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Sample records for ssc solenoidal detector

  1. High speed data transmission for the SSC solenoidal detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1991-04-01

    High speed data transmission using fiber optics for the Superconducting Super Collider solenoidal detector has been studied. The solenoidal detector system will consist of nine subsystems involving more than a total 10(exp 7) channels of readout electronics. Consequently, a new high performance data acquisition system, incorporating high-speed optical fiber networks, will be required to process this large quantity of data.

  2. Conceptual design report for a superconducting coil suitable for use in the large solenoid detector at the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Fast, R.W.; Grimson, J.H.; Krebs, H.J.; Kephart, R.D.; Theriot, D.; Wands, R.H.

    1989-09-15

    The conceptual design of a large superconducting solenoid suitable for a magnetic detector at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) was done at Fermilab. The magnet will provide a magnetic field of 1.7 T over a volume 8 m in diameter by 16 m long. The particle-physics calorimetry will be inside the field volume and so the coil will be bath cooled and cryostable; the vessels will be stainless steel. Predictability of performance and the ability to safely negotiate all probable failure modes, including a quench, are important items of the design philosophy. Our conceptual design of the magnet and calorimeter has convinced us that this magnet is a reasonable extrapolation of present technology and is therefore feasible. The principal difficulties anticipated are those associated with the very large physical dimensions and stored energy of the magnet. 5 figs.

  3. SSC muon detector group report

    SciTech Connect

    Carlsmith, D.; Groom, D.; Hedin, D.; Kirk, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Reeder, D.; Rosner, J.; Wojcicki, S.

    1986-01-01

    We report here on results from the Muon Detector Group which met to discuss aspects of muon detection for the reference 4..pi.. detector models put forward for evaluation at the Snowmass 1986 Summer Study. We report on: suitable overall detector geometry; muon energy loss mechanisms; muon orbit determination; muon momentum and angle measurement resolution; raw muon rates and trigger concepts; plus we identify SSC physics for which muon detection will play a significant role. We conclude that muon detection at SSC energies and luminosities is feasible and will play an important role in the evolution of physics at the SSC.

  4. Detector simulation for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Price, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Detector simulation activities for SSC detector designs are described. Topics include the extensive work to date using existing programs. In addition, the several efforts to extend the capabilities of today's programs are described, as the practical and experimental use of new computing platforms for simulation. Finally, progress in the field is compared with the recommendations of the first workshop in this series in 1987.

  5. Report of the large solenoid detector group

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G.; Mori, S.; Pondrom, L.G.; Williams, H.H.; Barnett, B.; Barnes, V.; Cashmore, R.; Chiba, M.; DeSalvo, R.; Devlin, T.

    1987-09-01

    This report presents a conceptual design of a large solenoid for studying physics at the SSC. The parameters and nature of the detector have been chosen based on present estimates of what is required to allow the study of heavy quarks, supersymmetry, heavy Higgs particles, WW scattering at large invariant masses, new W and Z bosons, and very large momentum transfer parton-parton scattering. Simply stated, the goal is to obtain optimum detection and identification of electrons, muons, neutrinos, jets, W's and Z's over a large rapidity region. The primary region of interest extends over +-3 units of rapidity, although the calorimetry must extend to +-5.5 units if optimal missing energy resolution is to be obtained. A magnetic field was incorporated because of the importance of identifying the signs of the charges for both electrons and muons and because of the added possibility of identifying tau leptons and secondary vertices. In addition, the existence of a magnetic field may prove useful for studying new physics processes about which we currently have no knowledge. Since hermeticity of the calorimetry is extremely important, the entire central and endcap calorimeters were located inside the solenoid. This does not at the moment seem to produce significant problems (although many issues remain to be resolved) and in fact leads to a very effective muon detector in the central region.

  6. The status of detectors at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanski, R.

    1990-09-01

    The announcement of the location of the SSC at the site near Waxahachie, Texas was made in January, 1989. Since then a great many important steps have been taken toward the start of the new Laboratory. Some 900 people have been brought to the site as the starting nucleus of the staff that will ultimate number about 2200. A design baseline has been completed that includes a conceptual design for the accelerator, and the detectors. Also, the process has begun to determine the configuration of detectors that will be built for the SSC. This process has several steps, and now the first of these has been taken: The detector collaborations have submitted the Expression of Interest to the Laboratory. These were reviewed by Laboratory management and the Physics Advisory Committee in July, 1990 and recommendations were made to the collaborations. Decisions were deferred for all of the detectors. But perhaps the most significant recommendation was the request to reduce the size and cost of the general purpose detectors. The detector collaborations are now reviewing their initial designs to prepare for the Letters of Intent, the next step in the detector planning process. This is clearly a difficult and crucial step in that the redesign of the detectors must be done with minimal reduction in detector quality. It is an interesting time in the development of the new laboratory, and a crucial time for the ultimate physics that will be done at the SSC.

  7. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering closeout report for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Hanlon, J.; Christensen, R.W.; Hayman, G.; Jones, D.C.; Ross, R.; Wilds, W.; Yeamans, S.; Ziock, H.J.

    1995-02-01

    The authors group at Los Alamos National Laboratory was responsible for the mechanical engineering of the silicon tracking system of the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) experiment of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project. The responsibility included the overall design of the system from the mechanical point of view, development and integration of the cooling system, which was required to remove the heat generated by the front-end electronics, assembly of the system to extremely tight tolerances, and verification that the construction and operational stability and alignment tolerances would be met. A detailed description of the concepts they developed and the work they performed can be found in a report titled ``Silicon Subsystem Mechanical Engineering Work for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration`` which they submitted to the SSC Laboratory. In addition to the mechanical engineering work, they also performed activation, background, and shielding studies for the SSC program. Much of the work they performed was potentially useful for other future high energy physics (HEP) projects. This report describes the closeout work that was performed for the Los Alamos SDC project. Four major tasks were identified for completion: (1) integration of the semi-automated assembly station being developed and construction of a precision part to demonstrate solutions to important general assembly problems (the station was designed to build precision silicon tracker subassemblies); (2) build a state-of-the-art TV holography (TVH) system to use for detector assembly stability tests; (3) design, build, and test a water based cooling system for a full silicon shell prototype; and (4) complete and document the activation, background, and shielding studies, which is covered in a separate report.

  8. Evaluation and Compensation of Detector Solenoid Effects in the JLEIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Guohui; Morozov, Vasiliy; Zhang, Yuhong; Pilat, Fulvia C.

    2016-05-01

    The JLEIC detector solenoid has a strong 3 T field in the IR area, and its tails extend over a range of several meters. One of the main effects of the solenoid field is coupling of the horizontal and vertical betatron motions which must be corrected in order to preserve the dynamical stability and beam spot size match at the IP. Additional effects include influence on the orbit and dispersion caused by the angle between the solenoid axis and the beam orbit. Meanwhile it affects ion polarization breaking the figure-8 spin symmetry. Crab dynamics further complicates the picture. All of these effects have to be compensated or accounted for. The proposed correction system is equivalent to the Rotating Frame Method. However, it does not involve physical rotation of elements. It provides local compensation of the solenoid effects independently for each side of the IR. It includes skew quadrupoles, dipole correctors and anti-solenoids to cancel perturbations to the orbit and linear optics. The skew quadrupoles and FFQ together generate an effect equivalent to adjustable rotation angle to do the decoupling task. Details of all of the correction systems are presented.

  9. SSC detector muon sub-system beam tests

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, R.; Errede, S.; Gauthier, A.; Haney, M.; Karliner, I.; Liss, T.; O`Halloran, T.; Sheldon, P.; Simiatis, V.; Thaler, J.; Wiss, J.; Green, D.; Martin, P.; Morfin, J.; Kunori, S.; Skuja, A.; Okusawa, T.; Takahashi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Yoshida, T.; Asano, Y.; Mann, T.; Davisson, R.; Liang, G.; Lubatti, H.; Wilkes, R.; Zhao, T.; Carlsmith, D.

    1993-08-01

    We propose to start a test-beam experiment at Fermilab studying the problems associated with tracking extremely high energy muons through absorbers. We anticipate that in this energy range the observation of the muons will be complicated by associated electromagnetic radiation Monte Carlo simulations of this background need to be tuned by direct observations. These beam tests are essential to determine important design parameters of a SSC muon detector, such as the choice of the tracking, geometry, hardware triggering schemes, the number of measuring stations, the amount of iron between measuring stations, etc. We intend to begin the first phase of this program in November of 1990 utilizing the Tevatron muon beam. We plan to measure the multiplicity, direction, and separation of secondary particles associated with the primary muon track as it emerges from an absorber. The second phase of beam test in 1992 or later will be a full scale test for the final design chosen in our muon subsystem proposal.

  10. Thermal design of the Mu2e detector solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanaraj, N.; Wands, R.; Buehler, M.; Feher, S.; Page, T.; Peterson, T.; Schmitt, R.

    2014-12-18

    The reference design for a superconducting detector solenoid (DS) for the Mu2e experiment has been completed. In this study, the main functions of the DS are to provide a graded field in the region of the stopping target, which ranges from 2 to 1 T and a uniform precision magnetic field of 1 T in a volume large enough to house a tracker downstream of the stopping target. The inner diameter of the magnet cryostat is 1.9 m and the length is 10.9 m. The gradient section of the magnet is about 4 m long and the spectrometer section with a uniform magnetic field is about 6 m long. The inner cryostat wall supports the stopping target, tracker, calorimeter and other equipment installed in the DS. This warm bore volume is under vacuum during operation. It is sealed on one end by the muon beam stop, while it is open on the other end where it interfaces with the Transport Solenoid. The operating temperature of the magnetic coil is 4.7 K and is indirectly cooled with helium flowing in a thermosiphon cooling scheme. This paper describes the thermal design of the solenoid, including the design aspects of the thermosiphon for the coil cooling, forced flow cooling of the thermal shields with 2 phase LN2 (Liquid Nitrogen) and the transient studies of the cool down of the cold mass as well.

  11. Thermal design of the Mu2e detector solenoid

    DOE PAGES

    Dhanaraj, N.; Wands, R.; Buehler, M.; ...

    2014-12-18

    The reference design for a superconducting detector solenoid (DS) for the Mu2e experiment has been completed. In this study, the main functions of the DS are to provide a graded field in the region of the stopping target, which ranges from 2 to 1 T and a uniform precision magnetic field of 1 T in a volume large enough to house a tracker downstream of the stopping target. The inner diameter of the magnet cryostat is 1.9 m and the length is 10.9 m. The gradient section of the magnet is about 4 m long and the spectrometer section withmore » a uniform magnetic field is about 6 m long. The inner cryostat wall supports the stopping target, tracker, calorimeter and other equipment installed in the DS. This warm bore volume is under vacuum during operation. It is sealed on one end by the muon beam stop, while it is open on the other end where it interfaces with the Transport Solenoid. The operating temperature of the magnetic coil is 4.7 K and is indirectly cooled with helium flowing in a thermosiphon cooling scheme. This paper describes the thermal design of the solenoid, including the design aspects of the thermosiphon for the coil cooling, forced flow cooling of the thermal shields with 2 phase LN2 (Liquid Nitrogen) and the transient studies of the cool down of the cold mass as well.« less

  12. Rad-hard electronics study for SSC detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ekenberg, T.; Dawson, J.; Stevens, A.; Haberichter, W.

    1991-01-01

    The radiation environment in a SSC detector operating at a luminosity of 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} will put stringent requirements on radiation hardness of the electronics. Over the expected 10 year life-time of a large detector, ionizing radiation doses of up to 20 MRad and neutron fluences of 10{sup 16} neutrons/cm{sup 2} are projected. At a luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} even higher total doses are expected. the effect of this environment have been simulated by exposing CMOS/bulk and CMOS/SOS devices from monolithic processes to neutrons and ionizing radiation. leakage currents, noise variations, and DC characteristics have been measured before and after exposure in order to evaluate the effects of the irradiations. As expected the device characteristics remained virtually unchanged by neutron irradiation, while ionizing radiation caused moderate degradation of performance. 5 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Silicon subsystem mechanical engineering work for the solenoidal detector collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.O.; Barney, M.; Byrd, D.; Christensen, R.W.; Dransfield, G.; Elder, M.; Gamble, M.; Crastataro, C.; Hanlon, J.; Jones, D.C.

    1995-02-01

    The silicon tracking system (STS) for the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC) represented an order of magnitude increase in size over any silicon system that had been previously built or even planned. In order to meet its performance requirements, it could not simply be a linear scaling of earlier systems, but instead required completely new concepts. The small size of the early systems made it possible to simply move the support hardware and services largely outside the active volume of the system. For a system five meters long, that simply is not an option. The design of the STS for the SDC experiment was the result of numerous compromises between the capabilities required to do the physics and the limitations imposed by cost, material properties, and silicon strip detector characteristics. From the point of view of the physics, the silicon system should start as close to the interaction point as possible. In addition, the detectors should measure the position of particles passing through them with no errors, and should not deflect or interact with the particles in any way. However, cost, radiation damage, and other factors limiting detector performance dictated, other, more realistic values. Radiation damage limited the inner radius of the silicon detectors to about 9 cm, whereas cost limited the outer radius of the detectors to about 50 cm. Cost also limits the half length of the system to about 250 cm. To control the effects of radiation damage on the detectors required operating the system at a temperature of 0{degrees}C or below, and maintaining that temperature throughout life of the system. To summarize, the physics and properties of the silicon strip detectors requires that the detectors be operated at or below 0{degrees}C, be positioned very accurately during assembly and remain positionally stable throughout their operation, and that all materials used be radiation hard and have a large thickness for one radiation length.

  14. Effects of superposition of detector solenoid and FFS quadrupole fields in SLC and correction methods

    SciTech Connect

    Murray, J.J.

    1983-07-25

    For the so-called superconducting FFS option with L* = 2.2 m, the MK2 solenoid does not overlap Q1, the FFS quad nearest the IP. For the permanent magnet option with L* = 0.75 m, the MK2 solenoid would overlap both Q1 and Q2. In either case an 8 m long solenoid, contemplated for the SLD detector, would overlap both Q1 and Q2. The solenoid field cannot be shielded so in an overlap region one will have a superposition of solenoid an quadrupole fields. Recently, the question was raised, What are the optical consequences when the solenoid and quad fields are superimposed. The question had not been considered before, but rough estimates suggested immediately that there might indeed be ugly consequences in terms of an enlargement of spot size at the IP. The purpose of this note is to answer the question quantitatively and to consider methods of correction of the ugly consequences.

  15. A full-acceptance detector for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Bjorken, J.D.

    1991-11-01

    In this paper, I will describe very briefly the cartoon of a full-acceptance detector as presented in the expression of interest, along with some of the basic features and technical difficulties. I will describe some theoretical-physics spinoffs emergent from the preparation of the EoI, which bear on general issues relevant to hadron spectroscopy. I review very briefly the capability of the detector for spectroscopy per se. The final section is devoted to concluding remarks.

  16. The UCLA Phi Factory detector, the integration of superconducting compensation solenoids and the final focus interaction region quadrupoles

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A. ); Cline, D.B. . Dept. of Physics)

    1992-06-01

    The proposed Phi Factory for the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) is a small 510 MeV electron-positron colliding beam storage ring with high luminosity (greater than 10{sup 32} CM{sup {minus}2} S{sup {minus}1}). In order to do high quality Phi physics, a particle detector system with a large solid angle (preferably greater than 98 percent ) is required. Particle detection and analysis will be done within a 0.5 tesla solenoidal magnetic field. The solenoidal field within the detector causes coupling between beam oscillations in the horizontal and vertical directions. Therefore, compensation solenoids are required to keep the circulating particle beams from seeing the effects of the field from the main detector solenoid. Since high luminosity and a large solid angle are required, the detectors and a pair of compensation solenoids must be integrated with the final focus quadrupoles within the detector straight section. This report describes the design of two tapered, 0.5 tesla, superconducting compensation solenoids which must go around six rare earth permanent final focus quadrupoles or six superconducting quadrupoles on either side of the beam collision point. A cryogenic cooling system for these two solenoids, which will be coupled with the cooling system for the primary detector solenoid, is also described.

  17. Conceptual design of a 2 tesla superconducting solenoid for the Fermilab D{O} detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Brzezniak, J.; Fast, R.W.; Krempetz, K.

    1994-05-01

    This paper presents a conceptual design of a superconducting solenoid to be part of a proposed upgrade for the D0 detector. This detector was completed in 1992, and has been taking data since then. The Fermilab Tevatron had scheduled a series of luminosity enhancements prior to the startup of this detector. In response to this accelerator upgrade, efforts have been underway to design upgrades for D0 to take advantage of the new luminosity, and improvements in detector technology. This magnet is conceived as part of the new central tracking system for D0, providing a radiation-hard high-precision magnetic tracking system with excellent electron identification.

  18. Development of aluminum-stabilized superconducting cables for the Mu2e detector solenoid

    DOE PAGES

    Lombardo, Vito; Buehler, M.; Lamm, M.; ...

    2016-06-01

    Here, the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is designed to measure the rare process of direct muon-to-electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. The experiment comprises a system of three superconducting solenoids, which focus secondary muons from the production target and transport them to an aluminum stopping target, while minimizing the associated background. The Detector Solenoid (DS) is the last magnet in the transport line and its main functions are to provide a graded field in the region of the stopping target as well as a precision magnetic field in a volume large enough to house the tracker downstream ofmore » the stopping target. The Detector Solenoid coils are designed to be wound using NbTi Rutherford cables conformed in high purity aluminum for stabilization and then cold-worked for strength. Two types of Al-stabilized conductor are required to build the DS coils, one for the gradient section and one for the spectrometer section of the solenoid. The dimensions are optimized to generate the required field profile when the same current is transported in both conductors. The conductors contain NbTi Rutherford cables with 12 (DS1) and 8 (DS2) strands respectively and are manufactured by two different vendors. This paper describes the results of the manufacturing of production lengths of the Al-stabilized cables needed to build the Mu2e Detector Solenoid as well as the testing campaigns and main results. The main cable properties and results of electrical and mechanical tests are summarized and discussed for each stage of the cable development process. Results are compared to design values to show how the production cables satisfy all the design criteria starting from the NbTi wires to the Al-stabilized cables.« less

  19. Development of aluminum-stabilized superconducting cables for the Mu2e detector solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Vito; Buehler, M.; Lamm, M.; Page, T.; Curreli, S.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.

    2016-06-01

    Here, the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is designed to measure the rare process of direct muon-to-electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. The experiment comprises a system of three superconducting solenoids, which focus secondary muons from the production target and transport them to an aluminum stopping target, while minimizing the associated background. The Detector Solenoid (DS) is the last magnet in the transport line and its main functions are to provide a graded field in the region of the stopping target as well as a precision magnetic field in a volume large enough to house the tracker downstream of the stopping target. The Detector Solenoid coils are designed to be wound using NbTi Rutherford cables conformed in high purity aluminum for stabilization and then cold-worked for strength. Two types of Al-stabilized conductor are required to build the DS coils, one for the gradient section and one for the spectrometer section of the solenoid. The dimensions are optimized to generate the required field profile when the same current is transported in both conductors. The conductors contain NbTi Rutherford cables with 12 (DS1) and 8 (DS2) strands respectively and are manufactured by two different vendors. This paper describes the results of the manufacturing of production lengths of the Al-stabilized cables needed to build the Mu2e Detector Solenoid as well as the testing campaigns and main results. The main cable properties and results of electrical and mechanical tests are summarized and discussed for each stage of the cable development process. Results are compared to design values to show how the production cables satisfy all the design criteria starting from the NbTi wires to the Al-stabilized cables.

  20. Development of aluminum-stabilized superconducting cables for the Mu2e detector solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardo, Vito; Buehler, M.; Lamm, M.; Page, T.; Curreli, S.; Fabbricatore, P.; Musenich, R.

    2016-06-01

    Here, the Mu2e experiment at Fermilab is designed to measure the rare process of direct muon-to-electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. The experiment comprises a system of three superconducting solenoids, which focus secondary muons from the production target and transport them to an aluminum stopping target, while minimizing the associated background. The Detector Solenoid (DS) is the last magnet in the transport line and its main functions are to provide a graded field in the region of the stopping target as well as a precision magnetic field in a volume large enough to house the tracker downstream of the stopping target. The Detector Solenoid coils are designed to be wound using NbTi Rutherford cables conformed in high purity aluminum for stabilization and then cold-worked for strength. Two types of Al-stabilized conductor are required to build the DS coils, one for the gradient section and one for the spectrometer section of the solenoid. The dimensions are optimized to generate the required field profile when the same current is transported in both conductors. The conductors contain NbTi Rutherford cables with 12 (DS1) and 8 (DS2) strands respectively and are manufactured by two different vendors. This paper describes the results of the manufacturing of production lengths of the Al-stabilized cables needed to build the Mu2e Detector Solenoid as well as the testing campaigns and main results. The main cable properties and results of electrical and mechanical tests are summarized and discussed for each stage of the cable development process. Results are compared to design values to show how the production cables satisfy all the design criteria starting from the NbTi wires to the Al-stabilized cables.

  1. Compensation of Detector Solenoid Effects on the Beam Size in Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Nosochkov, Y.

    2004-08-05

    In this paper, the authors discuss the optics effects of the realistic detector solenoid field on beam size at the Interaction Point (IP) of a future Linear Collider and their compensation. It is shown that most of the adverse effects on the IP beam size arise only from the part of the solenoid field which overlaps and extends beyond the final focusing quadrupoles. It is demonstrated that the most efficient and local compensation can be achieved using weak antisolenoids near the IP, while a correction scheme which employs only skew quadrupoles is less efficient, and compensation with strong antisolenoids is not appropriate. One of the advantages of the proposed antisolenoid scheme is that this compensation works well over a large range of the beam energy

  2. Evaluation and Compensation of Detector Solenoid Effects on Disrupted Beam in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect

    Toprek, Dragan; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

    2008-12-18

    This paper presents calculations of detector solenoid effects on disrupted primary beam in the ILC 14 mrad extraction line. Particle tracking simulations are performed for evaluation of primary beam loss along the line as well as of beam distribution and polarization at Compton Interaction Point. The calculations are done both without and with solenoid compensation. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

  3. Simulator for the Parity-Violating Deep Inelastic Scattering experiment in the Solenoidal Large Intensity Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jack; Hall A SoLID Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Solenoid Large Intensity Detector (SoLID) particle detector is the main detector that will be used for high energy particle experiments in Hall A that will be used with the 12 GeV electron beam at the Jefferson Lab. SoLID geometries were writen to be implemented in Geant4 using openGL as the visualization tool. This will allow us to test how the calorimeter, a specific yet integral part of the SoLID detector, detects the particles that result from electron beams colliding with targets. The goal is to simulate the approved experiments for the SoLID detector, starting with the Parity-Violating Deep Inelastic Scattering (PVDIS) experiment. This will provide critical information regarding the effectiveness of the calorimeter's design for such experiments. The expectation is that a Shashlik calorimeter will prove effective for the experiments approved for the SoLID detector. The ideal number of layers, or types of material for said layers, is an aspect of the calorimeter that will require testing through the simulations.The geometry files allow an easily-packaged program that can be shared amongst any collaborators interested in the SoLID experiments. NSF Grant No. 714001.

