Science.gov

Sample records for spontaneous r-parity violation

  1. Minimal gauged U(1) B-L model with spontaneous R parity violation.

    PubMed

    Barger, Vernon; Pérez, Pavel Fileviez; Spinner, Sogee

    2009-05-01

    We study the minimal gauged U(1) B-L supersymmetric model and show that it provides an attractive theory for spontaneous R-parity violation. Both U(1) B-L and R parity are broken by the vacuum expectation value of the right-handed sneutrino (proportional to the soft supersymmetry masses), thereby linking the B-L and soft SUSY scales. In this context we find a consistent mechanism for generating neutrino masses and a realistic mass spectrum, all without extending the Higgs sector of the minimal supersymmetry standard model. We discuss the most relevant collider signals and the connection between the Z' gauge boson and R-parity violation. PMID:19518859

  2. Models of dynamical R-parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáki, Csaba; Kuflik, Eric; Slone, Oren; Volansky, Tomer

    2015-06-01

    The presence of R-parity violating interactions may relieve the tension between existing LHC constraints and natural supersymmetry. In this paper we lay down the theoretical framework and explore models of dynamical R-parity violation in which the breaking of R-parity is communicated to the visible sector by heavy messenger fields. We find that R-parity violation is often dominated by non-holomorphic operators that have so far been largely ignored, and might require a modification of the existing searches at the LHC. The dynamical origin implies that the effects of such operators are suppressed by the ratio of either the light fermion masses or the supersymmetry breaking scale to the mediation scale, thereby providing a natural explanation for the smallness of R-parity violation. We consider various scenarios, classified by whether R-parity violation, flavor breaking and/or supersymmetry breaking are mediated by the same messenger fields. The most compact case, corresponding to a deformation of the so called flavor mediation scenario, allows for the mediation of supersymmetry breaking, R-parity breaking, and flavor symmetry breaking in a unified manner.

  3. Gravitational violation of R parity and its cosmological signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Berezinsky, V. |; Joshipura, A.S.; Valle, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Discrete R parity (R{sub P}) is usually imposed in the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) as an unbroken symmetry. In this paper we study very weak gravitationally induced R-parity breaking, described by nonrenormalizable terms inversely proportional to the Planck mass. The lightest supersymmetric particle, a neutralino, is unstable but its lifetime exceeds the age of the Universe and thus it can serve as a dark matter (DM) particle. The neutralino lifetime is severely constrained from below due to the production of positrons and antiprotons, diffuse gamma radiation, etc. The violation of R{sub P} generated gravitationally by dimension-five operators in the MSSM is shown to violate these constraints if they are suppressed only by the Planck scale. A general theoretical analysis of gravitationally induced R{sub P} violation is performed and two plausible and astrophysically consistent scenarios for achieving the required suppression are identified and discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Bilinear R-parity violation with flavor symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazzocchi, F.; Morisi, S.; Peinado, E.; Valle, J. W. F.; Vicente, A.

    2013-01-01

    Bilinear R-parity violation (BRPV) provides the simplest intrinsically super-symmetric neutrino mass generation scheme. While neutrino mixing parameters can be probed in high energy accelerators, they are unfortunately not predicted by the theory. Here we propose a model based on the discrete flavor symmetry A 4 with a single R-parity violating parameter, leading to (i) correct Cabbibo mixing given by the Gatto-Sartori-Tonin formula, and a successful unification-like b-tau mass relation, and (ii) a correlation between the lepton mixing angles θ 13 and θ 23 in agreement with recent neutrino oscillation data, as well as a (nearly) massless neutrino, leading to absence of neutrinoless double beta decay.

  5. Affleck-Dine baryogenesis with R-parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higaki, Tetsutaro; Nakayama, Kazunori; Saikawa, Ken'ichi; Takahashi, Tomo; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2014-08-01

    We investigate whether the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is explained in the framework of the supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model with R-parity violating interactions. It is shown that the Affleck-Dine mechanism naturally works via a trilinear interaction LLEc, LQDc, or UcDcDc, if the magnitude of the coupling corresponding to the operator λ, λ', or λ'' is sufficiently small. The formation of Q-balls and their subsequent evolution are also discussed. The present baryon asymmetry can be explained in the parameter region where R-parity is mildly violated 10-9≲λ,λ',λ''≲10-6 and the mass of the gravitino is relatively heavy m3/2≳104 GeV. On the other hand, it is difficult to explain the present baryon asymmetry for larger values of R-parity violating couplings λ ,λ',λ''≳10-5, since Q-balls are likely to be destructed in the thermal environment and the primordial baryon number is washed away.

  6. Constraining bilinear R-parity violation from neutrino masses

    SciTech Connect

    Gozdz, Marek; Kaminski, Wieslaw A.

    2008-10-01

    We confront the R-parity violating minimal supersymmetric standard model with the neutrino oscillation data. Investigating the 1-loop particle-sparticle diagrams with additional bilinear insertions on the external neutrino lines we construct the relevant contributions to the neutrino mass matrix. A comparison of the so-obtained matrices with the experimental ones assuming normal or inverted hierarchy and taking into account possible CP-violating phases allows to set constraints on the values of the bilinear coupling constants. A similar calculation is presented with the input from the Heidelberg-Moscow neutrinoless double beta decay experiment. We base our analysis on the renormalization group evolution of the minimal supersymmetric standard model parameters which are unified at the grand unified theory scale. Using the obtained bounds we calculate the contributions to the Majorana neutrino transition magnetic moments.

  7. U(1) prime dark matter and R-parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Brahm, D.E.

    1990-04-01

    Attempts to understand physics beyond the Standard Model must face many phenomenological constraint, from recent Z{sup {degree}} data, neutral current measurements, cosmology and astrophysics, neutrino experiments, tests of lepton-and baryon-number conservation and CP violation, and many other ongoing experiments. The most interesting models are those which are allowed by current data, but offer predictions which can soon be experimentally confirmed or refuted. Two classes of such models are explored in this dissertation. The first, containing an extra U(1){prime} gauge group, has a dark matter candidate which could soon be detected. The second, incorporating supersymmetry with R-parity violation, predicts rare Z{sup {degree}} decays at LEP; some of these models can already be ruled out by LEP data and gluino searches at the Tevatron. 54 refs., 31 figs.

  8. R-parity violating supersymmetry at IceCube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, P. S. Bhupal; Ghosh, Dilip Kumar; Rodejohann, Werner

    2016-11-01

    The presence of R-parity violating (RPV) supersymmetric interactions involving high-energy neutrinos can lead to resonant production of TeV-scale squarks inside large-volume neutrino detectors. Using the ultra-high energy neutrino events observed recently at the IceCube, with the fact that for a given power-law flux of astrophysical neutrinos, there is no statistically significant deviation in the current data from the Standard Model expectations, we derive robust upper limits on the RPV couplings as a function of the resonantly-produced squark mass, independent of the other unknown model parameters, as long as the squarks decay dominantly to 2-body final states involving leptons and quarks through the RPV couplings. With more statistics, we expect these limits to be comparable/complementary to the existing limits from direct collider searches and other low-energy processes.

  9. Hadronic electric dipole moments in R-parity violating supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Kovalenko, Sergey

    2006-06-01

    We calculate the electric dipole moments (EDM) of the neutral {sup 199}Hg atom, neutron and deuteron within a generic R-parity violating SUSY model (Re{sub p} SUSY) on the basis of a one-pion-exchange model with CP-odd pion-nucleon interactions. We consider two types of the Re{sub p} SUSY contributions to the above hadronic EDMs: via the quark chromoelectric dipole moments (CEDM) and CP-violating 4-quark interactions. We demonstrate that the former contributes to all the three studied EDMs while the latter appears only in the nuclear EDMs via the CP-odd nuclear forces. We find that the Re{sub p} SUSY induced 4-quark interactions arise at tree level through the sneutrino exchange and involve only s and b quarks. Therefore, their effect in hadronic EDMs is determined by the strange and bottom-quark sea of the nucleon. From the null experimental results on the hadronic EDMs we derive the limits on the imaginary parts of certain products Im({lambda}{sup '}{lambda}{sup '}*) of the trilinear Re{sub p}-couplings and show that the currently best limits come from the {sup 199}Hg EDM experiments. We demonstrate that some of these limits are better than those existing in the literature. We argue that future storage ring experiments on the deuteron EDM are able to improve these limits by several orders of magnitude.

  10. Fate of R parity

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Pavel Fileviez; Spinner, Sogee

    2011-02-01

    The possible origin of the R-parity-violating interactions in the minimal supersymmetric standard model and its connection to the radiative symmetry-breaking mechanism is investigated in the context of the simplest model where the radiative symmetry-breaking mechanism can be implemented. We find that, in the majority of the parameter space, R parity is spontaneously broken at the low scale. These results hint that R-parity-violating processes could be observed at the Large Hadron Collider, if supersymmetry is realized in nature.

  11. Can R-parity violation hide vanilla supersymmetry at the LHC?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Masaki; Rolbiecki, Krzysztof; Sakurai, Kazuki

    2013-01-01

    Current experimental constraints on a large parameter space in supersymmetric models rely on the large missing energy signature. This is usually provided by the lightest neutralino which stability is ensured by R-parity. However, if R-parity is violated, the lightest neutralino decays into the standard model particles and the missing energy cut is not efficient anymore. In particular, the U DD type R-parity violation induces the neutralino decay to three quarks which potentially leads to the most difficult signal to be searched at hadron colliders. In this paper, we study the constraints on R-parity violating supersymmetric models using a same-sign dilepton and a multijet signatures. We show that the gluino and squarks lighter than TeV are already excluded in the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model with the R-parity violation if their masses are approximately equal. We also analyze constraints in a simplified model with the R-parity violation. We compare how the R-parity violation changes some of the observables typically used to distinguish a supersymmetric signal from standard model backgrounds.

  12. Lepton flavor violation and cosmological constraints on R-parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Endo, Motoi; Hamaguchi, Koichi; Iwamoto, Sho E-mail: hama@hep-th.phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2010-02-01

    In supersymmetric standard models R-parity violating couplings are severely constrained, since otherwise they would erase the existing baryon asymmetry before the electroweak transition. It is often claimed that this cosmological constraint can be circumvented if the baryon number and one of the lepton flavor numbers are sufficiently conserved in these R-parity violating couplings, because B/3−L{sub i} for each lepton flavor is separately conserved by the sphaleron process. We discuss the effect of lepton flavor violation on the B−L conservation, and show that even tiny slepton mixing angles θ{sub 12}∼>O(10{sup −4}) and θ{sub 23},θ{sub 13}∼>O(10{sup −5}) will spoil the separate B/3−L{sub i} conservation. In particular, if lepton flavor violations are observed in experiments such as MEG and B-factories, it will imply that all the R-parity violating couplings must be suppressed to avoid the B−L erasure. We also discuss the implication for the decay of the lightest MSSM particle at the LHC.

  13. Neutrino mass in GUT constrained supersymmetry with R-parity violation in light of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gozdz, Marek; Kaminski, Wieslaw A.; Simkovic, Fedor

    2004-11-01

    The neutrino masses are generated in grand unified theory (GUT) constrained supersymmetric model with R-parity violation. The neutrinos acquire masses via tree-level neutrino-neutralino mixing as well as via one-loop radiative corrections. The theoretical mass matrix is compared with the phenomenological one, which is reconstructed by using neutrino oscillation and neutrinoless double beta decay data. This procedure allows to obtain significantly stronger constraints on R-parity breaking parameters than those existing in the literature. The implication of normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchy on the sneutrino expectation values, lepton-Higgs bilinear and trilinear R-parity breaking couplings is also discussed.

  14. New bounds on trilinear R-parity violation from lepton flavor violating observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiner, H. K.; Nickel, K.; Staub, F.; Vicente, A.

    2012-07-01

    Many extensions of the leptonic sector of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) are known, most of them leading to observable flavor violating effects. It has recently been shown that the 1-loop contributions to lepton flavor violating three-body decays li→3lj involving the Z0 boson may be dominant, that is, much more important than the usual photonic penguins. Other processes like μ-e conversion in nuclei and flavor violating τ decays into mesons are also enhanced by the same effect. This is for instance also the case in the MSSM with trilinear R-parity violation. The aim of this work is to derive new bounds on the relevant combinations of R-parity violating couplings and to compare them with previous results in the literature. For heavy supersymmetric spectra the limits are improved by several orders of magnitude. For completeness, also constraints coming from flavor violating Z0-decays and tree-level decay channels l→liljlk are presented for a set of benchmark points.

  15. Can flavor physics hint at distinctive signals for R-parity violation at the LHC?

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacherjee, Biplob; Raychaudhuri, Sreerup; Bhattacharyya, Gautam

    2011-10-01

    Observation of some low-energy processes in the flavor physics regime may require the existence of supersymmetry with two relatively large R-parity-violating couplings of the {lambda}{sup '}-type, together with reasonably light superparticles. At the LHC, such interactions would be expected to give rise to clear signals with convenient leptonic triggers, including some multileptons of the same sign. We undertake a detailed investigation of these signals taking care to correlate with low-energy requirements and taking proper account of the standard model backgrounds as well as the R-parity-conserving sector of the supersymmetric model. We find clear indications that R-parity violation as envisaged in this scenario can be detected at the LHC - even, perhaps, in the early runs.

  16. Reappraisal of two-loop contributions to the fermion electric dipole moments in R-parity violating supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Nodoka; Sato, Toru; Kubota, Takahiro

    2012-06-01

    We reexamine the R-parity violating contribution to the fermion electric and chromo-electric dipole moments in the two-loop diagrams. It is found that the leading Barr-Zee-type two-loop contribution is smaller than the result found in previous works, and that electric dipole moment experimental data provide looser limits on R-parity violating couplings.

  17. Probing (g -2 )μ at the LHC in the paradigm of R -parity violating MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Amit; Chakraborty, Sabyasachi

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon exhibits a long-standing discrepancy compared to the standard model prediction. In this paper, we concentrate on this issue in the framework of the R -parity violating minimal supersymmetric standard model. Such a scenario provides a substantial contribution to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon while satisfying constraints from low energy experimental observables as well as the neutrino mass. In addition, we point out that the implication of such operators satisfying muon g -2 are immense from the perspective of the LHC experiment, leading to a spectacular four muon final state. We propose an analysis in this particular channel which might help to settle the debate of R -parity violation as a probable explanation for (g -2 )μ.

  18. New signatures and limits on R-parity violation from resonant squark production

    DOE PAGES

    Monteux, Angelo

    2016-03-31

    Here, we discuss resonant squark production at the LHC via baryonic R-parity violating interactions. The cross section easily exceeds pair-production and a new set of signatures can be used to probe squarks, particularly stops. These include dijet resonances, same-sign top quarks and four-jet resonances with large b-jet multiplicities, as well as the possibility of displaced neutralino decays. We use publicly available searches at √s = 8 TeV and first results from collisions at √s = 13 TeV to set upper limits on R-parity violating couplings, with particular focus on simplified models with light stops and neutralinos. The exclusion reach ofmore » these signatures is comparable to R-parity-conserving searches, mt~ ≃ 500–700 GeV. In addition, we find that O(1) couplings involving the stop can be excluded well into the multi-TeV range, and stress that new searches for single- and pair-produced four-jet resonances will be necessary to exclude sub-TeV stops for a natural SUSY spectrum with light higgsinos.« less

  19. Exploring neutrino physics at LHC via R-parity violating SUSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitsou, Vasiliki A.

    2015-07-01

    R-parity violating supersymmetric models (RPV SUSY) are becoming increasingly more appealing than its R-parity conserving counterpart in view of the hitherto non-observation of SUSY signals at the LHC. In this paper, RPV scenarios where neutrino masses are naturally generated are discussed, namely RPV through bilinear terms (bRPV) and the "μ from ν" supersymmetric standard model (μνSSM). The latter is characterised by a rich Higgs sector that easily accommodates a 125-GeV Higgs boson. The phenomenology of such models at the LHC is reviewed, giving emphasis on final states with displaced objects, and relevant results obtained by LHC experiments are presented. The implications for dark matter for these theoretical proposals is also addressed.

  20. Search for r-parity violating supersymmetry in the multilepton final state

    SciTech Connect

    Attal, Alon Jacques

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents a search for physics beyond the standard model of elementary particles in events containing three or more charged leptons in the final state. The search is based on an R-parity violating supersymmetric model that assumes supersymmetric particles are pair produced at hadron colliders and the R-parity violating coupling is small enough so that these particles ''cascade'' decay into the lightest supersymmetric particle. The lightest supersymmetric particle may only decay into two charged leptons (electrons or muons) plus a neutrino through a lepton number violating interaction. Proton-antiproton collision events produced with √ s= 1.96 TeV are collected between March 2002 and August 2004 with an integrated luminosity of 346 pb-1. R-parity violating supersymmetry is sought for in two data samples, one with exactly three leptons and one with four or more leptons. The trilepton sample has a modest background primarily from Drell-Yan events where an additional lepton is a result of photon conversions or jet misidentification while the four or more lepton sample has an extremely low background. In the three lepton samples 6 events are observed while in the four or more lepton sample zero events are observed. These results are consistent with the standard model expectation and are interpreted as mass limits on the lightest neutralino and lightest chargino particles. The neutralino mass is constrained to be heavier than 97.7 to 110.4 GeV/c2, while the chargino mass is constrained to be heavier than 185.3 to 202.7 GeV/c2, depending on the supersymmetry scenario.

  1. R -parity violation and light neutralinos at SHiP and the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, Jordy; Dreiner, Herbi K.; Schmeier, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    We study the sensitivity of the proposed SHiP experiment to the L Q D operator in R -parity violating supersymmetric theories. We focus on single neutralino production via rare meson decays and the observation of downstream neutralino decays into charged mesons inside the SHiP decay chamber. We provide a generic list of effective operators and decay width formulas for any λ' coupling and show the resulting expected SHiP sensitivity for a widespread list of benchmark scenarios via numerical simulations. We compare this sensitivity to expected limits from testing the same decay topology at the LHC with ATLAS.

  2. Gravitino Dark Matter, Neutrino Masses and Lepton Flavor Violation from broken R-parity

    SciTech Connect

    Lola, S.

    2009-04-17

    We study gravitino dark matter and slow gravitino decays in supersymmetric theories with broken R-parity. It turns out that for the model parameters that may give rise to viable radiative neutrino masses, and visible R-violating signatures in colliders, gravitinos are cosmologically stable and can be good dark matter candidates. On the contrary, the decays of the Next-to-Lightest Supersymmetric Particle are fast, and can be easily reconciled with Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. For the interesting range of parameters, observable lepton flavour violation is also to be expected, with rates that are strongly dependent from the flavour structure of the R-violating operators, and with distinct correlations that should be distinguishable in the coming generation of experiments.

  3. Realizing the supersymmetric inverse seesaw model in the framework of R-parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de S. Pires, C. A.; Rodrigues, J. G.; Rodrigues da Silva, P. S.

    2016-08-01

    If, on one hand, the inverse seesaw is the paradigm of TeV scale seesaw mechanism, on the other it is a challenge to find scenarios capable of realizing it. In this work we propose a scenario, based on the framework of R-parity violation, that realizes minimally the supersymmetric inverse seesaw mechanism. In it the energy scale parameters involved in the mechanism are recognized as the vacuum expectation values of the scalars that compose the singlet superfields NˆC and S ˆ . We develop also the scalar sector of the model and show that the Higgs mass receives a new tree-level contribution that, when combined with the standard contribution plus loop correction, is capable of attaining 125 GeV without resort to heavy stops.

  4. Computation of neutrino masses in R-parity violating supersymmetry: SOFTSUSY3.2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, B. C.; Kom, C. H.; Hanussek, M.

    2012-03-01

    The program SOFTSUSY can calculate tree-level neutrino masses in the R-parity violating minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with real couplings. At tree-level, only one neutrino acquires a mass, in contradiction with neutrino oscillation data. Here, we describe an extension to the SOFTSUSY program which includes one-loop R-parity violating effects' contributions to neutrino masses and mixing. Including the one-loop effects refines the radiative electroweak symmetry breaking calculation, and may result in up to three massive, mixed neutrinos. This paper serves as a manual to the neutrino mass prediction mode of the program, detailing the approximations and conventions used. Program summaryProgram title: SOFTSUSY Catalogue identifier: ADPM_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADPM_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License version 3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 93 291 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 288 618 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, Fortran Computer: Personal computer Operating system: Tested on Linux 4.x Word size: 32 bits Classification: 11.1, 11.6 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADPM_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 181 (2010) 232 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Calculation of neutrino masses and the neutrino mixing matrix at one-loop level in the R-parity violating minimal supersymmetric standard model. The solution to the renormalisation group equations must be consistent with a high or weak-scale boundary condition on supersymmetry breaking parameters and R-parity violating parameters, as well as a weak-scale boundary condition on gauge couplings, Yukawa couplings and the Higgs potential parameters. Solution method: Nested iterative algorithm

  5. R-parity violating effects in top quark flavor-changing neutral-current production at LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Junjie; Heng Zhaoxia; Yang Jinmin; Wu Lei

    2009-03-01

    In the minimal supersymmetric model the R-parity violating top quark interactions, which are so far weakly constrained, can induce various flavor-changing neutral-current (FCNC) productions for the top quark at the large hadron collider (LHC). In this work we assume the presence of the B-violating couplings and examine their contributions to the FCNC productions proceeding through the parton processes cg{yields}t, gg{yields}tc, cg{yields}t{gamma}, cg{yields}tZ and cg{yields}th. We find that all these processes can be greatly enhanced relative to the R-parity preserving predictions. In the parameter space allowed by current experiments, all the production channels except cg{yields}th can reach the 3{sigma} sensitivity, in contrast to the R-parity preserving case in which only cg{yields}t can reach the 3{sigma} sensitivity.

  6. Implications of R-parity violating supersymmetry for atomic and hadronic electric dipole moments

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Kovalenko, Sergey

    2006-10-01

    We calculate the electric dipole moments (EDM) of the neutral {sup 199}Hg atom, deuteron, nucleons and neutral hyperons {lambda}, {sigma}{sup 0} and {xi}{sup 0} in the framework of a generic SUSY model without R-parity conservation (Re{sub p}SUSY) on the basis of the SU(3) version of chiral perturbation theory (ChPT). We consider CP-violation in the hadronic sector induced by the chromoelectric quark dipole moments and CP-violating 4-quark effective interactions. From the null experimental results on the neutron and {sup 199}Hg atom EDMs we derive limits on the imaginary parts of certain products Im({lambda}{sup '}{lambda}{sup '}*) of the trilinear Re{sub p}-couplings and demonstrate that they are more stringent than those existing in the literature. Using these limits we give predictions for the EDMs of neutral hyperons. We also estimate the prospects of future storage ring experiments on the deuteron EDM and show that the expected improvement of the above limits in these experiments may reach several orders of magnitude.

  7. Search for r-parity violating supersymmetry in multilepton final states with the D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kaefer, Daniela

    2006-10-27

    Results obtained from a search for the trilepton signature μμℓ (with ℓ = e, or μ) are combined with two complementary searches for the trilepton signatures eeℓ and eer and interpreted in the framework of R-parity violating Supersymmetry. Pairwise, R-parity conserving production of the supersymmetric particles is assumed, followed by R-parity violating decays via an LL$\\bar{E}$-operator with one dominant coupling λ122. An LL$\\bar{E}$-operator couples two weak isospin doublet and one singlet (s)lepton fields and thus violates lepton number conservation. The data, collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab proton-antiproton collider Tevatron, corresponds to an integrated luminosity of ∫ L dt = 360 ± 23 pb-1. No evident is observed, while 0.41 ± 0.11(stat) ± 0.07(sys) events are expected from Standard Model processes. The resulting 95% confidence level cross section limits on new physics producing a μμℓ signature in the detector are of the order of 0.020 to 0.136 pb. They are interpreted in two different supersymmetry scenarios: the mSUGRA and the MSSM model. The corresponding lower limits on the masses of the lightest neutralino ($\\tilde{X}$$0\\atop{1}$) and the lightest chargino ($\\tilde{X}$$±\\atop{1}$ in case of the mSUGRA model are found to be in the range of: mSUGRA, μ > 0: M($\\tilde{X}$$0\\atop{1}$) ~> 115-128 GeV and M($\\tilde{X}$$±\\atop{1}$) ~> 215-241 GeV; mSUGRA, μ < 0: ($\\tilde{X}$$0\\atop{1}$) ~> 101-114 GeV and M($\\tilde{X}$$±\\atop{1}$) ~> 194-230 GeV, depending on the actual values of the model parameters: m0, m1/2, A0, tanβ, and μ. The first and second parameters provide the boundary conditions for the masses of the supersymmetric spin-0 and spin-1/2 particles, respectively, while A0 gives the universal value for the trilinear couplings at the GUT scale. The parameter tan β denotes the ratio of the vacuum expectation values of the two Higgs fields

  8. Search for R parity violating supersymmetry using like-sign dielectrons at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    We present results of a search for like-sign dielectron plus multijet events using 107 pb{sup -1} of data at {radical}s = 1.8 TeV collected by the CDF experiment. Finding no events that pass our selection criteria, we set 95% confidence level upper limits on gluino-gluino ({tilde g}{tilde g}) and squark-squark ({tilde q}- {anti {tilde q}}) production with R parity violating decays of the charm squark ({tilde c}{sub L}) in {tilde g} {yields} c{tilde c}{sub L} and of the lightest neutralino ({tilde {xi}}{sup 0}{sub 1}) in {tilde q} {yields} q{tilde {xi}}{sup 0}{sub 1} via a non-zero {lambda}`{sub 121} coupling. We compare our results to NLO calculations of gluino and squark production cross sections and set lower limits on the masses M({tilde g}), M({tilde t}{sub 1}), and M({tilde q}).

  9. Searching for R-parity violation at run-II of the tevatron.

    SciTech Connect

    Allanach, B.; Banerjee, S.; Berger, E. L.; Chertok, M.; Diaz, M. A.; Dreiner, H.; Eboli, O. J. P.; Harris, B. W.; Hewett, J.; Magro, M. B.; Mondal, N. K.; Narasimham, V. S.; Navarro, L.; Parua, N.; Porod, W.; Restrepo, D. A.; Richardson, P.; Rizzo, T.; Seymour, M. H.; Sullivan, Z.; Valle, J. W. F.; de Campos, F.

    1999-06-22

    The authors present an outlook for possible discovery of supersymmetry with broken R-parity at Run II of the Tevatron. They first present a review of the literature and an update of the experimental bounds. In turn they then discuss the following processes: (1) resonant slepton production followed by R{sub P} decay, (a) via LQD{sup c} and (b) via LLE{sup c}; (2) how to distinguish resonant slepton production from Z{prime} or W{prime} production; (3) resonant slepton production followed by the decay to neutralino LSP, which decays via LQD{sup c}; (4) resonant stop production followed by the decay to a chargino, which cascades to the neutralino LSP; (5) gluino pair production followed by the cascade decay to charm squarks which decay directly via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (6) squark pair production followed by the cascade decay to the neutralino LSP which decays via L{sub 1}Q{sub 2}D{sub 1}{sup c}; (7) MSSM pair production followed by the cascade decay to the LSP which decays (a) via LLE{sup c}, (b) via LQD{sup c}, and (c) via U{sup c}D{sup c}D{sup c}, respectively; and (8) top quark and top squark decays in spontaneous R{sub P}.

