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Sample records for spontaneous parity violation

  1. Spontaneous parity violation and SUSY strong gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ohki, Hiroshi

    2012-07-27

    We suggest simple models of spontaneous parity violation in supersymmetric strong gauge theory. We focus on left-right symmetric model and investigate vacuum with spontaneous parity violation. Non-perturbative effects are calculable in supersymmetric gauge theory, and we suggest new models. Our models show confinement, so that we try to understand them by using a dual description of the theory. The left-right symmetry breaking and electroweak symmetry breaking are simultaneously occurred with the suitable energy scale hierarchy. This structure has several advantages compared to the MSSM. The scale of the Higgs mass (left-right breaking scale) and that of VEVs are different, so the SUSY little hierarchy problems are absent. The second model also induces spontaneous supersymmetry breaking.

  2. Hadronic Parity Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanasse, Jared

    2011-11-01

    For 50 years the field of hadronic parity violation has been unresolved. Since the 1980's the standard theoretical framework for hadronic parity violation has been the DDH model. However, discrepancies between the DDH model and experiment have called the use of this model into question. At low energies a new model independent analysis of hadronic parity violation can be carried out via pionless effective field theory. With the use of pionless effective field theory and new precision experiments, focusing on systems with A<=4 in order to eliminate nuclear physics uncertainties, the field of hadronic parity violation at low energies will finally be understood. This talk will give an overview of the theory and possible future experiments in this old yet still exciting field.

  3. Parity violation in nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, R.G.H.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of parity violating effects in nuclei is given. Thanks to vigorous experimental and theoretical effort, it now appears that a reasonably well-defined value for the weak isovector ..pi..-nucleon coupling constant can be obtained. There is one major uncertainty in the analysis, namely the M2/E1 mixing ratio for the 2.79 MeV transition in /sup 21/Ne. This quantity is virtually impossible to calculate reliably and must be measured. If it turns out to be much larger than 1, then a null result in /sup 21/Ne is expected no matter what the weak interaction, so an experimental determination is urgently needed. The most promising approach is perhaps a measurement of the pair internal conversion coefficient. Of course, a direct measurement of a pure isovector case is highly desirable, and it is to be hoped that the four ..delta..T = 1 experiments will be pushed still further, and that improved calculations will be made for the /sup 6/Li case. Nuclear parity violation seems to be rapidly approaching an interesting and useful synthesis.

  4. Parity Violating Electron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Krishna S.

    2003-07-01

    We report on a mature experimental program to measure the parity violating asymmetry in the elastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from unpolarized 1H, 2H, 4He and 208Pb targets. One focus is the measurement of the nucleon neutral weak form factors at intermediate four-momentum transfer (0.1 < Q2 < 1) (GeV/c)2 which provide information about the impact of virtual strange quarks on the charge and current distributions inside nucleons. Another focus is the neutral current elastic amplitude at very low Q2, which can provide stringent tests of the standard model and possess unique sensitivity to new physics at the TeV scale. Finally, the elastic neutral weak amplitude from scattering off a heavy spinless nucleus is very sensitive to the presence of a neutron skin. We report on recent technical progress in the design and scope of the experimental techniques. The physics implications of the published measurements are discussed and the current status and anticipated results experiments under construction are summarized.

  5. Theoretical framework for R-parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Kurimaya, Minoru; Nakajima, Hiroto; Watari, Taizan

    2009-04-01

    We propose a theoretical framework for R-parity violation. It is realized by a class of Calabi-Yau compactification of heterotic string theory. Trilinear R-parity violation in superpotential is either absent or negligibly small without an unbroken symmetry, due to a selection rule based on charge counting of a spontaneously broken U(1) symmetry. Although such a selection rule cannot be applied in general to nonrenormalizable operators in the low-energy effective superpotential, it is valid for terms trilinear in low-energy degrees of freedom, and hence can be used as a solution to the dimension-4 proton decay problem in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. Bilinear R-parity violation is generated, but there are good reasons why it is small enough to satisfy its upper bounds from neutrino mass and washout of baryon/lepton asymmetry. All R-parity violating dimension-5 operators can be generated. In this theoretical framework, nucleons can decay through squark-exchange diagrams combining dimension-5 and bilinear R-parity violating operators. B-L breaking neutron decay is predicted.

  6. Chirality and gravitational parity violation.

    PubMed

    Bargueño, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    In this review, parity-violating gravitational potentials are presented as possible sources of both true and false chirality. In particular, whereas phenomenological long-range spin-dependent gravitational potentials contain both truly and falsely chiral terms, it is shown that there are models that extend general relativity including also coupling of fermionic degrees of freedom to gravity in the presence of torsion, which give place to short-range truly chiral interactions similar to that usually considered in molecular physics. Physical mechanisms which give place to gravitational parity violation together with the expected size of the effects and their experimental constraints are discussed. Finally, the possible role of parity-violating gravity in the origin of homochirality and a road map for future research works in quantum chemistry is presented.

  7. Parity-violating electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, T. W.

    Parity-violating responses, occurring as interferences between electromagnetic and weak neutral currents in studies of inclusive scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons, are discussed. Three specific aspects of such studies are highlighted: (1) The role played by isospin-mixing in elastic scattering from 0 +N = Z nuclei; (2) The possibility of having a clean probe of ground-state neutron distributions in nuclei; (3) The sensitivity found in particular experimentally accessible observables to sizes of various form factors of the nucleon itself, including dependences on GEn and on form factors which arise from s overlines configurations in the nucleon.

  8. Parity Violation in Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Beise, Elizabeth

    2007-10-26

    About thirty years ago, electron scattering from nucleons was used [1] to identify, and then measure, the properties of the weak interaction, the only force of nature known to violate the symmetry parity. The basic technique has not fundamentally changed, which is to look for a small asymmetry in count rate from scattering a polarized electron beam from an unpolarized target. Since then, parity-violating (PV) electron scattering has developed substantially, a result of significant improvements in polarized electron beams, accelerator advancements, and developments in cryogenic targets that make it possible to carry out experiments with much higher statistical precision. In the last decade PV experiments have focused on using the complementary electron-quark flavor coupling of the weak interaction to identify and place limits on contributions of strange quark-antiquark pairs to the charge and magnetism of the proton. This observable provides a unique window into the structure of the proton since strange quark contributions can arise only from the sea of quarks and gluons that are responsible for the vast majority of the nucleon's mass. This paper will report on recent results aimed at this goal, along with a brief overview of future directions.

  9. Parity violation in low-energy

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Savage

    2001-12-01

    Parity violation in low-energy nuclear observables is included in the pionless effective field theory. The model-independent relation between the parity-violating asymmetry in polarized np -> d gamma and the non-nucleon part of the deuteron anapole moment is discussed. The asymmetry in np -> d gamma computed with KSW power-counting, and recently criticized by Desplanques, is discussed.

  10. Parity violation in few-nucleon systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Parity-violating interactions between nucleons are the manifestation of an interplay between strong and weak quark-quark interactions at the hadronic level. Because of the short range of the weak interactions, these parity-violating forces provide a unique probe of low-energy strong interactions. In addition, a better understanding of parity violation in nuclei could also shed light on problems in the hadronic weak interactions involving strange quarks. An ongoing experimental program is mapping out the weak component of the nuclear force in few-nucleon systems. Recent theoretical progress in analyzing and interpreting hadronic parity violation in such systems, based on effective field theory methods, will be described. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics.

  11. Parity violation in the hadronic weak interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balascuta, Septimiu

    This thesis deals with the first measurements done with a cold neutron beam at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The experimental technique consisted of capturing polarized cold neutrons by nuclei to measure parity-violation in the angular distribution of the gamma rays following neutron capture. The measurements presented here for the nuclei Chlorine (35Cl) and Aluminum (27Al) are part of a program with the ultimate goal of measuring the asymmetry in the angular distribution of gamma rays emitted in the capture of neutrons on protons, with a precision better than 10-8, in order to extract the weak hadronic coupling constant due to pion exchange interaction with isospin change equal with one (hpi 1). Based on theoretical calculations asymmetry in the angular distribution of the gamma rays from neutron capture on protons has an estimated size of 5·10 -8. This implies that the Al parity violation asymmetry and its uncertainty have to be known with a precision smaller than 4·10 -8. The proton target is liquid Hydrogen (H2) contained in an Aluminum vessel. Results are presented for parity violation and parity-conserving asymmetries in Chlorine and Aluminum. The systematic and statistical uncertainties in the calculation of the parity-violating and parity-conserving asymmetries are discussed.

  12. Parity violation in deep inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Souder, P.

    1994-04-01

    AA beam of polarized electrons at CEBAF with an energy of 8 GeV or more will be useful for performing precision measurements of parity violation in deep inelastic scattering. Possible applications include precision tests of the Standard Model, model-independent measurements of parton distribution functions, and studies of quark correlations.

  13. Atomic parity violation in ytterbium and dysprosium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antypas, Dionysios; Bougas, Lykourgos; Fabricant, Anne; Leefer, Nathan; Tsigutkin, Kostantin; Budker, Dmitry; D. Budker's research Group Team

    2016-09-01

    Atomic parity violation (APV) experiments offer the opportunity to study the weak interaction at low-energy scales, providing valuable information about the Standard Model and nuclear physics. Owing to their large atomic mass, rich energy-level structure (which results in enhanced weak-interaction-induced mixing of opposite-parity states) as well as the availability of many stable isotopes, ytterbium and dysprosium are particularly good candidates for investigating APV interactions. This brings within reach the possibility to detect nuclear anapole moments in these systems, as well as to probe the variation of neutron skin among the different isotopes of the ytterbium and dysprosium nuclei. We provide an overview of the field of APV and report on our group's experimental efforts in Mainz and in Berkeley on making precision measurements of parity violation in these two elements, having as our ultimate goal to probe neutron skin variation and anapole moments.

  14. Parity-Violating in e - e + Scattering at Finite Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chekerker, M.; Santos, A. F.; Khanna, Faqir C.; Ladrem, M.

    2017-09-01

    Parity violation implies that physics laws are not invariant under spatial coordinate reversal. Electron-positron scattering is a process that displays parity violation. Using the Thermo Field Dynamics formalism this scattering at finite temperature is analyzed. The transition amplitude is calculated as a function of temperature. The parity violation at very high temperatures tend to go to zero.

  15. Nuclear parity violation from Lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurth, Thorsten; Berkowitz, Evan; Walker-Loud, Andre; Briceno, Raul; Syritsyn, Sergey; Buchoff, Michael; Strother, Mark; Rinaldi, Enrico; Vranas, Pavlos; CalLat Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The steady advancement of computing technology and algorithms now allows for the computation of basic low-energy hadronic and nuclear observables directly from the fundamental theory of strong interactions, using the numerical technique of lattice QCD. We are beginning to compute specific matrix elements which are necessary to interpret the results from significant experimental efforts designed to probe the limits of the Standard Model. In this talk, I will present preliminary results of the first lattice QCD calculation of parity violation in the di-proton system, as well as the P-wave scattering phase shift necessary to determine the former. Ultimately, this calculation will determine low-energy coefficients in the parity-violating two-nucleon Lagrangian as well as the Desplanques, Donoghue, and Holstein (DDH) model, which can be used to compare with the experimental results.

  16. Parity-Violating Møller Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Krishna S.

    2009-12-01

    Precision measurements of electroweak observables at Q2≪MZ2 complement high energy collider experiments in order to comprehensively search for new dynamics at the TeV scale. Parity-violating electron scattering is one promising technique that has demonstrated the potential to achieve sufficient precision, and which has unique sensitivity to TeV scale dynamics. In particular, we discuss parity-violating electron-electron (Mo/ller scattering). After reviewing the completed SLAC E158 experiment, we discuss a new project to improve on the SLAC measurement by a factor of 5 using the upgraded 12 GeV beam at Jefferson Laboratory, allowing a measurement of the weak mixing angle sin 2θW with comparable precision to the single best measurement at e+e- colliders, and thus accessing the contact interaction scale Λee˜25 TeV.

  17. R parity violation from discrete R symmetries

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Ratz, Michael; Takhistov, Volodymyr

    2014-12-15

    We consider supersymmetric extensions of the standard model in which the usual R or matter parity gets replaced by another R or non–R discrete symmetry that explains the observed longevity of the nucleon and solves the µ problem of MSSM. In order to identify suitable symmetries, we develop a novel method of deriving the maximal Z(R) N symmetry that satisfies a given set of constraints. We identify R parity violating (RPV) and conserving models that are consistent with precision gauge unification and also comment on their compatibility with a unified gauge symmetry such as the Pati–Salam group. Finally, we providemore » a counter– example to the statement found in the recent literature that the lepton number violating RPV scenarios must have µ term and the bilinear κ L Hu operator of comparable magnitude.« less

  18. Cavity tests of parity-odd Lorentz violations in electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, Matthew; Petroff, Alexander

    2007-03-01

    Electromagnetic resonant cavities form the basis for a number modern tests of Lorentz invariance. The geometry of most of these experiments implies unsuppressed sensitivities to parity-even Lorentz violations only. Parity-odd violations typically enter through suppressed boost effects, causing a reduction in sensitivity by roughly 4 orders of magnitude. Here we discuss possible techniques for achieving unsuppressed sensitivities to parity-odd violations using asymmetric resonators.

  19. Parity-violating interactions and currents in the deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavilla, R.; Carlson, J.; Paris, M.

    2003-04-01

    We investigate parity-violating asymmetries in np radiative capture at thermal neutron energies and in deuteron electro-disintegration in quasi-elastic kinematics, using the DDH model for the parity-violating nucleon-nucleon interaction. We find dramatic cancellations between the asymmetries induced by the parity-violating interaction and those arising from the associated parity-violating pion-exchange currents. In the np capture, the model-dependence of the result is nevertheless quite small, because of constraints arising through the Siegert evaluation of the relevant E1 matrix elements. In quasi-elastic electron scattering these processes are found to be insignificant compared to the asymmetry produced by γ-Z interference on individual nucleons. These two experiments, then, provide clean probes of different aspects of weak-interaction physics associated with parity violation in the np system.

  20. Parity-Violating Interactions and Dark Currents in the Deuteron

    SciTech Connect

    R. Schiavilla; J. Carlson; M. Paris

    2002-12-01

    We investigate parity-violating asymmetries in np radiative capture at thermal neutron energies and in deuteron electro-disintegration in quasi-elastic kinematics, using the DDH model for the parity-violating nucleon-nucleon interaction. We find dramatic cancellations between the asymmetries induced by the parity-violating interactions and those arising from the associated parity-violating pion-exchange currents. In the np capture, the model-dependence of the result is nevertheless quite small, because of constraints arising through the Siegert evaluation of the relevant E{sub 1} matrix elements. In quasi-elastic electron scattering these processes are found to be insignificant compared to the asymmetry produced by gamma-Z interference on individual nucleons. These two experiments, then, provide clean probes of different aspects of weak-interaction physics associated with parity violation in the np system.

  1. Parity Violation Experiments with Rare Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budker, Dmitry

    1997-10-01

    Since the first suggestions (V. A. Dzuba, V. V. Flambaum, and I. B. Khriplovich, Z. Phys. D1, 243 (1986).), (A. Gongora and P. G. H. Sandars, J. Phys. B 19, L291 (1986).) to search for parity violation in the rare earth atoms, experiments have been carried out by groups in Novosibirsk, Oxford, Hiroshima and Berkeley with Sm, Yb and Dy. The status of these experiments will be reviewed, with some details given on recent Berkeley Dy results ( A.-T. Nguyen, D. Budker, D. DeMille, and M. Zolotorev, Submitted to Phys. Rev. A.). Progress of the Berkeley Yb experiment ( D. DeMille, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 4165 (1995).), ( C.J. Bowers, D. Budker, E.D. Commins, D. DeMille, S.J. Freedman, A.-T. Nguyen, S.-Q. Shang, and M. Zolotorev, Phys. Rev. A 53, 3103-9(1996). ) will be described elsewhere at this meeting by C. J. Bowers et al.

  2. Measurements of Parity Violation in Electron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschke, Kent

    2016-09-01

    The measurement of the violation of parity symmetry in electron scattering has proven to be a powerful technique for exploring nuclear matter and for the search for new fundamental forces. A successful history with the experimental technique has set the stage for a series of high precision measurements to be made over the next decade. Scattering from heavy, spinless targets will measure the neutron skin of heavy nuclei, providing a valuable calibration for the equation-of-state in neutron-rich nuclear systems. Searches for new neutral-current interactions will be performed in ultra-high precision measurements of scattering from protons and electrons at very low momentum transfer Q2 . In the DIS regime, scattering from deuterium will extend this search for new physics while also providing a unique window on nucleon partonic structure. The physics implications of recent results and development of the next generation of experiments will be reviewed.

  3. Probing neutron rich matter with parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, Charles

    2016-03-01

    Many compact and energetic astrophysical systems are made of neutron rich matter. In contrast, most terrestrial nuclei involve approximately symmetric nuclear matter with more equal numbers of neutrons and protons. However, heavy nuclei have a surface region that contains many extra neutrons. Precision measurements of this neutron rich skin can determine properties of neutron rich matter. Parity violating electron scattering provides a uniquely clean probe of neutrons, because the weak charge of a neutron is much larger than that of a proton. We describe first results and future plans for the Jefferson Laboratory experiment PREX that measures the thickness of the neutron skin in 208Pb. Another JLAB experiment CREX will measure the neutron radius of 48Ca and test recent microscopic calculations of this neutron rich 48 nucleon system. Finally, we show how measuring parity violation at multiple momentum transfers can determine not just the neutron radius but the full radial structure of the neutron density in 48Ca. A neutron star is eighteen orders of magnitude larger than a nucleus (km vs fm) but both the star and the neutron rich nuclear skin are made of the same neutrons, with the same strong interactions, and the same equation of state. A large pressure pushes neutrons out against surface tension and gives a thick neutron skin. Therefore, PREX will constrain the equation of state of neutron rich matter and improve predictions for the structure of neutron stars. Supported in part by DOE Grants DE-FG02-87ER40365 (Indiana University) and DE-SC0008808 (NUCLEI SciDAC Collaboration).

  4. Enantioselective autocatalysis. IV. Implications for parity violation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonner, William A.

    1996-02-01

    Historically, parity violation at the contemporary biomolecular level (i.e., only L-amino acids in proteins and D-sugars in DNA and RNA) has been postulated to be the inevitable result of parity violations at the elementary particle level, involving eitherβ-decay electrons or parity violating energy differences (PVEDs)between enantiomers. These two chiral biases have in turn allegedly impressed a small but persistent chirality onto prebiotic chemistry which, after appropriate amplification, has culminated in our contemporary homochiral biopolymers. Experiments and controversies pertaining to the efficacy of these two chiral biases are reviewed briefly, with the conclusions that: a) there is no experimental evidence supporting the capability ofβ-decay electrons or other spinpolarized chiral particles to generate chiral molecules, and b) only theoretical calculations, but no experimental evidence, support the allegation of a causal relation between PVEDs and biomolecular homochirality. We here attempt to examine the latter allegation experimentally. Spontaneous resolution under racemization conditions (SRURC) during the crystallization of the bromofluoro-1,4-benzodiazepinooxazole derivativeI is capable of affording products of high enantiomeric purity. This process, which involves very efficient stereoselective autocatalysis, has now been examined statistically. If PVED effects are operative, the SRURC of racemicI should provide, either exclusively or with a strong and consistent bias, only one enantiomer of crystallineI. However, crystallization experiments of racemicI showed no bias in its SRURC, leading to the conclusion that PVED effects are ineffective in dictating a preferred chirality in this system. Several earlier experiments in the literature leading to a similar conclusion as to the inefficacy of PVED effects in promoting a preferred chirality are noted.

  5. Hadronic parity violation in few-body systems

    SciTech Connect

    L. Girlanda, R. Schiavilla, M. Viviani, A. Kievsky, L.E. Marcucci

    2009-06-01

    Recent interest, both from experimental and theoretical point of view, on hadronic parity violation is reviewed, with particular emphasis on an effective theory description. After discussing the minimal form of the parity-violating NN contact e ective Lagrangian, we concentrate on the calculation of the neutron spin rotation in vec n - d scattering at zero energy. We find that this observable is sensitive to the long-range component of the parity-violating NN pontential due to the pion exchange, and that it is expected to be one order of magnitude larger than in vec n - p scattering.

  6. Precision electroweak studies using parity violation in electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Paschke, Kent D,

    2013-11-01

    The nature of new neutral-current interactions can be revealed at the low-energy precision frontier, where studies of parity-violation in electron scattering will complement the energy-frontier studies at the LHC. Measurements of the parity-violating observable APV - the cross-section asymmetry in the scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized target - are sensitive to possible contact interactions from new physics at multi-TeV mass scales. The 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and a new, high-intensity beam at Mainz offer opportunities for significant improvements in measurements of electron-electron and electron-quark parity-violating interactions.

  7. Strangeness-conserving hadronic parity violation at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, C.-P.

    2007-05-01

    The parity-violating nucleaon interacton is the key to understanding the strangeness-conserving hadronic weak interaction at low energies. In this brief talk, I review the past accomplishement in and current status of this subject, and outline a new joint effort between experiment and theory that that tries to address the potential problems in the past by focusing on parity violation in few-nucleon systems and using the language of effective field theory.

  8. Polarized electron scattering, new physics and dark parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Marciano, William J.

    2013-11-07

    'New Physics' sensitivities of polarized electron scattering asymmetries, atomic parity violation, m{sub W} and sin{sup 2} θ{sub W} (Z pole measurements) are compared. The utility of low Q{sup 2} polarized electron scattering for probing parity violating 'dark boson' effects is discussed. A possible determination of the weak charge Q{sub w}({sup 12}C) to about ±0.3% via elastic e-Carbon scattering is advocated.

  9. Parity-violating PVDIS with SoLID

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Souder

    2012-04-01

    An experiment designed to measure parity violation in the deep inelastic scattering of electrons from deuterium by using a novel solenoidal spectrometer (SoLID) has recently been approved at JLab. The main goal of the experiment is to make a precise measurement of the parity-violating coupling of the electron to the axial current of the quark. By covering a broad range of kinematics, the experiment will also search for charge symmetry violation in the structure functions. In addition the experiment is sensitive to di-quarks.

  10. Hadronic weak charges and parity-violating forward Compton scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorchtein, Mikhail; Spiesberger, Hubert

    2016-11-01

    Background: Parity-violating elastic electron-nucleon scattering at low momentum transfer allows one to access the nucleon's weak charge, the vector coupling of the Z -boson to the nucleon. In the Standard Model and at tree level, the weak charge of the proton is related to the weak mixing angle and accidentally suppressed, QWp ,tree=1 -4 sin2θW≈0.07 . Modern experiments aim at extracting QWp at ˜1 % accuracy. Similarly, parity nonconservation in atoms allows to access the weak charge of atomic nuclei. Purpose: We consider a novel class of radiative corrections due to the exchange of two photons, with parity violation in the hadronic/nuclear system. These corrections are prone to long-range interactions and may affect the extraction of sin2θW from the experimental data at the relevant level of precision. Methods: The two-photon exchange contribution to the parity-violating electron-proton scattering amplitude is studied in the framework of forward dispersion relations. We address the general properties of the parity-violating forward Compton scattering amplitude and use relativistic chiral perturbation theory to provide the first field-theoretical proof that it obeys a superconvergence relation. Results: We show that the significance of this new correction increases with the beam energy in parity-violating electron scattering, but the superconvergence relation protects the formal definition of the weak charge as a limit at zero-momentum transfer and zero energy. We evaluate the new correction in a hadronic model with pion loops and the Δ (1232 ) resonance, supplemented with a high-energy contribution. For the kinematic conditions of existing and upcoming experiments we show that two-photon exchange corrections with hadronic or nuclear parity violation do not pose a problem for the interpretation of the data in terms of the weak mixing angle at the present level of accuracy. Conclusions: Two-photon exchange in presence of hadronic or nuclear parity violation

  11. Novel Higgs decay signals in R-parity violating models

    SciTech Connect

    Sierra, D. Aristizabal; Porod, W.; Restrepo, D.; Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2008-07-01

    In supersymmetric models the lightest Higgs boson may decay with a sizable branching ratio into a pair of light neutralinos. We analyze such decays within the context of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation, where the neutralino itself is unstable and decays into standard model fermions. We show that the R-parity violating couplings induce novel Higgs decay signals that might facilitate the discovery of the Higgs boson at colliders. At the LHC, the Higgs may be observed, for instance, through its decay--via two neutralinos--into final states containing missing energy and isolated charged leptons such as l{sup {+-}}l{sup {+-}}, l{sup {+-}}l{sup {+-}}, 3l, and 4l. Another promising possibility is the search for the displaced vertices associated with the neutralino decay. We also point out that Higgs searches at the LHC might additionally provide the first evidence of R-parity violation.

  12. Imaging Parity-violating Modes in the CMB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contaldi, Carlo R.

    2017-01-01

    Correlations of polarization components in the coordinate frame are a natural basis for searches of parity-violating modes in the cosmic microwave background. This fact can be exploited to build estimators of parity-violating modes that are local and robust with respect to partial-sky coverage or inhomogeneous weighting. As an example application of a method based on these ideas, we develop a peak stacking tool that isolates the signature of parity-violating modes. We apply the tool to Planck maps and obtain a constraint on the monopole of the polarization rotation angle α < 0\\buildrel{\\circ}\\over{.} 72 at 95% We also demonstrate how the tool can be used as a local method for reconstructing maps of direction dependent rotation α (\\hat{{\\boldsymbol{n}}}).

  13. Parity Violation in Composite Inelastic Dark Matter Models

    SciTech Connect

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    Recent experimental results indicate that the dark matter sector may have a non-minimal structure with a spectrum of states and interactions. Inelastic scattering has received particular attention in light of DAMA's annual modulation signal. Composite inelastic dark matter (CiDM) provides a dynamical origin for the mass splittings in inelastic dark matter models. We show that higher dimensional operators in the CiDM Lagrangian lead to an admixture of inelastic and elastic scattering in the presence of parity violation. This scenario is consistent with direct detection experiments, even when parity violation is nearly maximal. We present an effective field theory description of such models and discuss the constraints from direct detection experiments. The CiDM model with parity violation has non-trivial phenomenology because of the multiple scattering channels that are allowed.

  14. Cosmological constraints on R-parity violation from neutrino decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Rakshit, Subhendu; Raychaudhuri, Amitava

    2000-11-01

    If the neutrino mass is nonzero, as hinted by several experiments, then R-parity-violating supersymmetric Yukawa couplings can drive a heavy neutrino decay into lighter states. The heavy neutrino may either decay radiatively into a lighter neutrino, or it may decay into three light neutrinos through a Z-mediated penguin diagram. For a given mass of the decaying neutrino, we calculate its lifetime for the various modes, each mode requiring certain pairs of R-parity-violating couplings to be nonzero. We then check whether the calculated lifetimes fall in zones allowed or excluded by cosmological requirements. For the latter case, we derive stringent new constraints on the corresponding products of R-parity-violating couplings for given values of the decaying neutrino mass.

  15. Precision electroweak studies using parity violation in electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Paschke, K. D.

    2013-11-07

    The nature of new neutral-current interactions can be revealed at the low-energy precision frontier, where studies of parity-violation in electron scattering will complement the energy-frontier studies at the LHC. Measurements of the parity-violating observable A{sub PV} - the cross-section asymmetry in the scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized target - are sensitive to possible contact interactions from new physics at multi-TeV mass scales. The 12 GeV upgrade at JLab and a new, high-intensity beam at Mainz offer opportunities for significant improvements in measurements of electron-electron and electron-quark parity-violating interactions.

  16. Model-space approach to parity violation in heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.B.

    1996-06-01

    The model-space approach is the basis of both shell model and statistical spectroscopy analyses of nuclear phenomena. The goal of this session is to bring out the main theoretical issues involved in its application to parity violation in the compound nucleus. Section 1 of the current paper sets the stage for the session, and Sect. 2 introduces and explores the model-space formulation as it underlies quantitative connections that are being made between the mean-square matrix element M{sup 2} measured in polarized neutron scattering from compound nuclei and the underlying parity violating interaction. This is followed in the paper by Tomsovic by a description of how statistical spectroscopy is applied to this problem, and in the paper by Hayes by a discussion of shell-model aspects of parity violation in the compound nucleus.

  17. Parity violation in low-energy neutron-deuteron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Ho; Lazauskas, Rimantas; Gudkov, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    Parity-violating effects for low-energy elastic neutron deuteron scattering are calculated for Desplanques, Donoghue, and Holstein (DDH) and effective field theory types of weak potentials in a distorted-wave Born approximation, using realistic hadronic strong interaction wave functions, obtained by solving three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space. The resulting relation between physical observables and low-energy constants can be used to fix low-energy constants from experiments. Potential model dependencies of parity-violating effects are discussed.

  18. Parity violation in low-energy neutron-deuteron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Young-Ho; Gudkov, Vladimir; Lazauskas, Rimantas

    2011-01-15

    Parity-violating effects for low-energy elastic neutron deuteron scattering are calculated for Desplanques, Donoghue, and Holstein (DDH) and effective field theory types of weak potentials in a distorted-wave Born approximation, using realistic hadronic strong interaction wave functions, obtained by solving three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space. The resulting relation between physical observables and low-energy constants can be used to fix low-energy constants from experiments. Potential model dependencies of parity-violating effects are discussed.

  19. Parity-violating electric-dipole transitions in helium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiller, J.; Sucher, J.; Bhatia, A. K.; Feinberg, G.

    1980-01-01

    The paper examines parity-violating electric-dipole transitions in He in order to gain insight into the reliability of approximate calculations which are carried out for transitions in many-electron atoms. The contributions of the nearest-lying states are computed with a variety of wave functions, including very simple product wave functions, Hartree-Fock functions and Hylleraas-type wave functions with up to 84 parameters. It is found that values of the matrix elements of the parity-violating interaction can differ considerably from the values obtained from the good wave functions, even when these simple wave functions give accurate values for the matrix elements in question

  20. Spin Density Matrices for Nuclear Density Functionals with Parity Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Bruce; Giraud, Bertrand

    2010-11-01

    Within the context of the radial density functional [1], we apply the spin density matrix (SDM) used in atomic and molecular physics [2] to nuclear physics. The vector part of the SDM defines a ``hedgehog'' situation, which exists only if nuclear states contain some amount of parity violation. Thus, looking for the vector profile of the SDM could be used as a test for parity violation in nuclei. The difference between the scalar profile and the vector profile of the SDM will be illustrated by a toy model. [4pt] [1] B. G. Giraud, Phys. Rev. C 78, 014307 (2008).[0pt] [2] A. Goerling, Phys. Rev. A 47, 2783 (1993).

  1. Status of Theory and Experiment in Hadronic Parity Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, W. M.; Ahmed, M. W.; Bowman, J. D.; Crawford, C.; Fomin, N.; Gao, H.; Gericke, M. T.; Gudkov, V.; Holstein, B. R.; Howell, C. R.; Huffman, P.; van Oers, W. T. H.; Penttilä, S.; Wu, Y. K.

    2016-02-01

    Hadronic parity violation uses quark-quark weak interactions to probe nonperturbative strong interaction dynamics through two nonperturbative QCD scales: ΛQCD and the fine-tuned MeV scales of NN bound states in low energy nuclear physics. The current and projected availability of high-intensity neutron and photon sources coupled with ongoing experiments and continuing developments in theoretical methods provide the opportunity to greatly expand our understanding of hadronic parity violation in few-nucleon systems. The current status of these efforts and future plans are discussed.

  2. Res-Parity: Parity Violation in Inelastic scattering at Low Q2

    SciTech Connect

    Reimer, Paul; Bosted, Peter; Arrington, John; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; Zheng, Xiaochao

    2006-05-16

    Parity violating electron scattering has become a well established tool which has been used, for example, to probe the Standard Model and the strange-quark contribution to the nucleon. While much of this work has focused on elastic scattering, the RES-Parity experiment, which has been proposed to take place at Jefferson Laboratory, would focus on inelastic scattering in the low-Q2, low-W domain. RES-Parity would search for evidence of quark-hadron duality and resonance structure with parity violation in the resonance region. In terms of parity violation, this region is essentially unexplored, but the interpretation of other high-precision electron scattering experiments will rely on a reasonable understanding of scattering at lower energy and low-W through the effects of radiative corrections. RES-Parity would also study nuclear effects with the weak current. Because of the intrinsic broad band energy spectrum of neutrino beams, neutrino experiments are necessarily dependent on an untested, implicit assumption that these effects are identical to electromagnetic nuclear effects. RES-Parity is a relatively straight forward experiment. With a large expected asymmetry (~ 0.5 × 10-4) these studies may be completed with in a relatively brief period.

  3. Parity-Violating PVDIS with SoLID

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Souder

    2011-09-01

    We are planning an experiment at JLab to measure parity-violation in deep inelastic scattering to high precision over a broad kinematic range. The goal of the experiment is to test the Standard Model, search for charge symmetry violation at the quark level, and to search for higher twist effects due to quark-quark interactions. We will also be able to measure the d/u ratio for the nucleon and search for nuclear effects in deep inelastic scattering.

  4. Parity-Violating PVDIS with SoLID

    SciTech Connect

    Souder, P. A.

    2011-09-21

    We are planning an experiment at JLab to measure parity-violation in deep inelastic scattering to high precision over a broad kinematic range. The goal of the experiment is to test the Standard Model, search for charge symmetry violation at the quark level, and to search for higher twist effects due to quark-quark interactions. We will also be able to measure the d/u ratio for the nucleon and search for nuclear effects in deep inelastic scattering.

  5. Measurements of parity violation in neutron-nucleus reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom, S.J.; Bowman, C.D.; Bowman, J.D.; Knudson, J.; Mortensen, R.; Penttila, S.; Szymanski, J.J.; Wender, S.A.; Yoo, S.H.; Yuan, V.W. ); Frankle, C.M.; Gould, C.R.; Haase, D.G.; Mitchell, G.E. Triangle Universities Nuclear Lab., Durham, NC ); Roberson, N.R.; Zhu, X. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC

    1991-01-01

    In this talk I describe a new generation of experiments studying the weak interaction between nucleons. Measurements of the effect of this interaction are few in number and the significance of the observed effects are generally small. It is well known that the weak interaction violates parity. This was first experimentally established by C. S. Wu through measurement of an asymmetry of electrons emitted in the beta-decay of polarized {sup 60}Co. The measured asymmetry was large because beta decay is a weak interaction process. For a process in which the strong interaction can contribute, we expect much smaller asymmetries, of order 10{sup {minus}7}. In the work I will describe here we study the effects of the weak interaction through the signal of the parity violation associated with that interaction. There are two basic classes of experiment used to detect parity violation. The first relies on the measurement of a cross section or width that would vanish if parity were conserved. One example of this type of experiment in nuclear physics is the decay of an unnatural parity state to a 0+ nucleus and an {alpha}-particle. Such measurements have been made for two nuclei: {sup 16}O(2{sup {minus}}) {implies} {sup 12} C(g.s) + {alpha} and {sup 20}N{var epsilon}(1{sup +}) {implies} {sup 16} O(g.s) + {alpha}. Parity-violating widths as small as of 10{sup {minus}10} eV have been measured in these experiments. The second class of experiments involves a measurement of pseudo-scalar observables which are odd under parity inversion. These involve correlations between spin and linear angular momenta, for example circular polarization of {gamma}-rays ({sigma}{sub {gamma}} {center dot} {kappa}{sub {gamma}}) or longitudinal analyzing power ({sigma}{sub p} {center dot} {kappa}{sub p}). 20 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Parity-violating interaction effects in the np system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiavilla, R.; Carlson, J.; Paris, M.

    2004-10-01

    We investigate parity-violating observables in the np system, including the longitudinal asymmetry and neutron-spin rotation in n→ p elastic scattering, the photon asymmetry in n→ p radiative capture, and the asymmetries in deuteron photodisintegration d( γ→ ,n)p in the threshold region and electrodisintegration d( e→ , e' )np in quasielastic kinematics. To have an estimate of the model dependence for the various predictions, a number of different, latest-generation strong-interaction potentials—Argonne v18 , Bonn 2000, and Nijmegen I—are used in combination with a weak-interaction potential consisting of π -, ρ -, and ω -meson exchanges—the Desplanques-Donoghue-Holstein (DDH) model. The complete bound and scattering problems in the presence of parity-conserving, including electromagnetic, and parity-violating potentials are solved in both configuration and momentum space. The issue of electromagnetic current conservation is examined carefully. We find large cancellations between the asymmetries induced by the parity-violating interactions and those arising from the associated pion-exchange currents. In the n→ p capture, the model dependence is nevertheless quite small, because of constraints arising through the Siegert evaluation of the relevant E1 matrix elements. In quasielastic electron scattering these processes are found to be insignificant compared to the asymmetry produced by γ-Z interference on individual nucleons. These two experiments, then, provide clean probes of different aspects of weak-interaction physics associated with parity violation in the np system. Finally, we find that the neutron-spin rotation in n→ p elastic scattering and asymmetry in deuteron disintegration by circularly polarized photons exhibit significant sensitivity both to the values used for the weak vector-meson couplings in the DDH model and to the input strong-interaction potential adopted in the calculation. This reinforces the conclusion that these short

  7. Constraining extra neutral gauge bosons with atomic parity violation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diener, Ross; Godfrey, Stephen; Turan, Ismail

    2012-12-01

    The discovery of a new neutral gauge boson Z' could provide the first concrete evidence of physics beyond the standard model. We explore how future parity violation experiments, especially atomic parity violation experiments, can be used to constrain Z' bosons. We use the recent measurement of the Cs133 nuclear weak charge to estimate lower bounds on the mass of Z' bosons for a number of representative models and to put constraints on the couplings of a newly discovered Z' boson. We also consider how these constraints might be improved by future atomic parity violation experiments that will measure nuclear weak charges of multiple isotopes. We show how measurements of a single isotope and combining measurements into ratios and differences can be used to constrain the couplings of a Z' and discriminate between models. We include in our results the constraints that can be obtained from the experiments Qweak and P2 that measure the proton weak charge. We find that current and future parity violation experiments could potentially play an important role in unravelling new physics if a Z' were discovered.

  8. Universal extra dimension: Violation of Kaluza-Klein parity

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacherjee, Biplob

    2009-01-01

    The minimal universal extra dimension (mUED) model respects the Kaluza-Klein (KK) parity (-1){sup n}, where n is the KK number. However, it is possible to have interactions located at only one of the two fixed points of the S{sub 1}/Z{sub 2} orbifold. Such asymmetric interactions violate the KK parity. This kills the cold dark matter component of UED but also removes the upper bound on the inverse compactification radius, and thus nonobservation of the KK excitations even at the Large Hadron Collider does not necessarily invalidate the model. Apart from the decay of the lightest n=1 KK excitation, this leads to collider signals which are markedly different from those in the mUED scenario. The phenomenological consequences of such KK-parity violating terms are explored.

  9. Measurement of parity violation in electron-quark scattering.

    PubMed

    2014-02-06

    Symmetry permeates nature and is fundamental to all laws of physics. One example is parity (mirror) symmetry, which implies that flipping left and right does not change the laws of physics. Laws for electromagnetism, gravity and the subatomic strong force respect parity symmetry, but the subatomic weak force does not. Historically, parity violation in electron scattering has been important in establishing (and now testing) the standard model of particle physics. One particular set of quantities accessible through measurements of parity-violating electron scattering are the effective weak couplings C2q, sensitive to the quarks' chirality preference when participating in the weak force, which have been measured directly only once in the past 40 years. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in electron-quark scattering, which yields a determination of 2C2u - C2d (where u and d denote up and down quarks, respectively) with a precision increased by a factor of five relative to the earlier result. These results provide evidence with greater than 95 per cent confidence that the C2q couplings are non-zero, as predicted by the electroweak theory. They lead to constraints on new parity-violating interactions beyond the standard model, particularly those due to quark chirality. Whereas contemporary particle physics research is focused on high-energy colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider, our results provide specific chirality information on electroweak theory that is difficult to obtain at high energies. Our measurement is relatively free of ambiguity in its interpretation, and opens the door to even more precise measurements in the future.

  10. Measurement of parity violation in electron–quark scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.; Deng, X.; Ahmed, Z.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bellini, V.; Beminiwattha, R.; Benesch, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Dalton, M. M.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deconinck, W.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Erler, J.; Flay, D.; Franklin, G. B.; Friend, M.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Giusa, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Golge, S.; Grimm, K.; Hafidi, K.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmes, R.; Holmstrom, T.; Holt, R. J.; Huang, J.; Hyde, C. E.; Jen, C. M.; Jones, D.; Kang, Hoyoung; King, P. M.; Kowalski, S.; Kumar, K. S.; Lee, J. H.; LeRose, J. J.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; McNulty, D.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Meddi, F.; Meekins, D. G.; Mercado, L.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Mihovilovic, M.; Muangma, N.; Myers, K. E.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Nuruzzaman,; Oh, Y.; Parno, D.; Paschke, K. D.; Phillips, S. K.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Quinn, B.; Rakhman, A.; Reimer, P. E.; Rider, K.; Riordan, S.; Roche, J.; Rubin, J.; Russo, G.; Saenboonruang, K.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Shahinyan, A.; Silwal, R.; Sirca, S.; Souder, P. A.; Suleiman, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Sutera, C. M.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Waidyawansa, B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ye, L.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.

    2014-02-05

    Symmetry permeates nature and is fundamental to all laws of physics. One example is parity (mirror) symmetry, which implies that flipping left and right does not change the laws of physics. Laws for electromagnetism, gravity and the subatomic strong force respect parity symmetry, but the subatomic weak force does not. Historically, parity violation in electron scattering has been important in establishing (and now testing) the standard model of particle physics. One particular set of quantities accessible through measurements of parity-violating electron scattering are the effective weak couplings C2q, sensitive to the quarks chirality preference when participating in the weak force, which have been measured directly3, 4 only once in the past 40?years. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in electron-quark scattering, which yields a determination of 2C2u???C2d (where u and d denote up and down quarks, respectively) with a precision increased by a factor of five relative to the earlier result. These results provide evidence with greater than 95 per cent confidence that the C2q couplings are non-zero, as predicted by the electroweak theory. They lead to constraints on new parity-violating interactions beyond the standard model, particularly those due to quark chirality. Whereas contemporary particle physics research is focused on high-energy colliders such as the Large Hadron Collider, our results provide specific chirality information on electroweak theory that is difficult to obtain at high energies. Our measurement is relatively free of ambiguity in its interpretation, and opens the door to even more precise measurements in the future.

  11. Parity-Violating Interaction Effects in the np System

    SciTech Connect

    R. Schiavilla; J.A. Carlson; M. Paris

    2003-09-03

    We investigate parity-violating observables in the np system, including the longitudinal asymmetry and neutron-spin rotation in np elastic scattering, the photon asymmetry in np radiative capture, and the asymmetries in deuteron photo-disintegration d(gamma,n)p in the threshold region and electro-disintegration d(e,e`)np in quasi-elastic kinematics. To have an estimate of the model dependence for the various predictions, a number of different, latest-generation strong-interaction potentials--Argonne v18, Bonn 2000, and Nijmegen I--are used in combination with a weak-interaction potential consisting of pi-, rho-, and omega-meson exchanges--the model known as DDH. The complete bound and scattering problems in the presence of parity-conserving, including electromagnetic, and parity-violating potentials is solved in both configuration and momentum space. The issue of electromagnetic current conservation is examined carefully. We find large cancellations between the asymmetries induced by the parity-violating interactions and those arising from the associated pion-exchange currents. In the np capture, the model dependence is nevertheless quite small, because of constraints arising through the Siegert evaluation of the relevant E1 matrix elements. In quasi-elastic electron scattering these processes are found to be insignificant compared to the asymmetry produced by gamma-Z interference on individual nucleons.

  12. Quantum gravity, torsion, parity violation, and all that

    SciTech Connect

    Freidel, Laurent; Minic, Djordje; Takeuchi, Tatsu

    2005-11-15

    We discuss the issue of parity violation in quantum gravity. In particular, we study the coupling of fermionic degrees of freedom in the presence of torsion and the physical meaning of the Immirzi parameter from the viewpoint of effective field theory. We derive the low-energy effective Lagrangian which turns out to involve two parameters: one measuring the nonminimal coupling of fermions in the presence of torsion, the other being the Immirzi parameter. In the case of nonminimal coupling the effective Lagrangian contains an axial-vector interaction leading to parity violation. Alternatively, in the case of minimal coupling there is no parity violation and the effective Lagrangian contains only the usual axial-axial interaction. In this situation the real values of the Immirzi parameter are not at all constrained. On the other hand, purely imaginary values of the Immirzi parameter lead to violations of unitarity for the case of nonminimal coupling. Finally, the effective Lagrangian blows up for the positive and negative unit imaginary values of the Immirzi parameter.

  13. New techniques for measuring atomic parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronin, Alexander Douglas

    1999-11-01

    Atomic Parity Non-Conservation (PNC) experiments are complimentary to high-energy particle physics experiments and have potential to detect physics beyond the Standard Model, such as extra gauge bosons. The Standard Model of the electroweak interaction predicts parity non- conserving transition amplitudes, such as E1PNC , in atoms. Measurements of E1PNC in thallium are consistent with the Standard Model predictions. But in cesium the single most precise result is highly suggestive of an additional gauge boson. New experiments with independent sources of uncertainty are needed to confirm this departure from Standard Model predictions. This dissertation explores several new atomic PNC experiments. This research started with an effort to improve the M1- E1PNC optical rotation experiments on the thallium 6P1/2-->6P3/2 transition by using electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) to address systematic sources of uncertainty which limited previous optical rotation experiments. An experimental study of EIT in thallium is presented, with data and models for transmission and optical rotation in the presence of EIT. EIT is a new method of sub-Doppler spectroscopy, which uses a two- laser nonlinear process. Using chopped optical beams and lock-in detection, EIT can help make a variety of precision measurements of atomic properties including PNC. To extend this technique to cesium, where the accuracy of atomic structure calculations permits the most critical tests of the Standard Model by atomic PNC, I considered the effect of EIT on an E2- E1PNC optical rotation signal. An analysis of angular momentum factors for PNC on an E2 transition is presented, along with EIT models for cesium vapor on the 6S1/2-->5D3/2 probe transition. This transition should have slightly larger E1PNC but uncorrelated atomic structure uncertainties compared to the 6S1/2-->7S1/2 transition on which the most accurate atomic PNC experiment was recently performed. I also propose a

  14. Parity Violating Electron Scattering and Strangeness in the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Maas, Frank E.

    2008-10-13

    A measurement of the weak form factor of the proton allows a flavor separation of the strangeness contribution to the electromagnetic form factors. The weak form factor is accessed experimentally by the measurement of a parity violating (PV) asymmetry in the scattering of polarized electrons on unpolarized protons. An extended experimental program to measure these parity violating asymmetries has been performed and is going on at different accelerators. After the first round of experiments allowing a separation of the strangeness form factors G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} at a Q{sup 2}-value of 0.1 (GeV/c){sup 2}, new, preliminary results have been achieved at 0.23 (GeV/c){sup 2}.

  15. Electroweak charge density distributions with parity-violating electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Ren, Zhongzhou; Xu, Chang; Xu, Renli

    2013-11-01

    Parity-violating electron scattering (PVS) is an accurate and model-independent way to investigate the weak-charge density distributions of nuclei. In this paper, we study parity-violating electron scattering with the Helm model where the effects of spin-orbit currents on nuclear weak skins are taken into account. The conditions of two PVS measurements to constrain the surface thickness σW of Helm weak-charge densities are investigated. According to the plane wave Born approximation, Apv is expressed in terms of parameters of the corresponding Helm charge and weak-charge densities. After fitting the results of Apv calculated from the phase-shift analysis method where the Coulomb distortion effects are incorporated, an empirical formula in terms of Helm model parameters for calculating Apv is obtained. If two PVS measurements with different scattering angles are carried out, the modeled weak-charge density distributions with two parameters could be extracted from this empirical formula.

  16. Parity and Time-Reversal Violation in Atomic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, B. M.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2015-10-01

    Studying the violation of parity and time-reversal invariance in atomic systems has proven to be a very effective means of testing the electroweak theory at low energy and searching for physics beyond it. Recent developments in both atomic theory and experimental methods have led to the ability to make extremely precise theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of these effects. Such studies are complementary to direct high-energy searches, and can be performed for only a fraction of the cost. We review the recent progress in the field of parity and time-reversal violation in atoms, molecules, and nuclei, and examine the implications for physics beyond the Standard Model, with an emphasis on possible areas for development in the near future.

  17. Bilinear R-parity violation with flavor symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzocchi, F.; Morisi, S.; Peinado, E.; Valle, J. W. F.; Vicente, A.

    2013-01-01

    Bilinear R-parity violation (BRPV) provides the simplest intrinsically super-symmetric neutrino mass generation scheme. While neutrino mixing parameters can be probed in high energy accelerators, they are unfortunately not predicted by the theory. Here we propose a model based on the discrete flavor symmetry A 4 with a single R-parity violating parameter, leading to (i) correct Cabbibo mixing given by the Gatto-Sartori-Tonin formula, and a successful unification-like b-tau mass relation, and (ii) a correlation between the lepton mixing angles θ 13 and θ 23 in agreement with recent neutrino oscillation data, as well as a (nearly) massless neutrino, leading to absence of neutrinoless double beta decay.

  18. Parity-violating interaction effects in the np system

    SciTech Connect

    Schiavilla, R.; Carlson, J.; Paris, M.

    2004-10-01

    We investigate parity-violating observables in the np system, including the longitudinal asymmetry and neutron-spin rotation in n-vectorp elastic scattering, the photon asymmetry in n-vectorp radiative capture, and the asymmetries in deuteron photodisintegration d({gamma}-vector,n)p in the threshold region and electrodisintegration d(e-vector,e{sup '})np in quasielastic kinematics. To have an estimate of the model dependence for the various predictions, a number of different, latest-generation strong-interaction potentials - Argonne v{sub 18}, Bonn 2000, and Nijmegen I - are used in combination with a weak-interaction potential consisting of {pi}-, {rho}-, and {omega}-meson exchanges - the Desplanques-Donoghue-Holstein (DDH) model. The complete bound and scattering problems in the presence of parity-conserving, including electromagnetic, and parity-violating potentials are solved in both configuration and momentum space. The issue of electromagnetic current conservation is examined carefully. We find large cancellations between the asymmetries induced by the parity-violating interactions and those arising from the associated pion-exchange currents. In the n-vectorp capture, the model dependence is nevertheless quite small, because of constraints arising through the Siegert evaluation of the relevant E{sub 1} matrix elements. In quasielastic electron scattering these processes are found to be insignificant compared to the asymmetry produced by {gamma}-Z interference on individual nucleons. These two experiments, then, provide clean probes of different aspects of weak-interaction physics associated with parity violation in the np system. Finally, we find that the neutron-spin rotation in n-vectorp elastic scattering and asymmetry in deuteron disintegration by circularly polarized photons exhibit significant sensitivity both to the values used for the weak vector-meson couplings in the DDH model and to the input strong-interaction potential adopted in the calculation

  19. New G -parity violating amplitude in the J /ψ decay?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini Ferroli, R.; De Mori, F.; Destefanis, M.; Maggiora, M.; Pacetti, S.; Yan, L.; Bertani, M.; Calcaterra, A.; Felici, G.; Patteri, P.; Wang, Y. D.; Zallo, A.; Bettoni, D.; Cibinetto, G.; Farinelli, R.; Fioravanti, E.; Garzia, I.; Mezzadri, G.; Santoro, V.; Savrié, M.; Bianchi, F.; Greco, M.; Marcello, S.; Spataro, S.; Carloni Calame, C. M.; Montagna, G.; Nicrosini, O.; Piccinini, F.

    2017-02-01

    The J /ψ meson has negative G parity so that, in the limit of isospin conservation, its decay into π+π- should be purely electromagnetic. However, the measured branching fraction B (J /ψ →π+π- ) exceeds by more than 4.5 standard deviations the expectation computed according to BABAR data on the e+e- →π+π- cross section. The possibility that the two-gluon plus one-photon decay mechanism is not suppressed by G -parity conservation is discussed, even by considering other multipion decay channels. As also obtained by phenomenological computation, such a decay mechanism could be responsible for the observed discrepancy. Finally, we notice that the BESIII experiment, having the potential to perform an accurate measurement of the e+e- →π+π- cross section in the J /ψ mass energy region, can definitely prove or disprove this strong G -parity-violating mechanism by confirming or confuting the BABAR data.

  20. Novel parity violating transport coefficients in 2 + 1 dimensions from holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jiunn-Wei; Dai, Shou-Huang; Lee, Nien-En; Maity, Debaprasad

    2012-09-01

    We construct a 3+1 dimensional holographic model dual to a parity violating hydrodynamic system in 2+1 dimensions. Our model contains gravitational and electrodynamic Chern-Simons terms coupled to a neutral pseudo scalar θ, and a potential composed of quadratic and quartic terms in θ. The background is a charged black brane. We study the hydrodynamics to first order in spacetime derivatives near the probe limit of the pseudo scalar, by extracting the transport coefficients from the scalar, vector, and tensor modes of bulk perturbations. We study two mechanisms for breaking the parity of the boundary fluid: the parity is either spontaneously broken by the nonzero vev of the dual pseudo scalar operator, or by the pseudo scalar source on the boundary. We discover some novel temperature-dependent behaviors of the transport coefficients. It would be interesting to find these behaviors being realized in the real world materials.

  1. Unparticle searches through low energy parity violating asymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Ozansoy, K. O.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we study the effects of the unparticles on the parity violating asymmetry for the low energy electron-electron scattering, e{sup -}e{sup -}{yields}e{sup -}e{sup -}. Using the data from the E158 experiment at SLAC we extract the limits on the unparticle coupling {lambda}{sub AV}, and on the energy scale {lambda} at 95% C.L. for various values of the scaling dimension d.

  2. Derivation of the parity-violating NN potential

    SciTech Connect

    Zenkin, S.

    1981-02-01

    The parity-violating NN potential due to vector-meson exchange is considered in the framework of current algebra. A method to calculate the effective P-odd NNV vertex, free of uncertainties due to the existence of the Schwinger and seagull terms, is presented. The final result coincides with the result of the factorization approximation and may be considered as a justification of the approximation.

  3. Parity violation in the CMB trispectrum from the scalar sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2016-10-01

    Under the existence of chiral non-Gaussian sources during inflation, the trispectrum of primordial curvature perturbations can break parity. We examine signatures of the induced trispectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. It is confirmed via a harmonic-space analysis that, as a consequence of parity violation, such a CMB trispectrum has nonvanishing signal in the ℓ1+ℓ2+ℓ3+ℓ4=odd domain, which is prohibited in the concordance cosmology. When the curvature trispectrum is parametrized with Legendre polynomials, the CMB signal due to the Legendre dipolar term is enhanced at the squeezed configurations in ℓ space, yielding a high signal-to-noise ratio. A Fisher matrix computation results in a minimum detectable size of the dipolar coefficient in a cosmic-variance-limited-level temperature survey as d1odd=640 . In an inflationary model where the inflaton field couples to the gauge field via an f (ϕ )(F2+F F ˜) interaction, the curvature trispectrum contains such a parity-odd dipolar term. We find that, in this model, the CMB trispectrum yields a high signal-to-noise ratio compared with the CMB power spectrum or bispectrum. Therefore, the ℓ1+ℓ2+ℓ3+ℓ4=odd signal could be a promising observable of cosmological parity violation.

  4. Precision tests of parity violation over cosmological distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Jonathan P.; Keating, Brian G.; Johnson, Bradley R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) B-mode polarization power spectrum by the BICEP2 and POLARBEAR experiments have demonstrated new precision tools for probing fundamental physics. Regardless of origin, the detection of sub-μK CMB polarization represents a technological tour de force. Yet more information may be latent in the CMB's polarization pattern. Because of its tensorial nature, CMB polarization may also reveal parity-violating physics via a detection of cosmic polarization rotation. Although current CMB polarimeters are sensitive enough to measure one degree-level polarization rotation with >5σ statistical significance, they lack the ability to differentiate this effect from a systematic instrumental polarization rotation. Here, we motivate the search for cosmic polarization rotation from current CMB data as well as independent radio galaxy and quasar polarization measurements. We argue that an improvement in calibration accuracy would allow the unambiguous measurement of parity- and Lorentz-violating effects. We describe the CalSat space-based polarization calibrator that will provide stringent control of systematic polarization angle calibration uncertainties to 0.05° - an order of magnitude improvement over current CMB polarization calibrators. CalSat-based calibration could be used with current CMB polarimeters searching for B-mode polarization, effectively turning them into probes of cosmic parity violation, `for free' - i.e. without the need to build dedicated instruments.

  5. Strange vector form factors from parity-violating electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Kent Paschke, Anthony Thomas, Robert Michaels, David Armstrong

    2011-06-01

    The simplest models might describe the nucleon as 3 light quarks, but this description would be incomplete without inclusion of the sea of glue and qbar q pairs which binds it. Early indications of a particularly large contribution from strange quarks in this sea to the spin and mass of the nucleon motivated an experimental program examining the role of these strange quarks in the nucleon vector form factors. The strangeness form factors can be extracted from the well-studied electromagnetic structure of the nucleon using parity-violation in electron-nuclear scattering to isolate the effect of the weak interaction. With high luminosity and polarization, and a very stable beam due to its superconducting RF cavities, CEBAF at Jefferson Lab is a precision instrument uniquely well suited to the challenge of measurements of the small parity-violating asymmetries. The techniques and results of the two major Jefferson Lab experimental efforts in parity-violation studies, HAPPEX and G0, as well as efforts to describe the strange form factors in QCD, will be reviewed.

