the complexity of the objective function compared with the fully semiparametric likelihood. The dependence of the time of interest on time to the originating event is induced by including the latter as a covariate in the proportional hazards model for the failure time of interest. The use of splines results in a higher rate of convergence of the estimator of the baseline hazard function compared with the usual nonparametric estimator. The computation of the estimator is facilitated by a multiple imputation approach. Asymptotic theory is established and a simulation study is conducted to assess its finite sample performance. It is also applied to analyzing a real data set on AIDS incubation time.

  5. MUSES-A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishimura, T.; Hayashi, T.

    1991-01-01

    The MUSES-A spacecraft mission objectives are to study the effect of a double lunar swingby technique, lunar orbital insertion, obtain experience using optical navigation equipment, measure mass and momentum of micrometeoroids by using a particle dust counter, and to support a packet telemetry and Reed-Solomon coding experiment by using a newly developed fault tolerant onboard computer. A flight profile is given, and information is presented in tabular form on the following topics: Deep Space Network support, frequency assignments, telemetry, command, and tracking support responsibility.

  6. Imaging_Earth_With_MUSES

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-07-11

    Commercial businesses and scientific researchers have a new capability to capture digital imagery of Earth, thanks to MUSES: the Multiple User System for Earth Sensing facility. This platform on the outside of the International Space Station is capable of holding four different payloads, ranging from high-resolution digital cameras to hyperspectral imagers, which will support Earth science observations in agricultural awareness, air quality, disaster response, fire detection, and many other research topics. MUSES program manager Mike Soutullo explains the system and its unique features including the ability to change and upgrade payloads using the space station’s Canadarm2 and Special Purpose Dexterous Manipulator. For more information about MUSES, please visit: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/news/MUSES For more on ISS science, https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/research/index.html or follow us on Twitter @ISS_research

  7. [Application of spline-based Cox regression on analyzing data from follow-up studies].

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Yu, Jin-ming; Hu, Da-yi

    2012-09-01

    With R, this study involved the application of the spline-based Cox regression to analyze data related to follow-up studies when the two basic assumptions of Cox proportional hazards regression were not satisfactory. Results showed that most of the continuous covariates contributed nonlinearly to mortality risk while the effects of three covariates were time-dependent. After considering multiple covariates in spline-based Cox regression, when the ankle brachial index (ABI) decreased by 0.1, the hazard ratio (HR) for all-cause death was 1.071. The spline-based Cox regression method could be applied to analyze the data related to follow-up studies when the assumptions of Cox proportional hazards regression were violated.

  8. A Musing on Schuller's "Musings"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asia, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    For many years Gunther Schuller was at the center of the classical music world, as a player, composer, conductor, writer, record producer, polemicist and publisher for new music and jazz, educator, and president of New England Conservatory. His book, entitled, "Musings: The Musical Worlds of Gunther Schuller: A Collection of His…

  9. A Musing on Schuller's "Musings"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asia, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    For many years Gunther Schuller was at the center of the classical music world, as a player, composer, conductor, writer, record producer, polemicist and publisher for new music and jazz, educator, and president of New England Conservatory. His book, entitled, "Musings: The Musical Worlds of Gunther Schuller: A Collection of His…

  10. Cubic Hermite Bezier spline based reconstruction of implanted aortic valve stents from CT images.

    PubMed

    Gessat, Michael; Altwegg, Lukas; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Plass, André; Falk, Volkmar

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical forces and strain induced by transcatheter aortic valve implantation are usually named as origins for postoperative left ventricular arrhythmia associated with the technique. No quantitative data has been published so far to substantiate this common belief. As a first step towards quantitative analysis of the biomechanic situation at the aortic root after transapical aortic valve implantation, we present a spline-based method for reconstruction of the implanted stent from CT images and for locally measuring the deformation of the stent.

  11. MPDAF: MUSE Python Data Analysis Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, Roland; Piqueras, Laure; Conseil, Simon; Richard, Johan; Shepherd, Martin

    2016-11-01

    MPDAF, the MUSE Python Data Analysis Framework, provides tools to work with MUSE-specific data (for example, raw data and pixel tables), and with more general data such as spectra, images, and data cubes. Originally written to work with MUSE data, it can also be used for other data, such as that from the Hubble Space Telescope. MPDAF also provides MUSELET, a SExtractor-based tool to detect emission lines in a data cube, and a format to gather all the information on a source in one FITS file. MPDAF was developed and is maintained by CRAL (Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon).

  12. The MUSE instrument detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Roland; Deiries, Sebastian; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Rupprecht, Gero

    2012-09-01

    The MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) instrument (see Bacon et al., this conference) for ESO's Very Large Telescope VLT employs 24 integral field units (spectrographs). Each of these is equipped with its own cryogenically cooled CCD head. The heads are individually cooled by continuous flow cryostats. The detectors used are deep depletion e2v CCD231-84 with 4096x4112 active 15 μm pixels. The MUSE Instrument Detector System is now in the final integration and test phase on the instrument. This paper gives an overview of the architecture and performance of the complex detector system including ESO's New General detector Controllers (NGC) for the 24 science detectors, the detector head electronics and the data acquisition system with Linux Local Control Units. NGC is sub-divided into 4 Detector Front End units each operating 6 CCDs. All CCDs are simultaneously read out through 4 ports to achieve short readout times at low noise levels. All science grade CCDs were thoroughly characterized on ESO's optical detectors testbench facility and the test results processed and documented in a semi-automated, reproducible way. We present the test methodology and the results that fully confirm the feasibility of these detectors for their use in this challenging instrument.

  13. MUSES-A double lunar swingby mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesugi, Kuninori; Hayashi, Tomonao; Matsuo, Hiroki

    MUSES-A is Japan's first double lunar swingby mission conducted by the ISAS (Institute of Space and Astronautical Science). The main objective of the MUSES-A mission is the verification of the technology and techniques, which are inevitably required for planetary or lunar missions, such as swingby or orbiting around a certain heavenly body, navigation, attitude and orbit control, telecommunication at X-band frequency, related ground control and operation hardware and software, etc. The MUSES-A spacecraft has a cylindrical shape and the mass is 194 kg including 12 kg of a tiny lunar orbiter which is installed on top of the spacecraft. The MUSES-A program started in 1985, and the launch is planned for early 1990.

  14. A B-spline based heterogeneous modeling and analysis of proximal femur with graded element.

    PubMed

    Pise, Uday V; Bhatt, Amba D; Srivastava, R K; Warkedkar, Ravi

    2009-08-25

    Bone is a complex biological tissue and natural heterogeneous object. The main objective of this study is to simulate quasi-static loading of bio-objects like human femur with B-spline based modeling and its 3D finite element analysis with graded element. B-spline surface representation method is extended to represent material composition to develop heterogeneous solid model of proximal femur. Lagrangian graded element is used to assign inhomogeneous isotropic elastic properties in finite element model to improve the performance. Convergence study is carried out with finite element model in single leg stance load condition. To test the feasibility of the model, sensitivity of simulation is investigated. To validate the model, numerical results are compared with those of an experimental work for the same specimen in simple stance load condition obtained from one of the reference paper. Good agreement is achieved for vertical displacement and strains in most of the locations.

  15. Musings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Robert D.

    1986-01-01

    Offers positive criticism of the presentations by authors and illustrators of children's books delivered at children's book and author programs, specifically the New Orleans American Booksellers Association Conference where J. Aruego, R. Peck, and B. Byars spoke and/or gave demonstrations. (SRT)

  16. Musings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    Recounts the experiences of a bookseller in dealing with children's books, including what strategies increase sales, how mothers and fathers choose children's books differently, and giving book talks at parents' nights at preschool schools. (NKA)

  17. Musings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    Recounts the experiences of a bookseller in dealing with children's books, including what strategies increase sales, how mothers and fathers choose children's books differently, and giving book talks at parents' nights at preschool schools. (NKA)

  18. PSF reconstruction for MUSE in wide field mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villecroze, R.; Fusco, Thierry; Bacon, Roland; Madec, Pierre-Yves

    2012-07-01

    The resolution of ground-based telescopes is dramatically limited by the atmospheric turbulence.. Adaptative optics (AO) is a real-time opto-mechanical approach which allows to correct for the turbulence effect and to reach the ultimate diffraction limit astronomical telescopes and their associated instrumentation. Nevertheless, the AO correction is never perfect especially when it has to deal with large Field of View (FoV). Hence, a posteriori image processing really improves the final estimation of astrophysical data. Such techniques require an accurate knowledge of the system response at any position in the FoV The purpose of this work is then the estimation of the AO response in the particular case of the MUSE [1] /GALACSI [2] instrument (a 3D mult-object spectrograph combined with a Laser-assisted wide field AO system which will be installed at the VLT in 2013). Using telemetry data coming from both AO Laser and natural guide stars, a Point Spread Function (PSF) is derived at any location of the FoV and for every wavelength of the MUSE spectrograph. This document presents the preliminary design of the MUSE WFM PSF reconstruction process. The various hypothesis and approximations are detailed and justified. A first description of the overall process is proposed. Some alternative strategies to improve the performance (in terms of computation time and storage) are described and have been implemented. Finally, after a validation of the proposed algorithm using end-to-end models, a performance analysis is conducted (with the help of a full end-to-end model). This performance analysis will help us to populate an exhaustive error budget table.

  19. Decomposition of LiDAR waveforms by B-spline-based modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiang; Li, Qing-Quan; Wu, Guofeng; Zhu, Jiasong

    2017-06-01

    Waveform decomposition is a widely used technique for extracting echoes from full-waveform LiDAR data. Most previous studies recommended the Gaussian decomposition approach, which employs the Gaussian function in laser pulse modeling. As the Gaussian-shape assumption is not always satisfied for real LiDAR waveforms, some other probability distributions (e.g., the lognormal distribution, the generalized normal distribution, and the Burr distribution) have also been introduced by researchers to fit sharply-peaked and/or heavy-tailed pulses. However, these models cannot be universally used, because they are only suitable for processing the LiDAR waveforms in particular shapes. In this paper, we present a new waveform decomposition algorithm based on the B-spline modeling technique. LiDAR waveforms are not assumed to have a priori shapes but rather are modeled by B-splines, and the shape of a received waveform is treated as the mixture of finite transmitted pulses after translation and scaling transformation. The performance of the new model was tested using two full-waveform data sets acquired by a Riegl LMS-Q680i laser scanner and an Optech Aquarius laser bathymeter, comparing with three classical waveform decomposition approaches: the Gaussian, generalized normal, and lognormal distribution-based models. The experimental results show that the B-spline model performed the best in terms of waveform fitting accuracy, while the generalized normal model yielded the worst performance in the two test data sets. Riegl waveforms have nearly Gaussian pulse shapes and were well fitted by the Gaussian mixture model, while the B-spline-based modeling algorithm produced a slightly better result by further reducing 6.4% of fitting residuals, largely benefiting from alleviating the adverse impact of the ringing effect. The pulse shapes of Optech waveforms, on the other hand, are noticeably right-skewed. The Gaussian modeling results deviated significantly from original signals, and

  20. A Bézier-Spline-based Model for the Simulation of Hysteresis in Variably Saturated Soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, Clemens; Peche, Aaron; Thiele, Luisa-Bianca; Graf, Thomas; Neuweiler, Insa

    2017-04-01

    Most transient variably saturated flow models neglect hysteresis in the p_c-S-relationship (Beven, 2012). Such models tend to inadequately represent matrix potential and saturation distribution. Thereby, when simulating flow and transport processes, fluid and solute fluxes might be overestimated (Russo et al., 1989). In this study, we present a simple, computationally efficient and easily applicable model that enables to adequately describe hysteresis in the p_c-S-relationship for variably saturated flow. This model can be seen as an extension to the existing play-type model (Beliaev and Hassanizadeh, 2001), where scanning curves are simplified as vertical lines between main imbibition and main drainage curve. In our model, we use continuous linear and Bézier-Spline-based functions. We show the successful validation of the model by numerically reproducing a physical experiment by Gillham, Klute and Heermann (1976) describing primary drainage and imbibition in a vertical soil column. With a deviation of 3%, the simple Bézier-Spline-based model performs significantly better that the play-type approach, which deviates by 30% from the experimental results. Finally, we discuss the realization of physical experiments in order to extend the model to secondary scanning curves and in order to determine scanning curve steepness. {Literature} Beven, K.J. (2012). Rainfall-Runoff-Modelling: The Primer. John Wiley and Sons. Russo, D., Jury, W. A., & Butters, G. L. (1989). Numerical analysis of solute transport during transient irrigation: 1. The effect of hysteresis and profile heterogeneity. Water Resources Research, 25(10), 2109-2118. https://doi.org/10.1029/WR025i010p02109. Beliaev, A.Y. & Hassanizadeh, S.M. (2001). A Theoretical Model of Hysteresis and Dynamic Effects in the Capillary Relation for Two-phase Flow in Porous Media. Transport in Porous Media 43: 487. doi:10.1023/A:1010736108256. Gillham, R., Klute, A., & Heermann, D. (1976). Hydraulic properties of a porous

  1. Motion immune diffusion imaging using augmented MUSE (AMUSE) for high-resolution multi-shot EPI

    PubMed Central

    Guhaniyogi, Shayan; Chu, Mei-Lan; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Song, Allen W.; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To develop new techniques for reducing the effects of microscopic and macroscopic patient motion in diffusion imaging acquired with high-resolution multi-shot EPI. Theory The previously reported Multiplexed Sensitivity Encoding (MUSE) algorithm is extended to account for macroscopic pixel misregistrations as well as motion-induced phase errors in a technique called Augmented MUSE (AMUSE). Furthermore, to obtain more accurate quantitative DTI measures in the presence of subject motion, we also account for the altered diffusion encoding among shots arising from macroscopic motion. Methods MUSE and AMUSE were evaluated on simulated and in vivo motion-corrupted multi-shot diffusion data. Evaluations were made both on the resulting imaging quality and estimated diffusion tensor metrics. Results AMUSE was found to reduce image blurring resulting from macroscopic subject motion compared to MUSE, but yielded inaccurate tensor estimations when neglecting the altered diffusion encoding. Including the altered diffusion encoding in AMUSE produced better estimations of diffusion tensors. Conclusion The use of AMUSE allows for improved image quality and diffusion tensor accuracy in the presence of macroscopic subject motion during multi-shot diffusion imaging. These techniques should facilitate future high-resolution diffusion imaging. PMID:25762216

  2. Motion immune diffusion imaging using augmented MUSE for high-resolution multi-shot EPI.

    PubMed

    Guhaniyogi, Shayan; Chu, Mei-Lan; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Song, Allen W; Chen, Nan-Kuei

    2016-02-01

    To develop new techniques for reducing the effects of microscopic and macroscopic patient motion in diffusion imaging acquired with high-resolution multishot echo-planar imaging. The previously reported multiplexed sensitivity encoding (MUSE) algorithm is extended to account for macroscopic pixel misregistrations, as well as motion-induced phase errors in a technique called augmented MUSE (AMUSE). Furthermore, to obtain more accurate quantitative diffusion-tensor imaging measures in the presence of subject motion, we also account for the altered diffusion encoding among shots arising from macroscopic motion. MUSE and AMUSE were evaluated on simulated and in vivo motion-corrupted multishot diffusion data. Evaluations were made both on the resulting imaging quality and estimated diffusion tensor metrics. AMUSE was found to reduce image blurring resulting from macroscopic subject motion compared to MUSE but yielded inaccurate tensor estimations when neglecting the altered diffusion encoding. Including the altered diffusion encoding in AMUSE produced better estimations of diffusion tensors. The use of AMUSE allows for improved image quality and diffusion tensor accuracy in the presence of macroscopic subject motion during multishot diffusion imaging. These techniques should facilitate future high-resolution diffusion imaging. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Accurate B-spline-based 3-D interpolation scheme for digital volume correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Maodong; Liang, Jin; Wei, Bin

    2016-12-01

    An accurate and efficient 3-D interpolation scheme, based on sampling theorem and Fourier transform technique, is proposed to reduce the sub-voxel matching error caused by intensity interpolation bias in digital volume correlation. First, the influence factors of the interpolation bias are investigated theoretically using the transfer function of an interpolation filter (henceforth filter) in the Fourier domain. A law that the positional error of a filter can be expressed as a function of fractional position and wave number is found. Then, considering the above factors, an optimized B-spline-based recursive filter, combining B-spline transforms and least squares optimization method, is designed to virtually eliminate the interpolation bias in the process of sub-voxel matching. Besides, given each volumetric image containing different wave number ranges, a Gaussian weighting function is constructed to emphasize or suppress certain of wave number ranges based on the Fourier spectrum analysis. Finally, a novel software is developed and series of validation experiments were carried out to verify the proposed scheme. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme can reduce the interpolation bias to an acceptable level.

  4. Accurate B-spline-based 3-D interpolation scheme for digital volume correlation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Maodong; Liang, Jin; Wei, Bin

    2016-12-01

    An accurate and efficient 3-D interpolation scheme, based on sampling theorem and Fourier transform technique, is proposed to reduce the sub-voxel matching error caused by intensity interpolation bias in digital volume correlation. First, the influence factors of the interpolation bias are investigated theoretically using the transfer function of an interpolation filter (henceforth filter) in the Fourier domain. A law that the positional error of a filter can be expressed as a function of fractional position and wave number is found. Then, considering the above factors, an optimized B-spline-based recursive filter, combining B-spline transforms and least squares optimization method, is designed to virtually eliminate the interpolation bias in the process of sub-voxel matching. Besides, given each volumetric image containing different wave number ranges, a Gaussian weighting function is constructed to emphasize or suppress certain of wave number ranges based on the Fourier spectrum analysis. Finally, a novel software is developed and series of validation experiments were carried out to verify the proposed scheme. Experimental results show that the proposed scheme can reduce the interpolation bias to an acceptable level.

  5. Spline-based deforming ellipsoids for interactive 3D bioimage segmentation.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Gonzalo, Ricard; Chenouard, Nicolas; Unser, Michael

    2013-10-01

    We present a new fast active-contour model (a.k.a. snake) for image segmentation in 3D microscopy. We introduce a parametric design that relies on exponential B-spline bases and allows us to build snakes that are able to reproduce ellipsoids. We design our bases to have the shortest-possible support, subject to some constraints. Thus, computational efficiency is maximized. The proposed 3D snake can approximate blob-like objects with good accuracy and can perfectly reproduce spheres and ellipsoids, irrespective of their position and orientation. The optimization process is remarkably fast due to the use of Gauss' theorem within our energy computation scheme. Our technique yields successful segmentation results, even for challenging data where object contours are not well defined. This is due to our parametric approach that allows one to favor prior shapes. In addition, this paper provides a software that gives full control over the snakes via an intuitive manipulation of few control points.

  6. Spline Based Shape Prediction and Analysis of Uniformly Rotating Sessile and Pendant Droplets.

    PubMed

    Jakhar, Karan; Chattopadhyay, Ashesh; Thakur, Atul; Raj, Rishi

    2017-06-06

    Prediction and analysis of the shapes of liquid-vapor interface of droplets under the influence of external forces is critical for various applications. In this regard, a geometric model that can capture the macroscopic shape of the liquid-vapor interface in tandem with the subtleties near the contact line, particularly in the regime where the droplet shape deviates significantly from the idealized spherical cap geometry, is desirable. Such deviations may occur when external forces such as gravity or centrifugal dominate over the surface tension force. Here we use vector parametrized cubic spline representation for axisymmetric fluid-fluid interfaces along with a novel thermodynamic free energy minimization based heuristic to determine the shape of liquid-vapor interface of droplets. We show that the current scheme can easily predict the shapes of sessile and pendant droplets under the action of centrifugal force over a broad range of surface contact angle values and droplet sizes encountered in practical applications. Finally, we show that the cubic spline based modeling approach makes it convenient to perform the inverse analysis as well, i.e., predict interfacial properties from the shape of a droplet under the action of various types of external forces including gravity and centrifugal. We believe that this versatile modeling approach can be extended to model droplet shapes under various other external forces including electric and acoustic. In addition, the simple shape analysis approach is also promising for the development of inexpensive interfacial analysis tools such as surface tensiometers.

  7. Beam particle tracking for MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liyanage, Anusha; MUSE Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The proton radius puzzle is the 7 σ disagreement between the proton radius extracted from the measured muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and the proton radius extracted from the regular hydrogen Lamb shift and elastic ep scattering form factor data. So far there is no generally accepted resolution to the puzzle. The explanations for the discrepancy include new degrees of freedom beyond the Standard Model. The MUon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) will simultaneously measure ep and μp scattering at the Paul Scherrer Institute, using the πM1 beam line at 100-250 MeV/c to cover a four-momentum transfer range of Q2=0.002-0.07 (GeV/c)2. Due to the large divergence of the secondary muon beam, beam particle trajectories are needed for every event. They are measured by a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) tracking telescope consisting of three 10x10 cm2 triple-GEM chambers. Fast segmented scintillator paddles provide precise timing information. The GEM detectors, their performance in test beam times, and plans and milestones will be discussed. This work has been supported by DOE DE-SC0012589 and NSF HRD-1649909. DOE DE-SC0012589 and NSF HRD-1649909.

  8. Update on the MUSE Proton Radius Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, Ethan; MUSE Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The results of the test beam run in December 2015 for the MUSE experiment are presented and the current status of MUSE will be discussed. During this test run a study of 2 mm thick scintillators coupled to SiPMs was performed and the results are the focus of this talk. SiPMs from two different companies, AvanSiD and Hamamatsu, were tested and it was found the timing resolution is between 89 ps - 110 ps, depending on SiPM model, bar length, and momentum. The bars have an operational efficiency of at least 99%.

  9. Image Quality Improvement in Adaptive Optics Scanning Laser Ophthalmoscopy Assisted Capillary Visualization Using B-spline-based Elastic Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Uji, Akihito; Ooto, Sotaro; Hangai, Masanori; Arichika, Shigeta; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of B-spline-based elastic image registration on adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (AO-SLO)-assisted capillary visualization. Methods AO-SLO videos were acquired from parafoveal areas in the eyes of healthy subjects and patients with various diseases. After nonlinear image registration, the image quality of capillary images constructed from AO-SLO videos using motion contrast enhancement was compared before and after B-spline-based elastic (nonlinear) image registration performed using ImageJ. For objective comparison of image quality, contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRS) for vessel images were calculated. For subjective comparison, experienced ophthalmologists ranked images on a 5-point scale. Results All AO-SLO videos were successfully stabilized by elastic image registration. CNR was significantly higher in capillary images stabilized by elastic image registration than in those stabilized without registration. The average ratio of CNR in images with elastic image registration to CNR in images without elastic image registration was 2.10 ± 1.73, with no significant difference in the ratio between patients and healthy subjects. Improvement of image quality was also supported by expert comparison. Conclusions Use of B-spline-based elastic image registration in AO-SLO-assisted capillary visualization was effective for enhancing image quality both objectively and subjectively. PMID:24265796

  10. The Practice of Sharing a Historical Muse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Sharing an imaginative energy for the storied landscape is one kind of pedagogical passion. The author had taken on the challenge of offering this particular passion to his fellow travellers. With students, the practice of peppering a trip with a historical muse involves focussed readings, in the moment stories, planned ceremonies and rituals and,…

  11. MUSES Transfer (for SpaceX CRS-11)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-12

    Technicians use a Hyster forklift to move the Multiple User System for Earth Sensing, or MUSES, payload out of the Space Station Processing Facility high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. MUSES will be delivered to the International Space Station aboard the SpaceX Dragon cargo carrier on the company’s 11th commercial resupply services mission to the space station. MUSES, developed by Teledyne Brown, is part of the company's new commercial space-based digital imaging business. MUSES hosts earth-viewing instruments, such as high-resolution digital cameras, hyperspectral imagers, and provides precision pointing and other accommodations.

  12. MUSES Transfer (for SpaceX CRS-11)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-12

    Inside the Space Station Processing Facility high bay at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the Multiple User System for Earth Sensing, or MUSES, payload is being prepared for transfer out of the high bay. MUSES will be delivered to the International Space Station aboard the SpaceX Dragon cargo carrier on the company’s 11th commercial resupply services mission to the space station. MUSES, developed by Teledyne Brown, is part of the company's new commercial space-based digital imaging business. MUSES hosts earth-viewing instruments, such as high-resolution digital cameras, hyperspectral imagers, and provides precision pointing and other accommodations.

  13. SELFI: an object-based, Bayesian method for faint emission line source detection in MUSE deep field data cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meillier, Céline; Chatelain, Florent; Michel, Olivier; Bacon, Roland; Piqueras, Laure; Bacher, Raphael; Ayasso, Hacheme

    2016-04-01

    We present SELFI, the Source Emission Line FInder, a new Bayesian method optimized for detection of faint galaxies in Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) deep fields. MUSE is the new panoramic integral field spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) that has unique capabilities for spectroscopic investigation of the deep sky. It has provided data cubes with 324 million voxels over a single 1 arcmin2 field of view. To address the challenge of faint-galaxy detection in these large data cubes, we developed a new method that processes 3D data either for modeling or for estimation and extraction of source configurations. This object-based approach yields a natural sparse representation of the sources in massive data fields, such as MUSE data cubes. In the Bayesian framework, the parameters that describe the observed sources are considered random variables. The Bayesian model leads to a general and robust algorithm where the parameters are estimated in a fully data-driven way. This detection algorithm was applied to the MUSE observation of Hubble Deep Field-South. With 27 h total integration time, these observations provide a catalog of 189 sources of various categories and with secured redshift. The algorithm retrieved 91% of the galaxies with only 9% false detection. This method also allowed the discovery of three new Lyα emitters and one [OII] emitter, all without any Hubble Space Telescope counterpart. We analyzed the reasons for failure for some targets, and found that the most important limitation of the method is when faint sources are located in the vicinity of bright spatially resolved galaxies that cannot be approximated by the Sérsic elliptical profile. The software and its documentation are available on the MUSE science web service (muse-vlt.eu/science).

  14. The MUon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) at PSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Michael; MUSE Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The proton is not an elementary particle but has a substructure governed by the interaction of quarks and gluons. The size of the proton is manifest in the spatial distributions of the electric charge and magnetization, which determine the response to electromagnetic interaction. Recently, contradictory measurements of the proton charge radius between muonic hydrogen and electronic probes have constituted the proton radius puzzle, which has been challenging our basic understanding of the proton. The MUon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) in preparation at the Paul-Scherrer Institute (PSI) has the potential to resolve the puzzle by measuring the proton charge radius with electron and muon scattering simultaneously and with high precision, including any possible difference between the two, and with both beam charges. The status of the MUSE experiment will be reported. Supported by NSF and DOE.

  15. MUSE: the Multi-Slit Solar Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarbell, Theodore D.; De Pontieu, Bart

    2017-08-01

    The Multi-Slit Solar Explorer is a proposed Small Explorer mission for studying the dynamics of the corona and transition region using both conventional and novel spectral imaging techniques. The physical processes that heat the multi-million degree solar corona, accelerate the solar wind and drive solar activity (CMEs and flares) remain poorly known. A breakthrough in these areas can only come from radically innovative instrumentation and state-of-the-art numerical modeling and will lead to better understanding of space weather origins. MUSE’s multi-slit coronal spectroscopy will use a 100x improvement in spectral raster cadence to fill a crucial gap in our knowledge of Sun-Earth connections; it will reveal temperatures, velocities and non-thermal processes over a wide temperature range to diagnose physical processes that remain invisible to current or planned instruments. MUSE will contain two instruments: an EUV spectrograph (SG) and EUV context imager (CI). Both have similar spatial resolution and leverage extensive heritage from previous high-resolution instruments such as IRIS and the HiC rocket payload. The MUSE investigation will build on the success of IRIS by combining numerical modeling with a uniquely capable observatory: MUSE will obtain EUV spectra and images with the highest resolution in space (1/3 arcsec) and time (1-4 s) ever achieved for the transition region and corona, along 35 slits and a large context FOV simultaneously. The MUSE consortium includes LMSAL, SAO, Stanford, ARC, HAO, GSFC, MSFC, MSU, ITA Oslo and other institutions.

  16. Women Writers Evoke the Muse: A Mythic Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Lori Ann

    A creative writing class explored the feminine creative powers evoked when searching for the Muse in an attempt to understand women as writers. Female student writers occasionally found "masculine" figures, but predominantly experienced a figure of the Muse that had a distinctly Goddess-linked quality or was not genderized at all.…

  17. Characterizing the environments of supernovae with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbany, L.; Anderson, J. P.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Krühler, T.; Sánchez, S. F.; Falcón-Barroso, J.; Pérez, E.; Maureira, J. C.; Hamuy, M.; González-Gaitán, S.; Förster, F.; Moral, V.

    2016-02-01

    We present a statistical analysis of the environments of 11 supernovae (SNe) which occurred in six nearby galaxies (z ≲ 0.016). All galaxies were observed with MUSE, the high spatial resolution integral-field spectrograph mounted to the 8 m VLT UT4. These data enable us to map the full spatial extent of host galaxies up to ˜3 effective radii. In this way, not only can one characterize the specific host environment of each SN, one can compare their properties with stellar populations within the full range of other environments within the host. We present a method that consists of selecting all H II regions found within host galaxies from 2D extinction-corrected Hα emission maps. These regions are then characterized in terms of their Hα equivalent widths, star formation rates and oxygen abundances. Identifying H II regions spatially coincident with SN explosion sites, we are thus able to determine where within the distributions of host galaxy e.g. metallicities and ages each SN is found, thus providing new constraints on SN progenitor properties. This initial pilot study using MUSE opens the way for a revolution in SN environment studies where we are now able to study multiple environment SN progenitor dependencies using a single instrument and single pointing.

  18. Porting Big Data technology across domains. WISE for MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vriend, Willem-Jan

    2015-12-01

    Due to the nature of MUSE data, each data-cube obtained as part of the GTO program is used by most of the consortium institutes which are spread across Europe. Since the effort required in reducing the data is significant, and to ensure uniformity in analysis, it is desirable to have a data management system that integrates data reduction, provenance tracking, quality control and data analysis. Such a system should support the distribution of storage and processing over the consortium institutes. The MUSE-WISE system incorporates these aspects. It is built on the Astro-WISE system, originally designed to handle OmegaCAM imaging data, which has been extended to support 3D spectroscopic data. MUSE-WISE is now being used to process MUSE GTO data. It currently stores 95 TB consisting of 48k raw exposures and processed data used by 79 users spread over 7 nodes in Europe.

  19. Muse Cells Derived from Dermal Tissues Can Differentiate into Melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Ting; Zhang, Ru-Zhi; Yang, Yu-Hua; Liu, Qi; Li, Di; Pan, Xiao-Ru

    2017-02-07

    The objective of the authors has been to obtain multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring cells (Muse cells) from primary cultures of dermal fibroblasts, identify their pluripotency, and detect their ability to differentiate into melanocytes. The distribution of SSEA-3-positive cells in human scalp skin was assessed by immunohistochemistry, and the distribution of Oct4, Sox2, Nanog, and SSEA-3-positive cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. The expression levels of Sox2, Oct4, hKlf4, and Nanog mRNAs and proteins in Muse cells were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses and Western blots, respectively. These Muse cells differentiated into melanocytes in differentiation medium. The SSEA-3-positive cells were scattered in the basement membrane zone and the dermis, with comparatively more in the sebaceous glands, vascular and sweat glands, as well as the outer root sheath of hair follicles, the dermal papillae, and the hair bulbs. Muse cells, which have the ability to self-renew, were obtained from scalp dermal fibroblasts by flow cytometry sorting with an anti-SSEA-3 antibody. The results of RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunofluorescence staining showed that the expression levels of Oct4, Nanog, Sox2, and Klf4 mRNAs and proteins in Muse cells were significantly different from their parental dermal fibroblasts. Muse cells differentiated into melanocytes when cultured in melanocyte differentiation medium, and the Muse cell-derived melanocytes expressed the melanocyte-specific marker HMB45. Muse cells could be obtained by flow cytometry from primary cultures of scalp dermal fibroblasts, which possessed the ability of pluripotency and self-renewal, and could differentiate into melanocytes in vitro.

  20. Improved Leg Tracking Considering Gait Phase and Spline-Based Interpolation during Turning Motion in Walk Tests.

    PubMed

    Yorozu, Ayanori; Moriguchi, Toshiki; Takahashi, Masaki

    2015-09-04

    Falling is a common problem in the growing elderly population, and fall-risk assessment systems are needed for community-based fall prevention programs. In particular, the timed up and go test (TUG) is the clinical test most often used to evaluate elderly individual ambulatory ability in many clinical institutions or local communities. This study presents an improved leg tracking method using a laser range sensor (LRS) for a gait measurement system to evaluate the motor function in walk tests, such as the TUG. The system tracks both legs and measures the trajectory of both legs. However, both legs might be close to each other, and one leg might be hidden from the sensor. This is especially the case during the turning motion in the TUG, where the time that a leg is hidden from the LRS is longer than that during straight walking and the moving direction rapidly changes. These situations are likely to lead to false tracking and deteriorate the measurement accuracy of the leg positions. To solve these problems, a novel data association considering gait phase and a Catmull-Rom spline-based interpolation during the occlusion are proposed. From the experimental results with young people, we confirm   that the proposed methods can reduce the chances of false tracking. In addition, we verify the measurement accuracy of the leg trajectory compared to a three-dimensional motion analysis system (VICON).

  1. Improved Leg Tracking Considering Gait Phase and Spline-Based Interpolation during Turning Motion in Walk Tests

    PubMed Central

    Yorozu, Ayanori; Moriguchi, Toshiki; Takahashi, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    Falling is a common problem in the growing elderly population, and fall-risk assessment systems are needed for community-based fall prevention programs. In particular, the timed up and go test (TUG) is the clinical test most often used to evaluate elderly individual ambulatory ability in many clinical institutions or local communities. This study presents an improved leg tracking method using a laser range sensor (LRS) for a gait measurement system to evaluate the motor function in walk tests, such as the TUG. The system tracks both legs and measures the trajectory of both legs. However, both legs might be close to each other, and one leg might be hidden from the sensor. This is especially the case during the turning motion in the TUG, where the time that a leg is hidden from the LRS is longer than that during straight walking and the moving direction rapidly changes. These situations are likely to lead to false tracking and deteriorate the measurement accuracy of the leg positions. To solve these problems, a novel data association considering gait phase and a Catmull–Rom spline-based interpolation during the occlusion are proposed. From the experimental results with young people, we confirm that the proposed methods can reduce the chances of false tracking. In addition, we verify the measurement accuracy of the leg trajectory compared to a three-dimensional motion analysis system (VICON). PMID:26404302

  2. Stochastic speckle noise compensation in optical coherence tomography using non-stationary spline-based speckle noise modelling.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Andrew; Lui, Dorothy; Boroomand, Ameneh; Glaister, Jeffrey; Wong, Alexander; Bizheva, Kostadinka

    2013-01-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) allows for non-invasive 3D visualization of biological tissue at cellular level resolution. Often hindered by speckle noise, the visualization of important biological tissue details in OCT that can aid disease diagnosis can be improved by speckle noise compensation. A challenge with handling speckle noise is its inherent non-stationary nature, where the underlying noise characteristics vary with the spatial location. In this study, an innovative speckle noise compensation method is presented for handling the non-stationary traits of speckle noise in OCT imagery. The proposed approach centers on a non-stationary spline-based speckle noise modeling strategy to characterize the speckle noise. The novel method was applied to ultra high-resolution OCT (UHROCT) images of the human retina and corneo-scleral limbus acquired in-vivo that vary in tissue structure and optical properties. Test results showed improved performance of the proposed novel algorithm compared to a number of previously published speckle noise compensation approaches in terms of higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and better overall visual assessment.

  3. BEM performance in calculation of pressure distribution in spline based segmented medical images.

    PubMed

    Pashaee, A; Fatouraee, N

    2007-01-01

    Conventional methods for non-invasively estimation of pressure distribution in the cardiovascular flow domain use the differential form of governing equations. This study evaluates the advantages of using integral form of governing equations. The concepts provided with the Boundary Element Method (BEM) together with the boundary based image segmentation tools are used to develop a fast calculation algorithm. Boundary based segmentation provides facility for BEM with domain pixel extraction, boundary meshing, wall normal vector calculation and accurate calculation of boundary element length. The integral form of governing equation reviewed in detail. Both the differential and integral based formulations are evaluated using mathematical test flow image.

  4. Spline based least squares integration for two-dimensional shape or wavefront reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Lei; Xue, Junpeng; Gao, Bo; Zuo, Chao; Idir, Mourad

    2016-12-21

    In this paper, we present a novel method to handle two-dimensional shape or wavefront reconstruction from its slopes. The proposed integration method employs splines to fit the measured slope data with piecewise polynomials and uses the analytical polynomial functions to represent the height changes in a lateral spacing with the pre-determined spline coefficients. The linear least squares method is applied to estimate the height or wavefront as a final result. Numerical simulations verify that the proposed method has less algorithm errors than two other existing methods used for comparison. Especially at the boundaries, the proposed method has better performance. The noise influence is studied by adding white Gaussian noise to the slope data. Finally, experimental data from phase measuring deflectometry are tested to demonstrate the feasibility of the new method in a practical measurement.

  5. Spline based least squares integration for two-dimensional shape or wavefront reconstruction

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Lei; Xue, Junpeng; Gao, Bo; ...

    2016-12-21

    In this paper, we present a novel method to handle two-dimensional shape or wavefront reconstruction from its slopes. The proposed integration method employs splines to fit the measured slope data with piecewise polynomials and uses the analytical polynomial functions to represent the height changes in a lateral spacing with the pre-determined spline coefficients. The linear least squares method is applied to estimate the height or wavefront as a final result. Numerical simulations verify that the proposed method has less algorithm errors than two other existing methods used for comparison. Especially at the boundaries, the proposed method has better performance. Themore » noise influence is studied by adding white Gaussian noise to the slope data. Finally, experimental data from phase measuring deflectometry are tested to demonstrate the feasibility of the new method in a practical measurement.« less

  6. Spline based least squares integration for two-dimensional shape or wavefront reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Lei; Xue, Junpeng; Gao, Bo; Zuo, Chao; Idir, Mourad

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we present a novel method to handle two-dimensional shape or wavefront reconstruction from its slopes. The proposed integration method employs splines to fit the measured slope data with piecewise polynomials and uses the analytical polynomial functions to represent the height changes in a lateral spacing with the pre-determined spline coefficients. The linear least squares method is applied to estimate the height or wavefront as a final result. Numerical simulations verify that the proposed method has less algorithm errors than two other existing methods used for comparison. Especially at the boundaries, the proposed method has better performance. The noise influence is studied by adding white Gaussian noise to the slope data. Experimental data from phase measuring deflectometry are tested to demonstrate the feasibility of the new method in a practical measurement.

  7. Muse Gas Flow and Wind (MEGAFLOW). I. First MUSE Results on Background Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroetter, I.; Bouché, N.; Wendt, M.; Contini, T.; Finley, H.; Pelló, R.; Bacon, R.; Cantalupo, S.; Marino, R. A.; Richard, J.; Lilly, S. J.; Schaye, J.; Soto, K.; Steinmetz, M.; Straka, L. A.; Wisotzki, L.

    2016-12-01

    The physical properties of galactic winds are one of the keys to understand galaxy formation and evolution. These properties can be constrained thanks to background quasar lines of sight (LOS) passing near star-forming galaxies (SFGs). We present the first results of the MusE GAs FLOw and Wind survey obtained from two quasar fields, which have eight Mg ii absorbers of which three have rest equivalent width greater than 0.8 Å. With the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) spectrograph on the Very Large Telescope (VLT), we detect six (75%) Mg ii host galaxy candidates within a radius of 30″ from the quasar LOS. Out of these six galaxy-quasar pairs, from geometrical argument, one is likely probing galactic outflows, where two are classified as “ambiguous,” two are likely probing extended gaseous disks and one pair seems to be a merger. We focus on the wind-pair and constrain the outflow using a high-resolution quasar spectra from the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph. Assuming the metal absorption to be due to ga;s flowing out of the detected galaxy through a cone along the minor axis, we find outflow velocities in the order of ≈150 {km} {{{s}}}-1 (i.e., smaller than the escape velocity) with a loading factor, η ={\\dot{M}}{out}/{{SFR}}, of ≈0.7. We see evidence for an open conical flow, with a low-density inner core. In the future, MUSE will provide us with about 80 multiple galaxy-quasar pairs in two dozen fields. Based on observations made at the ESO telescopes under programs 094.A-0211(B) and 293.A-5038(A).

  8. Reuse of B-spline-based shape interrogation tools for triangular mesh models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobashi, Yuji; Suzuki, Junya; Joo, Han Kyul; Maekawa, Takashi

    2012-06-01

    In many engineering applications, a smooth surface is often approximated by a mesh of polygons. In a number of downstream applications, it is frequently necessary to estimate the differential invariant properties of the underlying smooth surfaces of the mesh. Such applications include first-order surface interrogation methods that entail the use of isophotes, reflection lines, and highlight lines, and second-order surface interrogation methods such as the computation of geodesics, geodesic offsets, lines of curvature, and detection of umbilics. However, we are not able to directly apply these tools that were developed for B-spline surfaces to tessellated surfaces. This article describes a unifying technique that enables us to use the shape interrogation tools developed for B-spline surface on objects represented by triangular meshes. First, the region of interest of a given triangular mesh is transformed into a graph function (z=h(x,y)) so that we can treat the triangular domain within the rectangular domain. Each triangular mesh is then converted into a cubic graph triangular Bézier patch so that the positions as well as the derivatives of the surface can be evaluated for any given point (x,y) in the domain. A number of illustrative examples are given that show the effectiveness of our algorithm. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. MUSE observations of the lensing cluster Abell 1689

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bina, D.; Pelló, R.; Richard, J.; Lewis, J.; Patrício, V.; Cantalupo, S.; Herenz, E. C.; Soto, K.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Bacon, R.; Vernet, J. D. R.; Wisotzki, L.; Clément, B.; Cuby, J. G.; Lagattuta, D. J.; Soucail, G.; Verhamme, A.

    2016-05-01

    Context. This paper presents the results obtained with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) for the core of the lensing cluster Abell 1689, as part of MUSE's commissioning at the ESO Very Large Telescope. Aims: Integral-field observations with MUSE provide a unique view of the central 1 × 1 arcmin2 region at intermediate spectral resolution in the visible domain, allowing us to conduct a complete census of both cluster galaxies and lensed background sources. Methods: We performed a spectroscopic analysis of all sources found in the MUSE data cube. Two hundred and eighty-two objects were systematically extracted from the cube based on a guided-and-manual approach. We also tested three different tools for the automated detection and extraction of line emitters. Cluster galaxies and lensed sources were identified based on their spectral features. We investigated the multiple-image configuration for all known sources in the field. Results: Previous to our survey, 28 different lensed galaxies displaying 46 multiple images were known in the MUSE field of view, most of them were detected through photometric redshifts and lensing considerations. Of these, we spectroscopically confirm 12 images based on their emission lines, corresponding to 7 different lensed galaxies between z = 0.95 and 5.0. In addition, 14 new galaxies have been spectroscopically identified in this area thanks to MUSE data, with redshifts ranging between 0.8 and 6.2. All background sources detected within the MUSE field of view correspond to multiple-imaged systems lensed by A1689. Seventeen sources in total are found at z ≥ 3 based on their Lyman-α emission, with Lyman-α luminosities ranging between 40.5 ≲ log (Lyα) ≲ 42.5 after correction for magnification. This sample is particularly sensitive to the slope of the luminosity function toward the faintest end. The density of sources obtained in this survey is consistent with a steep value of α ≤ -1.5, although this result still

  10. Surface properties of Hayabusa (MUSES-C) spacecraft target 1998 SF36 (25143)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lederer, S. M.; Domingue, D.; Vilas, F.; Abe, M.; Farnham, T.; French, L. M.; Ishiguro, M.; Jarvis, K. S.; Larson, S. M.; Lowry, S.; Massey, P.; Ohba, Y.; Takagi, Y.; Weissman, P.

    2003-05-01

    In March, 2001, the MUSES-C spacecraft target asteroid 1998 SF36 (25143) made its final close approach to Earth prior to its rendezvous with the spacecraft in 2005. During this time, we carried out an extensive observing campaign to better characterize this near-Earth asteroid. Results included here capitalize on broadband UBVRI photometric observations taken with a series of telescopes, instrumentation, and observers. The photometric data sets were combined to calculate Hapke model parameters of the surface material of 1998 SF36, and examine the solar-corrected broadband color characteristics of the asteroid. We employed the Hapke model to estimate the surface roughness, single particle scattering albedo, and geometric and bond albedos. Model results indicate a large geometric albedo, which suggests a rocky, smoother surface, consistent with other smaller near-Earth asteroids. These calculations show that SF36 appears significantly brighter than the general main-belt S-class asteroids, in agreement with the results of other observers. Examination of the broad band colors in the context of the populations of the main-belt asteroids and near-Earth asteroids show that SF36 - a small-diameter NEA - has the spectral characteristics of a "space weathered", larger-diameter S-class asteroid. The characteristics of SF36 remain enigmatic, and await spacecraft examination. This work was supported in part by a National Research Council (NRC) Fellowship and the NASA/MUSES-C program.

  11. Spline-based Rayleigh-Ritz methods for the approximation of the natural modes of vibration for flexible beams with tip bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, I. G.

    1985-01-01

    Rayleigh-Ritz methods for the approximation of the natural modes for a class of vibration problems involving flexible beams with tip bodies using subspaces of piecewise polynomial spline functions are developed. An abstract operator theoretic formulation of the eigenvalue problem is derived and spectral properties investigated. The existing theory for spline-based Rayleigh-Ritz methods applied to elliptic differential operators and the approximation properties of interpolatory splines are useed to argue convergence and establish rates of convergence. An example and numerical results are discussed.

  12. Deep MUSE observations in the HDFS. Morpho-kinematics of distant star-forming galaxies down to 108M⊙

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contini, T.; Epinat, B.; Bouché, N.; Brinchmann, J.; Boogaard, L. A.; Ventou, E.; Bacon, R.; Richard, J.; Weilbacher, P. M.; Wisotzki, L.; Krajnović, D.; Vielfaure, J.-B.; Emsellem, E.; Finley, H.; Inami, H.; Schaye, J.; Swinbank, M.; Guérou, A.; Martinsson, T.; Michel-Dansac, L.; Schroetter, I.; Shirazi, M.; Soucail, G.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: Whereas the evolution of gas kinematics of massive galaxies is now relatively well established up to redshift z ~ 3, little is known about the kinematics of lower mass (M⋆≤ 1010M⊙) galaxies. We use MUSE, a powerful wide-field, optical integral-field spectrograph (IFS) recently mounted on the VLT, to characterize this galaxy population at intermediate redshift. Methods: We made use of the deepest MUSE observations performed so far on the Hubble Deep Field South (HDFS). This data cube, resulting from 27 h of integration time, covers a one arcmin2 field of view at an unprecedented depth (with a 1σ emission-line surface brightness limit of 1 × 10-19 erg s-1 cm-2 arcsec-2) and a final spatial resolution of ≈0.7''. We identified a sample of 28 resolved emission-line galaxies, extending over an area that is at least twice the seeing disk, spread over a redshift interval of 0.2 estimates of the disk inclination, disk scale length, and position angle of the major axis. We derived the resolved ionized gas properties of these galaxies from the MUSE data and model the disk (both in 2D and in 3D with GalPaK3D) to retrieve their intrinsic gas kinematics, including the maximum rotation velocity and velocity dispersion. Results: We build a sample of resolved emission-line galaxies of much lower stellar mass and SFR (by ~1 - 2 orders of magnitude) than previous IFS surveys. The gas kinematics of most of the spatially resolved MUSE-HDFS galaxies is consistent with disk-like rotation, but about 20% have velocity dispersions that are larger than the rotation velocities and 30% are part of a close pair and/or show clear signs of recent

  13. New muonium HFS measurements at J-PARC/MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, P.; Aoki, M.; Fukao, Y.; Higashi, Y.; Higuchi, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikedo, Y.; Ishida, K.; Ito, T. U.; Iwasaki, M.; Kadono, R.; Kamigaito, O.; Kanda, S.; Kawall, D.; Kawamura, N.; Koda, A.; Kojima, K. M.; Kubo, K.; Matsuda, Y.; Matsudate, Y.; Mibe, T.; Miyake, Y.; Mizutani, T.; Nagamine, K.; Nishimura, S.; Nishiyama, K.; Ogitsu, T.; Okubo, R.; Saito, N.; Sasaki, K.; Seo, S.; Shimomura, K.; Sugano, M.; Tajima, M.; Tanaka, K. S.; Tanaka, T.; Tomono, D.; Torii, H. A.; Torikai, E.; Toyoda, A.; Ueno, K.; Ueno, Y.; Yagi, D.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshida, M.

    2016-12-01

    At the Muon Science Facility (MUSE) of J-PARC (Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex), the MuSEUM collaboration is planing new measurements of the ground state hyperfine structure (HFS) of muonium both at zero field and at high magnetic field. The previous measurements were performed both at LAMPF (Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility) with experimental uncertainties mostly dominated by statistical errors. The new high intensity muon beam that will soon be available at MUSE H-Line will provide an opportunity to improve the precision of these measurements by one order of magnitude. An overview of the different aspects of these new muonium HFS measurements, the current status of the preparation, and the results of a first commissioning test experiment at zero field are presented.

  14. IFU simulator: a powerful alignment and performance tool for MUSE instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Boudon, Didier; Daguisé, Eric; Dubois, Jean-Pierre; Jarno, Aurélien; Kosmalski, Johan; Piqueras, Laure; Remillieux, Alban; Renault, Edgard

    2014-07-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation Very Large Telescope (VLT) integral field spectrograph (1x1arcmin² Field of View) developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO), operating in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently commissioning MUSE in the Very Large Telescope for the Preliminary Acceptance in Chile, scheduled for September, 2014. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic instrument mechanical structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2012 and 2013, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested to the P.I. institute at Lyon. After successful PAE in September 2013, MUSE instrument was shipped to the Very Large Telescope in Chile where that was aligned and tested in ESO integration hall at Paranal. After, MUSE was directly transferred in monolithic way without dismounting onto VLT telescope where the first light was overcame. This talk describes the IFU Simulator which is the main alignment and performance tool for MUSE instrument. The IFU Simulator mimics the optomechanical interface between the MUSE pre-optic and the 24 IFUs. The optomechanical design is presented. After, the alignment method of this innovative tool for identifying the pupil and image planes is depicted. At the end, the internal test report is described. The success of the MUSE alignment using the IFU Simulator is demonstrated by the excellent results obtained onto MUSE positioning, image quality and throughput. MUSE commissioning at the VLT is planned for September, 2014.

  15. Not Your Daddy's Data Link: Musings on Datalink Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branstetter, James

    2004-01-01

    Viewgraphs about musings on Datalink Communications are presented. Some of the topics include: 1) Keen Eye for a Straight Proposal (Next Gen Data Link); 2) So many datalinks so little funding!!!; 3) Brave New World; 4) Time marches on!; 5) Through the Looking Glass; 6) Dollars & Sense Cooking; 7) Economics 101; 8) The Missing Link(s); 9) Straight Shooting; and 10) All is not lost.

  16. Current status of the J-PARC muon facility, MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Kawamura, N.; Strasser, P.; Koda, A.; Fujimori, H.; Ikedo, Y.; Makimura, S.; Kobayashi, Y.; Nakamura, J.; Kojima, K.; Adachi, T.; Kadono, R.; Takeshita, S.; Nishiyama, K.; Higemoto, W.; Ito, T.; Nagamine, K.; Ohata, H.; Makida, Y.; Yoshida, M.; Okamura, T.; Okada, R.; Ogitsu, T.

    2014-12-01

    The muon science facility (MUSE), along with the neutron, hadron, and neutrino facilities, is one of the experimental areas of the J-PARC project. The MUSE facility is located in the Materials and Life Science Facility (MLF), which is a building integrated to include both neutron and muon science programs. Since the autumn of 2008, users operation is effective and making use of the pulsed muon beam particularly at the D-Line. Unfortunately, MUSE suffered severe damages from the earthquake on March 11, 2011, the so-called "Higashi-Nippon Dai-Shinsai". We managed to have a stable operation of the superconducting solenoid magnet with use of the on-line refrigerator on December, 2012, although we had to overcome a lot of difficulties against components not working properly. But we had to stop again the whole operations on May 2013, because of the radioactive materials leakage accident at the Hadron Hall Experimental Facility. Finally we restarted the users' runs on February 2014.

  17. Therapeutic Potential of Adipose-Derived SSEA-3-Positive Muse Cells for Treating Diabetic Skin Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Kinoshita, Kahori; Kuno, Shinichiro; Ishimine, Hisako; Aoi, Noriyuki; Mineda, Kazuhide; Kato, Harunosuke; Doi, Kentaro; Kanayama, Koji; Feng, Jingwei; Mashiko, Takanobu; Kurisaki, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Stage-specific embryonic antigen-3 (SSEA-3)-positive multipotent mesenchymal cells (multilineage differentiating stress-enduring [Muse] cells) were isolated from cultured human adipose tissue-derived stem/stromal cells (hASCs) and characterized, and their therapeutic potential for treating diabetic skin ulcers was evaluated. Cultured hASCs were separated using magnetic-activated cell sorting into positive and negative fractions, a SSEA-3+ cell-enriched fraction (Muse-rich) and the remaining fraction (Muse-poor). Muse-rich hASCs showed upregulated and downregulated pluripotency and cell proliferation genes, respectively, compared with Muse-poor hASCs. These cells also released higher amounts of certain growth factors, particularly under hypoxic conditions, compared with Muse-poor cells. Skin ulcers were generated in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with type 1 diabetes, which showed delayed wound healing compared with nondiabetic SCID mice. Treatment with Muse-rich cells significantly accelerated wound healing compared with treatment with Muse-poor cells. Transplanted cells were integrated into the regenerated dermis as vascular endothelial cells and other cells. However, they were not detected in the surrounding intact regions. Thus, the selected population of ASCs has greater therapeutic effects to accelerate impaired wound healing associated with type 1 diabetes. These cells can be achieved in large amounts with minimal morbidity and could be a practical tool for a variety of stem cell-depleted or ischemic conditions of various organs and tissues. PMID:25561682

  18. Human Muse Cells Reconstruct Neuronal Circuitry in Subacute Lacunar Stroke Model.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hiroki; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Wakao, Shohei; Tominaga, Teiji; Borlongan, Cesario V; Dezawa, Mari

    2017-02-01

    Multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (muse) cells are endogenous nontumorigenic stem cells with pluripotency harvestable as pluripotent marker SSEA-3(+) cells from the bone marrow from cultured bone marrow-mesenchymal stem cells. After transplantation into neurological disease models, muse cells exert repair effects, but the exact mechanism remains inconclusive. We conducted mechanism-based experiments by transplanting serum/xeno-free cultured-human bone marrow-muse cells into the perilesion brain at 2 weeks after lacunar infarction in immunodeficient mice. Approximately 28% of initially transplanted muse cells remained in the host brain at 8 weeks, spontaneously differentiated into cells expressing NeuN (≈62%), MAP2 (≈30%), and GST-pi (≈12%). Dextran tracing revealed connections between host neurons and muse cells at the lesioned motor cortex and the anterior horn. Muse cells extended neurites through the ipsilateral pyramidal tract, crossed to contralateral side, and reached to the pyramidal tract in the dorsal funiculus of spinal cord. Muse-transplanted stroke mice displayed significant recovery in cylinder tests, which was reverted by the human-selective diphtheria toxin. At 10 months post-transplantation, human-specific Alu sequence was detected only in the brain but not in other organs, with no evidence of tumor formation. Transplantation at the delayed subacute phase showed muse cells differentiated into neural cells, facilitated neural reconstruction, improved functions, and displayed solid safety outcomes over prolonged graft maturation period, indicating their therapeutic potential for lacunar stroke. © 2016 The Authors.