  4. CRYOGENIC SYSTEM FOR BEPCII SRF CAVITY, IR QUADRUPOLE AND DETECTOR SOLENOID MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    JIA,J.X.; WANG.L.

    2004-05-11

    Beijing Electron-Positron Collider Upgrade (BEPCII) requires three types of superconducting facilities, including one pair of SRF cavities, one pair of interaction region quadrupole magnets, and one detector solenoid magnet. The cryo-plant for BEPCII has a total cooling capacity of 1kW at 4.5K, which is composed of two separate helium refrigerators of 500W each. Two refrigerators share the same gas storage and recovery system. The engineering design for the cryogenic systems, including power leads, control dewars, subcooler, cryogenic valve boxes, cryogenic transfer-lines and cryogenic controls, is completed. The production of its subsystem is under way. This paper summarizes the progress in cryogenics of the BEPCII project.

  5. Surface-scanning coil detectors for magnetoelastic biosensors: A comparison of planar-spiral and solenoid coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yating; Horikawa, Shin; Wikle, Howard C.; Wang, Zhenyu; Chin, Bryan A.

    2013-10-01

    This research introduces a planar spiral coil as a surface-scanning detector for magnetoelastic biosensors, which have been used to detect bacteria directly on food surfaces. The planar coil was compared with the previously investigated solenoid coil, in terms of the magnetic flux change, signal amplitude, and detection distance. Both theoretical calculations and experimental results demonstrated that the planar coil detector yields a dramatically improved signal amplitude and greater detection distance. In addition, simultaneous measurement of multiple biosensors on surfaces was demonstrated. This planar coil is therefore anticipated to facilitate the detection of bacteria on surfaces using magnetoelastic biosensors.

  6. Design and testing of the 1.5 T superconducting solenoid for the BABAR detector at PEP-II in SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, T G; Shen, S; Fabbricatore, P; Farinon, S; Musenich, R; Priano, C; Bell, R A; Brendt, M; Burgess, W; Craddock, W; Keller, L; Dormicchi, O; Moreschi, P; Penco, R; Valente, P; Valle, N

    2001-01-26

    The 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid is part of the BABAR Detector located in the PEP-II B-Factory machine at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The solenoid has a 2.8 m bore and is 3.7 m long. The two layer solenoid is wound with an aluminum stabilized conductor which is graded axially to produce a {+-} 3% field uniformity in the tracking region. The 24 month fabrication, 3 month installation and 1 month commissioning of the solenoid were completed on time and budget. This paper summarizes the culmination of a 3 year design, fabrication and testing program of the BABAR superconducting solenoid. The work was completed by an international collaboration between Ansaldo, INFN, LLNL, and SLAC. Critical current measurements of the superconducting strand, cable and conductor, cool-down, operation with the thermo-siphon cooling, fast and slow discharges, and magnetic forces are discussed in detail.

  7. Novel Method of Compensation of the Effects of Detector Solenoid on the Vertical Beam Orbit in a Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B

    2005-02-25

    This paper presents a method for compensating the vertical orbit change through the Interaction Region (IR) that arises when the beam enters the Linear Collider detector solenoid at a crossing angle. Such compensation is required because any deviation of the vertical orbit causes degradation of the beam size due to synchrotron radiation, and also because the nonzero total vertical angle causes rotation of the polarization vector of the bunch. Compensation may be necessary to preserve the luminosity or to guarantee knowledge of the polarization at the Interaction Point (IP). The most effective compensation is done locally with a special dipole coil arrangement incorporated into the detector (Detector Integrated Dipole). The compensation is effective for both e{sup +}e{sup -} and e{sup -}e{sup -} beams, and the technique is compatible with beam size compensation either by the standard method, using skew quadrupoles, or by a more effective method using weak antisolenoids.

  8. ``24/36/48`` Cathode Strip Chamber layout for SSC GEM Detector muon subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Belser, F.C.; Clements, J.W.; Horvath, J.A.

    1993-12-15

    The ``48/48/48`` {phi}-segmentation design for the Cathode Strip Chambers in the GEM Detector produces a number of coverage ``gaps`` in {phi} and {theta}. A revised ``24/36/48`` {phi}-segmentation layout provides increased geometric coverage and a significant reduction in the number of chambers in the detector. This will increase physics performance while reducing the labor costs associated with building and installing chambers in the GEM Detector. This paper documents the physical layout of the proposed change to the baseline chamber arrangement.

  9. Tests of the radiation hardness of VLSI Integrated Circuits and Silicon Strip Detectors for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) under neutron, proton, and gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, H.J.; Milner, C.; Sommer, W.F. ); Carteglia, N.; DeWitt, J.; Dorfan, D.; Hubbard, B.; Leslie, J.; O'Shaughnessy, K.F.; Pitzl, D.; Rowe, W.A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E. . Inst. for Particle Physics); Ellison, J.A. ); Ferguson, P. ); Giubellino

    1990-01-01

    As part of a program to develop a silicon strip central tracking detector system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) we are studying the effects of radiation damage in silicon detectors and their associated front-end readout electronics. We report on the results of neutron and proton irradiations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and {gamma}-ray irradiations at UC Santa Cruz (UCSC). Individual components on single-sided AC-coupled silicon strip detectors and on test structures were tested. Circuits fabricated in a radiation hard CMOS process and individual transistors fabricated using dielectric isolation bipolar technology were also studied. Results indicate that a silicon strip tracking detector system should have a lifetime of at least one decade at the SSC. 17 refs., 17 figs.

  10. Compensation of the Effects of Detector Solenoid on the Vertical Beam Orbit in NLC(LCC-0143)

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, B

    2004-06-07

    In this note we consider compensation of the vertical angle at the IP that arises when the NLC beam enters the detector solenoid. While this angle is antisymmetric for e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions and does not affect luminosity, compensating this angle is desirable to guarantee knowledge of polarization at the IP. For the e{sup -}e{sup -} case compensation is necessary also from the luminosity point of view. We show in this note that the most effective compensation can be done locally, with a special dipole coil arrangement incorporated into the detector. It is shown that compensation can be achieved for both e{sup +}e{sup -} and e{sup -}e{sup -} case and that this scheme is compatible with beam size compensation by both the standard method, using skew quadrupoles, and by means of more advantageous method using weak antisolenoids.

  11. A fast calorimeter simulation for SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) detector design

    SciTech Connect

    Newman-Holmes, C.; Freeman, J.

    1987-12-01

    We have developed a fast and easily varied simulation of a ''generic'' 4..pi.. calorimeter. The program enables one to study the gross features of detector response for various physics processes. The simulation program is described and some examples of its use are presented. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  12. [SSC subsystem proposal for pre-shower and Shower Maximum Detectors]. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The basic purpose of this project was to devise low-cost photodetectors and arrays with large dynamic range capable of high-rate, radiation-resistant operation in multi-TeV hadron colliders. This project`s particular application was changed from the Superconducting Super Collider`s SDC detector to the Large Hadron Collider`s CMS after the Superconducting Super Collider project was cancelled. This report describes development and testing of photodetectors, and contains both a table summarizing the properties of different photodetectors and a paper on the performance of an avalanche photodiode photomultiplier tube tested at the CERN PS.

  13. An electro-optical imaging approach to the prompt signal processing problem of mega-channel SSC detector arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, M.; Ables, E.; Bionta, R.; Haigh, R.; Hugenberg, K.; Kalibjian, R.; McConaghy, C.; Milton, D.; Rotter, M.; Schulte, H.

    1990-12-01

    The physics demands of high luminosity at the SSC and the sometimes subtle measurements required to elucidate new physics will undoubtedly tax existing instrumentation. As is the case with most experimental fields, new physics follows from better measurement concepts and technologies. We expect this to be the case with the SSC as well. In what follows, we offer a glimpse of what may be possible using some of the recent results from the emerging technologies in the field of electro-optics. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Report of the intermediate-)ital p)/sub perpendicular/ detector group: A beauty spectrometer for the SSC (superconducting super collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, K.J.; Buchanan, C.D.; Morrison, R.J.; McHugh, S.W.; Witherell, M.S.; Atac, M.; Cox, B.; Purohit, M.V.; Stefanski, R.; Wagoner, D.E.

    1987-07-01

    A ''Beauty Spectrometer'' has been designed for studies of B physics at the SSC. The ultimate goal is a definitive measurement of CP violation in the B system. The spectrometer consists of two stages and occupies one side of an intermediate-luminosity interaction region. An upstream, or intermediate, stage extends from the interaction point to 14 m and covers the angular region from 57 mrad (3.3 degree) to 350 mrad (20 degree). The forward stage extends to 77 m and to angles down to 5.7 mrad. The design includes silicon microstrip detectors, conventional tracking, momentum analysis, and hadron and lepton identification. While no fundamental problems have been found, the detector must deal with unprecedented particles fluxes, trigger rates, and data rates. 11 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Solenoidal Magnet Installation

    SciTech Connect

    Stredde, H.; Lee, A.; /Fermilab

    1998-01-21

    The major modification to the D0 detector for the next physics collider run is the upgrade of the central tracking system. The first component to be installed will be the solenoid magnet, with the central pre-shower attached. This engineering note is directed to the installation of the solenoid magnet and the equipment needed to accomplish this task. As part of the installation process, the main detector must undergo a change in position of one of its major components, namely the South End Calorimeter (SEC). This calorimeter must be completely decoupled from the main detector, i.e. all cabling and cryo lines removed. The equipment used for installing all calorimeters (bridge and support structures) will be put into position and the calorimeter (SEC) will be pulled off of the detector center beam and parked on the south sidewalk of the D0 Assembly Hall. The necessary cryo lines will re-connected in order to keep the cryostat cold. This calorimeter will remain here during the greater portion of the upgrade reconfiguration schedule. When this task is finished, the old central tracking system and its mounts will be removed from the bore of the Central Calorimeter (CC). The main detector is now ready to receive the new tracking system, starting with the solenoid magnet.

  16. Thermal analysis of the cold mass of the 2T solenoid for the PANDA detector at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolando, G.; ten Kate, H. H. J.; Dudarev, A.; Pais Da Silva, H.; Vodopyanov, A.; Schmitt, L.

    2015-12-01

    The superconducting solenoid of the PANDA experiment at the Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) in Darmstadt (Germany) is designed to provide a magnetic field of 2 T over a length of about 4 m in a bore of 1.9 m. To allow a warm target feed pipe oriented transversely to the solenoid axis and penetrating through the cryostat and solenoid cold mass, the magnet is split into 3 inter-connected coils fitted in a common support cylinder. During normal operation, cooling of the cold mass to the working temperature of 4.5 K will be achieved through the circulation by natural convection of two-phase helium in cooling pipes attached to the Al-alloy support cylinder. Pure aluminium strips acting as heat drains and glued to the inner surface of the three coils and thermally bonded to the cooling pipes allow minimizing the temperature gradient across the 6-layers coils. In this paper the thermal design of the cold mass during normal operation and current ramps up and down is validated using an analytical approximation and numerical simulation.

  17. Superconducting solenoids for the MICE channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Barr, G.; Baynham, D.E.; Rockford, J.H.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinin, S.; Palmer, R.B.; Rey, J.M.

    2003-05-01

    This report describes the channel of superconductingsolenoids for the proposed international Muon Ionization CoolingExperiment (MICE). MICE consists of two cells of a SFOFO cooling channelthat is similar to that studied in the level 2 study of a neutrinofactory[1]. MICE also consists of two detector solenoids at either end ofthe cooling channel section. The superconducting solenoids for MICEperform three functions. The coupling solenoids, which are largesolenoids around 201.25 MHz RF cavities, couple the muon beam between thefocusing sections as it passes along the cooling channel. The focusingsolenoids are around the liquid hydrogen absorber that reduces themomentum of the muons in all directions. These solenoids generate agradient field along the axis as they reduce the beta of the muon beambefore it enters the absorber. Each detector solenoid system consists offive coils that match the muon beam coming to or from an absorber to a4.0 T uniform solenoidal field section that that contains the particledetectors at the ends of the experiment. There are detector solenoids atthe beginning and at the end of the experiment. This report describes theparameters of the eighteen superconducting coils that make up the MICEmagnetic channel.

  18. A data acquisition architecture for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Partridge, R.

    1990-01-01

    An SSC data acquisition architecture applicable to high-p{sub T} detectors is described. The architecture is based upon a small set of design principles that were chosen to simplify communication between data acquisition elements while providing the required level of flexibility and performance. The architecture features an integrated system for data collection, event building, and communication with a large processing farm. The interface to the front end electronics system is also discussed. A set of design parameters is given for a data acquisition system that should meet the needs of high-p{sub T} detectors at the SSC.

  19. A data acquisition architecture for the SSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partridge, Richard

    1990-08-01

    An SSC data acquisition architecture applicable to high-pT detectors is described. The architecture is based upon a small set of design principles that were chosen to simplify communication between data acquisition elements while providing the required level of flexibility and performance. The architecture features an integrated system for data collection, event building, and communication with a large processing farm. The interface to the front end electronics system is also discussed. A set of design parameters is given for a data acquisition system that should meet the needs of high-pT detectors at the SSC.

  20. Progress on the MICE Tracker Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.; Lau, W.; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2006-06-10

    This report describes the 400 mm warm bore tracker solenoid for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). The 2.923 m long tracker solenoid module includes the radiation shutter between the end absorber focus coil modules and the tracker as well as the 2.735 m long magnet cryostat vacuum vessel. The 2.554 m long tracker solenoid cold mass consists of two sections, a three-coil spectrometer magnet and a two-coil matching section that matches the uniform field 4 T spectrometer solenoid into the MICE cooling channel. The two tracker magnets are used to provide a uniform magnetic field for the fiber detectors that are used to measure the muon beam emittance at the two ends of the cooling channel. This paper describes the design for the tracker magnet coils and the 4.2 K cryogenic coolers that are used to cool the superconducting magnet. Interfaces between the magnet and the detectors are discussed.

  1. D0 Solenoid Commissioning September 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1998-10-12

    D-Zero installed a new 2 Tesla superconducting solenoid magnet into the central tracking region of the D-Zero detector. This report documents the cryogenic performance of the superconducting solenoid during its first cryogenic operation at Fermilab. By necessity, the liquid helium refrigerator was also operated. This was the second time the refrigerator plant has been operated. The refrigerator's performance is also documented herein.

  2. The superconducting solenoid magnets for MICE

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.

    2002-12-22

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is a channel of superconducting solenoid magnets. The magnets in MICE are around the RF cavities, absorbers (liquid or solid) and the primary particle detectors [1], [2]. The MICE superconducting solenoid system consists of eighteen coils that are grouped in three types of magnet assemblies. The cooling channel consists of two complete cell of an SFOFO cooling channel. Each cell consists of a focusing coil pair around an absorber and a coupling coil around a RF cavity that re-accelerates the muons to their original momentum. At the ends of the experiment are uniform field solenoids for the particle detectors and a set of matching coils used to match the muon beam to the cooling cells. Three absorbers are used instead of two in order to shield the detectors from dark currents generated by the RF cavities at high operating acceleration gradients.

  3. SSC/BCD data acquisition system proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Barsotti, E.; Bowden, M.; Swoboda, C.

    1989-04-01

    The proposed new data acquisition system architecture takes event fragments off a detector over fiber optics and to a parallel event building switch. The parallel event building switch concept, taken from the telephone communications industry, along with expected technology improvements in fiber-optic data transmission speeds over the next few years, should allow data acquisition system rates to increase dramatically and exceed those rates needed for the SSC. This report briefly describes the switch architecture and fiber optics for a SSC data acquisition system.

  4. Solenoid-Simulation Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, R. A.

    1986-01-01

    Electrical properties of solenoids imitated for tests of control circuits. Simulation circuit imitates voltage and current responses of two engine-controlling solenoids. Used in tests of programs of digital engine-control circuits, also provides electronic interface with circuits imitating electrical properties of pressure sensors and linear variable-differential transformers. Produces voltages, currents, delays, and discrete turnon and turnoff signals representing operation of solenoid in engine-control relay. Many such circuits used simulating overall engine circuitry.

  5. Fixed target facility at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Loken, S.C.; Morfin, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    The question of whether a facility for fixed target physics should be provided at the SSC must be answered before the final technical design of the SSC can be completed, particularly if the eventual form of extraction would influence the magnet design. To this end, an enthusiastic group of experimentalists, theoreticians and accelerator specialists have studied this point. The accelerator physics issues were addressed by a group led by E. Colton whose report is contained in these proceedings. The physics addressable by fixed target was considered by many of the Physics area working groups and in particular by the Structure Function Group. This report is the summary of the working group which considered various SSC fixed target experiments and determined which types of beams and detectors would be required. 13 references, 5 figures.

  6. SSC Safety Review Document

    SciTech Connect

    Toohig, T.E.

    1988-11-01

    The safety strategy of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Central Design Group (CDG) is to mitigate potential hazards to personnel, as far as possible, through appropriate measures in the design and engineering of the facility. The Safety Review Document identifies, on the basis of the Conceptual Design Report (CDR) and related studies, potential hazards inherent in the SSC project independent of its site. Mitigative measures in the design of facilities and in the structuring of laboratory operations are described for each of the hazards identified.

  7. Solenoid Compensation for the SuperB Interaction Region

    SciTech Connect

    Bertsche, Kirk; Sullivan, Michael K.; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    We present an approach for compensating adverse effects of the detector solenoid in the SuperB Interaction Region (IR). We place compensating solenoids around the IR quadrupole magnets to reduce the magnetic fields nearly to zero. This allows more operational headroom for superconducting IR magnets and avoids saturation of ferric IR magnets. We place stronger compensating solenoids between IR magnets to reverse the magnetic field direction. This allows adjusting the total integrated solenoid field to zero, which eliminates coordinate plane rotation and reduces vertical beam displacements in the IR.

  8. Tolerance Studies of the Mu2e Solenoid System

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Ambrosio, G.; Buehler, M.; Coleman, R.; Evbota, D.; Feher, S.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Lamm, M.; Miller, J.; Moretti, G.; Ostojic, R.; Page, T.; Popp, J.; Tartaglia, M.

    2014-01-01

    The muon-to-electron conversion experiment at Fermilab is designed to explore charged lepton flavor violation. It is composed of three large superconducting solenoids, namely, the production solenoid, the transport solenoid, and the detector solenoid. Each subsystem has a set of field requirements. Tolerance sensitivity studies of the magnet system were performed with the objective of demonstrating that the present magnet design meets all the field requirements. Systematic and random errors were considered on the position and alignment of the coils. The study helps to identify the critical sources of errors and which are translated to coil manufacturing and mechanical support tolerances.

  9. SSC design update

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M.J.

    1992-11-01

    Recent developments in the design and construction of the SSC are presented. Topics include status of the 20 TeV Collider rings, including interaction regions, utility regions, and main arcs, plus some remarks on the injector accelerators. Remaining issues facing the design of the colliding beams synchrotron and its injectors are discussed.

  10. Hadron colliders (SSC/LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chao, A.W.; Palmer, R.B. |; Evans, L.; Gareyte, J.; Siemann, R.H.

    1992-12-31

    The nominal SSC and LHC designs should operate conservatively at luminosities up to 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}. This luminosity is dictated by the event rates that can be handled by the detectors. However, this limit is event dependent (e.g. it does not take much of a detector to detect the event pp {yields} elephant; all one needs is extremely high luminosity). As such, it is useful to explore the possibility of going beyond the 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} level. Such exploration will also improve the accelerator physics understanding of pp collider designs. If the detector limitations are removed, the first accelerator limits occur when the luminosity is at the level of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}. These accelerator limits will first be reviewed. The authors will then continue on to explore even higher luminosity as the ultimate limit of pp colliders. Accelerator technologies needed to achieve this ultimate luminosity as well as the R and D needed to reach it are discussed.

  11. Cost estimate of initial SSC experimental equipment

    SciTech Connect

    1986-06-01

    The cost of the initial detector complement at recently constructed colliding beam facilities (or at those under construction) has been a significant fraction of the cost of the accelerator complex. Because of the complexity of large modern-day detectors, the time-scale for their design and construction is comparable to the time-scale needed for accelerator design and construction. For these reasons it is appropriate to estimate the cost of the anticipated detector complement in parallel with the cost estimates of the collider itself. The fundamental difficulty with this procedure is that, whereas a firm conceptual design of the collider does exist, comparable information is unavailable for the detectors. Traditionally, these have been built by the high energy physics user community according to their perception of the key scientific problems that need to be addressed. The role of the accelerator laboratory in that process has involved technical and managerial coordination and the allocation of running time and local facilities among the proposed experiments. It seems proper that the basic spirit of experimentation reflecting the scientific judgment of the community should be preserved at the SSC. Furthermore, the formal process of initiation of detector proposals can only start once the SSC has been approved as a construction project and a formal laboratory administration put in place. Thus an ad hoc mechanism had to be created to estimate the range of potential detector needs, potential detector costs, and associated computing equipment.

  12. A scalable parallel open architecture data acquisition system for low to high rate experiments, test beams and all SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Barsotti, E.; Booth, A.; Bowden, M.; Swoboda, C. ); Lockyer, N.; VanBerg, R. )

    1989-12-01

    A new era of high-energy physics research is beginning requiring accelerators with much higher luminosities and interaction rates in order to discover new elementary particles. As a consequences, both orders of magnitude higher data rates from the detector and online processing power, well beyond the capabilities of current high energy physics data acquisition systems, are required. This paper describes a new data acquisition system architecture which draws heavily from the communications industry, is totally parallel (i.e., without any bottlenecks), is capable of data rates of hundreds of GigaBytes per second from the detector and into an array of online processors (i.e., processor farm), and uses an open systems architecture to guarantee compatibility with future commercially available online processor farms. The main features of the system architecture are standard interface ICs to detector subsystems wherever possible, fiber optic digital data transmission from the near-detector electronics, a self-routing parallel event builder, and the use of industry-supported and high-level language programmable processors in the proposed BCD system for both triggers and online filters. A brief status report of an ongoing project at Fermilab to build the self-routing parallel event builder will also be given in the paper. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Solenoid Magnet System for the Fermilab Mu2e Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lamm, M. J.; Andreev, N.; Ambrosio, G.; Brandt, J.; Coleman, R.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V. V.; Lopes, M.; Miller, J.; Nicol, T.; Ostojic, R.; Page, T.; Peterson, T.; Popp, J.; Pronskikh, V.; Tang, Z.; Tartaglia, M.; Wake, M.; Wands, R.; Yamada, R.