  10. Search for top squarks in R-parity-violating supersymmetry using three or more leptons and b-tagged jets.

    PubMed

    Chatrchyan, S; Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Fabjan, C; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kiesenhofer, W; Knünz, V; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, C; Rohringer, H; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Bansal, M; Bansal, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Luyckx, S; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Roland, B; Rougny, R; Staykova, Z; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Blekman, F; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Keaveney, J; Maes, M; Olbrechts, A; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Villella, I; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Favart, L; Gay, A P R; Hreus, T; Léonard, A; Marage, P E; Mohammadi, A; Perniè, L; Reis, T; Seva, T; Thomas, L; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wang, J; Adler, V; Beernaert, K; Benucci, L; Cimmino, A; Costantini, S; Dildick, S; Garcia, G; Klein, B; Lellouch, J; Marinov, A; McCartin, J; Ocampo Rios, A A; Ryckbosch, D; Sigamani, M; Strobbe, N; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Walsh, S; Yazgan, E; Zaganidis, N; Basegmez, S; Beluffi, C; Bruno, G; Castello, R; Caudron, A; Ceard, L; Delaere, C; du Pree, T; Favart, D; Forthomme, L; Giammanco, A; Hollar, J; Jez, P; Lemaitre, V; Liao, J; Militaru, O; Nuttens, C; Pagano, D; Pin, A; Piotrzkowski, K; Popov, A; Selvaggi, M; Vizan Garcia, J M; Beliy, N; Caebergs, T; Daubie, E; Hammad, G H; Alves, G A; Correa Martins Junior, M; Martins, T; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Aldá Júnior, W L; Carvalho, W; Chinellato, J; Custódio, A; Da Costa, E M; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Malbouisson, H; Malek, M; Matos Figueiredo, D; Mundim, L; Nogima, H; Prado Da Silva, W L; Santoro, A; Sznajder, A; Tonelli Manganote, E J; Vilela Pereira, A; Bernardes, C A; Dias, F A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Gregores, E M; Lagana, C; Mercadante, P G; Novaes, S F; Padula, Sandra S; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Rodozov, M; Sultanov, G; Vutova, M; Dimitrov, A; Hadjiiska, R; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Bian, J G; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liang, S; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, X; Wang, Z; Xiao, H; Xu, M; Asawatangtrakuldee, C; Ban, Y; Guo, Y; Li, Q; Li, W; Liu, S; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Wang, D; Zhang, L; Zou, W; Avila, C; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Chaparro Sierra, L F; Gomez, J P; Gomez Moreno, B; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, D; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Kovac, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Luetic, J; Mekterovic, D; Morovic, S; Tikvica, L; Attikis, A; Mavromanolakis, G; Mousa, J; Nicolaou, C; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Abdelalim, A A; Assran, Y; Elgammal, S; Ellithi Kamel, A; Mahmoud, M A; Radi, A; Kadastik, M; Müntel, M; Murumaa, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Tiko, A; Eerola, P; Fedi, G; Voutilainen, M; Härkönen, J; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Peltola, T; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Tuovinen, E; Wendland, L; Tuuva, T; Besancon, M; Choudhury, S; Couderc, F; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Millischer, L; Nayak, A; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Titov, M; Baffioni, S; Beaudette, F; Benhabib, L; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Daci, N; Dahms, T; Dalchenko, M; Dobrzynski, L; Florent, A; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Mironov, C; Naranjo, I N; Nguyen, M; Ochando, C; Paganini, P; Sabes, D; Salerno, R; Sirois, Y; Veelken, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J-L; Andrea, J; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J-M; Chabert, E C; Collard, C; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J-C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Goetzmann, C; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A-C; Van Hove, P; Gadrat, S; Beauceron, S; Beaupere, N; Boudoul, G; Brochet, S; Chasserat, J; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; El Mamouni, H; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Gouzevitch, M; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Lethuillier, M; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Sgandurra, L; Sordini, V; Tschudi, Y; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Viret, S; Tsamalaidze, Z; Autermann, C; Beranek, S; Calpas, B; Edelhoff, M; Feld, L; Heracleous, N; Hindrichs, O; Klein, K; Ostapchuk, A; Perieanu, A; Raupach, F; Sammet, J; Schael, S; Sprenger, D; Weber, H; Wittmer, B; Zhukov, V; Ata, M; Caudron, J; Dietz-Laursonn, E; Duchardt, D; Erdmann, M; Fischer, R; Güth, A; Hebbeker, T; Heidemann, C; Hoepfner, K; Klingebiel, D; Kreuzer, P; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Olschewski, M; Padeken, K; Papacz, P; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Steggemann, J; Teyssier, D; Thüer, S; Weber, M; Cherepanov, V; Erdogan, Y; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Geisler, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hoehle, F; Kargoll, B; Kress, T; Kuessel, Y; Lingemann, J; Nowack, A; Nugent, I M; Perchalla, L; Pooth, O; Stahl, A; Aldaya Martin, M; Asin, I; Bartosik, N; Behr, J; Behrenhoff, W; Behrens, U; Bergholz, M; Bethani, A; Borras, K; Burgmeier, A; Cakir, A; Calligaris, L; Campbell, A; Costanza, F; Diez Pardos, C; Dooling, S; Dorland, T; Eckerlin, G; Eckstein, D; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Glushkov, I; Gunnellini, P; Habib, S; Hauk, J; Hellwig, G; Horton, D; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katsas, P; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Krämer, M; Krücker, D; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Leonard, J; Lipka, K; Lohmann, W; Lutz, B; Mankel, R; Marfin, I; Melzer-Pellmann, I-A; Meyer, A B; Mnich, J; Mussgiller, A; Naumann-Emme, S; Novgorodova, O; Nowak, F; Olzem, J; Perrey, H; Petrukhin, A; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Raspereza, A; Ribeiro Cipriano, P M; Riedl, C; Ron, E; Sahin, M Ö; Salfeld-Nebgen, J; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Sen, N; Stein, M; Walsh, R; Wissing, C; Blobel, V; Enderle, H; Erfle, J; Gebbert, U; Görner, M; Gosselink, M; Haller, J; Heine, K; Höing, R S; Kaussen, G; Kirschenmann, H; Klanner, R; Kogler, R; Lange, J; Marchesini, I; Peiffer, T; Pietsch, N; Rathjens, D; Sander, C; Schettler, H; Schleper, P; Schlieckau, E; Schmidt, A; Schröder, M; Schum, T; Seidel, M; Sibille, J; Sola, V; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Troendle, D; Vanelderen, L; Barth, C; Baus, C; Berger, J; Böser, C; Butz, E; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Descroix, A; Dierlamm, A; Feindt, M; Guthoff, M; Hartmann, F; Hauth, T; Held, H; Hoffmann, K H; Husemann, U; Katkov, I; Komaragiri, J R; Kornmayer, A; Lobelle Pardo, P; Martschei, D; Müller, Th; Niegel, M; Nürnberg, A; Oberst, O; Ott, J; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Röcker, S; Schilling, F-P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Ulrich, R; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wayand, S; Weiler, T; Zeise, M; Anagnostou, G; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Kesisoglou, S; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Ntomari, E; Gouskos, L; Mertzimekis, T J; Panagiotou, A; Saoulidou, N; Stiliaris, E; Aslanoglou, X; Evangelou, I; Flouris, G; Foudas, C; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Paradas, E; Bencze, G; Hajdu, C; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Radics, B; Sikler, F; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Zsigmond, A J; Beni, N; Czellar, S; Molnar, J; Palinkas, J; Szillasi, Z; Karancsi, J; Raics, P; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Swain, S K; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Dhingra, N; Gupta, R; Kaur, M; Mehta, M Z; Mittal, M; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, J B; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, S; Bhardwaj, A; Choudhary, B C; Malhotra, S; Naimuddin, M; Ranjan, K; Saxena, P; Sharma, V; Shivpuri, R K; Banerjee, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chatterjee, K; Dutta, S; Gomber, B; Jain, Sa; Jain, Sh; Khurana, R; Modak, A; Mukherjee, S; Roy, D; Sarkar, S; Sharan, M; Abdulsalam, A; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kumar, V; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Chatterjee, R M; Ganguly, S; Ghosh, S; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Kole, G; Kumar, S; Maity, M; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Mohanty, G B; Parida, B; Sudhakar, K; Wickramage, N; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Etesami, S M; Fahim, A; Hesari, H; Jafari, A; Khakzad, M; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Grunewald, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Calabria, C; Chhibra, S S; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; Fiore, L; Iaselli, G; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marangelli, B; My, S; Nuzzo, S; Pacifico, N; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Singh, G; Venditti, R; Verwilligen, P; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Benvenuti, A C; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Brigliadori, L; Campanini, R; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Cuffiani, M; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Grandi, C; Guiducci, L; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Meneghelli, M; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Perrotta, A; Primavera, F; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G P; Tosi, N; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Chiorboli, M; Costa, S; Giordano, F; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Gonzi, S; Gori, V; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bianco, S; Fabbri, F; Piccolo, D; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Tosi, S; Benaglia, A; De Guio, F; Di Matteo, L; Fiorendi, S; Gennai, S; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Lucchini, M T; Malvezzi, S; Manzoni, R A; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Moroni, L; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; De Cosa, A; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Meola, S; Merola, M; Paolucci, P; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Bisello, D; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Checchia, P; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Galanti, M; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gozzelino, A; Kanishchev, K; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Montecassiano, F; Passaseo, M; Pazzini, J; Pegoraro, M; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Gabusi, M; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Vitulo, P; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Fanò, L; Lariccia, P; Mantovani, G; Menichelli, M; Nappi, A; Romeo, F; Saha, A; Santocchia, A; Spiezia, A; Androsov, K; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Boccali, T; Broccolo, G; Castaldi, R; D'Agnolo, R T; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Giassi, A; Grippo, M T; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Martini, L; Messineo, A; Palla, F; Rizzi, A; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Squillacioti, P; Tenchini, R; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Vernieri, C; Barone, L; Cavallari, F; Del Re, D; Diemoz, M; Grassi, M; Longo, E; Margaroli, F; Meridiani, P; Micheli, F; Nourbakhsh, S; Organtini, G; Paramatti, R; Rahatlou, S; Soffi, L; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Cartiglia, N; Casasso, S; Costa, M; Demaria, N; Mariotti, C; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Obertino, M M; Ortona, G; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Potenza, A; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Tamponi, U; Belforte, S; Candelise, V; Casarsa, M; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; La Licata, C; Marone, M; Montanino, D; Penzo, A; Schizzi, A; Zanetti, A; Chang, S; Kim, T Y; Nam, S K; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kim, J E; Kong, D J; Oh, Y D; Park, H; Son, D C; Kim, J Y; Kim, Zero J; Song, S; Choi, S; Gyun, D; Hong, B; Jo, M; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Lee, K S; Park, S K; Roh, Y; Choi, M; Kim, J H; Park, C; Park, I C; Park, S; Ryu, G; Choi, Y; Choi, Y K; Goh, J; Kim, M S; Kwon, E; Lee, B; Lee, J; Lee, S; Seo, H; Yu, I; Grigelionis, I; Juodagalvis, A; Castilla-Valdez, H; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Heredia-de La Cruz, I; Lopez-Fernandez, R; Martínez-Ortega, J; Sanchez-Hernandez, A; Villasenor-Cendejas, L M; Carrillo Moreno, S; Vazquez Valencia, F; Salazar Ibarguen, H A; Casimiro Linares, E; Morelos Pineda, A; Reyes-Santos, M A; Krofcheck, D; Bell, A J; Butler, P H; Doesburg, R; Reucroft, S; Silverwood, H; Ahmad, M; Asghar, M I; Butt, J; Hoorani, H R; Khalid, S; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Qazi, S; Shah, M A; Shoaib, M; Bialkowska, H; Boimska, B; Frueboes, T; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Romanowska-Rybinska, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Brona, G; Bunkowski, K; Cwiok, M; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Kalinowski, A; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Misiura, M; Wolszczak, W; Almeida, N; Bargassa, P; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Gallinaro, M; Rodrigues Antunes, J; Seixas, J; Varela, J; Vischia, P; Afanasiev, S; Bunin, P; Golutvin, I; Gorbunov, I; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Kozlov, G; Lanev, A; Malakhov, A; Matveev, V; Moisenz, P; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Shmatov, S; Skatchkov, N; Smirnov, V; Zarubin, A; Evstyukhin, S; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Levchenko, P; Murzin, V; Oreshkin, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, An; Andreev, Yu; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Pashenkov, A; Tlisov, D; Toropin, A; Epshteyn, V; Erofeeva, M; Gavrilov, V; Lychkovskaya, N; Popov, V; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Spiridonov, A; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Andreev, V; Azarkin, M; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Leonidov, A; Mesyats, G; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Belyaev, A; Boos, E; Bunichev, V; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Markina, A; Obraztsov, S; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Azhgirey, I; Bayshev, I; Bitioukov, S; Kachanov, V; Kalinin, A; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Sobol, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Ekmedzic, M; Krpic, D; Milosevic, J; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Battilana, C; Calvo, E; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Colino, N; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Domínguez Vázquez, D; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; Gonzalez Lopez, O; Goy Lopez, S; Hernandez, J M; Josa, M I; Merino, G; Navarro De Martino, E; Puerta Pelayo, J; Quintario Olmeda, A; Redondo, I; Romero, L; Santaolalla, J; Soares, M S; Willmott, C; Albajar, C; de Trocóniz, J F; Brun, H; Cuevas, J; Fernandez Menendez, J; Folgueras, S; Gonzalez Caballero, I; Lloret Iglesias, L; Piedra Gomez, J; Brochero Cifuentes, J A; Cabrillo, I J; Calderon, A; Chuang, S H; Duarte Campderros, J; Fernandez, M; Gomez, G; Gonzalez Sanchez, J; Graziano, A; Jorda, C; Lopez Virto, A; Marco, J; Marco, R; Martinez Rivero, C; Matorras, F; Munoz Sanchez, F J; Rodrigo, T; Rodríguez-Marrero, A Y; Ruiz-Jimeno, A; Scodellaro, L; Vila, I; Vilar Cortabitarte, R; Abbaneo, D; Auffray, E; Auzinger, G; Bachtis, M; Baillon, P; Ball, A H; Barney, D; Bendavid, J; Benitez, J F; Bernet, C; Bianchi, G; Bloch, P; Bocci, A; Bonato, A; Bondu, O; Botta, C; Breuker, H; Camporesi, T; Cerminara, G; Christiansen, T; Coarasa Perez, J A; Colafranceschi, S; d'Enterria, D; Dabrowski, A; David, A; De Roeck, A; De Visscher, S; Di Guida, S; Dobson, M; Dupont-Sagorin, N; Elliott-Peisert, A; Eugster, J; Funk, W; Georgiou, G; Giffels, M; Gigi, D; Gill, K; Giordano, D; Girone, M; Giunta, M; Glege, F; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R; Gowdy, S; Guida, R; Hammer, J; Hansen, M; Harris, P; Hartl, C; Hinzmann, A; Innocente, V; Janot, P; Karavakis, E; Kousouris, K; Krajczar, K; Lecoq, P; Lee, Y-J; Lourenço, C; Magini, N; Malberti, M; Malgeri, L; Mannelli, M; Masetti, L; Meijers, F; Mersi, S; Meschi, E; Moser, R; Mulders, M; Musella, P; Nesvold, E; Orsini, L; Palencia Cortezon, E; Perez, E; Perrozzi, L; Petrilli, A; Pfeiffer, A; Pierini, M; Pimiä, M; Piparo, D; Plagge, M; Quertenmont, L; Racz, A; Reece, W; Rolandi, G; Rovelli, C; Rovere, M; Sakulin, H; Santanastasio, F; Schäfer, C; Schwick, C; Segoni, I; Sekmen, S; Sharma, A; Siegrist, P; Silva, P; Simon, M; Sphicas, P; Spiga, D; Stoye, M; Tsirou, A; Veres, G I; Vlimant, J R; Wöhri, H K; Worm, S D; Zeuner, W D; Bertl, W; Deiters, K; Erdmann, W; Gabathuler, K; Horisberger, R; Ingram, Q; Kaestli, H C; König, S; Kotlinski, D; Langenegger, U; Renker, D; Rohe, T; Bachmair, F; Bäni, L; Bortignon, P; Buchmann, M A; Casal, B; Chanon, N; Deisher, A; Dissertori, G; Dittmar, M; Donegà, M; Dünser, M; Eller, P; Freudenreich, K; Grab, C; Hits, D; Lecomte, P; Lustermann, W; Marini, A C; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P; Mohr, N; Moortgat, F; Nägeli, C; Nef, P; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pandolfi, F; Pape, L; Pauss, F; Peruzzi, M; Ronga, F J; Rossini, M; Sala, L; Sanchez, A K; Starodumov, A; Stieger, B; Takahashi, M; Tauscher, L; Thea, A; Theofilatos, K; Treille, D; Urscheler, C; Wallny, R; Weber, H A; Amsler, C; Chiochia, V; Favaro, C; Ivova Rikova, M; Kilminster, B; Millan Mejias, B; Otiougova, P; Robmann, P; Snoek, H; Taroni, S; Tupputi, S; Verzetti, M; Cardaci, M; Chen, K H; Ferro, C; Kuo, C M; Li, S W; Lin, W; Lu, Y J; Volpe, R; Yu, S S; Bartalini, P; Chang, P; Chang, Y H; Chang, Y W; Chao, Y; Chen, K F; Dietz, C; Grundler, U; Hou, W-S; Hsiung, Y; Kao, K Y; Lei, Y J; Lu, R-S; Majumder, D; Petrakou, E; Shi, X; Shiu, J G; Tzeng, Y M; Wang, M; Asavapibhop, B; Suwonjandee, N; Adiguzel, A; Bakirci, M N; Cerci, S; Dozen, C; Dumanoglu, I; Eskut, E; Girgis, S; Gokbulut, G; Gurpinar, E; Hos, I; Kangal, E E; Kayis Topaksu, A; Onengut, G; Ozdemir, K; Ozturk, S; Polatoz, A; Sogut, K; Sunar Cerci, D; Tali, B; Topakli, H; Vergili, M; Akin, I V; Aliev, T; Bilin, B; Bilmis, S; Deniz, M; Gamsizkan, H; Guler, A M; Karapinar, G; Ocalan, K; Ozpineci, A; Serin, M; Sever, R; Surat, U E; Yalvac, M; Zeyrek, M; Gülmez, E; Isildak, B; Kaya, M; Kaya, O; Ozkorucuklu, S; Sonmez, N; Bahtiyar, H; Barlas, E; Cankocak, K; Günaydin, Y O; Vardarlı, F I; Yücel, M; Levchuk, L; Sorokin, P; Brooke, J J; Clement, E; Cussans, D; Flacher, H; Frazier, R; Goldstein, J; Grimes, M; Heath, G P; Heath, H F; Kreczko, L; Metson, S; Newbold, D M; Nirunpong, K; Poll, A; Senkin, S; Smith, V J; Williams, T; Basso, L; Bell, K W; Belyaev, A; Brew, C; Brown, R M; Cockerill, D J A; Coughlan, J A; Harder, K; Harper, S; Jackson, J; Olaiya, E; Petyt, D; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C H; Tomalin, I R; Womersley, W J; Bainbridge, R; Buchmuller, O; Burton, D; Colling, D; Cripps, N; Cutajar, M; Dauncey, P; Davies, G; Della Negra, M; Ferguson, W; Fulcher, J; Futyan, D; Gilbert, A; Guneratne Bryer, A; Hall, G; Hatherell, Z; Hays, J; Iles, G; Jarvis, M; Karapostoli, G; Kenzie, M; Lane, R; Lucas, R; Lyons, L; Magnan, A-M; Marrouche, J; Mathias, B; Nandi, R; Nash, J; Nikitenko, A; Pela, J; Pesaresi, M; Petridis, K; Pioppi, M; Raymond, D M; Rogerson, S; Rose, A; Seez, C; Sharp, P; Sparrow, A; Tapper, A; Vazquez Acosta, M; Virdee, T; Wakefield, S; Wardle, N; Whyntie, T; Chadwick, M; Cole, J E; Hobson, P R; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Leggat, D; Leslie, D; Martin, W; Reid, I D; Symonds, P; Teodorescu, L; Turner, M; Dittmann, J; Hatakeyama, K; Kasmi, A; Liu, H; Scarborough, T; Charaf, O; Cooper, S I; Henderson, C; Rumerio, P; Avetisyan, A; Bose, T; Fantasia, C; Heister, A; Lawson, P; Lazic, D; Rohlf, J; Sperka, D; St John, J; Sulak, L; Alimena, J; Bhattacharya, S; Christopher, G; Cutts, D; Demiragli, Z; Ferapontov, A; Garabedian, A; Heintz, U; Kukartsev, G; Laird, E; Landsberg, G; Luk, M; Narain, M; Segala, M; Sinthuprasith, T; Speer, T; Breedon, R; Breto, G; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M; Chauhan, S; Chertok, M; Conway, J; Conway, R; Cox, P T; Erbacher, R; Gardner, M; Houtz, R; Ko, W; Kopecky, A; Lander, R; Mall, O; Miceli, T; Nelson, R; Pellett, D; Ricci-Tam, F; Rutherford, B; Searle, M; Smith, J; Squires, M; Tripathi, M; Wilbur, S; Yohay, R; Andreev, V; Cline, D; Cousins, R; Erhan, S; Everaerts, P; Farrell, C; Felcini, M; Hauser, J; Ignatenko, M; Jarvis, C; Rakness, G; Schlein, P; Takasugi, E; Traczyk, P; Valuev, V; Weber, M; Babb, J; Clare, R; Dinardo, M E; Ellison, J; Gary, J W; Hanson, G; Liu, H; Long, O R; Luthra, A; Nguyen, H; Paramesvaran, S; Sturdy, J; Sumowidagdo, S; Wilken, R; Wimpenny, S; Andrews, W; Branson, J G; Cerati, G B; Cittolin, S; Evans, D; Holzner, A; Kelley, R; Lebourgeois, M; Letts, J; Macneill, I; Mangano, B; Padhi, S; Palmer, C; Petrucciani, G; Pieri, M; Sani, M; Sharma, V; Simon, S; Sudano, E; Tadel, M; Tu, Y; Vartak, A; Wasserbaech, S; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yoo, J; Barge, D; Bellan, R; Campagnari, C; D'Alfonso, M; Danielson, T; Flowers, K; Geffert, P; George, C; Golf, F; Incandela, J; Justus, C; Kalavase, P; Kovalskyi, D; Krutelyov, V; Lowette, S; Magaña Villalba, R; McColl, N; Pavlunin, V; Ribnik, J; Richman, J; Rossin, R; Stuart, D; To, W; West, C; Apresyan, A; Bornheim, A; Bunn, J; Chen, Y; Di Marco, E; Duarte, J; Kcira, D; Ma, Y; Mott, A; Newman, H B; Rogan, C; Spiropulu, M; Timciuc, V; Veverka, J; Wilkinson, R; Xie, S; Yang, Y; Zhu, R Y; Azzolini, V; Calamba, A; Carroll, R; Ferguson, T; Iiyama, Y; Jang, D W; Liu, Y F; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Drell, B R; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Luiggi Lopez, E; Nauenberg, U; Smith, J G; Stenson, K; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chatterjee, A; Eggert, N; Gibbons, L K; Hopkins, W; Khukhunaishvili, A; Kreis, B; Mirman, N; Nicolas Kaufman, G; Patterson, J R; Ryd, A; Salvati, E; Sun, W; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Thompson, J; Tucker, J; Weng, Y; Winstrom, L; Wittich, P; Winn, D; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Anderson, J; Apollinari, G; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Chetluru, V; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gao, Y; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Gutsche, O; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hirschauer, J; Hooberman, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Klima, B; Kunori, S; Kwan, S; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Martinez Outschoorn, V I; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Mishra, K; Mrenna, S; Musienko, Y; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Prokofyev, O; Ratnikova, N; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Sharma, S; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vidal, R; Whitmore, J; Wu, W; Yang, F; Yun, J C; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bourilkov, D; Chen, M; Cheng, T; Das, S; De Gruttola, M; Di Giovanni, G P; Dobur, D; Drozdetskiy, A; Field, R D; Fisher, M; Fu, Y; Furic, I K; Hugon, J; Kim, B; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kropivnitskaya, A; Kypreos, T; Low, J F; Matchev, K; Milenovic, P; Mitselmakher, G; Muniz, L; Remington, R; Rinkevicius, A; Skhirtladze, N; Snowball, M; Yelton, J; Zakaria, M; Gaultney, V; Hewamanage, S; Lebolo, L M; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bochenek, J; Chen, J; Diamond, B; Gleyzer, S V; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Prosper, H; Veeraraghavan, V; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Dorney, B; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Bazterra, V E; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Callner, J; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Khalatyan, S; Kurt, P; Lacroix, F; Moon, D H; O'Brien, C; Silkworth, C; Strom, D; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Akgun, U; Albayrak, E A; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Duru, F; Griffiths, S; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Newsom, C R; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Sen, S; Tan, P; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yetkin, T; Yi, K; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Bolognesi, S; Fehling, D; Giurgiu, G; Gritsan, A V; Hu, G; Maksimovic, P; Swartz, M; Whitbeck, A; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Benelli, G; Kenny, R P; Murray, M; Noonan, D; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Wood, J S; Barfuss, A F; Chakaberia, I; Ivanov, A; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Shrestha, S; Svintradze, I; Gronberg, J; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Baden, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Lu, Y; Marionneau, M; Mignerey, A C; Pedro, K; Peterman, A; Skuja, A; Temple, J; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Bauer, G; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Chan, M; Dutta, V; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lai, Y S; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Ma, T; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Ralph, D; Roland, C; Roland, G; Stephans, G S F; Stöckli, F; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Velicanu, D; Wolf, R; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Zanetti, M; Zhukova, V; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Franzoni, G; Gude, A; Haupt, J; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Pastika, N; Rusack, R; Sasseville, M; Singovsky, A; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Cremaldi, L M; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Summers, D; Avdeeva, E; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Keller, J; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Malik, S; Meier, F; Snow, G R; Dolen, J; Godshalk, A; Iashvili, I; Jain, S; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Wan, Z; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Haley, J; Massironi, A; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Trocino, D; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Anastassov, A; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Lusito, L; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Pozdnyakov, A; Schmitt, M; Stoynev, S; Velasco, M; Won, S; Berry, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Chan, K M; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kolb, J; Lannon, K; Luo, W; Lynch, S; Marinelli, N; Morse, D M; Pearson, T; Planer, M; Ruchti, R; Slaunwhite, J; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Antonelli, L; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Kotov, K; Ling, T Y; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Smith, G; Vuosalo, C; Williams, G; Winer, B L; Wolfe, H; Berry, E; Elmer, P; Halyo, V; Hebda, P; Hegeman, J; Hunt, A; Jindal, P; Koay, S A; Lopes Pegna, D; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Piroué, P; Quan, X; Raval, A; Saka, H; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Werner, J S; Zenz, S C; Zuranski, A; Brownson, E; Lopez, A; Mendez, H; Ramirez Vargas, J E; Alagoz, E; Benedetti, D; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; De Mattia, M; Everett, A; Hu, Z; Jones, M; Jung, K; Koybasi, O; Kress, M; Leonardo, N; Maroussov, V; Merkel, P; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Svyatkovskiy, A; Vidal Marono, M; Wang, F; Xu, L; Yoo, H D; Zablocki, J; Zheng, Y; Guragain, S; Parashar, N; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Li, W; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Covarelli, R; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Garcia-Bellido, A; Goldenzweig, P; Han, J; Harel, A; Miner, D C; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Ciesielski, R; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Lungu, G; Malik, S; Mesropian, C; Arora, S; Barker, A; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, C; Contreras-Campana, E; Duggan, D; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Gray, R; Halkiadakis, E; Hidas, D; Lath, A; Panwalkar, S; Park, M; Patel, R; Rekovic, V; Robles, J; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Seitz, C; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Thomassen, P; Walker, M; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Rose, K; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Bouhali, O; Eusebi, R; Flanagan, W; Gilmore, J; Kamon, T; Khotilovich, V; Montalvo, R; Osipenkov, I; Pakhotin, Y; Perloff, A; Roe, J; Safonov, A; Sakuma, T; Suarez, I; Tatarinov, A; Toback, D; Akchurin, N; Damgov, J; Dragoiu, C; Dudero, P R; Jeong, C; Kovitanggoon, K; Lee, S W; Libeiro, T; Volobouev, I; Appelt, E; Delannoy, A G; Greene, S; Gurrola, A; Johns, W; Maguire, C; Mao, Y; Melo, A; Sharma, M; Sheldon, P; Snook, B; Tuo, S; Velkovska, J; Arenton, M W; Boutle, S; Cox, B; Francis, B; Goodell, J; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Lin, C; Neu, C; Wood, J; Gollapinni, S; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C; Lamichhane, P; Sakharov, A; Belknap, D A; Borrello, L; Carlsmith, D; Cepeda, M; Dasu, S; Friis, E; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Herndon, M; Hervé, A; Kaadze, K; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Mozer, M U; Ojalvo, I; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ross, I; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Swanson, J

    2013-11-27

    A search for anomalous production of events with three or more isolated leptons and bottom-quark jets produced in pp collisions at √s=8 TeV is presented. The analysis is based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb(-1) collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in 2012. No excess above the standard model expectations is observed. The results are interpreted in the context of supersymmetric models with signatures that have low missing transverse energy arising from light top-squark pair production with R-parity-violating decays of the lightest supersymmetric particle. In two models with different R-parity-violating couplings, top squarks are excluded below masses of 1020 GeV and 820 GeV when the lightest supersymmetric particle has a mass of 200 GeV. PMID:24329437

  11. Galileogenesis: A new cosmophenomenological zip code for reheating through R-parity violating coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhury, Sayantan; Dasgupta, Arnab

    2014-05-01

    In this paper we introduce an idea of leptogenesis scenario in higher derivative gravity induced DBI Galileon framework aka Galileogenesis in presence of one-loop R-parity violating couplings in the background of a low energy effective supergravity setup derived from higher dimensional string theory framework. We have studied extensively the detailed feature of reheating constraints and the cosmophenomenological consequences of thermal gravitino dark matter in light of PLANCK and PDG data. Finally, we have also established a direct cosmophenomenological connection among dark matter relic abundance, reheating temperature and tensor-to-scalar ratio in the context of DBI Galileon inflation. Higher order correction terms in the gravity sector are introduced in the effective action as a perturbative correction to the Einstein-Hilbert counterpart coming from the computation of Conformal Field Theory disk amplitude at the two loop level [34-36]. The matter sector encounters the effect of N=1, D=4 supergravity motivated DBI Galileon interaction which is embedded in the D3 brane. Additionally, we have considered the effect of R-parity violating interactions [37-40] in the matter sector which provide a convenient framework for quantifying quark and lepton-flavor violating effects. The low energy UV protective effective action for the proposed cosmophenomenological model is described by [31,32]: S=∫d4x √{-g}[K(Φ,X)-G(Φ,X)□Φ+B1R+(B2RRαβγδ-4B3RRαβ+B4R2)+B5] where the model dependent characteristic functions K(Φ,X) and G(Φ,X) are the implicit functions of Galileon and its kinetic counterpart is X=-1/2 >g∂μΦ∂νΦ. Additionally, Bi∀i are the self-coupling constants of graviton degrees of freedom appearing via dimensional reduction from higher dimensional string theory. Specifically B5 be the effective four dimensional cosmological constant. In general, B2≠B3≠B4 which implies that the quadratic curvature terms originated from two loop correction to the

  12. Single top quark production as a probe of R-parity-violating supersymmetry at pp and p{bar p} colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Oakes, R.J.; Yang, J.M.; Whisnant, K.; Yang, J.M.; Young, B.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, X.

    1998-01-01

    We investigate the ability of single top quark production via q{bar q}{prime}{r_arrow}squark{r_arrow}tb and q{bar q}{prime}{r_arrow}slepton{r_arrow}t{bar b} at the CERN LHC and Fermilab Tevatron to probe the strength of R-parity-violating couplings in the minimal supersymmetric model. We found that given the existing bounds on R-parity-violating couplings, single top quark production may be greatly enhanced over that predicted by the standard model, and that both colliders can either discover R-parity-violating SUSY or set strong constraints on the relevant R-parity-violating couplings. We further found that the LHC is much more powerful than the Tevatron in probing the squark couplings, but the two colliders have comparable sensitivity for the slepton couplings. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. R-parity violating supersymmetric Barr-Zee type contributions to the fermion electric dipole moment with weak gauge boson exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Nodoka; Sato, Toru; Kubota, Takahiro

    2013-06-01

    The contribution of the R-parity violating trilinear couplings in the supersymmetric model to the fermion electric dipole moment is analyzed at the two-loop level. We show that in general, the Barr-Zee type contribution to the fermion electric dipole moment with the exchange of W and Z bosons is not small compared to the currently known photon exchange one with R-parity violating interactions. We will then give new upper bounds on the imaginary parts of R-parity violating couplings from the experimental data of the electric dipole moments of the electron and of the neutron. The effect due to bilinear R-parity violating couplings, which needs to be investigated separately, is not included in our analyses.

  14. Sfermion loop contribution to the two-loop level fermion electric dipole moment in R-parity violating supersymmetric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Nodoka

    2012-10-01

    We evaluate the Barr-Zee-type two-loop level contribution to the fermion electric and chromo-electric dipole moments with sfermion loop in R-parity violating supersymmetric models. It is found that the Barr-Zee-type fermion dipole moment with sfermion loop acts destructively to the currently known fermion loop contribution, and that it has small effect when the mass of squarks or charged sleptons in the loop is larger than or comparable to that of the sneutrinos, but cannot be neglected if the sneutrinos are much heavier than loop sfermions.

  15. Infrared quasi-fixed-point structure in extended Yukawa sectors and application to R-parity violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mambrini, Y.; Moultaka, G.

    2002-06-01

    We investigate the one-loop renormalization-group evolution of extended sectors of Yukawa-type couplings. It is shown that Landau poles, which usually provide the necessary low-energy upper bounds that saturate quickly with increasing initial value conditions, lead in some cases to the opposite behavior: some of the low-energy couplings decrease and become vanishingly small for increasingly large initial conditions. We write down the general criteria for this to happen in typical situations, highlighting a concept of repulsive quasifixed points, and illustrate the case both within a two-Yukawa toy model as well as in the minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation. In the latter case, we consider the theoretical upper bounds on the various couplings, identifying regimes where λkl3,λ'kkk,λ″3kl are dynamically suppressed due to the Landau pole. We stress the importance of considering a large number of couplings simultaneously. This leads altogether to a phenomenologically interesting seesaw effect in the magnitudes of the various R-parity violating couplings, complementing and in some cases improving the existing limits.

  16. Constraint on R-parity violating MSSM at the one-loop level from CP-odd N-N interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yamanaka, Nodoka; Sato, Toru; Kubota, Takahiro

    2011-10-21

    Minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation (RPVMSSM) contributes to the P-, CP-odd four-quark interaction. The P-, CP-odd four-quark interaction is constrained by the new {sup 199}Hg EDM experimental data. It is then possible to constrain R-parity violating (RPV) couplings from the {sup 199}Hg EDM data. In this talk, we analyze the RPV contribution to the P-, CP-odd four-quark interaction at the one-loop level to give constraints on RPV parameters.

  17. Implications of R parity violating Yukawa couplings in {delta}S=1 semileptonic decays of K mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Mir, Azeem; Tahir, Farida; Haseeb, Mahnaz Q.; Ahmed, Kamaluddin

    2007-12-01

    We present a class of constraints on products and combinations of Yukawa couplings for R parity violating (Re{sub p}) and lepton flavor conserving as well as violating semileptonic decays of K mesons into light pseudoscalar mesons along with two charged leptons at 1{sigma} and 2{sigma} levels. We compare the constraints obtained by semileptonic rare decays with pure leptonic rare decays and find that most of these bounds are now improved over the existing ones. We also study the forward-backward asymmetry in the decays of K{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}l{sup +}l{sup -} (l=e and {mu}) in the absence of tensor terms. The asymmetry is found to be up to O(10{sup -3}) (O(10{sup -1})) for the electron and muon modes, respectively. The asymmetry is found to be as large as O(10{sup -1}) in the case of K{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}.