  19. Virtual Space Learning MariMUSE: Connecting Learners from Kindergarten to 99.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Billie; And Others

    The Multi-User Simulation Environment (MUSE) software is designed to motivate students across many age levels to engage in reading, writing, problem-solving, and collaborative and creative projects. MUSE software provides a text-based, virtual world on computers connected to a network, allowing synchronous and asynchronous communication among…

  20. The MUSE-Wide survey: A first catalogue of 831 emission line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herenz, Edmund Christian; Urrutia, Tanya; Wisotzki, Lutz; Kerutt, Josephine; Saust, Rikke; Werhahn, Maria; Schmidt, Kasper Borello; Caruana, Joseph; Diener, Catrina; Bacon, Roland; Brinchmann, Jarle; Schaye, Joop; Maseda, Michael; Weilbacher, Peter M.

    2017-09-01

    We present a first instalment of the MUSE-Wide survey, covering an area of 22.2 arcmin2 (corresponding to 20% of the final survey) in the CANDELS/Deep area of the Chandra Deep Field South. We use the MUSE integral field spectrograph at the ESO VLT to conduct a full-area spectroscopic mapping at a depth of 1 h exposure time per 1 arcmin2 pointing. We searched for compact emission line objects using our newly developed LSDCat software based on a 3D matched filtering approach, followed by interactive classification and redshift measurement of the sources. Our catalogue contains 831 distinct emission line galaxies with redshifts ranging from 0.04 to 6. Roughly one third (237) of the emission line sources are Lyman α emitting galaxies with 3 < z < 6, only four of which had previously measured spectroscopic redshifts. At lower redshifts 351 galaxies are detected primarily by their [O ii] emission line (0.3 ≲ z ≲ 1.5), 189 by their [O iii] line (0.21 ≲ z ≲ 0.85), and 46 by their Hα line (0.04 ≲ z ≲ 0.42). Comparing our spectroscopic redshifts to photometric redshift estimates from the literature, we find excellent agreement for z < 1.5 with a median Δz of only 4 × 10-4 and an outlier rate of 6%, however a significant systematic offset of Δz = 0.26 and an outlier rate of 23% for Lyα emitters at z > 3. Together with the catalogue we also release 1D PSF-weighted extracted spectra and small 3D datacubes centred on each of the 831 sources. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programme 094.A-0205.Data products are available via http://muse-vlt.eu/science/ and at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/606/A12 .

  1. GASP. I. Gas Stripping Phenomena in Galaxies with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poggianti, Bianca M.; Moretti, Alessia; Gullieuszik, Marco; Fritz, Jacopo; Jaffé, Yara; Bettoni, Daniela; Fasano, Giovanni; Bellhouse, Callum; Hau, George; Vulcani, Benedetta; Biviano, Andrea; Omizzolo, Alessandro; Paccagnella, Angela; D'Onofrio, Mauro; Cava, Antonio; Sheen, Y.-K.; Couch, Warrick; Owers, Matt

    2017-07-01

    GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with MUSE (GASP) is a new integral-field spectroscopic survey with MUSE at the VLT aimed at studying gas removal processes in galaxies. We present an overview of the survey and show a first example of a galaxy undergoing strong gas stripping. GASP is obtaining deep MUSE data for 114 galaxies at z = 0.04-0.07 with stellar masses in the range {10}9.2{--}{10}11.5 {M}⊙ in different environments (galaxy clusters and groups over more than four orders of magnitude in halo mass). GASP targets galaxies with optical signatures of unilateral debris or tails reminiscent of gas-stripping processes (“jellyfish galaxies”), as well as a control sample of disk galaxies with no morphological anomalies. GASP is the only existing integral field unit (IFU) survey covering both the main galaxy body and the outskirts and surroundings, where the IFU data can reveal the presence and origin of the outer gas. To demonstrate GASP’s ability to probe the physics of gas and stars, we show the complete analysis of a textbook case of a jellyfish galaxy, JO206. This is a massive galaxy (9× {10}10 {M}⊙ ) in a low-mass cluster (σ ˜ 500 {km} {{{s}}}-1) at a small projected clustercentric radius and a high relative velocity, with ≥90 kpc long tentacles of ionized gas stripped away by ram pressure. We present the spatially resolved kinematics and physical properties of the gas and stars and depict the evolutionary history of this galaxy.

  2. MUSE: A Second-Generation Integral-Field Spectrograph for the VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDermid, R. M.; Bacon, R.; Bauer, S.; Boehm, P.; Boudon, D.; Brau-Nogué, S.; Caillier, P.; Capoani, L.; Carollo, C. M.; Champavert, N.; Contini, T.; Daguisé, E.; Delabre, B.; Devriendt, J.; Dreizler, S.; Dubois, J.; Dupieux, M.; Dupin, J. P.; Emsellem, E.; Ferruit, P.; Franx, M.; Gallou, G.; Gerssen, J.; Guiderdoni, B.; Hahn, T.; Hofmann, D.; Jarno, A.; Kelz, A.; Koehler, C.; Kollatschny, W.; Kosmalski, J.; Laurent, F.; Lilly, S. J.; Lizon, J. L.; Loupias, M.; Manescau, A.; Monstein, C.; Nicklas, H.; Parès, L.; Pasquini, L.; Pécontal-Rousset, A.; Pécontal, E.; Pello, R.; Petit, C.; Picat, J.-P.; Popow, E.; Quirrenbach, A.; Reiss, R.; Renault, E.; Roth, M.; Schaye, J.; Soucail, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Stroebele, S.; Stuik, R.; Weilbacher, P.; Wisotzki, L.; Wozniak, H.; de Zeeuw, P. T.

    The Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) is a second-generation instrument in development for the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory (ESO), due to begin operation in 2011/12. MUSE will be an extremely powerful integral-field spectrograph fed by a new multiple-laser adaptive optics system on the VLT. In its usual operating mode, MUSE will, in a single observation, produce a 3-dimensional data cube consisting of 90,000 R 3000 spectra, each covering a full spectral octave (480-930 nm), and fully sampling a contiguous 1×1 arcmin2 field with 0.2×0.2 arcsec2 apertures. A high-resolution mode will increase the spatial sampling to 0.025 arcsec per pixel. MUSE is built around a novel arrangement of 24 identical spectrographs (each comparable to a 1st generation VLT instrument), which are fed by a set of 24 precision image slicers. MUSE is designed for stability, with only 2 modes, and virtually no moving parts, allowing very long exposures to be accumulated. Together with high throughput, this ensures that MUSE will have extreme sensitivity for observing faint objects. We overview the technical and scientific aspects of MUSE, highlighting the key challenges for dealing with the unprecedented quantity and complexity of the data, and the integration with the VLT adaptive optics facility (AOF) - a key development on the path to extremely large telescopes (ELTs).

  3. Vacuum and cryogenic system for the MUSE detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizon, J. L.; Accardo, M.; Gojak, Domingo; Reiss, Roland; Kern, Lothar

    2012-09-01

    MUSE with its 24 detectors distributed over an eight square meter vertical area was requiring a well engineered and extremely reliable cryogenic system. The solution should also use a technology proven to be compatible with the very high sensitivity of the VLT interferometer. A short introduction reviews the various available technologies to cool these 24 chips down to 160 K. The first part of the paper presents the selected concept insisting on the various advantages offered by LN2. In addition to the purely vacuum and cryogenic aspects we highlight some of the most interesting features given by the control system based on a PLC.

  4. Sample Return Mission to NEA : MUSES-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, A.; Mukai, T.; Kawaguchi, J.; Uesugi, K. T.

    MUSES-C is a mission for near-earth-asteroid sample return. The spacecraft is launched in 2002 and returns to the earth in 2006.The primary objective is to demonstrate the key technologies requisite for future advanced sample return mission. It collects samples of a few g from a near-earth asteroid. Sampling will be made by rendezvous with the asteroid, approaching the asteroid, then shooting a small projectile onto the asteroid surface and catching the ejecta. In this paper outline of the mission is shown with special stress on the science aspect

  5. Transplantation of Unique Subpopulation of Fibroblasts, Muse Cells, Ameliorates Experimental Stroke Possibly via Robust Neuronal Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Hiroki; Morita, Takahiro; Niizuma, Kuniyasu; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Wakao, Shohei; Sakata, Hiroyuki; Matsuzaka, Yoshiya; Mushiake, Hajime; Tominaga, Teiji; Borlongan, Cesario V; Dezawa, Mari

    2016-01-01

    Muse cells reside as pre-existing pluripotent-like stem cells within the fibroblasts, are nontumorigenic, exhibit differentiation capacity into triploblastic-lineage cells, and replenish lost cells when transplanted in injury models. Cell fate and function of human skin fibroblast-derived Muse cells were evaluated in a rat stroke model. Muse cells (30,000), collected by pluripotent surface marker stage-specific embryonic antigen-3, were injected stereotaxically into three deposits within the rat ischemic cortex at 2 days after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion, and the cells' biological effects were examined for more than 84 days. Muse cells spontaneously and promptly committed to neural/neuronal-lineage cells when cocultured with stroke brain slices. Muse-transplanted stroke rats exhibited significant improvements in neurological and motor functions compared to control groups at chronic days 70 and 84, without a reduction in the infarct size. Muse cells survived in the host brain for up to 84 days and differentiated into NeuN (∼ 65%), MAP-2 (∼ 32%), calbindin (∼ 28%), and GST-π (∼ 25%)-positive cells in the cortex, but glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive cells were rare. Tumor formation was not observed. Muse cells integrated into the sensory-motor cortex, extended their neurites into cervical spinal cord, and displayed normalized hind limb somatosensory evoked potentials. Muse cells are unique from other stem cells in that they differentiate with high ratio into neuronal cells after integration with host brain microenvironment, possibly reconstructing the neuronal circuit to mitigate stroke symptoms. Human fibroblast-derived Muse cells pose as a novel source of transplantable stem cells, circumventing the need for gene manipulations, especially when contemplating autologous cell therapy for stroke. © 2015 The Authors STEM CELLS published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  6. MUSE field splitter unit: fan-shaped separator for 24 integral field units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Anwand, Heiko; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Kosmalski, Johan; Loupias, Magali; Nicklas, Harald; Seifert, Walter; Salaun, Yves; Xu, Wenli

    2014-07-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation Very Large Telescope (VLT) integral field spectrograph developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO). It combines a 1' x 1' field of view sampled at 0.2 arcsec for its Wide Field Mode (WFM) and a 7.5"x7.5" field of view for its Narrow Field Mode (NFM). Both modes will operate with the improved spatial resolution provided by GALACSI (Ground Atmospheric Layer Adaptive Optics for Spectroscopic Imaging), that will use the VLT deformable secondary mirror and 4 Laser Guide Stars (LGS) foreseen in 2015. MUSE operates in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently commissioning MUSE in the Very Large Telescope for the Preliminary Acceptance in Chile, scheduled for September, 2014. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic instrument mechanical structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2012 and 2013, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested to the P.I. institute at Lyon. After successful PAE in September 2013, MUSE instrument was shipped to the Very Large Telescope in Chile where it was aligned and tested in ESO integration hall at Paranal. After, MUSE was directly transferred in monolithic way onto VLT telescope where the first light was achieved. This paper describes the MUSE main optical component: the Field Splitter Unit. It splits the VLT image into 24 subfields and provides the first separation of the beam for the 24 Integral Field Units. This talk depicts its manufacturing at Winlight Optics and its alignment into MUSE instrument. The success of the MUSE

  7. A MUSE View of the HDFS: The Lyα Luminosity Function out to z~6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Alyssa B.; Guiderdoni, Bruno; Blaizot, Jérémy; Richard, Johan; Bacon, Roland; Garel, Thibault; Hashimoto, Takuya

    We present preliminary results from MUSE on the Lyα luminosity function in the Hubble Deep Field South (HDFS). Using a large homogeneous sample of LAEs selected through blind spectroscopy, we utilise the unprecedented detection power of MUSE to study the progenitors of L* galaxies back to when the Universe was just ~2 Gyr old. We present these results in the context of the current literature, and highlight the importance of the forthcoming Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF) study with MUSE, which will increase the size of our sample by a factor of ~ 10.

  8. Estimation of coefficients and boundary parameters in hyperbolic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Murphy, K. A.

    1984-01-01

    Semi-discrete Galerkin approximation schemes are considered in connection with inverse problems for the estimation of spatially varying coefficients and boundary condition parameters in second order hyperbolic systems typical of those arising in 1-D surface seismic problems. Spline based algorithms are proposed for which theoretical convergence results along with a representative sample of numerical findings are given.

  9. MUSE, the goddess of muons, and her future.

    PubMed

    Kadono, Ryosuke; Miyake, Yasuhiro

    2012-02-01

    The Muon Science Establishment (MUSE) is one of the major experimental facilities, along with those for neutron, hadron and neutrino experiments, in J-PARC. It makes up a part of the Materials and Life Science Experiment Facility (MLF) that hosts a tandem neutron facility (JSNS) driven by a single proton beam. The facility consists of a superconducting solenoid (for pion confinement) with a modest-acceptance (about 45 mSr) injector of pions and muons obtained from a 20 mm thick edge-cooled stationary graphite target, delivering a 'surface muon' beam (μ(+)) and a 'decay muon' beam (μ(+)/μ(-)) for a wide variety of applications. It has recently been confirmed that the beamline has the world's highest muon intensity (∼10(6) μ(+)/s) at a proton beam power of 120 kW. The beamline is furnished with two experimental areas (D1 and D2) at the exit branches, where an apparatus for muon spin rotation/relaxation experiments (μSR) is currently installed at the D1 area while test experiments are conducted at the D2 area. In this paper, the current performance of the MUSE facility as a whole is reviewed. The facility is still in the early stage of development, including both beamlines and infrastructure for experiments, and plans for upgrading it are discussed together with perspectives for research works envisaged with unprecedented high-intensity muons.

  10. A cubic B-spline-based hybrid registration of lung CT images for a dynamic airway geometric model with large deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Youbing; Hoffman, Eric A.; Ding, Kai; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a matching algorithm that can handle large geometric changes in x-ray computed tomography (CT)-derived lung geometry occurring during deep breath maneuvers. These geometric relationships are further utilized to build a dynamic lung airway model for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of pulmonary air flow. The proposed algorithm is based on a cubic B-spline-based hybrid registration framework that incorporates anatomic landmark information with intensity patterns. A sequence of invertible B-splines is composed in a multiresolution framework to ensure local invertibility of the large deformation transformation and a physiologically meaningful similarity measure is adopted to compensate for changes in voxel intensity due to inflation. Registrations are performed using the proposed approach to match six pairs of 3D CT human lung datasets. Results show that the proposed approach has the ability to match the intensity pattern and the anatomical landmarks, and ensure local invertibility for large deformation transformations. Statistical results also show that the proposed hybrid approach yields significantly improved results as compared with approaches using either landmarks or intensity alone.

  11. A cubic B-spline-based hybrid registration of lung CT images for a dynamic airway geometric model with large deformation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Youbing; Hoffman, Eric A; Ding, Kai; Reinhardt, Joseph M; Lin, Ching-Long

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a matching algorithm that can handle large geometric changes in x-ray computed tomography (CT)-derived lung geometry occurring during deep breath maneuvers. These geometric relationships are further utilized to build a dynamic lung airway model for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of pulmonary air flow. The proposed algorithm is based on a cubic B-spline-based hybrid registration framework that incorporates anatomic landmark information with intensity patterns. A sequence of invertible B-splines is composed in a multiresolution framework to ensure local invertibility of the large deformation transformation and a physiologically meaningful similarity measure is adopted to compensate for changes in voxel intensity due to inflation. Registrations are performed using the proposed approach to match six pairs of 3D CT human lung datasets. Results show that the proposed approach has the ability to match the intensity pattern and the anatomical landmarks, and ensure local invertibility for large deformation transformations. Statistical results also show that the proposed hybrid approach yields significantly improved results as compared with approaches using either landmarks or intensity alone. PMID:21149947

  12. A cubic B-spline-based hybrid registration of lung CT images for a dynamic airway geometric model with large deformation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Youbing; Hoffman, Eric A; Ding, Kai; Reinhardt, Joseph M; Lin, Ching-Long

    2011-01-07

    The goal of this study is to develop a matching algorithm that can handle large geometric changes in x-ray computed tomography (CT)-derived lung geometry occurring during deep breath maneuvers. These geometric relationships are further utilized to build a dynamic lung airway model for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies of pulmonary air flow. The proposed algorithm is based on a cubic B-spline-based hybrid registration framework that incorporates anatomic landmark information with intensity patterns. A sequence of invertible B-splines is composed in a multiresolution framework to ensure local invertibility of the large deformation transformation and a physiologically meaningful similarity measure is adopted to compensate for changes in voxel intensity due to inflation. Registrations are performed using the proposed approach to match six pairs of 3D CT human lung datasets. Results show that the proposed approach has the ability to match the intensity pattern and the anatomical landmarks, and ensure local invertibility for large deformation transformations. Statistical results also show that the proposed hybrid approach yields significantly improved results as compared with approaches using either landmarks or intensity alone.

  13. Approximation techniques for parameter estimation and feedback control for distributed models of large flexible structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Rosen, I. G.

    1984-01-01

    Approximation ideas are discussed that can be used in parameter estimation and feedback control for Euler-Bernoulli models of elastic systems. Focusing on parameter estimation problems, ways by which one can obtain convergence results for cubic spline based schemes for hybrid models involving an elastic cantilevered beam with tip mass and base acceleration are outlined. Sample numerical findings are also presented.

  14. Estimation of discontinuous coefficients in parabolic systems: Applications to reservoir simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamm, P. D.

    1984-01-01

    Spline based techniques for estimating spatially varying parameters that appear in parabolic distributed systems (typical of those found in reservoir simulation problems) are presented. The problem of determining discontinuous coefficients, estimating both the functional shape and points of discontinuity for such parameters is discussed. Convergence results and a summary of numerical performance of the resulting algorithms are given.

  15. ModelMuse - A Graphical User Interface for MODFLOW-2005 and PHAST

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winston, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    ModelMuse is a graphical user interface (GUI) for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) models MODFLOW-2005 and PHAST. This software package provides a GUI for creating the flow and transport input file for PHAST and the input files for MODFLOW-2005. In ModelMuse, the spatial data for the model is independent of the grid, and the temporal data is independent of the stress periods. Being able to input these data independently allows the user to redefine the spatial and temporal discretization at will. This report describes the basic concepts required to work with ModelMuse. These basic concepts include the model grid, data sets, formulas, objects, the method used to assign values to data sets, and model features. The ModelMuse main window has a top, front, and side view of the model that can be used for editing the model, and a 3-D view of the model that can be used to display properties of the model. ModelMuse has tools to generate and edit the model grid. It also has a variety of interpolation methods and geographic functions that can be used to help define the spatial variability of the model. ModelMuse can be used to execute both MODFLOW-2005 and PHAST and can also display the results of MODFLOW-2005 models. An example of using ModelMuse with MODFLOW-2005 is included in this report. Several additional examples are described in the help system for ModelMuse, which can be accessed from the Help menu.

  16. The Story of Supernova “Refsdal” Told by Muse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grillo, C.; Karman, W.; Suyu, S. H.; Rosati, P.; Balestra, I.; Mercurio, A.; Lombardi, M.; Treu, T.; Caminha, G. B.; Halkola, A.; Rodney, S. A.; Gavazzi, R.; Caputi, K. I.

    2016-05-01

    We present Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) observations in the core of the Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) galaxy cluster MACS J1149.5+2223, where the first magnified and spatially resolved multiple images of supernova (SN) “Refsdal” at redshift 1.489 were detected. Thanks to a Director's Discretionary Time program with the Very Large Telescope and the extraordinary efficiency of MUSE, we measure 117 secure redshifts with just 4.8 hr of total integration time on a single 1 arcmin2 target pointing. We spectroscopically confirm 68 galaxy cluster members, with redshift values ranging from 0.5272 to 0.5660, and 18 multiple images belonging to seven background, lensed sources distributed in redshifts between 1.240 and 3.703. Starting from the combination of our catalog with those obtained from extensive spectroscopic and photometric campaigns using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), we select a sample of 300 (164 spectroscopic and 136 photometric) cluster members, within approximately 500 kpc from the brightest cluster galaxy, and a set of 88 reliable multiple images associated with 10 different background source galaxies and 18 distinct knots in the spiral galaxy hosting SN “Refsdal.” We exploit this valuable information to build six detailed strong-lensing models, the best of which reproduces the observed positions of the multiple images with an rms offset of only 0.″26. We use these models to quantify the statistical and systematic errors on the predicted values of magnification and time delay of the next emerging image of SN “Refsdal.” We find that its peak luminosity should occur between 2016 March and June and should be approximately 20% fainter than the dimmest (S4) of the previously detected images but above the detection limit of the planned HST/WFC3 follow-up. We present our two-dimensional reconstruction of the cluster mass density distribution and of the SN “Refsdal” host galaxy surface brightness distribution. We outline the road map

  17. MUSES-C, its launch and early orbit operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro; Kuninaka, Hitoshi; Fujiwara, Akira; Uesugi, Tono

    2003-11-01

    The MUSES-C was launched on May 9th of 2003 and was named 'Hayabusa'. It takes an aim at the world's first sample and return from a near Earth asteroid, 1998 SF36 now renamed "Itokawa". The spacecraft is a kind of technology demonstrator with four key technologies. The paper presents a quick report on the initial operation of the ion engines aboard and will show how the attitude control has been performed incorporating the closed loop de-saturation function onboard. The paper also presents how much delta-V has been applied to the spacecraft as well as how the orbit determination under the low-thrust acceleration has been performed.

  18. The New Hyperspectral Sensor Desis on the Multi-Payload Platform Muses Installed on the Iss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, R.; Avbelj, J.; Carmona, E.; Eckardt, A.; Gerasch, B.; Graham, L.; Günther, B.; Heiden, U.; Ickes, J.; Kerr, G.; Knodt, U.; Krutz, D.; Krawczyk, H.; Makarau, A.; Miller, R.; Perkins, R.; Walter, I.

    2016-06-01

    The new hyperspectral instrument DLR Earth Sensing Imaging Spectrometer (DESIS) will be developed and integrated in the Multi-User-System for Earth Sensing (MUSES) platform installed on the International Space Station (ISS). The DESIS instrument will be launched to the ISS mid of 2017 and robotically installed in one of the four slots of the MUSES platform. After a four month commissioning phase the operational phase will last at least until 2020. The MUSES / DESIS system will be commanded and operated by the publically traded company TBE (Teledyne Brown Engineering), which initiated the whole program. TBE provides the MUSES platform and the German Aerospace Center (DLR) develops the instrument DESIS and establishes a Ground Segment for processing, archiving, delivering and calibration of the image data mainly used for scientific and humanitarian applications. Well calibrated and harmonized products will be generated together with the Ground Segment established at Teledyne. The article describes the Space Segment consisting of the MUSES platform and the instrument DESIS as well as the activities at the two (synchronized) Ground Segments consisting of the processing methods, product generation, data calibration and product validation. Finally comments to the data policy are given.

  19. Measuring Self-Efficacy to Use Vaginal Microbicides: The Microbicide Use Self-Efficacy (MUSE) Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Fava, Joseph L.; van den Berg, Jacob J.; Rosen, Rochelle K.; Salomon, Liz A.; Vargas, Sara; Christensen, Anna L.; Pinkston, Megan; Morrow, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Microbicide Use Self-Efficacy (MUSE) instrument and to examine correlates of self-efficacy to use vaginal microbicides among a sample of racially and ethnically diverse women living in the northeastern United States. Methods Exploratory and confirmatory factor analytic methods were used to explore and determine the dimensionality and psychometric properties of the MUSE. Construct validity was assessed by examining the relationships of the MUSE to key sexual behavior, partner communication, relationship, and psychosocial variables. Results Two dimensions of microbicide use self-efficacy were psychometrically validated and identified as Adherence and Access and Situational Challenges. The two 4-item subscales measuring Adherence and Access and Situational Challenges had reliability coefficients of .78 and .85, respectively. Correlates of the two measures were tested at a Bonferroni-adjusted alpha level of p =.001, and 19 of 43 variables analyzed were found to significantly relate to Adherence and Access, while 16 of 43 variables were significantly related to Situational Challenges. Of the 35 significant relationships, 32 were in the domains of partner communication, partner relationships, and behavioral and psychosocial variables. Conclusions The MUSE instrument demonstrated strong internal validity, reliability, and initial construct validity. The MUSE can be a useful tool in capturing the multidimensional nature of microbicide use self-efficacy among diverse populations of women. PMID:23806676

  20. Neuro-regeneration therapy using human Muse cells is highly effective in a mouse intracerebral hemorrhage model.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Norihito; Kakuta, Kiyohide; Wang, Liang; Naraoka, Masato; Uchida, Hiroki; Wakao, Shohei; Dezawa, Mari; Ohkuma, Hiroki

    2017-02-01

    A novel type of non-tumorigenic pluripotent stem cell, the Muse cell (multi-lineage, differentiating stress enduring cell), resides in the connective tissue and in cultured mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and is reported to differentiate into multiple cell types according to the microenvironment to repair tissue damage. We examined the efficiency of Muse cells in a mouse intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) model. Seventy μl of cardiac blood was stereotactically injected into the left putamen of immunodeficient mice. Five days later, 2 × 10(5) of human bone marrow MSC-derived Muse cells (n = 6) or cells other than Muse cells in MSCs (non-Muse, n = 6) or the same volume of PBS (n = 11) was injected into the ICH cavity. Water maze and motor function tests were implemented for 68 days, and immunohistochemistry for NeuN, MAP2 and GFAP was done. The Muse group showed impressive recovery: Recovery was seen in the water maze after day 19, and motor functions after 5 days was compared with the other two groups, with a significant statistical difference (p < 0.05). The survival rate of the engrafted cells in the Muse group was significantly higher than in the non-Muse group (p < 0.05) at day 69, and those cells showed positivity for NeuN (~57%) and MAP-2 (~41.6%). Muse cells could remain in the ICH brain, differentiate into neural-lineage cells and restore functions without inducing them into neuronal cells by gene introduction and cytokine treatment prior to transplantation. A simple collection of Muse cells and their supply to the brain in naïve state facilitates regenerative therapy in ICH.

  1. Musings on mechanism: quest for a quark theory of proteins?

    PubMed

    Phillips, Rob

    2017-10-01

    The give and take between biology and physics is an important part of the history of modern science, with this partnership perhaps now more intimate than ever. In this essay, I explore the ways in which these different fields can strengthen each other through their distinct outlooks on some of the most important questions being asked about the living world. In particular, I highlight three areas where the perspective from physics might lead to deeper insights into the workings of cells. First, I consider what it means for two ostensibly unrelated problems to be the same, and how such sameness can provide unexpected insights into apparently unrelated phenomena. Second, I consider different conceptions of what constitutes a mechanistic understanding of a given phenomenon with an emphasis on nonmolecular notions of mechanism. The third idea is the importance of "toy problems" as a way of providing foundational insights into the real problems. Though my focus here is primarily on ways in which physics approaches might prove interesting in biology, I close with an example of how biology might substantially alter physics by providing a forum and the tools to uncover a fundamental understanding of nonequilibrium phenomena.-Phillips, R. Musings on mechanism: quest for a quark theory of proteins? © FASEB.

  2. The MUSES Satellite Team and Multidisciplinary System Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, John C.; Paiz, Alfred R.; Young, Donald L.

    1997-01-01

    In a unique partnership between three minority-serving institutions and NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a new course sequence, including a multidisciplinary capstone design experience, is to be developed and implemented at each of the schools with the ambitious goal of designing, constructing and launching a low-orbit Earth-resources satellite. The three universities involved are North Carolina A&T State University (NCA&T), University of Texas, El Paso (UTEP), and California State University, Los Angeles (CSULA). The schools form a consortium collectively known as MUSES - Minority Universities System Engineering and Satellite. Four aspects of this project make it unique: (1) Including all engineering disciplines in the capstone design course, (2) designing, building and launching an Earth-resources satellite, (3) sustaining the partnership between the three schools to achieve this goal, and (4) implementing systems engineering pedagogy at each of the three schools. This paper will describe the partnership and its goals, the first design of the satellite, the courses developed at NCA&T, and the implementation plan for the course sequence.

  3. Urania, the Muse of Astronomy: She Who Draws Our Eyes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, S.

    2016-01-01

    In exploring the inspiration of astronomical phenomena upon human culture we are invited, perhaps beckoned, to reflect on Urania, the Greek Muse of Astronomy. Heavenly One or Heavenly Bright, Urania teaches mortals the shape and wonder of the cosmos, “men who have been instructed by her she raises aloft to heaven for it is a fact that imagination and power of thought lift men's souls to heavenly heights” (Siculus 1935). Yet in cities, the heavenly lights are dimmed, flooded by another source of light which is that of culture, and that is the domain of Aphrodite. So it is to her we must turn to understand what draws our eyes up to the heavens above the dazzling city lights. And, as Aphrodite Urania, her cultural and aesthetic domain is connected to the order of the cosmos itself, “the triple Moirai are ruled by thy decree, and all productions yield alike to thee: whatever the heavens, encircling all, contain, earth fruit-producing, and the stormy main, thy sway confesses, and obeys thy word...” (Athanassakis 1988). My presentation is a mythopoetic cultural excavation of the gods and ideas in our passion for astronomy; how, in our fascination with the cosmos, we see Urania and Aphrodite, these goddesses who inspire us city dwellers, planetarium devotees, and silent-field stargazers to look upwards.

  4. Constraint-Muse: A Soft-Constraint Based System for Music Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölzl, Matthias; Denker, Grit; Meier, Max; Wirsing, Martin

    Monoidal soft constraints are a versatile formalism for specifying and solving multi-criteria optimization problems with dynamically changing user preferences. We have developed a prototype tool for interactive music creation, called Constraint Muse, that uses monoidal soft constraints to ensure that a dynamically generated melody harmonizes with input from other sources. Constraint Muse provides an easy to use interface based on Nintendo Wii controllers and is intended to be used in music therapy for people with Parkinson’s disease and for children with high-functioning autism or Asperger’s syndrome.

  5. Possible Signatures of a Cold-flow Disk from MUSE Using a z ˜ 1 Galaxy-Quasar Pair toward SDSS J1422-0001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouché, N.; Finley, H.; Schroetter, I.; Murphy, M. T.; Richter, P.; Bacon, R.; Contini, T.; Richard, J.; Wendt, M.; Kamann, S.; Epinat, B.; Cantalupo, S.; Straka, L. A.; Schaye, J.; Martin, C. L.; Péroux, C.; Wisotzki, L.; Soto, K.; Lilly, S.; Carollo, C. M.; Brinchmann, J.; Kollatschny, W.

    2016-04-01

    We use a background quasar to detect the presence of circumgalactic gas around a z=0.91 low-mass star-forming galaxy. Data from the new Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the Very Large Telescope show that the galaxy has a dust-corrected star formation rate (SFR) of 4.7 ± 2.0 M⊙ yr-1, with no companion down to 0.22 M⊙ yr-1 (5σ) within 240 {h}-1 kpc (“30”). Using a high-resolution spectrum of the background quasar, which is fortuitously aligned with the galaxy major axis (with an azimuth angle α of only 15°), we find, in the gas kinematics traced by low-ionization lines, distinct signatures consistent with those expected for a “cold-flow disk” extending at least 12 kpc (3× {R}1/2). We estimate the mass accretion rate {\\dot{M}}{{in}} to be at least two to three times larger than the SFR, using the geometric constraints from the IFU data and the H i column density of log {N}{{H}{{I}}}/{{cm}}-2 ≃ 20.4 obtained from a Hubble Space Telescope/COS near-UV spectrum. From a detailed analysis of the low-ionization lines (e.g., Zn ii, Cr ii, Ti ii, Mn ii, Si ii), the accreting material appears to be enriched to about 0.4 {Z}⊙ (albeit with large uncertainties: {log} Z/{Z}⊙ =-0.4\\quad +/- \\quad 0.4), which is comparable to the galaxy metallicity (12 + log O/H = 8.7 ± 0.2), implying a large recycling fraction from past outflows. Blueshifted Mg ii and Fe ii absorptions in the galaxy spectrum from the MUSE data reveal the presence of an outflow. The Mg ii and Fe ii absorption line ratios indicate emission infilling due to scattering processes, but the MUSE data do not show any signs of fluorescent Fe ii* emission. Based on observations made at the ESO telescopes under program 080.A-0364 (SINFONI), 079.A-0600 (UVES), and as part of MUSE commissioning (ESO program 060.A-9100). Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by the Association of Universities

  6. Muse Cells: Nontumorigenic Pluripotent Stem Cells Present in Adult Tissues—A Paradigm Shift in Tissue Regeneration and Evolution

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Muse cells are a novel population of nontumorigenic pluripotent stem cells, highly resistant to cellular stress. These cells are present in every connective tissue and intrinsically express pluripotent stem markers such as Nanog, Oct3/4, Sox2, and TRA1-60. Muse cells are able to differentiate into cells from all three embryonic germ layers both spontaneously and under media-specific induction. Unlike ESCs and iPSCs, Muse cells exhibit low telomerase activity and asymmetric division and do not undergo tumorigenesis or teratoma formation when transplanted into a host organism. Muse cells have a high capacity for homing into damaged tissue and spontaneous differentiation into cells of compatible tissue, leading to tissue repair and functional restoration. The ability of Muse cells to restore tissue function may demonstrate the role of Muse cells in a highly conserved cellular mechanism related to cell survival and regeneration, in response to cellular stress and acute injury. From an evolutionary standpoint, genes pertaining to the regenerative capacity of an organism have been lost in higher mammals from more primitive species. Therefore, Muse cells may offer insight into the molecular and evolutionary bases of autonomous tissue regeneration and elucidate the molecular and cellular mechanisms that prevent mammals from regenerating limbs and organs, as planarians, newts, zebrafish, and salamanders do. PMID:28070194

  7. Pluripotent muse cells derived from human adipose tissue: a new perspective on regenerative medicine and cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, Multilineage Differentiating Stress Enduring (Muse) cells were introduced to the scientific community, offering potential resolution to the issue of teratoma formation that plagues both embryonic stem (ES) and induced pluripotent (iPS) stem cells. Isolated from human bone marrow, dermal fibroblasts, adipose tissue and commercially available adipose stem cells (ASCs) under severe cellular stress conditions, Muse cells self-renew in a controlled manner and do not form teratomas when injected into immune-deficient mice. Furthermore, Muse cells express classic pluripotency markers and differentiate into cells from the three embryonic germ layers both spontaneously and under media-specific induction. When transplanted in vivo, Muse cells contribute to tissue generation and repair. This review delves into the aspects of Muse cells that set them apart from ES, iPS, and various reported adult pluripotent stem cell lines, with specific emphasis on Muse cells derived from adipose tissue (Muse-AT), and their potential to revolutionize the field of regenerative medicine and stem cell therapy. PMID:24940477

  8. MUSE-INGS ON AM1354-250: COLLISIONS, SHOCKS, AND RINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Conn, Blair C.; Fogarty, L. M. R.; Smith, Rory; Candlish, Graeme N.

    2016-03-10

    We present Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer observations of AM1354-250, confirming its status as a collisional ring galaxy that has recently undergone an interaction, creating its distinctive shape. We analyze the stellar and gaseous emission throughout the galaxy finding direct evidence that the gaseous ring is expanding with a velocity of ∼70 km s{sup −1} and that star formation is occurring primarily in H ii regions associated with the ring. This star formation activity is likely triggered by this interaction. We find evidence for several excitation mechanisms in the gas, including emission consistent with shocked gas in the expanding ring and a region of LINER-like emission in the central core of the galaxy. Evidence of kinematic disturbance in both the stars and gas, possibly also triggered by the interaction, can be seen in all of the velocity maps. The ring galaxy retains a weak spiral structure, strongly suggesting the progenitor galaxy was a massive spiral prior to the collision with its companion an estimated 140 ± 12 Myr ago.

  9. The MUSES-C, mission description and its status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro; Uesugi, Kuninori T.; Fujiwara, Akira; Saitoh, Hirobumi

    1999-11-01

    The MUSES-C mission is the world's first sample and return attempt to/from the near Earth asteroid Nereus (4660). It is the ISAS (The Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Ministry of Education) which manages the mission that started in 1996 scheduling to be launched in January of 2002. The mission is built as a kind of technology demonstration, however, it is aiming at not only the in-situ observation but also the touch-down sampling of the surface fragments. The sample collected is returned to the Earth in January of 2006. The mission is a four year journey. The major purpose of it originally consists of the following four subjects: 1) The Ion thruster propulsion performed in interplanetary field as a primary means, 2) Autonomous guidance, navigation and control during the rendezvous and touch down phase, 3) The sample collection mechanism and 4) The hyperbolic reentry capsule with the asteroid sample contained inside it. The current primary objective is extended to carry the joint small rover with NASA/JPL, which is supposed to be placed on the surface and to look into the crater created by the sampling shot of the projectile. The rover is designated as the Small Science Vehicle (SSV) that weighs about 1 kg carrying three kinds of in-situ instruments: 1) A Visible Camera, 2) Near Infra-Red Spectrometer and potentially 3) Alpha-Proton X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) similar to that delivered on the Mars Path Finder. During the fiscal 1998, the spacecraft undergoes the PM tests and the FM fabrication starts from next year, 1999. The paper presents the latest mission description around the asteroid and shows the current status of the spacecraft as well as the instruments and so on. The mission will be the good example of an international collaboration in the small interplanetary exploration.

  10. A very dark stellar system lost in Virgo: kinematics and metallicity of SECCO 1 with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccari, G.; Bellazzini, M.; Magrini, L.; Coccato, L.; Cresci, G.; Fraternali, F.; de Zeeuw, P. T.; Husemann, B.; Ibata, R.; Battaglia, G.; Martin, N.; Testa, V.; Perina, S.; Correnti, M.

    2017-02-01

    We present the results of VLT-MUSE (Very Large Telescope-Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) integral field spectroscopy of SECCO 1, a faint, star-forming stellar system recently discovered as the stellar counterpart of an ultracompact high-velocity cloud (HVC 274.68+74.0), very likely residing within a substructure of the Virgo cluster of galaxies. We have obtained the radial velocity of a total of 38 individual compact sources identified as H II regions in the main and secondary bodies of the system, and derived the metallicity for 18 of them. We provide the first direct demonstration that the two stellar bodies of SECCO 1 are physically associated and that their velocities match the H I velocities. The metallicity is quite uniform over the whole system, with a dispersion lower than the uncertainty on individual metallicity estimates. The mean abundance, <12 + log(O/H)> = 8.44, is much higher than the typical values for local dwarf galaxies of similar stellar mass. This strongly suggests that the SECCO 1 stars were born from a pre-enriched gas cloud, possibly stripped from a larger galaxy. Using archival Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images, we derive a total stellar mass of ≃1.6 × 105 M⊙ for SECCO 1, confirming that it has a very high H I-to-stellar mass ratio for a dwarf galaxy, M_{H I}/M* ∼ 100. The star formation rate, derived from the Hα flux, is a factor of more than 10 higher than in typical dwarf galaxies of similar luminosity.

  11. Musee de l'Holographie of Paris and its activities: 1980-1994

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christakis, Anne-Marie

    1995-02-01

    The Parisian Musee de l'Holographie was founded March 25, 1980 under the direction of Anne-Marie Christakis to promote holography, which was before then unknown to the general public. The following work highlights the museum and its activities.

  12. Musings of Someone in the Disability Support Services Field for Almost 40 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodin, Sam

    2014-01-01

    As the title states, this article is a collection of musings with only modest attempts at establishing an order for them or connections between them. It is not quite "free association," but it is close. This structure or perhaps lack of it reflects the variety of things we do in our work. Many of the things we do have little in common…

  13. MUSE--Model for University Strategic Evaluation. AIR 2002 Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutina, Kenneth L.; Zullig, Craig M.; Starkman, Glenn D.; Tanski, Laura E.

    A model for simulating college and university operations, finances, program investments, and market response in terms of applicants, acceptances, and retention has been developed and implemented using the system dynamics approach. The Model for University Strategic Evaluation (MUSE) is a simulation of the total operations of the university,…

  14. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MUSE 3D view of HDF-S (Bacon+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, R.; Brinchmann, J.; Richard, J.; Contini, T.; Drake, A.; Franx, M.; Tacchella, S.; Vernet, J.; Wisotzki, L.; Blaizot, J.; Bouche, N.; Bouwens, R.; Cantalupo, S.; Carollo, C. M.; Carton, D.; Caruana, J.; Clement, B.; Dreizler, S.; Epinat, B.; Guiderdoni, B.; Herenz, C.; Husser, T.-O.; Kamann, S.; Kerutt, J.; Kollatschny, W.; Krajnovic, D.; Lilly, S.; Martinsson, T.; Michel-Dansac, L.; Patricio, V.; Schaye, J.; Shirazi, M.; Soto, K.; Soucail, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Urrutia, T.; Weilbacher, P.; de Zeeuw, T.

    2015-04-01

    The HDFS was observed during six nights in July 25-29, 31 and August 2, 3 2014 of the last commissioning run of MUSE. We used the nominal wavelength range (4750-9300Å) and performed a series of exposures of 30min each. (3 data files).

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MUSE 3D view of HDF-S (Bacon+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, R.; Brinchmann, J.; Richard, J.; Contini, T.; Drake, A.; Franx, M.; Tacchella, S.; Vernet, J.; Wisotzki, L.; Blaizot, J.; Bouche, N.; Bouwens, R.; Cantalupo, S.; Carollo, C. M.; Carton, D.; Caruana, J.; Clement, B.; Dreizler, S.; Epinat, B.; Guiderdoni, B.; Herenz, C.; Husser, T.-O.; Kamann, S.; Kerutt, J.; Kollatschny, W.; Krajnovic, D.; Lilly, S.; Martinsson, T.; Michel-Dansac, L.; Patricio, V.; Schaye, J.; Shirazi, M.; Soto, K.; Soucail, G.; Steinmetz, M.; Urrutia, T.; Weilbacher, P.; de Zeeuw, T.

    2015-04-01

    The HDFS was observed during six nights in July 25-29, 31 and August 2, 3 2014 of the last commissioning run of MUSE. We used the nominal wavelength range (4750-9300Å) and performed a series of exposures of 30min each. (3 data files).

  16. From Sun King to Royal Twilight: Painting in Eighteenth Century France from the Musee Picardie, Amiens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Mark M.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the traveling exhibition from the Musee de Picardie in Amiens, France, called "From the Sun King to the Royal Twilight: Painting in Eighteenth Century France," that provides an overview of French paintings from the reign of Louis IV to the fall of the monarchy. (CMK)

  17. Estimation of discontinuous coefficients and boundary parameters for hyperbolic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamm, P. K.; Murphy, K. A.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of estimating discontinuous coefficients, including locations of discontinuities, that occur in second order hyperbolic systems typical of those arising in I-D surface seismic problems is discussed. In addition, the problem of identifying unknown parameters that appear in boundary conditions for the system is treated. A spline-based approximation theory is presented, together with related convergence findings and representative numerical examples.

  18. BOOK REVIEW: Galileo's Muse: Renaissance Mathematics and the Arts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Mark; Sterken, Christiaan

    2013-12-01

    Galileo's Muse is a book that focuses on the life and thought of Galileo Galilei. The Prologue consists of a first chapter on Galileo the humanist and deals with Galileo's influence on his student Vincenzo Viviani (who wrote a biography of Galileo). This introductory chapter is followed by a very nice chapter that describes the classical legacy: Pythagoreanism and Platonism, Euclid and Archimedes, and Plutarch and Ptolemy. The author explicates the distinction between Greek and Roman contributions to the classical legacy, an explanation that is crucial for understanding Galileo and Renaissance mathematics. The following eleven chapters of this book arranged in a kind of quadrivium, viz., Poetry, Painting, Music, Architecture present arguments to support the author's thesis that the driver for Galileo's genius was not Renaissance science as is generally accepted but Renaissance arts brought forth by poets, painters, musicians, and architects. These four sets of chapters describe the underlying mathematics in poetry, visual arts, music and architecture. Likewise, Peterson stresses the impact of the philosophical overtones present in geometry, but absent in algebra and its equations. Basically, the author writes about Galileo, while trying to ignore the Copernican controversy, which he sees as distracting attention from Galileo's scientific legacy. As such, his story deviates from the standard myth on Galileo. But the book also looks at other eminent characters, such as Galileo's father Vincenzo (who cultivated music and music theory), the painter Piero della Francesca (who featured elaborate perspectives in his work), Dante Alighieri (author of the Divina Commedia), Filippo Brunelleschi (who engineered the dome of the Basilica di Santa Maria del Fiore in Florence, Johannes Kepler (a strong supporter of Galileo's Copernicanism), etc. This book is very well documented: it offers, for each chapter, a wide selection of excellent biographical notes, and includes a fine

  19. MUSE deep-fields: the Ly α luminosity function in the Hubble Deep Field-South at 2.91 < z < 6.64

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Alyssa B.; Guiderdoni, Bruno; Blaizot, Jérémy; Wisotzki, Lutz; Herenz, Edmund Christian; Garel, Thibault; Richard, Johan; Bacon, Roland; Bina, David; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Contini, Thierry; den Brok, Mark; Hashimoto, Takuya; Marino, Raffaella Anna; Pelló, Roser; Schaye, Joop; Schmidt, Kasper B.

    2017-10-01

    We present the first estimate of the Ly α luminosity function using blind spectroscopy from the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer, MUSE, in the Hubble Deep Field-South. Using automatic source-detection software, we assemble a homogeneously detected sample of 59 Ly α emitters covering a flux range of -18.0 < log10 (F) < -16.3 (erg s-1 cm-2), corresponding to luminosities of 41.4 < log10 (L) < 42.8 (erg s-1). As recent studies have shown, Ly α fluxes can be underestimated by a factor of 2 or more via traditional methods, and so we undertake a careful assessment of each object's Ly α flux using a curve-of-growth analysis to account for extended emission. We describe our self-consistent method for determining the completeness of the sample, and present an estimate of the global Ly α luminosity function between redshifts 2.91 < z < 6.64 using the 1/Vmax estimator. We find that the luminosity function is higher than many number densities reported in the literature by a factor of 2-3, although our result is consistent at the 1σ level with most of these studies. Our observed luminosity function is also in good agreement with predictions from semi-analytic models, and shows no evidence for strong evolution between the high- and low-redshift halves of the data. We demonstrate that one's approach to Ly α flux estimation does alter the observed luminosity function, and caution that accurate flux assessments will be crucial in measurements of the faint-end slope. This is a pilot study for the Ly α luminosity function in the MUSE deep-fields, to be built on with data from the Hubble Ultra Deep Field that will increase the size of our sample by almost a factor of 10.

  20. VLT/MUSE discovers a jet from the evolved B[e] star MWC 137

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehner, A.; de Wit, W. J.; Groh, J. H.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Baade, D.; Rivinius, T.; Selman, F.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Martayan, C.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Not all stars exhibiting the optical spectral characteristics of B[e] stars are in the same evolutionary stage. The Galactic B[e] star MWC 137 is a prime example of an object with uncertain classification, where previous work has suggested either a pre- or a post-main sequence classification. Our goal is to settle this debate and provide a reliable evolutionary classification. Methods: Integral field spectrograph observations with the Very Large Telescope Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (VLT MUSE) of the cluster SH 2-266 are used to analyze the nature of MWC 137. Results: A collimated outflow is discovered that is geometrically centered on MWC 137. The central position of MWC 137 in the cluster SH 2-266 within the larger nebula suggests strongly that it is a member of this cluster and that it is the origin of both the nebula and the newly discovered jet. Comparison of the color-magnitude diagram of the brightest cluster stars with stellar evolutionary models results in a distance of about 5.2 ± 1.4 kpc. We estimate that the cluster is at least 3 Myr old. The jet emanates from MWC 137 at a position angle of 18-20°. The jet extends over 66'' (1.7 pc) projected on the plane of the sky, shows several knots, and has electron densities of about 103 cm-1 and projected velocities of up to ± 450 km s-1. From the Balmer emission line decrement of the diffuse intracluster nebulosity, we determine E(B-V) = 1.4 mag for the inner 1' cluster region. The spectral energy distribution of the brightest cluster stars yields a slightly lower extinction of E(B-V) ~ 1.2 mag for the inner region and E(B-V) ~ 0.4-0.8 mag for the outer region. The extinction toward MWC 137 is estimated to be E(B-V) ~ 1.8 mag (AV ~ 5.6 mag). Conclusions: Our analysis of the optical and near-infrared color-magnitude and color-color diagrams suggests a post-main sequence stage for MWC 137. The existence of a jet in this object implies the presence of an accretion disk. Several possibilities for MWC

  1. Estimation of Delays and Other Parameters in Nonlinear Functional Differential Equations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    FSTIMATION OF DELAYS AND OTHER PARAMETERS IN NONLINEAR FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS by K. T. Banks and P. L. Daniel December 1981 LCDS Report #82...ESTIMATION OF DELAYS AND OTHER PARAMETERS IN NONLINEAR FUNCTIONAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS H. T. Banks and P. L. Daniel ABSTRACT We discuss a spline...based approximation scheme for nonlinear nonautonomous delay differential equations . Convergence results (using dissipative type estimates on the

  2. New μSR spectrometer at J-PARC MUSE based on Kalliope detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, K. M.; Murakami, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Lee, H.; Suzuki, S. Y.; Koda, A.; Yamauchi, I.; Miyazaki, M.; Hiraishi, M.; Okabe, H.; Takeshita, S.; Kadono, R.; Ito, T.; Higemoto, W.; Kanda, S.; Fukao, Y.; Saito, N.; Saito, M.; Ikeno, M.; Uchida, T.; Tanaka, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    We developed a new positron detector system called Kalliope, which is based on multi-pixel avalanch photo-diode (m-APD), application specific integrated circuit (ASIC), field programmable gated array (FPGA) and ethernet-based SiTCP data transfer technology. We have manufactured a general-purpose spectrometer for muon spin relaxation (μSR) measurements, employing 40 Kalliope units (1280 channels of scintillators) installed in a 0.4 T longitudinal-field magnet. The spectrometer has been placed at D1 experimental area of J- PARC Muon Science Establishment (MUSE). Since February of 2014, the spectrometer has been used for the user programs of MUSE after a short commissioning period of one week. The data accumulation rate of the new spectrometer is 180 million positron events per hour (after taking the coincidence of two scintillators of telescopes) from a 20×20 mm sample for double-pulsed incoming muons.

  3. Collaborative Research: Equipment for and Running of the PSI MUSE Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kohl, Michael

    2016-10-01

    The R&D funding from this award has been a significant tool to move the Muon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland forward to the stage of realization. Specifically, this award has enabled Dr. Michael Kohl and his working group at Hampton University to achieve substantial progress toward the goal of providing beam particle tracking with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors for MUSE experiment. Establishing a particle detection system that is capable of operating in a high-intensity environment, with a data acquisition system capable of running at several kHz, combined with robust tracking software providing high efficiency for track reconstruction in the presence of noise and backgrounds will have immediate application in many other experiments.

  4. ICL light in a z~0.5 cluster: the MUSE perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pompei, E.; Adami, C.; XXL Team

    2017-03-01

    Intracluster light is contributed by both stars and gas and it is an important tracer of the interaction history of galaxies within a cluster. We present here the results obtained from MUSE observations of an intermediate redshift (z~ 0.5) cluster taken from the XXL survey and we conclude that the most plausible process responsible for the observed amount of ICL is ram pressure stripping.

  5. Choosing MUSE: Validation of a Low-Cost, Portable EEG System for ERP Research

    PubMed Central

    Krigolson, Olave E.; Williams, Chad C.; Norton, Angela; Hassall, Cameron D.; Colino, Francisco L.

    2017-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the number of portable low-cost electroencephalographic (EEG) systems available to researchers. However, to date the validation of the use of low-cost EEG systems has focused on continuous recording of EEG data and/or the replication of large system EEG setups reliant on event-markers to afford examination of event-related brain potentials (ERP). Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to conduct ERP research without being reliant on event markers using a portable MUSE EEG system and a single computer. Specifically, we report the results of two experiments using data collected with the MUSE EEG system—one using the well-known visual oddball paradigm and the other using a standard reward-learning task. Our results demonstrate that we could observe and quantify the N200 and P300 ERP components in the visual oddball task and the reward positivity (the mirror opposite component to the feedback-related negativity) in the reward-learning task. Specifically, single sample t-tests of component existence (all p's < 0.05), computation of Bayesian credible intervals, and 95% confidence intervals all statistically verified the existence of the N200, P300, and reward positivity in all analyses. We provide with this research paper an open source website with all the instructions, methods, and software to replicate our findings and to provide researchers with an easy way to use the MUSE EEG system for ERP research. Importantly, our work highlights that with a single computer and a portable EEG system such as the MUSE one can conduct ERP research with ease thus greatly extending the possible use of the ERP methodology to a variety of novel contexts. PMID:28344546

  6. ADS reactivity measurements from MUSE to TRADE (and where do we go from here?)

    SciTech Connect

    Imel, G.; Mellier, F.; Jammes, C.; Philibert, H.; Granget, G.; Gonzalez, E.; Villamarin, D.; Rosa, R.; Carta, M.; Monti, S.; Baeten, P.; Billebaud, A.