    2011-12-14

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment seeks to measure the rare process of direct muon to electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. Key to the design of the experiment is a system of three superconducting solenoids; a muon production solenoid (PS) which is a 1.8 m aperture axially graded solenoid with a peak field of 5 T used to focus secondary pions and muons from a production target located in the solenoid aperture; an 'S shaped' transport solenoid (TS) which selects and transports the subsequent muons towards a stopping target; a detector solenoid (DS) which is an axially graded solenoid at the upstream end to focus transported muons to a stopping target, and a spectrometer solenoid at the downstream end to accurately measure the momentum of the outgoing conversion elections. The magnetic field requirements, the significant magnetic coupling between the solenoids, the curved muon transport geometry and the large beam induced energy deposition into the superconducting coils pose significant challenges to the magnetic, mechanical, and thermal design of this system. In this paper a conceptual design for the magnetic system which meets the Mu2e experiment requirements is presented.

  14. Bent Superconducting Solenoids for the Muon Cooling Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Eyssa, Y.; Kenney, S.; Miller, J. R.; Prestemon, S.; Wang, S.T.

    1999-03-18

    This report describes some solenoid design work done for the cooling experiment for the muon collider collaboration. This report describes an analysis section of superconducting solenoids that have a center line induction of 3.0 T. The section is bent in the shape of an S. Each bend in the S bends the muon beam one radian (57.3 degrees). The warm bore diameter of the solenoid bent solenoid is 300 to 320 mm. The radius of the bend at the solenoid center line is 1000 mm. This report shows the results of three dimensional field calculations and presents a solenoid design that will include four TPC detectors that are 240 mm in diameter and 550 mm long as well as a 1300 mm long section of 1300 MHz RF cavities. The TPC sections need a solenoid wann bore diameter of about 300 320 mm while RF cavities require a warm bore diameter of 440 mm. The superconducting solenoid design must take into account the varying warm bore diameter requirements for the magnet string yet meet the stringent solenoidal field uniformity requirements within the active volume of the four TPCs.

  15. Silicon drift devices for track and vertex detection at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Kraner, H.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Radeka, V.; Rehak, P.; Rescia, S. ); Clark, J.; Henderson, S.; Hsu, L.; Oliver, J.; Wilson, R. ); Clemen, M.; Humanic, T.; Kraus, D.; Vilkelis, G.; Yu, B. ); McDonald, K.; Lu, C.; Wall, M. ); Vacchi, A. ); Bert

    1990-01-01

    We report on the recent progress in the study of Semiconductor Drift (Memory) Detectors intended for an inner tracking and vertexing system for the SSC. The systematic studies and the calibration of the existing detectors and the simulated performance in the actual SSC environment are highlighted. 5 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Hermiticity studies in SSC type calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Iwasaki, H.; Milliken, B.; Protopopescu, S.D.; Raja, R.

    1986-01-01

    We examine the effect of both dead material and missing material on the hermiticity of calorimetry for the type of detector proposed for the SSC. Using a simulation of the D0 detector based on the CERN Monte Carlo program Geant, we study the effects of cracks and cryostat dead material on missing E/sub T/. An improved version of the Isajet program that incorporates initial state Bremsstrahlung is used to investigate the contribution due to missing E/sub T/ from energy disappearing down the beam pipe.

  17. Calorimetry for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, H.A.; Grannis, P.D.

    1984-01-01

    The activities related to calorimetry at Snowmass took place in three main areas. These were: (1) The performance criteria for SSC calorimetry, including the requirements on hermeticity, shower containment, segmentation and time resolution. The use of calorimetric means of particle identification was studied. (2) The study of triggering methods using calorimeter energy, angle and timing information. (3) A review of a wide variety of calorimeter materials for absorber and sampling, as well as several means of obtaining the readout of the energy deposits. 48 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  18. Mu2e production solenoid cryostat conceptual design

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, T.H.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.M.; Peterson, T.J.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    Mu2e is a muon-to-electron conversion experiment being designed by an international collaboration of more than 65 scientists and engineers from more than 20 research institutions for installation at Fermilab. The experiment is comprised of three large superconducting solenoid magnet systems, production solenoid (PS), transport solenoid (TS) and detector solenoid (DS). A 25 kW, 8 GeV proton beam strikes a target located in the PS creating muons from the decay of secondary particles. These muons are then focused in the PS and the resultant muon beam is transported through the TS towards the DS. The production solenoid presents a unique set of design challenges as the result of high radiation doses, stringent magnetic field requirements, and large structural forces. This paper describes the conceptual design of the PS cryostat and will include discussions of the vacuum vessel, thermal shield, multi-layer insulation, cooling system, cryogenic piping, and suspension system.

  19. Slow extraction at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Colton, E.P.

    1985-01-01

    Resonant slow extraction at the SSC will permit fixed-target operation. Stochastic extraction appears to be a promising technique for achieving spill times of the order of 1000 s. However, systematic sextupole error fields in the SSC dipoles must be reduced a factor of twenty from the design values; otherwise the extraction process will be perturbed or suppressed. In addition, good regulation of the SSC power supplies is essential for smooth extraction over the spill period. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  20. Solenoid magnetic fields calculated from superposed semi-infinite solenoids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.; Flax, L.

    1966-01-01

    Calculation of a thick solenoid coils magnetic field components is made by a superposition of the fields produced by four solenoids of infinite length and zero inner radius. The field produced by this semi-infinite solenoid is dependent on only two variables, the radial and axial field point coordinates.

  1. Solenoid Magnet System for the Fermilab Mu2e Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Lamm, M. J.; Andreev, N.; Ambrosio, G.; ...

    2011-12-14

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment seeks to measure the rare process of direct muon to electron conversion in the field of a nucleus. Key to the design of the experiment is a system of three superconducting solenoids; a muon production solenoid (PS) which is a 1.8 m aperture axially graded solenoid with a peak field of 5 T used to focus secondary pions and muons from a production target located in the solenoid aperture; an 'S shaped' transport solenoid (TS) which selects and transports the subsequent muons towards a stopping target; a detector solenoid (DS) which is an axially graded solenoidmore » at the upstream end to focus transported muons to a stopping target, and a spectrometer solenoid at the downstream end to accurately measure the momentum of the outgoing conversion elections. The magnetic field requirements, the significant magnetic coupling between the solenoids, the curved muon transport geometry and the large beam induced energy deposition into the superconducting coils pose significant challenges to the magnetic, mechanical, and thermal design of this system. In this paper a conceptual design for the magnetic system which meets the Mu2e experiment requirements is presented.« less

  2. SSC environmental radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.D.

    1987-07-01

    The environmental radiation shielding requirements of the SSC have been evaluated using currently available computational tools that incorporate the well known processes of energy loss and degradation of high energy particles into Monte Carlo computer codes. These tools permit determination of isodose contours in the matter surrounding a source point and therefore the specification of minimum thicknesses or extents of shielding in order to assure annual dose equivalents less than some specified design amount. For the general public the annual dose equivalent specified in the design is 10 millirem, small compared to the dose from naturally occurring radiation. The types of radiation fall into two classes for the purposes of shielding determinations-hadrons and muons. The sources of radiation at the SSC of concern for the surrounding environment are the interaction regions, the specially designed beam dumps into which the beams are dumped from time to time, and beam clean-up regions where stops remove the beam halo in order to reduce experimental backgrounds. A final, unlikely source of radiation considered is the accidental loss of the full beam at some point around the ring. Conservative choices of a luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and a beam current three times design have been made in calculating the required shielding and boundaries of the facility. In addition to determination of minimum distances for the annual dose equivalents, the question of possible radioactivity produced in nearby wells or in municipal water supplies is addressed. The designed shielding distances and beam dumps are such that the induced radioactivity in ground water is safely smaller than the levels permitted by EPA and international agencies.

  3. Thermal issues at the SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranganathan, Raj P.; Dao, Bui V.

    1992-01-01

    A variety of heat transfer problems arise in the design of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). One class of problems is to minimize heat leak from the ambient to the SSC rings, since the rings contain superconducting magnets maintained at a temperature of 4 K. Another arises from the need to dump the beam of protrons (traveling around the SSC rings) on to absorbers during an abort of the collider. Yet another category of problems is the cooling of equipment to dissipate the heat generated during operation. An overview of these problems and sample heat transfer results are given in this paper.

  4. Magnetic latching solenoid

    DOEpatents

    Marts, Donna J.; Richardson, John G.; Albano, Richard K.; Morrison, Jr., John L.

    1995-01-01

    This invention discloses a D.C. magnetic latching solenoid that retains a moving armature in a first or second position by means of a pair of magnets, thereby having a zero-power requirement after actuation. The first or second position is selected by reversing the polarity of the D.C. voltage which is enough to overcome the holding power of either magnet and transfer the armature to an opposite position. The coil is then de-energized.

  5. Magnetic latching solenoid

    DOEpatents

    Marts, D.J.; Richardson, J.G.; Albano, R.K.; Morrison, J.L. Jr.

    1995-11-28

    This invention discloses a D.C. magnetic latching solenoid that retains a moving armature in a first or second position by means of a pair of magnets, thereby having a zero-power requirement after actuation. The first or second position is selected by reversing the polarity of the D.C. voltage which is enough to overcome the holding power of either magnet and transfer the armature to an opposite position. The coil is then de-energized. 2 figs.

  6. A warm liquid forward calorimeter for the SSC -- A new technology with challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, M.; Thur, W.; Wenzel, W.

    1991-03-01

    As part of the WALIC international collaboration, LBL engineers and physicists are building accelerator beamline prototype calorimeters using a room temperature ionizing liquid. If successful, this technology will be an immediate contender for the Forward Calorimeter of the Solenoidal Detector Collaboration (SDC), with potential application to complete, full scale SSC calorimeters. A 10 ton calorimeter using Tetramethylpentane as the ionizing liquid had been designed and built at LBL, and is now operating at Fermilab. In this unit, the TMP and ionization collecting electrodes are contained in stainless steel boxes'' interleaved with lead absorber plates; thus the TMP is in contact only with the stainless steel container and a few small ceramic insulators. A second generation design, known as the swimming pool'' version, is under construction. A simplified configuration is used, immersing some 3600 lead absorber/electrode plates directly in the ionizing liquid. Challenges lie ahead in terms of liquid contamination (tens of parts per billion), voltage holding, and vacuum pumpout. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  7. Triggering requirements for SSC physics

    SciTech Connect

    Gilchriese, M.G.D.

    1989-04-01

    Some aspects of triggering requirements for high P{sub T} physics processes at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) are described. A very wide range of trigger types will be required to enable detection of the large number of potential physics signatures possible at the SSC. Although in many cases trigger rates are not now well understood, it is possible to conclude that the ability to trigger on transverse energy, number and energy of jets, number and energy of leptons (electrons and muons), missing energy and combinations of these will be required. An SSC trigger system must be both highly flexible and redundant to ensure reliable detection of many new physics processes at the SSC.

  8. Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC)

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    INL's patented, continuous-flow Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) produces the highest ASTM-quality B-100 biodiesel from waste fats, oils, and greases at the site of waste generation. SSC delivers low-cost transportation fuel, avoids significant landfill costs for municipalities, and reduces potent methane and other emissions produced in landfills from these wastes. You can learn more about INL's energy research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  9. Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    INL's patented, continuous-flow Supercritical/Solid Catalyst (SSC) produces the highest ASTM-quality B-100 biodiesel from waste fats, oils, and greases at the site of waste generation. SSC delivers low-cost transportation fuel, avoids significant landfill costs for municipalities, and reduces potent methane and other emissions produced in landfills from these wastes. You can learn more about INL's energy research programs at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  10. LCLS Gun Solenoid Design Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Schmerge, John

    2010-12-10

    The LCLS photocathode rf gun requires a solenoid immediately downstream for proper emittance compensation. Such a gun and solenoid have been operational at the SSRL Gun Test Facility (GTF) for over eight years. Based on magnetic measurements and operational experience with the GTF gun solenoid multiple modifications are suggested for the LCLS gun solenoid. The modifications include adding dipole and quadrupole correctors inside the solenoid, increasing the bore to accommodate the correctors, decreasing the mirror plate thickness to allow the solenoid to move closer to the cathode, cutouts in the mirror plate to allow greater optical clearance with grazing incidence cathode illumination, utilizing pancake coil mirror images to compensate the first and second integrals of the transverse fields and incorporating a bipolar power supply to allow for proper magnet standardization and quick polarity changes. This paper describes all these modifications plus the magnetic measurements and operational experience leading to the suggested modifications.

  11. SSC OCIO, IT SUMMIT 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cottrell, Dinna L.

    2011-01-01

    The Stennis Space Center (SSC) Records Retention Facility is a centralized location for all SSC records, Records Management staff, and the SSC History Office. The building is a storm resistant facility and provides a secure environment for records housing. The Records Retention Facility was constructed in accordance with The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) requirements for records storage, making it the first NARA compliant facility in the agency. Stennis Space Center's Records Retention Facility became operational in May 2010. The SSC Records Retention Facility ensures that the required federal records are preserved, managed and accessible to all interested personnel. The facility provides 20,000 cubic feet of records storage capacity for the purpose of managing the centers consolidated records within a central, protected environment. Records housed in the facility are in the form of paper, optical, film and magnetic media. Located within the SSC Records Retention Facility, the Records Management Office provides comprehensive records management services in the form of: a) Storage and life-cycle management of inactive records of all media types; b) Digitizing/scanning of records and documents; c) Non-textual/digital electronic records media storage, migration and transfer; d) Records Remediation.

  12. Tracking the SSC test lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, B.T.; Douglas, D.R.; Forest, E.

    1990-01-01

    The dynamic aperture and its determination emerged from the SSC reference design study as the single most important accelerator physics issue pertinent to the SSC. Beside the fundamental need of a finite dynamic aperture for any accelerator, it was considered to be a useful criterion for the magnet selection. An aperture workshop organized in November 1984 at LBL served the purpose to identify the various aspects of the aperture question and to organize the aperture task force accordingly. It was recognized that numerical models had to play an important role and the qualifications of several tracking codes were investigated. None of the existing codes could meet all of the criteria for an ideal tracking code and substantial program development became unavoidable. It was therefore decided to begin tracking SSC test lattices, which were provided by the aperture task force's lattice group and are described in an other paper to this conference, with existing tracking programs. 6 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Tracking the SSC test lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Leemann, B.T.; Douglas, D.R.; Forest, E.

    1985-10-01

    The dynamic aperture and its determination emerged from the SSC reference design study as the single most important accelerator physics issue pertinent to the SSC. Beside the fundamental need of a finite dynamic aperture for any accelerator, it was considered to be a useful criterion for the magnet selection. An aperture workshop organized in November 1984 at LBL served the purpose to identify the various aspects of the aperture question and to organize the aperture task force accordingly. It was recognized that numerical models had to play an important role and the qualifications of several tracking codes were investigated. None of the existing codes could meet all of the criteria for an ideal tracking code and substantial program development became unavoidable. It was therefore decided to begin tracking SSC test lattices.

  14. Hollow Plasma in a Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

    2010-11-30

    A ring cathode for a pulsed, high-current, multi-spot cathodic arc discharge was placed inside a pulsed magnetic solenoid. Photography is used to evaluate the plasma distribution. The plasma appears hollow for cathode positions close the center of the solenoid, and it is guided closer to the axis when the cathode is away from the center.

  15. Where is the SSC today

    SciTech Connect

    Tigner, M.

    1985-10-01

    The SSC is a high luminosity pp collider designed to achieve 40 TeV in the center of mass. Depending on the final magnetic field chosen the main ring will be between 90 and 165 km in circumference. Construction of the SSC has been recommended to the DOE by HEPAP for completion in the early 1990's. The Universities Research Association has been designated by the DOE to do R/D and prepare a design proposal, construction plan and cost estimate. Model magnets are being tested and a field level will be chosen before October 1985. A design proposal will be submitted in April 1986.

  16. Where is the SSC today

    SciTech Connect

    Tigner, M.

    1990-01-01

    The SSC is a high luminosity pp collider designed to achieve 40 TeV in the center of mass. Depending on the final magnetic field chosen the main ring will be between 90 and 165 km in circumference. Construction of the SSC has been recommended to the DOE by HEPAP for completion in the early 1990's. The Universities Research Association has been designated by the DOE to do R/D and prepare a design proposal, construction plan and cost estimate. Model magnets are being tested and a field level will be chosen before October 1985. A design proposal will be submitted in April 1986. 4 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. STS-116 crew visits SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The astronauts of NASA's STS-116 space shuttle mission visited NASA Stennis Space Center in south Mississippi to share highlights of their 13-day mission and to thank SSC employees for the reliability of the space shuttle's main engines, which helped propel Space Shuttle Discovery into orbit during its Dec. 9, 2006, launch. Pictured (from left) are STS-116 crewmembers Commander Mark Polansky, Pilot Bill Oefelein, Mission Specialist Robert Curbeam, SSC Center Director, Richard Gilbrech, Mission Specialists Joan Higginbotham, Nicholas Patrick and Christer Fuglesang. During the mission, which began with the first evening launch since 2002, the astronauts installed the P5 spacer truss segment and rewired the International Space Station's power system.

  18. STS-115 crew visits SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Commander Brent Jett (center) talks with employees and visitors at NASA Stennis Space Center. The astronauts of NASA's STS-115 space shuttle mission visited SSC in south Mississippi to share highlights of their 12-day mission and to thank SSC employees for the reliability of the space shuttle's main engines, which helped propel Space Shuttle Atlantis into orbit. STS-115's other crewmembers are (from left) Mission Specialists Joe Tanner, Dan Burbank, Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper and Steve MacLean of the Canadian Space Agency. The mission launched Sept. 9, 2006, resuming construction of the International Space Station.

  19. Muscle Motion Solenoid Actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obata, Shuji

    It is one of our dreams to mechanically recover the lost body for damaged humans. Realistic humanoid robots composed of such machines require muscle motion actuators controlled by all pulling actions. Particularly, antagonistic pairs of bi-articular muscles are very important in animal's motions. A system of actuators is proposed using the electromagnetic force of the solenoids with the abilities of the stroke length over 10 cm and the strength about 20 N, which are needed to move the real human arm. The devised actuators are based on developments of recent modern electro-magnetic materials, where old time materials can not give such possibility. Composite actuators are controlled by a high ability computer and software making genuine motions.

  20. A proposed SSC damper system

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E.; Dugan, G.; Lopez, G.; Meinke, R.; Nexson, W.; Talman, R. )

    1994-02-01

    A transverse beam damper system for providing stability against ground motion, resistive wall instabilities, and other effects is the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is outlined. Use of two monitors, as in existing designs, provides phase insensitivity. The novel feature is the use of two kickers, which permits almost exact orbit compensation within one turn. Bunch-by-bunch stabilization requires fast computation.

  1. SSC San Diego Brief 2002

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    information dominance . We are at the cutting edge of the processes of transforming data into information, information into knowledge, and knowledge into...solutions for warrior information dominance . We intend to continue and expand SSC San Diego’s leadership in defining, developing, integrating, installing, and

  2. SSC Test Operations Contract Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleim, Kerry D.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Test Operations Contract at the Stennis Space Center (SSC). There are views of the test stands layouts, and closer views of the test stands. There are descriptions of the test stand capabilities, some of the other test complexes, the Cryogenic propellant storage facility, the High Pressure Industrial Water (HPIW) facility, and Fluid Component Processing Facility (FCPF).

  3. Quadrupole magnets for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Lietzke, A.; Barale, P.; Benjegerdes, R.; Caspi, S.; Cortella, J.; Dell`Orco, D.; Gilbert, W.; Green, M.I.; Mirk, K.; Peters, C.; Scanlan, R.; Taylor, C.E.; Wandesforde, A.

    1992-08-01

    At LBL, we have designed, constructed, and tested ten models (4-1meter, 6-5meter) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) main-ring 5 meter focusing quadrupole magnet (211Tesla/meter). The results of this program are herein summarized.

  4. Civil aspects of the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Reference Designs Study (RDS) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) came to a conclusion in May 1984. During the course of the study, the design team had shown the feasibility of designing and constructing an SSC. An important element in the overall project concerned the physical plant for the new research laboratory. About 1/3 of the approximately $3 billion cost estimate was devoted to the construction of the tunnels, buildings and conventional facilities for the project. The SSC is planned to be constructed in less than six years following the development phase, currently, estimated to end in October 1987. This paper will briefly review the civil systems that were developed during the course of the RDS. The technical features of the SSC led to a consideration of the siting needs and criteria. The criteria that have been suggested to DOE will be briefly described. Finally, the study and design work to be undertaken in the next couple years is outlined including a brief exploration of issues and problems.

  5. Supercomputing activities at the SSC Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.; Bourianoff, G.

    1991-09-01

    Supercomputers are used to simulate and track particle motion around the collider rings and the associated energy boosters of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). These numerical studies will aid in determining the best design for the SSC.

  6. Cabling for an SSC silicon tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, H.; Boissevain, J.; Cooke, B.; Miller, W.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) funded silicon tracking subsystem R D program, we examine the problems associated with cabling such a system. Different options for the cabling plant are discussed. A silicon microstrip tracking detector for an SSC experiment is an extremely complex system. The system consists of approximately 10{sup 7} detector channels, each of which requires a communication link with the outside world and connections to the detector bias voltage supply, to a DC power supply for the onboard electronics, and to an adjustable discrimination level. The large number of channels and the short time between beam interactions (16 nanoseconds) dictates the need for high speed and large bandwidth communication channels, and a power distribution system that can handle the high current draw of the electronics including the large AC component due to their switching. At the same time the constraints imposed by the physics measurements require that the cable plant have absolutely minimal mass and radiation length. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Self-compensating solenoid valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woeller, Fritz H. (Inventor); Matsumoto, Yutaka (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A solenoid valve is described in which both an inlet and an outlet of the valve are sealed when the valve is closed. This double seal compensates for leakage at either the inlet or the outlet by making the other seal more effective in response to the leakage and allows the reversal of the flow direction by simply switching the inlet and outlet connections. The solenoid valve has a valve chamber within the valve body. Inlet and outlet tubes extend through a plate into the chamber. A movable core in the chamber extends into the solenoid coil. The distal end of the core has a silicone rubber plug. Other than when the solenoid is energized, the compressed spring biases the core downward so that the surface of the plug is in sealing engagement with the ends of the tubes. A leak at either end increases the pressure in the chamber, resulting in increased sealing force of the plug.