  18. Search for R -Parity Violating Supersymmetry Using Like-Sign Dielectrons in p[ovr p] Collisions at [radical] (s) =1. 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, R.E.; Byrum, K.L.; Kovacs, E.; Kuhlmann, S.E.; LeCompte, T.; Nodulman, L. ); Breccia, L.; Brunetti, R.; Deninno, M.; Fiori, I.; Mazzanti, P. ); Behrends, S.; Bensinger, J.; Blocker, C.; Kirsch, L.; Lamoureux, J.I. ); Bonushkin, Y.; Hauser, J.; Lindgren, M. ); Amadon, A.; Berryhill, J.; Contreras, M.; Culbertson, R.; Frisch, H.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Hohlmann, M.; Nakaya, T. ); Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Dittmann, J.R.; Goshaw, A.T.; Khazins, D.; Kowald, W.; Oh, S.H. ); Albrow, M.G.; Atac, M.; Beretvas, A.; Berge, J.P.; Biery, K.; Binkley, M.; Buckley-Geer,

    1999-09-01

    We present a search for like-sign dielectron plus multijet events using 107 pb[sup [minus]1] of data in p[ovr p] collisions at [radical] (s) =1.8 TeV collected in 1992[endash]1995 by the CDF experiment. Finding no events that pass our selection, we set [sigma][times]BR limits on two supersymmetric processes that can produce this experimental signature: gluino-gluino or squark-antisquark production with R -parity violating decays of the charm squark or lightest neutralino via a nonzero [lambda][sup [prime

  19. Search for R-parity violating decays of a top squark in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; de Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; van de Klundert, M.; van Haevermaet, H.; van Mechelen, P.; van Remortel, N.; van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; de Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; van Doninck, W.; van Mulders, P.; van Onsem, G. P.; van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; de Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; McCartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Tytgat, M.; van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Musich, M.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, F. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; da Costa, E. M.; de Jesus Damiao, D.; de Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca de Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mora Herrera, C.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; de Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Spiezia, A.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Assran, Y.; Elgammal, S.; Ellithi Kamel, A.; Mahmoud, M. A.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Jo, M.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.; van Hove, P.; Gadrat, S.; Beauceron, S.; Bernet, C.; Boudoul, G.; Bouvier, E.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Chierici, R.; Contardo, D.; Courbon, B.; Depasse, P.; El Mamouni, H.; Fan, J.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Ille, B.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I. B.; Lethuillier, M.; Mirabito, L.; Pequegnot, A. L.; Perries, S.; Ruiz Alvarez, J. D.; Sabes, D.; Sgandurra, L.; Sordini, V.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Toriashvili, T.; Rurua, L.; Autermann, C.; Beranek, S.; Feld, L.; Heister, A.; Kiesel, M. K.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schulte, J. F.; Verlage, T.; Weber, H.; Zhukov, V.; Ata, M.; Brodski, M.; Dietz-Laursonn, E.; Duchardt, D.; Endres, M.; Erdmann, M.; Erdweg, S.; Esch, T.; Fischer, R.; Güth, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heidemann, C.; Hoepfner, K.; Knutzen, S.; Kreuzer, P.; Merschmeyer, M.; Meyer, A.; Millet, P.; Olschewski, M.; Padeken, K.; Papacz, P.; Pook, T.; Radziej, M.; Reithler, H.; Rieger, M.; Scheuch, F.; Sonnenschein, L.; Teyssier, D.; Thüer, S.; Cherepanov, V.; Erdogan, Y.; Flügge, G.; Geenen, H.; Geisler, M.; Hoehle, F.; Kargoll, B.; Kress, T.; Kuessel, Y.; Künsken, A.; Lingemann, J.; Nehrkorn, A.; Nowack, A.; Nugent, I. M.; Pistone, C.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Asin, I.; Bartosik, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bell, A. J.; Borras, K.; Burgmeier, A.; Campbell, A.; Costanza, F.; Diez Pardos, C.; Dolinska, G.; Dooling, S.; Dorland, T.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Flucke, G.; Gallo, E.; Garay Garcia, J.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gunnellini, P.; Hauk, J.; Hempel, M.; Jung, H.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Karacheban, O.; Kasemann, M.; Katsas, P.; Kieseler, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Leonard, J.; Lipka, K.; Lobanov, A.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Marfin, I.; Melzer-Pellmann, I.-A.; Meyer, A. B.; Mittag, G.; Mnich, J.; Mussgiller, A.; Naumann-Emme, S.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Raspereza, A.; Roland, B.; Sahin, M. Ö.; Saxena, P.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Schröder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Trippkewitz, K. D.; Walsh, R.; Wissing, C.; Blobel, V.; Centis Vignali, M.; Draeger, A. R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Goebel, K.; Gonzalez, D.; Görner, M.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Höing, R. S.; Junkes, A.; Klanner, R.; Kogler, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lapsien, T.; Lenz, T.; Marchesini, I.; Marconi, D.; Meyer, M.; Nowatschin, D.; Ott, J.; Pantaleo, F.; Peiffer, T.; Perieanu, A.; Pietsch, N.; Poehlsen, J.; Rathjens, D.; Sander, C.; Scharf, C.; Schettler, H.; Schleper, P.; Schlieckau, E.; Schmidt, A.; Schwandt, J.; Sola, V.; Stadie, H.; Steinbrück, G.; Tholen, H.; Troendle, D.; Usai, E.; Vanelderen, L.; Vanhoefer, A.; Vormwald, B.; Barth, C.; Baus, C.; Berger, J.; Böser, C.; Butz, E.; Chwalek, T.; Colombo, F.; de Boer, W.; Descroix, A.; Dierlamm, A.; Fink, S.; Frensch, F.; Friese, R.; Giffels, M.; Gilbert, A.; Haitz, D.; Hartmann, F.; Heindl, S. M.; Husemann, U.; Katkov, I.; Kornmayer, A.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Maier, B.; Mildner, H.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, T.; Müller, Th.; Plagge, M.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Röcker, S.; Roscher, F.; Sieber, G.; Simonis, H. J.; Stober, F. M.; Ulrich, R.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wayand, S.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T.; Williamson, S.; Wöhrmann, C.; Wolf, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Daskalakis, G.; Geralis, T.; Giakoumopoulou, V. A.; Kyriakis, A.; Loukas, D.; Psallidas, A.; Topsis-Giotis, I.; Agapitos, A.; Kesisoglou, S.; Panagiotou, A.; Saoulidou, N.; Tziaferi, E.; Evangelou, I.; Flouris, G.; Foudas, C.; Kokkas, P.; Loukas, N.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Paradas, E.; Strologas, J.; Bencze, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hazi, A.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Sikler, F.; Veszpremi, V.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zsigmond, A. J.; Beni, N.; Czellar, S.; Karancsi, J.; Molnar, J.; Szillasi, Z.; Bartók, M.; Makovec, A.; Raics, P.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Ujvari, B.; Choudhury, S.; Mal, P.; Mandal, K.; Sahoo, D. K.; Sahoo, N.; Swain, S. K.; Bansal, S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhatnagar, V.; Chawla, R.; Gupta, R.; Bhawandeep, U.; Kalsi, A. K.; Kaur, A.; Kaur, M.; Kumar, R.; Mehta, A.; Mittal, M.; Singh, J. B.; Walia, G.; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, A.; Choudhary, B. C.; Garg, R. B.; Kumar, A.; Malhotra, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nishu, N.; Ranjan, K.; Sharma, R.; Sharma, V.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterjee, K.; Dey, S.; Dutta, S.; Jain, Sa.; Majumdar, N.; Modak, A.; Mondal, K.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, A.; Roy, D.; Roy Chowdhury, S.; Sarkar, S.; Sharan, M.; Abdulsalam, A.; Chudasama, R.; Dutta, D.; Jha, V.; Kumar, V.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, S.; Bhowmik, S.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dewanjee, R. K.; Dugad, S.; Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, S.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Kole, G.; Kumar, S.; Mahakud, B.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Mitra, S.; Mohanty, G. B.; Parida, B.; Sarkar, T.; Sur, N.; Sutar, B.; Wickramage, N.; Chauhan, S.; Dube, S.; Kapoor, A.; Kothekar, K.; Sharma, S.; Bakhshiansohi, H.; Behnamian, H.; Etesami, S. M.; Fahim, A.; Goldouzian, R.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; de Filippis, N.; de Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Verwilligen, P.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Tosi, N.; Travaglini, R.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; di Mattia, A.; Giordano, F.; Potenza, R.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Barbagli, G.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Gori, V.; Lenzi, P.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Viliani, L.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Fabbri, F.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Calvelli, V.; Ferro, F.; Lo Vetere, M.; Monge, M. R.; Robutti, E.; Tosi, S.; Brianza, L.; Dinardo, M. E.; Fiorendi, S.; Gennai, S.; Gerosa, R.; Ghezzi, A.; Govoni, P.; Malvezzi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Marzocchi, B.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; di Guida, S.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Iorio, A. O. M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gonella, F.; Gozzelino, A.; Gulmini, M.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Montecassiano, F.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Foà, L.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; D'Imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Traczyk, P.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; La Licata, C.; Marone, M.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Kong, D. J.; Lee, S.; Oh, Y. D.; Sakharov, A.; Son, D. C.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, H.; Kim, T. J.; Song, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Hong, B.; Kim, H.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Yoo, H. D.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; de La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-de La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Khurshid, T.; Shoaib, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Brona, G.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão da Cruz E Silva, C.; di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nguyen, F.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Afanasiev, S.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbunov, I.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Levchenko, P.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Mesyats, G.; Rusakov, S. V.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Myagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; de La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro de Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Santaolalla, J.; Soares, M. S.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Folgueras, S.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras de Saa, J. R.; de Castro Manzano, P.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodríguez-Marrero, A. Y.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. H.; Barney, D.; Benaglia, A.; Bendavid, J.; Benhabib, L.; Benitez, J. F.; Berruti, G. M.; Bloch, P.; Bocci, A.; Bonato, A.; Botta, C.; Breuker, H.; Camporesi, T.; Castello, R.; Cerminara, G.; D'Alfonso, M.; D'Enterria, D.; Dabrowski, A.; Daponte, V.; David, A.; de Gruttola, M.; de Guio, F.; de Roeck, A.; de Visscher, S.; di Marco, E.; Dobson, M.; Dordevic, M.; Dorney, B.; Du Pree, T.; Duggan, D.; Dünser, M.; Dupont, N.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Franzoni, G.; Fulcher, J.; Funk, W.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Girone, M.; Glege, F.; Guida, R.; Gundacker, S.; Guthoff, M.; Hammer, J.; Harris, P.; Hegeman, J.; Innocente, V.; Janot, P.; Kirschenmann, H.; Kortelainen, M. J.; Kousouris, K.; Krajczar, K.; Lecoq, P.; Lourenço, C.; Lucchini, M. T.; Magini, N.; Malgeri, L.; Mannelli, M.; Martelli, A.; Masetti, L.; Meijers, F.; Mersi, S.; Meschi, E.; Moortgat, F.; Morovic, S.; Mulders, M.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Neugebauer, H.; Orfanelli, S.; Orsini, L.; Pape, L.; Perez, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Petrilli, A.; Petrucciani, G.; Pfeiffer, A.; Pierini, M.; Piparo, D.; Racz, A.; Reis, T.; Rolandi, G.; Rovere, M.; Ruan, M.; Sakulin, H.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stieger, B.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Wöhri, H. K.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz Del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Ronga, F. J.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Cardaci, M.; Chen, K. H.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Bartek, R.; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Petrakou, E.; Tsai, J. F.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Eskut, E.; Gecit, F. H.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Onengut, G.; Ozcan, M.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozturk, S.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Zorbilmez, C.; Akin, I. V.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Worm, S. D.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; de Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Lane, R.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leggat, D.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Fantasia, C.; Gastler, D.; Lawson, P.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; St. John, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Alimena, J.; Berry, E.; Bhattacharya, S.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Calderon de La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; McLean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Ivova Paneva, M.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Luthra, A.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; MacNeill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Incandela, J.; McColl, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chatterjee, A.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Eggert, N.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Soffi, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Teo, W. D.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Weng, Y.; Wittich, P.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hanlon, J.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes de Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Rossin, R.; Shchutska, L.; Snowball, M.; Sperka, D.; Terentyev, N.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Bochenek, J.; Diamond, B.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sady, A.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Bruner, C.; Kenny, R. P.; Majumder, D.; Malek, M.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; McGinn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Ratnikov, F.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira de Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Ling, T. Y.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Koay, S. A.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bortoletto, D.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. C.; Shi, X.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Sun, J.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Wang, F.; Xie, W.; Xu, L.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Adair, A.; Akgun, B.; Chen, Z.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Guilbaud, M.; Li, W.; Michlin, B.; Northup, M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Rorie, J.; Tu, Z.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Ferbel, T.; Galanti, M.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Hindrichs, O.; Khukhunaishvili, A.; Petrillo, G.; Tan, P.; Verzetti, M.; Arora, S.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Hughes, E.; Kaplan, S.; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R.; Lath, A.; Nash, K.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Sheffield, D.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Thomassen, P.; Walker, M.; Foerster, M.; Riley, G.; Rose, K.; Spanier, S.; Bouhali, O.; Castaneda Hernandez, A.; Celik, A.; Dalchenko, M.; de Mattia, M.; Delgado, A.; Dildick, S.; Eusebi, R.; Gilmore, J.; Huang, T.; Kamon, T.; Krutelyov, V.; Mueller, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Patel, R.; Perloff, A.; Rose, A.; Safonov, A.; Tatarinov, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Akchurin, N.; Cowden, C.; Damgov, J.; Dragoiu, C.; Dudero, P. R.; Faulkner, J.; Kunori, S.; Lamichhane, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Undleeb, S.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Delannoy, A. G.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Janjam, R.; Johns, W.; Maguire, C.; Mao, Y.; Melo, A.; Ni, H.; Sheldon, P.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Xu, Q.; Arenton, M. W.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Li, H.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Sinthuprasith, T.; Sun, X.; Wang, Y.; Wolfe, E.; Wood, J.; Xia, F.; Clarke, C.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sturdy, J.; Belknap, D. A.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Dodd, L.; Duric, S.; Gomber, B.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Lanaro, A.; Levine, A.; Long, K.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Perry, T.; Pierro, G. A.; Polese, G.; Ruggles, T.; Sarangi, T.; Savin, A.; Sharma, A.; Smith, N.; Smith, W. H.; Taylor, D.; Woods, N.

    2016-09-01

    The results of a search for a supersymmetric partner of the top quark (top squark), pair-produced in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV, are presented. The search, which focuses on R-parity violating, chargino-mediated decays of the top squark, is performed in final states with low missing transverse momentum, two oppositely charged electrons or muons, and at least five jets. The analysis uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 collected with the CMS detector at the LHC in 2012. The data are found to be in agreement with the standard model expectation, and upper limits are placed on the top squark pair production cross section at 95% confidence level. Assuming a 100% branching fraction for the top squark decay chain, t ˜ → t χ˜1 ± , χ˜1 ± →ℓ± + jj , top squark masses less than 890 (1000) GeV for the electron (muon) channel are excluded for the first time in models with a single nonzero R-parity violating coupling λijk‧ (i , j , k ≤ 2), where i , j , k correspond to the three generations.

  20. New constraints on R-parity violating couplings through the measurements of the Bs(d)0-B¯s(d)0 and K0-K¯0 mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiangdong, Gao; Li, Chong Sheng; Yang, Li Lin

    2007-02-01

    We calculate contributions to Bs-B¯s mixing through tree-level sneutrino exchange in the framework of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation, including the next-to-leading-order QCD corrections. We compare our results with the updated bounds on the Bs-B¯s mass difference reported by CDF collaborations and present new constraints on the relevant combinations of parameters of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with R-parity violation. Our results show that upper bound on the relevant combination of couplings of Bs-B¯s mixing is of the order 10-9. We also calculate the Bd0-B¯d0 and K0-K¯0 mass differences and show that the upper bounds on the relevant combinations of couplings are 2 and 4 orders of magnitude stronger than ones reported in the literatures, respectively. We also discuss the case of complex couplings and show that how the relevant combinations of couplings are constrained by the updated experiment data of Bs-B¯s, Bd-B¯d mixing and time-dependent CP asymmetry SJ/ψKs, and future possible observations of SJ/ψϕ at the Large Hadron Collider beauty experiment (LHCb), respectively.

  1. Search for the production of single sleptons through R-parity violation in pp; collisions at square root (s) =1.8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abdesselam, A; Abolins, M; Abramov, V; Acharya, B S; Adams, D L; Adams, M; Ahmed, S N; Alexeev, G D; Alton, A; Alves, G A; Anderson, E W; Arnoud, Y; Avila, C; Babintsev, V V; Babukhadia, L; Bacon, T C; Baden, A; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beaudette, F; Begel, M; Belyaev, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bertram, I; Besson, A; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Bhattacharjee, M; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Boehnlein, A; Bojko, N I; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Breedon, R; Briskin, G; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burtovoi, V S; Butler, J M; Canelli, F; Carvalho, W; Casey, D; Casilum, Z; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chekulaev, S V; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Chopra, S; Christenson, J H; Claes, D; Clark, A R; Coney, L; Connolly, B; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cummings, M A C; Cutts, D; Davis, G A; De, K; De Jong, S J; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doulas, S; Ducros, Y; Dudko, L V; Duensing, S; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyshkant, A; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Eltzroth, J T; Elvira, V D; Engelmann, R; Eno, S; Eppley, G; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, V N; Fein, D; Ferbel, T; Filthaut, F; Fisk, H E; Fisyak, Y; Flattum, E; Fleuret, F; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gallas, E; Galyaev, A N; Gao, M; Gavrilov, V; Genik, R J; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gilmartin, R; Ginther, G; Gómez, B; Goncharov, P I; Gordon, H; Goss, L T; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Graf, N; Grannis, P D; Green, J A; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Grinstein, S; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Gupta, A; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Hadley, N J; Haggerty, H; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Hall, R E; Hansen, S; Hauptman, J M; Hays, C; Hebert, C; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Huang, Y; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jöstlein, H; Juste, A; Kahl, W; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Karmanov, D; Karmgard, D; Kehoe, R; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kim, S K; Klima, B; Knuteson, B; Ko, W; Kohli, J M; Kostritskiy, A V; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Kozlovsky, E A; Krane, J; Krishnaswamy, M R; Krivkova, P; Krzywdzinski, S; Kubantsev, M; Kuleshov, S; Kulik, Y; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kuznetsov, V E; Landsberg, G; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Leggett, C; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipton, R; Lucotte, A; Lueking, L; Lundstedt, C; Luo, C; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Malyshev, V L; Manankov, V; Mao, H S; Marshall, T; Martin, M I; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McMahon, T; Melanson, H L; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Miao, C; Miettinen, H; Mihalcea, D; Mishra, C S; Mokhov, N; Mondal, N K; Montgomery, H E; Moore, R W; Mostafa, M; Da Motta, H; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Nang, F; Narain, M; Narasimham, V S; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nomerotski, A; Nunnemann, T; O'Neil, D; Oguri, V; Olivier, B; Oshima, N; Padley, P; Papageorgiou, K; Parashar, N; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Peters, O; Pétroff, P; Piegaia, R; Pope, B G; Popkov, E; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Przybycien, M B; Qian, J; Raja, R; Rajagopalan, S; Rapidis, P A; Reay, N W; Reucroft, S; Ridel, M; Rijssenbeek, M; Rizatdinova, F; Rockwell, T; Roco, M; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rutherfoord, J; Sabirov, B M; Sajot, G; Santoro, A; Sawyer, L; Schamberger, R D; Schellman, H; Schwartzman, A; Shabalina, E; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Shupe, M; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Singh, H; Sirotenko, V; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snihur, R; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Solomon, J; Song, Y; Sorín, V; Sosebee, M; Sotnikova, N; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Stanton, N R; Steinbrück, G; Stephens, R W; Stoker, D; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Taylor, W; Tentindo-Repond, S; Tripathi, S M; Trippe, T G; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Vaniev, V; Kooten, R Van; Varelas, N; Vertogradov, L S; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Volkov, A A; Vorobiev, A P; Wahl, H D; Wang, H; Wang, Z-M; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weerts, H; White, A; White, J T; Whiteson, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Willis, S; Wimpenny, S J; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Xu, Q; Yamada, R; Yamin, P; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Youssef, S; Yu, J; Zanabria, M; Zhang, X; Zheng, H; Zhou, B; Zhou, Z; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G; Zylberstejn, A

    2002-12-23

    We report the first search for supersymmetric particles via s-channel production and decay of smuons or muon sneutrinos at hadronic colliders. The data for the two-muon and two-jets final states were collected by the D0 experiment and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 94+/-5 pb(-1). Assuming that R parity is violated via the single coupling lambda'211, the number of candidate events is in agreement with expectation from the standard model. Exclusion contours are given in the (m(0),m(1/2)) and (m(x),m(v)) planes for lambda(')(211)=0.09, 0.08, and 0.07. PMID:12484810

  2. Search for R-parity violating supersymmetry via the LL anti-E couplings lambda(121), lambda(122) or lambda(133) in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2006-05-01

    A search for gaugino pair production with a trilepton signature in the framework of R-parity violating supersymmetry via the couplings {lambda}{sub 121}, {lambda}{sub 122}, or {lambda}{sub 133} is presented. The data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L {approx} 360 pb{sup -1}, were collected from April 2002 to August 2004 with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This analysis considers final states with three charged leptons with the flavor combinations ee{ell}, {mu}{mu}{ell}, and ee{tau} ({ell} = e or {mu}). No evidence for supersymmetry is found and limits at the 95% confidence level are set on the gaugino pair production cross section and lower bounds on the masses of the lightest neutralino and chargino are derived in two supersymmetric models.

  3. A search for top squarks with R-parity-violating decays to all-hadronic final states with the ATLAS detector in $$$ \\sqrt{s}=8 $$$ TeV proton-proton collisions

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; et al

    2016-06-10

    In this paper, a search for the pair production of top squarks, each with R -parity-violating decays into two Standard Model quarks, is performed using 17.4 fb -1 of √s=8 TeV proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Each top squark is assumed to decay to a b - and an s -quark, leading to four quarks in the final state. Background discrimination is achieved with the use of b -tagging and selections on the mass and substructure of large-radius jets, providing sensitivity to top squark masses as low as 100 GeV. Finally, no evidence ofmore » an excess beyond the Standard Model background prediction is observed and top squarks decaying to b ¯ s ¯ are excluded for top squark masses in the range 100 ≤ m t ¯ ≤ 315 GeV at 95% confidence level.« less

  4. Search for pair production of scalar top quarks in R-parity violating decay modes in pp collisions at square root of s=1.8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Coca, M; Colijn, A P; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; De Cecco, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fan, Q; Farrington, S; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Gerstein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Goncharov, M; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Gresele, A; Grim, G; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hou, S; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Issever, C; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lannon, K; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Le, Y; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, T; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Manca, G; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Matthews, J A J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Napora, R; Niell, F; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Pratt, T; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, H; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A; Scribano, A; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Shah, T; Shapiro, M D; Shepard, P F; Shibayama, T; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Sidoti, A; Siegrist, J; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Singh, P; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Solodsky, A; Spalding, J; Speer, T; Spezziga, M; Sphicas, P; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Spiegel, L; Steele, J; Stefanini, A; Strologas, J; Strumia, F; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Suzuki, T; Takano, T; Takashima, R; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P; Tanaka, M; Tannenbaum, B; Tecchio, M; Tesarek, R J; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thurman-Keup, R; Tipton, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tonelli, D; Tonnesmann, M; Toyoda, H; Trischuk, W; De Troconiz, J F; Tseng, J; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Vaiciulis, T; Valls, J; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Vucinic, D; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallace, N B; Wan, Z; Wang, C; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Watanabe, T; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wenzel, H; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilkes, T; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Winn, D; Wolbers, S; Wolinski, D; Wolinski, J; Wolinski, S; Wolter, M; Worm, S; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyss, J; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yeh, P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yosef, C; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zetti, F; Zucchelli, S

    2004-02-01

    We present the results of a search for pair production of scalar top quarks (t(1)) in an R-parity violating supersymmetry scenario in 106 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root of s=1.8 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. In this mode each t(1) decays into a tau lepton and a b quark. We search for events with two tau's, one decaying leptonically (e or mu) and one decaying hadronically, and two jets. No candidate events pass our final selection criteria. We set a 95% confidence level lower limit on the t(1) mass at 122 GeV/c(2) for Br(t(1)-->tau b)=1.

  5. A search for top squarks with R-parity-violating decays to all-hadronic final states with the ATLAS detector in √{s}=8 TeV proton-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Dell'Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Denysiuk, D.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Dette, K.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Feremenga, L.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Flaschel, N.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Fletcher, R. R. M.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Forcolin, G. T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Frate, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; Fressard-Batraneanu, S. M.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fusayasu, T.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gach, G. P.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. M.; García, C.; García Navarro, J. E.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudiello, A.; Gaudio, G.; Gaur, B.; Gauthier, L.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E. N.; Gecse, Z.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Geisler, M. P.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Geng, C.; Gentile, S.; George, S.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gershon, A.; Ghasemi, S.; Ghazlane, H.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giannetti, P.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, S. M.; Gignac, M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gillam, T. P. S.; Gillberg, D.; Gilles, G.; Gingrich, D. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giorgi, F. M.; Giraud, P. F.; Giromini, P.; Giugni, D.; Giuliani, C.; Giulini, M.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Gkaitatzis, S.; Gkialas, I.; Gkougkousis, E. L.; Gladilin, L. K.; Glasman, C.; Glatzer, J.; Glaysher, P. C. F.; Glazov, A.; Goblirsch-Kolb, M.; Goddard, J. R.; Godlewski, J.; Goldfarb, S.; Golling, T.; Golubkov, D.; Gomes, A.; Gonçalo, R.; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, J.; Gonella, L.; González de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Parra, G.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordon, H. A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Goshaw, A. T.; Gössling, C.; Gostkin, M. I.; Goudet, C. R.; Goujdami, D.; Goussiou, A. G.; Govender, N.; Gozani, E.; Graber, L.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Gradin, P. O. J.; Grafström, P.; Gramling, J.; Gramstad, E.; Grancagnolo, S.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Grefe, C.; Gregersen, K.; Gregor, I. M.; Grenier, P.; Grevtsov, K.; Griffiths, J.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groh, S.; Grohs, J. P.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grossi, G. C.; Grout, Z. J.; Guan, L.; Guenther, J.; Guescini, F.; Guest, D.; Gueta, O.; Guido, E.; Guillemin, T.; Guindon, S.; Gul, U.; Gumpert, C.; Guo, J.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gustavino, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Gutierrez Ortiz, N. G.; Gutschow, C.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haddad, N.; Hadef, A.; Haefner, P.; Hageböck, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haleem, M.; Haley, J.; Hall, D.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hamacher, K.; Hamal, P.; Hamano, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamity, G. N.; Hamnett, P. G.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanawa, K.; Hance, M.; Haney, B.; Hanke, P.; Hanna, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, M. C.; Hansen, P. H.; Hara, K.; Hard, A. S.; Harenberg, T.; Hariri, F.; Harkusha, S.; Harrington, R. D.; Harrison, P. F.; Hartjes, F.; Hasegawa, M.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hasib, A.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauser, R.; Hauswald, L.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, A. D.; Hayashi, T.; Hayden, D.; Hays, C. P.; Hays, J. M.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Head, S. J.; Heck, T.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heim, T.; Heinemann, B.; Heinrich, L.; Hejbal, J.; Helary, L.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, J.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Heng, Y.; Henkelmann, S.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Herbert, G. H.; Hernández Jiménez, Y.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hesketh, G. G.; Hessey, N. P.; Hetherly, J. W.; Hickling, R.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, E.; Hill, J. C.; Hiller, K. H.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hinman, R. R.; Hirose, M.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoenig, F.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hohn, D.; Holmes, T. R.; Homann, M.; Hong, T. M.; Hooberman, B. H.; Hopkins, W. H.; Horii, Y.; Horton, A. J.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howard, J.; Howarth, J.; Hrabovsky, M.; Hristova, I.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hrynevich, A.; Hsu, C.; Hsu, P. J.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hu, D.; Hu, Q.; Huang, Y.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T. B.; Hughes, E. W.; Hughes, G.; Huhtinen, M.; Hülsing, T. A.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Ideal, E.; Idrissi, Z.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Iizawa, T.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ilic, N.; Ince, T.; Introzzi, G.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Iordanidou, K.; Ippolito, V.; Irles Quiles, A.; Isaksson, C.; Ishino, M.; Ishitsuka, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Iturbe Ponce, J. M.; Iuppa, R.; Ivarsson, J.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jabbar, S.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, M.; Jackson, P.; Jain, V.; Jakobi, K. B.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakoubek, T.; Jamin, D. O.; Jana, D. K.; Jansen, E.; Jansky, R.; Janssen, J.; Janus, M.; Jarlskog, G.; Javadov, N.; Javůrek, T.; Jeanneau, F.; Jeanty, L.; Jejelava, J.; Jeng, G.-Y.; Jennens, D.; Jenni, P.; Jentzsch, J.; Jeske, C.; Jézéquel, S.; Ji, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, H.; Jiang, Y.; Jiggins, S.; Jimenez Pena, J.; Jin, S.; Jinaru, A.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Johnson, W. J.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, S.; Jones, T. J.; Jongmanns, J.; Jorge, P. M.; Jovicevic, J.; Ju, X.; Juste Rozas, A.; Köhler, M. K.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kahn, S. J.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalderon, C. W.; Kaluza, A.; Kama, S.; Kamenshchikov, A.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneti, S.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kaplan, L. S.; Kapliy, A.; Kar, D.; Karakostas, K.; Karamaoun, A.; Karastathis, N.; Kareem, M. J.; Karentzos, E.; Karnevskiy, M.; Karpov, S. N.; Karpova, Z. M.; Karthik, K.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kasahara, K.; Kashif, L.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, Y.; Kato, C.; Katre, A.; Katzy, J.; Kawade, K.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kazama, S.; Kazanin, V. F.; Keeler, R.; Kehoe, R.; Keller, J. S.; Kempster, J. J.; Keoshkerian, H.; Kepka, O.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Keyes, R. A.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharlamov, A. G.; Khoo, T. J.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kido, S.; Kim, H. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kind, O. M.; King, B. T.; King, M.; King, S. B.; Kirk, J.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kisielewska, D.; Kiss, F.; Kiuchi, K.; Kivernyk, O.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M. H.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klimek, P.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinger, J. A.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluit, P.; Kluth, S.; Knapik, J.; Kneringer, E.; Knoops, E. B. F. G.; Knue, A.; Kobayashi, A.; Kobayashi, D.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kocian, M.; Kodys, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kogan, L. A.; Kohlmann, S.; Kohriki, T.; Koi, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolb, M.; Koletsou, I.; Komar, A. A.; Komori, Y.; Kondo, T.; Kondrashova, N.; Köneke, K.; König, A. C.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kopeliansky, R.; Koperny, S.; Köpke, L.; Kopp, A. K.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korol, A. A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E. V.; Kortner, O.; Kortner, S.; Kosek, T.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotwal, A.; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, A.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Kouskoura, V.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kramarenko, V. A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J. K.; Kravchenko, A.; Kretz, M.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kreutzfeldt, K.; Krieger, P.; Krizka, K.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, A.; Kruse, M. C.; Kruskal, M.; Kubota, T.; Kucuk, H.; Kuday, S.; Kuechler, J. T.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuger, F.; Kuhl, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kukhtin, V.; Kukla, R.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kuna, M.; Kunigo, T.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kus, V.; Kuwertz, E. S.; Kuze, M.; Kvita, J.; Kwan, T.; Kyriazopoulos, D.; La Rosa, A.; La Rosa Navarro, J. L.; La Rotonda, L.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacey, J.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Lambourne, L.; Lammers, S.; Lampen, C. L.; Lampl, W.; Lançon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lang, V. S.; Lange, J. C.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J. F.; Lari, T.; Lasagni Manghi, F.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavrijsen, W.; Law, A. T.; Laycock, P.; Lazovich, T.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Menedeu, E.; LeBlanc, M.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, C. A.; Lee, S. C.; Lee, L.; Lefebvre, G.; Lefebvre, M.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehan, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leight, W. A.; Leisos, A.; Leister, A. G.; Leite, M. A. L.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lemmer, B.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzi, B.; Leone, R.; Leone, S.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Leontsinis, S.; Leroy, C.; Lester, C. G.; Levchenko, M.; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levy, M.; Lewis, A.; Leyko, A. M.; Leyton, M.; Li, B.; Li, H.; Li, H. L.; Li, L.; Li, L.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Liang, Z.; Liao, H.; Liberti, B.; Liblong, A.; Lichard, P.; Lie, K.; Liebal, J.; Liebig, W.; Limbach, C.; Limosani, A.; Lin, S. C.; Lin, T. H.; Lindquist, B. E.; Lipeles, E.; Lipniacka, A.; Lisovyi, M.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, B.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, J. B.; Liu, K.; Liu, L.; Liu, M.; Liu, M.; Liu, Y. L.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Lleres, A.; Llorente Merino, J.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lo Sterzo, F.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loevschall-Jensen, A. E.; Loew, K. M.; Loginov, A.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Long, B. A.; Long, J. D.; Long, R. E.; Looper, K. A.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Lopez Paredes, B.; Lopez Paz, I.; Lopez Solis, A.; Lorenz, J.; Lorenzo Martinez, N.; Losada, M.; Lösel, P. J.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Love, J.; Love, P. A.; Lu, H.; Lu, N.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Luedtke, C.; Luehring, F.; Lukas, W.; Luminari, L.; Lundberg, O.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lynn, D.; Lysak, R.; Lytken, E.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Macdonald, C. M.; Maček, B.; Machado Miguens, J.; Madaffari, D.; Madar, R.; Maddocks, H. J.; Mader, W. F.; Madsen, A.; Maeda, J.; Maeland, S.; Maeno, T.; Maevskiy, A.; Magradze, E.; Mahlstedt, J.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maier, A. A.; Maier, T.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makovec, N.; Malaescu, B.; Malecki, Pa.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Malone, C.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V. M.; Malyukov, S.; Mamuzic, J.; Mancini, G.; Mandelli, B.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Maneira, J.; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, L.; Manjarres Ramos, J.; Mann, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mantifel, R.; Mantoani, M.; Manzoni, S.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marjanovic, M.; Marley, D. E.; Marroquim, F.; Marsden, S. P.; Marshall, Z.; Marti, L. F.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, B.; Martin, T. A.; Martin, V. J.; Martin dit Latour, B.; Martinez, M.; Martin-Haugh, S.; Martoiu, V. S.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Marx, M.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Massa, I.; Massa, L.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Mättig, P.; Mattmann, J.; Maurer, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Maximov, D. A.; Mazini, R.; Mazza, S. M.; Mc Fadden, N. C.; Mc Goldrick, G.; Mc Kee, S. P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCarthy, T. G.; McFarlane, K. W.; Mcfayden, J. A.; Mchedlidze, G.; McMahon, S. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Medinnis, M.; Meehan, S.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meineck, C.; Meirose, B.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Meloni, F.; Mengarelli, A.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mercurio, K. M.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messina, A.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A. S.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, C.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, J.; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, H.; Middleton, R. P.; Miglioranzi, S.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuž, M.; Milesi, M.; Milic, A.; Miller, D. W.; Mills, C.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D. A.; Minaenko, A. A.; Minami, Y.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L. M.; Mistry, K. P.; Mitani, T.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miucci, A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Moa, T.; Mochizuki, K.; Mohapatra, S.; Mohr, W.; Molander, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Monden, R.; Mondragon, M. C.; Mönig, K.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montalbano, A.; Montejo Berlingen, J.; Monticelli, F.; Monzani, S.; Moore, R. W.; Morange, N.; Moreno, D.; Moreno Llácer, M.; Morettini, P.; Mori, D.; Mori, T.; Morii, M.; Morinaga, M.; Morisbak, V.; Moritz, S.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morris, J. D.; Mortensen, S. S.; Morvaj, L.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Motohashi, K.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Muanza, S.; Mudd, R. D.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, R. S. P.; Mueller, T.; Muenstermann, D.; Mullen, P.; Mullier, G. A.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Murillo Quijada, J. A.; Murray, W. J.; Musheghyan, H.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nachman, B. P.; Nackenhorst, O.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, R.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nagata, K.; Nagel, M.; Nagy, E.; Nairz, A. M.; Nakahama, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, T.; Nakano, I.; Namasivayam, H.; Naranjo Garcia, R. F.; Narayan, R.; Narrias Villar, D. I.; Naryshkin, I.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Nechaeva, P. Yu.; Neep, T. J.; Nef, P. D.; Negri, A.; Negrini, M.; Nektarijevic, S.; Nellist, C.; Nelson, A.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neumann, M.; Neves, R. M.; Nevski, P.; Newman, P. R.; Nguyen, D. H.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicquevert, B.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, J. K.; Nilsson, P.; Ninomiya, Y.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nobe, T.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nooney, T.; Norberg, S.; Nordberg, M.; Novgorodova, O.; Nowak, S.; Nozaki, M.; Nozka, L.; Ntekas, K.; Nurse, E.; Nuti, F.; O'grady, F.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermann, T.; Ocariz, J.; Ochi, A.; Ochoa, I.; Ochoa-Ricoux, J. P.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S. H.; Ohm, C. C.; Ohman, H.; Oide, H.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olariu, A.; Oleiro Seabra, L. F.; Olivares Pino, S. A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Olsson, M. J. R.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onogi, K.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Panagiotopoulou, E. St.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pascuzzi, V.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pozo Astigarraga, M. E.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Puddu, D.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Rodina, Y.; Rodriguez Perez, A.; Roe, S.; Rogan, C. S.; Røhne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Ryzhov, A.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shaikh, N. W.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans Sanchez, C. A.; Solar, M.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, G. H.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tong, B.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Trofymov, A.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turgeman, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wallangen, V.; Wang, C.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-06-01