    2006-07-01

    This paper provides a link between the MUSE (Multiplication avec Source Externe) program performed at CEA-Cadarache in France, and the TRADE (TRIGA Accelerator Driven Experiment) program performed at ENEA-Casaccia in Italy. In both programs, extensive measurements were made to determine the best methods for sub-criticality measurements in an accelerator-driven system. A very serious attempt was made to quantify the uncertainties associated with such measurements. While both MUSE and TRADE studied the methods of sub-criticality determination, in fact the two systems are very different. MUSE was a fast system with MOX fuel (generation time around 0.5 {mu}s), and TRADE was performed in a TRIGA reactor (generation time around 50 {mu}s). This paper will summarize the important results of these two experiments, with the main purpose being to tie them together to attempt to draw generic conclusions that can be applied in the future to a real ADS. In addition, this paper will briefly discuss the next series of experiments that will continue this work in the U.S. (RACE, Reactor Accelerator Coupled Experiments), Belarus (YALINA), Belgium (GUINEVERE), and Russia (SAD, Sub-critical Assembly Dubna). MUSE and TRADE have contributed greatly to our understanding of the uncertainties associated with sub-critical measurements, but there are still some gaps that must be covered. This paper will describe the gaps that exist, and demonstrate how the above future programs will fill in the missing information needed for the design of an actual ADS system in the future. (authors)

  7. Choosing MUSE: Validation of a Low-Cost, Portable EEG System for ERP Research.

    PubMed

    Krigolson, Olave E; Williams, Chad C; Norton, Angela; Hassall, Cameron D; Colino, Francisco L

    2017-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increase in the number of portable low-cost electroencephalographic (EEG) systems available to researchers. However, to date the validation of the use of low-cost EEG systems has focused on continuous recording of EEG data and/or the replication of large system EEG setups reliant on event-markers to afford examination of event-related brain potentials (ERP). Here, we demonstrate that it is possible to conduct ERP research without being reliant on event markers using a portable MUSE EEG system and a single computer. Specifically, we report the results of two experiments using data collected with the MUSE EEG system-one using the well-known visual oddball paradigm and the other using a standard reward-learning task. Our results demonstrate that we could observe and quantify the N200 and P300 ERP components in the visual oddball task and the reward positivity (the mirror opposite component to the feedback-related negativity) in the reward-learning task. Specifically, single sample t-tests of component existence (all p's < 0.05), computation of Bayesian credible intervals, and 95% confidence intervals all statistically verified the existence of the N200, P300, and reward positivity in all analyses. We provide with this research paper an open source website with all the instructions, methods, and software to replicate our findings and to provide researchers with an easy way to use the MUSE EEG system for ERP research. Importantly, our work highlights that with a single computer and a portable EEG system such as the MUSE one can conduct ERP research with ease thus greatly extending the possible use of the ERP methodology to a variety of novel contexts.

  8. Lens modelling Abell 370: crowning the final frontier field with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagattuta, David J.; Richard, Johan; Clément, Benjamin; Mahler, Guillaume; Patrício, Vera; Pelló, Roser; Soucail, Geneviève; Schmidt, Kasper B.; Wisotzki, Lutz; Martinez, Johany; Bina, David

    2017-08-01

    We present a strong lensing analysis on the massive cluster Abell 370 (A370; z = 0.375), using a combination of deep multiband Hubble Space Telescope (HST) imaging and Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) spectroscopy. From only 2 h of the MUSE data, we are able to measure 120 redshifts in the southern BCG area, including several multiply imaged lens systems. In total, we increase the number of multiply imaged systems with a secure redshift from 4 to 15, nine of which are newly discovered. Of these, eight are located at z > 3, greatly extending the redshift range of spectroscopically confirmed systems over previous work. Using these systems as constraints, we update a parametric lens model of A370, probing the mass distribution from cluster to galaxy scales. Overall, we find that a model with only two cluster-scale dark matter haloes (one for each BCG) does a poor job of fitting these new image constraints. Instead, two additional mass clumps - a central `bar' of mass located between the BCGs, and another clump located within a `crown' of galaxies in the northern part of the cluster field - provide significant improvements to the fit. Additional physical evidence suggests these clumps are indeed real features of the system, but with relatively few image constraints in the crown region, this claim is difficult to evaluate from a modelling perspective. Additional MUSE observations of A370 covering the entire strong-lensing region will greatly help these efforts, further improving our understanding of this intriguing cluster.

  9. A kinematically distinct core and minor-axis rotation: the MUSE perspective on M87

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emsellem, Eric; Krajnović, Davor; Sarzi, Marc

    2014-11-01

    We present evidence for the presence of a low-amplitude kinematically distinct component in the giant early-type galaxy M87, via data sets obtained with the SAURON and MUSE integral-field spectroscopic units. The MUSE velocity field reveals a strong twist of ˜140° within the central 30 arcsec connecting outwards such a kinematically distinct core to a prolate-like rotation around the large-scale photometric major axis of the galaxy. The existence of these kinematic features within the apparently round central regions of M87 implies a non-axisymmetric and complex shape for this galaxy, which could be further constrained using the presented kinematics. The associated orbital structure should be interpreted together with other tracers of the gravitational potential probed at larger scales (e.g. globular clusters, ultra-compact dwarfs, planetary nebulae): it would offer an insight in the assembly history of one of the brightest galaxies in the Virgo cluster. These data also demonstrate the potential of the MUSE spectrograph to uncover low-amplitude spectral signatures.

  10. GASP. II. A MUSE View of Extreme Ram-Pressure Stripping along the Line of Sight: Kinematics of the Jellyfish Galaxy JO201

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellhouse, C.; Jaffé, Y. L.; Hau, G. K. T.; McGee, S. L.; Poggianti, B. M.; Moretti, A.; Gullieuszik, M.; Bettoni, D.; Fasano, G.; D'Onofrio, M.; Fritz, J.; Omizzolo, A.; Sheen, Y.-K.; Vulcani, B.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a spatially resolved kinematic study of the jellyfish galaxy JO201, one of the most spectacular cases of ram-pressure stripping (RPS) in the GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with MUSE (GASP) survey. By studying the environment of JO201, we find that it is moving through the dense intracluster medium of Abell 85 at supersonic speeds along our line of sight, and that it is likely accompanied by a small group of galaxies. Given the density of the intracluster medium and the galaxy’s mass, projected position, and velocity within the cluster, we estimate that JO201 must so far have lost ˜50% of its gas during infall via RPS. The MUSE data indeed reveal a smooth stellar disk accompanied by large projected tails of ionized ({{H}}α ) gas, composed of kinematically cold (velocity dispersion <40 km s-1) star-forming knots and very warm (>100 km s-1) diffuse emission, that extend out to at least ˜ 50 {kpc} from the galaxy center. The ionized {{H}}α -emitting gas in the disk rotates with the stars out to ˜6 kpc but, in the disk outskirts, it becomes increasingly redshifted with respect to the (undisturbed) stellar disk. The observed disturbances are consistent with the presence of gas trailing behind the stellar component resulting from intense face-on RPS along the line of sight. Our kinematic analysis is consistent with the estimated fraction of lost gas and reveals that stripping of the disk happens outside-in, causing shock heating and gas compression in the stripped tails.

  11. The Use of Electronic Scholarly Journals: Models of Analysis and Data Drawn from the Project Muse Experience at Johns Hopkins University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, James G.

    This paper outlines a series of quantitative and qualitative models for understanding and evaluating the use of electronic scholarly journals, and summarizes data based on the experience of Project Muse at Johns Hopkins University and early feedback received from subscribing libraries. Project Muse is a collaborative initiative between the Press…

  12. Pluripotent Nontumorigenic Adipose Tissue-Derived Muse Cells Have Immunomodulatory Capacity Mediated by Transforming Growth Factor-β1.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, María L; Fuertes, Florencia; Barcala Tabarrozzi, Andres E; Attorressi, Alejandra I; Cucchiani, Rodolfo; Corrales, Luis; Oliveira, Talita C; Sogayar, Mari C; Labriola, Leticia; Dewey, Ricardo A; Perone, Marcelo J

    2016-08-02

    : Adult mesenchymal stromal cell-based interventions have shown promising results in a broad range of diseases. However, their use has faced limited effectiveness owing to the low survival rates and susceptibility to environmental stress on transplantation. We describe the cellular and molecular characteristics of multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells derived from adipose tissue (AT), a subpopulation of pluripotent stem cells isolated from human lipoaspirates. Muse-AT cells were efficiently obtained using a simple, fast, and affordable procedure, avoiding cell sorting and genetic manipulation methods. Muse-AT cells isolated under severe cellular stress, expressed pluripotency stem cell markers and spontaneously differentiated into the three germ lineages. Muse-AT cells grown as spheroids have a limited proliferation rate, a diameter of ∼15 µm, and ultrastructural organization similar to that of embryonic stem cells. Muse-AT cells evidenced high stage-specific embryonic antigen-3 (SSEA-3) expression (∼60% of cells) after 7-10 days growing in suspension and did not form teratomas when injected into immunodeficient mice. SSEA-3(+)-Muse-AT cells expressed CD105, CD29, CD73, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I, CD44, and CD90 and low levels of HLA class II, CD45, and CD34. Using lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages and antigen-challenged T-cell assays, we have shown that Muse-AT cells have anti-inflammatory activities downregulating the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. Muse-AT cells spontaneously gained transforming growth factor-β1 expression that, in a phosphorylated SMAD2-dependent manner, might prove pivotal in their observed immunoregulatory activity through decreased expression of T-box transcription factor in T cells. Collectively, the present study has demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of obtaining Muse-AT cells that can potentially be harnessed as

  13. Pluripotent Nontumorigenic Adipose Tissue-Derived Muse Cells have Immunomodulatory Capacity Mediated by Transforming Growth Factor-β1.

    PubMed

    Gimeno, María L; Fuertes, Florencia; Barcala Tabarrozzi, Andres E; Attorressi, Alejandra I; Cucchiani, Rodolfo; Corrales, Luis; Oliveira, Talita C; Sogayar, Mari C; Labriola, Leticia; Dewey, Ricardo A; Perone, Marcelo J

    2017-01-01

    Adult mesenchymal stromal cell-based interventions have shown promising results in a broad range of diseases. However, their use has faced limited effectiveness owing to the low survival rates and susceptibility to environmental stress on transplantation. We describe the cellular and molecular characteristics of multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells derived from adipose tissue (AT), a subpopulation of pluripotent stem cells isolated from human lipoaspirates. Muse-AT cells were efficiently obtained using a simple, fast, and affordable procedure, avoiding cell sorting and genetic manipulation methods. Muse-AT cells isolated under severe cellular stress, expressed pluripotency stem cell markers and spontaneously differentiated into the three germ lineages. Muse-AT cells grown as spheroids have a limited proliferation rate, a diameter of ∼15 µm, and ultrastructural organization similar to that of embryonic stem cells. Muse-AT cells evidenced high stage-specific embryonic antigen-3 (SSEA-3) expression (∼60% of cells) after 7-10 days growing in suspension and did not form teratomas when injected into immunodeficient mice. SSEA-3(+) -Muse-AT cells expressed CD105, CD29, CD73, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I, CD44, and CD90 and low levels of HLA class II, CD45, and CD34. Using lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages and antigen-challenged T-cell assays, we have shown that Muse-AT cells have anti-inflammatory activities downregulating the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. Muse-AT cells spontaneously gained transforming growth factor-β1 expression that, in a phosphorylated SMAD2-dependent manner, might prove pivotal in their observed immunoregulatory activity through decreased expression of T-box transcription factor in T cells. Collectively, the present study has demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of obtaining Muse-AT cells that can potentially be harnessed as

  14. Functional melanocytes are readily reprogrammable from multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (muse) cells, distinct stem cells in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiyama, Kenichiro; Wakao, Shohei; Kuroda, Yasumasa; Ogura, Fumitaka; Nojima, Makoto; Sawaya, Natsue; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Aiba, Setsuya; Dezawa, Mari

    2013-10-01

    The induction of melanocytes from easily accessible stem cells has attracted attention for the treatment of melanocyte dysfunctions. We found that multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells, a distinct stem cell type among human dermal fibroblasts, can be readily reprogrammed into functional melanocytes, whereas the remainder of the fibroblasts do not contribute to melanocyte differentiation. Muse cells can be isolated as cells positive for stage-specific embryonic antigen-3, a marker for undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells, and differentiate into cells representative of all three germ layers from a single cell, while also being nontumorigenic. The use of certain combinations of factors induces Muse cells to express melanocyte markers such as tyrosinase and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor and to show positivity for the 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine reaction. When Muse cell-derived melanocytes were incorporated into three-dimensional (3D) cultured skin models, they localized themselves in the basal layer of the epidermis and produced melanin in the same manner as authentic melanocytes. They also maintained their melanin production even after the 3D cultured skin was transplanted to immunodeficient mice. This technique may be applicable to the efficient production of melanocytes from accessible human fibroblasts by using Muse cells, thereby contributing to autologous transplantation for melanocyte dysfunctions, such as vitiligo.

  15. Modifications made to ModelMuse to add support for the Saturated-Unsaturated Transport model (SUTRA)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winston, Richard B.

    2014-01-01

    This report (1) describes modifications to ModelMuse,as described in U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Techniques and Methods (TM) 6–A29 (Winston, 2009), to add support for the Saturated-Unsaturated Transport model (SUTRA) (Voss and Provost, 2002; version of September 22, 2010) and (2) supplements USGS TM 6–A29. Modifications include changes to the main ModelMuse window where the model is designed, addition of methods for generating a finite-element mesh suitable for SUTRA, defining how some functions shouldapply when using a finite-element mesh rather than a finite-difference grid (as originally programmed in ModelMuse), and applying spatial interpolation to angles. In addition, the report describes ways of handling objects on the front view of the model and displaying data. A tabulation contains a summary of the new or modified dialog boxes.

  16. The MUlti-SpEctral, MUlti-SpEcies, MUlti-SEnsors (MUSES) Retrievals from the EOS to the Suomi-NPP Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, D.; Bowman, K. W.; Kulawik, S.; Worden, J. R.; Worden, H. M.; Miyazaki, K.; Neu, J. L.; Luo, M.; Veefkind, P.; Aben, I.; Landgraf, J.; Flynn, L. E.; Han, Y.; Strow, L. L.; Liu, X.; Yu, S.

    2016-12-01

    Knowing the vertical distribution of O3 concentrations is thus crucial for studies of air quality, its effects on human health and vegetation, and the natural and anthropogenic contributions to ozone regional climate forcing. Carbon monoxide is a chemical precursor of greenhouse gases CO2 and tropospheric O3, and is also an ideal tracer of transport processes due to its medium life time (weeks to months). The Aqua-AIRS and Aura-OMI instruments in the "A-Train", CrIS and OMPS instruments on the Suomi-NPP, and TROPOMI aboard the Sentinel 5 precursor have the potential to provide the synoptic chemical/dynamical context for O3 necessary to quantify long-range transport at global scales and to provide an anchor to the near-term constellation of geostationary sounders: NASA TEMPO, ESA Sentinel 4, and the Korean GEMS. We introduce the MUSES retrieval algorithm, which ingests panspectral observations across multiple platforms in a non-linear optimal estimation framework. MUSES incorporates advances in remote sensing science developed during the EOS era including rigorous error analysis diagnostics and observation operators needed for trend analysis, climate model evaluation, and data assimilation. We present joint tropospheric O3 retrievals from AIRS/OMI and CrIS/OMPS for the KORUS-AQ campaign period. We also demonstrate the potential of joint carbon monoxide profiles from CrIS/ TROPOMI. These results indicate that ozone can be retrieved with 2 degrees of freedom for signal (dofs) in the troposphere, which is similar to TES. Joint CO profiles have dofs similar to the MOPITT multispectral retrieval but with higher spatial resolution and coverage. Consequently, multispectral retrievals show promise in providing continuity with EOS observations and pave the way towards a new advanced atmospheric composition constellation.

  17. Modeling fetal weight for gestational age: a comparison of a flexible multi-level spline-based model with other approaches.

    PubMed

    Villandré, Luc; Hutcheon, Jennifer A; Trejo, Maria Esther Perez; Abenhaim, Haim; Jacobsen, Geir; Platt, Robert W

    2011-01-01

    We present a model for longitudinal measures of fetal weight as a function of gestational age. We use a linear mixed model, with a Box-Cox transformation of fetal weight values, and restricted cubic splines, in order to flexibly but parsimoniously model median fetal weight. We systematically compare our model to other proposed approaches. All proposed methods are shown to yield similar median estimates, as evidenced by overlapping pointwise confidence bands, except after 40 completed weeks, where our method seems to produce estimates more consistent with observed data. Sex-based stratification affects the estimates of the random effects variance-covariance structure, without significantly changing sex-specific fitted median values. We illustrate the benefits of including sex-gestational age interaction terms in the model over stratification. The comparison leads to the conclusion that the selection of a model for fetal weight for gestational age can be based on the specific goals and configuration of a given study without affecting the precision or value of median estimates for most gestational ages of interest.

  18. Unveiling the counter-rotating nature of the kinematically distinct core in NGC 5813 with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajnović, Davor; Weilbacher, Peter M.; Urrutia, Tanya; Emsellem, Eric; Carollo, C. Marcella; Shirazi, Maryam; Bacon, Roland; Contini, Thierry; Epinat, Benoît; Kamann, Sebastian; Martinsson, Thomas; Steinmetz, Matthias

    2015-09-01

    Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) observations of NGC 5813 reveal a complex structure in the velocity dispersion map, previously hinted at by SAURON observations. The structure is reminiscent of velocity dispersion maps of galaxies comprising two counter-rotating discs, and might explain the existence of the kinematically distinct core (KDC). Further evidence for two counter-rotating components comes from the analysis of the higher moments of the stellar line-of-sight velocity distributions and fitting MUSE spectra with two separate Gaussian line-of-sight velocity distributions. The emission-line kinematics show evidence of being linked to the present cooling flows and the buoyant cavities seen in X-rays. We detect ionized gas in a nuclear disc-like structure, oriented like the KDC, which is, however, not directly related to the KDC. We build an axisymmetric Schwarzschild dynamical model, which shows that the MUSE kinematics can be reproduced well with two counter-rotating orbit families, characterized by relatively low angular momentum components, but clearly separated in integral phase space and with radially varying contributions. The model indicates that the counter-rotating components in NGC 5813 are not thin discs, but dynamically hot structures. Our findings give further evidence that KDCs in massive galaxies should not necessarily be considered as structurally or dynamically decoupled regions, but as the outcomes of the mixing of different orbital families, where the balance in the distribution of mass of the orbital families is crucial. We discuss the formation of the KDC in NGC 5813 within the framework of gas accretion, binary mergers and formation of turbulent thick discs from cold streams at high redshift.

  19. Dissecting a supernova impostor's circumstellar medium: MUSEing about the SHAPE of η Carinae's outer ejecta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehner, A.; Steffen, W.; Groh, J. H.; Vogt, F. P. A.; Baade, D.; Boffin, H. M. J.; Davidson, K.; de Wit, W. J.; Humphreys, R. M.; Martayan, C.; Oudmaijer, R. D.; Rivinius, T.; Selman, F.

    2016-11-01

    Aims: The role of episodic mass loss is one of the outstanding questions in massive star evolution. The structural inhomogeneities and kinematics of their nebulae are tracers of their mass-loss history. We conduct a three-dimensional morpho-kinematic analysis of the ejecta of η Car outside its famous Homunculus nebula. Methods: We carried out the first large-scale integral field unit observations of η Car in the optical, covering a field of view of 1'× 1' centered on the star. Observations with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) reveal the detailed three-dimensional structure of η Car's outer ejecta. Morpho-kinematic modeling of these ejecta is conducted with the code SHAPE. Results: The largest coherent structure in η Car's outer ejecta can be described as a bent cylinder with roughly the same symmetry axis as the Homunculus nebula. This large outer shell is interacting with the surrounding medium, creating soft X-ray emission. Doppler velocities of up to 3000 km s-1 are observed. We establish the shape and extent of the ghost shell in front of the southern Homunculus lobe and confirm that the NN condensation can best be modeled as a bowshock in the orbital/equatorial plane. Conclusions: The SHAPE modeling of the MUSE observations provides a significant gain in the study of the three-dimensional structure of η Car's outer ejecta. Our SHAPE modeling indicates that the kinematics of the outer ejecta measured with MUSE can be described by a spatially coherent structure, and that this structure also correlates with the extended soft X-ray emission associated with the outer debris field. The ghost shell immediately outside the southern Homunculus lobe hints at a sequence of eruptions within the time frame of the Great Eruption from 1837-1858 or possibly a later shock/reverse shock velocity separation. Our 3D morpho-kinematic modeling and the MUSE observations constitute an invaluable dataset to be confronted with future

  20. Design and construction of the ultra-slow muon beamline at J-PARC/MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strasser, P.; Ikedo, Y.; Makimura, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nishiyama, K.; Shimomura, K.; Fujimori, H.; Adachi, T.; Koda, A.; Kawamura, N.; Kobayashi, Y.; Higemoto, W.; Ito, T. U.; Nagatomo, T.; Torikai, E.; Kadono, R.; Miyake, Y.

    2014-12-01

    At the J-PARC Muon Science Facility (MUSE), a new Ultra-Slow Muon beamline is being constructed to extend the μSR technique from bulk material to thin films, thus empowering a wide variety of surface and nano-science studies, and also a novel 3D imaging with the "ultra-slow muon microscope". Ultra-slow muons will be produced by the re-acceleration of thermal muons regenerated by the laser resonant ionization of muonium atoms evaporated from a hot tungsten foil, a method that originated from the Meson Science Laboratory at KEK. The design parameters, construction status and initial beam commissioning are reported.

  1. NeuroMap: A Spline-Based Interactive Open-Source Software for Spatiotemporal Mapping of 2D and 3D MEA Data.

    PubMed

    Abdoun, Oussama; Joucla, Sébastien; Mazzocco, Claire; Yvert, Blaise

    2011-01-01

    A major characteristic of neural networks is the complexity of their organization at various spatial scales, from microscopic local circuits to macroscopic brain-scale areas. Understanding how neural information is processed thus entails the ability to study them at multiple scales simultaneously. This is made possible using microelectrodes array (MEA) technology. Indeed, high-density MEAs provide large-scale coverage (several square millimeters) of whole neural structures combined with microscopic resolution (about 50 μm) of unit activity. Yet, current options for spatiotemporal representation of MEA-collected data remain limited. Here we present NeuroMap, a new interactive Matlab-based software for spatiotemporal mapping of MEA data. NeuroMap uses thin plate spline interpolation, which provides several assets with respect to conventional mapping methods used currently. First, any MEA design can be considered, including 2D or 3D, regular or irregular, arrangements of electrodes. Second, spline interpolation allows the estimation of activity across the tissue with local extrema not necessarily at recording sites. Finally, this interpolation approach provides a straightforward analytical estimation of the spatial Laplacian for better current sources localization. In this software, coregistration of 2D MEA data on the anatomy of the neural tissue is made possible by fine matching of anatomical data with electrode positions using rigid-deformation-based correction of anatomical pictures. Overall, NeuroMap provides substantial material for detailed spatiotemporal analysis of MEA data. The package is distributed under GNU General Public License and available at http://sites.google.com/site/neuromapsoftware.

  2. Mineralogy and Major Element Abundance of the Dust Particles Recovered from Muses-C Regio on the Asteroid Itokawa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, T.; Noguchi, T.; Tanaka, M.; Zolensky, M. E.; Kimura, M.; Nakato, A.; Ogami, T.; Ishida, H.; Tsuchiyama, A.; Yada, T.; Shirai, K.; Okazaki, R.; Fujimura, A.; Ishibashi, Y.; Abe, M.; Okada, T.; Ueno, M.; Mukai, T.

    2011-01-01

    Remote sensing by the spacecraft Hayabusa suggested that outermost surface particles of Muses-C regio of the asteroid Itokawa consist of centimeter and sub-centimeter size small pebbles. However, particles we found in the sample catcher A stored in the Hayabusa capsule, where Muses-C particles were captured during first touchdown, are much smaller. i.e., most are smaller than 100 microns in size. This suggests that only small fractions of Muses-C particles were stirred up due to the impact of the sampling horn onto the surface, or due to jets from chemical thrusters during the lift off of the spacecraft from the surface. X-ray fluorescence and near-infrared measurements by the Hayabusa spacecraft suggested that Itokawa surface materials have mineral and major element composition roughly similar to LL chondrites. The particles of the Muses-C region are expected to have experienced some effects of space weathering. Both of these prospects can be tested by the direct mineralogical analyses of the returned Itokawa particles in our study and another one. This comparison is most important aspect of the Hayabusa mission, because it finally links chemical analyses of meteorites fallen on the Earth to spectroscopic measurements of the asteroids.

  3. Minority Universities Systems Engineering (MUSE) Program at the University of Texas at El Paso

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robbins, Mary Clare; Usevitch, Bryan; Starks, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) responded to the suggestion of NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (NASA JPL) to form a consortium comprised of California State University at Los Angeles (CSULA), North Carolina Agricultural and Technical University (NCAT), and UTEP from which developed the Minority Universities Systems Engineering (MUSE) Program. The mission of this consortium is to develop a unique position for minority universities in providing the nation's future system architects and engineers as well as enhance JPL's system design capability. The goals of this collaboration include the development of a system engineering curriculum which includes hands-on project engineering and design experiences. UTEP is in a unique position to take full advantage of this program since UTEP has been named a Model Institution for Excellence (MIE) by the National Science Foundation. The purpose of MIE is to produce leaders in Science, Math, and Engineering. Furthermore, UTEP has also been selected as the site for two new centers including the Pan American Center for Earth and Environmental Sciences (PACES) directed by Dr. Scott Starks and the FAST Center for Structural Integrity of Aerospace Systems directed by Dr. Roberto Osegueda. The UTEP MUSE Program operates under the auspices of the PACES Center.

  4. The MUSE QSO Blind Survey: A Census of Absorber Host Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Lorrie A.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding the distribution of gas in galaxies and its interaction with the IGM is crucial to complete the picture of galaxy evolution. At all redshifts, absorption features seen in QSO spectra serve as a unique probe of the gaseous content of foreground galaxies and the IGM, extending out to 200 kpc. Studies show that star formation history is intimately related to the co-evolution of galaxies and the IGM. In order to study the environments traced by absorption systems and the role of inflows and outflows, it is critical to measure the emission properties of host galaxies and their halos. We overcome the challenge of detecting absorption host galaxies with the MUSE integral field spectrograph on VLT. MUSE's large field of view and sensitivity to emission lines has allowed a never-before seen match between the number density of absorbers along QSO sightlines and the number density of emission line galaxies within 200 kpc of the QSO. These galaxies represent a sample for which previously elusive connections can be made between mass, metallicity, SFR, and absorption.

  5. Resolved properties of high-redshift lensed galaxies seen with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patricio, Vera; Richard, Johan; Verhamme, Anne; Christensen, Lise; Lagattuta, David; Clément, Benjamin; Mahler, Guillaume

    2015-08-01

    Spatially resolved properties of high redshift galaxies provide important insights into galaxy formation processes. However, with the current instrumentation we have been limited to the analysis of the Lyman alpha line and UV continuum through long-slit observations of individual galaxies or stacking. Combining the power of the newly commissioned integral field spectrograph MUSE on VLT with strong gravitational lensing, it is now possible to spatially probe the rest-frame UV properties of individual high-z galaxies.I will present the study of a 109 M⊙ galaxy at z = 3.5 strongly lensed by the SMACS2031 cluster for which we were able to obtain 2D resolved spatial information of Lyman alpha, and, for the fist time, CIII] emission. The exceptional signal to noise of the data also allows the study of the UV continuum as well as emission and absorption lines rarely measured at these redshifts. We compare the spatial Lyman alpha information and continuum properties with radiative transfer models, resulting in a unique view of an individual high-z galaxy.Additionally, I will present the first results from a sample of 8 high redshift (z = 0.7 - 1.5) extended lensed arcs in the Frontier Fields, also observed with MUSE.With this sample, wederive gas kinematics from both emission and absorption lines, as well as properties of resolved stellar populations.

  6. Slide-free histology via MUSE: UV surface excitation microscopy for imaging unsectioned tissue (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levenson, Richard M.; Harmany, Zachary; Demos, Stavros G.; Fereidouni, Farzad

    2016-03-01

    Widely used methods for preparing and viewing tissue specimens at microscopic resolution have not changed for over a century. They provide high-quality images but can involve time-frames of hours or even weeks, depending on logistics. There is increasing interest in slide-free methods for rapid tissue analysis that can both decrease turn-around times and reduce costs. One new approach is MUSE (microscopy with UV surface excitation), which exploits the shallow penetration of UV light to excite fluorescent signals from only the most superficial tissue elements. The method is non-destructive, and eliminates requirement for conventional histology processing, formalin fixation, paraffin embedding, or thin sectioning. It requires no lasers, confocal, multiphoton or optical coherence tomography optics. MUSE generates diagnostic-quality histological images that can be rendered to resemble conventional hematoxylin- and eosin-stained samples, with enhanced topographical information, from fresh or fixed, but unsectioned tissue, rapidly, with high resolution, simply and inexpensively. We anticipate that there could be widespread adoption in research facilities, hospital-based and stand-alone clinical settings, in local or regional pathology labs, as well as in low-resource environments.

  7. Development of thermal protection system of the MUSES-C/DASH reentry capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Inatani, Yoshifumi; Honda, Masahisa; Hirai, Ken'ich

    2002-07-01

    In the final phase of the MUSES-C mission, a small capsule with asteroid sample conducts reentry flight directly from the interplanetary transfer orbit at the velocity over 12 km/s. The severe heat flux, the complicated functional requirements, and small weight budget impose several engineering challenges on the designing of the thermal protection system of the capsule. The heat shield is required to function not only as ablator but also as a structural component. The cloth-layered carbon-phenolic ablator, which has higher allowable stress, is developed in newly-devised fabric method for avoiding delamination due to the high aerodynamic heating. The ablation analysis code, which takes into account of the effect of pyrolysis gas on the surface recession rate, has been developed and verified in the arc-heating tests in the facility environment of broad range of enthalpy level. The capsule was designed to be ventilated during the reentry flight up to about atmospheric pressure by the time of parachute deployment by being sealed with porous flow-restrict material. The designing of the thermal protection system, the hardware specifications, and the ground-based test programs of both MUSES-C and DASH capsule are summarized and discussed here in this paper.

  8. Continuous delay estimation with polynomial splines.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Gianmarco F; Trahey, Gregg E

    2006-11-01

    Delay estimation is used in ultrasonic imaging to estimate blood flow, determine phase aberration corrections, and to calculate elastographic images. Several algorithms have been developed to determine these delays. The accuracy of these methods depends in differing ways on noise, bandwidth, and delay range. In most cases relevant to delay estimation in ultrasonics, a subsample estimate of the delay is required. We introduce two new delay algorithms that use cubic polynomial splines to continuously represent the delay. These algorithms are compared to conventional delay estimators, such as normalized cross correlation and autocorrelation, and to another spline-based method. We present simulations that compare the algorithms' performance for varying amounts of noise, delay, and bandwidth. The proposed algorithms have better performance, in terms of bias and jitter, in a realistic ultrasonic imaging environment. The computational requirements of the new algorithms also are considered.

  9. NASA Participation in the ISAS MUSES C Asteroid Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ross

    2000-01-01

    NASA and Japan's Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) have agreed to cooperate on the first mission to collect samples from the surface of an asteroid and return them to Earth for in-depth study. The MUSES-C mission will be launched on a Japanese MV launch vehicle in January 2002 from Kagoshima Space Center, Japan, toward a touchdown on the asteroid Nereus in September 2003. A NASA-provided miniature rover will conduct in-situ measurements on the surface. The asteroid samples will be returned to Earth by MUSES-C via a parachute-borne recovery capsule in January 2006. NASA and ISAS will cooperate on several aspects of the mission, including mission support and scientific analysis. In addition to providing the rover, NASA will arrange for the testing of the MUSES-C re-entry heat shield at NASA/Ames Research Center, provide supplemental Deep Space Network tracking of the spacecraft, assist in navigating the spacecraft and provide arrangements for the recovery of the sample capsule at a landing site in the U. S. Scientific coinvestigators from the U.S. and Japan will share data from the instruments on the rover and the spacecraft. They will also collaborate on the investigations of the returned samples. With a mass of about I kg, the rover experiment will be a direct descendant of the technology used to build the Sojourner rover. The rover will carry three science instruments: a visible imaging camera, a near-infrared point spectrometer and an alpha X ray spectrometer. The solarpowered rover will move around the surface of Nereus collecting imagery data which are complimentary to the spacecraft investigation. The imaging system will be capable of making surface texture, composition, and morphology measurements at resolutions better than 1 cm. The rover will transmit this data to the spacecraft for relay back to Earth. Due to the microgravity environment on Nereus, the rover has been designed to right itself in case it flips over. Solar panels on all

  10. Exploring the mass assembly of the early-type disc galaxy NGC 3115 with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guérou, A.; Emsellem, E.; Krajnović, D.; McDermid, R. M.; Contini, T.; Weilbacher, P. M.

    2016-07-01

    We present MUSE integral field spectroscopic data of the S0 galaxy NGC 3115 obtained during the instrument commissioning at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). We analyse the galaxy stellar kinematics and stellar populations and present two-dimensional maps of their associated quantities. We thus illustrate the capacity of MUSE to map extra-galactic sources to large radii in an efficient manner, i.e. ~4 Re, and provide relevant constraints on its mass assembly. We probe the well-known set of substructures of NGC 3115 (nuclear disc, stellar rings, outer kpc-scale stellar disc, and spheroid) and show their individual associated signatures in the MUSE stellar kinematics and stellar populations maps. In particular, we confirm that NGC 3115 has a thin fast-rotating stellar disc embedded in a fast-rotating spheroid, and that these two structures show clear differences in their stellar age and metallicity properties. We emphasise an observed correlation between the radial stellar velocity, V, and the Gauss-Hermite moment, h3, which creates a butterfly shape in the central 15'' of the h3 map. We further detect the previously reported weak spiral- and ring-like structures, and find evidence that these features can be associated with regions of younger mean stellar ages. We provide tentative evidence for the presence of a bar, although the V-h3 correlation can be reproduced by a simple axisymmetric dynamical model. Finally, we present a reconstruction of the two-dimensional star formation history of NGC 3115 and find that most of its current stellar mass was formed at early epochs (>12 Gyr ago), while star formation continued in the outer (kpc-scale) stellar disc until recently. Since z ~2 and within ~4 Re, we suggest that NGC 3115 has been mainly shaped by secular processes. The images of the derived parameters in FITS format and the reduced datacube are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  11. Spline-Based Smoothing of Airfoil Curvatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, W.; Krist, S.

    2008-01-01

    Constrained fitting for airfoil curvature smoothing (CFACS) is a splinebased method of interpolating airfoil surface coordinates (and, concomitantly, airfoil thicknesses) between specified discrete design points so as to obtain smoothing of surface-curvature profiles in addition to basic smoothing of surfaces. CFACS was developed in recognition of the fact that the performance of a transonic airfoil is directly related to both the curvature profile and the smoothness of the airfoil surface. Older methods of interpolation of airfoil surfaces involve various compromises between smoothing of surfaces and exact fitting of surfaces to specified discrete design points. While some of the older methods take curvature profiles into account, they nevertheless sometimes yield unfavorable results, including curvature oscillations near end points and substantial deviations from desired leading-edge shapes. In CFACS as in most of the older methods, one seeks a compromise between smoothing and exact fitting. Unlike in the older methods, the airfoil surface is modified as little as possible from its original specified form and, instead, is smoothed in such a way that the curvature profile becomes a smooth fit of the curvature profile of the original airfoil specification. CFACS involves a combination of rigorous mathematical modeling and knowledge-based heuristics. Rigorous mathematical formulation provides assurance of removal of undesirable curvature oscillations with minimum modification of the airfoil geometry. Knowledge-based heuristics bridge the gap between theory and designers best practices. In CFACS, one of the measures of the deviation of an airfoil surface from smoothness is the sum of squares of the jumps in the third derivatives of a cubicspline interpolation of the airfoil data. This measure is incorporated into a formulation for minimizing an overall deviation- from-smoothness measure of the airfoil data within a specified fitting error tolerance. CFACS has been extensively tested on a number of supercritical airfoil data sets generated by inverse design and optimization computer programs. All of the smoothing results show that CFACS is able to generate unbiased smooth fits of curvature profiles, trading small modifications of geometry for increasing curvature smoothness by eliminating curvature oscillations and bumps (see figure).

  12. Spline-based tests in survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Gray, R J

    1994-09-01

    This paper examines a method for testing hypotheses on covariate effects in a proportional hazards model, and also on how effects change over time in regression analysis of survival data. The technique used is very general and can be applied to testing many other aspects of parametric and semiparametric models. The basic idea is to formulate a flexible parametric alternative using fixed knot splines, together with a penalty function that penalizes noisy alternatives more than smooth ones, to focus the power of the tests toward smooth alternatives. The test statistics are the analogs of ordinary likelihood-based statistics, only computed from a penalized likelihood formed by subtracting the penalty function from the ordinary log-likelihood. Large-sample approximations to the distributions are found when the number of knots is held fixed as the sample size increases. Numerical results suggest these approximations may be adequate with moderate sized samples.

  13. Musing over Microbes in Microgravity: Microbial Physiology Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweickart, Randolph; McGinnis, Michael; Bloomberg, Jacob; Lee, Angie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    New York City, the most populated city in the United States, is home to over 8 million humans. This means over 26,000 people per square mile! Imagine, though, what the view would be if you peeked into the world of microscopic organisms. Scientists estimate that a gram of soil may contain up to 1 billion of these microbes, which is as much as the entire human population of China! Scientists also know that the world of microbes is incredibly diverse-possibly 10,000 different species in one gram of soil - more than all the different types of mammals in the world. Microbes fill every niche in the world - from 20 miles below the Earth's surface to 20 miles above, and at temperatures from less than -20 C to hotter than water's boiling point. These organisms are ubiquitous because they can adapt quickly to changing environments, an effective strategy for survival. Although we may not realize it, microbes impact every aspect of our lives. Bacteria and fungi help us break down the food in our bodies, and they help clean the air and water around us. They can also cause the dark, filmy buildup on the shower curtain as well as, more seriously, illness and disease. Since humans and microbes share space on Earth, we can benefit tremendously from a better understanding of the workings and physiology of the microbes. This insight can help prevent any harmful effects on humans, on Earth and in space, as well as reap the benefits they provide. Space flight is a unique environment to study how microbes adapt to changing environmental conditions. To advance ground-based research in the field of microbiology, this STS-107 experiment will investigate how microgravity affects bacteria and fungi. Of particular interest are the growth rates and how they respond to certain antimicrobial substances that will be tested; the same tests will be conducted on Earth at the same times. Comparing the results obtained in flight to those on Earth, we will be able to examine how microgravity induces

  14. Musing over Microbes in Microgravity: Microbial Physiology Flight Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schweickart, Randolph; McGinnis, Michael; Bloomberg, Jacob; Lee, Angie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    New York City, the most populated city in the United States, is home to over 8 million humans. This means over 26,000 people per square mile! Imagine, though, what the view would be if you peeked into the world of microscopic organisms. Scientists estimate that a gram of soil may contain up to 1 billion of these microbes, which is as much as the entire human population of China! Scientists also know that the world of microbes is incredibly diverse-possibly 10,000 different species in one gram of soil - more than all the different types of mammals in the world. Microbes fill every niche in the world - from 20 miles below the Earth's surface to 20 miles above, and at temperatures from less than -20 C to hotter than water's boiling point. These organisms are ubiquitous because they can adapt quickly to changing environments, an effective strategy for survival. Although we may not realize it, microbes impact every aspect of our lives. Bacteria and fungi help us break down the food in our bodies, and they help clean the air and water around us. They can also cause the dark, filmy buildup on the shower curtain as well as, more seriously, illness and disease. Since humans and microbes share space on Earth, we can benefit tremendously from a better understanding of the workings and physiology of the microbes. This insight can help prevent any harmful effects on humans, on Earth and in space, as well as reap the benefits they provide. Space flight is a unique environment to study how microbes adapt to changing environmental conditions. To advance ground-based research in the field of microbiology, this STS-107 experiment will investigate how microgravity affects bacteria and fungi. Of particular interest are the growth rates and how they respond to certain antimicrobial substances that will be tested; the same tests will be conducted on Earth at the same times. Comparing the results obtained in flight to those on Earth, we will be able to examine how microgravity induces

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: MUSE-Wide survey: 831 emission line galaxies (Herenz+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herenz, E. C.; Urrutia, T.; Wisotzki, L.; Kerutt, J.; Saust, R.; Werhahn, M.; Schmidt, K. B.; Caruana, J.; Diener, C.; Bacon, R.; Brinchman, J.; Schaye, J.; Maseda, M.; Weilbacher, P. M.

    2017-05-01

    This data release consists of an emission line galaxy catalogue containing 831 emission line galaxies detected in the first period of observations of the MUSE-Wide survey. We also release 1D PSF-weighted extracted spectra and 3D datacubes for each of those 831 sources. The emission line galaxy catalogue consists of two tables: A catalogue of all 831 detected emission line objects and a table of all 1652 detected emission lines in those objects. These tables are described in detail in Sect. 4.1 and 4.2 of the paper. Both tables are in the FITS binary table format, adhering to the FITS standard described in Pence et al. (2010A&A...524A..42P). (8 data files).

  16. Time of flight in MUSE at PIM1 at Paul Scherrer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wan; Gilman, Ronald; MUSE Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The MUSE experiment at PIM1 at Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, Switzerland, measures elastic scattering of electrons and muons from a liquid hydrogen target. The intent of the experiment is to deduce whether the radius of the proton is the same when determined from the two different particle types. Precision timing is an important aspect of the experiment, used to determine particle types, reaction types, and beam momentum. Here we present results for a test setup measuring time of flight between prototypes of two detector systems to be used in the experiment, compared to Geant4 simulations. The results demonstrate time of flight resolution better than 100 ps, and beam momentum determination at the level of a few tenths of a percent. Douglass Project for Rutgers Women in Math, Science & Engineering, National Science Foundation Grant 1306126 to Rutgers University.

  17. Development of a scintillating-fiber beam detector for the MUSE experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Erez O.; Piasetzky, Eli; Shamai, Yair; Pilip, Nikolay

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes the design, simulation, and prototyping of a scintillating-fiber (SciFi) beam hodoscope that enables real-time particle identification, momentum and position determination, and flux counting in a low-momentum mixed beam of pions, electrons and muons for the MUon-proton Scattering Experiment (MUSE) at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI), Switzerland. The experimental demands and conceptual design are discussed, including the mixing scheme used to suppress cross-talk between adjacent fibers. A comparison between different types of fibers is given. The timing resolution for 1 plane of SciFis is 0.40 ± 0.05 ns, and for 2 fiber planes in coincidence, it is 0.27 ± 0.03 ns. The detection efficiency when at least two planes are required to fire is 98%.

  18. The Muon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) at PSI and the proton radius puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, Michael

    2014-11-01

    The unexplained large discrepancy of the proton charge radius measurements with muonic hydrogen Lamb shift and determinations from elastic electron scattering and Lamb shift in regular hydrogen of seven standard deviations is known as the proton radius puzzle. Suggested solutions of the puzzle range from possible errors in the experiments through unexpectedly large hadronic physics effects to new physics beyond the Standard Model. A new approach to verify the radius discrepancy in a systematic manner will be pursued with the Muon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) at PSI. The experiment aims to compare elastic cross sections, the proton elastic form factors, and the extracted proton charge radius with scattering of electrons and muons of either charge and under identical conditions. The difference in the observed radius will be probed with a high precision to verify the discrepancy. An overview of the experiment and the current status will be presented.

  19. Ultra slow muon microscopy by laser resonant ionization at J-PARC, MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyake, Y.; Ikedo, Y.; Shimomura, K.; Strasser, P.; Kawamura, N.; Nishiyama, K.; Koda, A.; Fujimori, H.; Makimura, S.; Nakamura, J.; Nagatomo, T.; Kadono, R.; Torikai, E.; Iwasaki, M.; Wada, S.; Saito, N.; Okamura, K.; Yokoyama, K.; Ito, T.; Higemoto, W.

    2013-04-01

    As one of the principal muon beam line at the J-PARC muon facility (MUSE), we are now constructing a Muon beam line (U-Line), which consists of a large acceptance solenoid made of mineral insulation cables (MIC), a superconducting curved transport solenoid and superconducting axial focusing magnets. There, we can extract 2 × 108/s surface muons towards a hot tungsten target. At the U-Line, we are now establishing a new type of muon microscopy; a new technique with use of the intense ultra-slow muon source generated by resonant ionization of thermal Muonium (designated as Mu; consisting of a μ + and an e - ) atoms generated from the surface of the tungsten target. In this contribution, the latest status of the Ultra Slow Muon Microscopy project, fully funded, is reported.

  20. Visible/Near-Infrared Spectral Properties of MUSES C Target Asteroid 25143 Itokawa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarvis, K. S.; Vilas, F.; Kelley, M. S.; Abell, P. A.

    2004-01-01

    The Japanese MUSES C mission launched the Hayabusa spacecraft last May 15, 2003, to encounter and study the near-Earth asteroid 25143 Itokawa. The spacecraft will obtain visible images through broadband filters similar to the ECAS filters, and near-infrared spectra from 0.85 - 2.1 microns. In preparation for this encounter, opportunities to study the asteroid with Earth-based telescopes have been fully leveraged. Visible and near-infrared spectral observations were made of asteroid 25143 Itokawa during several nights of March, 2001, around the last apparition. We report here on the results of extensive spectral observations made to address the questions of compositional variations across the surface of the asteroid (as determined by the rotational period and shape model); variations in phase angle (Sun-Itokawa-Earth angle) on spectral characteristics; and predictions of Itokawa observations by Hayabusa based on the spectral resolution and responsivity of the NIRS and AMICA instruments.

  1. MUSE, a Lab-On-Chip System for In-Situ Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckhard, F.; Prak, A.; van den Assem, D.

    Stork Product Engineering and 3T are working for several years on the development of an assembly technology for microsystem parts. This work has led to MATAS: Modular Assembly Technology for μTAS, a generic methodology which enables the development of very compact and highly integrated microsystems technology (MST) systems. MATAS has as great advantage that it enables the application of commercially available microsystem parts derived from different suppliers. The high degree of integration of both the MST parts with electronics enables the development of highly autonomous and intelligent systems which are suited for incorporation in planetary rovers or to support the research in ISS. For further improvement of the technology, and to show its advantages, the development of a system for on-chip capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been selected. CE, which is of old applied in the biosciences and biotechnology, is one of the key technologies for the detection and measurement of enantiomers. The study on enantiomers is an important aspect in the search to pre-biotic life. Due to the limited dimensions of Muse, the system is perfectly suited for use in a planetary rover but could also easily become part of the Astrobiology Facility of Space Station. For the measurement and detection of these enantiomers and other biomolecules, the system is equipped with a fluorescence detector. In 2002 a new project has been started to equip the system with an electrochemical detector enabling conductivity and amperometric analysis. Direct conductivity detection is especially applied in capillary ion electrophoresis, which can be used complementary, or separate to the zone electrophoresis, in which the fluorescence detector is applied. The combination of these detection technologies leads to a multi analysis system (Muse) with a very broad application area.

  2. Gradient in the IMF slope and Sodium abundance of M87 with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiniello, C.; Sarzi, M.; Krajnovic, D.

    2016-06-01

    We present evidence for a radial variation of the stellar initial mass function IMF) in the giant elliptical NGC~4486 based on integral-field MUSE data acquired during the first Science Verification run for this instrument. A steepening of the low-mass end of the IMF towards the centre of this galaxy is necessary to explain the increasing strength of several of the optical IMF sensitive features introduced by Spiniello et al., which we observe in high-quality spectra extracted in annular apertures. The need for a varying slope of the IMF emerges when the strength of these IMF-sensitive features, together with that other classical Lick indices mostly sensitive to stellar metallicity and the bundance of α-elements, are fitted with the state-of-the-art stellar population models from Conroy & van Dokkum and Vazdekis et al., which we modified in order to allow variations in IMF slope, metallicity and α-elements abundance. More specifically, adopting 13-Gyr-old, single-age stellar population models and an unimodal IMF we find that the slope of the latter increases from x=1.8 to x=2.6 in the central 25 arcsec of NGC~4486. Varying IMF accompanied by a metallicity gradient, whereas the abundance of α-element appears constant throughout the MUSE field of view. We found metallicity and α-element abundance gradients perfectly consistent with the literature. A sodium over-abundance is necessary (according to CvD12 models) at all the distances (for all the apertures) and a slight gradient of increasing [Na/Fe] ratio towards the center can be inferred. However, in order to completely break the degeneracies between Na-abundance, total metallicity and IMF variation a more detailed investigation that includes the redder NaI line is required.

  3. Lyman-α emitters in the context of hierarchical galaxy formation: predictions for VLT/MUSE surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garel, T.; Guiderdoni, B.; Blaizot, J.

    2016-02-01

    The VLT/Multi Unit Spectrograph Explorer (MUSE) integral-field spectrograph can detect Lyα emitters (LAE) in the redshift range 2.8 ≲ z ≲ 6.7 in a homogeneous way. Ongoing MUSE surveys will notably probe faint Lyα sources that are usually missed by current narrow-band surveys. We provide quantitative predictions for a typical wedding-cake observing strategy with MUSE based on mock catalogues generated with a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation coupled to numerical Lyα radiation transfer models in gas outflows. We expect ≈1500 bright LAEs (FLyα ≳ 10-17 erg s-1 cm-2) in a typical shallow field (SF) survey carried over ≈100 arcmin2 , and ≈2000 sources as faint as 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 in a medium-deep field (MDF) survey over 10 arcmin2 . In a typical deep field (DF) survey of 1 arcmin2 , we predict that ≈500 extremely faint LAEs (FLyα ≳ 4 × 10-19 erg s-1 cm-2) will be found. Our results suggest that faint Lyα sources contribute significantly to the cosmic Lyα luminosity and SFR budget. While the host haloes of bright LAEs at z ≈ 3 and 6 have descendants with median masses of 2 × 1012 and 5 × 1013 M⊙, respectively, the faintest sources detectable by MUSE at these redshifts are predicted to reside in haloes which evolve into typical sub-L* and L* galaxy haloes at z = 0. We expect typical DF and MDF surveys to uncover the building blocks of Milky Way-like objects, even probing the bulk of the stellar mass content of LAEs located in their progenitor haloes at z ≈ 3.

  4. Characterization of the Surface Properties of MUSES-C/Hayabusa Spacecraft Target Asteroid 25143 Itokawa (1998 SF36)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lederer, S. M.; Domingue, D. L.; Vilas, F.; Abe, M.; Farnham, T. L.; Jarvis, K. S.; Lowry, S. C.; Ohba, Y.; Weissman, P. R.; French, L. M.

    2004-01-01

    Several spacecraft missions have recently targeted asteroids to study their morphologies and physical properties (e.g. Galileo, NEAR Shoemaker), and more are planned. MUSES-C is a Japanese mission designed to rendezvous with a near-Earth asteroid (NEA). The MUSES-C spacecraft, Hayabusa, was launched successfully in May 2003. It will rendezvous with its target asteroid in 2005, and return samples to the Earth in 2007. Its target, 25143 Itokawa (1998 SF36), made a close approach to the Earth in 2001. We collected an extensive ground-based database of broadband photometry obtained during this time, which maximized the phase angle coverage, to characterize this target in preparation for the mission. Our project was designed to capitalize on the broadband UBVRI photometric observations taken with a series of telescopes, instrumentation, and observers. Photometry and spectrophotometry of Itokawa were acquired at Lowell, McDonald, Steward, Palomar, Table Mountain and Kiso Observatories. The photometric data sets were combined to calculate Hapke model parameters of the surface material of Itokawa, and examine the solar-corrected broadband color characteristics of the asteroid. Broadband photometry of an object can be used to: (1) determine its colors and thereby contribute to the understanding of its surface composition and taxonomic class, and (2) infer global physical surface properties of the target body. We present both colors from UBVRI observations of the MUSES-C target Itokawa, and physical properties derived by applying a Hapke model to the broadband BVRI photometry.

  5. The MAGNUM survey: outflows and star formation in ten local Seyfert galaxies with the integral field eye of MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venturi, G.; Marconi, A.; Cresci, G.; Risaliti, G.; Carniani, S.; Mannucci, F.

    2016-08-01

    In this talk I will present the first results from the MAGNUM survey (Measuring Active Galactic Nuclei Under MUSE Microscope), which takes advantage of the unprecedented combination of the large field of view and spectral coverage of MUSE so as to carry out a detail study of the interaction of AGN outflows with the host galaxies and of the relation between AGN activity and star formation. The data comprise ten nearby galaxies so far, such as NGC 1365, NGC 1068 and Circinus. The analysis of MUSE data in many different emission lines has allowed to disentangle the various motions of the gas in the central regions of the galaxies (rotation, outflows and inflows), furthermore resolving the structure of the AGN-ionised cone. Other information of the separate phases of the gas (having different temperature, density and ionisation state) has been obtained thanks to the comparison with high resolution X-ray Chandra images. Moreover, possible evidence for star formation triggered by AGN outflows has been observed.

  6. THE MID-INFRARED LUMINOSITY FUNCTION AT z < 0.3 FROM 5MUSES: UNDERSTANDING THE STAR FORMATION/ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS BALANCE FROM A SPECTROSCOPIC VIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Yanling; Shi Yong; Helou, George; Armus, Lee; Stierwalt, Sabrina; Dale, Daniel A.; Papovich, Casey; Rahman, Nurur; Dasyra, Kalliopi E-mail: yong@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: lee@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: ddale@uwyo.edu E-mail: nurur@astro.umd.edu

    2011-06-10

    We present rest-frame 15 and 24 {mu}m luminosity functions (LFs) and the corresponding star-forming LFs at z < 0.3 derived from the 5MUSES sample. Spectroscopic redshifts have been obtained for {approx}98% of the objects and the median redshift is {approx}0.12. The 5-35 {mu}m Infrared Spectrograph spectra allow us to estimate accurately the luminosities and build the LFs. Using a combination of starburst and quasar templates, we quantify the star formation (SF) and active galactic nucleus (AGN) contributions in the mid-IR spectral energy distribution. We then compute the SF LFs at 15 and 24 {mu}m, and compare with the total 15 and 24 {mu}m LFs. When we remove the contribution of AGNs, the bright end of the LF exhibits a strong decline, consistent with the exponential cutoff of a Schechter function. Integrating the differential LF, we find that the fractional contribution by SF to the energy density is 58% at 15 {mu}m and 78% at 24 {mu}m, while it goes up to {approx}86% when we extrapolate our mid-IR results to the total IR luminosity density. We confirm that the AGNs play more important roles energetically at high luminosities. Finally, we compare our results with work at z {approx} 0.7 and confirm that evolution on both luminosity and density is required to explain the difference in the LFs at different redshifts.

  7. V: Musing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenfeld, Malke; Kelin, Daniel; Plows, Kate; Conarro, Ryan; Broderick, Debora

    2014-01-01

    When one says "writing about teaching artist practice," what exactly does that mean? In the first two sections (EJ1039315 and EJ1039319), the authors considered different ways to frame a story by either zooming in closely to a specific moment or zooming out to provide more context in an effort to address complex issues. The stories in…

  8. Estimation of discontinuous coefficients in parabolic systems - Applications to reservoir simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamm, Patricia K.