  8. House authorizes billion for SSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    On October 15, 1987, the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Science, Space, and Technology voted favorably on H.R. 3228, a bill authorizing $1.079 billion over the next 3 fiscal years (FY) for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The bill authorizes $10 million to be spent in FY 1988 on siting and construction. Site proposals from 26 states are currently under review by DOE and the National Academy of Sciences.Before the committee approved the authorization, Don Ritter (R-Pa.) introduced numerous amendments to the bill. The intent of the measures was to delay complete funding for the project until careful and objective site selection and partial funding of the SSC from other countries could be assured. All of the amendments were voted down.

  9. Scattering detection of a solenoidal Poynting vector field.

    PubMed

    Fardad, Shima; Salandrino, Alessandro; Samadi, Akbar; Heinrich, Matthias; Chen, Zhigang; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2016-08-01

    The Poynting vector S plays a central role in electrodynamics as it is directly related to the power and the momentum carried by an electromagnetic wave. In the presence of multiple electromagnetic waves with different polarizations and propagation directions, the Poynting vector may exhibit solenoidal components which are not associated to any power flow. Here, we demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the presence of such solenoidal components has physical consequences, and it is not a mere artifact of the gauge invariance of S. In particular, we identify a simple field configuration displaying solenoidal components of S and theoretically show that a judiciously designed scatterer can act as a "Poynting vector detector" which when immersed in such field distribution would experience a transverse optical force orthogonal to the incidence plane. We experimentally validate our theoretical predictions by observing a pronounced asymmetry in the scattering pattern of a spherical nanoparticle.

  10. Weak interactions at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1986-03-01

    Prospects for the study of standard model weak interactions at the SSC are reviewed, with emphasis on the unique capability of the SSC to study the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking whether the associated new quanta are at the TeV scale or higher. Symmetry breaking by the minimal Higgs mechanism and by related strong interaction dynamical variants is summarized. A set of measurements is outlined that would calibrate the proton structure functions and the backgrounds to new physics. The ability to measure the three weak gauge boson vertex is found to complement LEP II, with measurements extending to larger Q/sup 2/ at a comparable statistical level in detectable decays. B factory physics is briefly reviewed as one example of a possible broad program of high statistics studies of sub-TeV scale phenomena. The largest section of the talk is devoted to the possible manifestations of symmetry breaking in the WW and ZZ production cross sections. Some new results are presented bearing on the ability to detect high mass WW and ZZ pairs. The principal conclusion is that although nonstandard model scenarios are typically more forgiving, the capability to study symmetry breaking in the standard model (and in related strong interaction dynamical variants) requires achieving the SSC design goals of ..sqrt.. s,L = 40Tev, 10/sup 33/cm/sup -2/sec/sup -1/. 28 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Failure Scenarios and Mitigations for the BABAR Superconducting Solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, EunJoo; Candia, A.; Craddock, W. W.; Racine, M.; Weisend, J. G.

    2006-04-01

    The cryogenic department at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is responsible for the operation, troubleshooting, and upgrade of the 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid detector for the BABAR B-factory experiment. Events that disable the detector are rare but significantly impact the availability of the detector for physics research. As a result, a number of systems and procedures have been developed over time to minimize the downtime of the detector, for example improved control systems, improved and automatic backup systems, and spares for all major components. Together they can prevent or mitigate many of the failures experienced by the utilities, mechanical systems, controls and instrumentation. In this paper we describe various failure scenarios, their effect on the detector, and the modifications made to mitigate the effects of the failure. As a result of these modifications the reliability of the detector has increased significantly with only 3 shutdowns of the detector due to cryogenics systems over the last 2 years.

  12. Radiation levels in the SSC interaction regions

    SciTech Connect

    Groom, D.E.

    1988-06-10

    The radiation environment in a typical SSC detector has been evaluated using the best available particle production models coupled with Monte Carlo simulations of hadronic and electromagnetic cascades. The problems studied include direct charged particle dose, dose inside a calorimeter from the cascades produced by incident photons and hadrons, the flux of neutrons and photons backscattered from the calorimeter into a central cavity, and neutron flux in the calorimeter. The luminosity lifetime at the SSC is dominated by collision losses in the interaction regions, where the luminosity is equivalent to losing an entire full-energy proton beam into the apparatus every six days. The result of an average p-p collision can be described quite simply. The mean charged multiplicity is about 110, and the particles are distributed nearly uniformly in pseudorapidity ({eta}) over all the angles of interest. The transverse momentum distribution is independent of angle, and for our purposes may be written as p{perpendicular}exp(-p{perpendicular}/{beta}). The mean value of p{perpendicular} may be as high as 0.6 GeV/c. Most of the radiation is produced by the very abundant low-p{perpendicular} particles. The dose or neutron fluence produced by individual particles in this energy region are simulated over a wide variety of conditions, and several measurements serve to confirm the simulation results. In general, the response (a dose, fluence, the number of backscattered neutrons, etc.) for an incident particle of momentum p can be parameterized in the form Np{sup {alpha}}, where 0.5 < {alpha}< 1.0. The authors believe most of their results to be accurate to within a factor of two or three, sufficiently precise to serve as the basis for detailed designs.

  13. STS-121 crew visits SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Astronauts Steve Lindsey (left), Stephanie Wilson, Lisa Nowak and Piers Sellers meet with employees at NASA Stennis Space Center. The crewmembers on NASA's space shuttle mission STS-121, which launched July 4, 2006, thanked SSC's workers for their dedication and safe work history. `We feel blessed that you are a part of the NASA family,' Wilson said. All four expressed gratitude for the reliability of the space shuttle's main engines, which helped propel the STS-121 crew into orbit on their 13-day mission.

  14. D0 Cryogenic System Superconducting Solenoid Platform I/O

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, D.; /Fermilab

    1997-10-09

    The Dzero detector is scheduled for a major upgrade between 1996 and 1999. This note describes the specifications and configuration of the physical Input/Output devices and instrumentation of the 2 Tesla Superconducting Solenoid. The Solenoid and the VLPC cryostats both reside on the detector platform and are cooled by the Dzero Helium Refrigerator. The cryogenic process control s for these two components will be an extension of the TI565 programmable logic controller system used for other Dzero cryogenic controls. Two Input/Output Bases will be installed on the Dzero detector platform near the cryo corner. These I/O bases will handle all the sensor input and process control output devices from the Solenoid and VLPC cryostats. Having the I/O bases installed on the detector platform makes the connecting cabl ing to the platform much easier . All the instruments are wired directly to the I/O base. The bases have only one communications network cabl e that must be routed off the platform to the South side of the Dzero building.

  15. Development of Radhard VLSI electronics for SSC calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J.W.; Nodulman, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    A new program of development of integrated electronics for liquid argon calorimeters in the SSC detector environment is being started at Argonne National Laboratory. Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Vanderbilt University together with an industrial participants are expected to collaborate in this work. Interaction rates, segmentation, and the radiation environment dictate that front-end electronics of SSC calorimeters must be implemented in the form of highly integrated, radhard, analog, low noise, VLSI custom monolithic devices. Important considerations are power dissipation, choice of functions integrated on the front-end chips, and cabling requirements. An extensive level of expertise in radhard electronics exists within the industrial community, and a primary objective of this work is to bring that expertise to bear on the problems of SSC detector design. Radiation hardness measurements and requirements as well as calorimeter design will be primarily the responsibility of Argonne scientists and our Brookhaven and Vanderbilt colleagues. Radhard VLSI design and fabrication will be primarily the industrial participant's responsibility. The rapid-cycling synchrotron at Argonne will be used for radiation damage studies involving response to neutrons and charged particles, while damage from gammas will be investigated at Brookhaven. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. The SSC beam scraper system

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, M.A.; Mokhov, N.V.; Yazynin Institut Fiziki Vysokikh Ehnergij, Protvino )

    1991-06-01

    In this paper we present the results of a full-scale study of a beam scraping system that is designed to guarantee reliable operation of the SSC throughout the whole cycle and for minimum background for experiments at the interaction regions. The machine aperture limits and beam loss formation are analyzed. Simulation programs and a calculational model are described. The physics of beam scraping is explored, and measures to increase significantly the system efficiency are determined. A tolerable scraping rate, taking into account scraper material integrity, quench limits in downstream superconducting magnets, radiation shielding requirements, and minimal beam halo levels at the IPs are also determined. Finally, a complete multi-component scraper system in the SSC East Cluster is proposed. Throughout the paper we define a scraper as a primary absorber consisting of precise movable jaws that have a flat inner edge along the circulation beam and which may be forced to touch the beam halo in horizontal or vertical planes. Secondary absorbers -- collimators -- are destined to intercept outscattered protons and other particles produced in scraper material. All these are surrounded with a radiation shielding. 15 refs., 50 figs., 13 tabs.

  17. Ship to Shore Connector Amphibious Craft (SSC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    only). SSC shall embark on board the planned MLP , without ship alterations, as designed and built for the LCAC. SSC shall be able to...operate with existing ships services, including the planned MLP , in place for the LCAC including ship’s power, fueling/ defueling stations...planned MLP , without ship alterations, as designed and built for the LCAC. SSC shall be able to operate with existing ships services

  18. The Future SSC Pacific Civil Service Workforce

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT 1971 August 2008 The Future SSC Pacific Civil Service Workforce P. Shigley G. Pennoyer J. Carreño Approved for... Shigley G. Pennoyer J. Carreño Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. SSC San Diego San Diego, CA 92152-5001 SB...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 08–2008 Final THE FUTURE SSC PACIFIC CIVIL SERVICE WORKFORCE P. Shigley G. Pennoyer J

  19. The Design and Construction of the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bert; Wahrer, Bob; Taylor, Clyde; Xu, L.; Chen, J. Y.; Wang, M.; Juang, Tiki; Zisman, Michael S.; Virostek, Steve P.; Green, Michael A.

    2008-08-02

    The purpose of the MICE spectrometer solenoid is to provide a uniform field for a scintillating fiber tracker. The uniform field is produced by a long center coil and two short end coils. Together, they produce 4T field with a uniformity of better than 1% over a detector region of 1000 mm long and 300 mm in diameter. Throughout most of the detector region, the field uniformity is better than 0.3%. In addition to the uniform field coils, we have two match coils. These two coils can be independently adjusted to match uniform field region to the focusing coil field. The coil package length is 2544 mm. We present the spectrometer solenoid cold mass design, the powering and quench protection circuits, and the cryogenic cooling system based on using three cryocoolers with re-condensers.

  20. Magnetic design constraints of helical solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Krave, S. T.; Tompkins, J. C.; Yonehara, K.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S. A.; Melconian, K.

    2015-01-30

    Helical solenoids have been proposed as an option for a Helical Cooling Channel for muons in a proposed Muon Collider. Helical solenoids can provide the required three main field components: solenoidal, helical dipole, and a helical gradient. In general terms, the last two are a function of many geometric parameters: coil aperture, coil radial and longitudinal dimensions, helix period and orbit radius. In this paper, we present design studies of a Helical Solenoid, addressing the geometric tunability limits and auxiliary correction system.

  1. Refrigerator and Solenoid Run Summary August/September 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1999-09-20

    The helium refrigerator was cooled down and operated for the third time since its installation. D-Zero's 2 Tesla superconducting solenoid was cooled down and operated for its second time since its installation into the D-Zero detector. This engineering note summarizes the cryogenic aspects of the test run and performance measurements made. The main purpose of this run was to do field mapping of the solenoid with different combinations of field polarity on the Solenoid and CF iron magnets. This was accomplished. A second purpose was to test the lower field joint repair that was done in January 1999. This field joint had a measurable voltage drop across the soldered bus splice. The repair was an undoing of the joint, extensive cleaning of the bus, and then welding the splice. The repair was successful, no voltage drop was measured and the magnet behaved nicely. A parasitic purpose was to get some operating time on the refrigerator, measure the refrigeration performance, and measure the heat leak in the VLPC lines mounted on the detector platform. Refrigerator performance was spot checked, and was found to be 60 watts (10%) less than generic operating curves. At this level of performance, the operating margin for the full solenoid and VLPC system will be 75 watts (15%) which is somewhat uncomfortable from an operational stand point. The VLPC lines were operated and heat leak numbers of around 40 watts was measured for each pipe section including the supply u-tubes to the detector, the bayonet can, valve box on the platform and the piping back to the refrigerator valve box. Another purpose of the test run was to test the compatibility of other detector components with the new central magnetic field environment. I do not know the results of these tests.

  2. Superconducting materials for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlan, R.; Royet, J.; Taylor, C.E.

    1985-08-01

    The proposed Superconducting Supercollider presents several new challenges with regard to materials for dipole magnets. One design requires a NbTi superconductor with J/sub c/ (5T) greater than 2400 A/mm/sup 2/, whereas the Tevatron recently completed at Fermilab required a J/sub c/ (5T) greater than or equal to 1800 A/mm/sup 2/. In addition, the high field design requires a conductor with a filament diameter of about 2.5 ..mu..m, if correction coils are to be eliminated. Finally, the high field design utilizes a 30-strand cable which again is a significant increase from the 23-strand cable used in the Tevatron. This paper describes the results of recent R and D programs aimed at meeting the stringent material requirements for the SSC.

  3. Closed orbit correction in the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Ferede, H.; Pilat, F.

    1991-05-01

    A global correction scheme proposed for use in the SSC is described. Various features of the SSC lattice that impact the ability to correct the orbit are discussed. Typical results for the residual RMS closed orbit in the arc is calculated to be 0.65mm with peak values of 3mm. 3 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  4. SSC San Diego Strategic Plan. Revision 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    information dominance . This Strategic Plan is SSC San Diego’s blueprint to meet that challenge. The plan is both a vehicle for carrying us into the...provider of integrated C4ISR solutions for warrior information dominance is our enduring goal. Our plan specifies five long-range strategic objectives. SSC

  5. Accelerator physics issues at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Dugan, G.F.

    1993-05-01

    Realization of the design energy and luminosity goals of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will require proper resolutions of a number of challenging problems in accelerator physics. The status of several salient issues in the design of the SSC will be reviewed and updated in this paper. The emphasis will be on the superconducting accelerators.

  6. Experimental study of heavy flavor physics and SSC research and development at the University of Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Reidy, J.J.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Summers, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    The High Energy Physics Group has been principally involved with Fermilab experiments on photoproduction and hadroproduction of charm. Nuclear reactions with a mixed 250-GeV hadronic beam and 500-GeV [pi]-N interactions were used. Considerable attention is devoted to the UNIX/RISC computing farm. The Group also has an SSC R D program dealing with the adaptation and use of the HETC-based detector simulation code CALOR89, the development of liquid scintillator technology for use in SSC detector calorimeters, the hanging file calorimeter project, and the calorimetry program for GEM.

  7. Mu2e Transport Solenoid Cold-Mass Alignment Issues

    DOE PAGES

    Lopes, M.; Ambrosio, G.; Badgley, K.; ...

    2017-01-05

    The Muon-to-electron conversion experiment (Mu2e) at Fermilab is designed to explore charged lepton flavor violation. It is composed of three large superconducting solenoids: the Production Solenoid (PS), the Transport Solenoid (TS) and the Detector Solenoid (DS). The TS is formed by two magnets: TS upstream (TSu) and downstream (TSd). Each has its own cryostat and power supply. Tolerance sensitivity studies of the position and angular alignment of each coil in this magnet system were performed in the past with the objective to demonstrate that the magnet design meets all the field requirements. Furthermore, the alignment of the cold-masses is criticalmore » to maximize the transmission of muons and to avoid possible backgrounds that would reduce the sensitivity of the experiment. Each TS magnet cold-mass can be individually aligned. Here, we discuss implications of the alignment of the TS cold-masses in terms of the displacement of the magnetic center. Consideration of the practical mechanical limits are also presented.« less

  8. Heavy ion physics at LHC with the Compact Muon Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Bedjidian, M.; Contardo, D.; Haroutunian, R.

    1995-07-15

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), is one of the two detectors proposed to achieve the primary goal of the LHC: the discovery of the Higgs boson(s). For this purpose, the detector is optimized for the precise measurement of muons, photons, electrons and jets. It is a clear motivation to investigate its ability to measure the hard processes probing the formation of a Quark Gluon Plasma (QGP) in ion collisions. It is the case of the heavy quark bound states, long predicted to be suppressed in a QGP. In CMS they can be detected, via their muonic decay according to the principle adopted for the p-p physics.

  9. Solenoid and monocusp ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, John Paul; Burns, Erskine John Thomas; Draper, Charles Hadley

    1997-01-01

    An ion source which generates hydrogen ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal permanent magnets to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures.

  10. Solenoid and monocusp ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Brainard, J.P.; Burns, E.J.T.; Draper, C.H.

    1995-12-31

    An ion source which generates ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal magnetic field to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures.

  11. Solenoid and monocusp ion source

    DOEpatents

    Brainard, J.P.; Burns, E.J.T.; Draper, C.H.

    1997-10-07

    An ion source which generates hydrogen ions having high atomic purity incorporates a solenoidal permanent magnets to increase the electron path length. In a sealed envelope, electrons emitted from a cathode traverse the magnetic field lines of a solenoid and a monocusp magnet between the cathode and a reflector at the monocusp. As electrons collide with gas, the molecular gas forms a plasma. An anode grazes the outer boundary of the plasma. Molecular ions and high energy electrons remain substantially on the cathode side of the cusp, but as the ions and electrons are scattered to the aperture side of the cusp, additional collisions create atomic ions. The increased electron path length allows for smaller diameters and lower operating pressures. 6 figs.

  12. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  13. A solenoid failure detection system for cold gas attitude control jet valves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, P. A.

    1970-01-01

    The development of a solenoid valve failure detection system is described. The technique requires the addition of a radioactive gas to the propellant of a cold gas jet attitude control system. Solenoid failure is detected with an avalanche radiation detector located in the jet nozzle which senses the radiation emitted by the leaking radioactive gas. Measurements of carbon monoxide leakage rates through a Mariner type solenoid valve are presented as a function of gas activity and detector configuration. A cylindrical avalanche detector with a factor of 40 improvement in leak sensitivity is proposed for flight systems because it allows the quantity of radioactive gas that must be added to the propellant to be reduced to a practical level.

  14. Studies on the Magnetic Center of the Mu2e Solenoid System

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Ambrosio, G.; Buehler, M.; Coleman, R.; Evbota, D.; Khalatian, V.; Lamm, M.; Miller, J.; Moretti, G.; Page, T.; Tartaglia, M.

    2014-01-01

    The definition of the magnetic center in the Mu2e solenoid system is not trivial given the S-shaped nature of the transport solenoid. Moreover, due to the fringe field of the larger bore adjacent magnets-production solenoid and the detector solenoid-the magnetic center does not coincide with the geometric center of the system. The reference magnetic center can be obtained by tracking a low-momentum charged particle through the whole system. This paper will discuss this method and will evaluate the deviations from the nominal magnetic center given the tolerances in the manufacturing and the alignment of the coils. Methods for the correction of the magnetic center will also be presented.

  15. Beam-Based Solenoid Compensation for the PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yunhai

    1999-08-26

    Commissioning the compensation system of the solenoid in the BaBar detector presents a challenging problem due to the complexity of the system, which uses twelve normal quadrupoles and twelve skew quadrupoles in each ring. The setting of these skew quadrupoles needs to be readjusted according to the machine optical parameters since the machines always have some unknown errors. In this paper, we will describe a beam based method to match the coupling and optics in the interaction region to compensate for the optical effects due to the solenoid. The method has been successfully used to find the wrong polarities and the wrong scaling factor of the skew quadrupoles in the early stage of the commissioning. It is being refined to set the skew quadrupoles in the machines in order to reduce the beam size at the interaction point and improve the luminosity of PEP-II.

  16. Decoupling schemes for the SSC Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Y.; Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.; Meinke, R.; Peterson, J.; Pilat, F.; Stampke, S.; Syphers, M.; Talman, R.

    1993-05-01

    A decoupling system is designed for the SSC Collider. This system can accommodate three decoupling schemes by using 44 skew quadrupoles in the different configurations. Several decoupling schemes are studied and compared in this paper.

  17. Quench anaylsis of MICE spectrometer superconducting solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; Bross, Alan; Prestemon, Soren; / /LBL, Berkeley

    2011-09-01

    MICE superconducting spectrometer solenoids fabrication and tests are in progress now. First tests of the Spectrometer Solenoid discovered some issues which could be related to the chosen passive quench protection system. Both solenoids do not have heaters and quench propagation relied on the 'quench back' effect, cold diodes, and shunt resistors. The solenoids have very large inductances and stored energy which is 100% dissipated in the cold mass during a quench. This makes their protection a challenging task. The paper presents the quench analysis of these solenoids based on 3D FEA solution of coupled transient electromagnetic and thermal problems. The simulations used the Vector Fields QUENCH code. It is shown that in some quench scenarios, the quench propagation is relatively slow and some areas can be overheated. They describe ways of improving the solenoids quench protection in order to reduce the risk of possible failure.

  18. Beam instability studies for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.

    1994-09-01

    Beam instability studies of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) during the period 1989--1993 are briefly reviewed in this paper. Various topics are covered: single bunch and multi-bunch, single beam and beam-beam, parasitic heating and active feedback, etc. Although the SSC will not be built, many of the results obtained from these studies remain as useful references to the accelerator community.

  19. Mechanical analysis and test results of 4-coil superconducting helical solenoid model

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, M.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Johnson, R.P.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Lopes, M.L.; Makarov, A.; Tartaglia, M.; Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab

    2010-01-01

    Novel configurations of helical superconducting magnets for muon beam 6D phase space cooling channels and demonstration experiments are being designed at Fermilab. Operating as needed for the beam cooling in a cryogenic environment, the helical solenoid generates longitudinal and transverse magnetic fields; meanwhile, large Lorentz forces are produced, so rigid coil support structures need to be designed. A short model of a helical solenoid (HS), consisting of four coils and supporting structures, was designed, built and tested at Fermilab. The magnetic and mechanical designs were analyzed using TOSCA and ANSYS. The supporting structures were fabricated and assembled using SSC NbTi cable. Strain gauges were utilized to monitor the deformation of the structures due to both thermal contraction and Lorentz forces. The superconducting coils were trained during the test. The model should prove the design concept, fabrication technology, and the magnet system performance.