  6. Affleck-Dine baryogenesis with R-parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higaki, Tetsutaro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Saikawa, Ken'ichi; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2014-08-01

    We investigate whether the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is explained in the framework of the supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model with R-parity violating interactions. It is shown that the Affleck-Dine mechanism naturally works via a trilinear interaction LLEc, LQDc, or UcDcDc, if the magnitude of the coupling corresponding to the operator λ, λ', or λ'' is sufficiently small. The formation of Q-balls and their subsequent evolution are also discussed. The present baryon asymmetry can be explained in the parameter region where R-parity is mildly violated 10-9≲λ,λ',λ''≲10-6 and the mass of the gravitino is relatively heavy m3/2≳104 GeV. On the other hand, it is difficult to explain the present baryon asymmetry for larger values of R-parity violating couplings λ ,λ',λ''≳10-5, since Q-balls are likely to be destructed in the thermal environment and the primordial baryon number is washed away.

  7. Parity violation in polarized neutron capture on parahydrogen and aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Zhaowen

    Parity violation comes from the weak interaction, which is mediated by the W and Z bosons. The hadronic sector of weak interaction is particularly interesting. The natural strength of the interaction is 10-7 times smaller than the strong interaction. This fact, combined with the short range of the weak interaction, allows it to serve as a unique probe of nucleon structure. In this low energy regime QCD is nonperturbative, and quark gluon dynamics is not well understood. Understanding the modification of the weak interaction from the quark level to the nucleon level can shed light on quark-quark correlations in the nucleon. One dynamical theory which attempts to describe the weak hadronic interaction is the DDH model, which uses pi+/-, rho, and o mesons as mediating mesons with small parity violating couplings to nucleons to categorize the interaction. The NPDGamma experiment is sensitive to the hpi1 parameter at the 10-7 level, and is in progress on the Fundamental Neutron Beamline at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge National Lab. The NPDGamma experiment measures the parity violating gamma ray asymmetry from polarized neutron capture on parahydrogen. The proposed accuracy will be at 10-8 level, which is a factor of 5 smaller than the theoretical best estimate from DDH. In this thesis, a description of the setup of the experiment is provided, focusing on the parahydrogen target, as well as the analysis techniques, systematic errors and false asymmetries associated with the experiment. The other focus of this thesis will be the analysis of the parity-odd asymmetry from polarized neutron capture on aluminum, which is the biggest source of systematic error for the hydrogen asymmetry.

  8. Experiments on parity violation in the compound nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.D.

    1996-09-01

    Results from experiments that measure parity-violating longitudinal asymmetries in the scattering of epithermal neutrons from compound-nuclear resonances at the Manuel Lujan Neutron Scattering Center at Los Alamos are discussed. Parity non-conserving asymmetries have been observed for many p-wave resonances in a single target. Measurements were performed on several nuclei in the mass region of A-100 and A-230. The statistical model of the compound nucleus provides a theoretical basis for extracting mean-squared matrix elements from the experimental asymmetry data, and for interpreting the mean-squared matrix elements. The constraints on the weak meson-exchange couplings calculated from the compound-nucleus asymmetry data agree qualitatively with the results from few-body and light-nuclei experiments. For all nuclei but {sup 232}Th measured asymmetries have random signs. For {sup 232}Th eight of eight measured asymmetries are positive. This phenomenon is discussed in terms or doorway models.

  9. A parity-violating U[sub 4]-gravitation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, R. )

    1993-03-01

    The general structure of a metric-torsion theory of gravitation allows a parity-violating contribution to the complete action which is linear in the curvature tensor and vanishes identically in the absence of torsion. The resulting action involves, apart from the constant [tilde K][sub E] = 8[pi]/c[sup 4], a coupling (B) which governs the strength of the parity interaction mediated by torsion. In this model the Brans-Dicke scalar field generates the torsion field, even though it has zero spin. The interesting consequence of the theory is that its results for the solar-system differ very little from those obtained from Brans-Dicke (BD) theory. Therefore the theory is indistinguishable from BD theory in solar-system experiments. 5 refs.

  10. Jefferson Lab injector development for next generation parity violation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grames, J.; Hansknect, J.; Poelker, M.; Suleiman, R.

    2011-11-01

    To meet the challenging requirements of next generation parity violation experiments at Jefferson Lab, the Center for Injectors and Sources is working on improving the parity-quality of the electron beam. These improvements include new electron photogun design and fast helicity reversal of the Pockels Cell. We proposed and designed a new scheme for slow helicity reversal using a Wien Filter and two Solenoids. This slow reversal complements the insertable half-wave plate reversal of the laser-light polarization by reversing the electron beam polarization at the injector while maintaining a constant accelerator configuration. For position feedback, fast air-core magnets located in the injector were commissioned and a new scheme for charge feedback is planned.

  11. Parity-violating and anisotropic correlations in pseudoscalar inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Shiraishi, Maresuke; Peloso, Marco E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it E-mail: maresuke.shiraishi@pd.infn.it

    2015-01-01

    A pseudo-scalar inflaton field can have interesting phenomenological signatures associated with parity violation. The existing analyses of these signatures typically assume statistical isotropy. In the present work we instead investigate the possibility that a pseudo-scalar inflaton is coupled to a vector field carrying a small but non-negligible vacuum expectation value (vev) coherent over our Hubble patch. We show that, in such case, correlators involving the primordial curvature perturbations and gravitational waves violate both statistical isotropy and parity symmetry. We compute the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature anisotropies (T) and polarization (E/B) generated by these primordial modes. The CMB two-point correlation functions present distinct signals of broken rotational and parity invariance. Specifically, we find non-vanishing TT, TE, EE and BB correlators between ℓ{sub 1} and ℓ{sub 2} = ℓ{sub 1} ± 1 multipoles, and non-vanishing TB and EB correlators between ℓ{sub 1} and ℓ{sub 2} = ℓ{sub 1} ± 2 multipoles. Such signatures are specific of the models under consideration and they cannot be generated if one of parity and isotropy is preserved. As a specific example we consider the simple case in which the vector field has just an ''electric'' background component decaying in the standard way as a{sup −2}. In this case a strong scale-dependent quadrupolar modulation of the primordial power spectra is generated and we find that almost noiseless data of the large-scale temperature and E-mode polarization anisotropies (like, e.g., the ones provided by WMAP or Planck) should be able to constrain the quadrupolar amplitude coefficients g{sub 2M} of the primordial scalar power spectrum (normalized at the pivot scale comparable to the present horizon size k{sup −1}{sub 0} = 14 Gpc) down to g{sub 2M} = 30 (68%CL)

  12. Parity Violation at 8 - 12 GeV at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Michaels

    1998-06-01

    Experiments on parity violation in electron scattering measure the asymmetry A = {sigma}{sub R} - {sigma}{sub L}/{sigma}{sub R} + {sigma}{sub L} where {sigma}{sub R(L)} is the cross section for Right(Left) handed longitudinally polarized electrons. This asymmetry arises, in first order, from the interference between photon and Z-boson exchange amplitudes. Experiments make two basic uses of the Z-boson as a probe in electron-quark or electron-nucleon scattering. Historically the first usage was to test the electroweak theory in regions of kinematics where the hadronic structure is sufficiently understood. They discuss the application of higher energies at Jefferson Lab to repeat the SLAC e-D deep inelastic parity violation experiment [1] at a level of precision {approx} 0.5% in sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} which would be a useful constrain on extensions of the Standard Model [2]. The second, more recent usage of the Z-boson probe is to assume the Standard Model is correct at about the 1% level and use this as a unique method to address fundamental issues of nucleon structure, such as: (1) are the strange quarks an important component of the nucleon [3]; (2) In deep inelastic scattering, are the high momentum quarks u or d quarks? To address the first question, they discuss the feasibility of extending the HAPPEX experiment to higher Q{sup 2}. For the second question, they discuss a possible measurement of the ratio of valence quarks d/u in the proton using deep inelastic parity violation.

  13. Parity violation in radiative neutron capture on the deuteron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Young-Ho; Lazauskas, Rimantas; Gudkov, Vladimir

    2012-10-01

    Parity-violating (PV) effects in neutron-deuteron radiative capture are studied using Desplanques, Donoghue, and Holstein (DDH) and effective field theory weak potentials. The values of PV effects are calculated using wave functions, obtained by solving three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space for realistic strong potentials. The relations between physical observables and low-energy constants are presented, and dependencies of the calculated PV effects on strong and weak potentials are discussed. The presented analysis shows the possible reason for the existing discrepancy in PV nuclear data analysis using the DDH approach and reveals a new opportunity to study short-range interactions in nuclei.

  14. Radiative corrections and parity violating electron-nucleon scattering

    SciTech Connect

    S. Barkanova; A. Aleksejevs; P.G. Blunden

    2002-11-01

    Radiative corrections to the parity-violating asymmetry measured in elastic electron-proton scattering are analyzed in the framework of the Standard Model. We include the complete set of one-loop contributions to one quark current amplitudes. The contribution of soft photon emission to the asymmetry is also calculated, giving final results free of infrared divergences. The one quark radiative corrections, when combines with previous work on many quark effects and recent SAMPLE experimental data, are used to place some new constraints on electroweak form factors of the nucleon.

  15. Subleading corrections to parity-violating pion photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Barry Holstein; Michael Ramsey-Musolf; Steven Puglia; Shi-Lin Zhu

    2001-09-01

    We compute the photon asymmetry B{sub {gamma}} for near threshold parity violating (PV) pion photoproduction through sub-leading order. We show that sub-leading contributions involve a new combination of PV couplings not included in previous analyses of hadronic PV. We argue that existing constraints on the leading order contribution to B{sub {gamma}}--obtained from the PV {gamma}-decay of {sup 18}F--suggest that the impact of the subleading contributions may be more significant than expected from naturalness arguments.

  16. Finite-Q^2 Corrections to Parity-Violating DIS

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hobbs; W. Melnitchouk

    2008-01-23

    Parity-violating deep inelastic scattering (PVDIS) has been proposed as an important new tool to extract the flavor and isospin dependence of parton distributions in the nucleon. We discuss finite-$Q^2$ effects in PVDIS asymmetries arising from subleading kinematical corrections and longitudinal contributions to the $\\gamma Z$ interference. For the proton, these need to be accounted for when extracting the $d/u$ ratio at large $x$. For the deuteron, the finite-$Q^2$ corrections can distort the effects of charge symmetry violation in parton distributions, or signals for physics beyond the standard model. We further explore the dependence of PVDIS asymmetries for polarized targets on the $u$ and $d$ helicity distributions at large $x$.

  17. Constraining bilinear R-parity violation from neutrino masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Góźdź, Marek; Kamiński, Wiesław A.

    2008-10-01

    We confront the R-parity violating minimal supersymmetric standard model with the neutrino oscillation data. Investigating the 1-loop particle-sparticle diagrams with additional bilinear insertions on the external neutrino lines we construct the relevant contributions to the neutrino mass matrix. A comparison of the so-obtained matrices with the experimental ones assuming normal or inverted hierarchy and taking into account possible CP-violating phases allows to set constraints on the values of the bilinear coupling constants. A similar calculation is presented with the input from the Heidelberg-Moscow neutrinoless double beta decay experiment. We base our analysis on the renormalization group evolution of the minimal supersymmetric standard model parameters which are unified at the grand unified theory scale. Using the obtained bounds we calculate the contributions to the Majorana neutrino transition magnetic moments.

  18. U(1) prime dark matter and R-parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Brahm, D.E.

    1990-04-01

    Attempts to understand physics beyond the Standard Model must face many phenomenological constraint, from recent Z{sup {degree}} data, neutral current measurements, cosmology and astrophysics, neutrino experiments, tests of lepton-and baryon-number conservation and CP violation, and many other ongoing experiments. The most interesting models are those which are allowed by current data, but offer predictions which can soon be experimentally confirmed or refuted. Two classes of such models are explored in this dissertation. The first, containing an extra U(1){prime} gauge group, has a dark matter candidate which could soon be detected. The second, incorporating supersymmetry with R-parity violation, predicts rare Z{sup {degree}} decays at LEP; some of these models can already be ruled out by LEP data and gluino searches at the Tevatron. 54 refs., 31 figs.

  19. New bounds on trilinear R-parity violation from lepton flavor violating observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiner, H. K.; Nickel, K.; Staub, F.; Vicente, A.

    2012-07-01

    Many extensions of the leptonic sector of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) are known, most of them leading to observable flavor violating effects. It has recently been shown that the 1-loop contributions to lepton flavor violating three-body decays li→3lj involving the Z0 boson may be dominant, that is, much more important than the usual photonic penguins. Other processes like μ-e conversion in nuclei and flavor violating τ decays into mesons are also enhanced by the same effect. This is for instance also the case in the MSSM with trilinear R-parity violation. The aim of this work is to derive new bounds on the relevant combinations of R-parity violating couplings and to compare them with previous results in the literature. For heavy supersymmetric spectra the limits are improved by several orders of magnitude. For completeness, also constraints coming from flavor violating Z0-decays and tree-level decay channels l→liljlk are presented for a set of benchmark points.

  20. Constraining long-range parity violation in gravitation using high resolution spectroscopy of chiral molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargueño, Pedro; Pérez de Tudela, Ricardo

    2008-11-01

    New bounds on long-range parity violation in gravitation are reported from inconclusive searches of parity violating energy differences (PVED) in chiral molecules. In particular, it is found that Leitner-Okubo-Hari Dass’s α2 (or A2) parameter is constrained by current experimental searches of PVED between molecular enantiomers. The possibility of constraining other parameters which parametrize the strength of contact parity violation in gravity, as well as other long-range parity violating potentials will be briefly commented.

  1. Constraining long-range parity violation in gravitation using high resolution spectroscopy of chiral molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bargueno, Pedro; Perez de Tudela, Ricardo

    2008-11-15

    New bounds on long-range parity violation in gravitation are reported from inconclusive searches of parity violating energy differences (PVED) in chiral molecules. In particular, it is found that Leitner-Okubo-Hari Dass's {alpha}{sub 2} (or A{sub 2}) parameter is constrained by current experimental searches of PVED between molecular enantiomers. The possibility of constraining other parameters which parametrize the strength of contact parity violation in gravity, as well as other long-range parity violating potentials will be briefly commented.

  2. Parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in {rvec e} p scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad Aniol; David Armstrong; Todd Averett; Maud Baylac; Etienne Burtin; John Calarco; Gordon Cates; Christian Cavata; Zhengwei Chai; C. Chang; Jian-Ping Chen; Eugene Chudakov; Evaristo Cisbani; Marius Coman; Daniel Dale; Alexandre Deur; Pibero Djawotho; Martin Epstein; Stephanie Escoffier; Lars Ewell; Nicolas Falletto; John Finn; Kevin Fissum; A.Fleck; Bernard Frois; Salvatore Frullani; Haiyan Gao; Franco Garibaldi; Ashot Gasparian; G.Gerstner; Ronald Gilman; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Javier Gomez; Viktor Gorbenko; Jens-Ole Hansen; F. Hersman; Douglas Higinbotham; Richard Holmes; Maurik Holtrop; Thomas Humensky; Sebastien Incerti; Mauro Iodice; Cornelis de Jager; David Jardillier; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; J.Jorda; Christophe Jutier; Kahl; James Kelly; Donghee Kim; Min Kim; Minsuk Kim; Ioannis Kominis; Edgar Kooijman; Kevin Kramer; Krishna Kumar; Michael Kuss; John LeRose; Raffaele De Leo; M.Leuschner; David Lhuillier; Meihua Liang; Nilanga Liyanage; R.Lourie; Richard Madey; Sergey Malov; Demetrius Margaziotis; Frederic Marie; Pete Markowitz; Jacques Martino; Peter Mastromarino; Kathy McCormick; Justin McIntyre; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Robert Michaels; Brian Milbrath; Gerald Miller; Joseph Mitchell; Ludyvine Morand; Damien Neyret; Charles Perdrisat; Gerassimos Petratos; Roman Pomatsalyuk; John Price; David Prout; Vina Punjabi; Thierry Pussieux; Gilles Quemener; Ronald Ransome; David Relyea; Yves Roblin; Julie Roche; Gary Rutledge; Paul Rutt; Marat Rvachev; Franck Sabatie; Arunava Saha; Paul Souder; Marcus Spradlin; Steffen Strauch; Riad Suleiman; Jeffrey Templon; Tatsuo Terasawa; J.Thompson; Raphael Tieulent; Luminita Todor; Baris Tonguc; Paul Ulmer; Guido Urciuoli; Branislav Vlahovic; Krishni Wijesooriya; R.Wilson; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Rhett Woo; Wang Xu; Imran Younus; C. Zhang

    2004-02-01

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from protons. Significant contributions to this asymmetry could arise from the contributions of strange form factors in the nucleon. The measured asymmetry is A = -15.05 {+-} 0.98(stat) {+-} 0.56(syst) ppm at the kinematic point <{theta}{sub lab}> = 12.3{sup o} and = 0.477 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Based on these data as well as data on electromagnetic form factors, we extract the linear combination of strange form factors G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.392G{sub M}{sup s} = 0.014 {+-} 0.020 {+-} 0.010 where the first error arises from this experiment and the second arises from the electromagnetic form factor data. This paper provides a full description of the special experimental techniques employed for precisely measuring the small asymmetry, including the first use of a strained GaAs crystal and a laser-Compton polarimeter in a fixed target parity-violation experiment.

  3. PDF Contributions and Parity Violation at High Bjorken x.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Timothy

    2007-10-01

    In recent decades, leptonic deep inelastic scattering (DIS) has been widel y used to probe nucleon structure. Despite remarkable success, studies of parton contributions to nuclear structure and behavior have complicated t he original picture of a quark-dominated nucleon. Beyond issues of quark -parton contribution to nucleon spin, high precision data characterizing t he d-quark parton distribution function (PDF) at high values (i.e. >= 0.7) of the Bjorken parameterization remain incomplete. Calculations of the d/ u PDF ratio contribution to parity-violating asymmetries in un/-polarized DIS are performed for a range of values of the square momentum transfer Q ^2; for completeness, calculations involve several PDF models and target /polarization schemes for the neutral/electromagnetic interference current. So far, calculations predictably demonstrate a significant dependence o f beam asymmetries upon the d/u PDF ratio. These results for d/u are expa nded by similar findings for the dependence of the polarized, target asymm etry upon the spin-dependent PDF ratio δdδu. Thi s evaluation of PDF effects through d/u and δdδu co ncurs with and expands earlier findings in nucleon structure, thereby driv ing further interest and tests of the Quark-Parton Model (QPM) and parity violation.

  4. Measurement of Parity Violation in np Capture: the NPDGamma Experiment

    PubMed Central

    Page, Shelley A.; Bowman, J. D.; Carlini, R. D.; Case, T.; Chupp, T. E.; Coulter, K. P.; Dabaghyan, M.; Desai, D.; Freedman, S. J.; Gentile, T. R.; Gericke, M. T.; Gillis, R. C.; Greene, G. L.; Hersman, F. W.; Ino, T.; Ishimoto, S.; Jones, G. L.; Lauss, B.; Leuschner, M. B.; Losowski, B.; Mahurin, R.; Masuda, Y.; Mitchell, G. S.; Nann, H.; Penttila, S. I.; Ramsay, W. D.; Santra, S.; Seo, P.-N.; Sharapov, E. I.; Smith, T. B.; Snow, W. M.; Wilburn, W. S.; Yuan, V.; Zhu, H.

    2005-01-01

    The NPDGamma experiment will measure the parity-violating directional gamma ray asymmetry Aγ in the reaction n→+p→d+γ. Ultimately, this will constitute the first measurement in the neutron-proton system that is sensitive enough to challenge modern theories of nuclear parity violation, providing a theoretically clean determination of the weak pion-nucleon coupling. A new beam-line at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) delivers pulsed cold neutrons to the apparatus, where they are polarized by transmission through a large volume polarized 3He spin filter and captured in a liquid para-hydrogen target. The 2.2 MeV gamma rays from the capture reaction are detected in an array of CsI(Tl) scintillators read out by vacuum photodiodes operated in current mode. We will complete commissioning of the apparatus and carry out a first measurement at LANSCE in 2004–05, which would provide a statistics-limited result for Aγ accurate to a standard uncertainty of ±5 × 10−8 level or better, improving on existing measurements in the neutron-proton system by a factor of 4. Plans to move the experiment to a reactor facility, where the greater flux would enable us to make a measurement with a standard uncertainty of ±1 × 10−8, are actively being pursued for the longer term. PMID:27308121

  5. Parity violation in the CMB bispectrum by a rolling pseudoscalar

    SciTech Connect

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ricciardone, Angelo; Saga, Shohei E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it

    2013-11-01

    We investigate parity-violating signatures of temperature and polarization bispectra of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) in an inflationary model where a rolling pseudoscalar produces large equilateral tensor non-Gaussianity. By a concrete computation based on full-sky formalism, it is shown that resultant CMB bispectra have nonzero signals in both parity-even (ℓ{sub 1}+ℓ{sub 2}+ℓ{sub 3} = even) and parity-odd (ℓ{sub 1}+ℓ{sub 2}+ℓ{sub 3} = odd) spaces, and are almost uncorrelated with usual scalar-mode equilateral bispectra. These characteristic signatures and polarization information help to detect such tensor non-Gaussianity. Use of both temperature and E-mode bispectra potentially improves of 400% the detectability with respect to an analysis with temperature bispectrum alone. Considering B-mode bispectrum, the signal-to-noise ratio may be able to increase by 3 orders of magnitude. We present the 1σ uncertainties of a parameter depending on a coupling constant and a rolling condition for the pseudoscalar expected in the Planck and the proposed PRISM experiments.

  6. Analysing the Effect on CMB in a Parity and Charge Parity Violating Varying Alpha Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Maity, Debaprasad; Chen, Pisin; /NCTS, Taipei /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2012-09-14

    In this paper we study in detail the effect of our recently proposed model of parity and charge-parity (PCP) violating varying alpha on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) photon passing through the intra galaxy-cluster medium (ICM). The ICM is well known to be composed of magnetized plasma. According to our model, the polarization and intensity of the CMB would be affected when traversing through the ICM due to non-trivial scalar photon interactions. We have calculated the evolution of such polarization and intensity collectively, known as the stokes parameters of the CMB photon during its journey through the ICM and tested our results against the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) measurement on Coma galaxy cluster. Our model contains a PCP violating parameter, {beta}, and a scale of alpha variation {omega}. Using the derived constrained on the photon-to-scalar conversion probability, {bar P}{sub {gamma}{yields}{phi}}, for Coma cluster in ref.[34] we found a contour plot in the ({omega},{beta}) parameter plane. The {beta} = 0 line in this parameter space corresponds to well-studied Maxwell-dilaton type models which has lower bound on {omega} {approx}> 6.4 x 10{sup 9} GeV. In general, as the absolute value of {beta} increases, lower bound on {omega} also increases. Our model in general predicts the modification of the CMB polarization with a non-trivial dependence on the parity violating coupling parameter {beta}. However, it is unconstrained in this particular study. We show that this effect can in principle be detected in the future measurements on CMB polarization such that {beta} can also be constrained.

  7. Supersymmetric R parity violation and CP asymmetry in semileptonic {tau} decays

    SciTech Connect

    Delepine, D.; Faisel, G.; Khalil, S.

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the CP violation in the semileptonic |{delta}S|=1 {tau} decays in supersymmetric extensions of the standard model with R parity violating term. We show that the CP asymmetry of {tau} decay is enhanced significantly and the current experimental limits obtained by CLEO collaborations can be easily accommodated. We argue that observing CP violation in semileptonic {tau} decay would be a clear evidence for R parity violating supersymmetry extension of the standard model.

  8. Nuclear Parity-Violation in Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Shi-Lin Zhu; C.M. Maekawa; B.R. Holstein; M.J. Ramsey-Musolf; U van Kolck

    2005-02-21

    We reformulate the analysis of nuclear parity-violation (PV) within the framework of effective field theory (EFT). To order Q, the PV nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction depends on five a priori unknown constants that parameterize the leading-order, short-range four-nucleon operators. When pions are included as explicit degrees of freedom, the potential contains additional medium- and long-range components parameterized by PV piNN couplings. We derive the form of the corresponding one- and two-pion-exchange potentials. We apply these considerations to a set of existing and prospective PV few-body measurements that may be used to determine the five independent low-energy constants relevant to the pionless EFT and the additional constants associated with dynamical pions. We also discuss the relationship between the conventional meson-exchange framework and the EFT formulation, and argue that the latter provides a more general and systematic basis for analyzing nuclear PV.

  9. Parity-Violating Effects in Two-Nucleon Systems

    SciTech Connect

    R. Schiavilla; J. Carlson; M. Paris

    2002-10-01

    We report recent results obtained for the parity-violating (PV) asymmetries in pp elastic scattering, np radiative capture at thermal neutron energies, and deuteron electro-disintegration in quasi-elastic kinematics. The available data on the pp longitudinal asymmetry are used to put constraints on some of the P V vector-meson couplings occurring in the DDH model for the PV nucleon-nucleon interaction. In the np capture, we show that a measurement of the associated asymmetry will lead to an essentially model-independent determination of the PV pion coupling to the nucleon. Finally, in quasi-elastic electron scattering as demonstrate that the asymmetry induced by hadronic weak interactions (and associated currents) is two orders of magnitude smaller than that originating from interference of the 7- and Z-exchange amplitudes.

  10. Bonner Prize Talk: Parity Violation in Compound-Nuclear Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, J. David

    2002-04-01

    I will describe a series of experiments that observed large parity-violating asymmetries in the scattering of polarized neutrons from a number of nuclei. I will review statistical models of compound-nuclear resonances and the statistical interpretation of observables. I will present the results of the experiments and the analysis of the measured asymmetries to extract the strength function of the nuclear weak interaction. In A=232 10 of 10 measured asymmetries had a common sign, in contradiction to the predictions of statistical models. I will describe the interpretation of this phenomenon in terms of doorway states. I will summarize the status of theoretical efforts to obtain constraints on the couplings of the hadronic weak interaction from measured weak strength functions.

  11. Parity-Violating Electron Scattering: New Results and Future Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Krishna S.

    2006-11-17

    We discuss the status and prospects of an experimental program of parity-violating asymmetry measurements in the scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons off unpolarized fixed targets. One thrust is the measurements of nucleon neutral weak form factors at intermediate four-momentum transfer (0.1 < Q2 < 1) (GeV/c)2 which provide information about the role of virtual strange quarks on the charge and current distributions inside nucleons. A new topic is the elastic neutral weak amplitude from scattering off a heavy spinless nucleus, which is sensitive to the presence of a neutron skin. Finally, we discuss the neutral current elastic amplitude at very low Q2, which allows precision measurements of the weak mixing angle at low energy and is thus sensitive to new physics at the TeV scale. The physics implications of recent results, potential measurements from experiments under construction as well as new ideas at future facilities are discussed.

  12. Strong enhancement of parity violation effects in chiral uranium compounds.

    PubMed

    Wormit, Michael; Olejniczak, Małgorzata; Deppenmeier, Anna-Lena; Borschevsky, Anastasia; Saue, Trond; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2014-08-28

    The effects of parity violation (PV) on the vibrational transitions of chiral uranium compounds of the type N≡UXYZ and N≡UHXY (X, Y, Z = F, Cl, Br, I) are analysed by means of exact two-component relativistic (X2C) Hartree-Fock and density functional calculations using NUFClI and NUHFI as representative examples. The PV contributions to the vibrational transitions were found to be in the Hz range, larger than for any of the earlier proposed chiral molecules. Thus, these systems are very promising candidates for future experimental PV measurements. A detailed comparison of the N≡UHFI and the N≡WHFI homologues reveals that subtle electronic structure effects, rather than exclusively a simple Z(5) scaling law, are the cause of the strong enhancement in PV contributions of the chiral uranium molecules.

  13. Parity-Violating Electron Scattering: New Results and Future Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna S. Kumar

    2006-11-01

    We discuss the status and prospects of an experimental program of parity-violating asymmetry measurements in the scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons off unpolarized fixed targets. One thrust is the measurements of nucleon neutral weak form factors at intermediate four-momentum transfer (0.1 < Q2 < 1) (GeV/c)2 which provide information about the role of virtual strange quarks on the charge and current distributions inside nucleons. A new topic is the elastic neutral weak amplitude from scattering off a heavy spinless nucleus, which is sensitive to the presence of a neutron skin. Finally, we discuss the neutral current elastic amplitude at very low Q2, which allows precision measurements of the weak mixing angle at low energy and is thus sensitive to new physics at the TeV scale. The physics implications of recent results, potential measurements from experiments under construction as well as new ideas at future facilities are discussed.

  14. A Precision Measurement of Parity Violation in Moller Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Relyea, D

    2004-05-13

    This thesis reports on E158, an experiment located in End Station A at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). E158 has made the first observation of the parity violating right-left asymmetry (A{sub PV}) in fixed-target low-Q{sup 2} Moeller scattering. At tree level, A{sub PV} (expected to be around -150 ppb) is directly proportional to 1/4 - sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. A precision measurement of A{sub PV} at low Q{sup 2} allows the running of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} to be compared to the Standard Model prediction. Disagreements between the two might provide evidence for new physics at the TeV scale. This thesis presents the first physics data from E158, taken in the spring of 2002. The data were taken by scattering longitudinally polarized electrons at 45.0 and 48.3 GeV off a liquid hydrogen target at a Q{sup 2} of 0.027 GeV{sup 2}. A 60 meter long spectrometer/collimator system and a cooper-quartz calorimeter were used to detect the Moeller signal electrons. Both devices will be described in detail. The right-left parity violating asymmetry in Moeller scattering has been measured to be -152.3 {+-} 29.0(stat) {+-} 30.9(syst) ppb. The value of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} derived from this measurement is 0.2370 {+-} 0.0025(stat) {+-} 0.0026(syst), in comparison with the Standard Model prediction of 0.2387 {+-} 0.0007.

  15. Primordial magnetic fields and dynamos from parity violated torsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia de Andrade, L. C.

    2012-05-01

    It is well known that torsion induced magnetic fields may seed galactic dynamos, but the price one pays for that is the conformal and gauge invariance breaks and a tiny photon mass. More recently I have shown [L.C. Garcia de Andrade, Phys. Lett. B 468 (2011) 28] that magnetic fields decay in a gauge invariant non-minimal coupling theory of torsion is slow down, which would allow for dynamo action to take place. In this Letter, by adding a parity violation term of the type Rɛ to the non-coupling term, a magnetic dynamo equation is obtained. From dynamo equation it is shown that torsion terms only appear in the dynamo equation when diffusion in the cosmic plasma is present. Torsion breaks the homogeneity of the magnetic field in the universe. Since Zeldovich anti-dynamo theorem assumes that the spacetime should be totally flat, torsion is responsible for violation of anti-dynamo theorem in 2D spatial dimensions. Contrary to previous results torsion induced primordial magnetic fields cannot seed galactic dynamos since from torsion and diffusion coefficient the decaying time of the magnetic field is 106yrs, which is much shorter than the galaxy age.

  16. R-parity violation in F-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romão, Miguel Crispim; Karozas, Athanasios; King, Stephen F.; Leontaris, George K.; Meadowcroft, Andrew K.

    2016-11-01

    We discuss R-parity violation (RPV) in semi-local and local F-theory constructions. We first present a detailed analysis of all possible combinations of RPV operators arising from semi-local F-theory spectral cover constructions, assuming an SU(5) GUT. We provide a classification of all possible allowed combinations of RPV operators originating from operators of the form 10 \\cdotp overline{5} \\cdotp overline{5} , including the effect of U(1) fluxes with global restrictions. We then relax the global constraints and perform explicit computations of the bottom/tau and RPV Yukawa couplings, at an SO(12) local point of enhancement in the presence of general fluxes subject only to local flux restrictions. We compare our results to the experimental limits on each allowed RPV operator, and show that operators such as LLe c , LQd c and u c d c d c may be present separately within current bounds, possibly on the edge of observability, suggesting lepton number violation or neutron-antineutron oscillations could constrain F-theory models.

  17. Parity violation effects in the Josephson junction of a p-wave superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, Nikolay A.; Harman, Zoltán

    2016-10-01

    The phenomenon of the parity violation due to weak interaction may be studied with superconducting systems. Previous research considered the case of conventional superconductors. We here theoretically investigate the parity violation effect in an unconventional p-wave ferromagnetic superconductor, and find that its magnitude can be increased by three orders of magnitude, as compared to results of earlier studies. For potential experimental observations, the superconductor UGe2 is suggested, together with the description of a possible experimental scheme allowing one to effectively measure and control the phenomenon. Furthermore, we put forward a setup for a further significant enhancement of the signature of parity violation in the system considered.

  18. Detection of parity violation in chiral molecules by external tuning of electroweak optical activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bargueno, Pedro; Gonzalo, Isabel; Perez de Tudela, Ricardo

    2009-07-15

    A proposal is made to measure the parity-violating energy difference between enantiomers of chiral molecules by modifying the dynamics of the two-state system using an external chiral field, in particular, circularly polarized light. The intrinsic molecular parity-violating energy could be compensated by this external chiral field, with the subsequent change in the optical activity. From the observation of changes in the time-averaged optical activity of a sample with initial chiral purity and minimized environment effects, the value of the intrinsic parity-violating energy could be extracted. A discussion is made on the feasibility of this measurement.

  19. Spontaneous breaking of R parity in the minimal supersymmetric standard model revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comelli, D.; Masiero, A.; Pietroni, M.; Riotto, A.

    1994-04-01

    We reconsider the possibility of spontaneous breaking of R parity in the minimal supersymmetric standard model. By a renormalization group analysis we find the parameter space in which a sneutrino gets a vacuum expectation value, leading to the spontaneous breaking of the lepton number and to the appearance of a phenomenologically unacceptable massless Goldstone boson. We then analyze the effect of operators giving rise to a tiny amount of explicit violation of lepton number, which could emerge as remnants of physics at some superheavy (Planck or GUT) scale in the low energy effective theory. We show that the conspiracy between the spontaneous and the explicit breaking scales can provide a mass to the Goldstone boson larger than the Z0 boson mass, hence allowing for a non vanishing sneutrino vacuum expectation value without increasing the invisible width of the Z0.

  20. Extracting the CP-violating phases of trilinear R-parity violating couplings from μ→eee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farzan, Yasaman; Najjari, Saereh

    2010-06-01

    It has recently been shown that by measuring the transverse polarizations of the final particles in μ→eee, it is possible to extract information on the phases of the effective couplings leading to this decay. We examine this possibility within the context of R-parity violating Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) in which the μ→eee process can take place at a tree level. We demonstrate how a combined analysis of the angular distribution of the emitted electrons and their transverse polarization can determine the CP-violating phases of the trilinear R-parity violating Yukawa couplings.

  1. Parity-Violating Neutron Spin Rotation in n-4He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarsour, Murad; NSR Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The neutron spin rotation (NSR) collaboration used parity-violating spin rotation of transversely polarized neutrons transmitted through a 0.5 m liquid helium target to constrain weak coupling constants between nucleons. While consistent with theoretical expectation, the upper limit set by this measurement on the rotation angle, d ϕ/dz = [+1.7 +/- 9.1(stat.) +/-1.4(sys.)] ×10-7 rad/m, is limited by statistical uncertainties. The NSR collaboration is preparing a new measurement to improve this statistically-limited result by about an order of magnitude. In addition to using the new high-flux NG-C beam at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Center for Neutron Research, the apparatus is being upgraded to take advantage of the larger-area and more divergent NG-C beam. In addition, significant improvements have been made to the cryogenic design and the 3He ion chamber. Details of these improvements and readiness of the upgraded apparatus will be discussed and the current theoretical and experimental status of d ϕ/dz in n-4He will be reviewed. This work was supported in part by NSF-PHY-1068712 and DE-SC0010443.

  2. Parity violation in neutron deuteron scattering in pionless effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanasse, Jared J.

    In this dissertation the parity violating neutron deuteron scattering amplitudes are calculated using pionless effective field theory to leading order. The five low energy parity violating constants present in pionless effective field theory are estimated by matching onto the ``best" values for the parameters of the model by Desplanques, Donoghue, and Holstein (DDH). Using these estimates and the calculated amplitudes, predictions for the spin rotation of a neutron through a deuteron target are given with a value of 1.8 × 10-8 rad cm-1. Also given are the longitudinal analyzing power in neutron deuteron scattering with a polarized neutron yielding 2.2 × 10-8, and a polarized deuteron giving 4.0 × 10-8. These observables are discussed in the broader context of hadronic parity violation and as possible future experiments to determine the values of the five low energy parity violating constant present in pionless effective theory.

  3. Data on parity violation in the compound nucleus and its interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.D.; Frankle, C.M.; Knudson, J.N.; TRIPLE Collaboration

    1993-12-01

    This report discusses the measurement of parity-violating asymmetries in the compound nucleus; summary of data on this process; theories of the random asymmetry, M{sup 2}; and theories of the constant asymmetry.

  4. Z yields jets+. gamma. as a signal for R-parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.

    1992-02-01

    Supersymmetric models with explicit R-parity violation can induce new rare decay modes of the Z boson into single supersymmetric particles. Here, the rate and signature for one such decay, Z {yields} {tilde {upsilon}} {gamma}, is examined, where it is found that the rate is at least an order of magnitude smaller than that for the process Z{yields} H{gamma}, even with larger values of the R-parity violating couplings.

  5. Z{yields}jets+{gamma} as a signal for R-parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Hewett, J.L.

    1992-02-01

    Supersymmetric models with explicit R-parity violation can induce new rare decay modes of the Z boson into single supersymmetric particles. Here, the rate and signature for one such decay, Z {yields} {tilde {upsilon}} {gamma}, is examined, where it is found that the rate is at least an order of magnitude smaller than that for the process Z{yields} H{gamma}, even with larger values of the R-parity violating couplings.

  6. Parity-violating two-pion exchange nucleon-nucleon interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, N.

    2007-10-15

    We calculate in chiral perturbation theory the parity-violating two-pion exchange nucleon-nucleon potentials at leading one-loop order. At a distance of r=m{sub {pi}}{sup -1}{approx_equal}1.4 fm they amount to about {+-}16% of the parity-violating 1{pi} exchange potential. We evaluate also the parity-violating effects arising from 2{pi} exchange with excitation of virtual {delta}(1232) isobars. These come out to be relatively small in comparison with those from diagrams with only nucleon intermediate states. The reason for this behavior, which is opposite that of the parity-conserving case, is the blocking of the dominant isoscalar central channel by CP invariance. Furthermore, we calculate the T matrix related to the iteration of the parity-violating 1{pi} exchange with the parity-conserving one. The analytical results presented in this work can be easily implemented into calculations of parity-violating nuclear observables.

  7. Testing parity-violating physics from cosmic rotation power reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namikawa, Toshiya

    2017-02-01

    We study the reconstruction of the cosmic rotation power spectrum produced by parity-violating physics, with an eye to ongoing and near future cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments such as BICEP Array, CMBS4, LiteBIRD and Simons Observatory. In addition to the inflationary gravitational waves and gravitational lensing, measurements of other various effects on CMB polarization open new window into the early Universe. One of these is anisotropies of the cosmic polarization rotation which probes the Chern-Simons term generally predicted by string theory. The anisotropies of the cosmic rotation are also generated by the primordial magnetism and in the Standard Model extention framework. The cosmic rotation anisotropies can be reconstructed as quadratic in CMB anisotropies. However, the power of the reconstructed cosmic rotation is a CMB four-point correlation and is not directly related to the cosmic-rotation power spectrum. Understanding all contributions in the four-point correlation is required to extract the cosmic rotation signal. Assuming inflationary motivated cosmic-rotation models, we employ simulation to quantify each contribution to the four-point correlation and find that (1) a secondary contraction of the trispectrum increases the total signal-to-noise, (2) a bias from the lensing-induced trispectrum is significant compared to the statistical errors in, e.g., LiteBIRD and CMBS4-like experiments, (3) the use of a realization-dependent estimator decreases the statistical errors by 10%-20%, depending on experimental specifications, and (4) other higher-order contributions are negligible at least for near future experiments.

  8. Testing parity-violating physics from cosmic rotation power reconstruction

    DOE PAGES

    Namikawa, Toshiya

    2017-02-22

    We study the reconstruction of the cosmic rotation power spectrum produced by parity-violating physics, with an eye to ongoing and near future cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiments such as BICEP Array, CMBS4, LiteBIRD and Simons Observatory. In addition to the inflationary gravitational waves and gravitational lensing, measurements of other various effects on CMB polarization open new window into the early Universe. One of these is anisotropies of the cosmic polarization rotation which probes the Chern-Simons term generally predicted by string theory. The anisotropies of the cosmic rotation are also generated by the primordial magnetism and in the Standard Model extentionmore » framework. The cosmic rotation anisotropies can be reconstructed as quadratic in CMB anisotropies. However, the power of the reconstructed cosmic rotation is a CMB four-point correlation and is not directly related to the cosmic-rotation power spectrum. Understanding all contributions in the four-point correlation is required to extract the cosmic rotation signal. Here, assuming inflationary motivated cosmic-rotation models, we employ simulation to quantify each contribution to the four-point correlation and find that (1) a secondary contraction of the trispectrum increases the total signal-to-noise, (2) a bias from the lensing-induced trispectrum is significant compared to the statistical errors in, e.g., LiteBIRD and CMBS4-like experiments, (3) the use of a realization-dependent estimator decreases the statistical errors by 10%–20%, depending on experimental specifications, and (4) other higher-order contributions are negligible at least for near future experiments.« less

  9. Measurement of the RMS Parity Violating Matrix Element in URANIUM-239

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xianzhou (Joe).

    We report the first determination of the Root -Mean-Square (RMS) parity violating matrix element in a compound nucleus (CN) system, ^{239 }U. The experiment was performed using the intense pulsed epithermal neutron beam available at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE). The helicity dependence of neutron transmission through a spin zero target (^{238}U) is measured for neutron energies from 6 eV to 300 eV. Parity violation is analyzed on 17 p-wave resonances among which five show 2sigma or larger effects. The largest is a 7sigma effect at the 63.5 eV resonance which shows a parity violating asymmetry of p = 2.6%. A likelihood analysis is performed on these 17 parity violating asymmetries, and the RMS parity violating matrix element is determined for the first time to be M = 0.59_sp{-0.25}{+0.50} meV which corresponds to a parity violating spreading width ofGamma^{PV} = (1.0 {+1.7atop -0.8} ) times 10^{-7} {rm eV}.Using statistical nuclear spectroscopy, we are able to relate M to the effective nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction. The result is | alpha_{p}| ~ (4 {+4atop -2} ) times 10^{-7} where alpha_{p} is the ratio of the parity violating strength to the parity conserving strength in the effective NN interaction. This agrees qualitatively with the estimate of free NN interaction. The consistency of the experimental measurement with expectation suggests that the manifestation of parity violating NN interaction in CN is understood. It is a challenging problem for the theorists to relate the RMS matrix element in the CN to the underlying NN interaction, therefore providing alternative ways to determine the Desplanques -Donoghue-Holstein (DDH) parameters of the NN interaction. The success of the parity violation study also validates the proposed experiment of studying the time reversal symmetry violation utilizing the large enhancement in the CN.

  10. Bounds on R-parity violating supersymmetric couplings from leptonic and semileptonic meson decays

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiner, H. K.; Kraemer, M.; O'Leary, Ben

    2007-06-01

    We present a comprehensive update of the bounds on R-parity violating supersymmetric couplings from lepton-flavor- and lepton-number-violating decay processes. We consider {tau} and {mu} decays as well as leptonic and semileptonic decays of mesons. We present several new bounds resulting from {tau}, {eta}, and kaon decays and correct some results in the literature concerning B meson decays.

  11. Parity-violating interaction effects: The longitudinal asymmetry in pp elastic scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, J.; Schiavilla, R.; Brown, V. R.; Gibson, B. F.

    2002-03-01

    The proton-proton parity-violating longitudinal asymmetry is calculated in the laboratory-energy range 0-350 MeV, using a number of different, latest-generation strong-interaction potentials-Argonne v18, Bonn-2000, and Nijmegen-I-in combination with a weak-interaction potential consisting of ρ- and ω-meson exchanges-the model known as DDH. The complete scattering problem in the presence of parity conserving, including Coulomb, and parity-violating potentials is solved in both configuration and momentum space. The predicted parity-violating asymmetries are found to be only weakly dependent upon the input strong-interaction potential adopted in the calculation. Values for the ρ- and ω-meson weak coupling constants hppρ and hppω are determined by reproducing the measured asymmetries at 13.6 MeV, 45 MeV, and 221 MeV.

  12. Reconciling neutrino anomalies in a simple four-neutrino scheme with R-parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, M.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2000-12-01

    We propose a simple extension of the MSSM based on extra compact dimensions which includes an /SU(2)⊗U(1) singlet superfield. The fermion present in this superfield is the sterile neutrino, which combines with one linear combination of νe-νμ-ντ to form a Dirac pair whose mass accounts for the LSND anomaly. Its small mass can be ascribed to a volume suppression factor associated with extra compact dimensions. On the other hand the sterile neutrino scalar partner can trigger the spontaneous violation of R-parity, thereby inducing the necessary mass splittings to fit also the solar and atmospheric neutrino data. Thus the model can explain all neutrino oscillation data. It leads to four predictions for the neutrino oscillation parameters and implies that the atmospheric neutrino problem must include at least some νμ-->νs oscillations, which will be testable in the near future. Moreover, it also predicts that the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) decays visibly via lepton number violating modes, which could be searched for at present and future accelerators.

  13. (S)neutrino properties in {ital R}-parity-violating supersymmetry: {ital CP}-conserving phenomena

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Y.; Haber, H.E. |

    1999-05-01

    {ital R}-parity-violating supersymmetry (with a conserved baryon number {ital B}) provides a framework for particle physics with lepton-number- ({ital L}-) violating interactions. We examine in detail the structure of the most general {ital R}-parity-violating ({ital B}-conserving) model of low-energy supersymmetry. We analyze the mixing of Higgs bosons with sleptons and the mixing of charginos and neutralinos with charged leptons and neutrinos, respectively. Implications for neutrino and sneutrino masses and mixing and {ital CP}-conserving sneutrino phenomena are considered. {ital L}-violating low-energy supersymmetry can be probed at future colliders by studying the phenomenology of sneutrinos. Sneutrino-antisneutrino mass splittings and lifetime differences can provide new opportunities to probe lepton number violation at colliders. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in electron-deuteron inelastic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.; ...

    2015-04-01

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally-polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were publishedmore » earlier, but are presented here in more detail.« less

  15. Constrained gamma-Z interference corrections to parity-violating electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Nathan Luke; Blunden, Peter Gwithian; Melnitchouk, Wally; Thomas, Anthony W.; Young, Ross D.

    2013-07-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of gamma-Z interference corrections to the weak charge of the proton measured in parity-violating electron scattering, including a survey of existing models and a critical analysis of their uncertainties. Constraints from parton distributions in the deep-inelastic region, together with new data on parity-violating electron scattering in the resonance region, result in significantly smaller uncertainties on the corrections compared to previous estimates. At the kinematics of the Qweak experiment, we determine the gamma-Z box correction to be Re\\box_{gamma-Z}^V = (5.61 +- 0.36) x 10^{-3}. The new constraints also allow precise predictions to be made for parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries on the deuteron.

  16. Measurement of parity-violating asymmetry in electron-deuteron inelastic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.; Ahmed, Z.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bellini, V.; Beminiwattha, R.; Benesch, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertozzi, W.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Cisbani, E.; Dalton, M. M.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deconinck, W.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; Fassi, L. El; Erler, J.; Flay, D.; Franklin, G. B.; Friend, M.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Giusa, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Golge, S.; Grimm, K.; Hafidi, K.; Hansen, J.-O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmes, R.; Holmstrom, T.; Holt, R. J.; Huang, J.; Hyde, C. E.; Jen, C. M.; Jones, D.; Kang, Hoyoung; King, P. M.; Kowalski, S.; Kumar, K. S.; Lee, J. H.; LeRose, J. J.; Liyanage, N.; Long, E.; McNulty, D.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Meddi, F.; Meekins, D. G.; Mercado, L.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Mihovilovic, M.; Muangma, N.; Mesick, K. E.; Nanda, S.; Narayan, A.; Nelyubin, V.; Nuruzzaman, none; Oh, Y.; Parno, D.; Paschke, K. D.; Phillips, S. K.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Quinn, B.; Rakhman, A.; Reimer, P. E.; Rider, K.; Riordan, S.; Roche, J.; Rubin, J.; Russo, G.; Saenboonruang, K.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Shahinyan, A.; Silwal, R.; Sirca, S.; Souder, P. A.; Suleiman, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Sutera, C. M.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Waidyawansa, B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ye, L.; Zhao, B.; Zheng, X.

    2015-04-01

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally-polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were published earlier, but are presented here in more detail.

  17. Computation of molecular parity violation using the coupled-cluster linear response approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horný, Ľuboš; Quack, Martin

    2015-07-01

    In memoriam, Nicholas C. Handy. We report the implementation of a coupled-cluster linear response approach for the computation of molecular parity violation (in the framework of the PSI3 code, in particular). The approach is applied first to molecules such as hydrogen peroxide (HOOH), hydrogen disulfide (HSSH) and dichlorinedioxide (ClOOCl), which have been studied previously. The importance of including correlation is demonstrated for these examples, also including selected variations of geometry providing parity violation as a function of torsional angles. For the substituted allenes, 1,3 difluoroallene (CHF=C=CHF), 1,fluoro,3 chloroallene (CHF=C=CHCl) and 1,3 dichloroallene (CHCl=C=CHCl), we find that in particular the last molecule may be a suitable candidate for the experimental study of molecular parity violation.

  18. Parity violation in the Cosmic Microwave Background from a pseudoscalar inflaton

    SciTech Connect

    Sorbo, Lorenzo

    2011-06-01

    If the inflaton φ is a pseudoscalar, then it naturally interacts with gauge fields through the coupling ∝φ F{sub μν} F-tilde {sup μν}. Through this coupling, the rolling inflaton produces quanta of the gauge field, that in their turn source the tensor components of the metric perturbations. Due to the parity-violating nature of the system, the right- and the left-handed tensor modes have different amplitudes. Such an asymmetry manifests itself in the form of non-vanishing TB and EB correlation functions in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). We compute the amplitude of the parity-violating tensor modes and we discuss two scenarios, consistent with the current data, where parity-violating CMB correlation functions will be detectable in future experiments.

  19. Parity-violation energy of biomolecules-IV: protein secondary structure.

    PubMed

    Faglioni, Francesco; Cuesta, Inmaculada García

    2011-06-01

    The parity-violation energy difference between enantiomeric forms of the same amino acid sequence, from the amyloid β-peptide involved in Alzheimer's disease, in both α-helix and β-sheet configurations, is investigated with ab-initio techniques. To this end, we develop an extension of the N2 computational scheme that selectively includes neighboring amino acids to preserve the relevant H-bonds. In agreement with previous speculations, it is found that the helical α structure is associated with larger parity-violation energy differences than the corresponding β form. Implications for the evolution of biological homochirality are discussed as well as the relative importance of various effects in determining the parity-violation energy.

  20. Cosmic parity violation due to a flavor-space locked gauge field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caldwell, Robert

    2016-05-01

    A flavor-space locked gauge field is shown to behave like a birefringent medium, imparting a preferred left- or right-circular polarization onto gravitational waves. In a cosmological scenario, such a gauge field can cause a primordial spectrum of gravitational waves to develop a net handedness. The degree of chiral asymmetry depends on the wavelength, the abundance of the gauge field, and the strength of the gauge coupling. An asymmetry in the gravitational wave spectrum would be imprinted on the photon polarization pattern of the cosmic microwave background at last scattering. In this scenario, cosmic parity violation is written on the sky, as we predict nonzero correlation of the curl polarization with the temperature, as well as curl with gradient polarization. We compare this phenomena with parity violation in models of chiral gravity, in which the chiral asymmetry is primordial, and with models of quintessence cosmic birefringence, in which parity-violating correlations are induced along the line of sight.

  1. First Order QED Corrections to the Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Moller Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zykunov, Vladimir A.; Suarez, Juan; Tweedie, Brock A.; Kolomensky, Yury G.; /UC, Berkeley

    2005-08-15

    We compute a full set of the first order QED corrections to the parity-violating observables in polarized Moeller scattering. We employ a covariant method of removing infrared divergences, computing corrections without introducing any unphysical parameters. When applied to the kinematics of the SLAC E158 experiment, the QED corrections reduce the parity violating asymmetry by 4.5%. We combine our results with the previous calculations of the first-order electroweak corrections and obtain the complete {Omicron}({alpha}) prescription for relating the experimental asymmetry A{sub LR} to the low-energy value of the weak mixing angle sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. Our results are applicable to the recent measurement of A{sub LR} by the SLAC E158 collaboration, as well as to the future parity violation experiments.

  2. Measurement of Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Electron-Deuteron Inelastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.; Pan, K.; Subedi, R.; Ahmed, Z.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bellini, V.; Beminiwattha, R.; Benesch, J.; Benmokhtar, F; Bertozzi, W; Camsonne, A.; Canan, A.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, J.-P.; Cisbani, E.; Chudakov, E.; Dalton, M. M.; de Jager, C. W.; De Leo, R.; Deconinck, W.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Erler, J.; Flay, D.; Franklin, G.B.; Friend, M.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilad, S.; Giusa, A.; Glamazdin, A.; Golge, S.; Hafidi, K.; Holt, R. J.; Reimer, P. E.; Rubin, J.

    2015-04-16

    The parity-violating asymmetries between a longitudinally polarized electron beam and an unpolarized deuterium target have been measured recently. The measurement covered two kinematic points in the deep-inelastic scattering region and five in the nucleon resonance region. We provide here details of the experimental setup, data analysis, and results on all asymmetry measurements including parity-violating electron asymmetries and those of inclusive pion production and beam-normal asymmetries. The parity-violating deep-inelastic asymmetries were used to extract the electron-quark weak effective couplings, and the resonance asymmetries provided the first evidence for quark-hadron duality in electroweak observables. These electron asymmetries and their interpretation were published earlier, but are presented here in more detail.

  3. Quark-hadron duality constraints on $$\\gamma Z$$ box corrections to parity-violating elastic scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Hall, Nathan L.; Blunden, Peter G.; Melnitchouk, Wally; ...

    2015-12-08

    We examine the interference \\gamma Z box corrections to parity-violating elastic electron--proton scattering in the light of the recent observation of quark-hadron duality in parity-violating deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron, and the approximate isospin independence of duality in the electromagnetic nucleon structure functions down to Q2 \\approx 1 GeV2. Assuming that a similar behavior also holds for the \\gamma Z proton structure functions, we find that duality constrains the γ Z box correction to the proton's weak charge to be Re V γ Z V = (5.4 \\pm 0.4) \\times 10-3 at the kinematics of the Qweak experiment. Within themore » same model we also provide estimates of the γ Z corrections for future parity-violating experiments, such as MOLLER at Jefferson Lab and MESA at Mainz.« less

  4. Parity Violation in Proton-Proton Scattering at Intermediate Energies

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Yuan, V.; Frauenfelder, H.; Harper, R. W.; Bowman, J. D.; Carlini, R.; MacArthur, D. W.; Mischke, R. E.; Nagle, D. E.; Talaga, R. L.; McDonald, A. B.

    1986-05-01

    Results of a measurement of parity nonconservation in the anti p-p total cross sections at 800-MeV are presented. The dependence of transmission on beam properties and correction for systematic errors are discussed. The measured longitudinal asymmetry is A{sub L} = (+2.4 +- 1.1(statistical) +- 0.1(systematic)) x 10{sup -7}. A proposed experiment at 230 MeV is discussed.

  5. Dynamical ambiguities in models with spontaneous Lorentz violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonder, Yuri; Escobar, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous Lorentz violation is a viable mechanism to look for Planck scale physics. In this work, we study spontaneous Lorentz violation models, in flat spacetime, where a vector field produces such a violation and matter is modeled by a complex scalar field. We show that it is possible to construct a Hamilton density for which the evolution respects the dynamical constraints. However, we also find that the initial data, as required by standard field theory, does not determine the fields evolution in a unique way. In addition, we present some examples where the physical effects of such ambiguities can be recognized. As a consequence, the proposals in which the electromagnetic and gravitational interactions emerge from spontaneous Lorentz violation are challenged.

  6. Precision Measurement of Parity Violation in Polarized Cold Neutron Capture on the Proton: the NPDGamma Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard Lauss; J.D. Bowman; R. Carlini; T.E. Chupp; W. Chen; S. Corvig; M. Dabaghyan; D. Desai; S.J. Freeman; T.R. Gentile; M.T. Gericke; R.C. Gillis; G.L. Greene; F.W. Hersman; T. Ino; T. Ito; G.L. Jones; M. Kandes; M. Leuschner; B. Lozowski; R. Mahurin; M. Mason; Y. Masuda; J. Mei; G.S. Mitchell; S. Muto; H. Nann; S.A. Page; S.I. Penttila; W.D. Ramsay; S. Santra; P.-N. Seo; E.I. Sharapov; T.B. Smith; W.M. Snow; W.S. Wilburn; V. Yuan; H. Zhu

    2005-10-24

    The NPD{gamma} experiment at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is dedicated to measure with high precision the parity violating asymmetry in the {gamma} emission after capture of spin polarized cold neutrons in para-hydrogen. The measurement will determine unambiguously the weak pion-nucleon-nucleon ({pi} NN) coupling constant (line integral){sub {pi}}{sup l}.

