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Sample records for spontaneous deposition methanol

  1. Palladium deposits spontaneously grown on nickel foam for electro-catalyzing methanol oxidation: Effect of precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Xiangheng; Zhao, Hongli; Lan, Minbo

    2016-02-01

    Methanol, a high-energy substance, is widely used for green fuel cells. However, the sluggish electrochemical methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) on state-of-the-art catalysts still requires for exploring high-performance and low-cost materials to further promote the reaction kinetics at low overpotentials. Here we carried out the first electrocatalytic comparison study of two Ni foam-supported Pd nanomaterials (Pd-2-Ni and Pd-4-Ni, respectively), obtained through the spontaneous galvanic replacement of Ni with different palladic precursors ([PdCl4]2- and [PdCl6]2-, respectively), toward MOR. With replacement, Pd deposits with discrepant arrangements and coverages were grown on the porous Ni support. Compared to commercial Pd/C, both Pd-2-Ni and Pd-4-Ni exhibited better mass activity and catalytic durability for MOR in alkaline media. More interestingly, different palladic precursors made a significant effect on the catalytic performance of the Ni foam-supported Pd deposits. In Pd-4-Ni, the 2:1 stoichiometric replacement of Ni with [PdCl6]2- enabled the incompact arrangement of Pd structures, with more exposure of Ni atoms adjoined to Pd atoms on the catalytic interface compared to Pd-2-Ni. As a result, with the favorable Ni-neighbor-Pd regime and the higher utilization efficiency of Pd atoms, the synthesized Pd-4-Ni catalyst provided a mass activity of approximately 1.5 times higher than Pd-2-Ni toward MOR.

  2. Atmospheric deposition of methanol over the Atlantic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingxi; Nightingale, Philip D; Beale, Rachael; Liss, Peter S; Blomquist, Byron; Fairall, Christopher

    2013-12-10

    In the troposphere, methanol (CH3OH) is present ubiquitously and second in abundance among organic gases after methane. In the surface ocean, methanol represents a supply of energy and carbon for marine microbes. Here we report direct measurements of air-sea methanol transfer along a ∼10,000-km north-south transect of the Atlantic. The flux of methanol was consistently from the atmosphere to the ocean. Constrained by the aerodynamic limit and measured rate of air-sea sensible heat exchange, methanol transfer resembles a one-way depositional process, which suggests dissolved methanol concentrations near the water surface that are lower than what were measured at ∼5 m depth, for reasons currently unknown. We estimate the global oceanic uptake of methanol and examine the lifetimes of this compound in the lower atmosphere and upper ocean with respect to gas exchange. We also constrain the molecular diffusional resistance above the ocean surface-an important term for improving air-sea gas exchange models.

  3. Palladium catalysts synthesized by atomic layer deposition for methanol decomposition.

    SciTech Connect

    Elam, J. W.; Feng, H.; Stair, P. C.; Libera, J. A.; Setthapun, W.; Northwestern Univ.

    2010-05-25

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) palladium films were deposited at 200 C on various ALD metal oxide surfaces using sequential exposures to Pd(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate (Pd(hfac)2) and formalin. In situ quartz crystal microbalance measurements as well as ex situ measurements performed on planar substrates revealed that the Pd growth begins with a relatively slow nucleation process and accelerates once an adequate amount of Pd has deposited on the surface. Furthermore, the Pd nucleation is faster on ALD ZnO surfaces compared to ALD Al2O3 surfaces. ALD was utilized to synthesize highly dispersed, uniform Pd nanoparticles (1 to 2 nm in diameter) on ALD ZnO and Al2O3 coated mesoporous silica gel, and the catalytic performances of these samples were compared in the methanol decomposition reaction. The ALD Pd-Al2O3 showed high activity and hydrogen selectivity at relatively low temperatures while the ALD Pd-ZnO showed very low activity as well as quick deactivation. In situ extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurement revealed that the Pd supported on ZnO 'dissolves' into the substrate during the methanol decomposition reaction which accounts for the gradual disappearance of its catalytic activity. By applying one cycle of ALD Al2O3 on top of the Pd-ZnO catalyst, the activity was enhanced and the catalyst deactivation was mitigated. This Al2O3 overcoating method stabilizes the Pd-ZnO and effectively prevents the dissolution of Pd into the ZnO substrate.

  4. Methanol

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 11 / 001Fa www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF METHANOL ( NONCANCER ) ( CAS No . 67 - 56 - 1 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2013 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC ii DISCLAIMER This document

  5. Splitting methanol on ultra-thin MgO(100) films deposited on a Mo substrate.

    PubMed

    Song, Zhenjun; Xu, Hu

    2017-03-08

    The dissociation reaction of methanol on metal-supported MgO(100) films has been studied by employing density functional theory calculations. As far as we know, the dissociation of a single methanol molecule over inert oxide insulators such as MgO has not yet been successfully realized without the introduction of defects or low coordinated atoms. By depositing ultra-thin oxide films on a Mo substrate, we have successfully proposed the dissociative state of methanol. The dissociation reaction is energetically exothermic and nearly barrierless. The lattice mismatch between ultra-thin MgO(100) films and metal substrates plays a crucial role in the heterolytic dissociation of adsorbates, while the electronic effect of the Mo(100) substrate plays a non-ignorable role in the homolytic dissociation of methanol. The metal-supported ultra-thin oxide films studied herein provide a versatile approach to enhance the surface reaction activity and properties of oxides.

  6. A spontaneous and passive waste-management device (PWMD) for a micro direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yun-Ju; Chieng, Ching-Chang; Pan, Chin; Luo, Shih-Jin; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2007-05-01

    This paper introduces a passive waste-management device (PWMD) for a micro direct methanol fuel cell to exhale CO2 gas and to gather and transport water and methanol residue during operation. It passively employs condensation, temperature gradient, surface tension gradient and droplet coalescence to accumulate liquid, separate liquid and gas, and transport droplets without the need of external power. CO2 gas can be breathed out through hydrophobic micro holes with the assistance of buoyancy force while water/methanol vapor is condensing into droplets, coalescing with smaller droplets and is transported toward a cooler and more hydrophilic waste tank through wettability gradient. The wettability gradient is prepared by diffusion-controlled silanization with a gradient from 117° to 28° and is radial toward the outer boundary, which can drive droplets down to 1 µl with a speed of up to 20 mm s-1. With the assistance of coalescence along with the wettability gradient, the condensed water droplets can reach a double speed of 40 mm s-1. The maximum water removal rate of the PWMD can approach 6.134 µl s-1 cm-2, which is at least one order of magnitude higher than the demand of a standard µDMFC with power generation ability of 100 mW cm-2.

  7. Beta amyloid deposition and neurofibrillary tangles spontaneously occur in the brains of captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Serizawa, S; Chambers, J K; Une, Y

    2012-03-01

    Alzheimer disease is a dementing disorder characterized pathologically by Aβ deposition, neurofibrillary tangles, and neuronal loss. Although aged animals of many species spontaneously develop Aβ deposits, only 2 species (chimpanzee and wolverine) have been reported to develop Aβ deposits and neurofibrillary tangles in the same individual. Here, the authors demonstrate the spontaneous occurrence of Aβ deposits and neurofibrillary tangles in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). Among 22 cheetahs examined in this study, Aβ deposits were observed in 13. Immunostaining (AT8) revealed abnormal intracellular tau immunoreactivity in 10 of the cheetahs with Aβ deposits, and they were mainly distributed in the parahippocampal cortex and CA1 in a fashion similar to that in human patients with Alzheimer disease. Ultrastructurally, bundles of straight filaments filled the neuronal somata and axons, consistent with tangles. Interestingly, 2 of the cheetahs with the most severe abnormal tau immunoreactivity showed clinical cognitive dysfunction. The authors conclude that cheetahs spontaneously develop age-related neurodegenerative disease with pathologic changes similar to Alzheimer disease.

  8. Breath-by-breath measurement of particle deposition in the lung of spontaneously breathing rats.

    PubMed

    Karrasch, S; Eder, G; Bolle, I; Tsuda, A; Schulz, H

    2009-10-01

    A number of deposition models for humans, as well as experimental animals, have been described. However, no breath-by-breath deposition measurement in rats has been reported to date. The objective of this study is to determine lung deposition of micrometer-sized particles as a function of breathing parameters in the adult rat lung. A new aerosol photometry system was designed to measure deposition of nonhygroscopic, 2-mum sebacate particles in anesthetized, intubated, and spontaneously breathing 90-day-old Wistar-Kyoto rats placed in a size-adjusted body plethysmograph box. Instrumental dead space of the system was minimized down to 310 microl (i.e., approximately 20% of respiratory dead space). The system allows continuous monitoring of particle concentration in the respired volume. Breathing parameters, such as respiratory rate (f), tidal volume (Vt), as well as inspiration/expiration times, were also monitored at different levels of anesthesia. The results showed that Vt typically varied between 1.5 and 4.0 ml for regular breathing and between 4.0 and 10.0 ml for single-sigh breaths; f ranged from 40 to 200 breaths/min. Corresponding deposition values varied between 5 and 50%, depending on breath-by-breath breathing patterns. The best fit of deposition (D) was achieved by a bilinear function of Vt and f and found to be D = 11.0 - 0.09.f + 3.75.Vt. We conclude that our approach provides more realistic conditions for the measurement of deposition than conventional models using ventilated animals and allows us to analyze the correlation between breath-specific deposition and spontaneous breathing patterns.

  9. Bimetallic Nickel/Ruthenium Catalysts Synthesized by Atomic Layer Deposition for Low-Temperature Direct Methanol Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Heonjae; Kim, Jun Woo; Park, Joonsuk; An, Jihwan; Lee, Tonghun; Prinz, Fritz B; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2016-11-09

    Nickel and ruthenium bimetallic catalysts were heterogeneously synthesized via atomic layer deposition (ALD) for use as the anode of direct methanol solid oxide fuel cells (DMSOFCs) operating in a low-temperature range. The presence of highly dispersed ALD Ru islands over a porous Ni mesh was confirmed, and the Ni/ALD Ru anode microstructure was observed. Fuel cell tests were conducted using Ni-only and Ni/ALD Ru anodes with approximately 350 μm thick gadolinium-doped ceria electrolytes and platinum cathodes. The performance of fuel cells was assessed using pure methanol at operating temperatures of 300-400 °C. Micromorphological changes of the anode after cell operation were investigated, and the content of adsorbed carbon on the anode side of the operated samples was measured. The difference in the maximum power density between samples utilizing Ni/ALD Ru and Pt/ALD Ru, the latter being the best catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells, was observed to be less than 7% at 300 °C and 30% at 350 °C. The improved electrochemical activity of the Ni/ALD Ru anode compared to that of the Ni-only anode, along with the reduction of the number of catalytically active sites due to agglomeration of Ni and carbon formation on the Ni surface as compared to Pt, explains this decent performance.

  10. Spontaneous wrinkling of soft matter by energetic deposition of Cr and Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, F. S.; Araújo, W. W. R.; Salvadori, M. C.

    2016-04-01

    Wrinkling of stiff thin films deposited on compliant substrates is an effect that has been broadly investigated. However, wrinkling consequent to metal ion implantation has been less studied. In the work described here, we have explored the sub-micron wrinkling phenomena that spontaneously occur when metal ions (Au and Cr) are implanted with energy of a few tens of electron volts (49 eV for Au and 72 eV for Cr) into a compliant material (PDMS). This very low energy ion implantation was performed using a Filtered Cathodic Vacuum Arc technique, a process often referred to as energetic deposition or energetic condensation. For comparison, Au and Cr depositions with similar doses were also done using a sputtering technique (with lower particle energy of approximately 2 eV), and no wrinkle formation was then observed. In this way, we can discuss the role of ion energy in wrinkle formation. Depth profiles of the implanted material were calculated using the Tridyn computer simulation code for each metal, for several implantation doses. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of metal nanoparticles. Atomic Force Microscopy imaging with spectral processing was used to compare the wrinkle morphology for each case investigated.

  11. The synthesis of methanol and the reverse water-gas shift reaction over Zn-deposited Cu(100) and Cu(110) surfaces: comparison with Zn/Cu(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, I.; Fujitani, T.; Uchijima, T.; Nakamura, J.

    1998-03-01

    The catalytic activity of Zn vapor-deposited Cu(100) and Cu(110) surfaces for methanol synthesis by the hydrogenation of CO 2 and the reverse water-gas shift reaction were studied using an XPS apparatus combined with a high-pressure flow reactor (18 atm). At a reaction temperature of 523 K, no promotional effect of Zn was observed for the methanol synthesis on both Zn/Cu(100) and Zn/Cu(110). The results were quite different from those for Zn/Cu(111), on which a significant promotion of methanol synthesis activity appeared to be due to the deposition of Zn, indicating that the promotional effect of Zn was sensitive to the surface structure of Cu. However, hysteresis was observed in the catalytic activity for methanol synthesis over the Zn/Cu(110) surface upon heating above 543 K in the reaction mixture. The activity became twice that measured before heating, which was close to the methanol synthesis activity of Zn/Cu(111) at the same Zn coverage. On the other hand, no such hysteresis was observed for the reverse water-gas shift reaction on Zn/Cu(110), indicating that the active site for methanol synthesis was not identical to that for the reverse water-gas shift reaction. In the post-reaction surface analysis, formate species was detected on both Zn/Cu(100) and Zn/Cu(110), whose coverage increased with increasing Zn coverage at 0< ΘZn<0.2. No correlation between the formate coverage and the methanol synthesis activity was obtained, which was in contrast to the results for Zn/Cu(111). Thus, the structure sensitivity observed in the catalytic activity of methanol synthesis over Zn-deposited Cu surfaces is ascribed to the significant difference in the reactivity of the formate intermediate.

  12. Method of plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition of diamond using methanol-based solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tzeng, Yonhua (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Briefly described, methods of forming diamond are described. A representative method, among others, includes: providing a substrate in a reaction chamber in a non-magnetic-field microwave plasma system; introducing, in the absence of a gas stream, a liquid precursor substantially free of water and containing methanol and at least one carbon and oxygen containing compound having a carbon to oxygen ratio greater than one, into an inlet of the reaction chamber; vaporizing the liquid precursor; and subjecting the vaporized precursor, in the absence of a carrier gas and in the absence in a reactive gas, to a plasma under conditions effective to disassociate the vaporized precursor and promote diamond growth on the substrate in a pressure range from about 70 to 130 Torr.

  13. Os layers spontaneously deposited on the Pt(111) electrode : XPS, STM and GIF-XAS study.

    SciTech Connect

    Rhee, C. K.; Wakisaka, M.; Tolmachev, Y.; Johnston, C.; Haasch, R.; Attenkofer, K.; Lu, G. Q.; You, H.; Wieckowski, A.; Univ. of Illinois Champaigh-Urbana

    2003-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) characterized adlayers of spontaneously deposited osmium on a Pt(111) electrode were investigated using ex-situ X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and in-situ grazing incidence fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy (GIF-XAS). After a single spontaneous deposition, monoatomic (or nearly monoatomic) nanoislands of osmium are formed. The island diameter varies from 2 to 5 nm depending on the Os coverage, which in turn is adjusted by varying the concentration of the Os precursor salt (OsCl3) in the deposition bath and/or by the deposition time. XPS reveals three oxidation states: a metallic Os (the 4f7/2 core level binding energy of 50.8 eV), Os(IV) (51.5 eV) and Os(VIII) (52.4 eV). The metallic osmium exists at potentials below 500 mV (vs. RHE) while above 500 mV osmium is oxidized to Os(IV). Electrodissolution of osmium begins above 900 mV and occurs simultaneously with platinum oxidation. At ca. 1200 mV V versus the RHE reference, the oxidation state of some small amounts of osmium that survive dissolution is the Os(VIII). We demonstrate, for the first time, that mixed or odd valencies of osmium exist on the platinum surface at potentials higher that 800 mV. In-situ GIF-XAS measurements of an Os LIII edge also reveal the presence of three Os oxidation states. Namely, below the electrode potential of 400 mV, the X-ray fluorescent energy at maximum absorption is 10.8765 keV, and is characteristic of the metallic Os. In the potential range between 500 and 1000 mV this energy is gradually shifted to higher values, assignable to higher valencies of osmium, like Os(IV). This tendency continues to higher potentials consistent with the third, highly oxidized osmium form present, most likely Os(VIII). The variation of the 'raw edge jump height' of Os with the electrode potential, which is equivalent to a drop in osmium surface concentration, demonstrates that the electrochemical stripping of Os begins below 1.0 V versus RHE, as

  14. Ethanol oxidation on electrocatalysts obtained by spontaneous deposition of palladium onto nickel-zinc materials.

    PubMed

    Bambagioni, Valentina; Bianchini, Claudio; Filippi, Jonathan; Oberhauser, Werner; Marchionni, Andrea; Vizza, Francesco; Psaro, Rinaldo; Sordelli, Laura; Foresti, Maria Luisa; Innocenti, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    Ni-Zn and Ni-Zn-P alloys supported on Vulcan XC-72 are effective materials for the spontaneous deposition of palladium through redox transmetalation with Pd(IV) salts. The materials obtained, Pd-(Ni-Zn)/C and Pd-(Ni-Zn-P)/C, have been characterized by a variety of techniques. The analytical and spectroscopic data show that the surface of Pd-(Ni-Zn)/C and Pd-(Ni-Zn-P)/C contain very small, highly dispersed, and highly crystalline palladium clusters as well as single palladium sites, likely stabilized by interaction with oxygen atoms from Ni--O moieties. As a reference material, a nanostructured Pd/C material was prepared by reduction of an aqueous solution of PdCl(2)/HCl with ethylene glycol in the presence of Vulcan XC-72. In Pd/C, the Pd particles are larger, less dispersed, and much less crystalline. Glassy carbon electrodes coated with the Pd-(Ni-Zn)/C and Pd-(Ni-Zn-P)/C materials, containing very low Pd loadings (22-25 microg cm(-2)), were studied for the oxidation of ethanol in alkaline media in half cells and provided excellent results in terms of both specific current (as high as 3600 A g(Pd)(-1) at room temperature) and onset potential (as low as -0.6 V vs Ag/AgCl/KCl(sat)).

  15. The kinetics and mechanism of methanol synthesis by hydrogenation of CO 2 over a Zn-deposited Cu(111) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujitani, T.; Nakamura, I.; Uchijima, T.; Nakamura, J.

    1997-07-01

    The hydrogenation of CO 2 over a Zn-deposited Cu(111) surface has been studied using an X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) apparatus combined with a high-pressure flow reactor. It was shown that the turnover frequency (TOF) for methanol formation linearly increased with Zn coverage below ϑZn=0.19 and decreased above ϑZn=0.20. The optimum TOF obtained at ϑZn=0.19 was thirteen-fold larger than that of the Zn-free Cu(111) surface. On the other hand, the TOF for CO formation started to decrease at ϑZn=0.10 and approached zero at ϑZn=0.5. No promotional effect of Zn was thus observed for the reverse water-gas shift (RWGS) reaction on Cu(111). Post-reaction surface analysis by XPS showed the formation of formate species (HCOO a) on the Cu(111) surfaces. The formate coverage linearly increased with the Zn coverage below ϑZn=0.15, suggesting that the formation of the formate species was stabilized by the Zn species. The relation between ϑHCOO and ϑZn is similar to that between TOF and ϑZn; thus, the formate species is considered to be the reaction intermediates during methanol formation, and the amount of the formate species should determine the rate of the reaction. It was found that the surface chemistry of the Zn-deposited Cu surface drastically changed at ϑZn=0.15. At higher Zn coverages ( ϑZn>0.15), Zn on Cu(111) was readily oxidized to ZnO during the CO 2 hydrogenation reaction. On the other hand, at low Zn coverages below ϑZn=0.15, Zn was partially oxidized in the absence of oxygen in ZnO or O a on the Cu surface under the reaction conditions. It was suggested that the Zn on Cu(111) was directly bound to the oxygen in the surface formate species as the role of the active sites.

  16. Metal accumulation strategies in plants spontaneously inhabiting Zn-Pb waste deposits.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Małgorzata; Sugier, Piotr; Siebielec, Grzegorz

    2014-07-15

    Metal (Zn, Pb, Cd, Cu, Ni, Cr) accumulation in shoots of 38 plant species spontaneously colonizing three Zn-Pb waste deposits in southern Poland was studied in order to find out if the age of the waste (30-130 years) or its type (slag or flotation residues) influence metal content in plants and to identify species potentially suitable for biomonitoring and phytoremediation. The total metal concentrations in the waste upper layers ranged from 7300 to 171,790 mg kg(-1) for Zn, from 1390 to 22,265 mg kg(-1) for Pb, and from 66 to 1,464 mg kg(-1) for Cd, whereas CaCl2-extracted fractions accounted for 0.034-0.11 %, 0.005-0.03 %, and 0.28-0.62 % of total Zn, Pb and Cd concentrations, respectively. The concentrations of Cu, Ni, and Cr in substrates and in plants were low and ranged within the background values. Metal accumulation in plant shoots was poorly correlated with both total and CaCl2-extracted forms of metals in the substrate and was highly variable among species and also specimens of the same species. The highest mean concentrations of Zn, Pb and Cd were found in Anthyllis vulneraria L. (901.5 mg kg(-1)), Echium vulgare L. (116.92 mg kg(-1)), and Hieracium piloselloides Vill. (26.86 mg kg(-1)), respectively. Besides Reseda lutea L., no species appeared to be a good indicator of polymetallic environment pollution based on chemical analysis of shoots; however, metal accumulation in the whole plant communities of a particular contaminated area might be an accurate tool for assessment of metal transfer to vegetation irrespective of the type or age of the waste. All the species studied developed a metal exclusion strategy, thus exhibiting potential for phytostabilization of metalliferous wastelands.

  17. Optimizing the deposition of hydrogen evolution sites on suspended semiconductor particles using on-line photocatalytic reforming of aqueous methanol solutions.

    PubMed

    Busser, G Wilma; Mei, Bastian; Muhler, Martin

    2012-11-01

    The deposition of hydrogen evolution sites on photocatalysts is a crucial step in the multistep process of synthesizing a catalyst that is active for overall photocatalytic water splitting. An alternative approach to conventional photodeposition was developed, applying the photocatalytic reforming of aqueous methanol solutions to deposit metal particles on semiconductor materials such as Ga₂O₃ and (Ga₀.₆ Zn₀.₄)(N₀.₆O₀.₄). The method allows optimizing the loading of the co-catalysts based on the stepwise addition of their precursors and the continuous online monitoring of the evolved hydrogen. Moreover, a synergetic effect between different co-catalysts can be directly established.

  18. Spontaneous polarization of vapor-deposited 1-butanol films and its dependence on temperature.

    PubMed

    Gavra, Irini K; Pilidi, Alexandra N; Tsekouras, Athanassios A

    2017-03-14

    Films of 1-butanol were vapor deposited under vacuum conditions at cryogenic temperatures on a polycrystalline platinum foil. Kelvin probe measurements showed the generation of a large negative voltage on the vacuum side of the film relative to its back side in contact with the platinum foil. Voltages across vapor deposited films, which are known to require molecules with an electric dipole moment, were confirmed to be proportional to the amount of gas deposited at a given temperature. Voltages of several hundreds of volts were recorded for films that were a few thousand monolayers thick. As deposition temperature was reduced from 120 K, the film voltage was found to increase almost linearly from 0 V until a little below 38 K, where the trend was reversed. Ramping up the sample temperature after deposition at 15 K/min exhibited an initial increase in absolute magnitude and then a gradual elimination of the voltage as the temperature of 120 K was reached. Both the initial increase and the subsequent decrease were found to be irreversible and indicate structural changes in the amorphous film. The elimination of the film voltage is associated with small rearrangements of the deposited molecules which are facilitated by the gradual increase of the temperature and the cumulative electric field of the surrounding molecules.

  19. Spontaneous polarization of vapor-deposited 1-butanol films and its dependence on temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavra, Irini K.; Pilidi, Alexandra N.; Tsekouras, Athanassios A.

    2017-03-01

    Films of 1-butanol were vapor deposited under vacuum conditions at cryogenic temperatures on a polycrystalline platinum foil. Kelvin probe measurements showed the generation of a large negative voltage on the vacuum side of the film relative to its back side in contact with the platinum foil. Voltages across vapor deposited films, which are known to require molecules with an electric dipole moment, were confirmed to be proportional to the amount of gas deposited at a given temperature. Voltages of several hundreds of volts were recorded for films that were a few thousand monolayers thick. As deposition temperature was reduced from 120 K, the film voltage was found to increase almost linearly from 0 V until a little below 38 K, where the trend was reversed. Ramping up the sample temperature after deposition at 15 K/min exhibited an initial increase in absolute magnitude and then a gradual elimination of the voltage as the temperature of 120 K was reached. Both the initial increase and the subsequent decrease were found to be irreversible and indicate structural changes in the amorphous film. The elimination of the film voltage is associated with small rearrangements of the deposited molecules which are facilitated by the gradual increase of the temperature and the cumulative electric field of the surrounding molecules.

  20. Spontaneous Deposition of Prussian Blue on Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and the Application in an Amperometric Biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yanli; Bai, Xiaoyun; Shiu, Kwok-Keung

    2012-01-01

    A simple method has been developed for the spontaneous deposition of Prussian blue (PB) particles from a solution containing only ferricyanide ions onto conducting substrates such as indium tin oxide glass, glassy carbon disk and carbon nanotube (CNT) materials. Formation of PB deposits was confirmed by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectrometry and electrochemical techniques. The surface morphology of the PB particles deposited on the substrates was examined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. CNT/PB composite modified glassy carbon electrodes exhibited an electrocatalytic property for hydrogen peroxide reduction. These modified electrodes exhibited a high sensitivity for electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide at −0.05 V (vs. Ag|AgCl), probably due to the synergistic effect of CNT with PB. Then, CNT/PB modified electrodes were further developed as amperometric glucose biosensors. These biosensors offered a linear response to glucose concentration from 0.1 to 0.9 mM with good selectivity, high sensitivity of 0.102 A M−1 cm−2 and short response time (within 2 s) at a negative operation potential of −0.05 V (vs. Ag|AgCl). The detection limit was estimated to be 0.01 mM at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. PMID:28348317

  1. Spontaneous Electroless Galvanic Cell Deposition of 3D Hierarchical and Interlaced S-M-S Heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chuan Fu; Azmansah, Siti Aishah Bte; Zhu, Hai; Xu, Qing-Hua; Ho, Ghim Wei

    2017-01-01

    One-pot electroless galvanic cell deposition of a 3D hierarchical semiconductor-metal-semiconductor interlaced nanoarray is demonstrated. The fabricated 3D photoanode deviates from the typical planar geometry, and aims to optimize the effective surface area for light harvesting and long-range charge transfer-collection pathways.

  2. Multi-laminated copper nanoparticles deposited on conductive substrates for electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol in alkaline electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Lun-Peng; Guo, Peng; Wang, Yan; Ding, Shi-Qi; He, Jian-Bo

    2014-09-01

    A simple electrodeposition approach to grow multi-laminated copper particles on two conductive substrates is presented. Morphological and structural characterization was performed using SEM and XRD. The copper crystallites are preferentially oriented with {111} planes parallel to the substrate surfaces, providing an optimum interface for methanol oxidation. There are a large number of edges, corners, and atomic steps around individual multi-laminated nanostructured particles. The excellent electrocatalytic activity of the particles to methanol oxidation in alkaline solutions is demonstrated by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and chronoamperometry. The presence of the conductive poly(2-amino-5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazole) interlayer between the Cu particles and the carbon paste substrate results in larger specific surface areas of the particles and smaller charge-transfer resistances of methanol oxidation reaction in the lower potential range. Such an anisotropic laminated structure of non-noble metal nanomaterials deserves further investigation for finding a suitable alternative to noble metal-based anodic catalysts in fuel cells.

  3. Photocatalytic hydrogen production by water/methanol decomposition using Au/TiO2 prepared by deposition-precipitation with urea.

    PubMed

    Oros-Ruiz, Socorro; Zanella, Rodolfo; López, Rosendo; Hernández-Gordillo, Agileo; Gómez, Ricardo

    2013-12-15

    Gold nanoparticles deposited on TiO2 Degussa P25, prepared by deposition-precipitation with urea, were studied in the photocatalytic hydrogen production. The effect of parameters such as mass of catalyst, gold loading, thermal treatment, and atmosphere of treatment was evaluated and optimized. The presence of metallic gold on the titania surface showed to have contributed to the high improvement in the activity of bare TiO2 for hydrogen generation under UV light (λ=254 nm) using a lamp of low energy (2W) consumption. The optimal gold loading for the photocatalysts was 0.5 wt.%, the mass of catalyst in the reactor was 0.5 g/L in a water/methanol 1:1 vol. solution, and the thermal treatment that produced the most active gold nanoparticles was found at 300°C. The photocatalysts thermally treated under hydrogen at 300°C produced 1492 μmol g(-1)h(-1) of hydrogen; the same catalyst activated in air produced 1866 μmo lg(-1)h(-1) of hydrogen.

  4. Method for making methanol

    DOEpatents

    Mednick, R. Lawrence; Blum, David B.

    1986-01-01

    Methanol is made in a liquid-phase methanol reactor by entraining a methanol-forming catalyst in an inert liquid and contacting said entrained catalyst with a synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  5. Method for making methanol

    DOEpatents

    Mednick, R. Lawrence; Blum, David B.

    1987-01-01

    Methanol is made in a liquid-phase methanol reactor by entraining a methanol-forming catalyst in an inert liquid and contacting said entrained catalyst with a synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  6. In situ electro-deposition of Pt micro-nano clusters on the surface of {[PMo12O40]3-/PAMAM}n multilayer composite films and their electrocatalytic activities regarding methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Shui; Lin, Shen; Chen, Zu-liang; Shi, Yuan-De; Huang, Xiao-Mei

    2012-02-15

    The {[PMo(12)O(40)](3-)/PAMAM}(n) multilayer films are prepared by LBL electrostatic assembly technique, and their uniform and homogeneous traits have been verified by cyclic voltammetry. The {[PMo(12)O(40)](3-)/PAMAM}(n) multilayer films with PAMAM as the outmost layer, having an open structure and exhibiting good penetrability for the solvent molecules at low pH, are used as matrices for electro-deposition of Pt micro-nano clusters in situ. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) characterization show that the unique Pt micro-nano clusters with flower-like structure have been immobilized on the surface of {[PMo(12)O(40)](3-)/PAMAM}(n) multilayer films. The morphologies of Pt micro-nano clusters are influenced by electro-deposition conditions such as deposition potential, deposition time, and the number of layers of {[PMo(12)O(40)](3-)/PAMAM}(n) multilayer films. Pt(-clusters)-{PMo(12)/PAMAM}(3) composite films demonstrate good electrocatalytic activities regarding methanol oxidation and improved tolerance of CO.

  7. Correlating the chemical composition and size of various metal oxide substrates with the catalytic activity and stability of as-deposited Pt nanoparticles for the methanol oxidation reaction

    DOE PAGES

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; ...

    2015-12-09

    The performance of electrode materials in conventional direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) is constrained by (i) the low activity of the catalyst materials relative to their overall cost, (ii) the poisoning of the active sites due to the presence of partially oxidized carbon species (such as but not limited to CO, formate, and acetate) produced during small molecule oxidation, and (iii) the lack of catalytic stability and durability on the underlying commercial carbon support. Therefore, as a viable alternative, we have synthesized various metal oxide and perovskite materials of different sizes and chemical compositions as supports for Pt nanoparticles (NPs).more » Our results including unique mechanistic studies demonstrate that the SrRuO3 substrate with immobilized Pt NPs at its surface evinces the best methanol oxidation performance as compared with all of the other substrate materials tested herein, including commercial carbon itself. In addition, data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of electron transfer from bound Pt NPs to surface Ru species within the SrRuO3 substrate itself, thereby suggesting that favorable metal support interactions are responsible for the increased methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) activity of Pt species with respect to the underlying SrRuO3 composite catalyst material.« less

  8. Correlating the chemical composition and size of various metal oxide substrates with the catalytic activity and stability of as-deposited Pt nanoparticles for the methanol oxidation reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Bobb-Semple, Dara; Tao, Jing; Tong, Xiao; Wang, Lei; Lewis, Crystal S.; Vuklmirovic, Miomir; Zhu, Yimei; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2015-12-09

    The performance of electrode materials in conventional direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFC) is constrained by (i) the low activity of the catalyst materials relative to their overall cost, (ii) the poisoning of the active sites due to the presence of partially oxidized carbon species (such as but not limited to CO, formate, and acetate) produced during small molecule oxidation, and (iii) the lack of catalytic stability and durability on the underlying commercial carbon support. Therefore, as a viable alternative, we have synthesized various metal oxide and perovskite materials of different sizes and chemical compositions as supports for Pt nanoparticles (NPs). Our results including unique mechanistic studies demonstrate that the SrRuO3 substrate with immobilized Pt NPs at its surface evinces the best methanol oxidation performance as compared with all of the other substrate materials tested herein, including commercial carbon itself. In addition, data from electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the presence of electron transfer from bound Pt NPs to surface Ru species within the SrRuO3 substrate itself, thereby suggesting that favorable metal support interactions are responsible for the increased methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) activity of Pt species with respect to the underlying SrRuO3 composite catalyst material.

  9. Enhanced photoluminescence and Raman properties of Al-Doped ZnO nanostructures prepared using thermal chemical vapor deposition of methanol assisted with heated brass.

    PubMed

    Thandavan, Tamil Many K; Gani, Siti Meriam Abdul; San Wong, Chiow; Md Nor, Roslan

    2015-01-01

    Vapor phase transport (VPT) assisted by mixture of methanol and acetone via thermal evaporation of brass (CuZn) was used to prepare un-doped and Al-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures (NSs). The structure and morphology were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Photoluminescence (PL) properties of un-doped and Al-doped ZnO showed significant changes in the optical properties providing evidence for several types of defects such as zinc interstitials (Zni), oxygen interstitials (Oi), zinc vacancy (Vzn), singly charged zinc vacancy (VZn-), oxygen vacancy (Vo), singly charged oxygen vacancy (Vo+) and oxygen anti-site defects (OZn) in the grown NSs. The Al-doped ZnO NSs have exhibited shifted PL peaks at near band edge (NBE) and red luminescence compared to the un-doped ZnO. The Raman scattering results provided evidence of Al doping into the ZnO NSs due to peak shift from 145 cm-1 to an anomalous peak at 138 cm-1. Presence of enhanced Raman signal at around 274 and 743 cm-1 further confirmed Al in ZnO NSs. The enhanced D and G band in all Al-doped ZnO NSs shows possible functionalization and doping process in ZnO NSs.

  10. Enhanced Photoluminescence and Raman Properties of Al-Doped ZnO Nanostructures Prepared Using Thermal Chemical Vapor Deposition of Methanol Assisted with Heated Brass

    PubMed Central

    Thandavan, Tamil Many K.; Gani, Siti Meriam Abdul; San Wong, Chiow; Md. Nor, Roslan

    2015-01-01

    Vapor phase transport (VPT) assisted by mixture of methanol and acetone via thermal evaporation of brass (CuZn) was used to prepare un-doped and Al-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) nanostructures (NSs). The structure and morphology were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Photoluminescence (PL) properties of un-doped and Al-doped ZnO showed significant changes in the optical properties providing evidence for several types of defects such as zinc interstitials (Zni), oxygen interstitials (Oi), zinc vacancy (Vzn), singly charged zinc vacancy (VZn-), oxygen vacancy (Vo), singly charged oxygen vacancy (Vo+) and oxygen anti-site defects (OZn) in the grown NSs. The Al-doped ZnO NSs have exhibited shifted PL peaks at near band edge (NBE) and red luminescence compared to the un-doped ZnO. The Raman scattering results provided evidence of Al doping into the ZnO NSs due to peak shift from 145 cm-1 to an anomalous peak at 138 cm-1. Presence of enhanced Raman signal at around 274 and 743 cm-1 further confirmed Al in ZnO NSs. The enhanced D and G band in all Al-doped ZnO NSs shows possible functionalization and doping process in ZnO NSs. PMID:25756598

  11. Evaluation of uncertainty and detection limits in 210Pb and 210Po measurement in water by alpha spectrometry using 210Po spontaneous deposition onto a silver disk.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Pedro L; Gómez, José; Ródenas, Carmen

    2012-04-01

    An easy and accurate method for the determination of (210)Pb and (210)Po in water using (210)Po spontaneous deposition onto a silver disk is proposed and assessed for its detection capabilities according to the ISO Guide for the expression of uncertainty in measurement (GUM) and ISO Standard 11929-7 concerning the evaluation of the characteristic limits for ionizing radiation measurements. The method makes no assumption on the initial values of the activity concentrations of (210)Pb, (210)Bi and (210)Po in the sample to be analyzed, and is based on the alpha spectrometric measurement of (210)Po in two different aliquots: the first one measured five weeks after the sampling date to ensure radioactive equilibrium between (210)Pb and (210)Bi and the second after a sufficient time for the ingrowth of (210)Po from (210)Pb to be significant. As shown, for a recommended time interval of seven months between (210)Po measurements, the applicability of the proposed method is limited to water samples with a (226)Ra to (210)Pb activity ratio C(Ra)/C(Pb) ≤ 4, as usual in natural waters. Using sample and background counting times of 24h and 240 h, respectively, the detection limit of the activity concentration of each radionuclide at the sampling time for a 1L sample typically varies between 0.7 and 16 mBq L(-1) for (210)Pb in water samples with an initial activity of (210)Po in the range 0-200 mBq L(-1), and between 0.6 and 8.5 mBq L(-1) for (210)Po in water samples with an initial activity of (210)Pb in the same range.

  12. Formation and spectra of clathrate hydrates of methanol and methanol-ether mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Kenneth Dixon; Devlin, J. Paul

    1997-10-01

    Infrared spectra of mixed clathrate hydrates, with either ethylene oxide (EO) or tetrahydrofuran (THF) and methanol molecules as the guest species, have been obtained from thin films prepared by vapor deposition of D 2O mixtures in the 115-130 K range. Although methanol acts as a suppressant to the direct vapor deposition of a type I clathrate with EO, nearly complete conversion of 115 K amorphous codeposits, to the crystalline mixed clathrate, occurs upon warming near 150 K. By contrast, the type II clathrate of THF shows an increased crystalline quality when methanol is included in the vapor deposits of the mixed clathrate hydrate at 130 K. The observation of the OD stretch-mode band of weakly bonded CD 3OD near 2575 cm -1 is part of the evidence that the methanol molecules are encaged. However, as shown theoretically by Tanaka, the clathrate hydrates of methanol, even when mixed with an ether help gas, are not stable structures but form at low temperatures because of kinetic factors, only to decompose in the 140-160 K range. Attempts to prepare a simple type I or type II clathrate hydrate of methanol have produced mixed results. Limited amounts of clathrate hydrate form during deposition but annealing does not result in complete conversion to crystalline clathrates, particularly for host : guest ratios of 17 : 1.

  13. The Methanol Economy Project

    SciTech Connect

    Olah, George; Prakash, G. K.

    2014-02-01

    The Methanol Economy Project is based on the concept of replacing fossil fuels with methanol generated either from renewable resources or abundant natural (shale) gas. The full methanol cycle was investigated in this project, from production of methanol through bromination of methane, bireforming of methane to syngas, CO2 capture using supported amines, co-electrolysis of CO2 and water to formate and syngas, decomposition of formate to CO2 and H2, and use of formic acid in a direct formic acid fuel cell. Each of these projects achieved milestones and provided new insights into their respective fields.

  14. Spontaneous Fission

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Segre, Emilio

    1950-11-22

    The first attempt to discover spontaneous fission in uranium was made by [Willard] Libby, who, however, failed to detect it on account of the smallness of effect. In 1940, [K. A.] Petrzhak and [G. N.] Flerov, using more sensitive methods, discovered spontaneous fission in uranium and gave some rough estimates of the spontaneous fission decay constant of this substance. Subsequently, extensive experimental work on the subject has been performed by several investigators and will be quoted in the various sections. [N.] Bohr and [A.] Wheeler have given a theory of the effect based on the usual ideas of penetration of potential barriers. On this project spontaneous fission has been studied for the past several years in an effort to obtain a complete picture of the phenomenon. For this purpose the spontaneous fission decay constants {lambda} have been measured for separated isotopes of the heavy elements wherever possible. Moreover, the number {nu} of neutrons emitted per fission has been measured wherever feasible, and other characteristics of the spontaneous fission process have been studied. This report summarizes the spontaneous fission work done at Los Alamos up to January 1, 1945. A chronological record of the work is contained in the Los Alamos monthly reports.

  15. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  16. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-17

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  17. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  18. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    2001-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  19. Dietary methanol and autism.

    PubMed

    Walton, Ralph G; Monte, Woodrow C

    2015-10-01

    The authors sought to establish whether maternal dietary methanol during pregnancy was a factor in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders. A seven item questionnaire was given to women who had given birth to at least one child after 1984. The subjects were solicited from a large primary care practice and several internet sites and separated into two groups - mothers who had given birth to a child with autism and those who had not. Average weekly methanol consumption was calculated based on questionnaire responses. 550 questionnaires were completed by women who gave birth to a non-autistic child. On average these women consumed 66.71mg. of methanol weekly. 161 questionnaires were completed by women who had given birth to an autistic child. The average estimated weekly methanol consumption for this group was 142.31mg. Based on the results of the Wilcoxon rank sum-test, we see a significant difference between the reported methanol consumption rates of the two groups. This study suggests that women who have given birth to an autistic child are likely to have had higher intake of dietary sources of methanol than women who have not. Further investigation of a possible link of dietary methanol to autism is clearly warranted.

  20. The Methanol Multibeam Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, James A.; Cohen, R. J.; Caswell, J. L.; Fuller, G. A.; Brooks, K.; Burton, M. G.; Chrysostomou, A.; Diamond, P. J.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Gray, M. D.; Hoare, M. G.; Masheder, M. R. W.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; Pestalozzi, M.; Phillips, C.; Quinn, L.; Thompson, M. A.; Voronkov, M.; Walsh, A.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Wong-McSweeney, D.; Yates, J. A.; Cox, J.

    2007-03-01

    A new 7-beam methanol multibeam receiver is being used to survey the Galaxy for newly forming massive stars, that are pinpointed by strong methanol maser emission at 6.668 GHz. The receiver, jointly constructed by Jodrell Bank Observatory (JBO) and the Australia Telescope National Facility (ATNF), was successfully commissioned at Parkes in January 2006. The Parkes-Jodrell survey of the Milky Way for methanol masers is two orders of magnitude faster than previous systematic surveys using 30-m class dishes, and is the first systematic survey of the entire Galactic plane. The first 53 days of observations with the Parkes telescope have yielded 518 methanol sources, of which 218 are new discoveries. We present the survey methodology as well as preliminary results and analysis.

  1. Methanol Cannon Demonstrations Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dolson, David A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes two variations on the traditional methanol cannon demonstration. The first variation is a chain reaction using real metal chains. The second example involves using easily available components to produce sequential explosions that can be musical in nature. (AIM)

  2. The Asian methanol market

    SciTech Connect

    Nagase, Hideki

    1995-12-31

    For the purpose of this presentation, Asia has been broadly defined as a total of 15 countries, namely Japan, Korea, Taiwan, China, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, Indonesia, Myanmar, India, Vietnam, Australia and New Zealand. In 1994 and the first half of 1995, the methanol industry and its derivative industries experienced hard time, because of extraordinarily high methanol prices. In spite of this circumstance, methanol demand in Asian countries has been growing steadily and remarkably, following Asian high economic growth. Most of this growth in demand has been and will continue to be met by outside supply. However, even with increased import of methanol from outside of Asia, as a result of this growth, Asian trade volume will be much larger in the coming years. Asian countries must turn their collective attention to making logistics and transportation for methanol and its derivatives more efficient in the Asian region to make better use of existing supply resources. The author reviews current economic growth as his main topic, and explains the forecast of the growth of methanol demand and supply in Asian countries in the near future.

  3. Methanol in dark clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friberg, P.; Hjalmarson, A.; Madden, S. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1988-01-01

    The first observation of methanol in cold dark clouds TMC 1, L 134 N, and B 335 is reported. In all three clouds, the relative abundance of methanol was found to be in the range of 10 to the -9th (i.e., almost an order of magnitude more abundant than acetaldehyde), with no observable variation between the clouds. Methanol emission showed a complex velocity structure; in TMC 1, clear indications of non-LTE were observed. Dimethyl ether was searched for in L 134 N; the upper limit of the column density of dimethyl ether in L 134 N was estimated to be 4 x 10 to the 12th/sq cm, assuming 5 K rotation temperature and LTE. This limit makes the abundance ratio (CH3)2O/CH3OH not higher than 1/5, indicating that dimethyl ether is not overabundant in this dark cloud.

  4. A case of methanol intoxication caused by methomyl pesticide ingestion.

    PubMed

    Gil, H W; Hong, J R; Song, H Y; Hong, S Y

    2012-12-01

    When clinicians treat patients with pesticide poisoning, they often pay attention only to the chief toxic agent and ignore the toxicity of the pesticide's additives or solvents. Occasionally, however, a solvent (e.g. methanol) may itself be the cause of poisoning. We report a case of acute methanol intoxication that occurred after ingestion of a methomyl pesticide that contained methanol as an additive. A 49-year-old man was brought to the emergency department in an unconscious state after ingestion of 20 ml of a carbamate pesticide (chief ingredient: methomyl; active ingredient: methanol). Upon arrival, he was semicomatose and did not breathe spontaneously; however, his cholinesterase level was within normal limits and cholinergic symptoms were not observed. High anion gap metabolic acidosis was present. His blood ethanol level was 74.8 mg/dL. The urine methanol level was 55.60 mg/dL, and urine ethanol level was 22.0 mg/dL. He was treated with hemodialysis; subsequently, his metabolic acidosis resolved and he returned to normal mental status. We guessed that methanol, as the solvent of the methomyl, had produced the symptoms. When treating pesticide-poisoned patients, clinicians should identify the solvent used in the pesticide, because solvents such as methanol may exacerbate the symptoms of poisoned patients.

  5. Methanol contamination in traditionally fermented alcoholic beverages: the microbial dimension.

    PubMed

    Ohimain, Elijah Ige

    2016-01-01

    Incidence of methanol contamination of traditionally fermented beverages is increasing globally resulting in the death of several persons. The source of methanol contamination has not been clearly established in most countries. While there were speculations that unscrupulous vendors might have deliberately spiked the beverages with methanol, it is more likely that the methanol might have been produced by contaminating microbes during traditional ethanol fermentation, which is often inoculated spontaneously by mixed microbes, with a potential to produce mixed alcohols. Methanol production in traditionally fermented beverages can be linked to the activities of pectinase producing yeast, fungi and bacteria. This study assessed some traditional fermented beverages and found that some beverages are prone to methanol contamination including cachaca, cholai, agave, arak, plum and grape wines. Possible microbial role in the production of methanol and other volatile congeners in these fermented beverages were discussed. The study concluded by suggesting that contaminated alcoholic beverages be converted for fuel use rather than out rightly banning the age-long traditional alcohol fermentation.

  6. Methanol from coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, D. R.

    1978-01-01

    Economic feasibility of methanol or methyl fuel produced from coal using existing technology is discussed. Other factors considered include environmental, safety, toxicity, transportation, so storage, ease of burning, and retrofitting of present boilers. Demonstrations of its uses as a boiler fuel and as a turbine fuel are cited.

  7. Methanol and acetaldehyde fluxes over ryegrass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custer, Thomas; Schade, Gunnar

    2007-09-01

    Oxygenated volatile organic compounds (OVOCs) play an active role in tropospheric chemistry but our knowledge concerning their release and ultimate fate is limited. However, the recent introduction of Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTRMS) has improved our capability to make direct field observations of OVOC mixing ratios and fluxes. We used PTRMS in an eddy covariance setup to measure selected OVOC exchange rates above a well-characterized agricultural plot in Northern Germany. In fall 2003, mixing ratios of methanol and acetaldehyde 2 m above the field ranged from 1 to 10 and 0.4 to 2.1 ppb, respectively, well correlated with one another. Fluxes of both gases were followed for growing Italian ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) over a significant portion of its life cycle. Diurnally fluctuating emissions of methanol and very small acetaldehyde fluxes were observed up to the cutting and removal of the grass. Methanol emissions were exponentially related to ambient temperatures and appeared to be higher during the grass' rapid leaf area expansion and after a rain event. Acetaldehyde exchanges averaged over the whole period indicated very slow deposition. Our measurements confirm previous, similar results, as well as presumptions that grasses are comparatively low methanol emitters compared to non-grass species.

  8. The Development of Methanol Industry and Methanol Fuel in China

    SciTech Connect

    Li, W.Y.; Li, Z.; Xie, K.C.

    2009-07-01

    In 2007, China firmly established itself as the driver of the global methanol industry. The country became the world's largest methanol producer and consumer. The development of the methanol industry and methanol fuel in China is reviewed in this article. China is rich in coal but is short on oil and natural gas; unfortunately, transportation development will need more and more oil to provide the fuel. Methanol is becoming a dominant alternative fuel. China is showing the rest of the world how cleaner transportation fuels can be made from coal.

  9. Eucomic acid methanol monosolvate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guo-Qiang; Li, Yao-Lan; Wang, Guo-Cai; Liang, Zhi-Hong; Jiang, Ren-Wang

    2011-01-01

    In the crystal structure of the title compound [systematic name: 2-hy­droxy-2-(4-hy­droxy­benz­yl)butane­dioic acid methanol monosolvate], C11H12O6·CH3OH, the dihedral angles between the planes of the carboxyl groups and the benzene ring are 51.23 (9) and 87.97 (9)°. Inter­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen-bonding inter­actions involving the hy­droxy and carb­oxy­lic acid groups and the methanol solvent mol­ecule give a three-dimensional structure. PMID:22091200

  10. Two new methanol converters

    SciTech Connect

    Westerterp, K.R.; Bodewes, T.N.; Vrijiand, M.S.A.; Kuczynski, M. )

    1988-11-01

    Two novel converter systems were developed for the manufacture of methanol from synthesis gas: the Gas-Solid-Solid Trickle Flow Reactor (GSSTFR) and the Reactor System with Interstage Product Removal (RSIPR). In the GSSTFR version, the product formed at the catalyst surface is directly removed from the reaction zone by means of a solid adsorbent. This adsorbent continuously trickles over the catalyst bed. High reactant conversions up to 100% can be achieved in a single pass so that the usual recycle loop for the unconverted reactants is absent or greatly reduced in size. In the RSIPR version, high conversions per pass are achieved in a series of adiabatic or isothermal fixed bed reactors with selective product removal in absorbers between the reactor stages. The feasibility and economics of the two systems are discussed on the basis of 1,000 tpd methanol plants compared with a low-pressure Lurgi system.

  11. Reduced methanol kinetic mechanisms for combustion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Yalamanchili, S.; Sirignano, W.A.; Seiser, R.; Seshadri, K.

    2005-08-01

    Reduced chemical kinetic mechanisms for methanol combustion were investigated by evaluating ignition delay magnitudes and combustion in a continuously stirred reactor. Unsteady computations were made to study the characteristics of the kinetic mechanisms proposed in the literature and to compare the dependence of various parameters on methanol combustion. All computations were done under isobaric conditions, and, to capture the influence of all the reactions involved in the mechanism, a very small time step was used. Finite-difference methods were used to solve the coupled differential equations. The five-step mechanism developed by C.M. Mueller and N. Peters [in: N. Peters, B. Rogg (Eds.), Reduced Kinetic Mechanisms for Applications in Combustion Systems, Springer-Verlag, New York, 1993, pp. 143-155] for premixed flames and both the five-step mechanism and the four-step mechanisms developed by C.M. Mueller, K. Seshadri, J.Y. Chen [ibid, pp. 284-307] for non-premixed flames were considered. It was found that the Mueller et al. five-step mechanism, with some modifications, best supported the spontaneous ignition and continuous stirred reactor combustion. The results were validated by comparing calculated ignition delays with available experimental data of C.T. Bowman [Combust. Flame 25 (1975) 343-354], and calculated final steady-state concentrations with chemical equilibrium calculations [J.-Y. Chen, Combust. Sci. Technol. 78 (1991) 127]. Initial temperature and concentration and the operating pressure of the system have a major effect on the delay of methanol ignition. The residence time of the continuous stirred reactor affects ignition delay and also changes the transient characteristic of chemical composition of the fuel-vapor mixture. The computations are intended to guide and explain many combustion studies that require a methanol kinetic mechanism.

  12. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux. Synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-07-09

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be taken of

  13. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    PubMed Central

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model, and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on the production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, and stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem-level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; they are however neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow taking full advantage of the rich

  14. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-01-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model, and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land-atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on the production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, and stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem-level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; they are however neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow taking full advantage of the rich

  15. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-07-01

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land-atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be taken of

  16. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux. Synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; ...

    2015-07-09

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis ofmore » the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be

  17. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements.

    PubMed

    Wohlfahrt, G; Amelynck, C; Ammann, C; Arneth, A; Bamberger, I; Goldstein, A H; Gu, L; Guenther, A; Hansel, A; Heinesch, B; Holst, T; Hörtnagl, L; Karl, T; Laffineur, Q; Neftel, A; McKinney, K; Munger, J W; Pallardy, S G; Schade, G W; Seco, R; Schoon, N

    2015-01-27

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model, and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land-atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on the production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, and stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem-level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; they are however neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow taking full advantage of the rich

  18. The toxicity of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tephly, T.R. )

    1991-01-01

    Methanol toxicity in humans and monkeys is characterized by a latent period of many hours followed by a metabolic acidosis and ocular toxicity. This is not observed in most lower animals. The metabolic acidosis and blindness is apparently due to formic acid accumulation in humans and monkeys, a feature not seen in lower animals. The accumulation of formate is due to a deficiency in formate metabolism which is, in turn, related, in part, to low hepatic tetrahydrofolate (H{sub 4}folate). An excellent correlation between hepatic H{sub 4} folate and formate oxidation rates has been shown within and across species. Thus, humans and monkeys possess low hepatic H{sub 4}folate levels, low rates of formate oxidation and accumulation of formate after methanol. Formate, itself, produces blindness in monkeys in the absence of metabolic acidosis. In addition to low hepatic H{sub 4}folate concentrations, monkeys and humans also have low hepatic 10-formyl H{sub 4}folate dehydrogenase levels, the enzyme which is the ultimate catalyst for conversion of formate to carbon dioxide. This review presents the basis for the role of folic acid-dependent reactions in the regulation of methanol toxicity.

  19. California methanol assessment. Volume 2: Technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, R.; Dutzi, E.; Gershman, R.; Heft, R.; Kalema, W.; Maynard, D.

    1983-01-01

    Energy feedstock sources for methanol; methanol and other synfuels; transport, storage, and distribution; air quality impact of methanol use in vehicles, chemical methanol production and use; methanol utilization in vehicles; methanol utilization in stationary applications; and environmental and regulatory constraints are discussed.

  20. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection

    MedlinePlus

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Spontaneous coronary artery dissection — sometimes referred to as SCAD — is an ... the blood vessels in the heart. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) can slow or block blood flow ...

  1. Methanol-Air Batteries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-01-01

    Cells charged with 120 ml of anolyte , consisting of 6 M methanol in 11 M KOH, have operated for 2,230 hours under cyclic load drains of 50 mA for 13...minutes and 2 A for 1 second. One cell operated for more than 8,000 hours with periodic refilling of fresh anolyte , demonstrating the long serviceable...life of the electrode components. Fuel utilization efficiencies as high as 84% have been obtained from cells charged with an anolyte solution of

  2. Transport of methanol by pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-04-01

    This report examines and evaluates the problems and considerations that could affect the feasibility of transporting methanol by pipeline. The following are the major conclusions: Though technical problems, such as methanol water contamination and materials incompatibility, remain to be solved, none appears insolvable. Methanol appears to be less toxic, and therefore to represent less of a health hazard, than gasoline, the fuel for which methanol is expected to substitute. The primary safety hazards of methanol, fire and explosion, are no worse than those of gasoline. The environmental hazards that can be associated with methanol are not as significant as those of petroleum. Provided quantities of throughput sufficient to justify pipeline transport are available, there appear to be no economic impediments to the transport of methanol by pipeline. Based on these, it appears that it can be concluded that the pipelining of methanol, whether via an existing petroleum pipeline or a new methanol-dedicated pipeline, is indeed feasible. 66 refs., 3 figs., 27 tabs.