    1987-01-01

    Spline-based techniques for estimating spatially varying parameters that appear in parabolic distributed systems (typical of those found in reservoir simulation problems) are presented. In particular, the problem of determining discontinuous coefficients is discussed, estimating both the functional shape and points of discontinuity for such parameters. In addition, the ideas may also be applied to problems with unknown initial conditions and unknown parameters appearing in terms representing external forces. Convergence results and a summary of numerical performance of the resulting algorithms are given.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cells and their subpopulation, pluripotent muse cells, in basic research and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Yasumasa; Dezawa, Mari

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have gained a great deal of attention for regenerative medicine because they can be obtained from easy accessible mesenchymal tissues, such as bone marrow, adipose tissue, and the umbilical cord, and have trophic and immunosuppressive effects to protect tissues. The most outstanding property of MSCs is their potential for differentiation into cells of all three germ layers. MSCs belong to the mesodermal lineage, but they are known to cross boundaries from mesodermal to ectodermal and endodermal lineages, and differentiate into a variety of cell types both in vitro and in vivo. Such behavior is exceptional for tissue stem cells. As observed with hematopoietic and neural stem cells, tissue stem cells usually generate cells that belong to the tissue in which they reside, and do not show triploblastic differentiation. However, the scientific basis for the broad multipotent differentiation of MSCs still remains an enigma. This review summarizes the properties of MSCs from representative mesenchymal tissues, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, and the umbilical cord, to demonstrate their similarities and differences. Finally, we introduce a novel type of pluripotent stem cell, multilineage-differentiating stress-enduring (Muse) cells, a small subpopulation of MSCs, which can explain the broad spectrum of differentiation ability in MSCs.

  10. Highest Resolution Topography of 433 Eros and Implications for MUSES-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, A. F.; Barnouin-Jha, O.

    2003-01-01

    The highest resolution observations of surface morphology and topography at asteroid 433 Eros were obtained by the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) Shoemaker spacecraft on 12 February 2001, as it landed within a ponded deposit on Eros. Coordinated observations were obtained by the imager and the laser rangefinder, at best image resolution of 1 cm/pixel and best topographic resolution of 0.4 m. The NEAR landing datasets provide unique information on rock size and height distributions and regolith processes. Rocks and soil can be distinguished photometrically, suggesting that bare rock is indeed exposed. The NEAR landing data are the only data at sufficient resolution to be relevant to hazard assessment on future landed missions to asteroids, such as the MUSES-C mission which will land on asteroid 25143 (1998 SF36) in order to obtain samples. In a typical region just outside the pond where NEAR landed, the areal coverage by resolved positive topographic features is 18%. At least one topographic feature in the vicinity of the NEAR landing site would have been hazardous for a spacecraft.

  11. Multiple Scattering in Beam-line Detectors of the MUSE Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Heather; Robinette, Clay; Strauch, Steffen; MUon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The charge radius of the proton has been obtained precisely from elastic electron-scattering data and spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen. However, a recent experiment using muonic hydrogen, designed for high-precision, presented a charge radius significantly smaller than the accepted value. This discrepancy certainly prompts a discussion of topics ranging from experimental methods to physics beyond the Standard Model. The MUon Scattering Experiment (MUSE) collaboration at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland, is planning an experiment to measure the charge radius of the proton in elastic scattering of electrons and muons of positive and negative charge off protons. In the layout for the proposed experiment, detectors will be placed in the beam line upstream of a hydrogen target. Using Geant4 simulations, we studied the effect of multiple scattering due to these detectors and determined the fraction of primary particles that hit the target for a muon beam at each beam momentum. Of the studied detectors, a quartz Cherenkov detector caused the largest multiple scattering. Our results will guide further optimization of the detector setup. Supported in parts by the U.S. National Science Foundation: NSF PHY-1205782.

  12. Microscopy with UV Surface Excitation (MUSE) for slide-free histology and pathology imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fereidouni, Farzad; Datta-Mitra, Ananya; Demos, Stavros; Levenson, Richard

    2015-03-01

    A novel microscopy method that takes advantage of shallow photon penetration using ultraviolet-range excitation and exogenous fluorescent stains is described. This approach exploits the intrinsic optical sectioning function when exciting tissue fluorescence from superficial layers to generate images similar to those obtainable from a physically thinsectioned tissue specimen. UV light in the spectral range from roughly 240-275 nm penetrates only a few microns into the surface of biological specimens, thus eliminating out-of-focus signals that would otherwise arise from deeper tissue layers. Furthermore, UV excitation can be used to simultaneously excite fluorophores emitting across a wide spectral range. The sectioning property of the UV light (as opposed to more conventional illumination in the visible range) removes the need for physical or more elaborate optical sectioning approaches, such as confocal, nonlinear or coherent tomographic methods, to generate acceptable axial resolution. Using a tunable laser, we investigated the effect of excitation wavelength in the 230-350 nm spectral range on excitation depth. The results reveal an optimal wavelength range and suggest that this method can be a fast and reliable approach for rapid imaging of tissue specimens. Some of this range is addressable by currently available and relatively inexpensive LED light sources. MUSE may prove to be a good alternative to conventional, time-consuming, histopathology procedures.

  13. Reentry Motion and Aerodynamics of the MUSES-C Sample Return Capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Nobuaki; Yamada, Tetsuya; Hiraki, Koju; Inatani, Yoshifumi

    The Hayabusa spacecraft (MUSES-C) carries a small capsule for bringing asteroid samples back to the earth. The initial spin rate of the reentry capsule together with the flight path angle of the reentry trajectory is a key parameter for the aerodynamic motion during the reentry flight. The initial spin rate is given by the spin-release mechanism attached between the capsule and the mother spacecraft, and the flight path angle can be modified by adjusting the earth approach orbit. To determine the desired values of both parameters, the attitude motion during atmospheric flight must be clarified, and angles of attack at the maximum dynamic pressure and the parachute deployment must be assessed. In previous studies, to characterize the aerodynamic effects of the reentry capsule, several wind-tunnel tests were conducted using the ISAS high-speed flow test facilities. In addition to the ground test data, the aerodynamic properties in hypersonic flows were analyzed numerically. Moreover, these data were made more accurate using the results of balloon drop tests. This paper summarized the aerodynamic properties of the reentry capsule and simulates the attitude motion of the full-configuration capsule during atmospheric flight in three dimensions with six degrees of freedom. The results show the best conditions for the initial spin rates and flight path angles of the reentry trajectory.

  14. Connecting the Dots: MUSE Unveils the Destructive Effect of Massive Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLeod, A. F.; Ginsburg, A.; Klaassen, P.; Mottram, J.; Ramsay, S.; Testi, L.

    2016-09-01

    Throughout their entire lives, massive stars have a substantial impact on their surroundings, such as via protostellar outflows, stellar winds, ionising radiation and supernovae. Conceptually this is well understood, but the exact role of feedback mechanisms on the global star formation process and the stellar environment, as well as their dependence on the properties of the star-forming regions, are yet to be understood in detail. Observational quantification of the various feedback mechanisms is needed to precisely understand how high mass stars interact with and shape their environment, and which feedback mechanisms dominate under given conditions. We analysed the photo-evaporative effect of ionising radiation from massive stars on their surrounding molecular clouds using MUSE integral field data. This allowed us to determine the mass-loss rate of pillar-like structures (due to photo-evaporation) in different environments, and relate it to the ionising power of nearby massive stars. The resulting correlation is the first observational quantification of the destructive effect of ionising radiation from massive stars.

  15. Multi-band imaging camera and its sciences for the Japanese near-earth asteroid mission MUSES-C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Tsuko; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Saito, Jun; Sasaki, Sho; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Demura, Hirohide; Akiyama, Hiroaki; Tholen, David

    2001-11-01

    In this paper we present current development status of our Asteroid Multi-band Imaging CAmera (AMICA) for the Japan-US joint asteroid sample return mission MUSES-C. The launch of the spacecraft is planned around the end of 2002 and the whole mission period till sample retrieval on Earth will be approximately five years. The nominal target is the asteroid 1998SF36, one of the Amor-type asteroids. The AMICA specifications for the mission are shown here along with its ground-based and inflight calibration methods. We also describe the observational scenario at the asteroid, in relation to scientific goals.

  16. The Potsdam MRS spectrograph: heritage of MUSE and the impact of cross-innovation in the process of technology transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moralejo, B.; Roth, M. M.; Godefroy, P.; Fechner, T.; Bauer, S. M.; Schmälzlin, E.; Kelz, A.; Haynes, R.

    2016-07-01

    After having demonstrated that an IFU, attached to a microscope rather than to a telescope, is capable of differentiating complex organic tissue with spatially resolved Raman spectroscopy, we have launched a clinical validation program that utilizes a novel optimized fiber-coupled multi-channel spectrograph whose layout is based on the modular MUSE spectrograph concept. The new design features a telecentric input and has an extended blue performance, but otherwise maintains the properties of high throughput and excellent image quality over an octave of wavelength coverage with modest spectral resolution. We present the opto-mechanical layout and details of its optical performance.

  17. Hubble Frontier Fields: predictions for the return of SN Refsdal with the MUSE and GMOS spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauzac, M.; Richard, J.; Limousin, M.; Knowles, K.; Mahler, G.; Smith, G. P.; Kneib, J.-P.; Jullo, E.; Natarajan, P.; Ebeling, H.; Atek, H.; Clément, B.; Eckert, D.; Egami, E.; Massey, R.; Rexroth, M.

    2016-04-01

    We present a high-precision mass model of the galaxy cluster MACS J1149.6+ 2223, based on a strong gravitational lensing analysis of Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields (HFF) imaging data and spectroscopic follow-up with Gemini/Gemini Multi-Object Spectrographs (GMOS) and Very Large Telescope (VLT)/Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE). Our model includes 12 new multiply imaged galaxies, bringing the total to 22, composed of 65 individual lensed images. Unlike the first two HFF clusters, Abell 2744 and MACS J0416.1-2403, MACS J1149 does not reveal as many multiple images in the HFF data. Using the LENSTOOL software package and the new sets of multiple images, we model the cluster with several cluster-scale dark matter haloes and additional galaxy-scale haloes for the cluster members. Consistent with previous analyses, we find the system to be complex, composed of five cluster-scale haloes. Their spatial distribution and lower mass, however, makes MACS J1149 a less powerful lens. Our best-fitting model predicts image positions with an rms of 0.91 arcsec. We measure the total projected mass inside a 200-kpc aperture as (1.840 ± 0.006) × 1014 M⊙, thus reaching again 1 per cent precision, following our previous HFF analyses of MACS J0416.1-2403 and Abell 2744. In light of the discovery of the first resolved quadruply lensed supernova, SN Refsdal, in one of the multiply imaged galaxies identified in MACS J1149, we use our revised mass model to investigate the time delays and predict the rise of the next image between 2015 November and 2016 January.

  18. Spectral mapping of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with VLT/MUSE and SINFONI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie; Besse, Sebastien; Snodgrass, Colin; Yang, Bin

    2016-10-01

    Comets are supposedly the most primitive objects in the solar system, preserving the earliest record of material from the nebula out of which our Sun and planets were formed, and thus holding crucial clues on the early phases of the solar system formation and evolution. For most small bodies in the solar system we can only access the surface properties, whereas active comet nuclei lose material from their subsurface, so that understanding cometary activity represents an unique opportunity to assess their internal composition, and by extension the composition, the temperature and pressure conditions of the protoplanetary disk at their place of formation.The ESA/Rosetta mission is performing the most thorough investigation of a comet ever made. Rosetta is measuring properties of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko at distances between 5 and hundreds of km from the nucleus. However, it is unable to make any measurement over the thousands of km of the rest of the coma. Fortunately, the outer coma is accessible from the ground. In addition, we currently lack an understanding of how the very detailed information gathered from space-based observations can be extrapolated to the many ground-based observations that we can potentially perform. Combining parallel in situ observations with observations from the ground therefore gives us a great opportunity, not only to understand the behavior of 67P, but also to other comets observed exclusively from Earth. As part of the many observations taken from the ground, we have performed a spectral mapping of 67's coma using two IFU instruments mounted on the VLT: MUSE in the visible, and SINFONI in the near-infrared. The observations, carried out in March 2016, will be presented and discussed.

  19. Assessment of HIV testing among young methamphetamine users in Muse, Northern Shan State, Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Methamphetamine (MA) use has a strong correlation with risky sexual behaviors, and thus may be triggering the growing HIV epidemic in Myanmar. Although methamphetamine use is a serious public health concern, only a few studies have examined HIV testing among young drug users. This study aimed to examine how predisposing, enabling and need factors affect HIV testing among young MA users. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted from January to March 2013 in Muse city in the Northern Shan State of Myanmar. Using a respondent-driven sampling method, 776 MA users aged 18-24 years were recruited. The main outcome of interest was whether participants had ever been tested for HIV. Descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression were applied in this study. Results Approximately 14.7% of young MA users had ever been tested for HIV. Significant positive predictors of HIV testing included predisposing factors such as being a female MA user, having had higher education, and currently living with one’s spouse/sexual partner. Significant enabling factors included being employed and having ever visited NGO clinics or met NGO workers. Significant need factors were having ever been diagnosed with an STI and having ever wanted to receive help to stop drug use. Conclusions Predisposing, enabling and need factors were significant contributors affecting uptake of HIV testing among young MA users. Integrating HIV testing into STI treatment programs, alongside general expansion of HIV testing services may be effective in increasing HIV testing uptake among young MA users. PMID:25042697

  20. Star Observations by Asteroid Multiband Imaging Camera (AMICA) on Hayabusa (MUSES-C) Cruising Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, J.; Hashimoto, T.; Kubota, T.; Hayabusa AMICA Team

    Muses-C is the first Japanese asteroid mission and also a technology demonstration one to the S-type asteroid, 25143 Itokawa (1998SF36). It was launched at May 9, 2003, and renamed Hayabusa after the spacecraft was confirmed to be on the interplanetary orbit. This spacecraft has the event of the Earth-swingby for gravitational assist in the way to Itokawa on 2004 May. The arrival to Itokawa is scheduled on 2005 summer. During the visit to Itokawa, the remote-sensing observation with AMICA, NIRS (Near Infrared Spectrometer), XRS (X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer), and LIDAR are performed, and the spacecraft descends and collects the surface samples at the touch down to the surface. The captured asteroid sample will be returned to the Earth in the middle of 2007. The telescopic optical navigation camera (ONC-T) with seven bandpass filters (and one wide-band filter) and polarizers is called AMICA (Asteroid Multiband Imaging CAmera) when ONC-T is used for scientific observations. The AMICA's seven bandpass filters are nearly equivalent to the seven filters of the ECAS (Eight Color Asteroid Survey) system. Obtained spectroscopic data will be compared with previously obtained ECAS observations. AMICA also has four polarizers, which are located on one edge of the CCD chip (covering 1.1 x 1.1 degrees each). Using the polarizers of AMICA, we can obtain polarimetric information of the target asteroid's surface. Since last November, we planned the test observations of some stars and planets by AMICA and could successfully obtain these images. Here, we briefly report these observations and its calibration by the ground-based observational data. In addition, we also present a current status of AMICA.

  1. MUSE three-dimensional spectroscopy and kinematics of the gigahertz peaked spectrum radio galaxy PKS 1934-63: interaction, recently triggered active galactic nucleus and star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, Nathan; Humphrey, Andrew; Lagos, Patricio; Papaderos, Polychronis; Silva, Marckelson; Cardoso, Leandro S. M.; Gomes, Jean Michel

    2016-07-01

    We observe the radio galaxy PKS 1934-63 (at z = 0.1825) using the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The radio source is a gigahertz peaked spectrum source and is compact (0.13 kpc), implying an early stage of evolution (≤104 yr). Our data show an interacting pair of galaxies, with projected separation 9.1 kpc and velocity difference Δ(v) = 216 km s-1. The larger galaxy is a M* ≃ 1011 M⊙ spheroidal with the emission-line spectrum of a high-excitation young radio active galactic nucleus (AGN; e.g. strong [O I]6300 and [O III]5007). Emission-line ratios indicate a large contribution to the line luminosity from high-velocity shocks (≃ 550 km s-1). The companion is a non-AGN disc galaxy, with extended Hα emission from which its star formation rate is estimated as 0.61 M⊙ yr-1. Both galaxies show rotational velocity gradients in Hα and other lines, with the interaction being prograde-prograde. The SE-NW velocity gradient of the AGN host is misaligned from the E-W radio axis, but aligned with a previously discovered central ultraviolet source, and a factor of 2 greater in amplitude in Hα than in other (forbidden) lines (e.g. [O III]5007). This could be produced by a fast rotating (100-150 km s-1) disc with circumnuclear star formation. We also identify a broad component of [O III]5007 emission, blueshifted with a velocity gradient aligned with the radio jets, and associated with outflow. However, the broad component of [O I]6300 is redshifted. In spectral fits, both galaxies have old stellar populations plus ˜0.1 per cent of very young stars, consistent with the galaxies undergoing first perigalacticon, triggering infall and star formation from ˜40 Myr ago followed by the radio outburst.

  2. MUSE: MUlti-atlas region Segmentation utilizing Ensembles of registration algorithms and parameters, and locally optimal atlas selection

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Yangming; Resnick, Susan M.; Gur, Ruben C.; Gur, Raquel E.; Satterthwaite, Theodore D.; Furth, Susan; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    Atlas-based automated anatomical labeling is a fundamental tool in medical image segmentation, as it defines regions of interest for subsequent analysis of structural and functional image data. The extensive investigation of multi-atlas warping and fusion techniques over the past 5 or more years has clearly demonstrated the advantages of consensus-based segmentation. However, the common approach is to use multiple atlases with a single registration method and parameter set, which is not necessarily optimal for every individual scan, anatomical region, and problem/data-type. Different registration criteria and parameter sets yield different solutions, each providing complementary information. Herein, we present a consensus labeling framework that generates a broad ensemble of labeled atlases in target image space via the use of several warping algorithms, regularization parameters, and atlases. The label fusion integrates two complementary sources of information: a local similarity ranking to select locally optimal atlases and a boundary modulation term to refine the segmentation consistently with the target image's intensity profile. The ensemble approach consistently outperforms segmentations using individual warping methods alone, achieving high accuracy on several benchmark datasets. The MUSE methodology has been used for processing thousands of scans from various datasets, producing robust and consistent results. MUSE is publicly available both as a downloadable software package, and as an application that can be run on the CBICA Image Processing Portal (https://ipp.cbica.upenn.edu), a web based platform for remote processing of medical images. PMID:26679328

  3. Evolution Of The Galaxy Major Merger Rate Since Z 6 In The Muse Hubble Ultra Deep Field Survey.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventou, E.; Contini, T.; MUSE-GTO Collaboration

    2017-06-01

    Over the past two decades, strong evidence that galaxies have undergone a significant evolution over cosmic time were found. Do galaxy mergers, one of the main driving mechanisms behind the growth of galaxies, played a key role in their evolution at significant look-back time? Due to the difficulty to identify these violent interactions between galaxies at high redshifts, the major merger rate, involving two galaxies of similar masses, was constrained so far up to redshift z 3, from previous studies of spectrocopic pair counts. Thanks to MUSE, which is perfectly suited to identify close pairs of galaxies with secure spectroscopic redshifts, we are now able to extend such studies up to z 6. I will present the results obtained from deep (10-30h) MUSE observations in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. We provide the first constraints on the galaxy major merger evolution over 12 Gyrs (0.2 < z < 6) and over a broad range of stellar masses, showing that there is a flattening of the major merger rate evolution at very high redshift.

  4. MUSE: MUlti-atlas region Segmentation utilizing Ensembles of registration algorithms and parameters, and locally optimal atlas selection.

    PubMed

    Doshi, Jimit; Erus, Guray; Ou, Yangming; Resnick, Susan M; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E; Satterthwaite, Theodore D; Furth, Susan; Davatzikos, Christos

    2016-02-15

    Atlas-based automated anatomical labeling is a fundamental tool in medical image segmentation, as it defines regions of interest for subsequent analysis of structural and functional image data. The extensive investigation of multi-atlas warping and fusion techniques over the past 5 or more years has clearly demonstrated the advantages of consensus-based segmentation. However, the common approach is to use multiple atlases with a single registration method and parameter set, which is not necessarily optimal for every individual scan, anatomical region, and problem/data-type. Different registration criteria and parameter sets yield different solutions, each providing complementary information. Herein, we present a consensus labeling framework that generates a broad ensemble of labeled atlases in target image space via the use of several warping algorithms, regularization parameters, and atlases. The label fusion integrates two complementary sources of information: a local similarity ranking to select locally optimal atlases and a boundary modulation term to refine the segmentation consistently with the target image's intensity profile. The ensemble approach consistently outperforms segmentations using individual warping methods alone, achieving high accuracy on several benchmark datasets. The MUSE methodology has been used for processing thousands of scans from various datasets, producing robust and consistent results. MUSE is publicly available both as a downloadable software package, and as an application that can be run on the CBICA Image Processing Portal (https://ipp.cbica.upenn.edu), a web based platform for remote processing of medical images.

  5. Comparing the properties of the X-shaped bulges of NGC 4710 and the Milky Way with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, O. A.; Gadotti, D. A.; Debattista, V. P.; Rejkuba, M.; Valenti, E.; Zoccali, M.; Coccato, L.; Minniti, D.; Ness, M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Our view of the structure of the Milky Way and, in particular, its bulge is obscured by the intervening stars, dust, and gas in the disc. While great progress in understanding the bulge has been achieved with past and ongoing observations, the comparison of its global chemodynamical properties with respect to those of bulges seen in external galaxies has yet to be accomplished. Aims: We used the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument installed on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to obtain spectral and imaging coverage of NGC 4710. The wide area and excellent sampling of the MUSE integral field spectrograph allows us to investigate the dynamical properties of the X-shaped bulge of NGC 4710 and compare it with the properties of the X-shaped bulge of the Milky Way. Methods: We measured the radial velocities, velocity dispersion, and stellar populations using a penalised pixel full spectral fitting technique adopting simple stellar populations models, on a 1' × 1' area centred on the bulge of NGC 4710. We constructed the velocity maps of the bulge of NGC 4710 and investigated the presence of vertical metallicity gradients. These properties were compared to those of the Milky Way bulge and to a simulated galaxy with a boxy-peanut bulge. Results: We find the line-of-sight velocity maps and 1D rotation curves of the bulge of NGC 4710 to be remarkably similar to those of the Milky Way bulge. Some specific differences that were identified are in good agreement with the expectations from variations in the bar orientation angle. The bulge of NGC 4710 has a boxy-peanut morphology with a pronounced X-shape, showing no indication of any additional spheroidally distributed bulge population, in which we measure a vertical metallicity gradient of 0.35 dex/kpc. Conclusions: The general properties of NGC 4710 are very similar to those observed in the Milky Way bulge. However, it has been suggested that the Milky Way bulge has an additional component that is

  6. Time of flight and the MUSE experiment in the PIM1 Channel at the Paul Sherrer Institute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wan; MUSE Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The MUSE experiment in the PIM1 Channel at the Paul Sherrer Institute in Villigen, Switzerland, measures scattering of electrons and muons from a liquid hydrogen target. The intent of the experiment is to deduce from the scattering probabilities whether the radius of the proton is the same when determined from the scattering of the two different particle types. An important technique for the experiment is precise timing measurements, using high precision scintillators and a beam Cerenkov counter. We will describe the motivations for the precise timing measurement. We will present results for the timing measurements from prototype experimental detectors. We will also present results from a simulation program, Geant4, that was used to calculate energy loss corrections to the time of flight determined between the beam Cherenkov counter and the scintillator. This work is supported in part by the U.S. National Science Foundation Grant PHY 1306126 and the Douglass Project for Women in Math, Science, and Engineering.

  7. ModelMuse: A U.S. Geological Survey Open-Source, Graphical User Interface for Groundwater Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winston, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    ModelMuse is a free publicly-available graphical preprocessor used to generate the input and display the output for several groundwater models. It is written in Object Pascal and the source code is available on the USGS software web site. Supported models include the MODFLOW family of models, PHAST (version 1), and SUTRA version 2.2. With MODFLOW and PHAST, the user generates a grid and uses 'objects' (points, lines, and polygons) to define boundary conditions and the spatial variation in aquifer properties. Because the objects define the spatial variation, the grid can be changed without the user needing to re-enter spatial data. The same paradigm is used with SUTRA except that the user generates a quadrilateral finite-element mesh instead of a rectangular grid. The user interacts with the model in a top view and in a vertical cross section. The cross section can be at any angle or location. There is also a three-dimensional view of the model. For SUTRA, a new method of visualizing the permeability and related properties has been introduced. In three dimensional SUTRA models, the user specifies the permeability tensor by specifying permeability in three mutually orthogonal directions that can be oriented in space in any direction. Because it is important for the user to be able to check both the magnitudes and directions of the permeabilities, ModelMuse displays the permeabilities as either a two-dimensional or a three-dimensional vector plot. Color is used to differentiate the maximum, middle, and minimum permeability vectors. The magnitude of the permeability is shown by the vector length. The vector angle shows the direction of the maximum, middle, or minimum permeability. Contour and color plots can also be used to display model input and output data.

  8. MUSE Reveals a Recent Merger in the Post-starburst Host Galaxy of the TDE ASASSN-14li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, J. L.; Krühler, T.; Anderson, J. P.; Galbany, L.; Kochanek, C. S.; Aquino, E.; Brown, J. S.; Dong, Subo; Förster, F.; Holoien, T. W.-S.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Maureira, J. C.; Rosales-Ortega, F. F.; Sánchez, S. F.; Shappee, B. J.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2016-10-01

    We present Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) integral field spectroscopic observations of the host galaxy (PGC 043234) of one of the closest (z = 0.0206, D ≃ 90 Mpc) and best-studied tidal disruption events (TDEs), ASASSN-14li. The MUSE integral field data reveal asymmetric and filamentary structures that extend up to ≳10 kpc from the post-starburst host galaxy of ASASSN-14li. The structures are traced only through the strong nebular [O iii] λ5007, [N ii] λ6584, and Hα emission lines. The total off-nuclear [O iii] λ5007 luminosity is 4.7 × 1039 erg s-1, and the ionized H mass is ˜ {10}4(500/{n}{{e}}) {M}⊙ . Based on the Baldwin-Phillips-Terlevich diagram, the nebular emission can be driven by either AGN photoionization or shock excitation, with AGN photoionization favored given the narrow intrinsic line widths. The emission line ratios and spatial distribution strongly resemble ionization nebulae around fading AGNs such as IC 2497 (Hanny's Voorwerp) and ionization “cones” around Seyfert 2 nuclei. The morphology of the emission line filaments strongly suggest that PGC 043234 is a recent merger, which likely triggered a strong starburst and AGN activity leading to the post-starburst spectral signatures and the extended nebular emission line features we see today. We briefly discuss the implications of these observations in the context of the strongly enhanced TDE rates observed in post-starburst galaxies and their connection to enhanced theoretical TDE rates produced by supermassive black hole binaries.

  9. Human Muse cells, non-tumorigenic pluripotent-like stem cells, have the capacity for liver regeneration by specific homing and replenishment of new hepatocytes in liver fibrosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Iseki, Masahiro; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Wakao, Shohei; Akimoto, Takahiro; Mizuma, Masamichi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Asada, Ryuta; Shimizu, Shinobu; Unno, Michiaki; Chazenbalk, Gregorio; Dezawa, Mari

    2016-11-02

    Muse cells, a novel type of non-tumorigenic pluripotent-like stem cells reside in the bone marrow, skin and adipose tissue, are collectable as cells positive for pluripotent surface marker SSEA-3. They are able to differentiate into cells representative of all three germ layers. The capacity of intravenously injected human bone marrow-Muse cells to repair the liver fibrosis model of immunodeficient mice was evaluated in this study. They exhibited the ability for differentiation spontaneously into hepatoblast/hepatocyte-lineage cells and high migration toward the serum and liver tissue of carbon tetrachloride-treated mice in vitro. In vivo, they specifically accumulated into the liver, but not into other organs except the lower rate in the lung at 2 weeks after intravenous injection into the liver fibrosis model. After homing, Muse cells spontaneously differentiated in vivo into HepPar-1 (71.1±15.2%), human albumin (54.3±8.2%) and anti-trypsin (47.9±4.6%)-positive cells without fusing with host hepatocytes, and expressed mature functional markers such as human-CYP1A2, and human-Glc-6-Pase, at 8 weeks. Recovery in serum total bilirubin and albumin, and significant attenuation of fibrosis were recognized with statistical differences between the Muse group and control groups which received the vehicle or the same number of non-Muse cells, namely cells other than Muse cells in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Thus, unlike ES and iPS cells, Muse cells are unique in their efficient migration and integration into damaged liver only by intravenous injection, nontumorigenicity, and spontaneous differentiation into hepatocytes, rendering induction into hepatocytes prior to transplantation unnecessary. They are suggested to repair liver fibrosis in two simple steps; expansion after collection from the bone marrow and intravenous injection. Such feasible strategy might provide impressive regenerative performance to liver disease patients.

  10. The XXL Survey. VIII. MUSE characterisation of intracluster light in a z ~ 0.53 cluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adami, C.; Pompei, E.; Sadibekova, T.; Clerc, N.; Iovino, A.; McGee, S. L.; Guennou, L.; Birkinshaw, M.; Horellou, C.; Maurogordato, S.; Pacaud, F.; Pierre, M.; Poggianti, B.; Willis, J.

    2016-06-01

    Aims: Within a cluster, gravitational effects can lead to the removal of stars from their parent galaxies and their subsequent dispersal into the intracluster medium. Gas hydrodynamical effects can additionally strip gas and dust from galaxies; both gas and stars contribute to intracluster light (ICL). The properties of the ICL can therefore help constrain the physical processes at work in clusters by serving as a fossil record of the interaction history. Methods: The present study is designed to characterise this ICL for the first time in a ~1014 M⊙ and z ~ 0.53 cluster of galaxies from imaging and spectroscopic points of view. By applying a wavelet-based method to CFHT Megacam and WIRCAM images, we detect significant quantities of diffuse light and are able to constrain their spectral energy distributions. These sources were then spectroscopically characterised with ESO Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) spectroscopic data. MUSE data were also used to compute redshifts of 24 cluster galaxies and search for cluster substructures. Results: An atypically large amount of ICL, equivalent in i' to the emission from two brightest cluster galaxies, has been detected in this cluster. Part of the detected diffuse light has a very weak optical stellar component and apparently consists mainly of gas emission, while other diffuse light sources are clearly dominated by old stars. Furthermore, emission lines were detected in several places of diffuse light. Our spectral analysis shows that this emission likely originates from low-excitation parameter gas. Globally, the stellar contribution to the ICL is about 2.3 × 109 yr old even though the ICL is not currently forming a large number of stars. On the other hand, the contribution of the gas emission to the ICL in the optical is much greater than the stellar contribution in some regions, but the gas density is likely too low to form stars. These observations favour ram pressure stripping, turbulent viscous stripping, or

  11. Astrometric and Photometric Data Fusion for Mass and Surface Material Estimation using Refined Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions-Solar Radiation Pressure Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Evolution of Optical Characteristics and Dynamics of Proper Rotation of Uncontrolled Geostationary Artificial Satellites,” Advances in Space Research , Vol...Estimation from Radar Cross-Section Measurements,” Advances in Space Research , Vol. 34, 2004, pp. 1013–1020. [11] Mulrooney, M., Matney, M. J...Surface Roughness of Target Asteroid of MUSES-C by LIDAR,” Advances in Space Research , Vol. 29, No. 8, 2002, pp. 1231–1235. [17] Hanada, T. and

  12. Interleaved EPI Based fMRI Improved by Multiplexed Sensitivity Encoding (MUSE) and Simultaneous Multi-Band Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Hing-Chiu; Gaur, Pooja; Chou, Ying-hui; Chu, Mei-Lan; Chen, Nan-kuei

    2014-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a non-invasive and powerful imaging tool for detecting brain activities. The majority of fMRI studies are performed with single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI) due to its high temporal resolution. Recent studies have demonstrated that, by increasing the spatial-resolution of fMRI, previously unidentified neuronal networks can be measured. However, it is challenging to improve the spatial resolution of conventional single-shot EPI based fMRI. Although multi-shot interleaved EPI is superior to single-shot EPI in terms of the improved spatial-resolution, reduced geometric distortions, and sharper point spread function (PSF), interleaved EPI based fMRI has two main limitations: 1) the imaging throughput is lower in interleaved EPI; 2) the magnitude and phase signal variations among EPI segments (due to physiological noise, subject motion, and B0 drift) are translated to significant in-plane aliasing artifact across the field of view (FOV). Here we report a method that integrates multiple approaches to address the technical limitations of interleaved EPI-based fMRI. Firstly, the multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE) post-processing algorithm is used to suppress in-plane aliasing artifacts resulting from time-domain signal instabilities during dynamic scans. Secondly, a simultaneous multi-band interleaved EPI pulse sequence, with a controlled aliasing scheme incorporated, is implemented to increase the imaging throughput. Thirdly, the MUSE algorithm is then generalized to accommodate fMRI data obtained with our multi-band interleaved EPI pulse sequence, suppressing both in-plane and through-plane aliasing artifacts. The blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signal detectability and the scan throughput can be significantly improved for interleaved EPI-based fMRI. Our human fMRI data obtained from 3 Tesla systems demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed methods. It is expected that future fMRI studies requiring high

  13. MUSE-inspired view of the quasar Q2059-360, its Lyman α blob, and its neighborhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    North, P. L.; Marino, R. A.; Gorgoni, C.; Hayes, M.; Sluse, D.; Chelouche, D.; Verhamme, A.; Cantalupo, S.; Courbin, F.

    2017-07-01

    The radio-quiet quasar Q2059-360 at redshift z = 3.08 is known to be close to a small Lyman α blob (LAB) and to be absorbed by a proximate damped Lyα (PDLA) system. Here, we present the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) integral field spectroscopy follow-up of this quasi-stellar object (QSO). Our primary goal is to characterize this LAB in detail by mapping it both spatially and spectrally using the Lyα line, and by looking for high-ionization lines to constrain the emission mechanism. Combining the high sensitivity of the MUSE integral field spectrograph mounted on the Yepun telescope at ESO-VLT with the natural coronagraph provided by the PDLA, we map the LAB down to the QSO position, after robust subtraction of QSO light in the spectral domain. In addition to confirming earlier results for the small bright component of the LAB, we unveil a faint filamentary emission protruding to the south over about 80 pkpc (physical kpc); this results in a total size of about 120 pkpc. We derive the velocity field of the LAB (assuming no transfer effects) and map the Lyα line width. Upper limits are set to the flux of the N v λ1238 - 1242, C iv λ1548 - 1551, He ii λ1640, and C iii] λ1548 - 1551 lines. We have discovered two probable Lyα emitters at the same redshift as the LAB and at projected distances of 265 kpc and 207 kpc from the QSO; their Lyα luminosities might well be enhanced by the QSO radiation. We also find an emission line galaxy at z = 0.33 near the line of sight to the QSO. This LAB shares the same general characteristics as the 17 others surrounding radio-quiet QSOs presented previously. However, there are indications that it may be centered on the PDLA galaxy rather than on the QSO. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation for Astronomical Research in the Southern Hemisphere under ESO programme 60.A-9331(A).

  14. Galactic winds with MUSE: A direct detection of Fe II* emission from a z = 1.29 galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finley, Hayley; Bouché, Nicolas; Contini, Thierry; Epinat, Benoît; Bacon, Roland; Brinchmann, Jarle; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Erroz-Ferrer, Santiago; Marino, Raffaella Anna; Maseda, Michael; Richard, Johan; Schroetter, Ilane; Verhamme, Anne; Weilbacher, Peter M.; Wendt, Martin; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2017-09-01

    Emission signatures from galactic winds provide an opportunity to directly map the outflowing gas, but this is traditionally challenging because of the low surface brightness. Using very deep observations (27 h) of the Hubble Deep Field South with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument, we identify signatures of an outflow in both emission and absorption from a spatially resolved galaxy at z = 1.29 with a stellar mass M⋆ = 8 × 109M⊙, star formation rate SFR = 77+40-25 M⊙ yr-1, and star formation rate surface brightness ΣSFR = 1.6M⊙ kpc-2 within the [Oii] λλ3727,3729 half-light radius R1/2, [OII] = 2.76 ± 0.17 kpc. From a component of the strong resonant Mg II and Fe II absorptions at -350 km s-1, we infer a mass outflow rate that is comparable to the star formation rate. We detect non-resonant Fe II* emission, at λ2365, λ2396, λ2612, and λ2626, at 1.2-2.4-1.5-2.7 × 10-18 erg s-1 cm-2 respectively. The flux ratios are consistent with the expectations for optically thick gas. By combining the four non-resonant Fe II* emission lines, we spatially map the Fe II* emission from an individual galaxy for the first time. The Fe II* emission has an elliptical morphology that is roughly aligned with the galaxy minor kinematic axis, and its integrated half-light radius, R1/2, Fe II ∗ =4.1 ± 0.4 kpc, is 70% larger than the stellar continuum (R1/2,⋆ ≃2.34 ± 0.17) or the [Oii] nebular line. Moreover, the Fe II* emission shows a blue wing extending up to -400 km s-1, which is more pronounced along the galaxy minor kinematic axis and reveals a C-shaped pattern in a p-v diagram along that axis. These features are consistent with a bi-conical outflow. Based on observations of the Hubble Deep Field South made with ESO telescopes at the La Silla Paranal Observatory under program ID 60.A-9100(C). Advanced data products are available at http://muse-vlt.eu/ science

  15. A gravitationally boosted MUSE survey for emission-line galaxies at z ≳ 5 behind the massive cluster RCS 0224

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, Renske; Swinbank, A. M.; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Smail, Ian; Kneib, J.-P.

    2017-05-01

    We present a Very Large Telescope/Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) survey of lensed high-redshift galaxies behind the z = 0.77 cluster RCS 0224-0002. We study the detailed internal properties of a highly magnified (μ ˜ 29) z = 4.88 galaxy seen through the cluster. We detect widespread nebular C iv λλ1548,1551 Å emission from this galaxy as well as a bright Lyα halo with a spatially uniform wind and absorption profile across 12 kpc in the image plane. Blueshifted high- and low-ionization interstellar absorption indicate the presence of a high-velocity outflow (Δv ˜ 300 km s- 1) from the galaxy. Unlike similar observations of galaxies at z ˜ 2 - 3, the Lyα emission from the halo emerges close to the systemic velocity - an order of magnitude lower in velocity offset than predicted in 'shell'-like outflow models. To explain these observations, we favour a model of an outflow with a strong velocity gradient, which changes the effective column density seen by the Lyα photons. We also search for high-redshift Lyα emitters and identify 14 candidates between z = 4.8 - 6.6, including an overdensity at z = 4.88, of which only one has a detected counterpart in Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys+Wide Field Camera 3 imaging.

  16. The silver lining of a mind in the clouds: interesting musings are associated with positive mood while mind-wandering

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Michael S.; Mrazek, Michael D.; Anderson, Craig L.; Smallwood, Jonathan; Kingstone, Alan; Schooler, Jonathan W.

    2013-01-01

    The negative effects of mind-wandering on performance and mood have been widely documented. In a recent well-cited study, Killingsworth and Gilbert (2010) conducted a large experience sampling study revealing that all off-task episodes, regardless of content, have equal to or lower happiness ratings, than on-task episodes. We present data from a similarly implemented experience sampling study with additional mind-wandering content categories. Our results largely conform to those of the Killingsworth and Gilbert (2010) study, with mind-wandering generally being associated with a more negative mood. However, subsequent analyses reveal situations in which a more positive mood is reported after being off-task. Specifically when off-task episodes are rated for interest, the high interest episodes are associated with an increase in positive mood compared to all on-task episodes. These findings both identify a situation in which mind-wandering may have positive effects on mood, and suggest the possible benefits of encouraging individuals to shift their off-task musings to the topics they find most engaging. PMID:24009599

  17. MUSE searches for galaxies near very metal-poor gas clouds at z ˜ 3: new constraints for cold accretion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumagalli, Michele; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Dekel, Avishai; Morris, Simon L.; O'Meara, John M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Theuns, Tom

    2016-10-01

    We report on the search for galaxies in the proximity of two very metal-poor gas clouds at z ˜ 3 towards the quasar Q0956+122. With a 5-hour Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) integration in a ˜500 × 500 kpc2 region centred at the quasar position, we achieve a ≥80 per cent complete spectroscopic survey of continuum-detected galaxies with mR ≤ 25 mag and Lyα emitters with luminosity LLyα ≥ 3 × 1041 erg s- 1. We do not identify galaxies at the redshift of a z ˜ 3.2 Lyman limit system (LLS) with log Z/Z⊙ = -3.35 ± 0.05, placing this gas cloud in the intergalactic medium or circumgalactic medium of a galaxy below our sensitivity limits. Conversely, we detect five Lyα emitters at the redshift of a pristine z ˜ 3.1 LLS with log Z/Z⊙ ≤ -3.8, while ˜0.4 sources were expected given the z ˜ 3 Lyα luminosity function. Both this high detection rate and the fact that at least three emitters appear aligned in projection with the LLS suggest that this pristine cloud is tracing a gas filament that is feeding one or multiple galaxies. Our observations uncover two different environments for metal-poor LLSs, implying a complex link between these absorbers and galaxy haloes, which ongoing MUSE surveys will soon explore in detail. Moreover, in agreement with recent MUSE observations, we detected a ˜ 90 kpc Lyα nebula at the quasar redshift and three Lyα emitters reminiscent of a `dark galaxy' population.

  18. MUSE sneaks a peek at extreme ram-pressure stripping events - I. A kinematic study of the archetypal galaxy ESO137-001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fumagalli, Michele; Fossati, Matteo; Hau, George K. T.; Gavazzi, Giuseppe; Bower, Richard; Sun, Ming; Boselli, Alessandro

    2014-12-01

    We present Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) observations of ESO137-001, a spiral galaxy infalling towards the centre of the massive Norma cluster at z ˜ 0.0162. During the high-velocity encounter of ESO137-001 with the intracluster medium, a dramatic ram-pressure stripping event gives rise to an extended gaseous tail, traced by our MUSE observations to >30 kpc from the galaxy centre. By studying the Hα surface brightness and kinematics in tandem with the stellar velocity field, we conclude that ram pressure has completely removed the interstellar medium from the outer disc, while the primary tail is still fed by gas from the inner regions. Gravitational interactions do not appear to be a primary mechanism for gas removal. The stripped gas retains the imprint of the disc rotational velocity to ˜20 kpc downstream, without a significant gradient along the tail, which suggests that ESO137-001 is fast moving along a radial orbit in the plane of the sky. Conversely, beyond ˜20 kpc, a greater degree of turbulence is seen, with velocity dispersion up to ≳100 km s-1. For a model-dependent infall velocity of vinf ˜ 3000 km s-1, we conclude that the transition from laminar to turbulent flow in the tail occurs on time-scales ≥6.5 Myr. Our work demonstrates the terrific potential of MUSE for detailed studies of how ram-pressure stripping operates on small scales, providing a deep understanding of how galaxies interact with the dense plasma of the cluster environment.

  19. Gender difference in early initiation of methamphetamine use among current methamphetamine users in Muse, Northern Shan State, Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Saw, Yu Mon; Saw, Thu Nandar; Yasuoka, Junko; Chan, Nyein; Kham, Nang Pann Ei; Khine, Wint; Cho, Su Myat; Jimba, Masamine

    2017-05-08

    Globally, methamphetamine (MA) use is a significant public health concern due to unprecedented health effects of its use. However, gender similarities and differences in early age of MA initiation and its risk factors among current MA users have been understudied in a developing country setting. A community-based, cross-sectional study was conducted using a computer assisted self-interviewing program from January to March 2013 in Muse, Northern Shan State, Myanmar. A total of 1362 (775 male and 587 female) self-reported current MA users aged between 18 and 35 years were recruited using respondent-driven sampling. Two gender-stratified multiple logistic regression models (models I and II) were done for analysis. For similarities, 73.0% of males and 60.5% of females initiated MA before their 18th birthday. The early age of MA initiation was positively associated with the reasons and places of the first time MA use among both genders. For differences, males [hazard ratio 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 1.18-1.54] had a significantly higher risk than females to initiate MA at earlier age. Among male users, participants who had bisexual/homosexual preferences were more likely to initiate MA use earlier. In contrast, female users who exchanged sex for money and/or drugs were more likely to initiate MA in earlier age. More than 60.0% of male and female participants initiated MA use early; however, males initiated use earlier than females. Although similarities were found among both genders, differences found in key risk factors for early age MA initiation suggest that gender-specific, MA prevention programs are urgently needed in Myanmar.

  20. Ubiquitous Giant Lyα Nebulae around the Brightest Quasars at z ˜ 3.5 Revealed with MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Elena; Cantalupo, Sebastiano; Lilly, Simon J.; Marino, Raffaella A.; Gallego, Sofia G.; Bacon, Roland; Blaizot, Jeremy; Bouché, Nicolas; Brinchmann, Jarle; Carollo, C. Marcella; Caruana, Joseph; Finley, Hayley; Herenz, Edmund C.; Richard, Johan; Schaye, Joop; Straka, Lorrie A.; Turner, Monica L.; Urrutia, Tanya; Verhamme, Anne; Wisotzki, Lutz

    2016-11-01

    Direct Lyα imaging of intergalactic gas at z˜ 2 has recently revealed giant cosmological structures around quasars, e.g., the Slug Nebula. Despite their high luminosity, the detection rate of such systems in narrow-band and spectroscopic surveys is less than 10%, possibly encoding crucial information on the distribution of gas around quasars and the quasar emission properties. In this study, we use the MUSE integral-field instrument to perform a blind survey for giant {Ly}α nebulae around 17 bright radio-quiet quasars at 3\\lt z\\lt 4 that does not suffer from most of the limitations of previous surveys. After data reduction and analysis performed with specifically developed tools, we found that each quasar is surrounded by giant {Ly}α nebulae with projected sizes larger than 100 physical kiloparsecs and, in some cases, extending up to 320 kpc. The circularly averaged surface brightness profiles of the nebulae appear to be very similar to each other despite their different morphologies and are consistent with power laws with slopes ≈ -1.8. The similarity between the properties of all these nebulae and the Slug Nebula suggests a similar origin for all systems and that a large fraction of gas around bright quasars could be in a relatively “cold” (T ˜ 104 K) and dense phase. In addition, our results imply that such gas is ubiquitous within at least 50 kpc from bright quasars at 3\\lt z\\lt 4 independently of the quasar emission opening angle, or extending up to 200 kpc for quasar isotropic emission. Based on observations made with ESO Telescopes at the Paranal Observatory under programs 094.A-0396, 095.A-0708, 096.A-0345, 094.A-0131, 095.A-0200, and 096.A-0222.

  1. Mapping the dynamics of a giant Ly α halo at z = 4.1 with MUSE: the energetics of a large-scale AGN-driven outflow around a massive, high-redshift galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, A. M.; Vernet, J. D. R.; Smail, Ian; De Breuck, C.; Bacon, R.; Contini, T.; Richard, J.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Urrutia, T.; Venemans, B.

    2015-05-01

    We present Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) integral field unit spectroscopic observations of the ˜150 kpc Lyα halo around the z = 4.1 radio galaxy TN J1338-1942. This 9-h observation maps the full two-dimensional kinematics of the Lyα emission across the halo, which shows a velocity gradient of Δv ˜ 700 km s-1 across 150 kpc in projection, and also identified two absorption systems associated with the Lyα emission from the radio galaxy. Both absorbers have high covering fractions (˜1) spanning the full ˜150 × 80 kpc2 extent of the halo. The stronger and more blueshifted absorber (Δv ˜ -1200 km s-1 from the systemic) has dynamics that mirror that of the underlying halo emission and we suggest that this high column material (n(H I) ˜ 1019.4 cm-2), which is also seen in C IV absorption, represents an outflowing shell that has been driven by the active galactic nuclei (AGN) or the star formation within the galaxy. The weaker (n(H I) ˜ 1014 cm-2) and less blueshifted (Δv ˜ -500 km s-1) absorber most likely represents material in the cavity between the outflowing shell and the Lyα halo. We estimate that the mass in the shell must be ˜1010 M⊙ - a significant fraction of the interstellar medium from a galaxy at z = 4. The large scales of these coherent structures illustrate the potentially powerful influence of AGN feedback on the distribution and energetics of material in their surroundings. Indeed, the discovery of high-velocity (˜1000 km s-1), group-halo-scale (i.e. >150 kpc) and mass-loaded winds in the vicinity of the central radio source is in agreement with the requirements of models that invoke AGN-driven outflows to regulate star formation and black hole growth in massive galaxies.

  2. A robust multi-shot scan strategy for high-resolution diffusion weighted MRI enabled by multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE).

    PubMed

    Chen, Nan-Kuei; Guidon, Arnaud; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Song, Allen W

    2013-05-15

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) data have been mostly acquired with single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI) to minimize motion induced artifacts. The spatial resolution, however, is inherently limited in single-shot EPI, even when the parallel imaging (usually at an acceleration factor of 2) is incorporated. Multi-shot acquisition strategies could potentially achieve higher spatial resolution and fidelity, but they are generally susceptible to motion-induced phase errors among excitations that are exacerbated by diffusion sensitizing gradients, rendering the reconstructed images unusable. It has been shown that shot-to-shot phase variations may be corrected using navigator echoes, but at the cost of imaging throughput. To address these challenges, a novel and robust multi-shot DWI technique, termed multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE), is developed here to reliably and inherently correct nonlinear shot-to-shot phase variations without the use of navigator echoes. The performance of the MUSE technique is confirmed experimentally in healthy adult volunteers on 3Tesla MRI systems. This newly developed technique should prove highly valuable for mapping brain structures and connectivities at high spatial resolution for neuroscience studies.

  3. A robust multi-shot scan strategy for high-resolution diffusion weighted MRI enabled by multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nan-kuei; Guidon, Arnaud; Chang, Hing-Chiu; Song, Allen W.

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) data have been mostly acquired with single-shot echo-planar imaging (EPI) to minimize motion induced artifacts. The spatial resolution, however, is inherently limited in single-shot EPI, even when the parallel imaging (usually at an acceleration factor of 2) is incorporated. Multi-shot acquisition strategies could potentially achieve higher spatial resolution and fidelity, but they are generally susceptible to motion-induced phase errors among excitations that are exacerbated by diffusion sensitizing gradients, rendering the reconstructed images unusable. It has been shown that shot-to-shot phase variations may be corrected using navigator echoes, but at the cost of imaging throughput. To address these challenges, a novel and robust multi-shot DWI technique, termed multiplexed sensitivity-encoding (MUSE), is developed here to reliably and inherently correct nonlinear shot-to-shot phase variations without the use of navigator echoes. The performance of the MUSE technique is confirmed experimentally in healthy adult volunteers on 3 Tesla MRI systems. This newly developed technique should prove highly valuable for mapping brain structures and connectivities at high spatial resolution for neuroscience studies. PMID:23370063

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SN 1998bw MUSE datacube (Kruehler+, 2017)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruehler, T.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Schady, P.; Anderon, J. P.; Galbany, L.; Gensior, J.

    2017-05-01

    The ESO184-G82 data cube (SN1998bwastphotcube.fits multi-dimensional fits file with a primary header and two extensions: The primary header contains only the fits headers. The first fits extension (DATA) contains the observed flux values in units of 10-20erg/cm^2/s/Å. The dimensions of the cube are 320x324x3682 where the first two are celestial coordinates (RA, DEC), and the last one the wavelength coordinate. The second fits extension (STAT) contains the estimated variance in units of 10-40erg-2cm-4s-2Å-2 (2 data files).

  5. A Revised Planetary Nebula Luminosity Function Distance to NGC 628 Using MUSE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreckel, K.; Groves, B.; Bigiel, F.; Blanc, G. A.; Kruijssen, J. M. D.; Hughes, A.; Schruba, A.; Schinnerer, E.

    2017-01-01

    Distance uncertainties plague our understanding of the physical scales relevant to the physics of star formation in extragalactic studies. The planetary nebulae luminosity function (PNLF) is one of very few techniques that can provide distance estimates to within ˜10% however, it requires a planetary nebula (PN) sample that is uncontaminated by other ionizing sources. We employ optical integral field unit spectroscopy using the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer on the Very Large Telescope to measure [O iii] line fluxes for sources unresolved on 50 pc scales within the central star-forming galaxy disk of NGC 628. We use diagnostic line ratios to identify 62 PNe, 30 supernova remnants, and 87 H ii regions within our fields. Using the 36 brightest PNe, we determine a new PNLF distance modulus of {29.91}-0.13+0.08 mag (9.59{}-0.57+0.35 Mpc), which is in good agreement with literature values, but significantly larger than the previously reported PNLF distance. We are able to explain the discrepancy and recover the previous result when we reintroduce SNR contaminants to our sample. This demonstrates the power of full spectral information over narrowband imaging in isolating PNe. Given our limited spatial coverage within the Galaxy, we show that this technique can be used to refine distance estimates, even when IFU observations cover only a fraction of a galaxy disk.

  6. The MUSE view of He 2-10: No AGN ionization but a sparkling starburst⋆⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresci, G.; Vanzi, L.; Telles, E.; Lanzuisi, G.; Brusa, M.; Mingozzi, M.; Sauvage, M.; Johnson, K.