  7. Time reversal invariance violating and parity conserving effects in neutron-deuteron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Young-Ho; Gudkov, Vladimir; Lazauskas, Rimantas

    2011-08-15

    Time reversal invariance violating and parity conserving effects for low-energy elastic neutron-deuteron scattering are calculated for meson exchange and effective field theory type potentials in a distorted wave-born approximation using realistic hadronic wave functions, obtained by solving three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space.

  8. Parity violation in the elastic scattering from the proton in Hall A

    SciTech Connect

    Souder, Paul

    1992-06-01

    We are planning to measure the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the scattering of polarized electrons from hydrogen. We expect to obtain unique information about the weak form factors of the nucleon emphasizing the possible contributions of strange quarks to the weak vector matrix elements involved. Helium and deuterium and other possible targets of interest.

  9. Single top quark production at the CERN LHC as a probe of R parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiappetta, P.; Deandrea, A.; Nagy, E.; Negroni, S.; Polesello, G.; Virey, J. M.

    2000-06-01

    We investigate the potential of the CERN LHC to probe the R parity violating couplings involving the third generation by considering single top quark production. This study is based on particle level event generation for both signal and background, interfaced to a simplified simulation of the ATLAS detector.

  10. Constrained {gamma}Z correction to parity-violating electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, Nathan Luk; Blunden, Peter Gwithian; Melnitchouk, Wally; Thomas, Anthony W.; Young, Ross D.

    2013-11-01

    We update the calculation of {gamma}Z interference corrections to the weak charge of the proton. We show how constraints from parton distributions, together with new data on parity-violating electron scattering in the resonance region, significantly reduce the uncertainties on the corrections compared to previous estimates.

  11. Constrained γZ correction to parity-violating electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, N. L.; Thomas, A. W.; Young, R. D.; Blunden, P. G.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2013-11-07

    We update the calculation of γZ interference corrections to the weak charge of the proton. We show how constraints from parton distributions, together with new data on parity-violating electron scattering in the resonance region, significantly reduce the uncertainties on the corrections compared to previous estimates.

  12. Testing for parity violation in nuclei using spin density matrices for nuclear density functionals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, B. R.; Giraud, B. G.

    2015-06-01

    The spin density matrix (SDM) used in atomic and molecular physics is revisited for nuclear physics, in the context of the radial density functional theory. The vector part of the SDM defines a ‘hedgehog’ situation, which exists only if nuclear states contain some amount of parity violation. A toy model is given as an illustrative example.

  13. Parity-Violating Interaction Effects I: The Longitudinal Asymmetry in pp Elastic Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    J. Carlson; R. Schiavilla; V. Brown; B. Gibson

    2001-09-01

    The proton-proton parity-violating longitudinal asymmetry is calculated in the lab-energy range 0--350 MeV, using a number of different, latest-generation strong-interaction potentials--Argonne {nu}{sub 18}, Bonn-2000, and Nijmegen-I--in combination with a weak-interaction potential consisting of rho- and omega-meson exchanges--the model known as DDH. The complete scattering problem in the presence of parity-conserving, including Coulomb, and parity-violating potentials is solved in both configuration- and momentum-space. The predicted parity-violating asymmetries are found to be only weakly dependent upon the input strong-interaction potential adopted in the calculation. Values for the rho- and omega-meson weak coupling constants h{sub {rho}}{sup pp} and h{sub {omega}}{sup pp} are determined by reproducing the measured asymmetries at 13.6 MeV, 45 MeV, and 221 MeV.

  14. The measurements of parity violation in resonant neutron-capture reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Sharapov, E.I.; Popov, Y.P. ); Wender, S.A.; Seestrom, S.J.; Bowman, C.D. ); Postma, H. ); Gould, C.R. ); Wasson, A. )

    1990-01-01

    The study of parity violation in total (n,{gamma}) cross sections on {sup 139}La and {sup 117}Sn targets was performed at the LANSCE pulsed neutron source using longitudinally polarized neutrons and a BaF{sub 2} detector. The effect of parity nonconservation in the {sup 139}La(n,{gamma}) reaction for the resonance at E{sub n}=0.73 eV was confirmed. New results for p-wave resonances in the {sup 117}Sn(n, {gamma}) reaction were obtained. A comparison between the capture and transmission techniques is presented. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Measurement of the Parity-Violating Asymmetries in Electron-Deuteron Scattering in the Nucleon Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Diancheng; Pan, Kai; Subedi, Ramesh R.; Deng, Xiaoyan

    2013-08-22

    We report on parity-violating asymmetries in the nucleon resonance region measured using 5 - 6 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons scattering off an unpolarized deuterium target. These results are the first parity-violating asymmetry data in the resonance region beyond the Δ(1232), and provide a verification of quark-hadron duality in the nucleon electroweak γ Z interference structure functions at the (10-15)% level. The results are of particular interest to models relevant for calculating the γ Z box-diagram corrections to elastic parity-violating electron scattering measurements.

  16. First Observation of the Parity Violating Asymmetry in Moller Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Younus, Imran; /Syracuse U.

    2005-07-06

    This thesis reports on the E158 experiment at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), which has made the first observation of the parity non-conserving asymmetry in Moller scattering. Longitudinally polarized 48 GeV electrons are scattered off unpolarized (atomic) electrons in a liquid hydrogen target with an average Q{sup 2} of 0.027 GeV{sup 2}. The asymmetry in this process is proportional to (1/4 - sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W}), where sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} gives the weak mixing angle. The thesis describes the experiment in detail, with a particular focus on the design and construction of the electromagnetic calorimeter. This calorimeter was the primary detector in the experiment used to measure the flux of the scattered Moller electrons and eP electrons. It employed the quartz fiber calorimetry technique, and was built at Syracuse University. The preliminary results from the first experimental data taken in spring 2002 give A{sub PV} = -151.9 {+-} 29.0(stat) {+-} 32.5(syst) parts per billion. This in turn gives sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} = 0.2371 {+-} 0.0025 {+-} 0.0027, which is consistent with the Standard Model prediction (0.2386 {+-} 0.0006).

  17. Search for R-Parity Violating Supersymmetry in Two-Muon and Four-Jet Topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abdesselam, A.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahmed, S. N.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alton, A.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Arnoud, Y.; Avila, C.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Bacon, T. C.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Beaudette, F.; Begel, M.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bertram, I.; Besson, A.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Davis, G. A.; Davis, K.; de, K.; de Jong, S. J.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doulas, S.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Duensing, S.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Filthaut, F.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Frame, K. C.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gao, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gilmartin, R.; Ginther, G.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Graham, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grinstein, S.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Huang, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krivkova, P.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Landsberg, G.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Leggett, C.; Lehner, F.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Li, X.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lundstedt, C.; Luo, C.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manankov, V.; Mao, H. S.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Nagy, E.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Negroni, S.; Nunnemann, T.; O'Neil, D.; Oguri, V.; Olivier, B.; Oshima, N.; Padley, P.; Pan, L. J.; Papageorgiou, K.; Para, A.; Parashar, N.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Patwa, A.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, O.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Przybycien, M. B.; Qian, J.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramberg, E.; Rapidis, P. A.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Ridel, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sabirov, B. M.; Sajot, G.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schwartzman, A.; Sen, N.; Shabalina, E.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Slattery, P.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Song, Y.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Taylor, W.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Tripathi, S. M.; Trippe, T. G.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; Vaniev, V.; van Kooten, R.; Varelas, N.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, H.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Whiteson, D.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, Q.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yip, K.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Z.; Zanabria, M.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, Z.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2002-10-01

    We present results of a search for R-parity-violating decay of the neutralino χ ~01, taken as the lightest supersymmetric particle, to a muon and two jets. The decay proceeds through a lepton-number violating coupling λ'2jk (j=1,2; k=1,2,3), with R-parity conservation in all other production and decay processes. In the absence of candidate events from 77.5+/-3.9 pb-1 of data collected by the D0 experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron in pp¯ collisions at (s)=1.8 TeV, and with an expected background of 0.18+/-0.03+/-0.02 events, we set limits on squark and gluino masses within the framework of the minimal low-energy supergravity-supersymmetry model.

  18. Overview of the parity violation measurement of n+3 He --> p + t

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Christopher; n3He Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The hadronic weak interaction remains the least well-understood of the weak interactions. There are multiple models with effective degrees of freedom characterizing its spin and isospin dependence. Measuring the strength of this interaction is difficult due to the much larger strong interaction between nucleons. However, parity violation in few-body reactions allows isolation of weak contributions on the order of 10-7 from the strong background. The size of parity violating asymmetry in the reaction n+3 He is expected to be of this order. The experiment has fininshed taking data from a 3He target in a polarized pulsed neutron beam at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The expected precision of the asymmetry calculations is on the order of 10-8, and we are now in the analysis phase.

  19. Theoretical study on neutron distribution of 208Pb by parity-violating electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Zhang, Cun; Ren, Zhong-Zhou; Xu, Chang

    2016-03-01

    The precise determination of neutron distribution has important implications for both nuclear structure and nuclear astrophysics. The purpose of this paper is to study the characteristics of neutron distribution of 208Pb by parity-violating electron scattering (PVS). Parity-violating asymmetries of 208Pb with different types of neutron skins are systematically calculated and compared with the experimental data of PREx. The results indicate that the PVS experiments are very sensitive to the nuclear neutron distributions. From further PVS measurements, detailed information on nuclear neutron distributions can be extracted. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (11505292, 11175085, 11235001, 11447226), by the Shandong Provincial Natural Science Foundation, China (BS2014SF007), by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (15CX02072A, 15CX02070A, 15CX05026A, 13CX10022A, 14CX02157A).

  20. Search for R-Parity Violating Supersymmetry in the Dielectron Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Akimov, V.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Gobbi, B.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Tong; Ito, A. S.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Leflat, A.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Martin, R. D.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Parashar, N.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Toback, D.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Vaniev, V.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoshikawa, C.

    1999-11-01

    We report on a search for R-parity-violating supersymmetry in pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV using the D0 detector at Fermilab. Events with at least two electrons and four or more jets were studied. We observe two events in 99+/-4.4 pb-1 of data, consistent with the expected background of 1.8+/-0.4 events. This result is interpreted within the framework of minimal low-energy supergravity supersymmetry models. Squarks with mass below 243 GeV/c2 and gluinos with mass below 227 GeV/c2 are excluded at the 95% C.L. for A0 = 0, μ<0, tanβ = 2, and a finite value for any one of the six R-parity-violating couplings λ'1jk ( j = 1, 2 and k = 1, 2, 3).

  1. Precision Excited State Lifetime Measurements for Atomic Parity Violation and Atomic Clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Jerry; Patterson, Brian; Gearba, Alina; Snell, Jeremy; Knize, Randy

    2016-05-01

    Measurements of excited state atomic lifetimes provide a valuable test of atomic theory, allowing comparisons between experimental and theoretical transition dipole matrix elements. Such tests are important in Rb and Cs, where atomic parity violating experiments have been performed or proposed, and where atomic structure calculations are required to properly interpret the parity violating effect. In optical lattice clocks, precision lifetime measurements can aid in reducing the uncertainty of frequency shifts due to the surrounding blackbody radiation field. We will present our technique for precisely measuring excited state lifetimes which employs mode-locked ultrafast lasers interacting with two counter-propagating atomic beams. This method allows the timing in the experiment to be based on the inherent timing stability of mode-locked lasers, while counter-propagating atomic beams provides cancellation of systematic errors due to atomic motion to first order. Our current progress measuring Rb excited state lifetimes will be presented along with future planned measurements in Yb.

  2. A New Strangeness Fit to World Parity-Violating Electron Scattering Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    A global experimental effort to determine the strangeness content of nuclei, including experiments such as G0, SAMPLE, HAPPEx, and A4, have presented results on the precision frontier for parity-violating electron scattering. In particular, the kinematics of these experiments are in the low momentum-transfer region (Q2 < 1), to allow more robust extrapolation to the static (Q2 = 0) properties of the nucleon. The combination of these results into a global fit presents a new opportunity to comment on the globally observed strangeness content in nuclei. The process for constructing this fit faces certain challenges, with electromagnetic form factor model dependence standing out in particular. A novel fit including the most recent data for 1H, 2H, and 4He target parity-violating electron scattering experiments will also be presented, suggesting small but non-zero electromagnetic strangeness contributions. U.S. Department of Energy grant #DE-FG02-07ER41522

  3. SPONTANEOUS CP VIOLATION AND QUARK MASS AMBIGUITIES.

    SciTech Connect

    CREUTZ,M.

    2004-09-21

    I explore the regions of quark masses where CP will be spontaneously broken in the strong interactions. The boundaries of these regions are controlled by the chiral anomaly, which manifests itself in ambiguities in the definition of non-degenerate quark masses. In particular, the concept of a single massless quark is ill defined.

  4. Long-lived particle searches in R-parity violating MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwane, Nosiphiwo

    2017-10-01

    In this paper we study the constraints on MSSM R-Parity violating decays when the lightest superpartner (LSP) is moderately long lived. In this scenario the LSP vertex displacement may be observed at the LHC. We compute limits on the RPV Yukawa couplings for which the vertex displacement signature maybe used. We then use ATLAS and CMS displaced vertex, meta-stable and prompt decay searches to rule out a region of sparticle masses.

  5. Determination of the Proton's Weak Charge via Parity Violating Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Hoskins, Joshua Russell

    2015-08-01

    The Qweak experiment, which completed running in May of 2012 at Jefferson Laboratory, has measured the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at four-momentum transfer Q2=0.025 (GeV/c)2 in order to provide the first direct measurement of the proton's weak charge, Qpw. The Standard Model makes firm predictions for the weak charge; deviations from the predicted value would provide strong evidence of new physics beyond the Standard Model. Using an 89% polarized electron beam at 145 microA scattering from a 34.4 cm long liquid hydrogen target, scattered electrons were detected using an array of eight fused-silica detectors placed symmetric about the beam axis. The parity-violating asymmetry was then measured by reversing the helicity of the incoming electrons and measuring the normalized difference in rate seen in the detectors. The low Q2 enables a theoretically clean measurement; the higher order hadronic corrections are constrained using previous parity-violating electron scattering world data. The experimental method will be discussed, with recent results constituting 4% of our total data and projections of our proposed uncertainties on the full data set.

  6. Periodic trends in parity-violating hyperfine coupling constants of open-shell diatomic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, T. A.; Berger, R.

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear spin-dependent parity violation effects are predicted with the help of a quasi-relativistic two-component zeroth order regular approximation (ZORA) approach for a series of open-shell diatomic molecules that feature a 2Σ electronic ground state. The particular focus is on scaling behaviour of the parity violating parameter Wa in the effective spin-rotational Hamiltonion with increasing nuclear charge Z of the heavier atom in the diatomic molecule. Previously (Isaev and Berger, 2012) an approximate R(A,Z)Z2 scaling law, with R(A,Z) denoting a relativistic enhancement factor, was confirmed for Wa in the series of valence isoelectronic group II monofluorides and valence isoelectronic group XII monohydrides, that is along columns of the periodic table of the elements. In this work, a pronounced R(A,Z)Zk scaling is predicted for isolobal 2Σ diatomic molecules along rows of the periodic table, with k being approximately 4 and 6 for the fourth and fifth row, respectively, and even larger for the sixth and seventh row. This observation opens up a another dimension in the systematic search of candidate systems for measuring nuclear spin-dependent parity violating interactions in molecules.

  7. A study in entire chromosomes of violations of the intra-strand parity of complementary nucleotides (Chargaff's second parity rule).

    PubMed

    Powdel, B R; Satapathy, Siddhartha Sankar; Kumar, Aditya; Jha, Pankaj Kumar; Buragohain, Alak Kumar; Borah, Munindra; Ray, Suvendra Kumar

    2009-12-01

    Chargaff's rule of intra-strand parity (ISP) between complementary mono/oligonucleotides in chromosomes is well established in the scientific literature. Although a large numbers of papers have been published citing works and discussions on ISP in the genomic era, scientists are yet to find all the factors responsible for such a universal phenomenon in the chromosomes. In the present work, we have tried to address the issue from a new perspective, which is a parallel feature to ISP. The compositional abundance values of mono/oligonucleotides were determined in all non-overlapping sub-chromosomal regions of specific size. Also the frequency distributions of the mono/oligonucleotides among the regions were compared using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. Interestingly, the frequency distributions between the complementary mono/oligonucleotides revealed statistical similarity, which we named as intra-strand frequency distribution parity (ISFDP). ISFDP was observed as a general feature in chromosomes of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. Violation of ISFDP was also observed in several chromosomes. Chromosomes of different strains belonging a species in bacteria/archaea (Haemophilus influenza, Xylella fastidiosa etc.) and chromosomes of a eukaryote are found to be different among each other with respect to ISFDP violation. ISFDP correlates weakly with ISP in chromosomes suggesting that the latter one is not entirely responsible for the former. Asymmetry of replication topography and composition of forward-encoded sequences between the strands in chromosomes are found to be insufficient to explain the ISFDP feature in all chromosomes. This suggests that multiple factors in chromosomes are responsible for establishing ISFDP.

  8. A Study in Entire Chromosomes of Violations of the Intra-strand Parity of Complementary Nucleotides (Chargaff's Second Parity Rule)

    PubMed Central

    Powdel, B.R.; Satapathy, Siddhartha Sankar; Kumar, Aditya; Jha, Pankaj Kumar; Buragohain, Alak Kumar; Borah, Munindra; Ray, Suvendra Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Chargaff's rule of intra-strand parity (ISP) between complementary mono/oligonucleotides in chromosomes is well established in the scientific literature. Although a large numbers of papers have been published citing works and discussions on ISP in the genomic era, scientists are yet to find all the factors responsible for such a universal phenomenon in the chromosomes. In the present work, we have tried to address the issue from a new perspective, which is a parallel feature to ISP. The compositional abundance values of mono/oligonucleotides were determined in all non-overlapping sub-chromosomal regions of specific size. Also the frequency distributions of the mono/oligonucleotides among the regions were compared using the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test. Interestingly, the frequency distributions between the complementary mono/oligonucleotides revealed statistical similarity, which we named as intra-strand frequency distribution parity (ISFDP). ISFDP was observed as a general feature in chromosomes of bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. Violation of ISFDP was also observed in several chromosomes. Chromosomes of different strains belonging a species in bacteria/archaea (Haemophilus influenza, Xylella fastidiosa etc.) and chromosomes of a eukaryote are found to be different among each other with respect to ISFDP violation. ISFDP correlates weakly with ISP in chromosomes suggesting that the latter one is not entirely responsible for the former. Asymmetry of replication topography and composition of forward-encoded sequences between the strands in chromosomes are found to be insufficient to explain the ISFDP feature in all chromosomes. This suggests that multiple factors in chromosomes are responsible for establishing ISFDP. PMID:19861381

  9. Recent results and future direction of the parity-violating electron scattering program in Hall A at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Dalton, Mark M.

    2014-01-01

    Hall A at Jefferson Lab has recently completed three experiments done using the technique of parity-violating electron scattering. Taken together these experiments are a good demonstration of the versatility of this approach. Looking forward, there are two very large scale parity-violation experiments approved to run in Hall A in the 12 GeV era. These experiments represent a significant increase in precision and technical requirements.

  10. PROCEEDINGS FROM RIKEN-BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP: PARITY-VIOLATING SPIN ASYMMETRIES AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    VOGELSANG,W.; PERDEKAMP, M.; SURROW, B.

    2007-04-26

    The RHIC spin program is now fully underway. Several runs have been successfully completed and are producing exciting first results. Luminosity and polarization have improved remarkably and promising advances toward the higher RHIC energy of {radical}s = 500 GeV have been made. At this energy in particular, it will become possible to perform measurements of parity-violating spin asymmetries. Parity violation occurs in weak interactions, and in combination with the unique polarization capabilities at RHIC fascinating new opportunities arise. In particular, parity-violating single- and double-spin asymmetries give new insights into nucleon structure by allowing probes of up and down sea and anti-quark polarizations. Such measurements at RHIC are a DOE performance milestone for the year 2013 and are also supported by a very large effort from RIKEN. With transverse polarization, charged-current interactions may be sensitive to the Sivers effect. Parity-violating effects at RHIC have been proposed even as probes of physics beyond the Standard Model. With the era of measurements of parity-violating spin asymmetries at RHIC now rapidly approaching, we had proposed a small workshop that would bring together the main experts in both theory and experiment. We are very happy that this worked out. The whole workshop contained 17 formal talks, both experiment (10) and theory (7), and many fruitful discussions. The physics motivations for, the planned measurements were reviewed first. The RHIC machine prospects regarding polarized 500 GeV running were discussed, as well as the plans by the RHIC experiments for the vital upgrades of their detectors needed for the W physics program. We also had several talks on the topic of ''semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering'', which provides different access to related physics observables. On the theory side, new calculations were presented, for example in terms of QCD all-order resummations of perturbation theory. Also, new observables

  11. Top quark three-body decays in the R-parity violating MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Heng Zhaoxia; Yang Jinmin; Lu Gongru; Wu Lei

    2009-05-01

    In the minimal supersymmetric standard model the R-parity violating interactions can trigger various exotic three-body decays for the top quark, which may be accessible at the LHC. In this work we examine the R-violating decays t{yields}cX{sub 1}X{sub 2}, which include the tree-level processes t{yields}cl{sub i}{sup -}l{sub j}{sup +} (l{sub i}=e, {mu}, {tau}) and t{yields}cd{sub i}d{sub j} (d{sub i}=d, s, b), as well as the loop-induced processes t{yields}cgX (X=g, {gamma}, Z, h). We find that the hereto weakly constrained R-violating couplings can render the decay branching ratios quite sizable, some of which already reach the sensitivity of the Tevatron collider and can be explored at the LHC with better sensitivity.

  12. Difference in direct charge-parity violation between charged and neutral B meson decays.

    PubMed

    Lin, S-W; Unno, Y; Hou, W-S; Chang, P; Adachi, I; Aihara, H; Akai, K; Arinstein, K; Aulchenko, V; Aushev, T; Aziz, T; Bakich, A M; Balagura, V; Barberio, E; Bay, A; Bedny, I; Bitenc, U; Bondar, A; Bozek, A; Bracko, M; Browder, T E; Chang, M-C; Chao, Y; Chen, A; Chen, K-F; Chen, W T; Cheon, B G; Chiang, C-C; Chistov, R; Cho, I-S; Choi, S-K; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Cole, S; Dalseno, J; Danilov, M; Dash, M; Drutskoy, A; Eidelman, S; Epifanov, D; Fratina, S; Fujikawa, M; Furukawa, K; Gabyshev, N; Goldenzweig, P; Golob, B; Ha, H; Haba, J; Hara, T; Hayasaka, K; Hayashii, H; Hazumi, M; Heffernan, D; Hokuue, T; Hoshi, Y; Hsiung, Y B; Hyun, H J; Iijima, T; Ikado, K; Inami, K; Ishikawa, A; Ishino, H; Itoh, R; Iwabuchi, M; Iwasaki, M; Iwasaki, Y; Kah, D H; Kaji, H; Kataoka, S U; Kawai, H; Kawasaki, T; Kibayashi, A; Kichimi, H; Kikutani, E; Kim, H J; Kim, S K; Kim, Y J; Kinoshita, K; Korpar, S; Kozakai, Y; Krizan, P; Krokovny, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, C C; Kuzmin, A; Kwon, Y-J; Lee, M J; Lee, S E; Lesiak, T; Li, J; Liu, Y; Liventsev, D; Mandl, F; Marlow, D; McOnie, S; Medvedeva, T; Mimashi, T; Mitaroff, W; Miyabayashi, K; Miyake, H; Miyazaki, Y; Mizuk, R; Mori, T; Nakamura, T T; Nakano, E; Nakao, M; Nakazawa, H; Nishida, S; Nitoh, O; Noguchi, S; Nozaki, T; Ogawa, S; Ogawa, Y; Ohshima, T; Okuno, S; Olsen, S L; Ozaki, H; Pakhlova, G; Park, C W; Park, H; Peak, L S; Pestotnik, R; Peters, M; Piilonen, L E; Poluektov, A; Sahoo, H; Sakai, Y; Schneider, O; Schümann, J; Schwartz, A J; Seidl, R; Senyo, K; Sevior, M E; Shapkin, M; Shen, C P; Shibuya, H; Shidara, T; Shinomiya, S; Shiu, J-G; Shwartz, B; Singh, J B; Sokolov, A; Somov, A; Stanic, S; Staric, M; Sumisawa, K; Sumiyoshi, T; Suzuki, S; Tajima, O; Takasaki, F; Tamura, N; Tanaka, M; Tawada, M; Taylor, G N; Teramoto, Y; Tikhomirov, I; Trabelsi, K; Uehara, S; Ueno, K; Uglov, T; Uno, S; Urquijo, P; Ushiroda, Y; Usov, Y; Varner, G; Varvell, K E; Vervink, K; Villa, S; Wang, C C; Wang, C H; Wang, M-Z; Watanabe, Y; Wedd, R; Wicht, J; Won, E; Yabsley, B D; Yamaguchi, A; Yamashita, Y; Yamauchi, M; Yoshida, M; Yuan, C Z; Yusa, Y; Zhang, C C; Zhang, Z P; Zhilich, V; Zhulanov, V; Zupanc, A

    2008-03-20

    Equal amounts of matter and antimatter are predicted to have been produced in the Big Bang, but our observable Universe is clearly matter-dominated. One of the prerequisites for understanding this elimination of antimatter is the nonconservation of charge-parity (CP) symmetry. So far, two types of CP violation have been observed in the neutral K meson (K(0)) and B meson (B(0)) systems: CP violation involving the mixing between K(0) and its antiparticle (and likewise for B(0) and ), and direct CP violation in the decay of each meson. The observed effects for both types of CP violation are substantially larger for the B(0) meson system. However, they are still consistent with the standard model of particle physics, which has a unique source of CP violation that is known to be too small to account for the matter-dominated Universe. Here we report that the direct CP violation in charged B(+/-)-->K(+/-)pi(0) decay is different from that in the neutral B(0) counterpart. The direct CP-violating decay rate asymmetry, (that is, the difference between the number of observed B(-)-->K(-)pi(0) event versus B(+)-->K(+) pi(0) events, normalized to the sum of these events) is measured to be about +7%, with an uncertainty that is reduced by a factor of 1.7 from a previous measurement. However, the asymmetry for versus B(0)-->K(+)pi(-) is at the -10% level. Although it is susceptible to strong interaction effects that need further clarification, this large deviation in direct CP violation between charged and neutral B meson decays could be an indication of new sources of CP violation-which would help to explain the dominance of matter in the Universe.

  13. Difference in direct charge-parity violation between charged and neutral B meson decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, S.-W.; Unno, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Chang, P.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Akai, K.; Arinstein, K.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Aziz, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Barberio, E.; Bay, A.; Bedny, I.; Bitenc, U.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Chang, M.-C.; Chao, Y.; Chen, A.; Chen, K.-F.; Chen, W. T.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiang, C.-C.; Chistov, R.; Cho, I.-S.; Choi, S.-K.; Choi, Y.; Choi, Y. K.; Cole, S.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Dash, M.; Drutskoy, A.; Eidelman, S.; Epifanov, D.; Fratina, S.; Fujikawa, M.; Furukawa, K.; Gabyshev, N.; Goldenzweig, P.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Haba, J.; Hara, T.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; Hazumi, M.; Heffernan, D.; Hokuue, T.; Hoshi, Y.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Iijima, T.; Ikado, K.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, H.; Itoh, R.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Kah, D. H.; Kaji, H.; Kataoka, S. U.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kibayashi, A.; Kichimi, H.; Kikutani, E.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, S. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kinoshita, K.; Korpar, S.; Kozakai, Y.; Križan, P.; Krokovny, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, C. C.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, S. E.; Lesiak, T.; Li, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Mandl, F.; Marlow, D.; McOnie, S.; Medvedeva, T.; Mimashi, T.; Mitaroff, W.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyake, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizuk, R.; Mori, T.; Nakamura, T. T.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Noguchi, S.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, S.; Ogawa, Y.; Ohshima, T.; Okuno, S.; Olsen, S. L.; Ozaki, H.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Peak, L. S.; Pestotnik, R.; Peters, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Poluektov, A.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schümann, J.; Schwartz, A. J.; Seidl, R.; Senyo, K.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibuya, H.; Shidara, T.; Shinomiya, S.; Shiu, J.-G.; Shwartz, B.; Singh, J. B.; Sokolov, A.; Somov, A.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Suzuki, S.; Tajima, O.; Takasaki, F.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, M.; Tawada, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Teramoto, Y.; Tikhomirov, I.; Trabelsi, K.; Uehara, S.; Ueno, K.; Uglov, T.; Uno, S.; Urquijo, P.; Ushiroda, Y.; Usov, Y.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K. E.; Vervink, K.; Villa, S.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M.-Z.; Watanabe, Y.; Wedd, R.; Wicht, J.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamaguchi, A.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Yoshida, M.; Yuan, C. Z.; Yusa, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2008-03-01

    Equal amounts of matter and antimatter are predicted to have been produced in the Big Bang, but our observable Universe is clearly matter-dominated. One of the prerequisites for understanding this elimination of antimatter is the nonconservation of charge-parity (CP) symmetry. So far, two types of CP violation have been observed in the neutral K meson (K0) and B meson (B0) systems: CP violation involving the mixing between K0 and its antiparticle (and likewise for B0 and ), and direct CP violation in the decay of each meson. The observed effects for both types of CP violation are substantially larger for the B0 meson system. However, they are still consistent with the standard model of particle physics, which has a unique source of CP violation that is known to be too small to account for the matter-dominated Universe. Here we report that the direct CP violation in charged B+/--->K+/-π0 decay is different from that in the neutral B0 counterpart. The direct CP-violating decay rate asymmetry, (that is, the difference between the number of observed B--->K-π0 event versus B+-->K+ π0 events, normalized to the sum of these events) is measured to be about +7%, with an uncertainty that is reduced by a factor of 1.7 from a previous measurement. However, the asymmetry for versus B0-->K+π- is at the -10% level. Although it is susceptible to strong interaction effects that need further clarification, this large deviation in direct CP violation between charged and neutral B meson decays could be an indication of new sources of CP violation-which would help to explain the dominance of matter in the Universe.

  14. Line Shifts in Rotational Spectra of Polyatomic Chiral Molecules Caused by the Parity Violating Electroweak Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stohner, J.; Quack, M.

    2009-06-01

    Are findings in high-energy physics of any importance in molecular spectroscopy ? The answer is clearly `yes'. Energies of enantiomers were considered as exactly equal in an achiral environment, e.g. the gas phase. Today, however, it is well known that this is not valid. The violation of mirror-image symmetry (suggested theoretically and confirmed experimentally in 1956/57) was established in the field of nuclear, high-energy, and atomic physics since then, and it is also the cause for a non-zero energy difference between enantiomers. We expect today that the violation of mirror-image symmetry (parity violation) influences chemistry of chiral molecules as well as their spectroscopy. Progress has been made in the quantitative theoretical prediction of possible spectroscopic signatures of molecular parity violation. The experimental confirmation of parity violation in chiral molecules is, however, still open. Theoretical studies are helpful for the planning and important for a detailed analysis of rovibrational and tunneling spectra of chiral molecules. We report results on frequency shifts in rotational, vibrational and tunneling spectra of some selected chiral molecules which are studied in our group. If time permits, we shall also discuss critically some recent claims of experimental observations of molecular parity violation in condensed phase systems. T. D. Lee, C. N. Yang, Phys. Rev., 104, 254 (1956) C. S. Wu, E. Ambler, R. W. Hayward, D. D. Hoppes, R. P. Hudson, Phys. Rev., 105, 1413 (1957) M. Quack, Angew. Chem. Intl. Ed., 28, 571 (1989) Angew. Chem. Intl. Ed., 41, 4618 (2002) M. Quack, J. Stohner, Chimia, 59, 530 (2005) M. Quack, J. Stohner, M. Willeke, Ann Rev. Phys. Chem. 59, 741 (2008) M. Quack, J. Stohner, Phys. Rev. Lett., 84, 3807 (2000) M. Quack, J. Stohner, J. Chem. Phys., 119, 11228 (2003) J. Stohner, Int. J. Mass Spectrometry 233, 385 (2004) M. Gottselig, M. Quack, J. Stohner, M. Willeke, Int. J. Mass Spectrometry 233, 373 (2004) R. Berger, G

  15. PROBING THE STANDARD MODEL AND NUCLEON STRUCTURE VIA PARITY VIOLATING ELECTRON SCATTERING

    SciTech Connect

    Humensky, T

    2003-10-28

    Parity-violating electron scattering has developed over the last 25 years into a tool to study both the structure of electroweak interactions and the structure of nucleons. Work on two parity-violation experiments is reported in this thesis. They are the Hall A Proton Parity EXperiment (HAPPEX), which ran at Jefferson Laboratory in 1998-1999, and SLAC E-158, which had its first physics running in 2002. HAPPEX measured the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic e-p scattering at a momentum transfer squared of Q{sup 2} = 0.477 GeV{sup 2} and a scattering angle of 12{sup o}. This asymmetry is sensitive to the presence of strange sea quarks in the proton. In particular, it is sensitive to the proton's strange elastic form factors. An asymmetry of A{sub LR}{sup ep} = -15.05 {+-} 0.98 {+-} 0.56 ppm was measured, where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic. Combining this asymmetry measurement with existing measurements of the electromagnetic form factors of the proton and neutron allowed HAPPEX to set new constraints on the strange elastic form factors of the proton G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.392G{sub M}{sup s} = 0.025 {+-} 0.020 {+-} 0.014, where G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} are the strange electric and magnetic form factors of the proton, respectively. The first error is the quadrature sum of the experimental errors and the second error is due to uncertainty in the electromagnetic form factors. This result is consistent with the absence of a contribution from strange quarks. This thesis reports an analysis of the 1999 data set, with a particular focus on the determination of the raw asymmetry and the corrections to the raw asymmetry to account for helicity-correlated asymmetries in properties of the electron beam.

  16. Fate of R parity

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Pavel Fileviez; Spinner, Sogee

    2011-02-01

    The possible origin of the R-parity-violating interactions in the minimal supersymmetric standard model and its connection to the radiative symmetry-breaking mechanism is investigated in the context of the simplest model where the radiative symmetry-breaking mechanism can be implemented. We find that, in the majority of the parameter space, R parity is spontaneously broken at the low scale. These results hint that R-parity-violating processes could be observed at the Large Hadron Collider, if supersymmetry is realized in nature.

  17. Search for r-parity violating supersymmetry in the multilepton final state

    SciTech Connect

    Attal, Alon Jacques

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a search for physics beyond the standard model of elementary particles in events containing three or more charged leptons in the final state. The search is based on an R-parity violating supersymmetric model that assumes supersymmetric particles are pair produced at hadron colliders and the R-parity violating coupling is small enough so that these particles ''cascade'' decay into the lightest supersymmetric particle. The lightest supersymmetric particle may only decay into two charged leptons (electrons or muons) plus a neutrino through a lepton number violating interaction. Proton-antiproton collision events produced with √ s= 1.96 TeV are collected between March 2002 and August 2004 with an integrated luminosity of 346 pb-1. R-parity violating supersymmetry is sought for in two data samples, one with exactly three leptons and one with four or more leptons. The trilepton sample has a modest background primarily from Drell-Yan events where an additional lepton is a result of photon conversions or jet misidentification while the four or more lepton sample has an extremely low background. In the three lepton samples 6 events are observed while in the four or more lepton sample zero events are observed. These results are consistent with the standard model expectation and are interpreted as mass limits on the lightest neutralino and lightest chargino particles. The neutralino mass is constrained to be heavier than 97.7 to 110.4 GeV/c2, while the chargino mass is constrained to be heavier than 185.3 to 202.7 GeV/c2, depending on the supersymmetry scenario.

  18. Spontaneous CP violation and the strong CP problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchi, Luca

    2017-04-01

    We derive sufficient conditions that guarantee a robust solution of the strong CP problem in theories with spontaneous CP violation, and introduce a class of models satisfying these requirements. In the simplest scenarios the dominant contribution to the topological angle arises at 3-loop order in the Standard Model Yukawa couplings. A variety of new realizations are obtained on a warped extra dimension, which can dynamically generate a CKM phase of the right size as well as the Planck-TeV hierarchy. Experimental signatures of this approach to the strong CP problem include a characteristic pattern of flavor violation and vector-like partners of the top and/or bottom quarks.

  19. New signatures and limits on R-parity violation from resonant squark production

    SciTech Connect

    Monteux, Angelo

    2016-03-31

    Here, we discuss resonant squark production at the LHC via baryonic R-parity violating interactions. The cross section easily exceeds pair-production and a new set of signatures can be used to probe squarks, particularly stops. These include dijet resonances, same-sign top quarks and four-jet resonances with large b-jet multiplicities, as well as the possibility of displaced neutralino decays. We use publicly available searches at √s = 8 TeV and first results from collisions at √s = 13 TeV to set upper limits on R-parity violating couplings, with particular focus on simplified models with light stops and neutralinos. The exclusion reach of these signatures is comparable to R-parity-conserving searches, mt~ ≃ 500–700 GeV. In addition, we find that O(1) couplings involving the stop can be excluded well into the multi-TeV range, and stress that new searches for single- and pair-produced four-jet resonances will be necessary to exclude sub-TeV stops for a natural SUSY spectrum with light higgsinos.

  20. New signatures and limits on R-parity violation from resonant squark production

    DOE PAGES

    Monteux, Angelo

    2016-03-31

    Here, we discuss resonant squark production at the LHC via baryonic R-parity violating interactions. The cross section easily exceeds pair-production and a new set of signatures can be used to probe squarks, particularly stops. These include dijet resonances, same-sign top quarks and four-jet resonances with large b-jet multiplicities, as well as the possibility of displaced neutralino decays. We use publicly available searches at √s = 8 TeV and first results from collisions at √s = 13 TeV to set upper limits on R-parity violating couplings, with particular focus on simplified models with light stops and neutralinos. The exclusion reach ofmore » these signatures is comparable to R-parity-conserving searches, mt~ ≃ 500–700 GeV. In addition, we find that O(1) couplings involving the stop can be excluded well into the multi-TeV range, and stress that new searches for single- and pair-produced four-jet resonances will be necessary to exclude sub-TeV stops for a natural SUSY spectrum with light higgsinos.« less

  1. Planck intermediate results. XLIX. Parity-violation constraints from polarization data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J. P.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-01

    Parity-violating extensions of the standard electromagnetic theory cause in vacuo rotation of the plane of polarization of propagating photons. This effect, also known as cosmic birefringence, has an impact on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy angular power spectra, producing non-vanishing T-B and E-B correlations that are otherwise null when parity is a symmetry. Here we present new constraints on an isotropic rotation, parametrized by the angle α, derived from Planck 2015 CMB polarization data. To increase the robustness of our analyses, we employ two complementary approaches, in harmonic space and in map space, the latter based on a peak stacking technique. The two approaches provide estimates for α that are in agreement within statistical uncertainties and are very stable against several consistency tests.Considering the T-B and E-B information jointly, we find α = 0fdg31 ± 0fdg05 ({stat.) ± 0fdg28 (syst.)} from the harmonic analysis and α = 0fdg35 ± 0fdg05 ({stat.) ± 0fdg28 (syst.)} from the stacking approach. These constraints are compatible with no parity violation and are dominated by the systematic uncertainty in the orientation of Planck's polarization-sensitive bolometers.

  2. Planck intermediate results: XLIX. Parity-violation constraints from polarization data

    SciTech Connect

    Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J. -P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J. -F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Contreras, D.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F. -X.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J. -M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J. P.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y. -Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M. -A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Patrizii, L.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A. -S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-12

    Parity-violating extensions of the standard electromagnetic theory cause in vacuo rotation of the plane of polarization of propagating photons. This effect, also known as cosmic birefringence, has an impact on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy angular power spectra, producing non-vanishing T-B and E-B correlations that are otherwise null when parity is a symmetry. Here we present new constraints on an isotropic rotation, parametrized by the angle α, derived from Planck 2015 CMB polarization data. To increase the robustness of our analyses, we employ two complementary approaches, in harmonic space and in map space, the latter based on a peak stacking technique. The two approaches provide estimates for α that are in agreement within statistical uncertainties and are very stable against several consistency tests.Considering the T-B and E-B information jointly, we find α = 0°310°05(stat.)±0°28 (syst.) from the harmonic analysis and α = 0°350°05(stat.)±0°28 (syst.) from the stacking approach. These constraints are compatible with no parity violation and are dominated by the systematic uncertainty in the orientation of Planck's polarization-sensitive bolometers.

  3. Planck intermediate results: XLIX. Parity-violation constraints from polarization data

    DOE PAGES

    Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; ...

    2016-12-12

    Parity-violating extensions of the standard electromagnetic theory cause in vacuo rotation of the plane of polarization of propagating photons. This effect, also known as cosmic birefringence, has an impact on the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy angular power spectra, producing non-vanishing T-B and E-B correlations that are otherwise null when parity is a symmetry. Here we present new constraints on an isotropic rotation, parametrized by the angle α, derived from Planck 2015 CMB polarization data. To increase the robustness of our analyses, we employ two complementary approaches, in harmonic space and in map space, the latter based on a peakmore » stacking technique. The two approaches provide estimates for α that are in agreement within statistical uncertainties and are very stable against several consistency tests.Considering the T-B and E-B information jointly, we find α = 0°310°05(stat.)±0°28 (syst.) from the harmonic analysis and α = 0°350°05(stat.)±0°28 (syst.) from the stacking approach. These constraints are compatible with no parity violation and are dominated by the systematic uncertainty in the orientation of Planck's polarization-sensitive bolometers.« less

  4. Parity Violation in Chiral Molecules: Current Status of Theory and Spectroscopic Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quack, Martin; Seyfang, Georg

    2013-06-01

    In the ordinary quantum chemistry based on the electromagnetic interaction the ground state energies of enantiomers of chiral molecules are exactly the same by symmetry. Parity violation in electroweak interactions leads to a small ``parity violating'' energy difference Δ_{pv}E between the ground states of enantiomers corresponding to a heat of reaction for stereomutation Δ_{{R}} {H}_0 ^ominus ˜eq 10^{-11} J mol^{-1}, (typically, or about 100 aeV corresponding to about 10^{-12} cm^{-1}). After our finding (in 1995) that a revised theory leads to about a factor of 10 to 100 higher values than previously calculated in older theoretical work prior to 1995, the theoretical results from many groups have now essentially converged to the new values (see reviews). However, experimental results for Δ_{pv}E are still missing. We shall discuss the status of ongoing experiments in the Zürich group to detect this exceedingly small effect by spectroscopy following a scheme proposed in 1986 and shall discuss also the comparison with other efforts. M. Quack, Frontiers in Spectroscopy, in Faraday Discussions, Vol. 150, pp. 533-565, 2011. M. Quack, Fundamental Symmetries and Symmetry Violations from High Resolution Spectroscopy, in Handbook of High Resolution Spectroscopy, Vol. 1, Chapt. 18, pp. 659-722 (Eds.: M. Quack, F. Merkt), Wiley, Chichester, New York, 2011, ISBN 978-0-470-06653-9. M. Quack, J. Stohner, M. Willeke, High-resolution spectroscopic studies and theory of parity violation in chiral molecules, Annu. Rev. Phys. Chem., 2008, 59, 741-769. M. Quack, On the measurement of the parity violating energy difference between enantiomers, Chem. Phys. Lett., 1986, 132, 147-153. P. Dietiker, M. Quack, A. Schneider, G. Seyfang, F. Ünlü, IR-laser induced population transfer from highly populated rotational levels of NH_3 in a molecular beam, in Proceedings of the 18th Symposium on Atomic, Cluster and Surface Physics 2012 (SASP 2012), Alpe d`Huez, France, 22 to 27 January 2012

  5. Azimuthal charged-particle correlations and possible local strong parity violation.

    PubMed

    Abelev, B I; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alakhverdyants, A V; Anderson, B D; Arkhipkin, D; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Barannikova, O; Barnby, L S; Baumgart, S; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Benedosso, F; Betancourt, M J; Betts, R R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Biritz, B; Bland, L C; Bnzarov, I; Bonner, B E; Bouchet, J; Braidot, E; Brandin, A V; Bridgeman, A; Bruna, E; Bueltmann, S; Burton, T P; Cai, X Z; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Catu, O; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chajecki, Z; Chaloupka, P; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, J Y; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Choi, K E; Christie, W; Chung, P; Clarke, R F; Codrington, M J M; Corliss, R; Cormier, T M; Cosentino, M R; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Das, D; Dash, S; Daugherity, M; De Silva, L C; Dedovich, T G; DePhillips, M; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Didenko, L; Djawotho, P; Dzhordzhadze, V; Dogra, S M; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Dunlop, J C; Dutta Mazumdar, M R; Efimov, L G; Elhalhuli, E; Elnimr, M; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Erazmus, B; Estienne, M; Eun, L; Fachini, P; Fatemi, R; Fedorisin, J; Feng, A; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fine, V; Fisyak, Y; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Ganti, M S; Garcia-Solis, E J; Geromitsos, A; Geurts, F; Ghazikhanian, V; Ghosh, P; Gorbunov, Y N; Gordon, A; Grebenyuk, O; Grosnick, D; Grube, B; Guertin, S M; Guimaraes, K S F F; Gupta, A; Gupta, N; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hallman, T J; Hamed, A; Harris, J W; Heinz, M; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hjort, E; Hoffman, A M; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Hollis, R S; Huang, H Z; Humanic, T J; Huo, L; Igo, G; Iordanova, A; Jacobs, P; Jacobs, W W; Jakl, P; Jena, C; Jin, F; Jones, C L; Jones, P G; Joseph, J; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kajimoto, K; Kang, K; Kapitan, J; Kauder, K; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kettler, D; Khodyrev, V Yu; Kikola, D P; Kiryluk, J; Kisiel, A; Klein, S R; Knospe, A G; Kocoloski, A; Koetke, D D; Konzer, J; Kopytine, M; Koralt, I; Korsch, W; Kotchenda, L; Kouchpil, V; Kravtsov, P; Kravtsov, V I; Krueger, K; Krus, M; Kumar, L; Kurnadi, P; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; LaPointe, S; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, C-H; Lee, J H; Leight, W; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, N; Li, Y; Lin, G; Lindenbaum, S J; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Liu, H; Liu, J; Liu, L; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Longacre, R S; Love, W A; Lu, Y; Ludlam, T; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Mall, O I; Mangotra, L K; Manweiler, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; Matulenko, Yu A; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Meschanin, A; Milner, R; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, A; Mohanty, B; Morozov, D A; Munhoz, M G; Nandi, B K; Nattrass, C; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Netrakanti, P K; Ng, M J; Nogach, L V; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Okada, H; Okorokov, V; Olson, D; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Peitzmann, T; Perevoztchikov, V; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Phatak, S C; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Ploskon, M A; Pluta, J; Plyku, D; Poljak, N; Poskanzer, A M; Potukuchi, B V K S; Prindle, D; Pruneau, C; Pruthi, N K; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Redwine, R; Reed, R; Ridiger, A; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Rose, A; Roy, C; Ruan, L; Russcher, M J; Sahoo, R; Sakai, S; Sakrejda, I; Sakuma, T; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmitz, N; Seele, J; Seger, J; Selyuzhenkov, I; Semertzidis, Y; Seyboth, P; Shahaliev, E; Shao, M; Sharma, M; Shi, S S; Shi, X-H; Sichtermann, E P; Simon, F; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, N; Sorensen, P; Sowinski, J; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Staszak, D; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Suaide, A A P; Suarez, M C; Subba, N L; Sumbera, M; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Symons, T J M; Szanto de Toledo, A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarini, L H; Tarnowsky, T; Thein, D; Thomas, J H; Tian, J; Timmins, A R; Timoshenko, S; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Tram, V N; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tsai, O D; Ulery, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Videbaek, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Wada, M; Walker, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, Q; Wang, X; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Whitten, C; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xie, W; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yang, Y; Yepes, P; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yue, Q; Zawisza, M; Zbroszczyk, H; Zhan, W; Zhang, S; Zhang, W M; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, Y; Zhong, C; Zhou, J; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneev, R; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zuo, J X

    2009-12-18

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to nontrivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the system's orbital momentum axis. We investigate a three-particle azimuthal correlator which is a P even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of charged hadrons near center-of-mass rapidity with this observable in Au + Au and Cu + Cu collisions at square root of s(NN) = 200 GeV using the STAR detector. A signal consistent with several expectations from the theory is detected. We discuss possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  6. Azimuthal Charged-Particle Correlations and Possible Local Strong Parity Violation

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Collaboration; Abelev, Betty

    2010-07-05

    Parity-odd domains, corresponding to non-trivial topological solutions of the QCD vacuum, might be created during relativistic heavy-ion collisions. These domains are predicted to lead to charge separation of quarks along the system's orbital momentum axis. We investigate a three particle azimuthal correlator which is a {Rho} even observable, but directly sensitive to the charge separation effect. We report measurements of charged hadrons near center-of-mass rapidity with this observable in Au+Au and Cu+Cu collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV using the STAR detector. A signal consistent with several expectations from the theory is detected. We discuss possible contributions from other effects that are not related to parity violation.

  7. CURRENT STATUS OF THE G0 PARITY VIOLATION EXPERIMENT CARRIED OUT AT JEFFERSON LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Bimbot, L.

    2010-12-01

    Among experiments looking for strangeness in nuclear systems, electron scattering parity-violation type experiments aim mainly at measuring the strange quark contributions to the form factors of the proton. They can be accessed by measuring asymmetry in longitudinally polarized electron elastic scattering on hydrogen. The parity-violating asymmetry is measured at the ~ 10-7 level of accuracy, and when combined with the electromagnetic form factors of the proton, the strange form factors can be determined. The full separation of form factors according to quark flavour requires measurements at forward angle on hydrogen and at backward angle on proton and deuteron. The experimental setups used for the G0 experiment in the two different configurations will be described. The status of the analysis and the current results will be presented and discussed in relation with other experiments past and planned. The G0 forward angle measurement(2) detected the recoil proton with a segmented detector covering, for one incident energy, different Q2 bins ranging from 0.1 to 1.0 (GeV/c)2. This measurement provided a linear combination of strange magnetic and strange electric form factors for each Q2. In the backward angle configuration, electrons were detected and just one Q2 value was covered at a given incident energy. Due to time limitation, only two cases have been studied: Q2 ~ 0.63 and 0.23 (GeV/c)2. These values were chosen to be directly comparable with results from other experiments. By combining backward and forward configuration measurements it is possible to extract separately the electric and the magnetic strange form factors. The measurements are complete. The analysis, still in progress, will be described. A few comments will also be made regarding some other aspects of physics accessible in simultaneous measurements: neutral current in N transition parity violation in inclusive - production and 2 contribution to elastic scattering.

  8. Weak charge of the proton: loop corrections to parity-violating electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Wally Melnitchouk

    2011-05-01

    I review the role of two-boson exchange corrections to parity-violating elastic electron–proton scattering. Direct calculations of contributions from nucleon and Delta intermediate states show generally small, [script O](1–2%), effects over the range of kinematics relevant for proton strangeness form factor measurements. For the forward angle Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab, which aims to measure the weak charge of the proton, corrections from the gammaZ box diagram are computed within a dispersive approach and found to be sizable at the E~1 GeV energy scale of the experiment.

  9. Bi-large neutrino mixing from bilinear R-parity violation with non-universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Eung Jin; Jung, Dong-Won; Park, Jong Dae

    2003-04-01

    We investigate how the bi-large mixing required by the recent neutrino data can be accommodated in the supersymmetric standard model allowing bilinear R-parity violation and non-universal soft terms. In this scheme, the tree-level contribution and the so-called Grossman-Haber one-loop diagrams are two major sources of the neutrino mass matrix. The relative size of these two contributions falls into the right range to generate the atmospheric and solar neutrino mass hierarchy. On the other hand, the bi-large mixing is typically obtained by a mild tuning of input parameters to arrange a partial cancellation among various contributions.

  10. Recent Results in Parity-Violating Electron Scattering at Jefferson Lab: PREX and HAPPEX-III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Chun-Min; PREx Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    The parity-violating asymmetry APV in electron scattering from the 208Pb nucleus is cleanly sensitive to the neutron radius Rn. A precision measurement of Rn would have important implications for the understanding of nuclear structure, and be a powerful constraint on the symmetry energy Sν(n) of neutron-rich nuclear matter, including neutron stars. The PREX collaboration has completed a first run, measuring Rn to a precision of ~2.5% and providing the first electroweak evidence for the neutron skin of a heavy nucleus. Results from this measurement, and prospects for more precise future measurements, will be discussed.

  11. Parity-Violating Electron Scattering and the Electric and Magnetic Strange Form Factors of the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, David S.; McKeown, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Measurement of the neutral weak vector form factors of the nucleon provides unique access to the strange quark content of the nucleon. These form factors can be studied using parity-violating electron scattering. A comprehensive program of experiments has been performed at three accelerator laboratories to determine the role of strange quarks in the electromagnetic form factors of the nucleon. This article reviews the remarkable technical progress associated with this program, describes the various methods used in the different experiments, and summarizes the physics results along with recent theoretical calculations.

  12. Parity-Violating Electron Deuteron Scattering and the Proton's Neutral Weak Axial Vector Form Factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Takeyasu; Averett, Todd; Barkhuff, David; Batigne, Guillaume; Beck, Douglas; Beise, Elizabeth; Blake, A.; Breuer, Herbert; Carr, Robert; Clasie, Benjamin; Covrig, Silviu; Danagoulian, Areg; Dodson, George; Dow, Karen; Dutta, Dipangkar; Farkhondeh, Manouchehr; Filippone, Bradley; FRANKLIN, W.; Furget, Christophe; Gao, Haiyan; Gao, Juncai; Gustafsson, Kenneth; Hannelius, Lars; Hasty, R.; Allen, Alice; Herda, M.C.; Jones, CE; King, Paul; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kowalski, Stanley; Kox, Serge; Kramer, Kevin; Lee, P.; Liu, Jinghua; Martin, Jeffery; McKeown, Robert; Mueller, B.; Pitt, Mark; Plaster, Bradley; Quemener, Gilles; Real, Jean-Sebastien; Ritter, J.; Roche, Julie; Savu, V.; Schiavilla, Rocco; Seely, Charles; Spayde, Damon; Suleiman, Riad; Taylor, S.; Tieulent, Raphael; Tipton, Bryan; Tsentalovich, E.; Wells, Steven; Yang, Bin; Yuan, Jing; Yun, Junho; Zwart, Townsend

    2004-03-01

    We report on a new measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in quasielastic electron scattering from the deuteron at backward angles at Q2 = 0.038 (GeV/c)2. This quantity provides a determination of the neutral weak axial vector form factor of the nucleon, which can potentially receive large electroweak corrections. The measured asymmetry A = z3.51±0.57 (stat)±0.58 (syst) ppm is consistent with theoretical predictions. We also report on updated results of the previous experiment at Q2 = 0.091 (GeV/c)2, which are also consistent with theoretical predictions.

  13. Hints of R-parity violation in B decays into τν

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, N. G.; Menon, A.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we show that the recently observed enhanced semi-leptonic and leptonic decay rates of the B meson into τν modes can be explained within the frame work of R-parity violating (RPV) MSSM. In particular, RPV contributions involving the exchange of right-handed down-type squarks can give a universal contribution to the B + → τν, B→ Dτν and the B→ D * τν decaysinthemodelwepropose. Wefindthatthemasses and couplings that explain the enhanced B decay rates are phenomelogically viable and the squarks can possibly be observed at the LHC.

  14. Electroweak Radiative Corrections to the Parity-violating Asymmetry for SLAC Experiment E158

    SciTech Connect

    Zykunov, Vladimir A.; /Gomel State Tech. U.

    2012-04-04

    Electroweak radiative corrections to observable quantities of Moeller scattering of polarized particles are calculated. We emphasize the contribution induced by infrared divergent parts of cross section. The covariant method is used to remove infrared divergences, so that our results do not involve any unphysical parameters. When applied to the kinematics of SLAC E158 experiment, these corrections reduce the parity violating asymmetry by about -6.5% at E = 48 GeV and y = 0.5, and kinematically weighted 'hard' bremsstrahlung effect for SLAC E158 is {approx} 1%.

  15. γZ corrections to forward-angle parity-violating ep scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Alex Sibirtsev; Blunden, Peter G.; Melnitchouk, Wally; ...

    2010-07-30

    We use dispersion relations to evaluate the γZ box contribution to parity-violating electron scattering in the forward limit, taking into account constraints from recent JLab data on electroproduction in the resonance region as well as high energy data from HERA. The correction to the asymmetry is found to be 1.2 +- 0.2% at the kinematics of the JLab Qweak experiment, which is well within the limits required to achieve a 4% measurement of the weak charge of the proton.

  16. Measurement of the Neutron Radius of 208Pb Through Parity-Violation in Electron Scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Abrahamyan, Sergey; Albataineh, Hisham; Aniol, Konrad; ...

    2012-03-15

    We report the first measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry APV in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from 208Pb. APV is sensitive to the radius of the neutron distribution (Rn). The result APV = 0.656 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.013 (syst) corresponds to a difference between the radii of the neutron and proton distributions Rn-Rp = 0.33-0.18+0.16 fm and provides the first electroweak observation of the neutron skin which is expected in a heavy, neutron-rich nucleus.

  17. γZ corrections to forward-angle parity-violating ep scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Alex Sibirtsev; Blunden, Peter G.; Melnitchouk, Wally; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2010-07-30

    We use dispersion relations to evaluate the γZ box contribution to parity-violating electron scattering in the forward limit, taking into account constraints from recent JLab data on electroproduction in the resonance region as well as high energy data from HERA. The correction to the asymmetry is found to be 1.2 +- 0.2% at the kinematics of the JLab Qweak experiment, which is well within the limits required to achieve a 4% measurement of the weak charge of the proton.