  3. OTEC energy via methanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, W.H.; Richards, D.; Niemeyer, W.G.; Shoemaker, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The conceptual design of an 160 MW/sub e/ OTEC plantship has been documented; it is designed to produce 1000 tonne/day of fuel-grade methanol from coal slurry shipped to the plantship, using oxygen and hydrogen from the on-board electrolysis of water. Data and components are used that were derived by Brown and Root Development, Inc. (BARDI) in designing a barge-mounted plant to make methanol from natural gas for Litton Industries and in the design and construction of a coal-to-ammonia demonstration plant in operation at Muscle Shoals, Alabama, for the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). The OTEC-methanol plant design is based on the use of the Texaco gasifier and Lurgi synthesis units. The sale price of OTEC methanol delivered to port from this first-of-a-kind plant is estimated to be marginally competitive with methanol from other sources at current market prices.

  4. California methanol assessment. Volume 1: Summary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otoole, R.; Dutzi, E.; Gershman, R.; Heft, R.; Kalema, W.; Maynard, D.

    1983-01-01

    The near term methanol industry, the competitive environment, long term methanol market, the transition period, air quality impacts of methanol, roles of the public and private sectors are considered.

  5. A simple preparation of very high methanol tolerant cathode electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cell based on polymer-coated carbon nanotube/platinum

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zehui; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-01-01

    The development of a durable and methanol tolerant electrocatalyst with a high oxygen reduction reaction activity is highly important for the cathode side of direct methanol fuel cells. Here, we describe a simple and novel methodology to fabricate a practically applicable electrocatalyst with a high methanol tolerance based on poly[2,2′-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5′-bibenzimidazole]-wrapped multi-walled carbon nanotubes, on which Pt nanoparticles have been deposited, then coated with poly(vinylphosphonic acid) (PVPA). The polymer coated electrocatalyst showed an ~3.3 times higher oxygen reduction reaction activity compared to that of the commercial CB/Pt and methanol tolerance in the presence of methanol to the electrolyte due to a 50% decreased methanol adsorption on the Pt after coating with the PVPA. Meanwhile, the peroxide generation of the PVPA coated electrocatalyst was as low as 0.8% with 2 M methanol added to the electrolyte, which was much lower than those of the non-PVPA-coated electrocatalyst (7.5%) and conventional CB/Pt (20.5%). Such a high methanol tolerance is very important for the design of a direct methanol fuel cell cathode electrocatalyst with a high performance. PMID:26192397

  6. Single passive direct methanol fuel cell supplied with pure methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ligang; Zhang, Jing; Cai, Weiwei; Liang, Liang; Xing, Wei; Liu, Changpeng

    2011-03-01

    A new single passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) supplied with pure methanol is designed, assembled and tested using a pervaporation membrane (PM) to control the methanol transport. The effect of the PM size on the fuel cell performances and the constant current discharge of the fuel cell with one-fueling are studied. The results show that the fuel cell with PM 9 cm2 can yield a maximum power density of about 21 mW cm-2, and a stable performances at a discharge current of 100 mA can last about 45 h. Compared with DMFC supplied with 3 M methanol solution, the energy density provided by this new DMFC has increased about 6 times.

  7. A bottom-up perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of global eddy covariance flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlfahrt, Georg; Amelynck, Crist; Ammann, Christof; Arneth, Almut; Bamberger, Ines; Goldstein, Allen; Hansel, Armin; Heinesch, Bernhard; Holst, Thomas; Hörtnagl, Lukas; Karl, Thomas; Neftel, Albrecht; McKinney, Karena; Munger, William; Schade, Gunnar; Schoon, Niels

    2014-05-01

    Methanol (CH3OH) is, after methane, the second most abundant VOC in the troposphere and globally represents nearly 20% of the total biospheric VOC emissions. With typical concentrations of 1-10 ppb in the continental boundary layer, methanol plays a crucial role in atmospheric chemistry, which needs to be evaluated in the light of ongoing changes in land use and climate. Previous global methanol budgets have approached the net land flux by summing up the various emission terms (namely primary biogenic and anthropogenic emissions, plant decay and biomass burning) and by subtracting dry and wet deposition, resulting in a net land flux in the range of 75-245 Tg y-1. The data underlying these budget calculations largely stem from small-scale leaf gas exchange measurements and while recently column-integrated remotely sensed methanol concentrations have become available for constraining budget calculations, there have been few attempts to contrast model calculations with direct net ecosystem-scale methanol flux measurements. Here we use eddy covariance methanol flux measurements from 8 sites in Europe and North America to study the magnitude of and controls on the diurnal and seasonal variability in the net ecosystem methanol flux. In correspondence with leaf-level literature, our data show that methanol emission and its strong environmental and biotic control (by temperature and stomatal conductance) prevailed at the more productive (agricultural) sites and at a perturbed forest site. In contrast, at more natural, less productive sites substantial deposition of methanol occurred, in particular during periods of surface wetness. These deposition processes are poorly represented by currently available temperature/light and/or production-driven modelling algorithms. A new framework for modelling the bi-directional land-atmosphere methanol exchange is proposed which accounts for the production of methanol in leaves, the regulation of leaf methanol emission by stomatal

  8. Methanol crossover in direct methanol fuel cell systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovar, B. S.; Bender, G.; Davey, J. R.; Zelenay, P.

    2003-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are currently being investigated for a number of different applications from several milliwatts to near kilowatt size scales (cell phones, laptops, auxiliary power units, etc .). Because methanol has a very high energy density, over 6000 W hr/kg, a DMFC can possibly have greatly extended lifetimes compared to the batteries, doesn't present the storage problems associated with hydrogen fuel cells and can possibly operate more efficiently and cleanly than internal combustion engines.

  9. Methanol Oxidation on Pt3Sn(111) for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells: Methanol Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Zhigang; Guo, Chen; Wang, Weili; Wei, Shuxian; Ng, Siu-Pang; Chen, Xiangfeng; Ding, Ning; Guo, Wenyue; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence

    2016-05-18

    PtSn alloy, which is a potential material for use in direct methanol fuel cells, can efficiently promote methanol oxidation and alleviate the CO poisoning problem. Herein, methanol decomposition on Pt3Sn(111) was systematically investigated using periodic density functional theory and microkinetic modeling. The geometries and energies of all of the involved species were analyzed, and the decomposition network was mapped out to elaborate the reaction mechanisms. Our results indicated that methanol and formaldehyde were weakly adsorbed, and the other derivatives (CHxOHy, x = 1-3, y = 0-1) were strongly adsorbed and preferred decomposition rather than desorption on Pt3Sn(111). The competitive methanol decomposition started with the initial O-H bond scission followed by successive C-H bond scissions, (i.e., CH3OH → CH3O → CH2O → CHO → CO). The Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi relations and energy barrier decomposition analyses identified the C-H and O-H bond scissions as being more competitive than the C-O bond scission. Microkinetic modeling confirmed that the vast majority of the intermediates and products from methanol decomposition would escape from the Pt3Sn(111) surface at a relatively low temperature, and the coverage of the CO residue decreased with an increase in the temperature and decrease in partial methanol pressure.

  10. Methanol unity frays, discounting returns

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, G.D.L.

    1997-02-05

    This article reviews the price variation in methanol for February 1997 and how the company Methanex compares to other producers. The discrepancy between posting prices and transaction prices is noted.

  11. Indonesia to build methanol plant

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1992-08-05

    P.T. Kaltim Methanol Industri (Jakarta), a company set up to build a new methanol plant in Indonesia, expects to award contracts for the construction of a new plant, Indonesia's second methanol unit, by the end of this year. P.T. Kaltim Methanol is a private company owned by P.T. Humpuss, an industrial group active in transport, airlines, and shipping of LNG and methanol. The 2,000-m.t./day plant will be built at Bontang, Kalimantan Island, close to the fertilizer producer P.T. Pupuk Kaltim and near the country's largest natural gas reserves. The site is also a deepsea port, handy for transportation of ready product. Three groups are in discussions with the investor on plant supply as well as methanol offtake deals. They are H G/Kockner; John Brown/Davy/Lucky Goldstar, offering the ICI process independently; and Lurgi/Metallgesellschaft (MG), proposing the Lurgi process. At least 60% of the output is expected to be exported, and both ICI and MG are understood to be interested in selling product from the future plant. Japan, Southeast Asia, and the US are targeted.

  12. Acute methanol toxicity in minipigs

    SciTech Connect

    Dorman, D.C.; Dye, J.A.; Nassise, M.P.; Ekuta, J.; Bolon, B.

    1993-01-01

    The pig has been proposed as a potential animal model for methanol-induced neuro-ocular toxicosis in humans because of its low liver tetrahydrofolate levels and slower rate of formate metabolism compared to those of humans. To examine the validity of this animal model, 12 4-month-old female minipigs (minipig YU) were given a single oral dose of water or methanol at 1.0, 2.5, or 5.0 g/kg body wt by gavage (n = 3 pigs/dose). Dose-dependent signs of acute methanol intoxication, which included mild CNS depression, tremors, ataxia, and recumbency, developed within 0.5 to 2.0 hr, and resolved by 52 hr. Methanol- and formate-dosed pigs did not develop optic nerve lesions, toxicologically significant formate accumulation, or metabolic acidosis. Based on results following a single dose, female minipigs do not appear to be overtly sensitive to methanol and thus may not be a suitable animal model for acute methanol-induced neuroocular toxicosis.

  13. Unusual case of methanol poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    Shapiro, L.; Henderson, M. . Dept. of Chemical Pathology); Madi, S.; Mellor, L. . Dept. of Medicine, and Pharmacy)

    1993-01-09

    A 31-year-old man with a history of alcohol abuse presented to the accident and emergency department complaining of blurred vision. 4 h previously he had drunk 300 mL de-icer fluid. Electrolytes, urea, creatinine, glucose, and blood-gas analysis were normal. Measured osmolality, however, was 368 mosmol/kg with a calculated osmolality of 300 mosmol/kg, which indicated a greatly increased osmolar gap. He was therefore given 150 mL whisky and admitted. Methanol was later reported as 200 mg/dL. Ethylene glycol was not detected, but another glycol, propylene glycol, was present at 47 mg/dL. 10 h after ingestion an intravenous infusion of ethanol was started and he was hemodialysed for 7 h. After dialysis he was given a further 100 mL whisky and the rate of ethanol infusion was reduced to 11 g per h. Methanol and ethanol were measured twice daily until methanol was under 10/mg/dL: The recommendation is that blood ethanol be maintained between 100 and 200 mg/dL during treatment of methanol poisoning. This concentration was not achieved, presumably because of the high rate of ethanol metabolism often found in alcoholics. Antifreeze solutions commonly contain methanol and ethylene glycol. Sometimes propylene glycol is substituted because it has properties similar to those of ethylene glycol but is less toxic. The authors postulate that propylene glycol inhibited the metabolism of methanol in the patient, thus sparing him from the toxic effects of methanol.

  14. Rapid starting methanol reactor system

    DOEpatents

    Chludzinski, Paul J.; Dantowitz, Philip; McElroy, James F.

    1984-01-01

    The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

  15. Methanol conversion to higher hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Tabak, S.A.

    1994-12-31

    Several indirect options exist for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from coal, natural gas, or biomass. All involve an initial conversion step to synthesis gas (CO and H{sub 2}). Presently, there are two commercial technologies for converting syngas to liquids: Fischer-Tropsch, which yields a range of aliphatic hydrocarbons with molecular weights determined by Schulz-Flory kinetics, and methanol synthesis. Mobil`s diversity of technology for methanol conversion gives the methanol synthesis route flexibility for production of either gasoline, distillate or chemicals. Mobil`s ZSM-5 catalyst is the key in several processes for producing chemicals and transportation fuels from methanol: MTO for light olefins, MTG for gasoline, MOGD for distillates. The MTG process has been commercialized in New Zealand since 1985, producing one-third of the country`s gasoline supply, while MTO and MOGD have been developed and demonstrated at greater than 100 BPD scale. This paper will discuss recent work in understanding methanol conversion chemistry and the various options for its use.

  16. Fabrication and Characterization of a Micro Methanol Sensor Using the CMOS-MEMS Technique.

    PubMed

    Fong, Chien-Fu; Dai, Ching-Liang; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2015-10-23

    A methanol microsensor integrated with a micro heater manufactured using the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technique was presented. The sensor has a capability of detecting low concentration methanol gas. Structure of the sensor is composed of interdigitated electrodes, a sensitive film and a heater. The heater located under the interdigitated electrodes is utilized to provide a working temperature to the sensitive film. The sensitive film prepared by the sol-gel method is tin dioxide doped cadmium sulfide, which is deposited on the interdigitated electrodes. To obtain the suspended structure and deposit the sensitive film, the sensor needs a post-CMOS process to etch the sacrificial silicon dioxide layer and silicon substrate. The methanol senor is a resistive type. A readout circuit converts the resistance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. The experimental results show that the methanol sensor has a sensitivity of 0.18 V/ppm.

  17. Fabrication and Characterization of a Micro Methanol Sensor Using the CMOS-MEMS Technique

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Chien-Fu; Dai, Ching-Liang; Wu, Chyan-Chyi

    2015-01-01

    A methanol microsensor integrated with a micro heater manufactured using the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS)-microelectromechanical system (MEMS) technique was presented. The sensor has a capability of detecting low concentration methanol gas. Structure of the sensor is composed of interdigitated electrodes, a sensitive film and a heater. The heater located under the interdigitated electrodes is utilized to provide a working temperature to the sensitive film. The sensitive film prepared by the sol-gel method is tin dioxide doped cadmium sulfide, which is deposited on the interdigitated electrodes. To obtain the suspended structure and deposit the sensitive film, the sensor needs a post-CMOS process to etch the sacrificial silicon dioxide layer and silicon substrate. The methanol senor is a resistive type. A readout circuit converts the resistance variation of the sensor into the output voltage. The experimental results show that the methanol sensor has a sensitivity of 0.18 V/ppm. PMID:26512671

  18. Spontaneous closure of stoma.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Narendra; Singh, Harjeet; Kumar, Hemanth; Gupta, Rajesh; Verma, G R

    2016-11-01

    Intestinal loop stoma is a common surgical procedure performed for various benign and malignant abdominal problems, but it rarely undergoes spontaneous closure, without surgical intervention. Two male patients presented to our emergency surgical department with acute abdominal pain. One of them was diagnosed as having rectosigmoid perforation and underwent diversion sigmoid loop colostomy after primary closure of the perforation. The other was a known case of carcinoma of the rectum who had already undergone low anterior resection with covering loop ileostomy; the patient underwent second loop ileostomy, this time for complicated intestinal obstruction. To our surprise, both the loop colostomy and ileostomy closed spontaneously at 8 weeks and 6 weeks, respectively, without any consequences. Spontaneous stoma closure is a rare and interesting event. The exact etiology for spontaneous closure remains unknown, but it may be hypothesized to result from slow retraction of the stoma, added to the concept of a tendency towards spontaneous closure of enterocutaneous fistula.

  19. Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren; Xiaoming

    2003-07-22

    A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

  20. Fatal methanol poisoning: features of liver histopathology.

    PubMed

    Akhgari, Maryam; Panahianpour, Mohammad Hadi; Bazmi, Elham; Etemadi-Aleagha, Afshar; Mahdavi, Amirhosein; Nazari, Saeed Hashemi

    2013-03-01

    Methanol poisoning has become a considerable problem in Iran. Liver can show some features of poisoning after methanol ingestion. Therefore, our concern was to examine liver tissue histopathology in fatal methanol poisoning cases in Iranian population. In this study, 44 cases of fatal methanol poisoning were identified in a year. The histological changes of the liver were reviewed. The most striking features of liver damage by light microscopy were micro-vesicular steatosis, macro-vesicular steatosis, focal hepatocyte necrosis, mild intra-hepatocyte bile stasis, feathery degeneration and hydropic degeneration. Blood and vitreous humor methanol concentrations were examined to confirm the proposed history of methanol poisoning. The majority of cases were men (86.36%). In conclusion, methanol poisoning can cause histological changes in liver tissues. Most importantly in cases with mean blood and vitreous humor methanol levels greater than 127 ± 38.9 mg/dL more than one pathologic features were detected.

  1. Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2001-10-02

    The fuel utilization of a direct methanol fuel cell is enhanced for improved cell efficiency. Distribution plates at the anode and cathode of the fuel cell are configured to distribute reactants vertically and laterally uniformly over a catalyzed membrane surface of the fuel cell. A conductive sheet between the anode distribution plate and the anodic membrane surface forms a mass transport barrier to the methanol fuel that is large relative to a mass transport barrier for a gaseous hydrogen fuel cell. In a preferred embodiment, the distribution plate is a perforated corrugated sheet. The mass transport barrier may be conveniently increased by increasing the thickness of an anode conductive sheet adjacent the membrane surface of the fuel cell.

  2. Fermentation of methanol in the sheep rumen.

    PubMed

    Pol, A; Demeyer, D I

    1988-03-01

    Sheep fed a hay-concentrate diet were adapted to pectin administration and ruminal infusion of methanol. Both treatments resulted in a strong increase in the rate of methanogenesis from methanol. Quantitative data show that methanol was exclusively converted into methane. Treatments did not influence ruminal volatile fatty acid percentages.

  3. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source.

  4. The direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Halpert, G.; Narayanan, S.R.; Frank, H.

    1995-08-01

    This presentation describes the approach and progress in the ARPA-sponsored effort to develop a Direct Methanol, Liquid-Feed Fuel Cell (DMLFFC) with a solid Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) for battery replacement in small portable applications. Using Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) developed by JPL and Giner, significant voltage was demonstrated at relatively high current densities. The DMLFFC utilizes a 3 percent aqueous solution of methanol that is oxidized directly in the anode (fuel) chamber and oxygen (air) in the cathode chamber to produce water and significant power. The only products are water and CO{sub 2}. The ARPA effort is aimed at replacing the battery in the BA 5590 military radio.

  5. Methanol production method and system

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Michael J.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    1984-01-01

    Ethanol is selectively produced from the reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the presence of a transition metal carbonyl catalyst. Methanol serves as a solvent and may be accompanied by a less volatile co-solvent. The solution includes the transition metal carbonyl catalysts and a basic metal salt such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal formate, carbonate or bicarbonate. A gas containing a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio, as is present in a typical gasifer product, is contacted with the solution for the preferential production of ethanol with minimal water as a byproduct. Fractionation of the reaction solution provides substantially pure ethanol product and allows return of the catalysts for reuse.

  6. Heterogeneous Chemistry Involving Methanol in Tropospheric Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabazadeh, A.; Yokelson, R. J.; Singh, H. B.; Hobbs, P. V.; Crawford, J. H.; Iraci, L. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this report we analyze airborne measurements to suggest that methanol in biomass burning smoke is lost heterogeneously in clouds. When a smoke plume intersected a cumulus cloud during the SAFARI 2000 field project, the observed methanol gas phase concentration rapidly declined. Current understanding of gas and aqueous phase chemistry cannot explain the loss of methanol documented by these measurements. Two plausible heterogeneous reactions are proposed to explain the observed simultaneous loss and production of methanol and formaldehyde, respectively. If the rapid heterogeneous processing of methanol, seen in a cloud impacted by smoke, occurs in more pristine clouds, it could affect the oxidizing capacity of the troposphere on a global scale.

  7. Spontaneous combustion of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nusselt, Wilhelm; Pothmann, PH

    1923-01-01

    It is shown by the author's experiments that hydrogen which escapes to the atmosphere through openings in the system may burn spontaneously if it contains dust. Purely thermal reasoning can not account for the combustion. It seems to be rather an electrical ignition. In order to determine whether the cause of the spontaneous ignition was thermo-chemical, thermo-mechanical, or thermo-electrical, the experiments in this paper were performed.

  8. Trinidad to build fifth methanol plant

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-09

    Lurgi confirms it has been awarded a lump sum turnkey contract to build Trinidad`s fifth methanol plant. The facility will be owned by Titan Methanol, whose shareholders are Beacon Group Energy Investment Fund (75%) Amoco Chemical (15%), and Saturn Methanol (10%). The 2,500-m.t./day unit at Point Lisas, which is scheduled to come onstream at the end of 1999, will be Trinidad`s largest methanol unit. Saturn Methanol will be responsible for methanol offtake. Lurgi will use its combined reforming process for the gas section of the unit and its low-pressure methanol synthesis technology. Lurgi has used the same processes in plants in Malaysia and Indonesia.

  9. The toxicity of inhaled methanol vapors

    SciTech Connect

    Kavet, R.; Nauss, K.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Methanol could become a major automotive fuel in the U.S., and its use may result in increased exposure of the public to methanol vapor. Nearly all of the available information on methanol toxicity in humans relates to the consequences of acute, rather than chronic, exposures. Acute methanol toxicity evolves in a well-understood pattern and consists of an uncompensated metabolic acidosis with superimposed toxicity to the visual system. The toxic properties of methanol are rooted in the factors that govern both the conversion of methanol to formic acid and the subsequent metabolism of formate to carbon dioxide in the folate pathway. In short, the toxic syndrome sets in if formate generation continues at a rate that exceeds its rate of metabolism. Current evidence indicates that formate accumulation will not challenge the metabolic capacity of the folate pathway at the anticipated levels of exposure to automotive methanol vapor.117 references.

  10. Direct methanol fuel cell and system

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2004-10-26

    A fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and a polymer electrolyte membrane located between anode and cathode gas diffusion backings uses a methanol vapor fuel supply. A permeable polymer electrolyte membrane having a permeability effective to sustain a carbon dioxide flux equivalent to at least 10 mA/cm.sup.2 provides for removal of carbon dioxide produced at the anode by reaction of methanol with water. Another aspect of the present invention includes a superabsorpent polymer material placed in proximity to the anode gas diffusion backing to hold liquid methanol or liquid methanol solution without wetting the anode gas diffusion backing so that methanol vapor from the liquid methanol or liquid methanol-water solution is supplied to the membrane.

  11. Sol-gel based silica electrodes for inorganic membrane direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyea; Kohl, Paul A.

    Inorganic glass electrodes are of interest for use with inorganic proton exchange membranes for direct methanol fuel cells. Platinum-ruthenium glass electrodes (PtRu/C-SiO 2) have been prepared by incorporating the PtRu/C nanoparticles into a silica-based matrix. The SiO 2 matrix was synthesized through the sol-gel reaction of 3-(trihydroxysilyl)-1-propanesulfonic acid (3TPS) and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). The distribution of the PtRu/C particles can be controlled by changing the properties of the gel matrix. The effect of gelation time, mole fraction of reactants within the sol, curing temperature, and glass ionomer content were investigated. The adhesion of the catalyst layer on the membrane, catalytic activity for methanol oxidation, and inhibition of methanol permeation through the membrane have been characterized and optimized. The electroless deposition of PtRu onto the PtRu/C nanoparticles was performed to increase the sheet conductivity of the electrode. It was found that the electrolessly deposited metal improved the catalytic activity for methanol oxidation and decreased the methanol cross-over. The methanol fuel cell performance using the inorganic membrane electrode assembly was 236 μA cm -2 at 0.4 V and was stable for more than 10 days.

  12. Methanol-Tolerant Platinum-Palladium Catalyst Supported on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanofiber for High Concentration Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jiyoung; Jang, Jin-Sung; Peck, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Byungrok; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Jung, Doo-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Pt-Pd catalyst supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber (N-CNF) was prepared and evaluated as a cathode electrode of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The N-CNF, which was directly synthesized by the catalytic chemical vapor deposition from acetonitrile at 640 °C, was verified as having a change of electrochemical surface properties such as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities and the electrochemical double layer compared with common carbon black (CB). To attain the competitive oxygen reduction reaction activity with methanol tolerance, the Pt and Pd metals were supported on the CB or the N-CNF. The physical and electrochemical characteristics of the N-CNF–supported Pt-Pd catalyst were examined and compared with catalyst supported on the CB. In addition, DMFC single cells using these catalysts as the cathode electrode were applied to obtain I-V polarization curves and constant current operating performances with high-concentration methanol as the fuel. Pt-Pd catalysts had obvious ORR activity even in the presence of methanol. The higher power density was obtained at all the methanol concentrations when it applied to the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of the DMFC. When the N-CNF is used as the catalyst support material, a better performance with high-concentration methanol is expected.

  13. Methanol-Tolerant Platinum-Palladium Catalyst Supported on Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanofiber for High Concentration Direct Methanol Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jiyoung; Jang, Jin-Sung; Peck, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Byungrok; Yoon, Seong-Ho; Jung, Doo-Hwan

    2016-08-15

    Pt-Pd catalyst supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber (N-CNF) was prepared and evaluated as a cathode electrode of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The N-CNF, which was directly synthesized by the catalytic chemical vapor deposition from acetonitrile at 640 °C, was verified as having a change of electrochemical surface properties such as oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activities and the electrochemical double layer compared with common carbon black (CB). To attain the competitive oxygen reduction reaction activity with methanol tolerance, the Pt and Pd metals were supported on the CB or the N-CNF. The physical and electrochemical characteristics of the N-CNF-supported Pt-Pd catalyst were examined and compared with catalyst supported on the CB. In addition, DMFC single cells using these catalysts as the cathode electrode were applied to obtain I-V polarization curves and constant current operating performances with high-concentration methanol as the fuel. Pt-Pd catalysts had obvious ORR activity even in the presence of methanol. The higher power density was obtained at all the methanol concentrations when it applied to the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of the DMFC. When the N-CNF is used as the catalyst support material, a better performance with high-concentration methanol is expected.

  14. Metabolic methanol: molecular pathways and physiological roles.

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, Yuri L; Shindyapina, Anastasia V; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V; Komarova, Tatiana V

    2015-04-01

    Methanol has been historically considered an exogenous product that leads only to pathological changes in the human body when consumed. However, in normal, healthy individuals, methanol and its short-lived oxidized product, formaldehyde, are naturally occurring compounds whose functions and origins have received limited attention. There are several sources of human physiological methanol. Fruits, vegetables, and alcoholic beverages are likely the main sources of exogenous methanol in the healthy human body. Metabolic methanol may occur as a result of fermentation by gut bacteria and metabolic processes involving S-adenosyl methionine. Regardless of its source, low levels of methanol in the body are maintained by physiological and metabolic clearance mechanisms. Although human blood contains small amounts of methanol and formaldehyde, the content of these molecules increases sharply after receiving even methanol-free ethanol, indicating an endogenous source of the metabolic methanol present at low levels in the blood regulated by a cluster of genes. Recent studies of the pathogenesis of neurological disorders indicate metabolic formaldehyde as a putative causative agent. The detection of increased formaldehyde content in the blood of both neurological patients and the elderly indicates the important role of genetic and biochemical mechanisms of maintaining low levels of methanol and formaldehyde.

  15. Towards a methanol economy based on homogeneous catalysis: methanol to H2 and CO2 to methanol.

    PubMed

    Alberico, E; Nielsen, M

    2015-04-21

    The possibility to implement both the exhaustive dehydrogenation of aqueous methanol to hydrogen and CO2 and the reverse reaction, the hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol and water, may pave the way to a methanol based economy as part of a promising renewable energy system. Recently, homogeneous catalytic systems have been reported which are able to promote either one or the other of the two reactions under mild conditions. Here, we review and discuss these developments.

  16. Design and Operation of an Electrochemical Methanol Concentration Sensor for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T. I.; Chun, W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of a 150-Watt packaged power source based on liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells is being pursued currently at the Jet propulsion Laboratory for defense applications. In our studies we find that the concentration of methanol in the fuel circulation loop affects the electrical performance and efficiency the direct methanol fuel cell systems significantly. The practical operation of direct methanol fuel cell systems, therefore, requires accurate monitoring and control of methanol concentration. The present paper reports on the principle and demonstration of an in-house developed electrochemical sensor suitable for direct methanol fuel cell systems.

  17. Recent Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    In this work, the effects of methanol crossover and airflow rates on the cathode potential of an operating direct methanol fuel cell are explored. Techniques for quantifying methanol crossover in a fuel cell and for separating the electrical performance of each electrode in a fuel cell are discussed. The effect of methanol concentration on cathode potential has been determined to be significant. The cathode is found to be mass transfer limited when operating on low flow rate air and high concentrations of methanol. Improvements in cathode structure and operation at low methanol concentration have been shown to result in improved cell performance.

  18. Methods of conditioning direct methanol fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Cynthia; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2005-11-08

    Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer electrolyte membrane of the membrane electrode assembly to a cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, and an electrical current of polarity opposite to that in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is drawn through the membrane electrode assembly, wherein methanol is oxidized at the cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly while the catalyst on the anode surface is reduced. Surface oxides on the direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst of the membrane electrode assembly are thereby reduced.

  19. Spontaneous Perforation of Pyometra

    PubMed Central

    Yildizhan, Begüm; Uyar, Esra; Şişmanoğlu, Alper; Güllüoğlu, Gülfem; Kavak, Zehra N.

    2006-01-01

    Pyometra is the accumulation of purulent material in the uterine cavity. Its reported incidence is 0.01−0.5% in gynecologic patients; however, as far as elderly patients are concerned, its incidence is 13.6% [3]. The most common cause of pyometra is malignant diseases of genital tract and the consequences of their treatment (radiotherapy). Other causes are benign tumors like leiomyoma, endometrial polyps, senile cervicitis, cervical occlusion after surgery, puerperal infections, and congenital cervical anomalies. Spontaneous rupture of the uterus is an extremely rare complication of pyometra. To our knowledge, only 21 cases of spontaneous perforation of pyometra have been reported in English literature since 1980. This paper reports an additional case of spontaneous uterine rupture. PMID:17093350

  20. Biomodal spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K. )

    1989-09-26

    Investigations of mass and kinetic-energy distributions from spontaneous fission have been extended in recent years to an isotope of element 104 and, for half-lives, to an isotope of element 108. The results have been surprising in that spontaneous fission half-lives have turned out to be much longer than expected and mass and kinetic- energy distributions were found to abruptly shift away from those of the lighter actinides, showing two modes of fission. These new developments have caused a re-evaluation of our understanding of the fission process, bringing an even deeper appreciation of the role played by nuclear shell effects upon spontaneous fission properties. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source. Water loss from the cell is minimized by making the conductive cathode assembly hydrophobic and the conductive anode assembly hydrophilic.

  2. Direct methanol fuel cell for portable applications

    SciTech Connect

    Valdez, T.I.; Narayanan, S.R.; Frank, H.; Chun, W.

    1997-12-01

    A five cell direct methanol fuel cell stack has been developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Presently direct methanol fuel cell technology is being incorporated into a system for portable applications. Electrochemical performance and its dependence on flow rate and temperature for a five cell stack are presented. Water transport data, and water transport mechanisms for direct methanol fuel cells are discussed. Stack response to pulse loads has been characterized. Implications of stack performance and operating conditions on system design have been addressed.

  3. Method of steam reforming methanol to hydrogen

    DOEpatents

    Beshty, Bahjat S.

    1990-01-01

    The production of hydrogen by the catalyzed steam reforming of methanol is accomplished using a reformer of greatly reduced size and cost wherein a mixture of water and methanol is superheated to the gaseous state at temperatures of about 800.degree. to about 1,100.degree. F. and then fed to a reformer in direct contact with the catalyst bed contained therein, whereby the heat for the endothermic steam reforming reaction is derived directly from the superheated steam/methanol mixture.

  4. An Experimental Study of Methanol Reformation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-12-01

    1973, p. 1300) show how methanol compares to other alterna- tives. In addition, the production of methanol from syngas is a proven commercial...technology, and the syngas can be coal-derived (Wilk 1978, p. 56). The disadvantages of methanol concern the fact that more will have to be carried than...the chief engineer’s job to continue research and upgrading into 1980. 2.2 Design Parameters The following limitations were placed on the new system

  5. SnS2 Thin Film Deposition by Spray Pyrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaber, Abdallah Yahia; Alamri, Saleh Noaiman; Aida, Mohammed Salah

    2012-06-01

    Tin disulfide (SnS2) thin films have been synthesized using a simplified spray pyrolysis technique using a perfume atomizer. The films were deposited using two different solutions prepared by the dilution of SnCl2 and thiourea in distilled water and in methanol. The obtained films have a microcrystalline structure. The film deposited using methanol as the solvent is nearly stochiometric SnS2 with a spinel phase having a (001) preferential orientation. The film prepared with an aqueous solution is Sn-rich. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) images reveal that the film deposited with the aqueous solution is rough and is formed with large wires. However, the film deposited with methanol is dense and smooth. Conductivity measurements indicate that the aqueous solution leads to an n-type semiconductor, while methanol leads to a p-type semiconductor.

  6. Spontaneous sarcomere dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Stefan; Kruse, Karsten

    2010-12-01

    Sarcomeres are the basic force generating units of striated muscles and consist of an interdigitating arrangement of actin and myosin filaments. While muscle contraction is usually triggered by neural signals, which eventually set myosin motors into motion, isolated sarcomeres can oscillate spontaneously between a contracted and a relaxed state. We analyze a model for sarcomere dynamics, which is based on a force-dependent detachment rate of myosin from actin. Our numerical bifurcation analysis of the spontaneous sarcomere dynamics reveals notably Hopf bifurcations, canard explosions, and gluing bifurcations. We discuss possible implications for experiments.

  7. Spontaneous bilateral tubal pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Wali, Aisha Syed; Khan, Rozilla Sadia

    2012-02-01

    With the increase in incidence of ectopic pregnancy over the decades, bilateral ectopic pregnancy is also increasing. It is usually associated with assisted reproductive techniques (ART) but in recent years few cases of spontaneous bilateral ectopic pregnancy have been reported. Gynaecologists should be aware of this and that ultrasonography has limitations in diagnosis. In cases of ectopic pregnancy where contralateral adnexa is not clearly identified on ultrasound and fertility needs to be conserved, patient should be managed by experts in well equipped centres. A case of spontaneous bilateral tubal pregnancy that remained undiagnosed till laparotomy, is described.

  8. Methanol incorporation in clathrate hydrates and the implications for oil and gas pipeline flow assurance and icy planetary bodies

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kyuchul; Udachin, Konstantin A.; Moudrakovski, Igor L.; Leek, Donald M.; Alavi, Saman; Ratcliffe, Christopher I.; Ripmeester, John A.

    2013-01-01

    One of the best-known uses of methanol is as antifreeze. Methanol is used in large quantities in industrial applications to prevent methane clathrate hydrate blockages from forming in oil and gas pipelines. Methanol is also assigned a major role as antifreeze in giving icy planetary bodies (e.g., Titan) a liquid subsurface ocean and/or an atmosphere containing significant quantities of methane. In this work, we reveal a previously unverified role for methanol as a guest in clathrate hydrate cages. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and NMR experiments showed that at temperatures near 273 K, methanol is incorporated in the hydrate lattice along with other guest molecules. The amount of included methanol depends on the preparative method used. For instance, single-crystal XRD shows that at low temperatures, the methanol molecules are hydrogen-bonded in 4.4% of the small cages of tetrahydrofuran cubic structure II hydrate. At higher temperatures, NMR spectroscopy reveals a number of methanol species incorporated in hydrocarbon hydrate lattices. At temperatures characteristic of icy planetary bodies, vapor deposits of methanol, water, and methane or xenon show that the presence of methanol accelerates hydrate formation on annealing and that there is unusually complex phase behavior as revealed by powder XRD and NMR spectroscopy. The presence of cubic structure I hydrate was confirmed and a unique hydrate phase was postulated to account for the data. Molecular dynamics calculations confirmed the possibility of methanol incorporation into the hydrate lattice and show that methanol can favorably replace a number of methane guests. PMID:23661058

  9. Spontaneous transverse colon volvulus

    PubMed Central

    Sana, Landolsi; Ali, Gassara; Kallel, Helmi; Amine, Baklouti; Ahmed, Saadaoui; Mohamed Ali, Elouer; Wajdi, Chaeib; Saber, Mannaï

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous transverse colon volvulus in a young healthy woman. It constitutes an unusual case since it occurred in a young healthy woman with a subacute onset and no aetiological factor has been found. Its diagnosis is still challenging. Prompt recognition with emergency intervention constitutes the key to successful outcome. PMID:23785565

  10. Spontaneous transverse colon volvulus.

    PubMed

    Sana, Landolsi; Ali, Gassara; Kallel, Helmi; Amine, Baklouti; Ahmed, Saadaoui; Ali, Elouer Mohamed; Wajdi, Chaeib; Saber, Mannaï

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous transverse colon volvulus in a young healthy woman. It constitutes an unusual case since it occurred in a young healthy woman with a subacute onset and no aetiological factor has been found. Its diagnosis is still challenging. Prompt recognition with emergency intervention constitutes the key to successful outcome.

  11. Spontaneous fulminant gas gangrene.

    PubMed

    Delbridge, M S; Turton, E P L; Kester, R C

    2005-07-01

    Gas gangrene is a rare condition, usually associated with contaminated traumatic injuries. It carries a high rate of mortality and morbidity. A number of studies have implicated non-traumatic gas gangrene and colonic neoplasia. This paper reports a patient who presented spontaneously with Clostridium septicum gas gangrene and an occult caecal carcinoma.

  12. Resonance Raman spectrum of the solvated electron in methanol: simulation within a cluster model.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Stefanie; Eisfeld, Wolfgang; Sobolewski, Andrzej L; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2006-05-04

    The microsolvation of the CH(3)OH(2) hypervalent radical in methanol clusters has been investigated by density functional theory. It is shown that the CH(3)OH(2) radical spontaneously decomposes within methanol clusters into protonated methanol and a localized solvated electron cloud. The geometric and electronic structures of these clusters as well as their vibrational frequencies have been characterized. Resonance Raman intensities, associated with the s --> p transition of the unpaired electron, have been estimated for CH(3)OH(2)M(n) (M = CH(3)OH, n = 1-3) clusters. It is shown that with increasing cluster size the simulated spectra converge toward the resonance Raman spectrum of the solvated electron in methanol measured recently by Tauber and Mathies (J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2004, 126, 3414). The results suggest that CH(3)OH(2)M(n) clusters are useful finite-size model systems for the computational investigation of the spectroscopic properties of the solvated electron in liquid methanol.

  13. Biogeochemical Cycle of Methanol in Anoxic Deep-Sea Sediments.

    PubMed

    Yanagawa, Katsunori; Tani, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Naoya; Hachikubo, Akihiro; Kano, Akihiro; Matsumoto, Ryo; Suzuki, Yohey

    2016-06-25

    The biological flux and lifetime of methanol in anoxic marine sediments are largely unknown. We herein reported, for the first time, quantitative methanol removal rates in subsurface sediments. Anaerobic incubation experiments with radiotracers showed high rates of microbial methanol consumption. Notably, methanol oxidation to CO2 surpassed methanol assimilation and methanogenesis from CO2/H2 and methanol. Nevertheless, a significant decrease in methanol was not observed after the incubation, and this was attributed to the microbial production of methanol in parallel with its consumption. These results suggest that microbial reactions play an important role in the sources and sinks of methanol in subseafloor sediments.

  14. The platinum-catalyzed decomposition of methanol: A deceptive demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Coffing, D.L.; Wile, J.L. )

    1993-07-01

    The platinum-catalyzed gas-phase decomposition of methanol can be used for classroom demonstration in an exciting, interesting fashion. The platinum catalysts, after being heated until it glows, can be made to continue glowing for hours by suspending it over the methanol. This demonstration is useful in a classroom setting for several reasons. First it is more complicated than it appears initially, involving a reaction that is not immediately obvious and is, therefore, more challenging for students to understand. Second, the platinum illustrates the phenomenon of exothermic reactions in a distinctive and memorable way. Because the platinum foil has to be heated before the reactions will proceed, this demonstration also is a perfect example of the temperature dependence of [Delta]G in determining the spontaneity of a reaction. Finally, this demonstration can be used to explain the mutual interaction of two reactions. Because an explanation of this demonstration requires the use of many chemical concepts, it is an ideal activity for stimulating synthesis among students near the end of the course.

  15. Methanol Steam Reforming for Hydrogen Production

    SciTech Connect

    Palo, Daniel R.; Dagle, Robert A.; Holladay, Jamie D.

    2007-09-11

    Review article covering developments in methanol steam reforming in the context of PEM fuel cell power systems. Subjects covered include methanol background, use, and production, comparison to other fuels, power system considerations, militrary requirements, competing technologies, catalyst development, and reactor and system development and demonstration.

  16. Antidote review: fomepizole for methanol poisoning.

    PubMed

    Mycyk, Mark B; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2003-01-01

    Fomepizole (Antizol) was recently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of methanol poisoning. By inhibiting the hepatic enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase, it presents formation of toxic metabolites with far fewer consequences than traditional ethanol therapy. It appears that fomepizole will become standard therapy for methanol intoxication as it is for ethylene glycol poisoning.

  17. Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology of Methanol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methanol is a high production volume chemical used as a feedstock for chemical syntheses and as a solvent and fuel additive. Methanol is acutely toxic to humans, causing acidosis, blindness in death at high dosages, but its developmental and reproductive toxicity in humans is poo...

  18. Thin Film Catalyst Layers for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witham, C. K.; Chun, W.; Ruiz, R.; Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary obstacles to the widespread use of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is the high cost of the catalyst. Therefore, reducing the catalyst loading well below the current level of 8-12 mg/cm 2 would be important to commercialization. The current methods for preparation of catalyst layers consisting of catalyst, ionomer and sometimes a hydrophobic additive are applied by either painting, spraying, decal transfer or screen printing processes. Sputter deposition is a coating technique widely used in manufacturing and therefore particularly attractive. In this study we have begun to explore sputtering as a method for catalyst deposition. Present experiments focus on Pt-Ru catalyst layers for the anode.

  19. Spontaneous healing of spontaneous coronary artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Almafragi, Amar; Convens, Carl; Heuvel, Paul Van Den

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome and sudden cardiac death. It should be suspected in every healthy young woman without cardiac risk factors, especially during the peripartum or postpartum periods. It is important to check for a history of drug abuse, collagen vascular disease or blunt trauma of the chest. Coronary angiography is essential for diagnosis and early management. We wonder whether thrombolysis might aggravate coronary dissection. All types of treatment (medical therapy, percutaneous intervention or surgery) improve the prognosis without affecting survival times if used appropriately according to the clinical stability and the angiographic features of the involved coronary arteries. Prompt recognition and targeted treatment improve outcomes. We report a case of SCAD in a young female free of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, who presented six hours after thrombolysis for ST elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography showed a dissection of the left anterior descending and immediate branch. She had successful coronary artery bypass grafting, with complete healing of left anterior descending dissection.

  20. Spontaneous nephrocutaneous fistula.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Alberto A; Calado, Adriano A; Falcão, Evandro

    2004-01-01

    Spontaneous renal fistula to the skin is rare. The majority of cases develop in patients with antecedents of previous renal surgery, renal trauma, renal tumors, and chronic urinary tract infection with abscess formation. We report the case of a 62-year old woman, who complained of urine leakage through the skin in the lumbar region for 2 years. She underwent a fistulography that revealed drainage of contrast agent to the collecting system and images suggesting renal lithiasis on this side. The patient underwent simple nephrectomy on this side and evolved without intercurrences in the post-operative period. Currently, the occurrence of spontaneous renal and perirenal abscesses is extremely rare, except in patients with diabetes, neoplasias and immunodepression in general.

  1. Spontaneous recovery from acalculia.

    PubMed

    Basso, Anna; Caporali, Alessandra; Faglioni, Pietro

    2005-01-01

    A topic much considered in research on acalculia was its relationship with aphasia. Far less attention has been given to the natural course of acalculia. In this retrospective study, we examined the relationship between aphasia and acalculia in an unselected series of 98 left-brain-damaged patients and the spontaneous recovery from acalculia in 92 acalculic patients with follow-up. There was a significant association between aphasia and acalculia although 19 participants exhibited aphasia with no acalculia and six acalculia with no aphasia. We observed significant improvement between a first examination carried out between 1 and 5 months post-onset and a second examination carried out between 3 and 11 months later (mean: 5 months). The mechanisms of spontaneous recovery are discussed.

  2. Spontaneous Transomental Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hun

    2016-01-01

    A transomental hernia through the greater or lesser omentum is rare, accounting for approximately 4% of internal hernias. Transomental hernias are generally reported in patients aged over fifty. In such instances, acquired transomental hernias are usual, are commonly iatrogenic, and result from surgical interventions or from trauma or peritoneal inflammation. In rare cases, such as the one described in this study, internal hernias through the greater or lesser omentum occur spontaneously as the result of senile atrophy without history of surgery, trauma, or inflammation. A transomental hernia has a high postoperative mortality rate of 30%, and emergency diagnosis and treatment are critical. We report a case of a spontaneous transomental hernia of the small intestine causing intestinal obstruction. An internal hernia with strangulation of the small bowel in the lesser sac was suspected from the image study. After an emergency laparotomy, a transomental hernia was diagnosed. PMID:26962535

  3. [Spontaneous pneumothorax in children].

    PubMed

    Michel, J L

    2000-03-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is rare in childhood. Before 12 years of age the main underlying pathologies are asthma, cystic malformations, post infectious bullae, and infectious pneumoniae. After 12 years of age it is mainly associated with cystic fibrosis and constitutional slim morphology. Symptoms vary according to the extent of lung collapse and the diagnosis is confirmed on chest X rays. In mildly symptomatic pneumothorax, spontaneous resolution is achieved within few days. When cardiorespiratory difficulties are present, mechanical evacuation of air from the pleural cavity is necessary through a tube drainage maintained until complete pulmonary reexpansion. Surgical treatment is indicated in case of persisting air leakage after one week of efficient drainage, large cystic malformation or post infectious bullae, recurring or bilateral pneumothorax.

  4. Spontaneous Perforation of Pyometra

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ahanthem Santa; Bhaphiralyne, Wankhar

    2016-01-01

    Pyometra is collection of purulent material which occurs when there is interference with its normal drainage. It is an uncommon condition with incidence of 0.1 to 0.5% of all gynecological patients. Spontaneous rupture of uterus is an extremely rare complication of pyometra. A 65-year-old lady presented with pain abdomen and purulent vaginal discharge. Preoperative diagnosis of pyometra was made by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Laparotomy followed by peritoneal lavage and repair of perforation was performed. Although spontaneously perforated pyometra is rare, the condition must be borne in mind with regard to elderly women with acute abdominal pain. Preoperative diagnosis of perforated pyometra is absolutely essential. Computed tomography (CT) and MRI are diagnostic tools. In selected cases conservative approach at surgery can be opted. PMID:27152313

  5. Spontaneous Perforation of Pyometra.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nalini; Singh, Ahanthem Santa; Bhaphiralyne, Wankhar

    2016-04-01

    Pyometra is collection of purulent material which occurs when there is interference with its normal drainage. It is an uncommon condition with incidence of 0.1 to 0.5% of all gynecological patients. Spontaneous rupture of uterus is an extremely rare complication of pyometra. A 65-year-old lady presented with pain abdomen and purulent vaginal discharge. Preoperative diagnosis of pyometra was made by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Laparotomy followed by peritoneal lavage and repair of perforation was performed. Although spontaneously perforated pyometra is rare, the condition must be borne in mind with regard to elderly women with acute abdominal pain. Preoperative diagnosis of perforated pyometra is absolutely essential. Computed tomography (CT) and MRI are diagnostic tools. In selected cases conservative approach at surgery can be opted.

  6. Spontaneous Rupture of Pyometra

    PubMed Central

    Mallah, Fatemeh; Eftekhar, Tahere; Naghavi-Behzad, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous perforation is a very rare complication of pyometra. The clinical findings of perforated pyometra are similar to perforation of the gastrointestinal tract and other causes of acute abdomen. In most cases, a correct and definite diagnosis can be made only by laparotomy. We report two cases of diffuse peritonitis caused by spontaneous perforated pyometra. The first case is a 78-year-old woman with abdominal pain for which laparotomy was performed because of suspected incarcerated hernia. The second case is a 61-year-old woman with abdominal pain for which laparotomy was performed because of symptoms of peritonitis. At laparotomy of both cases, 1 liter of pus with the source of uterine was found in the abdominal cavity. The ruptured uterine is also detected. More investigations revealed no malignancy as the reason of the pyometra. PMID:24024054

  7. Spontaneous Iliopsoas Tendon Tear

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Mary; Patnaik, Soumya; Wang, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Hip pain is one of the most common reasons for the elderly to present to the emergency department, and the differential diagnosis spectrum is vast. Iliopsoas injury is a relatively uncommon condition that may present with hip or groin pain. It is usually seen in athletes due to trauma, particularly flexion injuries. However, spontaneous iliopsoas tendon tear is extremely rare, and only a small number of cases have been reported; it has an estimated prevalence of 0.66% in individuals from 7 to 95 years. Risk factors include aging, use of steroids, and chronic diseases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using its high soft-tissue contrast resolution remains the most valuable imaging modality. A prompt diagnosis and treatment, which is usually conservative, is important to improve the quality of life in this group of patients. We describe a case of spontaneous iliopsoas tendon tear in an elderly woman. PMID:26929854

  8. Spontaneous ileostomy closure

    PubMed Central

    Alyami, Mohammad S.; Lundberg, Peter W.; Cotte, Eddy G.; Glehen, Olivier J.

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic ileostomies are routinely placed during colorectal surgery for the diversion of intestinal contents to permit healing of the distal anastomosis prior to elective reversal. We present an interesting case of spontaneous closure of a diverting ileostomy without any adverse effects to the patient. A 65-year-old woman, positive for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer type-I, with locally invasive cancer of the distal colon underwent en-bloc total colectomy, hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingoophorectomy with creation of a proximal loop ileostomy. The ostomy temporarily closed without reoperation at 10 weeks, after spontaneously reopening, it definitively closed, again without surgical intervention at 18 weeks following the original surgery. This rare phenomenon has occurred following variable colorectal pathology and is poorly understood, particularly in patients with aggressive disease and adjunct perioperative interventions. PMID:27279518

  9. Arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture.

    PubMed

    Marques, Inês Brás; Vieira Barbosa, José

    2014-01-01

    Arachnoid cysts are benign congenital cerebrospinal fluid collections, usually asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally in children or adolescents. They may become symptomatic after enlargement or complications, frequently presenting with symptoms of intracranial hypertension. We report an unusual case of progressive refractory headache in an adult patient due to an arachnoid cyst spontaneous rupture. Although clinical improvement occurred with conservative treatment, the subdural hygroma progressively enlarged and surgical treatment was ultimately needed. Spontaneous rupture is a very rare complication of arachnoid cysts. Accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid accumulation in the subdural space causes sustained intracranial hypertension that may be life-threatening and frequently requires surgical treatment. Patients with arachnoid cysts must be informed on their small vulnerability to cyst rupture and be aware that a sudden and severe headache, especially if starting after minor trauma or a Valsalva manoeuvre, always requires medical evaluation.

  10. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum in Labor

    PubMed Central

    Benlamkadem, Said; Labib, Smael; Harandou, Mustapha

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous pneumomediastinum and subcutaneous emphysema also known as Hamman's syndrome is a very rare complication of labor that is often related to the valsalva maneuver during the labor. In most case, Hamman's syndrome is a self-limiting condition, rarely complicated unless there are underlying respiratory diseases. Chest X-ray can be a useful early diagnostic technique in severe clinical presentation. We report an uneventful pregnancy in a primigravid parturient, which was complicated in the late second stage of labor by the development of subcutaneous emphysema, pneumomediastinum, and mild pneumothorax. Spontaneous recovery occurred after four days of conservative management. This condition shows the major interest of labor analgesia especially locoregional techniques. PMID:28316849

  11. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Ellanti, P; Morris, S

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  12. Ion-Ice Astrochemistry: Barrierless Low-Energy Deposition Pathways to HCOOH, CH3OH, and CO2 on Icy Grain Mantles from Precursor Cations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woon, David E.

    2011-01-01

    A new family of very favorable reaction pathways is explored involving the deposition of ions on icy grain mantles with very low energies. Quantum chemical cluster calculations at the MP2/6-31+G** level in 4H2O clusters and at the B3LYP/6-31+G** level in 17H2O clusters indicate that HCO+ and CH3 + are able to react spontaneously with one of the water molecules in the cluster to form protonated formic acid (HCOOH2 +) and protonated methanol (CH3OH2 +), respectively. It is furthermore found that these initial adducts spontaneously transfer their excess protons to the cluster to form neutral formic acid and methanol, plus solvated hydronium, H3O+. In the final case, if a CO molecule is bound to the surface of the cluster, OH+ may react with it to form protonated carbon dioxide (HCO2 +), which then loses its proton to yield CO2 and H3O+. In the present model, all of these processes were found to occur with no barriers. Discussion includes the analogous gas phase processes, which have been considered in previous studies, as well as the competitive abstraction pathway for HCO(+) + H2O.

  13. Capacity additions ease tight methanol supply

    SciTech Connect

    Greek, B.F. )

    1988-10-03

    Two menthanol plants now in operation - one in the U.S., the other in Chile - will boost global supplies of methanol more than 375 million gal annually. This large capacity addition and smaller expansions in other parts of the world will exceed demand growth during 1988 and 1989, easing the squeeze on supplies. As the result of increased supplies, methanol prices could slip slightly in the fourth quarter. They are more likely to decline next year, however. The two plants, which started up in August, are owned and operated by Tenneco Oil Co. Processing and Marketing and by Cape Horn Methanol (CHM). The Tenneco plant, located in Pasadena, Tex., was restarted after a shutdown in 1982 when prices for methanol were low. It now is running at full capacity of 125 million gal per year. The plant uses the low-pressure process technology of Lurgi, reportedly requiring for feedstock and energy between 100,000 and 125,000 cu ft of methane per gallon. Global trade in methanol smooths out the supply and demand inconsistencies. Surging methanol demand in the U.S. and in Western Europe has been met by imports from areas where methanol production is most economical - that is, where natural gas is readily available and has no other application as high in value. Canada, Chile, and Trinidad are examples of those areas.

  14. Engineering Escherichia coli for methanol conversion.

    PubMed

    Müller, Jonas E N; Meyer, Fabian; Litsanov, Boris; Kiefer, Patrick; Potthoff, Eva; Heux, Stéphanie; Quax, Wim J; Wendisch, Volker F; Brautaset, Trygve; Portais, Jean-Charles; Vorholt, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    Methylotrophic bacteria utilize methanol and other reduced one-carbon compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy. For this purpose, these bacteria evolved a number of specialized enzymes and pathways. Here, we used a synthetic biology approach to select and introduce a set of "methylotrophy genes" into Escherichia coli based on in silico considerations and flux balance analysis to enable methanol dissimilation and assimilation. We determined that the most promising approach allowing the utilization of methanol was the implementation of NAD-dependent methanol dehydrogenase and the establishment of the ribulose monophosphate cycle by expressing the genes for hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase (Phi). To test for the best-performing enzymes in the heterologous host, a number of enzyme candidates from different donor organisms were selected and systematically analyzed for their in vitro and in vivo activities in E. coli. Among these, Mdh2, Hps and Phi originating from Bacillus methanolicus were found to be the most effective. Labeling experiments using (13)C methanol with E. coli producing these enzymes showed up to 40% incorporation of methanol into central metabolites. The presence of the endogenous glutathione-dependent formaldehyde oxidation pathway of E. coli did not adversely affect the methanol conversion rate. Taken together, the results of this study represent a major advancement towards establishing synthetic methylotrophs by gene transfer.

  15. Spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhea.

    PubMed

    Yerkes, S A; Thompson, D H; Fisher, W S

    1992-07-01

    The diagnosis of CSF rhinorrhea requires the performance of a thorough history and physical examination. Often no objective findings can be found and further evaluation will be required. In our experience, metrizamide CT cisternography yields the most information for localization of the fistula. When indicated, patients can be protected against meningitis by using prophylactic antibiotics for 4-6 weeks to allow a fistula to close spontaneously. If the fistula fails to close during this time, surgical closure with dural or muscle graft with or without waxing of the bone is the treatment of choice.

  16. Methanol: A Versatile Fuel for Immediate Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, T. B.; Lerner, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Advocates the large-scale production and use of methanol as a substitute for the diminishing reserves of low-cost petroleum resources. Describes the manufacturing process and advantages of the versatile fuel. (JR)

  17. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1990-01-01

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.13 ), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  18. Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1991-02-12

    There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.-), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

  19. BHP may scale up methanol production

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1993-06-23

    Broken Hill Pty. (BHP: Melbourne) says otherwise uneconomic gas reserves in the Timor Sea off northwest Australia could be developed if the company`s plans to commercialize a novel gas-to-methanol technology prove to be viable. BHP is building an A$70-million ($50 million) research unit in Victoria using ICI`s Leading Concept Methanol gas-to-methanol process. If this unit proves viable, it could be put on a vessel and taken to Timor Sea where BHP has oil exploration and production interests. Timor gas is not economically viable because of lack of nearby markets. The 54,000-m.t./year research plant, located at Werrbee near Melbourne, is scheduled to start production in the second half of 1994, according to BHP manager Joe Evon. The plant is being built by Davy/John Brown. Provided the economic climate is right, BHP is expected to build a world-scale methanol plant offshore.