  20. Cost comparisons for SSC magnet dependent systems

    SciTech Connect

    1985-08-15

    An SSC Cost Estimating Task Force was appointed by the SSC Director in May, 1985. The charge to the task force was to perform a detailed review of costs for all superconducting magnet design styles that are under consideration for the SSC. Cost information on five magnet styles was reviewed in detail by the task force members. The basic cost information was developed by participating laboratories and by industry. Details of the procedure and analysis are presented in Chapter III. The purpose of this report is to provide a comparison of all SSC construction project cost information that is dependent on the various magnet styles. It is emphasized that the costs displayed in the tables of this report are not the total costs for an SSC construction project. Only those systems for which costs vary with magnet style are included. In Appendix E, current results are compared with the relevant parts of the 1984 SSC Reference Designs Study (RDS) cost estimate. Following the method used in the RDS, the costs that are developed here are non-site specific. The labor rates utilized are based on a national average for the various labor categories. The Conventional Systems costs for underground structures are derived from an extension of the ``median-site`` model as described in the RDS.

  1. Validation of SSC using the FFTF natural-circulation tests

    SciTech Connect

    Horak, W.C.; Guppy, J.G.; Kennett, R.J.

    1982-01-01

    As part of the Super System Code (SSC) validation program, the 100% power FFTF natural circulation test has been simulated using SSC. A detailed 19 channel, 2 loop model was used in SSC. Comparisons showed SSC calculations to be in good agreement with the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), test data. Simulation of the test was obtained in real time.

  2. Central Solenoid Insert Technical Specification

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Smirnov, Alexandre

    2011-09-01

    The US ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for the ITER central solenoid (CS) contribution to the ITER project. The Central Solenoid Insert (CSI) project will allow ITER validation the appropriate lengths of the conductors to be used in the full-scale CS coils under relevant conditions. The ITER Program plans to build and test a CSI to verify the performance of the CS conductor. The CSI is a one-layer solenoid with an inner diameter of 1.48 m and a height of 4.45 m between electric terminal ends. The coil weight with the terminals is approximately 820 kg without insulation. The major goal of the CSI is to measure the temperature margin of the CS under the ITER direct current (DC) operating conditions, including determining sensitivity to load cycles. Performance of the joints, ramp rate sensitivity, and stability against thermal or electromagnetic disturbances, electrical insulation, losses, and instrumentation are addressed separately and therefore are not major goals in this project. However, losses and joint performance will be tested during the CSI testing campaign. The USIPO will build the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Naka, Japan. The industrial vendors (the Suppliers) will report to the USIPO (the Company). All approvals to proceed will be issued by the Company, which in some cases, as specified in this document, will also require the approval of the ITER Organization. Responsibilities and obligations will be covered by respective contracts between the USIPO, called Company interchangeably, and the industrial Prime Contractors, called Suppliers. Different stages of work may be performed by more than one Prime Contractor, as described in this specification. Technical requirements of the contract between the Company and the Prime Contractor will be covered by the Fabrication Specifications developed by the Prime Contractor based on this document and approved by

  3. R&D ERL: HTS Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.; Muratore, J.; Plate, S.

    2010-01-01

    An innovative feature of the ERL project is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The HTS solenoid design offers many advantages because of several unique design features. Typically the solenoid is placed outside the cryostat which means that the beam gets significantly defused before a focusing element starts. In the current design, the solenoid is placed inside the cryostat which provides an early focusing structure and thus a significant reduction in the emittance of the electron beam. In addition, taking full advantage of the high critical temperature of HTS, the solenoid has been designed to reach the required field at {approx}77 K, which can be obtained with liquid nitrogen. This significantly reduces the cost of testing and allows a variety of critical pre-tests which would have been prohibitively expensive at 4 K in liquid helium because of the additional requirements of cryostat and associated facilities.

  4. MICE Spectrometer Solenoid Magnetic Field Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Leonova, M.

    2013-09-01

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is designed to demonstrate ionization cooling in a muon beam. Its goal is to measure a 10% change in transverse emittance of a muon beam going through a prototype Neutrino Factory cooling channel section with an absolute measurement accuracy of 0.1%. To measure emittances, MICE uses two solenoidal spectrometers, with Solenoid magnets designed to have 4 T fields, uniform at 3 per mil level in the tracking volumes. Magnetic field measurements of the Spectrometer Solenoid magnet SS2, and analysis of coil parameters for input into magnet models will be discussed.

  5. Middle Level SS&C Energy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Linda W.; Aldridge, Bill G.

    The project on Scope Sequence and Coordination of Secondary School Science (SS&C) was initiated by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and recommends that all students study science every year and advocates carefully sequenced, well-coordinated instruction in biology, chemistry, earth/space science, and physics. This document…

  6. SSC marks anniversary of Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-08-29

    At the Hurricane Katrina observance held Aug. 29 in the StenniSphere auditorium, Stennis Space Center Deputy Director David Throckmorton (left) and RAdm. Timothy McGee, Commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command, unveil a plaque dedicated to SSC employees.

  7. Electron beam emittance monitor for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsyganov, E.; Meinke, R.; Nexsen, W.; Kauffmann, S.; Zinchenko, A.; Taratin, A.

    1993-05-01

    A nondestructive beam profile monitor for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is presented using as a probe a low-energy electron beam interacting with the proton bunch charge. Results using a full Monte Carlo simulation code look promising for the transverse and longitudinal beam profile measurements.

  8. Compensation of coupling in the SSC complex

    SciTech Connect

    Pilat, F.; Bourianoff, G.

    1991-10-01

    This paper will describe a study of the coupling effects and their compensation by means of local depending techniques for some of the accelerators in the SSC Complex. Results concerning corrections and decoupling for the Low Energy and Medium Energy Boosters will be compared to results obtained for the Collider Ring. Some preliminary experimental data about measurement of coupling quantities will also be presented.

  9. SSC San Diego Strategic Plan. Revision 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    information dominance . This Strategic Plan is SSC San Diego’s blueprint to meet that challenge. The plan is both a vehicle for carrying us into the...provider of integrated C4ISR solutions for warrior information dominance - is our enduring goal. Our plan specifies five long-range strategic

  10. SSC marks anniversary of Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    At the Hurricane Katrina observance held Aug. 29 in the StenniSphere auditorium, Stennis Space Center Deputy Director David Throckmorton (left) and RAdm. Timothy McGee, Commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command, unveil a plaque dedicated to SSC employees.

  11. Heavy particle production at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, S.J.; Haber, H.E.; Gunion, J.F.

    1984-03-01

    Predictions for the production of heavy quarks, supersymmetric particles, and other colored systems at high energy due to intrinsic twist-six components in the proton wavefunction are given. We also suggest the possibility of using asymmetric collision energies (e.g., via intersecting rings at the SSC) in order to facilitate the study of forward and diffractive particle production processes. 9 references.

  12. SSC marks anniversary of Hurricane Katrina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    At the Hurricane Katrina observance held Aug. 29 in the StenniSphere auditorium, Stennis Space Center Deputy Director David Throckmorton (left) and RAdm. Timothy McGee, Commander, Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command, unveil a plaque dedicated to SSC employees.

  13. Civil systems aspects of the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, J.R.

    1985-10-01

    The Reference Designs Study (RDS) of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) came to a conclusion in May, 1984. During the course of the study, the design team had shown the feasibility of designing and constructing an SSC. An important element in the overall project concerned the physical plant for the new research laboratory. About 1/3 of the approximately $3 billion cost estimate was devoted to the construction of the tunnels, buildings and conventional facilities for the project. The SSC is planned to be constructed in less than six years following the development phase, currently estimated to end in October, 1987. This paper briefly reviews the civil systems that were developed during the course of the RDS. The technical features of the SSC led to a consideration of the siting needs and criteria. The criteria that have been suggested to DOE will be briefly described. Finally, the study and design work to be undertaken in the next couple years is outlined including a brief exploration of issues and problems.

  14. Middle Level SS&C Energy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crow, Linda W.; Aldridge, Bill G.

    The project on Scope Sequence and Coordination of Secondary School Science (SS&C) was initiated by the National Science Teachers Association (NSTA) and recommends that all students study science every year and advocates carefully sequenced, well-coordinated instruction in biology, chemistry, earth/space science, and physics. This document…

  15. Liquid argon calorimetry for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, H.A.

    1990-01-01

    Liquid argon calorimetry is a mature technique. However, adapting it to the challenging environment of the SSC requires a large amount of R D. The advantages of the liquid argon approach are summarized and the issues being addressed by the R D program are described. 18 refs.

  16. Time measurment system at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Arai, Yasuo

    1989-04-01

    A proposal of time measurement system at the SSC experiment is described. An example of a possible scheme for central tracking chambers is shown. Designs of a preamp/shaper/discri chip and a time digitizer chip are described. A method to distribute system clock and power/cooling problems are also discussed.

  17. Bloodhound SSC: A Vehicle for STEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloway, Ian

    2009-01-01

    This article features the BLOODHOUND Project which aims to break the world land speed record by achieving 1,000mph. It is an iconic adventure that will push technology to its limit. BLOODHOUND SSC provides a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to inspire the next generation of scientists and engineers. It is an important educational project that is…

  18. Report of the working group on detector simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Price, L.E.; Lebrun, P.

    1986-01-01

    An ad hoc group at Snowmass reviewed the need for detector simulation to support detectors at the SSC. This report first reviews currently available programs for detector simulation, both those written for single specific detectors and those aimed at general utility. It then considers the requirements for detector simulation for the SSC, with particular attention to enhancements that are needed relative to present programs. Finally, a list of recommendations is given.

  19. An Investigation into the Electromagnetic Interactions between a Superconducting Torus and Solenoid for the Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Rajput-Ghoshal, Renuka; Ghoshal, Probir K.; Fair, Ruben J.; Hogan, John P.; Kashy, David H.

    2015-06-01

    The Jefferson Lab 12 GeV Upgrade in Hall B will need CLAS12 detector that requires two superconducting magnets. One is a magnet system consisting of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a Toroidal configuration (Torus) and the second is an actively shielded solenoidal magnet (Solenoid). Both the torus and solenoid are located in close proximity to one another and are surrounded by sensitive detectors. This paper investigates the electromagnetic interactions between the two systems during normal operation as well as during various fault scenarios as part of a Risk Assessment and Mitigation (RAM).

  20. The upgraded DØ detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S. N.; Ahn, S. H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G. A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J. T.; Anderson, S.; Andrieu, B.; Angstadt, R.; Anosov, V.; Arnoud, Y.; Arov, M.; Askew, A.; Åsman, B.; Assis Jesus, A. C. S.; Atramentov, O.; Autermann, C.; Avila, C.; Babukhadia, L.; Bacon, T. C.; Badaud, F.; Baden, A.; Baffioni, S.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Balm, P. W.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Bardon, O.; Barg, W.; Bargassa, P.; Baringer, P.; Barnes, C.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Baturitsky, M. A.; Bauer, D.; Bean, A.; Baumbaugh, B.; Beauceron, S.; Begalli, M.; Beaudette, F.; Begel, M.; Bellavance, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Besson, A.; Beuselinck, R.; Beutel, D.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Binder, M.; Biscarat, C.; Bishoff, A.; Black, K. M.; Blackler, I.; Blazey, G.; Blekman, F.; Blessing, S.; Bloch, D.; Blumenschein, U.; Bockenthien, E.; Bodyagin, V.; Boehnlein, A.; Boeriu, O.; Bolton, T. A.; Bonamy, P.; Bonifas, D.; Borcherding, F.; Borissov, G.; Bos, K.; Bose, T.; Boswell, C.; Bowden, M.; Brandt, A.; Briskin, G.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, D.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Burdin, S.; Burke, S.; Burnett, T. H.; Busato, E.; Buszello, C. P.; Butler, D.; Butler, J. M.; Cammin, J.; Caron, S.; Bystricky, J.; Canal, L.; Canelli, F.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, B. C. K.; Casey, D.; Cason, N. M.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapin, D.; Charles, F.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chi, E.; Chiche, R.; Cho, D. K.; Choate, R.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Chopra, S.; Christenson, J. H.; Christiansen, T.; Christofek, L.; Churin, I.; Cisko, G.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Clément, B.; Clément, C.; Coadou, Y.; Colling, D. J.; Coney, L.; Connolly, B.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Coppage, D.; Corcoran, M.; Coss, J.; Cothenet, A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Cristetiu, M.; Cummings, M. A. C.; Cutts, D.; da Motta, H.; Das, M.; Davies, B.; Davies, G.; Davis, G. A.; Davis, W.; De, K.; de Jong, P.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; De La Taille, C.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Dean, S.; Degenhardt, J. D.; Déliot, F.; Delsart, P. A.; Del Signore, K.; DeMaat, R.; Demarteau, M.; Demina, R.; Demine, P.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Doets, M.; Doidge, M.; Dong, H.; Doulas, S.; Dudko, L. V.; Duflot, L.; Dugad, S. R.; Duperrin, A.; Dvornikov, O.; Dyer, J.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Edwards, T.; Ellison, J.; Elmsheuser, J.; Eltzroth, J. T.; Elvira, V. D.; Eno, S.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Estrada, J.; Evans, D.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fagan, J.; Fast, J.; Fatakia, S. N.; Fein, D.; Feligioni, L.; Ferapontov, A. V.; Ferbel, T.; Ferreira, M. J.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fleck, I.; Fitzpatrick, T.; Flattum, E.; Fleuret, F.; Flores, R.; Foglesong, J.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franklin, C.; Freeman, W.; Fu, S.; Fuess, S.; Gadfort, T.; Galea, C. F.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, E.; Gao, M.; Garcia, C.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Gardner, J.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, A.; Gay, P.; Gelé, D.; Gelhaus, R.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gillberg, D.; Geurkov, G.; Ginther, G.; Gobbi, B.; Goldmann, K.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N.; Golovtsov, V.; Gómez, B.; Gomez, G.; Gomez, R.; Goodwin, R.; Gornushkin, Y.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graham, D.; Graham, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Gray, K.; Greder, S.; Green, D. R.; Green, J.; Green, J. A.; Greenlee, H.; Greenwood, Z. D.; Gregores, E. M.; Grinstein, S.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Groer, L.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Gu, W.; Guglielmo, J.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggard, E.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hall, I.; Hall, R. E.; Han, C.; Han, L.; Hance, R.; Hanagaki, K.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harrington, R.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hauser, R.; Hays, C.; Hays, J.; Hazen, E.; Hebbeker, T.; Hebert, C.; Hedin, D.; Heinmiller, J. M.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Hong, S. J.; Hooper, R.; Hou, S.; Houben, P.; Hu, Y.; Huang, J.; Huang, Y.; Hynek, V.; Huffman, D.; Iashvili, I.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jacquier, Y.; Jaffré, M.; Jain, S.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jayanti, R.; Jenkins, A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, Y.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Johnson, P.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Jöstlein, H.; Jouravlev, N.; Juarez, M.; Juste, A.; Kaan, A. P.; Kado, M. M.; Käfer, D.; Kahl, W.; Kahn, S.; Kajfasz, E.; Kalinin, A. M.; Kalk, J.; Kalmani, S. D.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, J.; Katsanos, I.; Kau, D.; Kaur, R.; Ke, Z.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Kesisoglou, S.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. M.; Kim, H.; Kim, K. H.; Kim, T. J.; Kirsch, N.; Klima, B.; Klute, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Konrath, J.-P.; Komissarov, E. V.; Kopal, M.; Korablev, V. M.; Kostritski, A.; Kotcher, J.; Kothari, B.; Kotwal, A. V.; Koubarovsky, A.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozminski, J.; Kryemadhi, A.; Kouznetsov, O.; Krane, J.; Kravchuk, N.; Krempetz, K.; Krider, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kubantsev, M.; Kubinski, R.; Kuchinsky, N.; Kuleshov, S.; Kulik, Y.; Kumar, A.; Kunori, S.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kvita, J.; Kuznetsov, V. E.; Kwarciany, R.; Lager, S.; Lahrichi, N.; Landsberg, G.; Larwill, M.; Laurens, P.; Lavigne, B.; Lazoflores, J.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Le Meur, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Leflat, A.; Leggett, C.; Lehner, F.; Leitner, R.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Leveque, J.; Lewis, P.; Li, J.; Li, Q. Z.; Li, X.; Lima, J. G. R.; Lincoln, D.; Lindenmeyer, C.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Litmaath, M.; Lizarazo, J.; Lobo, L.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lounis, A.; Love, P.; Lu, J.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lucotte, A.; Lueking, L.; Luo, C.; Lynker, M.; Lyon, A. L.; Machado, E.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madaras, R. J.; Mättig, P.; Magass, C.; Magerkurth, A.; Magnan, A.-M.; Maity, M.; Makovec, N.; Mal, P. K.; Malbouisson, H. B.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Manakov, V.; Mao, H. S.; Maravin, Y.; Markley, D.; Markus, M.; Marshall, T.; Martens, M.; Martin, M.; Martin-Chassard, G.; Mattingly, S. E. K.; Matulik, M.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McCroskey, R.; McKenna, M.; McMahon, T.; Meder, D.; Melanson, H. L.; Melnitchouk, A.; Mendes, A.; Mendoza, D.; Mendoza, L.; Meng, X.; Merekov, Y. P.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Michaut, M.; Miao, C.; Miettinen, H.; Mihalcea, D.; Mikhailov, V.; Miller, D.; Mitrevski, J.; Mokhov, N.; Molina, J.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Moore, R. W.; Moulik, T.; Muanza, G. S.; Mostafa, M.; Moua, S.; Mulders, M.; Mundim, L.; Mutaf, Y. D.; Nagaraj, P.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimhan, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Naumann, N. A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nelson, S.; Neuenschwander, R. T.; Neustroev, P.; Noeding, C.; Nomerotski, A.; Novaes, S. F.; Nozdrin, A.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurczyk, A.; Nurse, E.; O'Dell, V.; O'Neil, D. C.; Oguri, V.; Olis, D.; Oliveira, N.; Olivier, B.; Olsen, J.; Oshima, N.; Oshinowo, B. O.; Otero y Garzón, G. J.; Padley, P.; Papageorgiou, K.; Parashar, N.; Park, J.; Park, S. K.; Parsons, J.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Pawloski, G.; Perea, P. M.; Perez, E.; Peters, O.; Pétroff, P.; Petteni, M.; Phaf, L.; Piegaia, R.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Pogorelov, Y.; Pol, M.-E.; Pompoš, A.; Polosov, P.; Pope, B. G.; Popkov, E.; Porokhovoy, S.; Prado da Silva, W. L.; Pritchard, W.; Prokhorov, I.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Przybycien, M. B.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ramberg, E.; Ramirez-Gomez, R.; Rani, K. J.; Ranjan, K.; Rao, M. V. S.; Rapidis, P. A.; Rapisarda, S.; Raskowski, J.; Ratoff, P. N.; Ray, R. E.; Reay, N. W.; Rechenmacher, R.; Reddy, L. V.; Regan, T.; Renardy, J.-F.; Reucroft, S.; Rha, J.; Ridel, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robinson, S.; Rodrigues, R. F.; Roco, M.; Rotolo, C.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rucinski, R.; Rud, V. I.; Russakovich, N.; Russo, P.; Sabirov, B.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santoro, A.; Satyanarayana, B.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schmitt, C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schukin, A. A.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sengupta, S.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shankar, H. C.; Shary, V.; Shchukin, A. A.; Sheahan, P.; Shephard, W. D.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shishkin, A. A.; Shpakov, D.; Shupe, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Simak, V.; Sirotenko, V.; Skow, D.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smith, D. E.; Smith, R. P.; Smolek, K.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Song, X.; Song, Y.; Sonnenschein, L.; Sopczak, A.; Sorín, V.; Sosebee, M.; Soustruznik, K.; Souza, M.; Spartana, N.; Spurlock, B.; Stanton, N. R.; Stark, J.; Steele, J.; Stefanik, A.; Steinberg, J.; Steinbrück, G.; Stevenson, K.; Stolin, V.; Stone, A.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strandberg, J.; Strang, M. A.; Strauss, M.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D.; Strovink, M.; Stutte, L.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Sznajder, A.; Talby, M.; Tentindo-Repond, S.; Tamburello, P.; Taylor, W.; Telford, P.; Temple, J.; Terentyev, N.; Teterin, V.; Thomas, E.; Thompson, J.; Thooris, B.; Titov, M.; Toback, D.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tolian, C.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Toole, T.; Torborg, J.; Touze, F.; Towers, S.; Trefzger, T.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trippe, T. G.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Turcot, A. S.; Tuts, P. M.; Utes, M.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Vachon, B.; van den Berg, P. J.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vartapetian, A.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Vaupel, M.; Vaz, M.; Verdier, P.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vigneault, M.; Villeneuve-Seguier, F.; Vishwanath, P. R.; Vlimant, J.-R.; Von Toerne, E.; Vorobyov, A.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vysotsky, V.; Wahl, H. D.; Walker, R.; Wallace, N.; Wang, L.; Wang, Z.-M.; Warchol, J.; Warsinsky, M.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weber, M.; Weerts, H.; Wegner, M.; Wermes, N.; Wetstein, M.; White, A.; White, V.; Whiteson, D.; Wicke, D.; Wijnen, T.; Wijngaarden, D. A.; Wilcer, N.; Willutzki, H.; Wilson, G. W.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wittlin, J.; Wlodek, T.; Wobisch, M.; Womersley, J.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wu, Z.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Q.; Xuan, N.; Yacoob, S.; Yamada, R.; Yan, M.; Yarema, R.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Yen, Y.; Yip, K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yoffe, F.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zabi, A.; Zanabria, M.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zhang, B.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zheng, H.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zitoun, R.; Zmuda, T.; Zutshi, V.; Zviagintsev, S.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    2006-09-01

    The DØ experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to DØ.

  1. ITER Central Solenoid Module Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, John

    2016-09-23

    The fabrication of the modules for the ITER Central Solenoid (CS) has started in a dedicated production facility located in Poway, California, USA. The necessary tools have been designed, built, installed, and tested in the facility to enable the start of production. The current schedule has first module fabrication completed in 2017, followed by testing and subsequent shipment to ITER. The Central Solenoid is a key component of the ITER tokamak providing the inductive voltage to initiate and sustain the plasma current and to position and shape the plasma. The design of the CS has been a collaborative effort between the US ITER Project Office (US ITER), the international ITER Organization (IO) and General Atomics (GA). GA’s responsibility includes: completing the fabrication design, developing and qualifying the fabrication processes and tools, and then completing the fabrication of the seven 110 tonne CS modules. The modules will be shipped separately to the ITER site, and then stacked and aligned in the Assembly Hall prior to insertion in the core of the ITER tokamak. A dedicated facility in Poway, California, USA has been established by GA to complete the fabrication of the seven modules. Infrastructure improvements included thick reinforced concrete floors, a diesel generator for backup power, along with, cranes for moving the tooling within the facility. The fabrication process for a single module requires approximately 22 months followed by five months of testing, which includes preliminary electrical testing followed by high current (48.5 kA) tests at 4.7K. The production of the seven modules is completed in a parallel fashion through ten process stations. The process stations have been designed and built with most stations having completed testing and qualification for carrying out the required fabrication processes. The final qualification step for each process station is achieved by the successful production of a prototype coil. Fabrication of the first

  2. Environmental Geographic Information Systems (EGIS) at Stennis Space Center (SSC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carr, Hugh; Smoot, James; Parikh, Joy

    2004-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation includes: 1) Background of SSC Environmental GIS (EGIS); 2) Principal Center Activities; 3) SSC's GIS Applications: a) Environmental Emergency Response Tool, b) CERCLA, c) Facilities Master Planning, d) Natural Resource Management and Site Assessment.