  18. A Preliminary Measurement of the Left-Right Parity-Violating ep Asymmetry at E158

    SciTech Connect

    Biesiada, J.

    2005-04-11

    This thesis investigates the parity-violating ep asymmetry based on the Run I data produced in Spring of 2002 by the E158 experiment, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The main scientific objective of the experiment is the precision measurement of the weak mixing angle of the Standard Model. The ep asymmetry is an important background in the experiment and theoretically interesting in its own right, providing insights into the structure of the proton. The analysis centers upon identifying systematic error and consistency. The definite measurement of the ep asymmetry will await the final reprocessing of the data set during the Fall of 2002.

  19. Electroweak radiative corrections to parity-violating electroexcitation of the Delta

    SciTech Connect

    C.M. Maekawa; Michael Ramsey-Musolf; Barry Holstein; Shi-Lin Zhu; Gianfranco Sacco

    2001-12-01

    We analyze the degree to which parity-violating (PV) electroexcitation of the {Delta}(1232)$ resonance may be used to extract the weak neutral axial vector transition form factors. We find that the axial vector electroweak radiative corrections are large and theoretically uncertain, thereby modifying the nominal interpretation of the PV asymmetry in terms of the weak neutral form factors. We also show that, in contrast to the situation for elastic electron scattering, the axial N {yields} {Delta} PV asymmetry does not vanish at the photon point as a consequence of a new term entering the radiative corrections. We argue that an experimental determination of these radiative corrections would be of interest for hadron structure theory, possibly shedding light on the violation of Hara's theorem in weak, radiative hyperon decays.

  20. Parity Violating Photoproduction of {pi}{sup {+-}} on the {Delta} Resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Barry Holstein; C. Maekawa; Michael Ramsey-Musolf; Shi-Lin Zhu

    2001-11-12

    We analyze the real-photon asymmetry A{sub {gamma}}{sup {+-}} for the parity-violating (PV) {pi}{sup {+-}} production on the {Delta} resonance via the reactions {rvec {gamma}} + p {yields} {Delta}{sup +} {yields} {pi}{sup +} + n and {rvec {gamma}} + d {yields} {Delta}{sup 0} + p {yields} {pi}{sup -} + p + p. This asymmetry is nonvanishing due to a PV {gamma}N{Delta} coupling constant, d{sub {Delta}}{sup {+-}}. We argue that an experimental determination of this coupling would be of interest for hadron dynamics, possibly shedding light on the S-wave/P-wave puzzle in the hyperon nonleptonic decays and the violation of Hara's theorem in weak radiative hyperon decays.

  1. Six-quark decays of the Higgs boson in supersymmetry with R-parity violation.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Linda M; Kaplan, David E; Rhee, Eun-Jung

    2007-11-23

    Both electroweak precision measurements and simple supersymmetric extensions of the standard model prefer a mass of the Higgs boson less than the experimental lower limit (on a standard-model-like Higgs boson) of 114 GeV. We show that supersymmetric models with R parity violation and baryon-number violation have a significant range of parameter space in which the Higgs boson dominantly decays to six jets. These decays are much more weakly constrained by current CERN LEP analyses and would allow for a Higgs boson mass near that of the Z. In general, lighter scalar quark and other superpartner masses are allowed. The Higgs boson would potentially be discovered at hadron colliders via the appearance of new displaced vertices.

  2. Fully relativistic ab initio calculations of the energies of chiral molecules including parity-violating weak interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laerdahl, Jon K.; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    1999-12-01

    The parity-odd perturbation operator for the inelastic electron-nucleon scattering by weak neutral currents (exchange of virtual Z0 bosons) has been implemented into a fully relativistic four-component Dirac-Hartree-Fock scheme. Dirac-Hartree-Fock electronic structure calculations on H2O2, H2S2, H2Se2, H2Te2, and H2Po2 provides a demonstration of the higher than Z5 scaling of the parity-violating energy shift (Z is the nuclear charge) in chiral molecules. To our knowledge, the calculations for H2Te2 and H2Po2 are the first for molecules containing heavy elements from period 5 or 6 of the Periodic Table, and the parity-violating energy shifts are some of the highest reported in any ab initio study. It has been shown that special care is needed in the basis set expansion of the wave function because of the coupling between the large and small components of the Dirac wave function through the γ5 matrix. Estimates of the remaining errors in the calculations have been given. A comparison with the calculated parity-violating energy shift of H2TeO have confirmed the importance of the single-center theorem, which states that the parity-violating energy shift is suppressed in molecules containing only a single heavy atomic center. Due to the close correspondence between parity-violating energy shifts and observable parity-odd properties, our results have important consequences for the current search for an experimental confirmation of parity-odd effects in molecular physics: (i) The experiments should be performed on molecules containing heavy (period 5 or 6) elements. (ii) Molecules with more than one heavy atomic center will be extremely favorable due to the single-center theorem.

  3. Violation of parity and time-reversal in atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravaine, Boris

    Symmetries of the Universe have always provided theoreticians with a powerful tool in their efforts to understand and unify physics laws. Three of them have shaped physics over the last 50 years: parity (P), charge conjugation (C), and time-reversal (T). Today, T-violation remains the most mysterious symmetry violation as it is not understood properly and as much stronger T-violating mechanisms are required to explain the matter-antimatter in the Universe. T-violation could be potentially observed in some recently proposed and on-going experiments with atoms and molecules. In particular, T-violation could manifest itself in electric dipole moment (EDM) elemetary particles and atoms. Here I present results of three calculations in support of emerging searches for T violation: (1) A recently proposed experiment with liquid Xe at Princeton may significantly improve present limits on atomic EDM. We find that the liquid phase reduces the T-violating signal by only 40% still offering an improvement of several orders of magnitude to present limits for several sources of T-violation. (2) To guide emerging searches for electron EDMs with molecular ions, we estimate the EDM-induced energy corrections for hydrogen halide ions HBr+ and HI+. We find that the EDM-signal for the two ions differ by an unexpectedly large factor of fifteen due to a dissimilarity in the nature of the chemical bond. We conclude HI+ ion may be a potentially competitive candidate for the EDM search. These observations provide guidelines for finding a even better molecular ion candidate. (3) T-violation in an atom leads to the T-odd polarizability betaCP: a magnetic moment mu CP is induced by an electric field E0 applied to an atom, muCP = betaCP E0 . We estimate the T-violating polarizability for rare-gas atoms He through Rn. Finally, we evaluate a feasibility of setting a limit on electron EDM by measuring muCP of liquid Xe. We find that such an experiment could provide competitive bounds on electron

  4. Search for parity- and time-and-parity-violation effects in lead monofluoride (PbF): Ab initio molecular study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnikov, L. V.; Kudashov, A. D.; Petrov, A. N.; Titov, A. V.

    2014-12-01

    The relativistic coupled-clusters method combined with the generalized relativistic effective core potential approach and nonvariational one-center restoration technique is applied to evaluation of parameters of the spin-rotational effective Hamiltonian in lead monofluoride to study the effects of violation of time-reversal invariance (T ) and space parity (P ) in PbF. The obtained hyperfine structure constants, A||=9942 MHz and A⊥=-7174 MHz, are stable with respect to the improvement of the correlation treatment, and they are in very good agreement with the experimental data, A||=10 147 MHz and A⊥=-7264 MHz [R. J. Mawhorter, B. S. Murphy, A. L. Baum, T. J. Sears, T. Yang, P. M. Rupasinghe, C. P. McRaven, N. E. Shafer-Ray, L. D. Alphei, and J.-U. Grabow, Phys. Rev. A 84, 022508 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.84.022508; A. N. Petrov, L. V. Skripnikov, A. V. Titov, and R. J. Mawhorter, Phys. Rev. A 88, 010501(R) (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.88.010501]. This is essential to the important task of verifying the value of effective electric field Eeff=40 GV/cm, the parameter of P -odd interaction WP=-1213 Hz, and the parameter of T ,P -odd pseudoscalar-scalar electron-nucleus interaction WT ,P=91 kHz, which are of primary interest in the Brief Report.

  5. Tau and muon lepton flavor violations in the littlest Higgs model with T parity

    SciTech Connect

    Goto, Toru; Okada, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro

    2011-03-01

    Lepton flavor violation in {tau} and {mu} processes is studied in the littlest Higgs model with T parity. We consider various asymmetries defined in polarized {tau} and {mu} decays. Correlations among branching ratios and asymmetries are shown in the following lepton flavor violation processes: {mu}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{gamma}, {mu}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup +}e{sup -}, {mu}{sup -}A{yields}e{sup -}A (A=Al, Ti, Au, and Pb), {tau}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{gamma}, {tau}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {tau}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}e{sup +}e{sup -}, {tau}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}P (P={pi}{sup 0}, {eta} and {eta}{sup '}), {tau}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}V (V={rho}{sup 0}, {omega} and {phi}), {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{gamma}, {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup +}e{sup -}, {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}P, {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}V, {tau}{sup +}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}e{sup -} and {tau}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup +}{mu}{sup -}. It is shown that large parity asymmetries and time-reversal asymmetries are allowed in {mu}{sup +}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup +}e{sup -}. For {tau} lepton flavor violation processes, sizable asymmetries are possible reflecting characteristic chirality structure of lepton flavor violating interactions in this model.

  6. Measurement of the Parity Violating Asymmetry in Elastic Electron Scattering off 208Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, Jonathan

    2014-09-01

    The Lead Radius Experiment (PREX) was carried out in order to provide a model-independent measurement of the RMS radius √<$2\\atop{n}$> of the neutron distribution in the 208Pb nucleus. The parity-violating scattering asymmetry for longitudinally polarized 1.06 GeV electrons from an unpolarized 208Pb target was measured at Q2 = 0.00880 GeV2. This measurement was performed by the PREX collaboration in Hall A at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, VA, between March and June, 2010. The electron detectors used in this measurement were designed and fabricated by University of Massachusetts-Amherst and Smith College. The resulting parity-violating asymmetry was measured as APV = 656±60(stat.)±14(sys.) ppb. This asymmetry extrapolates to a difference in radii between the nuclear neutron and proton distributions of √<$2\\atop{n}$>-√<$2\\atop{p}$>=0.33$+0.16\\atop{-0.18}$ fm.

  7. Recent Results in Parity-Violating Electron Scattering at Jefferson Lab: PREX and HAPPEX-III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paschke, Kent

    2011-04-01

    The parity-violating asymmetry APV in electron scattering from the 208Pb nucleus is cleanly sensitive to the neutron radius Rn. A precision measurement of Rn would have important implications for the understanding of nuclear structure, and be a powerful constaint on the symmetry energy Sν(n) of neutron-rich nuclear matter, including neutron stars. The PREX collaboration has completed a first run, measuring Rn to a precision of ~ 2 . 5 %. The measurement of APV in electron-proton scattering is sensitive to vector form-factors associated with an intrinsic strange quark content of the nucleon. While at one time such contributions were considered to be potentially large, a world-wide program of parity-violation measurements has constrained these form-factors to be smaller than a few percent of the electric and magnetic form-factors of the proton at low momentum-transfer. HAPPEX-III has recently completed a measurement to improve the precision of this constaint at Q2 ~ 0 . 6GeV2 , a region in which previous experiments had indicated the possibility of intriguingly large strange contributions. Results from each experiment, and prospects for more precise Rn measurements, will be discussed. On behalf of the HAPPEX Collaboration and PREX Collaboration.

  8. The effective chiral Lagrangian from dimension-six parity and time-reversal violation

    SciTech Connect

    Vries, J. de; Mereghetti, E.; Timmermans, R.G.E.; Kolck, U. van

    2013-11-15

    We classify the parity- and time-reversal-violating operators involving quark and gluon fields that have effective dimension six: the quark electric dipole moment, the quark and gluon chromo-electric dipole moments, and four four-quark operators. We construct the effective chiral Lagrangian with hadronic and electromagnetic interactions that originate from them, which serves as the basis for calculations of low-energy observables. The form of the effective interactions depends on the chiral properties of these operators. We develop a power-counting scheme and calculate within this scheme, as an example, the parity- and time-reversal-violating pion–nucleon form factor. We also discuss the electric dipole moments of the nucleon and light nuclei. -- Highlights: •Classification of T-odd dimension-six sources based on impact on observables. •Building of the chiral Lagrangian for each dimension-six source. •Calculation of the PT-odd pion–nucleon form factor for each source. •Discussion of hadronic EDMs for each source and comparison with the theta term.

  9. Towards an Atomic Parity Violation Measurement with Laser Trapped Francium at ISAC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collister, R.; Tandecki, M.; Gwinner, G.; Zhang, J.; Orozco, L.; Behr, J. A.; Pearson, M. R.; Gomez-Garcia, E.; Aubin, S.

    2012-10-01

    The neutral atom trap for parity violation measurements at TRIUMF has recently accepted its first radioactive beam. The longest lived francium isotopes have half-lives of minutes, requiring us to produce them with the online mass separator of the ISAC facility. The ion beam is embedded into a catcher made of yttrium foil where it is neutralized. Subsequently, the foil is rotated and heated to release a pulse of atomic francium into the laser trap cell. Francium isotopes 207, 209 and 221 have successfully been cooled and confined in a magneto-optical trap, a crucial first step for later experiments. The next online measurements are planned for November 2012 where two physics goals will be pursued. Firstly, the hyperfine anomaly will be probed via high precision spectroscopy on the atomic D1 transition in order to investigate the nuclear magnetization distribution. This will be followed by ionization cross-section measurements from the 7p3/2 state to evaluate this as a potential problematic trap loss mechanism for future parity violation measurements.

  10. Development of a Hydrogen Møller Polarimeter for Precision Parity-Violating Electron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gray, Valerie M.

    2013-10-01

    Parity-violating electron scattering experiments allow for testing the Standard Model at low energy accelerators. Future parity-violating electron scattering experiments, like the P2 experiment at the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz, Germany, and the MOLLER and SoLID experiments at Jefferson Lab will measure observables predicted by the Standard Model to high precision. In order to make these measurements, we will need to determine the polarization of the electron beam to sub-percent precision. The present way of measuring the polarization, with Møller scattering in iron foils or using Compton laser backscattering, will not easily be able to reach this precision. The novel Hydrogen Møller Polarimeter presents a non-invasive way to measure the electron polarization by scattering the electron beam off of atomic hydrogen gas polarized in a 7 Tesla solenoidal magnetic trap. This apparatus is expected to be operational by 2016 in Mainz. Currently, simulations of the polarimeter are used to develop the detection system at College of William & Mary, while the hydrogen trap and superconducting solenoid magnet are being developed at the Johannes Gutenberg University, Mainz. I will discuss the progress of the design and development of this novel polarimeter system. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1206053.

  11. Parity Violation Inelastic Scattering Experiments at 6 GeV and 12 GeV Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Sulkosky, Vincent A.; et. al.,

    2015-03-01

    We report on the measurement of parity-violating asymmetries in the deep inelastic scattering and nucleon resonance regions using inclusive scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from an unpolarized deuterium target. The effective weak couplings C$_{2q}$ are accessible through the deep-inelastic scattering measurements. Here we report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry, which yields a determination of 2C$_{2u}$ - C$_{2d}$ with an improved precision of a factor of five relative to the previous result. This result indicates evidence with 95% confidence that the 2C$_{2u}$ - C$_{2d}$ is non-zero. This experiment also provides the first parity-violation data covering the whole resonance region, which provide constraints on nucleon resonance models. Finally, the program to extend these measurements at Jefferson Lab in the 12 GeV era using the Solenoidal Large Intensity Device was also discussed.

  12. Parity- and Time-Reversal-Invariance-Violating Nucleon-Nucleon Interactions in the Large-N_c Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Matthias R.

    2017-03-01

    Violations of parity (P) and time reversal invariance (T) in few-nucleon systems provide interesting tests of our understanding of the Standard Model as well as sensitive probes of Beyond-the-Standard-Model physics. Because of the small size of the symmetry-violating effects, experimental constraints on symmetry-violating nucleon-nucleon interactions are currently weak, if they exist at all. We analyze both P-violating T-conserving and P-violating T-violating nucleon-nucleon interactions in terms of the large-N_c expansion of QCD to provide additional theoretical constraints. This analysis leads to a hierarchy of terms in symmetry-violating potentials, establishes relations between couplings, and helps to delineate the terms that should be most important in phenomenological applications.

  13. Outcome from spontaneous [ital CP] violation for [ital B] decays

    SciTech Connect

    Ackley, A.W.; Frampton, P.H. ); Kayser, B. ); Leung, C.N. )

    1994-09-01

    In the aspon model solution of the strong [ital CP] problem, there is a gauged U(1) symmetry, spontaneously broken by the same vacuum expectation value which breaks [ital CP], whose massive gauge boson provides an additional mechanism of weak [ital CP] violation. We calculate the [ital CP] asymmetries in [ital B] decays for the aspon model and show that they are typically smaller than those predicted from the standard model. A linear relation between the [ital CP] asymmetries of different decay processes is obtained.

  14. Spontaneous Lorentz violation: the case of infrared QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandran, A. P.; Kürkçüoǧlu, S.; de Queiroz, A. R.; Vaidya, S.

    2015-02-01

    It is by now clear that the infrared sector of quantum electrodynamics (QED) has an intriguingly complex structure. Based on earlier pioneering work on this subject, two of us recently proposed a simple modification of QED by constructing a generalization of the charge group of QED to the "Sky" group incorporating the well-known spontaneous Lorentz violation due to infrared photons, but still compatible in particular with locality (Balachandran and Vaidya, Eur Phys J Plus 128:118, 2013). It was shown that the "Sky" group is generated by the algebra of angle-dependent charges and a study of its superselection sectors has revealed a manifest description of spontaneous breaking of the Lorentz symmetry. We further elaborate this approach here and investigate in some detail the properties of charged particles dressed by the infrared photons. We find that Lorentz violation due to soft photons may be manifestly codified in an angle-dependent fermion mass, modifying therefore the fermion dispersion relations. The fact that the masses of the charged particles are not Lorentz invariant affects their spin content, and time dilation formulas for decays should also get corrections.

  15. Planned Measurement of Nucleon-Nucleon Parity Violation in the Capture of Polarized Neutrons on Hydgrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chupp, Timothy

    1999-10-01

    A major experimental effort is underway to measure the parity violating asymmetry in gamma emission on the capture of polarized cold neutrons on parahydrogen. The experiment will take place at LANSCE at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. A large area pulsed spallation source neutron beam will be polarized by a ^3He spin filter. Spin transport and a novel RF spin flipper provide control of the neutron spin incident on a parahydrogen target. An array of gamma detectors surrounding the target will detect the neutron capture rate in ``current mode.'' Vacuum photodiodes, insensitive to magnetic fields will be used. Development of every aspect of the experimental set up is proceeding, and several test runs have successfully demonstrated sub-system concepts. Experiment design includes consideration of a host of false systematic effects. The expected sensitivity should provide a 10% measurement of the asymmetry assuming the best DDH values for the weak nucleon-pion coupling constants.

  16. Single-Top-Squark Production via R -Parity-Violating Supersymmetric Couplings in Hadron Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Edmond L.; Harris, B. W.; Sullivan, Z.

    1999-11-29

    Single-top-squark production via qq{sup '}{yields}t(tilde sign) {sub 1} probes R -parity-violating extensions of the minimal supersymmetric standard model through the {lambda}{sup ''}{sub 3ij} couplings. For masses in the range 180-325 GeV, and {lambda}{sup ''}{sub 3ij}>0.02- 0.06 , we show that discovery of the top squark is possible with 2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity at run II of the Fermilab Tevatron. The bound on {lambda}{sup ''}{sub 3ij} can be reduced by up to 1 order of magnitude with existing data from run I, and by 2 orders of magnitude at run II if the top squark is not found. (c) 1999 The American Physical Society.

  17. Laser-cooled RaF as a promising candidate to measure molecular parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Isaev, T. A.; Berger, R.; Hoekstra, S.

    2010-11-15

    The parameter W{sub a}, which characterizes nuclear-spin-dependent parity violation (PV) in the molecular spin-rotational Hamiltonian, was computed with a quasirelativistic Hartree-Fock approach for radium fluoride (RaF) and found to be one of the largest absolute values predicted so far. The peculiar electronic structure of RaF leads to highly diagonal Franck-Condon matrices between the energetically lowest two electronic states, which qualifies RaF for direct laser cooling. A subset of diatomic molecules with a wide range of internal structures suitable for this cooling technique is also indicated. As trapped cold molecules offer superior coherence times, RaF can be considered promising for high-precision experiments aimed at molecular PV.

  18. Computation of neutrino masses in R-parity violating supersymmetry: SOFTSUSY3.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, B. C.; Kom, C. H.; Hanussek, M.

    2012-03-01

    The program SOFTSUSY can calculate tree-level neutrino masses in the R-parity violating minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with real couplings. At tree-level, only one neutrino acquires a mass, in contradiction with neutrino oscillation data. Here, we describe an extension to the SOFTSUSY program which includes one-loop R-parity violating effects' contributions to neutrino masses and mixing. Including the one-loop effects refines the radiative electroweak symmetry breaking calculation, and may result in up to three massive, mixed neutrinos. This paper serves as a manual to the neutrino mass prediction mode of the program, detailing the approximations and conventions used. Program summaryProgram title: SOFTSUSY Catalogue identifier: ADPM_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADPM_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 93 291 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 288 618 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, Fortran Computer: Personal computer Operating system: Tested on Linux 4.x Word size: 32 bits Classification: 11.1, 11.6 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADPM_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181 (2010) 232 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Calculation of neutrino masses and the neutrino mixing matrix at one-loop level in the R-parity violating minimal supersymmetric standard model. The solution to the renormalisation group equations must be consistent with a high or weak-scale boundary condition on supersymmetry breaking parameters and R-parity violating parameters, as well as a weak-scale boundary condition on gauge couplings, Yukawa couplings and the Higgs potential parameters. Solution method: Nested iterative algorithm

  19. Contributions From yZ Box Diagrams to Parity Violating Elastic e-p Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin Rislow, Carl Carlson

    2011-06-01

    Parity-violating (PV) elastic electron-proton scattering measures Q-weak for the proton, Q{sub W}{sup p}. To extract Q{sub W}{sup p} from data, all radiative corrections must be well-known. Recently, disagreement on the {gamma}Z box contribution to Q{sub W}{sup p} has prompted the need for further analysis of this term. Here, we support one choice of a debated factor, go beyond the previously assumed equality of electromagnetic and {gamma}Z structure functions, and find an analytic result for one of the {gamma}Z box integrals. Our numerical evaluation of the {gamma}Z box is in agreement within errors with previous reports, albeit somewhat larger in central value, and is within the uncertainty requirements of current experiments.

  20. Highly Forbidden Transitions in Alkalis: Preparations for a Parity Violation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Claudia

    Preparatory steps for the experimental investigation of the highly forbidden 5s → 6s transition in rubidium using an atom trap and laser cooling are reported. A magneto-optical trap (MOT) has been assembled including saturation spectroscopy and a dichroic vapor laser lock. A frequency-doubled diode laser system has been installed to perform the spectroscopy of the forbidden transition with cold Rb atoms in the trap. The properties of the ns → n's transition in the presence of an external electric field have been investigated theoretically. A first measurement will be exploring the Stark-induced transition amplitude and the very faint magnetic dipole amplitude. The rubidium experiment is a precursor study for a long-term project at TRIUMF, Canada's National Laboratory for nuclear and particle physics, to measure atomic parity violation in the equivalent 7s → 8s transition in francium, the heaviest alkali atom which has no stable isotopes.

  1. A Clean Measurement of the Neutron Skin of 208Pb Through Parity Violating Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Riad Suleiman

    2003-07-01

    The difference between the neutron radius Rn of a heavy nucleus and the proton radius Rp is believed to be on the order of several percent. This qualitative feature of nuclei, which is essentially a neutron skin, has proven to be elusive to pin down experimentally in a rigorous fashion. A new Jefferson Lab experiment will measure the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from 208Pb. Since the Z-boson couples mainly to neutrons, this asymmetry provides a measure of the size of Rn that can be interpreted with as much confidence as the traditional electron scattering data. The projected experimental precision corresponds to a 1% determination of Rn, which will have a big impact on nuclear theory and its application to neutron rich matter such as neutron stars.

  2. Parity Violation in Neutrino Transport and the Origin of Pulsar Kicks: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Dong; Qian, Yong-Zhong

    1998-07-01

    In the Letter ``Parity Violation in Neutrino Transport and the Origin of Pulsar Kicks'' by D. Lai and Y.-Z. Qian (ApJ, 495, L103 [1998]), at the beginning of § 3, a citation of Horowitz & Li (1997; now updated to Phys. Rev. Lett., 80, 3694 [1998]) should be added to the end of the sentence ``However, the cumulative effect due to multiple scatterings can enhance the asymmetry in neutrino emission.'' We have recently realized that in the bulk interior of the neutron star, where local thermodynamic equilibrium applies to a good approximation, detailed balance requires that there be no cumulative effect from multiple scatterings. Enhancement of neutrino emission asymmetry is obtained only after neutrinos thermally decouple from proto-neutron star matter. Therefore, our Letter overestimated the neutrino emission asymmetry and the resulting pulsar kicks. More details will be presented in a future paper (P. Arras & F. Lai, Phys. Rev. Lett., submitted [1998]).

  3. Global analysis of parity-violating asymmetry data for elastic electron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Jiménez, R.; Caballero, J. A.; Donnelly, T. W.

    2014-08-01

    We perform a statistical analysis of the full set of parity-violating asymmetry data for elastic electron scattering including the most recent high precision measurement from Q-weak. Given the basis of the present analysis, our estimates appear to favor nonzero vector strangeness, specifically, positive (negative) values for the electric (magnetic) strange form factors. We also provide an accurate estimate of the axial-vector nucleon form factor at zero momentum transfer, GAep(0). Our study shows GAep(0) to be importantly reduced with respect to the currently accepted value. We also find our analysis of data to be compatible with the Standard Model values for the weak charges of the proton and neutron.

  4. The parity-violating asymmetry in the ^3He(n,p)^3H reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viviani, Michele

    2010-11-01

    In this contribution, we report for a theoretical study of the longitudinal asymmetry induced by parity-violating (PV) nucleon-nucleon potential in the charge-exchange reaction ^3He(n,p)^3H. Such an experiment is in an advanced stage of planning at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The matrix elements involving PV transitions are obtained in first-order perturbation theory in the hadronic weak-interaction potential, while those connecting states of the same parity are derived from solutions of the strong-interaction Hamiltonian with the hyperspherical-harmonics (HH) method, fully accounting for the coupled-channel nature of the scattering problem. We also present predictions for the n-^3He scattering lengths and compare them with the available measured values. The longitudinally asymmetry is finally calculated for vanishing neutron incident energies, in correspondence of two models of PV nucleon-nucleon interaction, the so-called DDH potential, and the one derived in pionless EFT.

  5. Parity-Violating Neutron Spin Rotation in Hydrogen and Deuterium and the Predictive Power of EFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesshammer, Harald W.

    2013-10-01

    One of the least-explored sectors of the Standard Model is the weak part of the nuclear force. Experiments on hadronic parity-violation (PV) at low energies require one comprehensive theoretical framework with reliable error-estimates to: check data consistency; subtract binding effects; and extract the PV interaction strengths. ``Pion-less'' Effective Field Theory is such a method with minimal theoretical bias. Different PV parameters are probed in np and nd spin rotation. Using naïve dimensional analysis, the signal for standard target densities is. An estimate of the numerical and systematic uncertainties of our calculations indicates excellent convergence. We also show that PV 3-nucleon interactions are suppressed in the nd -system, despite the non-perturbative renormalisation of parity-conserving 3-nucleon interactions. Therefore, few-nucleon experiments can dis-entangle PV 2-nucleon interactions at the 10%-level without introducing new unknowns. Supported in part by the US National Science Foundation under CAREER award PHY- 0645498, by the US Department of Energy under contract DE-FG02-95ER-40907, and by University Facilitating Funds of the George Washington University.

  6. Steps towards molecular parity violation in axially chiral molecules. I. Theory for allene and 1,3-difluoroallene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottselig, Michael; Quack, Martin

    2005-08-01

    In view of exploring possibilities for an experimental investigation of molecular parity violation we report quantum-chemical calculations of the parity-conserving and parity-violating potentials in the framework of electroweak quantum chemistry in allene C3H4 and 1,3-difluoroallene C3H2F2, which is nonplanar and axially chiral in the electronic ground state but expected to be nearly planar and achiral in several electronically excited states. The parity-violating potentials Epv for allene and 1,3-difluoroallene calculated with the multiconfiguration linear-response (MC-LR) approach of Berger and Quack [J. Chem. Phys. 112, 3148 (2000)] show qualitatively similar behavior as a function of torsional angle τ with maximum values of about 0.5pJmol-1 for C3H4 and 2pJmol-1 for C3H2F2. However, in the latter case they are asymmetrically shifted around τ =90°, with a nonzero value at the chiral equilibrium geometry resulting in a parity-violating energy difference between enantiomers ΔpvE=Epv(P)-Epv(M)=1.2pJmol-1 (equivalent to about 10-13cm-1). The calculated barrier heights corresponding to the nonrigid (multiple, and in part chiral) transition states in 1,3-difluoroallene fall in the range of 180-200kJmol-1. These high barriers result in hypothetical tunneling splittings much smaller than ΔpvE and thus parity violation dominates over tunneling for the stereomutation dynamics in 1,3-difluoroallene. Therefore, ΔpvE is predicted to be a spectroscopically measurable energy difference. Two of the lower excited electronic states of C3H2F2 (A1 and A3) are calculated to be planar or quasiplanar, allowing, in principle, for spectroscopic state selection of states of well-defined parity. The results are discussed in relation to possible schemes of measuring parity violation in chiral molecules.

  7. An alternative route to detect parity violating energy differences through Bose-Einstein condensation of chiral molecules.

    PubMed

    Bargueño, Pedro; Pérez de Tudela, Ricardo; Miret-Artés, Salvador; Gonzalo, Isabel

    2011-01-21

    Interactions which do not conserve parity might influence chiral compounds giving rise to a parity violating energy difference (PVED) that might have affected the evolution towards homochirality. However, this tiny effect predicted by electroweak-quantum chemistry calculations is easily masked by thermal effects, making it desirable to reach cold regimes in the laboratory. As an alternative route to the detection of the PVED, we study a simplified model of Bose-Einstein condensation of a sample of non-interacting chiral molecules, showing that it leads to a nonzero optical activity of the condensate and also to a subcritical temperature in the heat capacity, due to the internal structure of the molecule characterized by tunneling and parity violation. This predicted singular behavior found for the specific heat, below the condensation temperature, might shed some light on the existence of the thus far elusive PVED between enantiomers.

  8. R-parity violating effects in top quark flavor-changing neutral-current production at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Junjie; Heng Zhaoxia; Yang Jinmin; Wu Lei

    2009-03-01

    In the minimal supersymmetric model the R-parity violating top quark interactions, which are so far weakly constrained, can induce various flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) productions for the top quark at the large hadron collider (LHC). In this work we assume the presence of the B-violating couplings and examine their contributions to the FCNC productions proceeding through the parton processes cg{yields}t, gg{yields}tc, cg{yields}t{gamma}, cg{yields}tZ and cg{yields}th. We find that all these processes can be greatly enhanced relative to the R-parity preserving predictions. In the parameter space allowed by current experiments, all the production channels except cg{yields}th can reach the 3{sigma} sensitivity, in contrast to the R-parity preserving case in which only cg{yields}t can reach the 3{sigma} sensitivity.

  9. Probing Novel Properties of Nucleons and Nuclei via Parity Violating Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Mercado, Luis

    2012-05-01

    This thesis reports on two experiments conducted by the HAPPEx (Hall A Proton Parity Experiment) collaboration at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. For both, the weak neutral current interaction (WNC, mediated by the Z0 boson) is used to probe novel properties of hadronic targets. The WNC interaction amplitude is extracted by measuring the parity-violating asymmetry in the elastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons o unpolarized target hadrons. HAPPEx-III, conducted in the Fall of 2009, used a liquid hydrogen target at a momentum transfer of Q2 = 0.62 GeV2. The measured asymmetry was used to set new constraints on the contribution of strange quark form factors (GsE,M ) to the nucleon electromagnetic form factors. A value of APV = -23.803±} 0.778 (stat)± 0.359 (syst) ppm resulted in GsE + 0.517GsM = 0.003± 0.010 (stat)± 0.004 (syst)± 0.009 (FF). PREx, conducted in the Spring of 2010, used a polarized electron beam on a 208Pb target at a momentum transfer of Q2 = 0.009 GeV2. This parity-violating asymmetry can be used to obtain a clean measurement of the root-mean-square radius of the neutrons in the 208Pb nucleus. The Z0 boson couples mainly to neutrons; the neutron weak charge is much larger than that of the proton. The value of this asymmetry is at the sub-ppm level and has a projected experimental fractional precision of 3%. We will describe the accelerator setup used to set controls on helicity-correlated beam asymmetries and the analysis methods for finding the raw asymmetry for HAPPEx-III. We will also discuss in some detail the preparations to meet the experimental challenges associated with measuring such a small asymmetry with the degree of precision required for PREx.

  10. Emergent spin-valley-orbital physics by spontaneous parity breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-10-01

    The spin-orbit coupling in the absence of spatial inversion symmetry plays an important role in realizing intriguing electronic states in solids, such as topological insulators and unconventional superconductivity. Usually, the inversion symmetry breaking is inherent in the lattice structures, and hence, it is not easy to control these interesting properties by external parameters. We here theoretically investigate the possibility of generating the spin-orbital entanglement by spontaneous electronic ordering caused by electron correlations. In particular, we focus on the centrosymmetric lattices with local asymmetry at the lattice sites, e.g. zigzag, honeycomb, and diamond structures. In such systems, conventional staggered orders, such as charge order and antiferromagnetic order, break the inversion symmetry and activate the antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling, which is hidden in a sublattice-dependent form in the paramagnetic state. Considering a minimal two-orbital model on a honeycomb structure, we scrutinize the explicit form of the antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling for all the possible staggered charge, spin, orbital, and spin-orbital orders. We show that the complete table is useful for understanding of spin-valley-orbital physics, such as spin and valley splitting in the electronic band structure and generalized magnetoelectric responses in not only spin but also orbital and spin-orbital channels, reflecting in peculiar magnetic, elastic, and optical properties in solids.

  11. High Resolution FTIR Spectroscopy of Trisulfane Hsssh: a Candidate for Detecting Parity Violation in Chiral Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Sieghard; Bolotova, Irina; Chen, Ziqiu; Fábri, Csaba; Quack, Martin; Seyfang, Georg; Zindel, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    The measurement of the parity violating energy difference Δ_{pv}{E} between the enantiomers of chiral molecules is among the major current challenges in high resolution spectroscopy and physical-chemical stereochemistry. Theoretical predictions have recently identified dithiine^{b} and trisulfane as suitable candidates for such experiments. We report the first successful high-resolution analyses of the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of trisulfane. A band centered at 861.0292 cm^{-1} can be assigned unambiguously to the chiral trans conformer by means of ground state combination differences in comparison with known pure rotational spectra. A second band near 864.698 cm^{-1} is tentatively assigned to the cis conformer by comparison with theory. M. Quack , Fundamental Symmetries and Symmetry Violations from High-resolution Spectroscopy, Handbook of High Resolution Spectroscopy, M. Quack and F. Merkt eds.,John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, New York, 2001, vol. 1, ch. 18, pp. 659-722. S. Albert, I. Bolotova, Z. Chen, C. Fábri, L. Horný, M. Quack, G. Seyfang and D. Zindel, Phys.Chem.Chem.Phys.18, 21976-21993 (2016). C. Fábri, L. Horný and M. Quack, ChemPhysChem16, 3584-3589 (2015). M. Liedtke, K. M. T. Yamada, G. Winnewisser and J. Hahn, J.Mol.Struct.413, 265-270 (1997).

  12. Parity violation constraints using cosmic microwave background polarization spectra from 2006 and 2007 observations by the QUaD polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Wu, E Y S; Ade, P; Bock, J; Bowden, M; Brown, M L; Cahill, G; Castro, P G; Church, S; Culverhouse, T; Friedman, R B; Ganga, K; Gear, W K; Gupta, S; Hinderks, J; Kovac, J; Lange, A E; Leitch, E; Melhuish, S J; Memari, Y; Murphy, J A; Orlando, A; Piccirillo, L; Pryke, C; Rajguru, N; Rusholme, B; Schwarz, R; O'Sullivan, C; Taylor, A N; Thompson, K L; Turner, A H; Zemcov, M

    2009-04-24

    We constrain parity-violating interactions to the surface of last scattering using spectra from the QUaD experiment's second and third seasons of observations by searching for a possible systematic rotation of the polarization directions of cosmic microwave background photons. We measure the rotation angle due to such a possible "cosmological birefringence" to be 0.55 degrees +/-0.82 degrees (random) +/-0.5 degrees (systematic) using QUaD's 100 and 150 GHz temperature-curl and gradient-curl spectra over the spectra over the multipole range 200violating interactions to <2 x 10;{-43} GeV (68% confidence limit). This is the best constraint to date on electrodynamic parity violation on cosmological scales.

  13. Parity Violation Constraints Using Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Spectra from 2006 and 2007 Observations by the QUaD Polarimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, E. Y. S.; Church, S.; Hinderks, J.; Rusholme, B.; Thompson, K. L.; Ade, P.; Gear, W. K.; Gupta, S.; Rajguru, N.; Turner, A. H.; Bock, J.; Leitch, E.; Bowden, M.; Brown, M. L.; Cahill, G.; Murphy, J. A.; O'Sullivan, C.; Castro, P. G.; Culverhouse, T.; Friedman, R. B.

    2009-04-24

    We constrain parity-violating interactions to the surface of last scattering using spectra from the QUaD experiment's second and third seasons of observations by searching for a possible systematic rotation of the polarization directions of cosmic microwave background photons. We measure the rotation angle due to such a possible 'cosmological birefringence' to be 0.55 deg. {+-}0.82 deg. (random) {+-}0.5 deg. (systematic) using QUaD's 100 and 150 GHz temperature-curl and gradient-curl spectra over the spectra over the multipole range 200violating interactions to <2x10{sup -43} GeV (68% confidence limit). This is the best constraint to date on electrodynamic parity violation on cosmological scales.

  14. The Question of Absolute Space and Time Directions in Relation to Molecular Chirality, Parity Violation, and Biomolecular Homochirality

    SciTech Connect

    Quack, Martin

    2001-03-21

    The questions of the absolute directions of space and time or the 'observability' of absolute time direction as well as absolute handedness - left or right - are related to the fundamental symmetries of physics C, P, T as well as their combinations, in particular CPT, and their violations, such as parity violation. At the same time there is a relation to certain still open questions in chemistry concerning the fundamental physical-chemical principles of molecular chirality and in biochemistry concerning the selection of homochirality in evolution. In the lecture we shall introduce the concepts and then report new theoretical results from our work on parity violation in chiral molecules, showing order of magnitude increases with respect to previously accepted values. We discuss as well our current experimental efforts. We shall briefly mention the construction of an absolute molecular clock.

  15. The Question of Absolute Space and Time Directions in Relation to Molecular Chirality, Parity Violation, and Biomolecular Homochirality

    SciTech Connect

    Quack, Martin

    2001-03-21

    The questions of the absolute directions of space and time or the “observability” of absolute time direction as well as absolute handedness-left or right- are related to the fundamental symmetries of physics C, P, T as well as their combinations, in particular CPT, and their violations, such as parity violation. At the same time there is a relation to certain still open questions in chemistry concerning the fundamental physical- chemical principles of molecular chirality and in biochemistry concerning the selection of homochirality in evolution. In the lecture we shall introduce the concepts and then report new theoretical results from our work on parity violation in chiral molecules, showing order of magnitude increases with respect to previously accepted values. We discus as well our current experimental efforts. We shall briefly mention the construction of an absolute molecular clock.

  16. Probing the Strangeness Content of the Proton and the Neutron Radius of Lead-208 using Parity-Violating Electron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silwal, Rupesh

    Precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in electron-hadron scattering has been an extremely useful tool to study the structure of the hadrons. This thesis reports work on two such measurements: the measurement of the strange form-factors (FFs), GsE and GsM , by the Hall A Proton Parity Experiment (HAPPEX)-III collaboration, and the first direct measurement of the nucleon skin thickness in a heavy nucleus by the Lead (208Pb) Radius Experiment (PREX) collaboration. In HAPPEX-III, the parity-violating cross-section asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from unpolarized protons was measured at an average four-momentum transfer squared, , of 0.624 GeV2. A parity-violating asymmetry, A PV, of -23.80 +/- 0.78(stat) +/- 0.36(syst) parts-per-million (ppm) was measured, which corresponds to a linear combination of the strange FFs, GsE+0.517GsM = 0.003 +/- 0.010(stat) +/- 0.004(syst) +/-0.009(ff). The errors stat and syst are experimental statistical and systematic errors respectively. The error ff arises due to limits on precision of the electromagnetic FFs and radiative corrections. This result is consistent with zero contribution from the strange quarks to the proton FFs. Combined with the existing data on strange FFs, this result constrains the contribution of the strange FFs to the nucleon FFs to a few percent of the nucleon FFs. In PREX, the parity-violating asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from unpolarized 208Pb was measured at an average of 0.0088 GeV2. A parity-violating asymmetry, APV, of 656 +/- 60(stat) +/- 14(syst) parts-per-billion (ppb) was measured, which corresponds to a difference between the neutron and proton distribution radii in the 208Pb nucleus of Rn - R p = 0.33+0.16-0.18 fm. This result is the first electroweak evidence supporting the existence of a neutron skin in a neutron-rich nucleus. One class of systematic uncertainty that both of these experiments were sensitive to is the

  17. Constraints and stability in vector theories with spontaneous Lorentz violation

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Robert; Gagne, Nolan L.; Potting, Robertus; Vrublevskis, Arturs

    2008-06-15

    Vector theories with spontaneous Lorentz violation, known as bumblebee models, are examined in flat spacetime using a Hamiltonian constraint analysis. In some of these models, Nambu-Goldstone modes appear with properties similar to photons in electromagnetism. However, depending on the form of the theory, additional modes and constraints can appear that have no counterparts in electromagnetism. An examination of these constraints and additional degrees of freedom, including their nonlinear effects, is made for a variety of models with different kinetic and potential terms, and the results are compared with electromagnetism. The Hamiltonian constraint analysis also permits an investigation of the stability of these models. For certain bumblebee theories with a timelike vector, suitable restrictions of the initial-value solutions are identified that yield ghost-free models with a positive Hamiltonian. In each case, the restricted phase space is found to match that of electromagnetism in a nonlinear gauge.

  18. Spontaneous CP Violation in E6 GUT with horizontal symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, Nobuhiro

    2010-02-01

    We consider spontaneous CP violation in E6 grand unified theory (GUT) with horizontal symmetry and anomalous U(1)A gauge symmetry in order to solve the SUSY CP problem. To realize the sufficiently small phases of SUSY Higgs mass μ and mixing parameter B, an additional discrete symmetry is introduced. The discrete symmetry plays multiple roles in explaining various things. By the symmetry, the up-type Yukawa couplings become real, which is important in satisfying the Chromo-EDM constraints to the imaginary part of the off-diagonal elements of squark mass matrices, and the down-type Yukawa couplings become complex, which is important in obtaining the Kobayashi-Maskawa phase. Moreover, this symmetry improves the smallness of up quark mass, and reduces the number of O(1) coefficients. One of the interesting predictions is Vub˜γ4, which is quite good agreement with the measured value. This talk is based on the works in Ref. [1].

  19. Parity-Violating and Parity-Conserving Asymmetries in e->p and e->N Scattering in the Qweak Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deconinck, Wouter; Qweak Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab has made the first determination of the weak charge of the proton in elastic scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons from unpolarized protons at a momentum transfer Q2 of 0.025 (GeV/c)2. To achieve the required precision to measure the small parity-violating asymmetry of -279 parts per billion, we directed a 180 μA 85%-polarized electron beam on a 35 cm long liquid hydrogen target and integrated scattered events in eight azimuthally symmetric fused silica Cerenkov detectors. Based on 4% of the total data collected by the experiment, we find a value for the weak charge of proton in agreement with predictions of the Standard Model. To correct for the contributions from background processes, we conducted several additional parity-violating and parity-conserving asymmetry measurements with different kinematics (elastic and N --> Δ), electron polarization (longitudinal and transverse), and targets (protons, electrons, aluminum, and carbon). In many cases, these ancillary results are first or high-precision measurements as well. I will discuss the analysis and anticipated results of the main experiment with a focus on several of the ancillary results. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1405857.

  20. Search for r-parity violating supersymmetry in multilepton final states with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kaefer, Daniela

    2006-10-27

    Results obtained from a search for the trilepton signature μμℓ (with ℓ = e, or μ) are combined with two complementary searches for the trilepton signatures eeℓ and eer and interpreted in the framework of R-parity violating Supersymmetry. Pairwise, R-parity conserving production of the supersymmetric particles is assumed, followed by R-parity violating decays via an LL$\\bar{E}$-operator with one dominant coupling λ122. An LL$\\bar{E}$-operator couples two weak isospin doublet and one singlet (s)lepton fields and thus violates lepton number conservation. The data, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider Tevatron, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of ∫ L dt = 360 ± 23 pb-1. No evident is observed, while 0.41 ± 0.11(stat) ± 0.07(sys) events are expected from Standard Model processes. The resulting 95% confidence level cross section limits on new physics producing a μμℓ signature in the detector are of the order of 0.020 to 0.136 pb. They are interpreted in two different supersymmetry scenarios: the mSUGRA and the MSSM model. The corresponding lower limits on the masses of the lightest neutralino ($\\tilde{X}$$0\\atop{1}$) and the lightest chargino ($\\tilde{X}$$±\\atop{1}$ in case of the mSUGRA model are found to be in the range of: mSUGRA, μ > 0: M($\\tilde{X}$$0\\atop{1}$) ~> 115-128 GeV and M($\\tilde{X}$$±\\atop{1}$) ~> 215-241 GeV; mSUGRA, μ < 0: ($\\tilde{X}$$0\\atop{1}$) ~> 101-114 GeV and M($\\tilde{X}$$±\\atop{1}$) ~> 194-230 GeV, depending on the actual values of the model parameters: m0, m1/2, A0, tanβ, and μ. The first and second parameters provide the boundary conditions for the masses of the supersymmetric spin-0 and spin-1/2 particles, respectively, while A0 gives the universal value for the trilinear couplings at the GUT scale. The parameter tan β denotes the ratio of the vacuum expectation values of the two Higgs fields

  1. Parity-violating asymmetry in the He3(n⃗,p)H3 reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viviani, M.; Schiavilla, R.; Girlanda, L.; Kievsky, A.; Marcucci, L. E.

    2010-10-01

    The longitudinal asymmetry induced by parity-violating (PV) components in the nucleon-nucleon potential is studied in the charge-exchange reaction He3(n⃗,p)H3 at vanishing incident neutron energies. An expression for the PV observable is derived in terms of T-matrix elements for transitions from the 2S+1LJ=1S0 and 3S1 states in the incoming n-He3 channel to states with J=0 and 1 in the outgoing p-H3 channel. The T-matrix elements involving PV transitions are obtained in first-order perturbation theory in the hadronic weak-interaction potential, while those connecting states of the same parity are derived from solutions of the strong-interaction Hamiltonian with the hyperspherical-harmonics method. The coupled-channel nature of the scattering problem is fully accounted for. Results are obtained corresponding to realistic or chiral two- and three-nucleon strong-interaction potentials in combination with either the DDH or pionless EFT model for the weak-interaction potential. The asymmetries, predicted with PV pion and vector-meson coupling constants corresponding (essentially) to the DDH “best values” set, range from -9.44 to -2.48 in units of 10-8, depending on the input strong-interaction Hamiltonian. This large model dependence is a consequence of cancellations between long-range (pion) and short-range (vector-meson) contributions and is of course sensitive to the assumed values for the PV coupling constants.

  2. The parity-violating asymmetry in the 3He(n,p)3H reaction

    SciTech Connect

    M. Viviani, R. Schiavilla, L. Girlanda, A. Kievsky, L.E. Marcucci

    2010-10-01

    The longitudinal asymmetry induced by parity-violating (PV) components in the nucleon-nucleon potential is studied in the charge-exchange reaction 3He(n,p)3H at vanishing incident neutron energies. An expression for the PV observable is derived in terms of T-matrix elements for transitions from the {2S+1}L_J=1S_0 and 3S_1 states in the incoming n-3He channel to states with J=0 and 1 in the outgoing p-3H channel. The T-matrix elements involving PV transitions are obtained in first-order perturbation theory in the hadronic weak-interaction potential, while those connecting states of the same parity are derived from solutions of the strong-interaction Hamiltonian with the hyperspherical-harmonics method. The coupled-channel nature of the scattering problem is fully accounted for. Results are obtained corresponding to realistic or chiral two- and three-nucleon strong-interaction potentials in combination with either the DDH or pionless EFT model for the weak-interaction potential. The asymmetries, predicted with PV pion and vector-meson coupling constants corresponding (essentially) to the DDH "best values" set, range from -9.44 to -2.48 in units of 10^{-8}, depending on the input strong-interaction Hamiltonian. This large model dependence is a consequence of cancellations between long-range (pion) and short-range (vector-meson) contributions, and is of course sensitive to the assumed values for the PV coupling constants.

  3. Neutrino-nucleon interactions in magnetized neutron-star matter: The effects of parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Arras, P.; Lai, D.

    1999-08-01

    We study neutrino-nucleon scattering and absorption in a dense, magnetized nuclear medium. These are the most important sources of neutrino opacity governing the cooling of a proto-neutron star in the first tens of seconds after its formation. Because the weak interaction is parity violating, the absorption and scattering cross sections depend asymmetrically on the directions of the neutrino momenta with respect to the magnetic field. We develop the moment formalism of neutrino transport in the presence of such asymmetric opacities and derive explicit expressions for the neutrino flux and other angular moments of the Boltzmann transport equation. For a given neutrino species, there is a drift flux of neutrinos along the magnetic field in addition to the usual diffusive flux. This drift flux depends on the deviation of the neutrino distribution function from thermal equilibrium. Hence, despite the fact that the neutrino cross sections are asymmetric throughout the star, the asymmetric neutrino flux can be generated only in the outer region of the proto-neutron star where the neutrino distribution deviates significantly from thermal equilibrium. The deviation from equilibrium is similarly altered by the asymmetric scattering and absorption, although its magnitude will still be quite small in the interior of the star. We clarify two reasons why previous studies have led to misleading results. First, inelasticity must be included in the phase space integrals in order to satisfy detail balance. Second, nucleon recoil must be included in order to find the leading order asymmetric cross sections correctly, even though it can be ignored to leading order to get the zero field opacities. In addition to the asymmetric absorption opacity arising from nucleon polarization, we also derive the contribution of the electron (or positron) ground state Landau level. For neutrinos of energy less than a few times the temperature, this is the dominant source of asymmetric opacity. Last

  4. Parity-violating CMB correlators with non-decaying statistical anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Peloso, Marco; Shiraishi, Maresuke

    2015-07-01

    We examine the effect induced on cosmological correlators by the simultaneous breaking of parity and of statistical isotropy. As an example of this, we compute the scalar-scalar, scalar-tensor, tensor-tensor and scalar-scalar-scalar cosmological correlators in presence of the coupling Script L = f(phi) ( - 1/4 F2 + γ/4 F ~F ) between the inflaton phi and a vector field with vacuum expectation value A. For a suitably chosen function f, the energy in the vector field ρA does not decay during inflation. This results in nearly scale-invariant signatures of broken statistical isotropy and parity. Specifically, we find that the scalar-scalar correlator of primordial curvature perturbations includes a quadrupolar anisotropy, Pζ(k) = P(k)[1+g*(hat kṡÂ)2], and a (angle-averaged) scalar bispectrum that is a linear combination of the first 3 Legendre polynomials, Bζ(k1, k2, k3) = ∑L cL PL (hat k1 ṡ hat k2) P(k1) P(k2) + 2 perms , with c0:c1:c2=2-3:1 (c1≠0 is a consequence of parity violation, corresponding to the constant 0γ ≠ ). The latter is one of the main results of this paper, which provides for the first time a clear example of an inflationary model where a non-negligible c1 contribution to the bispectrum is generated. The scalar-tensor and tensor-tensor correlators induce characteristic signatures in the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature anisotropies (T) and polarization (E/B modes); namely, non-diagonal contributions to langleal1m1a*l2m2rangle, with |l1 - l2| = 1 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and |l1 - l2| = 2 in TB and EB. The latest CMB bounds on the scalar observables (g*, c0, c1 and c2), translate into the upper limit ρA / ρphi lesssim 10-9 at 0γ=. We find that the upper limit on the vector energy density becomes much more stringent as γ grows.

  5. High Resolution GHZ and Thz (ftir) Spectroscopy and Theory of Parity Violation and Tunneling for 1,2-DITHIINE (C4H4S2) as a Candidate for Measuring the Parity Violating Energy Difference Between Enantiomers of Chiral Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Sieghard; Bolotova, Irina; Chen, Ziqiu; Fábri, Csaba; Horny, Lubos; Quack, Martin; Seyfang, Georg; Zindel, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    We report high resolution spectroscopic results for 1,2-dithiine-(1,2-dithia-3,5-cyclohexadiene,C4H4S2) in the Gigahertz and Terahertz spectroscopic ranges and exploratory theoretical calculations of parity violation and tunneling processes in view of a possible experimental determination of the parity violating energy difference ΔpvE in this chiral molecule. Theory predicts that the parity violating energy difference in the ground state (ΔpvE≃11x10-11(hc) wn)is in principle measurable as it is much larger than the calculated tunneling splitting for the symmetrical potential Δ±E≃10-24(hc) wn. With a planar transition state for stereomutation at about 2500 wn tunneling splittings become appreciable above 2300 wn. This makes levels of well defined parity accessible to parity selection by available powerful infrared lasers and thus useful for one of the existing experimental approaches towards molecular parity violation. The new GHz spectra lead to greatly improved ground state rotational parameters for 1,2-dithiine. These are used as starting point for the first successful analyses of high resolution interferometric Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR, THz) spectra for the fundamentals ν17 (1308.873 wn or 39.23903 THz), ν22 (623.094 wn or 18.67989 THz) and ν3 (1544.900 wn or 46.314937 THz) for which highly accurate spectroscopic parameters are reported. The results are discussed in relation to current efforts to measure ΔpvE.a-. M. Quack , Fundamental Symmetries and Symmetry Violations from High-resolution Spectroscopy, Handbook of High Resolution Spectroscopy, M. Quack and F. Merkt eds.,John Wiley & Sons Ltd, Chichester, New York, 2001, vol. 1, ch. 18, pp. 659-722 S. Albert, I. Bolotova, Z. Chen, C. Fábri, L. Horny, M. Quack, G. Seyfang and D. Zindel,Proceedings of the 20th Symposium on Atomic, Cluster and Surface Physics (SASP 2016), Innsbruck University Press, 2016, pp. 127-130, ISBN:978-3-903122-04-8. and to be published P. Dietiker, E. Miloglyadov, M

  6. Search for top squarks in R-parity-violating supersymmetry using three or more leptons and b-tagged jets.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, C; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Luyckx, S; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Staykova, Z; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Keaveney, J; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Dildick, S; Garcia, G; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; McCartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Walsh, S; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jez, P; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Selvaggi, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Alves, G A; Correa Martins Junior, M; Martins, T; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Malek, M; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, Y; Li, Q; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Morovic, S; Tikvica, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Abdelalim, A A; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Ellithi Kamel, A; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Millischer, L; Nayak, A; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Boudoul, G; Brochet, S; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Tschudi, Y; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Calpas, B; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Klein, K; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Caudron, J; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Weber, M; Cherepanov, V; Erdogan, Y; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Lingemann, J; Nowack, A; Nugent, I M; Perchalla, L; Pooth, O; Stahl, A; Aldaya Martin, M; 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Snowball, M; Yelton, J; Zakaria, M; Gaultney, V; Hewamanage, S; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bochenek, J; Chen, J; Diamond, B; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Veeraraghavan, V; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Dorney, B; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Callner, J; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatyan, S; Kurt, P; Lacroix, F; Moon, D H; O'Brien, C; Silkworth, C; Strom, D; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Duru, F; Griffiths, S; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Sen, S; Tan, P; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Hu, G; Maksimovic, P; Swartz, M; Whitbeck, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Kenny, R P; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Wood, J S; Barfuss, A F; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Shrestha, S; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Baden, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Marionneau, M; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Peterman, A; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Bauer, G; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Dutta, V; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lai, Y S; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Velicanu, D; Wolf, R; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Franzoni, G; Gude, A; Haupt, J; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Sasseville, M; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Cremaldi, L M; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Keller, J; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Meier, F; Snow, G R; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Jain, S; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Wan, Z; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Massironi, A; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Anastassov, A; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Lusito, L; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Berry, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolb, J; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Antonelli, L; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Smith, G; Vuosalo, C; Williams, G; Winer, B L; Wolfe, H; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Halyo, V; Hebda, P; Hegeman, J; Hunt, A; Jindal, P; Koay, S A; Lopes Pegna, D; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Raval, A; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zenz, S C; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Alagoz, E; Benedetti, D; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Everett, A; Hu, Z; Jones, M; Jung, K; Koybasi, O; Kress, M; Leonardo, N; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Vidal Marono, M; Wang, F; Xu, L; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Guragain, S; Parashar, N; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Miner, D C; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Malik, S; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Rekovic, V; Robles, J; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Seitz, C; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Rose, K; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Bouhali, O; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Toback, D; Akchurin, N; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Jeong, C; Kovitanggoon, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sakharov, A; Belknap, D A; Borrello, L; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Friis, E; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Kaadze, K; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Mozer, M U; Ojalvo, I; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Swanson, J

    2013-11-27

    A search for anomalous production of events with three or more isolated leptons and bottom-quark jets produced in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV is presented. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb(-1) collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2012. No excess above the standard model expectations is observed. The results are interpreted in the context of supersymmetric models with signatures that have low missing transverse energy arising from light top-squark pair production with R-parity-violating decays of the lightest supersymmetric particle. In two models with different R-parity-violating couplings, top squarks are excluded below masses of 1020 GeV and 820 GeV when the lightest supersymmetric particle has a mass of 200 GeV.