  20. Methanol production from fermentor off-gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dale, B. E.; Moreira, A. R.

    The off gases from an acetone butanol fermentation facility are composed mainly of CO2 and H2. Such a gas stream is an ideal candidate as a feed to a methanol synthesis plant utilizing modern technology recently developed and known as the CDH-methanol process. A detailed economic analysis for the incremental cost of a methanol synthesis plant utilizing the off gases from an acetone butanol fermentation indicates a profitable rate of return of 25 to 30% under the most likely production conditions. Bench scale studies at different fermentor mixing rates indicate that the volume of gases released during the fermentation is a strong function of the agitation rate and point to a potential interaction between the volume of H2 evolved and the levels of butanol present in the final fermented broth. Such interaction may require establishing optimum operating conditions for an integrated butanol fermentation methanol synthesis plant.

  1. Advances in direct oxidation methanol fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, S.; Narayanan, S. R.; Vamos, E.; Frank, H.; Halpert, G.; Laconti, Anthony B.; Kosek, J.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Olah, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel cells that can operate directly on fuels such as methanol are attractive for low to medium power applications in view of their low weight and volume relative to other power sources. A liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell has been developed based on a proton exchange membrane electrolyte and Pt/Ru and Pt catalyzed fuel and air/O2 electrodes, respectively. The cell has been shown to deliver significant power outputs at temperatures of 60 to 90 C. The cell voltage is near 0.5 V at 300 mA/cm(exp 2) current density and an operating temperature of 90 C. A deterrent to performance appears to be methanol crossover through the membrane to the oxygen electrode. Further improvements in performance appear possible by minimizing the methanol crossover rate.

  2. Methanol in the sky with diamonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allamandola, L. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Herbst, T.

    1991-01-01

    The present of gas phase methanol in dense interstellar molecular clouds was established by radio detection of its rotational emission lines. However, the position, width, and profile of a absorption band near 1470 cm(exp -1) in the IR spectra of many dense molecular clouds strongly suggests that solid methanol is an important component of interstellar ices. In an attempt to better constrain the identification of 1470 cm(exp -1) feature, we began a program to search for other characteristic absorption bands of solid state methanol in the spectra of objects known to produce this band. One such feature is now identified in the spectra of several dense molecular clouds and its position, width, and profile fit well with those of laboratory H2O:CH3OH ices. Thus, the presence of methanol-bearing ices in space is confirmed.

  3. Solution-based deposition of ultrathin metal oxide films on metal and superconductor surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westwood, Glenn

    Solution chemical methods were used to deposit ultrathin metal oxide films on metal and superconductor surfaces. Platinum-molybdenum oxide films were deposited by spontaneous adsorption and electrodeposition of hexamolybdoplatinate, PtMO6O248-. Spectroscopic characterization by 17O and 195Pt NMR showed that the PtMo6O248- anion is stable in aqueous solution below pH 4. The interaction of this solution stable anion with Au and Ag was characterized by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. The anion was partially reduced upon adsorption on Ag, but spontaneously adsorbed on Au to form an amorphous surface phase. The electrodeposition of hexamolybdoplatinate on Au electrodes resulted in an electrode surface that was different from the spontaneously adsorbed species, in terms of composition, voltammetry, and reactivity. Cyclic voltammetry was also used to compare the reactivity of these materials for the electrooxidation of methanol. Ultrathin zirconia films were deposited on YBa2Cu3O 7-delta by alternating exposures to tetra n-propyl zirconate, Zr4(OPrn)16, and H2O in n-propanol. Physical and chemical characterization of these films was done by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and cross-section transmission electron microscopy. The zirconia films were determined to be ultrathin (<10 nm) and highly conformal to the surface of YBa2Cu3O7-delta. Metal-insulator-superconductor tunnel junctions fabricated in this fashion were characterized by current-voltage and conductivity-voltage measurements. Solution deposition from Zr4(OPrn) 16 was also used to deposit ultrathin zirconia films on gold, silver, and aluminum surfaces. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to compare the physical properties of these films. Electrical measurements showed that zirconia films on Ag and Au are not insulating, but aluminum-zirconia-aluminum capacitors fabricated by this method

  4. Assessment of the cancer potential of methanol.

    PubMed

    Cruzan, George

    2009-01-01

    There are no published cancer studies of methanol-exposed cohorts. Genotoxicity studies do not suggest carcinogenic activity from methanol exposure. Oncogenicity studies of methanol were conducted by inhalation for approximately 20 hrs/day at up to 1000 ppm in F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice (NEDO), and by incorporation into drinking water at up to 20,000 ppm in Sprague-Dawley rats (Ramazzini Foundation, by Soffritti et al.). No increased neoplasms were found in the NEDO rat and mouse inhalation studies, even at air levels (up to 1000 ppm for >19 hours/day, 7 days/week) that caused 10-fold increased blood methanol levels. The maximum dose level was 600 mg/kg/day. The breakdown of methanol to formaldehyde in rats is saturated at doses above 600 mg/kg according to Horton et al. Thus, higher inhalation exposure concentrations are not expected to lead to tumors in rats or mice. In the Soffritti et al. study there was excessive early mortality, and lung pathology (inflammation, dysplasia, or neoplasm) was present in 87-94% of those dying anytime in the study. Soffritti et al. reported lympho-immunoblastic lymphoma. There are no historical control data to which this study can be compared because this diagnosis is not used by any other pathologist in animal studies. Lung infections probably played a role in formation of the lesions called lympho-immunoblastic lymphoma in the Ramazzini methanol study. The data from genotoxicity studies, the inhalation and drinking water oncogenicity studies of methanol in rats and mice, and mode of action considerations support a conclusion that methanol is not likely to be carcinogenic in humans.

  5. Methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst composite for direct methanol fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Zelenay, Piotr

    2006-09-05

    A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having a methanol fuel supply, oxidant supply, and its membrane electrode assembly (MEA) formed of an anode electrode and a cathode electrode with a membrane therebetween, a methanol oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of Pt.sub.3Cr/C so that oxidation at the cathode of methanol that crosses from the anode through the membrane to the cathode is reduced with a concomitant increase of net electrical potential at the cathode electrode.

  6. Methanol-Tolerant Cathode Catalyst Composite For Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yimin; Zelenay, Piotr

    2006-03-21

    A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) having a methanol fuel supply, oxidant supply, and its membrane electrode assembly (MEA) formed of an anode electrode and a cathode electrode with a membrane therebetween, a methanol oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of a platinum-chromium alloy so that oxidation at the cathode of methanol that crosses from the anode through the membrane to the cathode is reduced with a concomitant increase of net electrical potential at the cathode electrode.

  7. Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) Photoionization of Small Methanol and Methanol-Water Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kostko, Oleg; Belau, Leonid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-04-24

    In this work, we report on the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuum-ultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH+(n = 1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH+, (CH3OH)2+, (CH3OH)nH+ (n = 1-9), and (CH3OH)n(H2O)H+ (n = 2-9) as a function of photon energy. With an increasein the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for the methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.

  8. Vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Musahid; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.; Belau, Leonid; Kostko, Oleg

    2008-05-12

    In this work we report on thevacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization of small methanol and methanol-water clusters. Clusters of methanol with water are generated via co-expansion of the gas phase constituents in a continuous supersonic jet expansion of methanol and water seeded in Ar. The resulting clusters are investigated by single photon ionization with tunable vacuumultraviolet synchrotron radiation and mass analyzed using reflectron mass spectrometry. Protonated methanol clusters of the form (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-12) dominate the mass spectrum below the ionization energy of the methanol monomer. With an increase in water concentration, small amounts of mixed clusters of the form (CH3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-11) are detected. The only unprotonated species observed in this work are the methanol monomer and dimer. Appearance energies are obtained from the photoionization efficiency (PIE) curves for CH3OH +, (CH 3OH)2 +, (CH3OH)nH + (n=1-9), and (CH 3OH)n(H2O)H + (n=2-9 ) as a function of photon energy. With an increase in the water content in the molecular beam, there is an enhancement of photoionization intensity for methanol dimer and protonated methanol monomer at threshold. These results are compared and contrasted to previous experimental observations.

  9. Transesterification of waste vegetable oil under pulse sonication using ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Pulse sonication effect on transesterification of waste vegetable oil was studied. • Effects of ethanol, methanol, and alcohol mixtures on FAMEs yield were evaluated. • Effect of ultrasonic intensity, power density, and its output rates were evaluated. • Alcohol mixtures resulted in higher biodiesel yields due to better solubility. - Abstract: This study reports on the effects of direct pulse sonication and the type of alcohol (methanol and ethanol) on the transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil without any external heating or mechanical mixing. Biodiesel yields and optimum process conditions for the transesterification reaction involving ethanol, methanol, and ethanol–methanol mixtures were evaluated. The effects of ultrasonic power densities (by varying sample volumes), power output rates (in W), and ultrasonic intensities (by varying the reactor size) were studied for transesterification reaction with ethanol, methanol and ethanol–methanol (50%-50%) mixtures. The optimum process conditions for ethanol or methanol based transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil were determined as: 9:1 alcohol to oil ratio, 1% wt. catalyst amount, 1–2 min reaction time at a power output rate between 75 and 150 W. It was shown that the transesterification reactions using ethanol–methanol mixtures resulted in biodiesel yields as high as >99% at lower power density and ultrasound intensity when compared to ethanol or methanol based transesterification reactions.

  10. Integrated anode structure for passive direct methanol fuel cells with neat methanol operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huijuan; Zhang, Haifeng; Chen, Peng; Guo, Jing; Yuan, Ting; Zheng, Junwei; Yang, Hui

    2014-02-01

    A microporous titanium plate based integrated anode structure (Ti-IAS) suitable for passive direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) fueled with neat methanol is reported. This anode structure incorporates a porous titanium plate as a methanol mass transfer barrier and current collector, pervaporation film for passively vaporizing methanol, vaporous methanol cavity for evenly distributing fuel, and channels for carbon dioxide venting. With the effective control of methanol delivery rate, the Ti-IAS based DMFC allows the direct use of neat methanol as the fuel source. In the meantime, the required water for methanol-oxidation reaction at the anode can also be fully recovered from the cathode with the help of the highly hydrophobic microporous layer in the cathode. DMFCs incorporating this new anode structure exhibit a power density as high as 40 mW cm-2 and a high volumetric energy density of 489 Wh L-1 operating with neat methanol and at 25 °C. Importantly, no obvious performance degradation of the passive DMFC system is observed after more than 90 h of continuous operation. The experimental results reveal that the compact DMFC based on the Ti-IAS exhibits a substantial potential as power sources for portable applications.

  11. Microfluidic distillation chip for methanol concentration detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yao-Nan; Liu, Chan-Chiung; Yang, Ruey-Jen; Ju, Wei-Jhong; Fu, Lung-Ming

    2016-03-17

    An integrated microfluidic distillation system is proposed for separating a mixed ethanol-methanol-water solution into its constituent components. The microfluidic chip is fabricated using a CO2 laser system and comprises a serpentine channel, a boiling zone, a heating zone, and a cooled collection chamber filled with de-ionized (DI) water. In the proposed device, the ethanol-methanol-water solution is injected into the microfluidic chip and driven through the serpentine channel and into the collection chamber by means of a nitrogen carrier gas. Following the distillation process, the ethanol-methanol vapor flows into the collection chamber and condenses into the DI water. The resulting solution is removed from the collection tank and reacted with a mixed indicator. Finally, the methanol concentration is inversely derived from the absorbance measurements obtained using a spectrophotometer. The experimental results show the proposed microfluidic system achieves an average methanol distillation efficiency of 97%. The practicality of the proposed device is demonstrated by detecting the methanol concentrations of two commercial fruit wines. It is shown that the measured concentration values deviate by no more than 3% from those obtained using a conventional bench top system.

  12. Order in Spontaneous Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Maye, Alexander; Hsieh, Chih-hao; Sugihara, George; Brembs, Björn

    2007-01-01

    Brains are usually described as input/output systems: they transform sensory input into motor output. However, the motor output of brains (behavior) is notoriously variable, even under identical sensory conditions. The question of whether this behavioral variability merely reflects residual deviations due to extrinsic random noise in such otherwise deterministic systems or an intrinsic, adaptive indeterminacy trait is central for the basic understanding of brain function. Instead of random noise, we find a fractal order (resembling Lévy flights) in the temporal structure of spontaneous flight maneuvers in tethered Drosophila fruit flies. Lévy-like probabilistic behavior patterns are evolutionarily conserved, suggesting a general neural mechanism underlying spontaneous behavior. Drosophila can produce these patterns endogenously, without any external cues. The fly's behavior is controlled by brain circuits which operate as a nonlinear system with unstable dynamics far from equilibrium. These findings suggest that both general models of brain function and autonomous agents ought to include biologically relevant nonlinear, endogenous behavior-initiating mechanisms if they strive to realistically simulate biological brains or out-compete other agents. PMID:17505542

  13. Genetic and physical analyses of Methylobacterium organophilum XX genes encoding methanol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Machlin, S.M.; Tam, P.E.; Bastien, C.A.; Hanson, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    When allyl alcohol was used as a suicide substrate, spontaneous mutants and UV light- and nitrous acid-generated mutants of Methylobacterium organophilum XX were selected which grew on methylamine but not on methanol. There was no detectable methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) activity in crude extracts of these mutants, yet Western blots revealed that some mutants still produced MDH protein. Complementation of 50 mutants by a cosmid gene bank of M. organophilum XX demonstrated that three major regions of the genome, each of which was separated by a minimum of 40 kilobases, were required for expression of active MDH. By subcloning and Tn5 insertion mutagenesis of subcloned fragments, at least 11 genes clustered within these three regions were subsequently identified. The identity of the MDH structural gene, which was initially determined by hybridization to the structural gene of Methylobacterium sp. strain AM1, was confirmed by Western blot analysis of an MDH-..beta..-galactosidase fusion protein.

  14. Methanol conversion to light olefins over SAPO-34. Sorption, diffusion, and catalytic reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.; Rebo, H.P.; Moljord, K.; Holmen, A.

    1999-11-01

    The catalytic conversion of methanol to lower olefins (MTO) is a way of converting natural gas and coal to chemicals via methanol. The effects of adsorption and diffusion of the reactants on methanol to olefins (MTO) and propene conversion over SAPO-34 have been studied in an oscillating microbalance reactor. The adsorption parameters of methanol and propene at reaction conditions (698 K) were determined by a pulse method, and the results were identical to the values obtained by extrapolation from low temperatures (323--398 K). Inverse uptake diffusion times were calculated form adsorption data at low temperatures, and these results were dependent on the temperature and the adsorbed amount. The inverse steady-state diffusion times calculated form the inverse uptake diffusion times were independent of the temperature and the adsorbed amount. The influence of diffusion on the reaction rates was estimated on the basis of the inverse steady-state diffusion times, using the Weisz-Prater criterion. The methanol conversion over SAPO-34 was influenced by diffusion of the reactant, while the propene conversion was not. A kinetic study revealed that both the rate constant and the site coverage of propene were much lower than that of methanol at 698 K. The deactivation behavior during the MTO reaction over SAPO-34 was studied by measuring both the adsorbed amount of methanol and the conversion at different coke contents. Catalyst deactivation was proposed to be due to a decreasing number of sites available for adsorption at high coke contents and a lower diffusivity, hence a lower effectiveness factor due to coke deposition.

  15. Coke formation and carbon atom economy of methanol-to-olefins reaction.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yingxu; Yuan, Cuiyu; Li, Jinzhe; Xu, Shutao; Zhou, You; Chen, Jingrun; Wang, Quanyi; Xu, Lei; Qi, Yue; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Zhongmin

    2012-05-01

    The methanol-to-olefins (MTO) process is becoming the most important non-petrochemical route for the production of light olefins from coal or natural gas. Maximizing the generation of the target products, ethene and propene, and minimizing the production of byproducts and coke, are major considerations in the efficient utilization of the carbon resource of methanol. In the present work, the heterogeneous catalytic conversion of methanol was evaluated by performing simultaneous measurements of the volatile products generated in the gas phase and the confined coke deposition in the catalyst phase. Real-time and complete reaction profiles were plotted to allow the comparison of carbon atom economy of methanol conversion over the catalyst SAPO-34 at varied reaction temperatures. The difference in carbon atom economy was closely related with the coke formation in the SAPO-34 catalyst. The confined coke compounds were determined. A new type of confined organics was found, and these accounted for the quick deactivation and low carbon atom economy under low-reaction-temperature conditions. Based on the carbon atom economy evaluation and coke species determination, optimized operating conditions for the MTO process are suggested; these conditions guarantee high conversion efficiency of methanol.

  16. Application of green chemistry techniques to prepare electrocatalysts for direct methanol fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kenichi; Wang, Joanna S; Wai, Chien M

    2010-03-25

    A series of green techniques for synthesizing carbon nanotube-supported platinum nanoparticles and their high electrocatalytic activity toward methanol fuel cell applications are reported. The techniques utilize either the supercritical fluid carbon dioxide or water as a medium for depositing platinum nanoparticles on surfaces of multiwalled or single-walled carbon nanotubes. The catalytic properties of the carbon nanotubes-supported Pt nanoparticle catalysts prepared by four different techniques are compared for anodic oxidation of methanol and cathodic reduction of oxygen using cyclic voltammetry. One technique using galvanic exchange of Pt(2+) in water with zerovalent iron present on the surfaces of as-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes produces a Pt catalyst that shows an unusually high catalytic activity for reduction of oxygen but a negligible activity for oxidation of methanol. This fuel-selective catalyst may have a unique application as a cathode catalyst in methanol fuel cells to alleviate the problems caused by crossover of methanol through the polymer electrolyte membrane.

  17. Electrodeposition of PdCu alloy and its application in methanol electro-oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Ming-Wei; Whang, Thou-Jen

    2013-04-01

    This study demonstrates a simple electrodeposition method to fabricate the palladium-copper alloy on an ITO coated glass (PdCu/ITO) and its application in methanol electro-oxidation. Our approaches involve the co-reduction of Pd and Cu using triethanolamine (TEA) as a complexing agent in the electroplating bath and a Pd redox replacement of Cu on the surface of the as-prepared PdCu alloy. The phase structures, alloy compositions and morphologies of catalysts are determined by X-ray diffraction, energy dispersive spectrometer and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. X-ray diffraction shows that the particle size of PdCu deposits shrink when the alloy is deposited in a TEA-contained solution. The electrocatalytic properties of PdCu alloys and Pd redox replacement modified PdCu alloys for methanol oxidation have been investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The PdCu alloy with atomic ratio of 20.5% Cu exhibits higher catalytic activity toward methanol oxidation compared with a pure Pd catalyst. PdCu alloys with smaller particle sizes associated with TEA agent and the surface confined Pd replacement are found to have enhanced catalytic performance in the electro-oxidation of methanol.

  18. Towards neat methanol operation of direct methanol fuel cells: a novel self-assembled proton exchange membrane.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Cai, Weiwei; Ma, Liying; Zhang, Yunfeng; Chen, Zhangxian; Cheng, Hansong

    2015-04-18

    We report here a novel proton exchange membrane with remarkably high methanol-permeation resistivity and excellent proton conductivity enabled by carefully designed self-assembled ionic conductive channels. A direct methanol fuel cell utilizing the membrane performs well with a 20 M methanol solution, very close to the concentration of neat methanol.

  19. Spontaneous coronary artery dissection.

    PubMed

    Giacoppo, Daniele; Capodanno, Davide; Dangas, George; Tamburino, Corrado

    2014-07-15

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a relatively rare and unexplored type of coronary disease. Although atherosclerosis, hormonal changes during pregnancy and connective tissue disorders might represent a sufficiently convincing explanation for some patients with SCAD, the many remaining cases display only a weak relationship with these causes. While on one side the clinical heterogeneity of SCAD masks a full understanding of their underlying pathophysiologic process, on the other side paucity of data and misleading presentations hamper the quick diagnosis and optimal management of this condition. A definite diagnosis of SCAD can be significantly facilitated by endovascular imaging techniques. In fact, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) overcome the limitations of coronary angiography providing detailed endovascular morphologic information. In contrast, optimal treatment strategies for SCAD still represent a burning controversial question. Herein, we review the published data examining possible causes and investigating the best therapy for SCAD in different clinical scenarios.

  20. Assessment of methanol electro-oxidation for direct methanol-air fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fritts, S.D.; Sen, R.K.

    1988-07-01

    The Office of Energy Storage and Distribution of the US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of a methanol-air fuel cell for transportation application. The approach used at Los Alamos National Laboratory converts the methanol fuel to a hydrogen-rich gas in a reformer, then operates the fuel cell on hydrogen and air. The reformer tends to be bulky (raising vehicle packaging problems), has a long startup period, and is not well suited for the transient operation required in a vehicle. Methanol, however, can be oxidized electrochemically in the fuel cell. If this process can be conducted efficiently, a direct methanol-air fuel cell can be used, which does not require a reformer. The objective of this study is to assess the potential of developing a suitable catalyst for the direct electrochemical oxidation of methanol. The primary conclusion of this study is that no acceptable catalysts exist can efficiently oxidize methanol electrochemically and have the desired cost and lifetime for vehicle applications. However, recent progress in understanding the mechanism of methanol oxidation indicates that a predictive base can be developed to search for methanol oxidation catalysts and can be used to methodically develop improved catalysts. Such an approach is strongly recommended. The study also recommends that until further progress in developing high-performance catalysts is achieved, research in cell design and testing is not warranted. 43 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Transesterification of waste vegetable oil under pulse sonication using ethanol, methanol and ethanol-methanol mixtures.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Guerra, Edith; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-12-01

    This study reports on the effects of direct pulse sonication and the type of alcohol (methanol and ethanol) on the transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil without any external heating or mechanical mixing. Biodiesel yields and optimum process conditions for the transesterification reaction involving ethanol, methanol, and ethanol-methanol mixtures were evaluated. The effects of ultrasonic power densities (by varying sample volumes), power output rates (in W), and ultrasonic intensities (by varying the reactor size) were studied for transesterification reaction with ethanol, methanol and ethanol-methanol (50%-50%) mixtures. The optimum process conditions for ethanol or methanol based transesterification reaction of waste vegetable oil were determined as: 9:1 alcohol to oil ratio, 1% wt. catalyst amount, 1-2 min reaction time at a power output rate between 75 and 150 W. It was shown that the transesterification reactions using ethanol-methanol mixtures resulted in biodiesel yields as high as >99% at lower power density and ultrasound intensity when compared to ethanol or methanol based transesterification reactions.

  2. Methanol as a gasoline extender: a critique.

    PubMed

    Wigg, E E

    1974-11-29

    The tests conducted with the three vehicles at different emission control levels suggest that, in the area of fuel economy and emissions, potential benefits with methanol blends are related to carburetion and are only significant in the case of the rich-operating cars built before emission control standards were imposed. Theoretical considerations related to methanol's leaning effect on carburetion support this conclusion. Potential advantages for methanol in these areas are therefore continuously diminishing as the older cars leave the roads. At present, these older cars use only about one-fourth of the totalc motor gasoline consumed and, before methanol could be used on a large scale, this fraction would be much smaller. The use of methanol in gasoline would almost certainly create severe product quality problems. Water contamination could lead to phase separation in the distribution system and possibly in the car tank as well, and this would require additional investment in fuel handling and blending equipment. Excess fuel volatility in hot weather may also have adverse effects on car performance if the methanol blends include typical concentrations of butanes and pentanes. Removal of these light hydrocarbon components would detract from methanol's role as a gasoline extender and if current fuel volatility specifications were maintained, its use could lead to a net loss in the total available energy for use in motor fuels. Car performance problems associated with excessively lean operation would also be expected in the case of a significant proportion of late-model cars which are adjusted to operate on lean fuel-air mixtures. If methanol does become available in large quantities, these factors suggest that it would be more practical to use it for purposes other than those related to the extending of motor gasoline, such as for gas turbines used for electric power generation. In this case, the "pure" methanol would act as a cleanburning fuel, having none of the

  3. Polyoxometalate-modified carbon nanotubes: new catalyst support for methanol electro-oxidation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Dawei; Chen, Jinhua; Tao, Wenyan; Nie, Lihua; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2006-06-20

    A new catalyst support, polyoxometalate-modified carbon nanotubes, is presented in this paper through the chemisorption between polyoxometalate and carbon. Pt and Pt-Ru nanoparticles were electrochemically deposited on polyoxometalate-modified carbon nanotubes electrodes, and their electrocatalytic properties for methanol electro-oxidation are investigated in detail. Due to the unique electrical properties of carbon nanotubes and the excellent redox properties and the high protonic conductivity of polyoxometalate, for the similar deposition charge of Pt and Pt-Ru catalysts, 1.4 times larger exchange current density, 1.5 times higher specific activity, and better cycle stabilities can be obtained at polyoxometalate-modified carbon nanotube electrodes as compared to the electrodes without polyoxometalate modification. These results show that polyoxometalate-modified carbon nanotubes as a new catalyst support have good potential application in direct methanol fuel cells.

  4. Biotechnological production of methanol from waste biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, R.; Morris, D.

    1995-12-01

    The production of methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) from waste biomass is possible through the use of genetically modified bacteria. The biomass to methanol conversion process makes use of a naturally occurring, direct aerobic enzymatic system referred to as oxidative demethylation. Methoxy groups are stripped off of lignin and lignin like plant substances (approximately fifty percent of all plant biomass) and hydrolyzed to form methanol. Since the biotech process is stoichiometric, potentially every methoxy group in the lignin feedstock can be converted to methanol fuel. Approximately 30-35% of lignin is a methoxy compound that can be converted. Biotechnological conversion could produce up to 100 gallons/ton or 20 billion gallons a year of methanol from waste biomass. Current work has focused on the genetic modification of the enzymatic conversion process to reach commercial production. The goals of this research are; increase product yields, implement an operon {open_quotes}switch{close_quotes} mechanism to exploit multiple feedstocks, and produce environmentally safe by-products. Progress on these topics will be reported.

  5. Spontaneous Ejaculations Associated with Aripiprazole

    PubMed Central

    EĞİLMEZ, Oğuzhan; ÇELİK, Mustafa; KALENDEROĞLU, Aysun

    2016-01-01

    Sexual side effects are common with antipsychotic use. Spontaneous ejaculations without sexual arousal have been previously described with several typical and atypical antipsychotics. We report the case of a man who had spontaneous ejaculations after stopping risperidone and starting 30 mg/day aripiprazole. Spontaneous ejaculations ceased 3 days after decreasing the aripiprazole dose to 15 mg/day. He denied sexual fantasies or increased sexual desire during the period in which he had spontaneous ejaculations. The partial agonistic effect of aripiprazole on D2 receptors may have augmented the mesolimbic dopaminergic pathway, which was suppressed by risperidone, causing spontaneous ejaculations in this patient. Serotoninergic effects of aripiprazole should also be considered. This unusual side effect should be questioned, particularly in patients who recieve aripiprazole after D2-blocking antipsychotics; otherwise, this side effect may cause embarrassement and noncompliance. PMID:28360773

  6. Improved Anode for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    A modified chemical composition has been devised to improve the performance of the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell. The main feature of the modified composition is the incorporation of hydrous ruthenium oxide into the anode structure. This modification can reduce the internal electrical resistance of the cell and increase the degree of utilization of the anode catalyst. As a result, a higher anode current density can be sustained with a smaller amount of anode catalyst. These improvements can translate into a smaller fuel-cell system and higher efficiency of conversion. Some background information is helpful for understanding the benefit afforded by the addition of hydrous ruthenium oxide. The anode of a direct methanol fuel cell sustains the electro-oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide in the reaction CH3OH + H2O--->CO2 + 6H(+) + 6e(-). An electrocatalyst is needed to enable this reaction to occur. The catalyst that offers the highest activity is an alloy of approximately equal numbers of atoms of the noble metals platinum and ruthenium. The anode is made of a composite material that includes high-surface-area Pt/Ru alloy particles and a proton-conducting ionomeric material. This composite is usually deposited onto a polymer-electrolyte (proton-conducting) membrane and onto an anode gas-diffusion/current-collector sheet that is subsequently bonded to the proton-conducting membrane by hot pressing. Heretofore, the areal density of noble-metal catalyst typically needed for high performance has been about 8 mg/cm2. However, not all of the catalyst has been utilized in the catalyzed electro-oxidation reaction. Increasing the degree of utilization of the catalyst would make it possible to improve the performance of the cell for a given catalyst loading and/or reduce the catalyst loading (thereby reducing the cost of the cell). The use of carbon and possibly other electronic conductors in the catalyst layer has been proposed for increasing the utilization of the

  7. 3D anodes for direct methanol fuel cells: Science and synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takmeel, Qanit

    The high specific energy density of methanol in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) makes them particularly suitable for portable applications. However, a typical DMFC membrane electrode assembly (MEA) delivers an order of magnitude less power density compared to a hydrogen fuel cell MEA. Conventional DMFCs are operated at dilute methanol concentrations to counter problems arising from the methanol crossover issue. A breakthrough in power density can be achieved if the MEA structure is fundamentally altered to enable supply of more concentrated methanol than in current DMFCs. It has been shown that the current anode designs are limited by mass transport resulting in low current density. [1] An anode, with manifold increase in surface area, for catalysis would increase the limiting current density (jL), as a result of which the power density of the fuel cell would increase. In this work, the role of layering of Pt on Ru was studied and this lay the foundation towards understanding catalytic behavior in the fuel cell anode. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), in conjunction with copper underpotential deposition (Cu-UPD) and 15 kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM), showed that by adjusting the thickness of Pt on a Ru substrate, the Fermi energy (EF) of the surface can be tailored to yield more efficient methanol electro-oxidizing catalysts. In order to increase the effective catalysis surface area, three-dimensional (3D) carbon based hierarchical structures were fabricated on which Pt-Ru catalyst was grown using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), with image processing, was used to determine the surface coverage of the carbon surfaces. CV showed that as much as hundred times the current density (j) can be achieved with such a structure as compared to a flat surface. Subsequently, mass transport limitations were studied via chronoamperometry (CA) performed in different methanol concentrations. The studies were also used to extract the rate order of

  8. Methanol Emission from Leaves (Enzymatic Detection of Gas-Phase Methanol and Relation of Methanol Fluxes to Stomatal Conductance and Leaf Development).

    PubMed Central

    Nemecek-Marshall, M.; MacDonald, R. C.; Franzen, J. J.; Wojciechowski, C. L.; Fall, R.

    1995-01-01

    We recently reported the detection of methanol emissions from leaves (R. MacDonald, R. Fall [1993] Atmos Environ 27A: 1709-1713). This could represent a substantial flux of methanol to the atmosphere. Leaf methanol production and emission have not been investigated in detail, in part because of difficulties in sampling and analyzing methanol. In this study we used an enzymatic method to convert methanol to a fluorescent product and verified that leaves from several species emit methanol. Methanol was emitted almost exclusively from the abaxial surfaces of hypostomatous leaves but from both surfaces of amphistomatous leaves, suggesting that methanol exits leaves via stomates. The role of stomatal conductance was verified in experiments in which stomates were induced to close, resulting in reduced methanol. Free methanol was detected in bean leaf extracts, ranging from 26.8 [mu]g g-1 fresh weight in young leaves to 10.0 [mu]g g-1 fresh weight in older leaves. Methanol emission was related to leaf development, generally declining with increasing leaf age after leaf expansion; this is consistent with volatilization from a cellular pool that declines in older leaves. It is possible that leaf emission could be a major source of methanol found in the atmosphere of forests. PMID:12228547

  9. Methanol sensor operated in a passive mode

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2002-01-01

    A sensor outputs a signal related to a concentration of methanol in an aqueous solution adjacent the sensor. A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is included with an anode side and a cathode side. An anode current collector supports the anode side of the MEA and has a flow channel therethrough for flowing a stream of the aqueous solution and forms a physical barrier to control access of the methanol to the anode side of the MEA. A cathode current collector supports the cathode side of the MEA and is configured for air access to the cathode side of the MEA. A current sensor is connected to measure the current in a short circuit across the sensor electrodes to provide an output signal functionally related to the concentration of methanol in the aqueous solution.

  10. Sabic; Methanol shortfall threatens MTBE growth

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-10

    This paper reports that a lack of methanol capacity in the mid-1990s could lead to shortages and limit production of methyl tertiary butyl ether, warns Abdullah Nojaidi, president of Sabic Marketing Ltd. It is estimated that world methanol demand will rise by about 5.6%/year in 1991-2000 fed by a jump of at least 20% in demand for MTBE. These averages are deceptive, because demand will explode in 1992-1993. Abdullah Nojaidi states that we are going to need every available gallon of methanol capacity to control pollution in the U.S., western and eastern Europe, Japan, and Asia...Unfortunately, new plants require long lead times, and those who want to see the right returns in advance are unlikely to have plants in place when demand starts to rise sharply in 1992 and 1993.

  11. Methanol and the productivity of tropical crops

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, T.U.

    1995-12-31

    Studies are being conducted in Trinidad and Tobago, St. Lucia and St. Kitts/Nevis to determine the effect of aqueous solutions of methanol on the growth and yield of a wide range of vegetable, field and perennial crops. The paper presents a summary of results to data for ten of the crops studied. Six of these crops, lettuce, sweet pepper, tomato, mango and breadfruit, have shown significant increases in growth or yield with methanol application, while others such as pigeon pea, rice, banana and cocoa have shown more limited responses. There appears to be some potential for the use of methanol in tropical crop production but further studies are required before this apparent potential can be harnessed.

  12. Thermally integrated staged methanol reformer and method

    DOEpatents

    Skala, Glenn William; Hart-Predmore, David James; Pettit, William Henry; Borup, Rodney Lynn

    2001-01-01

    A thermally integrated two-stage methanol reformer including a heat exchanger and first and second reactors colocated in a common housing in which a gaseous heat transfer medium circulates to carry heat from the heat exchanger into the reactors. The heat transfer medium comprises principally hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methanol vapor and water vapor formed in a first stage reforming reaction. A small portion of the circulating heat transfer medium is drawn off and reacted in a second stage reforming reaction which substantially completes the reaction of the methanol and water remaining in the drawn-off portion. Preferably, a PrOx reactor will be included in the housing upstream of the heat exchanger to supplement the heat provided by the heat exchanger.

  13. Efficient green methanol synthesis from glycerol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, Muhammad H.; Dummer, Nicholas F.; Knight, David W.; Jenkins, Robert L.; Howard, Mark; Moulijn, Jacob; Taylor, Stuart H.; Hutchings, Graham J.

    2015-12-01

    The production of biodiesel from the transesterification of plant-derived triglycerides with methanol has been commercialized extensively. Impure glycerol is obtained as a by-product at roughly one-tenth the mass of the biodiesel. Utilization of this crude glycerol is important in improving the viability of the overall process. Here we show that crude glycerol can be reacted with water over very simple basic or redox oxide catalysts to produce methanol in high yields, together with other useful chemicals, in a one-step low-pressure process. Our discovery opens up the possibility of recycling the crude glycerol produced during biodiesel manufacture. Furthermore, we show that molecules containing at least two hydroxyl groups can be converted into methanol, which demonstrates some aspects of the generality of this new chemistry.

  14. Acute toxicity of methanol to mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Helmstetter, A.; Gamerdinger, A.P.; Pruell, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    Methanol is being promoted as an alternative fuel because of the clean air benefits of reduced carbon monoxide and other by-product emissions. In the event of an accidental spill or leakage from a storage tank, there is limited data available on the impact of alternative fuels on marine ecosystems. Before considering the impact of methanol on ecosystem processes, it is necessary to establish the acute toxicity. The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) was selected for study because of its use as an indicator species of marine ecosystem health (Widdows and Donkin 1992). Our primary objective was to determine the LC-50 value of methanol to adult Mytilus edulis. We also not sublethal effects that were observed during the course of the 96-hr exposure. 16 refs., 1 fig. 3 tabs.

  15. Olefins from methanol by modified zeolites

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, T.; Takegami, Y.

    1982-11-01

    Compares the effects of modified catalysts (ZSM-34 and ZSM-5 class zeolites) on methanol conversion to olefins (MTO) with regard to olefin selectivity and cost. Presents tables with prices of olefins in the US and Japan; comparison of methanol-cracking with naphtha cracking; methanol conversion data for Type-1, Type-II and reference catalysts; hydrocarbon distribution from MTO processes; and speculative economics for MTO processes of Concept-1 and 2. Diagrams the proposed MTO process scheme. Scanning electron micrographs of the zeolite catalysts are shown. Graphs indicate the change of ethylene prices in the US since 1978 and forecast ethylene prices in several countries. Concludes that the prices of ethylene for both MTO processes examined compare favorably with products of conventional processes.

  16. Neuromuscular Functions on Experimental Acute Methanol Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Moral, Ali Reşat; Çankayalı, İlkin; Sergin, Demet; Boyacılar, Özden

    2015-01-01

    Objective The incidence of accidental or suicidal ingestion of methyl alcohol is high and methyl alcohol intoxication has high mortality. Methyl alcohol intoxication causes severe neurological sequelae and appears to be a significant problem. Methyl alcohol causes acute metabolic acidosis, optic neuropathy leading to permanent blindness, respiratory failure, circulatory failure and death. It is metabolised in the liver, and its metabolite formic acid has direct toxic effects, causing oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and increased lipid peroxidation associated with the mechanism of neurotoxicity. Methanol is known to cause acute toxicity of the central nervous system; however, the effects on peripheral neuromuscular transmission are unknown. In our study, we aimed to investigate the electrophysiological effects of experimentally induced acute methanol intoxication on neuromuscular transmission in the early period (first 24 h). Methods After approval by the Animal Experiment Ethics Committee of Ege University, the study was carried out on 10 Wistar rats, each weighing about 200 g. During electrophysiological recordings and orogastric tube insertion, the rats were anaesthetised using intra-peritoneal (IP) injection of ketamine 100 mg kg−1 and IP injection of xylazine 10 mg kg−1. The rats were given 3 g kg−1 methyl alcohol by the orogastric tube. Electrophysiological measurements from the gastrocnemius muscle were compared with baseline. Results Latency measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 0.81±0.11 ms and 0.76±0.12 ms, respectively. CMAP amplitude measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 9.85±0.98 mV and 9.99±0.40 mV, respectively. CMAP duration measurements before and 24 h after methanol injection were 9.86±0.03 ms and 9.86±0.045 ms, respectively. Conclusion It was concluded that experimental methanol intoxication in the acute phase (first 24 h) did not affect neuromuscular function. PMID:27366524

  17. Photocatalytic conversion of methane to methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, C.E.; Noceti, R.P.; D`Este, J.R.

    1995-12-31

    A long-term goal of our research group is the exploration of novel pathways for the direct oxidation of methane to liquid fuels, chemicals, and intermediates. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol is attractive. The products of reaction, methanol and hydrogen, are both commercially desirable, methanol being used as is or converted to a variety of other chemicals, and the hydrogen could be utilized in petroleum and/or chemical manufacturing. Methane is produced as a by-product of coal gasification. Depending upon reactor design and operating conditions, up to 18% of total gasifier product may be methane. In addition, there are vast proven reserves of geologic methane in the world. Unfortunately, a large fraction of these reserves are in regions where there is little local demand for methane and it is not economically feasible to transport it to a market. There is a global research effort under way in academia, industry, and government to find methods to convert methane to useful, more readily transportable and storable materials. Methanol, the initial product of methane oxidation, is a desirable product of conversion because it retains much of the original energy of the methane while satisfying transportation and storage requirements. Investigation of direct conversion of methane to transportation fuels has been an ongoing effort at PETC for over 10 years. One of the current areas of research is the conversion of methane to methanol, under mild conditions, using light, water, and a semiconductor photocatalyst. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol, is attractive. Research in the laboratory is directed toward applying the techniques developed for the photocatalytic splitting of the water and the photochemical conversion of methane.

  18. A novel process for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1992-01-01

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to study the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol (MEOH) in the liquid phase by a novel method. In previous reports, we provided evidence for a two step reaction consisting of a carbonylation reaction taking place mainly in the film'' close to a copper chromite surface followed by a hydrogenolysis reaction taking place on the surface of the copper chromite. The interaction between the two catalysts enhances the rate of methanol formation. In this quarter, we reexamined the equilibrium concentration for methyl formate and obtained data at higher loadings of copper chromite.

  19. Neat methanol fuel cell power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abens, S.; Farooque, M.

    1985-12-01

    Attention is given to a fuel cell development effort which has been directed, by ease-of-supply, low weight, and low volume criteria toward the use of undiluted methanol. Partial oxidation and internal water recovery concepts are incorporated, allowing the onboard dilution of methanol fuel through mixing with exhaust-recovered water. This scheme is successfully demonstrated for the case of a 3 kW unit employing commercial cross flow heat exchangers, as well as for a 5 kW reformer flue exhaust water recovery design with U.S. Air force baseload stationary applications. The USAF powerplant has an overall thermal efficiency of 32 percent at rated load.

  20. Environmental controls over methanol emission from leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harley, P.; Greenberg, J.; Niinemets, É.; Guenther, A.

    2007-12-01

    Methanol is found throughout the troposphere, with average concentrations second only to methane among atmospheric hydrocarbons. Proposed global methanol budgets are highly uncertain, but all agree that at least 60% of the total source arises from the terrestrial biosphere and primary emissions from plants. However, the magnitude of these emissions is also highly uncertain, and the environmental factors which control them require further elucidation. Using a temperature-controlled leaf enclosure, we measured methanol emissions from leaves of six plant species by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry, with simultaneous measurements of leaf evapotranspiration and stomatal conductance. Rates of emission at 30°C varied from 0.2 to 38 μg g (dry mass)-1 h-1, with higher rates measured on young leaves, consistent with the production of methanol via pectin demethylation in expanding foliage. On average, emissions increased by a factor of 2.3 for each 10°C increase in leaf temperature. At constant temperature, emissions were also correlated with co-varying incident photosynthetic photon flux density and rates of stomatal conductance. The data were analyzed using the emission model developed by Niinemets and Reichstein (2003a, b), with the incorporation of a methanol production term that increased exponentially with temperature. It was concluded that control of emissions, during daytime, was shared by leaf temperature and stomatal conductance, although rates of production may also vary diurnally in response to variations in leaf growth rate in expanding leaves. The model, which generally provided reasonable simulations of the measured data during the day, significantly overestimated emissions on two sets of measurements made through the night, suggesting that production rates of methanol were reduced at night, perhaps because leaf growth was reduced or possibly through a direct effect of light on production. Although the short-term dynamics of methanol emissions can

  1. Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Management

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jun Yup; Bae, Hee-Joon

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous non-traumatic intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) remains a significant cause of mortality and morbidity throughout the world. To improve the devastating course of ICH, various clinical trials for medical and surgical interventions have been conducted in the last 10 years. Recent large-scale clinical trials have reported that early intensive blood pressure reduction can be a safe and feasible strategy for ICH, and have suggested a safe target range for systolic blood pressure. While new medical therapies associated with warfarin and non-vitamin K antagonist oral anticoagulants have been developed to treat ICH, recent trials have not been able to demonstrate the overall beneficial effects of surgical intervention on mortality and functional outcomes. However, some patients with ICH may benefit from surgical management in specific clinical contexts and/or at specific times. Furthermore, clinical trials for minimally invasive surgical evacuation methods are ongoing and may provide positive evidence. Upon understanding the current guidelines for the management of ICH, clinicians can administer appropriate treatment and attempt to improve the clinical outcome of ICH. The purpose of this review is to help in the decision-making of the medical and surgical management of ICH. PMID:28178413

  2. Spontaneous breaking of supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Zumino, B.

    1981-12-01

    There has been recently a revival of interest in supersymmetric gauge theories, stimulated by the hope that supersymmetry might help in clarifying some of the questions which remain unanswered in the so called Grand Unified Theories and in particular the gauge hierarchy problem. In a Grand Unified Theory one has two widely different mass scales: the unification mass M approx. = 10/sup 15/GeV at which the unification group (e.g. SU(5)) breaks down to SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) and the mass ..mu.. approx. = 100 GeV at which SU(2) x U(1) is broken down to the U(1) of electromagnetism. There is at present no theoretical understanding of the extreme smallness of the ratio ..mu../M of these two numbers. This is the gauge hierarchy problem. This lecture attempts to review the various mechanisms for spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in gauge theories. Most of the discussions are concerned with the tree approximation, but what is presently known about radiative correction is also reviewed.

  3. 37 GHz METHANOL MASERS : HORSEMEN OF THE APOCALYPSE FOR THE CLASS II METHANOL MASER PHASE?

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingsen, S. P.; Breen, S. L.; Sobolev, A. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Caswell, J. L.; Lo, N.

    2011-12-01

    We report the results of a search for class II methanol masers at 37.7, 38.3, and 38.5 GHz toward a sample of 70 high-mass star formation regions. We primarily searched toward regions known to show emission either from the 107 GHz class II methanol maser transition, or from the 6.035 GHz excited OH transition. We detected maser emission from 13 sources in the 37.7 GHz transition, eight of these being new detections. We detected maser emission from three sources in the 38 GHz transitions, one of which is a new detection. We find that 37.7 GHz methanol masers are only associated with the most luminous 6.7 and 12.2 GHz methanol maser sources, which in turn are hypothesized to be the oldest class II methanol sources. We suggest that the 37.7 GHz methanol masers are associated with a brief evolutionary phase (of 1000-4000 years) prior to the cessation of class II methanol maser activity in the associated high-mass star formation region.

  4. A novel preparation method of Sn-modified Pt nanoparticles and application for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yongling; Su, Biquan; Zhang, Nuo; Wang, Chunming

    2008-12-01

    With polystyrene latex spheres self-assembled on ITO glass as templates, highly ordered two-dimensional (2D) Pt nanoparticles (PtNPs) were prepared by electrochemical deposition. The morphology and element composition of PtNPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrocatalytic properties of PtNPs/ITO and Sn underpotential deposition (UPD) modified PtNPs/ITO for methanol oxidation has been investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and chronoamperometry (CA). The excellent electrocatalytic activity can be observed for these catalytic systems.

  5. Effect of pH on the spontaneous synthesis of palladium nanoparticles on reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaorui; Ooki, Wataru; Kosaka, Yoshinori R.; Okonogi, Akinori; Marzun, Galina; Wagener, Philipp; Barcikowski, Stephan; Kondo, Takahiro; Nakamura, Junji

    2016-12-01

    Palladium (Pd) nanoparticles were spontaneously deposited on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) without any external reducing agents. The prepared Pd/rGO composites were then characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Spontaneous deposition occurred because of a redox reaction between the Pd precursor and rGO, which involved reduction of bivalent Pd to metallic Pd0 and oxidation of the sp2 carbon of rGO to oxygen-containing functional groups. The amount of Pd deposited on rGO varied with pH, and this was attributed to electrostatic interactions between the Pd precursor and rGO based on the results of zeta potential measurements. The importance of the redox reaction in the spontaneous deposition was demonstrated in the experiment with Zn, Ni, Cu, Ag, Pt, Pd, and Au.

  6. Spontaneous baryogenesis without baryon isocurvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Andrea; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new class of spontaneous baryogenesis models that does not produce baryon isocurvature perturbations. The baryon chemical potential in these models is independent of the field value of the baryon-generating scalar, hence the scalar field fluctuations are blocked from propagating into the baryon isocurvature. We demonstrate this mechanism in simple examples where spontaneous baryogenesis is driven by a non-canonical scalar field. The suppression of the baryon isocurvature allows spontaneous baryogenesis to be compatible even with high-scale inflation.

  7. Liquid phase methanol reactor staging process for the production of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnell, Leo W.; Perka, Alan T.; Roberts, George W.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention is a process for the production of methanol from a syngas feed containing carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Basically, the process is the combination of two liquid phase methanol reactors into a staging process, such that each reactor is operated to favor a particular reaction mechanism. In the first reactor, the operation is controlled to favor the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide, and in the second reactor, the operation is controlled so as to favor the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. This staging process results in substantial increases in methanol yield.

  8. The Acid Catalyzed Nitration of Methanol: Formation of Methyl Nitrate via Aerosol Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riffel, Brent G.; Michelsen, Rebecca R.; Iraci, Laura T.

    2004-01-01

    The liquid phase acid catalyzed reaction of methanol with nitric acid to yield methyl nitrate under atmospheric conditions has been investigated using gas phase infrared spectroscopy. This nitration reaction is expected to occur in acidic aerosol particles found in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere as highly soluble methanol and nitric acid diffuse into these aerosols. Gaseous methyl nitrate is released upon formation, suggesting that some fraction of NO(x) may he liberated from nitric acid (methyl nitrate is later photolyzed to NO(x)) before it is removed from the atmosphere by wet deposition. Thus, this reaction may have important implications for the NO(x) budget. Reactions have been initiated in 45-62 wt% H2SO4 solutions at 10.0 C. Methyl nitrate production rates increased exponentially with acidity within the acidity regime studied. Preliminary calculations suggest that the nitronium ion (NO2(+) is the active nitrating agent under these conditions. The reaction order in methanol appears to depend on the water/methanol ratio and varies from first to zeroth order under conditions investigated. The nitration is first order in nitronium at all acidities investigated. A second order rate constant, kappa(sub 2), has been calculated to be 1 x 10(exp 8)/ M s when the reaction is first order in methanol. Calculations suggest the nitration is first order in methanol under tropospheric conditions. The infinitesimal percentage of nitric acid in the nitronium ion form in this acidity regime probably makes this reaction insignificant for the upper troposphere; however, this nitration may become significant in the mid stratosphere where colder temperatures increase nitric acid solubility and higher sulfuric acid content shifts nitric acid speciation toward the nitronium ion.

  9. Spontaneous combustion of shale spoils at a sanitary landfill.

    PubMed

    Hudak, Paul F

    2002-01-01

    Shale deposits excavated from the Upper Cretaceous, Eagle Ford Formation for a sanitary landfill near Dallas, Texas spontaneously combusted. The shale is dark gray in color, with 3-4% fractional organic carbon, and no lignite seams. Gradual sifting and segregation of fine particles, having high surface area per unit volume, along with moisture trapped in the pile as it accumulated led to spontaneous combustion. Hot summer temperatures compounded the problem by heating the pile and preventing heat from efficiently venting to the atmosphere. Maximum temperatures exceeded 960 degrees F (516 degrees C) at several hot spots located approximately 4 m beneath the pile surface. The ongoing combustion problem, which has lasted for approximately 1 year, eventually will be extinguished by spreading the deposits in thin layers, and compacting them to reduce air circulation and segregation of fines.

  10. Antibacterial activity of Thymus daenensis methanolic extract.

    PubMed

    Mojab, Faraz; Poursaeed, Mahshid; Mehrgan, Hadi; Pakdaman, Shima

    2008-07-01

    Medicinal plants are potential of antimicrobial compounds. The present study deals with the antibacterial activity of methanolic extract of Thymus daenensis. Aerial parts of the plant were collected from Alvand mountainside (Hamadan, Iran) in May 2005, air-dried and extracted by methanol. The dried extract was redissolved in methanol to make a 100 mg/ml solution and then filtered. Antibacterial activity of the extract was evaluated against various Gram-positive and Gram-negatives bacteria using disk diffusion technique. Blank paper disks were loaded with 40 microl of the methanol solution and then dried up. The impregnated disks were placed on Mueller-Hinton agar inoculated with bacterial suspension equal to 0.5 McFarland. The extract inhibited the growth Gram-positive bacteria, i.e., Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus luteus, Entrococcus faecalis, Streptococcus pyogenes, but it showed no activity against Gram-negative bacteria. The most significant effect was seen against S.aureus including MRSA, which are important nosocomial pathogens. MIC90 of the extract was determined against Gram-positive bacteria (3.12 mg/ml) and 11 MRSA strain (1.56 mg/ml).

  11. Producing methanol from CO[sub 2

    SciTech Connect

    Goehna, H.; Koenig, P. )

    1994-06-01

    Year after year, large quantities of carbon dioxide are emitted to the atmosphere from a variety of sources. Solutions are sought to reduce CO[sub 2] emissions or to reconvert released CO[sub 2] into energy sources or other industrially usable substances. Methanol can be produced from CO[sub 2] and hydrogen, and can be used either as a fuel or as a chemical raw material. If used as a fuel, it would in effect have the added environmental advantage of reducing consumption of fossil fuels. Currently, methanol is produced from syngas, a mixture of H[sub 2], CO, and CO[sub 2]. CO is the main carbon source in the commercial-scale process by which methanol can be produced under competitive economics from a mixture of CO[sub 2] and hydrogen. This complex undertaking requires the development of a suitable catalyst, optimization of process parameters, and an adjustment of Lurgi's proven methanol technology to the specific requirements. This paper discusses goals for the catalyst, optimizing process parameters, adjustment of the process technology, and economic analysis.

  12. Metacridamide B methanol-d4 monosolvate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The title compound was extracted from conidia of the fungus Metarhizium acridum. Crystals were obtained as a methanol-d4 solvate. The tail part of the 4-methylhexan-2-yl group exhibits disorder over two positions, with an occupancy ratio of 0.682 (9):0.318 (9). The crystal structure confirms the abs...

  13. A methanol/air fuel cell system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asher, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    High power-density, self-regulating fuel cell develops electrical power from catalyzed reaction between methanol and atmospheric oxygen. Cells such as these are of particular interest, because they may one day offer an emission-free, extremely efficient alternative to internal-combustion engines as power source.

  14. A novel process for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1991-01-01

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to conduct studies of the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol by a novel process. In previous reports, we provided evidence for a two step reaction in series, the carbonylation reaction mainly taking place in a non-equilibrium region in the vicinity of the Cu-chromite surface, and the hydrogenolysis reaction taking place on the surface of the Cu-chromite. The synergism between the two catalysts enhances the rate of methanol formation. In this quarter, we studied the effect of pressure and temperature on the rate of MeOH synthesis. We also compared the reaction rate of a syngas feed simulated for an H{sub 2}/CO ratio from a Texaco gasifier with a methanol balanced syngas feed (H{sub 2}/CO=2). Atomic absorption analysis of solid and liquid samples for the KOMe/Cu-chromite runs was undertaken to identify the distribution of potassium at the end of the methanol synthesis runs. Modelling studies were initiated with emphasis on both kinetic and process behavior. 12 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  16. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  17. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  18. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Improvements to non-acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  19. HYDROGEN BONDING IN THE METHANOL DIMER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this work, two methanol molecules are placed in different arrangements to study hydrogen bonding in carbohydrate materials such as cellulose. Energy was calculated as a function of both hydrogen bond length and angle over wide ranges, using quantum mechanics (QM). The QM wavefunctions are analyze...

  20. Methanex, Hoechst Celanese dissolve methanol partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, G.D.L.

    1993-03-31

    One of the many joint venture alliances recently announced in the petrochemical sector is ending in divorce. Hoechst Celanese Chemical (Dallas) and Methanex Corp. (Vancouver) are in the process of dissolving the partnership they had formed to restart Hoechst Celanese's methanol plant at Clear Lake, TX. Hoechst Celanese says it is actively seeking replacement partners and has several likely prospects, while Methanex is concentrating on its other ventures. Those include its just-completed acquisition of Fletcher Challenge's (Auckland, NZ) methanol business and a joint venture with American Cyanamid to convert an ammonia plant at Fortier, LA to methanol. Methanex will still be the world's largest producer of methanol. Officially, the negotiations between Methanex and Hoechst Celanese just broke down over the last month or so,' says Steve Yurich, operations manager for the Clear Lake plant. Market sources, however, say that Methanex found itself with too many irons in the fire' and pulled out before it ran into financial or perhaps even antitrust difficulties.

  1. Methanol decomposition bottoming cycle for IC engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purohit, G.; Houseman, J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of methanol decomposition using engine exhaust heat, and examines its potential for use in the operation of passenger cars, diesel trucks, and diesel-electric locomotives. Energy economy improvements of 10-20% are calculated over the representative driving cycles without a net loss in power. Some reductions in exhaust emissions are also projected.