    2017-08-01

    We study the physical and dynamical properties of the ionized gas in the prototypical HII galaxy Henize 2-10 using MUSE integral field spectroscopy. The large-scale dynamics are dominated by extended outflowing bubbles that are probably the result of massive gas ejection from the central star forming regions. We derived a mass outflow rate Ṁout 0.30 M⊙ yr-1, corresponding to mass loading factor η 0.4, in the range of similar measurements in local luminous infrared galaxies. Such a massive outflow has a total kinetic energy that is sustainable by the stellar winds and supernova remnants expected in the galaxy. We studied the dust extinction, electron density, and ionization conditions all across the galaxy with a classical emission line diagnostic, confirming the extreme nature of the highly star forming knots in the core of the galaxy, which show high density and high ionization parameters. We measured the gas-phase metallicity in the galaxy, taking the strong variation of the ionization parameter into account, and found that the external parts of the galaxy have abundances as low as 12 + log (O / H) 8.3, while the central star forming knots are highly enriched with super solar metallicity. We found no sign of AGN ionization in the galaxy, despite the recent claim of the presence of a supermassive active black hole in the core of He 2-10. We therefore reanalyzed the X-ray data that were used to propose the presence of the AGN, but we concluded that the observed X-ray emission can be better explained with sources of a different nature, such as a supernova remnant. This work is based on observations made at the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO program 095.B-0321).The reduced datacube (FITS file) is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/604/A101

  7. Pluripotent Nontumorigenic Adipose Tissue‐Derived Muse Cells have Immunomodulatory Capacity Mediated by Transforming Growth Factor‐β1

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, María L.; Fuertes, Florencia; Barcala Tabarrozzi, Andres E.; Attorressi, Alejandra I.; Cucchiani, Rodolfo; Corrales, Luis; Oliveira, Talita C.; Sogayar, Mari C.; Labriola, Leticia; Dewey, Ricardo A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Adult mesenchymal stromal cell‐based interventions have shown promising results in a broad range of diseases. However, their use has faced limited effectiveness owing to the low survival rates and susceptibility to environmental stress on transplantation. We describe the cellular and molecular characteristics of multilineage‐differentiating stress‐enduring (Muse) cells derived from adipose tissue (AT), a subpopulation of pluripotent stem cells isolated from human lipoaspirates. Muse‐AT cells were efficiently obtained using a simple, fast, and affordable procedure, avoiding cell sorting and genetic manipulation methods. Muse‐AT cells isolated under severe cellular stress, expressed pluripotency stem cell markers and spontaneously differentiated into the three germ lineages. Muse‐AT cells grown as spheroids have a limited proliferation rate, a diameter of ∼15 µm, and ultrastructural organization similar to that of embryonic stem cells. Muse‐AT cells evidenced high stage‐specific embryonic antigen‐3 (SSEA‐3) expression (∼60% of cells) after 7–10 days growing in suspension and did not form teratomas when injected into immunodeficient mice. SSEA‐3+‐Muse‐AT cells expressed CD105, CD29, CD73, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I, CD44, and CD90 and low levels of HLA class II, CD45, and CD34. Using lipopolysaccharide‐stimulated macrophages and antigen‐challenged T‐cell assays, we have shown that Muse‐AT cells have anti‐inflammatory activities downregulating the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interferon‐γ and tumor necrosis factor‐α. Muse‐AT cells spontaneously gained transforming growth factor‐β1 expression that, in a phosphorylated SMAD2‐dependent manner, might prove pivotal in their observed immunoregulatory activity through decreased expression of T‐box transcription factor in T cells. Collectively, the present study has demonstrated the feasibility and efficiency of obtaining Muse

  8. MUSE crowded field 3D spectroscopy of over 12 000 stars in the globular cluster NGC 6397. I. The first comprehensive HRD of a globular cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husser, Tim-Oliver; Kamann, Sebastian; Dreizler, Stefan; Wendt, Martin; Wulff, Nina; Bacon, Roland; Wisotzki, Lutz; Brinchmann, Jarle; Weilbacher, Peter M.; Roth, Martin M.; Monreal-Ibero, Ana

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We demonstrate the high multiplex advantage of crowded field 3D spectroscopy with the new integral field spectrograph MUSE by means of a spectroscopic analysis of more than 12 000 individual stars in the globular cluster NGC 6397. Methods: The stars are deblended with a point spread function fitting technique, using a photometric reference catalogue from HST as prior, including relative positions and brightnesses. This catalogue is also used for a first analysis of the extracted spectra, followed by an automatic in-depth analysis via a full-spectrum fitting method based on a large grid of PHOENIX spectra. Results: We analysed the largest sample so far available for a single globular cluster of 18 932 spectra from 12 307 stars in NGC 6397. We derived a mean radial velocity of vrad = 17.84 ± 0.07 km s-1 and a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -2.120 ± 0.002, with the latter seemingly varying with temperature for stars on the red giant branch (RGB). We determine Teff and [Fe/H] from the spectra, and log g from HST photometry. This is the first very comprehensive Hertzsprung-Russell diagram (HRD) for a globular cluster based on the analysis of several thousands of stellar spectra, ranging from the main sequence to the tip of the RGB. Furthermore, two interesting objects were identified; one is a post-AGB star and the other is a possible millisecond-pulsar companion. Data products are available at http://muse-vlt.eu/scienceBased on observations obtained at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) of the European Southern Observatory, Paranal, Chile (ESO Programme ID 60.A-9100(C)).

  9. Estimating nonrigid motion from inconsistent intensity with robust shape features

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenyang; Ruan, Dan

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a nonrigid motion estimation method that is robust to heterogeneous intensity inconsistencies amongst the image pairs or image sequence. Methods: Intensity and contrast variations, as in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, present a considerable challenge to registration methods based on general discrepancy metrics. In this study, the authors propose and validate a novel method that is robust to such variations by utilizing shape features. The geometry of interest (GOI) is represented with a flexible zero level set, segmented via well-behaved regularized optimization. The optimization energy drives the zero level set to high image gradient regions, and regularizes it with area and curvature priors. The resulting shape exhibits high consistency even in the presence of intensity or contrast variations. Subsequently, a multiscale nonrigid registration is performed to seek a regular deformation field that minimizes shape discrepancy in the vicinity of GOIs. Results: To establish the working principle, realistic 2D and 3D images were subject to simulated nonrigid motion and synthetic intensity variations, so as to enable quantitative evaluation of registration performance. The proposed method was benchmarked against three alternative registration approaches, specifically, optical flow, B-spline based mutual information, and multimodality demons. When intensity consistency was satisfied, all methods had comparable registration accuracy for the GOIs. When intensities among registration pairs were inconsistent, however, the proposed method yielded pronounced improvement in registration accuracy, with an approximate fivefold reduction in mean absolute error (MAE = 2.25 mm, SD = 0.98 mm), compared to optical flow (MAE = 9.23 mm, SD = 5.36 mm), B-spline based mutual information (MAE = 9.57 mm, SD = 8.74 mm) and mutimodality demons (MAE = 10.07 mm, SD = 4.03 mm). Applying the proposed method on a real MR image sequence also provided

  10. A Galerkin method for the estimation of parameters in hybrid systems governing the vibration of flexible beams with tip bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, H. T.; Rosen, I. G.

    1985-01-01

    An approximation scheme is developed for the identification of hybrid systems describing the transverse vibrations of flexible beams with attached tip bodies. In particular, problems involving the estimation of functional parameters are considered. The identification problem is formulated as a least squares fit to data subject to the coupled system of partial and ordinary differential equations describing the transverse displacement of the beam and the motion of the tip bodies respectively. A cubic spline-based Galerkin method applied to the state equations in weak form and the discretization of the admissible parameter space yield a sequence of approximating finite dimensional identification problems. It is shown that each of the approximating problems admits a solution and that from the resulting sequence of optimal solutions a convergent subsequence can be extracted, the limit of which is a solution to the original identification problem. The approximating identification problems can be solved using standard techniques and readily available software.

  11. Musings about beauty.

    PubMed

    Kintsch, Walter

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, I explore how cognitive science could illuminate the concept of beauty. Two results from the extensive literature on aesthetics guide my discussion. As the term "beauty" is overextended in general usage, I choose as my starting point the notion of "perfect form." Aesthetic theorists are in reasonable agreement about the criteria for perfect form. What do these criteria imply for mental representations that are experienced as beautiful? Complexity theory can be used to specify constraints on mental representations abstractly formulated as vectors in a high-dimensional space. A central feature of the proposed model is that perfect form depends both on features of the objects or events perceived and on the nature of the encoding strategies or model of the observer. A simple example illustrates the proposed calculations. A number of interesting implications that arise as a consequence of reformulating beauty in this way are noted.

  12. Introduction: Information and Musings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shifman, M.

    The following sections are included: * Victor Frenkel * Background * The Accused * Alexander Leipunsky * Alexander Weissberg * Holodomor * The beginning of the Great Purge * Other foreigners at UPTI * The Ruhemanns * Tisza * Lange * Weisselberg * A detective story * Stalin's order * Yuri Raniuk * Giovanna Fjelstad * Giovanna's story * First time in the USSR * Fisl's humor * Houtermans and Pomeranchuk * Choices to make * Closing gaps * Houtermans and the Communist Party of Germany * Houtermans and von Ardenne * Houtermans' trip to Russia in 1941 * Why Houtermans had to flee from Berlin in 1945 * Houtermans in Göttingen in the 1940's * Denazification * Moving to Bern * Yuri Golfand, the discoverer of supersymmetry * Bolotovsky's and Eskin's essays * Moisei Koretz * FIAN * Additional recommended literature * References

  13. Musing while cutting.

    PubMed

    Guiraudon, G M

    1998-03-01

    Cardiac surgeons took to the heart and claimed an exclusive privilege to intervene. The task of cardiologists was to identify "candidates" and feed the great surgical machine. Recently, catheter surgery was developed and has fallen into the hands of cardiologists who became interventionists. Cardiac surgeons are concerned about shrinking domain, identity, and the future. The analysis of the current situation requires another look at old concepts: surgery, intervention, therapy, patients, invasiveness, etc., and a revision of the philosophy of the entire profession. Therapeutic plans comprise three interrelated components: the target, the bullet (therapeutic agent), and the gun (the way of delivering the bullet on target ). This description characterizes surgery as a way of delivering. If side effects are effects that do not affect the target, surgical procedures are mostly side effects, with significant morbidity. Future surgical rationales should reconcile target-specific therapy and minimal collateral damages: "minimal surgery!" or to use a new buzzword, "less invasive surgery." Cardiac surgery has focused on surgical practice and neglected the science of cardiology, missing opportunities for new research, new rationales, new techniques, and new territories. Surgeons must again become Renaissance men, involved in the entire field of cardiology, with a special skill in surgical techniques. Cardiac surgeons should no longer confine their practice to the delivering end. This end does not, any more, justify the means.

  14. Musings about Beauty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kintsch, Walter

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, I explore how cognitive science could illuminate the concept of beauty. Two results from the extensive literature on aesthetics guide my discussion. As the term "beauty" is overextended in general usage, I choose as my starting point the notion of "perfect form." Aesthetic theorists are in reasonable agreement about the criteria for…

  15. Musings on Adventure Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Antonio G.; Stauffer, Gary A.

    2001-01-01

    Critiques various definitions of adventure therapy, then suggests that adventure therapy is any intentional, facilitated use of adventure tools and techniques to guide personal change toward desired therapeutic goals. Reflects on the nature of adventure therapy through a discussion of the application of this definition and its implications for…

  16. Musings on Adventure Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Antonio G.; Stauffer, Gary A.

    2001-01-01

    Critiques various definitions of adventure therapy, then suggests that adventure therapy is any intentional, facilitated use of adventure tools and techniques to guide personal change toward desired therapeutic goals. Reflects on the nature of adventure therapy through a discussion of the application of this definition and its implications for…

  17. Musings about Beauty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kintsch, Walter

    2012-01-01

    In this essay, I explore how cognitive science could illuminate the concept of beauty. Two results from the extensive literature on aesthetics guide my discussion. As the term "beauty" is overextended in general usage, I choose as my starting point the notion of "perfect form." Aesthetic theorists are in reasonable agreement about the criteria for…

  18. Complex principal components for robust motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Mauldin, F William; Viola, Francesco; Walker, William F

    2010-11-01

    cross-correlation with cosine fitting (NC CF). More modest gains were observed relative to spline-based time delay estimation (sTDE). PCDE was also tested on experimental elastography data. Compressions of approximately 1.5% were applied to a CIRS elastography phantom with embedded 10.4-mm-diameter lesions that had moduli contrasts of -9.2, -5.9, and 12.0 dB. The standard deviation of displacement estimates was reduced by at least 67% in homogeneous regions at 35 to 40 mm in depth with respect to estimates produced by Loupas, NC CF, and sTDE. Greater improvements in CNR and displacement standard deviation were observed at larger depths where speckle decorrelation and other noise sources were more significant.

  19. Estimating Rain Rates from Tipping-Bucket Rain Gauge Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jianxin; Fisher, Brad L.; Wolff, David B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the cubic spline based operational system for the generation of the TRMM one-minute rain rate product 2A-56 from Tipping Bucket (TB) gauge measurements. Methodological issues associated with applying the cubic spline to the TB gauge rain rate estimation are closely examined. A simulated TB gauge from a Joss-Waldvogel (JW) disdrometer is employed to evaluate effects of time scales and rain event definitions on errors of the rain rate estimation. The comparison between rain rates measured from the JW disdrometer and those estimated from the simulated TB gauge shows good overall agreement; however, the TB gauge suffers sampling problems, resulting in errors in the rain rate estimation. These errors are very sensitive to the time scale of rain rates. One-minute rain rates suffer substantial errors, especially at low rain rates. When one minute rain rates are averaged to 4-7 minute or longer time scales, the errors dramatically reduce. The rain event duration is very sensitive to the event definition but the event rain total is rather insensitive, provided that the events with less than 1 millimeter rain totals are excluded. Estimated lower rain rates are sensitive to the event definition whereas the higher rates are not. The median relative absolute errors are about 22% and 32% for 1-minute TB rain rates higher and lower than 3 mm per hour, respectively. These errors decrease to 5% and 14% when TB rain rates are used at 7-minute scale. The radar reflectivity-rainrate (Ze-R) distributions drawn from large amount of 7-minute TB rain rates and radar reflectivity data are mostly insensitive to the event definition.

  20. A gravitationally-boosted MUSE survey for emission-line galaxies at z ≳ 5 behind the massive cluster RCS 0224

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smit, Renske; Swinbank, A. M.; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Smail, Ian; Kneib, J.-P.

    2017-01-01

    We present a VLT/MUSE survey of lensed high-redshift galaxies behind the z = 0.77 cluster RCS 0224-0002. We study the detailed internal properties of a highly magnified (μ ˜ 29) z = 4.88 galaxy seen through the cluster. We detect wide-spread nebular C IVλλ1548,1551 Å emission from this galaxy as well as a bright Lyα halo with a spatially-uniform wind and absorption profile across 12 kpc in the image plane. Blueshifted high- and low-ionisation interstellar absorption indicate the presence of a high-velocity outflow (Δ v˜ 300 km s^{-1}) from the galaxy. Unlike similar observations of galaxies at z ˜ 2 - 3, the Lyα emission from the halo emerges close to the systemic velocity - an order of magnitude lower in velocity offset than predicted in "shell"-like outflow models. To explain these observations we favour a model of an outflow with a strong velocity gradient, which changes the effective column density seen by the Lyα photons. We also search for high-redshift Lyα emitters and identify 14 candidates between z = 4.8 - 6.6, including an over-density at z = 4.88, of which only one has a detected counterpart in HST/ACS+WFC3 imaging.

  1. L'influence d'un stage d'enseignement dans un musee de sciences naturelles sur le sentiment d'autoefficacite en sciences de futurs enseignants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deblois, Annick

    Cette etude qualitative multicas est ancree dans l'approche sociale-cognitive de la theorie de l'autoefficacite de Bandura (1977). Elle s'interesse a quatre stages a l'enseignement qui se sont deroules au Musee canadien de la nature a Ottawa, Canada, en 2009. L'utilisation de donnees secondaires issues du questionnaire STEBI-B traduit et modifie (Dionne et Couture, 2010) ainsi que des entrevues semi-dirigees ont permis une analyse du changement du sentiment d'autoefficacite en sciences chez les stagiaires. Les elements les plus interessants de cette recherche sont l'apprentissage vicariant et la possibilite de repetition qui favorise une meilleure connaissance de soi et une pratique reflexive. Les resultats, dans l'ensemble positifs, illustrent bien le potentiel d'un tel stage afin de rehausser le sentiment d'autoefficacite en sciences chez des stagiaires en enseignement, particulierement chez ceux qui se destinent a enseigner a l'elementaire puisque ceux-ci ont souvent une formation academique dans un domaine autre que les sciences.

  2. Validation of Malaysian Versions of Perceived Diabetes Self-Management Scale (PDSMS), Medication Understanding and Use Self-Efficacy Scale (MUSE) and 8-Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) Using Partial Credit Rasch Model

    PubMed Central

    Al Abboud, Safaa Ahmed; Ahmad, Sohail; Bidin, Mohamed Badrulnizam Long

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a common silent epidemic disease with frequent morbidity and mortality. The psychological and psychosocial health factors are negatively influencing the glycaemic control in diabetic patients. Therefore, various questionnaires were developed to address the psychological and psychosocial well-being of the diabetic patients. Most of these questionnaires were first developed in English and then translated into different languages to make them useful for the local communities. Aim The main aim of this study was to translate and validate the Malaysian versions of Perceived Diabetes Self-Management Scale (PDSMS), Medication Understanding and Use Self-Efficacy Scale (MUSE), and to revalidate 8-Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) by Partial Credit Rasch Model (Modern Test Theory). Materials and Methods Permission was obtained from respective authors to translate the English versions of PDSMS, MUSE and MMAS-8 into Malay language according to established standard international translation guidelines. In this cross-sectional study, 62 adult DM patients were recruited from Hospital Kuala Lumpur by purposive sampling method. The data were extracted from the self-administered questionnaires and entered manually in the Ministeps (Winsteps) software for Partial Credit Rasch Model. The item and person reliability, infit/outfit Z-Standard (ZSTD), infit/outfit Mean Square (MNSQ) and point measure correlation (PTMEA Corr) values were analysed for the reliability analyses and construct validation. Results The Malay version of PDSMS, MUSE and MMAS-8 found to be valid and reliable instrument for the Malaysian diabetic adults. The instrument showed good overall reliability value of 0.76 and 0.93 for item and person reliability, respectively. The values of infit/outfit ZSTD, infit/outfit MNSQ, and PTMEA Corr were also within the stipulated range of the Rasch Model proving the valid item constructs of the questionnaire. Conclusion The

  3. Validation of Malaysian Versions of Perceived Diabetes Self-Management Scale (PDSMS), Medication Understanding and Use Self-Efficacy Scale (MUSE) and 8-Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) Using Partial Credit Rasch Model.

    PubMed

    Al Abboud, Safaa Ahmed; Ahmad, Sohail; Bidin, Mohamed Badrulnizam Long; Ismail, Nahlah Elkudssiah

    2016-11-01

    The Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a common silent epidemic disease with frequent morbidity and mortality. The psychological and psychosocial health factors are negatively influencing the glycaemic control in diabetic patients. Therefore, various questionnaires were developed to address the psychological and psychosocial well-being of the diabetic patients. Most of these questionnaires were first developed in English and then translated into different languages to make them useful for the local communities. The main aim of this study was to translate and validate the Malaysian versions of Perceived Diabetes Self-Management Scale (PDSMS), Medication Understanding and Use Self-Efficacy Scale (MUSE), and to revalidate 8-Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8) by Partial Credit Rasch Model (Modern Test Theory). Permission was obtained from respective authors to translate the English versions of PDSMS, MUSE and MMAS-8 into Malay language according to established standard international translation guidelines. In this cross-sectional study, 62 adult DM patients were recruited from Hospital Kuala Lumpur by purposive sampling method. The data were extracted from the self-administered questionnaires and entered manually in the Ministeps (Winsteps) software for Partial Credit Rasch Model. The item and person reliability, infit/outfit Z-Standard (ZSTD), infit/outfit Mean Square (MNSQ) and point measure correlation (PTMEA Corr) values were analysed for the reliability analyses and construct validation. The Malay version of PDSMS, MUSE and MMAS-8 found to be valid and reliable instrument for the Malaysian diabetic adults. The instrument showed good overall reliability value of 0.76 and 0.93 for item and person reliability, respectively. The values of infit/outfit ZSTD, infit/outfit MNSQ, and PTMEA Corr were also within the stipulated range of the Rasch Model proving the valid item constructs of the questionnaire. The translated Malay version of PDSMS, MUSE and MMAS-8 was found to

  4. Multiwaveband simulation-based signature analysis of camouflaged human dismounts in cluttered environments with TAIThermIR and MuSES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Packard, Corey D.; Klein, Mark D.; Viola, Timothy S.; Hepokoski, Mark A.

    2016-10-01

    The ability to predict electro-optical (EO) signatures of diverse targets against cluttered backgrounds is paramount for signature evaluation and/or management. Knowledge of target and background signatures is essential for a variety of defense-related applications. While there is no substitute for measured target and background signatures to determine contrast and detection probability, the capability to simulate any mission scenario with desired environmental conditions is a tremendous asset for defense agencies. In this paper, a systematic process for the thermal and visible-through-infrared simulation of camouflaged human dismounts in cluttered outdoor environments is presented. This process, utilizing the thermal and EO/IR radiance simulation tool TAIThermIR (and MuSES), provides a repeatable and accurate approach for analyzing contrast, signature and detectability of humans in multiple wavebands. The engineering workflow required to combine natural weather boundary conditions and the human thermoregulatory module developed by ThermoAnalytics is summarized. The procedure includes human geometry creation, human segmental physiology description and transient physical temperature prediction using environmental boundary conditions and active thermoregulation. Radiance renderings, which use Sandford-Robertson BRDF optical surface property descriptions and are coupled with MODTRAN for the calculation of atmospheric effects, are demonstrated. Sensor effects such as optical blurring and photon noise can be optionally included, increasing the accuracy of detection probability outputs that accompany each rendering. This virtual evaluation procedure has been extensively validated and provides a flexible evaluation process that minimizes the difficulties inherent in human-subject field testing. Defense applications such as detection probability assessment, camouflage pattern evaluation, conspicuity tests and automatic target recognition are discussed.

  5. Illuminating gas inflows/outflows in the MUSE deepest fields: Lyα nebulae around forming galaxies at z ≃ 3.3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanzella, E.; Balestra, I.; Gronke, M.; Karman, W.; Caminha, G. B.; Dijkstra, M.; Rosati, P.; De Barros, S.; Caputi, K.; Grillo, C.; Tozzi, P.; Meneghetti, M.; Mercurio, A.; Gilli, R.

    2017-03-01

    We report the identification of extended Lyα nebulae at z ≃ 3.3 in the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (HUDF, ≃40 kpc × 80 kpc) and behind the Hubble Frontier Field galaxy cluster MACSJ0416 (≃40 kpc), spatially associated with groups of star-forming galaxies. VLT/MUSE integral field spectroscopy reveals a complex structure with a spatially varying double-peaked Lyα emission. Overall, the spectral profiles of the two Lyα nebulae are remarkably similar, both showing a prominent blue emission, more intense and slightly broader than the red peak. From the first nebula, located in the HUDF, no X-ray emission has been detected, disfavouring the possible presence of active galactic nuclei. Spectroscopic redshifts have been derived for 11 galaxies within 2 arcsec from the nebula and spanning the redshift range 1.037 < z < 5.97. The second nebula, behind MACSJ0416, shows three aligned star-forming galaxies plausibly associated with the emitting gas. In both systems, the associated galaxies reveal possible intense rest-frame-optical nebular emissions lines [O III] λλ4959, 5007+Hβ with equivalent widths as high as 1500 Å rest frame and star formation rates ranging from a few to tens of solar masses per year. A possible scenario is that of a group of young, star-forming galaxies emitting ionizing radiation that induces Lyα fluorescence, therefore revealing the kinematics of the surrounding gas. Also Lyα powered by star formation and/or cooling radiation may resemble the double-peaked spectral properties and the morphology observed here. If the intense blue emission is associated with inflowing gas, then we may be witnessing an early phase of galaxy or a proto-cluster (or group) formation.

  6. GASP. IV. A Muse View of Extreme Ram-pressure-stripping in the Plane of the Sky: The Case of Jellyfish Galaxy JO204

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gullieuszik, Marco; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Moretti, Alessia; Fritz, Jacopo; Jaffé, Yara L.; Hau, George; Bischko, Jan C.; Bellhouse, Callum; Bettoni, Daniela; Fasano, Giovanni; Vulcani, Benedetta; D’Onofrio, Mauro; Biviano, Andrea

    2017-09-01

    In the context of the GAs Stripping Phenomena in galaxies with Muse (GASP) survey, we present the characterization of JO204, a jellyfish galaxy in A957, a relatively low-mass cluster with M=4.4× {10}14 {M}ȯ . This galaxy shows a tail of ionized gas that extends up to 30 kpc from the main body in the opposite direction of the cluster center. No gas emission is detected in the galaxy outer disk, suggesting that gas-stripping is proceeding outside-in. The stellar component is distributed as a regular disk galaxy; the stellar kinematics shows a symmetric rotation curve with a maximum radial velocity of 200 km s‑1 out to 20 kpc from the galaxy center. The radial velocity of the gas component in the central part of the disk follows the distribution of the stellar component; the gas kinematics in the tail retains the rotation of the galaxy disk, indicating that JO204 is moving at high speed in the intracluster medium. Both the emission and radial-velocity maps of the gas and stellar components indicate ram-pressure as the most likely primary mechanism for gas-stripping, as expected given that JO204 is close to the cluster center and it is likely at the first infall in the cluster. The spatially resolved star formation history of JO204 provides evidence that the onset of ram-pressure-stripping occurred in the last 500 Myr, quenching the star formation activity in the outer disk, where the gas has been already completely stripped. Our conclusions are supported by a set of hydrodynamic simulations.

  7. Attitude Control Flight Experience: Coping with Solar Radiation and Ion Engines Leak Thrust in Hayabusa (MUSES-C)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawaguchi, Jun'ichiro; Kominato, Takashi; Shirakawa, Ken'ichi

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents the attitude reorientation taking the advantage of solar radiation pressure without use of any fuel aboard. The strategy had been adopted to make Hayabusa spacecraft keep pointed toward the Sun for several months, while spinning. The paper adds the above mentioned results reported in Sedona this February showing another challenge of combining ion engines propulsion tactically balanced with the solar radiation torque with no spin motion. The operation has been performed since this March for a half year successfully. The flight results are presented with the estimated solar array panel diffusion coefficient and the ion engine's swirl torque.

  8. Unresolved versus resolved: testing the validity of young simple stellar population models with VLT/MUSE observations of NGC 3603

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuncarayakti, H.; Galbany, L.; Anderson, J. P.; Krühler, T.; Hamuy, M.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Stellar populations are the building blocks of galaxies, including the Milky Way. The majority, if not all, extragalactic studies are entangled with the use of stellar population models given the unresolved nature of their observation. Extragalactic systems contain multiple stellar populations with complex star formation histories. However, studies of these systems are mainly based upon the principles of simple stellar populations (SSP). Hence, it is critical to examine the validity of SSP models. Aims: This work aims to empirically test the validity of SSP models. This is done by comparing SSP models against observations of spatially resolved young stellar population in the determination of its physical properties, that is, age and metallicity. Methods: Integral field spectroscopy of a young stellar cluster in the Milky Way, NGC 3603, was used to study the properties of the cluster as both a resolved and unresolved stellar population. The unresolved stellar population was analysed using the Hα equivalent width as an age indicator and the ratio of strong emission lines to infer metallicity. In addition, spectral energy distribution (SED) fitting using STARLIGHT was used to infer these properties from the integrated spectrum. Independently, the resolved stellar population was analysed using the colour-magnitude diagram (CMD) to determine age and metallicity. As the SSP model represents the unresolved stellar population, the derived age and metallicity were tested to determine whether they agree with those derived from resolved stars. Results: The age and metallicity estimate of NGC 3603 derived from integrated spectroscopy are confirmed to be within the range of those derived from the CMD of the resolved stellar population, including other estimates found in the literature. The result from this pilot study supports the reliability of SSP models for studying unresolved young stellar populations. Based on observations collected at the European Organisation

  9. MUSE integral-field spectroscopy towards the Frontier Fields cluster Abell S1063. II. Properties of low luminosity Lyman α emitters at z > 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karman, W.; Caputi, K. I.; Caminha, G. B.; Gronke, M.; Grillo, C.; Balestra, I.; Rosati, P.; Vanzella, E.; Coe, D.; Dijkstra, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; McLeod, D.; Mercurio, A.; Nonino, M.

    2017-03-01

    In spite of their conjectured importance for the Epoch of Reionization, the properties of low-mass galaxies are currently still very much under debate. In this article, we study the stellar and gaseous properties of faint, low-mass galaxies at z > 3. We observed the Frontier Fields cluster Abell S1063 with MUSE over a 2 arcmin2 field, and combined integral-field spectroscopy with gravitational lensing to perform a blind search for intrinsically faint Lyα emitters (LAEs). We determined in total the redshift of 172 galaxies of which 14 are lensed LAEs at z = 3-6.1. We increased the number of spectroscopically-confirmed multiple-image families from 6 to 17 and updated our gravitational-lensing model accordingly. The lensing-corrected Lyα luminosities are with LLyα ≲ 1041.5 erg/s among the lowest for spectroscopically confirmed LAEs at any redshift. We used expanding gaseous shell models to fit the Lyα line profile, and find low column densities and expansion velocities. This is, to our knowledge, the first time that gaseous properties of such faint galaxies at z ≳ 3 are reported. We performed SED modelling to broadband photometry from the U band through the infrared to determine the stellar properties of these LAEs. The stellar masses are very low (106-8M⊙ ), and are accompanied by very young ages of 1-100 Myr. The very high specific star-formation rates ( 100 Gyr-1) are characteristic of starburst galaxies, and we find that most galaxies will double their stellar mass in ≲20 Myr. The UV-continuum slopes β are low in our sample, with β < -2 for all galaxies with M⋆ < 108M⊙. We conclude that our low-mass galaxies at 3 < z < 6 are forming stars at higher rates when correcting for stellar mass effects than seen locally or in more massive galaxies. The young stellar populations with high star-formation rates and low H i column densities lead to continuum slopes and LyC-escape fractions expected for a scenario where low mass galaxies reionise the Universe.

  10. Invoking the muse: Dada's chaos.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Diane

    2014-07-01

    Dada, a self-proclaimed (anti)art (non)movement, took shape in 1916 among a group of writers and artists who rejected the traditions of a stagnating bourgeoisie. Instead, they adopted means of creative expression that embraced chaos, stoked instability and undermined logic, an outburst that overturned centuries of classical and Romantic aesthetics. Paradoxically, this insistence on disorder foreshadowed a new order in understanding creativity. Nearly one hundred years later, Nonlinear Dynamical Systems theory (NDS) gives renewed currency to Dada's visionary perspective on chance, chaos and creative cognition. This paper explores commonalities between NDS-theory and this early precursor of the nonlinear paradigm, suggesting that their conceptual synergy illuminates what it means to 'be creative' beyond the disciplinary boundaries of either. Key features are discussed within a 5P model of creativity based on Rhodes' 4P framework (Person, Process, Press, Product), to which I add Participant-Viewer for the interactivity of observer-observed. Grounded in my own art practice, several techniques are then put forward as non-methodical methods that invoke creative border zones, those regions where Dada's chance and design are wedded in a dialectical tension of opposites.

  11. Musings on the Naked Trucker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abernathy, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author, dean of academic affairs at Augustana College in Illinois, reflects on an alumnus, English major David Allen, who has gained prominence in his field. A photo of the alumnus, wearing nothing but a cap, a pair of boots, and a strategically-placed guitar, appeared on the front page of a local newspaper, under a headline…

  12. Light and enlightenment: some musings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patthoff, Donald D.

    2012-03-01

    In the beginning of the age of enlightenment (or reason), the language of philosophy, science, and theology stemmed equally from the same pens. Many of these early enlightenment authors also applied their thoughts and experiences to practical inventions and entrepreneurship; in the process, they noted and measured different characteristics of light and redirected the use of lenses beyond that of the heat lens which had been developing for over 2000 years. Within decades, microscopes, telescopes, theodolites, and many variations of the heat lens were well known. These advances rapidly changed and expanded the nature of science, subsequent technology, and many boundary notions; that is the way boundaries are defined not just in the sense of what is land and commercial property, but also what notions of boundary help shape and define society, including the unique role that professions play within society. The advent of lasers in the mid twenty century, though, introduced the ability to measure the effects and characteristic of single coherent wavelengths. This also introduced more ways to evaluate the relationship of specific wavelengths of light to other variables and interactions. At the most basic level, the almost revolutionary boundary developments of lasers seem to split down two paths of work: 1) a pursuit of more sophisticated heat lenses having better controls over light's destructive and cutting powers and, 2) more nuanced light-based instruments that not only enhanced the powers of observation, but also offered more minute measurement opportunities and subtle treatment capabilities. It is well worth deliberating, then, if "enlightenment" and "light" might share more than five letters in a row. And (if a common underlying foundation is revealed within these deliberations) , is it worth questioning any possible revelations that might arise, or that might bear relevance on today's research and developments in light based sciences, technology, clinical professions, and other bio applications. And, finally, how might any such insight influence, then, the future of light based research and its possible application?

  13. Muses on the Gregorian Calendar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staples, Ed

    2013-01-01

    This article begins with an exploration of the origins of the Gregorian Calendar. Next it describes the function of school inspector Christian Zeller (1822-1899) used to determine the number of the elapsed days of a year up to and including a specified date and how Zeller's function can be used to determine the number of days that have elapsed in…

  14. Teaching Poetry: The Neglected Muse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perricone, Catherine R.

    1978-01-01

    A discussion of six techniques whereby the abstract nature of foreign language poetry may be communicated to students. These are introduction to the genre, understanding and appreciating poetry, the poet and his/her milieu, reading for expression and vocabulary and in context, and analysis for theme, content, and structure. (Author/AMH)

  15. Musings on the Naked Trucker

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abernathy, Jeff

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author, dean of academic affairs at Augustana College in Illinois, reflects on an alumnus, English major David Allen, who has gained prominence in his field. A photo of the alumnus, wearing nothing but a cap, a pair of boots, and a strategically-placed guitar, appeared on the front page of a local newspaper, under a headline…

  16. dPIRPLE: A Joint Estimation Framework for Deformable Registration and Penalized-Likelihood CT Image Reconstruction using Prior Images

    PubMed Central

    Dang, H.; Wang, A. S.; Sussman, Marc S.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Stayman, J. W.

    2014-01-01

    Sequential imaging studies are conducted in many clinical scenarios. Prior images from previous studies contain a great deal of patient-specific anatomical information and can be used in conjunction with subsequent imaging acquisitions to maintain image quality while enabling radiation dose reduction (e.g., through sparse angular sampling, reduction in fluence, etc.). However, patient motion between images in such sequences results in misregistration between the prior image and current anatomy. Existing prior-image-based approaches often include only a simple rigid registration step that can be insufficient for capturing complex anatomical motion, introducing detrimental effects in subsequent image reconstruction. In this work, we propose a joint framework that estimates the 3D deformation between an unregistered prior image and the current anatomy (based on a subsequent data acquisition) and reconstructs the current anatomical image using a model-based reconstruction approach that includes regularization based on the deformed prior image. This framework is referred to as deformable prior image registration, penalized-likelihood estimation (dPIRPLE). Central to this framework is the inclusion of a 3D B-spline-based free-form-deformation model into the joint registration-reconstruction objective function. The proposed framework is solved using a maximization strategy whereby alternating updates to the registration parameters and image estimates are applied allowing for improvements in both the registration and reconstruction throughout the optimization process. Cadaver experiments were conducted on a cone-beam CT testbench emulating a lung nodule surveillance scenario. Superior reconstruction accuracy and image quality were demonstrated using the dPIRPLE algorithm as compared to more traditional reconstruction methods including filtered backprojection, penalized-likelihood estimation (PLE), prior image penalized-likelihood estimation (PIPLE) without registration

  17. dPIRPLE: a joint estimation framework for deformable registration and penalized-likelihood CT image reconstruction using prior images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, H.; Wang, A. S.; Sussman, Marc S.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Stayman, J. W.

    2014-09-01

    Sequential imaging studies are conducted in many clinical scenarios. Prior images from previous studies contain a great deal of patient-specific anatomical information and can be used in conjunction with subsequent imaging acquisitions to maintain image quality while enabling radiation dose reduction (e.g., through sparse angular sampling, reduction in fluence, etc). However, patient motion between images in such sequences results in misregistration between the prior image and current anatomy. Existing prior-image-based approaches often include only a simple rigid registration step that can be insufficient for capturing complex anatomical motion, introducing detrimental effects in subsequent image reconstruction. In this work, we propose a joint framework that estimates the 3D deformation between an unregistered prior image and the current anatomy (based on a subsequent data acquisition) and reconstructs the current anatomical image using a model-based reconstruction approach that includes regularization based on the deformed prior image. This framework is referred to as deformable prior image registration, penalized-likelihood estimation (dPIRPLE). Central to this framework is the inclusion of a 3D B-spline-based free-form-deformation model into the joint registration-reconstruction objective function. The proposed framework is solved using a maximization strategy whereby alternating updates to the registration parameters and image estimates are applied allowing for improvements in both the registration and reconstruction throughout the optimization process. Cadaver experiments were conducted on a cone-beam CT testbench emulating a lung nodule surveillance scenario. Superior reconstruction accuracy and image quality were demonstrated using the dPIRPLE algorithm as compared to more traditional reconstruction methods including filtered backprojection, penalized-likelihood estimation (PLE), prior image penalized-likelihood estimation (PIPLE) without registration, and

  18. smoothHR: an R package for pointwise nonparametric estimation of hazard ratio curves of continuous predictors.

    PubMed

    Meira-Machado, Luís; Cadarso-Suárez, Carmen; Gude, Francisco; Araújo, Artur

    2013-01-01

    The Cox proportional hazards regression model has become the traditional choice for modeling survival data in medical studies. To introduce flexibility into the Cox model, several smoothing methods may be applied, and approaches based on splines are the most frequently considered in this context. To better understand the effects that each continuous covariate has on the outcome, results can be expressed in terms of splines-based hazard ratio (HR) curves, taking a specific covariate value as reference. Despite the potential advantages of using spline smoothing methods in survival analysis, there is currently no analytical method in the R software to choose the optimal degrees of freedom in multivariable Cox models (with two or more nonlinear covariate effects). This paper describes an R package, called smoothHR, that allows the computation of pointwise estimates of the HRs--and their corresponding confidence limits--of continuous predictors introduced nonlinearly. In addition the package provides functions for choosing automatically the degrees of freedom in multivariable Cox models. The package is available from the R homepage. We illustrate the use of the key functions of the smoothHR package using data from a study on breast cancer and data on acute coronary syndrome, from Galicia, Spain.

  19. Deconvolving an Estimate of Breath Measured Blood Alcohol Concentration from Biosensor Collected Transdermal Ethanol Data£

    PubMed Central

    Dumett, M; Rosen, G; Sabat, J; Shaman, A; Tempelman, L; Wang, C; Swift, RM

    2008-01-01

    Biosensor measurement of transdermal alcohol oncentration in perspiration exhibits significant variance from subject to subject and device to device. Short duration data collected in a controlled clinical setting is used to calibrate a forward model for ethanol transport from the blood to the sensor. The calibrated model is then used to invert transdermal signals collected in the field (short or long duration) to obtain an estimate for breath measured blood alcohol concentration. A distributed parameter model for the forward transport of ethanol from the blood through the skin and its processing by the sensor is developed. Model calibration is formulated as a nonlinear least squares fit to data. The fit model is then used as part of a spline based scheme in the form of a regularized, non-negatively constrained linear deconvolution. Fully discrete, steepest descent based schemes for solving the resulting optimization problems are developed. The adjoint method is used to accurately and efficiently compute requisite gradients. Efficacy is demonstrated on subject field data. PMID:19255617

  20. Estimating Eggs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Margaret; Scott, Amanda

    2005-01-01

    The authors discuss mass as one of the three fundamental measurements (the others being length and time), noting that estimation of mass is little taught and assessed in primary schools. This article briefly explores the reasons for this in terms of culture, practice, and the difficulty of assessing estimation of mass. An activity using the…

  1. CerebroMatic: A Versatile Toolbox for Spline-Based MRI Template Creation

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, Marko; Altaye, Mekibib; Holland, Scott K.

    2017-01-01

    Brain image spatial normalization and tissue segmentation rely on prior tissue probability maps. Appropriately selecting these tissue maps becomes particularly important when investigating “unusual” populations, such as young children or elderly subjects. When creating such priors, the disadvantage of applying more deformation must be weighed against the benefit of achieving a crisper image. We have previously suggested that statistically modeling demographic variables, instead of simply averaging images, is advantageous. Both aspects (more vs. less deformation and modeling vs. averaging) were explored here. We used imaging data from 1914 subjects, aged 13 months to 75 years, and employed multivariate adaptive regression splines to model the effects of age, field strength, gender, and data quality. Within the spm/cat12 framework, we compared an affine-only with a low- and a high-dimensional warping approach. As expected, more deformation on the individual level results in lower group dissimilarity. Consequently, effects of age in particular are less apparent in the resulting tissue maps when using a more extensive deformation scheme. Using statistically-described parameters, high-quality tissue probability maps could be generated for the whole age range; they are consistently closer to a gold standard than conventionally-generated priors based on 25, 50, or 100 subjects. Distinct effects of field strength, gender, and data quality were seen. We conclude that an extensive matching for generating tissue priors may model much of the variability inherent in the dataset which is then not contained in the resulting priors. Further, the statistical description of relevant parameters (using regression splines) allows for the generation of high-quality tissue probability maps while controlling for known confounds. The resulting CerebroMatic toolbox is available for download at http://irc.cchmc.org/software/cerebromatic.php. PMID:28275348

  2. Fast simulation of x-ray projections of spline-based surfaces using an append buffer.

    PubMed

    Maier, Andreas; Hofmann, Hannes G; Schwemmer, Chris; Hornegger, Joachim; Keil, Andreas; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-10-07

    Many scientists in the field of x-ray imaging rely on the simulation of x-ray images. As the phantom models become more and more realistic, their projection requires high computational effort. Since x-ray images are based on transmission, many standard graphics acceleration algorithms cannot be applied to this task. However, if adapted properly, the simulation speed can be increased dramatically using state-of-the-art graphics hardware. A custom graphics pipeline that simulates transmission projections for tomographic reconstruction was implemented based on moving spline surface models. All steps from tessellation of the splines, projection onto the detector and drawing are implemented in OpenCL. We introduced a special append buffer for increased performance in order to store the intersections with the scene for every ray. Intersections are then sorted and resolved to materials. Lastly, an absorption model is evaluated to yield an absorption value for each projection pixel. Projection of a moving spline structure is fast and accurate. Projections of size 640 × 480 can be generated within 254 ms. Reconstructions using the projections show errors below 1 HU with a sharp reconstruction kernel. Traditional GPU-based acceleration schemes are not suitable for our reconstruction task. Even in the absence of noise, they result in errors up to 9 HU on average, although projection images appear to be correct under visual examination. Projections generated with our new method are suitable for the validation of novel CT reconstruction algorithms. For complex simulations, such as the evaluation of motion-compensated reconstruction algorithms, this kind of x-ray simulation will reduce the computation time dramatically.

  3. Fast Simulation of X-ray Projections of Spline-based Surfaces using an Append Buffer

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Andreas; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Schwemmer, Chris; Hornegger, Joachim; Keil, Andreas; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Many scientists in the field of x-ray imaging rely on the simulation of x-ray images. As the phantom models become more and more realistic, their projection requires high computational effort. Since x-ray images are based on transmission, many standard graphics acceleration algorithms cannot be applied to this task. However, if adapted properly, simulation speed can be increased dramatically using state-of-the-art graphics hardware. A custom graphics pipeline that simulates transmission projections for tomographic reconstruction was implemented based on moving spline surface models. All steps from tessellation of the splines, projection onto the detector, and drawing are implemented in OpenCL. We introduced a special append buffer for increased performance in order to store the intersections with the scene for every ray. Intersections are then sorted and resolved to materials. Lastly, an absorption model is evaluated to yield an absorption value for each projection pixel. Projection of a moving spline structure is fast and accurate. Projections of size 640×480 can be generated within 254 ms. Reconstructions using the projections show errors below 1 HU with a sharp reconstruction kernel. Traditional GPU-based acceleration schemes are not suitable for our reconstruction task. Even in the absence of noise, they result in errors up to 9 HU on average, although projection images appear to be correct under visual examination. Projections generated with our new method are suitable for the validation of novel CT reconstruction algorithms. For complex simulations, such as the evaluation of motion-compensated reconstruction algorithms, this kind of x-ray simulation will reduce the computation time dramatically. Source code is available at http://conrad.stanford.edu/ PMID:22975431

  4. Three-dimensional B-spline-based intersubject nonrigid registration with geodesic closest points constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Liu, Feng; Deng, Fuqin; Tsui, Hungtat

    2014-11-01

    Due to the variance between subjects, there is usually ambiguity in intensity-based intersubject registration. The topological constraint in the brain cortical surface might be violated because of the highly convolved nature of the human cortical cortex. We propose an intersubject brain registration method by combining the intensity and the geodesic closest point-based similarity measurements. Each of the brain hemispheres can be topologically equal to a sphere and a one-to-one mapping of the points on the spherical surfaces of the two subjects can be achieved. The correspondences in the cortical surface are obtained by searching the geodesic closest points in the spherical surface. The corresponding features on the cortical surfaces between subjects are then used as anatomical landmarks for intersubject registration. By adding these anatomical constraints of the cortical surfaces, the intersubject registration results are more anatomically plausible and accurate. We validate our method by using real human datasets. Experimental results in visual inspection and alignment error show that the proposed method performs better than the typical joint intensity- and landmark-distance-based methods.

  5. Graph analysis of non-uniform rational B-spline-based metamodels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steuben, John C.; Turner, Cameron J.

    2015-09-01

    Over the past decade metamodels, also known as surrogate models, based on non-uniform rational B-splines (NURBs) have been developed. These metamodels exhibit unique properties that enable a wide range of computationally efficient analyses. Thus far, the analysis of these metamodels has been of a geometric nature, but in this article an approach based on graph theory is used. The properties of NURBs enable the interpretation of NURBs-based metamodels as graphs, and enable the demonstration of several analyses based on this structure. The general case of an analytically defined continuous-variable problem is given in the first example. A specific application in the field of robotic path planning constitutes the second example. Finally, an observation on the current state of this research, its merits and drawbacks, and an outline of future efforts that may increase its utility is provided.

  6. CerebroMatic: A Versatile Toolbox for Spline-Based MRI Template Creation.

    PubMed

    Wilke, Marko; Altaye, Mekibib; Holland, Scott K

    2017-01-01

    Brain image spatial normalization and tissue segmentation rely on prior tissue probability maps. Appropriately selecting these tissue maps becomes particularly important when investigating "unusual" populations, such as young children or elderly subjects. When creating such priors, the disadvantage of applying more deformation must be weighed against the benefit of achieving a crisper image. We have previously suggested that statistically modeling demographic variables, instead of simply averaging images, is advantageous. Both aspects (more vs. less deformation and modeling vs. averaging) were explored here. We used imaging data from 1914 subjects, aged 13 months to 75 years, and employed multivariate adaptive regression splines to model the effects of age, field strength, gender, and data quality. Within the spm/cat12 framework, we compared an affine-only with a low- and a high-dimensional warping approach. As expected, more deformation on the individual level results in lower group dissimilarity. Consequently, effects of age in particular are less apparent in the resulting tissue maps when using a more extensive deformation scheme. Using statistically-described parameters, high-quality tissue probability maps could be generated for the whole age range; they are consistently closer to a gold standard than conventionally-generated priors based on 25, 50, or 100 subjects. Distinct effects of field strength, gender, and data quality were seen. We conclude that an extensive matching for generating tissue priors may model much of the variability inherent in the dataset which is then not contained in the resulting priors. Further, the statistical description of relevant parameters (using regression splines) allows for the generation of high-quality tissue probability maps while controlling for known confounds. The resulting CerebroMatic toolbox is available for download at http://irc.cchmc.org/software/cerebromatic.php.

  7. Spline based iterative phase retrieval algorithm for X-ray differential phase contrast radiography.

    PubMed

    Nilchian, Masih; Wang, Zhentian; Thuering, Thomas; Unser, Michael; Stampanoni, Marco

    2015-04-20

    Differential phase contrast imaging using grating interferometer is a promising alternative to conventional X-ray radiographic methods. It provides the absorption, differential phase and scattering information of the underlying sample simultaneously. Phase retrieval from the differential phase signal is an essential problem for quantitative analysis in medical imaging. In this paper, we formalize the phase retrieval as a regularized inverse problem, and propose a novel discretization scheme for the derivative operator based on B-spline calculus. The inverse problem is then solved by a constrained regularized weighted-norm algorithm (CRWN) which adopts the properties of B-spline and ensures a fast implementation. The method is evaluated with a tomographic dataset and differential phase contrast mammography data. We demonstrate that the proposed method is able to produce phase image with enhanced and higher soft tissue contrast compared to conventional absorption-based approach, which can potentially provide useful information to mammographic investigations.

  8. BOX SPLINE BASED 3D TOMOGRAPHIC RECONSTRUCTION OF DIFFUSION PROPAGATORS FROM MRI DATA.

    PubMed

    Ye, Wenxing; Portnoy, Sharon; Entezari, Alireza; Vemuri, Baba C; Blackband, Stephen J

    2011-06-09

    This paper introduces a tomographic approach for reconstruction of diffusion propagators, P( r ), in a box spline framework. Box splines are chosen as basis functions for high-order approximation of P( r ) from the diffusion signal. Box splines are a generalization of B-splines to multivariate setting that are particularly useful in the context of tomographic reconstruction. The X-Ray or Radon transform of a (tensor-product B-spline or a non-separable) box spline is a box spline - the space of box splines is closed under the Radon transform.We present synthetic and real multi-shell diffusion-weighted MR data experiments that demonstrate the increased accuracy of P( r ) reconstruction as the order of basis functions is increased.

  9. A Spline-Based Lack-Of-Fit Test for Independent Variable Effect in Poisson Regression.

    PubMed

    Li, Chin-Shang; Tu, Wanzhu

    2007-05-01

    In regression analysis of count data, independent variables are often modeled by their linear effects under the assumption of log-linearity. In reality, the validity of such an assumption is rarely tested, and its use is at times unjustifiable. A lack-of-fit test is proposed for the adequacy of a postulated functional form of an independent variable within the framework of semiparametric Poisson regression models based on penalized splines. It offers added flexibility in accommodating the potentially non-loglinear effect of the independent variable. A likelihood ratio test is constructed for the adequacy of the postulated parametric form, for example log-linearity, of the independent variable effect. Simulations indicate that the proposed model performs well, and misspecified parametric model has much reduced power. An example is given.

  10. Spline-based Study of the Extragalactic Background Light Spectrum using Gamma-Ray Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Anoushka; Rathmann-Bloch, Julia; Biteau, Jonathan; Williams, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The extragalactic background light (EBL) is made of all the light emitted by stars and galaxies throughout cosmic history. Expanding on the work of Biteau & Williams 2015, we develop a novel natural cubic spline model of the local EBL spectrum and constrain its parameters using the gamma-ray spectra of 38 blazars measured in the high-energy (HE, 0.1 to 100 GeV) and very-high-energy (VHE, 0.1 to 20 TeV) bands. Starting from this best-fit model, we then study the so-called "delta gamma" (ΔΓ) observable, defined as the difference between the VHE and HE photon indices. This second study is focused on a subset of nine BL Lac objects. The application of a scaling factor to the cosmic optical background (0.1 - 10 nm) significantly impacts the predicted ΔΓ as a function of redshift, whereas a similar modification of the cosmic infrared background (10 - 1000 nm) has no impact. We conclude that the simple delta gamma approach can only constrain part of the EBL spectrum, while a detailed study of the spectra, such as presented in the first part of this research, is needed to constrain the cosmic infrared background.

  11. Fast simulation of x-ray projections of spline-based surfaces using an append buffer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maier, Andreas; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Schwemmer, Chris; Hornegger, Joachim; Keil, Andreas; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-10-01

    Many scientists in the field of x-ray imaging rely on the simulation of x-ray images. As the phantom models become more and more realistic, their projection requires high computational effort. Since x-ray images are based on transmission, many standard graphics acceleration algorithms cannot be applied to this task. However, if adapted properly, the simulation speed can be increased dramatically using state-of-the-art graphics hardware. A custom graphics pipeline that simulates transmission projections for tomographic reconstruction was implemented based on moving spline surface models. All steps from tessellation of the splines, projection onto the detector and drawing are implemented in OpenCL. We introduced a special append buffer for increased performance in order to store the intersections with the scene for every ray. Intersections are then sorted and resolved to materials. Lastly, an absorption model is evaluated to yield an absorption value for each projection pixel. Projection of a moving spline structure is fast and accurate. Projections of size 640 × 480 can be generated within 254 ms. Reconstructions using the projections show errors below 1 HU with a sharp reconstruction kernel. Traditional GPU-based acceleration schemes are not suitable for our reconstruction task. Even in the absence of noise, they result in errors up to 9 HU on average, although projection images appear to be correct under visual examination. Projections generated with our new method are suitable for the validation of novel CT reconstruction algorithms. For complex simulations, such as the evaluation of motion-compensated reconstruction algorithms, this kind of x-ray simulation will reduce the computation time dramatically.

  12. Spline-based high-accuracy piecewise-polynomial phase-to-sinusoid amplitude converters.

    PubMed

    Petrinović, Davor; Brezović, Marko

    2011-04-01

    We propose a method for direct digital frequency synthesis (DDS) using a cubic spline piecewise-polynomial model for a phase-to-sinusoid amplitude converter (PSAC). This method offers maximum smoothness of the output signal. Closed-form expressions for the cubic polynomial coefficients are derived in the spectral domain and the performance analysis of the model is given in the time and frequency domains. We derive the closed-form performance bounds of such DDS using conventional metrics: rms and maximum absolute errors (MAE) and maximum spurious free dynamic range (SFDR) measured in the discrete time domain. The main advantages of the proposed PSAC are its simplicity, analytical tractability, and inherent numerical stability for high table resolutions. Detailed guidelines for a fixed-point implementation are given, based on the algebraic analysis of all quantization effects. The results are verified on 81 PSAC configurations with the output resolutions from 5 to 41 bits by using a bit-exact simulation. The VHDL implementation of a high-accuracy DDS based on the proposed PSAC with 28-bit input phase word and 32-bit output value achieves SFDR of its digital output signal between 180 and 207 dB, with a signal-to-noise ratio of 192 dB. Its implementation requires only one 18 kB block RAM and three 18-bit embedded multipliers in a typical field-programmable gate array (FPGA) device. © 2011 IEEE

  13. Improving spatial resolution in skin-contact thermography: comparison between a spline based and linear interpolation.

    PubMed

    Giansanti, Daniele

    2008-07-01

    A wearable device for skin-contact thermography [Giansanti D, Maccioni G. Development and testing of a wearable integrated thermometer sensor for skin contact thermography. Med Eng Phys 2006 [ahead of print

  14. Attitude Estimation or Quaternion Estimation?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis

    2003-01-01

    The attitude of spacecraft is represented by a 3x3 orthogonal matrix with unity determinant, which belongs to the three-dimensional special orthogonal group SO(3). The fact that all three-parameter representations of SO(3) are singular or discontinuous for certain attitudes has led to the use of higher-dimensional nonsingular parameterizations, especially the four-component quaternion. In attitude estimation, we are faced with the alternatives of using an attitude representation that is either singular or redundant. Estimation procedures fall into three broad classes. The first estimates a three-dimensional representation of attitude deviations from a reference attitude parameterized by a higher-dimensional nonsingular parameterization. The deviations from the reference are assumed to be small enough to avoid any singularity or discontinuity of the three-dimensional parameterization. The second class, which estimates a higher-dimensional representation subject to enough constraints to leave only three degrees of freedom, is difficult to formulate and apply consistently. The third class estimates a representation of SO(3) with more than three dimensions, treating the parameters as independent. We refer to the most common member of this class as quaternion estimation, to contrast it with attitude estimation. We analyze the first and third of these approaches in the context of an extended Kalman filter with simplified kinematics and measurement models.