  7. New Measurement of Parity Violation in Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering and Implications for Strange Form Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Konrad Aniol; David Armstrong; Todd Averett; Maud Baylac; Etienne Burtin; John Calarco; Gordon Cates; Christian Cavata; Zhengwei Chai; C. Chang; Jian-Ping Chen; Eugene Chudakov; Evaristo Cisbani; Marius Coman; Daniel Dale; Alexandre Deur; Pibero Djawotho; Martin Epstein; Stephanie Escoffier; Lars Ewell; Nicolas Falletto; John Finn; A. Fleck; Bernard Frois; Salvatore Frullani; Juncai Gao; Franco Garibaldi; Ashot Gasparian; G. M. Gerstner; Ronald Gilman; Oleksandr Glamazdin; Javier Gomez; Viktor Gorbenko; Jens-ole Hansen; F. Hersman; Douglas Higinbotham; Richard Holmes; Maurik Holtrop; Thomas Humensky; Sebastien Incerti; Mauro Iodice; Cornelis De Jager; Johann Jardillier; Xiaodong Jiang; Mark Jones; J. Jorda; Christophe Jutier; W. Kahl; James Kelly; Donghee Kim; M. -J. Kim; Minsuk Kim; Ioannis Kominis; Edgar Kooijman; Kevin Kramer; Krishna Kumar; Michael Kuss; John LeRose; Raffaele De Leo; M. Leuschner; David Lhuillier; Meihua Liang; Nilanga Liyanage; R. Lourie; Richard Madey; Sergey Malov; Demetrius Margaziotis; Frederic Marie; Pete Markowitz; Jacques Martino; Peter Mastromarino; Kathy McCormick; Justin McIntyre; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Robert Michaels; Brian Milbrath; Gerald Miller; Joseph Mitchell; Ludyvine Morand; Damien Neyret; Gerassimos Petratos; Roman Pomatsalyuk; John Price; David Prout; Thierry Pussieux; Gilles Quemener; Ronald Ransome; David Relyea; Yves Roblin; Julie Roche; Gary Rutledge; Paul Rutt; Marat Rvachev; Franck Sabatie; Arunava Saha; Paul Souder; Marcus Spradlin; Steffen Strauch; Riad Suleiman; Jeffrey Templon; T. Teresawa; James Thompson; Raphael Tieulent; Luminita Todor; Baris Tonguc; Paul Ulmer; Guido Urciuoli; Branislav Vlahovic; Krishni Wijesooriya; R. Wilson; Bogdan Wojtsekhowski; Rhett Woo; Wang Xu; Imran Younus; C. Zhang

    2001-06-01

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from the proton. The result is A = -15.05 +- 0.98(stat) {+-} 0.56(syst) ppm at the kinematic point theta{sub lab} = 12.3 degrees and Q{sup 2} = 0.477 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The measurement implies that the value for the strange form factor (G{sub E}{sup s} + 0.392 G{sub M}{sup s})/(G{sub M}{sup p} {mu}{sub p}) = 0.069 +- 0.056 +- 0.039, where the first error is experimental and the second arises from the uncertainties in electromagnetic form factors. This measurement is the first fixed-target parity violation experiment that used either a ''strained'' GaAs photocathode to produce highly polarized electrons or a Compton polarimeter to continuously monitor the electron beam polarization.

  8. Measurement of parity-violating spin asymmetries in W± production at midrapidity in longitudinally polarized p +p collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adare, A.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Akimoto, R.; Alexander, J.; Alfred, M.; Aoki, K.; Apadula, N.; Aramaki, Y.; Asano, H.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Atomssa, E. T.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Bai, M.; Bai, X.; Bandara, N. S.; Bannier, B.; Barish, K. N.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Baublis, V.; Baumann, C.; Baumgart, S.; Bazilevsky, A.; Beaumier, M.; Beckman, S.; Belmont, R.; Berdnikov, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Black, D.; Blau, D. S.; Bok, J. S.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Bryslawskyj, J.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Butsyk, S.; Campbell, S.; Chen, C.-H.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choi, J. B.; Choi, S.; Choudhury, R. K.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chvala, O.; Cianciolo, V.; Citron, Z.; Cole, B. A.; Connors, M.; Cronin, N.; Crossette, N.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Dairaku, S.; Danley, T. W.; Datta, A.; Daugherity, M. S.; David, G.; Deblasio, K.; Dehmelt, K.; Denisov, A.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Ding, L.; Dion, A.; Diss, P. B.; Do, J. H.; Donadelli, M.; D'Orazio, L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Drees, K. A.; Durham, J. M.; Durum, A.; Edwards, S.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Engelmore, T.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Esumi, S.; Eyser, K. O.; Fadem, B.; Feege, N.; Fields, D. E.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fusayasu, T.; Gainey, K.; Gal, C.; Gallus, P.; Garg, P.; Garishvili, A.; Garishvili, I.; Ge, H.; Giordano, F.; Glenn, A.; Gong, X.; Gonin, M.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gu, Y.; Gunji, T.; Guragain, H.; Hachiya, T.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hahn, K. I.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamilton, H. F.; Han, S. Y.; Hanks, J.; Hasegawa, S.; Haseler, T. O. S.; Hashimoto, K.; Hayano, R.; Hayashi, S.; He, X.; Hemmick, T. K.; Hester, T.; Hill, J. C.; Hollis, R. S.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Horaguchi, T.; Hoshino, T.; Hotvedt, N.; Huang, J.; Huang, S.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikeda, Y.; Imai, K.; Imazu, Y.; Imrek, J.; Inaba, M.; Iordanova, A.; Isenhower, D.; Isinhue, A.; Ivanishchev, D.; Jacak, B. V.; Javani, M.; Jeon, S. J.; Jezghani, M.; Jia, J.; Jiang, X.; Johnson, B. M.; Joo, E.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Jumper, D. S.; Kamin, J.; Kanda, S.; Kang, B. H.; Kang, J. H.; Kang, J. S.; Kapustinsky, J.; Karatsu, K.; Kawall, D.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kempel, T.; Key, J. A.; Khachatryan, V.; Khandai, P. K.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kihara, K.; Kijima, K. M.; Kim, B. I.; Kim, C.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.-J.; Kim, G. W.; Kim, H.-J.; Kim, M.; Kim, Y.-J.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimelman, B.; Kinney, E.; Kistenev, E.; Kitamura, R.; Klatsky, J.; Kleinjan, D.; Kline, P.; Koblesky, T.; Kofarago, M.; Komkov, B.; Koster, J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, D.; Krizek, F.; Kurita, K.; Kurosawa, M.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lai, Y. S.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, G. H.; Lee, J.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. H.; Lee, S. R.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitgab, M.; Lewis, B.; Li, X.; Lim, S. H.; Linden Levy, L. A.; Liu, M. X.; Lynch, D.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Makek, M.; Manion, A.; Manko, V. I.; Mannel, E.; Maruyama, T.; McCumber, M.; McGaughey, P. L.; McGlinchey, D.; McKinney, C.; Meles, A.; Mendoza, M.; Meredith, B.; Miake, Y.; Mibe, T.; Midori, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Miller, A. J.; Milov, A.; Mishra, D. K.; Mitchell, J. T.; Miyasaka, S.; Mizuno, S.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, S.; Montuenga, P.; Moon, H. J.; Moon, T.; Morrison, D. P.; Moskowitz, M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Murakami, T.; Murata, J.; Mwai, A.; Nagae, T.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagashima, K.; Nagle, J. L.; Nagy, M. I.; Nakagawa, I.; Nakagomi, H.; Nakamiya, Y.; Nakamura, K. R.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, K.; Nattrass, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nihashi, M.; Niida, T.; Nishimura, S.; Nouicer, R.; Novák, T.; Novitzky, N.; Nukariya, A.; Nyanin, A. S.; Obayashi, H.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Oide, H.; Okada, K.; Orjuela Koop, J. D.; Osborn, J. D.; Oskarsson, A.; Ozaki, H.; Ozawa, K.; Pak, R.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, I. H.; Park, J. S.; Park, S.; Park, S. K.; Pate, S. F.; Patel, L.; Patel, M.; Pei, H.; Peng, J.-C.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perera, G. D. N.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Perry, J.; Petti, R.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pinson, R.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Qu, H.; Rak, J.; Ramson, B. J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reynolds, D.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Richardson, E.; Rinn, T.; Riveli, N.; Roach, D.; Roche, G.; Rolnick, S. D.; Rosati, M.; Rowan, Z.; Rubin, J. G.; Ryu, M. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sako, H.; Samsonov, V.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schaefer, B.; Schmoll, B. K.; Sedgwick, K.; Seele, J.; Seidl, R.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sen, A.; Seto, R.; Sett, P.; Sexton, A.; Sharma, D.; Shaver, A.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shoji, K.; Shukla, P.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, B. K.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skolnik, M.; Slunečka, M.; Snowball, M.; Solano, S.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Stankus, P. W.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Stone, M. R.; Sugitate, T.; Sukhanov, A.; Sumita, T.; Sun, J.; Sziklai, J.; Takagui, E. M.; Takahara, A.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, Y.; Taneja, S.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Tarafdar, S.; Taranenko, A.; Tennant, E.; Tieulent, R.; Timilsina, A.; Todoroki, T.; Tomášek, M.; Torii, H.; Towell, C. L.; Towell, M.; Towell, R.; Towell, R. S.; Tserruya, I.; Tsuchimoto, Y.; Vale, C.; van Hecke, H. W.; Vargyas, M.; Vazquez-Zambrano, E.; Veicht, A.; Velkovska, J.; Vértesi, R.; Virius, M.; Voas, B.; Vrba, V.; Vznuzdaev, E.; Wang, X. R.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, K.; Watanabe, Y.; Watanabe, Y. S.; Wei, F.; Whitaker, S.; White, A. S.; White, S. N.; Winter, D.; Wolin, S.; Woody, C. L.; Wysocki, M.; Xia, B.; Xue, L.; Yalcin, S.; Yamaguchi, Y. L.; Yanovich, A.; Ying, J.; Yokkaichi, S.; Yoo, J. H.; Yoon, I.; You, Z.; Younus, I.; Yu, H.; Yushmanov, I. E.; Zajc, W. A.; Zelenski, A.; Zhou, S.; Zou, L.; Phenix Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present midrapidity measurements from the PHENIX experiment of large parity-violating single-spin asymmetries of high transverse momentum electrons and positrons from W±/Z decays, produced in longitudinally polarized p +p collisions at center of mass energies of √{s }=500 and 510 GeV. These asymmetries allow direct access to the antiquark polarized parton distribution functions due to the parity-violating nature of the W -boson coupling to quarks and antiquarks. The results presented are based on data collected in 2011, 2012, and 2013 with an integrated luminosity of 240 pb-1 , which exceeds previous PHENIX published results by a factor of more than 27. These high Q2 data probe the parton structure of the proton at W mass scale and provide an important addition to our understanding of the antiquark parton helicity distribution functions at an intermediate Bjorken x value of roughly MW/√{s }=0.16 .

  9. A Measurement of the Parity Violating Parameter Ab with a Muon Tag at the SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Bellodi, Giulia

    2001-02-12

    We present a direct measurement of the parity violation parameter A{sub b}, derived from the left-right forward-backward asymmetry of b quarks tagged via muons from semileptonic decays. The value of A{sub b} is extracted using a maximum likelihood fit to the differential cross section for fermion production. The novelty of this measurement consists in the use of topological vertexing information alongside the more traditional decay kinematics to discriminate among the different sources of tagged leptons. The small and stable SLC beam spot and the CCD based vertex detector are used to reconstruct secondary decay vertices and to provide precise kinematic information and a highly efficient and pure B mass tag. A multivariate approach has been used, with a total of 4 tagging variables, whose correlation with each other has been taken into account. The final result has been cross-checked both with a classical cut-and-count method and combining all the information into a neural net. Based on the full SLD dataset of 550K Z{sup 0} events with highly polarized electron beams, this measurement represents an improvement of a factor of 2 with respect to the previously published result (1993-1995 only and with no vertexing information). The statistical sensitivity achieved is around 4% for A{sub b}, making this a world-class single measurement. An estimate of A{sub c} has been simultaneously derived from a common fit, with a precision of about 10%.

  10. Parity Violating Energetic Difference and Enantiomorphous Crystalsp-Caveats; Reinvestigation of Tyrosine Crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahav, Meir; Weissbuch, Isabelle; Shavit, Edna; Reiner, Clarissa; Nicholson, Graeme J.; Schurig, Volker

    2006-04-01

    The present article challenges reports claiming to have demonstrated the Parity Violating Energetic Difference (PVED) between enantiomorphous D- and L-crystals. Apart from PVED, the presence of minute quantities and differing profiles of impurities incorporated during their different history of preparation will affect the physical properties of D- and L-crystals. These impurities are anticipated to play a much greater role in affecting crystallization behavior than PVED. The effect of impurities on the growth and dissolution of enantiomorphous crystals is illustrated with some representative examples. Shinitzky et al. (2002) reported recently dramatic differences in the growth and dissolution properties of the D- and L-crystals of tyrosine. We have repeated these experiments using commercial samples from different sources and employing a validated enantioselective gas chromatographic technique. We attribute Shinitzky's findings either to the use of inappropriate analytical techniques for the determination of enantiomeric composition and/or to the presence of unidentified contaminants in the commercial tyrosine samples. Related caveats hold also for the recently published claims by Shinitzky (2006) and Scolnik et al. (2006) to have observed experimentally PVED between enantiomeric helices of poly-glutamic acid composed of 24 repeating units.

  11. Measurement of the Parity-Violating Neutron Spin Rotation in 4He

    PubMed Central

    Bass, C. D.; Dawkins, J. M.; Luo, D.; Micherdzinska, A.; Sarsour, M.; Snow, W. M.; Mumm, H. P.; Nico, J. S.; Huffman, P. R.; Markoff, D. M.; Heckel, B. R.; Swanson, H. E.

    2005-01-01

    In the meson exchange model of weak nucleon-nucleon (NN) interactions, the exchange of virtual mesons between the nucleons is parameterized by a set of weak meson exchange amplitudes. The strengths of these amplitudes from theoretical calculations are not well known, and experimental measurements of parity-violating (PV) observables in different nuclear systems have not constrained their values. Transversely polarized cold neutrons traveling through liquid helium experience a PV spin rotation due to the weak interaction with an angle proportional to a linear combination of these weak meson exchange amplitudes. A measurement of the PV neutron spin rotation in helium (φPV (n,α)) would provide information about the relative strengths of the weak meson exchange amplitudes, and with the longitudinal analyzing power measurement in the p + α system, allow the first comparison between isospin mirror systems in weak NN interaction. An earlier experiment performed at NIST obtained a result consistent with zero: φPV (n,α) = (8.0 ±14(stat) ±2.2(syst)) ×10−7 rad / m[1]. We describe a modified apparatus using a superfluid helium target to increase statistics and reduce systematic effects in an effort to reach a sensitivity goal of 10−7 rad/m. PMID:27308122

  12. A measurement of parity-violating asymmetries in the G0 experiment in forward mode

    SciTech Connect

    Covrig, Silviu Doru

    2004-01-01

    The G0 experiment in Hall C at Jefferson Lab measures the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron scattering off hydrogen and quasielastic electron scattering off deuterium in the Q2 range from 0.1 to 1 (GeV)2 in both forward and backward running modes by using a longitudinally polarized electron beam on unpolarized liquid targets. By measuring three independent asymmetries, one in forward running mode off liquid hydrogen and two in backward running mode, one off liquid hydrogen and one off liquid deuterium, the experiment aims to perform for the first time a complete separation and mapping of the strange vector form factors of the nucleon (G_Ms, G_Es) and the isovector axial form factor (G_Ae(T=1)) in three Q2 bins over the Q2 range from 0.1 to 1 (GeV/c)2. To complete the physics program in both forward and backward modes it will take about five years. To accomplish the forward running mode program some 100 C of data are needed. This thesis is based on 9 C of physics data taken during the first chekout of the G0 apparatus during October 2002 - January 2003.

  13. Di-Higgs signatures from R-parity violating supersymmetry as the origin of neutrino mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Sanjoy; Chun, Eung Jin; Sharma, Pankaj

    2016-12-01

    Motivated by the naturalness and neutrino mass generation, we study a bilinear R-parity violating supersymmetric scenario with a light Higgsino-like lightest super-symmetric particle (LSP). We observe that the LSP can have substantial decay branching ratio to ν h in a large part of the parameter space, and thus study the pair production of electroweakinos followed by the decays {tilde{χ}}_1^{±}to {tilde{χ}}_1^0{W}^{± (ast )} and {tilde{χ}}_1^0to ν h . This leads to an interesting signature of Higgs boson pair production associated with significantly large missing transverse energy which is grossly distinct from the di-Higgs production in the Standard Model. We investigate the perspective of probing such signatures by performing a detector level simulation using a toy calorimeter of both the signal and corresponding backgrounds for the high-luminosity high energy phase of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We also advocate some observables based on kinematical features to provide an excellent handle to suppress the backgrounds.

  14. Parity Violating Deep Inelastic Electron Scattering from the Deuteron at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Kai

    2013-02-01

    An experiment that measured the parity violating (PV) asymmetry Ad in e-2H deep inelastic scattering (DIS) at Q2 ~ 1.10 and 1.90 (GeV/c)2 and xB ~ 0.3 was completed in experimental Hall A at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The asymmetry can be used to extract the neutral weak coupling combination (2C2u-C2d), providing a factor of five to six improvement over the current world data. To achieve this precision, asymmetries of the 10-4 level needed to be measured at event rates up to 500 kHz with high electron detection efficiency and high pion background rejection capability. A specialized scaler-based counting data acquisition system (DAQ) with hardware-based particle identification was successfully implemented. The statistical quality of the asymmetry measurement agreed with the Gaussian distribution to over five orders of magnitudes and the experimental goal of 3-4% statistical uncertainty was achieved. The design and performance of the new DAQ system is presented with the preliminary asymmetry results given in the end.

  15. Constraining parity violation in gravity with measurements of neutron-star moments of inertia

    SciTech Connect

    Yunes, Nicolas; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Oezel, Feryal; Loeb, Abraham

    2010-03-15

    Neutron stars are sensitive laboratories for testing general relativity, especially when considering deviations where velocities are relativistic and gravitational fields are strong. One such deviation is described by dynamical, Chern-Simons modified gravity, where the Einstein-Hilbert action is modified through the addition of the gravitational parity-violating Pontryagin density coupled to a field. This four-dimensional effective theory arises naturally both in perturbative and nonperturbative string theory, loop quantum gravity, and generic effective field theory expansions. We calculate here Chern-Simons modifications to the properties and gravitational fields of slowly spinning neutron stars. We find that the Chern-Simons correction affects only the gravitomagnetic sector of the metric to leading order, thus introducing modifications to the moment-of-inertia but not to the mass-radius relation. We show that an observational determination of the moment-of-inertia to an accuracy of 10%, as is expected from near-future observations of the double pulsar, will place a constraint on the Chern-Simons coupling constant of {xi}{sup 1/4} < or approx. 5 km, which is at least three-orders of magnitude stronger than the previous strongest bound.

  16. Methodological aspects in the calculation of parity-violating effects in nuclear magnetic resonance parameters.

    PubMed

    Weijo, Ville; Bast, Radovan; Manninen, Pekka; Saue, Trond; Vaara, Juha

    2007-02-21

    We examine the quantum chemical calculation of parity-violating (PV) electroweak contributions to the spectral parameters of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) from a methodological point of view. Nuclear magnetic shielding and indirect spin-spin coupling constants are considered and evaluated for three chiral molecules, H2O2, H2S2, and H2Se2. The effects of the choice of a one-particle basis set and the treatment of electron correlation, as well as the effects of special relativity, are studied. All of them are found to be relevant. The basis-set dependence is very pronounced, especially at the electron correlated ab initio levels of theory. Coupled-cluster and density-functional theory (DFT) results for PV contributions differ significantly from the Hartree-Fock data. DFT overestimates the PV effects, particularly with nonhybrid exchange-correlation functionals. Beginning from third-row elements, special relativity is of importance for the PV NMR properties, shown here by comparing perturbational one-component and various four-component calculations. In contrast to what is found for nuclear magnetic shielding, the choice of the model for nuclear charge distribution--point charge or extended (Gaussian)--has a significant impact on the PV contribution to the spin-spin coupling constants.

  17. Parity Violation in the Elastic Scattering of Polarized Electrons from CARBON-12 at 250 Mev

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Robert William

    Measurements of the parity violating asymmetry in the differential cross section for elastic scattering of polarized electrons from ^{12} C at 250 MeV energy and 150 MeV/c momentum transfer are reported. The experiment is performed at the Bates Linear Accelerator Center. The systematic errors include electronic pickup, transverse polarization, nuclear structure, systematics in the laser system used to produce polarized electrons, and residual systematics associated with beam parameters. The dominant one was electronic pickup and the next most important one was helicity correlated energy changes. Developments which extended the lifetime of the polarized electron source were of vital importance. Our present measured asymmetry is sigma _{R} - sigma_{L} oversigma_{R} + sigma _{L} = 0.87 +/- 0.65 (stat.) +/- 0.38 (syst.) times 10^{-6} where sigma_{rm R(L)} is the differential cross section for right (left) handed electrons. This result was achieved in a data taking time of about two days. The standard model prediction for this electroweak interference effect is 0.68 ppm for our case where the electron polarization was 38%. With our present understanding of systematic errors it should be possible with adequate running time to achieve a precision of about 0.1 ppm in the measurement of the asymmetry.

  18. Simulator for the Parity-Violating Deep Inelastic Scattering experiment in the Solenoidal Large Intensity Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jack; Hall A SoLID Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Solenoid Large Intensity Detector (SoLID) particle detector is the main detector that will be used for high energy particle experiments in Hall A that will be used with the 12 GeV electron beam at the Jefferson Lab. SoLID geometries were writen to be implemented in Geant4 using openGL as the visualization tool. This will allow us to test how the calorimeter, a specific yet integral part of the SoLID detector, detects the particles that result from electron beams colliding with targets. The goal is to simulate the approved experiments for the SoLID detector, starting with the Parity-Violating Deep Inelastic Scattering (PVDIS) experiment. This will provide critical information regarding the effectiveness of the calorimeter's design for such experiments. The expectation is that a Shashlik calorimeter will prove effective for the experiments approved for the SoLID detector. The ideal number of layers, or types of material for said layers, is an aspect of the calorimeter that will require testing through the simulations.The geometry files allow an easily-packaged program that can be shared amongst any collaborators interested in the SoLID experiments. NSF Grant No. 714001.

  19. A Current Mode Ion Chamber for the n+p->D+gamma Parity Violation Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, William

    2001-04-01

    We have developed and tested a current-mode 3He-based ion chamber for the measurement of the neutron time-of-flight spectrum from a pulsed cold neutron source on a pulse-by-pulse basis. Such a device is required in the n+p->D+gamma experiment for general diagnostic purposes and for monitoring the ortho-para ratio in the liquid hydrogen target by neutron transmission. This detector was tested in the fall of 2000 at the LANSCE pulsed cold neutron source. The chamber operates with a mixture gas of 0.5 atm 3He and 3 atm H2 and possesses segmentation along the neutron beam. The design is similar to that of Penn et al [1] which was used for a neutron-4He parity violation experiment, but with modifications to the time response and the dynamic range in neutron energy required for operation at a pulsed neutron source. The relevant technical characteristics of the ion chamber (time response, sensitivity to Mev gammas, noise, efficiency, neutron energy dynamic range, linearity) will be described. [1] S. Penn et.al., submitted to NIM (2000)

  20. Parity Violation in Decays of Z Bosons into Heavy Quarks at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Thomas R

    2002-09-16

    This work presents measurements of the parity-violation parameters A{sub c} and A{sub b} made at the Z pole. These measurements include the data taken with the SLD detector at the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) during the period 1996-98. Heavy flavor events are selected with high efficiency and purity by searching for displaced vertices, identified with the SLD precision CCD vertex detector. Two methods are used for quark/antiquark discrimination: the net charge of the displaced vertex, and tracks in the displaced vertex identified as kaons by the SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector (CRID). The signal purities and analyzing powers are calibrated from the data to reduce the systematic errors and avoid experimental bias. The results are A{sub c} = 0.673 {+-} 0.029 {+-} 0.023 and A{sub b} = 0.919 {+-} 0.018 {+-} 0.017, where the first error is statistical and the second systematic. Fits to the electroweak data performed by the LEP Electroweak Working Group are used to study the consistency of the Standard Model, and to constrain the mass of the Standard Model Higgs boson.

  1. Measurement Of Neutron Radius In Lead By Parity Violating Scattering Flash ADC DAQ

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, Zafar

    2012-06-01

    This dissertation reports the experiment PREx, a parity violation experiment which is designed to measure the neutron radius in 208Pb. PREx is performed in hall A of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility from March 19th to June 21st. Longitudionally polarized electrons at energy 1 GeV scattered at and angle of θlab = 5.8 ° from the Lead target. Beam corrected pairty violaing counting rate asymmetry is (Acorr= 594 ± 50(stat) ± 9(syst))ppb at Q2 = 0.009068GeV 2. This dissertation also presents the details of Flash ADC Data Acquisition(FADC DAQ) system for Moller polarimetry in Hall A of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. The Moller polarimeter measures the beam polarization to high precision to meet the specification of the PREx(Lead radius experiment). The FADC DAQ is part of the upgrade of Moller polarimetery to reduce the systematic error for PREx. The hardware setup and the results of the FADC DAQ analysis are presented

  2. Measurement of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Deep Inelastic Scattering at JLab 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Diancheng

    2013-12-01

    The parity-violating asymmetry in deep inelastic scattering (PVDIS) offers us a useful tool to study the weak neutral couplings and the hadronic structure of the nucleon, and provides high precision tests on the Standard Model. During the 6 GeV PVDIS experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, the parity-violating asymmetries A{sub PV} of a polarized electron beam scattering off an unpolarized deuteron target in the deep inelastic scattering region were precisely measured at two Q2 values of 1.1 and 1.9 (GeV/c)2. The asymmetry at Q2=1.9 (GeV/c)2 can be used to extract the weak coupling combination 2C2u - C2d, assuming the higher twist effect is small. The extracted result from this measurement is in good agreement with the Standard Model prediction, and improves the precision by a factor of five over previous data. In addition, combining the asymmetries at both Q2 values provides us extra knowledge on the higher twist effects. The parity violation asymmetries in the resonance region were also measured during this experiment. These results are the first APV data in the resonance region beyond the Δ (1232). They provide evidence that the quark hadron duality works for APV at the (10-15)% level, and set constraints on nucleon resonance models that are commonly used for background calculations to other parity-violating electron scattering measurements.

  3. Energy dependence of the parity-violating asymmetry of circularly polarized photons in dγ-> --> np in pionless effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanasse, Jared; Schindler, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    At low energies parity-violating interactions between nucleons are described by five low energy constants. The aim of hadronic parity-violation is to cleanly obtain these from experiment, for which few-body systems and pionless effective field theory are ideally suited. In this talk I will discuss the calculation of the parity violating asymmetry in the cross sections for circularly polarized photons on an unpolarized deuteron target in dγ-> --> np using pionless effective field theory. Using this calculation with estimates for the parity-violating low energy constants I will show the ideal energy at which such an experiment should be performed. This experiment is of particular interest as it is a possible future experiment at an upgraded High Intensity Gamma-Ray Source at the Triangle Universities Nuclear Laboratory.

  4. Ruling out the Weinberg Model of Spontaneous CP Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Darwin

    2000-11-30

    There have been many declarations of the death of the Weinberg model of spontaneous CP violation. Previous studies, before the recent measurements of {epsilon}'/{epsilon}, indicated that the model could not accommodate the experimental values on {epsilon} in K{sup 0} - {bar K}{sup 0} mixing, the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM), the branching ratio of b {yields} s{gamma} and the upper limit on {epsilon}'/{epsilon}. The authors point out that these studies were based on optimistic estimates of the uncertainties in the calculations and that when more realistic estimates of these errors are used the Weinberg model cannot be conclusively ruled out from these considerations alone. Here we use these realistic error estimates to analyze the present situation of the Weinberg model. The latest results from Belle and BaBar on sin 2{beta} allow the small values of this parameter which occur naturally in the Weinberg model. However, in this model, the recently measured value of Re({epsilon}'/{epsilon}) = (1.92 {+-} 0.25) x 10{sup -3} cannot be made compatible with the branching ratio B(b {yields} s{gamma}) = (3.15 {+-} 0.54) x 10{sup -4}. As a result they conclude that the Weinburg model is now confidently and conservatively ruled out.

  5. Ruling out the Weinberg Model of Spontaneous CP Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Darwin

    2000-11-30

    There have been many declarations of the death of the Weinberg model of spontaneous CP violation. Previous studies, before the recent measurements of {epsilon}'/{epsilon} indicated that the model could not accommodate the experimental values on {epsilon} in K{sub 0} - {bar K}{sup 0} mixing, the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM), the branching ratio of b {yields} s{gamma} and the upper limit on {epsilon}'/{epsilon}. We point out that these studies were based on optimistic estimates of the uncertainties in the calculations and that when more realistic estimates of these errors are used the Weinberg model cannot be conclusively ruled out from these considerations alone. Here we use these realistic error estimates to analyze the present situation of the Weinberg model. The latest results from Belle and BaBar on sin 2{beta} allow the small values of this parameter which occur naturally in the Weinberg model. However, in this model, the recently measured value of Re({epsilon}'/{epsilon}) = (1.92 {+-} 10{sup -3}) cannot be made compatible with the branching ratio B(b {yields} s{gamma}) = (3.15 {+-} 0.54) x 10{sup -4}. As a result they conclude that the Weinberg model is now confidently and conservatively ruled out.

  6. Galileogenesis: A new cosmophenomenological zip code for reheating through R-parity violating coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Sayantan; Dasgupta, Arnab

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we introduce an idea of leptogenesis scenario in higher derivative gravity induced DBI Galileon framework aka Galileogenesis in presence of one-loop R-parity violating couplings in the background of a low energy effective supergravity setup derived from higher dimensional string theory framework. We have studied extensively the detailed feature of reheating constraints and the cosmophenomenological consequences of thermal gravitino dark matter in light of PLANCK and PDG data. Finally, we have also established a direct cosmophenomenological connection among dark matter relic abundance, reheating temperature and tensor-to-scalar ratio in the context of DBI Galileon inflation. Higher order correction terms in the gravity sector are introduced in the effective action as a perturbative correction to the Einstein-Hilbert counterpart coming from the computation of Conformal Field Theory disk amplitude at the two loop level [34-36]. The matter sector encounters the effect of N=1, D=4 supergravity motivated DBI Galileon interaction which is embedded in the D3 brane. Additionally, we have considered the effect of R-parity violating interactions [37-40] in the matter sector which provide a convenient framework for quantifying quark and lepton-flavor violating effects. The low energy UV protective effective action for the proposed cosmophenomenological model is described by [31,32]: S=∫d4x √{-g}[K(Φ,X)-G(Φ,X)□Φ+B1R+(B2RRαβγδ-4B3RRαβ+B4R2)+B5] where the model dependent characteristic functions K(Φ,X) and G(Φ,X) are the implicit functions of Galileon and its kinetic counterpart is X=-1/2 >g∂μΦ∂νΦ. Additionally, Bi∀i are the self-coupling constants of graviton degrees of freedom appearing via dimensional reduction from higher dimensional string theory. Specifically B5 be the effective four dimensional cosmological constant. In general, B2≠B3≠B4 which implies that the quadratic curvature terms originated from two loop correction to the

  7. Searching for R-parity violation at run-II of the tevatron.

    SciTech Connect

    Allanach, B.; Banerjee, S.; Berger, E. L.; Chertok, M.; Diaz, M. A.; Dreiner, H.; Eboli, O. J. P.; Harris, B. W.; Hewett, J.; Magro, M. B.; Mondal, N. K.; Narasimham, V. S.; Navarro, L.; Parua, N.; Porod, W.; Restrepo, D. A.; Richardson, P.; Rizzo, T.; Seymour, M. H.; Sullivan, Z.; Valle, J. W. F.; de Campos, F.

    1999-06-22

    The authors present an outlook for possible discovery of supersymmetry with broken R-parity at Run II of the Tevatron. They first present a review of the literature and an update of the experimental bounds. In turn they then discuss the following processes: (1) resonant slepton production followed by R{sub P} decay, (a) via LQD{sup c} and (b) via LLE{sup c}; (2) how to distinguish resonant slepton production from Z{prime} or W{prime} production; (3) resonant slepton production followed by the decay to neutralino LSP, which decays via LQD{sup c}; (4) resonant stop production followed by the decay to a chargino, which cascades to the neutralino LSP; (5) gluino pair production followed by the cascade decay to charm squarks which decay directly via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (6) squark pair production followed by the cascade decay to the neutralino LSP which decays via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (7) MSSM pair production followed by the cascade decay to the LSP which decays (a) via LLE{sup c}, (b) via LQD{sup c}, and (c) via U{sup c}D{sup c}D{sup c}, respectively; and (8) top quark and top squark decays in spontaneous R{sub P}.

  8. Parity-violating CMB correlators with non-decaying statistical anisotropy

    SciTech Connect

    Bartolo, Nicola; Matarrese, Sabino; Shiraishi, Maresuke; Peloso, Marco E-mail: sabino.matarrese@pd.infn.it E-mail: maresuke.shiraishi@ipmu.jp

    2015-07-01

    We examine the effect induced on cosmological correlators by the simultaneous breaking of parity and of statistical isotropy. As an example of this, we compute the scalar-scalar, scalar-tensor, tensor-tensor and scalar-scalar-scalar cosmological correlators in presence of the coupling L = f(φ) ( − 1/4 F{sup 2} + γ/4 F ∼F ) between the inflaton φ and a vector field with vacuum expectation value  A. For a suitably chosen function f, the energy in the vector field ρ{sub A} does not decay during inflation. This results in nearly scale-invariant signatures of broken statistical isotropy and parity. Specifically, we find that the scalar-scalar correlator of primordial curvature perturbations includes a quadrupolar anisotropy, P{sub ζ}(k) = P(k)[1+g{sub *}( k-circumflex ⋅Â){sup 2}], and a (angle-averaged) scalar bispectrum that is a linear combination of the first 3 Legendre polynomials, B{sub ζ}(k{sub 1}, k{sub 2}, k{sub 3}) = ∑{sub L} c{sub L} P{sub L} ( k-circumflex {sub 1} ⋅  k-circumflex {sub 2}) P(k{sub 1}) P(k{sub 2}) + 2 perms , with c{sub 0}:c{sub 1}:c{sub 2}=2-3:1 (c{sub 1}≠0 is a consequence of parity violation, corresponding to the constant 0γ ≠ ). The latter is one of the main results of this paper, which provides for the first time a clear example of an inflationary model where a non-negligible c{sub 1} contribution to the bispectrum is generated. The scalar-tensor and tensor-tensor correlators induce characteristic signatures in the Cosmic Microwave Background temperature anisotropies (T) and polarization (E/B modes); namely, non-diagonal contributions to (a{sub ℓ1m1}a{sup *}{sub ℓ2m2}), with |ℓ{sub 1} − ℓ{sub 2}| = 1 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and |ℓ{sub 1} − ℓ{sub 2}| = 2 in TB and EB. The latest CMB bounds on the scalar observables (g{sub *}, c{sub 0}, c{sub 1} and c{sub 2}), translate into the upper limit ρ{sub A} / ρ{sub φ} ∼< 10{sup −9} at 0γ=. We find that the upper

  9. Parity violation in neutron-proton capture—The NPDGamma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gericke, Michael; Page, S.; Ramsay, D.; Alarcon, R.; Balascuta, S.; Barron, L.; Bowman, J. D.; Carlini, R. D.; Chen, W.; Chupp, T. E.; Crawford, C.; Covrig, S.; Dabaghyan, M.; Freedman, S. J.; Gentile, T. R.; Gillis, R. C.; Greene, G. L.; Hersman, F. W.; Ino, T.; Jones, G. L.; Lauss, B.; Leuschner, M.; Losowki, B.; Mahurin, R.; Masuda, Y.; Mei, J.; Mitchell, G. S.; Muto, S.; Nann, H.; Penttilä, S. I.; Salas-Bacci, A.; Santra, S.; Seo, P.-N.; Sharapov, E.; Sharma, M.; Smith, T.; Snow, W. M.; Wilburn, W. S.; Yuan, V.

    2009-12-01

    The NPDGamma collaboration has recently completed the first phase of a measurement to determine the size of the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction from cold neutron capture on a liquid hydrogen target. In the framework of the nearly 30 year old DDH model [B. Desplanques, J.F. Donoghue, B.R. Holstein, Annals of Physics 124 (1980) 449], the measured process is explained in terms of the weak pion-nucleon coupling, while the framework of modern effective field theory parameterizes the measured process in terms of the S13-P13, long range transition (essentially the Danilov parameter ρt) [S.L. Zhu et al., Nuclear Physics A 748 (2005) 435; C.-P. Liu, Phys. Rev. C 75 (2007) 065501]. The couplings in terms of either model are directly proportional to the parity violating up-down asymmetry in the angular distribution of gamma rays with respect to the neutron spin direction in the reaction n⇒+p→d+γ. The asymmetry has a predicted size of 5×10-8 and the aim of the NPDGamma collaboration is to measure it to 20%. The first phase of the measurement was completed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Neutron Science Center Spallation Source with a preliminary result of (-1.1±2.1 stat.±0.2 sys.)×10-7. Here, we report on the measurements and the results obtained so far. The experiment is currently being installed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for the remainder of its run time.

  10. Parity Violation in Neutron-Proton Capture -- The NPD Gamma Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gericke, M. T.; Bowman, James D; Greene, G. L.; Penttila, Seppo I; Collaboration, NPDGamma

    2009-01-01

    The NPDGamma collaboration has recently completed the first phase of a measurement to determine the size of the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction from cold neutron capture on a liquid hydrogen target. In the framework of the nearly 30 year old DDH model [B. Desplanques, J.F. Donoghue, B.R. Holstein, Annals of Physics 124 (1980) 449], the measured process is explained in terms of the weak pion-nucleon coupling, while the framework of modern effective field theory parameterizes the measured process in terms of the {sup 3}S{sub 1}-{sup 3}P{sub 1}, long range transition (essentially the Danilov parameter {rho}{sub t}) [S.L. Zhu et al., Nuclear Physics A 748 (2005) 435; C.-P. Liu, Phys. Rev. C 75 (2007) 065501]. The couplings in terms of either model are directly proportional to the parity violating up-down asymmetry in the angular distribution of gamma rays with respect to the neutron spin direction in the reaction {rvec n} + p {yields} d + {gamma}. The asymmetry has a predicted size of 5 x 10{sup -8} and the aim of the NPDGamma collaboration is to measure it to 20%. The first phase of the measurement was completed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Neutron Science Center Spallation Source with a preliminary result of (-1.1 {+-} 2.1 stat. {+-} 0.2 sys.) x 10{sup -7}. Here, we report on the measurements and the results obtained so far. The experiment is currently being installed at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for the remainder of its run time.

  11. Constraints on parity violation from ACTpol and forecasts for forthcoming CMB experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molinari, Diego; Gruppuso, Alessandro; Natoli, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    We use the ACTpol published cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization data to constrain cosmological birefringence, a tracer of parity violation beyond the standard model of particle physics. To this purpose, we employ all the polarized ACTpol spectra, including the cross-correlations between temperature anisotropy and B mode polarization (TB) and between E mode and B mode (EB), which are most sensitive to the effect. We build specific, so-called D-estimators for birefringence and assess their performances and error budgets by using realistic Monte Carlo simulations based on the experimental characteristics provided by the ACTpol collaboration. We determine the optimal multipole range for our analysis to be 250 < ℓ < 3025 over which we find a null result for the uniform birefringence angle α = 0.29 ° ± 0.28 ° (stat.) ± 0.5 ° (syst.), the latter uncertainty being the estimate published by the ACTpol team on their global systematic error budget. We show that this result holds consistently when other multipole ranges are considered. Finally, we forecast the capability of several forthcoming ground based, balloon and space borne CMB experiments to constrain the birefringence angle, showing, e.g., that the proposed post-Planck COrE satellite mission could in principle constrain α at a level of 10 arcsec, provided that all systematics are under control. Under the same circumstances, we find the COrE constraints to be at least 2 or 3 times better than what could ideally be achieved by the other experiments considered.

  12. Weak charge form factor and radius of 208Pb through parity violation in electron scattering

    DOE PAGES

    Horowitz, C. J.; Ahmed, Z.; Jen, C. -M.; ...

    2012-03-26

    We use distorted wave electron scattering calculations to extract the weak charge form factor FW(more » $$\\bar{q}$$), the weak charge radius RW, and the point neutron radius Rn, of 208Pb from the PREX parity violating asymmetry measurement. The form factor is the Fourier transform of the weak charge density at the average momentum transfer $$\\bar{q}$$ = 0.475 fm-1. We find FW($$\\bar{q}$$) = 0.204 ± 0.028(exp) ± 0.001(model). We use the Helm model to infer the weak radius from FW($$\\bar{q}$$). We find RW = 5.826 ± 0.181(exp) ± 0.027(model) fm. Here the exp error includes PREX statistical and systematic errors, while the model error describes the uncertainty in RW from uncertainties in the surface thickness σ of the weak charge density. The weak radius is larger than the charge radius, implying a 'weak charge skin' where the surface region is relatively enriched in weak charges compared to (electromagnetic) charges. We extract the point neutron radius Rn = 5.751 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026(model) ± 0.005(strange) fm, from RW. Here there is only a very small error (strange) from possible strange quark contributions. We find Rn to be slightly smaller than RW because of the nucleon's size. As a result, we find a neutron skin thickness of Rn-Rp = 0.302 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026 (model) ± 0.005 (strange) fm, where Rp is the point proton radius.« less

  13. A chiral rhenium complex with predicted high parity violation effects: synthesis, stereochemical characterization by VCD spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Nidal; Zrig, Samia; Roisnel, Thierry; Guy, Laure; Bast, Radovan; Saue, Trond; Darquié, Benoît; Crassous, Jeanne

    2013-07-14

    With their rich electronic, vibrational, rotational and hyperfine structure, molecular systems have the potential to play a decisive role in precision tests of fundamental physics. For example, electroweak nuclear interactions should cause small energy differences between the two enantiomers of chiral molecules, a signature of parity symmetry breaking. Enantioenriched oxorhenium(VII) complexes S-(-)- and R-(+)-3 bearing a chiral 2-methyl-1-thio-propanol ligand have been prepared as potential candidates for probing molecular parity violation effects via high resolution laser spectroscopy of the Re=O stretching. Although the rhenium atom is not a stereogenic centre in itself, experimental vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra revealed a surrounding chiral environment, evidenced by the Re=O bond stretching mode signal. The calculated VCD spectrum of the R enantiomer confirmed the position of the sulfur atom cis to the methyl, as observed in the solid-state X-ray crystallographic structure, and showed the presence of two conformers of comparable stability. Relativistic quantum chemistry calculations indicate that the vibrational shift between enantiomers due to parity violation is above the target sensitivity of an ultra-high resolution infrared spectroscopy experiment under active preparation.

  14. Infrared laser induced population transfer and parity selection in {sup 14}NH{sub 3}: A proof of principle experiment towards detecting parity violation in chiral molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Dietiker, P.; Miloglyadov, E.; Quack, M. Schneider, A.; Seyfang, G.

    2015-12-28

    We have set up an experiment for the efficient population transfer by a sequential two photon—absorption and stimulated emission—process in a molecular beam to prepare quantum states of well defined parity and their subsequent sensitive detection. This provides a proof of principle for an experiment which would allow for parity selection and measurement of the time evolution of parity in chiral molecules, resulting in a measurement of the parity violating energy difference Δ{sub pv}E between enantiomers of chiral molecules. Here, we present first results on a simple achiral molecule demonstrating efficient population transfer (about 80% on the average for each step) and unperturbed persistence of a selected excited parity level over flight times of about 1.3 ms in the beam. In agreement with model calculations with and without including nuclear hyperfine structure, efficient population transfer can be achieved by a rather simple implementation of the rapid adiabatic passage method of Reuss and coworkers and considering also the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage technique of Bergmann and coworkers as an alternative. The preparation step uses two powerful single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillators of high frequency stability and accuracy. The detection uses a sensitive resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization method after free flight lengths of up to 0.8 m in the molecular beam. Using this technique, we were able to also resolve the nuclear hyperfine structure in the rovibrational levels of the ν{sub 1} and ν{sub 3} fundamentals as well as the 2ν{sub 4} overtone of {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, for which no previous data with hyperfine resolution were available. We present our new results on the quadrupole coupling constants for the ν{sub 1}, ν{sub 3}, and 2ν{sub 4} levels in the context of previously known data for ν{sub 2} and its overtone, as well as ν{sub 4}, and the ground state. Thus, now, {sup 14}N quadrupole coupling constants for all

  15. Chiral effective field theory analysis of hadronic parity violation in few-nucleon systems

    SciTech Connect

    Viviani, M.; Baroni, A.; Girlanda, L.; Kievsky, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Schiavilla, R.

    2014-06-18

    Weak interactions between quarks induce a parity-violating (PV) component in the nucleon-nucleon potential, whose effects are currently being studied in a number of experiments involving few-nucleon systems. In the present work, we reconsider the derivation of this PV component within a chiral effective field theory (${\\chi }$EFT) framework. Purpose: The objectives of the present work are twofold. The first is to perform a detailed analysis of the PV nucleon-nucleon potential up to next-to-next-to-leading (N2LO) order in the chiral expansion, in particular, by determining the number of independent low-energy constants (LECs) at N2LO. The second objective is to investigate PV effects in a number of few-nucleon observables, including the $\\vec{p}$-p longitudinal asymmetry, the neutron spin rotation in n-p and n-d scattering, and the longitudinal asymmetry in the 3He( $\\vec{n}$,p)3H charge-exchange reaction. Methods: The ${\\chi }$EFT PV potential includes one-pion-exchange, two-pion-exchange, and contact terms as well as 1/M (M being the nucleon mass) nonstatic corrections. Dimensional regularization is used to renormalize pion loops. The wave functions for the A=2-4 nuclei are obtained by using strong two- and three-body potentials also derived, for consistency, from ${\\chi }$EFT. In the case of the A=3-4 systems, systems, the wave functions are computed by expanding on a hyperspherical harmonics functions basis. Results: We find that the PV potential at N2LO depends on six LECs: the pion-nucleon PV coupling constant h$1\\atop{π}$ and five parameters multiplying contact interactions. An estimate for the range of values of the various LECs is provided by using available experimental data, and these values are used to obtain predictions for the other PV observables. Conclusions: The ${\\chi }$EFT approach provides a very satisfactory framework to analyze PV effects in few-nucleon systems.

  16. Parity-Violating Electron Scattering from 4He and the Strange Electric Form Factor of the Nucleon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Averett, T.; Benaoum, H.; Bertin, P. Y.; Burtin, E.; Cahoon, J.; Cates, G. D.; Chang, C. C.; Chao, Y.-C.; Chen, J.-P.; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, E.; Craver, B.; Cusanno, F.; Decowski, P.; Deepa, D.; Ferdi, C.; Feuerbach, R. J.; Finn, J. M.; Frullani, S.; Fuoti, K.; Garibaldi, F.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, A.; Gorbenko, V.; Grames, J. M.; Hansknecht, J.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Holmes, R.; Holmstrom, T.; Humensky, T. B.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jiang, X.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kelleher, A.; Kolarkar, A.; Kowalski, S.; Kumar, K. S.; Lambert, D.; Laviolette, P.; Lerose, J.; Lhuillier, D.; Liyanage, N.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Mazouz, M.; McCormick, K.; Meekins, D. G.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Munoz-Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Nelyubin, V.; Neyret, D.; Paschke, K. D.; Poelker, M.; Pomatsalyuk, R.; Qiang, Y.; Reitz, B.; Roche, J.; Saha, A.; Singh, J.; Snyder, R.; Souder, P. A.; Subedi, R.; Suleiman, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Tobias, W. A.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Vacheret, A.; Voutier, E.; Wang, K.; Wilson, R.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Zheng, X.

    2006-01-01

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from He4 at an average scattering angle ⟨θlab⟩=5.7° and a four-momentum transfer Q2=0.091GeV2. From these data, for the first time, the strange electric form factor of the nucleon GEs can be isolated. The measured asymmetry of APV=(6.72±0.84(stat)±0.21(syst))×10-6 yields a value of GEs=-0.038±0.042(stat)±0.010(syst), consistent with zero.

  17. Strange Quark Contributions to Parity-Violating Asymmetries in the Forward G0 Electron-Proton Scattering Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    David Armstrong; Francois Arvieux; Razmik Asaturyan; Todd Averett; Stephanie Bailey; Guillaume Batigne; Douglas Beck; Elizabeth Beise; Jay Benesch; Louis Bimbot; James Birchall; Angela Biselli; Peter Bosted; Elodie Boukobza; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; R. Carr; Nicholas Chant; Yu-Chiu Chao; Swapan Chattopadhyay; Russell Clark; Silviu Covrig; Anthony Cowley; Daniel Dale; C. Davis; Willie Falk; John Finn; Tony Forest; Gregg Franklin; Christophe Furget; David Gaskell; Joseph Grames; Keith Griffioen; Klaus Grimm; Benoit Guillon; Hayko Guler; Lars Hannelius; R. Hasty; A. Hawthorne Allen; Tanja Horn; Kathleen Johnston; Mark Jones; Peter Kammel; Reza Kazimi; Paul King; Ameya Kolarkar; Elie Korkmaz; Wolfgang Korsch; Serge Kox; Joachim Kuhn; Jeff Lachniet; Lawrence Lee; Jason Lenoble; Eric Liatard; J. Liu; Berenice Loupias; A. Lung; Glen MacLachlan; Dominique Marchand; J.W. Martin; Kenneth McFarlane; Daniella Mckee; Robert McKeown; Fernand Merchez; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Bryan Moffit; M. Morlet; Itaru Nakagawa; Kazutaka Nakahara; Melissa Nakos; Retief Neveling; Silvia Niccolai; S. Ong; Shelley Page; Vassilios Papavassiliou; Stephen Pate; Sarah Phillips; Mark Pitt; Benard Poelker; Tracy Porcelli; Gilles Quemener; Brian Quinn; William Ramsay; Aamer Rauf; Jean-Sebastien Real; Julie Roche; Philip Roos; Gary Rutledge; Jeffery Secrest; Neven Simicevic; G.R. Smith; Damon Spayde; Samuel Stepanyan; Marcy Stutzman; Vincent Sulkosky; Vardan Tadevosyan; Raphael Tieulent; Jacques Van de Wiele; Willem van Oers; Eric Voutier; William Vulcan; G. Warren; S.P. Wells; Steven Williamson; S.A. Wood; Chen Yan; Junho Yun; Valdis Zeps

    2005-06-01

    We have measured parity-violating asymmetries in elastic electron-proton scattering over the range of momentum transfers 0.12 < Q{sup 2} < 1.0 GeV{sup 2}. These asymmetries, arising from interference of the electromagnetic and neutral weak interactions, are sensitive to strange quark contributions to the currents of the proton. The measurements were made at JLab using a toroidal spectrometer to detect the recoiling protons from a liquid hydrogen target. The results indicate non-zero, Q{sup 2} dependent, strange quark contributions and provide new information beyond that obtained in previous experiments.

  18. Lepton flavor violating Higgs boson decay h →μ τ in the littlest Higgs model with T parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bingfang; Han, Jinzhong; Liu, Ning

    2017-02-01

    Inspired by the recent CMS h →μ τ excess, we calculate the lepton flavor violating Higgs decay h →μ τ in the littlest Higgs model with T parity (LHT). Under the constraints of ℓi→ℓjγ , Z →ℓiℓ¯j and Higgs data, we find that the branching ratio of h →μ τ can maximally reach O (10-4) . We also investigate the correlation between h →μ τ , τ →μ γ , and Z →μ τ , which can be used to test the LHT model at future e+e- colliders.

  19. Nuclear physics aspects involved in studies of low-Q parity-violating electron scattering from nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, T. W.; Moreno, O.

    2013-11-07

    The parity-violating asymmetry in polarized electron scattering from nuclei can be used to extract information on nuclear and nucleon structure, as well as to determine the values of Standard Model electroweak couplings. To achieve the latter, high precision is needed both in the measured asymmetry and in the underlying nuclear structure theory. For the former a few tenths of a percent may be attainable; for the latter the present discussions have the dual goal of ascertaining both the sizes of various nuclear structure related effects and of providing estimates of their uncertainties.

  20. Low energy tests of the standard model: the 12 GeV parity violation program at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna S. Kumar

    2010-06-01

    We discuss the current status and prospects of an experimental program of parity-violating asymmetry measurements in the scattering of longitudinally polarized electrons off unpolarized fixed targets. In particular, we focus on those measurements where judicious choices of target species and kinematics allows the theoretical predictions to be made purely in terms of fundamental electroweak couplings with little theoretical uncertainty. If such asymmetries are measured with sufficient precision, they are sensitive to new physics at the TeV scale. After reviewing recent results, two new experimental initiatives called MOLLER and SoLID being designed for the Jefferson Laboratory 12 GeV upgrade are discussed.

  1. Parity-violating electron scattering from 4He and the strange electric form factor of the nucleon.

    PubMed

    Aniol, K A; Armstrong, D S; Averett, T; Benaoum, H; Bertin, P Y; Burtin, E; Cahoon, J; Cates, G D; Chang, C C; Chao, Y-C; Chen, J-P; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, E; Craver, B; Cusanno, F; Decowski, P; Deepa, D; Ferdi, C; Feuerbach, R J; Finn, J M; Frullani, S; Fuoti, K; Garibaldi, F; Gilman, R; Glamazdin, A; Gorbenko, V; Grames, J M; Hansknecht, J; Higinbotham, D W; Holmes, R; Holmstrom, T; Humensky, T B; Ibrahim, H; de Jager, C W; Jiang, X; Kaufman, L J; Kelleher, A; Kolarkar, A; Kowalski, S; Kumar, K S; Lambert, D; LaViolette, P; LeRose, J; Lhuillier, D; Liyanage, N; Margaziotis, D J; Mazouz, M; McCormick, K; Meekins, D G; Meziani, Z-E; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Monaghan, P; Munoz-Camacho, C; Nanda, S; Nelyubin, V; Neyret, D; Paschke, K D; Poelker, M; Pomatsalyuk, R; Qiang, Y; Reitz, B; Roche, J; Saha, A; Singh, J; Snyder, R; Souder, P A; Subedi, R; Suleiman, R; Sulkosky, V; Tobias, W A; Urciuoli, G M; Vacheret, A; Voutier, E; Wang, K; Wilson, R; Wojtsekhowski, B; Zheng, X

    2006-01-20

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from 4He at an average scattering angle = 5.7 degrees and a four-momentum transfer Q2 = 0.091 GeV2 . From these data, for the first time, the strange electric form factor of the nucleon G(E)s can be isolated. The measured asymmetry of A(PV) = (6.72 +/- 0.84(stat) +/- 0.21(syst) x 10(-6) yields a value of G(E)s = -0.038 +/- 0.042(stat) +/- 0.010(syst), consistent with zero.

  2. Parity Violation in elastic electron scattering : A first measurment of the parity-violating Asymmetry at Q2 = 0.631 GeV/c2 at Backward Angle.

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Stephanie L.

    2007-05-01

    The goal of Experiment E04-115 (the G0 backward angle measurement) at Jefferson Lab is to investigate the contributions of strange quarks to the fundamental properties of the nucleon. The experiment measures parity-violating asymmetries in elastic electron scattering off hydrogen and quasielastic electron scattering off deuterium at backward angles at Q2 = 0.631 (GeV/c)2 and Q2 = 0.232 (GeV/c)2. The backward angle measurement represents the second phase of the G0 experiment. The first phase, Experiment E00-006 (the G0 forward angle experiment), measured parity-violating asymmetries in elastic electron scattering off hydrogen at forward angles over a Q2 range of 0.1-1.0 (GeV/c)2. The experiments used a polarized electron beam and unpolarized hydrogen and deuterium liquid targets. From these measurements, along with the electromagnetic form factors, one can extract the contribution of the strange quark to the proton's charge and magnetization distributions. This thesis represents a fi

  3. The particle spectrum of parity-violating Poincaré gravitational theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karananas, Georgios K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we investigate the physical spectrum of the gravitational theory based on the Poincaré group with terms that are at most quadratic in tetrad and spin connection, allowing for the presence of parity-even as well as parity-odd invariants. We determine restrictions on the parameters of the action so that all degrees of freedom propagate and are neither ghosts nor tachyons. We show that the addition of parity non-conserving invariants extends the healthy parameter space of the theory. To accomplish our goal, we apply the weak field approximation around flat spacetime and in order to facilitate the analysis, we separate the bilinear action for the excitations into completely independent spin sectors. For this purpose, we employ the spin-projection operator formalism and extend the original basis built previously, to be able to handle the parity-odd pieces.