  2. The Relative Acidities of Water and Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrash, Henry I.

    2001-11-01

    The experimental evidence for the relative acidities of water and methanol is reviewed. Because of solvent effects, a comparison of either autoprotolysis constants or dissociation constants measured in different media does not provide a reliable indication of these relative values. The most suitable measure of the relative acidities of water and methanol is the equilibrium constant for the proton transfer between water and methoxide ion (H2O + CH3O- OHO- + CH3OH) in various water-methanol mixtures. Experimental measurements of this thermodynamic equilibrium constant, in particular the contributions of Unmack, show considerable uncertainty owing to the difficulties in estimating activity coefficients, but they strongly indicate that methanol is about twice as acidic as water. This result shows that substitution of a methyl group for a hydrogen atom does not always destabilize a negative charge on a nearby oxygen atom. The question of whether to present acidities, particularly those of solvents, in terms of dissociation constants based on concentrations rather than activities is considered. In view of the slight consideration given to the relative acidities of water and alcohols in current organic chemistry tests and the discontinuity for students caused by use of concentration-based constants in organic chemistry only, thermodynamic constants remain the most suitable way to present acidities.

  3. Methanol Steam Reformer on a Silicon Wafer

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Malen, J; Piggott, T; Morse, J; Sopchak, D; Greif, R; Grigoropoulos, C; Havstad, M; Upadhye, R

    2004-04-15

    A study of the reforming rates, heat transfer and flow through a methanol reforming catalytic microreactor fabricated on a silicon wafer are presented. Comparison of computed and measured conversion efficiencies are shown to be favorable. Concepts for insulating the reactor while maintaining small overall size and starting operation from ambient temperature are analyzed.

  4. Optimized fuel cell grade hydrogen from methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongtaek

    2003-10-01

    To evaluate reaction rates liar making hydrogen from methanol, kinetic studies of methanol decomposition, methanol steam reforming, water gas shift reaction, and CO selective oxidation have been performed. These reactions were studied in a micro reactor testing unit using a commercial Cu-ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst for the first three reactions and Pt-Fe/gamma-alumina catalyst for the last reaction. The activity tests were performed between 120˜325°C and atmospheric pressure with a range of feed rates and compositions. For methanol decomposition, water addition to the feed increased the yield of hydrogen and reduced the formation of by-products. XPS analysis of used catalyst samples and time on-stream data showed that the Cu2+ oxidation state of copper favors methanol decomposition. A simplified reaction network of 5 elementary reactions was proposed and all five rate expressions were obtained using non-linear least squares optimization, numerical integration of a one-dimensional PFR model, and extensive experimental data. Similar numerical analysis was carried out to obtain the rate expressions for methanol steam reaction, the water gas shift reaction, and CO selective oxidation. For the kinetics of the water gas shift reaction, an empirical rate expression was obtained from the experimental data. Based on a review of published work on the WGS reaction mechanism, our study found that a rate expression derived from a regenerative mechanism and another rate expression derived from adsorptive mechanism fit the experimental data equally well. For the kinetics of CO preferential oxidation, a reaction model in which three reactions (CO oxidation, H2 oxidation and the WGS reaction) occur simultaneously was chosen to predict the reactor performance. In particular the reverse water gas shift reaction had an important role when fitting the experimental data precisely and explained the selectivity decrease at higher reaction temperatures. Combining the three reactors and several

  5. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Aricò, Antonino S; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D'Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-11-24

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion(®) were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate-PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion(®) 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm(-2) vs. 64 mW·cm(-2)). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm(-2) equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm(-2) for Nafion(®) 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm² for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm² for Nafion(®) 115).

  6. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Aricò, Antonino S.; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D’Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115). PMID:26610582

  7. Real-time mass spectrometric study of the methanol crossover in a direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.T.; Wasmus, S.; Savinell, R.F.

    1996-04-01

    The products of methanol crossover through the acid-doped polybenzimidazole polymer electrolyte membrane (PBI PEM) to the cathode of a prototype direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) were analyzed using multipurpose electrochemical mass spectrometry (MPEMS) coupled to the cathode exhaust gas outlet. It was found that the methanol crossing over reacts almost quantitatively to CO{sub 2} at the cathode with the platinum of the cathode acting as a heterogeneous catalyst. The cathode open-circuit potential is inversely proportional to the amount of CO{sub 2} formed. A poisoning effect on the oxygen reduction also was found. Methods for the estimation of the methanol crossover rate at operating fuel cells are suggested.

  8. Evaluation of the Ramazzini Foundation Study of Methanol in Rats

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Evaluation of the Ramazzini Foundation Study of Methanol in Rats: A Comparison of Diagnoses by the RF Study Pathologist and a Recent NTP Review Team, summarized by George Cruzan and submitted to the Methanol Institute

  9. Spontaneous Activity in Crustacean Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Preston, James B.; Kennedy, Donald

    1962-01-01

    Single units which discharged with regular spontaneous rhythms without intentional stimulation were observed in the ventral nerve cord by intracellular recording close to the sixth abdominal ganglion. These units were divided into two groups: group A units in which interspike intervals varied less than 10 msec.; group B units in which interspike intervals varied within a range of 10 to 30 msec. Group A units maintained "constant" interspike intervals and could not be discharged by sensory inputs, while the majority of group B units could be discharged by appropriate sensory nerve stimulation. Both group A and B units discharged to direct stimulation when the stimulating and recording electrodes were placed in the same ganglionic intersegment, and directly evoked single spikes reset the spontaneous rhythm. In group B units, presynaptic volleys reset the spontaneous rhythm of some units; but in others, synaptically evoked spikes were interpolated within the spontaneous rhythm without resetting. The phenomenon of enhancement could also be demonstrated in spontaneously active units as a result of repetitive stimulation. It is concluded that endogenous pacemaker activity is responsible for much of the regular spontaneous firing observed in crayfish central neurons, and that interaction of evoked responses with such pacemaker sites can produce a variety of effects dependent upon the anatomical relationships between pacemaker and synaptic regions. PMID:14488667

  10. Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria for methanol + ethanol + water, methanol + water, and ethanol + water

    SciTech Connect

    Kurihara, Kiyofumi; Takeda, Kouichi; Kojima, Kazuo; Minoura, Tsuyoshi

    1995-05-01

    Isothermal vapor-liquid equilibria were measured for the ternary system methanol + ethanol + water and its constituent binary systems of methanol + water and ethanol + water at 323.15, 328.15, and 333.15 K. The apparatus that was used made it possible to control the measured temperature and total pressure by computer. The experimental binary data were correlated by the NRTL equation. The ternary system was predicted using the binary NRTL parameters with good accuracy.

  11. Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01

    This feasibility study includes all phases of methanol production from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The study examines: production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-day methanol production facility; potential environmental impacts of the whole project; safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol; and development of site specific cost estimates.

  12. Low-temperature ceria-electrolyte solid oxide fuel cells for efficient methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xie; Zhan, Zhongliang; Liu, Xuejiao; Wu, Hao; Wang, Shaorong; Wen, Tinglian

    Low temperature anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells with thin films of samarium-doped ceria (SDC) as electrolytes, graded porous Ni-SDC anodes and composite La 0.6Sr 0.4Co 0.2Fe 0.8O 3 (LSCF)-SDC cathodes are fabricated and tested with both hydrogen and methanol fuels. Power densities achieved with hydrogen are between 0.56 W cm -2 at 500 °C and 1.09 W cm -2 at 600 °C, and with methanol between 0.26 W cm -2 at 500 °C and 0.82 W cm -2 at 600 °C. The difference in the cell performance can be attributed to variation in the interfacial polarization resistance due to different fuel oxidation kinetics, e.g., 0.21 Ω cm 2 for methanol versus 0.10 Ω cm 2 for hydrogen at 600 °C. Further analysis suggests that the leakage current densities as high as 0.80 A cm -2 at 600 °C and 0.11 A cm -2 at 500 °C, resulting from the mixed electronic and ionic conductivity in the SDC electrolyte and thus reducing the fuel efficiency, can nonetheless help remove any carbon deposit and thereby ensure stable and coking-free operation of low temperature SOFCs in methanol fuels.

  13. Acidities of Water and Methanol in Aqueous Solution and DMSO

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Daqing

    2009-01-01

    The relative acidities of water and methanol have been a nagging issue. In gas phase, methanol is more acidic than water by 36.0 kJ/mol; however, in aqueous solution, the acidities of methanol and water are almost identical. The acidity of an acid in solution is determined by both the intrinsic gas-phase ionization Gibbs energy and the solvent…

  14. A Methanol Intoxication Outbreak From Recreational Ingestion of Fracking Fluid.

    PubMed

    Collister, David; Duff, Graham; Palatnick, Wesley; Komenda, Paul; Tangri, Navdeep; Hingwala, Jay

    2017-01-19

    Single-patient methanol intoxications are a common clinical presentation, but outbreaks are rare and usually occur in settings in which there is limited access to ethanol and methanol is consumed as a substitute. In this case report, we describe an outbreak of methanol intoxications that was challenging from a public health perspective and discuss strategies for managing such an outbreak.

  15. The Relationship among Spontaneity, Impulsivity, and Creativity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kipper, David A.; Green, Doreen J.; Prorak, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate two characteristics of spontaneity, its relationship to creativity and to impulsivity. We hypothesized a positive relationship between spontaneity and creativity, consistent with Moreno, 1953 "canon of spontaneity-creativity." We also predicted a negative relationship between spontaneity and…

  16. Torsion-rotation intensities in methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John

    Methanol exists in numerous kinds of astronomical objects featuring a wide range of local conditions. The light nature of the molecule coupled with the internal rotation of the methyl group with respect to the hydroxyl group results in a rich, strong spectrum that spans the entire far-infrared region. As a result, any modest size observational window will have a number of strong methanol transitions. This has made it the gas of choice for testing THz receivers and to extract the local physical conditions from observations covering small frequency windows. The latter has caused methanol to be dubbed the Swiss army knife of astrophysics. Methanol has been increasingly used in this capacity and will be used even more for subsequent investigations into the Herschel archive, and with SOFIA and ALMA. Interpreting physical conditions on the basis of a few methanol lines requires that the molecular data, line positions, intensities, and collision rates, be complete, consistent and accurate to a much higher level than previously required for astrophysics. The need for highly reliable data is even more critical for modeling the two classes of widespread maser action and many examples of optical pumping through the torsional bands. Observation of the torsional bands in the infrared will be a unique opportunity to directly connect JWST observations with those of Herschel, SOFIA, and ALMA. The theory for the intensities of torsion-rotation transitions in a molecule featuring a single internally rotating methyl group is well developed after 70 years of research. However, other than a recent very preliminary and not completely satisfactory investigation of a few CH3OH torsional bands, this theory has never been experimentally tested for any C3V internal rotor. More alarming is a set of recent intensity calibrated microwave measurements that showed deviations relative to calculations of up to 50% in some ground state rotational transitions commonly used by astronomers to extract

  17. Spontaneously Combustible Solids -- A Literature Search

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-05-01

    hydrides, carbides, and phosphides are incompatible with water because of thý- generation of flammable, toxic, and/or explosive products. Cesium , potassium...spontaneously flammable in moist air H Cesium Amide possible explosion on contact with water Cesium Antimony Alloy spontaneously flammable Cesium Arsenic Alloy...spontaneously flammable Cesium Bismuth spontaneously flammable Cesium , Metal spontaneously flammable in moist air at room temperature Cesitnu Oxide

  18. Depolymerization of polyethylene terephthalate in supercritical methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Motonobu; Koyamoto, Hiroshi; Kodama, Akio; Hirose, Tsutomu; Nagaoka, Shoji

    2002-11-01

    The degradation of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) in supercritical methanol was investigated with the aim of developing a process for chemical recycling of waste plastics. A batch reactor was used at temperatures of 573-623 K under an estimated pressure of 20 MPa for a reaction time of 2-120 min. PET was decomposed to its monomers, dimethyl terephthalate and ethylene glycol, by methanolysis in supercritical methanol. The reaction products were analysed using size-exclusion chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and reversed-phase liquid chromatography. The molecular weight distribution of the products was obtained as a function of reaction time. The yields of monomer components of the decomposition products including by-products were measured. Continuous kinetics analysis was performed on the experimental data.

  19. Platinum Nickel Nanowires as Methanol Oxidation Electrocatalysts

    DOE PAGES

    Alia, Shaun M.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Neyerlin, Kenneth C.; ...

    2015-08-27

    We investigated platinum(Pt) nickel (Ni) nanowires (PtNiNWs) as methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells under acidic conditions. Pt-ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles have long been the state of the art MOR catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) where Ru provides oxophilic sites, lowering the potential for carbon monoxide oxidation and the MOR onset. Ru, however, is a precious metal that has long term durability concerns. Ni/Ni oxide species offer a potential to replace Ru in MOR electrocatalysis. PtNiNWs were investigated for MOR and oxygen annealing was investigated as a route to improve catalyst performance (mass activitymore » 65% greater) and stability to potential cycling. Our results presented show that PtNiNWs offer significant promise in the area, but also result in Ni ion leaching that is a concern requiring further evaluation in fuel cells.« less

  20. Platinum Nickel Nanowires as Methanol Oxidation Electrocatalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Alia, Shaun M.; Pylypenko, Svitlana; Neyerlin, Kenneth C.; Kocha, Shyam S.; Pivovar, Bryan S.

    2015-08-27

    We investigated platinum(Pt) nickel (Ni) nanowires (PtNiNWs) as methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) catalysts in rotating disk electrode (RDE) half-cells under acidic conditions. Pt-ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles have long been the state of the art MOR catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) where Ru provides oxophilic sites, lowering the potential for carbon monoxide oxidation and the MOR onset. Ru, however, is a precious metal that has long term durability concerns. Ni/Ni oxide species offer a potential to replace Ru in MOR electrocatalysis. PtNiNWs were investigated for MOR and oxygen annealing was investigated as a route to improve catalyst performance (mass activity 65% greater) and stability to potential cycling. Our results presented show that PtNiNWs offer significant promise in the area, but also result in Ni ion leaching that is a concern requiring further evaluation in fuel cells.

  1. Stevioside methanol tetra­solvate

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yunshan; Rodenburg, Douglas L.; Ibrahim, Mohamed A.; McChesney, James D.; Avery, Mitchell A.

    2013-01-01

    Stevioside is a naturally occurring diterpenoid glycoside in Stevia rebaudiana Bertoni. The title compound, C38H60O18·4CH3OH, crystallized as its methanol tetrasolvate. Stevioside consists of an aglycone steviol (a tetra­cyclic diterpene in which the four-fused-ring system consists of three six-membered rings and one five-membered ring) and a sugar part (three glucose units). A weak intra­molecular O—H⋯O hydrogen bond occurs. In the crystal, the methanol mol­ecules participate in a two-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network parallel to b axis with the sugars and together they form a hydrophilic tunnel which encloses the lipophilic part of the molecule. PMID:23476589

  2. Rapid detection of methanol in artisanal alcoholic beverages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Goes, R. E.; Muller, M.; Fabris, J. L.

    2015-09-01

    In the industry of artisanal beverages, uncontrolled production processes may result in contaminated products with methanol, leading to risks for consumers. Owing to the similar odor of methanol and ethanol, as well as their common transparency, the distinction between them is a difficult task. Contamination may also occur deliberately due to the lower price of methanol when compared to ethanol. This paper describes a spectroscopic method for methanol detection in beverages based on Raman scattering and Principal Component Analysis. Associated with a refractometric assessment of the alcohol content, the method may be applied in field for a rapid detection of methanol presence.

  3. Compact Fuel-Cell System Would Consume Neat Methanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Kindler, Andrew; Valdez, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    In a proposed direct methanol fuel-cell electric-power-generating system, the fuel cells would consume neat methanol, in contradistinction to the dilute aqueous methanol solutions consumed in prior direct methanol fuel-cell systems. The design concept of the proposed fuel-cell system takes advantage of (1) electro-osmotic drag and diffusion processes to manage the flows of hydrogen and water between the anode and the cathode and (2) evaporative cooling for regulating temperature. The design concept provides for supplying enough water to the anodes to enable the use of neat methanol while ensuring conservation of water for the whole fuel-cell system.

  4. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission

    PubMed Central

    Eggleston, Michael S.; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C.

    2015-01-01

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35× corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼115×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼2,500× spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d2. Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, Io = qω|xo|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|xo| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency. PMID:25624503

  5. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Eggleston, Michael S; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C

    2015-02-10

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼ 200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35 × corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼ 115 ×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼ 2,500 × spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d(2). Unfortunately, at d < 10 nm, antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, I(o) = qω|x(o)|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|x(o)| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency.

  6. The methanol industry`s missed opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Stokes, C.A.

    1995-12-31

    Throughout its history the methanol industry has been backward in research and development and in industry cooperation on public image and regulatory matters. It has been extremely reticent as to the virtue of its product for new uses, especially for motor fuel. While this is perhaps understandable looking back, it is inexcusable looking forward. The industry needs to cooperate on a worldwide basis in research and market development, on the one hand, and in image-building and political influence, on the other, staying, of course, within the US and European and other regional antitrust regulations. Unless the industry develops the motor fuel market, and especially the exciting new approach through fuel cell operated EVs, to siphon off incremental capacity and keep plants running at 90% or more of capacity, it will continue to live in a price roller-coaster climate. A few low-cost producers will do reasonably well and the rest will just get along or drop out here and there along the way, as in the past. Having come so far from such a humble beginning, it is a shame not to realize the full potential that is clearly there: a potential to nearly double sales dollars without new plants and to produce from a plentiful resource, at least for the next half-century, all the methanol that can be imagined to be needed. Beyond that the industry can turn to renewable energy--the sun--via biomass growth, to make their product. In so doing, it can perhaps apply methanol as a plant growth stimulant, in effect making the product fully self-sustainable. The world needs to know what methanol can do to provide--economically and reliably--the things upon which a better life rests.

  7. Towards oil independence through renewable methanol chemistry.

    PubMed

    Olah, George A

    2013-01-02

    Recycling of CO(2) into methanol, dimethyl ether (DME), and derived fuels and materials is a feasible approach to address our carbon conundrum. It would free humankind from its dependence on fossil fuel while at the same time help mitigate the problems associated with excessive CO(2) emission. The energy needed for this carbon cycle can come from renewable sources (hydro, solar, wind) as well as atomic energy.

  8. Lightweight Stacks of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Valdez, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    An improved design concept for direct methanol fuel cells makes it possible to construct fuel-cell stacks that can weigh as little as one-third as much as do conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks of equal power. The structural-support components of the improved cells and stacks can be made of relatively inexpensive plastics. Moreover, in comparison with conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks, the improved fuel-cell stacks can be assembled, disassembled, and diagnosed for malfunctions more easily. These improvements are expected to bring portable direct methanol fuel cells and stacks closer to commercialization. In a conventional bipolar fuel-cell stack, the cells are interspersed with bipolar plates (also called biplates), which are structural components that serve to interconnect the cells and distribute the reactants (methanol and air). The cells and biplates are sandwiched between metal end plates. Usually, the stack is held together under pressure by tie rods that clamp the end plates. The bipolar stack configuration offers the advantage of very low internal electrical resistance. However, when the power output of a stack is only a few watts, the very low internal resistance of a bipolar stack is not absolutely necessary for keeping the internal power loss acceptably low.

  9. Methanol as A Tracer of Fundamental Constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshakov, S. A.; Kozlov, M. G.; Reimers, D.

    2011-09-01

    The methanol molecule CH3OH has a complex microwave spectrum with a large number of very strong lines. This spectrum includes purely rotational transitions as well as transitions with contributions of the internal degree of freedom associated with the hindered rotation of the OH group. The latter takes place due to the tunneling of hydrogen through the potential barriers between three equivalent potential minima. Such transitions are highly sensitive to changes in the electron-to-proton mass ratio, μ = m e/m p, and have different responses to μ-variations. The highest sensitivity is found for the mixed rotation-tunneling transitions at low frequencies. Observing methanol lines provides more stringent limits on the hypothetical variation of μ than ammonia observation with the same velocity resolution. We show that the best-quality radio astronomical data on methanol maser lines constrain the variability of μ in the Milky Way at the level of |Δμ/μ| < 28 × 10-9 (1σ) which is in line with the previously obtained ammonia result, |Δμ/μ| < 29 × 10-9 (1σ). This estimate can be further improved if the rest frequencies of the CH3OH microwave lines will be measured more accurately.

  10. Liquid methanol under a static electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Cassone, Giuseppe; Giaquinta, Paolo V.; Saija, Franz; Saitta, A. Marco

    2015-02-07

    We report on an ab initio molecular dynamics study of liquid methanol under the effect of a static electric field. We found that the hydrogen-bond structure of methanol is more robust and persistent for field intensities below the molecular dissociation threshold whose value (≈0.31 V/Å) turns out to be moderately larger than the corresponding estimate obtained for liquid water. A sustained ionic current, with ohmic current-voltage behavior, flows in this material for field intensities above 0.36 V/Å, as is also the case of water, but the resulting ionic conductivity (≈0.40 S cm{sup −1}) is at least one order of magnitude lower than that of water, a circumstance that evidences a lower efficiency of proton transfer processes. We surmise that this study may be relevant for the understanding of the properties and functioning of technological materials which exploit ionic conduction, such as direct-methanol fuel cells and Nafion membranes.

  11. Supercritical methanol for polyethylene terephthalate depolymerization: Observation using simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Genta, Minoru; Iwaya, Tomoko; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2007-07-01

    To apply PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol to commercial recycling, the benefits of supercritical methanol usage in PET depolymerization was investigated from the viewpoint of the reaction rate and energy demands. PET was depolymerized in a batch reactor at 573 K in supercritical methanol under 14.7 MPa and in vapor methanol under 0.98 MPa in our previous work. The main products of both reactions were the PET monomers of dimethyl terephthalate (DMT) and ethylene glycol (EG). The rate of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol was faster than that of PET depolymerization in vapor methanol. This indicates supercritical fluid is beneficial in reducing reaction time without the use of a catalyst. We depicted the simple process flow of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol and in vapor methanol, and by simulation evaluated the total heat demand of each process. In this simulation, bis-hydroxyethyl terephthalate (BHET) was used as a model component of PET. The total heat demand of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol was 2.35 x 10{sup 6} kJ/kmol Produced-DMT. That of PET depolymerization in vapor methanol was 2.84 x 10{sup 6} kJ/kmol Produced-DMT. The smaller total heat demand of PET depolymerization in supercritical methanol clearly reveals the advantage of using supercritical fluid in terms of energy savings.

  12. Neurological Complications Resulting from Non-Oral Occupational Methanol Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ji Hyun; Lee, Seung Keun; Gil, Young Eun; Ryu, Jia; Jung-Choi, Kyunghee; Kim, Hyunjoo; Choi, Jun Young; Park, Sun Ah; Lee, Hyang Woon; Yun, Ji Young

    2017-02-01

    Methanol poisoning results in neurological complications including visual disturbances, bilateral putaminal hemorrhagic necrosis, parkinsonism, cerebral edema, coma, or seizures. Almost all reported cases of methanol poisoning are caused by oral ingestion of methanol. However, recently there was an outbreak of methanol poisoning via non-oral exposure that resulted in severe neurological complications to a few workers at industrial sites in Korea. We present 3 patients who had severe neurological complications resulting from non-oral occupational methanol poisoning. Even though initial metabolic acidosis and mental changes were improved with hemodialysis, all of the 3 patients presented optic atrophy and ataxia or parkinsonism as neurological complications resulting from methanol poisoning. In order to manage it adequately, as well as to prevent it, physicians should recognize that methanol poisoning by non-oral exposure can cause neurologic complications.

  13. Associated species in vaporized methanol-formaldehyde solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Silverman, D.C.; Freeman, J.J.

    1983-07-01

    Analysis of vaporized methanolic formaldehyde (50 mol % methanol) by gas chromatography revealed a sum of mole percents of formaldehyde, water, and methanol greater than 100%. This inconsistency was not found with vaporized solutions containing 1 or 10 mol % methanol. Direct evidence for an adduct of methanol and formaldehyde (CH/sub 3/OCH/sub 2/OH) in the vapor phase was found by use of infrared spectroscopy. The spectrum exhibited an absorption at 1140 cm/sup -1/ corresponding to a C-O-C stretch. Reasonable agreement was found between the C-O-C mole percent estimated from infrared spectroscopy, the increased amount of material detected by gas chromatography, and the estimated equilibrium mole percent of the adduct CH/sub 3/OCH/sub 2/OH. These results confirm that in completely vaporized methanolic formaldehyde at 373 to 423 K, one type of adduct predominates. It contains one molecule each of formaldehyde and methanol.

  14. Neurological Complications Resulting from Non-Oral Occupational Methanol Poisoning

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Keun; Gil, Young-Eun; Kim, Hyunjoo; Choi, Jun Young

    2017-01-01

    Methanol poisoning results in neurological complications including visual disturbances, bilateral putaminal hemorrhagic necrosis, parkinsonism, cerebral edema, coma, or seizures. Almost all reported cases of methanol poisoning are caused by oral ingestion of methanol. However, recently there was an outbreak of methanol poisoning via non-oral exposure that resulted in severe neurological complications to a few workers at industrial sites in Korea. We present 3 patients who had severe neurological complications resulting from non-oral occupational methanol poisoning. Even though initial metabolic acidosis and mental changes were improved with hemodialysis, all of the 3 patients presented optic atrophy and ataxia or parkinsonism as neurological complications resulting from methanol poisoning. In order to manage it adequately, as well as to prevent it, physicians should recognize that methanol poisoning by non-oral exposure can cause neurologic complications. PMID:28049252

  15. Data mining in spontaneous reports.

    PubMed

    Bate, Andrew; Edwards, I R

    2006-03-01

    The increasing size of spontaneous report data sets and the increasing capability for screening such data due to increases in computational power has led to a recent increase in interest and use of data mining on such data. While data mining plays an important role in the analysis of spontaneous reports, there is general debate on how and when data mining should be best performed. While the cornerstone principles for data mining of spontaneous reports have been in place since the 1960s, several significant changes have occurred to make their use widespread. Superficially the Bayesian methods seem unnecessarily complex, particularly given the nature of the data, but in practice implementation in Bayesian framework gives clear benefits. There are difficulties evaluating the performance of the methods, but they work and save resources in managing large data sets. The use of neural networks allows more sophisticated pattern recognition to be performed.

  16. Spontaneous emission and absorber theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegg, David T.

    1997-01-01

    One of the long term interests of George Series was the construction of a theory of spontaneous emission which does not involve field quantisation. His approach was written in terms of atomic operators only and he drew a parallel with the Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory of radiation. By making a particular extra postulate, he was able to obtain the correct spontaneous emission rate and the Lamb shift reasonably simply and directly. An examination of his approach indicates that this postulate is physically reasonable and the need for it arises because quantisation in his theory occurs after the response of the absorber has been accounted for by means of the radiative reaction field. We review briefly an alternative absorber theory approach to spontaneous emission based on the direct action between the emitting atom and a quantised absorber, and outline some applications to more recent effects of interest in quantum optics.

  17. Spontaneous compactification and chiral fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frampton, Paul H.; Yamamoto, Katsuji

    The question is addressed of which chiral fermions survive in spontaneously compactified solutions of the generalized Einstein-Yang-Mills field equations for higher even space-time dimensions. First, we study the allowed fermion representations of SU( N) which have no gauge or gravitational chiral anomalies in arbitrary even dimension and show how to find all such representations for the case of totally antisymmetric SU( N) tensors. Second, we look explicitly at monopole-induced spontaneous compactification in six dimensions; here, interesting chiral fermions in four dimensions do not occur easily but instead require highly artificial assignments of quantum numbers under the U(1) gauge group associated with the monopole. Finally, we consider instanton-induced spontaneous compactification in eight dimensions; for this case, we may readily obtain acceptable chiral fermions in four dimensions, including Georgi's three-family SU(11) model.

  18. Novel Diamond Films Synthesis Strategy: Methanol and Argon Atmosphere by Microwave Plasma CVD Method Without Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Jiang, Caiyi; Guo, Shenghui; Zhang, Libo; Gao, Jiyun; Peng, Jinhui; Hu, Tu; Wang, Liang

    2016-09-01

    Diamond thin films are grown on silicon substrates by only using methanol and argon mixtures in microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) reactor. It is worth mentioning that the novel strategy makes the synthesis reaction works smoothly without hydrogen atmosphere, and the substrates temperature is only 500 °C. The evidence of surface morphology and thickness under different time is obtained by characterizing the samples using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffractometer (XRD) spectrum reveals that the preferential orientation of (111) plane sample is obtained. The Raman spectra indicate that the dominant component of all the samples is a diamond. Moreover, the diamond phase content of the targeted films was quantitatively analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) method, and the surface roughness of diamond films was investigated by atomic force microscope (AFM). Meanwhile, the possible synthesis mechanism of the diamond films in methanol- and argon-mixed atmosphere was discussed.

  19. High performance methanol-oxygen fuel cell with hollow fiber electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Daniel D. (Inventor); Ingham, John D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A methanol/air-oxygen fuel cell including an electrode formed by open-ended ion-exchange hollow fibers having a layer of catalyst deposited on the inner surface thereof and a first current collector in contact with the catalyst layer. A second current collector external of said fibers is provided which is immersed along with the hollow fiber electrode in an aqueous electrolyte body. Upon passage of air or oxygen through the hollow fiber electrode and introduction of methanol into the aqueous electrolyte, a steady current output is obtained. Two embodiments of the fuel cell are disclosed. In the first embodiment the second metal electrode is displaced away from the hollow fiber in the electrolyte body while in the second embodiment a spiral-wrap electrode is provided about the outer surface of the hollow fiber electrode.

  20. Efficient Ceria-Platinum Inverse Catalyst for Partial Oxidation of Methanol.

    PubMed

    Ostroverkh, Anna; Johánek, Viktor; Kúš, Peter; Šedivá, Romana; Matolín, Vladimír

    2016-06-28

    Ceria-platinum-based bilayered thin films deposited by magnetron sputtering were developed and tested in regard to their catalytic activity for methanol oxidation by employing a temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) technique. The composition and structure of the samples were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both conventional (oxide-supported metal nanoparticles [NPs]) and inverse configurations (metal with oxide overlayer) were analyzed to uncover the structural dependence of activity and selectivity of these catalysts with respect to different pathways of methanol oxidation. We clearly demonstrate that the amount of cerium oxide (ceria) loading has a profound influence on methanol oxidation reaction characteristics. Adding a noncontinuous adlayer of ceria greatly enhances the catalytic performance of platinum (Pt) in favor of partial oxidation of methanol (POM), gaining an order of magnitude in the absolute yield of hydrogen. Moreover, the undesired by-production of carbon monoxide (CO) is strongly suppressed, making the ceria-platinum inverse catalyst a great candidate for clean hydrogen production. It is suggested that the methanol oxidation process is facilitated by the synergistic effect between both components of the inverse catalyst (involving oxygen from ceria and providing a reaction site on the adjacent Pt surface) as well as by the fact that the ability of ceria to exchange oxygen (i.e., to alter the oxidation state of Ce between 3+ and 4+) during the reaction is inversely proportional to its thickness. The increased redox capability of the discontinuous ceria adlayer shifts the preferred reaction pathway from dehydrogenation of hydroxymethyl intermediate to CO in favor of its oxidation to formate.

  1. Spontaneous triplet, tubal ectopic gestation.

    PubMed Central

    Nwanodi, Oroma; Berry, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Only six cases of spontaneous, unilateral, triplet ectopic gestations have previously been reported. We now present a seventh case. The patient's prior obstetrical history was significant for a term stillbirth and a term cesarean section for breech. Quantitative betahCG was normal for gestational age; however, the increased trophoblastic mass of an inappropriately implanted multiple gestation may produce sufficient betahCG to mimic an intrauterine singleton gestation. Resolution was achieved via salpingostomy. This case is significant for being spontaneously conceived and not the result of assisted reproductive technologies. Furthermore, this case supports an association between prior cesarean section and ectopic gestation. Images Figure 1 PMID:16775922

  2. Spontaneous waves in muscle fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Stefan; Kruse, Karsten

    2007-11-01

    Mechanical oscillations are important for many cellular processes, e.g. the beating of cilia and flagella or the sensation of sound by hair cells. These dynamic states originate from spontaneous oscillations of molecular motors. A particularly clear example of such oscillations has been observed in muscle fibers under non-physiological conditions. In that case, motor oscillations lead to contraction waves along the fiber. By a macroscopic analysis of muscle fiber dynamics we find that the spontaneous waves involve non-hydrodynamic modes. A simple microscopic model of sarcomere dynamics highlights mechanical aspects of the motor dynamics and fits with the experimental observations.

  3. Flow Friction or Spontaneous Ignition?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoltzfus, Joel M.; Gallus, Timothy D.; Sparks, Kyle

    2012-01-01

    "Flow friction," a proposed ignition mechanism in oxygen systems, has proved elusive in attempts at experimental verification. In this paper, the literature regarding flow friction is reviewed and the experimental verification attempts are briefly discussed. Another ignition mechanism, a form of spontaneous combustion, is proposed as an explanation for at least some of the fire events that have been attributed to flow friction in the literature. In addition, the results of a failure analysis performed at NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility are presented, and the observations indicate that spontaneous combustion was the most likely cause of the fire in this 2000 psig (14 MPa) oxygen-enriched system.

  4. Discovery of Methanol in a Planetary Birthplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    Data from the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has recently revealed the first detection of gas-phase methanol, a derivative of methane, in a protoplanetary disk. This milestone discovery is an important step in understanding the conditions for planet formation that can lead to life-supporting planets like Earth.Planetary ChemistryOne major goal in the study of exoplanets is to find planets that orbit in their host stars habitable zones, a measure that determines whether the planet receives the right amount of sunlight to support liquid water. But theres another crucial element in the formation of a life-supporting planet: chemistry.To understand the chemistry of newly born planets, we need to study protoplanetary disks because its from these that young planets form. The elements and molecules contained in these dusty disks are what initially make up the atmospheres of planets forming within the disks.The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array under the southern sky. [ESO/B. Tafreshi]The Hunt for ComplexityThe detection of complex molecules in protoplanetary disks is an important milestone, because complex molecules are necessary to build the correct chemistry to support life. Unfortunately, detecting these molecules is very difficult, requiring observations with both high spatial resolution and high sensitivity. Thus far, though weve observed elements and simple molecules in protoplanetary disks, detections of complex molecules have been elusive with only one success before now.Luckily, we now have an observatory up to the challenge! ALMAs unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity has recently allowed a team of scientists led by Catherine Walsh (Leiden University) to observe gas-phase methanol in a protoplanetary disk for the first time. This detection was made in the disk around the young star TW Hya, and it represents one of the largest molecules that has ever been observed in a disk to date.Locating IcesThe model (purple line

  5. Electrochemical oxidation of methanol on Pt nanoparticles composited MnO 2 nanowire arrayed electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guang-Yu; Li, Hu-Lin

    2008-03-01

    By use of the membrane-template synthesis route, MnO 2 nanowire arrayed electrodes are successfully synthesized by means of the anodic deposition technique. The Pt nanoparticles composited MnO 2 nanowire arrayed electrodes (PME) are obtained through depositing Pt on MnO 2 nanowire arrayed electrode by cathode deposition technique. For comparison of electrochemical performance, Pt nanowire arrayed electrodes which have the same amount of Pt with PME are also prepared. The electro-oxidation of methanol on PME and Pt nanowire arrayed electrodes is investigated at room temperature by cyclic voltammetry, which show that about 110 mV decreased overpotential and 2.1-fold enhanced votammetric current are achieved on PME. The chronoamperometry result demonstrates that the resistance to carbon monoxide for PME is improved.

  6. A novel process for methanol synthesis. [Concurrent sythesis of methly formate and methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1992-01-01

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to conduct studies of the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol (MeOH) by a novel process. In previous reports, we provided evidence for a two-step reaction in series, the carbonylation reaction taking place mainly in a non-equilibrium region in the vicinity of the copper chromite surface, and the hydrogenolysis reaction taking place on the surface of the copper chromite. Interaction between the two catalysts enhances the rate of methanol formation. In this quarter, we investigated the effect of pore diffusion on reaction rate and obtained an expression for the rate of reaction for the methanol/methyl formate concurrent synthesis.

  7. Methanol observation of IRAS 19312+1950: A possible new type of class I methanol maser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Sobolev, Andrej M.; Salii, Svetlana V.; Zhang, Yong; Yung, Bosco H. K.; Deguchi, Shuji

    2015-10-01

    We report the result of a systematic methanol observation toward IRAS 19312+1950. The properties of the SiO, H2O, and OH masers of this object are consistent with those of mass-losing evolved stars, but some other properties are difficult to explain in the standard scheme of stellar evolution in its late stage. Interestingly, a tentative detection of radio methanol lines was suggested toward this object by a previous observation. To date, there are no confirmed detections of methanol emission towards evolved stars, so investigation of this possible detection is important to better understand the circumstellar physical/chemical environment of IRAS 19312+1950. In this study, we systematically observed multiple methanol lines of IRAS 19312+1950 in the λ = 3 mm, 7 mm, and 13 mm bands, and detected six lines including four thermal lines and two class I maser lines. We derived basic physical parameters, including kinetic temperature and relative abundances, by fitting a radiative transfer model. According to the derived excitation temperature and line profiles, a spherically expanding outflow lying at the center of the nebulosity is excluded from the possibilities for methanol emission regions. The detection of class I methanol maser emission suggests that a shock region is involved in the system of IRAS 19312+1950. If the central star of IRAS 19312+1950 is an evolved star as suggested in the past, the class I maser detected in the present observation is the first case detected in an interaction region between an evolved star outflow and ambient molecular gas.

  8. Biogenic methanol and its impacts on tropospheric oxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, Xuexi; Guenther, Alex; Holland, Elisabeth

    2003-09-01

    We use a global chemical transport model (MOZART-2) to estimate the effects of surface emissions of methanol on tropospheric oxidants. The importance of methanol in tropospheric chemistry is two fold. First, methanol has a relatively large surface emission with an estimated global emission of 70 to 350 Tg methanol/year. The estimated methanol flux is comparable to other major hydrocarbon surface emissions such as isoprene and total monoterpenes, but the chemical lifetime of methanol is several days (in the boundary layer) to a few weeks (in the upper troposphere), which is much longer than the chemical lifetime of isoprene or monoterpenes (For example, the chemical lifetime of isoprene is about 2 hours). With a surface emission of 104 to 312 Tg methanol/year (encompasses estimated uncertainty in methanol emissions), the calculation shows that on average, the inclusion of methanol emission produces approximately 1-2% increase in O3, 1-3% decrease in OH, 3-5% increase in HO2, and 3-9% increase in CH2O globally. The maximum perturbation to the oxidants occurs in the tropical upper troposphere. However, the uncertainty associated with current methanol emission estimates produces significantly different model predictions of tropospheric oxidant distributions.

  9. Student Experiments in Spontaneous Fission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becchetti, F. D.; Ying, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    Advanced undergraduate experiments utilizing a commercially available, thin spontaneous fission source are described, including studies of the energy and mass distribution of the fission fragments and their energy and angular correlation. The experiments provide a useful introduction to fission, nuclear mass equations, heavy-ion physics, and…

  10. Toddlers' Spontaneous Attention to Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baroody, Arthur J.; Li, Xia; Lai, Meng-lung

    2008-01-01

    Hannula and Lehtinen (2001, 2005) defined spontaneous focusing on numerosity (SFON) as the tendency to notice the relatively abstract attribute of number despite the presence of other attributes. According to nativists, an innate concept of one to three directs young children's attention to these "intuitive numbers" in everyday situations--even…

  11. Spontaneous dissection of the oesophagus.

    PubMed Central

    Morritt, G N; Walbaum, P R

    1980-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the oesophagus is a well-known entity. Partial or intramural rupture of the oesophagus has been described but is not so well known, and the purpose of this paper is to draw attention to this condition. The clinical presentation, radiological appearances, and treatment of two such cases are described. Images PMID:7268663

  12. Spontaneous Number Representation in Mosquitofish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dadda, Marco; Piffer, Laura; Agrillo, Christian; Bisazza, Angelo

    2009-01-01

    While there is convincing evidence that preverbal human infants and non-human primates can spontaneously represent number, considerable debate surrounds the possibility that such capacity is also present in other animals. Fish show a remarkable ability to discriminate between different numbers of social companions. Previous work has demonstrated…

  13. Methanol May Function as a Cross-Kingdom Signal

    PubMed Central

    Dorokhov, Yuri L.; Komarova, Tatiana V.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Zinovkin, Roman A.; Shindyapina, Anastasia V.; Frolova, Olga Y.; Gleba, Yuri Y.

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that leaf wounding results in the synthesis of pectin methylesterase (PME), which causes the plant to release methanol into the air. Methanol emitted by a wounded plant increases the accumulation of methanol-inducible gene mRNA and enhances antibacterial resistance as well as cell-to-cell communication, which facilitates virus spreading in neighboring plants. We concluded that methanol is a signaling molecule involved in within-plant and plant-to-plant communication. Methanol is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of methanol into toxic formaldehyde. However, recent data showed that methanol is a natural compound in normal, healthy humans. These data call into question whether human methanol is a metabolic waste product or whether methanol has specific function in humans. Here, to reveal human methanol-responsive genes (MRGs), we used suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA libraries of HeLa cells lacking ADH and exposed to methanol. This design allowed us to exclude genes involved in formaldehyde and formic acid detoxification from our analysis. We identified MRGs and revealed a correlation between increases in methanol content in the plasma and changes in human leukocyte MRG mRNA levels after fresh salad consumption by volunteers. Subsequently, we showed that the methanol generated by the pectin/PME complex in the gastrointestinal tract of mice induces the up- and downregulation of brain MRG mRNA. We used an adapted Y-maze to measure the locomotor behavior of the mice while breathing wounded plant vapors in two-choice assays. We showed that mice prefer the odor of methanol to other plant volatiles and that methanol changed MRG mRNA accumulation in the mouse brain. We hypothesize that the methanol emitted by wounded plants may have a role in plant-animal signaling. The known positive effect of plant food intake on human health suggests a role for physiological methanol in

  14. A novel process for manufacture of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1990-01-01

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to conduct studies of the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol by a novel process. During the last quarter, the effect of potassium methoxide and Cu-chromite loading on the MeOH formation rate was investigated. The rate obtained with Cu-chromite was compared to that using Cu-ZnO as catalyst. Work also continued on the modification of the experimental equipment to permit on-line monitoring of liquid and gas compositions.

  15. Single Shot Hugoniots of Toluene and Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolme, C. A.; Eakins, D. E.; Funk, D. J.; McGrane, S. D.; Moore, D. S.; Whitley, V. H.

    2009-12-01

    Ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry was used to acquire shock and particle velocities and shocked refractive indices for toluene and methanol. The liquids were driven with a shock wave that was approximately 300 ps in duration, and the data for each was acquired in a single laser shot by utilizing the Gaussian spatial profile of the drive laser beam to create a range of pressures in the samples. The Hugoniot data match well with previous shock data and with Woolfolk's "universal liquid Hugoniot." The shocked refractive indices of both liquids deviate from the Gladstone-Dale relation, the value expected exclusively from a change in density.

  16. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous. The fuel cell system also comprises a fuel supplying part including a meter which meters an amount of fuel which is used by the fuel cell, and controls the supply of fuel based on said metering.

  17. Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Ramsey, John C.

    2005-03-08

    A stack of direct methanol fuel cells exhibiting a circular footprint. A cathode and anode manifold, tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are located within the circular footprint. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet cathode manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold, where the serpentine channels of the anode are orthogonal to the serpentine channels of the cathode. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  18. World methanol situation poses challenge in process design

    SciTech Connect

    Haggin, J.

    1984-07-16

    A review is presented of the technology and economics of methanol production processes. Synthesis gas production based on methane or coal are compared. Since methane-based synthesis gas is hydrogen rich and coal-based synthesis gas is carbon rich, the combination of both processes, as suggested by the M.W. Kellogg Co., should be economically attractive. A liquid-phase synthesis in the developmental stages and two reactor configurations under consideration for its use are discussed. The Wentworth system of catalytic processing, a Lurgi process using coal and methane for methanol, a Lurgi process for utilizing methanol in a variation of the Mobil methanol-to-gasoline process, and another Lurgi process to produce a methanol fuel mixture for direct use as a motor fuel, consisting of methanol and oxygenates, are also discussed.

  19. Methanol as an alternative fuel: Economic and health effects

    SciTech Connect

    Yuecel, M.K. )

    1991-09-01

    Switching from gasoline to methanol fuels has important economic and health effects. Replacing gasoline with methanol will affect oil markets by lowering the demand for oil and thus lowering oil prices. Increased demand for the natural gas feedstock will increase natural gas prices. Because methanol is more costly than gasoline, fuel prices will also increase. On the other hand, methanol use will reduce ozone pollution and some of the health risks associated with gasoline. Considering all three markets affected by the phasing-out of gasoline, the switch to methanol results in net gains. The health benefits from lower pollution and the lives saved from the switch from gasoline to methanol are in addition to these gains. Overall, the benefits of the policy far outweigh the costs. However, the gains in the oil market, arising from the US monopsony power in the world oil market, can be captured by other, more efficient policies. 21 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Thermodynamic properties of direct methanol polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seong, Ji Yun; Bae, Young Chan; Sun, Yang Kook

    A new semi-empirical model is established to describe the cell voltage of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) as a function of current density. The model equation is validated experimental data over a wide range of a methanol concentration and temperatures. A number of existing models are semi-empirical. They, however, have a serious mathematical defect. When the current density, j, becomes zero, the equation should reduce to the open circuit voltage, E0. These models, however, do not meet the mathematical boundary condition. The proposed model focuses on very unfavorable conditions for the cell operation, i.e. low methanol solution concentrations and relatively low cell temperatures. A newly developed semi-empirical equation with reasonable boundary conditions includes the methanol crossover effect that plays a major role in determining the cell voltage of DMFC. Also, it contains methanol activity based on thermodynamic functions to represent methanol crossover effect.

  1. Pressure Effects on Combustion of Methanol and Methanol-Docecanol Droplets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okai, K.; Ono, Y.; Muriue, O.; Tsue, M.; Kono, M.; Sato, J.; Dietrich, D. L.; Williams, F. A.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research is to improve understanding of the combustion of binary fuel mixtures in the vicinity of the critical point. Fiber-supported single droplets and two-droplet arrays of methanol and of mixtures of methanol and 1-dodecanol, initially 0.9 mm in diameter, were burned in room-temperature air at pressures from 0.1 MPa to 9.0 MPa in the NASA Lewis 2.2-second drop tower. The work is a continuation of a collaborative Japan-US research effort designed to increase knowledge of high-pressure combustion of fuel sprays, relevant to application in propulsive and power-production devices such as Diesel engines. Some previous publications from this cooperative program may be cited. All of the previous experiments concerned alkanes and alkane mixtures. The new research reported here addresses alcohols and alcohol mixtures, to ascertain the degree to which previous results for alkanes extend to alcohols. There have been many previous experimental studies of methanol droplet combustion and a few of alcohol mixtures, but not at the high pressures of interest here. There is some experimental information on methanol droplet combustion at elevated pressure but none on the alcohol mixtures extending to critical pressures, as in the present study.

  2. Activation of catalysts for synthesizing methanol from synthesis gas

    DOEpatents

    Blum, David B.; Gelbein, Abraham P.

    1985-01-01

    A method for activating a methanol synthesis catalyst is disclosed. In this method, the catalyst is slurried in an inert liquid and is activated by a reducing gas stream. The activation step occurs in-situ. That is, it is conducted in the same reactor as is the subsequent step of synthesizing methanol from a methanol gas stream catalyzed by the activated catalyst still dispersed in a slurry.

  3. A novel process for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1990-01-01

    A bench-salce reactor is being used to conduct studies of the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol by a novel process. During the last quarter, we investigated the nature of the reactions involved and the nature of the Cu-chromite catalyst being used. There is evidence that methanol is formed via a two step reaction with a methyl formate intermediate rather than by the direct hydrogenation of CO. The carbonylation reaction predominantly takes place in the liquid phase while the hydrogenolysis reaction is restricted to the surface of Cu-chromite. At steady state, the carbonylation reaction taking place in the region close to the Cu-chromite surface is probably the main source of MeF. This model also explains the increased tolerance of the process to CO. A mechanistic model is proposed to explain the interaction of different species in the reaction mixture. The topography of the Cu-chromite surface is also investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. 15 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. A micro direct methanol fuel cell demonstrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Konrad; Johansson, David; Bring, Martin; Sanz-Velasco, Anke; Enoksson, Peter

    2004-09-01

    The demand for compact power sources with high energy density is increasing. A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is a renewable energy source which works at near room temperature, and allows for easier liquid fuel storage, which makes it a potential candidate. We report the design, fabrication and characterization of a self-driven DMFC made by micromachining techniques and macro-assembly. Several designs were created on the basis of state-of-the-art DMFCs. A simplified mathematical model was used mainly to design the flow channels and verify the polarization curves, which reveal the output power of a cell. Silicon was used as a substrate for the fabrication of electrodes, and the membrane electrode assembly was provided by Ion Power, Inc. A 0.25 cm2 cell showed a performance of 0.29 mW cm-2 and an open circuit voltage of 0.7 V. Ten microliters of 6 M methanol solution is sufficient to operate the cell for more than 1 h.

  5. Spontaneity of Communication in Individuals with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Hsu-Min; Carter, Mark

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an examination of issues related to spontaneity of communication in children with autism. Deficits relating to spontaneity or initiation are frequently reported in individuals with autism, particularly in relation to communication and social behavior. Nevertheless, spontaneity is not necessarily clearly conceptualized or…

  6. Synthetic gas production for methanol--current and future trends

    SciTech Connect

    Camps, J.A.; Turnbull, D.McG.

    1980-01-01

    Methanol is one of the most easily made organic compounds and is synthesized from a gaseous mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, called ''synthesis gas''. Thus the first step in the manufacture of methanol constitutes the production of synthesis gas. This paper describes various methods of producing this gas from natural gas and naphtha through reforming, coal gasification and wood gasification. Chemical plants for synthesis of methanol on industrial scales are described. Markets for methanol are reviewed, with particular attention to its use as an additive to gasoline. (Refs. 4).

  7. Computer simulation of methanol exchange dynamics around cations and anions

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Santanu; Dang, Liem X.

    2016-03-03

    In this paper, we present the first computer simulation of methanol exchange dynamics between the first and second solvation shells around different cations and anions. After water, methanol is the most frequently used solvent for ions. Methanol has different structural and dynamical properties than water, so its ion solvation process is different. To this end, we performed molecular dynamics simulations using polarizable potential models to describe methanol-methanol and ion-methanol interactions. In particular, we computed methanol exchange rates by employing the transition state theory, the Impey-Madden-McDonald method, the reactive flux approach, and the Grote-Hynes theory. We observed that methanol exchange occurs at a nanosecond time scale for Na+ and at a picosecond time scale for other ions. We also observed a trend in which, for like charges, the exchange rate is slower for smaller ions because they are more strongly bound to methanol. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. The calculations were carried out using computer resources provided by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  8. Standardized treatment of severe methanol poisoning with ethanol and hemodialysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ekins, B.R.; Rollins, D.E.; Duffy, D.P.; Gregory, M.C.

    1985-03-01

    Seven patients with methanol poisoning were treated with ethanol, hemodialysis and supportive measures. The interval between ingestion and initiation of ethanol therapy varied from 3 to 67 hours and from ingestion to dialysis from 9 to 93 hours. All patients survived, but one had permanent visual impairment. A 10% ethanol solution administered intravenously is a safe and effective antidote for severe methanol poisoning. Ethanol therapy is recommended when plasma methanol concentrations are higher than 20 mg per dl, when ingested doses are greater than 30 ml and when there is evidence of acidosis or visual abnormalities in cases of suspected methanol poisoning. 13 references, 1 figure, 2 table.

  9. Biological Methanol Production by a Type II Methanotroph Methylocystis bryophila.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjay K S; Mardina, Primata; Kim, Sang-Yong; Lee, Jung-Kul; Kim, In-Won

    2016-04-28

    Methane (CH₄) is the most abundant component in natural gas. To reduce its harmful environmental effect as a greenhouse gas, CH₄ can be utilized as a low-cost feed for the synthesis of methanol by methanotrophs. In this study, several methanotrophs were examined for their ability to produce methanol from CH₄; including Methylocella silvestris, Methylocystis bryophila, Methyloferula stellata, and Methylomonas methanica. Among these methanotrophs, M. bryophila exhibited the highest methanol production. The optimum process parameters aided in significant enhancement of methanol production up to 4.63 mM. Maximum methanol production was observed at pH 6.8, 30°C, 175 rpm, 100 mM phosphate buffer, 50 mM MgCl₂ as a methanol dehydrogenase inhibitor, 50% CH₄ concentration, 24 h of incubation, and 9 mg of dry cell mass ml(-1) inoculum load, respectively. Optimization of the process parameters, screening of methanol dehydrogenase inhibitors, and supplementation with formate resulted in significant improvements in methanol production using M. bryophila. This report suggests, for the first time, the potential of using M. bryophila for industrial methanol production from CH₄.

  10. Synergic effect of methanol and water on pine liquefaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun-Peng; Zhu, Wei-Wei; Wei, Xian-Yong; Fan, Xing; Cao, Jing-Pei; Dou, You-Quan; Zong, Zhi-Min; Zhao, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Pine liquefaction (PL) and re-liquefaction of its liquefaction residues in sub- and supercritical methanol, water or methanol/water mixed solvents (MWMSs) was investigated. The results show that isometric MWMS has the highest synergic effect on PL. Moreover, the total yield of bio-oil (BO) and conversion from pine and its residue both liquefied in the MWMS were obvious higher than those from PL in methanol (water) and re-liquefaction of its residue in water (methanol), suggesting that the interaction between the two solvents is responsible for synergic effect. This approach facilitates understanding the mechanism for biomass liquefaction in mixed solvents and developing efficient utilization process of biomass.

  11. New constraints on terrestrial and oceanic sources of atmospheric methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, D. B.; Jacob, D. J.; Custer, T. G.; de Gouw, J. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Karl, T.; Singh, H. B.; Sive, B. C.; Talbot, R. W.; Warneke, C.; Williams, J.

    2008-04-01

    We use a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to interpret new aircraft, surface, and oceanic observations of methanol in terms of the constraints that they place on the atmospheric methanol budget. Recent measurements of methanol concentrations in the ocean mixed layer (OML) imply that in situ biological production must be the main methanol source in the OML, dominating over uptake from the atmosphere. It follows that oceanic emission and uptake must be viewed as independent terms in the atmospheric methanol budget. We deduce that the marine biosphere is a large primary source (85 Tg y-1) of methanol to the atmosphere and is also a large sink (101 Tg y-1), comparable in magnitude to atmospheric oxidation by OH (88 Tg y-1). The resulting atmospheric lifetime of methanol in the model is 4.7 days. Aircraft measurements in the North American boundary layer imply that terrestrial plants are a much weaker source than presently thought, likely reflecting an overestimate of broadleaf tree emissions, and this is also generally consistent with surface measurements. We deduce a terrestrial plant source of 80 Tg y-1, comparable in magnitude to the ocean source. The aircraft measurements show a strong correlation with CO (R2=0.51-0.61). We reproduce this correlation in the model with the reduced plant source, which also confirms that the anthropogenic source of methanol must be small. Our reduced plant source also provides a better simulation of methanol observations over tropical South America.

  12. [Extraction of alpha-cypermethrin from aqueous methanol solutions].

    PubMed

    Shormanov, V K; Chigareva, E N; Belousova, O V

    2010-01-01

    Alpha cypermethrin was extracted from aqueous methanol solutions using hydrophobic organic solvents. The efficiency of extraction was shown to depend on the chemical nature of the solvent, the water to methanol ratio, and saturation of the aqueous methanol layer with an electrolyte. Optimal extraction of alpha-cypermethrin was achieved using toluene as the solvent under desalinization conditions. The extraction factor for the removal of the sought amount of alpha-cypermethrin from the water-methanol solution (4:1) using various solvents was calculated.

  13. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment IV. Health and safety aspects of the eucalypt biomass to methanol energy system

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01

    The basic eucalyptus-to-methanol energy process is described and possible health and safety risks are identified at all steps of the process. The toxicology and treatment for exposure to these substances are described and mitigating measures are proposed. The health and safety impacts and risks of the wood gasification/methanol synthesis system are compared to those of the coal liquefaction and conversion system. The scope of this report includes the health and safety risks of workers (1) in the laboratory and greenhouse, where eucalyptus seedlings are developed, (2) at the biomass plantation, where these seedlings are planted and mature trees harvested, (3) transporting these logs and chips to the refinery, (4) in the hammermill, where the logs and chips will be reduced to small particles, (5) in the methanol synthesis plant, where the wood particles will be converted to methanol, and (6) transporting and dispensing the methanol. Finally, the health and safety risks of consumers using methanol is discussed.