  3. A SOLENOID CAPTURE SYSTEM FOR NEUTRINO PRODUCTION.

    SciTech Connect

    DIWAN,M.; KAHN,S.; PALMER,R.B.

    1999-03-29

    This paper describes the use of a high field solenoidal magnet to capture secondary pions from the production target. The captured pions subsequentially decay to produce the neutrino beam. A pion capture system using a high field solenoid magnet has been proposed for the muon collider[1]. This technology would also be available for neutrino beam production. It will be shown that a high field solenoid would produce a larger flux of neutrinos with energy, E{sub v} < 1.3 GeV, than a neutrino beam produced with a horn system. The {nu}{sub e}, {bar {nu}}{sub e} flux contamination in the solenoid neutrino beam is only 0.15%.

  4. Solenoidal model for superstructure in chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Finch, J T; Klug, A

    1976-01-01

    Chromatin prepared by brief digestion of nuclei with micrococcal nuclease, and extracted in 0.2 mM EDTA, appears in the electron microscope as filaments of about 100 A diameter which coil loosely. In 0.2 mM Mg++ these "nucleofilaments" condense into a supercoil or solenoidal structure of pitch about 110 A corresponding to the diameter of a nucleofilament. It is proposed that the x-ray reflections at orders of 110 A observed in chromatin originate in the spacing between turns of the solenoid rather than that between nucleosomes along the nucleofilament. The solenoidal structure appears to need histone H1 for its stabilization. Under certain conditions, isolated nucleosomes can also aggregate into a similar structure. The solenoidal structure can be correlated with the "thread" of diameter about 300 A observed by other workers in nuclei. Images PMID:1064861

  5. MUON COLLIDERS - IONIZATION COOLING AND SOLENOIDS.

    SciTech Connect

    PARSA,Z.

    1999-03-29

    For a muon collider, to obtain the needed luminosity, the phase space volume must be greatly reduced within the muon life time. The ionization cooling is the preferred method used to compress the phase space and reduce the emittance to obtain high luminosity muon beams. Alternating solenoid lattices has been proposed for muon colliders, where the emittance are huge. We present an overview, discuss formalism, transfer maps for solenoid magnets and beam dynamics.

  6. 40 CFR 35.6805 - Contents of an SSC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions Requirements for Administering A Superfund State Contract (ssc) § 35.6805 Contents of an SSC. The... the SSC. (d) A site description, pursuant to § 35.6105(a)(2)(i). (e) A site-specific Statement of Work...

  7. 40 CFR 35.6805 - Contents of an SSC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions Requirements for Administering A Superfund State Contract (ssc) § 35.6805 Contents of an SSC. The... and do not significantly impact the SSC. (i) The CERCLA assurances, as appropriate, described...

  8. 40 CFR 35.6805 - Contents of an SSC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions Requirements for Administering A Superfund State Contract (ssc) § 35.6805 Contents of an SSC. The... and do not significantly impact the SSC. (i) The CERCLA assurances, as appropriate, described...

  9. 40 CFR 35.6805 - Contents of an SSC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions Requirements for Administering A Superfund State Contract (ssc) § 35.6805 Contents of an SSC. The... and do not significantly impact the SSC. (i) The CERCLA assurances, as appropriate, described...

  10. 40 CFR 35.6820 - Conclusion of the SSC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conclusion of the SSC. 35.6820 Section... Actions Requirements for Administering A Superfund State Contract (ssc) § 35.6820 Conclusion of the SSC... (See § 35.6805(i)(4)). (b) After the administrative conclusion of the Superfund State Contract, EPA may...

  11. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, S.; Takahashi, K.; Okamura, M.; Horioka, K.

    2016-02-15

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons.

  12. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, S; Takahashi, K; Okamura, M; Horioka, K

    2016-02-01

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons.

  13. Behavior of moving plasma in solenoidal magnetic field in a laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, S.; Takahashi, K.; Okamura, M.; Horioka, K.

    2016-02-01

    In a laser ion source, a solenoidal magnetic field is useful to guide the plasma and to control the extracted beam current. However, the behavior of the plasma drifting in the magnetic field has not been well understood. Therefore, to investigate the behavior, we measured the plasma ion current and the total charge within a single pulse in the solenoid by changing the distance from the entrance of the solenoid to a detector. We observed that the decrease of the total charge along the distance became smaller as the magnetic field became larger and then the charge became almost constant with a certain magnetic flux density. The results indicate that the transverse spreading speed of the plasma decreased with increasing the field and the plasma was confined transversely with the magnetic flux density. We found that the reason of the confinement was not magnetization of ions but an influence induced by electrons.

  14. Construction of the Solenoid Spectrometer for Nuclear AstroPhysics (SSNAP) at Notre Dame

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Jacob; Bardayan, Dan; Blankstein, Drew; Hall, Matthew; Hall, Oscar; Kolata, James; O'Malley, Patrick; Becchetti, Frederick; Blackmon, Jeffery; Pain, Steven

    2016-09-01

    The study of nucleon transfer reactions gives information about many nuclei involved in astrophysical processes. The design and use of new detector systems improves our ability to accurately characterize these nuclei. The Solenoid Spectrometer for Nuclear AstroPhysics (SSNAP) is a new helical orbit spectrometer being designed at the University of Notre Dame to study transfer reactions with high-energy light ion beams from the FN tandem accelerator. SSNAP incorporates a series of position-sensitive silicon detectors to be set on-axis inside the second TwinSol solenoid. SSNAP will be sensitive to light ions produced in different reactions and the charged-particle decay products from the exotic nuclei produced. Results of initial testing and future plans with this detector system will be shown in this presentation. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation and the Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics.

  15. An industrial cabling machine for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Royet, J.; Armer, R.; Hannaford, R.; Scanlan, R.

    1989-02-01

    The SSC project will need the manufacturing of some 25,000 kilometers of keystoned flat cable. The technical specifications of the various cables to be produced are the result of five years of research and development work at LBL. An experimental cable machine was built and run in the laboratory; many improvements were implemented and tested. Semi-industrial production of the various cables was performed, and the resulting cables were used and tested in the one-meter model magnets and 17.5 meter dipole prototypes. From these experiments an industrial cabler specification was generated and used for an international RFQ. The winner of the contract is Dour Metal, a Belgium company that built the first industrial prototype which is now in a production line at New England Electric Wire Company. In this paper we describe the main characteristics of the machine and give the first industrial production results of superconducting keystoned cable for the SSC project. 4 refs.

  16. Compositeness and QCD at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, V.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cahn, R.; Chivukula, S.; Ellis, S.; Freeman, J.; Heusch, C.; Huston, J.; Kondo, K.; Morfin, J.

    1987-10-12

    Compositeness may be signaled by an increase in the production of high transverse momentum hadronic jet pairs or lepton pairs. The hadronic jet signal competes with the QCD production of jets, a subject of interest in its own right. Tests of perturbative QCD at the SSC will be of special interest because the calculations are expected to be quite reliable. Studies show that compositeness up to a scale of 20 to 35 TeV would be detected in hadronic jets at the SSC. Leptonic evidence would be discovered for scales up to 10 to 20 TeV. The charge asymmetry for leptons would provide information on the nature of the compositeness interaction. Calorimetry will play a crucial role in the detection of compositeness in the hadronic jet signal. Deviations from an e/h response of 1 could mask the effect. The backgrounds for lepton pair production seem manageable. 30 refs., 19 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. Magnetic field decay in model SSC dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, W.S.; Althaus, R.F.; Barale, P.J.; Benjegerdes, R.W.; Green, M.A.; Green, M.I.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1988-08-01

    We have observed that some of our model SSC dipoles have long time constant decays of the magnetic field harmonics with amplitudes large enough to result in significant beam loss, if they are not corrected. The magnets were run at constant current at the SSC injection field level of 0.3 tesla for one to three hours and changes in the magnetic field were observed. One explanation for the observed field decay is time dependent superconductor magnetization. Another explanation involves flux creep or flux flow. Data are presented on how the decay changes with previous flux history. Similar magnets with different Nb-Ti filament spacings and matrix materials have different long time field decay. A theoretical model using proximity coupling and flux creep for the observed field decay is discussed. 10 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Ship to Shore Connector Amphibious Craft (SSC)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-303 Ship to Shore Connector Amphibious Craft (SSC) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget Defense...RDT&E - Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation SAR - Selected Acquisition Report SCP - Service Cost Position TBD - To Be Determined TY - Then...Performance Parameter O - Objective SAASM - Selective Availability Anti-Spoofing Module SWH - Significant Wave Height T - Threshold TV - Technical View

  19. Operational decoupling in the SSC Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Bourianoff, G.

    1991-11-01

    This paper will summarize a recent study of the effects and correction of linear coupling in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) lattice. There are several aspects of the SSC lattice that make direct extrapolation of techniques used on existing machines unreliable. The most obvious aspect of the SSC which departs from previous experience is the small dynamic aperture which lies well within the beampipe. A second aspect is the existence of long arcs with low superperiodicity which allow various sources of skew quadrupole to accumulate to large, and, perhaps, nonlinear values. A third aspect is the relatively large value of systematic skew quadrupole error in the main dipoles. This results from asymmetric placement of the cold mass in the cryostat. Coupling must be considered harmful if it leads to irreversible emittance blow-up, a decrease in the dynamic aperture, or inoperability of the machine. These negative effects are generally related to coupling terms that accumulate to large and, hence, nonlinear values prior to correction. The harmful effects can also be caused by the linearly coupled orbits interacting with high-order multipole fields that exist in the other magnets.

  20. SSC Quadrupole Magnet Performance at LBL

    SciTech Connect

    Lietzke, A.F.; Barale, P.; Benjegerdes, r.; Caspi, S.; Cortella, J.; Dell'Orco, D.; Gilbert, W.; Green, M.I.; Mirk, K.; Peters, C.; Scalan, R.; Taylor, C.E.; Wandesforde, A.

    1992-10-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) contracted to design, construct, and test four short (1m) models and six full-size (5m) models of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) main-ring 5 meter focusing quadrupole magnet (211 Tesla/meter). The training performance of these magnets is summarized. Magnets were tested in a horizontal boiling helium (1 Atm) cryostat. The magnetic, strain-gage and training responses to two thermal cycles were measured. The quadrupole gradient, and relative multipole purity were determined from Fourier analysis of the rotating coil signals. Magnetic and strain-gage measurements were taken on-the-fly. The voltage-tap data was analyzed to determine quench-origin and propagation characteristics. Quench-training proceeded at 4.3K until a plateau was achieved or sub-cooling (2.5K) was used to accelerate the training process. The early short (1m) magnets were also trained at 1.8K (10kA) to help identify potential weak areas. The MIITs were calculated to compare various magnet protection methods. Except for modest training above the anticipated SSC operating point, the magnets performed very well and proved to be self-protecting. Some design flaws were identified and corrected. The last two 1 m models and all the 5m models have been reinstalled in cryostats at the SSC Laboratory, retested and used to achieve various milestones in their program.

  1. Failure Scenarios and Mitigations and for the BaBar Superconducting Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, EunJoo; Candia, A.; Craddock, W.W.; Racine, M.; Weisend, J.G., II; /SLAC

    2005-12-13

    The cryogenic department at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is responsible for the operation, troubleshooting, and upgrade of the 1.5 Tesla superconducting solenoid detector for the BABAR B-factory experiment. Events that disable the detector are rare but significantly impact the availability of the detector for physics research. As a result, a number of systems and procedures have been developed over time to minimize the downtime of the detector, for example improved control systems, improved and automatic backup systems, and spares for all major components. Together they can prevent or mitigate many of the failures experienced by the utilities, mechanical systems, controls and instrumentation. In this paper we describe various failure scenarios, their effect on the detector, and the modifications made to mitigate the effects of the failure. As a result of these modifications the reliability of the detector has increased significantly with only 3 shutdowns of the detector due to cryogenics systems over the last 2 years.

  2. Solenoid-valve-controlled fuel injection device

    SciTech Connect

    Oshizawa, H.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a solenoid-valve-controlled fuel injection device comprising: a fuel injection pump having a pump cylinder, a plunger rotatably and reciprocably disposed in the pump cylinder in a fluid-tight manner and defining a fuel pressurization chamber between a distal end of the plunger and the pump cylinder, a drive shaft rotatable in synchronism with an output shaft of an internal combustion engine, means responsive to rotation of the drive shaft for reciprocably displacing the plunger to pressurize fuel in the pressurization chamber, and a fuel chamber for being supplied with fuel from a fuel tank in response to rotation of the drive shaft, whereby the pressurized fuel can be fed into cylinders of the internal combustion engine; a solenoid valve for selectively opening and closing a communication passage by which the pressurization chamber and the fuel chamber communicate with each other; valve opening delay time detecting means for detecting a valve opening delay time of the solenoid valve; valve closing delay time detecting means for detecting a valve closing delay time of the solenoid valve; valve closing period calculating means for calculating a valve closing time of the solenoid valve according to operating conditions of the internal combustion engine; target fuel injection time calculating means for calculating a target fuel injection time according to the operating conditions of the internal combustion engine.

  3. Field Mapping System for Solenoid Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, K. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Kim, D. E.; Lee, H. G.; Park, S. J.; Chung, C. W.; Kang, B. K.

    2007-01-01

    A three-dimensional Hall probe mapping system for measuring the solenoid magnet of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun has been developed. It can map the solenoid field either in Cartesian or in cylindrical coordinate system with a measurement reproducibility better than 5 × 10-5 T. The system has three axis motors: one for the azimuthal direction and the other two for the x and z direction. This architecture makes the measuring system simple in fabrication. The magnetic center was calculated using the measured axial component of magnetic field Bz in Cartesian coordinate system because the accuracy of magnetic axis measurement could be improved significantly by using Bz, instead of the radial component of magnetic field Br. This paper describes the measurement system and summarizes the measurement results for the solenoid magnetic of PLS photo-cathode RF e-gun.

  4. Solenoid transport for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Edward

    2004-06-15

    Solenoid transport of high current, heavy ion beams is considered for several stages of a heavy ion fusion driver. In general this option is more efficient than magnetic quadrupole transport at sufficiently low kinetic energy and/or large e/m, and for this reason it has been employed in electron induction linacs. Ideally an ion beam would be transported in a state of Brillouin flow, i.e. cold in the transverse plane and spinning at one half the cyclotron frequency. The design of appropriate solenoids and the equilibrium and stability of transported ion beams are discussed. An outline of application to a fusion driver is also presented.

  5. Alternative Methods for Field Corrections in Helical Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, M. L.; Krave, S. T.; Tompkins, J. C.; Yonehara, K.; Flanagan, G.; Kahn, S. A.; Melconian, K.

    2015-05-01

    Helical cooling channels have been proposed for highly efficient 6D muon cooling. Helical solenoids produce solenoidal, helical dipole, and helical gradient field components. Previous studies explored the geometric tunability limits on these main field components. In this paper we present two alternative correction schemes, tilting the solenoids and the addition of helical lines, to reduce the required strength of the anti-solenoid and add an additional tuning knob.

  6. An alternate end design for SSC dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, C.; Caspi, S.; Taylor, C.

    1989-02-01

    Experience in the SSC dipole program has shown that fabrication of cylindrical coil ends is difficult. Cable stiffness requires large forces to maintain the proper position of the conductors in the end during winding. After winding, the coil ends remain distorted nd significant motion of the need conductors is required to force the coil end into the molding cavity. Local mechanical stresses are high during this process and extra pieces of insulation are required to prevent turn-to-turn shorts from developing during the winding and molding steps. Prior to assembly the coil end is compressed in a mold cavity and injected with a filler material to correct surface irregularities and fill voids in the end. LBL has developed an alternate design which permits the conductors to be wound over the end using minimal force and technician coerosion. The conductors are placed on a conical surface where the largest diameter over the outer layer conductors is 10 cm. No coil end spaces or insulation pieces between turns are required. The conductor geometry was analytically optimized to meet SSC multipole requirements for the ends. The first 1-m dipole utilizing this end geometry has been constructed and successfully tested. Design and construction data are presented. Also model test results, including training and multipole measurements of the end are given. 1 ref., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Sextupole correction coils for SSC model dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Rechen, J.B.; Gilbert, W.S.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1985-05-01

    Local correction of the sextupole error field is proposed for the dipoles of the SSC. This requirement is imposed on the design by the high field quality required both during injection at low fields and during colliding beam operation at high fields. Error fields in the main dipole windings due to superconductor magnetization and conductor misplacements and unwanted sextupole and decapole magnetic field terms. To correct the sextupole error field we have constructed sextupole coils made of a single layer of superconducting wire and have mounted them with high precision on the stainless steel bore tube. These correction coils have been operated with 1 meter long SSC model dipoles in both the self-powered and externally-powered modes. The sextupole field in the bore has been reduced by as much as a factor of 50. The level of correction depends strongly on the angular alignment of the correction coil with respect to the sextupole error field it is to correct. Results of tests, performance of the correction coils and alignment requirements for the system are presented.

  8. Preserving SSC Design Function Using RCM Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadi, K

    2009-02-04

    Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) can be defined as an approach that employs preventive, predictive, proactive, and reactive maintenance practices and strategies in an integrated manner to increase the probability that a Structure, System, or Component (SSC) will function as designed over its life cycle with optimum maintenance. The goal of RCM is to preserve the SSC intended design function at the lowest cost by developing a maintenance strategy that is supported by sound technical and economic justification. RCM has been used extensively by the aircraft, space, defense, power generation, and manufacturing industries where functional failures of SSCs can have the potential to compromise worker or public safety, cause adverse environmental impact, cause loss of production, and/or result in excessive damage to critical SSCs. This paper provides a framework for performing an RCM analysis in support of DOE Order 430.1A (Life Cycle Asset Management) and DOE Order 420.1B (Facility Safety). The influence of RCM on the various aspects of the maintenance program including the work control process is also discussed.

  9. Measurements of ground motion and SSC dipole vibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Shiltsev, V.D.; Weaver, H.J.

    1993-06-01

    The results of seismic ground measurements at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site and investigations of vibrational properties of superconducting dipoles for the SSC are presented. Spectral analysis of the data obtained in the large frequency band from 0.05 Hz to 2000 Hz is done. Resonant behavior and the dipole-to-ground transform ratio are investigated. The influence of measured vibrations on SSC operations is considered.

  10. Bent solenoid simulations for the muon cooling experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Eyssa, Y.M.; Kenney, S.; Miller, J.R.; Prestemon, S.

    1999-07-09

    The muon collider captures pions using solenoidal fields. The pion are converted to muons as they are bunched in an RF phase rotation system. Solenoids are used to focus the muons as their emitance is reduced during cooling. Bent solenoids are used to sort muons by momentum. This report describes a bent solenoid system that is part of a proposed muon cooling experiment. The superconducting solenoid described in this report consists of a straight solenoid that is 1.8 m long, a bent solenoid that is 1.0 m to 1.3 m long and a second straight solenoid that is 2.6 m long. The bent solenoid bends the muons over an angle of 57.3 degrees (1 radian). The bent solenoid has a minor coil radius (to the center of the coil) that is 0.24 m and a major radius (of the solenoid axis) of 1.0 m. The central induction along the axis is 3.0 T There is a dipole that generates an induction of 0.51 T, perpendicular to the plane of the bend, when the induction on the bent solenoid axis is 3.0 T.

  11. First experiment with the double solenoid RIBRAS system

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtenthaeler, R.; Condori, R. Pampa; Lepine-Szily, A.; Pires, K. C. C.; Morais, M. C.; Leistenschneider, E.; Scarduelli, V. B.; Gasques, L. R.; Faria, P. N. de; Mendes, D. R. Jr.; Shorto, J. M. B.

    2013-05-06

    A description of the double solenoid system (RIBRAS) operating since 2004 in one of the beam lines of the Pelletron Laboratory of the Institute of Physics of the University of Sao Paulo is presented. The recent installation of the secondary scattering chamber after the second solenoid is reported and the first experiment in RIBRAS using both solenoids is described.

  12. Bent Solenoids with Superimposed Dipole Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Rainer, B.; Goodzeit, Carl, L.

    2000-03-21

    A conceptual design and manufacturing technique were developed for a superconducting bent solenoid magnet with a superimposed dipole field that would be used as a dispersion device in the cooling channel of a future Muon Collider. The considered bent solenoid is equivalent to a 180° section of a toroid with a major radius of ~610 mm and a coil aperture of ~416 mm. The required field components of this magnet are 4 tesla for the solenoid field and 1 tesla for the superimposed dipole field. A magnet of this size and shape, operating at these field levels, has to sustain large Lorentz forces resulting in a maximum magnetic pressure of about 2,000 psi. A flexible round mini-cable with 37 strands of Cu-NbTi was selected as the superconductor. Detailed magnetic analysis showed that it is possible to obtain the required superimposed dipole field by tilting the winding planes of the solenoid by ~25°. A complete structural analysis of the coil support system and the helium containment vessel under thermal, pressure, and Lorentz force loads was carried out using 3D finite element models of the structures. The main technical issues were studied and solutions were worked out so that a highly reliable magnet of this type can be produced at an affordable cost.

  13. Emittance growth in rippled solenoidal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    Emittance growth results due to accelerating gaps, and magnetic field gaps in induction accelerators. The analytic technique previously used to study electric field induced emittance growth for immersed source beams is extended to include solenoid fringing field effects in the present work. These results have application to industrial induction accelerators and to high brightness Free Electron Laser drivers. 1 ref., 2 figs.