  4. Measurement of parity-violating spin asymmetries in W± production at midrapidity in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Adare, A.

    2016-03-23

    In this article, we present midrapidity measurements from the PHENIX experiment of large parity-violating single-spin asymmetries of high transverse momentum electrons and positrons from W±/Z decays, produced in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at center of mass energies of √s=500 and 510 GeV. These asymmetries allow direct access to the antiquark polarized parton distribution functions due to the parity-violating nature of the W-boson coupling to quarks and antiquarks. The results presented are based on data collected in 2011, 2012, and 2013 with an integrated luminosity of 240 pb-1, which exceeds previous PHENIX published results by a factor of more than 27.more » In addition, these high Q2 data probe the parton structure of the proton at W mass scale and provide an important addition to our understanding of the antiquark parton helicity distribution functions at an intermediate Bjorken x value of roughly MW/√s=0.16.« less

  5. Probing R -parity violating supersymmetric effects in the exclusive b →c ℓ-ν¯ℓ decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ru-Min; Zhu, Jie; Gan, Hua-Min; Fan, Ying-Ying; Chang, Qin; Xu, Yuan-Guo

    2016-05-01

    Motivated by recent results from the LHCb, BABAR, and Belle Collaborations on B →D(*)ℓ-ν¯ ℓ decays, which significantly deviate from the Standard Model and hint at the possible new physics beyond the Standard Model, we probe the R -parity violating supersymmetric effects in Bc-→ℓ-ν¯ ℓ and B →D(*)ℓ-ν¯ ℓ decays. We find the following: (i) B (Bc-→e-ν¯ e) and B (Bc-→μ-ν¯ μ) are sensitive to the constrained slepton exchange couplings. (ii) The normalized forward-backward asymmetries of B →D e-ν¯ e decays have been greatly affected by the constrained slepton exchange couplings, and their signs could be changed. (iii) All relevant observables in the exclusive b →c τ-ν¯ τ decays and ratios R (D(*)) are sensitive to the slepton exchange coupling, and R (D*) could be enhanced by the constrained slepton exchange coupling to reach each 95% confidence level experimental ranges from BABAR, Belle, and LHCb but not the lower limit of the 95% confidence level experimental average. Our results in this work could be used to probe R -parity violating effects and will correlate with searches for direct supersymmetric signals at the running LHCb and the forthcoming Belle-II.

  6. Measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in inclusive electroproduction of π- near the Delta0 resonance

    DOE PAGES

    Androic, D.; Armstrong, D. S.; Bailey, S. L.; ...

    2012-03-20

    The parity-violating (PV) asymmetry of inclusive π- production in electron scattering from a liquid deuterium target was measured at backward angles. The measurement was conducted as a part of the G0 experiment, at a beam energy of 360 MeV. The physics process dominating pion production for these kinematics is quasi-free photoproduction off the neutron via the Δ0 resonance. In the context of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory (HBχPT), this asymmetry is related to a low energy constant dΔ- that characterizes the parity-violating γNΔ coupling. Zhu et al. calculated dΔ- in a model benchmarked by the large asymmetries seen in hyperon weakmore » radiative decays, and predicted potentially large asymmetries for this process, ranging from Aγ- = -5.2 to +5.2 ppm. The measurement performed in this work leads to Aγ- = -0.36 ± 1.06 ± 0.37 ± 0.03 ppm (where sources of statistical, systematic and theoretical uncertainties are included), which would disfavor enchancements considered by Zhu et al. proportional to Vud/Vus. The measurement is part of a program of inelastic scattering measurements that were conducted by the G0 experiment, seeking to determine the N-Δ axial transition form-factors using PV electron scattering.« less

  7. Parity-violating α-decay of the 3.56 MeV Jπ, T = 0 +, 1 state of 6Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csótó, Attila; Langanke, Karlheinz

    1996-02-01

    We study the parity-violating α + d decay of the lowest 0 + state of 6Li in a microscopic three-cluster model. The initial bound and the final scattering states are described consistently within the same model. The parity-violating decay width is calculated in perturbation theory using the parity-nonconserving nucleon-nucleon interaction of Desplanques, Donoghue and Holstein (DDH). We find that the decay width is sensitive to dynamical degrees of freedom which are beyond the α + p + n model, for example, α excitation and breakup. In our full model, which contains breathing excitations of the α particle and 3H+ 3He rearrangement, the parity-nonconserving decay width is Γ αdPNC = 3.97 × 10 -9 eV, using the DDH weak coupling constants.

  8. Measurement of the Neutron Radius of 208Pb Through Parity Violation in Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak

    2013-05-01

    In contrast to the nuclear charge densities, which have been accurately measured with electron scattering, the knowledge of neutron densities still lack precision. Previous model-dependent hadron experiments suggest the difference between the neutron radius, Rn, of a heavy nucleus and the proton radius, Rp, to be in the order of several percent. To accurately obtain the difference, Rn-Rp, which is essentially a neutron skin, the Jefferson Lab Lead (208Pb) Radius Experiment (PREX) measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from 208Pb at an energy of 1.06 GeV and a scattering angle of 5° . Since Z0 boson couples mainly to neutrons, this asymmetry provides a clean measurement of Rn with respect to Rp. PREX was conducted at the Jefferson lab experimental Hall A, from March to June 2010. The experiment collected a final data sample of 2x 107 helicity-window quadruplets. The measured parity-violating electroweak asymmetry APV = 0.656 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.014 (syst) ppm corresponds to a difference between the radii of the neutron and proton distributions, Rn-Rp = 0.33+0.16-0.18 fm and provides the first electroweak observation of the neutron skin as expected in a heavy, neutron-rich nucleus. The value of the neutron radius of 208Pb has important implications for models of nuclear structure and their application in atomic physics and astrophysics such as atomic parity non-conservation (PNC) and neutron stars.

  9. An analysis of the parity violating asymmetry of polarized neutron capture in hydrogen from the NPDgamma experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Elise

    The NPDgamma Experiment is used to study the n[special character omitted] + p → d + gamma reaction for the purpose of examining the hadronic weak interaction. The nucleon-nucleon interaction is overwhelmingly mediated by the strong force, however, the weak part can be extracted by a study of its parity violating manifestations. When neutrons are incident on protons, deuterons and 2.2 MeV gamma rays are produced. If the incoming neutrons are polarized, the parity violating weak interaction gives rise to a measured spatial asymmetry, A , in the outgoing gamma rays, as sigma[special character omitted] n · k[special character omitted] gamma is parity odd. At low energies, the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction can be modeled as meson exchange and characterized with six parameters. NPDgamma is sensitive to one of these parameters, hpi. Previous measurements that extrapolate hpi from more complicated interactions disagree, and disagree with the theoretical reasonable range. Additionally, a previous iteration of the NPDgamma Experiment performed at Los Alamos National Lab was statistics limited in its measurement of Agamma. For this reason, a new measurement was performed at the high neutron flux Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Lab. In the experiment, a high ux of cold neutrons was polarized to ˜95% by a supermirror polarizer, the spins flipped in a defined sequence by a radio-frequency spin rotator, and then the neutrons captured on a 16L liquid para-hydrogen target, which emits gamma-rays asymmetrically upon capture. The gamma-rays are detected in a 3pi array of 48 CsI crystal detectors. This thesis discusses the NPDgamma Experiment in detail, and includes an analysis of subset of the NPDgamma data that has unique timing and data acquisition properties that preclude it being analyzed with the combined data set. Agamma was extracted with a result of (6.254 +/- 37.694) x 10-9.

  10. Determination of the weak charge of the proton through parity violating asymmetry measurements in the elastic e+p scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Subedi, Adesh

    2014-12-01

    The Qweak experiment has taken data to make a 2.5% measurement of parity violating elastic e+p asymmetry in the four momentum transfer region of 0.0250 (GeV/c)2. This asymmetry is proportional to the weak charge of the proton, which is related to the weak mixing angle, sin2(theta_W). The final Qweak measurement will provide the most precise measurement of the weak mixing angle below the Z0 pole to test the Standard Model prediction. A description of the experimental apparatus is provided in this dissertation. The experiment was carried out using a longitudinally polarized electron beam of up to 180 microampere on a 34.5 cm long unpolarized liquid hydrogen target. The Qweak target is not only the world's highest cryogenic target ever built for a parity experiment but also is the least noisy target. This dissertation provides a detailed description of this target and presents a thorough analysis of the target performance. Statistical analysis of Run 1 data, collected between Feb - May 2011, is done to extract a blinded parity violating asymmetry of size -299.7 ± 13.4 (stat.) ± 17.2 (syst.) ± 68 (blinding) parts-per-billion. This resulted in a preliminary proton's weak charge of value 0.0865 ± 0.0085, a 9% measurement. Based on this blinded asymmetry, the weak mixing angle was determined to be sin2(theta_W) = 0.23429 ± 0.00211.

  11. A Measurement of the Weak Charge of the Proton through Parity Violating Electron Scattering using the Q{sub weak} Apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Beminiwattha, Rakitha S.

    2013-12-01

    After a decade of preparations, the Q{sub weak} experiment at Jefferson Lab is making the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton, Q{sub weak}. Because this quantity is suppressed in the Standard Model, a 4% result will significantly constrain new physics at the TeV scale while providing the most precise measurement of sin{sup 2}{theta}{sub W} at low energies. Operationally, we measure the small (about -0.220 ppm) parity violating asymmetry in electron-proton scattering in integrating mode while flipping the longitudinal polarization of the electrons up to 1000 times per second. Potential sources of new, parity violating interactions between electrons and light quarks include a Z', lepto-quarks, and parity violating SUSY interactions. The result presented here is based on the data taken during an initial two weeks period which included a 16.7% measurement of the parity violating electron-proton ({vec e}p) scattering asymmetry, A=-0.279{+-}0.035(stat.){+-}0.031(syst.) ppm at Q{sup 2}=0.0250{+-}0.0006(GeV){sup 2}. The weak charge of the proton is extracted by performing a global analysis on parity violating electron scattering (PVES) asymmetries on nuclear targets and it is Q{sub W}{sup p}=0.064{+-}0.012. Then effective vector couplings of the up/down quarks (C{sub 1u}/C{sub 1d}) and weak charge of the neutron are extracted by combining precise {sup 133}Cs atomic parity violating (APV) measurement and PVES measurements. The result is a proof of principle for the analysis of the full Q{sub weak} data to be completed in the near future.

  12. Parity violation in nuclear magnetic resonance frequencies of chiral tetrahedral tungsten complexes NWXYZ (X, Y, Z = H, F, Cl, Br or I)

    SciTech Connect

    Nahrwold, Sophie Berger, Robert; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2014-01-14

    Density functional theory within the two-component quasi-relativistic zeroth-order regular approximation (ZORA) is used to predict parity violation shifts in {sup 183}W nuclear magnetic resonance shielding tensors of chiral, tetrahedrally bonded tungsten complexes of the form NWXYZ (X, Y, Z = H, F, Cl, Br or I), as well as for the heavier systems NWHAtF and NWH(117)F for comparison. The calculations reveal that sub-mHz accuracy is required to detect such tiny effects in this class of compounds, and that parity violation effects are very sensitive to the choice of ligands.

  13. Low scale seesaw, electron EDM and leptogenesis in a model with spontaneous CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Mahanthappa, K.T.; /Colorado U.

    2006-09-01

    Strong correlations between leptogenesis and low energy CP violating leptonic processes have been shown by us to exist fin the minimal left-right symmetric model with spontaneous CP violation. In this note, they investigate the implications of this model for the electric dipole moment of the electron. With an additional broken U(1){sub H} symmetry, the seesaw scale can be lowered to close to the electroweak scale. This additional symmetry also makes the connection between CP violation in quark sector to that in the lepton sector possible.

  14. Local Parity Violation in the Strong Interactions and Parton Collectivity in Gold+Gold Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangadharan, Dhevan

    Relativistic heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) provide a unique opportunity to study physics under very extraordinary energy densities which only exist in the core of very dense stars and during the time of a Big Bang. Azimuthal angular correlations of particles at the Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) allow us to study the possibility of new physics which may arise in these situations. Here we study two types of azimuthal correlations with respect to the impact parameter of the heavy-ion collision. Azimuthal correlations which are asymmetric across the reaction-plane are shown to be sensitive to the local violation of parity in the strong interactions. Violation of parity in the weak interactions has been experimentally observed in a variety of physical systems since its discovery in 1956. It has never been experimentally observed in the strong interactions. The formalism involved with its breaking also carries over into electro-weak theory where instead of parity being broken, baryon+lepton number conservation is broken. This has implications on the matter anti-matter asymmetry we observe in the universe. A measurement of a correlation function directly sensitive to local parity violation in the strong interactions is found to yield a signal in partial qualitative agreement with theoretical expectations. No known physics background from existing dynamical models of heavy-ion collisions has been found to mimic the signal. However, upon closer inspection of the correlation as a function of the observed charge separation, we find the signal to be even stronger over a subset of events with zero charge separation. As the signal must be caused by non-zero charge separation to be P-odd, its existence in events with zero charge separation suggests alternate P-even explanations. We conclude that since the signal is even larger in events with zero charge separation we find no convincing evidence for local parity violation in the strong

  15. Spin-parity effect in violation of Bell’s inequalities for entangled states of parallel polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haifeng; Wang, Jianhua; Song, Zhigang; Liang, J.-Q.; Wei, L.-F.

    2017-02-01

    Bell’s inequalities (BIs) derived in terms of quantum probability statistics are extended to general bipartite-entangled states of arbitrary spins with parallel polarization. The original formula of Bell for the two-spin singlet is slightly modified in the parallel configuration, while the inequality formulated by Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) remains unchanged. The violation of BIs indeed resulted from the quantum nonlocal correlation for spin-1 2 case. However, the inequalities are always satisfied for the spin-1 entangled states regardless of parallel or antiparallel polarizations of two spins. The spin parity effect originally demonstrated with the antiparallel spin-polarizations (Z. Song, J.-Q. Liang and L.-F. Wei, Mod. Phys. Lett. B 28 (2013) 145004) still exists for the parallel case. The quantum nonlocality does not lead to the violation for integer spins due to the cancellation of nonlocal interference effects by the quantum statistical average. Again, the violation of BIs seems to be a result of the measurement-induced nontrivial Berry phase (BP) for half-integer spins.

  16. Study of parity and time reversal violation in neutron-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Yi-Fen; Bowman, J.D.; Frankle, C.M.; Crawford, B.E. |

    1994-12-31

    The parity and time-reversal symmetries can be studies in neutron-nucleus interactions. Parity non-conserving asymmetries have been observed for many p-wave resonances in a compound nucleus and measurements were performed on several nuclei in the mass region of A{approximately}100 and A{approximately}230. The statistical model of the compound nucleus provides a theoretical basis for extracting mean-squared matrix elements from the experimental asymmetry data, and for interpreting the mean-squared matrix elements. The constraints on the weak meson-exchange couplings calculated from the compound-nucleus asymmetry data agree qualitatively with the results from few-body and light-nuclei experiments. The tests of time-reversal invariance in various experiments using thermal, epithermal and MeV neutrons are being developed.

  17. Manifestations of {ital R}-parity violation in ultrahigh-energy neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Carena, M.; Choudhury, D.; Lola, S.; Quigg, C.

    1998-11-01

    Supersymmetric couplings that do not respect {ital R} parity can induce significant changes in the interaction rates of ultrahigh-energy neutrinos through the direct-channel production of superpartner resonances and can provide new sources of extremely energetic {tau} leptons. We analyze the possible observable consequences of R/ transitions in large-volume neutrino telescopes. thinsp {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. A measurement of the parity-violating parameter A(B) with electrons at the SLD using a neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.

    2004-01-05

    The parity violating parameter A{sub b} of the Z{sup 0} {yields} b{bar b} coupling has been measured directly using the angular dependence of the Z{sup 0}-pole polarized cross section. Bottom hadrons are tagged via semileptonic decays. The semileptonic channel used in this analysis is the electron channel. The analysis takes advantage of a new Neural network algorithm to classify electrons according to the sources: b {yields} e, b {yields} c {yields} e, c {yields} e and background events. Based on the 1996-1998 SLD sample of 350,000 Z{sup 0} decays produced with highly polarized electron beams, this technique yields: A{sub b} = 0.877 {+-} 0.030(stat) {+-} 0.028(syst).

  19. Data analysis of the parity violating elastic proton asymmetry of the first commissioning of the G^0 experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jianglai

    2003-10-01

    G^0 (JLab experiment E00-006, D.H. Beck, spokesperson.) is an experiment to study parity-violating (PV) elastic electron-proton scattering. The PV asymmetry of the scattering cross-section is sensitive to the contribution of strange quarks to the proton's electromagnetic structure. The first commissioning of the G0 hardware took place in late 2002/early 2003 in Hall C at Jefferson Lab, during which several days of asymmetry data were acquired. In this talk, a summary of the data analysis will be presented, as well as preliminary results from the two days of asymmetry running. The report will include a discussion of the statistical properties of the data and of the dominant systematic effects, including electronic deadtime, target density fluctuations, beam induced false asymmetry and background due to inelastic scattering.

  20. Non-renormalizable operators for solar neutrino mass generation in Split SuSy with bilinear R-parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, Marco Aurelio; Koch, Benjamin; Rojas, Nicolás

    2017-03-01

    The Minimal Supersymmetric Extension of the Standard Model (MSSM) is able to explain the current data from neutrino physics. Unfortunately Split Supersymmetry as low energy approximation of this theory fails to generate a solar square mass difference, including after the addition of bilinear R-Parity Violation. In this work, it is shown how one can derive an effective low energy theory from the MSSM in the spirit of Split Supersymmetry, which has the potential of explaining the neutrino phenomenology. This is achieved by going beyond leading order in the process of integrating out heavy scalars from the original theory, which results in non-renormalizable operators in the effective low energy theory. It is found that in particular a d = 8 operator is crucial for the generation of the neutrino mass differences.

  1. Parity-Violating Electron Scattering from {sup 4}He and the Strange Electric Form Factor of the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Aniol, Konrad; Armstrong, David; Averett, Todd; Benaoum, Hachemi; Bertin, Pierre; Burtin, Etienne; Cahoon, Jason; Cates, Gordon; Chang, C; Chao, Yu-Chiu; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Craver, Brandon; Cusanno, Francesco; Decowski, Piotr; Deepa, Deepa; Ferdi, Catherine; Feuerbach, Robert; Finn, John; Frullani, Salvatore; Fuoti, Kirsten; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Gorbenko, V; Grames, Joseph; Hansknecht, John; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmes, Richard; Holmstrom, Timothy; Humensky, Thomas; Ibrahim, Hassan; Jager, Cornelis De; Jiang, Xiaodong; Kaufman, Lisa; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Kowalski, Stanley; Kumar, Krishna; Lambert, Daniel; Laviolette, Peter; LeRose, John; Lhuillier, David; Liyanage, Nilanga; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Mazouz, Malek; McCormick, Kathy; Meekins, David; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Monaghan, Peter; Camacho, Carlos Munoz; Nanda, Sirish; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Neyret, Damien; Paschke, Kent; Poelker, Benard; Pomatsalyuk, Roman; Qiang, Yi; Reitz, Bodo; Roche, Julie; Saha, Arunava; Singh, Jaideep; Snyder, Ryan; Souder, Paul; Subedi, Ramesh; Suleiman, Riad; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tobias, William; Urciuoli, Guido; Vacheret, Antonin; Voutier, Eric; Wang, Kebin; Wilson, R; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Zheng, Xiaochao

    2005-06-01

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from {sup 4}He at an average scattering angle {theta}{sub lab} = 5.7 degrees and a four-momentum transfer Q{sup 2} = 0.091 GeV{sup 2}. From these data, for the first time, the strange electric form factor of the nucleon G{sub E}{sup s} can be isolated. The measured asymmetry of A{sub PV} = 6.72 {+-} 0.84 (stat) {+-} 0.21 (syst) parts per million yields a value of G{sub E}{sup s} = -0.038 {+-} 0.042 (stat) {+-} 0.010 (syst), consistent with zero.

  2. Dominance of Pion Exchange in {ital {ital R}}-Parity-Violating Supersymmetric Contributions to Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, A.; Kovalenko, S.; Simkovic, F.; Schwieger, J.; Kovalenko, S.; Simkovic, F.; Simkovic, F.

    1997-01-01

    We present a new contribution of the R-parity-violating (R/{sub p}) supersymmetry (SUSY) to neutrinoless double beta decay (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) via the pion exchange between decaying neutrons. The pion coupling to the final state electrons is induced by the R/{sub p} SUSY interactions. We have found this pion-exchange mechanism to dominate over the conventional two-nucleon one. The latter corresponds to direct interaction between quarks from two decaying neutrons without any light hadronic mediator like {pi} meson. The constraints on the certain R/{sub p} SUSY parameters are extracted from the current experimental 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay half-life limit. These constraints are significantly stronger than those previously known or expected from the ongoing accelerator experiments. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Two-Photon-Exchange and {gamma}Z-Exchange Corrections to Parity-Violating Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Haiqing; Kao Chungwen; Yang Shinnan

    2007-12-31

    Leading electroweak corrections play an important role in precision measurements of the strange form factors. We calculate the two-photon-exchange (TPE) and {gamma}Z-exchange corrections to the parity-violating asymmetry of the elastic electron-proton scattering in a simple hadronic model including the finite size of the proton. We find both can reach a few percent and are comparable in size with the current experimental measurements of strange-quark effects in the proton neutral weak current. The effect of {gamma}Z exchange is in general larger than that of TPE, especially at low momentum transfer Q{sup 2}{<=}1 GeV{sup 2}. Their combined effects on the values of G{sub E}{sup s}+G{sub M}{sup s} extracted in recent experiments can be as large as -40% in certain kinematics.

  4. Parity-Violating Electron Scattering from {sup 4}He and the Strange Electric Form Factor of the Nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Aniol, K.A.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Armstrong, D.S.; Averett, T.; Finn, J.M.; Holmstrom, T.; Kelleher, A.; Moffit, B.; Sulkosky, V.; Benaoum, H.; Holmes, R.; Souder, P.A.; Bertin, P.Y.; Ferdi, C.

    2006-01-20

    We have measured the parity-violating electroweak asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from {sup 4}He at an average scattering angle <{theta}{sub lab}>=5.7 deg. and a four-momentum transfer Q{sup 2}=0.091 GeV{sup 2}. From these data, for the first time, the strange electric form factor of the nucleon G{sub E}{sup s} can be isolated. The measured asymmetry of A{sub PV}=(6.72{+-}0.84{sub (stat)}{+-}0.21{sub (syst)})x10{sup -6} yields a value of G{sub E}{sup s}=-0.038{+-}0.042{sub (stat)}{+-}0.010{sub (syst)}, consistent with zero.

  5. Measurement of the Neutron Radius of 208Pb Through Parity-Violation in Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Abrahamyan, Sergey; Albataineh, Hisham; Aniol, Konrad; Armstrong, David; Armstrong, Whitney; Averett, Todd; Babineau, Benjamin; Barbieri, A.; Bellini, Vincenzo; Beminiwattha, Rakitha; Benesch, Jay; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bierlarski, Trevor; Boeglin, Werner; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Carter, Philip; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian-Ping; Hen, O.; Cusanno, Francesco; Dalton, Mark; De Leo, Raffaele; De Jager, Cornelis; Deconinck, Wouter; Decowski, Piotr; Deng, Xiaoyan; Deur, Alexandre; Dutta, Dipangkar; Etile, Asenath; Flay, David; Franklin, Gregg; Friend, Megan; Frullani, Salvatore; Fuchey, Eric; Garibaldi, Franco; Gasser, Estelle; Gilman, Ronald; Guisa, Antonio; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Gomez, Javier; Grames, Joseph; Gu, Chao; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Hansknecht, John; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmes, Richard; Holmstrom, Timothy; Horowitz, Charles; Hoskins, Joshua; Huang, Jin; Hyde, Charles; Itard, Florian; Jen, Chun-Min; Jensen, Eric; Jin, Ge; Johnston, Sereres; Kelleher, Aidan; Kliakhandler, Konstantin; King, Paul; Kowalski, Stanley; Kumar, Krishna; Leacock, John; Leckey, John; Lee, Jeong Han; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Lubinsky, Nicholas; Mammei, Juliette; Mammoliti, Francesco; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; McCreary, Amber; McNulty, Dustin; Mercado, Luis; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Mihovilovic, Miha; Muangma, Navaphon; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nanda, Sirish; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Nuruzzaman, .; Oh, Yongseok; Palmer, Alvin; Parno, Diana; Paschke, Kent; Phillips, Sarah; Poelker, Benard; Pomatsalyuk, Roman; Posik, Matthew; Puckett, Andrew; Quinn, Brian; Rakhman, A.; Reimer, Paul; Riordan, Seamus; Rogan, Patrick; Ron, Guy; Russo, Guiseppe; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Shahinyan, Albert; Silwal, Rupesh; Sirca, Simon; Slifer, Karl; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Souder, Paul; Leda Sperduto, Maria; Subedi, Ramesh; Suleiman, Riad; Sulkosky, Vincent; Sutera, Concetta; Tobias, William; Troth, Wolfgang; Urciuoli, Guido; Buddhini Waidyawansa, Dinayadura; Wang, Diancheng; Wexler, Jonathan; Wilson, Richard; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, Xinhu; Yao, Huan; Ye, Yunxiu; Ye, Zhiohong; Yim, Vireak; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jixie; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Pengjia

    2012-03-15

    We report the first measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry APV in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from 208Pb. APV is sensitive to the radius of the neutron distribution (Rn). The result APV = 0.656 ± 0.060 (stat) ± 0.013 (syst) corresponds to a difference between the radii of the neutron and proton distributions Rn-Rp = 0.33-0.18+0.16 fm and provides the first electroweak observation of the neutron skin which is expected in a heavy, neutron-rich nucleus.

  6. On parity-violating three-nucleon interactions and the predictive power of few-nucleon EFT at very low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grießhammer, H. W.; Schindler, M. R.

    2010-10-01

    We address the typical strengths of hadronic parity-violating three-nucleon interactions in “pion-less” Effective Field Theory (EFT) in the nucleon-deuteron (iso-doublet) system. By analysing the superficial degree of divergence of loop diagrams, we conclude that no such interactions are needed at leading order, ensuremath {O}(ɛ Q^{-1}) . The only two distinct parity-violating three-nucleon structures with one derivative mix ensuremath ^2S_{1/2} and ensuremath ^2P_{1/2} waves with iso-spin transitions Δ I = 0 or 1. Due to their structure, they cannot absorb any divergence ostensibly appearing at next-to-leading order, ensuremath {O}(ɛ Q^0) . This observation is based on the approximate realisation of Wigner’s combined SU(4) spin-isospin symmetry in the two-nucleon system, even when effective-range corrections are included. Parity-violating three-nucleon interactions thus only appear beyond next-to-leading order. This guarantees renormalisability of the theory to that order without introducing new, unknown coupling constants and allows the direct extraction of parity-violating two-nucleon interactions from three-nucleon experiments.

  7. Neutrino masses and mixings from supersymmetry with bilinear R-parity violation: A theory for solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirsch, M.; Díaz, M. A.; Porod, W.; Romão, J. C.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2000-12-01

    The simplest unified extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with bilinear R-parity violation naturally predicts a hierarchical neutrino mass spectrum, in which one neutrino acquires mass by mixing with neutralinos, while the other two get mass radiatively. We have performed a full one-loop calculation of the neutralino-neutrino mass matrix in the bilinear R/p minimal supersymmetric standard model, taking special care to achieve a manifestly gauge invariant calculation. Moreover we have performed the renormalization of the heaviest neutrino, needed in order to get meaningful results. The atmospheric mass scale and maximal mixing angle arise from tree-level physics, while solar neutrino scale and oscillations follow from calculable one-loop corrections. If universal supergravity assumptions are made on the soft-supersymmetry breaking terms then the atmospheric scale is calculable as a function of a single R/p violating parameter by the renormalization group evolution due to the nonzero bottom quark Yukawa coupling. The solar neutrino problem must be accounted for by the small mixing angle Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) solution. If these assumptions are relaxed then one can implement large mixing angle solutions. The theory predicts the lightest supersymmetic particle decay to be observable at high-energy colliders, despite the smallness of neutrino masses indicated by experiment. This provides an independent way to test this solution of the atmospheric and solar neutrino anomalies.

  8. Multi-leptons and top-jets in the hunt for gluinos in R-parity violating supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Sanjoy; Ghosh, Diptimoy; Niyogi, Saurabh

    2014-06-01

    The presence of R-parity violation offers intersting decay channels for the gluinos. In this work we present a new search strategy for the gluinos in the presence of semileptonic violating couplings and . We consider two scenarios (i) λ' induced 3-body decay of gluinos to a top quark ( t), a bottom quark ( b) and a light lepton ( ℓ) (ii) cascade decay of gluinos to top quarks and neutralinos followed by the decay of to t, b and ℓ through λ' couplings. We present two different search procedures which are common to both the scenarios. While the first one involves the traditional approach with multi-leptons and b-tagged jets, the second one employs the more recent technique to reconstruct highly energetic hadronically decaying top quarks. We perform a detailed simulation of the signal as well as all the relevant Standard Model backgrounds to show that the second procedure offers slightly better sensitivity for gluino discovery. In both the procedures, a ≥ 5σ discovery is possible for the gluino mass in the range 1.5-1.7 TeV at 14 TeV LHC with 50 fb-1 integrated luminosity.

  9. Calculations of the neutron skin and its effect in atomic parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B. A.; Derevianko, A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2009-03-15

    We perform calculations for the neutron skin of nuclei and its contribution to atomic parity nonconservation (PNC) in many isotopes of Cs, Ba, Sm, Dy, Yb, Tl, Pb, Bi, Fr, and Ra. Three problems are addressed: (i) neutron-skin-induced errors to single-isotope PNC, (ii) the possibility of measuring neutron skin using atomic PNC, and (iii) neutron-skin-induced errors for ratios of PNC effects in different isotopes. In the latter case the correlations in the neutron skin values for different isotopes lead to cancellations of the errors; this makes the isotopic ratio method a competitive tool in a search for new physics beyond the standard model.

  10. Confirmation of parity violation in the {gamma} decay of {sup 180}Hf{sup m}

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, J. R.; Goldring, G.; Hass, M.; Lakshmi, S.; Stone, N. J.; Severijns, N.; Kraev, I. S.; Wauters, F.; Zakoucky, D.; Giles, T.; Lindroos, M.; Koester, U.

    2007-08-15

    This paper reports measurements made using the technique of online nuclear orientation which reexamine the {gamma} decay of isomeric {sup 180}Hf{sup m} and specifically the 501 keV 8{sup -}6{sup +} transition. The irregular admixture of E2 to M2/E3 multipolarity in this transition, deduced from the forward-backward asymmetry of its angular distribution, has for decades stood as the prime evidence for parity mixing in nuclear states. The experiment, based on ion implantation of the newly developed mass-separated {sup 180}Hf{sup m} beam at the CERN online isotope mass separator (ISOLDE) facility into an iron foil maintained at millikelvin temperatures, produces higher degrees of polarization than were achieved in previous studies of this system. The value found for the E2/M2 mixing ratio, {epsilon}=-0.0324(16)(19), is in close agreement with the previous published average value {epsilon}=-0.030(2), in full confirmation of the presence of the irregular E2 admixture in the 501 keV transition. The temperature dependence of the forward-backward asymmetry has been measured over a more extended range of nuclear polarization than previously possible, giving further evidence for parity mixing of the 8{sup -} and 8{sup +} levels and the deduced E2/M2 mixing ratio.

  11. Supersymmetry and R-parity: an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    2015-08-01

    This article provides a brief overview of some of the theoretical aspects of R-parity violation (RPV) in the minimal supersymmetric standard model and its extensions. Both spontaneous and explicit RPV models are discussed and some consequences are outlined. In particular, it is emphasized that the simplest supersymmetric theories based on local B-L predict that R-parity must be a broken symmetry, a fact which makes a compelling case for taking R-parity breaking seriously in discussions of supersymmetry phenomenology. Invited article for the Richard Arnowitt memorial focus issue

  12. Searches for R -parity-violating supersymmetry in p p collisions at √{s }=8 TeV in final states with 0-4 leptons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Forthomme, L.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Fernandez Perez Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Fang, W.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Leggat, D.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Ferencek, D.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Carrera Jarrin, E.; Abdelalim, A. A.; El-khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Perrini, L.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Abdulsalam, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Dobrzynski, L.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; Van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Popov, A.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schomakers, C.; Schulte, J. 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J.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Filipovic, N.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Nayak, A.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. 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M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. 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M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Passaseo, M.; Pazzini, J.; Pegoraro, M.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Vanini, S.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Traczyk, P.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; La Licata, C.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Oh, Y. D.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Song, S.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Jo, Y.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Mejia Guisao, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Qazi, S.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. 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V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras De Saa, J. R.; Curras, E.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Benhabib, L.; Berruti, G. M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Fartoukh, S.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Sauvan, J. B.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. 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W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Penning, B.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Benelli, G.; Berry, E.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Jesus, O.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Winstrom, L.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cremonesi, M.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Lewis, J.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Santra, A.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bruner, C.; Castle, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Rupprecht, N.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y.-T.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Randall, S.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Verwilligen, P.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2016-12-01

    Results are presented from searches for R -parity-violating supersymmetry in events produced in p p collisions at √{s }=8 TeV at the LHC. Final states with 0, 1, 2, or multiple leptons are considered independently. The analysis is performed on data collected by the CMS experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1 . No excesses of events above the standard model expectations are observed, and 95% confidence level limits are set on supersymmetric particle masses and production cross sections. The results are interpreted in models featuring R -parity-violating decays of the lightest supersymmetric particle, which in the studied scenarios can be either the gluino, a bottom squark, or a neutralino. In a gluino pair production model with baryon number violation, gluinos with a mass less than 0.98 and 1.03 TeV are excluded, by analyses in a fully hadronic and one-lepton final state, respectively. An analysis in a dilepton final state is used to exclude bottom squarks with masses less than 307 GeV in a model considering bottom squark pair production. Multilepton final states are considered in the context of either strong or electroweak production of superpartners and are used to set limits on the masses of the lightest supersymmetric particles. These limits range from 300 to 900 GeV in models with leptonic and up to approximately 700 GeV in models with semileptonic R -parity-violating couplings.

  13. Measuring the Weak Charge of the Proton and the Hadronic Parity Violation of the N → Δ Transition

    SciTech Connect

    Leacock, John D.

    2012-10-16

    Qweak will determine the weak charge of the proton, Qp{sub W}, via an asymmetry measurement of parity-violating elastic electron-proton scattering at low four momentum transfer to a precision of 4%. QpW has a firm Standard Model prediction and is related to the weak mixing angle, sin2 ΦW, a well-defined Standard Model parameter. Qweak will probe a subset of new physics to the TeV mass scale and test the Standard Model. The details of how this measurement was performed and the analysis of the 25% elastic dataset will be presented in this thesis. Also, an analysis of an auxiliary measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in the N → Δ transition is presented. It is used as a systematic inelastic background correction in the elastic analysis and to extract information about the hadronic parity violation through the low energy constant, dΔ. The elastic asymmetry at Q2 = 0.0252 ± 0.0007 GeV2 was measured to be Aep = -265 ± 40 ± 22 ± 68 ppb (stat., sys., and blinding). Extrapolated to Q2 = 0, the value of the proton's weak charge was measured to be QpW = 0.077 ± 0.019 (stat. and sys.) ± 0.026 (blinding). This is within 1 σ of the Standard Model prediction of QpW = 0.0705 ± 0.0008. The N → Δ inelastic asymmetry at Q2 = 0.02078 ± 0.0005 GeV2 and W = 1205 MeV was measured to be Ainel = -3.03 ± 0.65 ± 0.73 ± 0.07 ppm (stat., sys., and blinding). This result constrains the low energy constant to be dΔ = 5.8 ± 22gπ, and, if the result of the G0 experiment is included, dΔ = 5.8 ± 17gπ. This result rules out suggested large values of dΔ motivated by radiative hyperon decays. The elastic measurement is the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton while the inelastic measurement is only the second

  14. Parity-violating asymmetry in the {sup 3}He(n-vector,p){sup 3}H reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Viviani, M.; Kievsky, A.; Schiavilla, R.; Girlanda, L.; Marcucci, L. E.

    2010-10-15

    The longitudinal asymmetry induced by parity-violating (PV) components in the nucleon-nucleon potential is studied in the charge-exchange reaction {sup 3}He(n-vector,p){sup 3}H at vanishing incident neutron energies. An expression for the PV observable is derived in terms of T-matrix elements for transitions from the {sup 2S+1}L{sub J}={sup 1}S{sub 0} and {sup 3}S{sub 1} states in the incoming n-{sup 3}He channel to states with J=0 and 1 in the outgoing p-{sup 3}H channel. The T-matrix elements involving PV transitions are obtained in first-order perturbation theory in the hadronic weak-interaction potential, while those connecting states of the same parity are derived from solutions of the strong-interaction Hamiltonian with the hyperspherical-harmonics method. The coupled-channel nature of the scattering problem is fully accounted for. Results are obtained corresponding to realistic or chiral two- and three-nucleon strong-interaction potentials in combination with either the DDH or pionless EFT model for the weak-interaction potential. The asymmetries, predicted with PV pion and vector-meson coupling constants corresponding (essentially) to the DDH ''best values'' set, range from -9.44 to -2.48 in units of 10{sup -8}, depending on the input strong-interaction Hamiltonian. This large model dependence is a consequence of cancellations between long-range (pion) and short-range (vector-meson) contributions and is of course sensitive to the assumed values for the PV coupling constants.

  15. Measuring the anti-quark contribution to the proton spin using parity violating W production in polarized proton proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Ciprian

    Since the 1980s the spin puzzle has been at the heart of many experimental measurements. The initial discovery that only ~30% of the spin of the proton comes from quarks and anti-quarks has been refined and cross checked by several other deep inelastic scattering (DIS) and semi inclusive DIS (SIDIS) experiments. Through measurements of polarized parton distribution functions (PDFs) the individual contributions of the u, d, u, d, quarks have been measured. The flavor separation done in SIDIS experiments requires knowledge of fragmentation functions (FFs). However, due to the higher uncertainty of the anti-quark FFs compared to the quark FFs, the quark polarized PDFs (Deltau(x), Delta d(x)) are significantly better constrained than the anti-quark distributions (Deltau( x), Deltad(x). By accessing the anti-quarks directly through W boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions (ud → W+ → e+/mu+ and du→ W- → e-/mu-), the large FF uncertainties are avoided and a cleaner measurement can be done. The parity violating single spin asymmetry of the W decay leptons can be directly related to the polarized PDFs of the anti-quarks. The W+/- → e+/- measurement has been performed with the PHENIX central arm detectors at √s=510 GeV at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and is presented in this thesis. Approximately 40 pb-1 of data from the 2011 and 2012 was analyzed and a large parity violating single spin asymmetry for W+/- has been measured. The combined data for 2011 and 2012 provide a single spin asymmetry for both charges: W+: -0.27 +/- 0.10(stat) +/- 0.01(syst) W -: 0.28 +/- 0.16(stat) +/- 0.02(syst) These results are consistent with the different theoretical predictions at the 1sigma level. The increased statistical precision enabled and required a more careful analysis of the background contamination for the this measurement. A method based on Gaussian Processes for Regression has been employed to determine this background contribution. This

  16. Violation of the weak energy condition: Is it generic of spontaneous scalarization?

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, Marcelo; Sudarsky, Daniel; Nucamendi, Ulises

    2004-10-15

    It was recently shown by Whinnett and Torres [A. W. Whinnett and D. F. Torres, Astrophys. J. 603, L133 (2004).] that the phenomenon of spontaneous scalarization in compact objects (polytropes) was accompanied also by a spontaneous violation of the weak energy condition (WEC). Notably, by the encounter of negative-energy densities as measured by a static observer at several points of the star. Here we argue that such a situation is not generic of scalar-tensor theories of gravity (STT). We support this conclusion by numerical results within a class of STT and by using three realistic models of dense matter. However, we show that the 'angular parts' of the additional conditions needed for the WEC to hold {rho}{sub eff}+T{sub i}{sup i(eff)}{>=}0 tend to be 'slightly violated' at the outskirts of the star.

  17. A simple method to detect spontaneous CP violation in multi-Higgs models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogreid, O. M.; Osland, P.; Rebelo, M. N.

    2017-08-01

    For models with several Higgs doublets we present an alternative method to the one proposed by Branco, Gerard and Grimus, in 1984, to check whether or not CP is spontaneously violated in the Higgs potential. The previous method is powerful and rigorous. It requires the identification of a matrix U corresponding to a symmetry of the Lagrangian and verifying a simple relation involving the vacuum expectation values. The nonexistence of such a matrix signals spontaneous CP violation. This approach may be far from trivial as complexity grows with the number of Higgs doublets. In such cases it may turn out to be easier to analyse the potential by going to the so-called Higgs basis. The transformation to the Higgs basis is straightforward once the vacuum expectation values are known. The method proposed in this work is also powerful and rigorous and can be particularly useful to analyse models with more than two Higgs doublets and with continuous symmetries.

  18. Calculation of energy levels, {ital E}1 transition amplitudes, and parity violation in francium

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V.A.; Flambaum, V.V.; Sushkov, O.P.

    1995-05-01

    Many-body perturbation theory in the screened Coulomb interaction was used to calculate energy levels, {ital E}1 trransition amplitudes, and the parity-nonconserving (PNC) {ital E}1 amplitude of the 7{ital s}-8{ital s} transition in francium. The method takes into account the core-polarization effect, the second-order correlations, and the three dominating sequences of higher-order correlation diagrams: screening of the electron-electron interaction, particle-hole interaction, and the iterations of the self-energy operator. The result for the PNC amplitude for {sup 223}Fr is {ital E}1(7{ital s}-8{ital s})=(1.59{plus_minus}{similar_to}1%){times}10{sup {minus}10}{ital iea}{sub {ital B}}({minus}{ital Q}{sub {ital W}}/{ital N}), where {ital Q}{sub {ital W}} is the weak charge of the nucleus, {ital N}=136 is the number of neutrons, {ital e}={vert_bar}{ital e}{vert_bar} is the elementary charge, and {ital a}{sub {ital B}} is the Bohr radius. Our prediction for the position of the 8{ital s} energy level of Fr, which has not been measured yet, is 13 110 cm{sup {minus}1} below the limit of the continuous spectrum. The accuracy of the calculations was controlled by comparison with available experimental data and analogous calculations for cesium. It is estimated to be {similar_to}0.1% for the energy levels and {similar_to}1% for the transition amplitudes.

  19. A measurement of the parity violating asymmetry in the neutron capture on 3He at the SNS.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Latiful; The n-3He Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Studies of parity violating (PV) observables in hadronic systems offer a unique probe of nucleon structure, complementary to other probes of low-energy non-perturbative QCD. The n-3He experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source at the ORNL measures the PV asymmetry of the recoil proton momentum k-> with respect to the neutron spin σ-> in the reaction n +3 He -> p + T + 764 keV . This asymmetry is sensitive to the isospin-conserving and isospin-changing (ΔI = 0, 1) channels of the Hadronic Weak Interaction, and is expected to be extremely small ( 10-7). The experiment will determine this PV asymmetry with the statistical sensitivity of the order of 10-8. Challenges like beam fluctuation, pedestal and background subtraction, instrumental interference, detector correlations and many others must be considered very carefully in the analysis to achieve this precision. I will discuss the data analysis and a method to extract the value for the PV asymmetry.

  20. Feasibility of Parity-Violating Electron Scattering Experiments Below 1 GeV Beam Energy with a Toroidal Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Kurtis

    2015-10-01

    The next generation of high precision parity-violating electron scattering experiments could potentially make use of a toroidal spectrometer to perform additional measurements of the proton's weak charge (Qwp) using a hydrogen target, a test of the Standard Model using a carbon target as well as possibly studying the neutron skin of heavier nuclei. I will present the results of recent Geant4 Monte-Carlo studies performed to test the feasibility of such a toroidal spectrometer at beam energies below 1 GeV employing a concept similar to that used by the recent JLab Qweak measurement. It appears that given sufficient beam time such a measurement could be complementary to the JLab measurement, but at a significantly lower Q2. The feasibility of measuring the neutron skin using such a spectrometer will also be discussed. The key issue for this latter type of measurement is the ability to achieve the necessary resolution to separate the elastic and first excited state. This work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. PHY-1206053.

  1. SLAC's Polarized Electron Source LaserSystem and Minimization of Helicity Correlations for the E-158 Parity Violation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Humensky, Thomas B

    2002-09-06

    SLAC E-158 is an experiment designed to make the first measurement of parity violation in Moeller scattering. E-158 will measure the right-left cross-section asymmetry, A{sub LR}{sup Moeller}, in the elastic scattering of a 45-GeV polarized electron beam off unpolarized electrons in a liquid hydrogen target. E-158 plans to measure the expected Standard Model asymmetry of {approx} 10{sup -7} to an accuracy of better than 10{sup -8}. To make this measurement, the polarized electron source requires for operation an intense circularly polarized laser beam and the ability to quickly switch between right- and left-helicity polarization states with minimal right-left helicity-correlated asymmetries in the resulting beam parameters (intensity, position, angle, spot size, and energy), {sup beam}A{sub LR}'s. This laser beam is produced by a unique SLAC-designed flashlamp-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser and is propagated through a carefully designed set of polarization optics. We analyze the transport of nearly circularly polarized light through the optical system and identify several mechanisms that generate {sup beam}A{sub LR}'s. We show that the dominant effects depend linearly on particular polarization phase shifts in the optical system. We present the laser system design and a discussion of the suppression and control of {sup beam}A{sub LR}'s. We also present results on beam performance from engineering and physics runs for E-158.

  2. Contribution of two-boson exchange with {delta}(1232) excitation to parity-violating elastic electron-proton scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Nagata, Keitaro; Kao, C. W.; Zhou Haiqing; Yang Shinnan

    2009-06-15

    We study the leading electroweak corrections in the precision measurement of the strange form factors. Specifically, we calculate the two-boson exchange (TBE), two-photon exchange (TPE) plus {gamma}Z exchange ({gamma}ZE), and corrections with {delta}(1232) excitation to the parity-violating asymmetry of the elastic electron-proton scattering. The interplay between nucleon and {delta} contributions is found to depend strongly on the kinematics, as {delta}{sub {delta}} begins as negligible at backward angles but becomes very large and negative and dominant at forward angles, while {delta}{sub N} always stays positive and decreases monotonically with increasing {epsilon}. The total TBE corrections to the extracted values of G{sub E}{sup s}+{beta}G{sub M}{sup s} in recent experiments of HAPPEX and G0 are, depending on kinematics, found to be large and range between 13% and -75%, but are found to be small in the case of A4 experiments.

  3. Spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry, and eventually of parity, in a σ-model with two Mexican hats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giacosa, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    A σ-model with two linked Mexican hats is discussed. This scenario could be realized in low-energy QCD when the ground state and the first excited (pseudo)scalar mesons are included, and where not only in the subspace of the ground states, but also in that of the first excited states, a Mexican hat potential is present. This possibility can change some basic features of a low-energy hadronic theory of QCD. It is also shown that spontaneous breaking of parity can occur in the vacuum for some parameter choice of the model.

  4. Search for R-parity violation in multilepton final states in pp¯ collisions at s=1.8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Akimov, V.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bean, A.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Doulas, S.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Gilmartin, R.; Ginther, G.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Ito, A. S.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Landsberg, G.; Leflat, A.; Lehner, F.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lu, J. G.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lundstedt, C.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Martin, R. D.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Meng, X. C.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Nagy, E.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Negroni, S.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Olivier, B.; Oshima, N.; Padley, P.; Pan, L. J.; Para, A.; Parashar, N.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Patwa, A.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schwartzman, A.; Sculli, J.; Sen, N.; Shabalina, E.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Slattery, P.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Song, X. F.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sznajder, A.; Taylor, W.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Toback, D.; Trippe, T. G.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; van Gemmeren, P.; Vaniev, V.; van Kooten, R.; Varelas, N.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, H.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Whiteson, D.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yip, K.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Z.; Zanabria, M.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2000-10-01

    The result of a search for gaugino pair production with a trilepton signature is reinterpreted in the framework of minimal supergravity (MSUGRA) with R-parity violation via leptonic λ Yukawa couplings. The search used 95 pb-1 of pp¯ collisions at s=1.8 TeV recorded by the DØ detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. A large domain of the MSUGRA parameter space is excluded for λ121, λ122>=10-4.

  5. A Measurement of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Aluminum and its Contribution to a Measurement of the Proton's Weak Charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, Joshua Allen

    The Qweak experiment, which ran at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, made a precision measurement of the proton's weak charge, QpW. The weak charge is extracted via a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering from hydrogen at low momentum transfer (Q2=0.025 GeV2). This result is directly related to the electroweak mixing angle, sin2 (theta W ), a fundamental parameter in the Standard Model of particle physics. This provides a precision test sensitive to new, as yet unknown, fundamental physics. This dissertation focuses on two central corrections to the Qweak measurement: the target window contribution and sub-percent determination of the electron beam polarization. The aluminum target windows contribute approximately 30% of the measured asymmetry. Removal of this background requires precise measurements of both the elastic electron-aluminum scattering rate and its parity-violating asymmetry. The results reported here are the most precise measurement of the Qweak target dilution and asymmetry to date. The parity-violating asymmetry for the aluminum alloy was found to be 1.6174 +/- 0.0704 (stat.) +/- 0.0113 (sys.) parts-per-million. The first sub-percent precision polarization measurements made from the Hall C Moller polarimeter are also reported, with systematic uncertainties of 0.84%.

  6. A Measurement of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry in Aluminum and its Contribution to a Measurement of the Proton's Weak Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, Joshua Allen

    2016-05-01

    The Q_weak experiment, which ran at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, made a precision measurement of the proton's weak charge, Q^p_W. The weak charge is extracted via a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering from hydrogen at low momentum transfer (Q^2=0.025 GeV^2). This result is directly related to the electroweak mixing angle, sin^2(Theta_W), a fundamental parameter in the Standard Model of particle physics. This provides a precision test sensitive to new, as yet unknown, fundamental physics. This dissertation focuses on two central corrections to the Q_weak measurement: the target window contribution and sub-percent determination of the electron beam polarization. The aluminum target windows contribute approximately 30% of the measured asymmetry. Removal of this background requires precise measurements of both the elastic electron-aluminum scattering rate and its parity-violating asymmetry. The results reported here are the most precise measurement of the Q_weak target dilution and asymmetry to date. The parity-violating asymmetry for the aluminum alloy was found to be 1.6174 +/- 0.0704 (stat.) +/- 0.0113 (sys.) parts-per-million. The first sub-percent precision polarization measurements made from the Hall C Moller polarimeter are also reported, with systematic uncertainties of 0.84%.

  7. Connecting nonzero θ 13, Dirac CP phase and leptogenesis through spontaneous CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karmakar, Biswajit; Sil, Arunansu

    2017-09-01

    We have analyzed a Type-I+II seesaw scenario to generate neutrino masses and mixing in a A 4 based flavor symmetric framework. The Standard Model (SM) particle content is extended by three singlet right handed neutrinos, an additional higgs triplet along with few SM singlet flavon fields. In this set-up, the pure type-I contribution to the neutrino mass matrix exhibits a tribimaximal (TBM) of lepton mixing where the triplet contribution generates θ 13. Complex vev of one flavon provides a unique source of spontaneous CP violation. Here it turns out that the triplet contribution provides a common source for θ 13, Dirac CP phase (δ) and CP violation required for leptogenesis.

  8. Weak charge form factor and radius of 208Pb through parity violation in electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, C. J.; Ahmed, Z.; Jen, C. -M.; Rakhman, A.; Souder, P. A.; Dalton, M. M.; Liyanage, N.; Paschke, K. D.; Saenboonruang, K.; Silwal, R.; Franklin, G. B.; Friend, M.; Quinn, B.; Kumar, K. S.; McNulty, D.; Mercado, L.; Riordan, S.; Wexler, J.; Michaels, R. W.; Urciuoli, G. M.

    2012-03-26

    We use distorted wave electron scattering calculations to extract the weak charge form factor FW($\\bar{q}$), the weak charge radius RW, and the point neutron radius Rn, of 208Pb from the PREX parity violating asymmetry measurement. The form factor is the Fourier transform of the weak charge density at the average momentum transfer $\\bar{q}$ = 0.475 fm-1. We find FW($\\bar{q}$) = 0.204 ± 0.028(exp) ± 0.001(model). We use the Helm model to infer the weak radius from FW($\\bar{q}$). We find RW = 5.826 ± 0.181(exp) ± 0.027(model) fm. Here the exp error includes PREX statistical and systematic errors, while the model error describes the uncertainty in RW from uncertainties in the surface thickness σ of the weak charge density. The weak radius is larger than the charge radius, implying a 'weak charge skin' where the surface region is relatively enriched in weak charges compared to (electromagnetic) charges. We extract the point neutron radius Rn = 5.751 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026(model) ± 0.005(strange) fm, from RW. Here there is only a very small error (strange) from possible strange quark contributions. We find Rn to be slightly smaller than RW because of the nucleon's size. As a result, we find a neutron skin thickness of Rn-Rp = 0.302 ± 0.175 (exp) ± 0.026 (model) ± 0.005 (strange) fm, where Rp is the point proton radius.

  9. Evaluation of coupled perturbed and density functional methods of computing the parity-violating energy difference between enantiomers.

    PubMed

    MacDermott, A J; Hyde, G O; Cohen, A J

    2009-10-01

    We present new coupled-perturbed Hartree-Fock (CPHF) and density functional theory (DFT) computations of the parity-violating energy difference (PVED) between enantiomers for H(2)O(2) and H(2)S(2). Our DFT PVED computations are the first for H(2)S(2) and the first with the new HCTH and OLYP functionals. Like other "second generation" PVED computations, our results are an order of magnitude larger than the original "first generation" uncoupled-perturbed Hartree-Fock computations of Mason and Tranter. We offer an explanation for the dramatically larger size in terms of cancellation of contributions of opposing signs, which also explains the basis set sensitivity of the PVED, and its conformational hypersensitivity (addressed in the following paper). This paper also serves as a review of the different types of "second generation" PVED computations: we set our work in context, comparing our results with those of four other groups, and noting the good agreement between results obtained by very different methods. DFT PVEDs tend to be somewhat inflated compared to the CPHF values, but this is not a problem when only sign and order of magnitude are required. Our results with the new OLYP functional are less inflated than those with other functionals, and OLYP is also more efficient computationally. We therefore conclude that DFT computation offers a promising approach for low-cost extension to larger biosystems, especially polymers. The following two papers extend to terrestrial and extra-terrestrial amino acids respectively, and later work will extend to polymers.

  10. Towards a Precision Measurement of Parity-Violating e-p Elastic Scattering at Low Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Jie

    2012-01-01

    The goal of the Q-weak experiment is to make a measurement of the proton's weak charge QWp = 1 - 4 sin2W2(θW2(θWWp by measuring the parity violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering at low momentum transfer Q2 = 0.026 (GeV/c)2 and forward angles (8 degrees). The anticipated size of the asymmetry, based on the SM, is about 230 parts per billion (ppb). With the proposed accuracy, the experiment may probe new physics beyond Standard Model at the TeV scale. This thesis focuses on my contributions to the experiment, including track reconstruction for momentum transfer determination of the scattering process, and the focal plane scanner, a detector I designed and built to measure the flux profile of scattered electrons on the focal plane of the Q-weak spectrometer to assist in the extrapolation of low beam current tracking results to high beam current. Preliminary results from the commissioning and the first run period of the Q-weak experiment are reported and discussed.

  11. Searches for R-parity-violating supersymmetry in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV in final states with 0-4 leptons

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-12-29

    Results are presented from searches for R-parity-violating supersymmetry in events produced inmore » $pp$ collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$ = 8 TeV at the LHC. Final states with 0, 1, 2, or multiple leptons are considered independently. The analysis is performed on data collected by the CMS experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb-1. No excesses of events above the standard model expectations are observed, and 95% confidence level limits are set on supersymmetric particle masses and production cross sections. The results are interpreted in models featuring R-parity-violating decays of the lightest supersymmetric particle, which in the studied scenarios can be either the gluino, a bottom squark, or a neutralino. In a gluino pair production model with baryon number violation, gluinos with a mass less than 0.98 and 1.03 TeV are excluded, by analyses in a fully hadronic and one-lepton final state, respectively. An analysis in a dilepton final state is used to exclude bottom squarks with masses less than 307 GeV in a model considering bottom squark pair production. Multilepton final states are considered in the context of either strong or electroweak production of superpartners and are used to set limits on the masses of the lightest supersymmetric particles. Finally, these limits range from 300 to 900 GeV in models with leptonic and up to approximately 700 GeV in models with semileptonic R-parity-violating couplings.« less

  12. Higgs-Anti Sitter Spacetime Bubbles from Spontaneous Z2-VIOLATION at Electroweak Symmetry Breaking Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dariescu, Ciprian

    The Einstein-Gordon equations for Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) geometries in feedback reaction with the quartically self-interacting physical field, arisen from the spontaneous Z2-symmetry breaking, are explicitly formulated. The fixed point exact solutions to the "inner parity" non-invariant Einstein-Gordon system (mandatory) describe (k=-1)-FRW manifolds which actually are either Milne or anti-de Sitter Universes. Setting the Z2-invariance breaking scale at one of the electroweak symmetry, we speculate on the cosmological implications of the Higgs-anti-de Sitter bubbles and derive a set of closed-form solutions to the S2-cobordism with a spatially-flat FRW Universe.