  14. Spontaneous acute spinal subdural hematoma: spontaneous recovery from severe paraparesis--case report and review.

    PubMed

    Payer, Michael; Agosti, Reto

    2010-11-01

    Spontaneous idiopathic acute spinal subdural hematomas are highly exceptional. Neurological symptoms are usually severe, and rapid diagnosis with MRI is mandatory. Surgical evacuation has frequently been used therapeutically; however, spontaneous recovery in mild cases has also been reported. We present a case of spontaneous recovery from severe paraparesis after spontaneous acute SSDH, and review the English-speaking literature.

  15. Speeding up spontaneous disease extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasin, Michael

    2012-02-01

    The dynamics of epidemic in a susceptible population is affected both by the random character of interactions between the individuals and by environmental variations. As a consequence, the sizes of the population groups (infected, susceptible, etc.) fluctuate in the course of evolution of the epidemic. In a small community a rare large fluctuation in the number of infected can result in extinction of the disease. We suggest a novel paradigm of controlling the epidemic, where the control field, such as vaccination, is designed to maximize the rate of spontaneous disease extinction. We show that, for a limited-scope vaccination, the optimal vaccination protocol and its impact on the epidemics have universal features: (i) the vaccine must be applied in pulses, (ii) the spontaneous disease extinction is synchronized with the vaccination. We trace this universality to general properties of the response of large fluctuations to external perturbations.

  16. Laser cooling without spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Corder, Christopher; Arnold, Brian; Metcalf, Harold

    2015-01-30

    This Letter reports the demonstration of laser cooling without spontaneous emission, and thereby addresses a significant controversy. It works by restricting the atom-light interaction to a time short compared to a cycle of absorption followed by natural decay. It is achieved by using the bichromatic force on an atomic transition with a relatively long excited state lifetime and a relatively short cooling time so that spontaneous emission effects are minimized. The observed width of the one-dimensional velocity distribution is reduced by ×2 thereby reducing the "temperature" by ×4. Moreover, our results comprise a compression in phase space because the spatial expansion of the atomic sample is limited. This accomplishment is of interest to direct laser cooling of molecules or in experiments where working space or time is limited.

  17. [Spontaneous nephro-cutaneous fistula].

    PubMed

    Bruni, R; Bartolucci, R; Biancari, F; Santoro, M

    1995-04-01

    The authors report a rare case of spontaneous nephrocutaneous fistula. The patient was asymptomatic and with a negative history for renal lithiasis, inflammation, trauma or tuberculosis. Radiological and echographical examinations permitted a complete study of the fistulous tract and the renal function; the staghorn calculi and pyelonephritis guided the decision to operate on the patient performing a nephrectomy and ureterectomy with a quick complete recovery. Biological test for micobacterium tuberculosis resulted positive after 60 days.

  18. AGGRESSIVE TREATMENT OF SPONTANEOUS PNEUMOTHORAX

    PubMed Central

    Hecker, Sydney P.; Jamplis, Robert W.; Mitchell, Sidney P.

    1962-01-01

    In analysis of the results of treatment of 48 episodes of spontaneous pneumothorax, aggressive treatment by means of closed intercostal drainage with constant suction was found to achieve the aims of therapy more effectively than conservative measures of bed rest with or without needle aspiration. In general, full expansion of the lung was more quickly restored, recurrence was of lesser incidence, the period in hospital was shorter and the time away from work was reduced. ImagesFigure 1. PMID:13905846

  19. Alzheimer's disease and methanol toxicity (part 1): chronic methanol feeding led to memory impairments and tau hyperphosphorylation in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meifeng; Lu, Jing; Miao, Junye; Rizak, Joshua; Yang, Jianzhen; Zhai, Rongwei; Zhou, Jun; Qu, Jiagui; Wang, Jianhong; Yang, Shangchuan; Ma, Yuanye; Hu, Xintian; He, Rongqiao

    2014-01-01

    Although methanol toxicity is well known for acute neurological sequelae leading to blindness or death, there is a new impetus to investigate the chronic effects of methanol exposure. These include a recently established link between formaldehyde, a methanol metabolite, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology. In the present study, mice were fed with methanol to revisit the chronic effects of methanol toxicity, especially as it pertains to AD progression. Three groups of mice (n = 9) were given either water as a control or a methanol solution (concentrations of 2% or 3.8%) over a 6-week period. The methanol-fed mice were found to have impaired spatial recognition and olfactory memory in Y-maze and olfactory memory paradigms. Immunohistochemical analysis of the mouse brains found increased neuronal tau phosphorylation in the hippocampus and an increased cellular apoptotic marker in hippocampal CA1 neurons (~10% of neurons displayed chromatin condensation) in the methanol-fed groups. Two additional in vitro experiments in mouse embryonic cerebral cortex neurons and mouse neuroblastoma N2a cells found that formaldehyde, but not methanol or the methanol end product formic acid, induced microtubule disintegration and tau protein hyperphosphorylation. The findings of the behavioral tests and immunohistochemical analysis suggested that the methanol-fed mice presented with partial AD-like symptoms. The in vitro experiments suggested that formaldehyde was most likely the detrimental component of methanol toxicity related to hippocampal tau phosphorylation and the subsequent impaired memory in the mice. These findings add to a growing body of evidence that links formaldehyde to AD pathology.

  20. Chemical mutagenesis of Gluconobacter frateurii to construct methanol-resistant mutants showing glyceric acid production from methanol-containing glycerol.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shun; Kitamoto, Dai; Habe, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    To produce glyceric acid (GA) from methanol-containing glycerol, resistance to methanol of Gluconobacter frateurii NBRC103465 was improved by chemical mutagenesis using N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. The obtained mutant Gf398 produced 6.3 g/L GA in 5% (v/v) methanol-containing 17% (w/v) glycerol medium, in which the wild-type strain neither grew nor produced GA.

  1. Bronchodilator, vasodilator and spasmolytic activities of methanolic extract of Myrtus communis L.

    PubMed

    Janbaz, K H; Nisa, M; Saqib, F; Imran, I; Zia-Ul-Haq, M; De Feo, V

    2013-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to validate some of the folkloric claims about the effectiveness of the use of a Myrtus communis L. crude methanol extract (Mc.Cr) in gastrointestinal, respiratory and vascular diseases. Mc.Cr caused complete relaxation of spontaneous and K⁺ (80 mM)-induced contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum. It caused right ward parallel shift of calcium concentration response curves. Mc.Cr exhibited relaxant effect on CCh- and K⁺ (80 mM)-induced contractions in isolated rabbit tracheal preparations. Furthermore, Mc.Cr caused relaxation of phenylephrine (1 μM)- and K⁺ (80 mM)-induced contractions in isolated rabbit aorta preparations. These effects were similar to verapamil, a standard calcium channel blocker. These findings could be the basis for explaining the spasmolytic, bronchodilator and vasodilator activities of the extract, through a possible calcium channel blocking activity.

  2. Te/Pt nanonetwork modified carbon fiber microelectrodes for methanol oxidation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsiang-Yu; Shih, Zih-Yu; Lin, Zong-Hong; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-05-17

    Te/Pt nanonetwork-decorated carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) have been fabricated and employed as anodic catalysts in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Te nanowires were prepared from tellurite ions (TeO3(2-)) through a seed-mediated growth process and were deposited onto CFMEs to form three-dimensional Te nanonetworks. The Te nanonetworks then acted as a framework and reducing agent to reduce PtCl6(2-) ions to form Te/Pt through a galvanic replacement reaction, leading to the formation of Te/PtCFMEs. By controlling the reaction time, the amount of Pt and morphology of Te/Pt nanonetworks were controlled, leading to various degrees of electrocatalytic activity. The Te/PtCFMEs provide a high electrochemical active surface area (129.2 m(2) g(-1)), good catalytic activity (1.2 A mg(-1)), high current density (20.0 mA cm(-2)), long durability, and tolerance toward the poisoning species for methanol oxidation in 0.5 M sulfuric acid containing 1 M methanol. We have further demonstrated an enhanced current density by separately using 3 and 5 Te/PtCFMEs. Our results show that the low-cost, stable, and effective Te/PtCFMEs have great potential in the fabrication of cost-effective fuel cells.

  3. Te/Pt nanonetwork modified carbon fiber microelectrodes for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsiang-Yu; Shih, Zih-Yu; Lin, Zong-Hong; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-05-01

    Te/Pt nanonetwork-decorated carbon fiber microelectrodes (CFMEs) have been fabricated and employed as anodic catalysts in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Te nanowires were prepared from tellurite ions (TeO32-) through a seed-mediated growth process and were deposited onto CFMEs to form three-dimensional Te nanonetworks. The Te nanonetworks then acted as a framework and reducing agent to reduce PtCl62- ions to form Te/Pt through a galvanic replacement reaction, leading to the formation of Te/PtCFMEs. By controlling the reaction time, the amount of Pt and morphology of Te/Pt nanonetworks were controlled, leading to various degrees of electrocatalytic activity. The Te/PtCFMEs provide a high electrochemical active surface area (129.2 m2 g-1), good catalytic activity (1.2 A mg-1), high current density (20.0 mA cm-2), long durability, and tolerance toward the poisoning species for methanol oxidation in 0.5 M sulfuric acid containing 1 M methanol. We have further demonstrated an enhanced current density by separately using 3 and 5 Te/PtCFMEs. Our results show that the low-cost, stable, and effective Te/PtCFMEs have great potential in the fabrication of cost-effective fuel cells.

  4. Spontaneous Scalarization: Dead or Alive?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berti, Emanuele; Crispino, Luis; Gerosa, Davide; Gualtieri, Leonardo; Horbatsch, Michael; Macedo, Caio; Okada da Silva, Hector; Pani, Paolo; Sotani, Hajime; Sperhake, Ulrich

    2015-04-01

    In 1993, Damour and Esposito-Farese showed that a wide class of scalar-tensor theories can pass weak-field gravitational tests and exhibit nonperturbative strong-field deviations away from General Relativity in systems involving neutron stars. These deviations are possible in the presence of ``spontaneous scalarization,'' a phase transition similar in nature to spontaneous magnetization in ferromagnets. More than twenty years after the original proposal, binary pulsar experiments have severely constrained the possibility of spontaneous scalarization occurring in nature. I will show that these experimental constraints have important implications for the torsional oscillation frequencies of neutron stars and for the so-called ``I-Love-Q'' relations in scalar-tensor theories. I will also argue that there is still hope to observe strong scalarization effects, despite the strong experimental bounds on the original mechanism. In particular, I will discuss two mechanisms that could produce strong scalarization in neutron stars: anisotropy and multiscalarization. This work was supported by NSF CAREER Award PHY-1055103.

  5. Turbulence, Spontaneous Stochasticity and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyink, Gregory

    Turbulence is well-recognized as important in the physics of climate. Turbulent mixing plays a crucial role in the global ocean circulation. Turbulence also provides a natural source of variability, which bedevils our ability to predict climate. I shall review here a recently discovered turbulence phenomenon, called ``spontaneous stochasticity'', which makes classical dynamical systems as intrinsically random as quantum mechanics. Turbulent dissipation and mixing of scalars (passive or active) is now understood to require Lagrangian spontaneous stochasticity, which can be expressed by an exact ``fluctuation-dissipation relation'' for scalar turbulence (joint work with Theo Drivas). Path-integral methods such as developed for quantum mechanics become necessary to the description. There can also be Eulerian spontaneous stochasticity of the flow fields themselves, which is intimately related to the work of Kraichnan and Leith on unpredictability of turbulent flows. This leads to problems similar to those encountered in quantum field theory. To quantify uncertainty in forecasts (or hindcasts), we can borrow from quantum field-theory the concept of ``effective actions'', which characterize climate averages by a variational principle and variances by functional derivatives. I discuss some work with Tom Haine (JHU) and Santha Akella (NASA-Goddard) to make this a practical predictive tool. More ambitious application of the effective action is possible using Rayleigh-Ritz schemes.

  6. Spontaneous Necrosis of Choroidal Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Thareja, Shalini; Rashid, Alia; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical presentations and pathological features of spontaneously necrotic choroidal melanomas. Methods The clinical and histological features of patients who underwent enucleation for uveal melanoma from 1989 to 2012 at Emory University and were found to have spontaneously necrotic choroidal melanomas were retrospectively analyzed. Results A total of 6 cases were identified. All cases had 90-100% tumor necrosis and also exhibited marked ischemic necrosis of the iris and ciliary body; 5 of 6 cases exhibited marked ischemic necrosis of the retina. The tumor consisted of melanoma ghost cells often surrounded by a zone of pigmented macrophages. Thrombi were not found in any of the cases. All of the tumors in our cases were centered around the equatorial choroid and 2 extended into the ciliary body. One of the cases exhibited a wedge-shaped infarct in a lateral aspect of the tumor. In most of the cases, microscopic areas of intact tumor cells were present in the peripheries of the tumors. Conclusions Spontaneous necrosis may occur in uveal melanoma. We believe that this occurs secondary to tumor hypoxia in the center of the tumor, followed by secondary inflammation, generalized ischemia and finally complete tumor necrosis. PMID:27175363

  7. Spontaneous Splenic Rupture in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Oryan, Ahmad; Davari, Aida; Daneshbod, Khosrow; Daneshbod, Yahya

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous rupture of spleen due to malignant melanoma is a rare situation, with only a few case reports in the literature. This study reports a previously healthy, 30-year-old man who came with chief complaint of acute abdominal pain to emergency room. On physical examination, abdominal tenderness and guarding were detected to be coincident with hypotension. Ultrasonography revealed mild splenomegaly with moderate free fluid in abdominopelvic cavity. Considering acute abdominal pain and hemodynamic instability, he underwent splenectomy with splenic rupture as the source of bleeding. Histologic examination showed diffuse infiltration by tumor. Immunohistochemical study (positive for S100, HMB45, and vimentin and negative for CK, CD10, CK20, CK7, CD30, LCA, EMA, and chromogranin) confirmed metastatic malignant melanoma. On further questioning, there was a past history of a nasal dark skin lesion which was removed two years ago with no pathologic examination. Spontaneous (nontraumatic) rupture of spleen is an uncommon situation and it happens very rarely due to neoplastic metastasis. Metastasis of malignant melanoma is one of the rare causes of the spontaneous rupture of spleen. PMID:24795827

  8. Mesoporous silica materials modified with alumina polycations as catalysts for the synthesis of dimethyl ether from methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Macina, Daniel; Piwowarska, Zofia; Tarach, Karolina; Góra-Marek, Kinga; Ryczkowski, Janusz; Chmielarz, Lucjan

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Deposition of alumina ologoctaions on mesoporous silicas modified with surface −SO{sub 3}H groups. • Alumina aggregates generated acid properties in the silica supports. • Alumina modified SBA-15 and MCF were active and selective catalysts in DME synthesis. - Abstract: Mesoporous silica materials (SBA-15 and MCF) were used as catalytic supports for the deposition of aggregated alumina species using the method consisting of the following steps: (i) anchoring 3-(mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) on the silica surface followed by (ii) oxidation of −SH to−SO{sub 3}H groups and then (iii) deposition of aluminum Keggin oligocations by ion-exchange method and (iv) calcination. The obtained samples were tested as catalysts for synthesis of dimethyl ether from methanol. The modified silicas were characterized with respect to the ordering of their porous structure (XRD), textural properties (BET), chemical composition (EDS, CHNS), structure ({sup 27}Al NMR, FTIR) and location of alumina species (EDX-TEM), surface acidity (NH{sub 3}-TPD, Py-FTIR) and thermal stability (TGA). The obtained materials were found to be active and selective catalysts for methanol dehydration to dimethyl ether (DME) in the MTD process (methanol-to-dimethyl ether).

  9. Nano-Engineered Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myung, Nosang; Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Wiberg, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Nano-engineered catalysts, and a method of fabricating them, have been developed in a continuing effort to improve the performances of direct methanol fuel cells as candidate power sources to supplant primary and secondary batteries in a variety of portable electronic products. In order to realize the potential for high energy densities (as much as 1.5 W h/g) of direct methanol fuel cells, it will be necessary to optimize the chemical compositions and geometric configurations of catalyst layers and electrode structures. High performance can be achieved when catalyst particles and electrode structures have the necessary small feature sizes (typically of the order of nanometers), large surface areas, optimal metal compositions, high porosity, and hydrophobicity. The present method involves electrodeposition of one or more catalytic metal(s) or a catalytic-metal/polytetrafluoroethylene nanocomposite on an alumina nanotemplate. The alumina nanotemplate is then dissolved, leaving the desired metal or metal/polytetrafluoroethylene-composite catalyst layer. Unlike some prior methods of making fine metal catalysts, this method does not involve processing at elevated temperature; all processing can be done at room temperature. In addition, this method involves fewer steps and is more amenable to scaling up for mass production. Alumina nanotemplates are porous alumina membranes that have been fabricated, variously, by anodizing either pure aluminum or aluminum that has been deposited on silicon by electronbeam evaporation. The diameters of the pores (7 to 300 nm), areal densities of pores (as much as 7 x 10(exp 10)sq cm), and lengths of pores (up to about 100 nm) can be tailored by selection of fabrication conditions. In a given case, the catalytic metal, catalytic metal alloy, or catalytic metal/ polytetrafluoroethylene composite is electrodeposited in the pores of the alumina nanotemplate. The dimensions of the pores, together with the electrodeposition conditions

  10. Alzheimer's disease and methanol toxicity (part 2): lessons from four rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) chronically fed methanol.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meifeng; Miao, Junye; Rizak, Joshua; Zhai, Rongwei; Wang, Zhengbo; Huma, Tanzeel; Li, Ting; Zheng, Na; Wu, Shihao; Zheng, Yingwei; Fan, Xiaona; Yang, Jianzhen; Wang, Jianhong; Yang, Shangchuan; Ma, Yuanye; Lü, Longbao; He, Rongqiao; Hu, Xintian

    2014-01-01

    A recently established link between formaldehyde, a methanol metabolite, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology has provided a new impetus to investigate the chronic effects of methanol exposure. This paper expands this investigation to the non-human primate, rhesus macaque, through the chronic feeding of young male monkeys with 3% methanol ad libitum. Variable Spatial Delay Response Tasks of the monkeys found that the methanol feeding led to persistent memory decline in the monkeys that lasted 6 months beyond the feeding regimen. This change coincided with increases in tau protein phosphorylation at residues T181 and S396 in cerebrospinal fluid during feeding as well as with increases in tau phosphorylated aggregates and amyloid plaques in four brain regions postmortem: the frontal lobe, parietal lobe, temporal lobe, and the hippocampus. Tau phosphorylation in cerebrospinal fluid was found to be dependent on methanol feeding status, but phosphorylation changes in the brain were found to be persistent 6 months after the methanol feeding stopped. This suggested the methanol feeding caused long-lasting and persistent pathological changes that were related to AD development in the monkey. Most notably, the presence of amyloid plaque formations in the monkeys highlighted a marked difference in animal systems used in AD investigations, suggesting that the innate defenses in mice against methanol toxicity may have limited previous investigations into AD pathology. Nonetheless, these findings support a growing body of evidence that links methanol and its metabolite formaldehyde to AD pathology.

  11. Mass balance research for high electrochemical performance direct methanol fuel cells with reduced methanol crossover at various operating conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Jin-Hwa; Kang, SangKyun; Sauk, Jun-Ho; Song, Inseob

    Mass balance research in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) provides a more practical method in characterizing the mass transport phenomena in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA). This method can be used to measure methanol utilization efficiency, water transport coefficient (WTC), and methanol to electricity conversion rate of a MEA in DMFCs. First, the vital design parameters of a MEA are recognized for achieving high methanol utilization efficiency with increased power density. In particular, the structural adjustment of anode diffusion layer by adding microporous layer (MPL) is a very effective way to decrease WTC with reduced methanol crossover due to the mass transfer limitation in the anode. On the other hand, the cathode MPL in the MEA design can contribute in decreasing methanol crossover. The change of structure of cathode diffusion layer is also found to be a very effective way in improving power density. In contrast, the WTC of DMFC MEAs remains virtually constant in the range of 3.4 and 3.6 irrespective of the change of the cathode GDL. The influence of operating condition on the methanol utilization efficiency, WTC, and methanol to electricity conversion rate is also presented and it is found that these mass balance properties are strongly affected by temperature, current density, methanol concentration, and the stoichiometry of fuel and air.

  12. Metabolic engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for methanol metabolism.

    PubMed

    Witthoff, Sabrina; Schmitz, Katja; Niedenführ, Sebastian; Nöh, Katharina; Noack, Stephan; Bott, Michael; Marienhagen, Jan

    2015-03-01

    Methanol is already an important carbon feedstock in the chemical industry, but it has found only limited application in biotechnological production processes. This can be mostly attributed to the inability of most microbial platform organisms to utilize methanol as a carbon and energy source. With the aim to turn methanol into a suitable feedstock for microbial production processes, we engineered the industrially important but nonmethylotrophic bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum toward the utilization of methanol as an auxiliary carbon source in a sugar-based medium. Initial oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde was achieved by heterologous expression of a methanol dehydrogenase from Bacillus methanolicus, whereas assimilation of formaldehyde was realized by implementing the two key enzymes of the ribulose monophosphate pathway of Bacillus subtilis: 3-hexulose-6-phosphate synthase and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase. The recombinant C. glutamicum strain showed an average methanol consumption rate of 1.7 ± 0.3 mM/h (mean ± standard deviation) in a glucose-methanol medium, and the culture grew to a higher cell density than in medium without methanol. In addition, [(13)C]methanol-labeling experiments revealed labeling fractions of 3 to 10% in the m + 1 mass isotopomers of various intracellular metabolites. In the background of a C. glutamicum Δald ΔadhE mutant being strongly impaired in its ability to oxidize formaldehyde to CO2, the m + 1 labeling of these intermediates was increased (8 to 25%), pointing toward higher formaldehyde assimilation capabilities of this strain. The engineered C. glutamicum strains represent a promising starting point for the development of sugar-based biotechnological production processes using methanol as an auxiliary substrate.

  13. Metabolic Engineering of Corynebacterium glutamicum for Methanol Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Witthoff, Sabrina; Schmitz, Katja; Niedenführ, Sebastian; Nöh, Katharina; Noack, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Methanol is already an important carbon feedstock in the chemical industry, but it has found only limited application in biotechnological production processes. This can be mostly attributed to the inability of most microbial platform organisms to utilize methanol as a carbon and energy source. With the aim to turn methanol into a suitable feedstock for microbial production processes, we engineered the industrially important but nonmethylotrophic bacterium Corynebacterium glutamicum toward the utilization of methanol as an auxiliary carbon source in a sugar-based medium. Initial oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde was achieved by heterologous expression of a methanol dehydrogenase from Bacillus methanolicus, whereas assimilation of formaldehyde was realized by implementing the two key enzymes of the ribulose monophosphate pathway of Bacillus subtilis: 3-hexulose-6-phosphate synthase and 6-phospho-3-hexuloisomerase. The recombinant C. glutamicum strain showed an average methanol consumption rate of 1.7 ± 0.3 mM/h (mean ± standard deviation) in a glucose-methanol medium, and the culture grew to a higher cell density than in medium without methanol. In addition, [13C]methanol-labeling experiments revealed labeling fractions of 3 to 10% in the m + 1 mass isotopomers of various intracellular metabolites. In the background of a C. glutamicum Δald ΔadhE mutant being strongly impaired in its ability to oxidize formaldehyde to CO2, the m + 1 labeling of these intermediates was increased (8 to 25%), pointing toward higher formaldehyde assimilation capabilities of this strain. The engineered C. glutamicum strains represent a promising starting point for the development of sugar-based biotechnological production processes using methanol as an auxiliary substrate. PMID:25595770

  14. The spontaneous puncture of thick liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Néel, Baptiste; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2016-11-01

    We call thick those films for which the disjoining pressure is ineffective. Water films with thickness h in the 1-10 μm range are thick, but it is also known that, paradoxically, they nucleate holes spontaneously. We have uncovered a mechanism solving the paradox. Most natural films are dirty to some extent, and we show that if a spot of dissolved substance lowers locally the surface tension of the liquid, the corresponding Marangoni stress may lead to a self-sustained instability triggering film rupture. When deposited with size a, the spot dissipates by molecular diffusion (coefficient D) along the film in a time a2 / D . Before doing so, the surface tension gradient Δσ / a between the spot center (tension σ - Δσ) and the rest of the film (tension σ) induces an inhomogeneous outward interstitial flow which digs the spot, and reinforces the tension gradient. Hence the instability, which occurs within a timescale τ √{ ρa2 h / Δσ } , with ρ the liquid density. When the Péclet number Pe =a2 / Dτ is small, diffusion regularizes the film, which remains flat: clean films don't break, while for Pe > 1 , the film punctures. This new scenario will be illustrated by several experiments.

  15. Kinetic modeling of esterification reaction of surfactin-C₁₅ in methanol solution.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Surfactin in methanol solution with acid would be spontaneously esterified into the mono- or dimethyl ester surfactin even at a temperature as low as 4 °C because there were two free carboxyl groups in the peptide loop of surfactin. Using trifluoroacetic acid as the catalyst, the esterification and the contents change in surfactin-C(15), mono- and dimethyl ester surfactin-C(15) with time were investigated at 4, 25, and 45 °C, respectively. The kinetic model was established for prediction of the esterification degree under experimental conditions. At 4, 25, and 45 °C, more than 10 % of the surfactin-C(15) in methanol solution in the presence of 0.05 % trifluoroacetic acid was changed into the esterified surfactin-C(15) after 37.6, 14.1, and 7.4 h, respectively. The maximum of intermediate of the mono-methyl ester surfactin-C(15) was observed at 4, 25, and 45 °C after 25, 10, and 5 days, respectively. Our results indicated that the time for preparation should be strictly controlled to avoid an unexpected esterification of surfactin during its storage and experimental treatment, and the kinetic results could be adopted as the reference condition for preparation of monomethyl ester surfactin-C(15).

  16. Characterization of Polyethylene-Graft-Sulfonated Polyarylsulfone Proton Exchange Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Kyu; Zhang, Gang; Nam, Changwoo; Chung, T C Mike

    2015-12-04

    This paper examines polymer film morphology and several important properties of polyethylene-graft-sulfonated polyarylene ether sulfone (PE-g-s-PAES) proton exchange membranes (PEMs) for direct methanol fuel cell applications. Due to the extreme surface energy differences between a semi-crystalline and hydrophobic PE backbone and several amorphous and hydrophilic s-PAES side chains, the PE-g-s-PAES membrane self-assembles into a unique morphology, with many proton conductive s-PAES channels embedded in the stable and tough PE matrix and a thin hydrophobic PE layer spontaneously formed on the membrane surfaces. In the bulk, these membranes show good mechanical properties (tensile strength >30 MPa, Young's modulus >1400 MPa) and low water swelling (λ < 15) even with high IEC >3 mmol/g in the s-PAES domains. On the surface, the thin hydrophobic and semi-crystalline PE layer shows some unusual barrier (protective) properties. In addition to exhibiting higher through-plane conductivity (up to 160 mS/cm) than in-plane conductivity, the PE surface layer minimizes methanol cross-over from anode to cathode with reduced fuel loss, and stops the HO• and HO₂• radicals, originally formed at the anode, entering into PEM matrix. Evidently, the thin PE surface layer provides a highly desirable protecting layer for PEMs to reduce fuel loss and increase chemical stability. Overall, the newly developed PE-g-s-PAES membranes offer a desirable set of PEM properties, including conductivity, selectivity, mechanical strength, stability, and cost-effectiveness for direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  17. Characterization of Polyethylene-Graft-Sulfonated Polyarylsulfone Proton Exchange Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Kyu; Zhang, Gang; Nam, Changwoo; Chung, T.C. Mike

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines polymer film morphology and several important properties of polyethylene-graft-sulfonated polyarylene ether sulfone (PE-g-s-PAES) proton exchange membranes (PEMs) for direct methanol fuel cell applications. Due to the extreme surface energy differences between a semi-crystalline and hydrophobic PE backbone and several amorphous and hydrophilic s-PAES side chains, the PE-g-s-PAES membrane self-assembles into a unique morphology, with many proton conductive s-PAES channels embedded in the stable and tough PE matrix and a thin hydrophobic PE layer spontaneously formed on the membrane surfaces. In the bulk, these membranes show good mechanical properties (tensile strength >30 MPa, Young’s modulus >1400 MPa) and low water swelling (λ < 15) even with high IEC >3 mmol/g in the s-PAES domains. On the surface, the thin hydrophobic and semi-crystalline PE layer shows some unusual barrier (protective) properties. In addition to exhibiting higher through-plane conductivity (up to 160 mS/cm) than in-plane conductivity, the PE surface layer minimizes methanol cross-over from anode to cathode with reduced fuel loss, and stops the HO• and HO2• radicals, originally formed at the anode, entering into PEM matrix. Evidently, the thin PE surface layer provides a highly desirable protecting layer for PEMs to reduce fuel loss and increase chemical stability. Overall, the newly developed PE-g-s-PAES membranes offer a desirable set of PEM properties, including conductivity, selectivity, mechanical strength, stability, and cost-effectiveness for direct methanol fuel cell applications. PMID:26690232

  18. Lurgi, Haldor Topsoe win Statoil methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1992-06-24

    Following intensive screening and evaluation of technologies, Statoil (Stavanger) and Conoco, partners in a major methanol project in Norway, have selected a Lurgi (Frankfurt)/Haldor Topsoe (Copenhagen) process combination for the NK2.6-billion ($423.5 million) plant. Capacity of the plant, which will become Europe's largest and one of the biggest in the world, will be enlarged to 1 million m.t./year (3,000 m.t./day) against earlier plants of 825,000 m.t./year. Conoco will have 18.125% in the venture and Statoil the remainder. Part of the financing will come from Statoil's own reserves. Engineering work is expected to begin almost immediately with completion planned for end-1996.

  19. A novel process for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1993-02-12

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to conduct studies of the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol (MeOH) in the liquid phase by a novel process. In previous reports, we provided evidence for a two step reaction in series, the carbonylation reaction mainly takng place close and the hydrogenolysis reaction taking place on the surface of the copper chromate. The interaction between the two catalyst enhances the rate of MeOH formation. In the last quarter, we showed that under present operating conditions, the methyl formate (MeOH) concentration is not in equilibrium and hence both the carboxylation and the hydrogenolysis reactions influence the rate of MEOH formation. The activities of other alkali and alkaline earth compounds as catalysts, the effect of water and the controlling reaction in the concurrent synthesis is described in this report.

  20. Mobil plans methanol plant in Nigeria

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1992-08-12

    Mobil Chemical (Houston) is in discussions with Nigerian National Petroleum Corp. (NNPC; Lagos) on a joint venture methanol plant at Port Harcourt, Nigeria. The U.S. firm has invited process owners to submit proposals for a 1-million m.t./year unit and hopes to select the technology by the end of this year. Three proposals have been submitted: Lurgi, offering its own low-pressure process; John Brown/Davy, with the ICI process; and M.W. Kellogg, proposing its own technology. Shareholding in the joint venture is yet to be decided, but it is likely to be a 50/50 tie-up. Marketing of Mobil's share or of the entire tonnage would be handled by Mobil Petrochemical International (Brussels). The plant could be onstream in late 1996.

  1. Low temperature catalyst system for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.

    1984-04-20

    This patent discloses a catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (150/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The catalyst components are used in slurry form and comprise (1) a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-ROH-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms and (2) a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. For the first component, Nic is preferred (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). For the second component, Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is preferred. The mixture is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  2. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1986-09-30

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1--6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  3. Electrolytic synthesis of methanol from CO.sub.2

    DOEpatents

    Steinberg, Meyer

    1976-01-01

    A method and system for synthesizing methanol from the CO.sub.2 in air using electric power. The CO.sub.2 is absorbed by a solution of KOH to form K.sub.2 CO.sub.3 which is electrolyzed to produce methanol, a liquid hydrocarbon fuel.

  4. Silver catalysts in the partial oxidation of methanol to formaldehyde

    SciTech Connect

    Devochkin, A.N.; Pestryakov, A.N.; Kurina, L.N.; Sakharov, A.A.

    1992-07-20

    A comparative study of the catalytic activity of supported (Ag/pumice, LNKh-M) and bulk (Ag{sub cryst}, SD, KS) catalysts for methanol oxidation was carried out. The effect of technological parameters on the partial oxidation of methanol was studied. The optimum conditions for conducting the process on the catalysts studied were determined. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  5. METHANOL: THE CURRENT STATUS OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH ISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methanol has been a topic of interest both as an environmental pollutant and as a fuel. The Clean Air Act (CAA) includes methanol in a list of 189 toxic air pollutants that the U.S. Congress identified for special consideration in the 1990 CAA Amendments. In addition, growing i...

  6. Methanol Oxidation Using Ozone on Titania-Supported Vanadium Catalyst

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone-enhanced catalytic oxidation of methanol has been conducted at mild temperatures of 100 to 250NC using V2O5/TiO2 catalyst prepared by the sol-gel method. The catalyst was characterized using XRD, surface area measurements, and temperature-programmed desorption of methanol. ...

  7. Studies on Methanol Crossover in Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Pem Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.

    1995-01-01

    The performance of liquid feed direct methanol fuel cells using various types of Nafion membranes as the solid polymer electrolyte have been studied. The rate of fuel crossover and electrical performance has been measured for cells with Nafion membranes of various thicknesses and equivalent weights. The crossover rate is found to decrease with increasing thickness and applied current. The dependence of crossover rate on current density can be understood in terms of a simple linear diffusion model which suggests that the crossover rate can be influenced by the electrode structure in addition to the membrane. The studies suggest that Nafion EW 1500 is a very promising alternate to Nafion EW 1100 for direct methanol fuel cells.

  8. Performance, methanol tolerance and stability of Fe-aminobenzimidazole derived catalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebastián, David; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Aricò, Antonino S.; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2016-07-01

    Highly active and durable non-platinum group metals (non-PGM) catalyst based on iron-nitrogen-carbon (Fe-N-C) for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) derived from pyrolyzed Fe-aminobenzimidazole (Fe-ABZIM) was synthesized by sacrificial support method (SSM), and characterized by several physical-chemical techniques: scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In half-cell electrochemical configuration, the Fe-ABZIM catalyst presented a significant improvement of ORR activity with respect to a recently reported non-PGM formulation based on Fe-aminoantipyrine, with an enhancement of half-wave potential of about 85 mV in O2-saturated sulfuric acid solution. To the moment, the gap with respect to a benchmark Pt/C catalyst was about 90 mV. The Fe-ABZIM catalyst showed a remarkably high tolerance to methanol, resulting in superior ORR performance compared to Pt/C at methanol concentrations higher than 0.02 M. In direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) good performances were also obtained. A durability test (100 h) at 90 °C, feeding 5 M methanol, was carried out. A certain decrease of performance was recorded, amounting to -0.20 mW cm-2 h-1 at the very beginning of test and -0.05 mW cm-2 h-1 at the end. However, the Fe-ABZIM is more adequate than previously reported formulations in terms of both ORR activity and stability.

  9. Microwave Spectrum of the Ethanol-Methanol Dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finneran, Ian A.; Carroll, Brandon; Mead, Griffin; Blake, Geoffrey

    2016-06-01

    The hydrogen bond donor/acceptor competition in mixed alcohol clusters remains a fundamental question in physical chemistry. Previous theoretical work on the prototype ethanol-methanol dimer has been inconclusive in predicting the energetically preferred structure. Here, we report the microwave spectrum of the ethanol-methanol dimer between 8-18 GHz, using a chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectrometer. With the aid of ab initio calculations, 36 transitions have been fit and assigned to a t-ethanol-acceptor, methanol-donor structure in an argon-backed expansion. In a helium-backed expansion, a second excited conformer has been observed, and tentatively assigned to a g-ethanol-acceptor, methanol-donor structure. No ethanol-donor, methanol-acceptor structures have been found, suggesting such structures are energetically disfavored.

  10. Regulation of methanol utilisation pathway genes in yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Hartner, Franz S; Glieder, Anton

    2006-01-01

    Methylotrophic yeasts such as Candida boidinii, Hansenula polymorpha, Pichia methanolica and Pichia pastoris are an emerging group of eukaryotic hosts for recombinant protein production with an ever increasing number of applications during the last 30 years. Their applications are linked to the use of strong methanol-inducible promoters derived from genes of the methanol utilisation pathway. These promoters are tightly regulated, highly repressed in presence of non-limiting concentrations of glucose in the medium and strongly induced if methanol is used as carbon source. Several factors involved in this tight control and their regulatory effects have been described so far. This review summarises available data about the regulation of promoters from methanol utilisation pathway genes. Furthermore, the role of cis and trans acting factors (e.g. transcription factors, glucose processing enzymes) in the expression of methanol utilisation pathway genes is reviewed both in the context of the native cell environment as well as in heterologous hosts. PMID:17169150

  11. Outdoor smog-chamber experiments: reactivity of methanol exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffries, H.E.; Sexton, K.G.; Holleman, M.S.

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of the report was to provide an experimental smog-chamber database especially designed to test photochemical kinetics mechanisms that would be used to assess the effects of methanol fuel use in automobiles. The mechanisms would be used in urban air-quality control models to investigate the advantages of large-scale use of methanol fuel in automobiles. The smog-chamber experiments were performed during three summer months. They have been added to the existing UNC database for photochemical mechanism validation and testing, bringing the total number of dual experiments in the database to over 400. Three different hydrocarbon mixtures were used: a 13-component mixture representing synthetic automobile exhaust; an 18-component mixture representing synthetic urban ambient hydrocarbons; and a 14-component mixture derived from the synthetic automobile exhaust by the addition of n-butane. Three different synthetic methanol-exhaust mixtures were used: 80% methanol/10% formaldehyde; and 100% methanol.

  12. Cardioprotective effect of spontaneous activity.

    PubMed

    Peltier, S; Novel-Chate, V; Malaisse, W J; Molnar, A; Leverve, X M; Favier, R

    2007-12-01

    In the perspective of giving a better understanding of the cardioprotective effects attributable to the tandem low caloric intake and training, Lou/C rats would be an interesting model since these animals exhibit spontaneously these two characteristics for months, without any dietary manipulations or stressor stimuli. No information was so far available on their cardiac function. Therefore, the aim of this pilot study was (i) to document cardiac function before and after ischemia in this strain, and (ii) to investigate whether spontaneous wheel-running activity can improve the ability of cardiac muscle to recover its function after an ischemic period. Cardiac mechanical and metabolic functions were measured in isolated Langendorff hearts from Wistar sedentary, Lou/C sedentary, and Lou/C wheel-running male rats submitted to a 20-min low-flow ischemia and 20-min reperfusion. In Lou/C sedentary rats, rate-pressure product, an index of cardiac work, was decreased before ischemia as compared to Wistar sedentary animals (- 24 %, p < 0.05). After ischemia, cardiac mechanical function recovery did not significantly differ between these two groups. Nevertheless, flux of non-oxidative glycolysis was lower before and after ischemia in Lou/C sedentary animals than in Wistar sedentary rats. In Lou/C rats, during normoxic perfusion, wheel-running activity significantly decreased heart rate (- 15 %), oxygen consumption (- 2.2 %) and cardiac efficiency (- 37 %), whereas coronary flow and flux of non-oxidative glycolysis were significantly increased (+ 15 % and + 263 %, respectively). After ischemia, recovery of cardiac mechanical function and cardiac efficiency were improved in Lou/C wheel-running rats versus Lou/C sedentary animals (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the impact of ischemia-reperfusion is similar between Lou/C- and Wistar sedentary rats. Spontaneous wheel-running activity decreases cardiac efficiency before ischemia and confers a protection against ischemia- and

  13. Protective effect of Urtica dioica methanol extract against experimentally induced urinary calculi in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haiying; Li, Ning; Li, Kun; Li, Peng

    2014-12-01

    Renal calculi formation is one of the most common urological disorders. Urinary stone disease is a common disease, which affects 10‑12% of the population in industrialized countries. In males, the highest prevalence of the disease occurs between the age of 20 and 40 years, while in females, the highest incidence of the disease occurs later. Previous studies have shown that long‑term exposure to oxalate is toxic to renal epithelial cells and results in oxidative stress. In the present study, a methanolic extract of aerial parts of Urtica dioica was screened for antiurolithiatic activity against ethylene glycol and ammonium chloride‑induced calcium oxalate renal stones in male rats. In the control rats, ethylene glycol and ammonium chloride administration was observed to cause an increase in urinary calcium, oxalate and creatinine levels, as well as an increase in renal calcium and oxalate deposition. Histopathological observations revealed calcium oxalate microcrystal deposits in the kidney sections of the rats treated with ethylene glycol and ammonium chloride, indicating the induction of lithiasis. In the test rats, treatment with the methanolic extract of Urtica dioica was found to decrease the elevated levels of urinary calcium, oxalate and creatinine, and significantly decrease the renal deposition of calcium and oxalate. Furthermore, renal histological observations revealed a significant reduction in calcium oxalate crystal deposition in the test rats. Phytochemical analysis of the Urtica dioica extract was also performed using liquid chromatography‑electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection, to determine the chemical composition of the extract. The eight chemical constituents identified in the extract were protocatechuic acid, salicylic acid, luteolin, gossypetin, rutin, kaempferol‑3‑O‑rutinoside, kaempferol‑3‑O‑glucoside and chlorogenic acid. In conclusion

  14. Ultrafine particle deposition in subjects with asthma.

    PubMed

    Chalupa, David C; Morrow, Paul E; Oberdörster, Günter; Utell, Mark J; Frampton, Mark W

    2004-06-01

    Ambient air particles in the ultrafine size range (diameter < 100 nm) may contribute to the health effects of particulate matter. However, there are few data on ultrafine particle deposition during spontaneous breathing, and none in people with asthma. Sixteen subjects with mild to moderate asthma were exposed for 2 hr, by mouthpiece, to ultrafine carbon particles with a count median diameter (CMD) of 23 nm and a geometric standard deviation of 1.6. Deposition was measured during spontaneous breathing at rest (minute ventilation, 13.3 +/- 2.0 L/min) and exercise (minute ventilation, 41.9 +/- 9.0 L/min). The mean +/- SD fractional deposition was 0.76 +/- 0.05 by particle number and 0.69 +/- 0.07 by particle mass concentration. The number deposition fraction increased as particle size decreased, reaching 0.84 +/- 0.03 for the smallest particles (midpoint CMD = 8.7 nm). No differences between sexes were observed. The deposition fraction increased during exercise to 0.86 +/- 0.04 and 0.79 +/- 0.05 by particle number and mass concentration, respectively, and reached 0.93 +/- 0.02 for the smallest particles. Experimental deposition data exceeded model predictions during exercise. The deposition at rest was greater in these subjects with asthma than in previously studied healthy subjects (0.76 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.65 +/- 0.10, p < 0.001). The efficient respiratory deposition of ultrafine particles increases further in subjects with asthma. Key words: air pollution, asthma, deposition, dosimetry, inhalation, ultrafine particles.

  15. The (perceived) meaning of spontaneous thoughts.

    PubMed

    Morewedge, Carey K; Giblin, Colleen E; Norton, Michael I

    2014-08-01

    Spontaneous thoughts, the output of a broad category of uncontrolled and inaccessible higher order mental processes, arise frequently in everyday life. The seeming randomness by which spontaneous thoughts arise might give people good reason to dismiss them as meaningless. We suggest that it is precisely the lack of control over and access to the processes by which they arise that leads people to perceive spontaneous thoughts as revealing meaningful self-insight. Consequently, spontaneous thoughts potently influence judgment. A series of experiments provides evidence supporting two hypotheses. First, we hypothesize that the more a thought is perceived to be spontaneous, the more it is perceived to provide meaningful self-insight. Participants perceived more spontaneous kinds of thought (e.g., intuition) to reveal greater self-insight than did more controlled kinds of thought in Study 1 (e.g., deliberation). In Studies 2 and 3, participants perceived thoughts with the same content and target to reveal greater self-insight when spontaneously rather than deliberately generated (i.e., childhood memories and impressions formed). Second, we hypothesize that the greater self-insight attributed to thoughts that are (perceived to be) spontaneous leads those thoughts to more potently influence judgment. Participants felt more sexually attracted to an attractive person whom they thought of spontaneously than deliberately in Study 4, and reported their commitment to a current romantic relationship would be more affected by the spontaneous rather than deliberate recollection of a good or bad experience with their romantic partner in Study 5.

  16. Investigation on C-TiO2 nanotubes composite as Pt catalyst support for methanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sui, Xu-Lei; Wang, Zhen-Bo; Yang, Min; Huo, Li; Gu, Da-Ming; Yin, Ge-Ping

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, Pt nanoparticles have been successfully deposited on the mixture of carbon black and one-dimensional self-ordered TiO2 nanotubes (TNTs) array by a microwave-assisted polyol process to synthesize Pt/C-TNTs catalyst. TiO2 nanoparticles (TNPs) are used instead of TNTs to prepare catalyst as a reference. The obtained samples are characterized by physical characterization and electrochemical measurements. The results show that Pt nanoparticles are uniformly deposited on the three-phase interfaces between carbon and TNTs. The Pt/C-TNTs possesses substantially enhanced activity and stability in electrochemical performance. Such remarkable properties are due to the excellent composite carrier of C-TNTs: (1) TNTs has strong corrosion resistance in acidic and oxidative environment and a metal support interaction between Pt and TNTs; (2) Compared to TNPs, TNTs is more suitable for electro-catalytic field on account of its better electronic conductivity; (3) Compared to TNPs, TNTs can improve the anti-poisoning ability of catalyst for methanol oxidation. (4) Amorphous carbon can improve the dispersion of platinum particles; (5) The distribution of carbon improves the poor conductivity of TNTs. These studies indicate that Pt/C-TNTs compound is a promising catalyst for methanol electrooxidation.

  17. Steam reforming of methanol over copper loaded anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) prepared through electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linga Reddy, E.; Karuppiah, J.; Lee, Hyun Chan; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2014-12-01

    In order to study the steam reforming of methanol (SRM) to produce hydrogen for fuel cells, porous γ-alumina support is developed on Al substrate using anodic oxidation process and copper catalyst particles are deposited homogeneously over anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) surface by electrodeposition method. We investigated the effect of electrodeposition time and hot water treatment (HWT) on the activity of catalysts for SRM reaction in the temperature range between 160 and 360 °C. The experimental results indicate that the SRM activity, CO2 and dimethyl ether (DME) selectivity's over Cu catalysts increased as the electrodeposition time increased from 30 to 120 s, further increment in deposition time of Cu have no significant effect on it. The rates of SRM conversion are found to be higher for the catalysts made from the supports obtained after HWT, which may be due to the enhancement in the surface area of AAO support. It is found that the SRM activity and CO2 selectivity strongly depended upon the free exposed copper sites available for methanol adsorption and reaction, and DME in products is mainly observed in the reaction temperature range between 300 and 350 °C and it is higher for the catalysts with low Cu content.

  18. Performance of vertically oriented graphene supported platinum-ruthenium bimetallic catalyst for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, Zheng; Hu, Dan; Kong, Jing; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2015-01-01

    This work reports the electrocatalytic performance of vertically oriented graphene (VG) supported Pt-Ru bimetallic catalysts toward methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). Dense networks of VG are directly synthesized on carbon paper (CP) via a microwave plamsa-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. A repeated pulse potentials approach is applied in a conventional three-electrode electrochemical system for the co-electrodeposition of Pt-Ru bimetallic nanoparticles. It is found that, the decoration of VG can simultaneously lead to a ∼3.5 times higher catalyst mass loading and a ∼50% smaller nanoparticle size than the pristine CP counterparts. An optimum Pt molar ratio of 83.4% in the deposits, achieved with a [H2PtCl6]:[RuCl3] of 1:1 in the electrolyte, is clarified with synthetically considering the mass specific activity, CO tolerance, and catalytic stability. According to Tafel analysis and cyclic voltammetry (CV) tests, the Pt-Ru/VG catalyst with the optimized Pt molar ratio can realize a faster methanol dehydrogenation than Pt/VG, and present a significantly enhanced catalytic activity (maximum current density of 339.2 mA mg-1) than those using pristine CP and Vulcan XC-72 as the supports.

  19. How the C-O bond breaks during methanol decomposition on nanocrystallites of palladium catalysts.

    PubMed

    Yudanov, Ilya V; Matveev, Alexei V; Neyman, Konstantin M; Rösch, Notker

    2008-07-23

    Experimental findings imply that edge sites (and other defects) on Pd nanocrystallites exposing mainly (111) facets in supported model catalysts are crucial for catalyst modification via deposition of CH(x) (x = 0-3) byproducts of methanol decomposition. To explore this problem computationally, we applied our recently developed approach to model realistically metal catalyst particles as moderately large three-dimensional crystallites. We present here the first results of this advanced approach where we comprehensively quantify the reactivity of a metal catalyst in an important chemical process. In particular, to unravel the mechanism of how CH(x) species are formed, we carried out density functional calculations of C-O bond scission in methanol and various dehydrogenated intermediates (CH3O, CH2OH, CH2O, CHO, CO), deposited on the cuboctahedron model particle Pd79. We calculated the lowest activation barriers, approximately 130 kJ mol(-1), of C-O bond breaking and the most favorable thermodynamics for the adsorbed species CH3O and CH2OH which feature a C-O single bond. In contrast, dissociation of adsorbed CO was characterized as negligibly slow. From the computational result that the decomposition products CH3 and CH2 preferentially adsorb at edge sites of nanoparticles, we rationalize experimental data on catalyst poisoning.

  20. Spontaneous haematomyelia: a necropsy study.

    PubMed Central

    Leech, R W; Pitha, J V; Brumback, R A

    1991-01-01

    Spontaneous haematomyelia (intramedullary spinal haematoma), is an uncommon event. Predisposing conditions have been reported including syringomyelia, pregnancy and delivery, angioma, spinal artery aneurysm, and haemophilia, but only rarely has a pathological evaluation been performed. Two such cases studied at necropsy are reported. In one case, the haematoma was restricted to the cervical spinal cord, while in the second case it extended from the medulla into the lowest thoracic cord segments. In both cases the haematomyelia was fatal. In the first case the clinical course was subacute, but in the other the course was more acute. Careful neuropathological examination showed no apparent cause for the haemorrhages. Images PMID:2019846

  1. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum Associated with Sex

    PubMed Central

    Flatman, Sam; Morrison, Edwin; Elahi, Maqsood

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of spontaneous pneumomediastinum (SPM) associated with sex. A 22-year-old lesbian with a history of asthma, cigarette and illicit drug smoking was diagnosed with a SPM after developing chest pain and dyspnoea in the context of performing oral sex. The main finding was subcutaneous emphysema involving the neck. SPM is an important differential diagnosis for chest pain in young people. It is a benign condition and diagnosis mainly limited to chest X-ray with increased incidence in asthmatics, smokers and drug addicts. PMID:22470723

  2. Modifications for use of methanol or methanol-gasoline blends in automotive vehicles, September 1976-January 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, D.J.; Bolt, J.A.; Cole, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    Methanol or blends of methanol and gasoline as automotive fuels may be attractive means for extending the nation's petroleum reserves. The present study was aimed at identifying potential problems and solutions for this use of methanol. Retrofitting of existing vehicles as well as future vehicle design have been considered. The use of ethanol or higher alcohols was not addressed in this study but will be included at a later date. Several potentially serious problems have been identified with methanol use. The most attractive solutions depend upon an integrated combination of vehicle modifications and fuel design. No vehicle problems were found which could not be solved with relatively minor developments of existing technology providing the methanol or blend fuel was itself engineered to ameliorate the solution. Research needs have been identified in the areas of lubrication and materials. These, while apparently solvable, must precede use of methanol or methanol-gasoline blends as motor fuels. Because of the substantial costs and complexities of a retrofitting program, use of methanol must be evaluated in relation to other petroleum-saving alternatives. Future vehicles can be designed initially to operate satisfactorily on these alternate fuels. However a specific fuel composition must be specified around which the future engines and vehicles can be designed.

  3. An algebraic model on the performance of a direct methanol fuel cell with consideration of methanol crossover

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Ken-Ming

    An algebraic one-dimensional model on the membrane-electrode-assembly (MEA) of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is proposed. Non-linear regression procedure was imposed on the model to retrieve important parameters: solid polymer electrolyte conductivity κ m, exchange current density of methanol electro-oxidation at anode catalyst surface i oM,ref, and mass diffusivity of methanol in aqueous phase within the porous electrode D a that correspond to the experimentally measured polarization curves. Although numerical iteration is required for a complete solution, the explicit relationships of methanol concentration, methanol crossover rate, oxygen concentration and cell discharge current density do provide a clear picture of the mass transport and electrochemical kinetics within the various porous media in the MEA. It is shown the cathode mixed potential induced by the parallel reactions of oxygen reduction and oxidation of crossover methanol elucidates the potential drop of the cathode and the decrease of the cell open circuit voltage (OCV). Methanol transport in the membrane is described by the diffusion, electro-osmosis, and pressure induced convection. Detailed accounts of the effects of anode methanol and cathode oxygen feed concentrations on the cell discharge performance are given with correlation to the physical structure and chemical compositions of the catalyst layers (CLs).

  4. Anaerobic treatment of methanol condensate from pulp mill compared with anaerobic treatment of methanol using mesophilic UASB reactors.

    PubMed

    Badshah, Malik; Parawira, Wilson; Mattiasson, Bo

    2012-12-01

    The feasibility of anaerobic treatment of methanol condensate from pulp and paper mill in UASB reactor was investigated and compared with the anaerobic treatment of methanol. The UASB reactor treating methanol condensate was operated for 480 days with minimum problems of overload. COD removal from methanol condensate and methanol under normal operating conditions ranged from 84-86% to 86-98%, respectively. Under optimal conditions (OLR=5.0 g COD L(-1)day(-1), COD(influent)=11.40 g L(-1)) a methane yield of 0.29 NL CH(4) per g COD(removed) (at standard temperature and pressure) was achieved during the treatment of methanol condensate. The recovery time of the microorganisms after several overloads was decreasing each time probably due to the adaptation to methanol condensate. These findings indicate that methanol condensate can be efficiently treated in a UASB reactor with the benefit of biogas production. As a bonus effect of the treatment, much of the smell of the feed was eliminated.

  5. Fabrication of ionic liquid ultrathin film by sequential deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morino, Yusuke; Kanai, Yuta; Imanishi, Akihito; Yokota, Yasuyuki; Fukui, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    A simple, mild, reproducible, and controllable nanodeposition method for ionic liquids (ILs) by ejection of IL solution through a high-speed electromagnetic valve (pulse valve) to a substrate under vacuum is proposed (pulse-valve method). Sequential deposition of an IL [1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (BMIM-TFSI)] on Au(111) substrates from its methanol solution was examined by adopting the pulse-valve method and the deposited IL films were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and tapping-mode atomic force microscopy (AFM). The amount of IL deposited per a pulse was successfully reduced to less than an equivalent thickness of 0.2 nm. The deposited IL was homogeneously distributed over a substrate area of 1 × 1 cm2 substrate area and the deposited amount was reproducible for independent depositions.

  6. Spontaneous generation of anchorless prions in transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Stöhr, Jan; Watts, Joel C; Legname, Giuseppe; Oehler, Abby; Lemus, Azucena; Nguyen, Hoang-Oanh B; Sussman, Joshua; Wille, Holger; DeArmond, Stephen J; Prusiner, Stanley B; Giles, Kurt

    2011-12-27

    Some prion protein mutations create anchorless molecules that cause Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker (GSS) disease. To model GSS, we generated transgenic mice expressing cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) lacking the glycosylphosphatidyl inositol (GPI) anchor, denoted PrP(ΔGPI). Mice overexpressing PrP(ΔGPI) developed a late-onset, spontaneous neurologic dysfunction characterized by widespread amyloid deposition in the brain and the presence of a short protease-resistant PrP fragment similar to those found in GSS patients. In Tg(PrP,ΔGPI) mice, disease onset could be accelerated either by inoculation with brain homogenate prepared from spontaneously ill animals or by coexpression of membrane-anchored, full-length PrP(C). In contrast, coexpression of N-terminally truncated PrP(Δ23-88) did not affect disease progression. Remarkably, disease from ill Tg(PrP,ΔGPI) mice transmitted to mice expressing wild-type PrP(C), indicating the spontaneous generation of prions.

  7. Thermal decomposition of methanol in the sonolysis of methanol-water mixtures. Spin-trapping evidence for isotope exchange reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, C.M.; Lion, Y.; Kondo, T.; Riesz, P.