  14. Error field generation of solenoid magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    Many applications for large solenoids and solenoidal arrays depend on the high precision of the axial field profile. In cases where requirements of ..delta..B/B for nonaxial fields are on the order of 10/sup -4/, the actual winding techniques of the solenoid need to be considered. Whereas an ideal solenoid consisting of current loops would generate no radial fields along the axis, in reality, the actual current-carrying conductors must follow spiral or helical paths. A straightforward method for determining the radial error fields generated by coils wound with actual techniques employed in magnet fabrication has been developed. The method devised uses a computer code which models a magnet by sending a single, current-carrying filament along the same path taken by the conductor during coil winding. Helical and spiral paths are simulated using small, straight-line current segments. This technique, whose results are presented in this paper, was used to predict radial field errors for the Elmo Bumpy Torus-Proof of Principle magnet. These results include effects due to various winding methods, not only spiral/helical and layer-to-layer transitions, but also the effects caused by worst-case tolerance conditions both from the conductor and the winding form (bobbin). Contributions made by extraneous circuitry (e.g., overhead buswork and incoming leads) are also mentioned.

  15. Solenoid and non-solenoid protein recognition using stationary wavelet packet transform

    PubMed Central

    Vo, An; Nguyen, Nha; Huang, Heng

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: Solenoid proteins are emerging as a protein class with properties intermediate between structured and intrinsically unstructured proteins. Containing repeating structural units, solenoid proteins are expected to share sequence similarities. However, in many cases, the sequence similarities are weak and non-detectable. Moreover, solenoids can be degenerated and widely vary in the number of units. So that it is difficult to detect them. Recently, several solenoid repeats detection methods have been proposed, such as self-alignment of the sequence, spectral analysis and discrete Fourier transform of sequence. Although these methods have shown good performance on certain data sets, they often fail to detect repeats with weak similarities. In this article, we propose a new approach to recognize solenoid repeats and non-solenoid proteins using stationary wavelet packet transform (SWPT). Our method associates with three advantages: (i) naturally representing five main factors of protein structure and properties by wavelet analysis technique; (ii) extracting novel wavelet features that can capture hidden components from solenoid sequence similarities and distinguish them from global proteins; (iii) obtaining statistics features that capture repeating motifs of solenoid proteins. Results: Our method analyzes the characteristics of amino acid sequence in both spectral and temporal domains using SWPT. Both global and local information of proteins are captured by SWPT coefficients. We obtain and integrate wavelet-based features and statistics-based features of amino acid sequence to improve the classification task. Our proposed method is evaluated by comparing to state-of-the-art methods such as HHrepID and REPETITA. The experimental results show that our algorithm consistently outperforms them in areas under ROC curve. At the same false positive rate, the sensitivity of our WAVELET method is higher than other methods. Availability: http

  16. The Upgraded D0 detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahmed, S.N.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; Anastasoaie, M.; Andeen, T.; Anderson, J.T.; Anderson, S.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U. /Prague, Inst. Phys. /San Francisco de Quito U. /Clermont-Ferrand U. /LPSC, Grenoble /Marseille, CPPM /Orsay, LAL /Paris U., VI-VII /DAPNIA, Saclay /Strasbourg, IReS

    2005-07-01

    The D0 experiment enjoyed a very successful data-collection run at the Fermilab Tevatron collider between 1992 and 1996. Since then, the detector has been upgraded to take advantage of improvements to the Tevatron and to enhance its physics capabilities. We describe the new elements of the detector, including the silicon microstrip tracker, central fiber tracker, solenoidal magnet, preshower detectors, forward muon detector, and forward proton detector. The uranium/liquid-argon calorimeters and central muon detector, remaining from Run I, are discussed briefly. We also present the associated electronics, triggering, and data acquisition systems, along with the design and implementation of software specific to D0.

  17. Early instrumentation projects at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, D.J.; Mestha, L.K.; Miller, S.A.; Talman, R.

    1990-04-01

    Conceptual designs for some SSC instrumentation is given. Stripline beam position monitors, appropriate for cryogenic operation are described, along with plans for their A/D conversion and recording. A global timing system based on fibre optics is described; it is to be capable of {plus minus}100 psec accuracy over many tens of kilometers. Stabilization is patterned after a scheme in use at CERN. Timing pulses (roughly 60 MHz) as well as pulses synchronized to the various frequency modulated RF systems are distributed and scaled by digital clocks situated at those locations where accurate timing is required. Finally, a digital control circuit to be used for synchronizing beam transfer the Low Energy Booster to the Medium Energy Booster is described. It is based on controlling the relative phases of the two RF systems even though one of the frequencies is variable. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  18. Design studies of SSC coupled cavity linac

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.R.; Bhandari, R.; Funk, W.; Raparia, D.; Watson, J.

    1991-05-01

    The SSC coupled cavity linac (CCL) will be a side coupled structure operating at 1284 MHz to accelerate a nominal 25 mA H{sup {minus}} beam from 70 MeV to 600 MeV. We present results of both cavity design and beam dynamic studies. Each accelerating cavity is optimized by SUPERFISH; coupled cavity characteristics in the region of low-, mid- and high-energies are checked by MAFIA-3D. MAFIA-3D was also used to design the bridge coupler systems. The beam dynamics and error analysis are simulated by CCLDYN and CCLTRACE. Possible future upgrade of the CCL to 1 GeV is also discussed. 2 refs., 6 figs.

  19. Film Implementation of a Neutron Detector (FIND): Critical Materials Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    absorption factor much less than one. Other- wise, the measured count rate will be the product of the neutron absorption factor, neutron flux, and detector...TECHNICAL REPORT 1957 September 2007 Film Implementation of a Neutron Detector (FIND): Critical Materials Properties W. C. McGinnis SSC San...TECHNICAL REPORT 1957 September 2007 Film Implementation of a Neutron Detector (FIND): Critical Materials Properties W. C. McGinnis SSC San Diego

  20. SDC solenoidal detector notes: Jets in the forward region

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.D. . Inst. for Fundamental Theory); Barnett, M. ); White, A. . Dept. of Physics)

    1991-01-01

    We examine jet shapes in the forward region, {eta}(jet) > 4, of 40 TeV proton-proton collisions and compare them with 90{degree} jets. In the laboratory, forward jets are Lorentz contracted into thin disks.'' For example, a jet which at {theta}{sub cm}(jet) = 90{degree} would have its particles located within a cone'' with angular widths {Delta}{theta}{sub cm} = {Delta}{phi} = 28{degree} (i.e., 0.5 radians), if boosted'' to {eta}(jet) = 4 ({theta}{sub cm} = 2{degree}) becomes a disk'' with an angular width of {Delta}{theta}{sub cm} = 1{degree} Jet shapes are roughly invariant when plotted versus pseudorapidity, {eta}, and azimuthal angle, {phi}. In addition, we examine how well the electromagnetic component (i.e., photons and electrons) of a jet tracks'' the true position of the jet.

  1. SDC solenoidal detector notes: Jets in the forward region

    SciTech Connect

    Field, R.D.; Barnett, M.; White, A.

    1991-12-31

    We examine jet shapes in the forward region, {eta}(jet) > 4, of 40 TeV proton-proton collisions and compare them with 90{degree} jets. In the laboratory, forward jets are Lorentz contracted into thin ``disks.`` For example, a jet which at {theta}{sub cm}(jet) = 90{degree} would have its particles located within a ``cone`` with angular widths {Delta}{theta}{sub cm} = {Delta}{phi} = 28{degree} (i.e., 0.5 radians), if ``boosted`` to {eta}(jet) = 4 ({theta}{sub cm} = 2{degree}) becomes a ``disk`` with an angular width of {Delta}{theta}{sub cm} = 1{degree}! Jet shapes are roughly invariant when plotted versus pseudorapidity, {eta}, and azimuthal angle, {phi}. In addition, we examine how well the electromagnetic component (i.e., photons and electrons) of a jet ``tracks`` the true position of the jet.

  2. 50 CFR 600.133 - Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC... Fishery Management Councils § 600.133 Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC). (a) Each Council shall..., evaluation, and peer review of such statistical, biological, economic, social, and other...

  3. 50 CFR 600.133 - Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC... Fishery Management Councils § 600.133 Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC). (a) Each Council shall..., evaluation, and peer review of such statistical, biological, economic, social, and other...

  4. A model for computing at the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Baden, D. . Dept. of Physics); Grossman, R. . Lab. for Advanced Computing)

    1990-06-01

    High energy physics experiments at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will show a substantial increase in complexity and cost over existing forefront experiments, and computing needs may no longer be met via simple extrapolations from the previous experiments. We propose a model for computing at the SSC based on technologies common in private industry involving both hardware and software. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  5. 40 CFR 35.6820 - Conclusion of the SSC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions Requirements for Administering A Superfund State Contract (ssc) § 35.6820 Conclusion of the SSC... all future operation and maintenance as required by CERCLA section 104(c) and addressed in 40 CFR...

  6. 40 CFR 35.6820 - Conclusion of the SSC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions Requirements for Administering A Superfund State Contract (ssc) § 35.6820 Conclusion of the SSC... all future operation and maintenance as required by CERCLA section 104(c) and addressed in 40 CFR...

  7. 40 CFR 35.6820 - Conclusion of the SSC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions Requirements for Administering A Superfund State Contract (ssc) § 35.6820 Conclusion of the SSC... all future operation and maintenance as required by CERCLA section 104(c) and addressed in 40 CFR...

  8. 40 CFR 35.6820 - Conclusion of the SSC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions Requirements for Administering A Superfund State Contract (ssc) § 35.6820 Conclusion of the SSC... all future operation and maintenance as required by CERCLA section 104(c) and addressed in 40 CFR...

  9. 40 CFR 35.6805 - Contents of an SSC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Cooperative Agreements and Superfund State Contracts for Superfund Response Actions Requirements for Administering A Superfund State Contract (ssc) § 35.6805 Contents of an SSC. The... statutes and regulations (of each government entity that is a party to the contract) governing the...

  10. Experimental study of heavy flavor physics and SSC research and development at the University of Mississippi. Progress report, November 1, 1991--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Reidy, J.J.; Cremaldi, L.M.; Summers, D.J.

    1992-12-31

    The High Energy Physics Group has been principally involved with Fermilab experiments on photoproduction and hadroproduction of charm. Nuclear reactions with a mixed 250-GeV hadronic beam and 500-GeV {pi}-N interactions were used. Considerable attention is devoted to the UNIX/RISC computing farm. The Group also has an SSC R&D program dealing with the adaptation and use of the HETC-based detector simulation code CALOR89, the development of liquid scintillator technology for use in SSC detector calorimeters, the hanging file calorimeter project, and the calorimetry program for GEM.

  11. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    DOE PAGES

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; ...

    2014-11-12

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. In this study, the laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, whichmore » was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.« less

  12. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-01

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. The laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  13. Laser ion source with solenoid field

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue, Takeshi; Fuwa, Yasuhiro; Kondo, Kotaro; Okamura, Masahiro

    2014-11-12

    Pulse length extension of highly charged ion beam generated from a laser ion source is experimentally demonstrated. In this study, the laser ion source (LIS) has been recognized as one of the most powerful heavy ion source. However, it was difficult to provide long pulse beams. By applying a solenoid field (90 mT, 1 m) at plasma drifting section, a pulse length of carbon ion beam reached 3.2 μs which was 4.4 times longer than the width from a conventional LIS. The particle number of carbon ions accelerated by a radio frequency quadrupole linear accelerator was 1.2 × 1011, which was provided by a single 1 J Nd-YAG laser shot. A laser ion source with solenoid field could be used in a next generation heavy ion accelerator.

  14. SUPERCONDUCTING SOLENOIDS FOR THE MUON COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    GREEN,M.A.; EYSSA,Y.; KENNY,S.; MILLER,J.R.; PRESTEMON,S.; WEGGEL,R.J.

    2000-06-12

    The muon collider is a new idea for lepton colliders. The ultimate energy of an electron ring is limited by synchrotron radiation. Muons, which have a rest mass that is 200 times that of an electron can be stored at much higher energies before synchrotron radiation limits ring performance. The problem with muons is their short life time (2.1 {micro}s at rest). In order to operate a muon storage ring large numbers of muon must be collected, cooled and accelerated before they decay to an electron and two neutrinos. As the authors see it now, high field superconducting solenoids are an integral part of a muon collider muon production and cooling systems. This report describes the design parameters for superconducting and hybrid solenoids that are used for pion production and collection, RF phase rotations of the pions as they decay into muons and the muon cooling (reduction of the muon emittance) before acceleration.

  15. Superconducting solenoids for the Muon collider

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Eyssa, Y.; Kenny, S.; Miller, J.R.; Prestemon, S.; Weggel, R.J.

    1999-09-23

    The muon collider is a new idea for lepton colliders. The ultimate energy of an electron ring is limited by synchrotron radiation. Mouns, which have a rest mass that is 200 times that of an electron can be stored at much higher energies before synchrotron radiation limits ring performance. The problem with muon is their short lifetime (2.1 microseconds at rest). In order to operate a muon storage ring large numbers of muon must be collected, cooled and accelerated before they decay to an electron and two neutrinos. As we see it now, high field superconducting solenoids are an integral part of a muon coUider muon production and cooling systems. This report will describe the design parameters for superconducting and hybrid solenoids that are used for pion production and collection, RF phase rotations of the pions as they decay into muons and the muon cooling (reduction of the muon emittance) before acceleration.

  16. Restoration of the DIII-D solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, P.M.; Robinson, J.I.; Gonzales, E.; Rolens, G.W.

    1997-11-01

    The DIII-D tokamak has been operated since June 1995 with constrained ohmic heating capability as imposed by the abandonment of half of it`s solenoid system due to a cooling water leak. The solenoid is comprised of A and B windings with separate multiple power leads to each. The cooling water leak occurred in the lead of the B winding. This leak occurred in a remote area under the DIII-D vessel and is believed to be caused by magnetic forces developing cyclic bending loads on the conductor. Visual inspection of the lead using flexible bore scopes indicated that the structural fiberglass overwrap intended to band the supply and return leads into a primary-force canceling group had failed allowing individual conductors to become inadequately supported against bending loads. The overwrap failed as a result of poor epoxy encapsulation of the lead which was manufactured in 1978. Inspection of the A lead confirmed no overwrap failure and that the vacuum encapsulation of the A lead was proper and to specification. In order to continue operations, it was decided to abandon the B winding of the solenoid and operate under reduced (5 V-sec) capability. An in-situ repair approach was mandated by the extensive and lengthy effort required to disassemble, repair, and reassemble the tokamak. Access from outside the tokamak was severely limited. A plan to repair the damaged lead was developed and implemented over a 10 month period. This paper describes the repair of the solenoid lead. A VCR video tape of these remote installation efforts has been assembled and will be shown.

  17. Bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichmann, H.; Deboi, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    The design, fabrication, assembly and test of a development configuration bistable (latching) solenoid actuated propellant isolation valve suitable for the control hydrazine and liquid fluorine to an 800 pound thrust rocket engine is described. The valve features a balanced poppet, utilizing metal bellows, a hard poppet/seat interface and a flexure support system for the internal moving components. This support system eliminates sliding surfaces, thereby rendering the valve free of self generated particles.

  18. Lamination and end pack design studies of SSC low energy booster magnet prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, N.

    1993-05-01

    The SSC Laboratory plans to deploy two ``large`` detectors for the essential high-energy physics experiments at the initial startup of the collider. The GEM detector is optimized to emphasize precise measurement of photons and electrons, as well as precise tracking of high-energy muons. An essential part of the GEM detector is the magnet subsystem, which provides the magnetic field necessary for identification and high-resolution tracking of charged particles. This large superconducting magnet system, with ferromagnetic field-shapers, presents a variety of engineering challenges in superconductor technology, in magnet-winding technology, fabrication, assembly and installation of large and heavy components, and in ensuring the required high operating availability.

  19. Focusing solenoids for the MICE cooling channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Baynham, E.; Barr, G.; Lau, W.; Rochford, J.H.; Yang, S.

    2003-09-15

    This report describes a design for focusing solenoids for the low beta sections for the proposed Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). There are three focusing solenoid pairs that will be around the muon absorbers for MICE. The two solenoid coils have an inside diameter of 510 mm, a length of 180 mm, and a thickness of 100 mm. A distance of 260 mm separates the two coils in the pair. The coils are designed to operate at opposite polarity, in order to create a gradient field in the low beta sections of the MICE cooling channel. As result, the force pushing the coil pair apart approaches 270 metric tons when the coils operate close to the short sample current for the superconductor. The forces between the coils will be carried by a support structure that is both on the inside and the outside the coils. During some modes of operation for MICE, the coils may operate at the same polarity, which means that the force between the coils pushes them together. The focusing magnet must be designed for both modes of operation. This support structure for the coils will be part of the focusing magnet quench protection system.

  20. Focusing Solenoids for the Mice Cooling Channel

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Baynham, E.; Rochford, J.H.; Barr, G.; Lau, W.; Yang, S.

    2004-06-23

    This report describes a design for focusing solenoids for the low beta sections for the proposed Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE). There are three focusing solenoid pairs that will be around the muon absorbers for MICE. The two solenoid coils have an inside diameter of 510 mm, a length of 180 mm, and a thickness of 100 mm. A distance of 260 mm separates the two coils in the pair. The coils are designed to operate at opposite polarity, in order to create a gradient field in the low beta sections of the MICE cooling channel. As result, the force pushing the coil pair apart approaches 270 metric tons when the coils operate close to the short sample current for the superconductor. The forces between the coils will be carried by a support structure that is both on the inside and the outside the coils. During some modes of operation for MICE, the coils may operate at the same polarity, which means that the force between the coils pushes them together. The focusing magnet must be designed for both modes of operation. This support structure for the coils will be part of the focusing magnet quench protection system.

  1. D0 Solenoid Upgrade Project: Vacuum Pumping Calculations for the D0 Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-08-02

    This engineering note documents the calculations done to determine the vacuum pumping speed for the D-Zero solenoid. The raw calculations are attached. A summary of the results are listed. The vacuum pumping speed of the solenoid is determined by the conductance of the pumping path. At higher pressure ranges during initial pumpdown, the conductances will be rather high. Calculations were not done for the transient pumpdown period, only the steady state type pumping situation. The pressure is assumed to be on the order of 10E-7 torr. This is the free molecular flow regime based on Knudsen number. This pressure regime is also where the pumping speed would be least. The conductances were calculated based on pumping helium gas at a temperature of 300 Kelvin. The total conductance of the pumping path from the solenoid to the inlet of the turbomolecular pump is 11.8 L/s. The effective pumping speed of a 1000 L/s turbo pump attached to this pumping path is 11.7 L/s. The minimum required pumping speed for design purposes was set at 4.3 L/s. This value was arrived at by assuming a warm leak size (10E-8 atm-cc/sec) was not detected during fabrication of the solenoid. It is then assumed that the leak leaks cold liquid helium into the vacuum space. With this leak rate, a 4.3 L/s pumping speed would be able to maintain a 2 x 10E-7 torr pressure in the solenoid vacuum jacket. The solenoid would be able to be operated with this small leak with continuous pumping.

  2. Geotechnical characterization and construction methods for SSC tunnel excavation

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, P.P.; Lundin, T.K. Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX )

    1990-06-01

    The site for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) facility was selected in 1988 after a nationwide proposal competition. The selected site is located in Ellis County, Texas, surrounding the town of Waxahachie which is about 30 miles (48 km) south of the City of Dallas central business district. This paper will describe the geotechnical conditions anticipated for excavation at the SSC site. A general geologic and geomechanical description of the rock present will be followed by a summary of the site-specific conceptual design for the tunneled components of the SSC machine. The Supercollider project will include about 70 miles (113) km of tunnel excavation.

  3. Dual-latching solenoid-actuated valve assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brudnicki, Myron J. (Inventor); Yang, Jeff (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A tube-type shutoff valve is electrically positioned to its open or closed position by a concentric electromagnetic solenoid. The valve is dual latching in that the armature of the solenoid maintains the sliding tube of the valve in an open or closed position by means of permanent magnets which are effective when current is not supplied to the solenoid. The valve may also be actuated manually.

  4. Dual-latching solenoid-actuated valve assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brudnicki, Myron J.; Yang, Jeff

    1994-08-01

    A tube-type shutoff valve is electrically positioned to its open or closed position by a concentric electromagnetic solenoid. The valve is dual latching in that the armature of the solenoid maintains the sliding tube of the valve in an open or closed position by means of permanent magnets which are effective when current is not supplied to the solenoid. The valve may also be actuated manually.

  5. An elementary argument for the magnetic field outside a solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Aritro

    2017-01-01

    The evaluation of the magnetic field inside and outside a uniform current density infinite solenoid of uniform cross-section is an elementary problem in classical electrodynamics that all undergraduate Physics students study. Symmetry properties of the cylinder and the judicious use of Ampere’s circuital law leads to correct results; however it does not explain why the field is non zero for a finite length solenoid, and why it vanishes as the solenoid becomes infinitely long. An argument is provided in Farley and Price (2001 Am. J. Phys. 69 751), explaining how the magnetic field behaves outside the solenoid and not too far from it, as a function of the length of the solenoid. A calculation is also outlined for obtaining the field just outside the circular cross section solenoid, in the classic text Classical Electrodynamics by Jackson, 3rd edn (John Wiley and Sons, Inc.), problems 5.3-5.5. The purpose of this paper is to provide an elementary argument for why the field becomes negligible as the length of the solenoid is increased. A quantitative analysis is provided for the field outside the solenoid, at radial distances large compared to the linear dimension of the solenoid cross section.

  6. The effects of realistic pancake solenoids on particle transport

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, X.; Okamura, M.; Pikin, A.; Fischer, W.; Luo, Y.

    2011-02-01

    Solenoids are widely used to transport or focus particle beams. Usually, they are assumed as being ideal solenoids with a high axial-symmetry magnetic field. Using the Vector Field Opera program, we modeled asymmetrical solenoids with realistic geometry defects, caused by finite conductor and current jumpers. Their multipole magnetic components were analyzed with the Fourier fit method; we present some possible optimized methods for them. We also discuss the effects of 'realistic' solenoids on low energy particle transport. The finding in this paper may be applicable to some lower energy particle transport system design.

  7. Approximate theory the electromagnetic energy of solenoid in special relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prastyaningrum, I.; Kartikaningsih, S.

    2017-01-01

    Solenoid is a device that is often used in electronic devices. A solenoid is electrified will cause a magnetic field. In our analysis, we just focus on the electromagnetic energy for solenoid form. We purpose to analyze by the theoretical approach in special relativity. Our approach is begun on the Biot Savart law and Lorentz force. Special theory relativity can be derived from the Biot Savart law, and for the energy can be derived from Lorentz for, by first determining the momentum equation. We choose the solenoid form with the goal of the future can be used to improve the efficiency of the electrical motor.