  13. Stationary solutions for the parity-even sector of the CPT-even and Lorentz-covariance-violating term of the standard model extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casana, Rodolfo; Ferreira, Manoel M.; Gomes, A. R.; Pinheiro, Paulo R. D.

    2009-08-01

    In this work, we focus on some properties of the parity-even sector of the CPT-even electrodynamics of the standard model extension. We analyze how the six non-birefringent terms belonging to this sector modify the static and stationary classical solutions of the usual Maxwell theory. We observe that the parity-even terms do not couple the electric and magnetic sectors (at least in the stationary regime). The Green’s method is used to obtain solutions for the field strengths E and B at first order in the Lorentz-covariance-violating parameters. Explicit solutions are attained for point-like and spatially extended sources, for which a dipolar expansion is achieved. Finally, an Earth-based experiment is presented that can lead (in principle) to an upper bound on the anisotropic coefficients as stringent as left(widetilde{kappa}_{e-}right)^{ij}<2.9×10^{-20}.

  14. Application of the coupled-cluster approach to the electric dipole moment of atoms and molecules due to parity and time-reversal violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, Alok; Das, B. P.; Mukherjee, D.

    1994-09-01

    In this paper we present a variant of Monkhorst's coupled-cluster-based linear-response approach designed for direct calculations of static properties of closed-shell many-fermion systems [Int. J. Quantum Chem Symp. 11, 421 (1977)]. All the required equations are derived in the framework of the coupled-cluster singles and doubles model. Although the approach has been developed with the calculation of electric-dipole moment of atoms and molecules due to parity- and time-reversal-violating interactions in mind, it is general enough to be applicable to other problems which require the presence of two one-electron perturbations.

  15. Search for R -Parity Violating Supersymmetry Using Like-Sign Dielectrons in p[ovr p] Collisions at [radical] (s) =1. 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, R.E.; Byrum, K.L.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.E.; LeCompte, T.; Nodulman, L. ); Breccia, L.; Brunetti, R.; Deninno, M.; Fiori, I.; Mazzanti, P. ); Behrends, S.; Bensinger, J.; Blocker, C.; Kirsch, L.; Lamoureux, J.I. ); Bonushkin, Y.; Hauser, J.; Lindgren, M. ); Amadon, A.; Berryhill, J.; Contreras, M.; Culbertson, R.; Frisch, H.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Hohlmann, M.; Nakaya, T. ); Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dittmann, J.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Khazins, D.; Kowald, W.; Oh, S.H. ); Albrow, M.G.; Atac, M.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J.P.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Buckley-Geer,

    1999-09-01

    We present a search for like-sign dielectron plus multijet events using 107 pb[sup [minus]1] of data in p[ovr p] collisions at [radical] (s) =1.8 TeV collected in 1992[endash]1995 by the CDF experiment. Finding no events that pass our selection, we set [sigma][times]BR limits on two supersymmetric processes that can produce this experimental signature: gluino-gluino or squark-antisquark production with R -parity violating decays of the charm squark or lightest neutralino via a nonzero [lambda][sup [prime

  16. Measurement of the parity violating asymmetry in the quasielastic electron-deuteron scattering and improved determination of the magnetic strange form factor and the isovector anapole radiative correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaguer Ríos, D.; Aulenbacher, K.; Baunack, S.; Diefenbach, J.; Gläser, B.; von Harrach, D.; Imai, Y.; Kabuß, E.-M.; Kothe, R.; Lee, J. H.; Merkel, H.; Mora Espí, M. C.; Müller, U.; Schilling, E.; Weinrich, C.; Capozza, L.; Maas, F. E.; Arvieux, J.; El-Yakoubi, M. A.; Frascaria, R.; Kunne, R. A.; Ong, S.; van de Wiele, J.; Kowalski, S.; Prok, Y.

    2016-09-01

    A new measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in the electron-deuteron quasielastic scattering for backward angles at ⟨Q2⟩ =0.224 (GeV/c ) 2 , obtained in the A4 experiment at the Mainz Microtron accelerator (MAMI) facility, is presented. The measured asymmetry is APV d=(-20.11 ±0.8 7stat±1.0 3sys)×10-6. A combination of these data with the proton measurements of the parity-violating asymmetry in the A4 experiment yields a value for the effective isovector axial-vector form factor of GAe ,(T =1 )=-0.19 ±0.43 and RA(T =1 ),anap=-0.41 ±0.35 for the anapole radiative correction. When combined with a reanalysis of measurements obtained in the G0 experiment at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, the uncertainties are further reduced to GMs=0.17 ±0.11 for the magnetic strange form factors, and RA(T =1 ),anap=-0.54 ±0.26 .

  17. Search for R-parity violating decays of a top squark in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. 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M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; D'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; de Gruttola, M.; de Guio, F.; de Roeck, A.; de Visscher, S.; di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz Del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, R.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. 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M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; de Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Gastler, D.; Lawson, P.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon de La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; McLean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Paneva, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; MacNeill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; McColl, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes de Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-09-01

    The results of a search for a supersymmetric partner of the top quark (top squark), pair-produced in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV, are presented. The search, which focuses on R-parity violating, chargino-mediated decays of the top squark, is performed in final states with low missing transverse momentum, two oppositely charged electrons or muons, and at least five jets. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 collected with the CMS detector at the LHC in 2012. The data are found to be in agreement with the standard model expectation, and upper limits are placed on the top squark pair production cross section at 95% confidence level. Assuming a 100% branching fraction for the top squark decay chain, t ˜ → t χ˜1 ± , χ˜1 ± →ℓ± + jj , top squark masses less than 890 (1000) GeV for the electron (muon) channel are excluded for the first time in models with a single nonzero R-parity violating coupling λijk‧ (i , j , k ≤ 2), where i , j , k correspond to the three generations.

  18. Search for R-parity violating decays of a top squark in proton–proton collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-06-21

    The results of a search for a supersymmetric partner of the top quark (top squark), pair-produced in proton-proton collisions atmore » $$\\sqrt{s} =$$ 8 TeV, are presented. The search, which focuses on R-parity violating, chargino-mediated decays of the top squark, is performed in final states with low missing transverse momentum, two oppositely charged electrons or muons, and at least five jets. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb$$^{-1}$$ collected with the CMS detector at the LHC in 2012. The data are found to be in agreement with the standard model expectation, and upper limits are placed on the top squark pair production cross section at 95% confidence level. Assuming a 100% branching fraction for the top squark decay chain, $$ \\mathrm{ \\tilde{t} \\to t \\tilde{\\chi}^{\\pm}_1,\\, \\tilde{\\chi}^{\\pm}_1 \\to \\ell^\\pm+jj } $$, top squark masses less than 890 (1000) GeV for the electron (muon) channel are excluded for the first time in models with a single nonzero R-parity violating coupling $$\\lambda^{\\prime}_{ijk}$$ $$(i,j,k \\leq 2)$$, where $i,j,k$ correspond to the three generations.« less

  19. Complex CKM matrix, spontaneous CP violation and generalized μ- τ symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshipura, Anjan S.; Kodrani, Bhavik P.

    2009-01-01

    The multi-Higgs models having spontaneous CP violation (SPCPV) and natural flavor conservation (NFC) lead to a real CKM matrix V contradicting current evidence in favour of a complex V. This contradiction can be removed by using a generalized μ- τ (called 23) symmetry in place of the discrete symmetry conventionally used to obtain NFC. If the 23 symmetry is exact then the Higgs induced flavour changing neutral currents (FCNC) vanish as in the case of NFC. 23 breaking introduces SPCPV, a phase in V and suppressed FCNC among quarks. The FCNC couplings F ij d , u between i and j generations show a hierarchy | F 12 d , u | < | F 13 d , u | < | F 23 d , u | with the result that the FCNC can have observable consequences in B mixing without conflicting with the K0-Kbar0 mixing. Detailed fits to the quark masses and the CKM matrix are used to obtain the (complex) couplings Fijd and Fiju. Combined constraints from flavour and CP violations in the K, Bd, Bs, D mesons are analyzed within the model. They allow (i) relatively light Higgs, 100-150 GeV (ii) measurable extra contributions to the magnitudes and phases of the B d , s 0-Bbar d , s 0 mixing amplitudes and (iii) the D0-Dbar0 mixing at the current sensitivity level.

  20. Search for the Production of Single Sleptons through R-Parity Violation in pp ¯ Collisions at (s)=1.8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abdesselam, A.; Abolins, M.; Abramov, V.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahmed, S. N.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alton, A.; Alves, G. A.; Anderson, E. W.; Arnoud, Y.; Avila, C.; Babintsev, V. V.; Babukhadia, L.; Bacon, T. C.; Baden, A.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Beaudette, F.; Begel, M.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bertram, I.; Besson, A.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Bolton, T. A.; Borcherding, F.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Breedon, R.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Cho, D. K.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Christenson, J. H.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Davis, G. A.; de, K.; de Jong, S. J.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doulas, S.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Duensing, S.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dyshkant, A.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Filthaut, F.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gao, M.; Gavrilov, V.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gilmartin, R.; Ginther, G.; Gómez, B.; Goncharov, P. I.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grinstein, S.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hall, R. E.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, C.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Huang, Y.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jöstlein, H.; Juste, A.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, W.; Kohli, J. M.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krivkova, P.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Landsberg, G.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Leggett, C.; Lehner, F.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Lundstedt, C.; Luo, C.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manankov, V.; Mao, H. S.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Mostafa, M.; da Motta, H.; Mutaf, Y. D.; Nagy, E.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nomerotski, A.; Nunnemann, T.; O'Neil, D.; Oguri, V.; Olivier, B.; Oshima, N.; Padley, P.; Papageorgiou, K.; Parashar, N.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Peters, O.; Pétroff, P.; Piegaia, R.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Przybycien, M. B.; Qian, J.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rapidis, P. A.; Reay, N. W.; Reucroft, S.; Ridel, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sabirov, B. M.; Sajot, G.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Schwartzman, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Singh, H.; Sirotenko, V.; Slattery, P.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Song, Y.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Stanton, N. R.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Taylor, W.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Tripathi, S. M.; Trippe, T. G.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; Vaniev, V.; Kooten, R. Van; Varelas, N.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, H.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Whiteson, D.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, Q.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yip, K.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Zanabria, M.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, Z.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zutshi, V.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2002-12-01

    We report the first search for supersymmetric particles via s-channel production and decay of smuons or muon sneutrinos at hadronic colliders. The data for the two-muon and two-jets final states were collected by the D0 experiment and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 94+/-5 pb-1. Assuming that R parity is violated via the single coupling λ'211, the number of candidate events is in agreement with expectation from the standard model. Exclusion contours are given in the (m0,m1/2) and (mχ ~,mν ~) planes for λ'211=0.09, 0.08, and 0.07.

  1. Measurement of the parity-violating triton emission asymmetry in the reaction {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha}){sup 3}H with polarized cold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Vesna, V. A.; Shulgina, E. V.; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Sedyshev, P. V.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Petoukhov, A. K.; Soldner, T.; Zimmer, O.

    2008-03-15

    We describe measurements of the parity-violating (P-odd) triton emission asymmetry coefficient a{sub P-odd} in the {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha}){sup 3}H reaction with polarized cold neutrons. Experiments were carried out at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (Gatchina, Russia) and at the Institut Laue-Langevin (Grenoble, France). We employed an ionisation chamber in a configuration allowing us to suppress the left-right asymmetry well below 10{sup -8}. An additional test for a false asymmetry due to eventual target impurities (''zero test'') resulted in a{sub 0-test}=(0.0{+-}0.5)x10{sup -8}. As final result of this series of experiments we obtained a{sub P-odd}=(-8.8{+-}2.1)x10{sup -8}.

  2. Measurement of the parity-violating longitudinal single-spin asymmetry for W+- boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at sqrt s = 500 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, M.M.; Dunlop, J.; et al.

    2011-02-11

    We report the first measurement of the parity-violating single-spin asymmetries for midrapidity decay positrons and electrons from W{sup +} and W{sup -} boson production in longitudinally polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}s = 500 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The measured asymmetries, A{sub L}{sup W+} = -0.27 {+-} 0.10(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) {+-} 0.03(norm.) and A{sub L}{sup W-} = 0.14 {+-} 0.19(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) {+-} 0.01(norm.), are consistent with theory predictions, which are large and of opposite sign. These predictions are based on polarized quark and antiquark distribution functions constrained by polarized deep-inelastic scattering measurements.

  3. Commissioning of the NPDGamma Detector Array: Counting Statistics in Current Mode Operation and Parity Violation in the Capture of Cold Neutrons on B 4 C and (27) Al.

    PubMed

    Gericke, M T; Bowman, J D; Carlini, R D; Chupp, T E; Coulter, K P; Dabaghyan, M; Desai, D; Freedman, S J; Gentile, T R; Gillis, R C; Greene, G L; Hersman, F W; Ino, T; Ishimoto, S; Jones, G L; Lauss, B; Leuschner, M B; Losowski, B; Mahurin, R; Masuda, Y; Mitchell, G S; Muto, S; Nann, H; Page, S A; Penttila, S I; Ramsay, W D; Santra, S; Seo, P-N; Sharapov, E I; Smith, T B; Snow, W M; Wilburn, W S; Yuan, V; Zhu, H

    2005-01-01

    The NPDGamma γ-ray detector has been built to measure, with high accuracy, the size of the small parity-violating asymmetry in the angular distribution of gamma rays from the capture of polarized cold neutrons by protons. The high cold neutron flux at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) spallation neutron source and control of systematic errors require the use of current mode detection with vacuum photodiodes and low-noise solid-state preamplifiers. We show that the detector array operates at counting statistics and that the asymmetries due to B4C and (27)Al are zero to with- in 2 × 10(-6) and 7 × 10(-7), respectively. Boron and aluminum are used throughout the experiment. The results presented here are preliminary.

  4. A search for B-L R-parity-violating top squark decays in √{ s} = 13 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyckes, Ian; Atlas Experiment Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A search for pair produced massive particles decaying to b-quarks plus leptons is presented using the √{ s} = 13 TeV proton-proton collision data collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC in 2016. This search is motivated by a B-L extension to the MSSM, in which the scalar partner of the top quark (the stop) may be the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle (the LSP). In this model, the stop predominantly decays via an R-Parity violating coupling to a b-quark plus a lepton. This model is targeted by searching for an excess in final states containing b-tagged jets and two light leptons (electrons or muons).

  5. Search for R -Parity Violating Supersymmetry Using Like-Sign Dielectrons in p{ovr p} Collisions at {radical} (s) =1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, R.E.; Byrum, K.L.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.E.; LeCompte, T.; Nodulman, L.; Breccia, L.; Brunetti, R.; Deninno, M.; Fiori, I.; Mazzanti, P.; Behrends, S.; Bensinger, J.; Blocker, C.; Kirsch, L.; Lamoureux, J.I.; Bonushkin, Y.; Hauser, J.; Lindgren, M.; Amadon, A.; Berryhill, J.; Contreras, M.; Culbertson, R.; Frisch, H.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Hohlmann, M.; Nakaya, T.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dittmann, J.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Khazins, D.; Kowald, W.; Oh, S.H.; Albrow, M.G.; Atac, M.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J.P.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Buckley-Geer, E.; Byon-Wagner, A.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cooper, J.; DeJongh, F.; Demina, R.; Derwent, P.F.; Elias, J.E.; Erdmann, W.; Flaugher, B.; Foster, G.W.; Freeman, J.; Geer, S.; Hahn, S.R.; Harris, R.M.; Incandela, J.; Jensen, H.; Joshi, U.; Kennedy, R.D.; Kephart, R.; Lammel, S.; Lewis, J.D.; Lukens, P.; Maeshima, K.; Marriner, J.P.; Miao, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Nelson, C.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Klimenko, S.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Nomerotski, A.; Barone, M.; Bertolucci, S.; Cordelli, M.; Dell`Agnello, S.; Giromini, P.; Happacher, F.; Miscetti, S.; Clark, A.G.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Kambara, H.; Baumann, T.; Burkett, K.; Franklin, M.; Gordon, A.; Hamilton, R.; Huth, J.; and others

    1999-09-01

    We present a search for like-sign dielectron plus multijet events using 107 pb{sup {minus}1} of data in p{ovr p} collisions at {radical} (s) =1.8 TeV collected in 1992{endash}1995 by the CDF experiment. Finding no events that pass our selection, we set {sigma}{times}BR limits on two supersymmetric processes that can produce this experimental signature: gluino-gluino or squark-antisquark production with R -parity violating decays of the charm squark or lightest neutralino via a nonzero {lambda}{sup {prime}}{sub 121} coupling. We compare our results to the next-to-leading order calculations for gluino and squark production cross sections and set lower limits on M({tilde g}) , M({tilde t}{sub 1}) , and M({tilde q}) . {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Compton Scattering Polarimetry for the Determination of the Proton's Weak Charge Through Measurements of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry of 1H(e,e')p

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornejo, Juan Carlos

    The Standard Model has been a theory with the greatest success in describing the fundamental interactions of particles. As of the writing of this dissertation, the Standard Model has not been shown to make a false prediction. However, the limitations of the Standard Model have long been suspected by its lack of a description of gravity, nor dark matter. Its largest challenge to date, has been the observation of neutrino oscillations, and the implication that they may not be massless, as required by the Standard Model. The growing consensus is that the Standard Model is simply a lower energy effective field theory, and that new physics lies at much higher energies. The Qweak Experiment is testing the Electroweak theory of the Standard Model by making a precise determination of the weak charge of the proton (Qpw). Any signs of "new physics" will appear as a deviation to the Standard Model prediction. The weak charge is determined via a precise measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry of the electron-proton interaction via elastic scattering of a longitudinally polarized electron beam of an un-polarized proton target. The experiment required that the electron beam polarization be measured to an absolute uncertainty of 1 %. At this level the electron beam polarization was projected to contribute the single largest experimental uncertainty to the parity-violating asymmetry measurement. This dissertation will detail the use of Compton scattering to determine the electron beam polarization via the detection of the scattered photon. I will conclude the remainder of the dissertation with an independent analysis of the blinded Qweak.

  7. Measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in inclusive electroproduction of π- near the Delta0 resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Androic, D.; Armstrong, D. S.; Bailey, S. L.; Beck, D. H.; Beise, E. J.; Benesch, J.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bimbot, L.; Birchall, J.; Bosted, P.; Breuer, H.; Capuano, C. L.; Chao, Y. -C.; Coppens, A.; Davis, C. A.; Ellis, C.; Flores, G.; Franklin, G.; Furget, C.; Gaskell, D.; Gericke, T. W.; Grames, J.; Guillard, G.; Hansknecht, J.; Horn, T.; Jones, M. K.; King, P. M.; Korsch, W.; Kox, S.; Lee, L.; Liu, J.; Lung, A.; Mammei, J.; Martin, J. W.; McKeown, R. D.; Micherdzinska, A.; Mihovilovic, M.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Muether, M.; Page, S. A.; Papvassiliou, V.; Pate, S. F.; Phillips, S. K.; Pillot, P.; Pitt, M. L.; Poelker, M.; Quinn, B.; Ramsay, W. D.; Real, J. -S.; Roche, J.; Roos, P.; Schaub, J.; Seva, T.; Simicevic, N.; Smith, G. R.; Spayde, D. T.; Stutzman, M.; Suleiman, R.; Tadevosyan, V.; van Oers, W. T.H.; Versteegen, M.

    2012-03-20

    The parity-violating (PV) asymmetry of inclusive π- production in electron scattering from a liquid deuterium target was measured at backward angles. The measurement was conducted as a part of the G0 experiment, at a beam energy of 360 MeV. The physics process dominating pion production for these kinematics is quasi-free photoproduction off the neutron via the Δ0 resonance. In the context of heavy-baryon chiral perturbation theory (HBχPT), this asymmetry is related to a low energy constant dΔ- that characterizes the parity-violating γNΔ coupling. Zhu et al. calculated dΔ- in a model benchmarked by the large asymmetries seen in hyperon weak radiative decays, and predicted potentially large asymmetries for this process, ranging from Aγ- = -5.2 to +5.2 ppm. The measurement performed in this work leads to Aγ- = -0.36 ± 1.06 ± 0.37 ± 0.03 ppm (where sources of statistical, systematic and theoretical uncertainties are included), which would disfavor enchancements considered by Zhu et al. proportional to Vud/Vus. The measurement is part of a program of inelastic scattering measurements that were conducted by the G0 experiment, seeking to determine the N-Δ axial transition form-factors using PV electron scattering.

  8. Compton Scattering Polarimetry for the Determination of the Proton's Weak Charge Through Measurements of the Parity-Violating Asymmetry of 1H(e,e')p

    SciTech Connect

    Cornejo, Juan Carlos

    2016-08-01

    The Standard Model has been a theory with the greatest success in describing the fundamental interactions of particles. As of the writing of this dissertation, the Standard Model has not been shown to make a false prediction. However, the limitations of the Standard Model have long been suspected by its lack of a description of gravity, nor dark matter. Its largest challenge to date, has been the observation of neutrino oscillations, and the implication that they may not be massless, as required by the Standard Model. The growing consensus is that the Standard Model is simply a lower energy effective field theory, and that new physics lies at much higher energies. The Qweak Experiment is testing the Electroweak theory of the Standard Model by making a precise determination of the weak charge of the proton (Qpw). Any signs of "new physics" will appear as a deviation to the Standard Model prediction. The weak charge is determined via a precise measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry of the electron-proton interaction via elastic scattering of a longitudinally polarized electron beam of an un-polarized proton target. The experiment required that the electron beam polarization be measured to an absolute uncertainty of 1%. At this level the electron beam polarization was projected to contribute the single largest experimental uncertainty to the parity-violating asymmetry measurement. This dissertation will detail the use of Compton scattering to determine the electron beam polarization via the detection of the scattered photon. I will conclude the remainder of the dissertation with an independent analysis of the blinded Qweak.

  9. A Measurement of the Weak Charge of the Proton through Parity Violating Electron Scattering using the Qweak Apparatus: A 21% Result

    SciTech Connect

    Beminiwattha, Rakitha

    2013-08-01

    After a decade of preparations, the Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab is making the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton, Q^p_W. This quantity is suppressed in the Standard Model making a good candidate for search for new physics beyond the SM at the TeV scale. Operationally, we measure a small (about -0.200 ppm) parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering in integrating mode while flipping the helicity of the electrons 1000 times per second. Commissioning took place Fall 2010, and we finished taking data in early summer 2012. This dissertation is based on the data taken on an initial two weeks period (Wien0). It will provide an overview of the Qweak apparatus, description of the data acquisition and analysis software systems, and final analysis and results from the Wien0 data set. The result is a 16% measurement of the parity violating electron-proton scattering asymmetry, A = -0.2788 +/- 0.0348 (stat.) +/- 0.0290 (syst.) ppm at Q^2 = 0.0250 +/- 0.0006 (GeV)^2. From this a 21% measurement of the weak charge of the proton, Q_w^p(msr)= +0.0952 +/- 0.0155 (stat.) +/- 0.0131 (syst.) +/- 0.0015 (theory) is extracted. From this a 2% measurement of the weak mixing angle, sin^2theta_W(msr)= +0.2328 +/- 0.0039 (stat.) +/- 0.0033 (syst.) +/- 0.0004 (theory) and improved constraints on isoscalar/isovector effective coupling constants of the weak neutral hadronic currents are extracted. These results deviate from the Standard Model by one standard deviation. The Wien0 results are a proof of principle of the Qweak data analysis and a highlight of the road ahead for obtaining full results.

  10. Hunting the "impossible atoms" Pauli exclusion principle violation and spontaneous collapse of the wave function at test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curceanu, Catalina; Bartalucci, Sergio; Bassi, Angelo; Bertolucci, Sergio; Berucci, Carolina; Bragadireanu, Alexandru Mario; Cargnelli, Michael; Clozza, Alberto; Di Matteo, Sergio; Donadi, S.; D'Uffizi, Alessandro; Egger, J.-P.; Guaraldo, Carlo; Iliescu, Mihail; Ishiwatari, Tomoichi; Laubenstein, Matthias; Marton, Johann; Milotti, Edoardo; Pietreanu, Dorel; Piscicchia, Kristian; Ponta, Titus; Sbardella, Emanuele; Scordo, Alessandro; Shi, Hexi; Sirghi, Diana; Sirghi, Florin; Sperandio, Laura; Doce, Oton Vazquez; Zmeskal, Johann

    2014-12-01

    The Pauli exclusion principle (PEP) and, more generally, the spin-statistics connection, are at the very basis of our understanding of matter, life and Universe. The PEP spurs, presently, a lively debate on its possible limits, deeply rooted in the very foundations of Quantum Mechanics. It is, therefore, extremely important to test the limits of its validity. The Violation of the PEP (VIP) experiment established the best limit on the probability that PEP is violated by electrons, using the method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in copper. We describe the experimental method, the obtained results, and plans to go beyond the actual limit by upgrading the experimental apparatus. We discuss the possibility of using a similar experimental technique to search for X-rays as a signature of the spontaneous collapse of the wave function predicted by continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) theories.

  11. Search for R-parity violating supersymmetry with displaced vertices in proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Jennifer; CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Results are reported from a search for R-parity violating supersymmetry in proton-proton collision events collected by the CMS experiment at a center-of-mass energy of √{ s} = 8 TeV. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 17.6 fb-1. This search assumes a minimal flavor violating model where the lightest supersymmetric particle is a long-lived neutralino or gluino, leading to a signal with jets emanating from displaced vertices. In a sample of events with two displaced vertices, no excess yield above the expectation from standard model processes is observed, and limits are placed on the pair production cross section as a function of mass and lifetime of the neutralino or gluino. For a mass of 400 GeV and mean proper decay length of 10 mm, the analysis excludes cross sections above 0.6 fb at 95% confidence level. The results are also applicable to other models in which long-lived particles decay into multijet final states.

  12. Search for R -parity violating supersymmetry with displaced vertices in proton-proton collisions at √{s }=8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; König, A.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rad, N.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Lauwers, J.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Lowette, S.; Moortgat, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Parijs, I.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Delannoy, H.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Goldouzian, R.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Luetic, J.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Randle-conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Cimmino, A.; Cornelis, T.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Poyraz, D.; Salva, S.; Schöfbeck, R.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; De Visscher, S.; Delaere, C.; Delcourt, M.; Forthomme, L.; Francois, B.; Giammanco, A.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Magitteri, A.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Wertz, S.; Beliy, N.; Aldá Júnior, W. 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M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. 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M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. 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S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Oh, Y. D.; Sekmen, S.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Lee, A.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, T. J.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Ha, S.; Hong, B.; Jo, Y.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Almond, J.; Kim, J.; Oh, S. B.; Seo, S. h.; Yang, U. K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yu, G. B.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Hwang, C.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Magaña Villalba, R.; Mejia Guisao, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Carpinteyro, S.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Shah, M. A.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Voytishin, N.; Zarubin, A.; Chtchipounov, L.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Sulimov, V.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Toms, M.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Chistov, R.; Rusinov, V.; Tarkovskii, E.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Rusakov, S. V.; Terkulov, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Elumakhov, D.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Dordevic, M.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Barrio Luna, M.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; González Fernández, J. R.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Sanchez Cruz, S.; Suárez Andrés, I.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras De Saa, J. R.; Curras, E.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cepeda, M.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; d'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; De Gruttola, M.; De Guio, F.; De Roeck, A.; Di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dorney, B.; du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Fartoukh, S.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Gulhan, D.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Knünz, V.; Kornmayer, A.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krammer, M.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Sauvan, J. B.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Tosi, M.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Candelise, V.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Paganis, E.; Psallidas, A.; Tsai, J. f.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Kara, O.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Kiminsu, U.; Oglakci, M.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Topakli, H.; Turkcapar, S.; Zorbakir, I. S.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; James, T.; Lane, R.; Laner, C.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Penning, B.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Summers, S.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Wright, J.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Benelli, G.; Berry, E.; Cutts, D.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Hogan, J. M.; Jesus, O.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Spencer, E.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Burns, D.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Holzner, A.; Klein, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Ovcharova, A.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Lawhorn, J. M.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Mcdermott, K.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Zientek, M.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cremonesi, M.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Magini, N.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Shchutska, L.; Sperka, D.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Diamond, B.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Santra, A.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wang, H.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bowen, J.; Bruner, C.; Castle, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Abercrombie, D.; Allen, B.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Malta Rodrigues, A.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Duh, Y. t.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Lo, K. H.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gómez Espinosa, T. A.; Halkiadakis, E.; Heindl, M.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Kyriacou, S.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Saka, H.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Heideman, J.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Thapa, K.; Bouhali, O.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; De Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Juska, E.; Kamon, T.; Mueller, R.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Perniè, L.; Rathjens, D.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Wang, Z.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Barria, P.; Cox, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.; CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Results are reported from a search for R -parity violating supersymmetry in proton-proton collision events collected by the CMS experiment at a center-of-mass energy of √{s }=8 TeV . The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 17.6 fb-1 . This search assumes a minimal flavor violating model in which the lightest supersymmetric particle is a long-lived neutralino or gluino, leading to a signal with jets emanating from displaced vertices. In a sample of events with two displaced vertices, no excess yield above the expectation from standard model processes is observed, and limits are placed on the pair production cross section as a function of mass and lifetime of the neutralino or gluino. At 95% confidence level, the analysis excludes cross sections above approximately 1 fb for neutralinos or gluinos with mass between 400 and 1500 GeV and mean proper decay length between 1 and 30 mm. Gluino masses are excluded below 1 and 1.3 TeV for mean proper decay lengths of 300 μ m and 1 mm, respectively, and below 1.4 TeV for the range 2-30 mm. The results are also applicable to other models in which long-lived particles decay into multijet final states.

  13. Search for R-parity violating supersymmetry with displaced vertices in proton-proton collisions at s=8 TeV

    DOE PAGES

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; ...

    2017-01-25

    Results are reported from a search for R-parity violating supersymmetry in proton-proton collision events collected by the CMS experiment at a center-of-mass energy of √s = 8 TeV. Here, the data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 17.6 fb–1. This search assumes a minimal flavor violating model in which the lightest supersymmetric particle is a long-lived neutralino or gluino, leading to a signal with jets emanating from displaced vertices. In a sample of events with two displaced vertices, no excess yield above the expectation from standard model processes is observed, and limits are placed on the pair production crossmore » section as a function of mass and lifetime of the neutralino or gluino. At 95% confidence level, the analysis excludes cross sections above approximately 1 fb for neutralinos or gluinos with mass between 400 and 1500 GeV and mean proper decay length between 1 and 30 mm. Gluino masses are excluded below 1 and 1.3 TeV for mean proper decay lengths of 300 μm an 1 mm, respectively, and below 1.4 TeV for the range 2–30 mm. The results are also applicable to other models in which long-lived particles decay into multijet final states.« less

  14. Consequences of R-parity violating interactions for anomalies in {bar{B}}→ D^{(*)} τ {bar{ν }} and b→ s μ ^+μ ^-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, N. G.; He, Xiao-Gang

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the possibility of explaining the enhancement in semileptonic decays of {bar{B}} → D^{(*)} τ {bar{ν }}, the anomalies induced by b→ sμ ^+μ ^- in {bar{B}}→ (K, K^*, φ )μ ^+μ ^- and violation of lepton universality in R_K = Br({bar{B}}→ K μ ^+μ ^-)/Br({bar{B}}→ K e^+e^-) within the framework of R-parity violating MSSM. The exchange of down type right-handed squark coupled to quarks and leptons yields interactions which are similar to leptoquark induced interactions that have been proposed to explain the {bar{B}} → D^{(*)} τ {bar{ν }} by tree level interactions and b→ s μ ^+μ ^- anomalies by loop induced interactions, simultaneously. However, the Yukawa couplings in such theories have severe constraints from other rare processes in B and D decays. Although this interaction can provide a viable solution to the R(D^{(*)}) anomaly, we show that with the severe constraint from {bar{B}} → K ν {bar{ν }}, it is impossible to solve the anomalies in the b→ s μ ^+μ ^- process simultaneously.

  15. Parity violation in the γ-decay of polarized 93Tc nuclei in the {17}/{2}- isomeric state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hass, M.; Broude, C.; Weissman, L.; Müller, L.; Montagnoli, G.; Scarlassara, F.; Segato, G. F.; Signorini, C.; Goldring, G.; Ackermann, D.; Bednarczyk, P.; Corradi, L.; Spolaore, P.; Lindroos, M.; Hormann, S.; Ninov, V.; Hessberger, F. P.; Soramel, F.; Takahashi, N.; Brown, B. A.

    1996-02-01

    We report on a determination of the parity nonconserving (PNC) matrix element in the bound parity doublet {17 -}/{2} - {17 +}/{2} of 93Tc. The experiment was carried out at the GSI, Darmstadt and LNL, Legnaro laboratories. The recoil-mass-separated radioactive beam of 93Tc nuclei in the {17 -}/{2} isomer, following a fusion-evaporation reaction, was polarized by the tilted-foil method and the resulting 0°-180° γ asymmetry with respect to the induced polarization direction was measured by two large-volume Ge detectors. The measured γ asymmetry of 3-σ significance, Aγ = 8.4(2.7) · 10 -4, yields a matrix element of |< {17 -}/{2}|H pnc| {17 +}/{2}>| = 0.59(19)(25) meV. This experimental result is c microscopic calculations based on the DDH “best value” interaction for the nuclear weak Hamiltonian. We discuss our results and their significance with respect to the existing data regarding PNC effects in bound nuclear systems.

  16. Relativistic second-order many-body and density-functional theory for the parity-violation contribution to the C-F stretching mode in CHFClBr

    SciTech Connect

    Schwerdtfeger, Peter; Saue, Trond; Stralen, Joost N.P. van; Visscher, Lucas

    2005-01-01

    Relativistic four-component electronic structure theory using both wave-function (Dirac-Coulomb-Hartree-Fock and second-order many-body perturbation-theory) and density-functional based methods (local density, hybrid, and generalized gradient approximations) is applied to discuss the current status on the accuracy of parity-violation calculations for molecules. As a test case we choose the C-F stretching mode of CHFClBr, which is currently being investigated by molecular-beam spectroscopy. We show that electron correlation effects are important and cannot be neglected anymore for the parity nonconservation contribution to the total electronic energy. However, electron correlation contributions to parity violation in vibrational transitions of the C-F stretching mode are less important. The density functionals tested give somewhat different results, but the Becke three-parameter Lee-Yang-Parr functional agrees quite well with the second-order many-body perturbation-theory values. The calculations suggest that electron correlation effects have to be considered for future investigations in parity-violation effects in electronic transitions. The performance of density-functional based methods for this property needs further statistics.

  17. Measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in the reactions of cold polarized neutrons and light nuclei 6Li, 10B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesna, V. A.; Gledenov, Yu. M.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Petukhov, A. K.; Sedyshev, P. V.; Soldner, T.; Shulgina, E. V.

    2009-08-01

    We present two measurements of parity-violating secondary particle emission asymmetry in the reactions of polarized cold neutrons and light nuclei. We aim at studies of the neutral weak currents in nucleon-nucleon interaction. First, we describe the triton emission asymmetry in the Li6(n,α)H3 reaction. It is equal to αP-odd6=-(8.8±2.1)ṡ10. Second, we present the γ-rays emission asymmetry in the nuclear reaction B10(n,α)Li∗7→γ→Li7(g.s.). The result is αP-odd10=+(0.8±3.9)ṡ10. Using these values, we constrain the weak neutral current constant in framework of the cluster model fπ6⩽1.1ṡ10 and fπ10⩽2.4ṡ10 (at 90% c.i.). Both these constrains contradict to “the best” DDH value of fπDDH=4.6ṡ10.

  18. A Preliminary Direct Measurement of the Parity Violating Coupling of the Z{sup 0} to Strange Quarks, A{sub s}

    SciTech Connect

    Staengle, H

    1999-03-04

    We present a preliminary direct measurement of the parity violating coupling of the Z{sup 0} to strange quarks, A{sub s}, derived from a sample of approximately 300,000 hadronic decays of Z{sup 0} produced with a polarized electron beam and recorded by the SLD experiment at SLAC between 1993 and 1997. Z{sup 0} {r_arrow} s{bar s} events are tagged by the presence in each event hemisphere of a high-momentum K{sup {+-}}, K{sub s}{sup 0} or {Lambda}{sup 0}/{bar {Lambda}}{sup 0} identified using the Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector and/or a mass tag. The CCD vertex detector is used to suppress the background from heavy flavor events. The strangeness of the tagged particle is used to sign the event thrust axis in the direction of the initial strange quark. The coupling A{sub s} is obtained directly from a measurement of the left-right-forward-backward production asymmetry in polar angle of the tagged strange quark. To reduce the model dependence of the measurement, the background from primary up and down events is measured from the data, as is the analyzing power of the method for primary strange events. We measure: A{sub s} = 0.82 {+-} 0.10(stat.) {+-} 0.08(syst.)(preliminary).

  19. Parity-violating weak neutral current effects in elastic e-/sup 12/C scattering. Progress report, March 1, 1982-December 31, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Lubell, M.S.

    1983-01-31

    As a means of investigating unified gauge theories of the electro-weak interaction we have been preparing an experiment for the Bates Electron Accelerator to determine the parity violating asymmetry A = (sigma/sub R/ - sigma/sub L/) for 30/sup 0/ elastic scattering by /sup 12/C of 250 MeV longitudinally polarized electrons, where sigma/sub R/ and sigma/sub L/ are respectively the differential cross sections for electrons with right and left helicities. The asymmetry depends strictly on the isoscalar vector-hadronic coupling constant, and in terms of the Weinberg-Salam model is predicted to have a value of approx. 2 x 10/sup -6/ for our choice of kinematics. Central to the success of the measurement of such a small quantity is the use of an intense, highly stable source of polarized electrons. The progress in the development of such a source, based upon photoemission from GaAs, is reviewed in this report.

  20. Search for parity and time reversal violating effects in HgH: Relativistic coupled-cluster study.

    PubMed

    Sasmal, Sudip; Pathak, Himadri; Nayak, Malaya K; Vaval, Nayana; Pal, Sourav

    2016-03-28

    The high effective electric field (Eeff) experienced by the unpaired electron in an atom or a molecule is one of the key ingredients in the success of electron electric dipole moment (eEDM) experiment and its precise calculation requires a very accurate theory. We, therefore, employed the Z-vector method in the relativistic coupled-cluster framework and found that HgH has a very large Eeff value (123.2 GV/cm) which makes it a potential candidate for the next generation eEDM experiment. Our study also reveals that it has a large scalar-pseudoscalar (S-PS) P,T-violating interaction constant, Ws = 284.2 kHz. To judge the accuracy of the obtained results, we have calculated parallel and perpendicular magnetic hyperfine structure (HFS) constants and compared with the available experimental values. The results of our calculation are found to be in nice agreement with the experimental values. Therefore, by looking at the HFS results, we can say that both Eeff and Ws values are also very accurate. Further, We have derived the relationship between these quantities and the ratio which will help to get model independent value of eEDM and S-PS interaction constant.

  1. Charged lepton flavour violation and (g-2)μ in the Littlest Higgs model with T-Parity: a clear distinction from Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanke, Monika; Buras, Andrzej J.; Duling, Björn; Poschenrieder, Anton; Tarantino, Cecilia

    2007-05-01

    We calculate the rates for the charged lepton flavour violating decays elli → elljγ, τ → ellπ, τ → ellη, τ → ellη', μ- → e-e+e-, the six three body leptonic decays τ- → elli-ellj+ellk- and the rate for μ-e conversion in nuclei in the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT). We also calculate the rates for KL,S → μe, KL,S → π0μe and Bd,s → elliellj. We find that the relative effects of mirror leptons in these transitions are by many orders of magnitude larger than analogous mirror quark effects in rare K and B decays analyzed recently. In particular, in order to suppress the μ → eγ and μ- → e-e+e- decay rates and the μ-e conversion rate below the experimental upper bounds, the relevant mixing matrix in the mirror lepton sector VHell must be rather hierarchical, unless the spectrum of mirror leptons is quasi-degenerate. We find that the pattern of the LFV branching ratios in the LHT model differs significantly from the one encountered in the MSSM, allowing in a transparent manner to distinguish these two models with the help of LFV processes. We also calculate (g-2)μ and find the new contributions to aμ below 1 ċ 10-10 and consequently negligible. We compare our results with those present in the literature.

  2. LCAO-based theoretical study of PbTiO3 crystal to search for parity and time reversal violating interaction in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skripnikov, L. V.; Titov, A. V.

    2016-08-01

    An experiment towards the search for the interaction of the Schiff moment (S) of the 207Pb nuclei with electrons in PbTiO3 crystal which violates the time reversal (T) and space parity (P) symmetries was proposed by Mukhamedjanov and Sushkov [Phys. Rev. A 72, 034501 (2005)]. The interpretation of the experiment in terms of the Schiff moment requires knowledge of an electronic density gradient parameter (usually designated as X) on the Pb nucleus in the crystal, which is determined by the electronic structure of the crystal. Here we propose a theoretical approach to calculate the properties in solids which are directly sensitive to the changes of valence electron densities in atomic cores but not in the valence spatial regions (Mössbauer parameters, hyperfine structure (HFS) constants, parameters of T,P-odd Hamiltonians, etc. [L. V. Skripnikov and A. V. Titov, Phys. Rev. A 91, 042504 (2015)]). It involves constructing the crystalline orbitals via the linear combination of atomic orbitals and employs a two-step concept of calculating such properties that was earlier proposed by us for the case of heavy-atom molecules. The application of the method to the PbTiO3 crystal results in the energy shift, Δ ɛ = 0 . 82 × 1 0 6 /S ( 207 Pb ) e aB 3 eV , due to the T,P-odd interactions. The value is compared to the corresponding parameter in diatomic molecules (TlF, RaO, PbO), which have been proposed and used in the past decades in the search for the nuclear Schiff moment. We also present the calculation of the electric field gradient at the Pb nucleus in PbTiO3 for the comparison with other solid-state electronic structure approaches.

  3. LCAO-based theoretical study of PbTiO3 crystal to search for parity and time reversal violating interaction in solids.

    PubMed

    Skripnikov, L V; Titov, A V

    2016-08-07

    An experiment towards the search for the interaction of the Schiff moment (S) of the (207)Pb nuclei with electrons in PbTiO3 crystal which violates the time reversal (T) and space parity (P) symmetries was proposed by Mukhamedjanov and Sushkov [Phys. Rev. A 72, 034501 (2005)]. The interpretation of the experiment in terms of the Schiff moment requires knowledge of an electronic density gradient parameter (usually designated as X) on the Pb nucleus in the crystal, which is determined by the electronic structure of the crystal. Here we propose a theoretical approach to calculate the properties in solids which are directly sensitive to the changes of valence electron densities in atomic cores but not in the valence spatial regions (Mössbauer parameters, hyperfine structure (HFS) constants, parameters of T,P-odd Hamiltonians, etc. [L. V. Skripnikov and A. V. Titov, Phys. Rev. A 91, 042504 (2015)]). It involves constructing the crystalline orbitals via the linear combination of atomic orbitals and employs a two-step concept of calculating such properties that was earlier proposed by us for the case of heavy-atom molecules. The application of the method to the PbTiO3 crystal results in the energy shift, Δε=0.82×10(6)S((207)Pb)eaB (3)eV, due to the T,P-odd interactions. The value is compared to the corresponding parameter in diatomic molecules (TlF, RaO, PbO), which have been proposed and used in the past decades in the search for the nuclear Schiff moment. We also present the calculation of the electric field gradient at the Pb nucleus in PbTiO3 for the comparison with other solid-state electronic structure approaches.

  4. Strong C P problem and spontaneous generation of the C P violating phase in the CKM matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Wei

    2017-05-01

    We show that in a complementary two-Higgs doublet model (C2HDM) the C P violating phase in the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix can be generated spontaneously, dangerous flavor changing neutral currents (FCNC) can be naturally suppressed and the strong C P problem can also be avoided. The two Higgs doublets in the model are complementary in the sense that none of them is enough to describe masses of a given type of quarks. We find that the strength of FCNC is suppressed by the strength of Yukawa couplings of the first generation quark and the tree-level FCNC is sufficiently small. Using an explicit example, we show that radiative correction to the assumed Yukawa couplings can modify the discussion about the strong θ . The correction to the strong θ is estimated to be less than around 10-12˜10-10 which can be tested in future experiments.

  5. Universal dynamics of spontaneous Lorentz violation and a new spin-dependent inverse-square law force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Cheng, Hsin-Chia; Luty, Markus; Thaler, Jesse

    2005-07-01

    We study the universal low-energy dynamics associated with the spontaneous breaking of Lorentz invariance down to spatial rotations. The effective lagrangian for the associated Goldstone field can be uniquely determined by the non-linear realization of a broken time diffeomorphism symmetry, up to some overall mass scales. It has previously been shown that this symmetry breaking pattern gives rise to a Higgs phase of gravity, in which gravity is modified in the infrared. In this paper, we study the effects of direct couplings between the Goldstone boson and standard model fermions, which necessarily accompany Lorentz-violating terms in the theory. The leading interaction is the coupling to the axial vector current, which reduces to spin in the non-relativistic limit. A spin moving relative to the ``ether" rest frame will emit Goldstone Cerenkov radiation. The Goldstone also induces a long-range inverse-square law force between spin sources with a striking angular dependence, reflecting the underlying Goldstone shockwaves and providing a smoking gun for this theory. We discuss the regime of validity of the effective theory describing these phenomena, and the possibility of probing Lorentz violations through Goldstone boson signals in a way that is complementary to direct tests in some regions of parameter space.

  6. Recovery Act - Measurement of Parity Violation in Deep Inelastic Scattering and Studies of the Nucleon Spin Structure at JLab 6 and 11 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Xiaochao

    2016-03-10

    The program proposed contains two ingredients which aim to address aspects of two of the three research frontiers of nuclear science as identified in the 2007 NSAC Long Range Plan. The first topic, a test of the current Standard Model, is an ongoing project focusing on measurements of the parity-violating asymmetry in ~e-2H deep inelastic scattering (PVDIS). The PVDIS measurement is complementary to other completed or ongoing low- to medium-energy tests of the Standard Model. As the first, exploratory, step, an experiment using a 6 GeV electron beam will be carried out from October to December 2009 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). Meanwhile, a program using the upgraded JLab 11 GeV beam is being planned. The PVDIS program as a whole will provide the first precision data on the axial quark neutral-weak coupling constants. This will either put the current Standard Model to a test that has never been done before, or reveal information on where to look for New Physics beyond the current Standard Model. The PVDIS program will also provide results on hadronic physics effects such as charge symmetry violation. The second part of the proposed program uses spin observables to address the research frontier concerning QCD and structure of the nucleon. An experiment using the JLab 6 GeV beam in 2001 showed that, contrary to predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD), while the valence up quark’s spin is parallel to the nucleon’s spin, the valence down quark’s spin is not. In order to test the limit of QCD in describing the nucleon spin structure to a region beyond the 6 GeV kinematics, this measurement will be extended to a more energetic, “deeper” valence quark region using the upgraded JLab 11 GeV beam with a polarized 3He target. Although the two topics of the proposed program appear to focus on different physics, for the upgraded JLab 11 GeV beam, both will utilize a new, yet-to-be-built large acceptance

  7. Search for R-parity violating decays of sneutrinos to eμ, μτ, and eτ pairs in pp collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramanov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-11-05

    We present a search for supersymmetric neutrino ν production using the Tevatron pp collision data collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 fb-1. We focus on the scenarios predicted by the R-parity violating (RPV) supersymmetric models in which sneutrinos decay to two charged leptons of different flavor. With the data consistent with the standard model expectations, we set upper limits on σ(pp→ν)×BR(ν→eμ,μτ,eτ) and use these results to constrain the RPV couplings as a function of the sneutrino mass.

  8. Search for R-Parity Violating Decays of Sneutrinos to eμ, μτ, and eτ Pairs in pp¯ Collisions at s=1.96TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramanov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2010-11-01

    We present a search for supersymmetric neutrino ν˜ production using the Tevatron pp¯ collision data collected with the CDF II detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1fb-1. We focus on the scenarios predicted by the R-parity violating (RPV) supersymmetric models in which sneutrinos decay to two charged leptons of different flavor. With the data consistent with the standard model expectations, we set upper limits on σ(pp¯→ν˜)×BR(ν˜→eμ,μτ,eτ) and use these results to constrain the RPV couplings as a function of the sneutrino mass.

  9. Search for Pair-Production of Scalar Top Quarks in R-Parity Violating Decay Modes in $p \\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, Y.

    2002-09-01

    A search for the pair production of supersymmetric partner of the top quark in scenario with R-parity violation is presented. The quantum number called R-parity distinguishes particles in standard model from supersymmetric particles. A scalar top quark (stop) is assumed to decay only via $R_p$-violating supersymmetric coupling into tau lepton and $b$-quark. To collect events with multiple taus, a new special tau trigger (the lepton plus track trigger) is installed in Run II experiment of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The goal of the lepton plus track trigger is to collect generic dilepton ($\\ell \\ell, \\ell \\tau, \\tau\\tau$) events with lower $P_T$ threshold (8 GeV /c) and without prescale even at high luminosity. The $Z \\to \\tau\\tau$ event, where one $\\tau$-lepton decays leptonically and the other hadronically, is a good benchmark to calibrate the the lepton plus track trigger and T identification. The data sample of 72 $pb^{-1}$ , collected using the electron plus track trigger, contains clear a $\\tau$ signal from $Z \\to \\tau\\tau$ events. The data used in stop search correspond to 200 $pb^{-1}$ . The lower stop mass bound of 134 GeV/c2 at a 95% confidence level is obtained. This limit is also directly applicable to the case of the third generation scalar leptoquark ($LQ_3$) assuming a 100% branching for the $LQ_3 \\to \\tau b$ decay mode.

  10. Measurement of the Parity-Violating Longitudinal Single-Spin Asymmetry for W{sup {+-}} Boson Production in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at {radical}(s)=500 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, M. M.; Bhati, A. K.; Pruthi, N. K.; Ahammed, Z.; Dong, X.; Grebenyuk, O.; Hjort, E.; Jacobs, P.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Klein, S. R.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Naglis, M.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Ploskon, M. A.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Powell, C. B.; Ritter, H. G.

    2011-02-11

    We report the first measurement of the parity-violating single-spin asymmetries for midrapidity decay positrons and electrons from W{sup +} and W{sup -} boson production in longitudinally polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s)=500 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The measured asymmetries, A{sub L}{sup W+}=-0.27{+-}0.10(stat.){+-}0.02(syst.){+-}0.03(norm.) and A{sub L}{sup W-}=0.14{+-}0.19(stat.){+-}0.02(syst.){+-}0.01(norm.), are consistent with theory predictions, which are large and of opposite sign. These predictions are based on polarized quark and antiquark distribution functions constrained by polarized deep-inelastic scattering measurements.

  11. A search for top squarks with R-parity-violating decays to all-hadronic final states with the ATLAS detector in $ \\sqrt{s}=8 $ TeV proton-proton collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. 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K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. 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A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. 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    2016-06-10

    A search for the pair production of top squarks, each with R -parity-violating decays into two Standard Model quarks, is performed using 17.4 fb -1 of √s=8 TeV proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Each top squark is assumed to decay to a b- and an s-quark, leading to four quarks in the final state. Background discrimination is achieved with the use of b-tagging and selections on the mass and substructure of large-radius jets, providing sensitivity to top squark masses as low as 100 GeV. Finally, no evidence of an excess beyond the Standard Model background prediction is observed and top squarks decaying to $\\overline{b}$$\\overline{s}$ are excluded for top squark masses in the range 100 ≤ m $\\overline{t}$ ≤ 315 GeV at 95% confidence level.

  12. Search for pair production of scalar top quarks in R-parity violating decay modes in pp collisions at square root of s=1.8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Coca, M; Colijn, A P; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; De Cecco, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fan, Q; Farrington, S; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Gerstein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Goncharov, M; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Gresele, A; Grim, G; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hou, S; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Issever, C; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lannon, K; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Le, Y; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, T; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Manca, G; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Matthews, J A J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Napora, R; Niell, F; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Pratt, T; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, H; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Spezziga, M; Sphicas, P; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J; Strumia, F; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Takano, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P; Tanaka, M; Tannenbaum, B; Tecchio, M; Tesarek, R J; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thurman-Keup, R; Tipton, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tonelli, D; Tonnesmann, M; Toyoda, H; Trischuk, W; De Troconiz, J F; Tseng, J; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Vaiciulis, T; Valls, J; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Vucinic, D; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallace, N B; Wan, Z; Wang, C; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Watanabe, T; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilkes, T; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Winn, D; Wolbers, S; Wolinski, D; Wolinski, J; Wolinski, S; Wolter, M; Worm, S; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyss, J; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yeh, P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yosef, C; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zetti, F; Zucchelli, S

    2004-02-06

    We present the results of a search for pair production of scalar top quarks (t(1)) in an R-parity violating supersymmetry scenario in 106 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root of s=1.8 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. In this mode each t(1) decays into a tau lepton and a b quark. We search for events with two tau's, one decaying leptonically (e or mu) and one decaying hadronically, and two jets. No candidate events pass our final selection criteria. We set a 95% confidence level lower limit on the t(1) mass at 122 GeV/c(2) for Br(t(1)-->tau b)=1.

  13. A search for top squarks with R-parity-violating decays to all-hadronic final states with the ATLAS detector in √{s}=8 TeV proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.

    2016-06-01

    A search for the pair production of top squarks, each with R-parity-violating decays into two Standard Model quarks, is performed using 17.4 fb-1 of √{s}=8 TeV proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Each top squark is assumed to decay to a b- and an s-quark, leading to four quarks in the final state. Background discrimination is achieved with the use of b-tagging and selections on the mass and substructure of large-radius jets, providing sensitivity to top squark masses as low as 100 GeV. No evidence of an excess beyond the Standard Model background prediction is observed and top squarks decaying to overline{b}overline{s} are excluded for top squark masses in the range 100 le {m}_{overline{t}}le 315 GeV at 95% confidence level. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Measurement of the parity-violating longitudinal single-spin asymmetry for W{sup {+-}} boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 500 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Igo, G.

    2011-07-15

    We report the first measurement of the parity violating single-spin asymmetries for midrapidity decay positrons and electrons from W{sup +} and W{sup -} boson production in longitudinally polarized proton-proton collisions at {radical}(s) = 500 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The measured asymmetries, A{sub L}{sup W+} = -0.27{+-}0.10(stat.){+-}0.02(syst.){+-}0.03(norm.) and A{sub L}{sup W-} 0.14{+-}0.19(stat.){+-}0.02(syst.){+-}0.01(norm.), are consistent with theory predictions, which are large and of opposite sign. These predictions are based on polarized quark and antiquark distribution functions constrained by polarized DIS measurements.

  15. Search for Scalar Top Quark Pair-Production in Scenario with Violated R-parity in pp¯ Collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Takashi

    2005-03-01

    A search for the pair production of supersymmetric partner of the top quark in scenario with R-parity violation is presented. The quantum number called R-parity distinguishes particles in standard model from supersymmetric particles. A scalar top quark (stop) is assumed to decay only via Rp-violating supersymmetric coupling into tau lepton and b-quark. To collect events with multiple taus, a new special tau trigger (the lepton plus track trigger) is installed in Run II experiment of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The goal of the lepton plus track trigger is to collect generic dilepton (ll, lτ, ττ) events with lower pT threshold (8 GeV/c) and without prescale even at high luminosity. The Z → ττ event, where one τ-lepton decays leptonically and the other hadronically, is a good benchmark to calibrate the lepton plus track trigger and τ identification. The data sample of 72 pb-1, collected using the electron plus track trigger, contains clear a τ signal from Z → ττ events. The data used in stop search correspond to 200 pb-1. The lower stop mass bound of 134 GeV/c2 at a 95% confidence level is obtained. This limit is also directly applicable to the case of the third generation scalar leptoquark (LQ3) assuming a 100% branching for the LQ3 → τb decay mode.

  16. Contribution to the G0 violation of parity experience: calculation and simulation of radiative corrections and the background noise study; Contribution a l'experience G0 de violation de la parite : calcul et simulation des corrections radiatives et etude du bruit de fond

    SciTech Connect

    Guler, Hayg

    2003-12-17

    In the framework of quantum chromodynamics, the nucleon is made of three valence quarks surrpounded by a sea of gluons and quark-antiquark pairs. Only the only lightest quarks (u, d and s) contribute significantly to the nucleon properties. In Go we using the property of weak interaction to violate parity symmetry, in order to determine separately the contributions of the three types of quarks to nucleon form factors. The experiment, which takes place at Thomas Jefferson laboratory (USA), aims at measuring parity violation asymmetry in electron-proton scattering. By doing several measurements at different momentum squared of the exchanged photons and for different kinematics (forward angle when the proton is detected and backward angle it will be the electron) will permit to determine separately strange quarks electric and magnetic contributions to nucleon form factors. To extract an asymmetry with small errors, it is necessary to correct all the beam parameters, and to have high enough counting rates in detectors. A special electronics was developed to treat information coming from 16 scintillator pairs for each of the 8 sectors of the Go spectrometer. A complete calculation of radiative corrections has been clone and Monte Carlo simulations with the GEANT program has permitted to determine the shape of the experimental spectra including inelastic background. This work will allow to do a comparison between experimental data and theoretical calculations based on the Standard Model.