    1987-11-05

    The spin trap 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzenesulfonate was used to monitor the yield of free radicals produced during sonolysis of water-methanol mixtures. Methyl radicals and CH/sub 2/OH radicals were observed as well as the isotopically mixed radicals CH/sub 2/D and CHD/sub 2/ when CH/sub 3/OD:D/sub 2/O mixtures were studied. The results clearly show that thermal decomposition of methanol to methyl radicals occurs in the gas phase. The methyl radical yield rises sharply at very low concentrations of methanol, reaches a maximum at 5 mol dm/sup -3/ in water and decreases to a smaller value in methanol. The yield of methyl radicals as a function of methanol concentration is discussed in terms of the different factors influencing the sonochemistry.

  8. Effect of the impurities in crude bio-methanol on the performance of the direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujiguchi, Takuya; Furukawa, Takayuki; Nakagawa, Nobuyoshi

    As an environmental friendly and economical methanol for the fuel of a DMFC, we focused on a crude bio-methanol from woody biomass without refining. The effects of the impurities, i.e., ethanol, 1-butanol, methyl formate and diisopropyl ether, contained in the crude bio-methanol on the DMFC performance were investigated. Methyl formate and diisopropyl ether hardly or only slightly affected the DMFC performance, while ethanol and 1-butanol caused a significant degradation in the performance. When multiple impurities are present in the fuel as well as the crude bio-methanol, the degradation was somewhat lower than that of the single impurity, 1-butanol, which was the most harmful component of the multiple impurities. When using the crude bio-methanol as a DMFC fuel, removal of the harmful impurities, such as ethanol and 1-butanol, is necessary, otherwise a novel catalyst, which is also active for the oxidation of these impurities, required.

  9. Methanol synthesis using a catalyst combination of alkali or alkaline earth salts and reduced copper chromite for methanol synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Tierney, John W.; Wender, Irving; Palekar, Vishwesh M.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel route for the synthesis of methanol, and more specifically to the production of methanol by contacting synthesis gas under relatively mild conditions in a slurry phase with a catalyst combination comprising reduced copper chromite and basic alkali salts or alkaline earth salts. The present invention allows the synthesis of methanol to occur in the temperature range of approximately 100.degree.-160.degree. C. and the pressure range of 40-65 atm. The process produces methanol with up to 90% syngas conversion per pass and up to 95% methanol selectivity. The only major by-product is a small amount of easily separated methyl formate. Very small amounts of water, carbon dioxide and dimethyl ether are also produced. The present catalyst combination also is capable of tolerating fluctuations in the H.sub.2 /CO ratio without major deleterious effect on the reaction rate. Furthermore, carbon dioxide and water are also tolerated without substantial catalyst deactivation.

  10. Methanol production from Eucalyptus wood chips. Working Document 9. Economics of producing methanol from Eucalyptus in Central Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-06-01

    A detailed feasibility study of producing methanol from Eucalyptus in Central Florida encompasses all phases of production - from seedling to delivery of finished methanol. The project includes the following components: (1) production of 55 million, high quality, Eucalyptus seedlings through tissue culture; (2) establishment of a Eucalyptus energy plantation on approximately 70,000 acres; and (3) engineering for a 100 million gallon-per-year methanol production facility. In addition, the potential environmental impacts of the whole project were examined, safety and health aspects of producing and using methanol were analyzed, and site specific cost estimates were made. The economics of the project are presented here. Each of the three major components of the project - tissue culture lab, energy plantation, and methanol refinery - are examined individually. In each case a site specific analysis of the potential return on investment was conducted.

  11. Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell grade hydrogen production by methanol steam reforming: A comparative multiple reactor modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katiyar, Nisha; Kumar, Shashi; Kumar, Surendra

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of a fuel processor based on methanol steam reforming has been carried out to produce fuel cell grade H2. Six reactor configurations namely FBR1 (fixed bed reactor), MR1 (H2 selective membrane reactor with one reaction tube), MR2 (H2 selective membrane reactor with two reaction tubes), FBR2 (FBR1 + preferential CO oxidation (PROX) reactor), MR3 (MR1 + PROX), and MR4 (MR2 + PROX) are evaluated by simulation to identify the suitable processing scheme. The yield of H2 is significantly affected by H2 selective membrane, residence time, temperature, and pressure conditions at complete methanol conversion. The enhancement in residence time in MR2 by using two identical reaction tubes provides H2 yield of 2.96 with 91.25 mol% recovery at steam/methanol ratio of 1.5, pressure of 2 bar and 560 K temperature. The exit retentate gases from MR2 are further treated in PROX reactor of MR4 to reduce CO concentration to 4.1 ppm to ensure the safe discharge to the environment. The risk of carbon deposition on reforming catalyst is highly reduced in MR4, and MR4 reactor configuration generates 7.4 NL min-1 of CO free H2 from 0.12 mol min-1 of methanol which can provide 470 W PEMFC feedstock requirement. Hence, process scheme in MR4 provides a compact and innovative fuel cell grade H2 generating unit.

  12. Surfactant therapy and spontaneous diuresis.

    PubMed

    Bhat, R; John, E; Diaz-Blanco, J; Ortega, R; Fornell, L; Vidyasagar, D

    1989-03-01

    The effect of artificial surfactant therapy on renal function and the onset of spontaneous diuresis was prospectively evaluated in 19 infants with hyaline membrane disease in a double-blind, controlled study. Twelve infants were in the surfactant group; seven infants received placebo (0.9% saline solution). There was no difference in the time of onset of spontaneous diuresis (as defined by output greater than or equal to 80% of intake). The glomerular filtration rate, determined by endogenous creatinine clearance, was also similar in the surfactant- and placebo-treated infants during the first 3 days of life. The fractional excretion of sodium was significantly higher in the placebo group at 24 hours and 36 hours. Infants in the placebo group had a higher negative sodium balance than those in the surfactant group. Ventilatory status improved significantly soon after surfactant treatment, as evidenced by improvement in the alveolar/arterial oxygen pressure ratio and by a lower mean airway pressure. These data suggest that ventilatory status can be improved without diuresis; the factors that regulate diuresis are multiple and not fully understood.

  13. [Spontaneous pneumothorax and atmospheric pressure].

    PubMed

    Morales Suárez-Varela, M M; Plaza Valía, P; Martínez Giménez, J L; Martínez Selva, I; Llopis González, A; Blanquer Olivas, R

    2002-02-01

    In order to assess factors associated with spontaneous pneumothorax (SP), mainly climatic changes, a prospective study was undertaken of 62 SP episodes among patients admitted to our hospital during a two-year period, from January 1994 to January 1996. Atmospheric pressure (AP) changes were analyzed, with daily recording of the number of unusual changes in AP (increases above 95th percentile and decreases below 5th percentile) and how many of these changes were followed by some episode of spontaneous pneumothorax during the following five days. To measure the degree of this association between the emergence of pneumothorax and exposure to unusual changes I AP, the relative risk (RR) was calculated. A total of 77 unusual AP changes were observed, 17 of which concurred with the emergence of 8 episodes of SP during the following five days, with a RR of 2.7 (1.6-4.4). Although the etiology of SP is unknown and probably of multifactorial origin, these data suggest that unusual changes in AP may play a relevant role in triggering this condition.

  14. Spontaneous recovery in dynamical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majdandzic, Antonio; Podobnik, Boris; Buldyrev, Sergey V.; Kenett, Dror Y.; Havlin, Shlomo; Eugene Stanley, H.

    2014-01-01

    Much research has been carried out to explore the structural properties and vulnerability of complex networks. Of particular interest are abrupt dynamic events that cause networks to irreversibly fail. However, in many real-world phenomena, such as brain seizures in neuroscience or sudden market crashes in finance, after an inactive period of time a significant part of the damaged network is capable of spontaneously becoming active again. The process often occurs repeatedly. To model this marked network recovery, we examine the effect of local node recoveries and stochastic contiguous spreading, and find that they can lead to the spontaneous emergence of macroscopic `phase-flipping' phenomena. As the network is of finite size and is stochastic, the fraction of active nodes z switches back and forth between the two network collective modes characterized by high network activity and low network activity. Furthermore, the system exhibits a strong hysteresis behaviour analogous to phase transitions near a critical point. We present real-world network data exhibiting phase switching behaviour in accord with the predictions of the model.

  15. Study of catalysis for solid oxide fuel cells and direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xirong

    Fuel cells offer the enticing promise of cleaner electricity with lower environmental impact than traditional energy conversion technologies. Driven by the interest in power sources for portable electronics, and distributed generation and automotive propulsion markets, active development efforts in the technologies of both solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) devices have achieved significant progress. However, current catalysts for fuel cells are either of low catalytic activity or extremely expensive, presenting a key barrier toward the widespread commercialization of fuel cell devices. In this thesis work, atomic layer deposition (ALD), a novel thin film deposition technique, was employed to apply catalytic Pt to SOFC, and investigate both Pt skin catalysts and Pt-Ru catalysts for methanol oxidation, a very important reaction for DMFC, to increase the activity and utilization levels of the catalysts while simultaneously reducing the catalyst loading. For SOFCs, we explored the use of ALD for the fabrication of electrode components, including an ultra-thin Pt film for use as the electrocatalyst, and a Pt mesh structure for a current collector for SOFCs, aiming for precise control over the catalyst loading and catalyst geometry, and enhancement in the current collect efficiency. We choose Pt since it has high chemical stability and excellent catalytic activity for the O2 reduction reaction and the H2 oxidation reaction even at low operating temperatures. Working SOFC fuel cells were fabricated with ALD-deposited Pt thin films as an electrode/catalyst layer. The measured fuel cell performance reveals that comparable peak power densities were achieved for ALD-deposited Pt anodes with only one-fifth of the Pt loading relative to a DC-sputtered counterpart. In addition to the continuous electrocatalyst layer, a micro-patterned Pt structure was developed via the technique of area selective ALD. By coating yttria-stabilized zirconia, a

  16. METHODOLOGICAL NOTES: The nature of spontaneous radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, Vitalii L.

    1983-08-01

    The nature of spontaneous radiation is discussed in its technical and historical aspects. The point of view encountered in the literature according to which spontaneous radiation is induced radiation produced by the zero-point (vacuum) oscillations of the electromagnetic field is criticized. Spontaneous radiation is not a purely quantum effect since it occurs also in the classical region (and in this case it is described by classical electrodynamics).

  17. Methanol Production by a Broad Phylogenetic Array of Marine Phytoplankton

    PubMed Central

    Mincer, Tracy J.; Aicher, Athena C.

    2016-01-01

    Methanol is a major volatile organic compound on Earth and serves as an important carbon and energy substrate for abundant methylotrophic microbes. Previous geochemical surveys coupled with predictive models suggest that the marine contributions are exceedingly large, rivaling terrestrial sources. Although well studied in terrestrial ecosystems, methanol sources are poorly understood in the marine environment and warrant further investigation. To this end, we adapted a Purge and Trap Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (P&T-GC/MS) method which allowed reliable measurements of methanol in seawater and marine phytoplankton cultures with a method detection limit of 120 nanomolar. All phytoplankton tested (cyanobacteria: Synechococcus spp. 8102 and 8103, Trichodesmium erythraeum, and Prochlorococcus marinus), and Eukarya (heterokont diatom: Phaeodactylum tricornutum, coccolithophore: Emiliania huxleyi, cryptophyte: Rhodomonas salina, and non-diatom heterokont: Nannochloropsis oculata) produced methanol, ranging from 0.8–13.7 micromolar in culture and methanol per total cellular carbon were measured in the ranges of 0.09–0.3%. Phytoplankton culture time-course measurements displayed a punctuated production pattern with maxima near early stationary phase. Stabile isotope labeled bicarbonate incorporation experiments confirmed that methanol was produced from phytoplankton biomass. Overall, our findings suggest that phytoplankton are a major source of methanol in the upper water column of the world’s oceans. PMID:26963515

  18. Morphological changes in the liver of rats intoxicated with methanol.

    PubMed

    Kasacka, I; Skrzydlewska, E

    1999-01-01

    On the basis of morphological examinations in light and electron microscope, the evaluation of methanol influence on the liver of rats was conducted. The examination was carried out in the group of 36 rats that were given a single dose of methanol (1.5 g/kg b.w.) into the stomach through a gastric tube. The liver was taken from rats under the ether anaesthesia after 6, 12, and 24 hours as well as after 2, 5, and 7 days of methanol administration. Results showed that methanol intoxication caused visible changes in the examined organ. Only 6 h after intoxication, lobular peripheral hepatocytes presented characteristic features of vacuolar degradation persisting up to 48 h. Since the second day of intoxication, many cells with double nuclei were found more frequently than in controls. Single hepatocytes or small hepatocytic clusters with the features of deliquescent necrosis could be seen after 5 and 7 days of examination. All animals intoxicated with methanol showed distinct weakness of glycogen reaction. The loss of glycogen resources was highest at 24 h after methanol administration. The results indicate, that methanol causes morphological changes in the rat liver and that intensification of these changes depends on the time after intoxication.

  19. Studies on an ultrasonic atomization feed direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chaoqun; Liu, Linghao; Tang, Kai; Chen, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is promising as an energy conversion device for the replacement of conventional chemical cell in future, owing to its convenient fuel storage, high energy density and low working temperature. The development of DMFC technology is currently limited by catalyst poison and methanol crossover. To alleviate the methanol crossover, a novel fuel supply system based on ultrasonic atomization is proposed. Experimental investigations on this fuel supply system to evaluate methanol permeation rates, open circuit voltages (OCVs) and polarization curves under a series of conditions have been carried out and reported in this paper. In comparison with the traditional liquid feed DMFC system, it can be found that the methanol crossover under the ultrasonic atomization feed system was significantly reduced because the DMFC reaches a large stable OCV value. Moreover, the polarization performance does not vary significantly with the liquid feed style. Therefore, the cell fed by ultrasonic atomization can be operated with a high concentration methanol to improve the energy density of DMFC. Under the supply condition of relatively high concentration methanol such as 4M and 8M, the maximum power density fed by ultrasonic atomization is higher than liquid by 6.05% and 12.94% respectively.

  20. Methanol Uptake by Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, L. T.; Essin, A. M.; Golden, D. M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The global methanol budget is currently unbalanced, with source terms significantly larger than the sinks terms. To evaluate possible losses of gaseous methanol to sulfate aerosols, the solubility and reactivity of methanol in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions representative of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols is under investigation. Methanol will partition into sulfate aerosols according to its Henry's law solubility. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H*, for cold (196 - 220 K) solutions ranging between 45 and 70 wt % H2SO4. We have found that methanol solubility ranges from approx. 10(exp 5) - 10(exp 7) M/atm for UT/LS conditions. Solubility increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. Although methanol is slightly more soluble than are acetone and formaldehyde, current data indicate that uptake by clean aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and any rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H is not significant over our experimental time scale for solutions below 80 wt % H2SO4. To confirm this directly, results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique will also be presented.

  1. Methanol Production by a Broad Phylogenetic Array of Marine Phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Mincer, Tracy J; Aicher, Athena C

    2016-01-01

    Methanol is a major volatile organic compound on Earth and serves as an important carbon and energy substrate for abundant methylotrophic microbes. Previous geochemical surveys coupled with predictive models suggest that the marine contributions are exceedingly large, rivaling terrestrial sources. Although well studied in terrestrial ecosystems, methanol sources are poorly understood in the marine environment and warrant further investigation. To this end, we adapted a Purge and Trap Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (P&T-GC/MS) method which allowed reliable measurements of methanol in seawater and marine phytoplankton cultures with a method detection limit of 120 nanomolar. All phytoplankton tested (cyanobacteria: Synechococcus spp. 8102 and 8103, Trichodesmium erythraeum, and Prochlorococcus marinus), and Eukarya (heterokont diatom: Phaeodactylum tricornutum, coccolithophore: Emiliania huxleyi, cryptophyte: Rhodomonas salina, and non-diatom heterokont: Nannochloropsis oculata) produced methanol, ranging from 0.8-13.7 micromolar in culture and methanol per total cellular carbon were measured in the ranges of 0.09-0.3%. Phytoplankton culture time-course measurements displayed a punctuated production pattern with maxima near early stationary phase. Stabile isotope labeled bicarbonate incorporation experiments confirmed that methanol was produced from phytoplankton biomass. Overall, our findings suggest that phytoplankton are a major source of methanol in the upper water column of the world's oceans.

  2. Pigment dispersion syndrome associated with spontaneous subluxation of crystalline lens

    PubMed Central

    Veerwal, Vikas; Goyal, Jawahar Lal; Jain, Parul; Arora, Ritu

    2017-01-01

    Pigment dispersion syndrome (PDS) is an ocular condition characterized by a dispersion of iris pigment throughout the eye. This pigment is deposited in a characteristic manner on the corneal endothelium as Krukenberg's spindle, anterior surface of the iris, in the trabecular meshwork, on the lens and zonule and occasionally on the anterior hyaloid face. Even with deposition of pigment on zonular fibers, no zonular weakness, or zonular dehiscence has been reported in these cases. We report a unique case of PDS with bilateral spontaneous subluxation of crystalline lens. With characteristic findings of pigment distribution in both his eyes, the patient had concave iris configuration with heavily pigmented trabecular meshwork confirming the diagnosis of PDS. The patient had bilateral 180° temporal subluxation of crystalline lens in both his eyes. The usual cause of lens subluxation such as Marfan's Syndrome and Ehler's Danlos Syndrome was ruled out. The patient underwent right eye followed by left eye intracapsular cataract extraction with ab-interno technique with postoperative best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 6/9 in both eyes. Spontaneous subluxation of crystalline lens in isolated PDS is not known to occur and has been reported by means of this case. We recommend a thorough assessment of zonular status in all cases of PDS. PMID:28298869

  3. Physiological response of Pichia pastoris GS115 to methanol-induced high level production of the Hepatitis B surface antigen: catabolic adaptation, stress responses, and autophagic processes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    proceed via the ERAD pathway and through the proteasome. However, the amount of HBsAg did not show any significant decline during the cultivation revealing its general protection from proteolytic degradation. During the methanol fed-batch phase, induction of vacuolar proteases (e.g. strong increase of APR1) and constitutive autophagic processes were observed. Vacuolar enclosures were mainly found around peroxisomes and not close to HBsAg deposits and, thus, were most likely provoked by peroxisomal components damaged by reactive oxygen species generated by methanol oxidation. Conclusions In the methanol fed-batch phase P. pastoris is exposed to dual stress; stress resulting from methanol degradation and stress resulting from the production of the recombinant protein leading to the induction of oxidative stress and unfolded protein response pathways, respectively. Finally, the modest increase of methanol assimilatory enzymes compared to the strong increase of methanol dissimilatory enzymes suggests here a potential to increase methanol incorporation into biomass/product through metabolic enhancement of the methanol assimilatory pathway. PMID:22873405

  4. Microbial Oxidation of Methane and Methanol: Crystallization of Methanol Dehydrogenase and Properties of Holo- and Apo-Methanol Dehydrogenase from Methylomonas methanica

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ramesh N.; Hou, Ching T.; Felix, Andre

    1978-01-01

    Procedures are described for the purification and crystallization of methanol dehydrogenase from the soluble fraction of the type I obligate methylotroph Methylomonas methanica strain S1. The crystallized enzyme is homogeneous as judged by acrylamide gel electrophoresis and ultracentrifugation. The enzyme had a high pH optimum (9.5) and required ammonium salt as an activator. In the presence of phenazine methosulfate as an electron acceptor, the enzyme catalyzed the oxidation of primary alcohols and formaldehyde. Secondary, tertiary, and aromatic alcohols were not oxidized. The molecular weight as well as subunit size of methanol dehydrogenase was 60,000, indicating that it is monomeric. The sedimentation constant (s20,w) was 3.1S. The amino acid composition of the crystallized enzyme is also presented. Antisera prepared against the crystalline enzyme were nonspecific; they cross-reacted with and inhibited the isofunctional enzyme from other obligate methylotrophic bacteria. The crystalline methanol dehydrogenase had an absorption peak at 350 nm in the visible region and weak fluorescence peaks at 440 and 470 nm due to the presence of a pteridine derivative as the prosthetic group. A procedure was developed for the preparation of apo-methanol dehydrogenase. The molecular weights, sedimentation constants, electrophoretic mobilities, and immunological properties of apo- and holo-methanol dehydrogenases are identical. Apo-methanol dehydrogenase lacked the absorption peak at 350 nm and the fluorescence peaks at 440 and 470 nm and was catalytically inactive. All attempts to reconstitute an active enzyme from apo-methanol dehydrogenase, using various pteridine derivatives, were unsuccessful. Images PMID:415046

  5. Mutagenic and cytotoxic activities of Limonium globuliferum methanol extracts.

    PubMed

    Eren, Yasin

    2016-10-01

    Unmonitored use of plant extractions alone or in combination with drugs may cause important health problems and toxic effects. Limonium (Plumbaginaceae) plants are known as antibacterial, anticancer and antivirus agent. But it is possible that this genus may have toxic effects. This study evaluated the mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of Limonium globuliferum (Boiss. et Heldr.) O. Kuntze (Plumbaginaceae) acetone/methanol (2:1), and methanol extracts of root, stem, and leaf. Different parts of this species were used in order to compare the mutagenic and cytotoxic effects of these parts. Ames test was carried out with S. typhimurium TA98, and TA100 strains. Strains were incubated at 37 °C for 72 h. MDBK cell line was used in MTT test. 10,000, 1000, 100, 10, 1 and 0.1 µg/plate concentrations of plant extracts were used in Ames test. 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25 and 3.125 µg/ml concentrations of root, stem and leaf acetone/methanol (2:1) and methanol extracts were used in MTT test. Ames test results indicated that only methanol leaf extract (10,000 µg/plate) had mutagenic activity. L. globuliferum root methanol extracts (3.125 and 6.25 µg/ml) increased the proliferation rates. Root acetone/methanol (2:1) extracts were found highly cytotoxic in all treatments. The results indicated that leaf extracts had lower cytotoxic effects than root and stem extracts. High concentrations of L. globuliferum stem and leaf methanol extracts showed cytotoxic activity in all treatment periods while low concentrations of the stem methanol extracts increased the proliferation rates.

  6. Embryotoxicity of methanol in well-nourished and malnourished rats.

    PubMed

    De-Carvalho, R R; Delgado, I F; Souza, C A; Chahoud, I; Paumgartten, F J

    1994-12-01

    1. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether maternal protein-energy malnutrition alters methanol-induced embryotoxic effects in rats. 2. On day 0 of pregnancy, dams were assigned at random to one of the following treatment groups: well-nourished methanol (WNM), well-nourished control (WNC), malnourished methanol (MNM) and malnourished control (MNC). Malnourished animals received half of the well-nourished food intake (ca 12 g/day) throughout pregnancy. Methanol was administered by gavage (2.5 g/kg body weight) from gestation day 6 to 15. 3. Rats were weighed on days 0, 6 to 15, and 21 of pregnancy. On day 21 rats were submitted to cesarean section. The number of implantations, living and dead fetuses, resorptions and corpora lutea was recorded. All fetuses were weighed, examined for externally visible malformations, fixed, and examined for skeletal anomalies after clearing and staining with Alizarin Red S. 4. An increased proportion of fetuses with skeletal malformations, particularly cervical extra ribs, was found in the methanol-treated groups (fetuses with skeletal malformations: WNC = 5.6%, WNM = 45.4%, MNC = 3.8%, and MNM = 38.8%). Malnutrition produced fetal growth retardation, but did not cause any increase in the occurrence of gross structural malformations. The methanol-induced increase in the proportion of fetuses with extra ribs was not altered by malnutrition, but methanol potentiated the malnutrition-induced increase in the proportion of fetuses with signs of delayed ossification (WNC = 18.6%, WNM = 25.4%, MNC = 39.7%, and MNM = 78.4%). 5. These findings suggest that methanol-induced gross structural malformations are not affected by maternal malnutrition, but the delay in ossification caused by malnutrition is aggravated by treatment with methanol.

  7. New constraints on terrestrial and oceanic sources of atmospheric methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millet, D. B.; Jacob, D. J.; Custer, T. G.; de Gouw, J. A.; Goldstein, A. H.; Karl, T.; Singh, H. B.; Sive, B. C.; Talbot, R. W.; Warneke, C.; Williams, J.

    2008-12-01

    We use a global 3-D chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem) to interpret new aircraft, surface, and oceanic observations of methanol in terms of the constraints that they place on the atmospheric methanol budget. Recent measurements of methanol concentrations in the ocean mixed layer (OML) imply that in situ biological production must be the main methanol source in the OML, dominating over uptake from the atmosphere. It follows that oceanic emission and uptake must be viewed as independent terms in the atmospheric methanol budget. We deduce that the marine biosphere is a large primary source (85 Tg a-1) of methanol to the atmosphere and is also a large sink (101 Tg a-1), comparable in magnitude to atmospheric oxidation by OH (88 Tg a-1). The resulting atmospheric lifetime of methanol in the model is 4.7 days. Aircraft measurements in the North American boundary layer imply that terrestrial plants are a much weaker source than presently thought, likely reflecting an overestimate of broadleaf tree emissions, and this is also generally consistent with surface measurements. We deduce a terrestrial plant source of 80 Tg a-1, comparable in magnitude to the ocean source. The aircraft measurements show a strong correlation with CO (R2=0.51-0.61) over North America during summer. We reproduce this correlation and slope in the model with the reduced plant source, which also confirms that the anthropogenic source of methanol must be small. Our reduced plant source also provides a better simulation of methanol observations over tropical South America.

  8. Scaffoldless engineered enzyme assembly for enhanced methanol utilization

    DOE PAGES

    Price, J. Vincent; Chen, Long; Whitaker, W. Brian; ...

    2016-10-24

    Methanol is an important feedstock derived from natural gas and can be chemically converted into commodity and specialty chemicals at high pressure and temperature. Although biological conversion of methanol can proceed at ambient conditions, there is a dearth of engineered microorganisms that use methanol to produce metabolites. In nature, methanol dehydrogenase (Mdh), which converts methanol to formaldehyde, highly favors the reverse reaction. Thus, efficient coupling with the irreversible sequestration of formaldehyde by 3-hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloseisomerase (Phi) serves as the key driving force to pull the pathway equilibrium toward central metabolism. An emerging strategy to promote efficient substrate channelingmore » is to spatially organize pathway enzymes in an engineered assembly to provide kinetic driving forces that promote carbon flux in a desirable direction. Here, we report a scaffoldless, self-assembly strategy to organize Mdh, Hps, and Phi into an engineered supramolecular enzyme complex using an SH3–ligand interaction pair, which enhances methanol conversion to fructose-6-phosphate (F6P). To increase methanol consumption, an “NADH Sink” was created using Escherichia coli lactate dehydrogenase as an NADH scavenger, thereby preventing reversible formaldehyde reduction. Combination of the two strategies improved in vitro F6P production by 97-fold compared with unassembled enzymes. The beneficial effect of supramolecular enzyme assembly was also realized in vivo as the engineered enzyme assembly improved whole-cell methanol consumption rate by ninefold. This approach will ultimately allow direct coupling of enhanced F6P synthesis with other metabolic engineering strategies for the production of many desired metabolites from methanol.« less

  9. Scaffoldless engineered enzyme assembly for enhanced methanol utilization.

    PubMed

    Price, J Vincent; Chen, Long; Whitaker, W Brian; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios; Chen, Wilfred

    2016-10-24

    Methanol is an important feedstock derived from natural gas and can be chemically converted into commodity and specialty chemicals at high pressure and temperature. Although biological conversion of methanol can proceed at ambient conditions, there is a dearth of engineered microorganisms that use methanol to produce metabolites. In nature, methanol dehydrogenase (Mdh), which converts methanol to formaldehyde, highly favors the reverse reaction. Thus, efficient coupling with the irreversible sequestration of formaldehyde by 3-hexulose-6-phosphate synthase (Hps) and 6-phospho-3-hexuloseisomerase (Phi) serves as the key driving force to pull the pathway equilibrium toward central metabolism. An emerging strategy to promote efficient substrate channeling is to spatially organize pathway enzymes in an engineered assembly to provide kinetic driving forces that promote carbon flux in a desirable direction. Here, we report a scaffoldless, self-assembly strategy to organize Mdh, Hps, and Phi into an engineered supramolecular enzyme complex using an SH3-ligand interaction pair, which enhances methanol conversion to fructose-6-phosphate (F6P). To increase methanol consumption, an "NADH Sink" was created using Escherichia coli lactate dehydrogenase as an NADH scavenger, thereby preventing reversible formaldehyde reduction. Combination of the two strategies improved in vitro F6P production by 97-fold compared with unassembled enzymes. The beneficial effect of supramolecular enzyme assembly was also realized in vivo as the engineered enzyme assembly improved whole-cell methanol consumption rate by ninefold. This approach will ultimately allow direct coupling of enhanced F6P synthesis with other metabolic engineering strategies for the production of many desired metabolites from methanol.

  10. SPONTANEOUS COAL COMBUSTION; MECHANISMS AND PREDICTION.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herring, James R.; Rich, Fredrick J.

    1983-01-01

    Spontaneous ignition and combustion of coal is a major problem to the coal mining, shipping, and use industries; unintentional combustion causes loss of the resource as well as jeopardy to life and property. The hazard to life is especially acute in the case of underground coal mine fires that start by spontaneous ignition. It is the intention of this research to examine previously suggested causes of spontaneous ignition, to consider new evidence, and to suggest an experimental approach to determine which of these suggested causes is relevant to western U. S. coal. This discussion focuses only on causes and mechanism of spontaneous ignition.

  11. Method of producing UO2 wherein methanol wash is provided

    SciTech Connect

    Sondermann, T.

    1981-03-24

    In the production of UO2, ammonium uranyl carbonate is an intermediate product wet with water and contaminated with ammonium carbonate and is washed with methanol to remove water and ammonium carbonate. The spent methanol containing 50% water and up to 10% ammonium carbonate is subjected to rectification in a column under subatmospheric pressure with cooling the top of the tower to a low temperature to retard decomposition of ammonium carbonate and condense a liquid water fraction. Clogging of the column, vapor lines and condenser by recombination of the decomposition products is prevented. The purified methanol contains less than 5% water and may be returned for further washing of ammonium uranyl carbonate.

  12. Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, Stephen; Mountz, David; He, Wensheng; Zhang, Tao

    2013-12-31

    Direct methanol fuel cell membranes were developed using blends of different polyelectrolytes with PVDF. The membranes showed complex relationships between polyelectrolyte chemistry, morphology, and processing. Although the PVDF grade was found to have little effect on the membrane permselectivity, it does impact membrane conductivity and methanol permeation values. Other factors, such as varying the polyelectrolyte polarity, using varying crosslinking agents, and adjusting the equivalent weight of the membranes impacted methanol permeation, permselectivity, and areal resistance. We now understand, within the scope of the project work completed, how these inter-related performance properties can be tailored to achieve a balance of performance.

  13. Microbial methanol formation: A major end product of pectin metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Schink, B.; Zeikus, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Various pectinolytic strains of Clostridium, Erwinia, and Pseudomonas species produced methanol as a major end product during growth on pectin but not on glucose of polygalacturonic acid. Pectin metabolism of Clostridium butyricum strain 4PI correlated with a final product concentration of 16 mM at the end of growth, and a 1:1 stoichiometry for methanol production and percent initial substrate methoxylation. Growth on pectin was associated with high activity of pectin methylesterase and the absence of methanol consumption. The ecological significance of pectin metabolism and the establishment of microbial methylotrophic metabolism in nature is discussed.

  14. An interesting case of characteristic methanol toxicity through inhalational exposure

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pratyush; Gogia, Atul; Kakar, Atul; Miglani, Pratyush

    2015-01-01

    Methanol poisoning is rare but carries high risk of morbidity and mortality. Most of the cases witnessed in emergency are due to consumption of adulterated alcohol. Here we are reporting a very rare case of methanol poisoning through inhalational exposure leading to putamen necrosis and decreased visual acuity. He had dyselectrolytemia and metabolic acidosis which was successfully managed with early intervention. Its importance lies in the fact that inhalational methanol poisoning is an entity which if picked up early can prevent long-term neurological sequelae. PMID:26285665

  15. Method validation for methanol quantification present in working places

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muna, E. D. M.; Bizarri, C. H. B.; Maciel, J. R. M.; da Rocha, G. P.; de Araújo, I. O.

    2015-01-01

    Given the widespread use of methanol by different industry sectors and high toxicity associated with this substance, it is necessary to use an analytical method able to determine in a sensitive, precise and accurate levels of methanol in the air of working environments. Based on the methodology established by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), it was validated a methodology for determination of methanol in silica gel tubes which had demonstrated its effectiveness based on the participation of the international collaborative program sponsored by the American Industrial Hygiene Association (AIHA).

  16. Methanol from Wood Waste: A Technical and Economic Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-06-01

    percent of the gas is converted to methanol , the balance passing as inerts to the boiler. The reaction is as follows: catalyst 2H + CO ’ CH3OH 2 *-3...the boiler. Catalyst life is expected to be 6 years for methanol synthesis and 2 to 3 years for the shift reactor . PLANT SIZE In a chemical processing...percent of methyl alcohol ( methanol ) in gasoline for automotive use. / At a current consumption rate of 110 billion gallons per year (gpy), 11 billion

  17. ICI and Penspen in Nigerian and Qatari methanol deals

    SciTech Connect

    Alperowicz, N.

    1992-03-11

    The U.K. consulting and engineering company Penspen Ltd. (London) has signed a second joint venture agreement in Qatar and has selected the ICI (London) methanol process. The technology will also be used in a world-scale methanol plant in Nigeria that Penspen is helping to set up. Under the first agreement, signed on January 1 with Qatar General Petroleum Corp. (QGPC), a 50/50 venture is being formed to build a $370-million, 2,000-m.t./day methanol plant at Umm Said. ICI will provide its low-pressure technology and help market 75% of the output. Completion is due late 1994.

  18. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1985-03-12

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen is disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-RONa-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  19. A novel process for methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1992-01-01

    A bench-scale reactor is being used to study the conversion of synthesis gas to methanol (MeOH) by a novel process. In previous reports, we provided evidence that the reaction takes place in two steps. A molecule of MeOH is first carbonylated to form methyl formate (MeF) which then reacts with H{sub 2} to form two molecules of MeOH. The second reaction occurs on the surface of a heterogeneous catalyst such as copper chromite, while the first reaction requires a homegenous catalyst such as potassium methoxide (KOMe) and takes place in a non-equilibrium region in the vicinity of the heterogeneous catalyst. A synergism between the two catalysts enhances the rate of MeOH formation. In this quarter, we studied the effect of reaction conditions on the rate of formation of MeF and the effect of CO{sub 2} concentration in the feed gas on the rate of MeOH synthesis. Kinetic studies were also initiated and rate expressions were examined.

  20. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; O'Hare, Thomas E.; Mahajan, Devinder

    1986-01-01

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160.degree. C.) and preferably in the range 80.degree.-120.degree. C. used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen is disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa--M(OAc).sub.2 where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1-6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M=Ni and R=tertiary amyl). Mo(CO).sub.6 is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  1. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1986-10-28

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1-6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is NiC (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  2. Dynamical properties of water-methanol solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Cirino; Vasi, Sebastiano; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2016-02-01

    We study the relaxation times tα in the water-methanol system. We examine new data and data from the literature in the large temperature range 163 < T < 335 K obtained using different experimental techniques and focus on how tα affects the hydrogen bond structure of the system and the hydrophobicity of the alcohol methyl group. We examine the relaxation times at a fixed temperature as a function of the water molar fraction XW and observe two opposite behaviors in their curvature when the system moves from high to low T regimes. This behavior differs from that of an ideal solution in that it has excess values located at different molar fractions (XW = 0.5 for high T and 0.75 in the deep supercooled regime). We analyze the data and find that above a crossover temperature T ˜ 223 K, hydrophobicity plays a significant role and below it the water tetrahedral network dominates. This temperature is coincident with the fragile-to-strong dynamical crossover observed in confined water and supports the liquid-liquid phase transition hypothesis. At the same time, the reported data suggest that this crossover temperature (identified as the Widom line temperature) also depends on the alcohol concentration.

  3. Double trisomy in spontaneous abortions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, K S

    1997-12-01

    Cytogenetic data on products of conception from spontaneous abortions studied over a 10-year period have been reviewed for double trisomies. A total of 3034 spontaneous abortions were karyotyped between 1986 and 1997. Twenty-two cases with double trisomy, one case with triple trisomy, and a case with a trisomy and monosomy were found. The tissues studied were mostly sac, villi, or placenta. The gestational age ranged from 6 to 11 weeks and the mean age was 8.2 +/- 1.7 (SD) weeks. The mean maternal age in years was 35.9 +/- 5.3. Of the twenty-two cases, four were mosaics. All but two of the cases involved autosomal aneuploidies. The double trisomies included chromosomes 2, 4, 5, 7, 8, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 20, 21, and 22. The chromosomes that were trisomic in more than one double trisomy case were numbers 16 (8 cases), 8 (5 cases), 15 (4 cases), 2, 13, and 21 (3 cases each), and 5, 7, 14, 18, 20, 22, and X (2 cases). The triple trisomy involved chromosomes 18, 21, and X. The monosomy and trisomy case was a mosaic, with a monosomy 21 in all cells and some cells also with a trisomy 5. The double trisomies cited for the first time in this study were 4/13, 5/16, 8/14, 8/15, 14/21, 15/20, and 7/12. The pooled mean maternal age for double trisomy cases (34.1 +/- 5.7 years) was higher than that for single trisomy cases (31 +/- 6.1 years). The difference was statistically significant at P = < 0.001. The pooled mean gestational age of spontaneous abortions was lower for double trisomy (8.7 +/- 2.2 weeks) than for reported single trisomy cases (10.1 +/- 2.9 weeks). This difference is also statistically significant at P = < 0.001. The sex ratio among double trisomies was 15 females to 13 males. This difference was not statistically significant from the expected 1:1.

  4. Performance of composite Nafion/PVA membranes for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mollá, Sergio; Compañ, Vicente

    2011-03-01

    This work has been focused on the characterization of the methanol permeability and fuel cell performance of composite Nafion/PVA membranes in function of their thickness, which ranged from 19 to 97 μm. The composite membranes were made up of Nafion® polymer deposited between polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) nanofibers. The resistance to methanol permeation of the Nafion/PVA membranes shows a linear variation with the thickness. The separation between apparent and true permeability permits to give an estimated value of 4.0 × 10-7 cm2 s-1 for the intrinsic or true permeability of the bulk phase at the composite membranes. The incorporation of PVA nanofibers causes a remarkable reduction of one order of magnitude in the methanol permeability as compared with pristine Nafion® membranes. The DMFC performances of membrane-electrode assemblies prepared from Nafion/PVA and pristine Nafion® membranes were tested at 45, 70 and 95 °C under various methanol concentrations, i.e., 1, 2 and 3 M. The nanocomposite membranes with thicknesses of 19 μm and 47 μm reached power densities of 211 mW cm-2 and 184 mW cm-2 at 95 °C and 2 M methanol concentration. These results are comparable to those found for Nafion® membranes with similar thickness at the same conditions, which were 210 mW cm-2 and 204 mW cm-2 respectively. Due to the lower amount of Nafion® polymer present within the composite membranes, it is suggested a high degree of utilization of Nafion® as proton conductive material within the Nafion/PVA membranes, and therefore, significant savings in the consumed amount of Nafion® are potentially able to be achieved. In addition, the reinforcement effect caused by the PVA nanofibers offers the possibility of preparing membranes with very low thickness and good mechanical properties, while on the other hand, pristine Nafion® membranes are unpractical below a thickness of 50 μm.

  5. Fog spontaneously folds mosquito wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickerson, Andrew K.; Liu, Xing; Zhu, Ting; Hu, David L.

    2015-02-01

    The flexibility of insect wings confers aerodynamic benefits, but can also present a hazard if exposed to fog or dew. Fog can cause water to accumulate on wings, bending them into tight taco shapes and rendering them useless for flight. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we use high-speed video to film the spontaneous folding of isolated mosquito wings due to the evaporation of a water drop. We predict shapes of the deformed wing using two-dimensional elastica theory, considering both surface tension and Laplace pressure. We also recommend fold-resistant geometries for the wings of flapping micro-aerial vehicles. Our work reveals the mechanism of insect wing folding and provides a framework for further study of capillarity-driven folding in both natural and biomimetic systems at small scales.

  6. Spontaneous germinal centers and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Domeier, Phillip P; Schell, Stephanie L; Rahman, Ziaur S M

    2017-02-01

    Germinal centers (GCs) are dynamic microenvironments that form in the secondary lymphoid organs and generate somatically mutated high-affinity antibodies necessary to establish an effective humoral immune response. Tight regulation of GC responses is critical for maintaining self-tolerance. GCs can arise in the absence of purposeful immunization or overt infection (called spontaneous GCs, Spt-GCs). In autoimmune-prone mice and patients with autoimmune disease, aberrant regulation of Spt-GCs is thought to promote the development of somatically mutated pathogenic autoantibodies and the subsequent development of autoimmunity. The mechanisms that control the formation of Spt-GCs and promote systemic autoimmune diseases remain an open question and the focus of ongoing studies. Here, we discuss the most current studies on the role of Spt-GCs in autoimmunity.

  7. Estimation of spontaneous mutation rates.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Loki; Berry, Charles C; Gasche, Christoph

    2003-09-01

    Spontaneous or randomly occurring mutations play a key role in cancer progression. Estimation of the mutation rate of cancer cells can provide useful information about the disease. To ascertain these mutation rates, we need mathematical models that describe the distribution of mutant cells. In this investigation, we develop a discrete time stochastic model for a mutational birth process. We assume that mutations occur concurrently with mitosis so that when a nonmutant parent cell splits into two progeny, one of these daughter cells could carry a mutation. We propose an estimator for the mutation rate and investigate its statistical properties via theory and simulations. A salient feature of this estimator is the ease with which it can be computed. The methods developed herein are applied to a human colorectal cancer cell line and compared to existing continuous time models.

  8. Spontaneous rupture on irregular faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-01

    It is now know (e.g. Robinson et al., 2006) that when ruptures propagate around bends, the rupture velocity decrease. In the extreme case, a large bend in the fault can stop the rupture. We develop a 2-D finite difference method to simulate spontaneous dynamic rupture on irregular faults. This method is based on a second order leap-frog finite difference scheme on a uniform mesh of triangles. A relaxation method is used to generate an irregular fault geometry-conforming mesh from the uniform mesh. Through this numerical coordinate mapping, the elastic wave equations are transformed and solved in a curvilinear coordinate system. Extensive numerical experiments using the linear slip-weakening law will be shown to demonstrate the effect of fault geometry on rupture properties. A long term goal is to simulate the strong ground motion near the vicinity of bends, jogs, etc.

  9. Effect of pervaporation plate thickness on the rate of methanol evaporation in a passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauzi, N. F. I.; Hasran, U. A.; Kamarudin, S. K.

    2015-09-01

    In a passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), methanol vapor is typically obtained using a pervaporation plate in a process by which liquid methanol contained in the fuel reservoir undergoes a phase change to vapor in the anodic vapor chamber. This work investigates the effect of pervaporation plate thickness on the rate of methanol evaporation using a three-dimensional simulation model developed by varying the plate thickness. A. The rate of methanol evaporation was measured using Darcy's law. The rate of methanol evaporation was found to be inversely proportional to the plate thickness, where the decrease in thickness inevitably lowers the resistance along the plate and consequently increases the methanol transport through the plate. This shows that the plate thickness has a significant influence on the rate of methanol evaporation and thereby plays an important role in improving the performance of the passive vapor-feed direct methanol fuel cell.

  10. Anti-spasmodic action of crude methanolic extract and a new compound isolated from the aerial parts of Myrsine africana

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Myrsine africana is an herbaceous plant that is traditionally used as appetizer and carminative. Locally, it is used for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis, rheumatism and diarrhea by healers. The aims of the current study were to screen the crude methanol extract obtained from the aerial parts (leaves and stem) of M. africana, for antispasmodic actions on isolated tissues and further to subject the ethyl acetate (EtOAc) fraction of plant to column chromatography for isolation of pure compounds. Methods The antispasmodic action of the crude methanol extract was measured on the spontaneous rabbit's jejunum preparations at concentration 0.01, 0.03, 0.1, 0.3, 1.0, 5.0 and 10.0 mg/ml. The crude extract was also applied, in similar concentrations, on KCl (80 mM) induced contractions to explain its possible mode of action. Results A new compound Myrsigenin was isolated from the EtOAc fraction of M. africana. The structure of the compound was identified with the help of 13C-NMR, 1H-NMR, HMBC, HMQC, NOESY and COSY. The plant crude methanol extract showed a significant antispasmodic action on rabbit jejunum and abolished the tissue contraction completely at concentration of 5.0 mg/ml. Conclusion The study concludes that the methanol crude extract of aerial parts of M. africana has antispasmodic action possibly through the calcium channel blocking mechanisms. A new compound Myrsigenin was isolated from the EtOAc fraction of the plant. PMID:21733176

  11. Spontaneous resorption of calcification at the long head of the biceps tendon

    PubMed Central

    Amri, Adriansyah; Nakai, Sho; Hara, Michiharu; Yamanaka, Issei; Hamawaki, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    Calcific tendinitis of the long head of the biceps tendon is a rare cause of shoulder pain. Calcium deposits are often spontaneously resorbed or reduced in size in the rotator cuff tendons, which represent the most common sites of calcific tendinitis around the shoulder. To our knowledge, no case of spontaneous resorption of calcification in the long head of the biceps tendon has been reported in the literature. Here, we report one such case and describe its successful treatment using a conservative approach. PMID:27582978

  12. Hydrogen and methanol exchange processes for (TMP)Rh-OCH3(CH3OH) in binary solutions of methanol and benzene.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sounak; Li, Shan; Wayland, Bradford B

    2011-04-18

    Tetramesityl porphinato rhodium(III) methoxide ((TMP)Rh-OCH(3)) binds with methanol in benzene to form a 1:1 methanol complex ((TMP)Rh-OCH(3)(CH(3)OH)) (1). Dynamic processes are observed to occur for the rhodium(III) methoxide methanol complex (1) that involve both hydrogen and methanol exchange. Hydrogen exchange between coordinated methanol and methoxide through methanol in solution results in an interchange of the environments for the non-equivalent porphyrin faces that contain methoxide and methanol ligands. Interchange of the environments of the coordinated methanol and methoxide sites in 1 produces interchange of the inequivalent mesityl o-CH(3) groups, but methanol ligand exchange occurs on one face of the porphyrin and the mesityl o-CH(3) groups remain inequivalent. Rate constants for dynamic processes are evaluated by full line shape analysis for the (1)H NMR of the mesityl o-CH(3) and high field methyl resonances of coordinated methanol and methoxide groups in 1. The rate constant for interchange of the inequivalent porphyrin faces is associated with hydrogen exchange between 1 and methanol in solution and is observed to increase regularly with the increase in the mole fraction of methanol. The rate constant for methanol ligand exchange between 1 and the solution varies with the solution composition and fluctuates in a manner that parallels the change in the activation energy for methanol diffusion which is a consequence of solution non-ideality from hydrogen bonded clusters.

  13. Reduced graphene oxide (RGO)-supported NiCo2O4 nanoparticles: an electrocatalyst for methanol oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Ashok Kumar; Layek, Rama K.; Kim, Nam Hoon; Jung, Daeseung; Lee, Joong Hee

    2014-08-01

    The design and development of cheap, highly active, and durable non-platinum (Pt)-based electrocatalysts for methanol electrooxidation is highly desirable, but is a challenging task. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of a hydrothermally synthesized NiCo2O4-reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composite as an electrocatalyst for the electrochemical oxidation of methanol in alkaline pH. The physicochemical properties of the NiCo2O4-RGO composite were investigated via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (RS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements. The physical characterization methods confirm the deposition of NiCo2O4 nanoparticles on the RGO surface. The TEM image shows that the NiCo2O4 nanoparticles with an average size of ~10 nm are distributed over the RGO surface. Compared to RGO and NiCo2O4 nanoparticles, the NiCo2O4-RGO-based electrode shows excellent electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol in alkaline pH. On the NiCo2O4-RGO-based electrode, the oxidation of methanol occurs at ~0.6 V with a higher catalytic current density, and the response is highly stable. The excellent electrocatalytic activity of the NiCo2O4-RGO composite is attributed to the synergistic effects between the NiCo2O4 nanoparticles and RGO. Since the NiCo2O4-RGO composite shows a highly stable response during methanol oxidation reaction, it is a very promising material to be used as an electrocatalyst in the development of high performance non-Pt based alkaline fuel cells.The design and development of cheap, highly active, and durable non-platinum (Pt)-based electrocatalysts for methanol electrooxidation is highly desirable, but is a challenging task. In this paper, we demonstrate the application of a hydrothermally synthesized NiCo2O4-reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composite as an electrocatalyst for the electrochemical

  14. Evaluation of wound healing potential of methanolic Crinum jagus bulb extract

    PubMed Central

    Udegbunam, Sunday Ositadimma; Kene, Raphael Okoli Chukwujekwu; Anika, Silvanus Maduka; Udegbunam, Rita Ijeoma; Nnaji, Theophilus Okafor; Anyanwu, Madubuike Umunna

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Crinum jagus (J. Thomps.) Dandy commonly called Harmattan or St. Christopher’s lily belonging to the family Liliaceae is widely used traditionally in Southeastern Nigeria for treatment of skin sores. This study investigated the wound healing potentials of methanolic C. jagus bulb extract (MCJBE) using incision, excision, and dead space wound healing models. Materials and Methods: Phytochemical screening showed the presence of alkaloids, glycosides, tannins, saponins in the extract, but absence of flavonoids. In the incision and dead space wound models, rats were dosed orally with 300 mg/kg body weight (bw) of 10 and 5% of MCJBE solution, respectively, while in the excision wound model, rats were treated topically with 10 and 5% MCJBE ointments (MCJBEO), respectively. Result: The 10% MCJBE gave significantly (P < 0.05) highest percentage rate of wound contraction, shortest re-epithelialization and complete healing time when compared with 5% MCJBE and reference drug, framycetin sulfate. The extract of C. jagus showed significant (P < 0.05) concentration-dependent wound healing activity in incision, dead space and excision wound models. No contaminating microbial organism was isolated from wound sites of the rats dosed and treated with MCJBE throughout the study period. At day 7, post infliction of excision wound, histomorphological, and histochemical studies revealed more fibroblasts and Type 1 collagen deposits in wound site sections of rats treated with both 10 and 5% MCJBEO while those of the control showed more inflammatory cells and fewer Type 1 collagen deposits. At day 14 post infliction of excision wound, more epithelial regeneration with overlying keratin were seen in the histological sections of wounds of rats treated with both 10 and 5% MCJBEO, while histochemical study showed more Type 1 collagen deposits in wound site sections of rats in 10% MCJBEO treated group. Conclusion: This study established that methanolic C. jagus bulb extract

  15. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) Battery Replacement Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-29

    studies on performance degradation of Catalysts and Nafion™ Membrane Functional Groups in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells, IN PREP (06 2013) TOTAL: 1 Books... 18 Single Cell: Progress...31 Laser Activated Membrane Introduction Mass Spectrometry (LAMIMS) .................................... 37 Future Work (internally

  16. Catalytic studies on a novel synthesis of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Palekar, V.M.; Tierney, J.W.; Wender, I.

    1991-06-28

    Catalytic studies on a new method for methanol synthesis from CO and H{sub 2} in a slurry reactor are described. This reaction proceeds through the carbonylation of methanol to methyl formate in the liquid phase followed by hydrogenolysis of methyl formate to two molecules of methanol; the net result is the reaction of CO with H{sub 2} to give methanol. Moderate temperatures and pressures (100--160{degrees}C, 50--65 atm) are used. Reaction rates using mixed catalysts comprised of an alkali methoxide and Cu-chromite are presented. It seems likely that Cu-chromite maintains the activity of the alkali methoxide catalyst. A mixed catalyst comprised of potassium methoxide and Cu-chromite was found to be the most active under the reaction conditions used. Evidence is provided for an interaction between the alkali methoxide and Cu-chromite. 27 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Removal of sulfur contaminants in methanol for fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Kumar, R.; Sederquist, R.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cell power plants are being developed for transit bus and passenger car applications that use methanol as the on-board fuel. Commodity methanol by itself contains very little sulfur; however, it may occasionally be contaminated with up to about 1% diesel fuel or gasoline in current liquid-fuel distribution systems, leading to the presence of sulfur in the methanol fuel. This sulfur must be removed because of its deleterious effect on the reforming catalysts. International Fuel Cells has set the allowable sulfur limit in the methanol fuel at less than 1 ppm. The equilibrium adsorption isotherm and breakthrough data were used to assess the feasibility of developing a granular activated carbon adsorber for the removal of sulfur from transportation fuel cell systems.

  18. Detection of Methanol in a Class 0 Protostellar Disk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langer, W.; Velusamy, T.; Goldsmith, P.

    1999-01-01

    We report the detection of emission from methanol in a compact source coincident with the position of the L1157 infrared source, which we attribute to molecules in the disk surrounding this young, class 0 protostellar object.

  19. Ultrasonic Spray-Assisted Solution-Based Vapor-Deposition of Aluminum Tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, Jinchun; Katori, Shigetaka; Ikenoue, Takumi; Fujita, Shizuo

    2011-02-01

    Aluminum tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq3) thin films were fabricated by a vapor-deposition technique from its methanol solution, that is, by the ultrasonic-assisted mist deposition technique. The application of high ultrasonic power to the Alq3-methanol mixture resulted in a stable and transparent solution. Mist particles formed by ultrasonic atomization of the solution were used as the source for vapor-deposition at the substrate temperature of 100-200 °C. Optical absorption and photoluminescence characteristics indicated the formation of Alq3 thin films. The results promise the formation of thin films of a variety of organic materials by the solution-based technique.

  20. Two-step method preparation of graphene without hydrogen on methanol pretreatment copper substrate by PECVD at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Linzhi; Liu, JingJing; Zhao, Zhanxia; Chen, Shumin; Ma, Zhongquan; Zhao, Lei

    2016-10-01

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is one effective method to prepare graphene at low temperature in a short time. However, the low temperature in PECVD could not provide substrate a proper state for large area and few layer graphene preparation. Herein, we propose a two-step method to grow graphene on Cu foils. In the first step, in order to acquire a smooth and oxide-free surface state, methanol was used as a reductant to pretreat Cu. In the second step, graphene films were prepared on Cu foils by PECVD using CH4 as carbon source with H2-free. Few-layer graphene sheets with diameter about 1 μm under low temperature (700 °C) and at a short time (10 min) on well pretreated Cu foils were successfully gotten. The effect of methanol pretreatment on graphene synthesis and the graphene growth mechanism on Cu substrate by PECVD are analyzed comprehensively.

  1. Coke formation in a zeolite crystal during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction as studied with atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGES

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; ...

    2016-08-03

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using 13C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30–60 13C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid sitemore » density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. Here, this nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.« less

  2. Coke formation in a zeolite crystal during the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction as studied with atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Joel E.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.; Mazumder, Baishakhi; Attila, Özgün; Fu, Donglong; de Winter, D. A. Matthijs; Meirer, Florian; Bare, Simon R.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2016-08-03

    Understanding the formation of carbon deposits in zeolites is vital to developing new, superior materials for various applications, including oil and gas conversion processes. Herein, atom probe tomography (APT) has been used to spatially resolve the 3D compositional changes at the sub-nm length scale in a single zeolite ZSM-5 crystal, which has been partially deactivated by the methanol-to-hydrocarbons reaction using 13C-labeled methanol. The results reveal the formation of coke in agglomerates that span length scales from tens of nanometers to atomic clusters with a median size of 30–60 13C atoms. These clusters correlate with local increases in Brønsted acid site density, demonstrating that the formation of the first deactivating coke precursor molecules occurs in nanoscopic regions enriched in aluminum. Here, this nanoscale correlation underscores the importance of carefully engineering materials to suppress detrimental coke formation.

  3. Spontaneity and Equilibrium II: Multireaction Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic criteria for spontaneity and equilibrium in multireaction systems are developed and discussed. When N reactions are occurring simultaneously, it is shown that G and A will depend upon N independent reaction coordinates, ?a (a = 1,2, ..., N), in addition to T and p for G or T and V for A. The general criteria for spontaneity and…

  4. Spontaneous diaphragm rupture associated with vaginal delivery.

    PubMed

    Hamaji, Masatsugu; Burt, Bryan M; Ali, Syed Osman; Cohen, Daniel M

    2013-08-01

    Spontaneous rupture of the diaphragm associated with vaginal delivery is a rare occurrence, but has high rates of morbidity and mortality. Herein, we present a first uncomplicated case of spontaneous rupture of the diaphragm associated with vaginal delivery, which was treated successfully with surgery via a thoracotomy.