  15. Estimation Destinations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Threewit, Fran

    This book leads students through a journey of hands-on investigations of skill-based estimation. The 30 lessons in the book are grouped into four units: Holding Hands, The Real Scoop, Container Calculations, and Estimeasurements. In each unit children work with unique, real materials intended to build an awareness of number, quantity, and…

  16. Computational Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Maria G.; Latulippe, Christine L.

    2010-01-01

    Elementary school teachers are responsible for constructing the foundation of number sense in youngsters, and so it is recommended that teacher-training programs include an emphasis on number sense to ensure the development of dynamic, productive computation and estimation skills in students. To better prepare preservice elementary school teachers…

  17. Validating Dose Uncertainty Estimates Produced by AUTODIRECT: An Automated Program to Evaluate Deformable Image Registration Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hojin; Chen, Josephine; Phillips, Justin; Pukala, Jason; Yom, Sue S; Kirby, Neil

    2017-01-01

    Deformable image registration is a powerful tool for mapping information, such as radiation therapy dose calculations, from one computed tomography image to another. However, deformable image registration is susceptible to mapping errors. Recently, an automated deformable image registration evaluation of confidence tool was proposed to predict voxel-specific deformable image registration dose mapping errors on a patient-by-patient basis. The purpose of this work is to conduct an extensive analysis of automated deformable image registration evaluation of confidence tool to show its effectiveness in estimating dose mapping errors. The proposed format of automated deformable image registration evaluation of confidence tool utilizes 4 simulated patient deformations (3 B-spline-based deformations and 1 rigid transformation) to predict the uncertainty in a deformable image registration algorithm's performance. This workflow is validated for 2 DIR algorithms (B-spline multipass from Velocity and Plastimatch) with 1 physical and 11 virtual phantoms, which have known ground-truth deformations, and with 3 pairs of real patient lung images, which have several hundred identified landmarks. The true dose mapping error distributions closely followed the Student t distributions predicted by automated deformable image registration evaluation of confidence tool for the validation tests: on average, the automated deformable image registration evaluation of confidence tool-produced confidence levels of 50%, 68%, and 95% contained 48.8%, 66.3%, and 93.8% and 50.1%, 67.6%, and 93.8% of the actual errors from Velocity and Plastimatch, respectively. Despite the sparsity of landmark points, the observed error distribution from the 3 lung patient data sets also followed the expected error distribution. The dose error distributions from automated deformable image registration evaluation of confidence tool also demonstrate good resemblance to the true dose error distributions. Automated

  18. Angular momentum evolution of galaxies over the past 10 Gyr: A MUSE and KMOS dynamical survey of 400 star-forming galaxies from z = 0.3-1.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, A. M.; Harrison, C. M.; Trayford, J.; Schaller, M.; Smail, Ian; Schaye, J.; Theuns, T.; Smit, R.; Alexander, D. M.; Bacon, R.; Bower, R. G.; Contini, T.; Crain, R. A.; de Breuck, C.; Decarli, R.; Epinat, B.; Fumagalli, M.; Furlong, M.; Galametz, A.; Johnson, H. L.; Lagos, C.; Richard, J.; Vernet, J.; Sharples, R. M.; Sobral, D.; Stott, J. P.

    2017-01-01

    We present a MUSE and KMOS dynamical study 405 star-forming galaxies at redshift z = 0.28-1.65 (median redshift bar{z} = 0.84). Our sample is representative of the star-forming "main-sequence", with star-formation rates of SFR = 0.1-30 M⊙ yr-1 and stellar masses M⋆ = 108-1011 M⊙. For 49 ± 4% of our sample, the dynamics suggest rotational support, 24 ± 3% are unresolved systems and 5 ± 2% appear to be early-stage major mergers with components on 8-30 kpc scales. The remaining 22 ± 5% appear to be dynamically complex, irregular (or face-on systems). For galaxies whose dynamics suggest rotational support, we derive inclination corrected rotational velocities and show these systems lie on a similar scaling between stellar mass and specific angular momentum as local spirals with j⋆ = J / M_star ∝ M_star ^{2/3} but with a redshift evolution that scales as j⋆ ∝ M_star ^{2/3}(1+z)^{-1}. We also identify a correlation between specific angular momentum and disk stability such that galaxies with the highest specific angular momentum (log(j⋆ / M_star ^{2/3}) > 2.5) are the most stable, with Toomre Q = 1.10 ± 0.18, compared to Q = 0.53 ± 0.22 for galaxies with log(j⋆ / M_star ^{2/3}) < 2.5. At a fixed mass, the HST morphologies of galaxies with the highest specific angular momentum resemble spiral galaxies, whilst those with low specific angular momentum are morphologically complex and dominated by several bright star-forming regions. This suggests that angular momentum plays a major role in defining the stability of gas disks: at z ˜ 1, massive galaxies that have disks with low specific angular momentum, are globally unstable, clumpy and turbulent systems. In contrast, galaxies with high specific angular have evolved in to stable disks with spiral structure where star formation is a local (rather than global) process.

  19. Angular momentum evolution of galaxies over the past 10 Gyr: a MUSE and KMOS dynamical survey of 400 star-forming galaxies from z = 0.3 to 1.7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swinbank, A. M.; Harrison, C. M.; Trayford, J.; Schaller, M.; Smail, Ian; Schaye, J.; Theuns, T.; Smit, R.; Alexander, D. M.; Bacon, R.; Bower, R. G.; Contini, T.; Crain, R. A.; de Breuck, C.; Decarli, R.; Epinat, B.; Fumagalli, M.; Furlong, M.; Galametz, A.; Johnson, H. L.; Lagos, C.; Richard, J.; Vernet, J.; Sharples, R. M.; Sobral, D.; Stott, J. P.

    2017-05-01

    We present a MUSE (Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) and KMOS (K-band Multi-Object Spectrograph) dynamical study 405 star-forming galaxies at redshift z = 0.28-1.65 (median redshift \\bar{z} = 0.84). Our sample is representative of the star-forming 'main sequence', with star formation rates of SFR = 0.1-30 M⊙ yr-1 and stellar masses M⋆ = 108-1011 M⊙. For 49 ± 4 per cent of our sample, the dynamics suggest rotational support, 24 ± 3 per cent are unresolved systems and 5 ± 2 per cent appear to be early-stage major mergers with components on 8-30 kpc scales. The remaining 22 ± 5 per cent appear to be dynamically complex, irregular (or face-on systems). For galaxies whose dynamics suggest rotational support, we derive inclination-corrected rotational velocities and show that these systems lie on a similar scaling between stellar mass and specific angular momentum as local spirals with j⋆ = J/M_\\star ∝ M_\\star ^{2/3} but with a redshift evolution that scales as j⋆ ∝ M_\\star ^{2/3}(1+z)^{-1}. We also identify a correlation between specific angular momentum and disc stability such that galaxies with the highest specific angular momentum (log(j⋆/M_\\star ^{2/3}) > 2.5) are the most stable, with Toomre Q = 1.10 ± 0.18, compared to Q = 0.53 ± 0.22 for galaxies with log(j⋆/M_\\star ^{2/3}) < 2.5. At a fixed mass, the Hubble Space Telescope morphologies of galaxies with the highest specific angular momentum resemble spiral galaxies, whilst those with low specific angular momentum are morphologically complex and dominated by several bright star-forming regions. This suggests that angular momentum plays a major role in defining the stability of gas discs: at z ˜ 1, massive galaxies that have discs with low specific angular momentum are globally unstable, clumpy and turbulent systems. In contrast, galaxies with high specific angular momentum have evolved into stable discs with spiral structure where star formation is a local (rather than global

  20. Estimating Modifying Effect of Age on Genetic and Environmental Variance Components in Twin Models

    PubMed Central

    He, Liang; Sillanpää, Mikko J.; Silventoinen, Karri; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pitkäniemi, Janne

    2016-01-01

    Twin studies have been adopted for decades to disentangle the relative genetic and environmental contributions for a wide range of traits. However, heritability estimation based on the classical twin models does not take into account dynamic behavior of the variance components over age. Varying variance of the genetic component over age can imply the existence of gene–environment (G × E) interactions that general genome-wide association studies (GWAS) fail to capture, which may lead to the inconsistency of heritability estimates between twin design and GWAS. Existing parametric G × E interaction models for twin studies are limited by assuming a linear or quadratic form of the variance curves with respect to a moderator that can, however, be overly restricted in reality. Here we propose spline-based approaches to explore the variance curves of the genetic and environmental components. We choose the additive genetic, common, and unique environmental variance components (ACE) model as the starting point. We treat the component variances as variance functions with respect to age modeled by B-splines or P-splines. We develop an empirical Bayes method to estimate the variance curves together with their confidence bands and provide an R package for public use. Our simulations demonstrate that the proposed methods accurately capture dynamic behavior of the component variances in terms of mean square errors with a data set of >10,000 twin pairs. Using the proposed methods as an alternative and major extension to the classical twin models, our analyses with a large-scale Finnish twin data set (19,510 MZ twins and 27,312 DZ same-sex twins) discover that the variances of the A, C, and E components for body mass index (BMI) change substantially across life span in different patterns and the heritability of BMI drops to ∼50% after middle age. The results further indicate that the decline of heritability is due to increasing unique environmental variance, which provides

  1. Estimating Modifying Effect of Age on Genetic and Environmental Variance Components in Twin Models.

    PubMed

    He, Liang; Sillanpää, Mikko J; Silventoinen, Karri; Kaprio, Jaakko; Pitkäniemi, Janne

    2016-04-01

    Twin studies have been adopted for decades to disentangle the relative genetic and environmental contributions for a wide range of traits. However, heritability estimation based on the classical twin models does not take into account dynamic behavior of the variance components over age. Varying variance of the genetic component over age can imply the existence of gene-environment (G×E) interactions that general genome-wide association studies (GWAS) fail to capture, which may lead to the inconsistency of heritability estimates between twin design and GWAS. Existing parametricG×Einteraction models for twin studies are limited by assuming a linear or quadratic form of the variance curves with respect to a moderator that can, however, be overly restricted in reality. Here we propose spline-based approaches to explore the variance curves of the genetic and environmental components. We choose the additive genetic, common, and unique environmental variance components (ACE) model as the starting point. We treat the component variances as variance functions with respect to age modeled by B-splines or P-splines. We develop an empirical Bayes method to estimate the variance curves together with their confidence bands and provide an R package for public use. Our simulations demonstrate that the proposed methods accurately capture dynamic behavior of the component variances in terms of mean square errors with a data set of >10,000 twin pairs. Using the proposed methods as an alternative and major extension to the classical twin models, our analyses with a large-scale Finnish twin data set (19,510 MZ twins and 27,312 DZ same-sex twins) discover that the variances of the A, C, and E components for body mass index (BMI) change substantially across life span in different patterns and the heritability of BMI drops to ∼50% after middle age. The results further indicate that the decline of heritability is due to increasing unique environmental variance, which provides more

  2. Comparison of Total Variation with a Motion Estimation Based Compressed Sensing Approach for Self-Gated Cardiac Cine MRI in Small Animal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Marinetto, Eugenio; Pascau, Javier; Desco, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Compressed sensing (CS) has been widely applied to prospective cardiac cine MRI. The aim of this work is to study the benefits obtained by including motion estimation in the CS framework for small-animal retrospective cardiac cine. Methods We propose a novel B-spline-based compressed sensing method (SPLICS) that includes motion estimation and generalizes previous spatiotemporal total variation (ST-TV) methods by taking into account motion between frames. In addition, we assess the effect of an optimum weighting between spatial and temporal sparsity to further improve results. Both methods were implemented using the efficient Split Bregman methodology and were evaluated on rat data comparing animals with myocardial infarction with controls for several acceleration factors. Results ST-TV with optimum selection of the weighting sparsity parameter led to results similar to those of SPLICS; ST-TV with large relative temporal sparsity led to temporal blurring effects. However, SPLICS always properly corrected temporal blurring, independently of the weighting parameter. At acceleration factors of 15, SPLICS did not distort temporal intensity information but led to some artefacts and slight over-smoothing. At an acceleration factor of 7, images were reconstructed without significant loss of quality. Conclusion We have validated SPLICS for retrospective cardiac cine in small animal, achieving high acceleration factors. In addition, we have shown that motion modelling may not be essential for retrospective cine and that similar results can be obtained by using ST-TV provided that an optimum selection of the spatiotemporal sparsity weighting parameter is performed. PMID:25350290

  3. Variance estimation for stratified propensity score estimators.

    PubMed

    Williamson, E J; Morley, R; Lucas, A; Carpenter, J R

    2012-07-10

    Propensity score methods are increasingly used to estimate the effect of a treatment or exposure on an outcome in non-randomised studies. We focus on one such method, stratification on the propensity score, comparing it with the method of inverse-probability weighting by the propensity score. The propensity score--the conditional probability of receiving the treatment given observed covariates--is usually an unknown probability estimated from the data. Estimators for the variance of treatment effect estimates typically used in practice, however, do not take into account that the propensity score itself has been estimated from the data. By deriving the asymptotic marginal variance of the stratified estimate of treatment effect, correctly taking into account the estimation of the propensity score, we show that routinely used variance estimators are likely to produce confidence intervals that are too conservative when the propensity score model includes variables that predict (cause) the outcome, but only weakly predict the treatment. In contrast, a comparison with the analogous marginal variance for the inverse probability weighted (IPW) estimator shows that routinely used variance estimators for the IPW estimator are likely to produce confidence intervals that are almost always too conservative. Because exact calculation of the asymptotic marginal variance is likely to be complex, particularly for the stratified estimator, we suggest that bootstrap estimates of variance should be used in practice.

  4. Estimating potential evapotranspiration with improved radiation estimation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Potential evapotranspiration (PET) is of great importance to estimation of surface energy budget and water balance calculation. The accurate estimation of PET will facilitate efficient irrigation scheduling, drainage design, and other agricultural and meteorological applications. However, accuracy o...

  5. Ensemble estimators for multivariate entropy estimation.

    PubMed

    Sricharan, Kumar; Wei, Dennis; Hero, Alfred O

    2013-07-01

    The problem of estimation of density functionals like entropy and mutual information has received much attention in the statistics and information theory communities. A large class of estimators of functionals of the probability density suffer from the curse of dimensionality, wherein the mean squared error (MSE) decays increasingly slowly as a function of the sample size T as the dimension d of the samples increases. In particular, the rate is often glacially slow of order O(T(-)(γ)(/)(d) ), where γ > 0 is a rate parameter. Examples of such estimators include kernel density estimators, k-nearest neighbor (k-NN) density estimators, k-NN entropy estimators, intrinsic dimension estimators and other examples. In this paper, we propose a weighted affine combination of an ensemble of such estimators, where optimal weights can be chosen such that the weighted estimator converges at a much faster dimension invariant rate of O(T(-1)). Furthermore, we show that these optimal weights can be determined by solving a convex optimization problem which can be performed offline and does not require training data. We illustrate the superior performance of our weighted estimator for two important applications: (i) estimating the Panter-Dite distortion-rate factor and (ii) estimating the Shannon entropy for testing the probability distribution of a random sample.

  6. Comparing Mapped Plot Estimators

    Treesearch

    Paul C. Van Deusen

    2006-01-01

    Two alternative derivations of estimators for mean and variance from mapped plots are compared by considering the models that support the estimators and by simulation. It turns out that both models lead to the same estimator for the mean but lead to very different variance estimators. The variance estimators based on the least valid model assumptions are shown to...

  7. Estimating avian population size using Bowden's estimator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Diefenbach, D.R.

    2009-01-01

    Avian researchers often uniquely mark birds, and multiple estimators could be used to estimate population size using individually identified birds. However, most estimators of population size require that all sightings of marked birds be uniquely identified, and many assume homogeneous detection probabilities. Bowden's estimator can incorporate sightings of marked birds that are not uniquely identified and relax assumptions required of other estimators. I used computer simulation to evaluate the performance of Bowden's estimator for situations likely to be encountered in bird studies. When the assumptions of the estimator were met, abundance and variance estimates and confidence-interval coverage were accurate. However, precision was poor for small population sizes (N < 50) unless a large percentage of the population was marked (>75%) and multiple (≥8) sighting surveys were conducted. If additional birds are marked after sighting surveys begin, it is important to initially mark a large proportion of the population (pm ≥ 0.5 if N ≤ 100 or pm > 0.1 if N ≥ 250) and minimize sightings in which birds are not uniquely identified; otherwise, most population estimates will be overestimated by >10%. Bowden's estimator can be useful for avian studies because birds can be resighted multiple times during a single survey, not all sightings of marked birds have to uniquely identify individuals, detection probabilities among birds can vary, and the complete study area does not have to be surveyed. I provide computer code for use with pilot data to design mark-resight surveys to meet desired precision for abundance estimates.

  8. Price and cost estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Price and Cost Estimating Program (PACE II) was developed to prepare man-hour and material cost estimates. Versatile and flexible tool significantly reduces computation time and errors and reduces typing and reproduction time involved in preparation of cost estimates.

  9. Price and cost estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Price and Cost Estimating Program (PACE II) was developed to prepare man-hour and material cost estimates. Versatile and flexible tool significantly reduces computation time and errors and reduces typing and reproduction time involved in preparation of cost estimates.

  10. Zen Musings on Bion's "O" and "K".

    PubMed

    Cooper, Paul C

    2016-08-01

    The author defines Bion's use of "O" and "K" and discusses both from the radical nondualist realizational perspective available through the lens of Eihei Dogen's (1200-1253) Soto Zen Buddhist orientation. Fundamental differences in core foundational principles are discussed as well as similarities and their relevance to clinical practice. A case example exemplifies and explicates the abstract aspects of the discussion, which draws from Zen teaching stories, reference to Dogen's original writings, and the scholarly commentarial literature as well as from contemporary writers who integrate Zen Buddhist study and practice with Bion's psychoanalytic writings on theory and technique.

  11. Musings on the Moral Life of Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryk, Anthony S.

    1988-01-01

    Many current school problems arise from a desiccated sense of institutional purpose that fosters student and teacher alienation. A regeneration rather than reform is in order. This essay mixes research findings, personal concerns, and individual speculations to provide educators an entry point for further discussion regarding the moral life of…

  12. Musings on the Internet, Part 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerf, Vinton G.

    2004-01-01

    In t his article, the author discusses the role of higher education research and development (R&D)--particularly R&D into the issues and problems that industry is less able to explore. In addition to high-speed computer communication, broadband networking efforts, and the use of fiber, a rich service environment is equally important and is…

  13. Student Musings on Life without Mass Media.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dardenne, Robert

    1994-01-01

    Discusses comments from hundreds of students over a dozen years in response to an assignment in which they are asked to avoid all forms of mass media for four of five days and record their reactions in diaries. Discusses media as companion, media easing routine tasks, media as addiction, antidote to silence, alternate activities, and fear of…

  14. Musings on Willower's "Fog": A Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Fenwick

    1998-01-01

    Professor Willower complains about the "fog" encountered in postmodernist literature and the author's two articles in "Journal of School Leadership." On closer examination, this miasma is simply the mildew on Willower's Cartesian glasses. Educational administration continues to substitute management and business fads for any…

  15. Dancing with the Muses: dissociation and flow.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Paula; Jaque, S Victoria

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated dissociative psychological processes and flow (dispositional and state) in a group of professional and pre-professional dancers (n=74). In this study, high scores for global (Mdn=4.14) and autotelic (Mdn=4.50) flow suggest that dancing was inherently integrating and rewarding, although 17.6% of the dancers were identified as possibly having clinical levels of dissociation (Dissociative Experiences Scale-Taxon cutoff score≥20). The results of the multivariate analysis of variance indicated that subjects with high levels of dissociation had significantly lower levels of global flow (p<.05). Stepwise linear regression analyses demonstrated that dispositional flow negatively predicted the dissociative constructs of depersonalization and taxon (p<.05) but did not significantly predict the variance in absorption/imagination (p>.05). As hypothesized, dissociation and flow seem to operate as different mental processes.

  16. Musings: "Hasten Slowly:" Thoughtfully Planned Acceleration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Miraca U. M.

    2008-01-01

    Acceleration is one of the best researched interventions for gifted students. The author is an advocate of acceleration. However, advocating for the thoughtful, carefully judged employment of a procedure with well researched effectiveness does not imply approval of cases where the procedure is used without sufficient thought--especially where it…

  17. Musings by a Non-"Born Teacher"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oswald, Lynda J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on her continual journal in regard to improving her teaching skills. She opines that this journey is a story that could resonate with other colleagues to whom teaching is also critically important but to whom it does not come naturally. She describes lessons she learned in her early years of teaching, and she…

  18. Musings: "Hasten Slowly:" Thoughtfully Planned Acceleration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Miraca U. M.

    2008-01-01

    Acceleration is one of the best researched interventions for gifted students. The author is an advocate of acceleration. However, advocating for the thoughtful, carefully judged employment of a procedure with well researched effectiveness does not imply approval of cases where the procedure is used without sufficient thought--especially where it…

  19. Molecular musings in microbial ecology and evolution

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A few major discoveries have influenced how ecologists and evolutionists study microbes. Here, in the format of an interview, we answer questions that directly relate to how these discoveries are perceived in these two branches of microbiology, and how they have impacted on both scientific thinking and methodology. The first question is "What has been the influence of the 'Universal Tree of Life' based on molecular markers?" For evolutionists, the tree was a tool to understand the past of known (cultured) organisms, mapping the invention of various physiologies on the evolutionary history of microbes. For ecologists the tree was a guide to discover the current diversity of unknown (uncultured) organisms, without much knowledge of their physiology. The second question we ask is "What was the impact of discovering frequent lateral gene transfer among microbes?" In evolutionary microbiology, frequent lateral gene transfer (LGT) made a simple description of relationships between organisms impossible, and for microbial ecologists, functions could not be easily linked to specific genotypes. Both fields initially resisted LGT, but methods or topics of inquiry were eventually changed in one to incorporate LGT in its theoretical models (evolution) and in the other to achieve its goals despite that phenomenon (ecology). The third and last question we ask is "What are the implications of the unexpected extent of diversity?" The variation in the extent of diversity between organisms invalidated the universality of species definitions based on molecular criteria, a major obstacle to the adaptation of models developed for the study of macroscopic eukaryotes to evolutionary microbiology. This issue has not overtly affected microbial ecology, as it had already abandoned species in favor of the more flexible operational taxonomic units. This field is nonetheless moving away from traditional methods to measure diversity, as they do not provide enough resolution to uncover what lies below the species level. The answers of the evolutionary microbiologist and microbial ecologist to these three questions illustrate differences in their theoretical frameworks. These differences mean that both fields can react quite distinctly to the same discovery, incorporating it with more or less difficulty in their scientific practice. Reviewers This article was reviewed by W. Ford Doolittle, Eugene V. Koonin and Maureen A. O'Malley. PMID:22074255

  20. Molecular musings in microbial ecology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Case, Rebecca J; Boucher, Yan

    2011-11-10

    A few major discoveries have influenced how ecologists and evolutionists study microbes. Here, in the format of an interview, we answer questions that directly relate to how these discoveries are perceived in these two branches of microbiology, and how they have impacted on both scientific thinking and methodology.The first question is "What has been the influence of the 'Universal Tree of Life' based on molecular markers?" For evolutionists, the tree was a tool to understand the past of known (cultured) organisms, mapping the invention of various physiologies on the evolutionary history of microbes. For ecologists the tree was a guide to discover the current diversity of unknown (uncultured) organisms, without much knowledge of their physiology.The second question we ask is "What was the impact of discovering frequent lateral gene transfer among microbes?" In evolutionary microbiology, frequent lateral gene transfer (LGT) made a simple description of relationships between organisms impossible, and for microbial ecologists, functions could not be easily linked to specific genotypes. Both fields initially resisted LGT, but methods or topics of inquiry were eventually changed in one to incorporate LGT in its theoretical models (evolution) and in the other to achieve its goals despite that phenomenon (ecology).The third and last question we ask is "What are the implications of the unexpected extent of diversity?" The variation in the extent of diversity between organisms invalidated the universality of species definitions based on molecular criteria, a major obstacle to the adaptation of models developed for the study of macroscopic eukaryotes to evolutionary microbiology. This issue has not overtly affected microbial ecology, as it had already abandoned species in favor of the more flexible operational taxonomic units. This field is nonetheless moving away from traditional methods to measure diversity, as they do not provide enough resolution to uncover what lies below the species level.The answers of the evolutionary microbiologist and microbial ecologist to these three questions illustrate differences in their theoretical frameworks. These differences mean that both fields can react quite distinctly to the same discovery, incorporating it with more or less difficulty in their scientific practice.

  1. The conformational musings of a medicinal chemist.

    PubMed

    Finch, Harry

    2014-03-01

    Structure-based drug design strategies based on X-ray crystallographic data of ligands bound to biological targets or computationally derived pharmacophore models have been introduced over the past 25 years or so. These have now matured and are deeply embedded in the drug discovery process in most pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies where they continue to play a major part in the discovery of new medicines and drug candidates. Newly developed NMR methods can now provide a full description of the conformations in which ligands exist in free solution, crucially allowing those that are dominant to be identified. Integrating experimentally determined conformational information on active and inactive molecules in drug discovery programmes, alongside the existing techniques, should have a major impact on the success of drug discovery.

  2. Transits of Venus and Mercury as muses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, William

    2013-11-01

    Transits of Venus and Mercury have inspired artistic creation of all kinds. After having been the first to witness a Venusian transit, in 1639, Jeremiah Horrocks expressed his feelings in poetry. Production has subsequently widened to include songs, short stories, novels, novellas, sermons, theatre, film, engravings, paintings, photography, medals, sculpture, stained glass, cartoons, stamps, music, opera, flower arrangements, and food and drink. Transit creations are reviewed, with emphasis on the English- and French-speaking worlds. It is found that transits of Mercury inspire much less creation than those of Venus, despite being much more frequent, and arguably of no less astronomical significance. It is suggested that this is primarily due to the mythological associations of Venus with sex and love, which are more powerful and gripping than Mercury's mythological role as a messenger and protector of traders and thieves. The lesson for those presenting the night sky to the public is that sex sells.

  3. Estimating tail probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, D.B.; Tolley, H.D.

    1982-12-01

    This paper investigates procedures for univariate nonparametric estimation of tail probabilities. Extrapolated values for tail probabilities beyond the data are also obtained based on the shape of the density in the tail. Several estimators which use exponential weighting are described. These are compared in a Monte Carlo study to nonweighted estimators, to the empirical cdf, to an integrated kernel, to a Fourier series estimate, to a penalized likelihood estimate and a maximum likelihood estimate. Selected weighted estimators are shown to compare favorably to many of these standard estimators for the sampling distributions investigated.

  4. An Optimized Spline-Based Registration of a 3D CT to a Set of C-Arm Images

    PubMed Central

    Thévenaz, P.; Zheng, G.; Nolte, L. -P.; Unser, M.

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm for the rigid-body registration of a CT volume to a set of C-arm images. The algorithm uses a gradient-based iterative minimization of a least-squares measure of dissimilarity between the C-arm images and projections of the CT volume. To compute projections, we use a novel method for fast integration of the volume along rays. To improve robustness and speed, we take advantage of a coarse-to-fine processing of the volume/image pyramids. To compute the projections of the volume, the gradient of the dissimilarity measure, and the multiresolution data pyramids, we use a continuous image/volume model based on cubic B-splines, which ensures a high interpolation accuracy and a gradient of the dissimilarity measure that is well defined everywhere. We show the performance of our algorithm on a human spine phantom, where the true alignment is determined using a set of fiducial markers. PMID:23165033

  5. A quartic B-spline based explicit time integration scheme for structural dynamics with controllable numerical dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, W. B.; Duan, S. Y.; Yan, J.; Ma, Y. B.; Wei, K.; Fang, D. N.

    2017-03-01

    An explicit time integration scheme based on quartic B-splines is presented for solving linear structural dynamics problems. The scheme is of a one-parameter family of schemes where free algorithmic parameter controls stability, accuracy and numerical dispersion. The proposed scheme possesses at least second-order accuracy and at most third-order accuracy. A 2D wave problem is analyzed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme in reducing high-frequency modes and retaining low-frequency modes. Except for general structural dynamics, the proposed scheme can be used effectively for wave propagation problems in which numerical dissipation is needed to reduce spurious oscillations.

  6. Periodic quasi-orthogonal spline bases and applications to least-squares curve fitting of digital images.

    PubMed

    Flickner, M; Hafner, J; Rodriguez, E J; Sanz, J C

    1996-01-01

    Presents a new covariant basis, dubbed the quasi-orthogonal Q-spline basis, for the space of n-degree periodic uniform splines with k knots. This basis is obtained analogously to the B-spline basis by scaling and periodically translating a single spline function of bounded support. The construction hinges on an important theorem involving the asymptotic behavior (in the dimension) of the inverse of banded Toeplitz matrices. The authors show that the Gram matrix for this basis is nearly diagonal, hence, the name "quasi-orthogonal". The new basis is applied to the problem of approximating closed digital curves in 2D images by least-squares fitting. Since the new spline basis is almost orthogonal, the least-squares solution can be approximated by decimating a convolution between a resolution-dependent kernel and the given data. The approximating curve is expressed as a linear combination of the new spline functions and new "control points". Another convolution maps these control points to the classical B-spline control points. A generalization of the result has relevance to the solution of regularized fitting problems.

  7. A B-Spline-Based Colocation Method to Approximate the Solutions to the Equations of Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    M. D. Landon; R. W. Johnson

    1999-07-01

    The potential of a B-spline collocation method for numerically solving the equations of fluid dynamics is discussed. It is known that B-splines can resolve complex curves with drastically fewer data than can their standard shape function counterparts. This feature promises to allow much faster numerical simulations of fluid flow than standard finite volume/finite element methods without sacrificing accuracy. An example channel flow problem is solved using the method.

  8. A B-Spline-Based Colocation Method to Approximate the Solutions to the Equations of Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Richard Wayne; Landon, Mark Dee

    1999-07-01

    The potential of a B-spline collocation method for numerically solving the equations of fluid dynamics is discussed. It is known that B-splines can resolve curves with drastically fewer data than can their standard shape function counterparts. This feature promises to allow much faster numerical simulations of fluid flow than standard finite volume/finite element methods without sacrificing accuracy. An example channel flow problem is solved using the method.

  9. An Optimized Spline-Based Registration of a 3D CT to a Set of C-Arm Images.

    PubMed

    Jonić, S; Thévenaz, P; Zheng, G; Nolte, L-P; Unser, M

    2006-01-01

    We have developed an algorithm for the rigid-body registration of a CT volume to a set of C-arm images. The algorithm uses a gradient-based iterative minimization of a least-squares measure of dissimilarity between the C-arm images and projections of the CT volume. To compute projections, we use a novel method for fast integration of the volume along rays. To improve robustness and speed, we take advantage of a coarse-to-fine processing of the volume/image pyramids. To compute the projections of the volume, the gradient of the dissimilarity measure, and the multiresolution data pyramids, we use a continuous image/volume model based on cubic B-splines, which ensures a high interpolation accuracy and a gradient of the dissimilarity measure that is well defined everywhere. We show the performance of our algorithm on a human spine phantom, where the true alignment is determined using a set of fiducial markers.

  10. Estimating Uncertainty in Annual Forest Inventory Estimates

    Treesearch

    Ronald E. McRoberts; Veronica C. Lessard

    1999-01-01

    The precision of annual forest inventory estimates may be negatively affected by uncertainty from a variety of sources including: (1) sampling error; (2) procedures for updating plots not measured in the current year; and (3) measurement errors. The impact of these sources of uncertainty on final inventory estimates is investigated using Monte Carlo simulation...

  11. Aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.

    1987-01-01

    The aircraft parameter estimation problem is used to illustrate the utility of parameter estimation, which applies to many engineering and scientific fields. Maximum likelihood estimation has been used to extract stability and control derivatives from flight data for many years. This paper presents some of the basic concepts of aircraft parameter estimation and briefly surveys the literature in the field. The maximum likelihood estimator is discussed, and the basic concepts of minimization and estimation are examined for a simple simulated aircraft example. The cost functions that are to be minimized during estimation are defined and discussed. Graphic representations of the cost functions are given to illustrate the minimization process. Finally, the basic concepts are generalized, and estimation from flight data is discussed. Some of the major conclusions for the simulated example are also developed for the analysis of flight data from the F-14, highly maneuverable aircraft technology (HiMAT), and space shuttle vehicles.

  12. Information geometric density estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ke; Marchand-Maillet, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    We investigate kernel density estimation where the kernel function varies from point to point. Density estimation in the input space means to find a set of coordinates on a statistical manifold. This novel perspective helps to combine efforts from information geometry and machine learning to spawn a family of density estimators. We present example models with simulations. We discuss the principle and theory of such density estimation.

  13. Price Estimation Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, R. G.; Aster, R. W.; Firnett, P. J.; Miller, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Improved Price Estimation Guidelines, IPEG4, program provides comparatively simple, yet relatively accurate estimate of price of manufactured product. IPEG4 processes user supplied input data to determine estimate of price per unit of production. Input data include equipment cost, space required, labor cost, materials and supplies cost, utility expenses, and production volume on industry wide or process wide basis.

  14. Fuel Burn Estimation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterji, Gano

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Validated the fuel estimation procedure using flight test data. A good fuel model can be created if weight and fuel data are available. Error in assumed takeoff weight results in similar amount of error in the fuel estimate. Fuel estimation error bounds can be determined.

  15. Making Connections with Estimation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobato, Joanne E.

    1993-01-01

    Describes four methods to structure estimation activities that enable students to make connections between their understanding of numbers and extensions of those concepts to estimating. Presents activities that connect estimation with other curricular areas, other mathematical topics, and real-world applications. (MDH)

  16. Price Estimation Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, R. G.; Aster, R. W.; Firnett, P. J.; Miller, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Improved Price Estimation Guidelines, IPEG4, program provides comparatively simple, yet relatively accurate estimate of price of manufactured product. IPEG4 processes user supplied input data to determine estimate of price per unit of production. Input data include equipment cost, space required, labor cost, materials and supplies cost, utility expenses, and production volume on industry wide or process wide basis.

  17. Bayesian sparse channel estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chulong; Zoltowski, Michael D.

    2012-05-01

    In Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) systems, the technique used to estimate and track the time-varying multipath channel is critical to ensure reliable, high data rate communications. It is recognized that wireless channels often exhibit a sparse structure, especially for wideband and ultra-wideband systems. In order to exploit this sparse structure to reduce the number of pilot tones and increase the channel estimation quality, the application of compressed sensing to channel estimation is proposed. In this article, to make the compressed channel estimation more feasible for practical applications, it is investigated from a perspective of Bayesian learning. Under the Bayesian learning framework, the large-scale compressed sensing problem, as well as large time delay for the estimation of the doubly selective channel over multiple consecutive OFDM symbols, can be avoided. Simulation studies show a significant improvement in channel estimation MSE and less computing time compared to the conventional compressed channel estimation techniques.

  18. Maximum likelihood signature estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    Maximum-likelihood estimates are discussed which are based on an unlabeled sample of observations, of unknown parameters in a mixture of normal distributions. Several successive approximation procedures for obtaining such maximum-likelihood estimates are described. These procedures, which are theoretically justified by the local contractibility of certain maps, are designed to take advantage of good initial estimates of the unknown parameters. They can be applied to the signature extension problem, in which good initial estimates of the unknown parameters are obtained from segments which are geographically near the segments from which the unlabeled samples are taken. Additional problems to which these methods are applicable include: estimation of proportions and adaptive classification (estimation of mean signatures and covariances).

  19. Multitaper Spectrum Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, I. K.; Stark, P. B.

    Multitapering is a statistical technique developed to improve on the notorious periodogram estimate of the power spectrum (Thomson, 1982; Percival, Walden 1993). We show how to obtain orthogonal tapers for time series observed with gaps, and how to use statistical resampling techniques (Efron, Tibshirani 1993) to calculate realistic uncertainty estimates for multitaper estimates. We introduce multisegment multitapering. Multitapering can also be extended to the 2D case. We indicate how to construct tapers that minimize the spatial leakage in estimates of the spherical harmonic decomposition of the velocity images. Spatial multitapering followed by the temporal tapering of the estimated spherical harmonic time series is expected to result in improved spectrum and subsequent solar oscillation mode parameter estimates.

  20. Estimation in satellite control.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debra, D. B.

    1971-01-01

    The use of estimators or observers is discussed as applied to satellite attitude control and the control of drag-free satellites. The practical problems of implementation are discussed, and the relative advantages of full and reduced state estimators are compared, particularly in terms of their effectiveness and bandwidth as filters. Three applications are used to illustrate the principles. They are: (1) a reaction wheel control system, (2) a spinning attitude control system, and (3) a drag-free satellite translational control system. Fixed estimator gains are shown to be adequate for these (and many other) applications. Our experience in the hardware realization of estimators has led to categorize the error sources in terms of those that improve with increased estimator gains and those that get worse with increased estimator gains.

  1. Estimating Prices of Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aster, R. W.; Chamberlain, R. G.; Zendejas, S. C.; Lee, T. S.; Malhotra, S.

    1986-01-01

    Company-wide or process-wide production simulated. Price Estimation Guidelines (IPEG) program provides simple, accurate estimates of prices of manufactured products. Simplification of SAMIS allows analyst with limited time and computing resources to perform greater number of sensitivity studies. Although developed for photovoltaic industry, readily adaptable to standard assembly-line type of manufacturing industry. IPEG program estimates annual production price per unit. IPEG/PC program written in TURBO PASCAL.

  2. Estimating Prices of Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aster, R. W.; Chamberlain, R. G.; Zendejas, S. C.; Lee, T. S.; Malhotra, S.

    1986-01-01

    Company-wide or process-wide production simulated. Price Estimation Guidelines (IPEG) program provides simple, accurate estimates of prices of manufactured products. Simplification of SAMIS allows analyst with limited time and computing resources to perform greater number of sensitivity studies. Although developed for photovoltaic industry, readily adaptable to standard assembly-line type of manufacturing industry. IPEG program estimates annual production price per unit. IPEG/PC program written in TURBO PASCAL.

  3. Reservoir Temperature Estimator

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, Carl D.

    2014-12-08

    The Reservoir Temperature Estimator (RTEst) is a program that can be used to estimate deep geothermal reservoir temperature and chemical parameters such as CO2 fugacity based on the water chemistry of shallower, cooler reservoir fluids. This code uses the plugin features provided in The Geochemist's Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2011) and interfaces with the model-independent parameter estimation code Pest (Doherty, 2005) to provide for optimization of the estimated parameters based on the minimization of the weighted sum of squares of a set of saturation indexes from a user-provided mineral assemblage.

  4. Piecewise Linear Slope Estimation.

    PubMed

    Ingle, A N; Sethares, W A; Varghese, T; Bucklew, J A

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a method for directly estimating slope values in a noisy piecewise linear function. By imposing a Markov structure on the sequence of slopes, piecewise linear fitting is posed as a maximum a posteriori estimation problem. A dynamic program efficiently solves this by traversing a linearly growing trellis. The alternating maximization algorithm (a kind of pseudo-EM method) is used to estimate the model parameters from data and its convergence behavior is analyzed. Ultrasound shear wave imaging is presented as a primary application. The algorithm is general enough for applicability in other fields, as suggested by an application to the estimation of shifts in financial interest rate data.

  5. Piecewise Linear Slope Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Sethares, W. A.; Bucklew, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a method for directly estimating slope values in a noisy piecewise linear function. By imposing a Markov structure on the sequence of slopes, piecewise linear fitting is posed as a maximum a posteriori estimation problem. A dynamic program efficiently solves this by traversing a linearly growing trellis. The alternating maximization algorithm (a kind of pseudo-EM method) is used to estimate the model parameters from data and its convergence behavior is analyzed. Ultrasound shear wave imaging is presented as a primary application. The algorithm is general enough for applicability in other fields, as suggested by an application to the estimation of shifts in financial interest rate data. PMID:26229417

  6. Parameter estimating state reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, E. B.

    1976-01-01

    Parameter estimation is considered for systems whose entire state cannot be measured. Linear observers are designed to recover the unmeasured states to a sufficient accuracy to permit the estimation process. There are three distinct dynamics that must be accommodated in the system design: the dynamics of the plant, the dynamics of the observer, and the system updating of the parameter estimation. The latter two are designed to minimize interaction of the involved systems. These techniques are extended to weakly nonlinear systems. The application to a simulation of a space shuttle POGO system test is of particular interest. A nonlinear simulation of the system is developed, observers designed, and the parameters estimated.

  7. Updated Conceptual Cost Estimating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    16-page report discusses development and use of NASA TR-1508, the Kennedy Space Center Aerospace Construction Price Book for preparing conceptual, budget, funding, cost-estimating, and preliminary cost-engineering reports. Updated annually from 1974 through 1985 with actual bid prices and government estimates. Includes labor and material quantities and prices with contractor and subcontractor markups for buildings, facilities, and systems at Kennedy Space Center. While data pertains to aerospace facilities, format and cost-estimating techniques guide estimation of costs in other construction applications.

  8. Estimating Latent Distributions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mislevy, Robert J.

    1984-01-01

    Assuming vectors of item responses depend on ability through a fully specified item response model, this paper presents maximum likelihood equations for estimating the population parameters without estimating an ability parameter for each subject. Asymptotic standard errors, tests of fit, computing approximations, and details of four special cases…

  9. Estimating Health Services Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, H. M.

    1985-01-01

    In computer program NOROCA populations statistics from National Center for Health Statistics used with computational procedure to estimate health service utilization rates, physician demands (by specialty) and hospital bed demands (by type of service). Computational procedure applicable to health service area of any size and even used to estimate statewide demands for health services.

  10. Overconfidence in Interval Estimates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soll, Jack B.; Klayman, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    Judges were asked to make numerical estimates (e.g., "In what year was the first flight of a hot air balloon?"). Judges provided high and low estimates such that they were X% sure that the correct answer lay between them. They exhibited substantial overconfidence: The correct answer fell inside their intervals much less than X% of the time. This…

  11. Conceptual Cost Estimating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center data aid in efficient construction-cost managment. Report discusses development and use of NASA TR-1508, Kennedy Space Center Aerospace Construction price book for preparing conceptual budget, funding cost estimating, and preliminary cost engineering reports. Report based on actual bid prices and Government estimates.

  12. Fano factor estimation.

    PubMed

    Rajdl, Kamil; Lansky, Petr

    2014-02-01

    Fano factor is one of the most widely used measures of variability of spike trains. Its standard estimator is the ratio of sample variance to sample mean of spike counts observed in a time window and the quality of the estimator strongly depends on the length of the window. We investigate this dependence under the assumption that the spike train behaves as an equilibrium renewal process. It is shown what characteristics of the spike train have large effect on the estimator bias. Namely, the effect of refractory period is analytically evaluated. Next, we create an approximate asymptotic formula for the mean square error of the estimator, which can also be used to find minimum of the error in estimation from single spike trains. The accuracy of the Fano factor estimator is compared with the accuracy of the estimator based on the squared coefficient of variation. All the results are illustrated for spike trains with gamma and inverse Gaussian probability distributions of interspike intervals. Finally, we discuss possibilities of how to select a suitable observation window for the Fano factor estimation.

  13. Estimating mutual information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraskov, Alexander; Stögbauer, Harald; Grassberger, Peter

    2004-06-01

    We present two classes of improved estimators for mutual information M(X,Y) , from samples of random points distributed according to some joint probability density μ(x,y) . In contrast to conventional estimators based on binnings, they are based on entropy estimates from k -nearest neighbor distances. This means that they are data efficient (with k=1 we resolve structures down to the smallest possible scales), adaptive (the resolution is higher where data are more numerous), and have minimal bias. Indeed, the bias of the underlying entropy estimates is mainly due to nonuniformity of the density at the smallest resolved scale, giving typically systematic errors which scale as functions of k/N for N points. Numerically, we find that both families become exact for independent distributions, i.e. the estimator M̂ (X,Y) vanishes (up to statistical fluctuations) if μ(x,y)=μ(x)μ(y) . This holds for all tested marginal distributions and for all dimensions of x and y . In addition, we give estimators for redundancies between more than two random variables. We compare our algorithms in detail with existing algorithms. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of our estimators for assessing the actual independence of components obtained from independent component analysis (ICA), for improving ICA, and for estimating the reliability of blind source separation.

  14. Time Delay Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    investigate the possibility of exploiting the properties of a detected Low Probability of Intercept (LPI) signal waveform to estimate time delay, and by...ratios, namely 10 dB and less. We also examine the minimum time –delay estimate error – the Cramer–Rao bound. The results indicate that the method

  15. Conceptual Cost Estimating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center data aid in efficient construction-cost managment. Report discusses development and use of NASA TR-1508, Kennedy Space Center Aerospace Construction price book for preparing conceptual budget, funding cost estimating, and preliminary cost engineering reports. Report based on actual bid prices and Government estimates.

  16. Bivariate Estimates of Giftedness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Edward

    1983-01-01

    Presents the bivariate normal probability distribution as a method for estimating the prevalence of giftedness. The bivariate model requires the specification of two cutoff values for two selection variables and information regarding the size of the correlations between variables. The use and interpretation of bivariate estimates is discussed.…

  17. Robust incremental condition estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Bischof, C.H.; Tang, P.T.P.

    1991-03-29

    This paper presents an improved version of incremental condition estimation, a technique for tracking the extremal singular values of a triangular matrix as it is being constructed one column at a time. We present a new motivation for this estimation technique using orthogonal projections. The paper focuses on an implementation of this estimation scheme in an accurate and consistent fashion. In particular, we address the subtle numerical issues arising in the computation of the eigensystem of a symmetric rank-one perturbed diagonal 2 {times} 2 matrix. Experimental results show that the resulting scheme does a good job in estimating the extremal singular values of triangular matrices, independent of matrix size and matrix condition number, and that it performs qualitatively in the same fashion as some of the commonly used nonincremental condition estimation schemes.

  18. Automated Estimating System (AES)

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, D.A.

    1989-09-01

    This document describes Version 3.1 of the Automated Estimating System, a personal computer-based software package designed to aid in the creation, updating, and reporting of project cost estimates for the Estimating and Scheduling Department of the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Engineering Division. Version 3.1 of the Automated Estimating System is capable of running in a multiuser environment across a token ring network. The token ring network makes possible services and applications that will more fully integrate all aspects of information processing, provides a central area for large data bases to reside, and allows access to the data base by multiple users. Version 3.1 of the Automated Estimating System also has been enhanced to include an Assembly pricing data base that may be used to retrieve cost data into an estimate. A WBS Title File program has also been included in Version 3.1. The WBS Title File program allows for the creation of a WBS title file that has been integrated with the Automated Estimating System to provide WBS titles in update mode and in reports. This provides for consistency in WBS titles and provides the capability to display WBS titles on reports generated at a higher WBS level.

  19. Estimating cell populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. S.; Castleman, K. R.

    1981-01-01

    An important step in the diagnosis of a cervical cytology specimen is estimating the proportions of the various cell types present. This is usually done with a cell classifier, the error rates of which can be expressed as a confusion matrix. We show how to use the confusion matrix to obtain an unbiased estimate of the desired proportions. We show that the mean square error of this estimate depends on a 'befuddlement matrix' derived from the confusion matrix, and how this, in turn, leads to a figure of merit for cell classifiers. Finally, we work out the two-class problem in detail and present examples to illustrate the theory.

  20. Estimating cell populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, B. S.; Castleman, K. R.

    1981-01-01

    An important step in the diagnosis of a cervical cytology specimen is estimating the proportions of the various cell types present. This is usually done with a cell classifier, the error rates of which can be expressed as a confusion matrix. We show how to use the confusion matrix to obtain an unbiased estimate of the desired proportions. We show that the mean square error of this estimate depends on a 'befuddlement matrix' derived from the confusion matrix, and how this, in turn, leads to a figure of merit for cell classifiers. Finally, we work out the two-class problem in detail and present examples to illustrate the theory.

  1. Estimating Radiogenic Cancer Risks

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document presents a revised methodology for EPA's estimation of cancer risks due to low-LET radiation exposures developed in light of information that has become available, especially new information on the Japanese atomic bomb survivors.

  2. Estimation of food consumption

    SciTech Connect

    Callaway, J.M. Jr.

    1992-04-01

    The research reported in this document was conducted as a part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. The objective of the HEDR Project is to estimate the radiation doses that people could have received from operations at the Hanford Site. Information required to estimate these doses includes estimates of the amounts of potentially contaminated foods that individuals in the region consumed during the study period. In that general framework, the objective of the Food Consumption Task was to develop a capability to provide information about the parameters of the distribution(s) of daily food consumption for representative groups in the population for selected years during the study period. This report describes the methods and data used to estimate food consumption and presents the results developed for Phase I of the HEDR Project.

  3. Supernova frequency estimates

    SciTech Connect

    Tsvetkov, D.Y.

    1983-01-01

    Estimates of the frequency of type I and II supernovae occurring in galaxies of different types are derived from observational material acquired by the supernova patrol of the Shternberg Astronomical Institute.

  4. Estimation of spectral kurtosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutawanir

    2017-03-01

    Rolling bearings are the most important elements in rotating machinery. Bearing frequently fall out of service for various reasons: heavy loads, unsuitable lubrications, ineffective sealing. Bearing faults may cause a decrease in performance. Analysis of bearing vibration signals has attracted attention in the field of monitoring and fault diagnosis. Bearing vibration signals give rich information for early detection of bearing failures. Spectral kurtosis, SK, is a parameter in frequency domain indicating how the impulsiveness of a signal varies with frequency. Faults in rolling bearings give rise to a series of short impulse responses as the rolling elements strike faults, SK potentially useful for determining frequency bands dominated by bearing fault signals. SK can provide a measure of the distance of the analyzed bearings from a healthy one. SK provides additional information given by the power spectral density (psd). This paper aims to explore the estimation of spectral kurtosis using short time Fourier transform known as spectrogram. The estimation of SK is similar to the estimation of psd. The estimation falls in model-free estimation and plug-in estimator. Some numerical studies using simulations are discussed to support the methodology. Spectral kurtosis of some stationary signals are analytically obtained and used in simulation study. Kurtosis of time domain has been a popular tool for detecting non-normality. Spectral kurtosis is an extension of kurtosis in frequency domain. The relationship between time domain and frequency domain analysis is establish through power spectrum-autocovariance Fourier transform. Fourier transform is the main tool for estimation in frequency domain. The power spectral density is estimated through periodogram. In this paper, the short time Fourier transform of the spectral kurtosis is reviewed, a bearing fault (inner ring and outer ring) is simulated. The bearing response, power spectrum, and spectral kurtosis are plotted to

  5. Early Training Estimation System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    are needed. First, by developing earlier and more accurate estimates of training requirements, the training planning process can begin earlier, and...this period and these questions require training input data and (2) the early training planning process requires a solid foundation on which to...development of initial design, task, skill, and training estimates? provision of input into training planning and acquisition documents: 2-39 provision

  6. Estimating parasite host range.

    PubMed

    Dallas, Tad; Huang, Shan; Nunn, Charles; Park, Andrew W; Drake, John M

    2017-08-30

    Estimating the number of host species that a parasite can infect (i.e. host range) provides key insights into the evolution of host specialism and is a central concept in disease ecology. Host range is rarely estimated in real systems, however, because variation in species relative abundance and the detection of rare species makes it challenging to confidently estimate host range. We applied a non-parametric richness indicator to estimate host range in simulated and empirical data, allowing us to assess the influence of sampling heterogeneity and data completeness. After validating our method on simulated data, we estimated parasite host range for a sparsely sampled global parasite occurrence database (Global Mammal Parasite Database) and a repeatedly sampled set of parasites of small mammals from New Mexico (Sevilleta Long Term Ecological Research Program). Estimation accuracy varied strongly with parasite taxonomy, number of parasite occurrence records, and the shape of host species-abundance distribution (i.e. the dominance and rareness of species in the host community). Our findings suggest that between 20% and 40% of parasite host ranges are currently unknown, highlighting a major gap in our understanding of parasite specificity, host-parasite network structure, and parasite burdens. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. Estimating networks with jumps

    PubMed Central

    Kolar, Mladen; Xing, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    We study the problem of estimating a temporally varying coefficient and varying structure (VCVS) graphical model underlying data collected over a period of time, such as social states of interacting individuals or microarray expression profiles of gene networks, as opposed to i.i.d. data from an invariant model widely considered in current literature of structural estimation. In particular, we consider the scenario in which the model evolves in a piece-wise constant fashion. We propose a procedure that estimates the structure of a graphical model by minimizing the temporally smoothed L1 penalized regression, which allows jointly estimating the partition boundaries of the VCVS model and the coefficient of the sparse precision matrix on each block of the partition. A highly scalable proximal gradient method is proposed to solve the resultant convex optimization problem; and the conditions for sparsistent estimation and the convergence rate of both the partition boundaries and the network structure are established for the first time for such estimators. PMID:25013533

  8. Nonparametric conditional estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    Many nonparametric regression techniques (such as kernels, nearest neighbors, and smoothing splines) estimate the conditional mean of Y given X = chi by a weighted sum of observed Y values, where observations with X values near chi tend to have larger weights. In this report the weights are taken to represent a finite signed measure on the space of Y values. This measure is studied as an estimate of the conditional distribution of Y given X = chi. From estimates of the conditional distribution, estimates of conditional means, standard deviations, quantiles and other statistical functionals may be computed. Chapter 1 illustrates the computation of conditional quantiles and conditional survival probabilities on the Stanford Heart Transplant data. Chapter 2 contains a survey of nonparametric regression methods and introduces statistical metrics and von Mises' method for later use. Chapter 3 proves some consistency results. Chapter 4 provides conditions under which the suitably normalized errors in estimating the conditional distribution of Y have a Brownian limit. Using von Mises' method, asymptotic normality is obtained for nonparametric conditional estimates of compactly differentiable statistical functionals.

  9. Estimating population size with correlated sampling unit estimates

    Treesearch

    David C. Bowden; Gary C. White; Alan B. Franklin; Joseph L. Ganey

    2003-01-01

    Finite population sampling theory is useful in estimating total population size (abundance) from abundance estimates of each sampled unit (quadrat). We develop estimators that allow correlated quadrat abundance estimates, even for quadrats in different sampling strata. Correlated quadrat abundance estimates based on mark–recapture or distance sampling methods occur...

  10. Subelliptic Estimates for Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Guillemin, Victor; Sternberg, Shlomo

    1970-01-01

    New results are announced linking properties of the symbol module and characteristic variety of a differential complex with test estimates near the characteristic variety of the type considered by Hörmander (½-estimate). The first result is the invariance of the test estimates under pseudo-differential change of coordinates, and this leads to the introduction of a normal form for the complex in the neighborhood of a Cohen-MacCauley point of the symbol module. If the characteristic variety V is a manifold near the Cohen-MacCauley point (x0,ζ0) with parametrizing functions p1,...,pq, where q is the codimension of the characteristic variety in the complexified contangent bundle, the matrix [Formula: see text] of Poisson brackets defines invariantly a Hermitian form Q on the normal space to V at (x0,ζ0) when the dpζ(x0,ζ0) are used as basis, and the test estimates are satisfied at the ith stage of the complex if sig. Q (signature of Q) is ≥ n - i + 1 (n the dimension of the base manifold) or rank Q - sig. Q ≥ i + 1. Finally, conditions are given in order that, on a manifold with smooth boundary, the associated boundary complexes satisfy the ½-estimate. PMID:16591855

  11. Adaptive spectral doppler estimation.

    PubMed

    Gran, Fredrik; Jakobsson, Andreas; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, 2 adaptive spectral estimation techniques are analyzed for spectral Doppler ultrasound. The purpose is to minimize the observation window needed to estimate the spectrogram to provide a better temporal resolution and gain more flexibility when designing the data acquisition sequence. The methods can also provide better quality of the estimated power spectral density (PSD) of the blood signal. Adaptive spectral estimation techniques are known to provide good spectral resolution and contrast even when the observation window is very short. The 2 adaptive techniques are tested and compared with the averaged periodogram (Welch's method). The blood power spectral capon (BPC) method is based on a standard minimum variance technique adapted to account for both averaging over slow-time and depth. The blood amplitude and phase estimation technique (BAPES) is based on finding a set of matched filters (one for each velocity component of interest) and filtering the blood process over slow-time and averaging over depth to find the PSD. The methods are tested using various experiments and simulations. First, controlled flow-rig experiments with steady laminar flow are carried out. Simulations in Field II for pulsating flow resembling the femoral artery are also analyzed. The simulations are followed by in vivo measurement on the common carotid artery. In all simulations and experiments it was concluded that the adaptive methods display superior performance for short observation windows compared with the averaged periodogram. Computational costs and implementation details are also discussed.