    A search for the pair production of top squarks, each with R-parity-violating decays into two Standard Model quarks, is performed using 17.4 fb-1 of √{s}=8 TeV proton-proton collision data recorded by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Each top squark is assumed to decay to a b- and an s-quark, leading to four quarks in the final state. Background discrimination is achieved with the use of b-tagging and selections on the mass and substructure of large-radius jets, providing sensitivity to top squark masses as low as 100 GeV. No evidence of an excess beyond the Standard Model background prediction is observed and top squarks decaying to overline{b}overline{s} are excluded for top squark masses in the range 100 le {m}_{overline{t}}le 315 GeV at 95% confidence level. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Search for pair production of scalar top quarks in R-parity violating decay modes in pp collisions at square root of s=1.8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Coca, M; Colijn, A P; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; De Cecco, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fan, Q; Farrington, S; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Gerstein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Goncharov, M; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Gresele, A; Grim, G; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hou, S; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Issever, C; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lannon, K; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Le, Y; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, T; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Manca, G; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Matthews, J A J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Napora, R; Niell, F; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Pratt, T; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Safonov, A; St Denis, R

    2004-02-01

    We present the results of a search for pair production of scalar top quarks (t(1)) in an R-parity violating supersymmetry scenario in 106 pb(-1) of pp collisions at square root of s=1.8 TeV collected by the Collider Detector at Fermilab. In this mode each t(1) decays into a tau lepton and a b quark. We search for events with two tau's, one decaying leptonically (e or mu) and one decaying hadronically, and two jets. No candidate events pass our final selection criteria. We set a 95% confidence level lower limit on the t(1) mass at 122 GeV/c(2) for Br(t(1)-->tau b)=1. PMID:14995297

  7. Search for Scalar Top Quark Pair-Production in Scenario with Violated R-parity in pp¯ Collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Takashi

    2005-03-01

    A search for the pair production of supersymmetric partner of the top quark in scenario with R-parity violation is presented. The quantum number called R-parity distinguishes particles in standard model from supersymmetric particles. A scalar top quark (stop) is assumed to decay only via Rp-violating supersymmetric coupling into tau lepton and b-quark. To collect events with multiple taus, a new special tau trigger (the lepton plus track trigger) is installed in Run II experiment of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). The goal of the lepton plus track trigger is to collect generic dilepton (ll, lτ, ττ) events with lower pT threshold (8 GeV/c) and without prescale even at high luminosity. The Z → ττ event, where one τ-lepton decays leptonically and the other hadronically, is a good benchmark to calibrate the lepton plus track trigger and τ identification. The data sample of 72 pb-1, collected using the electron plus track trigger, contains clear a τ signal from Z → ττ events. The data used in stop search correspond to 200 pb-1. The lower stop mass bound of 134 GeV/c2 at a 95% confidence level is obtained. This limit is also directly applicable to the case of the third generation scalar leptoquark (LQ3) assuming a 100% branching for the LQ3 → τb decay mode.

  8. Long-lived stop at the LHC with or without R-parity

    SciTech Connect

    Covi, L.; Dradi, F. E-mail: federico.dradi@theorie.physik.uni-goettingen.de

    2014-10-01

    We consider scenarios of gravitino LSP and DM with stop NLSP both within R-parity conserving and R-parity violating supersymmetry (RPC and RPV SUSY, respectively). We discuss cosmological bounds from Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the gravitino abundance and then concentrate on the signals of long-lived stops at the LHC as displaced vertices or metastable particles. Finally we discuss how to distinguish R-parity conserving and R-parity breaking stop decays if they happen within the detector and how to suppress SM backgrounds.

  9. The theory of R-parity, unification and SUSY at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Pavel Fileviez

    2012-07-27

    The simplest gauge theories for the conservation of R-parity in supersymmetry are discussed. We show how the minimal theory based on the B-L gauge symmetry predicts that R-parity must be spontaneously broken at the TeV scale. The most striking signals of these theories at the Large Hadron Collider are discussed. We present a realistic theory where the local baryon and lepton numbers are spontaneously broken at the supersymmetry breaking scale. The possibility to understand the conservation of R-parity in grand unified theories defined in four dimensions is mentioned.

  10. Radiative B decays in supersymmetry without R parity

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Otto C.W.; Vaidya, Rishikesh D.

    2005-03-01

    We present a systematic analysis of all the contributions at the leading log order to the branching ratio of the inclusive radiative decay B{yields}X{sub s}+{gamma} in the framework of supersymmetry without R parity. The relevant set of four-quark operators involved in QCD running are extended from six (within the standard model and the minimal supersymmetric standard model) to 24, with also many new contributions to the Wilson coefficients of (chromo)magnetic penguins for either chiral structure. We present complete analytical results here without any a priori assumptions on the form of R-parity violation. Mass-eigenstate expressions are given; hence the results are free from the commonly adopted mass-insertion approximation. In the numerical analysis, we focus here only on the influence of the trilinear {lambda}{sub ijk}{sup '} couplings and report on the possibility of a few orders of magnitude improvement for the bounds on a few combinations of the {lambda}{sup '} couplings. Our study shows that the Wilson coefficients of the current-current operators due to R-parity violation dominate over the direct contributions to the penguins. However, the interplay of various contributions is complicated due to the QCD corrections which we elaborate here.

  11. Dynamical R-parity breaking at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Long; Kumar Ghosh, Dilip; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.; Zhang, Yue

    2011-02-01

    In a class of extensions of the minimal supersymmetric standard model with (B-L)/left-right symmetry that explains the neutrino masses, breaking R-parity symmetry is an essential and dynamical requirement for successful gauge symmetry breaking. Two consequences of these models are: (i) a new kind of R-parity breaking interaction that protects proton stability but adds new contributions to neutrinoless double beta decay and (ii) an upper bound on the extra gauge and parity symmetry breaking scale which is within the large hadron collider (LHC) energy range. We point out that an important prediction of such theories is a potentially large mixing between the right-handed charged lepton ( e c ) and the superpartner of the right-handed gauge boson left( {tilde{W}_R+ } right) , which leads to a brand new class of R-parity violating interactions of type {tilde{μ }^{{c^dag }}}ν_μ^c{e^c} and {tilde{d}^{{c^dag }}}{u^c}{e^c} . We analyze the relevant constraints on the sparticle mass spectrum and the LHC signatures for the case with smuon/stau NLSP and gravitino LSP. We note the "smoking gun" signals for such models to be lepton flavor/number violating processes: pp!μ±μ±e+ e - jj (or τ±τ± e + e - jj) and pp to {μ^± }{e^± }boverline b jj (or {tau^± }{e^± }boverline b jj ) without significant missing energy. The predicted multi-lepton final states and the flavor structure make the model be distinguishable even in the early running of the LHC.

  12. Leptonic radiative decay in supersymmetry without R parity

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, C.-Y.; Kong, Otto C. W.

    2009-06-01

    We present a detailed analysis together with exact numerical calculations on one-loop contributions to the branching ratio of the radiative decay of {mu} and {tau}, namely {mu}{yields}e{gamma}, {tau}{yields}e{gamma}, and {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} from supersymmetry without R parity, focusing on contributions involving bilinear couplings. A numerical study is performed to obtain explicit bounds on the parameters under the present experimental limit. We present, and use in the calculation, formulas for exact mass eigenstate effective couplings. In this sense, we present an exact analysis free from approximation for the first time. After comparing our results against the closest early analysis, we discovered a major difference in resulted constraints on some {mu}{sub i}*B{sub j} combinations. Constraints from neutrino masses on the parameters were considered. Our result indicates that the branching ratio measurement on {mu}{yields}e{gamma} down to 10{sup -13}-10{sup -14} and beyond, as targeted by the MEG experiment, has a chance of observing decay from the R-parity violating scenario.

  13. Vacuum stability with spontaneous violation of lepton number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonilla, Cesar; Fonseca, Renato M.; Valle, José W. F.

    2016-05-01

    The vacuum of the Standard Model is known to be unstable for the measured values of the top and Higgs masses. Here we show how vacuum stability can be achieved naturally if lepton number is violated spontaneously at the TeV scale. More precise Higgs measurements in the next LHC run should provide a crucial test of our symmetry breaking scenario. In addition, these schemes typically lead to enhanced rates for processes involving lepton flavor violation.

  14. Spontaneous parity violation and SUSY strong gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Haba, Naoyuki; Ohki, Hiroshi

    2012-07-27

    We suggest simple models of spontaneous parity violation in supersymmetric strong gauge theory. We focus on left-right symmetric model and investigate vacuum with spontaneous parity violation. Non-perturbative effects are calculable in supersymmetric gauge theory, and we suggest new models. Our models show confinement, so that we try to understand them by using a dual description of the theory. The left-right symmetry breaking and electroweak symmetry breaking are simultaneously occurred with the suitable energy scale hierarchy. This structure has several advantages compared to the MSSM. The scale of the Higgs mass (left-right breaking scale) and that of VEVs are different, so the SUSY little hierarchy problems are absent. The second model also induces spontaneous supersymmetry breaking.

  15. R -parity conserving supersymmetric extension of the Zee model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemura, Shinya; Shindou, Tetsuo; Sugiyama, Hiroaki

    2015-12-01

    We extend the Zee model, where tiny neutrino masses are generated at the one-loop level, to a supersymmetric model with R -parity conservation. It is found that the neutrino mass matrix can be consistent with the neutrino oscillation data thanks to the nonholomorphic Yukawa interaction generated via one-loop diagrams of sleptons. We find a parameter set of the model, where in addition to the neutrino oscillation data, experimental constraints from the lepton flavor violating decays of charged leptons and current LHC data are also satisfied. In the parameter set, an additional C P -even neutral Higgs boson other than the standard-model-like one, a C P -odd neutral Higgs boson, and two charged scalar bosons are light enough to be produced at the LHC and future lepton colliders. If the lightest charged scalar bosons are mainly composed of the SU (2 )L-singlet scalar boson in the model, they would decay into e ν and μ ν with 50% of a branching ratio for each. In such a case, the relation among the masses of the charged scalar bosons and the C P -odd Higgs in the minimal supersymmetric standard model approximately holds with a radiative correction. Our model can be tested by measuring the specific decay patterns of charged scalar bosons and the discriminative mass spectrum of additional scalar bosons.

  16. Spontaneous CP violation in A4 flavor symmetry and leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Y. H.; Kang, Sin Kyu; Kim, C. S.

    2013-06-01

    We propose a simple renormalizable model for the spontaneous CP violation based on SU(2)L×U(1)Y×A4 symmetry in a radiative seesaw mechanism, which can be guaranteed by an extra Z2 symmetry. In our model CP is spontaneously broken at high energies, after the breaking of flavor symmetry, by a complex vacuum expectation value of the A4 triplet and gauge-singlet scalar field. We show that the spontaneously generated CP phase could become a natural source of leptogenesis, and also investigate CP violation at low energies in the lepton sector and show how the CP phases in the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakagawa-Sakata formalism could arise through a spontaneous symmetry-breaking mechanism. As a numerical study, interestingly, we show that the normal mass hierarchy favors relatively large values of θ13, large deviations from maximality of θ23<π/4, and the Dirac-CP phase 0°≤δCP≤50° and 300°≤δCP≤360°. For the inverted hierarchy case, the experimentally measured values of θ13 favors θ23>π/4 and discrete values of δCP around 100°, 135°, 255°, and 300°. Finally, with a successful leptogenesis our numerical results give more predictive values on the Dirac CP phase: for the normal mass hierarchy 1°≲δCP≲10° and for inverted one δCP˜100°, 135°, 300°.

  17. Some simple criteria for gauged R-parity

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, S.P.

    1992-07-01

    Some simple conditions which are sufficient to guarantee that R- parity survives as an unbroken gauged discrete subgroup of the continuous gauge symmetry in certain supersymmetric extensions of the standard model are presented.

  18. SUSY CP problem and spontaneous CP violation in SUSY GUT

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiduki, M.; Kim, S.-G.; Maekawa, N.; Sakurai, K.

    2008-11-23

    We study spontaneous CP violation in association with so-called SUSY flavor problem, SUSY CP problem, and stability of electroweak (EW) scale on the context of supersymmetric grand unified theory (SUSY GUT). In view of naturalness we retain stop masses on EW scale. Then in order to suppress non-decoupling SUSY contribution to up quark EDM we examine a certain type of flavor structure where up-type quark sector is real whereas down-type quark and charged lepton sectors are complex. We exhibit, as an example, an explicit model based on E{sub 6} SUSY GUT with SU(2) flavor symmetry that realizes these situations.

  19. Constraints and stability in vector theories with spontaneous Lorentz violation

    SciTech Connect

    Bluhm, Robert; Gagne, Nolan L.; Potting, Robertus; Vrublevskis, Arturs

    2008-06-15

    Vector theories with spontaneous Lorentz violation, known as bumblebee models, are examined in flat spacetime using a Hamiltonian constraint analysis. In some of these models, Nambu-Goldstone modes appear with properties similar to photons in electromagnetism. However, depending on the form of the theory, additional modes and constraints can appear that have no counterparts in electromagnetism. An examination of these constraints and additional degrees of freedom, including their nonlinear effects, is made for a variety of models with different kinetic and potential terms, and the results are compared with electromagnetism. The Hamiltonian constraint analysis also permits an investigation of the stability of these models. For certain bumblebee theories with a timelike vector, suitable restrictions of the initial-value solutions are identified that yield ghost-free models with a positive Hamiltonian. In each case, the restricted phase space is found to match that of electromagnetism in a nonlinear gauge.

  20. Is electromagnetic gauge invariance spontaneously violated in superconductors?

    SciTech Connect

    Greiter, Martin . E-mail: greiter@tkm.uni-karlsruhe.de

    2005-09-01

    We aim to give a pedagogical introduction to those elementary aspects of superconductivity which are not treated in the classic textbooks. In particular, we emphasize that global U (1) phase rotation symmetry, and not gauge symmetry, is spontaneously violated, and show that the BCS wave function is, contrary to claims in the literature, fully gauge invariant. We discuss the nature of the order parameter, the physical origin of the many degenerate states, and the relation between formulations of superconductivity with fixed particle numbers vs. well-defined phases. We motivate and to some extend derive the effective field theory at low temperatures, explore symmetries and conservation laws, and justify the classical nature of the theory. Most importantly, we show that the entire phenomenology of superconductivity essentially follows from the single assumption of a charged order parameter field. This phenomenology includes Anderson's characteristic equations of superfluidity, electric and magnetic screening, the Bernoulli Hall effect, the balance of the Lorentz force, as well as the quantum effects, in which Planck's constant manifests itself through the compactness of the U (1) phase field. The latter effects include flux quantization, phase slippage, and the Josephson effect.

  1. Ruling out the Weinberg Model of Spontaneous CP Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Darwin

    2000-11-30

    There have been many declarations of the death of the Weinberg model of spontaneous CP violation. Previous studies, before the recent measurements of {epsilon}'/{epsilon} indicated that the model could not accommodate the experimental values on {epsilon} in K{sub 0} - {bar K}{sup 0} mixing, the neutron electric dipole moment (EDM), the branching ratio of b {yields} s{gamma} and the upper limit on {epsilon}'/{epsilon}. We point out that these studies were based on optimistic estimates of the uncertainties in the calculations and that when more realistic estimates of these errors are used the Weinberg model cannot be conclusively ruled out from these considerations alone. Here we use these realistic error estimates to analyze the present situation of the Weinberg model. The latest results from Belle and BaBar on sin 2{beta} allow the small values of this parameter which occur naturally in the Weinberg model. However, in this model, the recently measured value of Re({epsilon}'/{epsilon}) = (1.92 {+-} 10{sup -3}) cannot be made compatible with the branching ratio B(b {yields} s{gamma}) = (3.15 {+-} 0.54) x 10{sup -4}. As a result they conclude that the Weinberg model is now confidently and conservatively ruled out.

  2. Low scale seesaw, electron EDM and leptogenesis in a model with spontaneous CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Mu-Chun; Mahanthappa, K.T.; /Colorado U.

    2006-09-01

    Strong correlations between leptogenesis and low energy CP violating leptonic processes have been shown by us to exist fin the minimal left-right symmetric model with spontaneous CP violation. In this note, they investigate the implications of this model for the electric dipole moment of the electron. With an additional broken U(1){sub H} symmetry, the seesaw scale can be lowered to close to the electroweak scale. This additional symmetry also makes the connection between CP violation in quark sector to that in the lepton sector possible.

  3. Neutron-antineutron transition as a test-bed for dynamical CPT violations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Addazi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    We show a simple mechanism for a dynamical CPT violation in the neutron sector. In particular, we show a CPT-violating see-saw mechanism, generating a Majorana mass and a CPT-violating mass for the neutron. CPT-violating see-saw involves a sterile partner of the neutron, living in a hidden sector, in which CPT is spontaneously broken. In particular, neutrons (antineutrons) can communicate with the hidden sector through nonperturbative quantum gravity effects called exotic instantons. Exotic instantons dynamically break R-parity, generating one effective vertex between the neutron and its sterile partner. In this way, we show how a small CPT-violating mass term for the neutron is naturally generated. This model can be tested in the next generation of experiments in neutron-antineutron physics. This strongly motivates researches of CPT-violating effects in neutron-antineutron physics as a test-bed for dynamical CPT-violations in SM.

  4. Higgs bosons in a minimal R-parity conserving left-right supersymmetric model

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, Mariana; Korutlu, Beste

    2011-04-01

    We revisit the Higgs sector of the left-right supersymmetric model. We study the scalar potential in a version of the model in which the minimum is the charge-conserving vacuum state, without R-parity violation or additional nonrenormalizable terms in the Lagrangian. We analyze the dependence of the potential and of the Higgs mass spectrum on the various parameters of the model, pinpointing the most sensitive ones. We also show that the model can predict light neutral flavor-conserving Higgs bosons, while the flavor-violating ones are heavy and within the limits from K{sup 0}-K{sup 0}, D{sup 0}-D{sup 0}, and B{sub d,s}{sup 0}-B{sub d,s}{sup 0} mixings. We study variants of the model in which at least one doubly charged Higgs boson is light and show that the parameter space for such Higgs masses and mixings is very restrictive, thus making the model more predictive.

  5. A New Strong Field Effect in Scalar-Tensor Gravity: Spontaneous Violation of the Energy Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Whinnett, A; Torres, D F

    2003-11-04

    A decade ago, it was shown that a wide class of scalar-tensor theories can pass very restrictive weak field tests of gravity and yet exhibit non-perturbative strong field deviations away from General Relativity. This phenomenon was called 'Spontaneous Scalarization' and causes the (Einstein frame) scalar field inside a neutron star to rapidly become inhomogeneous once the star's mass increases above some critical value. For a star whose mass is below the threshold, the field is instead nearly uniform (a state which minimizes the star's energy) and the configuration is similar to the General Relativity one. Here, we show that the spontaneous scalarization phenomenon is linked to another strong field effect: a spontaneous violation of the weak energy condition.

  6. Violation of the weak energy condition: Is it generic of spontaneous scalarization?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salgado, Marcelo; Sudarsky, Daniel; Nucamendi, Ulises

    2004-10-01

    It was recently shown by Whinnett and Torres [A. W. WhinnettD. F. Torres, Astrophys. J.6032004L133] that the phenomenon of spontaneous scalarization in compact objects (polytropes) was accompanied also by a spontaneous violation of the weak energy condition (WEC). Notably, by the encounter of negative-energy densities as measured by a static observer at several points of the star. Here we argue that such a situation is not generic of scalar-tensor theories of gravity (STT). We support this conclusion by numerical results within a class of STT and by using three realistic models of dense matter. However, we show that the “angular parts” of the additional conditions needed for the WEC to hold ρeff+Ti(eff)i≥0 tend to be “slightly violated” at the outskirts of the star.

  7. Lightness of Higgs boson and spontaneous C P violation in the Lee model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ying-nan; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2014-12-01

    We proposed a mechanism in which the lightness of Higgs boson and the smallness of charge parity (C P ) violation are correlated based on the Lee model, namely, the spontaneous C P -violation two-Higgs-doublet model. In this model, the mass of the lightest Higgs boson mh as well as the quantities K and J are ∝tβsξ in the limit tβsξ→0 (see text for definitions of tβ and ξ ), namely, the C P conservation limit. Here, K and J are the measures for C P -violation effects in scalar and Yukawa sectors, respectively. It is a new way to understand why the Higgs boson discovered at the LHC is light. We investigated the important constraints from both high energy LHC data and numerous low energy experiments, especially the measurements of electric dipole moments of electron and neutron as well as the quantities of B meson and kaon. Confronting all data, we found that this model is still viable. It should be emphasized that there is no standard-model limit for this scenario; thus it is always testable for future experiments. In order to pin down the Lee model, it is important to discover the extra neutral and charged Higgs bosons and measure their C P properties and the flavor-changing decays. At the LHC with √{s }=14 TeV , this scenario is favored if there is significant suppression in the b b ¯ decay channel or any vector boson fusion, V +H production channels. On the contrary, it will be disfavored if the signal strengths are standard-model-like more and more. It can be easily excluded at (3 - 5 )σ level with several fb-1 at future e+e- colliders, via accurately measuring the Higgs boson production cross sections.

  8. Broken R parity contributions to flavor changing rates and CP asymmetries in fermion pair production at leptonic colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemtob, M.; Moreau, G.

    1999-06-01

    We examine the effects of the R parity odd renormalizable interactions on flavor changing rates and CP asymmetries in the production of fermion-antifermion pairs at leptonic (electron and muon) colliders. In the reactions l-+l+-->fJ+f¯J' (l=e, μ J≠J') the produced fermions may be leptons, down quarks, or up quarks, and the center of mass energies may range from the Z-boson pole up to 1000 GeV. Off the Z-boson pole, the flavor changing rates are controlled by tree level amplitudes and the CP asymmetries by interference terms between tree and loop level amplitudes. At the Z-boson pole, both observables involve loop amplitudes. The lepton number violating interactions, associated with the coupling constants λijk, λ'ijk, are only taken into account. The consideration of loop amplitudes is restricted to the photon and Z-boson vertex corrections. We briefly review flavor violation physics at colliders. We present numerical results using a single, species and family independent, mass parameter m~ for all the scalar superpartners and considering simple assumptions for the family dependence of the R parity odd coupling constants. Finite nondiagonal rates (CP asymmetries) entail nonvanishing products of two (four) different coupling constants in different family configurations. For lepton pair production, the Z-boson decays branching ratios BJJ'=B(Z-->l-J+l+J') scale in order of magnitude as BJJ'~(λ/0.1)4(100 GeV/m~)2.510-9, with coupling constants λ=λijk or λ'ijk in appropriate family configurations. The corresponding results for d- and u quarks are larger, due to an extra color factor Nc=3. The flavor nondiagonal rates, at energies well above the Z-boson pole, slowly decrease with the center of mass energy and scale with the mass parameter approximately as σJJ'~(λ/0.1)4(100 GeV/m~)2-3(1-10) fbarn. Including the contributions from an sneutrino s-channel exchange could raise the rates for leptons or d quarks by one order of magnitude. The CP-odd asymmetries at

  9. Transition magnetic moments of Majorana neutrinos in supersymmetry without R-parity in light of neutrino oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Gozdz, Marek; Kaminski, Wieslaw A.; Simkovic, Fedor; Faessler, Amand

    2006-09-01

    The transition magnetic moments of Majorana neutrinos {mu}{sub {nu}{sub ij}} (ij=e{mu}, e{tau}, {mu}{tau}) are calculated in grand unified theory (GUT) constrained Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) with explicit R-parity violation. It is assumed that neutrinos acquire masses via one-loop (quark-squark and lepton-slepton) radiative corrections. The mixing of squarks, sleptons, and quarks is considered explicitly. The connection between {mu}{sub {nu}{sub ij}} and the entries of neutrino mass matrix is studied. The current upper limits on {mu}{sub {nu}{sub ij}} are deduced from the elements of phenomenological neutrino mass matrix, which is reconstructed using the neutrino oscillation data and the lower bound on the neutrinoless double beta decay half-life. Further, the results for {mu}{sub {nu}{sub e}{sub {mu}}}, {mu}{sub {nu}{sub e}{sub {tau}}} and {mu}{sub {nu}{sub {mu}}{sub {tau}}} are presented for the cases of inverted and normal hierarchy of neutrino masses and different SUSY scenarios. The largest values are of the order of 10{sup -17} in units of Bohr magneton.

  10. Gauged B-xiL origin of R parity and its implications

    DOE PAGES

    Lee, Hye-Sung; Ma, Ernest

    2010-05-01

    Gauged B-L is a popular candidate for the origin of the conservation of R parity, i.e.R=(-)3B+L+2j, in supersymmetry, but it fails to forbid the effective dimension-five terms arising from the superfield combinations QQQL, ucucdcec, and ucdcdcNc, which allow the proton to decay. Changing it to B-xiL, where xe+xμ+xτ=3 (with xi≠1) for the three families, would forbid these terms while still serving as a gauge origin of Rparity. We show how this is achieved in two minimal models with realistic neutrino mass matrices, and discuss their phenomenological implications.

  11. Double beta decay, lepton flavor violation, and collider signatures of left-right symmetric models with spontaneous D -parity breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deppisch, Frank F.; Gonzalo, Tomas E.; Patra, Sudhanwa; Sahu, Narendra; Sarkar, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    We propose a class of left-right symmetric models (LRSMs) with spontaneous D -parity breaking, where S U (2 )R breaks at the TeV scale while discrete left-right symmetry breaks around 1 09 GeV . By embedding this framework in a nonsupersymmetric S O (10 ) grand unified theory (GUT) with Pati-Salam symmetry as the highest intermediate breaking step, we obtain gR/gL≈0.6 between the right- and left-handed gauge couplings at the TeV scale. This leads to a suppression of beyond the Standard Model phenomena induced by the right-handed gauge coupling. Here we focus specifically on the consequences for neutrinoless double beta decay, low-energy lepton flavor violation, and LHC signatures due to the suppressed right handed currents. Interestingly, the reduced gR allows us to interpret an excess of events observed recently in the range of 1.9 to 2.4 TeV by the CMS group at the LHC as the signature of a right-handed gauge boson in LRSMs with spontaneous D -parity breaking. Moreover, the reduced right-handed gauge coupling also strongly suppresses the nonstandard contribution of heavy states to the neutrinoless double beta decay rate as well as the amplitude of low-energy lepton flavor violating processes. In a dominant type-II seesaw mechanism of neutrino mass generation, we find that both sets of observables provide stringent and complimentary bounds which make it challenging to observe the scenario at the LHC.

  12. Trimaximal TM1 neutrino mixing in S4 with spontaneous CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhn, Christoph

    2013-10-01

    The measurement of the reactor angle by the Daya Bay and RENO experiments in 2012 has ruled out the tri-bimaximal paradigm. Adopting an S4 family symmetry, we propose direct models of the trimaximal type TM1 in which the tri-bimaximal Klein symmetry of the neutrino sector is broken to a residual Z2 symmetry. In such a scenario, the solar mixing angle is decreased compared to its tri-bimaximal value by about 1°, thus bringing it in excellent agreement with experimental observation. The atmospheric mixing angle, on the other hand, depends on the CP violating Dirac phase δ. Imposing CP conservation in the family symmetry limit, we show how to break the CP symmetry via flavon VEVs with well-defined complex phases, so that sizable deviations of the atmospheric angle from maximal mixing, consistent with the latest global fits, are produced. A related approach adopts non-Abelian groups which contain only half the Klein symmetry of the neutrino sector [44-47].

  13. Partial Mass-Degeneracy and Spontaneous CP Violation in the Lepton Sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Hiroyuki

    We have investigated a flavour model which inspired by small squared-mass difference measured in solar neutrino oscillation experiments and observability in neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. In our model, the 1st. and 2nd. generations of fermions have a common mass at the leading order. Such limit may be a good starting point from the points of view of understanding the mixing patterns and mass spectra. In this limit, the mass matrices are respected an O(2) symmetry on flavor space of the first two generations. For simplicity, we propose a model for lepton sector based on the DN group which is a discrete subgroup of O(2). We show that our model can reproduce the experimental data without hierarchical couplings except for 5-10% tuning partially for the large neutrino mixing. Further, we show a novel relation between the tiny electron mass and the relatively large θPMNS13 via CP violation by the complex vacuum expectation values of the extra scalar fields.

  14. The Spontaneous Violation of the Cosmological Principle and the Possible Wave Structures of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinich, P.; Nurowski, P.; Raczka, R.; Ramella, M.

    1995-09-01

    Recent redshift surveys reveal large structures of galaxies with sizes in excess of 100 h-1 Mpc. These structures appear to be two-dimensional sheets ("walls") that are perhaps periodically spaced. Here we propose that these "walls" are the manifestation of a spontaneous breaking of the symmetry implied by the cosmological principle. We present a model of a Robertson-Walker universe where the geometry of the large-scale matter-distribution is determined by the most symmetric eigenmode Yη,0,0 of S3. This model reproduces the geometry of the observed large-scale structures for an appropriate choice of the center of vibration and wavelength of the eigenmode Yη,0,0. We also formulate predictions on the distribution of galaxies that should be observed as soon as new deep and wide-angle redshift surveys will become available. The observation of the predicted wave structures would confirm our model, which in turn could have far-reaching consequences for cosmology and also for physics. In fact, as shown by Fock in 1935, the most symmetric eigenfunction of the hydrogen atom represented in momentum space is the same Yη,0,0.

  15. Spontaneous SU(2) symmetry violation in the SU(2){sub L} Multiplication-Sign SU(2){sub R} Multiplication-Sign SU(4) electroweak model

    SciTech Connect

    Simonov, Yu. A.

    2012-09-15

    A new approach to electroweak (EW) composite scalars is developed starting from the fundamental gauge interaction on high scale. The latter is assumed to have the group structure SU(2){sub L} Multiplication-Sign SU(2){sub R} Multiplication-Sign SU(4), where SU(4) is the Pati-Salam color-lepton group. The topological EW vacuum filled by instantons is explicitly constructed and the resulting equations for fermion masses exhibit spontaneous SU(2) flavor symmetry violation with possibility of very large mass ratios.