  5. "Spontaneous" Strategy Use: Perspectives from Metacognitive Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borkowski, John G.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A metacognitive model was proposed as an explanatory framework for spontaneous strategy use. A study in which hyperactive children transferred newly acquired strategies following self-control training and attributional retraining served as an illustration of how components in the model can be used to better understand "spontaneity." (Author/LMO)

  6. Spontaneous fission properties and lifetime systematics

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1989-03-01

    Half-lives for spontaneous fission of nuclides with even and odd numbers of particles are compared with recent theoretical calculations. A summary of odd particle hindrance factors is given. The most recent measurements of kinetic-energy and mass distributions and neutron emission for spontaneous fission of the heaviest nuclides are summarized and discussed. 51 refs., 9 figs.

  7. Ibn Sina plans giant methanol plant in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-14

    Following an announcement last week by Saudi Basic Industries Corp. that its Ar Razi joint venture plans to build an 850,000 m.t./year methanol plant at Al Jubail (CW December 7, p. 20) comes word that Sabic`s other domestic methanol production subsidiary, Ibn Sina, plans to add 1 million m.t./year of capacity. The new project will likely exceed $300 million.

  8. Effect of methanol on the biofiltration of n-hexane.

    PubMed

    Zehraoui, Abderrahman; Hassan, Ashraf Aly; Sorial, George A

    2012-06-15

    This study investigated the removal of recalcitrant compounds in the presence of a hydrophilic compound. n-Hexane is used as a model compound to represent hydrophobic compounds. Methanol has been introduced in mixture with n-hexane in order to increase the bioavailability of n-hexane in trickle-bed-air-biofilters (TBABs). The mixing ratios investigated were: 70% methanol:30% n-hexane, and 80% methanol:20% n-hexane by volume. n-Hexane loading rates (LRs) ranged from 0.9 to 13.2 g m(-3) h(-1). Methanol LRs varied from 4.6 to 64.5 g m(-3) h(-1) and from 2.3 to 45.2 g m(-3) h(-1) depending upon the mixing ratio used. Biofilter performance, effect of mixing ratios of methanol to n-hexane, removal profile along biofilter depth, COD/nitrogen consumption and CO(2) production were studied under continuous loading operation conditions. Results have shown that the degradation of n-hexane is significantly enhanced by the presence of methanol for n-hexane LRs less than 13.2 g m(-3) h(-1). For n-hexane LR greater than 13.2 g m(-3) h(-1), even though methanol had impacted n-hexane biodegradation, its removal efficiency was higher than our previous study for biodegradation of n-hexane alone, in presence of surfactant, or in presence of benzene. On the other hand, the degradation of methanol was not impacted by the presence of n-hexane.

  9. Engineering electromagnetic metamaterials and methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yen, Tajen

    2005-07-01

    Electromagnetic metamaterials represent a group of artificial structures, whose dimensions are smaller than subwavelength. Due to electromagnetic metamaterials' collective response to the applied fields, they can exhibit unprecedented properties to fascinate researchers' eyes. For instance, artificial magnetism above terahertz frequencies and beyond, negative magnetic response, and artificial plasma lower than ultraviolet and visible frequencies. Our goal is to engineer those novel properties aforementioned at interested frequency regions and further optimize their performance. To fulfill this task, we developed exclusive micro/nano fabrication techniques to construct magnetic metamaterials (i.e., split-ring resonators and L-shaped resonators) and electric metamaterials (i.e., plasmonic wires) and also employed Taguchi method to study the optimal design of electromagnetic metamaterials. Moreover, by integrating magnetic and electric metamaterials, we have been pursuing to fabricate so-called negative index media---the Holy Grail enables not only to reverse conventional optical rules such as Snell's law, Doppler shift, and Cerenkov radiation, but also to smash the diffraction limit to realize the superlensing effect. In addition to electromagnetic metamaterials, in this dissertation we also successfully miniaturize silicon-based methanol fuel cells by means of micro-electrical-mechanical-system technique, which promise to provide an integrated micro power source with excellent performance. Our demonstrated power density and energy density are one of the highest in reported documents. Finally, based on the results of metamaterials and micro fuel cells, we intend to supply building blocks to complete an omnipotent device---a system with sensing, communication, computing, power, control, and actuation functions.

  10. Dietary Methanol Regulates Human Gene Activity

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Tatiana V.; Sheshukova, Ekaterina V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Kiryanov, Gleb I.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2014-01-01

    Methanol (MeOH) is considered to be a poison in humans because of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH)-mediated conversion of MeOH to formaldehyde (FA), which is toxic. Our recent genome-wide analysis of the mouse brain demonstrated that an increase in endogenous MeOH after ADH inhibition led to a significant increase in the plasma MeOH concentration and a modification of mRNA synthesis. These findings suggest endogenous MeOH involvement in homeostasis regulation by controlling mRNA levels. Here, we demonstrate directly that study volunteers displayed increasing concentrations of MeOH and FA in their blood plasma when consuming citrus pectin, ethanol and red wine. A microarray analysis of white blood cells (WBC) from volunteers after pectin intake showed various responses for 30 significantly differentially regulated mRNAs, most of which were somehow involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). There was also a decreased synthesis of hemoglobin mRNA, HBA and HBB, the presence of which in WBC RNA was not a result of red blood cells contamination because erythrocyte-specific marker genes were not significantly expressed. A qRT-PCR analysis of volunteer WBCs after pectin and red wine intake confirmed the complicated relationship between the plasma MeOH content and the mRNA accumulation of both genes that were previously identified, namely, GAPDH and SNX27, and genes revealed in this study, including MME, SORL1, DDIT4, HBA and HBB. We hypothesized that human plasma MeOH has an impact on the WBC mRNA levels of genes involved in cell signaling. PMID:25033451

  11. Enhanced Methanol Production in Plants Provides Broad Spectrum Insect Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Sameer; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Harpal; Sidhu, Om Prakash; Verma, Praveen Chandra; K, Chandrashekar

    2013-01-01

    Plants naturally emit methanol as volatile organic compound. Methanol is toxic to insect pests; but the quantity produced by most of the plants is not enough to protect them against invading insect pests. In the present study, we demonstrated that the over-expression of pectin methylesterase, derived from Arabidopsis thaliana and Aspergillus niger, in transgenic tobacco plants enhances methanol production and resistance to polyphagous insect pests. Methanol content in the leaves of transgenic plants was measured using proton nuclear spectroscopy (1H NMR) and spectra showed up to 16 fold higher methanol as compared to control wild type (WT) plants. A maximum of 100 and 85% mortality in chewing insects Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura larvae was observed, respectively when fed on transgenic plants leaves. The surviving larvae showed less feeding, severe growth retardation and could not develop into pupae. In-planta bioassay on transgenic lines showed up to 99 and 75% reduction in the population multiplication of plant sap sucking pests Myzus persicae (aphid) and Bemisia tabaci (whitefly), respectively. Most of the phenotypic characters of transgenic plants were similar to WT plants. Confocal microscopy showed no deformities in cellular integrity, structure and density of stomata and trichomes of transgenic plants compared to WT. Pollen germination and tube formation was also not affected in transgenic plants. Cell wall enzyme transcript levels were comparable with WT. This study demonstrated for the first time that methanol emission can be utilized for imparting broad range insect resistance in plants. PMID:24223989

  12. Production of Methanol from Methane by Encapsulated Methylosinus sporium.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sanjay K S; Jeong, Jae-Hoon; Mehariya, Sanjeet; Otari, Sachin V; Madan, Bharat; Haw, Jung Rim; Lee, Jung-Kul; Zhang, Liaoyuan; Kim, In-Won

    2016-12-28

    Massive reserves of methane (CH₄) remain unexplored as a feedstock for the production of liquid fuels and chemicals, mainly because of the lack of economically suitable and sustainable strategies for selective oxidation of CH₄ to methanol. The present study demonstrates the bioconversion of CH₄ to methanol mediated by Type I methanotrophs, such as Methylomicrobium album and Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum. Furthermore, immobilization of a Type II methanotroph, Methylosinus sporium, was carried out using different encapsulation methods, employing sodium-alginate (Na-alginate) and silica gel. The encapsulated cells demonstrated higher stability for methanol production. The optimal pH, temperature, and agitation rate were determined to be pH 7.0, 30°C, and 175 rpm, respectively, using inoculum (1.5 mg of dry cell mass/ml) and 20% of CH₄ as a feed. Under these conditions, maximum methanol production (3.43 and 3.73 mM) by the encapsulated cells was recorded. Even after six cycles of reuse, the Na-alginate and silica gel encapsulated cells retained 61.8% and 51.6% of their initial efficiency for methanol production, respectively, in comparison with the efficiency of 11.5% observed in the case of free cells. These results suggest that encapsulation of methanotrophs is a promising approach to improve the stability of methanol production.

  13. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gurau, Bogdan

    2013-05-31

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  14. Towards operating direct methanol fuel cells with highly concentrated fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T. S.; Yang, W. W.; Chen, R.; Wu, Q. X.

    A significant advantage of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is the high specific energy of the liquid fuel, making it particularly suitable for portable and mobile applications. Nevertheless, conventional DMFCs have to be operated with excessively diluted methanol solutions to limit methanol crossover and the detrimental consequences. Operation with diluted methanol solutions significantly reduces the specific energy of the power pack and thereby prevents it from competing with advanced batteries. In view of this fact, there exists a need to improve conventional DMFC system designs, including membrane electrode assemblies and the subsystems for supplying/removing reactants/products, so that both the cell performance and the specific energy can be simultaneously maximized. This article provides a comprehensive review of past efforts on the optimization of DMFC systems that operate with concentrated methanol. Based on the discussion of the key issues associated with transport of the reactants/products, the strategies to manage the supply/removal of the reactants/products in DMFC operating with highly concentrated methanol are identified. With these strategies, the possible approaches to achieving the goal of concentrated fuel operation are then proposed. Past efforts in the management of the reactants/products for implementing each of the approaches are also summarized and reviewed.

  15. Methanol-powered cars get ready to hit the road

    SciTech Connect

    Moffat, A.S.

    1991-02-01

    In an effort to free the US from oil dependence on the Middle East and to reduce atmospheric pollution by automobile exhausts, the US automobile makers are about to take the historic step of commercial production of cars designed to run on methanol. Methanol has a higher octane rating (100) than gasoline (93-97), allows cars to run more efficiently, and offers more lively automobile performance. Some disadvantages of methanol powered cars are problems with cold starts; less energy per gallon of fuel would decrease the driving range of automobiles before refuel ling; production of more aldehydes, which exacerbate ozone and smog production and may be carcinogens as well; and higher costs ($300 to 500 more) than conventional vehicles. The uncertainty of availability of fuel has prompted automobile manufacturers to design current models of automobiles to be flexible fuel vehicles to run on mixtures of gasoline and methanol. Should the demand for methanol fuel increase, the availability would surely rise. The cost of methanol compares favorably with that of gasoline - $1.20 to 1.30 per gallon.

  16. [Effect of plant-associated methanolic bacteria on methane and methanol concentration dynamics in atmosphere of pressurized chamber].

    PubMed

    Berkovich, Iu A; Doronina, N V; Fedorov, D N; Mukhamedieva, L N; Mikos, K N; Krivobock, N M; Smolianin, V G; Smolianina, S O; Shanturin, N A

    2010-01-01

    Stability of Chinese cabbage crop colonization by methanolic bacteria Methylovorus mays, Methylomonas methanica and Methylosinus trichosporium inoculated using a space-applicable method was evaluated. Besides, trends of methane and methanol concentrations in the pressurized chamber with inoculated and uninoculated crops were calculated. Methylovorus mays and Methylosinus trichosporium were shown to establish more stable colonization as compared to Methylomonas methanica. Also, stable association of methanolic bacteria with plants reduced airborne methanol 75% faster owing to its uptake by bacteria. Therefore, inoculation of these microorganisms can be viewed as a promising method of controlling volatile pollutants in space vehicle atmosphere. Methane drop after 6-hour exposure to inoculated control and test crops was not significant.

  17. 26 CFR 48.4041-19 - Exemption for qualified methanol and ethanol fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exemption for qualified methanol and ethanol....4041-19 Exemption for qualified methanol and ethanol fuel. (a) In general. Under section 4041(b)(2... or use of qualified methanol or ethanol fuel. (b) Qualified methanol or ethanol fuel defined....

  18. 26 CFR 48.4041-19 - Exemption for qualified methanol and ethanol fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exemption for qualified methanol and ethanol....4041-19 Exemption for qualified methanol and ethanol fuel. (a) In general. Under section 4041(b)(2... or use of qualified methanol or ethanol fuel. (b) Qualified methanol or ethanol fuel defined....

  19. 26 CFR 48.4041-19 - Exemption for qualified methanol and ethanol fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Exemption for qualified methanol and ethanol....4041-19 Exemption for qualified methanol and ethanol fuel. (a) In general. Under section 4041(b)(2... or use of qualified methanol or ethanol fuel. (b) Qualified methanol or ethanol fuel defined....

  20. 26 CFR 48.4041-19 - Exemption for qualified methanol and ethanol fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exemption for qualified methanol and ethanol....4041-19 Exemption for qualified methanol and ethanol fuel. (a) In general. Under section 4041(b)(2... or use of qualified methanol or ethanol fuel. (b) Qualified methanol or ethanol fuel defined....

  1. Assessment/Review of Methanol Technology and Utilization as a Fuel.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    employment of a selective zeolite molecular sieve catalyst which dehydrates methanol. The remaining methyl radicals combine to form a material similar...turbine ingestion and utilization inhalation Distribution Neat methanol Spark-ignition, Flame and handling, Compression-ignition, invisibility...ENVIRONMENT Methanol is a toxic substance that can enter the body through inhalation , ingestion, or absorption through the skin. Methanol has a low

  2. Microscopic models of PdZn alloy catalysts: structure and reactivity in methanol decomposition.

    PubMed

    Neyman, Konstantin M; Lim, Kok Hwa; Chen, Zhao-Xu; Moskaleva, Lyudmila V; Bayer, Andreas; Reindl, Armin; Borgmann, Dieter; Denecke, Reinhard; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Rösch, Notker

    2007-07-21

    We review systematic experimental and theoretical efforts that explored formation, structure and reactivity of PdZn catalysts for methanol steam reforming, a material recently proposed to be superior to the industrially used Cu based catalysts. Experimentally, ordered surface alloys with a Pd : Zn ratio of approximately 1 : 1 were prepared by deposition of thin Zn layers on a Pd(111) surface and characterized by photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. The valence band spectrum of the PdZn alloy resembles closely the spectrum of Cu(111), in good agreement with the calculated density of states for a PdZn alloy of 1 : 1 stoichiometry. Among the issues studied with the help of density functional calculations are surface structure and stability of PdZn alloys and effects of Zn segregation in them, and the nature of the most likely water-related surface species present under the conditions of methanol steam reforming. Furthermore, a series of elementary reactions starting with the decomposition of methoxide, CH(3)O, along both C-H and C-O bond scission channels, on various surfaces of the 1 : 1 PdZn alloy [planar (111), (100) and stepped (221)] were quantified in detail thermodynamically and kinetically in comparison with the corresponding reactions on the surfaces Pd(111) and Cu(111). The overall surface reactivity of PdZn alloy was found to be similar to that of metallic Cu. Reactive methanol adsorption was also investigated by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for pressures between 3 x 10(-8) and 0.3 mbar.

  3. Physical characteristics of bright Class I methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leurini, S.; Menten, K. M.; Walmsley, C. M.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Class I methanol masers are thought to be tracers of interstellar shock waves. However, they have received relatively little attention mostly as a consequence of their low luminosities compared to other maser transitions. This situation has changed recently and Class I methanol masers are now routinely used as signposts of outflow activity especially in high extinction regions. The recent detection of polarisation in Class I lines now makes it possible to obtain direct observational information about magnetic fields in interstellar shocks. Aims: We make use of newly calculated collisional rate coefficients for methanol to investigate the excitation of Class I methanol masers and to reconcile the observed Class I methanol maser properties with model results. Methods: We performed large velocity gradient calculations with a plane-parallel slab geometry appropriate for shocks to compute the pump and loss rates which regulate the interactions of the different maser systems with the maser reservoir. We study the dependence of the pump rate coefficient, the maser loss rate, and the inversion efficiency of the pumping scheme of several Class I masers on the physics of the emitting gas. Results: We predict inversion in all transitions where maser emission is observed. Bright Class I methanol masers are mainly high-temperature (>100 K) high-density (n(H2) ~ 107-108 cm-3) structures with methanol maser emission measures, ξ, corresponding to high methanol abundances close to the limits set by collisional quenching. Our model predictions reproduce reasonably well most of the observed properties of Class I methanol masers. Class I masers in the 25 GHz series are the most sensitive to the density of the medium and mase at higher densities than other lines. Moreover, even at high density and high methanol abundances, their luminosity is predicted to be lower than that of the 44 GHz and 36 GHz masers. Our model predictions also reflect the observational result that the

  4. Cytochemical studies on the localization of methanol oxidase and other oxidases in peroxisomes of methanol-grown Hansenula polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Veenhuis, M; van Dijken, J P; Harder, W

    1976-12-01

    The localization of methanol oxidase activity in cells of methanol-limited chemostat cultures of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha has been studied with different cytochemical staining techniques. The methods were based on enzymatic or chemical trapping of the hydrogen peroxide produced by the enzyme during aerobic incubations of whole cells in methanol-containing media. The results showed that methanol-dependent hydrogen peroxide production in either fixed or unfixed cells exclusively occurred in peroxisomes, which characteristically develop during growth of this yeast on methanol. Apart from methanol oxidase and catalase, the typical peroxisomal enzymes D-aminoacid oxidase and L-alpha-hydroxyacid oxidase were also found to be located in the peroxisomes. Urate oxidase was not detected in these organelles. Phase-contrast microscopy of living cells revealed the occurrence of peroxisomes which were cubic of form. This unusual shape was also observed in thin sections examined by electron microscopy. The contents of the peroxisomes showed, after various fixation procedures, a completely crystalline or striated substructure. It is suggested that this substructure might represent the in vivo organization structure of the peroxisomal enzymes.

  5. Percolative fragmentation and spontaneous agglomeration

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, R.; Davis, K.

    1999-03-01

    Captive particle imaging experiments were performed on over 200 coal and char particles in the pulverized size range from four coals of various rank at oxygen concentration from 3--19 mol% and at gas temperatures of about 1250 K. Despite wide variations in single-particle behavior, the data set reveals two clear trends that provide new information on the nature of char combustion. First, the low-rank coal chars are observed to maintain their high reactivity through the late stages of combustion, thus avoiding the near-extinction events and long burnout tails observed for bituminous coal chars. Secondly, percolative fragmentation in the late stages of combustion is a rare event under these conditions. Some particles reach a percolation threshold rate in combustion, but typically undergo spontaneous agglomeration rather than liberation of the incipient fragments. It is concluded that percolative fragmentation behavior in the pulverized size range is determined not only by solid-phase connectivity, but also by a real competition between disruptive and cohesive forces present at the time of formation of the colloidal-sized incipient fragments.

  6. Cosmological aspects of spontaneous baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Simone, Andrea De; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2016-08-24

    We investigate cosmological aspects of spontaneous baryogenesis driven by a scalar field, and present general constraints that are independent of the particle physics model. The relevant constraints are obtained by studying the backreaction of the produced baryons on the scalar field, the cosmological expansion history after baryogenesis, and the baryon isocurvature perturbations. We show that cosmological considerations alone provide powerful constraints, especially for the minimal scenario with a quadratic scalar potential. Intriguingly, we find that for a given inflation scale, the other parameters including the reheat temperature, decoupling temperature of the baryon violating interactions, and the mass and decay constant of the scalar are restricted to lie within ranges of at most a few orders of magnitude. We also discuss possible extensions to the minimal setup, and propose two ideas for evading constraints on isocurvature perturbations: one is to suppress the baryon isocurvature with nonquadratic scalar potentials, another is to compensate the baryon isocurvature with cold dark matter isocurvature by making the scalar survive until the present.

  7. Spontaneous Circumrenal Hæmatoma

    PubMed Central

    Heritage, Kenneth

    1934-01-01

    By spontaneous circum-renal hæmatoma is meant a condition of extensive extravasation of blood into the kidney bed and surrounding tissues, unassociated with trauma. Since this is manifested by a fairly uniform clinical picture, by similar operative findings, and by peculiar difficulties in treatment, I propose to discuss it as a clinical entity irrespective of its wide ultimate causation. Very few cases are reported in the English literature. Nevertheless, from the world literature I have collected 170 case reports, and on them, together with three further cases, I base the present paper. Etiologically the cases fall into three groups:— (1) Those due to definite disease of the kidney or its blood-vessels, 58%. (2) Those due to extra-renal causes, 22%. (3) Those cases whose cause is obscure, 20%. In the first group neoplasms and inflammations of the kidney, aneurysms of the renal artery and arteriosclerosis are obvious causes. Many cases are due to obstruction of the renal veins. The classical triad of abdominal pain, signs of internal hæmorrhage, and a tumour in the loin are often obscured by the resemblance of an acute abdominal catastrophe. In acute cases, expectant treatment is almost invariably fatal. Evacuation of the clot, tamponage and drainage has a mortality of about 40%, whilst nephrectomy in 55 cases showed a mortality of 22%. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3 PMID:19989861

  8. Structural Characterization of Methanol Substituted Lanthanum Halides

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Timothy J.; Ottley, Leigh Anna M.; Alam, Todd M.; Rodriguez, Mark A.; Yang, Pin; Mcintyre, Sarah K.

    2010-01-01

    The first study into the alcohol solvation of lanthanum halide [LaX3] derivatives as a means to lower the processing temperature for the production of the LaBr3 scintillators was undertaken using methanol (MeOH). Initially the de-hydration of {[La(µ-Br)(H2O)7](Br)2}2 (1) was investigated through the simple room temperature dissolution of 1 in MeOH. The mixed solvate monomeric [La(H2O)7(MeOH)2](Br)3 (2) compound was isolated where the La metal center retains its original 9-coordination through the binding of two additional MeOH solvents but necessitates the transfer of the innersphere Br to the outersphere. In an attempt to in situ dry the reaction mixture of 1 in MeOH over CaH2, crystals of [Ca(MeOH)6](Br)2 (3) were isolated. Compound 1 dissolved in MeOH at reflux temperatures led to the isolation of an unusual arrangement identified as the salt derivative {[LaBr2.75•5.25(MeOH)]+0.25 [LaBr3.25•4.75(MeOH)]−0.25} (4). The fully substituted species was ultimately isolated through the dissolution of dried LaBr3 in MeOH forming the 8-coordinated [LaBr3(MeOH)5] (5) complex. It was determined that the concentration of the crystallization solution directed the structure isolated (4 concentrated; 5 dilute) The other LaX3 derivatives were isolated as [(MeOH)4(Cl)2La(µ-Cl)]2 (6) and [La(MeOH)9](I)3•MeOH (7). Beryllium Dome XRD analysis indicated that the bulk material for 5 appear to have multiple solvated species, 6 is consistent with the single crystal, and 7 was too broad to elucidate structural aspects. Multinuclear NMR (139La) indicated that these compounds do not retain their structure in MeOD. TGA/DTA data revealed that the de-solvation temperatures of the MeOH derivatives 4 – 6 were slightly higher in comparison to their hydrated counterparts. PMID:20514349

  9. Reversible methanol addition to copper Schiff base complexes: a kinetic, structural and spectroscopic study of reactions at azomethine C[double bond, length as m-dash]N bonds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wuyu; Saraei, Nina; Nie, Hanlin; Vaughn, John R; Jones, Alexis S; Mashuta, Mark S; Buchanan, Robert M; Grapperhaus, Craig A

    2016-10-12

    The reversible methanolysis of an azomethine C[double bond, length as m-dash]N in a series of copper(ii) Schiff base complexes has been investigated through combined spectroscopic, structural, and kinetic studies. Pentadentate copper(ii) complexes [L1-Cu(X)]Y (L1 = 1,2-bis[(1-methyl-2-imidazolyl)methyleneamino]ethane; X = Y = ClO4(-) (1); X = Y = TfO(-) (2); X = Y = BF4(-) (3); X = H2O, Y = (ClO4(-))2 (4) spontaneously add methanol in a ligand centered reaction to yield stable, isolable hemiaminal ether product complexes 5-8. In methanol free solution, 5-8 spontaneously release alcohol to regenerate 1-4. The methanol addition reaction is first-order in methanol and first-order in complex with second-order rate constants varying from 1.1 × 10(-4) to 187 × 10(-4) M(-1) s(-1) dependent on the donor ability of the axial ligand. Rate constants for methanol elimination vary from 0.67 to 3.7 × 10(-4) s(-1) with dependence on the counterion and water content of the solvent. Equilibrium constants for methanolysis range from 1.5 to 51 M(-1). Structural comparisons of the Schiff base complexes 1-4 and the hemiaminal ether complexes 5-8 suggest methanol addition is favored by the release of ligand strain associated with three planar five-membered chelates in 1-4.

  10. Catalytic gasification of bagasse for the production of methanol

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Brown, M.D.; Robertus, R.J.

    1985-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of catalytic gasification of bagasse to produce methanol. In previous studies, a catalytic steam gasification process was developed which converted wood to methanol synthesis gas in one step using nickel based catalysts in a fluid-bed gasifier. Tests in a nominal 1 ton/day process development unit (PDU) gasifier with these same catalysts showed bagasse to be a good feedstock for fluid-bed gasifiers, but the catalysts deactivated quite rapidly in the presence of bagasse. Laboratory catalyst screening tests showed K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ doped on the bagasse to be a promising catalyst for converting bagasse to methanol synthesis gas. PDU tests with 10 wt % K/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ doped on bagasse showed the technical feasibility of this type of catalyst on a larger scale. A high quality synthesis gas was produced and carbon conversion to gas was high. The gasifier was successfully operated without forming agglomerates of catalyst, ash, and char in the gasifier. There was no loss of activity throughout the runs because catalysts is continually added with the bagasse. Laboratory tests showed about 80% of the potassium carbonate could be recovered and recycled with a simple water wash. An economic evaluation of the process for converting bagasse to methanol showed the required selling price of methanol to be significantly higher than the current market price of methanol. Several factors make this current evaluaton using bagasse as a feedstock less favorable: (1) capital costs are higher due to inflation and some extra costs required to use bagasse, (2) smaller plant sizes were considered so economies of scale are lost, and (3) the market price of methanol in the US has fallen 44% in the last six months. 24 refs., 14 figs., 16 tabs.

  11. The Revised Version of Class I Methanol Maser Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larionov, G. M.; Litovchenko, I. D.; Val'tts, I. E.; Alakoz, A. V.

    2011-05-01

    The revised version of the class I methanol maser catalog is presented. It contains 198 sources in total. New class I methanol masers detected in the direction of EGOs (38 sources) were added to the previous list containing ˜ 160 sources (the list have been published in the first version of this catalog - see reference in the text). Electronic version of the catalog has been generated in the form of html file - http://www.asc.rssi.ru/MMI. A statistical analysis was carried out within 2' around a maser position to find an identification of class I methanol masers with any objects typical for star-forming regions - UCHII regions, IRAS sources, dark clouds, bipolar outflows, CS lines as of dense gas tracer, and other masers (class II methanol masers, OH and H_2O). Class I methanol masers identification was made with short-wave infrared objects EGO (extended green objects), which are tracers of bipolar outflows in young stellar objects. It was shown that in the new version of catalog more than 50% of class I methanol masers are identified with bipolar outflow - given EGOs as bipolar outflows (compared with the result of 22% in the first version of the catalog that contains no information about EGO). This result is a strong evidence in favor of the fact that EGOs are indeed active bipolar outflows. At the same time it is important to note, that none of the bipolar outflow, already registered in the direction of class I methanol maser, did not coincide with EGO (with the exception of G45.47+0.07). The results are submitted in a form of a diagram.

  12. The Methanol Poisoning Outbreaks in Libya 2013 and Kenya 2014

    PubMed Central

    Rostrup, Morten; Edwards, Jeffrey K.; Abukalish, Mohamed; Ezzabi, Masoud; Some, David; Ritter, Helga; Menge, Tom; Abdelrahman, Ahmed; Rootwelt, Rebecca; Janssens, Bart; Lind, Kyrre; Paasma, Raido; Hovda, Knut Erik

    2016-01-01

    Background Outbreaks of methanol poisoning occur frequently on a global basis, affecting poor and vulnerable populations. Knowledge regarding methanol is limited, likely many cases and even outbreaks go unnoticed, with patients dying unnecessarily. We describe findings from the first three large outbreaks of methanol poisoning where Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) responded, and evaluate the benefits of a possible future collaboration between local health authorities, a Non-Governmental Organisation and international expertise. Methods Retrospective study of three major methanol outbreaks in Libya (2013) and Kenya (May and July 2014). Data were collected from MSF field personnel, local health personnel, hospital files, and media reports. Findings In Tripoli, Libya, over 1,000 patients were poisoned with a reported case fatality rate of 10% (101/1,066). In Kenya, two outbreaks resulted in approximately 341 and 126 patients, with case fatality rates of 29% (100/341) and 21% (26/126), respectively. MSF launched an emergency team with international experts, medications and equipment, however, the outbreaks were resolving by the time of arrival. Interpretation Recognition of an outbreak of methanol poisoning and diagnosis seem to be the most challenging tasks, with significant delay from time of first presentations to public health warnings being issued. In spite of the rapid response from an emergency team, the outbreaks were nearly concluded by the time of arrival. A major impact on the outcome was not seen, but large educational trainings were conducted to increase awareness and knowledge about methanol poisoning. Based on this training, MSF was able to send a local emergency team during the second outbreak, supporting that such an approach could improve outcomes. Basic training, simplified treatment protocols, point-of-care diagnostic tools, and early support when needed, are likely the most important components to impact the consequences of methanol poisoning

  13. Prediction and validation of hemodialysis duration in acute methanol poisoning.

    PubMed

    Lachance, Philippe; Mac-Way, Fabrice; Desmeules, Simon; De Serres, Sacha A; Julien, Anne-Sophie; Douville, Pierre; Ghannoum, Marc; Agharazii, Mohsen

    2015-11-01

    The duration of hemodialysis (HD) in methanol poisoning (MP) is dependent on the methanol concentration, the operational parameters used during HD, and the presence and severity of metabolic acidosis. However, methanol assays are not easily available, potentially leading to undue extension or premature termination of treatment. Here we provide a prediction model for the duration of high-efficiency HD in MP. In a retrospective cohort study, we identified 71 episodes of MP in 55 individuals who were treated with alcohol dehydrogenase inhibition and HD. Four patients had residual visual abnormality at discharge and only one patient died. In 46 unique episodes of MP with high-efficiency HD the mean methanol elimination half-life (T1/2) during HD was 108 min in women, significantly different from the 129 min in men. In a training set of 28 patients with MP, using the 90th percentile of gender-specific elimination T1/2 (147 min in men and 141 min in women) and a target methanol concentration of 4 mmol/l allowed all cases to reach a safe methanol of under 6 mmol/l. The prediction model was confirmed in a validation set of 18 patients with MP. High-efficiency HD time in hours can be estimated using 3.390 × (Ln (MCi/4)) for women and 3.534 × (Ln (MCi/4)) for men, where MCi is the initial methanol concentration in mmol/l, provided that metabolic acidosis is corrected.

  14. Comparison of methanol and ethylene glycol oxidation by alloy and Core-Shell platinum based catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, D.; Burstein, L.; Rosenberg, Yu.; Peled, E.

    2011-10-01

    Two Core-Shell, RuCore-PtShell and IrNiCore-PtRuShell, XC72-supported catalyst were synthesized in a two-step deposition process with NaBH4 as reducing agent. The structure and composition of the Core-Shell catalysts were determined by EDS, XPS and XRD. Electrochemical characterization was performed with the use of cyclic voltammetry. Methanol and ethylene glycol oxidation activities of the Core-Shell catalysts (in terms of surface and mass activities) were studied at 80 °C and compared to those of a commercial Pt-Ru alloy catalyst. The surface activity of the alloy based catalyst, in the case of methanol oxidation, was found to be superior as a result of optimized surface Pt:Ru composition. However, the mass activity of the PtRu/IrNi/XC72 was higher than that of the alloy based catalyst by ∼50%. Regarding ethylene glycol oxidation, while the surface activity of the alloy based catalyst was slightly higher than that of the Pt/Ru/XC72 catalyst, the latter showed ∼66% higher activities in terms of A g-1 of Pt. These results show the potential of Core-Shell catalysts for reducing the cost of catalysts for DMFC and DEGFC.

  15. Enhancing the Electrocatalytic Property of Hollow Structured Platinum Nanoparticles for Methanol Oxidation Through A Hybrid Construction

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yan; Liu, Hui; Wang, Pengfei; Ye, Feng; Tan, Qiangqiang; Yang, Jun

    2014-01-01

    The integration of different components into a hybrid nanosystem for the utilization of the synergistic effects is an effective way to design the electrocatalysts. Herein, we demonstrate a hybrid strategy to enhance the electrocatalytic property of hollow structured Pt nanoparticles for methanol oxidation reaction. This strategy begins with the preparation of bimetallic Ag-Pt nanoparticles with a core-shell construction. Element sulfur is then added to transform the core-shell Ag-Pt nanostructures into hybrid nanodimers consisting of Ag2S nanocrystals and remaining Pt domains with intact hollow interiors (Ag2S-hPt). Finally, Au is deposited at the surface of the Ag2S domain in each hetero-dimer, resulting in the formation of ternary Ag2S-Au-hPt nanocomposites with solid-state interfaces. The ternary nanocomposites exhibit enhanced electrocatalytic property toward methanol oxidation due to the strong electronic coupling between Pt and other domains in the hybrid particles. The concept might be used toward the design and synthesis of other hetero-nanostructures with technological importance. PMID:25160947

  16. Pt nanocatalysts on a polyindole-functionalized carbon nanotube composite with high performance for methanol electrooxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui-Xiang; Fan, You-Jun; Wang, Li; Wu, Li-Na; Sun, Sheng-Nan; Sun, Shi-Gang

    2015-08-01

    Herein, we report a novel electrocatalyst consisting of Pt nanoparticles supported on a polyindole (PIn)-functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite (Pt/PIn-MWCNT) for use in the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR). The PIn-MWCNT support is synthesized via in situ chemical polymerization of indole on the MWCNT surface. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicated that the Pt nanoparticles were approximately 3.0 nm in size and were uniformly deposited on the surface of PIn-MWCNTs with no aggregation into larger clusters. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements confirm the strong electron interaction between the Pt nanoparticles and the PIn-MWCNT support as well as the formation of the Pt-N bond. The electrochemical tests demonstrate that the Pt/PIn-MWCNT composite exhibits much higher electrocatalytic activity, durability and CO tolerance than the Pt/MWCNT and commercial Pt/C catalysts toward MOR. The results indicate that the as-prepared Pt/PIn-MWCNTs are promising for use as an anode electrocatalyst in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs).

  17. The effect of the surface composition of Ru-Pt bimetallic catalysts for methanol oxidation

    DOE PAGES

    Garrick, Taylor R.; Diao, Weijian; Tengco, John M.; ...

    2016-02-23

    Here, a series of Ru-Pt bimetallic catalysts prepared by the electroless deposition of controlled and variable amounts of Ru on the Pt surface of a commercially-available 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst has been characterized and evaluated for the oxidation of methanol. The activity of each Ru-Pt catalyst was determined as a function of surface composition via cyclic voltammetry. For the Ru-Pt bimetallic catalysts, activity passed through a maximum at approximately 50% monodisperse Ru surface coverage. However, due to the monolayer coverage of Ru on Pt, the amount of metal in the catalyst is minimized compared to a bulk 1:1 atomic ratiomore » of Ru:Pt seen in commercial bimetallic catalysts. Chemisorption and temperature programmed reduction experiments confirmed that the surface had characteristics of a true bimetallic catalyst. On a mass of Pt basis, the activity of this composition for methanol oxidation was 7 times higher than pure Pt and 3.5 times higher than a commercial catalyst with a 1:1 Pt:Ru bulk atomic ratio.« less

  18. The effect of the surface composition of Ru-Pt bimetallic catalysts for methanol oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Garrick, Taylor R.; Diao, Weijian; Tengco, John M.; Stach, Eric A.; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Chen, Donna A.; Monnier, John R.; Weidner, John W.

    2016-02-23

    Here, a series of Ru-Pt bimetallic catalysts prepared by the electroless deposition of controlled and variable amounts of Ru on the Pt surface of a commercially-available 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst has been characterized and evaluated for the oxidation of methanol. The activity of each Ru-Pt catalyst was determined as a function of surface composition via cyclic voltammetry. For the Ru-Pt bimetallic catalysts, activity passed through a maximum at approximately 50% monodisperse Ru surface coverage. However, due to the monolayer coverage of Ru on Pt, the amount of metal in the catalyst is minimized compared to a bulk 1:1 atomic ratio of Ru:Pt seen in commercial bimetallic catalysts. Chemisorption and temperature programmed reduction experiments confirmed that the surface had characteristics of a true bimetallic catalyst. On a mass of Pt basis, the activity of this composition for methanol oxidation was 7 times higher than pure Pt and 3.5 times higher than a commercial catalyst with a 1:1 Pt:Ru bulk atomic ratio.

  19. Coal to methanol feasiblity study: Beluga methanol project. Volume 4: Environmental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    The major environmental issues relevant to development of a coal gasification and methanol fuels production facility and related coal mining activities and transportation systems in the west Cook Inlet area, Alaska were assessed. An extensive review into existing information on the Beluga region of west Cook Inlet was conducted and updated with the findings of land resource projects. Specific field activities then were initiated to expand the environmental data base in areas relevant to this project where there was a paucity of information. Based on these findings the project was reviewed in detail to identify significant environmental issues and to outline the state and federal permit requirements to ensure that these element are an integral component of all subsequent project planning and management decisions.

  20. Spontaneous emission in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, P. A.; Vitanov, N. V.; Bergmann, K.

    2005-11-15

    This work explores the effect of spontaneous emission on the population transfer efficiency in stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP). The approach uses adiabatic elimination of weakly coupled density matrix elements in the Liouville equation, from which a very accurate analytic approximation is derived. The loss of population transfer efficiency is found to decrease exponentially with the factor {omega}{sub 0}{sup 2}/{gamma}, where {gamma} is the spontaneous emission rate and {omega}{sub 0} is the peak Rabi frequency. The transfer efficiency increases with the pulse delay and reaches a steady value. For large pulse delay and large spontaneous emission rate STIRAP degenerates into optical pumping.

  1. Insights into high mass star formation from methanol maser observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmer, Hontas Freeman

    2013-06-01

    We present high angular resolution data on Class I and Class II methanol masers, together with other tracers of star formation like H2O masers, ultracompact (UC) ionized hydrogen (H II) regions, and 4.5 um infrared sources, taken from the literature. The aim is to study what these data tell us about the process of high mass star formation; in particular, whether disk-outflow systems are compatible with the morphology exhibited by Class I and Class II methanol masers. Stars form in the dense cores inside molecular clouds, and while the process of the formation of stars like our Sun is reasonably well understood, details of the formation of stars with masses eight times that of our Sun or greater, the so-called high mass stars, remain a mystery. Being compact and bright sources, masers provide an excellent way to observe high mass star forming regions. In particular, Class II methanol masers are found exclusively in high mass star forming regions. Based on the positions of the Class I and II methanol and H2O masers, UCHII regions and 4.5 um infrared sources, and the center velocities (vLSR) of the Class I methanol and H2O masers, compared to the vLSR of the Class II methanol masers, we propose three disk-outflow models that may be traced by methanol masers. In all three models, we have located the Class II methanol maser near the protostar, and the Class I methanol maser in the outflow, as is known from observations during the last twenty years. In our first model, the H2O masers trace the linear extent of the outflow. In our second model, the H2O masers are located in a circumstellar disk. In our third model, the H2O masers are located in one or more outflows near the terminating shock where the outflow impacts the ambient interstellar medium. Together, these models reiterate the utility of coordinated high angular resolution observations of high mass star forming regions in maser lines and associated star formation tracers.

  2. Platinum supported on functionalized ordered mesoporous carbon as electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvillo, L.; Lázaro, M. J.; García-Bordejé, E.; Moliner, R.; Cabot, P. L.; Esparbé, I.; Pastor, E.; Quintana, J. J.

    Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) with a specific area of 570 m 2 g -1 was synthesised using mesoporous silica SBA-15 as template. OMC was used as platinum catalyst support using the method of reduction with NaBH 4. Before deposition of platinum, the texture and surface chemistry of the support were modified by oxidation treatments in liquid phase using nitric acid as oxidative agent. During the oxidation process, oxygen surface groups were created, whereas ordered porous structure was maintained, as temperature programmed desorption and transmission electronic microscopy showed, respectively. Platinum supported materials were well dispersed over the mesoporous support and its catalytic performance towards methanol oxidation improved when compared with commercial carbon (Vulcan XC-72).

  3. Upgrading of high-boiling fraction of bio-oil in supercritical methanol.

    PubMed

    Li, Wang; Pan, Chunyan; Sheng, Li; Liu, Zhen; Chen, Ping; Lou, Hui; Zheng, Xiaoming

    2011-10-01

    In this work, the upgrading reactions of high-boiling fraction (HBF) of bio-oil were carried out over a series of supported mono- and bi-metallic catalysts under the supercritical methanol condition. During these reactions, esterification and cracking (alcoholysis and hydrocracking) were the two dominant processes. PtNi/MgO exhibited good performance, and gave a high yield (72.4 wt.%) of refined oil. The acid-base properties of the supports have an important effect on the coke deposition on the catalyst surface. The acidic catalysts gave the somewhat lower product yields, but tended to inhibit coking reaction. This would improve the life of the catalysts in the practical applications. The refined oil is believed to be a potential substitute or partial substitute for the fossil transportation fuel.

  4. Origin of spontaneous exchange bias in Co/NiMn bilayer structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbulut, A.; Akbulut, S.; Yildiz, F.

    2016-11-01

    Spontaneous exchange bias (EB) is reported for as deposited Si/Pt(tPt)/Ni45Mn55(tAFM/Co(tFM)/Pt(30 Å) thin film system without requiring any post annealing, deposition with field or field cooling procedures. Magnetic properties of this system were investigated with respect to thicknesses of buffer Pt layer (tPt), antiferromagnetic NiMn layer (tAFM) and ferromagnetic Co layer (tFM). Exchange coupling between NiMn and Co layers enhanced considerably by increasing tPt. In order to observe a spontaneous EB in the system, Pt buffer layer must be thicker than a certain thickness, and NiMn layer must be grown directly on the buffer layer. On the other hand, significant increments in the coercive fields (HC) were reported for thinner Pt buffer layers. The thickness ranges for Co and NiMn layers were also determined to obtain spontaneous EB. This spontaneous EB is discussed to be a result of NiMn (111) texture which is induced by Pt buffer layer. Greater EB fields (HEB) are measured for the samples in the negative field direction by the effect of annealing and field cooling (from 400 K to 300 K at 2 kOe).

  5. Methanol fuel vehicle demonstration: Exhaust emission testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, J.D.

    1993-07-01

    Ford Motor Company converted four stock 1986 Ford Crown Victoria sedans to methanol flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs). During 143,108 operational miles from 1987 to 1990, the FFVs underwent more than 300 dynamometer driving tests to measure exhaust emissions, catalytic activity, fuel economy, acceleration, and driveability with gasoline and methanol blend fuels. Dynamometer driving tests included the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), the Highway Fuel Economy Test, and the New York City Cycle. Exhaust emission measurements included carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), non- oxygenated hydrocarbons, organic material hydrocarbon equivalent (OMHCE), formaldehyde, and methanol. Catalytic activity was based on exhaust emissions data from active and inactive catalysts. OMHCE, CO, and NO{sub x} were usually lower with M85 (85% methanol, 15% gasoline) than with gasoline for both active and inactive catalysts when initial engine and catalyst temperatures were at or near normal operating temperatures. CO was higher with M85 than with gasoline when initial engine and catalyst temperatures were at or near ambient temperature. Formaldehyde and methanol were higher with M85. Active catalyst FTP OMHCE, CO, and NO{sub x} increased as vehicle mileage increased, but increased less with M85 than with gasoline. Energy based fuel economy remained almost constant with changes in fuel composition and vehicle mileage.

  6. Low Crossover Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, G. K. Surya; Smart, Marshall; Atti, Anthony R.; Olah, George A.; Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T.; Surampudi, S.

    1996-01-01

    Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC's) using polymer electrolyte membranes are promising power sources for portable and vehicular applications. State of the art technology using Nafion(R) 117 membranes (Dupont) are limited by high methanol permeability and cost, resulting in reduced fuel cell efficiencies and impractical commercialization. Therefore, much research in the fuel cell field is focused on the preparation and testing of low crossover and cost efficient polymer electrolyte membranes. The University of Southern California in cooperation with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is focused on development of such materials. Interpenetrating polymer networks are an effective method used to blend polymer systems without forming chemical links. They provide the ability to modify physical and chemical properties of polymers by optimizing blend compositions. We have developed a novel interpenetrating polymer network based on poly (vinyl - difluoride)/cross-linked polystyrenesulfonic acid polymer composites (PVDF PSSA). Sulfonation of polystyrene accounts for protonic conductivity while the non-polar, PVDF backbone provides structural integrity in addition to methanol rejection. Precursor materials were prepared and analyzed to characterize membrane crystallinity, stability and degree of interpenetration. USC JPL PVDF-PSSA membranes were also characterized to determine methanol permeability, protonic conductivity and sulfur distribution. Membranes were fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) and tested for single cell performance. Tests include cell performance over a wide range of temperatures (20 C - 90 C) and cathode conditions (ambient Air/O2). Methanol crossover values are measured in situ using an in-line CO2 analyzer.

  7. Thermodynamic feasibility of enzymatic reduction of carbon dioxide to methanol.

    PubMed

    Baskaya, F Suhan; Zhao, Xueyan; Flickinger, Michael C; Wang, Ping

    2010-09-01

    Production of valuable chemicals from CO(2) is highly desired for the purpose of controlling CO(2) emission. Toward that, enzymatic reduction of CO(2) for the production of methanol appeared to be especially promising. That has been achieved by reversing the biological metabolic reaction pathways. However, hitherto, there has been little discussion on the thermodynamic feasibility of reversing such biological pathways. The reported yields of methanol have been generally very low under regular reaction conditions preferred by naturally evolved enzymes. The current work examines the sequential enzymatic conversion of CO(2) into methanol from a thermodynamic point of view with a focus on factors that control the reaction equilibrium. Our analysis showed that the enzymatic conversion of carbon dioxide is highly sensitive to the pH value of the reaction solution and, by conducting the reactions at low pHs (such as pH 6 or 5) and ionic strength, it is possible to shift the biological methanol metabolic reaction equilibrium constants significantly (by a factor of several orders of magnitude) to favor the synthesis of methanol.

  8. Bifunctional Anode Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Ferrin, Peter A.; Tritsaris, Georgios A.; Nilekar, Anand U.; Koh, Shirlaine; Bae, Sang Eun; Brankovic, Stanko R.; Strasser, Peter; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2012-06-13

    Using the binding energy of OH* and CO* on close-packed surfaces as reactivity descriptors, we screen bulk and surface alloy catalysts for methanol electro-oxidation activity. Using these two descriptors, we illustrate that a good methanol electro-oxidation catalyst must have three key properties: (1) the ability to activate methanol, (2) the ability to activate water, and (3) the ability to react off surface intermediates (such as CO* and OH*). Based on this analysis, an alloy catalyst made up of Cu and Pt should have a synergistic effect facilitating the activity towards methanol electro-oxidation. Using these two reactivity descriptors, a surface PtCu3 alloy is proposed to have the best catalytic properties of the Pt–Cu model catalysts tested, similar to those of a Pt–Ru bulk alloy. To validate the model, experiments on a Pt(111) surface modified with different amounts of Cu adatoms are performed. Adding Cu to a Pt(111) surface increases the methanol oxidation current by more than a factor of three, supporting our theoretical predictions for improved electrocatalysts.

  9. Methanol Uptake By Low Temperature Aqueous Sulfuric Acid Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Essin, Andrew M.; Golden, David M.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the role of upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols in the global budget of methanol, the solubility and reactivity of CH3OH in aqueous sulfuric acid solutions are under investigation. Using standard uptake techniques in a Knudsen cell reactor, we have measured the effective Henry's law coefficient, H(*), for methanol dissolution into 45 to 70 percent by weight H2SO4. We find that methanol solubility ranges from 10(exp 5) to 10(exp 8) M/atm and increases with decreasing temperature and with increasing sulfuric acid content. These solubility measurements include uptake due to physical solvation and all rapid equilibria which are established in solution. Our data indicate that simple uptake by aqueous sulfuric acid particles will not be a significant sink for methanol in the UT/LS. These results differ from those recently reported in the literature, and an explanation of this disparity will be presented. In addition to solvation, reaction between primary alcohols and sulfuric acid does occur, leading to the production of alkyl sulfates. Literature values for the rate of this reaction suggest that formation of CH3OSO3H may proceed in the atmosphere but is not significant under our experimental conditions. Results obtained using a complementary equilibrium measurement technique confirm this directly. In addition, the extent of methanol sequestration via formation of mono- and dimethylsulfate will be evaluated under several atmospheric conditions.

  10. The Equilibrium Compositions of Methanol Synthesis System by Cornstalk Syngas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ling-feng; Zhao, Qing-ling; Wang, Yang-yang; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Le; Zhang, Run-tao; Liu, Li-li; Zhang, Zhao-yue

    2010-11-01

    Methanol can be used as a promising alternative for conventional gasoline and Diesel fuel. It is necessary to decompose biomass such as cornstalks in order to produce methanol which is a raw material from agricultural residues. A promising route for processing cornstalks is firstly to gasify cornstalks with thermo-chemical method to prepare the syngas, which can be conducted under a down-flow fixed bed gasifier. The low-heat-value cornstalk syngas produced in this way needs purification and a variety of technical procedures such as deoxygenation, desulfurization, catalytic cracking of tar and hydrogenation. In this paper, the catalytic experiments of methanol synthesis with cornstalk syngas were carried out in a tubular-flow integral and isothermal reactor. The effect such as reaction temperature, pressure, catalyst types, catalyst particle size, syngas flow at entering end and composition of syngas was investigated. Moreover, the equilibrium constants (Kf1, Kf2, KP1, KP2), equilibrium compositions and the concentrations of each part of the equilibrium system for methanol synthesis were calculated by SHBWR state equation under given reaction pressure. The results provided basic data for the design of the industrial equipments in which catalyzed synthesis of methanol from cornstalk gases is operated.

  11. Effects of methanol vapor on human neurobehavioral measures

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, M.R.; Bergman, F.J.; Cohen, H.D.; Gerkovich, M.M.; Graham, C.; Harris, R.K.; Siemann, L.G. )

    1991-08-01

    Methanol could become an important motor fuel. The objective of this exploratory study was to provide preliminary information about whether or not acute exposure to methanol at 250 mg/m3 for 75 minutes would have adverse effects on human neurobehavioral functions important in everyday life. This concentration level was selected because it is at the upper limit of the traffic scenario estimates provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)2 (86 to 240 mg/m3), but is below the maximum concentrations for eight-hour average exposures currently recommended by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the American Conference of Government and Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) (260 mg/m3). Although traffic scenario exposure estimates suggest that such high levels of exposure last less than 15 minutes, the authors used a 75-minute exposure to increase the probability of identifying dependent measures that should be studied in more detail in a future confirmatory study. Twelve healthy young men, each serving as his own control, participated in two sham exposures and two methanol exposures under counterbalanced, double-blind control conditions. Because methanol is present in many foods, and because high preexposure levels of methanol or formate might obscure exposure effects, subjects were required to strictly limit their diets for 12 hours before each experimental session.

  12. An autopsy case of methanol induced intracranial hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye-Jeong; Na, Joo-Young; Lee, Young-Jik; Park, Jong-Tae; Kim, Hyung-Seok

    2015-01-01

    The major component of car washer fluid is a methanol. Intracranial hemorrhage is a rare but lethal complication in methanol poisoning. We report a case of massive bilateral basal ganglia hematoma in a 32-year-old man with methanol poisoning. He drank car washer solution twice time (about 500 ml), and was admitted to a territorial hospital 10 hours post-ingestion for depressed mental status, lower blood pressure, and high anion gap metabolic acidosis. Computed tomographic (CT) scan showed lesions in both putamen and cerebral deep white matter. Twenty-one days after methanol exposure, he suddenly developed cardiorespiratory arrest. In autopsy, external examination revealed moderate cerebral edema, but no evidence of herniation. Coronal sections of the brain showed softening and about 34 g hematoma in the bilateral putamen and 3rd ventricles. The toxic effect of methanol on the visual system has been noted in the absence of neurologic manifestations; however, there have also been a report of concomitant brain in Korea.

  13. Process conditions for preparing methanol from cornstalk gas.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling-Feng; Du, Lei; Li, Xin-Bao; Li, Guo-Ting; Zhang, Jie

    2007-01-01

    The low-heat-value cornstalk gas produced in the down-flow fixed bed gasifier was tentatively used for methanol synthesis. The cornstalk gas was purified and the technical procedures such as deoxygenation, desulfurization, catalytic cracking of tar, purification and hydrogenation were studied. The catalytic experiments of methanol synthesis with cornstalk syngas were carried out in a tubular-flow integral and isothermal reactor. The effect of reaction temperature, pressure, catalyst types, catalyst particle size, syngas flow at entering end and composition of syngas was investigated. The optimum process conditions and yield of methanol from cornstalk syngas were obtained. The experimental results indicated that the proper catalyst for the synthetic reaction was C301 and the optimum catalyst size was 0.833 mm x 0.351 mm. The optimum operating temperature and pressure were found to be 235 degrees C and 5 MPa, respectively. The suitable syngas flow 0.9-1.10 mol/h at entering end was selected and the best composition of syngas were CO 10.49%, CO2 8.8%, N2 37.32%, C(n)H(m) 0.95% and H2 40.49%. The best methanol yield was 0.418 g/g cornstalk. This study provided the technical support for the industrial test of methanol production from biomass (cornstalk) gas.

  14. Process for producing methanol from a feed gas

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, A.P.

    1987-03-17

    A process is described for producing methanol from a feed gas comprising: passing at least a portion of the feed gas stream comprising hydrogen plus carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide to a first separation zone, the ratio of hydrogen to carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide in the feed gas stream being insufficient for effective methanol production; physically separating the feed gas stream in the first separation zone into a first hydrogen stream wherein the ratio of hydrogen to carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide is greater than in the feed gas stream and a first product stream comprising a hydrogen lean stream rich in carbon monoxide wherein the ratio of hydrogen to carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide is less than in the feed gas stream; passing the first hydrogen stream to a product reaction zone to form a mixed product comprising methanol formed by the reaction of the reactants comprisng hydrogen plus carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide and also residual components comprising residual hydrogen and carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. The ratio of hydrogen to other reactants in the product reaction zone is such as to facilitate the formation of methanol; and removing the methanol and residual components as a mixed product stream from the product reaction zone.

  15. Performance of direct methanol polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dong Ryul; Jung, Doo Hwan; Lee, Chang Hyeong; Chun, Young Gab

    1996-12-31

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) using polymer electrolyte membrane are promising candidate for application of portable power sources and transportation applications because they do not require any fuel processing equipment and can be operated at low temperature of 60{degrees}C - 130{degrees}C. Elimination of the fuel processor results in simpler design, higher operation reliability, lower weight volume, and lower capital and operating cost. However, methanol as a fuel is relatively electrochemical inert, so that kinetics of the methanol oxidation is too slow. Platinum and Pt-based binary alloy electrodes have been extensively studied for methanol electro-oxidation in acid electrolyte at ambient and elevated temperatures. Particularly, unsupported carbon Pt-Ru catalyst was found to be superior to the anode of DMFC using a proton exchange membrane electrolyte (Nafion). The objective of this study is to develop the high performance DNTC. This paper summarizes the results from half cell and single cell tests, which focus on the electrode manufacturing process, catalyst selection, and operating conditions of single cell such as methanol concentration, temperature and pressure.