  17. Generation of polarization-entangled photon pairs and violation of Bell's inequality using spontaneous four-wave mixing in a fiber loop

    SciTech Connect

    Takesue, Hiroki; Inoue, Kyo

    2004-09-01

    We report the generation of polarization entangled photon pairs in the 1550-nm wavelength band using spontaneous four-wave mixing in a dispersion-shifted fiber loop. The use of the fiber-loop configuration made it possible to generate polarization entangled states very stably. With accidental coincidences subtracted, we obtained coincidence fringes with >90% visibilities, and observed a violation of Bell's inequality by seven standard deviations. We also confirmed the preservation of the quantum correlation between the photons even after they had been separated by 20 km of optical fiber.

  18. CP Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigi, I. I.; Sanda, A. I.

    1999-11-01

    Why did the matter in our Universe not annihilate itself with antimatter immediately after its creation? The discovery of CP violation may answer this fundamental question. From the basics to the front line of research, this timely account presents background information and theoretical tools necessary for understanding this phenomenon. Early chapters explore charge conjugation, parity, and time reversal symmetries before introducing the Kobayashi-Maskawa ansatz for CP violation and examining the theoretical understanding of CP violating K meson decays. Following chapters reveal how the discovery of B mesons provides a new laboratory in which to study CP violation and predict CP violation in B meson decays and rare K meson decays. Later chapters continue the search for a new fundamental theory and address the problem of baryogenesis in the big bang universe. The importance of close links with experiment is stressed throughout. Each chapter concludes with problems. Detailed references are included. This book is suitable for graduate students and researchers in particle physics, atomic and nuclear physics and the history and philosophy of science.

  19. Brain activation for spontaneous and explicit false belief tasks overlaps: new fMRI evidence on belief processing and violation of expectation.

    PubMed

    Bardi, Lara; Desmet, Charlotte; Nijhof, Annabel; Wiersema, Jan R; Brass, Marcel

    2017-03-01

    There is extensive discussion on whether spontaneous and explicit forms of ToM are based on the same cognitive/neural mechanisms or rather reflect qualitatively different processes. For the first time, we analyzed the BOLD signal for false belief processing by directly comparing spontaneous and explicit ToM task versions. In both versions, participants watched videos of a scene including an agent who acquires a true or false belief about the location of an object (belief formation phase). At the end of the movies (outcome phase), participants had to react to the presence of the object. During the belief formation phase, greater activity was found for false vs true belief trials in the right posterior parietal cortex. The ROI analysis of the right temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), confirmed this observation. Moreover, the anterior medial prefrontal cortex (aMPFC) was active during the outcome phase, being sensitive to violation of both the participant's and agent's expectations about the location of the object. Activity in the TPJ and aMPFC was not modulated by the spontaneous/explicit task. Overall, these data show that neural mechanisms for spontaneous and explicit ToM overlap. Interestingly, a dissociation between TPJ and aMPFC for belief tracking and outcome evaluation, respectively, was also found.

  20. Brain activation for spontaneous and explicit false belief tasks overlaps: new fMRI evidence on belief processing and violation of expectation

    PubMed Central

    Desmet, Charlotte; Nijhof, Annabel; Wiersema, Jan R.; Brass, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There is extensive discussion on whether spontaneous and explicit forms of ToM are based on the same cognitive/neural mechanisms or rather reflect qualitatively different processes. For the first time, we analyzed the BOLD signal for false belief processing by directly comparing spontaneous and explicit ToM task versions. In both versions, participants watched videos of a scene including an agent who acquires a true or false belief about the location of an object (belief formation phase). At the end of the movies (outcome phase), participants had to react to the presence of the object. During the belief formation phase, greater activity was found for false vs true belief trials in the right posterior parietal cortex. The ROI analysis of the right temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), confirmed this observation. Moreover, the anterior medial prefrontal cortex (aMPFC) was active during the outcome phase, being sensitive to violation of both the participant’s and agent’s expectations about the location of the object. Activity in the TPJ and aMPFC was not modulated by the spontaneous/explicit task. Overall, these data show that neural mechanisms for spontaneous and explicit ToM overlap. Interestingly, a dissociation between TPJ and aMPFC for belief tracking and outcome evaluation, respectively, was also found. PMID:27683425

  1. Translation-coupled violation of Parity Rule 2 in human genes is not the cause of heterogeneity of the DNA G+C content of third codon position.

    PubMed

    Sueoka, N

    1999-09-30

    The genome of higher eukaryotes consists of genes having a widely heterogeneous base composition at the third codon position. Ubiquitous variability of the DNA base composition has the following two aspects: intragenomic heterogeneity of the G+C content and the amino-acid-specific translation-coupled biases from the Parity Rule 2 (PR2). PR2 is an intrastrand rule where A = T and G = C are expected if there is no bias in mutation and selection between the two complementary strands of DNA. To examine whether or not the biases from PR2 are responsible for the wide heterogeneity of the DNA G+C content in human, the third codon position of 846 human genes was analyzed. Genes were separated into six groups according to their G+C content of the third codon position, and each group was examined for the translation-coupled PR2 biases in the nucleotide composition of the third codon position for two- and four-codon amino acids. The results show that genes in the different G+C content groups have similar PR2 biases, indicating that the intragenomic heterogeneity of the G+C content is not correlated with translation-coupled biases from the PR2. Therefore, the heterogeneity of the G+C content is likely to be determined by some other mechanism (e.g. locally variable directional mutation pressures) than amino-acid-specific selections for the codon preference.

  2. A search for top squarks with R-parity-violating decays to all-hadronic final states with the ATLAS detector in $$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$ TeV proton-proton collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2016-06-10

    A search for the pair production of top squarks, each with R -parity-violating decays into two Standard Model quarks, is performed using 17.4 fb -1 of √s=8 TeV proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Each top squark is assumed to decay to a b- and an s-quark, leading to four quarks in the final state. Background discrimination is achieved with the use of b-tagging and selections on the mass and substructure of large-radius jets, providing sensitivity to top squark masses as low as 100 GeV. Finally, no evidence of an excess beyond the Standard Model background prediction is observed and top squarks decaying tomore » $$\\overline{b}$$$\\overline{s}$$ are excluded for top squark masses in the range 100 ≤ m $$\\overline{t}$$ ≤ 315 GeV at 95% confidence level.« less

  3. Measurement of parity-violating spin asymmetries in W± production at midrapidity in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Adare, A.

    2016-03-23

    In this article, we present midrapidity measurements from the PHENIX experiment of large parity-violating single-spin asymmetries of high transverse momentum electrons and positrons from W±/Z decays, produced in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at center of mass energies of √s=500 and 510 GeV. These asymmetries allow direct access to the antiquark polarized parton distribution functions due to the parity-violating nature of the W-boson coupling to quarks and antiquarks. The results presented are based on data collected in 2011, 2012, and 2013 with an integrated luminosity of 240 pb-1, which exceeds previous PHENIX published results by a factor of more than 27. In addition, these high Q2 data probe the parton structure of the proton at W mass scale and provide an important addition to our understanding of the antiquark parton helicity distribution functions at an intermediate Bjorken x value of roughly MW/√s=0.16.

  4. A Little Higgs model with Exact Dark Matter Parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwaller, Pedro

    2010-02-01

    We present a little Higgs model where a dark matter parity is implemented such that it is not violated by WZW terms present in strongly coupled UV-completions. We show how to consistently implement fermions into this setup and determine the low energy spectrum of the model. The lightest parity odd state is stable and a viable dark matter candidate. We briefly discuss experimental constraints on the model.

  5. Energy parity games.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Krishnendu; Doyen, Laurent

    2012-11-02

    Energy parity games are infinite two-player turn-based games played on weighted graphs. The objective of the game combines a (qualitative) parity condition with the (quantitative) requirement that the sum of the weights (i.e., the level of energy in the game) must remain positive. Beside their own interest in the design and synthesis of resource-constrained omega-regular specifications, energy parity games provide one of the simplest model of games with combined qualitative and quantitative objectives. Our main results are as follows: (a) exponential memory is sufficient and may be necessary for winning strategies in energy parity games; (b) the problem of deciding the winner in energy parity games can be solved in NP [Formula: see text] coNP; and (c) we give an algorithm to solve energy parity by reduction to energy games. We also show that the problem of deciding the winner in energy parity games is logspace-equivalent to the problem of deciding the winner in mean-payoff parity games, which can thus be solved in NP [Formula: see text] coNP. As a consequence we also obtain a conceptually simple algorithm to solve mean-payoff parity games.

  6. Lorentz violation and Faddeev-Popov ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, B.

    2006-02-15

    We consider how Lorentz-violating interactions in the Faddeev-Popov ghost sector will affect scalar QED. The behavior depends sensitively on whether the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken. If the symmetry is not broken, Lorentz violations in the ghost sector are unphysical, but if there is spontaneous breaking, radiative corrections will induce Lorentz-violating and gauge-dependent terms in other sectors of the theory.

  7. Testing Lorentz invariance using an odd-parity asymmetric optical resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Baynes, Fred N.; Luiten, Andre N.; Tobar, Michael E.

    2011-10-15

    We present the first experimental test of Lorentz invariance using the frequency difference between counter-propagating modes in an asymmetric odd-parity optical resonator. This type of test is {approx}10{sup 4} more sensitive to odd-parity and isotropic (scalar) violations of Lorentz invariance than equivalent conventional even-parity experiments due to the asymmetry of the optical resonator. The disadvantages of odd-parity resonators have been negated by the use of counter-propagating modes, delivering a high level of immunity to environmental fluctuations. With a nonrotating experiment our result limits the isotropic Lorentz violating parameter {kappa}-tilde{sub tr} to 3.4{+-}6.2x10{sup -9}, the best reported constraint from direct measurements. Using this technique the bounds on odd-parity and scalar violations of Lorentz invariance can be improved by many orders of magnitude.

  8. The Parity Theorem Shuffle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The Parity Theorem states that any permutation can be written as a product of transpositions, but no permutation can be written as a product of both an even number and an odd number of transpositions. Most proofs of the Parity Theorem take several pages of mathematical formalism to complete. This article presents an alternative but equivalent…

  9. The Parity Theorem Shuffle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The Parity Theorem states that any permutation can be written as a product of transpositions, but no permutation can be written as a product of both an even number and an odd number of transpositions. Most proofs of the Parity Theorem take several pages of mathematical formalism to complete. This article presents an alternative but equivalent…

  10. Parity-violating asymmetry in the He3 ( n⃗,p ) H3 reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Viviani, M.; Schiavilla, R.; Girlanda, L.; Kievsky, A.; Marcucci, L. E.

    2010-10-01

    The longitudinal asymmetry induced by parity-violating (PV) components in the nucleon-nucleon potential is studied in the charge-exchange reaction 3He(~n, p)3H at vanishing incident neutron energies. An expression for the PV observable is derived in terms of T-matrix elements for transitions from the 2S+1LJ = 1S0 and 3S1 states in the incoming n-3He channel to states with J = 0 and 1 in the outgoing p-3H channel. The T-matrix elements involving PV transitions are obtained in first-order perturbation theory in the hadronic weak-interaction potential, while those connecting states of the same parity are derived from solutions of the strong-interaction Hamiltonian with the hyperspherical-harmonics method. The coupled-channel nature of the scattering problem is fully accounted for. Results are obtained corresponding to realistic or chiral two- and three-nucleon strong-interaction potentials in combination with either the DDH or pionless EFT model for the weak-interaction potential. The asymmetries, predicted with PV pion and vector-meson coupling constants corresponding (essentially) to the DDH ?best values? set, range from ?9.44 to ?2.48 in units of 10?8, depending on the input strong-interaction Hamiltonian. This large model dependence is a consequence of cancellations between long-range (pion) and short-range (vector-meson) contributions, and is of course sensitive to the assumed values for the PV coupling constants.

  11. Parity nonconservation and the origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilenkin, A.; Leahy, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Three mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field generation are discussed: (1) asymmetric decay of particles emitted by rotating black holes; (2) asymmetric proton emission by black holes due to weak radiative corrections, and (3) equilibrium parity-violating currents. It is shown that all three mechanisms can produce a seed field sufficiently strong to account for the present galactic fields.

  12. Parity nonconservation and the origin of cosmic magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilenkin, A.; Leahy, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    Three mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field generation are discussed: (1) asymmetric decay of particles emitted by rotating black holes; (2) asymmetric proton emission by black holes due to weak radiative corrections, and (3) equilibrium parity-violating currents. It is shown that all three mechanisms can produce a seed field sufficiently strong to account for the present galactic fields.

  13. Mental health parity legislation.

    PubMed

    Smaldone, Arlene; Cullen-Drill, Mary

    2010-09-01

    Although recognition and treatment of mental health disorders have become integrated into routine medical care, inequities remain regarding limits on mental health outpatient visits and higher copayments and deductibles required for mental health services when accessed. Two federal laws were passed by Congress in 2008: The Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act and the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act. Both laws became effective on January 1, 2010. The purpose of this article is to discuss provisions of each act and provide clinical examples describing how patients are affected by lack of parity and may potentially benefit from implementation of these new laws. Using available evidence, we examine the potential strengths and limitations of mental health parity legislation from the health policy perspectives of health care access, cost, and quality and identify the important role of nurses as patient and mental health parity advocates.

  14. Parity-doublet representation of Majorana fermions and neutron oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujikawa, Kazuo; Tureanu, Anca

    2016-12-01

    We present a parity-doublet theorem for the representation of the intrinsic parity of Majorana fermions, which is expected to be useful also in condensed matter physics, and it is illustrated to provide a criterion of neutron-antineutron oscillation in a Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer type of effective theory with Δ B =2 baryon number-violating terms. The C P violation in the present effective theory causes no direct C P -violating effects in the oscillation itself, which is demonstrated by the exact solution, although it influences the neutron electric dipole moment in the leading order of small Δ B =2 parameters. An analog of Bogoliubov transformation, which preserves P and C P , is crucial in the analysis.

  15. Time reversal invariance violation in neutron-deuteron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Young-Ho; Gudkov, Vladimir; Lazauskas, Rimantas

    2011-06-15

    Time reversal invariance-violating (TRIV) effects in low-energy elastic neutron-deuteron scattering are calculated using meson exchange and EFT-type TRIV potentials in a distorted-wave Born approximation with realistic hadronic strong interaction wave functions, obtained by solving the three-body Faddeev equations in configuration space. The relation between TRIV and parity-violating observables is discussed.

  16. Unification of gauge couplings and the tau-neutrino mass in supergravity without R parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz, M. A.; Ferrandis, J.; Romão, J. C.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2000-12-01

    Minimal R-parity violating supergravity predicts a value for αs(M Z) smaller than in the case with conserved R-parity, and therefore closer to the experimental world average. We show that the R-parity violating effect on the αs prediction comes from the larger two-loop b-quark Yukawa contribution to the renormalization group evolution of the gauge couplings which characterizes R-parity violating supergravity. The effect is related to the tau neutrino mass and is sensitive to the initial conditions on the soft supersymmetry breaking parameters at the unification scale. We show how a few percent effect on αs(M Z) may occur even with ντ masses as small as indicated by the simplest neutrino oscillation interpretation of the atmospheric neutrino data from Super-Kamiokande.

  17. Optimal bounds for parity-oblivious random access codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chailloux, André; Kerenidis, Iordanis; Kundu, Srijita; Sikora, Jamie

    2016-04-01

    Random access coding is an information task that has been extensively studied and found many applications in quantum information. In this scenario, Alice receives an n-bit string x, and wishes to encode x into a quantum state {ρ }x, such that Bob, when receiving the state {ρ }x, can choose any bit i\\in [n] and recover the input bit x i with high probability. Here we study two variants: parity-oblivious random access codes (RACs), where we impose the cryptographic property that Bob cannot infer any information about the parity of any subset of bits of the input apart from the single bits x i ; and even-parity-oblivious RACs, where Bob cannot infer any information about the parity of any even-size subset of bits of the input. In this paper, we provide the optimal bounds for parity-oblivious quantum RACs and show that they are asymptotically better than the optimal classical ones. Our results provide a large non-contextuality inequality violation and resolve the main open problem in a work of Spekkens et al (2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 102 010401). Second, we provide the optimal bounds for even-parity-oblivious RACs by proving their equivalence to a non-local game and by providing tight bounds for the success probability of the non-local game via semidefinite programming. In the case of even-parity-oblivious RACs, the cryptographic property holds also in the device independent model.

  18. Long-lived stop at the LHC with or without R-parity

    SciTech Connect

    Covi, L.; Dradi, F. E-mail: federico.dradi@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de

    2014-10-01

    We consider scenarios of gravitino LSP and DM with stop NLSP both within R-parity conserving and R-parity violating supersymmetry (RPC and RPV SUSY, respectively). We discuss cosmological bounds from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the gravitino abundance and then concentrate on the signals of long-lived stops at the LHC as displaced vertices or metastable particles. Finally we discuss how to distinguish R-parity conserving and R-parity breaking stop decays if they happen within the detector and how to suppress SM backgrounds.

  19. Parity in knot theory

    SciTech Connect

    Manturov, Vassily O

    2010-06-29

    In this work we study knot theories with a parity property for crossings: every crossing is declared to be even or odd according to a certain preassigned rule. If this rule satisfies a set of simple axioms related to the Reidemeister moves, then certain simple invariants solving the minimality problem can be defined, and invariant maps on the set of knots can be constructed. The most important example of a knot theory with parity is the theory of virtual knots. Using the parity property arising from Gauss diagrams we show that even a gross simplification of the theory of virtual knots, namely, the theory of free knots, admits simple and highly nontrivial invariants. This gives a solution to a problem of Turaev, who conjectured that all free knots are trivial. In this work we show that free knots are generally not invertible, and provide invariants which detect the invertibility of free knots. The passage to ordinary virtual knots allows us to strengthen known invariants (such as the Kauffman bracket) using parity considerations. We also discuss other examples of knot theories with parity. Bibliography: 27 items.

  20. CP Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigi, I. I.; Sanda, A. I.

    2016-10-01

    Foreword; Part I. Basics of CP Violation: 1. Prologue; 2. Prelude: C, P and T in classical dynamics; 3. C, P and T in non-relativistic quantum mechanics; 4. C, P and T in relativistic quantum theories; 5. The arrival of strange particles; 6. Quantum mechanics of neutral particles; Part II. Theory and Experiments: 7. The quest for CP violation in K decays - a marathon; 8. The KM implementation of CP violation; 9. The theory of KL → ππ decays; 10. Paradigmatic discoveries in B physics; 11. Let the drama unfold - B CP phenomenology; 12. Rare K and B decays - almost perfect laboratories; 13. CPT violation - could it be in K and B decays?; 14. CP violation in charm decays - the dark horse; 15. The strong CP problem; Part III. Looking Beyond the Standard Model: 16. Quest for CP violation in the neutrino sector; 17. Possible corrections to the KM ansatz: right-handed currents and non-minimal Higgs dynamics; 18. CP violation without nonperturbative dynamics - top quarks and charged leptons; 19. SUSY - providing shelter for Higgs dynamics; 20. Minimal flavour violation and extra dimensions; 21. Baryogenesis in the universe; Part IV. Summary: 22. Summary and perspectives; References; Index.

  1. From symmetry violation to dynamics: The charm window

    SciTech Connect

    Appel, J.A.

    1997-12-01

    C.S. Wu observed parity violation in the low energy process of nuclear decay. She was the first to observe this symmetry violation at any energy. Yet, her work taught us about the form and strengths of the couplings of the massive weak boson. Today, we use the same approach. We look for very much higher mass-scale interactions through symmetry violations in the decays of charm quark systems. These charm decays provide a unique window to new physics.

  2. Observation of Parity Nonconservation in Møller Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anthony, P. L.; Arnold, R. G.; Arroyo, C.; Baird, K.; Bega, K.; Biesiada, J.; Bosted, P. E.; Breuer, M.; Carr, R.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; Cooke, M.; Decker, F. J.; Decowski, P.; Deur, A.; Emam, W.; Erickson, R.; Fieguth, T.; Field, C.; Gao, J.; Gustafsson, K.; Hicks, R. S.; Holmes, R.; Hughes, E. W.; Humensky, T. B.; Jones, G. M.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kumar, K. S.; Lhuillier, D.; Lombard-Nelsen, R.; Mastromarino, P.; Mayer, B.; McKeown, R. D.; Michaels, R.; Olson, M.; Paschke, K. D.; Peterson, G. A.; Pitthan, R.; Pope, K.; Relyea, D.; Rock, S. E.; Saxton, O.; Shapiro, G.; Singh, J.; Souder, P. A.; Szalata, Z. M.; Tobias, W. A.; Tonguc, B. T.; Turner, J.; Tweedie, B.; Vacheret, A.; Walz, D.; Weber, T.; Weisend, J.; Whittum, D.; Woods, M.; Younus, I.

    2004-05-01

    We report a measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in fixed target electron-electron (Møller) scattering: APV=[-175±30(stat)±20(syst)]×10-9. This first direct observation of parity nonconservation in Møller scattering leads to a measurement of the electron's weak charge at low energy QeW=-0.053±0.011. This is consistent with the standard model expectation at the current level of precision: sin(2θW(MZ)MS¯=0.2293±0.0024(stat)±0.0016(syst)±0.0006(theory).

  3. Low energy supergravity: R-parity breaking and the top quark mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carena, Marcela S.; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    1987-03-01

    We study the process of spontaneous R-parity breaking in minimal low energy supergravity models. We show that it is very hard to obtain models with heavy top quarks if one wants to preserve the radiative breaking of SU(2)L⊗U(1)Y without breaking R-parity. Fellow of Consejo National de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas.

  4. The Fall of Parity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Paul

    1982-01-01

    Physicists had assumed that the world is distinguishable from its mirror image and constructed theories to ensure that the corresponding mathematical property (parity) is conserved in all subatomic processes. However, a scientific experiment demonstrated an intrinsic handedness to at least one physical process. The experiment, equipment, and…

  5. The Fall of Parity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forman, Paul

    1982-01-01

    Physicists had assumed that the world is distinguishable from its mirror image and constructed theories to ensure that the corresponding mathematical property (parity) is conserved in all subatomic processes. However, a scientific experiment demonstrated an intrinsic handedness to at least one physical process. The experiment, equipment, and…

  6. Volkswagen Violations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This site provides information on EPA's issued notice of violation (NOV) of the Clean Air Act (CAA) to Volkswagen. The NOV alleges software that circumvents EPA emissions standards for certain air pollutants.

  7. Two- and Three-Dimensional Probes of Parity in Primordial Gravity Waves.

    PubMed

    Masui, Kiyoshi Wesley; Pen, Ue-Li; Turok, Neil

    2017-06-02

    We show that three-dimensional information is critical to discerning the effects of parity violation in the primordial gravity-wave background. If present, helical gravity waves induce parity-violating correlations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) between parity-odd polarization B modes and parity-even temperature anisotropies (T) or polarization E modes. Unfortunately, EB correlations are much weaker than would be naively expected, which we show is due to an approximate symmetry resulting from the two-dimensional nature of the CMB. The detectability of parity-violating correlations is exacerbated by the fact that the handedness of individual modes cannot be discerned in the two-dimensional CMB, leading to a noise contribution from scalar matter perturbations. In contrast, the tidal imprints of primordial gravity waves fossilized into the large-scale structure of the Universe are a three-dimensional probe of parity violation. Using such fossils the handedness of gravity waves may be determined on a mode-by-mode basis, permitting future surveys to probe helicity at the percent level if the amplitude of primordial gravity waves is near current observational upper limits.

  8. Two- and Three-Dimensional Probes of Parity in Primordial Gravity Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masui, Kiyoshi Wesley; Pen, Ue-Li; Turok, Neil

    2017-06-01

    We show that three-dimensional information is critical to discerning the effects of parity violation in the primordial gravity-wave background. If present, helical gravity waves induce parity-violating correlations in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) between parity-odd polarization B modes and parity-even temperature anisotropies (T ) or polarization E modes. Unfortunately, E B correlations are much weaker than would be naively expected, which we show is due to an approximate symmetry resulting from the two-dimensional nature of the CMB. The detectability of parity-violating correlations is exacerbated by the fact that the handedness of individual modes cannot be discerned in the two-dimensional CMB, leading to a noise contribution from scalar matter perturbations. In contrast, the tidal imprints of primordial gravity waves fossilized into the large-scale structure of the Universe are a three-dimensional probe of parity violation. Using such fossils the handedness of gravity waves may be determined on a mode-by-mode basis, permitting future surveys to probe helicity at the percent level if the amplitude of primordial gravity waves is near current observational upper limits.

  9. The theory of R-parity, unification and SUSY at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Pavel Fileviez

    2012-07-27

    The simplest gauge theories for the conservation of R-parity in supersymmetry are discussed. We show how the minimal theory based on the B-L gauge symmetry predicts that R-parity must be spontaneously broken at the TeV scale. The most striking signals of these theories at the Large Hadron Collider are discussed. We present a realistic theory where the local baryon and lepton numbers are spontaneously broken at the supersymmetry breaking scale. The possibility to understand the conservation of R-parity in grand unified theories defined in four dimensions is mentioned.

  10. Time-reversal-invariance-violating nucleon-nucleon potential in the 1 /Nc expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samart, Daris; Schat, Carlos; Schindler, Matthias R.; Phillips, Daniel R.

    2016-08-01

    We apply the large-Nc expansion to the time-reversal-invariance-violating (TV) nucleon-nucleon potential. The operator structures contributing to next-to-next-to-leading order in the large-Nc counting are constructed. For the TV and parity-violating case we find a single operator structure at leading order. The TV but parity-conserving potential contains two leading-order terms, which, however, are suppressed by 1 /Nc compared to the parity-violating potential. Comparison with phenomenological potentials, including the chiral effective field theory potential in the TV parity-violating case, leads to large-Nc scaling relations for TV meson-nucleon and nucleon-nucleon couplings.

  11. Symmetry violations in neutron-deuteron reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gudkov, Vladimir; Song, Young-Ho; Lazauskas, Rimantas

    2012-10-01

    The study of parity violating (PV) and time reversal invariance violating (TRIV) effects in low energy physics are very important for the understanding of the main features of the Standard model and for a search for the possible manifestations of new physics. In this talk we present a comprehensive analysis of PV and TRIV effects for the simple nuclear processes: neutron-deuteron reactions. We compare different PV and TRIV effects, which have been calculated using both traditional (DDH-type) symmetry violating potentials and the potentials obtained using the effective field theory approach. The possibility to measure symmetry violating effects in neutron-deuteron system and the issues related to theoretical uncertainties in calculations of these effects are discussed.

  12. Parity horizons in shape dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herczeg, Gabriel

    2016-11-01

    I introduce the notion of a parity horizon, and show that many simple solutions of shape dynamics possess them. I show that the event horizons of the known asymptotically flat black hole solutions of shape dynamics are parity horizons and that this notion of parity implies that these horizons possess a notion of CPT invariance that can in some cases be extended to the solution as a whole. I present three new solutions of shape dynamics with parity horizons and find that not only do event horizons become parity horizons in shape dynamics, but observer-dependent horizons and Cauchy horizons do as well. The fact that Cauchy horizons become (singular) parity horizons suggests a general chronology protection mechanism in shape dynamics that prevents the formation of closed timelike curves.

  13. Parity violation asymmetry in nucleon-nucleon scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avishai, Y.; Grangé, P.

    1989-01-01

    We evaluate the helicity dependence of the differential and total cross section for the scattering of longitudinally polarized neutrons on unpolarized neutrons at E = 45 MeV following a SIN experiment and at E = 230 MeV in anticipation of an experiment at TRIUMF. (Both experiments study proton-proton scattering of course, namely overlinep+ p→ p+ p). Calculations are based on the Desplanques, Donoghue and Holstein (DDH) theory for the weak NN interaction and on the Paris potential for the strong NN force. The results can be expressed as a linear combination in the (DDH) weak parameters hρ0, hρ2 and hω0, corresponding to exchanges of isoscalar ρ-, isotensor ρ-, and isoscalar ω- mesons, respectively. For the asymmetry in the total cross section we have found, using DDH suggested "best values", Az (45 MeV) = -2.62 × 10 -7 and Az (230 MeV) = 0.07 × 10 -7. The small value of Az at 230 MeV is due to a sign change in the differential asymmetry. As for the asymmetry in the differential cross section we notice that even at the lower energy E = 45 MeV, the asymmetry in the differential cross section deviates from isotropy, since J > 0 weak amplitudes cannot be neglected.

  14. Parity violating cylindrical shell in the framework of QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fialkovsky, I. V.; Markov, V. N.; Pis'mak, Yu M.

    2008-02-01

    We present calculations of Casimir energy (CE) in a system of quantized electromagnetic (EM) field interacting with an infinite circular cylindrical shell (which we call 'the defect'). Interaction is described in the only QFT-consistent way by Chern-Simon action concentrated on the defect, with a single coupling constant a. For the regularization of UV divergencies of the theory, we use the Pauli-Villars regularization of the free-EM action. The divergencies are extracted as a polynomial in the regularization mass M, and they renormalize the classical part of the surface action. We reveal the dependence of CE on the coupling constant a. Corresponding Casimir force is attractive for all values of a. For a → ∞, we reproduce the known results for CE for perfectly conducting cylindrical shell first obtained by DeRaad and Milton. As a future task for solving existing arguments on observational status of (rigid) self-pressure of a single object, we propose for investigation a system which we call 'Casimir drum'.

  15. Charge symmetry breaking and parity violating electron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Gerald A.

    2013-11-07

    I review the effects of charge symmetry breaking CSB on electromagnetic form factors and how that influences extraction of information regarding nucleon strangeness content and the weak mixing angle. It seems that CSB effects are very modest and should not impact the analysis of experiments.

  16. Strong coupling constant of negative parity octet baryons with light pseudoscalar mesons in light cone QCD sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, T. M.; Savcı, M.

    2017-01-01

    The strong coupling constants of the π and K mesons with negative parity octet baryons are estimated within the light cone QCD sum rules. It is observed that all strong coupling constants, similarly to the case for the positive parity baryons, can be described in terms of three invariant functions, where two of them correspond to the well known F and D couplings in the SU(3)f symmetry, and the third function describes the SU(3)f symmetry violating effects. We compare our predictions on the strong coupling constants of pseudoscalar mesons of negative parity baryons with those corresponding to the strong coupling constants for the positive parity baryons.

  17. Lepton Number Violation in Higgs Decay at LHC.

    PubMed

    Maiezza, Alessio; Nemevšek, Miha; Nesti, Fabrizio

    2015-08-21

    We show that within the left-right symmetric model, lepton number violating decays of the Higgs boson can be discovered at the LHC. The process is due to the mixing of the Higgs boson with the triplet that breaks parity. As a result, the Higgs boson can act as a gateway to the origin of the heavy Majorana neutrino mass. To assess the LHC reach, a detailed collider study of the same-sign dileptons plus jets channel is provided. This process is complementary to the existing nuclear and collider searches for lepton number violation and can probe the scale of parity restoration even beyond other direct searches.

  18. Fourth Generation Parity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hye-Sung; Soni, Amarjit

    2013-01-01

    We present a very simple 4th-generation (4G) model with an Abelian gauge interaction under which only the 4G fermions have nonzero charge. The U(1) gauge symmetry can have a Z_2 residual discrete symmetry (4G-parity), which can stabilize the lightest 4G particle (L4P). When the 4G neutrino is the L4P, it would be a neutral and stable particle and the other 4G fermions would decay into the L4P leaving the trace of missing energy plus the standard model fermions. Because of the new symmetry, the 4G particle creation and decay modes are different from those of the sequential 4G model, and the 4G particles can be appreciably lighter than typical experimental bounds.

  19. Radiative B decays in supersymmetry without R parity

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Otto C.W.; Vaidya, Rishikesh D.

    2005-03-01

    We present a systematic analysis of all the contributions at the leading log order to the branching ratio of the inclusive radiative decay B{yields}X{sub s}+{gamma} in the framework of supersymmetry without R parity. The relevant set of four-quark operators involved in QCD running are extended from six (within the standard model and the minimal supersymmetric standard model) to 24, with also many new contributions to the Wilson coefficients of (chromo)magnetic penguins for either chiral structure. We present complete analytical results here without any a priori assumptions on the form of R-parity violation. Mass-eigenstate expressions are given; hence the results are free from the commonly adopted mass-insertion approximation. In the numerical analysis, we focus here only on the influence of the trilinear {lambda}{sub ijk}{sup '} couplings and report on the possibility of a few orders of magnitude improvement for the bounds on a few combinations of the {lambda}{sup '} couplings. Our study shows that the Wilson coefficients of the current-current operators due to R-parity violation dominate over the direct contributions to the penguins. However, the interplay of various contributions is complicated due to the QCD corrections which we elaborate here.

  20. Preferred axis of CMB parity asymmetry in the masked maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhao, Wen; Huang, Qing-Guo; Santos, Larissa

    2016-06-01

    Both WMAP and Planck data show a significant odd-multipole preference in the large scales of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies. If this pattern originates from cosmological effects, then it can be considered a crucial clue for a violation in the cosmological principle. By defining various direction dependent statistics in the full-sky Planck 2015 maps (see, for instance, Naselsky et al. (2012); W. Zhao (2014)), we found that the CMB parity asymmetry has a preferred direction, which is independent of the choices of the statistics. In particular, this preferred axis is strongly aligned with those in the CMB quadrupole and octopole, as well as that in the CMB kinematic dipole, which hints to their non-cosmological origin. In realistic observations, the foreground residuals are inevitable, and should be properly masked out in order to avoid possible misinterpretation of the results. In this paper, we extend our previous analyses to the masked Planck 2015 data. By defining a similar direction dependent statistic in the masked map, we find a preferred direction of the CMB parity asymmetry, in which the axis also coincides with that found in the full-sky analysis. Therefore, our conclusions on the CMB parity violation and its directional properties are confirmed.

  1. A measurement of the parity conserving asymmetry in the neutron capture on 3He at SNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabir, Latiful; n3He Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The n3He experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source is motivated to measure the parity violating asymmetry of the recoil proton momentum kp with respect to the neutron spin σn in the reaction n+ 3He --> p +T+765 KeV. This is sensitive to isospin ΔI = 0 and 1 components of the Hadronic Weak Interaction (HWI), and is expected to be extremely small (10-7). There is an additional parity even nuclear asymmetry proportional to k->p .σ->n ×k->n predicted by R-matrix analysis to be 1 ×10-6 at 5 meV. We measured this asymmetry for the first time for verification of nuclear theory in this new observable and for confirmation of the sensitivity of our experiment to the parity violating asymmetry. I will present the measurement of the PC asymmetry and discuss on data analysis.

  2. Parity-time-symmetric quantum critical phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Ashida, Yuto; Furukawa, Shunsuke; Ueda, Masahito

    2017-01-01

    Synthetic non-conservative systems with parity-time (PT) symmetric gain–loss structures can exhibit unusual spontaneous symmetry breaking that accompanies spectral singularity. Recent studies on PT symmetry in optics and weakly interacting open quantum systems have revealed intriguing physical properties, yet many-body correlations still play no role. Here by extending the idea of PT symmetry to strongly correlated many-body systems, we report that a combination of spectral singularity and quantum criticality yields an exotic universality class which has no counterpart in known critical phenomena. Moreover, we find unconventional low-dimensional quantum criticality, where superfluid correlation is anomalously enhanced owing to non-monotonic renormalization group flows in a PT-symmetry-broken quantum critical phase, in stark contrast to the Berezinskii–Kosterlitz–Thouless paradigm. Our findings can be experimentally tested in ultracold atoms and predict critical phenomena beyond the Hermitian paradigm of quantum many-body physics. PMID:28593991

  3. Agricultural Parity: Historical Review and Alternative Calculations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teigen, Lloyd D.

    By setting current legal definitions of parity in the context of history, this report traces how the parity price and parity income concepts developed. It identifies some of the consequences of price and income parity on agricultural resource use and efficiency, on the size and structure of the agricultural sector, and on the extent of producer…

  4. Crossings in alternating-parity bands of neutron-rich Ba nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, W.; Jones, M.A.; Durell, J.L.

    1995-07-22

    {sup 144}Ba and {sup 146}Ba nuclei produced in the spontaneous fission of {sup 248}Cm have been studied using the EUROGRAM II array. Spins and parities of excited levels have been deduced from triple-{gamma} angular correlation and direction-polarization correlation measurements, which is the first use of these techniques in studies of fission product nuclei. Ground-state, alternating-parity bands have been extended significantly and crossing in these bands has been found in both isotopes. For the first time alternating-parity band termination by particle alignment has been observed.

  5. CPT violation implies violation of Lorentz invariance.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, O W

    2002-12-02

    A interacting theory that violates CPT invariance necessarily violates Lorentz invariance. On the other hand, CPT invariance is not sufficient for out-of-cone Lorentz invariance. Theories that violate CPT by having different particle and antiparticle masses must be nonlocal.

  6. Neutron resonances in the compound nucleus: Parity nonconservation to dynamic temperature measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, V.W.

    1997-08-01

    Experiments using epithermal neutrons that interact to form compound-nuclear resonances serve a wide range of scientific applications. Changes in transmission which are correlated to polarization reversal in incident neutrons have been used to study parity nonconservation in the compound nucleus for a wide range of targets. The ensemble of measured parity asymmetries provides statistical information for the extraction of the rms parity-violating mean-square matrix element as a function of mass. Parity nonconservation in neutron resonances can also be used to determine the polarization of neutron beams. Finally the motion of target atoms results in an observed temperature-dependent Doppler broadening of resonance line widths. This broadening can be used to determine temperatures on a fast time scale of one microsecond or less.

  7. Aging, rule-violation checking strategies, and strategy combination: An EEG study in arithmetic.

    PubMed

    Hinault, Thomas; Lemaire, Patrick

    2017-10-01

    In arithmetic, rule-violation checking strategies are used while participants solve problems that violate arithmetic rules, like the five rule (i.e., products of problems including five as an operand end with either five or zero; e.g., 5×14=70) or the parity rule (i.e., when at least one of the two operands is even, the product is also even; otherwise the product is odd; e.g., 4×13=52). When problems violate both rules, participants use strategy combination and have better performance on both-rule than on one-rule violation problems (i.e., five or parity rule). Aging studies found that older adults efficiently use one-rule violation checking strategies but have difficulties to combine two strategies. To better understand these aging effects, we used EEG and found important age-related changes while participants used rule-violation checking strategies. We compared participants' performance while they verified arithmetic problems that differ in number and type of violated rule. More specifically, both-rule violation problems elicited larger negativity than one-rule violation problems between 600 and 800ms. Five-rule violation problems differed from parity-rule violation problems between 1100 and 1200ms. Moreover, rule-violation checking strategies and strategy combination involved delta, theta, and lower alpha frequencies. Age-related changes in ERPs and frequency were associated with less efficient strategy combination. Moreover, efficient use of one-rule violation checking strategies in older adults was associated with changes in ERPs and frequency. These findings contribute to further our understanding of age-related changes and invariance in arithmetic strategies, and in combination of arithmetic strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Parity fluctuations in stellar dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, D. L.; Sokoloff, D. D.

    2017-10-01

    Observations of the solar butterfly diagram from sunspot records suggest persistent fluctuations in parity, away from the overall, approximately dipolar pattern. A simple mean-field dynamo model is used with a solar-like rotation law and perturbed α effect. The parity of the magnetic field relative to the rotational equator can demonstrate can be described as resonance behavior, while the magnetic energy behaves in a more or less expected way. Possible applications of this effect are discussed in the context of various deviations of the solar magnetic field from dipolar symmetry, as reported from analyses of archival sunspot data. The model produces fluctuations in field parity, and hence in the butterfly diagram, that are consistent with observed fluctuaions in solar behavior.

  9. Embodied markedness of parity? Examining handedness effects on parity judgments.

    PubMed

    Huber, Stefan; Klein, Elise; Graf, Martina; Nuerk, Hans-Christoph; Moeller, Korbinian; Willmes, Klaus

    2015-11-01

    Parity is important semantic information encoded by numbers. Interestingly, there are hand-based effects in parity judgment tasks: right-hand responses are faster for even and left-hand responses for odd numbers. As this effect was initially explained by the markedness of the words even vs. odd and right vs. left, it was denoted as the linguistic markedness of response codes (MARC) effect. In the present study, we investigated whether the MARC effect differs for right and left handers. We conducted a parity judgment task, in which right- and left-handed participants had to decide whether a presented single or two-digit number was odd or even by pressing a corresponding response key. We found that handedness modulated the MARC effect for unit digits. While we replicated a regular MARC effect for right handers, there was no evidence for a MARC effect for left handers. However, closer inspection revealed that the MARC effect in left handers depended on the degree of left-handedness with a reversed MARC effect for most left-handed participants. Furthermore, although parity of tens digits interfered with the processing of unit digits, the MARC effect for tens digits was not modulated by handedness. Our findings are discussed in the light of three different accounts for the MARC effect: the linguistic markedness account, the polarity correspondence principle, and the body-specificity hypothesis.

  10. Matter-parity as a residual gauge symmetry: Probing a theory of cosmological dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Alexandre; Arcadi, Giorgio; Dong, P. V.; Duarte, Laura; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Valle, José W. F.

    2017-09-01

    We discuss a non-supersymmetric scenario which addresses the origin of the matter-parity symmetry, PM =(- 1) 3 (B - L) + 2 s, leading to a viable Dirac fermion dark matter candidate. Implications to electroweak precision, muon anomalous magnetic moment, flavor changing interactions, lepton flavor violation, dark matter and collider physics are discussed in detail. We show that this non-supersymmetric model is capable of generating the matter-parity symmetry in agreement with existing data with gripping implications to particle physics and cosmology.

  11. Dynamical matter-parity breaking and gravitino dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Jonas; Weniger, Christoph; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2010-11-15

    Scenarios where gravitinos with GeV masses makeup dark matter are known to be in tension with high reheating temperatures, as required by e.g. thermal leptogenesis. This tension comes from the longevity of the NLSPs (next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle), which can destroy the successful predictions of the standard primordial nucleosynthesis. However, a small violation of matter parity can open new decay channels for the NLSP, avoiding the BBN (standard primordial nucleosynthesis) problems, while being compatible with experimental cosmic-ray constraints. In this paper, we propose a model where matter parity, which we assume to be embedded in the U(1){sub B-L} gauge symmetry, is broken dynamically in a hidden sector at low-scales. This can naturally explain the smallness of the matter parity breaking in the visible sector. We discuss the dynamics of the corresponding pseudo Nambu-Goldstone modes of B-L breaking in the hidden sector, and we comment on typical cosmic-ray and collider signatures in our model.

  12. Permutation parity machines for neural cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes, Oscar Mauricio; Zimmermann, Karl-Heinz

    2010-06-15

    Recently, synchronization was proved for permutation parity machines, multilayer feed-forward neural networks proposed as a binary variant of the tree parity machines. This ability was already used in the case of tree parity machines to introduce a key-exchange protocol. In this paper, a protocol based on permutation parity machines is proposed and its performance against common attacks (simple, geometric, majority and genetic) is studied.

  13. Permutation parity machines for neural cryptography.

    PubMed

    Reyes, Oscar Mauricio; Zimmermann, Karl-Heinz

    2010-06-01

    Recently, synchronization was proved for permutation parity machines, multilayer feed-forward neural networks proposed as a binary variant of the tree parity machines. This ability was already used in the case of tree parity machines to introduce a key-exchange protocol. In this paper, a protocol based on permutation parity machines is proposed and its performance against common attacks (simple, geometric, majority and genetic) is studied.

  14. Permutation parity machines for neural cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes, Oscar Mauricio; Zimmermann, Karl-Heinz

    2010-06-01

    Recently, synchronization was proved for permutation parity machines, multilayer feed-forward neural networks proposed as a binary variant of the tree parity machines. This ability was already used in the case of tree parity machines to introduce a key-exchange protocol. In this paper, a protocol based on permutation parity machines is proposed and its performance against common attacks (simple, geometric, majority and genetic) is studied.

  15. The role of CP violating scatterings in baryogenesis—case study of the neutron portal

    SciTech Connect

    Baldes, Iason; Bell, Nicole F.; Millar, Alexander; Volkas, Raymond R.; Petraki, Kalliopi E-mail: n.bell@unimelb.edu.au E-mail: kpetraki@nikhef.nl

    2014-11-01

    Many baryogenesis scenarios invoke the charge parity (CP) violating out-of-equilibrium decay of a heavy particle in order to explain the baryon asymmetry. Such scenarios will in general also allow CP violating scatterings. We study the effect of these CP violating scatterings on the final asymmetry in a neutron portal scenario. We solve the Boltzmann equations governing the evolution of the baryon number numerically and show that the CP violating scatterings play a dominant role in a significant portion of the parameter space.

  16. Order from disorder in closed systems via time-reversal violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, T.; Sharp, D. H.

    2012-03-01

    Definitions of entropy usually assume time-reversal (T) invariance of interactions, yet microscopically T is known to be violated. We present a detailed computational example of (uncharged) particle species separation (Maxwell demon) using an interaction that violates both parity (P) and T so that PT is preserved, consistent with the CPT invariance required in quantum field theory (C is charge conjugation). This illustrates how T-violating forces can produce more organized states from disorganized ones, contrary to expectations based on increase of entropy. We also outline several scenarios in which T-violating forces could lead to an organized state in the early Universe, starting from a still earlier disorganized state.

  17. Input-output, expandable-parity network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckevitt, J. F., III

    1974-01-01

    Large-scale integrated circuit generates and checks parity of four eight-bit registers. In addition, circuit will indicate by output signal whether parity error exists. Circuit can also generate or check parity of words up to 32 bits. This is done by making appropriate internal wiring connections on the large-scale integrated chip.

  18. 7 CFR 1782.17 - Parity lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Parity lien. 1782.17 Section 1782.17 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) SERVICING OF WATER AND WASTE PROGRAMS § 1782.17 Parity lien. In order for the Agency to agree to a parity lien position, the borrower must submit a written request to the servicing office. (a)...

  19. 7 CFR 1782.17 - Parity lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Parity lien. 1782.17 Section 1782.17 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) SERVICING OF WATER AND WASTE PROGRAMS § 1782.17 Parity lien. In order for the Agency to agree to a parity lien position, the borrower must submit a written request to the servicing office. (a)...

  20. 7 CFR 1782.17 - Parity lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Parity lien. 1782.17 Section 1782.17 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) SERVICING OF WATER AND WASTE PROGRAMS § 1782.17 Parity lien. In order for the Agency to agree to a parity lien position, the borrower must submit a written request to the servicing office. (a)...

  1. 7 CFR 1782.17 - Parity lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Parity lien. 1782.17 Section 1782.17 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) SERVICING OF WATER AND WASTE PROGRAMS § 1782.17 Parity lien. In order for the Agency to agree to a parity lien position, the borrower must submit a written request to the servicing office. (a)...

  2. 7 CFR 1782.17 - Parity lien.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parity lien. 1782.17 Section 1782.17 Agriculture... (CONTINUED) SERVICING OF WATER AND WASTE PROGRAMS § 1782.17 Parity lien. In order for the Agency to agree to a parity lien position, the borrower must submit a written request to the servicing office. (a)...

  3. Toward full mental health parity and beyond.

    PubMed

    Gitterman, D P; Sturm, R; Scheffler, R M

    2001-01-01

    The 1996 Mental Health Parity Act (MHPA), which became effective in January 1998, is scheduled to expire in September 2001. This paper examines what the MHPA accomplished and steps toward more comprehensive parity. We explain the strategic and self-reinforcing link of parity with managed behavioral health care and conclude that the current path will be difficult to reverse. The paper ends with a discussion of what might be behind the claims that full parity in mental health benefits is insufficient to achieve true equity and whether additional steps beyond full parity appear realistic or even desirable.

  4. Parity of publication for psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Vivekanantham, Sayinthen; Strawbridge, Rebecca; Rampuri, Riaz; Ragunathan, Thivvia; Young, Allan H

    2016-09-01

    There is an established disparity between physical and mental healthcare. Parity of research outputs has not been assessed internationally across influential medical journals. To assess parity of publication between physical and mental health, and within psychiatry. Four major medical disciplines were identified and their relative burden estimated. All publications from the highest-impact general medical journals in 2001, 2006 and 2011 were categorised accordingly. The frequency of psychiatry, cardiology, oncology and respiratory medicine articles were compared with the expected proportion (given illness burdens). Six subspecialties within psychiatry were also compared. Psychiatry was consistently and substantially underrepresented; other specialties were overrepresented. Dementia and psychosis demonstrated overrepresentation, with addiction and anxiety disorders represented proportionately and other disorders underrepresented. The underrepresentation of mood disorders increased more recently. There appears to be an important element of disparity of esteem; further action is required to achieve equivalence between mental and physical health research publications. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  5. Neutrino masses in lepton number violating mSUGRA

    SciTech Connect

    Kom, Steve C. H.

    2008-11-23

    In SUSY models which violate R-parity, there exist trilinear lepton number violating (LNV) operators which can lead to neutrino masses. If these operators are defined at the unification scale, the renormalization group flow becomes important and generally leads to one neutrino mass much heavier than the others. We study, in a minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) set-up with two trilinear LNV operators and three charged lepton mixing angles, numerically how these parameters may be arranged to be compatible with neutrino oscillation data, and discuss some phenomenological observations.

  6. Supersymmetric radiative corrections on {mu}-{tau} neutrino refraction including possible R-parity breaking interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gava, J.; Jean-Louis, C.-C.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the one-loop radiative corrections to the neutrino indices of refraction from supersymmetric models. We consider the next-to-minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model which happens to be a better supersymmetric candidate than the minimal supersymmetric standard model for both theoretical and experimental reasons. We scan the relevant supersymmetry parameters and identify regions in the parameter space which yield interesting values for V{sub {mu}{tau}.} If R-parity is broken there are significant differences between the minimal supersymmetric standard model and next-to-minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model contributions contrary to the R-parity conserved case. Finally, for a nonzero CP-violating phase, we show analytically that the presence of V{sub {mu}{tau}}will explicitly imply CP-violation effects on the supernova electron (anti)neutrino fluxes.

  7. Supersymmetric Froggatt-Nielsen Models with Baryon- and Lepton-Number Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiner, Herbi K.; Thormeier, Marc

    2004-04-16

    We systematically investigate the embedding of U(1)_X Froggatt-Nielsen models in (four-dimensional) local supersymmetry. We restrict ourselves to models with a single flavon field. We do not impose a discrete symmetry by hand, e.g., R-parity, baryon-parity or lepton-parity. Thus we determine the order of magnitude of the baryon- and/or lepton violating coupling constants through the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We then scrutinize whether the predicted coupling constants are in accord with weak or GUT scale constraints. Many models turn out to be incompatible.

  8. Supersymmetric Froggatt-Nielsen models with baryon- and lepton-number violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiner, Herbi K.; Thormeier, Marc

    2004-03-01

    We systematically investigate the embedding of U(1)X Froggatt-Nielsen models in (four-dimensional) local supersymmetry. We restrict ourselves to models with a single flavon field. We do not impose a discrete symmetry by hand, e.g., R parity, baryon parity, or lepton parity. Thus we determine the order of magnitude of the baryon- and/or lepton-violating coupling constants through the Froggatt-Nielsen scenario. We then scrutinize whether the predicted coupling constants are in accord with weak or GUT scale constraints. Many models turn out to be incompatible.

  9. Constraining PCP Violating Varying Alpha Theory through Laboratory Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Maity, Debaprasad; Chen, Pisin; /NCTS, Taipei /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2012-06-06

    In this report we have studied the implication of a parity and charge-parity (PCP) violating interaction in varying alpha theory. Due to this interaction, the state of photon polarization can change when it passes through a strong background magnetic field. We have calculated the optical rotation and ellipticity of the plane of polarization of an electromagnetic wave and tested our results against different laboratory experiments. Our model contains a PCP violating parameter {beta} and a scale of alpha variation {omega}. By analyzing the laboratory experimental data, we found the most stringent constraints on our model parameters to be 1 {le} {omega} {le} 10{sup 13} GeV{sup 2} and -0.5 {le} {beta} {le} 0.5. We also found that with the existing experimental input parameters it is very difficult to detect the ellipticity in the near future.

  10. Crossovers from parity conserving to directed percolation universality.

    PubMed

    Odor, Géza; Menyhárd, Nóra

    2008-10-01

    The crossover behavior of various models exhibiting phase transition to absorbing phase with parity conserving class has been investigated by numerical simulations and cluster mean-field method. In case of models exhibiting Z_2 symmetric absorbing phases (the cellular automaton version of the nonequilibrium kinetic Ising model (NEKIMCA) and a stochastic cellular automaton invented by Grassberger, Krause, and von der Twer [J. Phys. A 17, L105 (1984)]) the introduction of an external symmetry breaking field causes a crossover to kink parity conserving models characterized by dynamical scaling of the directed percolation (DP) and the crossover exponent: 1/phi approximately equal to 0.53(2) . In the case of a branching and annihilating random walk model with an even number of offspring (dual to NEKIMCA) the introduction of spontaneous particle decay destroys the parity conservation and results in a crossover to the DP class characterized by the crossover exponent: 1/phi approximately equal to 0.205(5) . The two different kinds of crossover operators cannot be mapped onto each other and the resulting models show a diversity within the DP universality class in one dimension. These subclasses differ in cluster scaling exponents.

  11. Unidirectional invisibility induced by parity-time symmetric circuit.

    PubMed

    Lv, Bo; Fu, Jiahui; Wu, Bian; Li, Rujiang; Zeng, Qingsheng; Yin, Xinhua; Wu, Qun; Gao, Lei; Chen, Wan; Wang, Zhefei; Liang, Zhiming; Li, Ao; Ma, Ruyu

    2017-01-18

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric structures present the unidirectional invisibility at the spontaneous PT-symmetry breaking point. In this paper, we propose a PT-symmetric circuit consisting of a resistor and a microwave tunnel diode (TD) which represent the attenuation and amplification, respectively. Based on the scattering matrix method, the circuit can exhibit an ideal unidirectional performance at the spontaneous PT-symmetry breaking point by tuning the transmission lines between the lumped elements. Additionally, the resistance of the reactance component can alter the bandwidth of the unidirectional invisibility flexibly. Furthermore, the electromagnetic simulation for the proposed circuit validates the unidirectional invisibility and the synchronization with the input energy well. Our work not only provides an unidirectional invisible circuit based on PT-symmetry, but also proposes a potential solution for the extremely selective filter or cloaking applications.

  12. Unidirectional invisibility induced by parity-time symmetric circuit

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Bo; Fu, Jiahui; Wu, Bian; Li, Rujiang; Zeng, Qingsheng; Yin, Xinhua; Wu, Qun; Gao, Lei; Chen, Wan; Wang, Zhefei; Liang, Zhiming; Li, Ao; Ma, Ruyu

    2017-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric structures present the unidirectional invisibility at the spontaneous PT-symmetry breaking point. In this paper, we propose a PT-symmetric circuit consisting of a resistor and a microwave tunnel diode (TD) which represent the attenuation and amplification, respectively. Based on the scattering matrix method, the circuit can exhibit an ideal unidirectional performance at the spontaneous PT-symmetry breaking point by tuning the transmission lines between the lumped elements. Additionally, the resistance of the reactance component can alter the bandwidth of the unidirectional invisibility flexibly. Furthermore, the electromagnetic simulation for the proposed circuit validates the unidirectional invisibility and the synchronization with the input energy well. Our work not only provides an unidirectional invisible circuit based on PT-symmetry, but also proposes a potential solution for the extremely selective filter or cloaking applications. PMID:28098258

  13. Unidirectional invisibility induced by parity-time symmetric circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Bo; Fu, Jiahui; Wu, Bian; Li, Rujiang; Zeng, Qingsheng; Yin, Xinhua; Wu, Qun; Gao, Lei; Chen, Wan; Wang, Zhefei; Liang, Zhiming; Li, Ao; Ma, Ruyu

    2017-01-01

    Parity-time (PT) symmetric structures present the unidirectional invisibility at the spontaneous PT-symmetry breaking point. In this paper, we propose a PT-symmetric circuit consisting of a resistor and a microwave tunnel diode (TD) which represent the attenuation and amplification, respectively. Based on the scattering matrix method, the circuit can exhibit an ideal unidirectional performance at the spontaneous PT-symmetry breaking point by tuning the transmission lines between the lumped elements. Additionally, the resistance of the reactance component can alter the bandwidth of the unidirectional invisibility flexibly. Furthermore, the electromagnetic simulation for the proposed circuit validates the unidirectional invisibility and the synchronization with the input energy well. Our work not only provides an unidirectional invisible circuit based on PT-symmetry, but also proposes a potential solution for the extremely selective filter or cloaking applications.

  14. CP violation with an unbroken CP transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratz, Michael; Trautner, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    A CP conserving SU(3) gauge theory is spontaneously broken to T7 by the vacuum expectation value (VEV) of a 15-plet. Even though the SU(3)- CP transformation is not broken by the VEV, the theory exhibits physical CP violation in the broken phase. This is because the SU(3)- CP transformation corresponds to the unique order-two outer automorphism of T7, which is not a physical CP transformation for the T7 states, and there is no other possible CP transformation. We explicitly demonstrate that CP is violated by calculating a CP odd decay asymmetry in the broken phase. This scenario provides us with a natural protection for topological vacuum terms, ensuring that θ {G}_{μ ν }{tilde{G}}^{μ ν } is absent even though CP is violated for the physical states of the model.

  15. Continuous multipartite entangled state in Wigner representation and violation of the Zukowski-Brukner inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Chunfeng; Chen Jingling; Oh, C.H.; Kwek, L.C.; Xue Kang

    2005-02-01

    We c