  16. Superstring standard model from Bbb Z12-I orbifold compactification with and without exotics, and effective R-parity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihn E.; Kim, Ji-Hun; Kyae, Bumseok

    2007-06-01

    We construct a supersymmetric standard model in the context of the Bbb Z12-I orbifold compactification of the heterotic string theory. The gauge group is SU(3)c × SU(2)L × U(1)Y × U(1)4 × [SO(10) × U(1)3]'. We obtain three chiral families, 3 × {Q, dc, uc, L, ec, νc}, and Higgs doublets. There are numerous neutral singlets many of which can have VEVs so that low energy phenomenology on Yukawa couplings can be satisfied. In one assignment (Model E) of the electroweak hypercharge, we obtain the string scale value of sin 2 θW0 = (3/8) and another exactly massless exphoton (in addition to the photon) coupling to exotic particles only. There are color triplet and anti-triplet exotics, α and bar alpha, SU(2)L doublet exotics, δ and bar delta, and SU(3)c × SU(2)L singlet but Y = 2/3, -1/3, -2/3, 1/3 exotics, ξ, η, bar xi, bar eta. We show that all these vector-like exotics achieve heavy masses by appropriate VEVs of neutral singlets. One can find an effective R-parity between light (electroweak scale) particles so that proton and the LSP can live sufficiently long. In another assignment (Model S) of the electroweak hypercharge, there does not appear any exotic particle but sin2 θW0 = 3/14.

  17. Spontaneous CP violation in E{sub 6} supersymmetric grand unified theory with SU(2) flavor and anomalous U(1) symmetries

    SciTech Connect

    Ishiduki, M.; Maekawa, N.; Kim, S.-G.; Sakurai, K.

    2009-12-01

    We construct a model of spontaneous CP violation in E{sub 6} supersymmetric grand unified theory. In the model, we employ an SU(2){sub F} flavor symmetry and an anomalous U(1){sub A} symmetry. The SU(2){sub F} flavor symmetry is introduced to provide the origin of hierarchical structures of Yukawa coupling and to ensure the universality of sfermion soft masses. The anomalous U(1){sub A} symmetry is introduced to realize the doublet-triplet mass splitting, to provide the origin of hierarchical structures of Yukawa couplings, and to solve the {mu} problem. In the model, CP is spontaneously broken by the SU(2){sub F} breaking in order to provide a Kobayashi-Maskawa phase and to evade the supersymmetric CP problem. However, a naive construction of the model generally leads to an unwanted outcome, arg[{mu}b*]=O(1), when CP violating effects in the flavor sector are taken into account. We cure this difficulty by imposing a discrete symmetry and find that this prescription can play additional roles. It ensures that the realistic up-quark mass and Cabibbo angle are simultaneously realized without cancellation between O(1) coefficients. Also, severe constraints from the chromo-electric dipole moment of the quark can be satisfied without destabilizing the weak scale. The discrete symmetry reduces the number of free parameters, but the model is capable of reproducing quark and lepton mass spectra, mixing angles, and a Jarlskog invariant. We obtain characteristic predictions V{sub ub}{approx}O({lambda}{sup 4}) ({lambda}=0.22) and |V{sub cb}Y{sub b}|=|Y{sub c}| at the grand unified theory scale.

  18. Model for particle masses, flavor mixing, and {ital CP} violation, based on spontaneously broken discrete chiral symmetry as the origin of families

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, S.L.

    1999-01-01

    We construct extensions of the standard model based on the hypothesis that Higgs bosons also exhibit a family structure and that the flavor weak eigenstates in the three families are distinguished by a discrete Z{sub 6} chiral symmetry that is spontaneously broken by the Higgs sector. We study in detail at the tree level models with three Higgs doublets and with six Higgs doublets comprising two weakly coupled sets of three. In a leading approximation of S{sub 3} cyclic permutation symmetry the three-Higgs-doublet model gives a {open_quotes}democratic{close_quotes} mass matrix of rank 1, while the six-Higgs-doublet model gives either a rank-1 mass matrix or, in the case when it spontaneously violates {ital CP}, a rank-2 mass matrix corresponding to nonzero second family masses. In both models, the CKM matrix is exactly unity in the leading approximation. Allowing small explicit violations of cyclic permutation symmetry generates small first family masses in the six-Higgs-doublet model, and first and second family masses in the three-Higgs-doublet model, and gives a nontrivial CKM matrix in which the mixings of the first and second family quarks are naturally larger than mixings involving the third family. Complete numerical fits are given for both models, flavor-changing neutral current constraints are discussed in detail, and the issues of unification of couplings and neutrino masses are addressed. On a technical level, our analysis uses the theory of circulant and retrocirculant matrices, the relevant parts of which are reviewed. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  19. Publisher's Note: Lightness of a Higgs boson and spontaneous C P -violation in the Lee model: An alternative scenario [Phys. Rev. D 94, 055008 (2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Ying-nan; Zhu, Shou-hua

    2016-09-01

    Based on the weakly-coupled two-Higgs-doublet model with spontaneous CP-violation (named Lee model) and the mechanism to generate the correlation between smallness of CP-violation and lightness of scalar mass, as we proposed earlier, we predicted a light CP-mixing scalar $\\eta$ in which pseudoscalar component is dominant. It is a natural scenario in which $m_{\\eta}\\sim\\mathcal{O}(10\\textrm{GeV})\\ll v$. Masses of all other scalars ($h$, $H$, $H^\\pm$) should be around the electro-weak scale $v$. Among them, the 125 GeV Higgs ($h$) couplings are standard-model like, and the charged Higgs ($H^\\pm$) mass should be around the heaviest neutral scalar ($H$) mass. We discussed all experimental constraints and showed that this scenario is still allowed by data. The strictest constraints come from the experiments of the flavor-changing processes and the EDM of lepton and neutron. We also discussed the future tests for this scenario. It is possible to discover the extra scalars or exclude this scenario at future colliders, especially at the LHC and $e^+e^-$ colliders with $\\mathcal{O}(\\textrm{ab}^{-1})$ luminosity. We also pointed out that the $Z$-mediated Higgs pair production via $e^+e^-\\rightarrow h_ih_j$ ($h_i, h_j$ stand for two of the $\\eta, h, H$) would be the key observable to confirm or exclude CP-violation in Higgs sector. The sensitivity to test this scenario is worth further studying in greater detail.

  20. Nuclear beta-decay, Atomic Parity Violation, and New Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Ramsey-Musolf

    2000-08-01

    Determinations of vuds with super-allowed Fermi beta-decay in nuclei and of the weak charge of the cesium in atomic parity-violation deviate from the Standard Model predictions by 2 sigma or more. In both cases, the Standard Model over-predicts the magnitudes of the relevant observables. I discuss the implications of these results for R-parity violating (RPV) extensions of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. I also explore the possible consequences for RPV supersymmetry of prospective future low-energy electroweak measurements.

  1. Neutrino masses in lepton number violating mSUGRA

    SciTech Connect

    Kom, Steve C. H.

    2008-11-23

    In SUSY models which violate R-parity, there exist trilinear lepton number violating (LNV) operators which can lead to neutrino masses. If these operators are defined at the unification scale, the renormalization group flow becomes important and generally leads to one neutrino mass much heavier than the others. We study, in a minimal supergravity (mSUGRA) set-up with two trilinear LNV operators and three charged lepton mixing angles, numerically how these parameters may be arranged to be compatible with neutrino oscillation data, and discuss some phenomenological observations.

  2. Search for lepton flavor violating decays of a heavy neutral particle in p(-)p collisions at sqrt[s]=1.8 TeV.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Akimoto, H; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amidei, D; Anikeev, K; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Bailey, S; de Barbaro, P; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Bensinger, J; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Blusk, S R; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bonushkin, Y; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Brandl, A; Bromberg, C; Brozovic, M; Brubaker, E; Bruner, N; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campbell, M; Carithers, W; Carlson, J; Carlsmith, D; Caskey, W; Castro, A; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chan, A W; Chang, P S; Chang, P T; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Cheng, M-T; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chirikov-Zorin, I; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Christofek, L; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Clark, A G; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; D'Auria, S; De Cecco, S; DeJongh, F; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Devlin, T; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Eddy, N; Einsweiler, K; Engels, E; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fan, Q; Farrington, S; Feild, R G; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J; Friedman, J; Fukui, Y; Furic, I; Galeotti, S; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Gao, T; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gatti, P; Gay, C; Gerdes, D W; Gerstein, E; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Goncharov, M; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Green, C; Gresele, A; Grim, G; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guillian, G; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haas, R M; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hall, C; Handa, T; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hardman, A D; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Heinrich, J; Heiss, A; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Hollebeek, R; Holloway, L; Hou, S; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R; Huston, J; Huth, J; Ikeda, H; Issever, C; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iwai, J; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jones, M; Joshi, U; Kambara, H; Kamon, T; Kaneko, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karr, K; Kartal, S; Kasha, H; Kato, Y; Keaffaber, T A; Kelley, K; Kelly, M; Kennedy, R D; Kephart, R; Khazins, D; Kikuchi, T; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirk, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kovacs, E; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kurino, K; Kuwabara, T; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, N; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Le, Y; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Liu, J B; Liu, T; Liu, Y C; Litvintsev, D O; Lobban, O; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lusin, S; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Mangano, M; Manca, G; Mariotti, M; Martignon, G; Martin, M; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Matthews, J A J; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; Menguzzato, M; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Minato, H; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, E; Moore, R; Morita, Y; Moulik, T; Mulhearn, M; Mukherjee, A; Muller, T; Munar, A; Murat, P; Murgia, S; Nachtman, J; Nagaslaev, V; Nahn, S; Nakada, H; Nakano, I; Napora, R; Niell, F; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neuberger, D; Newman-Holmes, C; Ngan, C-Y P; Nigmanov, T; Niu, H; Nodulman, L; Nomerotski, A; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Ohmoto, T; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Olsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Partos, D; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Pescara, L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Pratt, T; Prokoshin, F; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pukhov, O; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reher, D; Reichold, A; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Ribon, A; Riegler, W; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Riveline, M; Robertson, W J; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Roy, A; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Safonov, A; St Denis, R

    2003-10-24

    We report on a search for a high mass, narrow width particle that decays directly to emu, etau, or microtau. We use approximately 110 pb(-1) of data collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab from 1992 to 1995. No evidence of lepton flavor violating decays is found. Limits are set on the production and decay of sneutrinos with R-parity violating interactions. PMID:14611332

  3. Discovering Baryon-Number Violating Neutralino Decays at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, Jonathan M.; Ellis, John R.; Raklev, Are R.; Salam, Gavin P.

    2009-12-11

    Recently there has been much interest in the use of single-jet mass and jet substructure to identify boosted particles decaying hadronically at the LHC. We develop these ideas to address the challenging case of a neutralino decaying to three quarks in models with baryonic violation of R parity. These decays have previously been found to be swamped by QCD backgrounds. We demonstrate for the first time that such a decay might be observed directly at the LHC with high significance, by exploiting characteristics of the scales at which its composite jet breaks up into subjets.

  4. Lorentz violation and Faddeev-Popov ghosts

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, B.

    2006-02-15

    We consider how Lorentz-violating interactions in the Faddeev-Popov ghost sector will affect scalar QED. The behavior depends sensitively on whether the gauge symmetry is spontaneously broken. If the symmetry is not broken, Lorentz violations in the ghost sector are unphysical, but if there is spontaneous breaking, radiative corrections will induce Lorentz-violating and gauge-dependent terms in other sectors of the theory.

  5. Search for lepton flavour violation in the e mu continuum with the ATLAS detector in root s=7 TeV pp collisions at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Aad G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Addy, T. N.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; et al.

    2012-06-01

    This paper presents a search for the t-channel exchange of an R-parity violating scalar top quark ({tilde t}) in the e{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup {-+}} continuum using 2.1 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the ATLAS detector in {radical}s = 7 TeV pp collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Data are found to be consistent with the expectation from the Standard Model backgrounds. Limits on R-parity-violating couplings at 95% C.L. are calculated as a function of the scalar top mass (m{sub {tilde t}}). The upper limits on the production cross section for pp {yields} e{mu}X, through the t-channel exchange of a scalar top quark, ranges from 170 fb for m{sub {tilde t}} = 95 GeV to 30 fb for m{sub {tilde t}} = 1000 GeV.

  6. Search for lepton flavour violation in the emu continuum with the ATLAS detector in sqrt(s) = 7 TeV pp collisions at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdesselam, Abdelouahab; Abdinov, Ovsat; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; /SUNY, Albany /Alberta U. /Ankara U. /Dumlupinar U. /Gazi U. /TOBB ETU, Ankara /TAEK, Ankara /Annecy, LAPP /Argonne /Arizona U. /Texas U., Arlington

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a search for the t-channel exchange of an R-parity violating scalar top quark (tilde-(t)) in the e{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup {+-}} continuum using 2.1 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the ATLAS detector in {radical}s=7 TeV pp collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. Data are found to be consistent with the expectation from the Standard Model backgrounds. Limits on R-parity-violating couplings at 95% C.L. are calculated as a function of the scalar top mass (m{sub [tilde-(t)]}). The upper limits on the production cross section for pp{yields}e{mu}X, through the t-channel exchange of a scalar top quark, ranges from 170 fb for m{sub [tilde-(t)]}=95 GeV to 30 fb for m{sub [tilde (t)]}=1000 GeV.

  7. k-essence explains a Lorentz violation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Li Miao; Pang Yi; Wang Yi

    2009-06-15

    Recently, a state of the art experiment shows evidence for Lorentz violation in the gravitational sector. To explain this experiment, we investigate a spontaneous Lorentz violation scenario with a generalized scalar field. We find that when the scalar field is nonminimally coupled to gravity, the Lorentz violation induces a deformation in the Newtonian potential along the direction of Lorentz violation.

  8. Outlook of an Improved Measurement of Parity Violation in Moeller Scattering at JLab (e2ePV)

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, David

    2008-06-01

    Jefferson Laboratory has the potential to make a dramatically improved measurement of parity violation in Moeller scattering (e + e â e + e). In the context of the Standard Model, the measurement would yield the best determination of sin2  W at low energy ( sin2  W = ±0.00025), and one of the best at any energy scale. As a new physics search via the running of the weak mixing angle, the experiment would have unparalleled sensitivity to new parity-violating e ? e interactions, probing electron substructure to 29 TeV (95% CL). In terms of specific models, pulls of 6A are allowed in R-parity violating SUSY, about 5A in E6 Z2, and almost 3A in R-parity conserving SUSY. The latter makes an improved Moeller measurement complementary to searches for SUSY loop-induced Electric Dipole Moments. Interpretability limits are well below the projected experimental error. A conceptual design for a 12 GeV JLab experiment is presented.

  9. Testing spontaneous parity violation at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chin-Aik; Shafi, Qaisar

    2008-03-01

    We construct a supersymmetric SU(2)L × SU(2)R × U(1) B - L model in which a discrete symmetry (C-parity) implements strict left-right symmetry in the scalar (Higgs) sector. Although two electroweak bidoublets are introduced to accommodate the observed fermion masses and mixings, a natural missing partner mechanism insures that a single pair of MSSM Higgs doublets survives below the left-right symmetry breaking scale. If this scale happens to lie in the TeV range, several new particles potentially much lighter than the SU(2)R charged gauge bosons WR± will be accessible at the LHC.

  10. CPT violation implies violation of Lorentz invariance.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, O W

    2002-12-01

    A interacting theory that violates CPT invariance necessarily violates Lorentz invariance. On the other hand, CPT invariance is not sufficient for out-of-cone Lorentz invariance. Theories that violate CPT by having different particle and antiparticle masses must be nonlocal. PMID:12484997

  11. CPT violation implies violation of Lorentz invariance.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, O W

    2002-12-01

    A interacting theory that violates CPT invariance necessarily violates Lorentz invariance. On the other hand, CPT invariance is not sufficient for out-of-cone Lorentz invariance. Theories that violate CPT by having different particle and antiparticle masses must be nonlocal.

  12. Baryon number violation in supersymmetry: n - overline{n} oscillations as a probe beyond the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calibbi, Lorenzo; Ferretti, Gabriele; Milstead, David; Petersson, Christoffer; Pöttgen, Ruth

    2016-05-01

    We study baryon number violation in R-parity violating supersymmetry with focus on Δ B = 2 processes which allow neutron-anti-neutron ( n - overline{n} ) oscillations. We provide prospects for going beyond the present limits by means of a new search for n - overline{n} oscillations. The motivation is the recently proposed n - overline{n} oscillation experiment at the European Spallation Source in Lund, which is projected to be able to improve the current bound on the transition probability in the quasi-free regime by three orders of magnitude. We consider various processes giving rise to baryon number violation and extract the corresponding simplified models, including only the relevant superpartners and couplings. In terms of these models we determine the exclusion limits from LHC searches as well as from searches for flavor transitions, CP violation and di-nucleon decays. We find that, for certain regions of parameter space, the proposed n - overline{n} experiment has a reach that goes beyond all other experiments, as it can probe gluino and squark masses in the multi-TeV range.

  13. Spontaneous Fission

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Segre, Emilio

    1950-11-22

    The first attempt to discover spontaneous fission in uranium was made by [Willard] Libby, who, however, failed to detect it on account of the smallness of effect. In 1940, [K. A.] Petrzhak and [G. N.] Flerov, using more sensitive methods, discovered spontaneous fission in uranium and gave some rough estimates of the spontaneous fission decay constant of this substance. Subsequently, extensive experimental work on the subject has been performed by several investigators and will be quoted in the various sections. [N.] Bohr and [A.] Wheeler have given a theory of the effect based on the usual ideas of penetration of potential barriers. On this project spontaneous fission has been studied for the past several years in an effort to obtain a complete picture of the phenomenon. For this purpose the spontaneous fission decay constants {lambda} have been measured for separated isotopes of the heavy elements wherever possible. Moreover, the number {nu} of neutrons emitted per fission has been measured wherever feasible, and other characteristics of the spontaneous fission process have been studied. This report summarizes the spontaneous fission work done at Los Alamos up to January 1, 1945. A chronological record of the work is contained in the Los Alamos monthly reports.

  14. SUSY_FLAVOR: A computational tool for FCNC and CP-violating processes in the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosiek, J.; Chankowski, P. H.; Dedes, A.; Jäger, S.; Tanedo, P.

    2010-12-01

    We present SUSY_FLAVOR - a Fortran 77 program that calculates important leptonic and semi-leptonic low-energy observables in the general R-parity conserving MSSM. For a set of input MSSM parameters, the code gives predictions for the KK, D¯D, BB and BB mixing parameters; B→Xγ, B→ll, KL0→πν¯ν and K→πν¯ν decay branching ratios; and the electric dipole moments of the leptons and the neutron. All these quantities are calculated at one-loop level (with some higher-order QCD corrections included) in the exact sfermion mass eigenbasis, without resorting to mass insertion approximations. The program can be obtained from http://www.fuw.edu.pl/susy_flavor. Program summaryProgram title: SUSY_FLAVOR Catalogue identifier: AEGV_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGV_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 14 603 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 82 126 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran 77 Computer: PCs and workstations Operating system: Any, tested on Linux Classification: 11.6 Nature of problem: Predicting CP-violating observables, meson mixing parameters and branching ratios for a set of rare processes in the general R-parity conserving MSSM. Solution method: We use standard quantum theoretical methods to calculate Wilson coefficients in MSSM and at one loop including QCD corrections at higher orders when this is necessary and possible. The input parameters can be read from an external file in SLHA format. Restrictions: The results apply only to the case of MSSM with R-parity conservation. Running time: For single parameter set approximately 1 s in double precision on a PowerBook Mac G4.

  15. Spontaneous Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rescorla, Robert A.

    2004-01-01

    Spontaneous recovery from extinction is one of the most basic phenomena of Pavlovian conditioning. Although it can be studied by using a variety of designs, some procedures are better than others for identifying the involvement of underlying learning processes. A wide range of different learning mechanisms has been suggested as being engaged by…

  16. Search for the lepton-flavour violating decay D0 → e±μ∓

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-03-01

    A search for the lepton-flavour violating decay D0 →e±μ∓ is made with a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of 7TeV and 8TeV, collected by the LHCb experiment. Candidate D0 mesons are selected using the decay D*+ →D0π+ and the D0 →e±μ∓ branching fraction is measured using the decay mode D0 →K-π+ as a normalization channel. No significant excess of D0 →e±μ∓ candidates over the expected background is seen, and a limit is set on the branching fraction, B (D0 →e±μ∓) < 1.3 ×10-8, at 90% confidence level. This is an order of magnitude lower than the previous limit and it further constrains the parameter space in some leptoquark models and in supersymmetric models with R-parity violation.

  17. Spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, D.C.

    1993-09-01

    The spontaneous fission (SF) of the heaviest actinides and the transactinides is of particular interest because of the dramatic changes in properties observed in the region of the heavy fermion isotopes and for still heavier elements. The existing experimental information on SF properties including half-life systematics, fragment kinetic-energy and mass-yield distributions, prompt neutron emission, and gamma emission will be reviewed. Possibility for extending studies of SF properties to other regions are considered and the potential for obtaining additional information about low-energy fission properties is discussed.

  18. Time Reversal Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  19. Soft CP violation and the global matter-antimatter symmetry of the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senjanovic, G.; Stecker, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    Scenarios for baryon production are considered within the context of SU(5) and SO(10) grand unified theories where CP violation arises spontaneously. The spontaneous CP symmetry breaking then results in a matter-antimatter domain structure in the universe. Two possible, distinct types of theories of soft CP violation are defined. In the first type the CP nonconservation originates only from the breaking of SU(2) sub L X U(1) symmetry, and in the second type, even at the unification temperature scale, CP violation can emerge as a result of symmetry breaking by the vacuum expectation values of the superheavy Higgs sector scalars.

  20. Lorentz-violating gravitoelectromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Quentin G.

    2010-09-15

    The well-known analogy between a special limit of general relativity and electromagnetism is explored in the context of the Lorentz-violating standard-model extension. An analogy is developed for the minimal standard-model extension that connects a limit of the CPT-even component of the electromagnetic sector to the gravitational sector. We show that components of the post-Newtonian metric can be directly obtained from solutions to the electromagnetic sector. The method is illustrated with specific examples including static and rotating sources. Some unconventional effects that arise for Lorentz-violating electrostatics and magnetostatics have an analog in Lorentz-violating post-Newtonian gravity. In particular, we show that even for static sources, gravitomagnetic fields arise in the presence of Lorentz violation.

  1. Is violation of Newton's second law possible?

    PubMed

    Ignatiev, A Yu

    2007-03-01

    Astrophysical observations (usually explained by dark matter) suggest that classical mechanics could break down when the acceleration becomes extremely small [the approach known as modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND)]. I present the first analysis of MOND manifestations in terrestrial (rather than astrophysical) settings. A new effect is reported: around each equinox date, 2 spots emerge on the Earth where static bodies experience spontaneous acceleration due to the possible violation of Newton's second law. Preliminary estimates indicate that an experimental search for this effect can be feasible. PMID:17358522

  2. Is violation of Newton's second law possible?

    PubMed

    Ignatiev, A Yu

    2007-03-01

    Astrophysical observations (usually explained by dark matter) suggest that classical mechanics could break down when the acceleration becomes extremely small [the approach known as modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND)]. I present the first analysis of MOND manifestations in terrestrial (rather than astrophysical) settings. A new effect is reported: around each equinox date, 2 spots emerge on the Earth where static bodies experience spontaneous acceleration due to the possible violation of Newton's second law. Preliminary estimates indicate that an experimental search for this effect can be feasible.

  3. On spontaneous CP violation in the lepton sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimus, W.; Neufeld, H.

    1990-03-01

    After a general discussion of CP transformations in the lepton sector we apply a class of non-standard CP sysmmetries to the Zee model. We show that the resulting cases are all equivalent and give rise to a Zeldovich-Konopinski-Mahmoud lepton number and to neutral flavour conservation. The mass, the magnetic moment and the electric dipole moment of the corresponding Dirac neutrino are calculated.

  4. 48 CFR 1303.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1303.104-7 Section 1303.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1303.104-7 Violations...

  5. 48 CFR 403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 403.104-7 Section 403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 403.104-7 Violations...

  6. 48 CFR 1303.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1303.104-7 Section 1303.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1303.104-7 Violations...

  7. 48 CFR 603.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 603.104-7 Section 603.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 603.104-7 Violations or...

  8. 48 CFR 1303.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1303.104-7 Section 1303.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1303.104-7 Violations...

  9. 48 CFR 3.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 3.104-7 Section 3.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 3.104-7 Violations...

  10. 48 CFR 603.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 603.104-7 Section 603.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 603.104-7 Violations or...

  11. 48 CFR 1403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1403.104-7 Section 1403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1403.104-7 Violations...

  12. 48 CFR 403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 403.104-7 Section 403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 403.104-7 Violations...

  13. 48 CFR 803.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 803.104-7 Section 803.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 803.104-7 Violations...

  14. 48 CFR 803.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 803.104-7 Section 803.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 803.104-7 Violations...

  15. 48 CFR 603.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 603.104-7 Section 603.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 603.104-7 Violations or...

  16. 48 CFR 3.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 3.104-7 Section 3.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 3.104-7 Violations...

  17. 48 CFR 1403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1403.104-7 Section 1403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1403.104-7 Violations...

  18. 48 CFR 1303.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1303.104-7 Section 1303.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1303.104-7 Violations...

  19. 48 CFR 1403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1403.104-7 Section 1403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1403.104-7 Violations...

  20. 48 CFR 1403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1403.104-7 Section 1403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1403.104-7 Violations...

  1. 48 CFR 403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 403.104-7 Section 403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 403.104-7 Violations...

  2. 48 CFR 803.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 803.104-7 Section 803.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 803.104-7 Violations...

  3. 48 CFR 3.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 3.104-7 Section 3.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 3.104-7 Violations...

  4. 48 CFR 603.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 603.104-7 Section 603.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 603.104-7 Violations or...

  5. 48 CFR 3.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 3.104-7 Section 3.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 3.104-7 Violations...

  6. 48 CFR 1403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1403.104-7 Section 1403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1403.104-7 Violations...

  7. 48 CFR 803.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 803.104-7 Section 803.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 803.104-7 Violations...

  8. 48 CFR 403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 403.104-7 Section 403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 403.104-7 Violations...

  9. 48 CFR 603.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 603.104-7 Section 603.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF STATE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 603.104-7 Violations or...

  10. 48 CFR 403.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 403.104-7 Section 403.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 403.104-7 Violations...

  11. 48 CFR 803.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 803.104-7 Section 803.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 803.104-7 Violations...

  12. 48 CFR 1303.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 1303.104-7 Section 1303.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 1303.104-7 Violations...

  13. CP violation in K decays

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, F.J.

    1989-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental progress on the manifestation of CP violation in K decays, and toward understanding whether CP violation originates in a phase, or phases, in the weak mixing matrix of quarks is reviewed. 23 refs., 10 figs.

  14. Beautiful CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Dunietz, I.

    1997-09-24

    CP violation is observed to date only in K{sup 0} decays and is parameterizable by a single quantity {epsilon}. Because it is one of the least understood phenomena in the Standard Model and holds a clue to baryogenesis, it must be investigated further. Highly specialized searches in K{sup 0} decays are possible. Effects in B decays are much larger. In addition to the traditional B{sub d} {yields} J/{psi}K{sub S}, {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} asymmetries, CP violation could be searched for in already existing inclusive B data samples. The rapid B{sub s}--{anti B}{sub s} oscillations cancel in untagged B{sub s} data samples, which therefore allow feasibility studies for the observation of CP violation and the extraction of CKM elements with present vertex detectors. The favored method for the extraction of the CKM angle {gamma} is shown to be unfeasible and a solution is presented involving striking direct CP violation in charged B decays. Novel methods for determining the B{sub s} mixing parameter {Delta}m are described without the traditional requirement of flavor-specific final states.

  15. Time-Reversal Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, José; Martínez-Vidal, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    The violation of CP symmetry between matter and antimatter in the neutral K and B meson systems is well established, with a high degree of consistency between all available experimental measurements and with the Standard Model of particle physics. On the basis of the up-to-now-unbroken CPT symmetry, the violation of CP symmetry strongly suggests that the behavior of these particles under weak interactions must also be asymmetric under time reversal T. Many searches for T violation have been performed and proposed using different observables and experimental approaches. These include T-odd observables, such as triple products in weak decays, and genuine observables, such as permanent electric dipole moments of nondegenerate stationary states and the breaking of the reciprocity relation. We discuss the conceptual basis of the required exchange of initial and final states with unstable particles, using quantum entanglement and the decay as a filtering measurement, for the case of neutral B and K mesons. Using this method, the BaBar experiment at SLAC has clearly observed T violation in B mesons.

  16. Exact SU(5) Yukawa matrix unification in the general flavour violating MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskrzyński, Mateusz; Kowalska, Kamila

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the possibility of satisfying the SU(5) boundary condition Y d = Y eT at the GUT scale within the renormalizable R-parity conserving Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). Working in the super-CKM basis, we consider non-zero flavour off-diagonal entries in the soft SUSY-breaking mass matrices and the A-terms. At the same time, the diagonal A-terms are assumed to be suppressed by the respective Yukawa couplings. We show that a non-trivial flavour structure of the soft SUSY-breaking sector can contribute to achieving precise Yukawa coupling unification for all three families, and that the relevant flavour-violating parameters are , , and A {12/21/ d }. We indicate the parameter space regions where the Yukawa unification condition can be satisfied, and we demonstrate that it is consistent with a wide set of experimental constraints, including flavour and electroweak observables, Higgs physics and the LHC bounds. However, as a consequence of the down-electron Yukawa unification requirement, the MSSM vacuum in our scenario is metastable, though long-lived. We also point out that the lightest neutralino needs to be almost purely bino-like and relatively light, with the mass in the ballpark of 250 GeV. Since the proper value of the dark matter relic density is in this case obtained through co-annihilation with a sneutrino, at least one generation of sleptons must be light. Such a clear experimental prediction makes the flavour-violating SU(5) Yukawa unification scenario fully testable at the LHC TeV with the 3-lepton searches for electroweakino production.

  17. SO(10) SUSY GUT for fermion masses: Lepton flavor and CP violation

    SciTech Connect

    Dermisek, R.; Harada, M.; Raby, S.

    2006-08-01

    We discuss the results of a global {chi}{sup 2} analysis of a simple SO(10) supersymmetric grand unified theory (SUSY GUT) with D{sub 3} family symmetry and low energy R parity. The model describes fermion mass matrices with 14 parameters and gives excellent fits to 20 observable masses and mixing angles in both quark and lepton sectors, giving six predictions. Bi-large neutrino mixing is obtained with hierarchical quark and lepton Yukawa matrices, thus avoiding the possibility of large lepton flavor violation. The model naturally predicts small 1-3 neutrino mixing, with sin{theta}{sub 13}{approx_equal}0.05-0.06. In this paper we evaluate the predictions for the lepton flavor violating processes, {mu}{yields}e{gamma}, {tau}{yields}{mu}{gamma} and {tau}{yields}e{gamma} and also the electric dipole moment of the electron (d{sub e}), the muon, and the tau, assuming universal squark and slepton masses (m{sub 16}) and a universal soft SUSY breaking A parameter (A{sub 0}) at the GUT scale. We find Br({mu}{yields}e{gamma}) is naturally below present bounds, but may be observable by MEG. Similarly, d{sub e} is below present bounds, but it is within the range of future experiments. We also give predictions for the light Higgs mass (using FeynHiggs). We find an upper bound given by m{sub h}{<=}127 GeV, with an estimated {+-}3 GeV theoretical uncertainty. Finally we present predictions for SUSY particle masses in the favored region of parameter space.

  18. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B.; Ariely, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that “moral disgust” influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior. PMID:25125931

  19. Moral Violations Reduce Oral Consumption.

    PubMed

    Chan, Cindy; Van Boven, Leaf; Andrade, Eduardo B; Ariely, Dan

    2014-07-01

    Consumers frequently encounter moral violations in everyday life. They watch movies and television shows about crime and deception, hear news reports of corporate fraud and tax evasion, and hear gossip about cheaters and thieves. How does exposure to moral violations influence consumption? Because moral violations arouse disgust and because disgust is an evolutionarily important signal of contamination that should provoke a multi-modal response, we hypothesize that moral violations affect a key behavioral response to disgust: reduced oral consumption. In three experiments, compared with those in control conditions, people drank less water and chocolate milk while (a) watching a film portraying the moral violations of incest, (b) writing about moral violations of cheating or theft, and (c) listening to a report about fraud and manipulation. These findings imply that "moral disgust" influences consumption in ways similar to core disgust, and thus provide evidence for the associations between moral violations, emotions, and consumer behavior.