  16. Sulfur removal from diesel fuel-contaminated methanol.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S. H. D.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.; Chemical Engineering

    2002-03-01

    Methanol is considered to be a potential on-board fuel for fuel cell-powered vehicles. In current distribution systems for liquid fuels used in the transportation sector, commodity methanol can occasionally become contaminated with the sulfur in diesel fuel or gasoline. This sulfur would poison the catalytic materials used in fuel reformers for fuel cells. We tested the removal of this sulfur by means of ten activated carbons (AC) that are commercially available. Tests were conducted with methanol doped with 1 vol.% grade D-2 diesel fuel containing 0.29% sulfur, which was present essentially as 33-35 wt.% benzothiophenes (BTs) and 65-67 wt.% dibenzothiophenes (DBT). In general, coconut shell-based carbons activated by high-temperature steam were more effective at sulfur removal than coal-based carbons. Equilibrium sorption data showed linear increase in sulfur capture with the increase of sulfur concentration in methanol. Both types of carbons had similar breakthrough characteristics, with the dynamic sorption capacity of each being about one-third of its equilibrium sorption capacity. Results of this study suggest that a fixed-bed sorber of granular AC can be used, such as in refueling stations, for the removal of sulfur in diesel fuel-contaminated methanol.

  17. Observations of the Zeeman effect in Class I methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratim Sarma, Anuj; Momjian, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    We present observations of the Zeeman effect in Class I methanol maser sources toward high mass star forming regions. Toward DR21(OH), we have detected the Zeeman effect at 44 GHz in a 219 Jy/beam maser centered at an LSR velocity of 0.83 km/s, and we find $zB_\\text{los} = 53.5 \\pm 2.7$ Hz. If 44 GHz methanol masers are excited at $10^{7-8}$ cm$^{-3}$, then magnetic fields in DR21(OH) should be ~10 mG. Our detected $zB_\\text{los}$ would then imply that the Zeeman splitting factor for the 44 GHz methanol maser line should be ~5 Hz/mG. Such small values for z would not be surprising, since the methanol molecule is non-paramagnetic, like H2O. Since there are no direct measurements or calculations of the 44 GHz methanol maser Zeeman splitting factor to date, such empirical attempts could prove valuable in building a repository of measurements from which to gain an understanding of the magnitude of z.

  18. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection with Cardiac Tamponade.

    PubMed

    Goh, Anne C H; Lundstrom, Robert J

    2015-10-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome. Clinical presentation ranges from chest pain alone to ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction, ventricular fibrillation, and sudden death. The treatment of patients with spontaneous coronary artery dissection is challenging because the disease pathophysiology is unclear, optimal treatment is unknown, and short- and long-term prognostic data are minimal. We report the case of a 70-year-old woman who presented with an acute ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction secondary to a spontaneous dissection of the left anterior descending coronary artery. She was treated conservatively. Cardiac tamponade developed 16 hours after presentation. Repeat coronary angiography revealed extension of the dissection. Medical therapy was continued after the hemopericardium was aspirated. The patient remained asymptomatic 3 years after hospital discharge. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of spontaneous coronary artery dissection in association with cardiac tamponade that was treated conservatively and had a successful outcome.

  19. Spontaneous network activity and synaptic development

    PubMed Central

    Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Throughout development, the nervous system produces patterned spontaneous activity. Research over the last two decades has revealed a core group of mechanisms that mediate spontaneous activity in diverse circuits. Many circuits engage several of these mechanisms sequentially to accommodate developmental changes in connectivity. In addition to shared mechanisms, activity propagates through developing circuits and neuronal pathways (i.e. linked circuits in different brain areas) in stereotypic patterns. Increasing evidence suggests that spontaneous network activity shapes synaptic development in vivo. Variations in activity-dependent plasticity may explain how similar mechanisms and patterns of activity can be employed to establish diverse circuits. Here, I will review common mechanisms and patterns of spontaneous activity in emerging neural networks and discuss recent insights into their contribution to synaptic development. PMID:24280071

  20. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection during Cabergoline Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Nishaki Kiran; Malkani, Samir; Ockene, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Although spontaneous coronary artery dissection is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome, it should be considered during the evaluation of patients who have chest pain. Coronary vasospasm can lead to spontaneous dissection. The dopamine agonist cabergoline is known to cause digital vasospasm. Herein, we report a case of spontaneous right coronary artery dissection in a 43-year-old woman who was taking cabergoline as therapy for prolactinoma. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an apparent relationship between cabergoline therapy and spontaneous coronary artery dissection. The possible association of cabergoline with coronary artery spasm and dissection should be considered in patients who present with chest pain while taking this medication. PMID:22412238

  1. Lunar Cycle Influences Spontaneous Delivery in Cows

    PubMed Central

    Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Uchida, Mona; Tomioka, Michiko; Matsuki, Naoaki

    2016-01-01

    There is a popular belief that the lunar cycle influences spontaneous delivery in both humans and cattle. To assess this relationship, we investigated the synodic distribution of spontaneous deliveries in domestic Holstein cows. We used retrospective data from 428 spontaneous, full-term deliveries within a three-year period derived from the calving records of a private farm in Hokkaido, Japan. Spontaneous birth frequency increased uniformly from the new moon to the full moon phase and decreased until the waning crescent phase. There was a statistically significant peak between the waxing gibbous and full moon phases compared with those between the last quarter and the waning crescent. These changes were clearly observed in deliveries among multiparous cows, whereas they were not evident in deliveries among nulliparous cows. These data suggest the utility of dairy cows as models for bio-meteorological studies, and indicate that monitoring lunar phases may facilitate comprehensive understanding of parturition. PMID:27580019

  2. Spontaneous Trait Inferences on Social Media

    PubMed Central

    Utz, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    The present research investigates whether spontaneous trait inferences occur under conditions characteristic of social media and networking sites: nonextreme, ostensibly self-generated content, simultaneous presentation of multiple cues, and self-paced browsing. We used an established measure of trait inferences (false recognition paradigm) and a direct assessment of impressions. Without being asked to do so, participants spontaneously formed impressions of people whose status updates they saw. Our results suggest that trait inferences occurred from nonextreme self-generated content, which is commonly found in social media updates (Experiment 1) and when nine status updates from different people were presented in parallel (Experiment 2). Although inferences did occur during free browsing, the results suggest that participants did not necessarily associate the traits with the corresponding status update authors (Experiment 3). Overall, the findings suggest that spontaneous trait inferences occur on social media. We discuss implications for online communication and research on spontaneous trait inferences. PMID:28123646

  3. Lunar Cycle Influences Spontaneous Delivery in Cows.

    PubMed

    Yonezawa, Tomohiro; Uchida, Mona; Tomioka, Michiko; Matsuki, Naoaki

    2016-01-01

    There is a popular belief that the lunar cycle influences spontaneous delivery in both humans and cattle. To assess this relationship, we investigated the synodic distribution of spontaneous deliveries in domestic Holstein cows. We used retrospective data from 428 spontaneous, full-term deliveries within a three-year period derived from the calving records of a private farm in Hokkaido, Japan. Spontaneous birth frequency increased uniformly from the new moon to the full moon phase and decreased until the waning crescent phase. There was a statistically significant peak between the waxing gibbous and full moon phases compared with those between the last quarter and the waning crescent. These changes were clearly observed in deliveries among multiparous cows, whereas they were not evident in deliveries among nulliparous cows. These data suggest the utility of dairy cows as models for bio-meteorological studies, and indicate that monitoring lunar phases may facilitate comprehensive understanding of parturition.

  4. Spontaneously broken spacetime symmetries and Goldstone's theorem.

    PubMed

    Low, Ian; Manohar, Aneesh V

    2002-03-11

    Goldstone's theorem states that there is a massless mode for each broken symmetry generator. It has been known for a long time that the naive generalization of this counting fails to give the correct number of massless modes for spontaneously broken spacetime symmetries. We explain how to get the right count of massless modes in the general case, and discuss examples involving spontaneously broken Poincaré and conformal invariance.

  5. Spontaneous thrombosis of vein of Galen malformation

    PubMed Central

    Kariyappa, Kalpana Devi; Krishnaswami, Murali; Gnanaprakasam, Francis; Ramachandran, Madan; Krishnaswamy, Visvanathan

    2016-01-01

    Vein of Galen malformation (VOGM) is a rare intracranial vascular malformation. Before the advent and advancement of various endovascular techniques, there was dismal prognosis. Rarely, this condition may spontaneously thrombose without the need for surgical or endovascular treatment with good prognosis. We report a case of an 8-month-old infant who had serial imaging, suggestive of VOGM and presented to us for further management, wherein the imaging revealed spontaneous thrombosis. PMID:27857804

  6. Symptomatic tarlov cyst following spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kong, Woo Keun; Cho, Keun-Tae; Hong, Seung-Koan

    2011-08-01

    Most of Tarlov or perineurial cysts remain asymptomatic throughout the patient's life. The pathogenesis is still unclear. Hemorrhage has been suggested as one of the possible causes and trauma with resultant hemorrhage into subarachnoid space has been suggested as an origin of these cysts. However, Tarlov cysts related to spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been reported. The authors report a case of Tarlov cyst which was symptomatic following spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  7. Symptomatic Tarlov Cyst Following Spontaneous Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Woo Keun; Hong, Seung-Koan

    2011-01-01

    Most of Tarlov or perineurial cysts remain asymptomatic throughout the patient's life. The pathogenesis is still unclear. Hemorrhage has been suggested as one of the possible causes and trauma with resultant hemorrhage into subarachnoid space has been suggested as an origin of these cysts. However, Tarlov cysts related to spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage has not been reported. The authors report a case of Tarlov cyst which was symptomatic following spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:22053232

  8. Spontaneous Gastric Perforation in Two Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Akalonu, Amaka; Yasrebi, Mona; Rios, Zarela Molle

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patients: Female, 11 • Male, 15 Final Diagnosis: Spontaneous gastric perforation Symptoms: Abdominal pain • distention • vomiting • leukocytosis Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Both patients had surgery Specialty: Gastroenterology Objective: Rare etiology Background: Spontaneous gastric perforation is a rare clinical disorder. The majority of the available data have been reported in the neonatal age group. There are a few cases of spontaneous gastric perforation in preschool children. To our knowledge, there is no published information on spontaneous gastric perforation in older children and adolescents. Case Report: We describe the presentation and clinical course of two adolescent children who presented with spontaneous gastric perforation. Both children presented with acute onset abdominal pain, which progressively worsened. In both cases, the patient were taken urgently to the operating room after imaging studies had shown pneumoperitoneum. In both cases, surgery revealed gastric perforation with no obvious etiology, specifically no ulcer, inflammation, or other pathology. Conclusions: These two cases highlight the importance of including spontaneous gastric perforation, not just the typical duodenal/gastric ulcer, in the differential of a patient with severe abdominal pain and distension, who has imaging showing pneumoperitoneum. PMID:27686129

  9. FEL gain optimisation and spontaneous radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Bali, L.M.; Srivastava, A.; Pandya, T.P.

    1995-12-31

    Colson have evaluated FEL gains for small deviations from perfect electron beam injection, with radiation of the same polarisation as that of the wiggler fields. We find that for optimum gain the polarisation of the optical field should be the same as that of the spontaneous emission under these conditions. With a helical wiggler the axial oscillations resulting from small departures from perfect electron beam injection lead to injection dependent unequal amplitudes and phases of the spontaneous radiation in the two transverse directions. Viewed along the axis therefore the spontaneous emission is elliptically polarised. The azimuth of the ellipse varies with the difference of phase of the two transverse components of spontaneous emission but the eccentricity remains the same. With planar wigglers the spontaneous emission viewed in the axial direction is linearly polarised, again with an injection dependent azimuth. For optimum coherent gain of a radiation field its polarisation characteristics must be the same as those of the spontaneous radiation with both types of wiggler. Thus, with a helical wiggler and the data reported earlier, an increase of 10% in the FEL gain at the fundamental frequency and of 11% at the fifth harmonic has been calculated in the small gain per pass limit. Larger enhancements in gain may result from more favourable values of input parameters.

  10. Molecular Dynamic Simulations on Surface Tension of Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeidat, Abdalla

    2015-04-01

    Molecular dynamic simulations have been performed to study the surface tension of methanol at low temperatures. Six different models of methanol have been studied to compute the surface tension of different models. The models have been used to predict the surface tensions are: OPLS, Gromos 96, H1, J1, J2, and van Leeuwen model. Our results show that the most accurate model compared to true methanol was van Leeuwen model. The results were fitted to a straight line to predict other data of surface tension at specific temperature. The simulation were performed using the Gromacs package at temperatures: 200, 210, 220, 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, 290, and 300 K. This work is supported by JUST.

  11. Polar solvation dynamics in water and methanol: search for molecularity.

    PubMed

    Sajadi, Mohsen; Weinberger, Michael; Wagenknecht, Hans-Achim; Ernsting, Nikolaus P

    2011-10-21

    Time-dependent Stokes shifts (TDSS) were measured for diverse polarity probes in water, heavy water, methanol, and benzonitrile, by broadband fluorescence up-conversion with 85 fs time resolution. In water the spectral dynamics is solute-independent and quantitatively described by simple dielectric continuum theory of solvation. In methanol the slower part of the TDSS is solute-dependent. A correlation with anisotropy decay suggests that methanol solvation dynamics is modulated by orientational solute diffusion. An empirical power law which links the solvation relaxation function of a mobile solute to that of an immobile solute is experimentally verified. Activation energies for the average relaxation rate are also given. Solvation dynamics in H(2)O and D(2)O are identical at and above 20 °C but diverge below.

  12. Catalytic partial oxidation of methanol and ethanol for hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Hohn, Keith L; Lin, Yu-Chuan

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen-powered fuel cell vehicles feature high energy efficiency and minor environmental impact. Liquid fuels are ideal hydrogen carriers, which can catalytically be converted into syngas or hydrogen to power vehicles. Among the potential liquid fuels, alcohols have several advantages. The hydrogen/carbon ratio is higher than that of other liquid hydrocarbons or oxygenates, especially in the case of methanol. In addition, alcohols can be derived from renewable biomass resources. Catalytic partial oxidation of methanol or ethanol offers immense potential for onboard hydrogen generation due to its rapid reaction rate and exothermic nature. These benefits stimulate a burgeoning research community in catalyst design, reaction engineering, and mechanistic investigation. The purpose of this Minireview is to provide insight into syngas and hydrogen production from methanol and ethanol partial oxidation, particularly highlighting catalytic chemistry.

  13. Homologation of olefins by methanol over ZSM-5 zeolite

    SciTech Connect

    Behrsing, T.; Mole, T.; Smart, P.; Western, R.J.

    1986-11-01

    /sup 13/C-Labeled methanol has been coreacted with excess C/sub 6/ olefins (2-methylpentene-1 or hexene-1) over the proton form of ZSM-5 zeolite under such conditions (ca. 550 K and a 2-s contact time) so that the C/sub 6/ olefins undergo extensive reaction while the methanol undergoes partial conversion to hydrocarbons. The resulting mixture of olefins was then hydrogenated to facilitate isotopic analysis. The /sup 13/C label was most abundant in the C/sub 7/ products, consistent with the hypothesis that the methanol is converted mainly by the homologation of an olefin to form an olefin with one more methylene group. 13 references.

  14. Partial oxidative conversion of methane to methanol through selective inhibition of methanol dehydrogenase in methanotrophic consortium from landfill cover soil.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji-Sun; Ahn, Chang-Min; Mahanty, Biswanath; Kim, Chang-Gyun

    2013-11-01

    Using a methanotrophic consortium (that includes Methylosinus sporium NCIMB 11126, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, and Methylococcus capsulatus Bath) isolated from a landfill site, the potential for partial oxidation of methane into methanol through selective inhibition of methanol dehydrogenase (MDH) over soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) with some selected MDH inhibitors at varied concentration range, was evaluated in batch serum bottle and bioreactor experiments. Our result suggests that MDH activity could effectively be inhibited either at 40 mM of phosphate, 100 mM of NaCl, 40 mM of NH4Cl or 50 μM of EDTA with conversion ratios (moles of CH3OH produced per mole CH4 consumed) of 58, 80, 80, and 43 %, respectively. The difference between extent of inhibition in MDH activity and sMMO activity was significantly correlated (n = 6, p < 0.05) with resultant methane to methanol conversion ratio. In bioreactor study with 100 mM of NaCl, a maximum specific methanol production rate of 9 μmol/mg h was detected. A further insight with qPCR analysis of MDH and sMMO coding genes revealed that the gene copy number continued to increase along with biomass during reactor operation irrespective of presence or absence of inhibitor, and differential inhibition among two enzymes was rather the key for methanol production.

  15. Design of a novel automated methanol feed system for pilot-scale fermentation of Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Hamaker, Kent H; Johnson, Daniel C; Bellucci, Joseph J; Apgar, Kristie R; Soslow, Sherry; Gercke, John C; Menzo, Darrin J; Ton, Christopher

    2011-01-01

    Large-scale fermentation of Pichia pastoris requires a large volume of methanol feed during the induction phase. However, a large volume of methanol feed is difficult to use in the processing suite because of the inconvenience of constant monitoring, manual manipulation steps, and fire and explosion hazards. To optimize and improve safety of the methanol feed process, a novel automated methanol feed system has been designed and implemented for industrial fermentation of P. pastoris. Details of the design of the methanol feed system are described. The main goals of the design were to automate the methanol feed process and to minimize the hazardous risks associated with storing and handling large quantities of methanol in the processing area. The methanol feed system is composed of two main components: a bulk feed (BF) system and up to three portable process feed (PF) systems. The BF system automatically delivers methanol from a central location to the portable PF system. The PF system provides precise flow control of linear, step, or exponential feed of methanol to the fermenter. Pilot-scale fermentations with linear and exponential methanol feeds were conducted using two Mut(+) (methanol utilization plus) strains, one expressing a recombinant therapeutic protein and the other a monoclonal antibody. Results show that the methanol feed system is accurate, safe, and efficient. The feed rates for both linear and exponential feed methods were within ± 5% of the set points, and the total amount of methanol fed was within 1% of the targeted volume.

  16. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes/carbon fiber paper composite to support Pt nanoparticles for direct methanol fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing; Yi, Xi-bin; Liu, Shuo; Fan, Hui-Li; Ju, Wei; Wang, Qi-Chun; Ma, Jie

    2017-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) grown on carbon fiber paper (CFP) by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition is introduced as a catalyst support material for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). Well dispersed Pt nanoparticles on VACNTs surface are prepared by impregnation-reduction method. The VACNTs on CFP possess well-maintained alignment, large surface area and good electrical conductivity, which leading to the formation of Pt particles with a smaller size and enhance the Pt utilization rate. The structure and nature of resulting Pt/VACNTs/CFP catalysts for methanol oxidation are investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). With the aid of VACNTs, well-dispersed Pt catalysts enable the reversibly rapid redox kinetic since electron transport efficiently passes through a one-dimensional pathway, which leads to enhance the catalytic activity and Pt utilization rate. Compared with the Pt/XC-72/CFP electrode, the electrochemical measurements results display that the Pt/VACNTs/CFP catalyst shows much higher electrocatalytic activity and better stability for methanol oxidation. In addition, the oxidation current from 200 to 1200 s decayed more slowly for the Pt/VACNTs/CFP than that of the Pt/XC-72/CFP catalysts, indicating less accumulation of adsorbed CO species. All those results imply that the Pt/VACNTs/CFP has a great potential for applications in DMFCs.

  17. Methanol along the path from envelope to protoplanetary disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdovskaya, Maria N.; Walsh, Catherine; Visser, Ruud; Harsono, Daniel; van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    2014-11-01

    Interstellar methanol is considered to be a parent species of larger, more complex organic molecules. A physicochemical simulation of infalling parcels of matter is performed for a low-mass star-forming system to trace the chemical evolution from cloud to disc. An axisymmetric 2D semi-analytic model generates the time-dependent density and velocity distributions, and full continuum radiative transfer is performed to calculate the dust temperature and the UV radiation field at each position as a function of time. A comprehensive gas-grain chemical network is employed to compute the chemical abundances along infall trajectories. Two physical scenarios are studied, one in which the dominant disc growth mechanism is viscous spreading, and another in which continuous infall of matter prevails. The results show that the infall path influences the abundance of methanol entering each type of disc, ranging from complete loss of methanol to an enhancement by a factor of >1 relative to the prestellar phase. Critical chemical processes and parameters for the methanol chemistry under different physical conditions are identified. The exact abundance and distribution of methanol is important for the budget of complex organic molecules in discs, which will be incorporated into forming planetary system objects such as protoplanets and comets. These simulations show that the comet-forming zone contains less methanol than in the precollapse phase, which is dominantly of prestellar origin, but also with additional layers built up in the envelope during infall. Such intriguing links will soon be tested by upcoming data from the Rosetta mission.

  18. Structures of protonated methanol clusters and temperature effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fifen, Jean Jules; Nsangou, Mama; Dhaouadi, Zoubeida; Motapon, Ousmanou; Jaidane, Nejm-Eddine

    2013-05-01

    The accurate evaluation of pKa's, or solvation energies of the proton in methanol at a given temperature is subject to the determination of the most favored structures of various isomers of protonated (H+(MeOH)n) and neutral ((MeOH)n) methanol clusters in the gas phase and in methanol at that temperature. Solvation energies of the proton in a given medium, at a given temperature may help in the determination of proton affinities and proton dissociation energies related to the deprotonation process in that medium and at that temperature. pKa's are related to numerous properties of drugs. In this work, we were interested in the determination of the most favored structures of various isomers of protonated methanol clusters in the gas phase and in methanol, at a given temperature. For this aim, the M062X/6-31++G(d,p) and B3LYP/6-31++G(d,p) levels of theory were used to perform geometries optimizations and frequency calculations on various isomers of (H+(MeOH)n) in both phases. Thermal effects were retrieved using our homemade FORTRAN code. Thus, we accessed the relative populations of various isomers of protonated methanol clusters, in both phases for temperatures ranging from 0 to 400 K. As results, in the gas phase, linear structures are entropically more favorable at high temperatures, while more compact ones are energetically more favorable at lower temperatures. The trend is somewhat different when bulk effects are taken into account. At high temperatures, the linear structure only dominates the population for n ⩽ 6, while it is dominated by the cyclic structure for larger cluster sizes. At lower temperatures, compact structures still dominate the population, but with an order different from the one established in the gas phase. Hence, temperature effects dominate solvent effects in small cluster sizes (n ⩽ 6), while the reverse trend is noted for larger cluster sizes.

  19. Visual and neurologic sequelae of methanol poisoning in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Ruiz, Alberto; Elkhamary, Sahar M.; Asghar, Nasira; Bosley, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To present the visual sequelae of methanol poisoning and to emphasize the characteristics of methanol exposure in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Methods: A retrospective case series was carried out on 50 sequential patients with methanol poisoning seen at the King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital and King Saud University Hospitals in Riyadh, KSA between 2008 and 2014. All patients were examined by a neuro-ophthalmologist at least one month after methanol intoxication. Results: All 50 patients were young or middle-aged males. All admitted to drinking unbranded alcohol within 2-3 days before profound or relatively profound, painless, bilateral visual loss. Mean visual acuity in this group was hand motions (logMAR 2.82; range 0.1 - 5.0) with some eye to eye variability within individuals. Worse visual acuity was correlated with advancing age (Pearson correlation: oculus dextrus [right eye] - 0.37, p=0.008; oculus sinister [left eye] - 0.36, p=0.011). All patients had optic atrophy bilaterally, and all tested patients had visual field defects. Tremors with or without rigidity were present in 12 patients, and 11 of 30 patients who had neuroimaging performed had evidence of putaminal necrosis. Conclusion: Methanol intoxication causes visual loss within 12-48 hours due to relatively severe, painless, bilateral optic nerve damage that may be somewhat variable between eyes, and is generally worse with advancing age. The coincidence of bilateral optic nerve damage and bilateral putaminal necrosis in a young or middle-aged male is very suspicious for methanol-induced damage. PMID:25935177

  20. Dynamics of spontaneous otoacoustic emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergevin, Christopher; Salerno, Anthony

    2015-12-01

    Spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs) have become a hallmark feature in modern theories of an `active' inner ear, given their numerous correlations to auditory function (e.g., threshold microstructure, neurophysiological tuning curves), near universality across tetrapod classes, and physiological correlates at the single hair cell level. However, while several different classes of nonlinear models exist that describe the mechanisms underlying SOAE generation (e.g., coupled limit-cycle oscillators, global standing waves), there is still disagreement as to precisely which biophysical concepts are at work. Such is further compounded by the idiosyncratic nature of SOAEs: Not all ears emit, and when present, SOAE activity can occur at seemingly arbitrary frequencies (though always within the most sensitive range of the audiogram) and in several forms (e.g., peaks, broad `baseline' plateaus). The goal of the present study was to develop new signal processing and stimulation techniques that would allow for novel features of SOAE activity to be revealed. To this end, we analyzed data from a variety of different species: human, lizard, and owl. First, we explored several strategies for examining SOAE waveforms in the absence of external stimuli to further ascertain what constitutes `self-sustained sinusoids' versus `filtered noise'. We found that seemingly similar peaks in the spectral domain could exhibit key differences in the time domain, which we interpret as providing critical information about the underlying oscillators and their coupling. Second, we introduced dynamic stimuli (swept-tones, tone bursts) at a range of levels, whose interaction with SOAEs could be visualized in the time-frequency domain. Aside from offering a readily accessible way to visualize many previously reported effects (e.g., entrainment, facilitation), we observed several new features such as subharmonic distortion generation and competing pulling/pushing effects when multiple tones were

  1. Control of oxidative stress in microcirculation of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    DeLano, F A; Balete, R; Schmid-Schönbein, G W

    2005-02-01

    One mechanism for organ damage in individuals with arterial hypertension may be due to oxygen free radical production. This study was designed to localize free radicals in a microvascular network of mature spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. Because glucocorticoids play a role in pressure elevation of SHRs, we investigated their role in microvascular free radical formation. Oxygen radical production in mesentery was detected by tetranitroblue tetrazolium reduction to formazan aided by digital light-absorption measurements. Formazan deposits were observed in the endothelial cells and lumens of all microvessels and in lymphatic endothelia but were fewer in tissue parenchyma. The formazan distribution in younger (14-16 wk old) WKY rats and SHRs was heterogeneous with low values in capillaries and small arterioles/venules (<30 microm) but enhanced deposits in larger venules. Adrenalectomy served to reduce the formazan density in SHRs to the level of WKY rats, whereas dexamethasone supplementation of the adrenalectomized rats caused elevation in the larger venules of SHRs. In older (40 wk old) SHRs, formazan levels were elevated in all hierarchies of microvessels. After pressure reduction was employed with chronic hydralazine treatment, the formazan deposits were reduced in all locations of the microcirculation in both WKY rats and SHRs. Elevated formazan deposits were also found in lymphatic endothelium. These results suggest that oxygen free radical production is elevated in both high- and low-pressure regions of SHR microcirculation via a process that is controlled by glucocorticoids. Older SHRs have higher formazan levels than younger SHRs in all microvessels. Chronic hydralazine treatment, which serves to reduce arterial blood pressure, attenuates tetranitroblue tetrazolium reduction in WKY rats and SHRs even in venules of the microcirculation, which has no micropressure elevation. Free radical production may be a more

  2. The combined oxidation of methanol and ethanol on silver catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Kurina, L.N.; Gryaznov, V.M.; Gul yanova, S.G.; Plakidkin, A.A.; Vedernikov, V.I.

    1985-10-01

    The authors study the oxidation of methanol, ethanol, and mixtures of these alcohols on industrial silver-pumice and silver membrane catalysts as well as the adsorption of these alcohols on silver. The oxidation of the alcohol mixture on the industrial silver-pumice catalyst gives higher yields of both formaldehyde and acetaldehyde than in the oxidation of the alcohols taken individually. It is also shown that an increase in the rates of formaldehyde formation in the combined oxidation of methanol and ethanol was observed on the silver membrane catalyst.

  3. Single-cell protein from methanol with Enterobacter aerogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Gnan, S.O.; Abodreheba, A.O.

    1987-02-20

    An identified Enterobacter aerogenes utilizing methanol as a sole carbon source was studied for the optimization of biomass production and the reduction of its nucleic acid content. Results indicated that the highest yield and conversion were obtained at 0.5% methanol. The addition of seawater as a source of trace elements has an adverse effect. However, the addition of urea as source of nitrogen enhanced the growth of E. aerogenes. Heat shock at 60 degrees C for one minute followed by incubation at 50 degrees C for 2 hours caused 72.6% reduction in the nucleic acid. 12 references.

  4. Environmental information volume: Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) project

    SciTech Connect

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the commercial viability of the Liquid Phase Methanol Process using coal-derived synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This report describes the proposed actions, alternative to the proposed action, the existing environment at the coal gasification plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, environmental impacts, regulatory requirements, offsite fuel testing, and DME addition to methanol production. Appendices include the air permit application, solid waste permits, water permit, existing air permits, agency correspondence, and Eastman and Air Products literature.

  5. Process assessment of small scale low temperature methanol synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendriyana, Susanto, Herri; Subagjo

    2015-12-01

    Biomass is a renewable energy resource and has the potential to make a significant impact on domestic fuel supplies. Biomass can be converted to fuel like methanol via several step process. The process can be split into following main steps: biomass preparation, gasification, gas cooling and cleaning, gas shift and methanol synthesis. Untill now these configuration still has a problem like high production cost, catalyst deactivation, economy of scale and a huge energy requirements. These problems become the leading inhibition for biomass conversion to methanol, which should be resolved to move towards the economical. To address these issues, we developed various process and new configurations for methanol synthesis via methyl formate. This configuration combining two reactors: the one reactor for the carbonylation of methanol and CO to form methyl formate, and the second for the hydrogenolysis of methyl formate and H2 to form two molecule of methanol. Four plant process configurations were compared with the biomass basis is 300 ton/day. The first configuration (A) is equipped with a steam reforming process for converting methane to CO and H2 for increasing H2/CO ratio. CO2 removal is necessary to avoid poisoning the catalyst. COSORB process used for the purpose of increasing the partial pressure of CO in the feed gas. The steam reforming process in B configuration is not used with the aim of reducing the number of process equipment, so expect lower investment costs. For C configuration, the steam reforming process and COSORB are not used with the aim of reducing the number of process equipment, so expect lower investment costs. D configuration is almost similar to the configuration A. This configuration difference is in the synthesis of methanol which was held in a single reactor. Carbonylation and hydrogenolysis reactions carried out in the same reactor one. These processes were analyzed in term of technical process, material and energy balance and economic

  6. Injector spray characterization of methanol in reciprocating engines

    SciTech Connect

    Dodge, L.; Naegeli, D.

    1994-06-01

    This report covers a study that addressed cold-starting problems in alcohol-fueled, spark-ignition engines by using fine-spray port-fuel injectors to inject fuel directly into the cylinder. This task included development and characterization of some very fine-spray, port-fuel injectors for a methanol-fueled spark-ignition engine. After determining the spray characteristics, a computational study was performed to estimate the evaporation rate of the methanol fuel spray under cold-starting and steady-state conditions.

  7. Discovery of methanol electro-oxidation catalysts by combinatorial analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mallouk, T.E.; Reddington, E.; Pu, C.

    1996-12-31

    Hydrogen fuel cells are likely to become a major energy source in the next century, but they are not ideal for all applications. A safe alternative fuel with a high energy density will be necessary for transportation and mobile applications. Direct methanol-air fuel cells (DMFCs) are an attractive alternative to hydrogen fuel cells because of the high energy density and low cost of methanol as a fuel. However, in order for DMFCs to become commercially viable, better electrocatalysts for the anode reaction need to be developed. This paper describes a combinatorial technique for generating an array of electrodes with varying metal compositions.

  8. New OH Observations toward Northern Class I Methanol Masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Val'tts, I. E.; Litovchenko, I. D.; Bayandina, O. S.; Alakoz, A. V.; Larionov, G. M.; Mukha, D. V.; Nabatov, A. S.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Zakharenko, V. V.; Alekseev, E. V.; Nikolaenko, V. S.; Kulishenko, V. F.; Odincov, S. A.

    2012-07-01

    Maser emission of OH(1720) is formed, according to modern concepts, under the influence of collisional pumping. Class I methanol masers (MMI) are also formed by a collisional mechanism of the inversion of the molecular levels. It is not excluded in this case that physical conditions in the condensations of the interstellar medium where masers are formed may be similar for MMI and OH(1720) masers, and they can associate with each other. To establish a possible association between these two kinds of masers, and obtain reliable statistical estimates, a survey of class I methanol masers at a frequency of 1720 MHz has been carried out.

  9. Boria modified alumina probed by methanol dehydration and IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Farias, Andréa M. Duarte; Esteves, Angela M. Lavogade; Ziarelli, Fabio; Caldarelli, Stefano; Fraga, Marco A.; Appel, Lucia G.

    2004-04-01

    Al 2O 3·B 2O 3 catalysts were synthesized by co-precipitation and impregnation methods applying two calcination temperatures and boria loadings. Catalysts were analyzed by IR spectroscopy of pyridine and CO 2 adsorption and were evaluated in methanol dehydration. Results showed that boron addition to alumina causes a decrease of the number of basic and Lewis acid sites on alumina surface. It could also be observed an enhancement in acid strength of Lewis sites for impregnated samples. The results of methanol dehydration show that strong Brönsted sites are not formed on borate alumina.

  10. Process assessment of small scale low temperature methanol synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Hendriyana; Susanto, Herri Subagjo

    2015-12-29

    Biomass is a renewable energy resource and has the potential to make a significant impact on domestic fuel supplies. Biomass can be converted to fuel like methanol via several step process. The process can be split into following main steps: biomass preparation, gasification, gas cooling and cleaning, gas shift and methanol synthesis. Untill now these configuration still has a problem like high production cost, catalyst deactivation, economy of scale and a huge energy requirements. These problems become the leading inhibition for biomass conversion to methanol, which should be resolved to move towards the economical. To address these issues, we developed various process and new configurations for methanol synthesis via methyl formate. This configuration combining two reactors: the one reactor for the carbonylation of methanol and CO to form methyl formate, and the second for the hydrogenolysis of methyl formate and H{sub 2} to form two molecule of methanol. Four plant process configurations were compared with the biomass basis is 300 ton/day. The first configuration (A) is equipped with a steam reforming process for converting methane to CO and H{sub 2} for increasing H{sub 2}/CO ratio. CO{sub 2} removal is necessary to avoid poisoning the catalyst. COSORB process used for the purpose of increasing the partial pressure of CO in the feed gas. The steam reforming process in B configuration is not used with the aim of reducing the number of process equipment, so expect lower investment costs. For C configuration, the steam reforming process and COSORB are not used with the aim of reducing the number of process equipment, so expect lower investment costs. D configuration is almost similar to the configuration A. This configuration difference is in the synthesis of methanol which was held in a single reactor. Carbonylation and hydrogenolysis reactions carried out in the same reactor one. These processes were analyzed in term of technical process, material and energy

  11. Methanol dehydrogenation by iridium N-heterocyclic carbene complexes.

    PubMed

    Campos, Jesús; Sharninghausen, Liam S; Manas, Michael G; Crabtree, Robert H

    2015-06-01

    A series of homogeneous iridium bis(N-heterocyclic carbene) catalysts are active for three transformations involving dehydrogenative methanol activation: acceptorless dehydrogenation, transfer hydrogenation, and amine monoalkylation. The acceptorless dehydrogenation reaction requires base, yielding formate and carbonate, as well as 2-3 equivalents of H2. Of the few homogeneous systems known for this reaction, our catalysts tolerate air and employ simple ligands. Transfer hydrogenation of ketones and imines from methanol is also possible. Finally, N-monomethylation of anilines occurs through a "borrowing hydrogen" reaction. Notably, this reaction is highly selective for the monomethylated product.

  12. ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S-based buffer layer deposition for solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Bhattacharya, Raghu N.

    2009-11-03

    The invention provides CBD ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S and spray deposited ZnS/Zn(O,OH)S buffer layers prepared from a solution of zinc salt, thiourea and ammonium hydroxide dissolved in a non-aqueous/aqueous solvent mixture or in 100% non-aqueous solvent. Non-aqueous solvents useful in the invention include methanol, isopropanol and triethyl-amine. One-step deposition procedures are described for CIS, CIGS and other solar cell devices.

  13. Deposition of thin mesoporous silica films on glass substrates from basic solution.

    PubMed

    Shimura, Naoki; Ogawa, Makoto

    2006-11-01

    Transparent thin (ca. 100 nm) films of silica-surfactant mesostructured materials were deposited on borosilicate glass plates and soda-lime glass tubes from aqueous solutions containing tetraethoxysilane, alkyltrimethylammonium chloride, ammonia, and methanol. By calcination in air, the films became mesoporous (BET surface area of 700-900 m2 g-1) with pore diameter 2.0-2.8 nm.

  14. Pressure and temperature dependence of excess enthalpies of methanol + tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether and methanol + polyethylene glycol dimethyl ether 250

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, E.R.; Coxam, J.Y.; Fernandez, J.; Grolier, J.P.E.

    1999-12-01

    The excess molar enthalpies at 323.15 K, 373.15 K, and 423.15 K, at 8 MPa, are reported for the binary mixtures methanol + tetraethylene glycol dimethyl ether (TEGDME) and methanol + poly(ethylene glycol) dimethyl ether 250 (PEGDME 250). Excess molar enthalpies were determined with a Setaram C-80 calorimeter equipped with a flow mixing cell. For both systems, the excess enthalpies are positive over the whole composition range, increasing with temperature. The H{sup E}(x) curves are slightly asymmetrical, and their maxima are skewed toward the methanol-rich region. The excess enthalpies slightly change with the pressure, the sign of this change being composition-dependent. In the case of mixtures with TEGDME, the experimental H{sup E} values have been compared with those predicted with the Gmehling et al. version of UNIFAC (Dortmund) and the Nitta-Chao and DISQUAC group contribution models.

  15. Adsorption and Deactivation Characteristics of Cu/ZnO-Based Catalysts for Methanol Synthesis from Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Natesakhawat, Sittichai; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Howard, Bret H; Lekse, Jonathan W; Baltrus, John P; Matranga, Christopher

    2013-07-09

    The adsorption and deactivation characteristics of coprecipitated Cu/ZnO-based catalysts were examined and correlated to their performance in methanol synthesis from CO₂ hydrogenation. The addition of Ga₂O₃ and Y₂O₃ promoters is shown to increase the Cu surface area and CO₂/H₂ adsorption capacities of the catalysts and enhance methanol synthesis activity. Infrared studies showed that CO₂ adsorbs spontaneously on these catalysts at room temperature as both monoand bi-dentate carbonate species. These weakly bound species desorb completely from the catalyst surface by 200 °C while other carbonate species persist up to 500 °C. Characterization using N₂O decomposition, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) analysis clearly indicated that Cu sintering is the main cause of catalyst deactivation. Ga and Y promotion improves the catalyst stability by suppressing the agglomeration of Cu and ZnO particles under pretreatment and reaction conditions.

  16. Steam reforming of methanol over oxide decorated nanoporous gold catalysts: a combined in situ FTIR and flow reactor study.

    PubMed

    Shi, J; Mahr, C; Murshed, M M; Gesing, T M; Rosenauer, A; Bäumer, M; Wittstock, A

    2017-03-29

    Methanol as a green and renewable resource can be used to generate hydrogen by reforming, i.e., its catalytic oxidation with water. In combination with a fuel cell this hydrogen can be converted into electrical energy, a favorable concept, in particular for mobile applications. Its realization requires the development of novel types of structured catalysts, applicable in small scale reactor designs. Here, three different types of such catalysts were investigated for the steam reforming of methanol (SRM). Oxides such as TiO2 and CeO2 and mixtures thereof (Ce1Ti2Ox) were deposited inside a bulk nanoporous gold (npAu) material using wet chemical impregnation procedures. Transmission electron and scanning electron microscopy reveal oxide nanoparticles (1-2 nm in size) abundantly covering the strongly curved surface of the nanoporous gold host (ligaments and pores on the order of 40 nm in size). These catalysts were investigated in a laboratory scaled flow reactor. First conversion of methanol was detected at 200 °C. The measured turn over frequency at 300 °C of the CeOx/npAu catalyst was 0.06 s(-1). Parallel investigation by in situ infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) reveals that the activation of water and the formation of OHads are the key to the activity/selectivity of the catalysts. While all catalysts generate sufficient OHads to prevent complete dehydrogenation of methanol to CO, only the most active catalysts (e.g., CeOx/npAu) show direct reaction with formic acid and its decomposition to CO2 and H2. The combination of flow reactor studies and in operando DRIFTS, thus, opens the door to further development of this type of catalyst.

  17. Spasmolytic, bronchodilator and vasorelaxant activity of methanolic extract of Tephrosia purpurea.

    PubMed

    Janbaz, Khalid Hussain; Jan, Asma; Qadir, M Imran; Gilani, Anwarul Hassan

    2013-01-01

    The methanolic extract of the whole plant of Tephrosia pupurea, Linn. was subjected to find out its possible therapeutic utility to validate its folkloric use in native systems of medicine. The extract on application to spontaneous contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum preparations exerted a concentration dependent (0.003-3.0 mg/mL) relaxant effect. The extract also caused concentration dependent relaxation of K+(80 mM)-induced spastic contractions. These findings were further supported by the observations that the extract caused a concentration dependent right ward shift of the Ca2+ response curves in manner similar to that of verapamil. The extract exhibited a relaxant effect on carbachol and high K+ (80 mM)-induced contractions of isolated rabbit tracheal preparations in a manner similar to verapamil. The observed non-specific bronchodilator response is possibly mediated through Ca2+ channel blockade. Moreover, the extract also exhibited a dose dependent relaxant effect on phenylephrine (1 microM) and K+(80 mM)-induced contractions in a manner similar to verapamil. On the basis of the above-mentioned findings, it can be concluded that the use of Tephrosia purpurea, in gastrointestinal spasm, asthma and hypertension is likely to be mediated through calcium channel blockage.

  18. Ternary Pt-Ru-Ni catalytic layers for methanol electrooxidation prepared by electrodeposition and galvanic replacement

    PubMed Central

    Papaderakis, Athanasios; Pliatsikas, Nikolaos; Prochaska, Chara; Papazisi, Kalliopi M.; Balomenou, Stella P.; Tsiplakides, Dimitrios; Patsalas, Panagiotis; Sotiropoulos, Sotiris

    2014-01-01

    Ternary Pt-Ru-Ni deposits on glassy carbon substrates, Pt-Ru(Ni)/GC, have been formed by initial electrodeposition of Ni layers onto glassy carbon electrodes, followed by their partial exchange for Pt and Ru, upon their immersion into equimolar solutions containing complex ions of the precious metals. The overall morphology and composition of the deposits has been studied by SEM microscopy and EDS spectroscopy. Continuous but nodular films have been confirmed, with a Pt ÷ Ru ÷ Ni % bulk atomic composition ratio of 37 ÷ 12 ÷ 51 (and for binary Pt-Ni control systems of 47 ÷ 53). Fine topographical details as well as film thickness have been directly recorded using AFM microscopy. The composition of the outer layers as well as the interactions of the three metals present have been studied by XPS spectroscopy and a Pt ÷ Ru ÷ Ni % surface atomic composition ratio of 61 ÷ 12 ÷ 27 (and for binary Pt-Ni control systems of 85 ÷ 15) has been found, indicating the enrichment of the outer layers in Pt; a shift of the Pt binding energy peaks to higher values was only observed in the presence of Ru and points to an electronic effect of Ru on Pt. The surface electrochemistry of the thus prepared Pt-Ru(Ni)/GC and Pt(Ni)/GC electrodes in deaerated acid solutions (studied by cyclic voltammetry) proves the existence of a shell consisting exclusively of Pt-Ru or Pt. The activity of the Pt-Ru(Ni) deposits toward methanol oxidation (studied by slow potential sweep voltammetry) is higher from that of the Pt(Ni) deposit and of pure Pt; this enhancement is attributed both to the well-known Ru synergistic effect due to the presence of its oxides but also (based on the XPS findings) to a modification effect of Pt electronic properties. PMID:24959530

  19. Environmental controls over methanol production, emission, and δ13C values from Lycopersicon esculentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, P.; Giebel, B. M.; Mak, J. E.; Riemer, D. D.; Swart, P. K.; Lerdau, M.

    2009-12-01

    Phytogenic methanol is the dominant source of methanol to the atmosphere, where it is the second most abundant organic compound. Beyond methanol’s role in atmospheric chemistry, it is an indicator of plant function and is linked to plant wound response. Methanol emissions are considered to be a by-product of cell wall expansion and, more specifically, the demethylation of pectin by pectin methylesterase (PME) in cell walls. Production of methanol was investigated in mature and immature tomato Lycopersicon esculentum via measurement of methanol flux, foliar PME activity, and methanol extraction from leaf, root, and stem tissues. δ13C values for mature and immature methanol emissions were also measured using a GC-IRMS system. Environmental control over methanol production and emission was studied by changing temperature and light while holding stomatal conductance constant. As seen previously, mature leaf methanol emissions were significantly less than immature emissions. Surprisingly, preliminary results suggest mature leaf methanol production to be similar to immature leaves, indicating an enhanced metabolic sink for methanol in mature leaves. These data enhance our understanding of methanol production, a term which is not well constrained in current methanol flux models.

  20. Spontaneous Bacterial Empyema in Liver Cirrhosis: An Underdiagnosed Pleural Complication

    PubMed Central

    Allam, Naglaa A. H.

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial empyema, defined as spontaneous infection of the pleural fluid, represents a distinct complication of hepatic hydrothorax with a different pathogenesis, clinical course and treatment strategy from those of empyema secondary to pneumonia. Nearly 40% of episodes of spontaneous empyema are not associated with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) or even ascites. The condition portends a poor prognosis, and is frequently under-diagnosed. This article reviews the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of spontaneous bacterial empyema. PMID:19568497

  1. Spontaneous bacterial empyema in liver cirrhosis: an underdiagnosed pleural complication.

    PubMed

    Allam, Naglaa A H

    2008-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial empyema, defined as spontaneous infection of the pleural fluid, represents a distinct complication of hepatic hydrothorax with a different pathogenesis, clinical course and treatment strategy from those of empyema secondary to pneumonia. Nearly 40% of episodes of spontaneous empyema are not associated with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) or even ascites. The condition portends a poor prognosis, and is frequently under-diagnosed. This article reviews the pathogenesis, diagnosis and management of spontaneous bacterial empyema.

  2. Deposition head for laser

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Gary K.; Less, Richard M.

    1999-01-01

    A deposition head for use as a part of apparatus for forming articles from materials in particulate form in which the materials are melted by a laser beam and deposited at points along a tool path to form an article of the desired shape and dimensions. The deposition head delivers the laser beam and powder to a deposition zone, which is formed at the tip of the deposition head. A controller comprised of a digital computer directs movement of the deposition zone along the tool path and provides control signals to adjust apparatus functions, such as the speed at which the deposition head moves along the tool path.

  3. Techniques for sensing methanol concentration in aqueous environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An analyte concentration sensor that is capable of fast and reliable sensing of analyte concentration in aqueous environments with high concentrations of the analyte. Preferably, the present invention is a methanol concentration sensor device coupled to a fuel metering control system for use in a liquid direct-feed fuel cell.

  4. Methanol market slowly tightens as Brazil starts soaking up material

    SciTech Connect

    Young, I.

    1992-11-25

    Although the US methanol market's response to mandated oxygen requirements in reformulated gasoline has been disappointing, the European market has surprisingly been tightening in recent weeks and looks set for a price rise in first-quarter 1993. The tightness is being felt mainly in the Mediterranean market, where the Libyan methanol plant is running at only 70% because of problems with gas feedstock supplies. More significantly, the Brazilian government has now given the go-ahead for a yearlong extension on imports of methanol for use as an ethanol replacement in fuel blending. The new authorization sets a monthly import limit of 48,000 m.t. during that period. Libya is an important supplier of methanol to the Brazilian market and has already shipped about 20,000 m.t. since the authorization was given. Another major supplier to Brazil is Russia, from its two giant 750,000-m.t./year plants at Gubakha and Tomsk. The material is shipped from the terminal at Yuzhnyy on the Black Sea, in Ukrainian territory since the collapse of the Soviet Union.

  5. Hydrogen Bonding Interaction between Atmospheric Gaseous Amides and Methanol

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hailiang; Tang, Shanshan; Xu, Xiang; Du, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Amides are important atmospheric organic–nitrogen compounds. Hydrogen bonded complexes of methanol (MeOH) with amides (formamide, N-methylformamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, acetamide, N-methylacetamide and N,N-dimethylacetamide) have been investigated. The carbonyl oxygen of the amides behaves as a hydrogen bond acceptor and the NH group of the amides acts as a hydrogen bond donor. The dominant hydrogen bonding interaction occurs between the carbonyl oxygen and the OH group of methanol as well as the interaction between the NH group of amides and the oxygen of methanol. However, the hydrogen bonds between the CH group and the carbonyl oxygen or the oxygen of methanol are also important for the overall stability of the complexes. Comparable red shifts of the C=O, NH- and OH-stretching transitions were found in these MeOH–amide complexes with considerable intensity enhancement. Topological analysis shows that the electron density at the bond critical points of the complexes fall in the range of hydrogen bonding criteria, and the Laplacian of charge density of the O–H∙∙∙O hydrogen bond slightly exceeds the upper value of the Laplacian criteria. The energy decomposition analysis further suggests that the hydrogen bonding interaction energies can be mainly attributed to the electrostatic, exchange and dispersion components. PMID:28042825

  6. A MEMS methanol reformer heated by decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taegyu; Hwang, Jin Soo; Kwon, Sejin

    2007-07-01

    This paper presents the design, fabrication and evaluation of a micro methanol reformer complete with a heat source. The micro system consists of the steam reforming reactor of methanol, the catalytic decomposition reactor of hydrogen peroxide, and a heat exchanger between the two reactors. In the present study, catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide is used as a process to supply heat to the reforming reactor. The decomposition process of hydrogen peroxide produces water vapor and oxygen as a product that can be used efficiently to operate the reformer/PEMFC system. Cu/ZnO was selected as a catalyst for methanol steam reforming and Pt for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Incipient wetness method was used to load catalysts on a porous support. Catalyst loaded supports were inserted in the cavity made on the glass wafer. The performance of the methanol steam reforming system was measured at various test conditions and the optimum operation condition was sought. At the optimum condition, the hydrogen selectivity was 86.4% and the thermal efficiency was 44.8%. The product gas included 74.1% H(2), 24.5% CO(2) and 1.4% CO and the total volume production rate was 23.5 ml min(-1). This amount of hydrogen can produce 1.5 W of power on a typical PEMFC.

  7. METHANOL PRODUCTION FROM BIOMASS AND NATURAL GAS AS TRANSPORTATION FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two processes are examined for production of methanol. They are assessed against the essential requirements of a future alternative fuel for road transport: that it (i) is producible in amounts comparable to the 19 EJ of motor fuel annually consumed in the U.S., (ii) minimizes em...

  8. On direct and indirect methanol fuel cells for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Xiaoming; Wilson, M.S.; Gottesfeld, S.

    1995-09-01

    Power densities in electrolyte Direct Methanol Fuel Cells have been achieved which are only three times lower than those achieved with similar reformate/air fuel cells. Remaining issues are: improved anode catalyst activity, demonstrated long-term stable performance, and high fuel efficiencies.

  9. IRIS Toxicological Review of Methanol (Noncancer) (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On May 3, 2013, the Toxicological Review of Methanol (noncancer) (Revised External Review Draft) was posted for public review and comment. Subsequently, the draft Toxicological Review, Appendices, and draft IRIS Summary were reviewed internally by EPA and by other federal agenci...

  10. EVALUATION OF A PROCESS TO CONVERT BIOMASS TO METHANOL FUEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a review of the design of a reactor capable of gasifying approximately 50 lb/hr of biomass for a pilot-scale facility to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate the Hynol Process, a high-temperature, high-pressure method for converting biomass into methanol...

  11. Infrared Spectrum of Methanol: A First-Year Student Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehm, Garth; Dwyer, Mark

    1981-01-01

    Describes an experiment providing an experimental introduction to vibrational spectroscopy and experience in using an elementary vacuum line. The experiment, using a gas cell charged with methanol, is completed in a three-hour laboratory period and is directed toward understanding vibrational spectroscopy rather than the diagnostic value of the…

  12. New processes target methanol production, off-gas cleaning

    SciTech Connect

    Haggin, J. )

    1994-03-28

    Catalysis plays a key role in two technological developments aimed at addressing environmental-related matters. One, a process that converts carbon dioxide to methanol, is seen as a means of reducing the amount of carbon dioxide dumped into the atmosphere without an economic penalty. The other, unsteady-state operation, is a chemical processing innovation that is finding its way into the cleaning of plant exhaust gases. Particulars on the developments were presented in separate forums at the American Chemical Society's national meeting in San Diego. The methanol process, developed by Lurgi Oel-Gas-Chemie, Frankfurt, was outlined for the Catalysis and Surface Science Secretariat. Lurgi is ready to commercialized a variation of its methanol process, which converts carbon dioxide to ethanol in two stages. Underlying the process is development of a catalyst that is suitable for operation in two temperature regimes. The paper describes the development of the process. A catalytic reverse processing system is being used to decontaminate gas streams containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs). These VOCs may be unacceptable in the environment or undesirable in subsequent processing units. Other applications include nitrogen oxides reduction, ammonia and methanol synthesis, and oxidation of SO[sub 2] to SO[sub 3] in the manufacture of sulfuric acid. Among the materials that have been removed as VOCs are C[sub 4] to C[sub 8] alcohols, phenol, formaldehyde, cyanic acid, and a variety of organic solvents. The advantages over conventional methods are discussed.

  13. IRIS Toxicological Review of Methanol (External Review Draft, 2013)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review and public comment of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of methanol (non-cancer) that when finalized will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  14. IRIS Toxicological Review of Methanol (External Review Draft; December 2009)

    EPA Science Inventory

    NOTE: The IRIS Toxicological Review of Methanol (external review draft; December 2009) was released for public comment and external peer review in January 2010 (Federal Register Not...

  15. Liquid-Feed Methanol Fuel Cell With Membrane Electrolyte

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao; Narayanan, S. R.; Halpert, Gerald; Frank, Harvey; Vamos, Eugene

    1995-01-01

    Fuel cell generates electricity from direct liquid feed stream of methanol/water solution circulated in contact with anode, plus direct gaseous feed stream of air or oxygen in contact with cathode. Advantages include relative simplicity and elimination of corrosive electrolytic solutions. Offers potential for reductions in size, weight, and complexity, and for increases in safety of fuel-cell systems.

  16. On direct and indirect methanol fuel cells for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gottesfield, S.

    1996-04-01

    Research on direct oxidation methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) and polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is discussed. Systems considered for transportation applications are addressed. The use of platinum/ruthenium anode electrocatalysts and platinum cathode electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte DMFCs has resulted in significant performance enhancements.

  17. The shock sensitivity of nitromethane/methanol mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartram, Brian; Dattelbaum, Dana; Sheffield, Steve; Gibson, Lee

    2013-06-01

    The dilution of liquid explosives has multiple effects on detonation properties including an increase in critical diameter, spatiotemporal lengthening of the chemical reaction zone, and the development of propagating wave instabilities. Earlier detonation studies of NM/methanol mixtures have shown several effects of increasing dilution, including: 1) a continual increase in the critical diameter, 2) lowering of the Chapman-Jouguet detonation pressure, and 3) slowing of the steady detonation velocity (Koldunov et al., Comb. Expl. Shock Waves). Here, we present the results of a series of gas gun-driven plate-impact experiments to study the shock-to-detonation transition in NM/methanol mixtures. Embedded electromagnetic gauges were used to obtain in situ particle velocity wave profiles at multiple Lagrangian positions in the initiating explosive mixture. From the wave profiles obtained in each experiment, an unreacted Hugoniot locus, the initiation mechanism, and the overtake-time-to-detonation were obtained as a function of shock input condition for mixture concentrations from 100% NM to 50 wt%/50 wt% NM/methanol. Desensitization with dilution is less than expected. For example, little change in overtake time occurs in 80 wt%/20 wt% NM/methanol when compared with neat NM. Furthermore, the shock wave profiles from the gauges indicate that wave instabilities grow in as the overdriven detonation wave settles down following the shock-to-detonation transition.

  18. IRIS Toxicological Review of Methanol (Noncancer) (Revised External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is seeking additional public comment and external peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of methanol (noncancer).