  12. Overconfidence in interval estimates.

    PubMed

    Soll, Jack B; Klayman, Joshua

    2004-03-01

    Judges were asked to make numerical estimates (e.g., "In what year was the first flight of a hot air balloon?"). Judges provided high and low estimates such that they were X% sure that the correct answer lay between them. They exhibited substantial overconfidence: The correct answer fell inside their intervals much less than X% of the time. This contrasts with choices between 2 possible answers to a question, which showed much less overconfidence. The authors show that overconfidence in interval estimates can result from variability in setting interval widths. However, the main cause is that subjective intervals are systematically too narrow given the accuracy of one's information-sometimes only 40% as large as necessary to be well calibrated. The degree of overconfidence varies greatly depending on how intervals are elicited. There are also substantial differences among domains and between male and female judges. The authors discuss the possible psychological mechanisms underlying this pattern of findings.

  13. Estimating Commit Sizes Efficiently

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Philipp; Riehle, Dirk

    The quantitative analysis of software projects can provide insights that let us better understand open source and other software development projects. An important variable used in the analysis of software projects is the amount of work being contributed, the commit size. Unfortunately, post-facto, the commit size can only be estimated, not measured. This paper presents several algorithms for estimating the commit size. Our performance evaluation shows that simple, straightforward heuristics are superior to the more complex text-analysis-based algorithms. Not only are the heuristics significantly faster to compute, they also deliver more accurate results when estimating commit sizes. Based on this experience, we design and present an algorithm that improves on the heuristics, can be computed equally fast, and is more accurate than any of the prior approaches.

  14. Thermodynamic estimation: Ionic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Glasser, Leslie

    2013-10-15

    Thermodynamics establishes equilibrium relations among thermodynamic parameters (“properties”) and delineates the effects of variation of the thermodynamic functions (typically temperature and pressure) on those parameters. However, classical thermodynamics does not provide values for the necessary thermodynamic properties, which must be established by extra-thermodynamic means such as experiment, theoretical calculation, or empirical estimation. While many values may be found in the numerous collected tables in the literature, these are necessarily incomplete because either the experimental measurements have not been made or the materials may be hypothetical. The current paper presents a number of simple and relible estimation methods for thermodynamic properties, principally for ionic materials. The results may also be used as a check for obvious errors in published values. The estimation methods described are typically based on addition of properties of individual ions, or sums of properties of neutral ion groups (such as “double” salts, in the Simple Salt Approximation), or based upon correlations such as with formula unit volumes (Volume-Based Thermodynamics). - Graphical abstract: Thermodynamic properties of ionic materials may be readily estimated by summation of the properties of individual ions, by summation of the properties of ‘double salts’, and by correlation with formula volume. Such estimates may fill gaps in the literature, and may also be used as checks of published values. This simplicity arises from exploitation of the fact that repulsive energy terms are of short range and very similar across materials, while coulombic interactions provide a very large component of the attractive energy in ionic systems. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Estimation methods for thermodynamic properties of ionic materials are introduced. • Methods are based on summation of single ions, multiple salts, and correlations. • Heat capacity, entropy

  15. Ability Estimation for Conventional Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jwa K.; Nicewander, W. Alan

    1993-01-01

    Bias, standard error, and reliability of five ability estimators were evaluated using Monte Carlo estimates of the unknown conditional means and variances of the estimators. Results indicate that estimates based on Bayesian modal, expected a posteriori, and weighted likelihood estimators were reasonably unbiased with relatively small standard…

  16. Estimating nonlinear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billings, S. A.

    1988-03-01

    Time and frequency domain identification methods for nonlinear systems are reviewed. Parametric methods, prediction error methods, structure detection, model validation, and experiment design are discussed. Identification of a liquid level system, a heat exchanger, and a turbocharge automotive diesel engine are illustrated. Rational models are introduced. Spectral analysis for nonlinear systems is treated. Recursive estimation is mentioned.

  17. Estimating Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landy, David; Silbert, Noah; Goldin, Aleah

    2013-01-01

    Despite their importance in public discourse, numbers in the range of 1 million to 1 trillion are notoriously difficult to understand. We examine magnitude estimation by adult Americans when placing large numbers on a number line and when qualitatively evaluating descriptions of imaginary geopolitical scenarios. Prior theoretical conceptions…

  18. Estimating Gender Wage Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Judith A.; Thornton, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Course research projects that use easy-to-access real-world data and that generate findings with which undergraduate students can readily identify are hard to find. The authors describe a project that requires students to estimate the current female-male earnings gap for new college graduates. The project also enables students to see to what…

  19. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time…

  20. Interval estimations in metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mana, G.; Palmisano, C.

    2014-06-01

    This paper investigates interval estimation for a measurand that is known to be positive. Both the Neyman and Bayesian procedures are considered and the difference between the two, not always perceived, is discussed in detail. A solution is proposed to a paradox originated by the frequentist assessment of the long-run success rate of Bayesian intervals.

  1. Bayesian Threshold Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafson, S. C.; Costello, C. S.; Like, E. C.; Pierce, S. J.; Shenoy, K. N.

    2009-01-01

    Bayesian estimation of a threshold time (hereafter simply threshold) for the receipt of impulse signals is accomplished given the following: 1) data, consisting of the number of impulses received in a time interval from zero to one and the time of the largest time impulse; 2) a model, consisting of a uniform probability density of impulse time…

  2. SAFIS Area Estimation Techniques

    Treesearch

    Gregory A. Reams

    2000-01-01

    The Southern Annual Forest inventory System (SAFIS) is in various stages of implementation in 8 of the 13 southern states served by the Southern Research Station of the USDA Forest Service. Compared to periodic inventories, SAFIS requires more rapid generation of land use and land cover maps. The current photo system for phase one area estimation has changed little...

  3. SAFIS area estimation techniques

    Treesearch

    Gregory A. Reams

    2000-01-01

    The Southern Annual Forest Inventory System (SAFIS) is in various stages of implementation in 8 of the 13 southern states served by the Southern Research Station of the USDA Forest Service. Compared to periodic inventories, SAFIS requires more rapid generation of land use and land cover maps. The current photo system for phase one area estimation has changed little...

  4. Numerical Estimation in Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berteletti, Ilaria; Lucangeli, Daniela; Piazza, Manuela; Dehaene, Stanislas; Zorzi, Marco

    2010-01-01

    Children's sense of numbers before formal education is thought to rely on an approximate number system based on logarithmically compressed analog magnitudes that increases in resolution throughout childhood. School-age children performing a numerical estimation task have been shown to increasingly rely on a formally appropriate, linear…

  5. Quantifying surface normal estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Robert B.; Oxley, Mark E.; Eismann, Michael T.; Goda, Matthew E.

    2006-05-01

    An inverse algorithm for surface normal estimation from thermal polarimetric imagery was developed and used to quantify the requirements on a priori information. Building on existing knowledge that calculates the degree of linear polarization (DOLP) and the angle of polarization (AOP) for a given surface normal in a forward model (from an object's characteristics to calculation of the DOLP and AOP), this research quantifies the impact of a priori information with the development of an inverse algorithm to estimate surface normals from thermal polarimetric emissions in long-wave infrared (LWIR). The inverse algorithm assumes a polarized infrared focal plane array capturing LWIR intensity images which are then converted to Stokes vectors. Next, the DOLP and AOP are calculated from the Stokes vectors. Last, the viewing angles, θ v, to the surface normals are estimated assuming perfect material information about the imaged scene. A sensitivity analysis is presented to quantitatively describe the a priori information's impact on the amount of error in the estimation of surface normals, and a bound is determined given perfect information about an object. Simulations explored the impact of surface roughness (σ) and the real component (n) of a dielectric's complex index of refraction across a range of viewing angles (θ v) for a given wavelength of observation.

  6. Activities: Visualization, Estimation, Computation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maletsky, Evan M.

    1982-01-01

    The material is designed to help students build a cone model, visualize how its dimensions change as its shape changes, estimate maximum volume position, and develop problem-solving skills. Worksheets designed for duplication for classroom use are included. Part of the activity involves student analysis of a BASIC program. (MP)

  7. Estimating Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this activity was to help students understand the percentage of cloud cover and make more accurate cloud cover observations. Students estimated the percentage of cloud cover represented by simulated clouds and assigned a cloud cover classification to those simulations. (Contains 2 notes and 3 tables.)

  8. Estimating Cloud Cover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moseley, Christine

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this activity was to help students understand the percentage of cloud cover and make more accurate cloud cover observations. Students estimated the percentage of cloud cover represented by simulated clouds and assigned a cloud cover classification to those simulations. (Contains 2 notes and 3 tables.)

  9. Estimating Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landy, David; Silbert, Noah; Goldin, Aleah

    2013-01-01

    Despite their importance in public discourse, numbers in the range of 1 million to 1 trillion are notoriously difficult to understand. We examine magnitude estimation by adult Americans when placing large numbers on a number line and when qualitatively evaluating descriptions of imaginary geopolitical scenarios. Prior theoretical conceptions…

  10. Estimating Foodborne Gastroenteritis, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Martyn D.; Becker, Niels; Gregory, Joy E.; Unicomb, Leanne; Millard, Geoffrey; Stafford, Russell; Lalor, Karin

    2005-01-01

    We estimated for Australia the number of cases, hospitalizations, and deaths due to foodborne gastroenteritis in a typical year, circa 2000. The total amount of infectious gastroenteritis was measured by using a national telephone survey. The foodborne proportion was estimated from Australian data on each of 16 pathogens. To account for uncertainty, we used simulation techniques to calculate 95% credibility intervals (CrI). The estimate of incidence of gastroenteritis in Australia is 17.2 million (95% confidence interval 14.5–19.9 million) cases per year. We estimate that 32% (95% CrI 24%–40%) are foodborne, which equals 0.3 (95% CrI 0.2–0.4) episodes per person, or 5.4 million (95% CrI 4.0–6.9 million) cases annually in Australia. Norovirus, enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Campylobacter spp., and Salmonella spp. cause the most illnesses. In addition, foodborne gastroenteritis causes ≈15,000 (95% CrI 11,000–18,000) hospitalizations and 80 (95% CrI 40–120) deaths annually. This study highlights global public health concerns about foodborne diseases and the need for standardized methods, including assessment of uncertainty, for international comparison. PMID:16102316

  11. Estimating Pump Blockage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, W.; Meng, S. Y.; Meng, C. Y.

    1984-01-01

    Blockage predicted for all components including inducers, impellers and diffusers. Pump performance predicted by semiempirical method shows excellent agreement with test results in Space Shuttle main-engine highpressure fuel turbopump. Comparisons of pump efficiency show equally good agreement of calculated values with experimental ones. Method improves current estimation methods based solely on subjective engineering judgment.

  12. Estimating Gender Wage Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Judith A.; Thornton, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Course research projects that use easy-to-access real-world data and that generate findings with which undergraduate students can readily identify are hard to find. The authors describe a project that requires students to estimate the current female-male earnings gap for new college graduates. The project also enables students to see to what…

  13. Thermodynamically Correct Bioavailability Estimations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-30

    6448 I 1. SWPPUMENTA* NOTIS lIa. OISTUAMJTiOAVAILAIILTY STATIMENT 121 OT REbT ostwosCo z I Approved for public release; distribution unlimited... research is to develop thermodynamically correct bioavailability estimations using chromatographic stationary phases as a model of the "interphase

  14. Estimating Thermoelectric Water Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutson, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    In 2009, the Government Accountability Office recommended that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Department of Energy-Energy Information Administration, (DOE-EIA) jointly improve their thermoelectric water-use estimates. Since then, the annual mandatory reporting forms returned by powerplant operators to DOE-EIA have been revised twice to improve the water data. At the same time, the USGS began improving estimation of withdrawal and consumption. Because of the variation in amount and quality of water-use data across powerplants, the USGS adopted a hierarchy of methods for estimating water withdrawal and consumptive use for the approximately 1,300 water-using powerplants in the thermoelectric sector. About 800 of these powerplants have generation and cooling data, and the remaining 500 have generation data only, or sparse data. The preferred method is to accept DOE-EIA data following validation. This is the traditional USGS method and the best method if all operators follow best practices for measurement and reporting. However, in 2010, fewer than 200 powerplants reported thermodynamically realistic values of both withdrawal and consumption. Secondly, water use was estimated using linked heat and water budgets for the first group of 800 plants, and for some of the other 500 powerplants where data were sufficient for at least partial modeling using plant characteristics, electric generation, and fuel use. Thermodynamics, environmental conditions, and characteristics of the plant and cooling system constrain both the amount of heat discharged to the environment and the share of this heat that drives evaporation. Heat and water budgets were used to define reasonable estimates of withdrawal and consumption, including likely upper and lower thermodynamic limits. These results were used to validate the reported values at the 800 plants with water-use data, and reported values were replaced by budget estimates at most of these plants. Thirdly, at plants without valid

  15. Numerical estimation of densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ascasibar, Y.; Binney, J.

    2005-01-01

    We present a novel technique, dubbed FIESTAS, to estimate the underlying density field from a discrete set of sample points in an arbitrary multidimensional space. FIESTAS assigns a volume to each point by means of a binary tree. Density is then computed by integrating over an adaptive kernel. As a first test, we construct several Monte Carlo realizations of a Hernquist profile and recover the particle density in both real and phase space. At a given point, Poisson noise causes the unsmoothed estimates to fluctuate by a factor of ~2 regardless of the number of particles. This spread can be reduced to about 1dex (~26 per cent) by our smoothing procedure. The density range over which the estimates are unbiased widens as the particle number increases. Our tests show that real-space densities obtained with an SPH kernel are significantly more biased than those yielded by FIESTAS. In phase space, about 10 times more particles are required in order to achieve a similar accuracy. As a second application we have estimated phase-space densities in a dark matter halo from a cosmological simulation. We confirm the results of Arad, Dekel & Klypin that the highest values of f are all associated with substructure rather than the main halo, and that the volume function v(f) ~f-2.5 over about four orders of magnitude in f. We show that a modified version of the toy model proposed by Arad et al. explains this result and suggests that the departures of v(f) from power-law form are not mere numerical artefacts. We conclude that our algorithm accurately measures the phase-space density up to the limit where discreteness effects render the simulation itself unreliable. Computationally, FIESTAS is orders of magnitude faster than the method based on Delaunay tessellation that Arad et al. employed, making it practicable to recover smoothed density estimates for sets of 109 points in six dimensions.

  16. J-adaptive estimation with estimated noise statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jazwinski, A. H.; Hipkins, C.

    1973-01-01

    The J-adaptive sequential estimator is extended to include simultaneous estimation of the noise statistics in a model for system dynamics. This extension completely automates the estimator, eliminating the requirement of an analyst in the loop. Simulations in satellite orbit determination demonstrate the efficacy of the sequential estimation algorithm.

  17. Power spectral estimation algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatia, Manjit S.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithms to estimate the power spectrum using Maximum Entropy Methods were developed. These algorithms were coded in FORTRAN 77 and were implemented on the VAX 780. The important considerations in this analysis are: (1) resolution, i.e., how close in frequency two spectral components can be spaced and still be identified; (2) dynamic range, i.e., how small a spectral peak can be, relative to the largest, and still be observed in the spectra; and (3) variance, i.e., how accurate the estimate of the spectra is to the actual spectra. The application of the algorithms based on Maximum Entropy Methods to a variety of data shows that these criteria are met quite well. Additional work in this direction would help confirm the findings. All of the software developed was turned over to the technical monitor. A copy of a typical program is included. Some of the actual data and graphs used on this data are also included.

  18. Bayesian background estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, R.; Dose, V.; Hanson, K. M.; von der Linden, W.

    2001-05-01

    The ubiquitous problem of estimating the background of a measured spectrum is solved with Bayesian probability theory. A mixture model is used to capture the defining characteristics of the problem, namely that the background is smoother than the signal. The smoothness property is quantified in terms of a cubic spline basis where a variable degree of smoothness is attained by allowing the number of knots and the knot positions to be adaptively chosen on the basis of the data. The fully Bayesian approach taken provides a natural way to handle knot adaptivity, allows uncertainties in the background to be estimated and data points to be classified in groups containing only background and groups with additional signal contribution. Our technique is demonstrated on a PIXE spectrum from a geological sample and an Auger spectrum from an 10 monolayer iron film on tungsten.

  19. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation.

    PubMed

    Weaver, John B; Rauwerdink, Adam M; Hansen, Eric W

    2009-05-01

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 degree K between 20 and 50 degrees C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution.

  20. Magnetic nanoparticle temperature estimation

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, John B.; Rauwerdink, Adam M.; Hansen, Eric W.

    2009-01-01

    The authors present a method of measuring the temperature of magnetic nanoparticles that can be adapted to provide in vivo temperature maps. Many of the minimally invasive therapies that promise to reduce health care costs and improve patient outcomes heat tissue to very specific temperatures to be effective. Measurements are required because physiological cooling, primarily blood flow, makes the temperature difficult to predict a priori. The ratio of the fifth and third harmonics of the magnetization generated by magnetic nanoparticles in a sinusoidal field is used to generate a calibration curve and to subsequently estimate the temperature. The calibration curve is obtained by varying the amplitude of the sinusoidal field. The temperature can then be estimated from any subsequent measurement of the ratio. The accuracy was 0.3 °K between 20 and 50 °C using the current apparatus and half-second measurements. The method is independent of nanoparticle concentration and nanoparticle size distribution. PMID:19544801

  1. Estimating distances from parallaxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astraatmadja, Tri L.; Bailer-Jones, Coryn

    2017-01-01

    In astrometric surveys such as Gaia and LSST, parallaxes will be measured for about a billion stars, but zero distances will be measured. Distances must be inferred from the parallaxes, and the common inference practice is by inverting the parallax. This, however, is only appropriate when there is no noise present. As noise will always be present and most stars in future surveys will have non-negligible fractional parallax uncertainties, we must treat distance estimation as an inference problem. The usage of prior assumptions become unavoidable. In this talk I will present a method on how to infer distances using Bayesian inference. Three minimalists, isotropic priors are used, as well an anisotropic prior derived from the observability of stars in a Milky Way model. The performance of these priors are investigated using a simulated Gaia-like catalogue. Recent results of distance estimation using the parallaxes of 2 million Gaia DR1 stars will also be discussed.

  2. Estimating groundwater recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, Richard W.; Scanlon, Bridget R.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding groundwater recharge is essential for successful management of water resources and modeling fluid and contaminant transport within the subsurface. This book provides a critical evaluation of the theory and assumptions that underlie methods for estimating rates of groundwater recharge. Detailed explanations of the methods are provided - allowing readers to apply many of the techniques themselves without needing to consult additional references. Numerous practical examples highlight benefits and limitations of each method. Approximately 900 references allow advanced practitioners to pursue additional information on any method. For the first time, theoretical and practical considerations for selecting and applying methods for estimating groundwater recharge are covered in a single volume with uniform presentation. Hydrogeologists, water-resource specialists, civil and agricultural engineers, earth and environmental scientists and agronomists will benefit from this informative and practical book. It can serve as the primary text for a graduate-level course on groundwater recharge or as an adjunct text for courses on groundwater hydrology or hydrogeology.

  3. Nonparametric Conditional Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-02-01

    have a Brownian limit. Using von Mises’ method, asymptotic normality is obtained for nonparametric conditional estimates of compactly differentiable ... differentiable statistical functionals. This res~arch supported by Office of Naval Research Contract NOOOl4-83-K-0472; supported National Science Foundation...2.5 Models for F. 2.6 Compact Differentiability and von Mises’ Method 3. Consistency . 3.1 Introduction and Definitions 3.2 Prohorov Consistency of

  4. Airborne Crowd Density Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meynberg, O.; Kuschk, G.

    2013-10-01

    This paper proposes a new method for estimating human crowd densities from aerial imagery. Applications benefiting from an accurate crowd monitoring system are mainly found in the security sector. Normally crowd density estimation is done through in-situ camera systems mounted on high locations although this is not appropriate in case of very large crowds with thousands of people. Using airborne camera systems in these scenarios is a new research topic. Our method uses a preliminary filtering of the whole image space by suitable and fast interest point detection resulting in a number of image regions, possibly containing human crowds. Validation of these candidates is done by transforming the corresponding image patches into a low-dimensional and discriminative feature space and classifying the results using a support vector machine (SVM). The feature space is spanned by texture features computed by applying a Gabor filter bank with varying scale and orientation to the image patches. For evaluation, we use 5 different image datasets acquired by the 3K+ aerial camera system of the German Aerospace Center during real mass events like concerts or football games. To evaluate the robustness and generality of our method, these datasets are taken from different flight heights between 800 m and 1500 m above ground (keeping a fixed focal length) and varying daylight and shadow conditions. The results of our crowd density estimation are evaluated against a reference data set obtained by manually labeling tens of thousands individual persons in the corresponding datasets and show that our method is able to estimate human crowd densities in challenging realistic scenarios.

  5. Optimal Centroid Position Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J V; McClay, W A; Awwal, A S; Ferguson, S W

    2004-07-23

    The alignment of high energy laser beams for potential fusion experiments demand high precision and accuracy by the underlying positioning algorithms. This paper discusses the feasibility of employing online optimal position estimators in the form of model-based processors to achieve the desired results. Here we discuss the modeling, development, implementation and processing of model-based processors applied to both simulated and actual beam line data.

  6. Chernobyl source term estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Harvey, T.F.; Lange, R.

    1990-09-01

    The Chernobyl source term available for long-range transport was estimated by integration of radiological measurements with atmospheric dispersion modeling and by reactor core radionuclide inventory estimation in conjunction with WASH-1400 release fractions associated with specific chemical groups. The model simulations revealed that the radioactive cloud became segmented during the first day, with the lower section heading toward Scandinavia and the upper part heading in a southeasterly direction with subsequent transport across Asia to Japan, the North Pacific, and the west coast of North America. By optimizing the agreement between the observed cloud arrival times and duration of peak concentrations measured over Europe, Japan, Kuwait, and the US with the model predicted concentrations, it was possible to derive source term estimates for those radionuclides measured in airborne radioactivity. This was extended to radionuclides that were largely unmeasured in the environment by performing a reactor core radionuclide inventory analysis to obtain release fractions for the various chemical transport groups. These analyses indicated that essentially all of the noble gases, 60% of the radioiodines, 40% of the radiocesium, 10% of the tellurium and about 1% or less of the more refractory elements were released. These estimates are in excellent agreement with those obtained on the basis of worldwide deposition measurements. The Chernobyl source term was several orders of magnitude greater than those associated with the Windscale and TMI reactor accidents. However, the {sup 137}Cs from the Chernobyl event is about 6% of that released by the US and USSR atmospheric nuclear weapon tests, while the {sup 131}I and {sup 90}Sr released by the Chernobyl accident was only about 0.1% of that released by the weapon tests. 13 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Bayesian Error Estimation Functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, Karsten W.

    The challenge of approximating the exchange-correlation functional in Density Functional Theory (DFT) has led to the development of numerous different approximations of varying accuracy on different calculated properties. There is therefore a need for reliable estimation of prediction errors within the different approximation schemes to DFT. The Bayesian Error Estimation Functionals (BEEF) have been developed with this in mind. The functionals are constructed by fitting to experimental and high-quality computational databases for molecules and solids including chemisorption and van der Waals systems. This leads to reasonably accurate general-purpose functionals with particual focus on surface science. The fitting procedure involves considerations on how to combine different types of data, and applies Tikhonov regularization and bootstrap cross validation. The methodology has been applied to construct GGA and metaGGA functionals with and without inclusion of long-ranged van der Waals contributions. The error estimation is made possible by the generation of not only a single functional but through the construction of a probability distribution of functionals represented by a functional ensemble. The use of the functional ensemble is illustrated on compound heat of formation and by investigations of the reliability of calculated catalytic ammonia synthesis rates.

  8. Estimating directional epistasis

    PubMed Central

    Le Rouzic, Arnaud

    2014-01-01

    Epistasis, i.e., the fact that gene effects depend on the genetic background, is a direct consequence of the complexity of genetic architectures. Despite this, most of the models used in evolutionary and quantitative genetics pay scant attention to genetic interactions. For instance, the traditional decomposition of genetic effects models epistasis as noise around the evolutionarily-relevant additive effects. Such an approach is only valid if it is assumed that there is no general pattern among interactions—a highly speculative scenario. Systematic interactions generate directional epistasis, which has major evolutionary consequences. In spite of its importance, directional epistasis is rarely measured or reported by quantitative geneticists, not only because its relevance is generally ignored, but also due to the lack of simple, operational, and accessible methods for its estimation. This paper describes conceptual and statistical tools that can be used to estimate directional epistasis from various kinds of data, including QTL mapping results, phenotype measurements in mutants, and artificial selection responses. As an illustration, I measured directional epistasis from a real-life example. I then discuss the interpretation of the estimates, showing how they can be used to draw meaningful biological inferences. PMID:25071828

  9. Injury Risk Estimation Expertise

    PubMed Central

    Petushek, Erich J.; Ward, Paul; Cokely, Edward T.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Simple observational assessment of movement is a potentially low-cost method for anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury screening and prevention. Although many individuals utilize some form of observational assessment of movement, there are currently no substantial data on group skill differences in observational screening of ACL injury risk. Purpose/Hypothesis: The purpose of this study was to compare various groups’ abilities to visually assess ACL injury risk as well as the associated strategies and ACL knowledge levels. The hypothesis was that sports medicine professionals would perform better than coaches and exercise science academics/students and that these subgroups would all perform better than parents and other general population members. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: A total of 428 individuals, including physicians, physical therapists, athletic trainers, strength and conditioning coaches, exercise science researchers/students, athletes, parents, and members of the general public participated in the study. Participants completed the ACL Injury Risk Estimation Quiz (ACL-IQ) and answered questions related to assessment strategy and ACL knowledge. Results: Strength and conditioning coaches, athletic trainers, physical therapists, and exercise science students exhibited consistently superior ACL injury risk estimation ability (+2 SD) as compared with sport coaches, parents of athletes, and members of the general public. The performance of a substantial number of individuals in the exercise sciences/sports medicines (approximately 40%) was similar to or exceeded clinical instrument-based biomechanical assessment methods (eg, ACL nomogram). Parents, sport coaches, and the general public had lower ACL-IQ, likely due to their lower ACL knowledge and to rating the importance of knee/thigh motion lower and weight and jump height higher. Conclusion: Substantial cross-professional/group differences in visual ACL

  10. Estimation for bilinear stochastic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willsky, A. S.; Marcus, S. I.

    1974-01-01

    Three techniques for the solution of bilinear estimation problems are presented. First, finite dimensional optimal nonlinear estimators are presented for certain bilinear systems evolving on solvable and nilpotent lie groups. Then the use of harmonic analysis for estimation problems evolving on spheres and other compact manifolds is investigated. Finally, an approximate estimation technique utilizing cumulants is discussed.

  11. Los Alamos PC estimating system

    SciTech Connect

    Stutz, R.A.; Lemon, G.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Los Alamos Cost Estimating System (QUEST) is being converted to run on IBM personal computers. This very extensive estimating system is capable of supporting cost estimators from many different and varied fields. QUEST does not dictate any fixed method for estimating. QUEST supports many styles and levels of detail estimating. QUEST can be used with or without data bases. This system allows the estimator to provide reports based on levels of detail defined by combining work breakdown structures. QUEST provides a set of tools for doing any type of estimate without forcing the estimator to use any given method. The level of detail in the estimate can be mixed based on the amount of information known about different parts of the project. The system can support many different data bases simultaneously. Estimators can modify any cost in any data base.

  12. ESTIM: A parameter estimation computer program: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, R.G.

    1987-08-01

    The computer code, ESTIM, enables subroutine versions of existing simulation codes to be used to estimate model parameters. Nonlinear least squares techniques are used to find the parameter values that result in a best fit between measurements made in the simulation domain and the simulation code's prediction of these measurements. ESTIM utilizes the non-linear least square code DQED (Hanson and Krogh (1982)) to handle the optimization aspects of the estimation problem. In addition to providing weighted least squares estimates, ESTIM provides a propagation of variance analysis. A subroutine version of COYOTE (Gartling (1982)) is provided. The use of ESTIM with COYOTE allows one to estimate the thermal property model parameters that result in the best agreement (in a least squares sense) between internal temperature measurements and COYOTE's predictions of these internal temperature measurements. We demonstrate the use of ESTIM through several example problems which utilize the subroutine version of COYOTE.

  13. Estimation of Lung Ventilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Kai; Cao, Kunlin; Du, Kaifang; Amelon, Ryan; Christensen, Gary E.; Raghavan, Madhavan; Reinhardt, Joseph M.

    Since the primary function of the lung is gas exchange, ventilation can be interpreted as an index of lung function in addition to perfusion. Injury and disease processes can alter lung function on a global and/or a local level. MDCT can be used to acquire multiple static breath-hold CT images of the lung taken at different lung volumes, or with proper respiratory control, 4DCT images of the lung reconstructed at different respiratory phases. Image registration can be applied to this data to estimate a deformation field that transforms the lung from one volume configuration to the other. This deformation field can be analyzed to estimate local lung tissue expansion, calculate voxel-by-voxel intensity change, and make biomechanical measurements. The physiologic significance of the registration-based measures of respiratory function can be established by comparing to more conventional measurements, such as nuclear medicine or contrast wash-in/wash-out studies with CT or MR. An important emerging application of these methods is the detection of pulmonary function change in subjects undergoing radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer. During RT, treatment is commonly limited to sub-therapeutic doses due to unintended toxicity to normal lung tissue. Measurement of pulmonary function may be useful as a planning tool during RT planning, may be useful for tracking the progression of toxicity to nearby normal tissue during RT, and can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a treatment post-therapy. This chapter reviews the basic measures to estimate regional ventilation from image registration of CT images, the comparison of them to the existing golden standard and the application in radiation therapy.

  14. Time estimation in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Awe, Cynthia A.; Johnson, Walter W.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine whether edge rate and flow rate impact the perception of time during an active control task and to further examine the relationship between edge rate or flow rate and time perception. One experiment also examined the extent to which time perception is driven by: (1) the temporal structure of the world, i.e., edge rate/flow rate changes, and (2) the amount of activity involved in accomplishing a task. The second factor was varied by examining time estimations made while subjects passively viewed the simulated flight and while also actively engaged in controlling lateral craft disturbances.

  15. Estimating turbine limit load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for estimating turbine limit-load pressure ratio from turbine map information is presented and demonstrated. It is based on a mean line analysis at the last-rotor exit. The required map information includes choke flow rate at all speeds as well as pressure ratio and efficiency at the onset of choke at design speed. One- and two-stage turbines are analyzed to compare the results with those from a more rigorous off-design flow analysis and to show the sensitivities of the computed limit-load pressure ratios to changes in the key assumptions.

  16. Estimating carnivore community structures

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, José; Nuñez-Arjona, Juan Carlos; Rueda, Carmen; González, Luis Mariano; García-Domínguez, Francisco; Muñoz-Igualada, Jaime; López-Bao, José Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Obtaining reliable estimates of the structure of carnivore communities is of paramount importance because of their ecological roles, ecosystem services and impact on biodiversity conservation, but they are still scarce. This information is key for carnivore management: to build support for and acceptance of management decisions and policies it is crucial that those decisions are based on robust and high quality information. Here, we combined camera and live-trapping surveys, as well as telemetry data, with spatially-explicit Bayesian models to show the usefulness of an integrated multi-method and multi-model approach to monitor carnivore community structures. Our methods account for imperfect detection and effectively deal with species with non-recognizable individuals. In our Mediterranean study system, the terrestrial carnivore community was dominated by red foxes (0.410 individuals/km2); Egyptian mongooses, feral cats and stone martens were similarly abundant (0.252, 0.249 and 0.240 individuals/km2, respectively), whereas badgers and common genets were the least common (0.130 and 0.087 individuals/km2, respectively). The precision of density estimates improved by incorporating multiple covariates, device operation, and accounting for the removal of individuals. The approach presented here has substantial implications for decision-making since it allows, for instance, the evaluation, in a standard and comparable way, of community responses to interventions. PMID:28120871

  17. Estimating carnivore community structures.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, José; Nuñez-Arjona, Juan Carlos; Rueda, Carmen; González, Luis Mariano; García-Domínguez, Francisco; Muñoz-Igualada, Jaime; López-Bao, José Vicente

    2017-01-25

    Obtaining reliable estimates of the structure of carnivore communities is of paramount importance because of their ecological roles, ecosystem services and impact on biodiversity conservation, but they are still scarce. This information is key for carnivore management: to build support for and acceptance of management decisions and policies it is crucial that those decisions are based on robust and high quality information. Here, we combined camera and live-trapping surveys, as well as telemetry data, with spatially-explicit Bayesian models to show the usefulness of an integrated multi-method and multi-model approach to monitor carnivore community structures. Our methods account for imperfect detection and effectively deal with species with non-recognizable individuals. In our Mediterranean study system, the terrestrial carnivore community was dominated by red foxes (0.410 individuals/km(2)); Egyptian mongooses, feral cats and stone martens were similarly abundant (0.252, 0.249 and 0.240 individuals/km(2), respectively), whereas badgers and common genets were the least common (0.130 and 0.087 individuals/km(2), respectively). The precision of density estimates improved by incorporating multiple covariates, device operation, and accounting for the removal of individuals. The approach presented here has substantial implications for decision-making since it allows, for instance, the evaluation, in a standard and comparable way, of community responses to interventions.

  18. Estimating large numbers.

    PubMed

    Landy, David; Silbert, Noah; Goldin, Aleah

    2013-07-01

    Despite their importance in public discourse, numbers in the range of 1 million to 1 trillion are notoriously difficult to understand. We examine magnitude estimation by adult Americans when placing large numbers on a number line and when qualitatively evaluating descriptions of imaginary geopolitical scenarios. Prior theoretical conceptions predict a log-to-linear shift: People will either place numbers linearly or will place numbers according to a compressive logarithmic or power-shaped function (Barth & Paladino, ; Siegler & Opfer, ). While about half of people did estimate numbers linearly over this range, nearly all the remaining participants placed 1 million approximately halfway between 1 thousand and 1 billion, but placed numbers linearly across each half, as though they believed that the number words "thousand, million, billion, trillion" constitute a uniformly spaced count list. Participants in this group also tended to be optimistic in evaluations of largely ineffective political strategies, relative to linear number-line placers. The results indicate that the surface structure of number words can heavily influence processes for dealing with numbers in this range, and it can amplify the possibility that analogous surface regularities are partially responsible for parallel phenomena in children. In addition, these results have direct implications for lawmakers and scientists hoping to communicate effectively with the public. Copyright © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  19. Estimating sparse precision matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanabhan, Nikhil; White, Martin; Zhou, Harrison H.; O'Connell, Ross

    2016-08-01

    We apply a method recently introduced to the statistical literature to directly estimate the precision matrix from an ensemble of samples drawn from a corresponding Gaussian distribution. Motivated by the observation that cosmological precision matrices are often approximately sparse, the method allows one to exploit this sparsity of the precision matrix to more quickly converge to an asymptotic 1/sqrt{N_sim} rate while simultaneously providing an error model for all of the terms. Such an estimate can be used as the starting point for further regularization efforts which can improve upon the 1/sqrt{N_sim} limit above, and incorporating such additional steps is straightforward within this framework. We demonstrate the technique with toy models and with an example motivated by large-scale structure two-point analysis, showing significant improvements in the rate of convergence. For the large-scale structure example, we find errors on the precision matrix which are factors of 5 smaller than for the sample precision matrix for thousands of simulations or, alternatively, convergence to the same error level with more than an order of magnitude fewer simulations.

  20. Phenological Parameters Estimation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKellip, Rodney D.; Ross, Kenton W.; Spruce, Joseph P.; Smoot, James C.; Ryan, Robert E.; Gasser, Gerald E.; Prados, Donald L.; Vaughan, Ronald D.

    2010-01-01

    The Phenological Parameters Estimation Tool (PPET) is a set of algorithms implemented in MATLAB that estimates key vegetative phenological parameters. For a given year, the PPET software package takes in temporally processed vegetation index data (3D spatio-temporal arrays) generated by the time series product tool (TSPT) and outputs spatial grids (2D arrays) of vegetation phenological parameters. As a precursor to PPET, the TSPT uses quality information for each pixel of each date to remove bad or suspect data, and then interpolates and digitally fills data voids in the time series to produce a continuous, smoothed vegetation index product. During processing, the TSPT displays NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) time series plots and images from the temporally processed pixels. Both the TSPT and PPET currently use moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite multispectral data as a default, but each software package is modifiable and could be used with any high-temporal-rate remote sensing data collection system that is capable of producing vegetation indices. Raw MODIS data from the Aqua and Terra satellites is processed using the TSPT to generate a filtered time series data product. The PPET then uses the TSPT output to generate phenological parameters for desired locations. PPET output data tiles are mosaicked into a Conterminous United States (CONUS) data layer using ERDAS IMAGINE, or equivalent software package. Mosaics of the vegetation phenology data products are then reprojected to the desired map projection using ERDAS IMAGINE

  1. Earthquake Loss Estimation Uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frolova, Nina; Bonnin, Jean; Larionov, Valery; Ugarov, Aleksander

    2013-04-01

    The paper addresses the reliability issues of strong earthquakes loss assessment following strong earthquakes with worldwide Systems' application in emergency mode. Timely and correct action just after an event can result in significant benefits in saving lives. In this case the information about possible damage and expected number of casualties is very critical for taking decision about search, rescue operations and offering humanitarian assistance. Such rough information may be provided by, first of all, global systems, in emergency mode. The experience of earthquakes disasters in different earthquake-prone countries shows that the officials who are in charge of emergency response at national and international levels are often lacking prompt and reliable information on the disaster scope. Uncertainties on the parameters used in the estimation process are numerous and large: knowledge about physical phenomena and uncertainties on the parameters used to describe them; global adequacy of modeling techniques to the actual physical phenomena; actual distribution of population at risk at the very time of the shaking (with respect to immediate threat: buildings or the like); knowledge about the source of shaking, etc. Needless to be a sharp specialist to understand, for example, that the way a given building responds to a given shaking obeys mechanical laws which are poorly known (if not out of the reach of engineers for a large portion of the building stock); if a carefully engineered modern building is approximately predictable, this is far not the case for older buildings which make up the bulk of inhabited buildings. The way population, inside the buildings at the time of shaking, is affected by the physical damage caused to the buildings is not precisely known, by far. The paper analyzes the influence of uncertainties in strong event parameters determination by Alert Seismological Surveys, of simulation models used at all stages from, estimating shaking intensity

  2. Estimating many variances

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, H.

    1981-01-01

    Suppose that an unknown random parameter theta with distribution function G is such that given theta, an observable random variable x has conditional probability density f(x / theta) of known form. If a function t = t(x) is used to estimate theta, then the expected squared error with respect to the random variation of both theta and x is: E(t-theta)/sup 2/ = ..integral.. ..integral..(t(x)-theta)/sup 2/ f(x parallel theta)dx dG(theta). For fixed G we can seek to minimize this equation within any desired class of functions t, such as the class of all linear functions A + Bx, or the class of al Borel functions whatsoever.

  3. Estimating earthquake potential

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, R.A.

    1980-01-01

    The hazards to life and property from earthquakes can be minimized in three ways. First, structures can be designed and built to resist the effects of earthquakes. Second, the location of structures and human activities can be chosen to avoid or to limit the use of areas known to be subject to serious earthquake hazards. Third, preparations for an earthquake in response to a prediction or warning can reduce the loss of life and damage to property as well as promote a rapid recovery from the disaster. The success of the first two strategies, earthquake engineering and land use planning, depends on being able to reliably estimate the earthquake potential. The key considerations in defining the potential of a region are the location, size, and character of future earthquakes and frequency of their occurrence. Both historic seismicity of the region and the geologic record are considered in evaluating earthquake potential. 

  4. Precipitation Estimates for Hydroelectricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapiador, Francisco J.; Hou, Arthur Y.; de Castro, Manuel; Checa, Ramiro; Cuartero, Fernando; Barros, Ana P.

    2011-01-01

    Hydroelectric plants require precise and timely estimates of rain, snow and other hydrometeors for operations. However, it is far from being a trivial task to measure and predict precipitation. This paper presents the linkages between precipitation science and hydroelectricity, and in doing so it provides insight into current research directions that are relevant for this renewable energy. Methods described include radars, disdrometers, satellites and numerical models. Two recent advances that have the potential of being highly beneficial for hydropower operations are featured: the Global Precipitation Measuring (GPM) mission, which represents an important leap forward in precipitation observations from space, and high performance computing (HPC) and grid technology, that allows building ensembles of numerical weather and climate models.

  5. Uncertainties in transpiration estimates.

    PubMed

    Coenders-Gerrits, A M J; van der Ent, R J; Bogaard, T A; Wang-Erlandsson, L; Hrachowitz, M; Savenije, H H G

    2014-02-13

    arising from S. Jasechko et al. Nature 496, 347-350 (2013)10.1038/nature11983How best to assess the respective importance of plant transpiration over evaporation from open waters, soils and short-term storage such as tree canopies and understories (interception) has long been debated. On the basis of data from lake catchments, Jasechko et al. conclude that transpiration accounts for 80-90% of total land evaporation globally (Fig. 1a). However, another choice of input data, together with more conservative accounting of the related uncertainties, reduces and widens the transpiration ratio estimation to 35-80%. Hence, climate models do not necessarily conflict with observations, but more measurements on the catchment scale are needed to reduce the uncertainty range. There is a Reply to this Brief Communications Arising by Jasechko, S. et al. Nature 506, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature12926 (2014).

  6. Estimating Bias Error Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tian-Shu; Finley, Tom D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper formulates the general methodology for estimating the bias error distribution of a device in a measuring domain from less accurate measurements when a minimal number of standard values (typically two values) are available. A new perspective is that the bias error distribution can be found as a solution of an intrinsic functional equation in a domain. Based on this theory, the scaling- and translation-based methods for determining the bias error distribution arc developed. These methods are virtually applicable to any device as long as the bias error distribution of the device can be sufficiently described by a power series (a polynomial) or a Fourier series in a domain. These methods have been validated through computational simulations and laboratory calibration experiments for a number of different devices.

  7. Bayesian sperm competition estimates.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Beatrix; Clark, Andrew G

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a Bayesian method for estimating parameters for a model of multiple mating and sperm displacement from genotype counts of brood-structured data. The model is initially targeted for Drosophila melanogaster, but is easily adapted to other organisms. The method is appropriate for use with field studies where the number of mates and the genotypes of the mates cannot be controlled, but where unlinked markers have been collected for a set of females and a sample of their offspring. Advantages over previous approaches include full use of multilocus information and the ability to cope appropriately with missing data and ambiguities about which alleles are maternally vs. paternally inherited. The advantages of including X-linked markers are also demonstrated. PMID:12663555

  8. Precipitation Estimates for Hydroelectricity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tapiador, Francisco J.; Hou, Arthur Y.; de Castro, Manuel; Checa, Ramiro; Cuartero, Fernando; Barros, Ana P.

    2011-01-01

    Hydroelectric plants require precise and timely estimates of rain, snow and other hydrometeors for operations. However, it is far from being a trivial task to measure and predict precipitation. This paper presents the linkages between precipitation science and hydroelectricity, and in doing so it provides insight into current research directions that are relevant for this renewable energy. Methods described include radars, disdrometers, satellites and numerical models. Two recent advances that have the potential of being highly beneficial for hydropower operations are featured: the Global Precipitation Measuring (GPM) mission, which represents an important leap forward in precipitation observations from space, and high performance computing (HPC) and grid technology, that allows building ensembles of numerical weather and climate models.

  9. Estimation Strategies of Four Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowker, Ann; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes a study of the estimation skills of mathematicians (N=44), accountants (N=44), psychology students (N=44), and English students (N=44). Explores their methods of estimating the products and quotients of 20 problems. Contains 49 references. (DDR)

  10. Estimating cull in northern hardwoods

    Treesearch

    W.M. Zillgitt; S.R. Gevorkiantz

    1946-01-01

    Cull in northern hardwood stands is often very heavy and is difficult to estimate. To help clarify this situation and aid the average cruiser to become more accurate in his estimates, the study reported here should prove very helpful.

  11. Model optimization using statistical estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J. D.; Hart, G. C.; Hasselman, T. K.; Kennedy, B.; Pack, H., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Program revises initial or prior estimate of stiffness and mass parameters to parameters yielding frequency and mode characteristics in agreement with test data. Variances are also calculated and consequently define uncertainties of final estimates.

  12. Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST) was developed to allow users to easily estimate the toxicity of chemicals using Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSARs) methodologies. QSARs are mathematical models used to predict measures of toxicity from the physical c...

  13. Sampling and estimating recreational use.

    Treesearch

    Timothy G. Gregoire; Gregory J. Buhyoff

    1999-01-01

    Probability sampling methods applicable to estimate recreational use are presented. Both single- and multiple-access recreation sites are considered. One- and two-stage sampling methods are presented. Estimation of recreational use is presented in a series of examples.

  14. Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST) was developed to allow users to easily estimate the toxicity of chemicals using Quantitative Structure Activity Relationships (QSARs) methodologies. QSARs are mathematical models used to predict measures of toxicity from the physical c...

  15. Strategies for Estimating Discrete Quantities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crites, Terry W.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the benchmark and decomposition-recomposition estimation strategies and presents five techniques to develop students' estimation ability. Suggests situations involving quantities of candy and popcorn in which the teacher can model those strategies for the students. (MDH)

  16. Improved Estimates of Thermodynamic Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, D. D.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques refined for estimating heat of vaporization and other parameters from molecular structure. Using parabolic equation with three adjustable parameters, heat of vaporization can be used to estimate boiling point, and vice versa. Boiling points and vapor pressures for some nonpolar liquids were estimated by improved method and compared with previously reported values. Technique for estimating thermodynamic parameters should make it easier for engineers to choose among candidate heat-exchange fluids for thermochemical cycles.

  17. Estimating concurrence via entanglement witnesses

    SciTech Connect

    Jurkowski, Jacek; Chruscinski, Dariusz

    2010-05-15

    We show that each entanglement witness detecting a given bipartite entangled state provides an estimation of its concurrence. We illustrate our result with several well-known examples of entanglement witnesses and compare the corresponding estimation of concurrence with other estimations provided by the trace norm of partial transposition and realignment.

  18. Acquisition Cost/Price Estimating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-01

    SYSTEMS, RECOMMENDING COST COALS FOR THOSE SYSTEMS, AND VALIDATING THOSE ESTIMATES THROUGH INDEPENDENT COSTING METHODS. INSTRUMENTS THROUGH WHICH SYSTEM...REVIEW AND VALIDATION, (3) RESEARCH AND METHODOLOGY AND (4) DATA ANALYSIS. THESE FUNCTIONAL THRUSTS ARE IN TURN FOCUSED TO ESTIMATING AND ANALISIS ...ANALYSIS OF COST ISSUES -- TO PROVIDE CONSISTENCY AND COMPLETENESS OF ESTIMATES PREPARED BY OTHER FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITIES. MANAGERIAL 1. COST ANALISIS HAS

  19. Bayes' estimators of generalized entropies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holste, D.; Große, I.; Herzel, H.

    1998-03-01

    The order-q Tsallis 0305-4470/31/11/007/img5 and Rényi entropy 0305-4470/31/11/007/img6 receive broad applications in the statistical analysis of complex phenomena. A generic problem arises, however, when these entropies need to be estimated from observed data. The finite size of data sets can lead to serious systematic and statistical errors in numerical estimates. In this paper, we focus upon the problem of estimating generalized entropies from finite samples and derive the Bayes estimator of the order-q Tsallis entropy, including the order-1 (i.e. the Shannon) entropy, under the assumption of a uniform prior probability density. The Bayes estimator yields, in general, the smallest mean-quadratic deviation from the true parameter as compared with any other estimator. Exploiting the functional relationship between 0305-4470/31/11/007/img7 and 0305-4470/31/11/007/img8, we use the Bayes estimator of 0305-4470/31/11/007/img7 to estimate the Rényi entropy 0305-4470/31/11/007/img8. We compare these novel estimators with the frequency-count estimators for 0305-4470/31/11/007/img7 and 0305-4470/31/11/007/img8. We find by numerical simulations that the Bayes estimator reduces statistical errors of order-q entropy estimates for Bernoulli as well as for higher-order Markov processes derived from the complete genome of the prokaryote Haemophilus influenzae.

  20. Mapped Plot Patch Size Estimates

    Treesearch

    Paul C. Van Deusen

    2005-01-01

    This paper demonstrates that the mapped plot design is relatively easy to analyze and describes existing formulas for mean and variance estimators. New methods are developed for using mapped plots to estimate average patch size of condition classes. The patch size estimators require assumptions about the shape of the condition class, limiting their utility. They may...

  1. Estimating volume from stump measurements

    Treesearch

    Kenneth L. Quigley

    1954-01-01

    Foresters sometimes have to estimate the volume of timber harvested from the stumps that remain after logging. Such estimates may be needed when the timber cutters have crossed property lines or when they have removed trees not marked for cutting. Stump measurements on sample areas may also be used for state or regional estimates of the volume of timber cut annually,...

  2. Error Estimates for Mixed Methods.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-01

    This paper presents abstract error estimates for mixed methods for the approximate solution of elliptic boundary value problems. These estimates are...then applied to obtain quasi-optimal error estimates in the usual Sobolev norms for four examples: three mixed methods for the biharmonic problem and a mixed method for 2nd order elliptic problems. (Author)

  3. Misclassification bias in areal estimates

    Treesearch

    Raymond L. Czaplewski

    1992-01-01

    In addition to thematic maps, remote sensing provides estimates of area in different thematic categories. Areal estimates are frequently used for resource inventories, management planning, and assessment analyses. Misclassification causes bias in these statistical areal estimates. For example, if a small percentage of a common cover type is misclassified as a rare...

  4. Bibliography for aircraft parameter estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iliff, Kenneth W.; Maine, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    An extensive bibliography in the field of aircraft parameter estimation has been compiled. This list contains definitive works related to most aircraft parameter estimation approaches. Theoretical studies as well as practical applications are included. Many of these publications are pertinent to subjects peripherally related to parameter estimation, such as aircraft maneuver design or instrumentation considerations.

  5. AN ESTIMATE OF THE DETECTABILITY OF RISING FLUX TUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Birch, A. C.; Braun, D. C.; Fan, Y.

    2010-11-10

    The physics of the formation of magnetic active regions (ARs) is one of the most important problems in solar physics. One main class of theories suggests that ARs are the result of magnetic flux that rises from the tachocline. Time-distance helioseismology, which is based on measurements of wave propagation, promises to allow the study of the subsurface behavior of this magnetic flux. Here, we use a model for a buoyant magnetic flux concentration together with the ray approximation to show that the dominant effect on the wave propagation is expected to be from the roughly 100 m s{sup -1} retrograde flow associated with the rising flux. Using a B-spline-based method for carrying out inversions of wave travel times for flows in spherical geometry, we show that at 3 days before emergence the detection of this retrograde flow at a depth of 30 Mm should be possible with a signal-to-noise level of about 8 with a sample of 150 emerging ARs.

  6. TRAC performance estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everett, L.

    1992-01-01

    This report documents the performance characteristics of a Targeting Reflective Alignment Concept (TRAC) sensor. The performance will be documented for both short and long ranges. For long ranges, the sensor is used without the flat mirror attached to the target. To better understand the capabilities of the TRAC based sensors, an engineering model is required. The model can be used to better design the system for a particular application. This is necessary because there are many interrelated design variables in application. These include lense parameters, camera, and target configuration. The report presents first an analytical development of the performance, and second an experimental verification of the equations. In the analytical presentation it is assumed that the best vision resolution is a single pixel element. The experimental results suggest however that the resolution is better than 1 pixel. Hence the analytical results should be considered worst case conditions. The report also discusses advantages and limitations of the TRAC sensor in light of the performance estimates. Finally the report discusses potential improvements.

  7. Tree Topology Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Rolando; Tomasi, Carlo; Schmidler, Scott C.; Farsiu, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Tree-like structures are fundamental in nature, and it is often useful to reconstruct the topology of a tree—what connects to what—from a two-dimensional image of it. However, the projected branches often cross in the image: the tree projects to a planar graph, and the inverse problem of reconstructing the topology of the tree from that of the graph is ill-posed. We regularize this problem with a generative, parametric tree-growth model. Under this model, reconstruction is possible in linear time if one knows the direction of each edge in the graph—which edge endpoint is closer to the root of the tree—but becomes NP-hard if the directions are not known. For the latter case, we present a heuristic search algorithm to estimate the most likely topology of a rooted, three-dimensional tree from a single two-dimensional image. Experimental results on retinal vessel, plant root, and synthetic tree datasets show that our methodology is both accurate and efficient. PMID:26353004

  8. Cooperative photometric redshift estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavuoti, S.; Tortora, C.; Brescia, M.; Longo, G.; Radovich, M.; Napolitano, N. R.; Amaro, V.; Vellucci, C.

    2017-06-01

    In the modern galaxy surveys photometric redshifts play a central role in a broad range of studies, from gravitational lensing and dark matter distribution to galaxy evolution. Using a dataset of ~ 25,000 galaxies from the second data release of the Kilo Degree Survey (KiDS) we obtain photometric redshifts with five different methods: (i) Random forest, (ii) Multi Layer Perceptron with Quasi Newton Algorithm, (iii) Multi Layer Perceptron with an optimization network based on the Levenberg-Marquardt learning rule, (iv) the Bayesian Photometric Redshift model (or BPZ) and (v) a classical SED template fitting procedure (Le Phare). We show how SED fitting techniques could provide useful information on the galaxy spectral type which can be used to improve the capability of machine learning methods constraining systematic errors and reduce the occurrence of catastrophic outliers. We use such classification to train specialized regression estimators, by demonstrating that such hybrid approach, involving SED fitting and machine learning in a single collaborative framework, is capable to improve the overall prediction accuracy of photometric redshifts.

  9. Tree Topology Estimation.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Rolando; Tomasi, Carlo; Schmidler, Scott C; Farsiu, Sina

    2015-08-01

    Tree-like structures are fundamental in nature, and it is often useful to reconstruct the topology of a tree - what connects to what - from a two-dimensional image of it. However, the projected branches often cross in the image: the tree projects to a planar graph, and the inverse problem of reconstructing the topology of the tree from that of the graph is ill-posed. We regularize this problem with a generative, parametric tree-growth model. Under this model, reconstruction is possible in linear time if one knows the direction of each edge in the graph - which edge endpoint is closer to the root of the tree - but becomes NP-hard if the directions are not known. For the latter case, we present a heuristic search algorithm to estimate the most likely topology of a rooted, three-dimensional tree from a single two-dimensional image. Experimental results on retinal vessel, plant root, and synthetic tree data sets show that our methodology is both accurate and efficient.