  20. Lorentz violation naturalness revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belenchia, Alessio; Gambassi, Andrea; Liberati, Stefano

    2016-06-01

    We revisit here the naturalness problem of Lorentz invariance violations on a simple toy model of a scalar field coupled to a fermion field via a Yukawa interaction. We first review some well-known results concerning the low-energy percolation of Lorentz violation from high energies, presenting some details of the analysis not explicitly discussed in the literature and discussing some previously unnoticed subtleties. We then show how a separation between the scale of validity of the effective field theory and that one of Lorentz invariance violations can hinder this low-energy percolation. While such protection mechanism was previously considered in the literature, we provide here a simple illustration of how it works and of its general features. Finally, we consider a case in which dissipation is present, showing that the dissipative behaviour does not percolate generically to lower mass dimension operators albeit dispersion does. Moreover, we show that a scale separation can protect from unsuppressed low-energy percolation also in this case.

  1. Lepton flavor-violating decays of the Higgs boson from sgoldstino mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demidov, S. V.; Sobolev, I. V.

    2016-08-01

    We study lepton flavor violation in a class of supersymmetric models with light sgoldstino — scalar superpartner of Goldstone fermions responsible for spontaneous supersymmetry breaking. Sgoldstino couplings to the Standard Model (SM) fermions are determined by the MSSM soft terms and, in general, provide with flavor violation in this sector. Sgoldstino admixture to the lightest Higgs boson results in changes of its coupling constants and, in particular, leads to lepton flavor-violating decay h → τ μ of the Higgs resonance. We discuss viability and phenomenological consequences of this scenario.

  2. Lorentz violation and {alpha} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Altschul, Brett

    2009-01-01

    Relating the effective Lorentz violation coefficients for composite particles to the coefficients for their constituent fields is a challenging problem. We calculate the Lorentz violation coefficients relevant to the dynamics of an {alpha} particle in terms of proton and neutron coefficients. The {alpha}-particle coefficients would lead to anisotropies in the {alpha} decays of nuclei, and because the decay process involves quantum tunneling, the effects of any Lorentz violations could be exponentially enhanced.

  3. Supersymmetric Lepton Flavor Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Ilakovac, Amon; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2010-02-10

    We study a new supersymmetric mechanism for lepton flavor violation in a minimal extension of the MSSM with low-mass heavy singlet neutrinos, which is fully independent of the flavour structure of the soft SUSY breaking sector. We find that l->l'gamma processes are forbidden in the SUSY limit, whilst the processes l->l'l{sub 1}l{sub 2} and mu->e conversion in nuclei can be enhanced well above the observable level, via large neutrino Yukawa-coupling effects.

  4. CP Violation in B Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzaro, Alfio; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2007-05-11

    Symmetries and their conservation laws play a fundamental role in Physics. Among them, the discrete symmetries corresponding to charge (C), parity (P), and time (T) transformations are extensively used in the theory of the elementary particles and their interactions (so called Standard Model (SM)) to give the basis of the fundamental physical description of nature. Eventual discoveries of violations of these symmetries become a crucial test for our understanding of the nature. It was assumed that the three discrete symmetries were not violated until 1956 when it was found that P is violated in the weak interaction. Soon it was understood that also the C is violated in the weak interaction. At that time these two violated symmetries were replaced by their combination, CP, which was considered a new fundamental symmetry. In 1964 also the CP was found violated in the case of the neutral K meson system. Since that year there were many achievements in theories and experiments in order to explain this symmetry violation. In the last five years the main contribution comes from the discovery of the CP violation in B meson system. In this note we will describe briefly how the CP violation is described in the SM and the main experimental results obtained in the B mesons system.

  5. Second law violations, continuum mechanics, and permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin

    2016-03-01

    The violations of the second law are relevant as the length and/or time scales become very small. The second law then needs to be replaced by the fluctuation theorem and mathematically, the irreversible entropy is a submartingale. First, we discuss the consequences of these results for the axioms of continuum mechanics, arguing in favor of a framework relying on stochastic functionals of energy and entropy. We next determine a Lyapunov function for diffusion-type problems governed by stochastic rather than deterministic functionals of internal energy and entropy, where the random field coefficients of diffusion are not required to satisfy the positive definiteness everywhere. Next, a formulation of micropolar fluid mechanics is developed, accounting for the lack of symmetry of stress tensor on molecular scales. This framework is then applied to employed to show that spontaneous random fluctuations of the microrotation field will arise in Couette—and Poiseuille-type flows in the absence of random (turbulence-like) fluctuations of the classical velocity field. Finally, while the permeability is classically modeled by the Darcy law or its modifications, besides considering the violations of the second law, one also needs to account for the spatial randomness of the channel network, implying a modification of the hierarchy of scale-dependent bounds on the macroscopic property of the network.

  6. 7 CFR 632.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 632.41 Section 632.41 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Appeals and Violations § 632.41 Violations. (a) Actions causing violation. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a land user:...

  7. 7 CFR 632.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 632.41 Section 632.41 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Appeals and Violations § 632.41 Violations. (a) Actions causing violation. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a land user:...

  8. 7 CFR 632.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 632.41 Section 632.41 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Appeals and Violations § 632.41 Violations. (a) Actions causing violation. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a land user:...

  9. 7 CFR 632.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 632.41 Section 632.41 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Appeals and Violations § 632.41 Violations. (a) Actions causing violation. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a land user:...

  10. 48 CFR 2803.104-10 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... violations. 2803.104-10 Section 2803.104-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE General IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 2803.104-10 Violations... interest of the Government, then the contracting officer may be authorized to award the contract...

  11. 48 CFR 2803.104-10 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 2803.104-10 Section 2803.104-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 2803.104-10...

  12. 48 CFR 2803.104-10 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 2803.104-10 Section 2803.104-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 2803.104-10...

  13. 48 CFR 2803.104-10 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 2803.104-10 Section 2803.104-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 2803.104-10...

  14. 48 CFR 2803.104-10 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 2803.104-10 Section 2803.104-10 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 2803.104-10...

  15. 48 CFR 3.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... reported violation or possible violation has any impact on the pending award or selection of the contractor. (1) If the contracting officer concludes that there is no impact on the procurement, the contracting... supporting a determination that there is no impact on the procurement to an individual designated...

  16. Causality violation and paradoxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnikov, S. V.

    1997-03-01

    Paradoxes that can supposedly occur if causality is violated are discussed. It is shown that the existence of ``trajectories of multiplicity zero'' (i.e., trajectories that describe, say, a ball hitting its younger self so that the latter cannot fall into the time machine) is not paradoxical by itself. This apparent paradox can be resolved (at least sometimes) without any harm to local physics or to the time machine. Also a simple model is adduced for which the absence of true paradoxes caused by self-interaction in an acausal world is proved. The conclusion is made that the paradoxes appear if and (within this model) only if the fact is neglected that no conditions fixed to the past of a time machine guarantee that a system remains isolated after it intersects the Cauchy horizon.

  17. Spontaneous pneumothorax during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gorospe, Luis; Puente, Susana; Madrid, Carmen; Novo, Susana; Gil-Alonso, José L; Guntiñas, Alicia

    2002-05-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax complicating pregnancy is rare. Only 41 cases have been previously published. We describe a case of spontaneous pneumothorax successfully treated with tube thoracostomy during the 38th week of pregnancy. Under epidural anesthesia, the patient had vaginal delivery of a healthy male infant 36 hours after tube thoracostomy.

  18. Beyond Spontaneously Broken Symmetry in Bose-Einstein Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Mullin, W. J.; Laloee, F.

    2010-04-16

    Spontaneous symmetry breaking (SSB) for Bose-Einstein condensates cannot treat phase off-diagonal effects, and thus cannot explain Bell inequality violations. We describe another situation that is beyond a SSB treatment: an experiment where particles from two (possibly macroscopic) condensate sources are used for conjugate measurements of the relative phase and populations. Off-diagonal phase effects are characterized by a 'quantum angle' and observed via 'population oscillations', signaling quantum interference of macroscopically distinct states.

  19. Cosmological aspects of spontaneous baryogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Andrea; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2016-08-01

    We investigate cosmological aspects of spontaneous baryogenesis driven by a scalar field, and present general constraints that are independent of the particle physics model. The relevant constraints are obtained by studying the backreaction of the produced baryons on the scalar field, the cosmological expansion history after baryogenesis, and the baryon isocurvature perturbations. We show that cosmological considerations alone provide powerful constraints, especially for the minimal scenario with a quadratic scalar potential. Intriguingly, we find that for a given inflation scale, the other parameters including the reheat temperature, decoupling temperature of the baryon violating interactions, and the mass and decay constant of the scalar are restricted to lie within ranges of at most a few orders of magnitude. We also discuss possible extensions to the minimal setup, and propose two ideas for evading constraints on isocurvature perturbations: one is to suppress the baryon isocurvature with nonquadratic scalar potentials, another is to compensate the baryon isocurvature with cold dark matter isocurvature by making the scalar survive until the present.

  20. CP violation studies at Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Haim, E.; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2007-04-01

    We present an overview of a few recent results related to CP-violation from the Tevatron. First, we discuss a measurement of the dimuon charge asymmetry from D{O} , that extracts the CP-violation parameter of B{sup 0} mixing and decay. This is followed by the CDF measurement of the CP-violating asymmetry in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays. Finally we give the CDF result on the ratio R = BR(B{yields}D0K)/BR(B{yields}D0{pi}).

  1. Violation of classical inequalities by resonant Hawking radiation in a sonic black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Nova, J. R. M.; Zapata, I.; Sols, F.

    2015-10-01

    We argue that, in a sonic black hole, the two-mode classical Cauchy-Schwarz inequality can be violated at nonzero frequencies, which can be viewed as a smoking gun of spontaneous analog Hawking radiation. A double-barrier structure generates resonant peaks in the spectrum where the inequality can be largely violated. For a given frequency, we compute the maximum temperature at which this violation can be observed. We also study the scenario where a space-dependent constant coupling produces a resonant spectrum. We prove that the zero-frequency peak always shows classical behavior. When we compare our results with those obtained for non-resonant structures such as the single barrier or the waterfall configuration, we find that the absolute amount of violation is extremely weak compared to that of resonant setups.

  2. Spontaneous droplet trampolining on rigid superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutzius, Thomas M.; Jung, Stefan; Maitra, Tanmoy; Graeber, Gustav; Köhme, Moritz; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous removal of condensed matter from surfaces is exploited in nature and in a broad range of technologies to achieve self-cleaning, anti-icing and condensation control. But despite much progress, our understanding of the phenomena leading to such behaviour remains incomplete, which makes it challenging to rationally design surfaces that benefit from its manifestation. Here we show that water droplets resting on superhydrophobic textured surfaces in a low-pressure environment can self-remove through sudden spontaneous levitation and subsequent trampoline-like bouncing behaviour, in which sequential collisions with the surface accelerate the droplets. These collisions have restitution coefficients (ratios of relative speeds after and before collision) greater than unity despite complete rigidity of the surface, and thus seemingly violate the second law of thermodynamics. However, these restitution coefficients result from an overpressure beneath the droplet produced by fast droplet vaporization while substrate adhesion and surface texture restrict vapour flow. We also show that the high vaporization rates experienced by the droplets and the associated cooling can result in freezing from a supercooled state that triggers a sudden increase in vaporization, which in turn boosts the levitation process. This effect can spontaneously remove surface icing by lifting away icy drops the moment they freeze. Although these observations are relevant only to systems in a low-pressure environment, they show how surface texturing can produce droplet-surface interactions that prohibit liquid and freezing water-droplet retention on surfaces.

  3. Spontaneous droplet trampolining on rigid superhydrophobic surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schutzius, Thomas M; Jung, Stefan; Maitra, Tanmoy; Graeber, Gustav; Köhme, Moritz; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous removal of condensed matter from surfaces is exploited in nature and in a broad range of technologies to achieve self-cleaning, anti-icing and condensation control. But despite much progress, our understanding of the phenomena leading to such behaviour remains incomplete, which makes it challenging to rationally design surfaces that benefit from its manifestation. Here we show that water droplets resting on superhydrophobic textured surfaces in a low-pressure environment can self-remove through sudden spontaneous levitation and subsequent trampoline-like bouncing behaviour, in which sequential collisions with the surface accelerate the droplets. These collisions have restitution coefficients (ratios of relative speeds after and before collision) greater than unity despite complete rigidity of the surface, and thus seemingly violate the second law of thermodynamics. However, these restitution coefficients result from an overpressure beneath the droplet produced by fast droplet vaporization while substrate adhesion and surface texture restrict vapour flow. We also show that the high vaporization rates experienced by the droplets and the associated cooling can result in freezing from a supercooled state that triggers a sudden increase in vaporization, which in turn boosts the levitation process. This effect can spontaneously remove surface icing by lifting away icy drops the moment they freeze. Although these observations are relevant only to systems in a low-pressure environment, they show how surface texturing can produce droplet-surface interactions that prohibit liquid and freezing water-droplet retention on surfaces. PMID:26536959

  4. Speeded Recognition of Ungrammaticality: Double Violations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Timothy E.; Biederman, Irving

    1979-01-01

    The speed at which sentences with various kinds of violations could be rejected was studied. Compatible with the sequential model was the finding that noun-verb and adjective-noun double violations did not result in shorter reaction times than noun-verb single violations, although double violations were judged less acceptable. (Author/RD)

  5. 10 CFR 30.63 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 30.63 Section 30.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  6. 5 CFR 1312.31 - Security violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security violations. 1312.31 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.31 Security violations. (a) A security violation notice is issued by the United... discovery of an alleged security violation, the USSS implements their standard procedures which include...

  7. 10 CFR 25.37 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 25.37 Section 25.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Violations § 25.37 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision of: (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  8. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  9. 21 CFR 1230.46 - Violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Violation. 1230.46 Section 1230.46 Food and Drugs... POISON ACT Imports § 1230.46 Violation. (a) If a violation of the Federal Caustic Poison Act is disclosed, the chief of the district shall send to the importer due notice of the nature of the violation and...

  10. 10 CFR 30.63 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 30.63 Section 30.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  11. 10 CFR 32.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 32.301 Section 32.301 Energy NUCLEAR... BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 32.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  12. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR... RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  13. 10 CFR 26.823 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 26.823 Section 26.823 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Inspections, Violations, and Penalties § 26.823 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision...

  14. 10 CFR 11.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 11.30 Section 11.30 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... MATERIAL Violations § 11.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II...

  15. 29 CFR 503.19 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Violations. 503.19 Section 503.19 Labor Regulations... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT Enforcement § 503.19 Violations. (a) Types of violations. Pursuant to the statutory provisions governing enforcement of the H-2B program, 8 U.S.C. 1184(c)(14)(A), a violation...

  16. 43 CFR 4150.1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations. 4150.1 Section 4150.1 Public... Grazing Use § 4150.1 Violations. Violation of § 4140.1(b)(1) constitutes unauthorized grazing use. (a) The authorized officer shall determine whether a violation is nonwillful, willful, or repeated willful....

  17. 10 CFR 25.37 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 25.37 Section 25.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Violations § 25.37 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision of: (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  18. 10 CFR 33.21 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 33.21 Section 33.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 33.21 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  19. 10 CFR 63.171 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 63.171 Section 63.171 Energy NUCLEAR... MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Violations § 63.171 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  20. 10 CFR 74.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 74.83 Section 74.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  1. 29 CFR 503.19 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Violations. 503.19 Section 503.19 Labor Regulations... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT Enforcement § 503.19 Violations. (a) Types of violations. Pursuant to the statutory provisions governing enforcement of the H-2B program, 8 U.S.C. 1184(c)(14)(A), a violation...

  2. 10 CFR 30.63 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 30.63 Section 30.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  3. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  4. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR... RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  5. 10 CFR 30.63 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 30.63 Section 30.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  6. 10 CFR 26.823 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 26.823 Section 26.823 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Inspections, Violations, and Penalties § 26.823 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision...

  7. 43 CFR 4150.1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations. 4150.1 Section 4150.1 Public... Grazing Use § 4150.1 Violations. Violation of § 4140.1(b)(1) constitutes unauthorized grazing use. (a) The authorized officer shall determine whether a violation is nonwillful, willful, or repeated willful....

  8. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR... RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  9. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations. (a) Actions causing violations. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a participant:...

  10. 10 CFR 50.110 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 50.110 Section 50.110 Energy NUCLEAR... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  11. 10 CFR 26.823 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 26.823 Section 26.823 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Inspections, Violations, and Penalties § 26.823 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision...

  12. 10 CFR 11.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 11.30 Section 11.30 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... MATERIAL Violations § 11.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II...

  13. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  14. 10 CFR 74.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 74.83 Section 74.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  15. 10 CFR 30.63 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 30.63 Section 30.63 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  16. 10 CFR 50.110 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 50.110 Section 50.110 Energy NUCLEAR... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  17. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  18. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  19. 7 CFR 247.20 - Program violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Program violations. 247.20 Section 247.20 Agriculture... CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY SUPPLEMENTAL FOOD PROGRAM § 247.20 Program violations. (a) What are program violations in CSFP? Program violations are actions taken by CSFP applicants or participants,...

  20. 43 CFR 4150.1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations. 4150.1 Section 4150.1 Public... Grazing Use § 4150.1 Violations. Violation of § 4140.1(b)(1) constitutes unauthorized grazing use. (a) The authorized officer shall determine whether a violation is nonwillful, willful, or repeated willful....

  1. 10 CFR 25.37 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 25.37 Section 25.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Violations § 25.37 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision of: (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  2. 10 CFR 95.61 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 95.61 Section 95.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... RESTRICTED DATA Violations § 95.61 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  3. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR... RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  4. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations. (a) Actions causing violations. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a participant:...

  5. 10 CFR 95.61 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 95.61 Section 95.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... RESTRICTED DATA Violations § 95.61 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  6. 5 CFR 1312.31 - Security violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Security violations. 1312.31 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.31 Security violations. (a) A security violation notice is issued by the United... discovery of an alleged security violation, the USSS implements their standard procedures which include...

  7. 10 CFR 50.110 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 50.110 Section 50.110 Energy NUCLEAR... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  8. 10 CFR 74.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 74.83 Section 74.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  9. 10 CFR 32.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 32.301 Section 32.301 Energy NUCLEAR... BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 32.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  10. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations. (a) Actions causing violations. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a participant:...

  11. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations. (a) Actions causing violations. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a participant:...

  12. 10 CFR 33.21 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 33.21 Section 33.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 33.21 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  13. 10 CFR 26.823 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 26.823 Section 26.823 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Inspections, Violations, and Penalties § 26.823 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision...

  14. 10 CFR 95.61 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 95.61 Section 95.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... RESTRICTED DATA Violations § 95.61 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  15. 29 CFR 503.19 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Violations. 503.19 Section 503.19 Labor Regulations... IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT Enforcement § 503.19 Violations. (a) Types of violations. Pursuant to the statutory provisions governing enforcement of the H-2B program, 8 U.S.C. 1184(c)(14)(A), a violation...

  16. 10 CFR 25.37 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 25.37 Section 25.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Violations § 25.37 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision of: (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  17. 21 CFR 1230.46 - Violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Violation. 1230.46 Section 1230.46 Food and Drugs... POISON ACT Imports § 1230.46 Violation. (a) If a violation of the Federal Caustic Poison Act is disclosed, the chief of the district shall send to the importer due notice of the nature of the violation and...

  18. 10 CFR 33.21 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 33.21 Section 33.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 33.21 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  19. 10 CFR 11.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 11.30 Section 11.30 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... MATERIAL Violations § 11.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II...

  20. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  1. 10 CFR 34.121 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 34.121 Section 34.121 Energy NUCLEAR... RADIOGRAPHIC OPERATIONS Violations § 34.121 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  2. 10 CFR 74.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 74.83 Section 74.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  3. 5 CFR 1312.31 - Security violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Security violations. 1312.31 Section 1312... Classified Information § 1312.31 Security violations. (a) A security violation notice is issued by the United... discovery of an alleged security violation, the USSS implements their standard procedures which include...

  4. 10 CFR 11.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 11.30 Section 11.30 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... MATERIAL Violations § 11.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II...

  5. 10 CFR 74.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 74.83 Section 74.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  6. 10 CFR 32.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 32.301 Section 32.301 Energy NUCLEAR... BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 32.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  7. 7 CFR 634.29 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 634.29 Section 634.29 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL CLEAN WATER PROGRAM Participant RCWP Contracts § 634.29 Violations. (a) Actions causing violations. The following actions constitute violation of a contract by a participant:...

  8. 10 CFR 32.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 32.301 Section 32.301 Energy NUCLEAR... BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 32.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  9. 10 CFR 95.61 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 95.61 Section 95.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... RESTRICTED DATA Violations § 95.61 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  10. 10 CFR 32.301 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 32.301 Section 32.301 Energy NUCLEAR... BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 32.301 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as...

  11. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  12. 10 CFR 50.110 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 50.110 Section 50.110 Energy NUCLEAR... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  13. 10 CFR 75.51 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 75.51 Section 75.51 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  14. 10 CFR 25.37 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 25.37 Section 25.37 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION ACCESS AUTHORIZATION Violations § 25.37 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision of: (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  15. 10 CFR 33.21 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 33.21 Section 33.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 33.21 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  16. 43 CFR 4150.1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations. 4150.1 Section 4150.1 Public... Grazing Use § 4150.1 Violations. Violation of § 4140.1(b)(1) constitutes unauthorized grazing use. (a) The authorized officer shall determine whether a violation is nonwillful, willful, or repeated willful....

  17. 21 CFR 1230.46 - Violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Violation. 1230.46 Section 1230.46 Food and Drugs... POISON ACT Imports § 1230.46 Violation. (a) If a violation of the Federal Caustic Poison Act is disclosed, the chief of the district shall send to the importer due notice of the nature of the violation and...

  18. 10 CFR 63.171 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 63.171 Section 63.171 Energy NUCLEAR... MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Violations § 63.171 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended;...

  19. CPT violation and B-meson oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelecky, V. Alan; Van Kooten, Richard J.

    2010-11-15

    Recent evidence for anomalous CP violation in B-meson oscillations can be interpreted as resulting from CPT violation. This yields the first sensitivity to CPT violation in the B{sub s}{sup 0} system, with the relevant coefficient for CPT violation constrained at the level of parts in 10{sup 12}.

  20. 10 CFR 50.110 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 50.110 Section 50.110 Energy NUCLEAR... Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the... Energy Act: (1) For violations of— (i) Sections 53, 57, 62, 63, 81, 82, 101, 103, 104, 107, or 109 of...

  1. 10 CFR 33.21 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 33.21 Section 33.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC LICENSES OF BROAD SCOPE FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Violations § 33.21 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  2. 10 CFR 26.823 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 26.823 Section 26.823 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION FITNESS FOR DUTY PROGRAMS Inspections, Violations, and Penalties § 26.823 Violations. (a) An injunction or other court order may be obtained to prohibit a violation of any provision...

  3. 10 CFR 11.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 11.30 Section 11.30 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... MATERIAL Violations § 11.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II...

  4. 21 CFR 1230.46 - Violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Violation. 1230.46 Section 1230.46 Food and Drugs... POISON ACT Imports § 1230.46 Violation. (a) If a violation of the Federal Caustic Poison Act is disclosed, the chief of the district shall send to the importer due notice of the nature of the violation and...

  5. 21 CFR 1230.46 - Violation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Violation. 1230.46 Section 1230.46 Food and Drugs... POISON ACT Imports § 1230.46 Violation. (a) If a violation of the Federal Caustic Poison Act is disclosed, the chief of the district shall send to the importer due notice of the nature of the violation and...

  6. 7 CFR 632.42 - Violation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... conservationist, that a violation did not occur or that the violation was of such a nature that no penalty of... refused. (2) The notice setting forth the nature of the alleged violation is to give the land user an... decision is to state whether the violation is of such a nature as to warrant termination of the...

  7. C P -violating baryon oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeen, David; Nelson, Ann E.

    2016-10-01

    We enumerate the conditions necessary for C P violation to be manifest in n -n ¯ oscillations and build a simple model that can give rise to such effects. We discuss a possible connection between neutron oscillations and dark matter, provided the mass of the latter lies between mp-me and mp+me. We apply our results to a possible baryogenesis scenario involving C P violation in the oscillations of the Ξ0.

  8. CP Violation in B Mesons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roe, Natalie A.

    2001-04-01

    Our world manifestly violates CP, the symmetry between matter and antimatter; there is no observational evidence for any significant amount of antimatter in the Universe. Andrei Sakharov was the first to point out that, in the context of Big Bang theory, a matter-dominated universe requires CP violation at the quantum level. Indeed, CP violation was subsequently observed as a tiny effect in K-meson decays, and it can be naturally accommodated in the Standard Model of fundamental particles with 3 generations of quarks. However, to produce the observed baryon asymmetry, baryogenesis calculations require more CP violation than the Standard Model affords. This is an intriguing puzzle whose solution will require input from both particle physics and cosmology, and it has inspired particle physicists to study CP violation with greater precision in a new generation of experiments. We are now entering this exciting new era in CP violation studies. Several new or upgraded experiments plan a program of detailed measurements of CP violating effects in B mesons. The predicted asymmetries are large, observable in a variety of decay channels, and the theoretical uncertainties are small for the best modes. Some interesting experimental results have recently been announced, and more precise measurements will soon follow. Future experiments are already planned to make even more definitive measurements. In this talk I will review the theoretical predictions and the connection to cosmology, survey the experimental scene, and describe how the study of CP violation in B mesons will allow us to make stringent tests of the Standard Model.

  9. Time-reversal violation in beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Herczeg, P.

    2003-01-01

    At present there is no unambigous direct evidence for time-reversal (T) violation in the fundamental interactions. But T-violation is intimately connected with CP-violation by the CPT theorem. A stringent bound on possible violation of CPT invariance comes from the properties of K{sup 0} - {bar K}{sup 0} mixing [I]. In the following we shall assume that CPT violating interactions, if present, can be neglected, and use the terms 'T-violation' and 'CP-violation' interchangably.

  10. Spontaneous combustion of hydrogen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nusselt, Wilhelm; Pothmann, PH

    1923-01-01

    It is shown by the author's experiments that hydrogen which escapes to the atmosphere through openings in the system may burn spontaneously if it contains dust. Purely thermal reasoning can not account for the combustion. It seems to be rather an electrical ignition. In order to determine whether the cause of the spontaneous ignition was thermo-chemical, thermo-mechanical, or thermo-electrical, the experiments in this paper were performed.

  11. Spontaneous cholecystocutaneous abscess.

    PubMed

    Metsemakers, W J; Quanten, I; Vanhoenacker, F; Spiessens, T

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous cholecystocutaneous abscesses or fistulae are rare complications of neglected biliary calculous disease which have become extremely rare during the last decades. We report a case of spontaneous cholecystocutaneous abscess in a 69-year-old male who presented with a mass in the right subcostal region.The diagnosis was made by CT scan with multiplanar reformating. Treatment consisted of incision and drainage of the abdominal wall abscess followed by cholecystectomy in a one-stage protocol.

  12. CP violation at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreau, J.

    2001-04-16

    A major goal of experimental particle physics over the next decade is to measure the sides and angles of the Unitarity triangle redundantly, and as precisely as possible. Overconstraining the triangle will test the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa model of quark mixing. The CDF collaboration, due to begin a second run in March 2001 with major upgrades to both the accelerator and the detector, will study the angle {beta} using B{sup 0} decays, the angle {gamma} using B{sup 0} and B{sub s}{sup 0} decays, and a side of the triangle through the observation of B{sub s}{sup 0}--{bar B}{sub s}{sup 0} mixing. Projected sensitivities are driven mostly by previous measurements using data from the first run. One highlight of the Run I B physics program is a measurement of the CP violating parameter sin 2{beta} = 0.79{sub {minus}0.44}{sup +0.41}, based on a tagged sample of 400 B{sup 0} decays in the mode B{sub 0}/{bar B}{sup 0} {r_arrow} J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0}. The technology of flavor tagging, used here as well as in numerous B{sup 0}-{bar B}{sup 0} mixing analyses in run I, is crucial and will be augmented in Run II with better particle identification capabilities. Exclusive all-hadronic final states will enter the data sample in Run II through a new displaced track trigger.

  13. Spontaneous Representations of Small Numbers of Objects by Rhesus Macaques: Examinations of Content and Format

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauser, Marc D.; Carey, Susan

    2003-01-01

    The project of comparative cognition benefits from common measures across species. We report here on five experiments using the violation of expectancy looking time measure with free-ranging rhesus macaques ("Macaca mulatta"), each designed to build on current knowledge concerning spontaneous representations of number. Each subject, tested in only…

  14. Biomodal spontaneous fission

    SciTech Connect

    Hulet, E.K. )

    1989-09-26

    Investigations of mass and kinetic-energy distributions from spontaneous fission have been extended in recent years to an isotope of element 104 and, for half-lives, to an isotope of element 108. The results have been surprising in that spontaneous fission half-lives have turned out to be much longer than expected and mass and kinetic- energy distributions were found to abruptly shift away from those of the lighter actinides, showing two modes of fission. These new developments have caused a re-evaluation of our understanding of the fission process, bringing an even deeper appreciation of the role played by nuclear shell effects upon spontaneous fission properties. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  15. CP VIOLATION HIGHLIGHTS: CIRCA 2005

    SciTech Connect

    SONI A.

    2005-02-27

    Recent highlights in CP violation phenomena, are reviewed. B-factory results imply that, CP-violation phase in the CKM matrix is the dominant contributor to the observed CP violation in K and B-physics. Deviations from the predictions of the CKM-paradigm due to beyond the Standard Model CP-odd phase are likely to be a small perturbation. Therefore, large data sample of clean B's will be needed. Precise determination of the unitarity triangle, along with time dependent CP in penguin dominated hadronic and radiative modes are discussed. Null tests in B, K and top-physics and separate determination of the K-unitarity triangle are also emphasized.

  16. Chirality and gravitational parity violation.

    PubMed

    Bargueño, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    In this review, parity-violating gravitational potentials are presented as possible sources of both true and false chirality. In particular, whereas phenomenological long-range spin-dependent gravitational potentials contain both truly and falsely chiral terms, it is shown that there are models that extend general relativity including also coupling of fermionic degrees of freedom to gravity in the presence of torsion, which give place to short-range truly chiral interactions similar to that usually considered in molecular physics. Physical mechanisms which give place to gravitational parity violation together with the expected size of the effects and their experimental constraints are discussed. Finally, the possible role of parity-violating gravity in the origin of homochirality and a road map for future research works in quantum chemistry is presented. PMID:25919812

  17. Chirality and gravitational parity violation.

    PubMed

    Bargueño, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    In this review, parity-violating gravitational potentials are presented as possible sources of both true and false chirality. In particular, whereas phenomenological long-range spin-dependent gravitational potentials contain both truly and falsely chiral terms, it is shown that there are models that extend general relativity including also coupling of fermionic degrees of freedom to gravity in the presence of torsion, which give place to short-range truly chiral interactions similar to that usually considered in molecular physics. Physical mechanisms which give place to gravitational parity violation together with the expected size of the effects and their experimental constraints are discussed. Finally, the possible role of parity-violating gravity in the origin of homochirality and a road map for future research works in quantum chemistry is presented.

  18. Spontaneous sarcomere dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Günther, Stefan; Kruse, Karsten

    2010-12-01

    Sarcomeres are the basic force generating units of striated muscles and consist of an interdigitating arrangement of actin and myosin filaments. While muscle contraction is usually triggered by neural signals, which eventually set myosin motors into motion, isolated sarcomeres can oscillate spontaneously between a contracted and a relaxed state. We analyze a model for sarcomere dynamics, which is based on a force-dependent detachment rate of myosin from actin. Our numerical bifurcation analysis of the spontaneous sarcomere dynamics reveals notably Hopf bifurcations, canard explosions, and gluing bifurcations. We discuss possible implications for experiments.

  19. Hyperscaling violation and electroweak symmetry breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elander, Daniel; Lawrance, Robert; Piai, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    We consider a class of simplified models of dynamical electroweak symmetry breaking built in terms of their five-dimensional weakly-coupled gravity duals, in the spirit of bottom-up holography. The sigma-model consists of two abelian gauge bosons and one real, non-charged scalar field coupled to gravity in five dimensions. The scalar potential is a simple exponential function of the scalar field. The background metric resulting from solving the classical equations of motion exhibits hyperscaling violation, at least at asymptotically large values of the radial direction. We study the spectrum of scalar composite states of the putative dual field theory by fluctuating the sigma-model scalars and gravity, and discuss in which cases we find a parametrically light scalar state in the spectrum. We model the spontaneous breaking of the (weakly coupled) gauge symmetry to the diagonal subgroup by the choice of IR boundary conditions. We compute the mass spectrum of spin-1 states, and the precision electroweak parameter S as a function of the hyperscaling coefficient. We find a general bound on the mass of the lightest spin-1 resonance, by requiring that the indirect bounds on the precision parameters be satisfied, that implies that precision electroweak physics excludes the possibility of a techni-rho meson with mass lighter than several TeV.

  20. 48 CFR 903.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 903.104-7 Violations or possible... requirements of 48 CFR 3.104-7(a) (1) and (2), relative to contracting officer conclusions on the impact of a... individual designated to perform the responsibilities in 48 CFR 3.104-7(a) (1) and (2) regarding questions...

  1. 48 CFR 903.104-7 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... IMPROPER BUSINESS PRACTICES AND PERSONAL CONFLICTS OF INTEREST Safeguards 903.104-7 Violations or possible... requirements of 48 CFR 3.104-7(a) (1) and (2), relative to contracting officer conclusions on the impact of a... individual designated to perform the responsibilities in 48 CFR 3.104-7(a) (1) and (2) regarding questions...

  2. Bonobos (Pan paniscus) vocally protest against violations of social expectations.

    PubMed

    Clay, Zanna; Ravaux, Lucie; de Waal, Frans B M; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    Research has shown that great apes possess certain expectations about social regularities and both perceive and act according to social rules within their group. During natural and experimentally induced contexts, such as the inequitable distribution of resources, individuals also show protesting behaviors when their expectations about a social situation are violated. Despite broad interest in this topic, systematic research examining the nature of these expectations and the communicative signals individuals use to express them remains scant. Here, we addressed this by exploring whether bonobos (Pan paniscus) respond to violations of social expectations in naturally occurring social interactions, focusing on the vocal behavior of victims following socially expected and unexpected aggression. Expected aggression included conflicts over a contested resource and conflicts that were provoked by the victim. Unexpected aggression was any spontaneous, unprovoked hostility toward the victim. For each conflict, we also determined its severity and the composition of the nearby audience. We found that the acoustic and temporal structure of victim screams was individually distinct and varied significantly depending on whether or not aggression could be socially predicted. Certain acoustic parameters also varied as a function of conflict severity, but unlike social expectation, conflict severity did not discriminate scream acoustic structure overall. We found no effect of audience composition. We concluded that, beyond the physical nature of a conflict, bonobos possess certain social expectations about how they should be treated and will publicly protest with acoustically distinctive vocal signals if these expectations are violated.

  3. Bonobos (Pan paniscus) vocally protest against violations of social expectations.

    PubMed

    Clay, Zanna; Ravaux, Lucie; de Waal, Frans B M; Zuberbühler, Klaus

    2016-02-01

    Research has shown that great apes possess certain expectations about social regularities and both perceive and act according to social rules within their group. During natural and experimentally induced contexts, such as the inequitable distribution of resources, individuals also show protesting behaviors when their expectations about a social situation are violated. Despite broad interest in this topic, systematic research examining the nature of these expectations and the communicative signals individuals use to express them remains scant. Here, we addressed this by exploring whether bonobos (Pan paniscus) respond to violations of social expectations in naturally occurring social interactions, focusing on the vocal behavior of victims following socially expected and unexpected aggression. Expected aggression included conflicts over a contested resource and conflicts that were provoked by the victim. Unexpected aggression was any spontaneous, unprovoked hostility toward the victim. For each conflict, we also determined its severity and the composition of the nearby audience. We found that the acoustic and temporal structure of victim screams was individually distinct and varied significantly depending on whether or not aggression could be socially predicted. Certain acoustic parameters also varied as a function of conflict severity, but unlike social expectation, conflict severity did not discriminate scream acoustic structure overall. We found no effect of audience composition. We concluded that, beyond the physical nature of a conflict, bonobos possess certain social expectations about how they should be treated and will publicly protest with acoustically distinctive vocal signals if these expectations are violated. PMID:26881943

  4. Models of neutrino mass, mixing and CP violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.

    2015-12-01

    In this topical review we argue that neutrino mass and mixing data motivates extending the Standard Model (SM) to include a non-Abelian discrete flavour symmetry in order to accurately predict the large leptonic mixing angles and {C}{P} violation. We begin with an overview of the SM puzzles, followed by a description of some classic lepton mixing patterns. Lepton mixing may be regarded as a deviation from tri-bimaximal mixing, with charged lepton corrections leading to solar mixing sum rules, or tri-maximal lepton mixing leading to atmospheric mixing rules. We survey neutrino mass models, using a roadmap based on the open questions in neutrino physics. We then focus on the seesaw mechanism with right-handed neutrinos, where sequential dominance (SD) can account for large lepton mixing angles and {C}{P} violation, with precise predictions emerging from constrained SD (CSD). We define the flavour problem and discuss progress towards a theory of favour using GUTs and discrete family symmetry. We classify models as direct, semidirect or indirect, according to the relation between the Klein symmetry of the mass matrices and the discrete family symmetry, in all cases focussing on spontaneous {C}{P} violation. Finally we give two examples of realistic and highly predictive indirect models with CSD, namely an A to Z of flavour with Pati-Salam and a fairly complete A 4 × SU(5) SUSY GUT of flavour, where both models have interesting implications for leptogenesis.

  5. Common origin of fermion mixing and geometrical CP violation, and its test through Higgs physics at the LHC.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Varzielas, Ivo de Medeiros; Leser, Philipp

    2012-12-14

    We construct for the first time a flavor model, based on the smallest discrete symmetry Δ(27) that implements spontaneous CP violation with a complex phase of geometric origin, which can actually reproduce all quark masses and mixing data. We show that its scalar sector has exotic properties that can be tested at the LHC.

  6. Atomic CP-violating polarizability

    SciTech Connect

    Ravaine, Boris; Derevianko, Andrei; Kozlov, M.G.

    2005-07-15

    Searches for CP-violating effects in atoms and molecules provide important constrains on competing extensions to the standard model of elementary particles. In particular, CP violation in an atom leads to the CP-odd (T,P-odd) polarizability {beta}{sup CP}: a magnetic moment {mu}{sup CP} is induced by an electric field E{sub 0} applied to an atom, {mu}{sup CP}={beta}{sup CP}E{sub 0}. We estimate the CP-violating polarizability for rare-gas (diamagnetic) atoms He through Rn. We relate {beta}{sup CP} to the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron and to the scalar constant of the CP-odd electron-nucleus interaction. The analysis is carried out using the third-order perturbation theory and the Dirac-Hartree-Fock formalism. We find that, as a function of nuclear charge Z, {beta}{sup CP} scales steeply as Z{sup 5}R(Z), where slowly varying R(Z) is a relativistic enhancement factor. Finally, we evaluate the feasibility of setting a limit on electron EDM by measuring CP-violating magnetization of liquid Xe. We find that such an experiment could provide competitive bounds on electron EDM only if the present level of experimental sensitivity to ultraweak magnetic fields [Kominis et al., Nature 422, 596 (2003)] is improved by several orders of magnitude.

  7. CP violation in B decays

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, H.R.

    1994-02-01

    She reviews how one can test the Standard Model predictions for CP violation. This test requires sufficient independent measurements to overconstrain the model parameters and thus be sensitive to possible beyond Standard Model contributions. She addresses the challenges for theory as well as for experiment to achieve such a test.

  8. CP Violation and B Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Helen R

    2001-11-13

    These lectures provide a basic overview of topics related to the study of CP Violation in B decays. In the first lecture, I review the basics of discrete symmetries in field theories, the quantum mechanics of neutral but flavor-non-trivial mesons, and the classification of three types of CP violation. The actual second lecture which I gave will be separately published as it is my Dirac award lecture and is focused on the separate topic of strong CP Violation. In Lecture 2 here, I cover the Standard Model predictions for neutral B decays, and in particular discuss some channels of interest for CP Violation studies. Lecture 3 reviews the various tools and techniques used to deal with the hadronic physics effects. In Lecture 4, I briefly review the present and planned experiments that can study B decays. I cannot teach all the details of this subject in this short course, so my approach is instead to try to give students a grasp of the relevant concepts and an overview of the available tools. The level of these lectures is introductory. I will provide some references to more detailed treatments and current literature, but this is not a review article so I do not attempt to give complete references to all related literature. By now there are some excellent textbooks that cover this subject in great detail. I refer students to these for more details and for more complete references to the original literature.

  9. CP violation and rare decays

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    2000-01-24

    After a brief essay on the current state of particle physics and possible approaches to the opportunities that have presented themselves, the author summarizes the contributions to the Third Workshop on Physics and Detectors for DA{Phi}NE that deal with CP Violation and Rare Decays.

  10. Velocity Requirements for Causality Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modanese, Giovanni

    We re-examine the "Regge-Tolman paradox" with reference to some recent experimental results. It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity v of the moving system required to produce causality violation. This formula typically yields a velocity very close to the speed of light (for instance, v/c > 0.97 for X-shaped microwaves), which raises some doubts about the real physical observability of the violations. We then compute the velocity requirement introducing a delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that in principle for any delay it is possible to find moving observers able to produce active causal violation. This is mathematically due to the singularity of the Lorentz transformations for β →1. For a realistic delay due to the propagation of a luminal precursor, we find that causality violations in the reported experiments are still more unlikely (v/c > 0.989), and even in the hypothesis that the superluminal propagation velocity goes to infinity, the velocity requirement is bounded by v/c > 0.62. We also prove that if two oscopic bodies exchange energy and momentum through superluminal signals, then the swap of signal source and target is incompatible with the Lorentz transformations; therefore it is not possible to distinguish between source and target, even with reference to a definite reference frame.

  11. Physicist sentenced for export violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2009-08-01

    J Reece Roth, a retired University of Tennessee plasma physicist convicted of violating the American Arms Export Control Act, is planning to appeal against a four-year prison sentence handed down last month. "It's an appeal against everything, including the verdict and the sentence," says his lawyer Thomas Dundon.

  12. The strong equivalence principle and its violation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V. M.; Goldman, I.

    1983-01-01

    Theoretical and observational aspects of an SEP violation are discussed. A two-times theory is presented as a possible framework to handle an SEP violation, and tests performed to check the compatibility of such violation with a host of data ranging from nucleosynthesis to geophysics are summarized. Also discussed are the dynamical equations needed to analyze radar ranging data to reveal an SEP violation and in particular the method employed by Shapiro and Reasenberg (1976).

  13. 48 CFR 203.070 - Reporting of violations and suspected violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... and suspected violations. 203.070 Section 203.070 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... CONFLICTS OF INTEREST § 203.070 Reporting of violations and suspected violations. Report violations and... 3.203). (d) Antitrust laws (FAR 3.303). (e) Covenant Against Contingent Fees (FAR 3.405). (f)...

  14. 48 CFR 203.070 - Reporting of violations and suspected violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and suspected violations. 203.070 Section 203.070 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... CONFLICTS OF INTEREST 203.070 Reporting of violations and suspected violations. Report violations and... 3.203). (d) Antitrust laws (FAR 3.303). (e) Covenant Against Contingent Fees (FAR 3.405)....

  15. 48 CFR 703.104-10.1 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 703.104-10.1 Section 703.104-10.1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... Violations or possible violations. Requests for concurrence under paragraph (a)(1) of FAR 3.104-10 shall...

  16. 48 CFR 703.104-10.1 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 703.104-10.1 Section 703.104-10.1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... Violations or possible violations. Requests for concurrence under paragraph (a)(1) of FAR 3.104-10 shall...

  17. 48 CFR 703.104-10.1 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 703.104-10.1 Section 703.104-10.1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... Violations or possible violations. Requests for concurrence under paragraph (a)(1) of FAR 3.104-10 shall...

  18. 48 CFR 703.104-10.1 - Violations or possible violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations or possible violations. 703.104-10.1 Section 703.104-10.1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL... Violations or possible violations. Requests for concurrence under paragraph (a)(1) of FAR 3.104-10 shall...

  19. 48 CFR 303.104-7 - Violations or possible violations of the Procurement Integrity Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations or possible violations of the Procurement Integrity Act. 303.104-7 Section 303.104-7 Federal Acquisition Regulations... Safeguards 303.104-7 Violations or possible violations of the Procurement Integrity Act. (a)(1)...

  20. 10 CFR 76.131 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  1. 10 CFR 76.131 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  2. 10 CFR 76.131 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  3. 10 CFR 76.131 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  4. 10 CFR 76.131 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 76.131 Section 76.131 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) CERTIFICATION OF GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANTS Enforcement § 76.131 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  5. 40 CFR 141.860 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Revised Total Coliform Rule § 141.860 Violations. (a) E. coli MCL Violation. A system is in violation of the MCL for E. coli when any of the conditions identified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(4) of this section occur. (1) The system has an E. coli-positive repeat...

  6. 40 CFR 141.860 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... PRIMARY DRINKING WATER REGULATIONS Revised Total Coliform Rule § 141.860 Violations. (a) E. coli MCL Violation. A system is in violation of the MCL for E. coli when any of the conditions identified in paragraphs (a)(1) through (a)(4) of this section occur. (1) The system has an E. coli-positive repeat...

  7. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under...

  8. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation...

  9. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation...

  10. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation...

  11. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation...

  12. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under...

  13. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under...

  14. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under...

  15. 10 CFR 490.310 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 490.310 Section 490.310 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Alternative Fuel Provider Vehicle Acquisition Mandate § 490.310 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation...

  16. 10 CFR 490.206 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 490.206 Section 490.206 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Mandatory State Fleet Program § 490.206 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under...

  17. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of...

  18. 18 CFR 415.52 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Violations. 415.52 Section 415.52 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Enforcement § 415.52 Violations. Any violation of...

  19. 18 CFR 415.52 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Violations. 415.52 Section 415.52 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Enforcement § 415.52 Violations. Any violation of...

  20. 10 CFR 218.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 218.41 Section 218.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL STANDBY MANDATORY INTERNATIONAL OIL ALLOCATION Investigations, Violations, Sanctions and Judicial Actions § 218.41 Violations. Any practice that circumvents, contravenes or results in...

  1. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of...

  2. 10 CFR 63.171 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 63.171 Section 63.171 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Violations § 63.171 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  3. 10 CFR 63.171 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 63.171 Section 63.171 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Violations § 63.171 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  4. 10 CFR 63.171 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 63.171 Section 63.171 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN A GEOLOGIC REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Violations § 63.171 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  5. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Enforcement § 39.101 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  6. 10 CFR 39.101 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 39.101 Section 39.101 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Enforcement § 39.101 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of...

  7. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.181 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  8. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.181 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  9. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.181 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  10. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.181 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  11. 10 CFR 60.181 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 60.181 Section 60.181 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DISPOSAL OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES IN GEOLOGIC REPOSITORIES Violations § 60.181 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  12. 10 CFR 218.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 218.41 Section 218.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL STANDBY MANDATORY INTERNATIONAL OIL ALLOCATION Investigations, Violations, Sanctions and Judicial Actions § 218.41 Violations. Any practice that circumvents, contravenes or results in...

  13. 32 CFR 552.114 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.114 Section 552.114 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL...-Fort Lewis, Washington § 552.114 Violations. Violations of the provisions of this regulation...

  14. 32 CFR 552.216 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.216 Section 552.216 National... on the Installation of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland § 552.216 Violations. (a) A person is in violation of the terms of this subpart if: (1) That person enters or remains upon Aberdeen Proving...

  15. 14 CFR 300.20 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 300.20 Section 300.20... REGULATIONS RULES OF CONDUCT IN DOT PROCEEDINGS UNDER THIS CHAPTER § 300.20 Violations. (a) DOT may disqualify... unethical or improper professional conduct. Any violation of this part shall be deemed to be such...

  16. 10 CFR 40.81 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 40.81 Section 40.81 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SOURCE MATERIAL Enforcement § 40.81 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The...

  17. 10 CFR 218.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 218.41 Section 218.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL STANDBY MANDATORY INTERNATIONAL OIL ALLOCATION Investigations, Violations, Sanctions and Judicial Actions § 218.41 Violations. Any practice that circumvents, contravenes or results in...

  18. 32 CFR 763.6 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Violations. 763.6 Section 763.6 National Defense... PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.6 Violations. (a) Any person who... Security Act of 1950 (50 U.S.C. 797), violations of which may result in a maximum penalty of...

  19. 10 CFR 40.81 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 40.81 Section 40.81 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SOURCE MATERIAL Enforcement § 40.81 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The...

  20. 32 CFR 763.6 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Violations. 763.6 Section 763.6 National Defense... PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.6 Violations. (a) Any person who... Security Act of 1950 (50 U.S.C. 797), violations of which may result in a maximum penalty of...

  1. 10 CFR 55.71 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 55.71 Section 55.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES Enforcement § 55.71 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act...

  2. 10 CFR 19.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 19.30 Section 19.30 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NOTICES, INSTRUCTIONS AND REPORTS TO WORKERS: INSPECTION AND INVESTIGATIONS § 19.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  3. 10 CFR 73.80 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 73.80 Section 73.80 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Enforcement § 73.80 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  4. 15 CFR 764.2 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 764.2 Section 764.2... MEASURES § 764.2 Violations. (a) Engaging in prohibited conduct. No person may engage in any conduct... order, license or authorization issued thereunder. (b) Causing, aiding, or abetting a violation....

  5. 10 CFR 19.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 19.30 Section 19.30 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NOTICES, INSTRUCTIONS AND REPORTS TO WORKERS: INSPECTION AND INVESTIGATIONS § 19.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  6. 7 CFR 632.42 - Violation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violation procedures. 632.42 Section 632.42..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Appeals and Violations § 632.42 Violation procedures. (a) Scope. This section prescribes the regulations dealing with contract...

  7. 10 CFR 31.22 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 31.22 Section 31.22 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION GENERAL DOMESTIC LICENSES FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL § 31.22 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic...

  8. 7 CFR 631.14 - Contract violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Contract violations. 631.14 Section 631.14 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS CONSERVATION PROGRAM Contracts § 631.14 Contract violations. Contract violations, determinations and appeals will be handled in accordance with the terms of...

  9. 10 CFR 725.31 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 725.31 Section 725.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PERMITS FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA Permits § 725.31 Violations. An injunction or other court order may be obtained prohibiting any violation of any provision of the Act or any regulation or...

  10. 10 CFR 150.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 150.30 Section 150.30 Energy NUCLEAR... OFFSHORE WATERS UNDER SECTION 274 Enforcement § 150.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act...

  11. 32 CFR 552.145 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.145 Section 552.145 National... Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana § 552.145 Violations. (a) Any person/persons entering or remaining on... this subpart. (c) In addition, violation of this subpart by persons subject to the Uniform Code...

  12. 10 CFR 140.87 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 140.87 Section 140.87 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS AND INDEMNITY AGREEMENTS Violations § 140.87 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  13. 15 CFR 764.2 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 764.2 Section 764.2... MEASURES § 764.2 Violations. (a) Engaging in prohibited conduct. No person may engage in any conduct... order, license or authorization issued thereunder. (b) Causing, aiding, or abetting a violation....

  14. 10 CFR 70.91 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 70.91 Section 70.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Enforcement § 70.91 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  15. 10 CFR 35.4001 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 35.4001 Section 35.4001 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Enforcement § 35.4001 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  16. 15 CFR 764.2 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 764.2 Section 764.2... MEASURES § 764.2 Violations. (a) Engaging in prohibited conduct. No person may engage in any conduct... order, license or authorization issued thereunder. (b) Causing, aiding, or abetting a violation....

  17. 33 CFR 6.18-1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Violations. 6.18-1 Section 6.18-1... OF VESSELS, HARBORS, AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES Penalties § 6.18-1 Violations. Section 2, Title II of... as merchandise is forfeited for violation of the customs revenue laws; and the person guilty of...

  18. 10 CFR 73.80 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 73.80 Section 73.80 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Enforcement § 73.80 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  19. 22 CFR 127.1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Violations. 127.1 Section 127.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS VIOLATIONS AND PENALTIES § 127.1 Violations. (a) It is unlawful: (1) To export or attempt to export from the United States, or to reexport...

  20. 10 CFR 31.22 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 31.22 Section 31.22 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION GENERAL DOMESTIC LICENSES FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL § 31.22 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic...

  1. 10 CFR 150.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 150.30 Section 150.30 Energy NUCLEAR... OFFSHORE WATERS UNDER SECTION 274 Enforcement § 150.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act...

  2. 10 CFR 725.31 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 725.31 Section 725.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PERMITS FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA Permits § 725.31 Violations. An injunction or other court order may be obtained prohibiting any violation of any provision of the Act or any regulation or...

  3. 10 CFR 40.81 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 40.81 Section 40.81 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SOURCE MATERIAL Enforcement § 40.81 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The...

  4. 33 CFR 6.18-1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Violations. 6.18-1 Section 6.18-1... OF VESSELS, HARBORS, AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES Penalties § 6.18-1 Violations. Section 2, Title II of... as merchandise is forfeited for violation of the customs revenue laws; and the person guilty of...

  5. 10 CFR 19.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 19.30 Section 19.30 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NOTICES, INSTRUCTIONS AND REPORTS TO WORKERS: INSPECTION AND INVESTIGATIONS § 19.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  6. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of...

  7. 10 CFR 31.22 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 31.22 Section 31.22 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION GENERAL DOMESTIC LICENSES FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL § 31.22 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic...

  8. 10 CFR 61.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 61.83 Section 61.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., and Inspections § 61.83 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2)...

  9. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2012-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.172 Section 552.172 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL..., and Camp Bonneville § 552.172 Violations. Anyone observing violators of this or other regulations...

  10. 10 CFR 140.87 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 140.87 Section 140.87 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS AND INDEMNITY AGREEMENTS Violations § 140.87 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  11. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of...

  12. 32 CFR 552.145 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Violations. 552.145 Section 552.145 National... Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana § 552.145 Violations. (a) Any person/persons entering or remaining on... this subpart. (c) In addition, violation of this subpart by persons subject to the Uniform Code...

  13. 14 CFR 300.20 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 300.20 Section 300.20... REGULATIONS RULES OF CONDUCT IN DOT PROCEEDINGS UNDER THIS CHAPTER § 300.20 Violations. (a) DOT may disqualify... unethical or improper professional conduct. Any violation of this part shall be deemed to be such...

  14. 7 CFR 632.42 - Violation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violation procedures. 632.42 Section 632.42..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING RURAL ABANDONED MINE PROGRAM Appeals and Violations § 632.42 Violation procedures. (a) Scope. This section prescribes the regulations dealing with contract...

  15. 48 CFR 3.1105 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Violations. 3.1105 Section... Contractor Employees Performing Acquisition Functions 3.1105 Violations. If the contracting officer suspects violation by the contractor of a requirement of paragraph (b), (c)(3), or (d) of the clause at...

  16. 33 CFR 6.18-1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Violations. 6.18-1 Section 6.18-1... OF VESSELS, HARBORS, AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES Penalties § 6.18-1 Violations. Section 2, Title II of... as merchandise is forfeited for violation of the customs revenue laws; and the person guilty of...

  17. 32 CFR 763.6 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Violations. 763.6 Section 763.6 National Defense... PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.6 Violations. (a) Any person who... Security Act of 1950 (50 U.S.C. 797), violations of which may result in a maximum penalty of...

  18. 10 CFR 70.91 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 70.91 Section 70.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Enforcement § 70.91 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  19. 44 CFR 401.6 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations. 401.6 Section 401.6 Emergency Management and Assistance DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SHIPPING RESTRICTIONS (T-1) § 401.6 Violations. Any person who wilfully violates any provisions of...

  20. 32 CFR 552.114 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.114 Section 552.114 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL...-Fort Lewis, Washington § 552.114 Violations. Violations of the provisions of this regulation...

  1. 32 CFR 552.114 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Violations. 552.114 Section 552.114 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL...-Fort Lewis, Washington § 552.114 Violations. Violations of the provisions of this regulation...

  2. 32 CFR 552.145 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Violations. 552.145 Section 552.145 National... Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana § 552.145 Violations. (a) Any person/persons entering or remaining on... this subpart. (c) In addition, violation of this subpart by persons subject to the Uniform Code...

  3. 48 CFR 3.1105 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations. 3.1105 Section... Contractor Employees Performing Acquisition Functions 3.1105 Violations. If the contracting officer suspects violation by the contractor of a requirement of paragraph (b), (c)(3), or (d) of the clause at...

  4. 10 CFR 207.5 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 207.5 Section 207.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... Coordination Act of 1974 § 207.5 Violations. Any practice that circumvents or contravenes or results in a... thereto is a violation of the DOE regulations stated in this subpart....

  5. 10 CFR 150.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 150.30 Section 150.30 Energy NUCLEAR... OFFSHORE WATERS UNDER SECTION 274 Enforcement § 150.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act...

  6. 10 CFR 36.91 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 36.91 Section 36.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Enforcement § 36.91 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  7. 10 CFR 35.4001 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 35.4001 Section 35.4001 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Enforcement § 35.4001 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  8. 10 CFR 725.31 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 725.31 Section 725.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PERMITS FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA Permits § 725.31 Violations. An injunction or other court order may be obtained prohibiting any violation of any provision of the Act or any regulation or...

  9. 14 CFR 300.20 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 300.20 Section 300.20... REGULATIONS RULES OF CONDUCT IN DOT PROCEEDINGS UNDER THIS CHAPTER § 300.20 Violations. (a) DOT may disqualify... unethical or improper professional conduct. Any violation of this part shall be deemed to be such...

  10. 10 CFR 140.87 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 140.87 Section 140.87 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS AND INDEMNITY AGREEMENTS Violations § 140.87 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  11. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.172 Section 552.172 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL..., and Camp Bonneville § 552.172 Violations. Anyone observing violators of this or other regulations...

  12. 43 CFR 423.70 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Violations. 423.70 Section 423.70 Public... PUBLIC CONDUCT ON BUREAU OF RECLAMATION FACILITIES, LANDS, AND WATERBODIES Violations and Sanctions § 423.70 Violations. (a) When at, in, or on Reclamation facilities, lands, or waterbodies, you must...

  13. 14 CFR 300.20 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 300.20 Section 300.20... REGULATIONS RULES OF CONDUCT IN DOT PROCEEDINGS UNDER THIS CHAPTER § 300.20 Violations. (a) DOT may disqualify... unethical or improper professional conduct. Any violation of this part shall be deemed to be such...

  14. 10 CFR 55.71 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 55.71 Section 55.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES Enforcement § 55.71 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act...

  15. 32 CFR 552.114 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Violations. 552.114 Section 552.114 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL...-Fort Lewis, Washington § 552.114 Violations. Violations of the provisions of this regulation...

  16. 10 CFR 110.60 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 110.60 Section 110.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Violations and Enforcement § 110.60 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  17. 32 CFR 552.216 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.216 Section 552.216 National... on the Installation of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland § 552.216 Violations. (a) A person is in violation of the terms of this subpart if: (1) That person enters or remains upon Aberdeen Proving...

  18. 10 CFR 73.80 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 73.80 Section 73.80 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Enforcement § 73.80 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  19. 32 CFR 552.216 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Violations. 552.216 Section 552.216 National... on the Installation of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland § 552.216 Violations. (a) A person is in violation of the terms of this subpart if: (1) That person enters or remains upon Aberdeen Proving...

  20. 10 CFR 73.80 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 73.80 Section 73.80 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Enforcement § 73.80 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  1. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Violations. 552.172 Section 552.172 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL..., and Camp Bonneville § 552.172 Violations. Anyone observing violators of this or other regulations...

  2. 32 CFR 770.40 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Violations. 770.40 Section 770.40 National... § 770.40 Violations. Any person entering or remaining on U.S. Naval installations and properties in... representatives, shall be considered to be in violation of these regulations and therefore subject to...

  3. 22 CFR 127.1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Violations. 127.1 Section 127.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS VIOLATIONS AND PENALTIES § 127.1 Violations. (a) Without first obtaining the required license or other written approval from the...

  4. 10 CFR 71.99 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 71.99 Section 71.99 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... § 71.99 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the...

  5. 18 CFR 415.52 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Violations. 415.52 Section 415.52 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Enforcement § 415.52 Violations. Any violation of...

  6. 10 CFR 207.5 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 207.5 Section 207.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... Coordination Act of 1974 § 207.5 Violations. Any practice that circumvents or contravenes or results in a... thereto is a violation of the DOE regulations stated in this subpart....

  7. 10 CFR 725.31 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 725.31 Section 725.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PERMITS FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA Permits § 725.31 Violations. An injunction or other court order may be obtained prohibiting any violation of any provision of the Act or any regulation or...

  8. 18 CFR 415.52 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Violations. 415.52 Section 415.52 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Enforcement § 415.52 Violations. Any violation of...

  9. 32 CFR 770.40 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Violations. 770.40 Section 770.40 National... § 770.40 Violations. Any person entering or remaining on U.S. Naval installations and properties in... representatives, shall be considered to be in violation of these regulations and therefore subject to...

  10. 10 CFR 70.91 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 70.91 Section 70.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Enforcement § 70.91 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  11. 10 CFR 71.99 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 71.99 Section 71.99 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... § 71.99 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the...

  12. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Violations. 552.172 Section 552.172 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL..., and Camp Bonneville § 552.172 Violations. Anyone observing violators of this or other regulations...

  13. 10 CFR 35.4001 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 35.4001 Section 35.4001 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Enforcement § 35.4001 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  14. 10 CFR 40.81 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 40.81 Section 40.81 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SOURCE MATERIAL Enforcement § 40.81 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The...

  15. 10 CFR 40.81 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 40.81 Section 40.81 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SOURCE MATERIAL Enforcement § 40.81 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The...

  16. 32 CFR 552.145 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Violations. 552.145 Section 552.145 National... Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana § 552.145 Violations. (a) Any person/persons entering or remaining on... this subpart. (c) In addition, violation of this subpart by persons subject to the Uniform Code...

  17. 10 CFR 490.708 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 490.708 Section 490.708 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Biodiesel Fuel Use Credit § 490.708 Violations. Violations of this subpart are subject to investigation and enforcement under subpart G of...

  18. 32 CFR 552.172 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Violations. 552.172 Section 552.172 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL..., and Camp Bonneville § 552.172 Violations. Anyone observing violators of this or other regulations...

  19. 10 CFR 20.2401 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 20.2401 Section 20.2401 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Enforcement § 20.2401 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  20. 14 CFR 300.20 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 300.20 Section 300.20... REGULATIONS RULES OF CONDUCT IN DOT PROCEEDINGS UNDER THIS CHAPTER § 300.20 Violations. (a) DOT may disqualify... unethical or improper professional conduct. Any violation of this part shall be deemed to be such...

  1. 14 CFR § 1204.1006 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. § 1204.1006 Section § 1204.1006 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE AUTHORITY AND... Unauthorized Introduction of Weapons or Dangerous Materials § 1204.1006 Violations. Anyone violating...

  2. 10 CFR 61.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 61.83 Section 61.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., and Inspections § 61.83 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2)...

  3. 32 CFR 763.6 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Violations. 763.6 Section 763.6 National Defense... PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.6 Violations. (a) Any person who... Security Act of 1950 (50 U.S.C. 797), violations of which may result in a maximum penalty of...

  4. 10 CFR 1048.5 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 1048.5 Section 1048.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... § 1048.5 Violations. Willful unauthorized entry, or willful unauthorized introduction of weapons or dangerous materials into or upon real property subject to this part, constitutes a violation of...

  5. 10 CFR 20.2401 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 20.2401 Section 20.2401 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Enforcement § 20.2401 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  6. 44 CFR 401.6 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations. 401.6 Section 401.6 Emergency Management and Assistance DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SHIPPING RESTRICTIONS (T-1) § 401.6 Violations. Any person who wilfully violates any provisions of...

  7. 10 CFR 20.2401 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 20.2401 Section 20.2401 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Enforcement § 20.2401 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  8. 10 CFR 31.22 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 31.22 Section 31.22 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION GENERAL DOMESTIC LICENSES FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL § 31.22 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic...

  9. 10 CFR 110.60 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 110.60 Section 110.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Violations and Enforcement § 110.60 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  10. 10 CFR 1016.44 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 1016.44 Section 1016.44 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Control of Information § 1016.44 Violations. An injunction or other court order may be obtained prohibiting any violation of any provision of...

  11. 10 CFR 37.107 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 37.107 Section 37.107 Energy NUCLEAR... Enforcement § 37.107 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the...

  12. 10 CFR 61.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 61.83 Section 61.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., and Inspections § 61.83 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2)...

  13. 22 CFR 127.1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Violations. 127.1 Section 127.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS VIOLATIONS AND PENALTIES § 127.1 Violations. (a) Without first obtaining the required license or other written approval from the...

  14. 10 CFR 71.99 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 71.99 Section 71.99 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... § 71.99 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the...

  15. 10 CFR 55.71 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 55.71 Section 55.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES Enforcement § 55.71 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act...

  16. 10 CFR 725.31 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 725.31 Section 725.31 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PERMITS FOR ACCESS TO RESTRICTED DATA Permits § 725.31 Violations. An injunction or other court order may be obtained prohibiting any violation of any provision of the Act or any regulation or...