  10. Uveal melanoma: estimating prognosis.

    PubMed

    Kaliki, Swathi; Shields, Carol L; Shields, Jerry A

    2015-02-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary malignant tumor of the eye in adults, predominantly found in Caucasians. Local tumor control of uveal melanoma is excellent, yet this malignancy is associated with relatively high mortality secondary to metastasis. Various clinical, histopathological, cytogenetic features and gene expression features help in estimating the prognosis of uveal melanoma. The clinical features associated with poor prognosis in patients with uveal melanoma include older age at presentation, male gender, larger tumor basal diameter and thickness, ciliary body location, diffuse tumor configuration, association with ocular/oculodermal melanocytosis, extraocular tumor extension, and advanced tumor staging by American Joint Committee on Cancer classification. Histopathological features suggestive of poor prognosis include epithelioid cell type, high mitotic activity, higher values of mean diameter of ten largest nucleoli, higher microvascular density, extravascular matrix patterns, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, tumor-infiltrating macrophages, higher expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, and higher expression of human leukocyte antigen Class I and II. Monosomy 3, 1p loss, 6q loss, and 8q and those classified as Class II by gene expression are predictive of poor prognosis of uveal melanoma. In this review, we discuss the prognostic factors of uveal melanoma. A database search was performed on PubMed, using the terms "uvea," "iris," "ciliary body," "choroid," "melanoma," "uveal melanoma" and "prognosis," "metastasis," "genetic testing," "gene expression profiling." Relevant English language articles were extracted, reviewed, and referenced appropriately.

  11. Frequentist accuracy of Bayesian estimates

    PubMed Central

    Efron, Bradley

    2014-01-01

    In the absence of relevant prior experience, popular Bayesian estimation techniques usually begin with some form of “uninformative” prior distribution intended to have minimal inferential influence. Bayes rule will still produce nice-looking estimates and credible intervals, but these lack the logical force attached to experience-based priors and require further justification. This paper concerns the frequentist assessment of Bayes estimates. A simple formula is shown to give the frequentist standard deviation of a Bayesian point estimate. The same simulations required for the point estimate also produce the standard deviation. Exponential family models make the calculations particularly simple, and bring in a connection to the parametric bootstrap. PMID:26089740

  12. Direct volume estimation without segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, X.; Wang, Z.; Islam, A.; Bhaduri, M.; Chan, I.; Li, S.

    2015-03-01

    Volume estimation plays an important role in clinical diagnosis. For example, cardiac ventricular volumes including left ventricle (LV) and right ventricle (RV) are important clinical indicators of cardiac functions. Accurate and automatic estimation of the ventricular volumes is essential to the assessment of cardiac functions and diagnosis of heart diseases. Conventional methods are dependent on an intermediate segmentation step which is obtained either manually or automatically. However, manual segmentation is extremely time-consuming, subjective and highly non-reproducible; automatic segmentation is still challenging, computationally expensive, and completely unsolved for the RV. Towards accurate and efficient direct volume estimation, our group has been researching on learning based methods without segmentation by leveraging state-of-the-art machine learning techniques. Our direct estimation methods remove the accessional step of segmentation and can naturally deal with various volume estimation tasks. Moreover, they are extremely flexible to be used for volume estimation of either joint bi-ventricles (LV and RV) or individual LV/RV. We comparatively study the performance of direct methods on cardiac ventricular volume estimation by comparing with segmentation based methods. Experimental results show that direct estimation methods provide more accurate estimation of cardiac ventricular volumes than segmentation based methods. This indicates that direct estimation methods not only provide a convenient and mature clinical tool for cardiac volume estimation but also enables diagnosis of cardiac diseases to be conducted in a more efficient and reliable way.

  13. Precision cosmological parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fendt, William Ashton, Jr.

    2009-09-01

    methods. These techniques will help in the understanding of new physics contained in current and future data sets as well as benefit the research efforts of the cosmology community. Our idea is to shift the computationally intensive pieces of the parameter estimation framework to a parallel training step. We then provide a machine learning code that uses this training set to learn the relationship between the underlying cosmological parameters and the function we wish to compute. This code is very accurate and simple to evaluate. It can provide incredible speed- ups of parameter estimation codes. For some applications this provides the convenience of obtaining results faster, while in other cases this allows the use of codes that would be impossible to apply in the brute force setting. In this thesis we provide several examples where our method allows more accurate computation of functions important for data analysis than is currently possible. As the techniques developed in this work are very general, there are no doubt a wide array of applications both inside and outside of cosmology. We have already seen this interest as other scientists have presented ideas for using our algorithm to improve their computational work, indicating its importance as modern experiments push forward. In fact, our algorithm will play an important role in the parameter analysis of Planck, the next generation CMB space mission.

  14. Magnitude estimation of softness

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Robert M.; Hester, Kim D.; Green, Barry G.

    2008-01-01

    The human capacity to estimate the magnitude of softness of silicone rubber disks of differing compliance was studied under experimental conditions that altered the mode of contact. Subjects were able to scale softness regardless of whether they (1) actively indented each specimen by tapping or pressing it with the finger pad, (2) received passive indentation of the finger pad by each specimen via a force controlled tactile stimulator, thus eliminating kinesthetic cues, or (3) actively indented each specimen with a stylus that was manipulated either by tapping with one finger, or held by two fingers in a precision grip, thereby removing tactile cues provided by direct mechanical contact between the finger pad and specimen. Ratings of softness were independent of moderate variations in peak compressional force and force-rate. Additionally, functions for scaling softness were affected by the mode of contact; the slopes of the functions were greater in the tasks with a complete complement of compliance cues. When subjects were asked to classify objects as either hard or soft, specimens were classified as soft if the compliance were greater than that of the human finger. This suggests that the classification of softness depends on whether the object conforms to the body, and that tactile information about the spatial profile of object deformation is sufficient for the magnitude scaling of softness. But typically, kinesthetic information about the magnitude of object displacement, along with contact vibratory cues is also used while judging softness especially in the absence of direct skin contact with the object when using a tool. PMID:18679665

  15. Uveal melanoma: Estimating prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaliki, Swathi; Shields, Carol L; Shields, Jerry A

    2015-01-01

    Uveal melanoma is the most common primary malignant tumor of the eye in adults, predominantly found in Caucasians. Local tumor control of uveal melanoma is excellent, yet this malignancy is associated with relatively high mortality secondary to metastasis. Various clinical, histopathological, cytogenetic features and gene expression features help in estimating the prognosis of uveal melanoma. The clinical features associated with poor prognosis in patients with uveal melanoma include older age at presentation, male gender, larger tumor basal diameter and thickness, ciliary body location, diffuse tumor configuration, association with ocular/oculodermal melanocytosis, extraocular tumor extension, and advanced tumor staging by American Joint Committee on Cancer classification. Histopathological features suggestive of poor prognosis include epithelioid cell type, high mitotic activity, higher values of mean diameter of ten largest nucleoli, higher microvascular density, extravascular matrix patterns, tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, tumor-infiltrating macrophages, higher expression of insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor, and higher expression of human leukocyte antigen Class I and II. Monosomy 3, 1p loss, 6q loss, and 8q and those classified as Class II by gene expression are predictive of poor prognosis of uveal melanoma. In this review, we discuss the prognostic factors of uveal melanoma. A database search was performed on PubMed, using the terms “uvea,” “iris,” “ciliary body,” “choroid,” “melanoma,” “uveal melanoma” and “prognosis,” “metastasis,” “genetic testing,” “gene expression profiling.” Relevant English language articles were extracted, reviewed, and referenced appropriately. PMID:25827538

  16. Hardware accelerated ray cast of volume data and volume gradient for an optimized splines-based multi-resolution 2D-3D registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Zheng, Guoyan

    2007-03-01

    This paper describes a method for DRR generation as well as for volume gradients projection using hardware accelerated 2D texture mapping and accumulation buffering and demonstrates its application in 2D-3D registration of X-ray fluoroscopy to CT images. The robustness of the present registration scheme are guaranteed by taking advantage of a coarse-to-fine processing of the volume/image pyramids based on cubic B-splines. A human cadaveric spine specimen together with its ground truth was used to compare the present scheme with a purely software-based scheme in three aspects: accuracy, speed, and capture ranges. Our experiments revealed an equivalent accuracy and capture ranges but with much shorter registration time with the present scheme. More specifically, the results showed 0.8 mm average target registration error, 55 second average execution time per registration, and 10 mm and 10° capture ranges for the present scheme when tested on a 3.0 GHz Pentium 4 computer.

  17. A Locally Modal B-Spline Based Full-Vector Finite-Element Method with PML for Nonlinear and Lossy Plasmonic Waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimi, Hossein; Nikmehr, Saeid; Khodapanah, Ehsan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we develop a B-spline finite-element method (FEM) based on a locally modal wave propagation with anisotropic perfectly matched layers (PMLs), for the first time, to simulate nonlinear and lossy plasmonic waveguides. Conventional approaches like beam propagation method, inherently omit the wave spectrum and do not provide physical insight into nonlinear modes especially in the plasmonic applications, where nonlinear modes are constructed by linear modes with very close propagation constant quantities. Our locally modal B-spline finite element method (LMBS-FEM) does not suffer from the weakness of the conventional approaches. To validate our method, first, propagation of wave for various kinds of linear, nonlinear, lossless and lossy materials of metal-insulator plasmonic structures are simulated using LMBS-FEM in MATLAB and the comparisons are made with FEM-BPM module of COMSOL Multiphysics simulator and B-spline finite-element finite-difference wide angle beam propagation method (BSFEFD-WABPM). The comparisons show that not only our developed numerical approach is computationally more accurate and efficient than conventional approaches but also it provides physical insight into the nonlinear nature of the propagation modes.

  18. A priori SNR estimation and noise estimation for speech enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Rui; Zeng, ZeQing; Zhu, Ping

    2016-12-01

    A priori signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimation and noise estimation are important for speech enhancement. In this paper, a novel modified decision-directed (DD) a priori SNR estimation approach based on single-frequency entropy, named DDBSE, is proposed. DDBSE replaces the fixed weighting factor in the DD approach with an adaptive one calculated according to change of single-frequency entropy. Simultaneously, a new noise power estimation approach based on unbiased minimum mean square error (MMSE) and voice activity detection (VAD), named UMVAD, is proposed. UMVAD adopts different strategies to estimate noise in order to reduce over-estimation and under-estimation of noise. UMVAD improves the classical statistical model-based VAD by utilizing an adaptive threshold to replace the original fixed one and modifies the unbiased MMSE-based noise estimation approach using an adaptive a priori speech presence probability calculated by entropy instead of the original fixed one. Experimental results show that DDBSE can provide greater noise suppression than DD and UMVAD can improve the accuracy of noise estimation. Compared to existing approaches, speech enhancement based on UMVAD and DDBSE can obtain a better segment SNR score and composite measure c ovl score, especially in adverse environments such as non-stationary noise and low-SNR.

  19. A priori SNR estimation and noise estimation for speech enhancement.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rui; Zeng, ZeQing; Zhu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    A priori signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) estimation and noise estimation are important for speech enhancement. In this paper, a novel modified decision-directed (DD) a priori SNR estimation approach based on single-frequency entropy, named DDBSE, is proposed. DDBSE replaces the fixed weighting factor in the DD approach with an adaptive one calculated according to change of single-frequency entropy. Simultaneously, a new noise power estimation approach based on unbiased minimum mean square error (MMSE) and voice activity detection (VAD), named UMVAD, is proposed. UMVAD adopts different strategies to estimate noise in order to reduce over-estimation and under-estimation of noise. UMVAD improves the classical statistical model-based VAD by utilizing an adaptive threshold to replace the original fixed one and modifies the unbiased MMSE-based noise estimation approach using an adaptive a priori speech presence probability calculated by entropy instead of the original fixed one. Experimental results show that DDBSE can provide greater noise suppression than DD and UMVAD can improve the accuracy of noise estimation. Compared to existing approaches, speech enhancement based on UMVAD and DDBSE can obtain a better segment SNR score and composite measure covl score, especially in adverse environments such as non-stationary noise and low-SNR.

  20. Quantum Estimation, meet Computational Statistics; Computational Statistics, meet Quantum Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrie, Chris; Granade, Chris; Combes, Joshua

    2013-03-01

    Quantum estimation, that is, post processing data to obtain classical descriptions of quantum states and processes, is an intractable problem--scaling exponentially with the number of interacting systems. Thankfully there is an entire field, Computational Statistics, devoted to designing algorithms to estimate probabilities for seemingly intractable problems. So, why not look to the most advanced machine learning algorithms for quantum estimation tasks? We did. I'll describe how we adapted and combined machine learning methodologies to obtain an online learning algorithm designed to estimate quantum states and processes.

  1. Hybrid estimation of complex systems.

    PubMed

    Hofbaur, Michael W; Williams, Brian C

    2004-10-01

    Modern automated systems evolve both continuously and discretely, and hence require estimation techniques that go well beyond the capability of a typical Kalman Filter. Multiple model (MM) estimation schemes track these system evolutions by applying a bank of filters, one for each discrete system mode. Modern systems, however, are often composed of many interconnected components that exhibit rich behaviors, due to complex, system-wide interactions. Modeling these systems leads to complex stochastic hybrid models that capture the large number of operational and failure modes. This large number of modes makes a typical MM estimation approach infeasible for online estimation. This paper analyzes the shortcomings of MM estimation, and then introduces an alternative hybrid estimation scheme that can efficiently estimate complex systems with large number of modes. It utilizes search techniques from the toolkit of model-based reasoning in order to focus the estimation on the set of most likely modes, without missing symptoms that might be hidden amongst the system noise. In addition, we present a novel approach to hybrid estimation in the presence of unknown behavioral modes. This leads to an overall hybrid estimation scheme for complex systems that robustly copes with unforeseen situations in a degraded, but fail-safe manner.

  2. Estimators for the Cauchy distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Wolf, D.R.

    1993-12-31

    We discuss the properties of various estimators of the central position of the Cauchy distribution. The performance of these estimators is evaluated for a set of simulated experiments. Estimators based on the maximum and mean of the posterior probability density function are empirically found to be well behaved when more than two measurements are available. On the contrary, because of the infinite variance of the Cauchy distribution, the average of the measured positions is an extremely poor estimator of the location of the source. However, the median of the measured positions is well behaved. The rms errors for the various estimators are compared to the Fisher-Cramer-Rao lower bound. We find that the square root of the variance of the posterior density function is predictive of the rms error in the mean posterior estimator.

  3. The G-Spectral Estimator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    correlation function and is equivalent to an en-transformation [11] of the same function. Gray, Houston and Morgan ( GHM ) noted the estimator to have some...satis- factory way of selecting the proper value n in the en-transform. GHM went on to conclude that an ARMA spectral estimator would probably have...which will be seen to avoid the difficulties noted by GHM , and will in fact, be shown to be equivalent to a method of moments ARMA spectral estimator

  4. Estimating the Modified Allan Variance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, Charles

    1995-01-01

    The third-difference approach to modified Allan variance (MVAR) leads to a tractable formula for a measure of MVAR estimator confidence, the equivalent degrees of freedom (edf), in the presence of power-law phase noise. The effect of estimation stride on edf is tabulated. A simple approximation for edf is given, and its errors are tabulated. A theorem allowing conservative estimates of edf in the presence of compound noise processes is given.

  5. Robust and intelligent bearing estimation

    DOEpatents

    Claassen, John P.

    2000-01-01

    A method of bearing estimation comprising quadrature digital filtering of event observations, constructing a plurality of observation matrices each centered on a time-frequency interval, determining for each observation matrix a parameter such as degree of polarization, linearity of particle motion, degree of dyadicy, or signal-to-noise ratio, choosing observation matrices most likely to produce a set of best available bearing estimates, and estimating a bearing for each observation matrix of the chosen set.

  6. Spring Small Grains Area Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, W. F.; Mohler, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    SSG3 automatically estimates acreage of spring small grains from Landsat data. Report describes development and testing of a computerized technique for using Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) data to estimate acreage of spring small grains (wheat, barley, and oats). Application of technique to analysis of four years of data from United States and Canada yielded estimates of accuracy comparable to those obtained through procedures that rely on trained analysis.

  7. Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Roskovensky, John; Sallade, Jeff

    2012-05-04

    The Cloud Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool (SEET) is a user driven Graphical User Interface (GUI) that estimates cloud supercooled liquid water (SLW) content in terms of vertical column and total mass from Moderate resolution Imaging Supercooled liquid water Estimation Tool Spectroradiometer (MODIS) spatially derived cloud products and realistic vertical cloud parameterizations that are user defined. It also contains functions for post-processing of the resulting data in tabular and graphical form.

  8. Estimating Absolute Site Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Malagnini, L; Mayeda, K M; Akinci, A; Bragato, P L

    2004-07-15

    The authors use previously determined direct-wave attenuation functions as well as stable, coda-derived source excitation spectra to isolate the absolute S-wave site effect for the horizontal and vertical components of weak ground motion. They used selected stations in the seismic network of the eastern Alps, and find the following: (1) all ''hard rock'' sites exhibited deamplification phenomena due to absorption at frequencies ranging between 0.5 and 12 Hz (the available bandwidth), on both the horizontal and vertical components; (2) ''hard rock'' site transfer functions showed large variability at high-frequency; (3) vertical-motion site transfer functions show strong frequency-dependence, and (4) H/V spectral ratios do not reproduce the characteristics of the true horizontal site transfer functions; (5) traditional, relative site terms obtained by using reference ''rock sites'' can be misleading in inferring the behaviors of true site transfer functions, since most rock sites have non-flat responses due to shallow heterogeneities resulting from varying degrees of weathering. They also use their stable source spectra to estimate total radiated seismic energy and compare against previous results. they find that the earthquakes in this region exhibit non-constant dynamic stress drop scaling which gives further support for a fundamental difference in rupture dynamics between small and large earthquakes. To correct the vertical and horizontal S-wave spectra for attenuation, they used detailed regional attenuation functions derived by Malagnini et al. (2002) who determined frequency-dependent geometrical spreading and Q for the region. These corrections account for the gross path effects (i.e., all distance-dependent effects), although the source and site effects are still present in the distance-corrected spectra. The main goal of this study is to isolate the absolute site effect (as a function of frequency) by removing the source spectrum (moment-rate spectrum) from

  9. Asymptotic Normality of Quadratic Estimators.

    PubMed

    Robins, James; Li, Lingling; Tchetgen, Eric; van der Vaart, Aad

    2016-12-01

    We prove conditional asymptotic normality of a class of quadratic U-statistics that are dominated by their degenerate second order part and have kernels that change with the number of observations. These statistics arise in the construction of estimators in high-dimensional semi- and non-parametric models, and in the construction of nonparametric confidence sets. This is illustrated by estimation of the integral of a square of a density or regression function, and estimation of the mean response with missing data. We show that estimators are asymptotically normal even in the case that the rate is slower than the square root of the observations.

  10. ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO ESTIMATING CANCER ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The alternative approach for estimating cancer potency from inhalation exposure to asbestos seeks to improve the methods developed by USEPA (1986). This efforts seeks to modify the the current approach for estimating cancer potency for lung cancer and mesothelioma to account for the current scientific consensus that cancer risk from asbestos depends both on mineral type and on particle size distribution. In brief, epidemiological exposure-response data for lung cancer and mesothelioma in asbestos workers are combined with estimates of the mineral type(s) and partical size distribution at each exposure location in order to estimate potency factors that are specific to a selected set of mineral type and size

  11. Rasch model estimation: further topics.

    PubMed

    Linacre, John M

    2004-01-01

    Building on Wright and Masters (1982), several Rasch estimation methods are briefly described, including Marginal Maximum Likelihood Estimation (MMLE) and minimum chi-square methods. General attributes of Rasch estimation algorithms are discussed, including the handling of missing data, precision and accuracy, estimate consistency, bias and symmetry. Reasons for, and the implications of, measure misestimation are explained, including the effect of loose convergence criteria, and failure of Newton-Raphson iteration to converge. Alternative parameterizations of rating scales broaden the scope of Rasch measurement methodology.

  12. ALTERNATIVE APPROACH TO ESTIMATING CANCER ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The alternative approach for estimating cancer potency from inhalation exposure to asbestos seeks to improve the methods developed by USEPA (1986). This efforts seeks to modify the the current approach for estimating cancer potency for lung cancer and mesothelioma to account for the current scientific consensus that cancer risk from asbestos depends both on mineral type and on particle size distribution. In brief, epidemiological exposure-response data for lung cancer and mesothelioma in asbestos workers are combined with estimates of the mineral type(s) and partical size distribution at each exposure location in order to estimate potency factors that are specific to a selected set of mineral type and size

  13. Estimating the Cost of Doing a Cost Estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, D. S.; Buchanan, H. R.

    1996-01-01

    This article provides a model for estimating the cost required to do a cost estimate...Our earlier work provided data for high technology projects. This article adds data from the construction industry which validates the model over a wider range of technology.

  14. Frequency tracking and parameter estimation for robust quantum state estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Ralph, Jason F.; Jacobs, Kurt; Hill, Charles D.

    2011-11-15

    In this paper we consider the problem of tracking the state of a quantum system via a continuous weak measurement. If the system Hamiltonian is known precisely, this merely requires integrating the appropriate stochastic master equation. However, even a small error in the assumed Hamiltonian can render this approach useless. The natural answer to this problem is to include the parameters of the Hamiltonian as part of the estimation problem, and the full Bayesian solution to this task provides a state estimate that is robust against uncertainties. However, this approach requires considerable computational overhead. Here we consider a single qubit in which the Hamiltonian contains a single unknown parameter. We show that classical frequency estimation techniques greatly reduce the computational overhead associated with Bayesian estimation and provide accurate estimates for the qubit frequency.

  15. Space vehicle pose estimation via optical correlation and nonlinear estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakoczy, John M.; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2008-03-01

    A technique for 6-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) pose estimation of space vehicles is being developed. This technique draws upon recent developments in implementing optical correlation measurements in a nonlinear estimator, which relates the optical correlation measurements to the pose states (orientation and position). For the optical correlator, the use of both conjugate filters and binary, phase-only filters in the design of synthetic discriminant function (SDF) filters is explored. A static neural network is trained a priori and used as the nonlinear estimator. New commercial animation and image rendering software is exploited to design the SDF filters and to generate a large filter set with which to train the neural network. The technique is applied to pose estimation for rendezvous and docking of free-flying spacecraft and to terrestrial surface mobility systems for NASA's Vision for Space Exploration. Quantitative pose estimation performance will be reported. Advantages and disadvantages of the implementation of this technique are discussed.

  16. Estimating discharge measurement uncertainty using the interpolated variance estimator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cohn, T.; Kiang, J.; Mason, R.

    2012-01-01

    Methods for quantifying the uncertainty in discharge measurements typically identify various sources of uncertainty and then estimate the uncertainty from each of these sources by applying the results of empirical or laboratory studies. If actual measurement conditions are not consistent with those encountered in the empirical or laboratory studies, these methods may give poor estimates of discharge uncertainty. This paper presents an alternative method for estimating discharge measurement uncertainty that uses statistical techniques and at-site observations. This Interpolated Variance Estimator (IVE) estimates uncertainty based on the data collected during the streamflow measurement and therefore reflects the conditions encountered at the site. The IVE has the additional advantage of capturing all sources of random uncertainty in the velocity and depth measurements. It can be applied to velocity-area discharge measurements that use a velocity meter to measure point velocities at multiple vertical sections in a channel cross section.

  17. Space Vehicle Pose Estimation via Optical Correlation and Nonlinear Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John; Herren, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    A technique for 6-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) pose estimation of space vehicles is being developed. This technique draws upon recent developments in implementing optical correlation measurements in a nonlinear estimator, which relates the optical correlation measurements to the pose states (orientation and position). For the optical correlator, the use of both conjugate filters and binary, phase-only filters in the design of synthetic discriminant function (SDF) filters is explored. A static neural network is trained a priori and used as the nonlinear estimator. New commercial animation and image rendering software is exploited to design the SDF filters and to generate a large filter set with which to train the neural network. The technique is applied to pose estimation for rendezvous and docking of free-flying spacecraft and to terrestrial surface mobility systems for NASA's Vision for Space Exploration. Quantitative pose estimation performance will be reported. Advantages and disadvantages of the implementation of this technique are discussed.

  18. Space Vehicle Pose Estimation via Optical Correlation and Nonlinear Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John M.; Herren, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    A technique for 6-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) pose estimation of space vehicles is being developed. This technique draws upon recent developments in implementing optical correlation measurements in a nonlinear estimator, which relates the optical correlation measurements to the pose states (orientation and position). For the optical correlator, the use of both conjugate filters and binary, phase-only filters in the design of synthetic discriminant function (SDF) filters is explored. A static neural network is trained a priori and used as the nonlinear estimator. New commercial animation and image rendering software is exploited to design the SDF filters and to generate a large filter set with which to train the neural network. The technique is applied to pose estimation for rendezvous and docking of free-flying spacecraft and to terrestrial surface mobility systems for NASA's Vision for Space Exploration. Quantitative pose estimation performance will be reported. Advantages and disadvantages of the implementation of this technique are discussed.

  19. Estimation in Latent Trait Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigdon, Steven E.; Tsutakawa, Robert K.

    Estimation of ability and item parameters in latent trait models is discussed. When both ability and item parameters are considered fixed but unknown, the method of maximum likelihood for the logistic or probit models is well known. Discussed are techniques for estimating ability and item parameters when the ability parameters or item parameters…

  20. PBXN-110 Burn Rate Estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E

    2008-08-11

    It is estimated that PBXN-110 will burn laminarly with a burn function of B = (0.6-1.3)*P{sup 1.0} (B is the burn rate in mm/s and P is pressure in MPa). This paper provides a brief discussion of how this burn behavior was estimated.

  1. Computer-Aided Reliability Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bavuso, S. J.; Stiffler, J. J.; Bryant, L. A.; Petersen, P. L.

    1986-01-01

    CARE III (Computer-Aided Reliability Estimation, Third Generation) helps estimate reliability of complex, redundant, fault-tolerant systems. Program specifically designed for evaluation of fault-tolerant avionics systems. However, CARE III general enough for use in evaluation of other systems as well.

  2. ARSENIC REMOVAL COST ESTIMATING PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Arsenic Removal Cost Estimating program (Excel) calculates the costs for using adsorptive media and anion exchange treatment systems to remove arsenic from drinking water. The program is an easy-to-use tool to estimate capital and operating costs for three types of arsenic re...

  3. ARSENIC REMOVAL COST ESTIMATING PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Arsenic Removal Cost Estimating program (Excel) calculates the costs for using adsorptive media and anion exchange treatment systems to remove arsenic from drinking water. The program is an easy-to-use tool to estimate capital and operating costs for three types of arsenic re...

  4. A method for estimating proportions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guseman, L. F., Jr.; Marion, B. P.

    1975-01-01

    A proportion estimation procedure is presented which requires only on set of ground truth data for determining the error matrix. The error matrix is then used to determine an unbiased estimate. The error matrix is shown to be directly related to the probability of misclassifications, and is more diagonally dominant with the increase in the number of passes used.

  5. Estimating Bottleneck Bandwidth using TCP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allman, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with estimating bottleneck bandwidth using TCP are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Why TCP is wanted to estimate the bottleneck bandwidth; 2) Setting ssthresh to an appropriate value to reduce loss; 3) Possible packet-pair solutions; and 4) Preliminary results: ACTS and the Internet.

  6. Estimating Agricultural Nitrous Oxide Emissions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nitrous oxide emissions are highly variable in space and time and different methodologies have not agreed closely, especially at small scales. However, as scale increases, so does the agreement between estimates based on soil surface measurements (bottom up approach) and estimates derived from chang...

  7. Estimating Costs Of Aerospace Construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Joseph A.

    1994-01-01

    Report presents brief descriptions of techniques, instructional and reference literature, computer hardware and software, and compilations of data used to estimate costs of specially equipped buildings and other aerospace construction projects. Descriptions replete with practical examples. Experiences gained in estimating costs of specific projects included.

  8. Quantum estimation of unknown parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Vargas, Esteban; Pineda, Carlos; Leyvraz, François; Barberis-Blostein, Pablo

    2017-01-01

    We discuss the problem of finding the best measurement strategy for estimating the value of a quantum system parameter. In general the optimum quantum measurement, in the sense that it maximizes the quantum Fisher information and hence allows one to minimize the estimation error, can only be determined if the value of the parameter is already known. A modification of the quantum Van Trees inequality, which gives a lower bound on the error in the estimation of a random parameter, is proposed. The suggested inequality allows us to assert if a particular quantum measurement, together with an appropriate estimator, is optimal. An adaptive strategy to estimate the value of a parameter, based on our modified inequality, is proposed.

  9. A Note on Entropy Estimation.

    PubMed

    Schürmann, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    We compare an entropy estimator H(z) recently discussed by Zhang (2012) with two estimators, H(1) and H(2), introduced by Grassberger (2003) and Schürmann (2004). We prove the identity H(z) ≡ H(1), which has not been taken into account by Zhang (2012). Then we prove that the systematic error (bias) of H(1) is less than or equal to the bias of the ordinary likelihood (or plug-in) estimator of entropy. Finally, by numerical simulation, we verify that for the most interesting regime of small sample estimation and large event spaces, the estimator H(2) has a significantly smaller statistical error than H(z).

  10. Applications of the MuSES Infrared Signature Code

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-01

    absorptivity of a node. Retrieve and Set the first strike diffuse, direct or total solar flux. Retrieve the incoming/outgoing/net conduction ... convection , radiation, or advection heat rate. Retrieve the convergence criteria. Retrieve the current time step’s maximum temperature change. Retrieve

  11. Musings in the Wake of Columbine: What Can Schools Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raywid, Mary Anne; Oshiyama, Libby

    2000-01-01

    As suggested by standard indicators--truancy, dropout rates, graffiti, vandalism, violence--youngsters in small schools rarely display the anger at the institution and its inhabitants that typifies Columbine and many other comprehensive high schools. Educators must cultivate learning communities and qualities (like empathy and compassion)…

  12. Presence of Mind... A Reaction to Sheridan's "Musing on Telepresence"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    What are the benefits and significance of developing a scientifically useful measure of the human sense of presence in an environment? Such a scale could be conceived to measure the extent to which users of telerobotics interfaces feel or behave as if they were present at the site of a remotely controlled robot. The essay examines some issues raised in order to identify characteristics, a scale of 'presence' ought to have to be useful as an explanatory scientific concept. It also addresses the utility of worrying about developing such a scale at all. To be useful in the same manner as a traditional scientific concept such as mass, for example, it is argued that such scales not only need to be precisely defined and co-vary with determinative factors but also need to establish equivalence classes of its independent constituents. This simplifying property is important for either subjective or objective scales of presence and arises if the constituents of presence are truly independent.

  13. Supersymmetric musings on the predictivity of family symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Kadota, Kenji; Kersten, Joern; Velasco-Sevilla, Liliana

    2010-10-15

    We discuss the predictivity of family symmetries for the soft supersymmetry breaking parameters in the framework of supergravity. We show that unknown details of the messenger sector and the supersymmetry breaking hidden sector enter into the soft parameters, making it difficult to obtain robust predictions. We find that there are specific choices of messenger fields which can improve the predictivity for the soft parameters.

  14. The Unembarressed Muse: The Popular Arts in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nye, Russel

    This book is a study of certain of the popular arts in American society, that is, the arts in their customarily accepted genres. "Popular" is interpreted to mean "generally dispersed and approved"--descriptive of those artistic productions which express the taste and understanding of the majority and which are free of control, in content and…

  15. Practitioner Meets Philosopher: Bakhtinian Musings on Learning with Paul

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnsson, Mary Chen

    2013-01-01

    The stars and the planets must have been in alignment when Paul Hager needed a doctoral student to work on his research grant at the same time that I had transitioned from 20 years as business practitioner to become an educator interested in workplace learning. This paper explores the Bakhtinian ways in which I learned about learning with Paul,…

  16. Mentors, Muses, and Mutuality: Honoring Barbara Snell Dohrenwend

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Anne

    2012-01-01

    I describe feminist community psychology principles that have the potential to expand and enrich mentoring and that honor Barbara Snell Dohrenwend, a leader who contributed to the research, theory, and profession of community psychology. I reflect on the affect that Barbara Dohrenwend had on life and on the development of feminist community…

  17. Musings in the Wake of Columbine: What Can Schools Do?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raywid, Mary Anne; Oshiyama, Libby

    2000-01-01

    As suggested by standard indicators--truancy, dropout rates, graffiti, vandalism, violence--youngsters in small schools rarely display the anger at the institution and its inhabitants that typifies Columbine and many other comprehensive high schools. Educators must cultivate learning communities and qualities (like empathy and compassion)…

  18. End of the Line: A Poet's Postmodern Musings on Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leggo, Carl

    2006-01-01

    I invite and encourage students to take risks in their writing, to engage innovatively with a wide range of genre, to push limits in order to explore creatively how language and discourse are never ossified, but always organic, how language use is integrally and inextricably connected to identity, knowledge, subjectivity, and living. Informed by…

  19. Sing, muse: songs in Homer and in hospital.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Robert; Bleakley, Alan

    2011-06-01

    This paper progresses the original argument of Richard Ratzan that formal presentation of the medical case history follows a Homeric oral-formulaic tradition.The everyday work routines of doctors involve a ritual poetics, where the language of recounting the patient’s ‘history’ offers an explicitly aesthetic enactment or performance that can be appreciated and given meaning within the historical tradition of Homeric oral poetry and the modernist aesthetic of Minimalism. This ritual poetics shows a reliance on traditional word usages that crucially act as tools for memorisation and performance and can be linked to forms of clinical reasoning; both contain a tension between the oral and the written record, questioning the priority of the latter; and the performance of both helps to create the Janus-faced identity of the doctor as a ‘performance artist’ or ‘medical bard’ in identifying with medical culture and maintaining a positive difference from the patient as audience, offering a valid form of patient-centredness.

  20. Musings on cosmological relaxation and the hierarchy problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeckel, Joerg; Mehta, Viraf M.; Witkowski, Lukas T.

    2016-03-01

    Recently Graham, Kaplan and Rajendran proposed cosmological relaxation as a mechanism for generating a hierarchically small Higgs vacuum expectation value. Inspired by this we collect some thoughts on steps towards a solution to the electroweak hierarchy problem and apply them to the original model of cosmological relaxation [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 221801 (2015)]. To do so, we study the dynamics of the model and determine the relation between the fundamental input parameters and the electroweak vacuum expectation value. Depending on the input parameters the model exhibits three qualitatively different regimes, two of which allow for hierarchically small Higgs vacuum expectation values. One leads to standard electroweak symmetry breaking whereas in the other regime electroweak symmetry is mainly broken by a Higgs source term. While the latter is not acceptable in a model based on the QCD axion, in non-QCD models this may lead to new and interesting signatures in Higgs observables. Overall, we confirm that cosmological relaxation can successfully give rise to a hierarchically small Higgs vacuum expectation value if (at least) one model parameter is chosen sufficiently small. However, we find that the required level of tuning for achieving this hierarchy in relaxation models can be much more severe than in the Standard Model.

  1. In Pursuit of the Muse: Librarians Who Write.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chepesiuk, Ron

    1991-01-01

    This article profiles six librarians in academic and public libraries who discuss how they balance their dual careers as authors and librarians. The influence of librarianship on their writing is described, the influence of writing on their careers in librarianship is considered, and the problems of finding time for both careers is discussed. (LRW)

  2. Musing on the Memes of Open and Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latchem, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Just as genes propagate themselves in the gene pool by leaping from body to body, so memes (ideas, behaviours, and actions) transmit cultural ideas or practices from one mind to another through writing, speech, or other imitable phenomena. This paper considers the memes that influence the evolution of open and distance education. If the…

  3. The debilitated muse: poetry in the face of illness.

    PubMed

    Ofri, Danielle

    2010-12-01

    Poetry is a supremely sensory art, both in the imagining and in the writing. What happens when the poet faces illness? How is the poetry affected by alterations of the body and mind? This paper examines the poetry of several writers afflicted by physical illness-poets of great renown and poets who might be classified as "emerging voices," in order to explore the interplay between creativity and corporeal vulnerability.

  4. Musings: Gifts to the Gifted--Training Our Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Miraca U. M.

    2002-01-01

    This article discusses teacher misconceptions of gifted students and gifted programs and the effects of a postgraduate teacher education program in Australia called the Certificate of Gifted Education. Results of the program indicate powerful changes in teachers' attitudes and support the need to provide every teacher with training in gifted…

  5. Marrying the "Muse" and the Thinker "Poetry as Scientific Writing"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcum-Dietrich, Nanette I.; Byrne, Eileen; O'Hern, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an unlikely collaboration between a high school chemistry teacher and a high school English teacher who attempted to teach scientific concepts through poetry. Inspired by poet John Updike's (1960) "Cosmic Gall," these two teachers crafted writing tasks aimed at teaching science content through literary devices. The result…

  6. The Game Veteran Theatre Teachers Are Playing: Anatomy of Musings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schonmann, Shifra

    2009-01-01

    This paper is the result of an explorative study, based on the in-depth meta-analysis of a corpus of contemporary pieces of research in which there was found clear references to veteran theatre teachers talking about their work. Following that, extracts from interviews of experienced theatre teachers were analyzed. The major aim of this study is…

  7. The muse in the machine: computers can help us compose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenhough, M.

    1990-01-01

    A method of producing musical structures by means of a constrained random process is described. Real-time operation allows intuitive control. Musical samples from a computer system can 'evolve' Darwinian-style in the environment provided by the operator's ear-brain.

  8. Practitioner Meets Philosopher: Bakhtinian Musings on Learning with Paul

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnsson, Mary Chen

    2013-01-01

    The stars and the planets must have been in alignment when Paul Hager needed a doctoral student to work on his research grant at the same time that I had transitioned from 20 years as business practitioner to become an educator interested in workplace learning. This paper explores the Bakhtinian ways in which I learned about learning with Paul,…

  9. Musings on genome medicine: the Obama effect redux.

    PubMed

    Nathan, David G; Orkin, Stuart H

    2009-09-11

    From the point of view of genome medicine, Barack Obama has made two vital policy decisions: he has chosen a new director of the National Institutes of Health, and his proposed change in United States healthcare policy will have profound effects on genome medicine and, indeed, all of academic medicine.

  10. Looking for the Muse in Some of the Right Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pariser, David A.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses C. Milbrath's thesis that artistically talented and less talented children follow different developmental paths because they rely on different ways of responding to the world. Relates this thesis to studies of the childhood work of Paul Klee, Henri Toulouse Lautrec, and Pablo Picasso. (SLD)

  11. Method and the Muse: Planning a School Arts Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgard, Ralph

    The document stresses that planning is essential to introduce arts programs into the schools and provides suggestions for the planning process. Elements of a good planning process include clearly stated goals and objectives, efficient use of existing resources, a survey of local conditions, involvement of influential school officials and community…

  12. Musings on genome medicine: the Obama effect redux

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    From the point of view of genome medicine, Barack Obama has made two vital policy decisions: he has chosen a new director of the National Institutes of Health, and his proposed change in United States healthcare policy will have profound effects on genome medicine and, indeed, all of academic medicine. PMID:19769781

  13. Awaken the Muse--Teaching Music to Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tusnady, Monika

    2001-01-01

    Presents ways educators can make music an integral part of early childhood education and give every child a quality music experience. Discusses five ways children experience musical play: singing, rhymes and fingerplays, movement, listening, and instruments. Emphasizes the importance of musical goals rather than spatial-temporal reasoning or other…

  14. Musing on the Memes of Open and Distance Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latchem, Colin

    2014-01-01

    Just as genes propagate themselves in the gene pool by leaping from body to body, so memes (ideas, behaviours, and actions) transmit cultural ideas or practices from one mind to another through writing, speech, or other imitable phenomena. This paper considers the memes that influence the evolution of open and distance education. If the…

  15. Marrying the "Muse" and the Thinker "Poetry as Scientific Writing"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcum-Dietrich, Nanette I.; Byrne, Eileen; O'Hern, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    This article describes an unlikely collaboration between a high school chemistry teacher and a high school English teacher who attempted to teach scientific concepts through poetry. Inspired by poet John Updike's (1960) "Cosmic Gall," these two teachers crafted writing tasks aimed at teaching science content through literary devices. The result…

  16. In Pursuit of the Muse: Librarians Who Write.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chepesiuk, Ron

    1991-01-01

    This article profiles six librarians in academic and public libraries who discuss how they balance their dual careers as authors and librarians. The influence of librarianship on their writing is described, the influence of writing on their careers in librarianship is considered, and the problems of finding time for both careers is discussed. (LRW)

  17. Musings on Models and the Genius of Jens Rasmussen.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Thomas B

    2017-03-01

    Two well-known Rasmussen models, the skill-rule knowledge (SRK) paradigm and the abstraction hierarchy, are compared to well-known models in both physics and psychology. Some of the latter are quantitative and make explicit predictions; some are qualitative, such as the Rasmussen models, being more useful for provoking thought about the relevant issues. Each of the Rasmussen models is evaluated with respect to six-attribute model taxonomy recently introduced by the author. The SRK model is shown to characterize modern automation as well as human behavior, with computer and physical devices exhibiting the a skill-based, rule-based and knowledge-based properties, and with monitoring and intermittent intervention by a human supervisor. A further suggestion is that the Rasmussen abstraction hierarchy could be applied not only to systems such as air traffic control but also to general situations of living. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Looking for the Muse in Some of the Right Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pariser, David A.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses C. Milbrath's thesis that artistically talented and less talented children follow different developmental paths because they rely on different ways of responding to the world. Relates this thesis to studies of the childhood work of Paul Klee, Henri Toulouse Lautrec, and Pablo Picasso. (SLD)

  19. Traceability of radiation measurements: musings of a user

    SciTech Connect

    Kathren, R.L.

    1980-04-01

    Although users of radiation desire measurement traceability for a number of reasons, including legal, regulatory, contractual, and quality assurance requirements, there exists no real definition of the term in the technical literature. Definitions are proposed for both traceability and traceability to the National Bureau of Standards. The hierarchy of radiation standards is discussed and allowable uncertainties are given for each level. Areas of need with respect to radiation standards are identified, and a system of secondary radiation calibration laboratories is proposed as a means of providing quality calibrations and traceability on a routine basis.

  20. Musings on the State of the ILS in 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breeding, Marshall

    2006-01-01

    It is hard to imagine operating a library today without the assistance of an integrated library system (ILS). Without help from it, library work would be tedious, labor would be intensive, and patrons would be underserved in almost all respects. Given the importance of these automation systems, it is essential that they work well and deliver…

  1. Presence of Mind... A Reaction to Sheridan's "Musing on Telepresence"

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    What are the benefits and significance of developing a scientifically useful measure of the human sense of presence in an environment? Such a scale could be conceived to measure the extent to which users of telerobotics interfaces feel or behave as if they were present at the site of a remotely controlled robot. The essay examines some issues raised in order to identify characteristics, a scale of 'presence' ought to have to be useful as an explanatory scientific concept. It also addresses the utility of worrying about developing such a scale at all. To be useful in the same manner as a traditional scientific concept such as mass, for example, it is argued that such scales not only need to be precisely defined and co-vary with determinative factors but also need to establish equivalence classes of its independent constituents. This simplifying property is important for either subjective or objective scales of presence and arises if the constituents of presence are truly independent.

  2. Tracking the Muse: The Writing Processes of Poets.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Cherryl

    Focusing on the nature of revision in lyric poetry, a study investigated poets' writing processes. Primary data sources included poets' commentary, letters, recorded conversations, interviews, and essays. Two case studies were also conducted--an evaluation of two poets at work (one a novice and one an experienced poet) and a textual analysis of…

  3. The painful muse: migrainous artistic archetypes from visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Aguggia, Marco; Grassi, Enrico

    2014-05-01

    Neurological diseases which constituted traditionally obstacles to artistic creation can, in the case of migraine, be transformed by the artists into a source of inspiration and artistic production. These phenomena represent a chapter of a broader embryonic neurobiology of painting.

  4. Awaken the Muse--Teaching Music to Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tusnady, Monika

    2001-01-01

    Presents ways educators can make music an integral part of early childhood education and give every child a quality music experience. Discusses five ways children experience musical play: singing, rhymes and fingerplays, movement, listening, and instruments. Emphasizes the importance of musical goals rather than spatial-temporal reasoning or other…

  5. Learning Religion and Religiously Learning: Musings on a Theme

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Mary

    2010-01-01

    One of the author's most vivid and early memories of "learning about religion" comes from when she was in seventh grade, and her math teacher scolded her and her friend for arguing about religion in the back of the room. Both of them were deeply steeped in family religious practice, and new to each other's traditions. That experience was…

  6. Musings on the management of Nylanderia fulva Crazy Ants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Nylanderia fulva is an invasive crazy ant that can inundate landscapes and structures. This invasive ant has been called the Caribbean crazy ant in Florida and the Rasberry [sic] crazy ant in Texas. The species was thought to be Nylanderia pubens or Nylanderia near pubens, in Florida and Texas, resp...

  7. Musing on the Use of Dynamic Software and Mathematics Epistemology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos-Trigo, Manuel; Reyes-Rodriguez, Aaron; Espinosa-Perez, Hugo

    2007-01-01

    Different computational tools may offer teachers and students distinct opportunities in representing, exploring and solving mathematical tasks. In this context, we illustrate that the use of dynamic software (Cabri Geometry) helped high school teachers to think of and represent a particular task dynamically. In this process, the teachers had the…

  8. Nanorover Technology and the MUSES-CN Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Ross; Wilcox, Brian

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has been sponsoring efforts to develop very small planetary rovers for Mars and other planetary bodies. Recent advances in microtechnology and mobile robotics have made it feasible to create extremely small automated or remote-controlled vehicles which open new application frontiers.

  9. Research using blogs for data: public documents or private musings?

    PubMed

    Eastham, Linda A

    2011-08-01

    Nursing and other health sciences researchers increasingly find blogs to be valuable sources of information for investigating illness and other human health experiences. When researchers use blogs as their exclusive data source, they must discern the public/private aspects inherent in the nature of blogs in order to plan for appropriate protection of the bloggers' identities. Approaches to the protection of human subjects are poorly addressed when the human subject is a blogger and the blog is used as an exclusive source of data. Researchers may be assisted to protect human subjects via a decisional framework for assessing a blog author's intended position on the public/private continuum.

  10. Mentors, Muses, and Mutuality: Honoring Barbara Snell Dohrenwend

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Anne

    2012-01-01

    I describe feminist community psychology principles that have the potential to expand and enrich mentoring and that honor Barbara Snell Dohrenwend, a leader who contributed to the research, theory, and profession of community psychology. I reflect on the affect that Barbara Dohrenwend had on life and on the development of feminist community…

  11. Musings about the effects of environment on photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Lawlor, David W

    2009-02-01

    Understanding of how plants respond to their environment, particularly to extreme conditions to which their metabolisms are not adapted, is advancing on many fronts. An enormous matrix of plant and environmental factors exists from which mechanisms and assessments of quantitative responses must be developed if further progress in understanding how to improve plant (and particularly crop) production is to be achieved. This Special Issue contains assessments of different areas of plant sciences, ranging from genome to field, but with a focus on photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is central to all aspects of plant biology as the provider of energy and assimilates for growth and reproduction, yet how it is regulated by abiotic stresses, such as salinity and water deficits, and by biotic stresses, such as insect herbivory, is still unclear. Differences in responses of C3, C4 and CAM plants are still uncertain and mechanisms unclarified. Gene distribution and transfer between chloroplasts and nucleus on an evolutionary time scale may reflect conditions in the cell and organelles relevant to the short-term effects of water deficits on photosynthetic rate and the function of ATP synthase. Regulation of conditions in tissues and cells depends not only on chloroplast functions but on mitochondrial activity, and their interaction and differences in responses have implications for understanding many aspects of cell metabolism. Adaptation of plant structure, such as stomatal frequency and composition of the photosynthetic machinery by changes to gene expression controlled by transcription factors, or arising from regulation of gene expression by redox state, is of major importance with implications for adaptation in the short- and long-term. The incisive and thought-provoking reviews in this Special Issue offer analyses of experimental information and develop concepts within the complex matrix, relating photosynthesis and associated metabolism to the environment and addressing mechanisms critically with a balanced assessment of the current state of the science.

  12. Musing on the Use of Dynamic Software and Mathematics Epistemology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santos-Trigo, Manuel; Reyes-Rodriguez, Aaron; Espinosa-Perez, Hugo

    2007-01-01

    Different computational tools may offer teachers and students distinct opportunities in representing, exploring and solving mathematical tasks. In this context, we illustrate that the use of dynamic software (Cabri Geometry) helped high school teachers to think of and represent a particular task dynamically. In this process, the teachers had the…

  13. Space shuttle propulsion parameter estimation using optional estimation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    A regression analyses on tabular aerodynamic data provided. A representative aerodynamic model for coefficient estimation. It also reduced the storage requirements for the "normal' model used to check out the estimation algorithms. The results of the regression analyses are presented. The computer routines for the filter portion of the estimation algorithm and the :"bringing-up' of the SRB predictive program on the computer was developed. For the filter program, approximately 54 routines were developed. The routines were highly subsegmented to facilitate overlaying program segments within the partitioned storage space on the computer.

  14. Space shuttle propulsion parameter estimation using optimal estimation techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    The first twelve system state variables are presented with the necessary mathematical developments for incorporating them into the filter/smoother algorithm. Other state variables, i.e., aerodynamic coefficients can be easily incorporated into the estimation algorithm, representing uncertain parameters, but for initial checkout purposes are treated as known quantities. An approach for incorporating the NASA propulsion predictive model results into the optimal estimation algorithm was identified. This approach utilizes numerical derivatives and nominal predictions within the algorithm with global iterations of the algorithm. The iterative process is terminated when the quality of the estimates provided no longer significantly improves.

  15. Coverage-adjusted entropy estimation.

    PubMed

    Vu, Vincent Q; Yu, Bin; Kass, Robert E

    2007-09-20

    Data on 'neural coding' have frequently been analyzed using information-theoretic measures. These formulations involve the fundamental and generally difficult statistical problem of estimating entropy. We review briefly several methods that have been advanced to estimate entropy and highlight a method, the coverage-adjusted entropy estimator (CAE), due to Chao and Shen that appeared recently in the environmental statistics literature. This method begins with the elementary Horvitz-Thompson estimator, developed for sampling from a finite population, and adjusts for the potential new species that have not yet been observed in the sample-these become the new patterns or 'words' in a spike train that have not yet been observed. The adjustment is due to I. J. Good, and is called the Good-Turing coverage estimate. We provide a new empirical regularization derivation of the coverage-adjusted probability estimator, which shrinks the maximum likelihood estimate. We prove that the CAE is consistent and first-order optimal, with rate O(P)(1/log n), in the class of distributions with finite entropy variance and that, within the class of distributions with finite qth moment of the log-likelihood, the Good-Turing coverage estimate and the total probability of unobserved words converge at rate O(P)(1/(log n)(q)). We then provide a simulation study of the estimator with standard distributions and examples from neuronal data, where observations are dependent. The results show that, with a minor modification, the CAE performs much better than the MLE and is better than the best upper bound estimator, due to Paninski, when the number of possible words m is unknown or infinite.

  16. Estimation of toxicity using the Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tens of thousands of chemicals are currently in commerce, and hundreds more are introduced every year. Since experimental measurements of toxicity are extremely time consuming and expensive, it is imperative that alternative methods to estimate toxicity are developed.

  17. Estimation of toxicity using the Toxicity Estimation Software Tool (TEST)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Tens of thousands of chemicals are currently in commerce, and hundreds more are introduced every year. Since experimental measurements of toxicity are extremely time consuming and expensive, it is imperative that alternative methods to estimate toxicity are developed.

  18. Space Station Facility government estimating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Joseph A.

    1993-01-01

    This new, unique Cost Engineering Report introduces the 800-page, C-100 government estimate for the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF) and Volume IV Aerospace Construction Price Book. At the January 23, 1991, bid opening for the SSPF, the government cost estimate was right on target. Metric, Inc., Prime Contractor, low bid was 1.2 percent below the government estimate. This project contains many different and complex systems. Volume IV is a summary of the cost associated with construction, activation and Ground Support Equipment (GSE) design, estimating, fabrication, installation, testing, termination, and verification of this project. Included are 13 reasons the government estimate was so accurate; abstract of bids, for 8 bidders and government estimate with additive alternates, special labor and materials, budget comparison and system summaries; and comments on the energy credit from local electrical utility. This report adds another project to our continuing study of 'How Does the Low Bidder Get Low and Make Money?' which was started in 1967, and first published in the 1973 AACE Transaction with 18 ways the low bidders get low. The accuracy of this estimate proves the benefits of our Kennedy Space Center (KSC) teamwork efforts and KSC Cost Engineer Tools which are contributing toward our goals of the Space Station.

  19. Condition Number Regularized Covariance Estimation.

    PubMed

    Won, Joong-Ho; Lim, Johan; Kim, Seung-Jean; Rajaratnam, Bala

    2013-06-01

    Estimation of high-dimensional covariance matrices is known to be a difficult problem, has many applications, and is of current interest to the larger statistics community. In many applications including so-called the "large p small n" setting, the estimate of the covariance matrix is required to be not only invertible, but also well-conditioned. Although many regularization schemes attempt to do this, none of them address the ill-conditioning problem directly. In this paper, we propose a maximum likelihood approach, with the direct goal of obtaining a well-conditioned estimator. No sparsity assumption on either the covariance matrix or its inverse are are imposed, thus making our procedure more widely applicable. We demonstrate that the proposed regularization scheme is computationally efficient, yields a type of Steinian shrinkage estimator, and has a natural Bayesian interpretation. We investigate the theoretical properties of the regularized covariance estimator comprehensively, including its regularization path, and proceed to develop an approach that adaptively determines the level of regularization that is required. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the regularized estimator in decision-theoretic comparisons and in the financial portfolio optimization setting. The proposed approach has desirable properties, and can serve as a competitive procedure, especially when the sample size is small and when a well-conditioned estimator is required.

  20. Condition Number Regularized Covariance Estimation*

    PubMed Central

    Won, Joong-Ho; Lim, Johan; Kim, Seung-Jean; Rajaratnam, Bala

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of high-dimensional covariance matrices is known to be a difficult problem, has many applications, and is of current interest to the larger statistics community. In many applications including so-called the “large p small n” setting, the estimate of the covariance matrix is required to be not only invertible, but also well-conditioned. Although many regularization schemes attempt to do this, none of them address the ill-conditioning problem directly. In this paper, we propose a maximum likelihood approach, with the direct goal of obtaining a well-conditioned estimator. No sparsity assumption on either the covariance matrix or its inverse are are imposed, thus making our procedure more widely applicable. We demonstrate that the proposed regularization scheme is computationally efficient, yields a type of Steinian shrinkage estimator, and has a natural Bayesian interpretation. We investigate the theoretical properties of the regularized covariance estimator comprehensively, including its regularization path, and proceed to develop an approach that adaptively determines the level of regularization that is required. Finally, we demonstrate the performance of the regularized estimator in decision-theoretic comparisons and in the financial portfolio optimization setting. The proposed approach has desirable properties, and can serve as a competitive procedure, especially when the sample size is small and when a well-conditioned estimator is required. PMID:23730197