  17. 10 CFR 218.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 218.41 Section 218.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL STANDBY MANDATORY INTERNATIONAL OIL ALLOCATION Investigations, Violations, Sanctions and Judicial Actions § 218.41 Violations. Any practice that circumvents, contravenes or results in...

  18. 44 CFR 401.6 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations. 401.6 Section 401.6 Emergency Management and Assistance DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SHIPPING RESTRICTIONS (T-1) § 401.6 Violations. Any person who wilfully violates any provisions of...

  19. 44 CFR 401.6 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Violations. 401.6 Section 401.6 Emergency Management and Assistance DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SHIPPING RESTRICTIONS (T-1) § 401.6 Violations. Any person who wilfully violates any provisions of...

  20. 10 CFR 140.87 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 140.87 Section 140.87 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS AND INDEMNITY AGREEMENTS Violations § 140.87 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  1. 43 CFR 423.70 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations. 423.70 Section 423.70 Public... PUBLIC CONDUCT ON BUREAU OF RECLAMATION FACILITIES, LANDS, AND WATERBODIES Violations and Sanctions § 423.70 Violations. (a) When at, in, or on Reclamation facilities, lands, or waterbodies, you must...

  2. 32 CFR 552.145 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2011-07-01 2009-07-01 true Violations. 552.145 Section 552.145 National... Fort Benjamin Harrison, Indiana § 552.145 Violations. (a) Any person/persons entering or remaining on... this subpart. (c) In addition, violation of this subpart by persons subject to the Uniform Code...

  3. 33 CFR 6.18-1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Violations. 6.18-1 Section 6.18-1... OF VESSELS, HARBORS, AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES Penalties § 6.18-1 Violations. Section 2, Title II of... as merchandise is forfeited for violation of the customs revenue laws; and the person guilty of...

  4. 22 CFR 127.1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Violations. 127.1 Section 127.1 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS VIOLATIONS AND PENALTIES § 127.1 Violations. (a) It is unlawful: (1) To export or attempt to export from the United States, or to reexport...

  5. 32 CFR 770.40 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Violations. 770.40 Section 770.40 National... § 770.40 Violations. Any person entering or remaining on U.S. Naval installations and properties in... representatives, shall be considered to be in violation of these regulations and therefore subject to...

  6. 10 CFR 70.91 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 70.91 Section 70.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Enforcement § 70.91 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  7. 10 CFR 19.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 19.30 Section 19.30 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NOTICES, INSTRUCTIONS AND REPORTS TO WORKERS: INSPECTION AND INVESTIGATIONS § 19.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  8. 10 CFR 71.99 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 71.99 Section 71.99 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... § 71.99 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the...

  9. 10 CFR 35.4001 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 35.4001 Section 35.4001 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Enforcement § 35.4001 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  10. 10 CFR 20.2401 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 20.2401 Section 20.2401 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Enforcement § 20.2401 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  11. 10 CFR 70.91 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 70.91 Section 70.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL Enforcement § 70.91 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  12. 10 CFR 110.60 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 110.60 Section 110.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Violations and Enforcement § 110.60 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  13. 10 CFR 207.5 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 207.5 Section 207.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... Coordination Act of 1974 § 207.5 Violations. Any practice that circumvents or contravenes or results in a... thereto is a violation of the DOE regulations stated in this subpart....

  14. 10 CFR 1016.44 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 1016.44 Section 1016.44 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Control of Information § 1016.44 Violations. An injunction or other court order may be obtained prohibiting any violation of any provision of...

  15. 10 CFR 31.22 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 31.22 Section 31.22 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION GENERAL DOMESTIC LICENSES FOR BYPRODUCT MATERIAL § 31.22 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic...

  16. 44 CFR 401.6 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Violations. 401.6 Section 401.6 Emergency Management and Assistance DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SHIPPING RESTRICTIONS (T-1) § 401.6 Violations. Any person who wilfully violates any provisions of...

  17. 10 CFR 55.71 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 55.71 Section 55.71 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) OPERATORS' LICENSES Enforcement § 55.71 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act...

  18. 48 CFR 3.1105 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations. 3.1105 Section... Contractor Employees Performing Acquisition Functions 3.1105 Violations. If the contracting officer suspects violation by the contractor of a requirement of paragraph (b), (c)(3), or (d) of the clause at...

  19. 10 CFR 110.60 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 110.60 Section 110.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Violations and Enforcement § 110.60 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  20. 32 CFR 770.40 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Violations. 770.40 Section 770.40 National... § 770.40 Violations. Any person entering or remaining on U.S. Naval installations and properties in... representatives, shall be considered to be in violation of these regulations and therefore subject to...

  1. 10 CFR 1048.5 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 1048.5 Section 1048.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... § 1048.5 Violations. Willful unauthorized entry, or willful unauthorized introduction of weapons or dangerous materials into or upon real property subject to this part, constitutes a violation of...

  2. 10 CFR 218.41 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 218.41 Section 218.41 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL STANDBY MANDATORY INTERNATIONAL OIL ALLOCATION Investigations, Violations, Sanctions and Judicial Actions § 218.41 Violations. Any practice that circumvents, contravenes or results in...

  3. 10 CFR 1048.5 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 1048.5 Section 1048.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... § 1048.5 Violations. Willful unauthorized entry, or willful unauthorized introduction of weapons or dangerous materials into or upon real property subject to this part, constitutes a violation of...

  4. 32 CFR 763.6 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Violations. 763.6 Section 763.6 National Defense... PUBLIC ACCESS Entry Regulations for Kaho'olawe Island, Hawaii § 763.6 Violations. (a) Any person who... Security Act of 1950 (50 U.S.C. 797), violations of which may result in a maximum penalty of...

  5. 43 CFR 423.70 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Violations. 423.70 Section 423.70 Public... PUBLIC CONDUCT ON BUREAU OF RECLAMATION FACILITIES, LANDS, AND WATERBODIES Violations and Sanctions § 423.70 Violations. (a) When at, in, or on Reclamation facilities, lands, or waterbodies, you must...

  6. 10 CFR 150.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 150.30 Section 150.30 Energy NUCLEAR... OFFSHORE WATERS UNDER SECTION 274 Enforcement § 150.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act...

  7. 10 CFR 20.2401 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 20.2401 Section 20.2401 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION STANDARDS FOR PROTECTION AGAINST RADIATION Enforcement § 20.2401 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  8. 33 CFR 6.18-1 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Violations. 6.18-1 Section 6.18-1... OF VESSELS, HARBORS, AND WATERFRONT FACILITIES Penalties § 6.18-1 Violations. Section 2, Title II of... as merchandise is forfeited for violation of the customs revenue laws; and the person guilty of...

  9. 7 CFR 1430.214 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... benefits; (3) Failure to comply with highly erodible land conservation and wetland provisions of this 7 CFR... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 1430.214 Section 1430.214 Agriculture... Violations. (a) If producers in a dairy operation violates the MILC or the requirements of this subpart,...

  10. 10 CFR 73.80 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 73.80 Section 73.80 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF PLANTS AND MATERIALS Enforcement § 73.80 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  11. 10 CFR 61.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 61.83 Section 61.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., and Inspections § 61.83 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2)...

  12. 10 CFR 1016.44 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 1016.44 Section 1016.44 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Control of Information § 1016.44 Violations. An injunction or other court order may be obtained prohibiting any violation of any provision of...

  13. 10 CFR 110.60 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 110.60 Section 110.60 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXPORT AND IMPORT OF NUCLEAR EQUIPMENT AND MATERIAL Violations and Enforcement § 110.60 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  14. 10 CFR 140.87 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 140.87 Section 140.87 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FINANCIAL PROTECTION REQUIREMENTS AND INDEMNITY AGREEMENTS Violations § 140.87 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent...

  15. 10 CFR 36.91 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 36.91 Section 36.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Enforcement § 36.91 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  16. 10 CFR 71.99 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 71.99 Section 71.99 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY... § 71.99 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2) Title II of the...

  17. 10 CFR 36.91 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 36.91 Section 36.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Enforcement § 36.91 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  18. 43 CFR 423.70 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Violations. 423.70 Section 423.70 Public... PUBLIC CONDUCT ON BUREAU OF RECLAMATION FACILITIES, LANDS, AND WATERBODIES Violations and Sanctions § 423.70 Violations. (a) When at, in, or on Reclamation facilities, lands, or waterbodies, you must...

  19. 10 CFR 1016.44 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 1016.44 Section 1016.44 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Control of Information § 1016.44 Violations. An injunction or other court order may be obtained prohibiting any violation of any provision of...

  20. 10 CFR 150.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 150.30 Section 150.30 Energy NUCLEAR... OFFSHORE WATERS UNDER SECTION 274 Enforcement § 150.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act...

  1. 18 CFR 415.52 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Violations. 415.52 Section 415.52 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Enforcement § 415.52 Violations. Any violation of...

  2. 10 CFR 207.5 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Violations. 207.5 Section 207.5 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... Coordination Act of 1974 § 207.5 Violations. Any practice that circumvents or contravenes or results in a... thereto is a violation of the DOE regulations stated in this subpart....

  3. 7 CFR 631.14 - Contract violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Contract violations. 631.14 Section 631.14 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS CONSERVATION PROGRAM Contracts § 631.14 Contract violations. Contract violations, determinations and appeals will be handled in accordance with the terms of...

  4. 7 CFR 1430.214 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... benefits; (3) Failure to comply with highly erodible land conservation and wetland provisions of this 7 CFR... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 1430.214 Section 1430.214 Agriculture... Violations. (a) If producers in a dairy operation violates the MILC or the requirements of this subpart,...

  5. 10 CFR 1016.44 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 1016.44 Section 1016.44 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) SAFEGUARDING OF RESTRICTED DATA Control of Information § 1016.44 Violations. An injunction or other court order may be obtained prohibiting any violation of any provision of...

  6. 32 CFR 552.114 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Violations. 552.114 Section 552.114 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL...-Fort Lewis, Washington § 552.114 Violations. Violations of the provisions of this regulation...

  7. 7 CFR 631.14 - Contract violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contract violations. 631.14 Section 631.14 Agriculture... AGRICULTURE LONG TERM CONTRACTING GREAT PLAINS CONSERVATION PROGRAM Contracts § 631.14 Contract violations. Contract violations, determinations and appeals will be handled in accordance with the terms of...

  8. 10 CFR 35.4001 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 35.4001 Section 35.4001 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Enforcement § 35.4001 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  9. 32 CFR 770.40 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Violations. 770.40 Section 770.40 National... § 770.40 Violations. Any person entering or remaining on U.S. Naval installations and properties in... representatives, shall be considered to be in violation of these regulations and therefore subject to...

  10. 10 CFR 36.91 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Violations. 36.91 Section 36.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Enforcement § 36.91 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  11. 43 CFR 423.70 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Violations. 423.70 Section 423.70 Public... PUBLIC CONDUCT ON BUREAU OF RECLAMATION FACILITIES, LANDS, AND WATERBODIES Violations and Sanctions § 423.70 Violations. (a) When at, in, or on Reclamation facilities, lands, or waterbodies, you must...

  12. 32 CFR 552.216 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Violations. 552.216 Section 552.216 National... on the Installation of Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland § 552.216 Violations. (a) A person is in violation of the terms of this subpart if: (1) That person enters or remains upon Aberdeen Proving...

  13. 10 CFR 19.30 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Violations. 19.30 Section 19.30 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NOTICES, INSTRUCTIONS AND REPORTS TO WORKERS: INSPECTION AND INVESTIGATIONS § 19.30 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the...

  14. 22 CFR 127.11 - Past violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Past violations. 127.11 Section 127.11 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN ARMS REGULATIONS VIOLATIONS AND PENALTIES § 127.11 Past violations. (a) Presumption of denial. Pursuant to section 38 of the Arms Export Control...

  15. 10 CFR 61.83 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 61.83 Section 61.83 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY..., and Inspections § 61.83 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1) The Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended; (2)...

  16. 10 CFR 36.91 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Violations. 36.91 Section 36.91 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Enforcement § 36.91 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other court order to prevent a violation of the provisions of— (1)...

  17. 10 CFR 95.61 - Violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Violations. 95.61 Section 95.61 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Violations § 95.61 Violations. (a) The Commission may obtain an injunction or other...

  18. 5 CFR 1312.31 - Security violations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Security violations. 1312.31 Section 1312..., DOWNGRADING, DECLASSIFICATION AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION Control and Accountability of Classified Information § 1312.31 Security violations. (a) A security violation notice is issued by the...

  19. Spontaneous periodic hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Kloos, R T

    1995-09-01

    Spontaneous periodic hypothermia is a rare syndrome of recurrent, centrally mediated hypothermia without an identifiable systemic cause or brain lesion. Most patients defend a temporarily lowered temperature "set point" during episodes of hypothermia, despite manifesting many well-known systemic consequences of core temperature hypothermia. No case of death directly attributable to an episode of spontaneous periodic hypothermia has been reported, although many of the serious systemic effects of hypothermia have been documented in these cases, so it is not unlikely that death may occur. The syndrome's cause, and that of Shapiro syndrome, remains unknown. Pharmacologic trials to date have been only modestly successful. Anticonvulsant agents, clonidine, and cyproheptadine appear the most likely to succeed, with cyproheptadine being a reasonable first choice. Given that the term "spontaneous periodic hypothermia" describes a syndrome, and not a pathophysiologic mechanism, it is likely to encompass a common eventuality, arrived at via several different pathways. One can postulate mechanisms such as structural abnormalities, trauma, infection, irritation, and degeneration involving strategic locations which create a focus for epileptic or other periodic dysfunction whose scope involves the centers for thermoregulation. The existence of 2 distinct, oppositional thermoregulatory centers would allow for speculation of similar mechanisms accounting for cases of both periodic hypo- and hyperthermia (61). Postmortem data regarding the hypothalamic and surrounding areas from future cases of Shapiro syndrome and spontaneous periodic hypothermia would be of great interest. Further, more sensitive in vivo testing methods are clearly needed. The role of PET or single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with technetium 99m-labeled hexamethylpropylene amine oxime (Tc 99m HMPAO) performed acutely during an episode remains to be characterized (64, 103, 105). The term

  20. Sources of CP violation from E{sub 6} inspired heterotic string model

    SciTech Connect

    Boussahel, M.; Mebarki, N.

    2012-06-27

    Sources of the weak CP violation from the SU{sub L}(3)x SU{sub R}(3)x SU{sub c}(3) subgroup of the E{sub 6} inspired heterotic string model are discussed. It is shown that the number of the Cabibo-Kobayachi-Maskawa like matrices depends on the spontaneous breakdown of the E{sub 6} gauge symmetry and/or supersymmetry.

  1. Spontaneous ileostomy closure

    PubMed Central

    Alyami, Mohammad S.; Lundberg, Peter W.; Cotte, Eddy G.; Glehen, Olivier J.

    2016-01-01

    Iatrogenic ileostomies are routinely placed during colorectal surgery for the diversion of intestinal contents to permit healing of the distal anastomosis prior to elective reversal. We present an interesting case of spontaneous closure of a diverting ileostomy without any adverse effects to the patient. A 65-year-old woman, positive for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer type-I, with locally invasive cancer of the distal colon underwent en-bloc total colectomy, hysterectomy, and bilateral salpingoophorectomy with creation of a proximal loop ileostomy. The ostomy temporarily closed without reoperation at 10 weeks, after spontaneously reopening, it definitively closed, again without surgical intervention at 18 weeks following the original surgery. This rare phenomenon has occurred following variable colorectal pathology and is poorly understood, particularly in patients with aggressive disease and adjunct perioperative interventions. PMID:27279518

  2. Spontaneous Transomental Hernia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung Hun

    2016-01-01

    A transomental hernia through the greater or lesser omentum is rare, accounting for approximately 4% of internal hernias. Transomental hernias are generally reported in patients aged over fifty. In such instances, acquired transomental hernias are usual, are commonly iatrogenic, and result from surgical interventions or from trauma or peritoneal inflammation. In rare cases, such as the one described in this study, internal hernias through the greater or lesser omentum occur spontaneously as the result of senile atrophy without history of surgery, trauma, or inflammation. A transomental hernia has a high postoperative mortality rate of 30%, and emergency diagnosis and treatment are critical. We report a case of a spontaneous transomental hernia of the small intestine causing intestinal obstruction. An internal hernia with strangulation of the small bowel in the lesser sac was suspected from the image study. After an emergency laparotomy, a transomental hernia was diagnosed. PMID:26962535

  3. [Spontaneous bilateral Petit hernia].

    PubMed

    Fontoura, Rodrigo Dias; Araújo, Emerson Silveira de; Oliveira, Gustavo Alves de; Sarmenghi Filho, Deolindo; Kalil, Mitre

    2011-01-01

    Petit's lumbar hernia is an uncommon defect of the posterior abdominal wall that represents less than 1% of all abdominal wall hernias. It is more often unilateral and founded in young females, rarely containing a real herniated sac. There are two different approaches to repair: laparoscopy and open surgery. The goal of this article is to report one case of spontaneous bilateral lumbar Petit's hernia treated with open surgery.

  4. Flavour violation in general supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chankowski, Piotr H.; Lebedev, Oleg; Pokorski, Stefan

    2005-06-01

    We reappraise the flavour changing neutral currents (FCNC) problem in string-derived supergravity models. We overview and classify possible sources of flavour violation and find that the problem often does not arise in classes of models which generate hierarchical Yukawa matrices. In such models, constraints from the K- and D-meson systems leave room for substantial flavour non-universality of the soft terms. The current B-physics experiments only begin to probe its natural range. Correlations among different observables can allow one to read off the chirality structure of flavour violating sources. We briefly discuss the lepton sector where the problem of FCNC is indeed serious and perhaps points at an additional symmetry or flavour universality.

  5. CP violation experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiung, Yee B.

    1990-07-01

    The E731 experiment at Fermilab has searched for direct'' CP violation in K{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{pi}, which is parametrized by {var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon}. For the first time, in 20% of the data set, all four modes of the K{sub L,S} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} ({pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}) were collected simultaneously, providing a great check on the systematic uncertainty. The result is Re({var epsilon}{prime}/{var epsilon}) = {minus}0.0004 {plus minus} 0.0014 (stat) {plus minus} 0.0006(syst), which provides no evidence for direct'' CP violation. The CPT symmetry has also been tested by measuring the phase difference {Delta}{phi} = {phi}{sub 00} {minus} {phi}{sub {plus minus}} between the two CP violating parameters {eta}{sub 00} and {eta}{sub {plus minus}}. We fine {Delta}{phi} = {minus}0.3{degrees} {plus minus} 2.4{degree}(stat) {plus minus} 1.2{degree}(syst). Using this together with the world average {phi}{sub {plus minus}}, we fine that the phase of the K{sup 0}-{bar K}{sup 0} mixing parameter {var epsilon} is 44.5{degree} {plus minus} 1.5{degree}. Both of these results agree well with the predictions of CPT symmetry. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  6. [Recurrent spontaneous abortions].

    PubMed

    Salat-Baroux, J

    1988-01-01

    The process of fertilization in humans, is remarkably inefficient. Spontaneous abortion is estimated to be between 15 and 20% of all clinical pregnancies, and the early spontaneous abortion rate is closer to 30-50% of fertilized ova. Not all authors agree on the definition of "recurrent spontaneous abortion" (RSA), so the frequency of repeated pregnancy wastage is difficult to determine; from empirically derived data, it has been estimated to range between 0.4 and 0.8%. Because of the various etiologies of RSA, their association in determining an abortive event, it is difficult to evaluate their exact incidence. Moreover, their is no prospective study on this subject, so it is advisable to distinguish between the admitted causes, the likely factors, and the etiologies to be evaluated. In the first group, the congenital or acquired müllerian anomalies (especially the septate uterus), represent about 25% of the RSA, but a lot of problems concerning the physiopathology are still debated, even if the rate of pregnancies after surgery ranges around 50% in certain series. On the other hand, the genetic factors, identified especially with the banding technique, are undeniable: however, although the rate of chromosomal aberrations in the offspring (Monosomy X, Trisony 16, Triploidy) is very high (50 to 60% of spontaneous abortions in the first trimester of pregnancy), when couples with usual abortions are subjected to karyotypic analysis, genetic anomalies (especially translocations) are been noted in only 6.2% of the women and 2.6% of the men. In the second group, the infective factors (chlamydiae, toxoplasma and mycoplasma) are difficult to analyse since the serology is not sufficient without a real proof of an endometrial colonization. Among the endocrinological causes, the classical luteal phase deficiency remains a subject of controversy (estimated between 3 and 30%) not only for the establishment of the diagnosis, but also for the efficiency of progesterone

  7. Spontaneous acalculous gallbladder perforation

    PubMed Central

    Sheridan, David; Qazi, Almas; Lisa, Selina; Vashisht, Rajiv

    2014-01-01

    An 86-year-old woman, 4 days post-operative following a right-sided Austin-Moore arthroplasty, reported abdominal pain around a known umbilical hernia and became increasingly confused. A diagnosis of incarcerated umbilical hernia was made. At surgery, on entering the peritoneal cavity, bile was immediately noted. The operation was converted to a laparotomy and a perforation was noted in the gallbladder. An open cholecystectomy was performed. Macroscopically the gallbladder was perforated in multiple places, was thin walled and did not contain gallstones. This case demonstrates the difficulty in diagnosing an apparently spontaneous gallbladder perforation in a cognitively frail patient. PMID:25293685

  8. Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strocchi, Franco

    One of the most powerful ideas of modern theoretical physics is the mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking. It is at the basis of most of the recent achievements in the description of phase transitions in Statistical Mechanics as well as of collective phenomena in solid state physics. It has also made possible the unification of weak, electromagnetic and strong interactions in elementary particle physics. Philosophically, the idea is very deep and subtle (this is probably why its exploitation is a rather recent achievement) and the popular accounts do not fully do justice to it.

  9. Spontaneous acalculous gallbladder perforation.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, David; Qazi, Almas; Lisa, Selina; Vashisht, Rajiv

    2014-10-07

    An 86-year-old woman, 4 days post-operative following a right-sided Austin-Moore arthroplasty, reported abdominal pain around a known umbilical hernia and became increasingly confused. A diagnosis of incarcerated umbilical hernia was made. At surgery, on entering the peritoneal cavity, bile was immediately noted. The operation was converted to a laparotomy and a perforation was noted in the gallbladder. An open cholecystectomy was performed. Macroscopically the gallbladder was perforated in multiple places, was thin walled and did not contain gallstones. This case demonstrates the difficulty in diagnosing an apparently spontaneous gallbladder perforation in a cognitively frail patient.

  10. [Spontaneous course of depression].

    PubMed

    Azorin, J M

    1995-03-01

    The study of the spontaneous course of depressions nowadays comes up against a number of obstacles. The most important of these is the necessity of using untreated cases, which virtually forces the contemporary researcher to refer to studies performed in the pretherapeutic era, if conclusions are not be drawn only from classical descriptions. Unfortunately, these studies are marked by the absence of strict diagnostic criteria, the heterogeneity of patients included in them, the lack of preciseness of evaluations and the primitive statistical methods used. They are concerned essentially with the duration of depressive phases and the factors which influence it. Among these latter are regularly found age, sex, the number of episodes, the duration of the preceding symptom-free interval, the severity and semiology of the attack, heredity, mode of onset, level of intelligence, the presence or absence of associated pathology and the presence or absence of hospitalisation. Chronicization of depression and the factors concerned with it have also been the object of several studies. A small number of investigations compare the course of the illness in untreated populations. The study of the spontaneous course of depression evidences the necessity of having consensus definitions, and may serve as a basis for a better comprehension of the process of cure and of the real impact of therapies designed to treat depression.

  11. Flavor Physics & CP Violation 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    "Flavor Physics & CP violation 2015" (FPCP 2015) was held in Nagoya, Japan, at Nagoya University, from May 25 to May 29 2015. This is the 13th meeting of the series of annual conferences started in Philadelphia, PA, USA in 2002. The aim of the conference is to review developments in flavor physics and CP violation, in both theory and experiment, exploiting the potential to study new physics at the LHC and future facilities. The topics include CP violation, rare decays, CKM elements with heavy quark decays, flavor phenomena in charged leptons and neutrinos, and also interplay between flavor and LHC high Pt physics. The FPCP2015 conference had more than 140 participants, including researchers from abroad and many young researchers (postdocs and students). The conference consisted of plenary talks and poster presentations. The plenary talks include 2 overview talks, 48 review talks, and 2 talks for outlook in theories and experiments, given by world leading researchers. There was also a special lecture by Prof. Makoto Kobayashi, one of the Nobel laureates in 2008. The poster session had 41 contributions. Many young researchers presented their works. These proceedings contain written documents for these plenary and poster presentations. The full scientific program and presentation materials can be found at http://fpcp2015.hepl.phys.nagoya-u.ac.jp/. We would like to thank the International Advisory Committee for their invaluable assistance in coordinating the scientific program and in helping to identifying many speakers. Thanks are also due to the Local Organizing Committee for tireless efforts for smooth running of the conference and very enjoyable social activities. We also thank the financial supports provided by Japanese Scociety for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) unfer the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (S) "Probing New Physics with Tau-Lepton" (No. 26220706), by Nagoya University under the Program for Promoting the Enhancement of Research Universities, and

  12. Recent Results on CP Violation From BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, David B

    2002-03-14

    The BABAR experiment at the PEP-II B factory at SLAC has collected over 37 10{sup 6} BB pairs in the years 2000 and 2001. Based on this data sample, various studies of CP violation in the B system are presented, including the first observation of CP violation outside the kaon system and a measurement of the CKM parameter sin(2{beta}) = 0.59 {+-} 0.14(stat) {+-} 0.05(syst). Studies on direct CP violation and CP violation in mixing are also presented.

  13. Aspects of current correlators in holographic theories with hyperscaling violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edalati, Mohammad; Pedraza, Juan F.

    2013-10-01

    We study the low-energy and low-momentum behavior of current correlators in a class of holographic zero-temperature, finite-density critical theories which do not respect the hyperscaling relation. The dual holographic description is assumed to be given by probe D-branes embedded in background geometries characterized by a dynamical critical exponent z and a hyperscaling violation exponent θ. We show that a subset of these theories with 1≤z<2(1-θ/d) exhibit a stable, linearly dispersing mode in their low-energy spectrum of excitations. This mode, which appears as a pole in the retarded correlators of charge density and longitudinal currents, has some characteristics similar to that of the zero sound in Fermi liquids. Given some reasonable assumptions, we argue that the class of theories with θ=d-1 that logarithmically violate the area law in the entanglement entropy in a manner reminiscent of theories with Fermi surfaces does not exhibit a zero-sound-like mode in the low-energy spectrum of the probe sector. Furthermore, utilizing the holographic Wilsonian approach, we explicitly show that such a mode has a natural interpretation as a Goldstone boson arising from the spontaneous breaking of a specific symmetry.

  14. Spontaneous soft tissue hematomas.

    PubMed

    Dohan, A; Darnige, L; Sapoval, M; Pellerin, O

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous muscle hematomas are a common and serious complication of anticoagulant treatment. The incidence of this event has increased along with the rise in the number of patients receiving anticoagulants. Radiological management is both diagnostic and interventional. Computed tomography angiography (CTA) is the main tool for the detection of hemorrhage to obtain a positive, topographic diagnosis and determine the severity. Detection of an active leak of contrast material during the arterial or venous phase is an indication for the use of arterial embolization. In addition, the interventional radiological procedure can be planned with CTA. Arterial embolization of the pedicles that are the source of the bleeding is an effective technique. The rate of technical and clinical success is 90% and 86%, respectively. PMID:26066549

  15. Spontaneous Iliac Vein Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Hyung Sub; Lee, Taeseung

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous iliac vein rupture (SIVR) is a rare entity, which usually occurs without a precipitating factor, but can be a life-threatening emergency often requiring an emergency operation. This is a case report of SIVR in a 62-year-old female who presented to the emergency room with left leg swelling. Workup with contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a left leg deep vein thrombosis with May-Thurner syndrome and a hematoma in the pelvic cavity without definite evidence of arterial bleeding. She was managed conservatively without surgical intervention, and also underwent inferior vena cava filter insertion and subsequent anticoagulation therapy for pulmonary thromboembolism. This case shows that SIVR can be successfully managed with close monitoring and conservative management, and anticoagulation may be safely applied despite the patient presenting with venous bleeding. PMID:26217647

  16. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Tweet, Marysia S; Gulati, Rajiv; Hayes, Sharonne N

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is an important etiology of nonatherosclerotic acute coronary syndrome, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Innovations in the catheterization laboratory including optical coherence tomography and intravascular ultrasound have enhanced the ability to visualize intimal disruption and intramural hematoma associated with SCAD. Formerly considered "rare," these technological advances and heightened awareness suggest that SCAD is more prevalent than prior estimates. SCAD is associated with female sex, young age, extreme emotional stress, or extreme exertion, pregnancy, and fibromuscular dysplasia. The clinical characteristics and management strategies of SCAD patients are different than for atherosclerotic heart disease and deserve specific consideration. This review will highlight recent discoveries about SCAD as well as describe current efforts to elucidate remaining gaps in knowledge.

  17. Spontaneous Coronary Artery Dissection.

    PubMed

    Tweet, Marysia S; Gulati, Rajiv; Hayes, Sharonne N

    2016-07-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection is an important etiology of nonatherosclerotic acute coronary syndrome, myocardial infarction, and sudden death. Innovations in the catheterization laboratory including optical coherence tomography and intravascular ultrasound have enhanced the ability to visualize intimal disruption and intramural hematoma associated with SCAD. Formerly considered "rare," these technological advances and heightened awareness suggest that SCAD is more prevalent than prior estimates. SCAD is associated with female sex, young age, extreme emotional stress, or extreme exertion, pregnancy, and fibromuscular dysplasia. The clinical characteristics and management strategies of SCAD patients are different than for atherosclerotic heart disease and deserve specific consideration. This review will highlight recent discoveries about SCAD as well as describe current efforts to elucidate remaining gaps in knowledge. PMID:27216840

  18. Lepton flavor violation without supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Cirigliano, V.; Kurylov, A.; Ramsey-Musolf, M.J.; Vogel, P.

    2004-10-01

    We study the lepton flavor-violating (LFV) processes {mu}{yields}e{gamma}, {mu}{yields}3e, and {mu}{yields}e conversion in nuclei in the left-right symmetric model without supersymmetry and perform the first complete computation of the LFV branching ratios B({mu}{yields}f) to leading nontrivial order in the ratio of left- and right-handed symmetry-breaking scales. To this order, B({mu}{yields}e{gamma}) and B({mu}{yields}e) are governed by the same combination of LFV violating couplings, and their ratio is naturally of order unity. We also find B({mu}{yields}3e)/B({mu}{yields}e){approx}100 under slightly stronger assumptions. Existing limits on the branching ratios already substantially constrain mass splittings and/or mixings in the heavy neutrino sector. When combined with future collider studies and precision electroweak measurements, improved limits on LFV processes will test the viability of low-scale, nonsupersymmetric LFV scenarios.

  19. Parity Violation in Electron Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Beise, Elizabeth

    2007-10-26

    About thirty years ago, electron scattering from nucleons was used [1] to identify, and then measure, the properties of the weak interaction, the only force of nature known to violate the symmetry parity. The basic technique has not fundamentally changed, which is to look for a small asymmetry in count rate from scattering a polarized electron beam from an unpolarized target. Since then, parity-violating (PV) electron scattering has developed substantially, a result of significant improvements in polarized electron beams, accelerator advancements, and developments in cryogenic targets that make it possible to carry out experiments with much higher statistical precision. In the last decade PV experiments have focused on using the complementary electron-quark flavor coupling of the weak interaction to identify and place limits on contributions of strange quark-antiquark pairs to the charge and magnetism of the proton. This observable provides a unique window into the structure of the proton since strange quark contributions can arise only from the sea of quarks and gluons that are responsible for the vast majority of the nucleon's mass. This paper will report on recent results aimed at this goal, along with a brief overview of future directions.

  20. Spontaneous resolution of a traumatic cataract caused by an intralenticular foreign body.

    PubMed

    Rofagha, Soraya; Day, Shelley; Winn, Bryan J; Ou, Judy I; Bhisitkul, Robert B; Chiu, Cynthia S

    2008-06-01

    A 49-year-old man presented with an intralenticular metal foreign body incurred while he was sawing wood. The metal chard had violated the lens capsule and was lodged in the cortex of the lens. It was removed using a lens-preservation technique during open-globe repair. Subsequently, a dense posterior cortical cataract developed, which spontaneously resolved over the ensuing months. The cataract had a cruciate configuration with wave-like disruption of the stromal lamellae. To our knowledge, this is the first case of spontaneous resolution of a cataract after capsule violation by an intralenticular foreign body. The unique appearance of the cataract and its unusual resolution led to a new theory of lens injury by shockwave.