  8. Functional and Genomic Analyses of Alpha-Solenoid Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, David; Palidwor, Gareth A.; Shcherbinin, Sergey; Szengel, Angelika; Schaefer, Martin H.; Perez-Iratxeta, Carol; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-solenoids are flexible protein structural domains formed by ensembles of alpha-helical repeats (Armadillo and HEAT repeats among others). While homology can be used to detect many of these repeats, some alpha-solenoids have very little sequence homology to proteins of known structure and we expect that many remain undetected. We previously developed a method for detection of alpha-helical repeats based on a neural network trained on a dataset of protein structures. Here we improved the detection algorithm and updated the training dataset using recently solved structures of alpha-solenoids. Unexpectedly, we identified occurrences of alpha-solenoids in solved protein structures that escaped attention, for example within the core of the catalytic subunit of PI3KC. Our results expand the current set of known alpha-solenoids. Application of our tool to the protein universe allowed us to detect their significant enrichment in proteins interacting with many proteins, confirming that alpha-solenoids are generally involved in protein-protein interactions. We then studied the taxonomic distribution of alpha-solenoids to discuss an evolutionary scenario for the emergence of this type of domain, speculating that alpha-solenoids have emerged in multiple taxa in independent events by convergent evolution. We observe a higher rate of alpha-solenoids in eukaryotic genomes and in some prokaryotic families, such as Cyanobacteria and Planctomycetes, which could be associated to increased cellular complexity. The method is available at http://cbdm.mdc-berlin.de/~ard2/. PMID:24278209

  9. Space Charge Compensation (SSC) in hadron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V; /Fermilab

    2010-04-01

    Longitudinal space-charge fields can generate substantial distortion of the rf-generated potential wells, fill the extraction kicker gap in the beam, affect the incoherent synchrotron tune spread, and have the potential for causing instability and longitudinal emittance growth. The net effective voltage per turn resulting from the space-charge self voltage and the ring inductive wall impedance ?0L is proportional to the slope of the beam current distribution e{beta}c {lambda}(s) and can be expressed as: V{sub s} = {partial_derivative}{lambda}(s)/{partial_derivative}s [g{sub 0}Z{sub 0}/2{beta}{gamma}{sup 2} - {omega}{sub 0}L]e{beta}cR where R = c/{omega}{sub 0} is the average machine radius, Z{sub 0} = 377 Ohm and g{sub 0} = 1 + 2ln(b/a) is the geometric space-charge constant, a and b are the beam radii and vacuum-chamber aperture. By introduction a tunable inductance L, e.g. of ferrite rings, the term in brackets and, consequently, the space-charge effect may be substantially reduced or canceled at some chosen energy [1]. This concept has been experimentally proven at the LANL Proton Storage Ring at LANL where three inductive inserts, each consisting of 30 'cores' of a cylindrically shaped ferrite with thickness of 1 inch, inner diameter of 5 inches, and an outer diameter of 8 inches, were installed. The magnetic permeability of the ferrite could be adjusted by introducing current into solenoids wound around the ferrite so that in the MHz range of frequencies the longitudinal space charge impedance of the machine was compensated. A strong longitudinal instability was noticed at much higher frequencies of about 75 MHz, but it was later suppressed by heating the ferrite to a temperature of 130 C to make it more lossy.

  10. High field solenoids for muon cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Eyssa, Y.; Kenny, S.; Miller, J.R.; Prestemon, S.

    1999-09-08

    The proposed cooling system for the muon collider will consist of a 200 meter long line of alternating field straight solenoids interspersed with bent solenoids. The muons are cooled in all directions using a 400 mm long section liquid hydrogen at high field. The muons are accelerated in the forward direction by about 900 mm long, 805 MHz RF cavities in a gradient field that goes from 6 T to -6 T in about 300 mm. The high field section in the channel starts out at an induction of about 2 T in the hydrogen. As the muons proceed down the cooling channel, the induction in the liquid hydrogen section increases to inductions as high as 30 T. The diameter of the liquid hydrogen section starts at 750 mm when the induction is 2 T. As the induction in the cooling section goes up, the diameter of the liquid hydrogen section decreases. When the high field induction is 30 T, the diameter of the liquid hydrogen section is about 80 mm. When the high field solenoid induction is below 8.5 T or 9T, niobium titanium coils are proposed for generating .the magnetic field. Above 8.5 T or 9 T to about 20 T, graded niobium tin and niobium titanium coils would be used at temperatures down to 1.8 K. Above 20 T, a graded bybrid magnet system is proposed, where the high field magnet section (above 20 T) is either a conventional water cooled coil section or a water cooled Bitter type coil. Two types of superconducting coils have been studied. They include; epoxy impregnated intrinsically stable coils, and cable in conduit conductor (CICC) coils with helium in the conduit.

  11. Status of superconducting magnet development (SSC, RHIC, LHC)

    SciTech Connect

    Wanderer, P.

    1993-12-31

    This paper summarize recent superconducting accelerator magnet construction and test activities at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSC), the Large Hadron Collider at CERN (LHC), and the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven (RHIC). Future plan are also presented.

  12. A simulation of data acquisition system for SSC experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Watase, Y.; Ikeda, H.

    1989-04-01

    A simulation on some parts of the data acquisition system was performed using a general purpose simulation language GPSS. Several results of the simulation are discussed for the data acquisition system for the SSC experiment.

  13. Heavy neutrinos and new bosons at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Kayser, B. . Div. of Physics); Deshpande, N. . Dept. of Physics); Gunion, J.F. . Dept. of Physics)

    1984-01-01

    Methods for seeking and studying heavy neutrinos and new W bosons at the SSC are considered. Such particles are predicted by left-right symmetric models. Their properties and experimental signatures are analyzed. 25 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Optimization of the cell lattice parameters for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    1986-10-15

    This report discusses the following topics on the cell lattices parameters optimization at the SSC: Cell lattices; needed aperture; magnet errors; calculated aperture; the trade off curves; cost model; and additional considerations.

  15. Toward a realistic low-field SSC lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Heifets, S.

    1985-10-01

    Three six-fold lattices for 3 T superferric SSC have been generated at TAC. The program based on the first order canonical transformation was used to compare lattices. On this basis the realistic race-track lattices were generated.

  16. Development of Solenoid Spectrometer for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xiao; Bucher, Brian; Howard, Alan; Li, Yunju; Kolata, James; Roberts, Amy; Tang, Xiaodong

    2012-10-01

    A Helios-type solenoid spectrometer has been successfully built using the existing TWINSOL facility at Notre Dame. This spectrometer has been tested using the ^12C+^12C fusion reaction in the energy of range of 4 MeV to 6 MeV in the center of mass frame. With this spectrometer, we have achieved 65 keV(FWHM) resolution for the excitation energy. A measurement with a clean background has been achieved at Ecm=4 MeV by using an aluminum degrader to absorb the scattered 12C particle. The preliminary result together with our future plan will be presented.

  17. Angular momentum paradoxes with solenoids and monopoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipkin, Harry J.; Peshkin, Murray

    1982-12-01

    The Poynting vector produced by crossing the Coulomb field from a charged particle with a distant external magnetic field gives rise to a physical angular momentum which must be included in applications of angular momentum conservation and quantization. Simple examples show how the neglect of the return flux in an infinite solenoid or in two-dimensional models can lead to unphysical effects, how the Dirac charge quantization is obtained and can be modified by the presence of additional long range forces, and why the origin must be excluded in describing the motion of a point charge in the field of a fixed point monopole.

  18. Underground measurements of seismic vibrations at the SSC site

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.D.; Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Weaver, H.J.

    1995-03-17

    The results of underground measurements of seismic vibrations at the tunnel depth of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site are presented. Spectral analysis of the data obtained in the frequency band from 0.05 Hz to 1500 Hz is performed. It is found that amplitudes of ambient ground motion are less than requirements for the Collider, but cultural vibrations are unacceptably large and will cause fast growth of transverse emittance of the SSC beams.

  19. Tracking simulation and wire chamber requirements for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G.; Niczyporuk, B.B.; Palounek, A.P.T.

    1988-11-01

    Limitations placed on wire chambers by radiation damage and rate requirements in the SSC environment are reviewed. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tracking systems which meet these requirements are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. 16 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Detector limitations, STAR

    SciTech Connect

    Underwood, D. G.

    1998-07-13

    Every detector has limitations in terms of solid angle, particular technologies chosen, cracks due to mechanical structure, etc. If all of the presently planned parts of STAR [Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC] were in place, these factors would not seriously limit our ability to exploit the spin physics possible in RHIC. What is of greater concern at the moment is the construction schedule for components such as the Electromagnetic Calorimeters, and the limited funding for various levels of triggers.

  1. Status report on an engineering design study of hermetic liquid argon calorimetry for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, T.; Davis, M.; DiGiacomo, N.J.; Easom, B.; Gordon, H.; Hupp, J.; Killian, K.; Kroon, P.; Lajczok, M.; Marx, M. . Astronautics Group; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY; Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver, CO . Astronautics Group; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY; Martin Marietta Aerospace, Denver, CO . Astronautics Group; State Un

    1989-01-01

    There is general recognition that engineering issues are critical to the viability of liquid argon calorimetry (LAC) at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). We have undertaken to quantitatively address these issues and, if possible, perform a preliminary design of a proof of principle'' LAC for SSC. To establish LAC as viable at SSC, we must demonstrate that the physics performance of the device is acceptable, despite the presence of dead material due to vessels and support structure. Our approach involves the construction, by a team of physicists and engineers, of one three dimensional model of the LAC system, built as a hierarchy of components and structures, from which we directly perform interferences checks, mechanical, thermal and magnetic analyses, particle tracking, hermeticity evaluation, physics simulation and assembly. This study, begun in February 1989 as part of the SSC generic detector R and D program, was immediately preceded by a workshop at which engineering details of existing and planned LAC systems were thoroughly examined. We describe below the status of our work, beginning with short descriptions of the tools used, the study requirements and LAC configuration baseline. We then detail the LAC design as it presently stands, including assembly considerations, and conclude with a quantitative assessment of the LAC hermeticity. 19 refs., 12 figs.

  2. ITER Central Solenoid support structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Freudenberg, Kevin D; Myatt, R.

    2011-01-01

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) is comprised of six independent coils held together by a pre-compression support structure. This structure must provide enough preload to maintain sufficient coil-to-coil contact and interface load throughout the current pulse. End of burn (EOB) represents one of the most extreme time-points doing the reference scenario when the currents in the CS3 coils oppose those of CS1 & CS2. The CS structure is performance limited by the room temperature static yield requirements needed to support the roughly 180 MN preload to resist coil separation during operation. This preload is applied by inner and external tie plates along the length of the coil stack by mechanical fastening methods utilizing Superbolt technology. The preloading structure satisfies the magnet structural design criteria of ITER and will be verified during mockup studies. The solenoid is supported from the bottom of the toroidal field (TF) coil casing in both the vertical radial directions. The upper support of the CS coil structure maintains radial registration with the TF coil in the event of vertical disruptions (VDE) loads and earthquakes. All of these structure systems are analyzed via a global finite element analysis (FEA). The model includes a complete sector of the TF coil and the CS coil/structure in one self-consistent analysis. The corresponding results and design descriptions are described in this report.

  3. Superconducting solenoid magnet of the DCBA-T3 experiment searching for neutrinoless double beta decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, M.; Kondou, Y.; Makida, Y.; Haruyama, T.; Ishihara, N.; Kobayashi, Y.; Iwai, G.; Iwase, H.; Ohama, T.; Takahashi, K.; Yamada, Y.; Kato, Y.; Tanaka, K.; Tonooka, M.; Kitamura, S.; Ishikawa, T.; Igarashi, H.; Kakuno, H.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tajima, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Ito, R.; Tamura, N.

    2014-03-01

    The experiment of neutrinoless double beta decay (0ν β β) is the only realistic method for investigating the Majorana nature and the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. An R&D project called Drift Chamber Beta-ray Analyzer (DCBA) has been developing a magnetic tracking detector for 0ν β β experiments at KEK. A superconducting solenoid magnet (SCSM) has been constructed to produce a uniform magnetic field for the prototype test facility called DCBA-T3. The results of SCSM test runs are described, as well as its design studies. Since the SCSM is a prototype magnet for a future detector temporarily called Magnetic Tracking Detector (MTD), it is essential to understand its long-term operation. The experience of about two years of operation is also described.

  4. Plasma confinement apparatus using solenoidal and mirror coils

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, T. Kenneth; Condit, William C.

    1979-01-01

    A plasma confinement apparatus, wherein multiple magnetic mirror cells are linked by magnetic field lines inside of a solenoid with the mirroring regions for adjacent magnetic mirror cells each formed by a separate mirror coil inside of the solenoid. The magnetic mirror cells may be field reversed.

  5. Residual magnetism holds solenoid armature in desired position

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawford, R. P.

    1967-01-01

    Holding solenoid uses residual magnetism to hold its armature in a desired position after excitation current is removed from the coil. Although no electrical power or mechanical devices are used, the solenoid has a low tolerance to armature displacement from the equilibrium position.

  6. Optimum dimensions of power solenoids for magnetic suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaznacheyev, B. A.

    1985-01-01

    Design optimization of power solenoids for controllable and stabilizable magnetic suspensions with force compensation in a wind tunnel is shown. It is assumed that the model of a levitating body is a sphere of ferromagnetic material with constant magnetic permeability. This sphere, with a radius much smaller than its distance from the solenoid above, is to be maintained in position on the solenoid axis by balance of the vertical electromagnetic force and the force of gravitation. The necessary vertical (axial) force generated by the solenoid is expressed as a function of relevant system dimensions, solenoid design parameters, and physical properties of the body. Three families of curves are obtained which depict the solenoid power for a given force as a function of the solenoid length with either outside radius or inside radius as a variable parameter and as a function of the outside radius with inside radius as a variable parameter. The curves indicate the optimum solenoid length and outside radius, for minimum power, corresponding to a given outside radius and inside radius, respectively.

  7. The Belle detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abashian, A.; Gotow, K.; Morgan, N.; Piilonen, L.; Schrenk, S.; Abe, K.; Adachi, I.; Alexander, J. P.; Aoki, K.; Behari, S.; Doi, Y.; Enomoto, R.; Fujii, H.; Fujita, Y.; Funahashi, Y.; Haba, J.; Hamasaki, H.; Haruyama, T.; Hayashi, K.; Higashi, Y.; Hitomi, N.; Igarashi, S.; Igarashi, Y.; Iijima, T.; Ikeda, Hirokazu; Ikeda, Hitomi; Itoh, R.; Iwai, M.; Iwasaki, H.; Iwasaki, Y.; Joo, K. K.; Kasami, K.; Katayama, N.; Kawai, M.; Kichimi, H.; Kobayashi, T.; Koike, S.; Kondo, Y.; Lee, M. H.; Makida, Y.; Manabe, A.; Matsuda, T.; Murakami, T.; Nagayama, S.; Nakao, M.; Nozaki, T.; Ogawa, K.; Ohkubo, R.; Ohnishi, Y.; Ozaki, H.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, M.; Sakai, Y.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, N.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Suzuki, J.; Suzuki, J. I.; Suzuki, S.; Takasaki, F.; Tamai, K.; Tanaka, M.; Tatomi, T.; Tsuboyama, T.; Tsukada, K.; Tsukamoto, T.; Uehara, S.; Ujiie, N.; Uno, S.; Yabsley, B.; Yamada, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamaoka, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Yoshimura, Y.; Zhao, H.; Abe, R.; Iwai, G.; Kawasaki, T.; Miyata, H.; Shimada, K.; Takahashi, S.; Tamura, N.; Abe, K.; Hanada, H.; Nagamine, T.; Nakajima, M.; Nakajima, T.; Narita, S.; Sanpei, M.; Takayama, T.; Ueki, M.; Yamaga, M.; Yamaguchi, A.; Ahn, B. S.; Kang, J. S.; Kim, Hyunwoo; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Ahn, H. S.; Jang, H. K.; Kim, C. H.; Kim, S. K.; Lee, S. H.; Park, C. S.; Won, E.; Aihara, H.; Higuchi, T.; Kawai, H.; Matsubara, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Tajima, H.; Tanaka, J.; Tomura, T.; Yokoyama, M.; Akatsu, M.; Fujimoto, K.; Hirose, M.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Itami, S.; Kani, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Nagai, I.; Okabe, T.; Oshima, T.; Senyo, K.; Sugi, A.; Sugiyama, A.; Suitoh, S.; Suzuki, S.; Tomoto, M.; Yoshida, K.; Akhmetshin, R.; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, Y. Q.; Hou, W. S.; Hsu, S. C.; Huang, H. C.; Huang, T. J.; Lee, M. C.; Lu, R. S.; Peng, J. C.; Peng, K. C.; Sahu, S.; Sung, H. F.; Tsai, K. L.; Ueno, K.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, M. Z.; Alimonti, G.; Browder, T. E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Fang, F.; Guler, H.; Jones, M.; Li, Y.; Olsen, S. L.; Peters, M.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Rosen, M.; Swain, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Varner, G.; Yamamoto, H.; Zheng, Y. H.; An, Q.; Chen, H. F.; Wang, Y. F.; Xu, Z. Z.; Ye, S. W.; Zhang, Z. P.; Asai, M.; Asano, Y.; Mori, S.; Stanič, S.; Tsujita, Y.; Zhang, J.; Žontar, D.; Aso, T.; Aulchenko, V.; Beiline, D.; Bondar, A.; Dneprovsky, L.; Eidelman, S.; Garmash, A.; Kuzmin, A.; Romanov, L.; Root, N.; Shwartz, B.; Sidorov, A.; Sidorov, V.; Usov, Y.; Zhilich, V.; Bakich, A. M.; Peak, L. S.; Varvell, K. E.; Banas, E.; Bozek, A.; Jalocha, P.; Kapusta, P.; Natkaniec, Z.; Ostrowicz, W.; Palka, H.; Rozanka, M.; Rybicki, K.; Behera, P. K.; Mohapatra, A.; Satapathy, M.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, H. S.; Dong, L. Y.; Li, J.; Liu, H. M.; Mao, Z. P.; Yu, C. X.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, S. Q.; Zhao, Z. G.; Zheng, Z. P.; Cheon, B. G.; Choi, Y.; Kim, D. W.; Nam, J. W.; Chidzik, S.; Korotuschenko, K.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Liu, T.; Marlow, D.; Mindas, C.; Prebys, E.; Rabberman, R.; Sands, W.; Wixted, R.; Choi, S.; Dragic, J.; Everton, C. W.; Gordon, A.; Hastings, N. C.; Heenan, E. M.; Moffitt, L. C.; Moloney, G. R.; Moorhead, G. F.; Sevior, M. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Tovey, S. N.; Drutskoy, A.; Kagan, R.; Pakhlov, P.; Semenov, S.; Fukunaga, C.; Suda, R.; Fukushima, M.; Goriletsky, V. I.; Grinyov, B. V.; Lyubinsky, V. R.; Panova, A. I.; Shakhova, K. V.; Shpilinskaya, L. I.; Vinograd, E. L.; Zaslavsky, B. G.; Guo, R. S.; Haitani, F.; Hoshi, Y.; Neichi, K.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Hazumi, M.; Hojo, T.; Jackson, D.; Miyake, H.; Nagashima, Y.; Ryuko, J.; Sumisawa, K.; Takita, M.; Yamanaka, T.; Hayashii, H.; Miyabayashi, K.; Noguchi, S.; Hikita, S.; Hirano, H.; Hoshina, K.; Mamada, H.; Nitoh, O.; Okazaki, N.; Yokoyama, T.; Ishino, H.; Ichizawa, S.; Hirai, T.; Kakuno, H.; Kaneko, J.; Nakamura, T.; Ohshima, Y.; Watanabe, Y.; Yanaka, S.; Inoue, Y.; Nakano, E.; Takahashi, T.; Teramoto, Y.; Kang, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Heejong; Kwon, Y.-J.; Kawai, H.; Kurihara, E.; Ooba, T.; Suzuki, K.; Unno, Y.; Kawamura, N.; Yuta, H.; Kinoshita, K.; Satpathy, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Kuniya, T.; Murakami, A.; Tsukamoto, T.; Kumar, S.; Singh, J.; Lange, J.; Stock, R.; Matsumoto, S.; Watanabe, M.; Matsuo, H.; Nishida, S.; Nomura, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sasao, N.; Ushiroda, Y.; Nagasaka, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Ogawa, S.; Shibuya, H.; Hanagaki, K.; Okuno, S.; Shen, D. Z.; Yan, D. S.; Yin, Z. W.; Tan, N.; Wang, C. H.; Yamaki, T.; Yamashita, Y.

    2002-02-01

    The Belle detector was designed and constructed to carry out quantitative studies of rare B-meson decay modes with very small branching fractions using an asymmetric e +e - collider operating at the ϒ(4S) resonance, the KEK-B-factory. Such studies require data samples containing ˜10 7 B-meson decays. The Belle detector is configured around a 1.5 T superconducting solenoid and iron structure surrounding the KEK-B beams at the Tsukuba interaction region. B-meson decay vertices are measured by a silicon vertex detector situated just outside of a cylindrical beryllium beam pipe. Charged particle tracking is performed by a wire drift chamber (CDC). Particle identification is provided by d E/d x measurements in CDC, aerogel threshold Cherenkov counter and time-of-flight counter placed radially outside of CDC. Electromagnetic showers are detected in an array of CsI( Tl) crystals located inside the solenoid coil. Muons and K L mesons are identified by arrays of resistive plate counters interspersed in the iron yoke. The detector covers the θ region extending from 17° to 150°. The part of the uncovered small-angle region is instrumented with a pair of BGO crystal arrays placed on the surfaces of the QCS cryostats in the forward and backward directions. Details of the design and development works of the detector subsystems, which include trigger, data acquisition and computer systems, are described. Results of performance of the detector subsystems are also presented.

  8. The DARHT-II-DC Final Focus Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A.C.

    2000-03-06

    The baseline DARHT2 external beam uses a pulsed solenoid final focus lens. The design of this lens was presented at TOS2 and has been considered as the final focus lens in all of the Livermore beamlines for DARHT2. In this note, we consider a new alternative DC final focus solenoid. A crude comparison between the parameters of these two designs is given in table 1. The small spot size required by the radiography and the small drift distance available between the last magnetic focusing element and the final focus solenoid imposed by the close proximity between the DARHT 2 building and the DARHT 1 axis, implies a short focal length solenoid. This in turn requires that the final focus solenoid mount inside the re-entrant cavity of the containment vessel in order to accommodate the 0.9 meter conjugate: figure 1. The ID of this cavity is 13.88 inches (35.25 cm).

  9. SOLENOID MAGNETS FOR THE FRONT END OF A NEUTRINO FACTORY.

    SciTech Connect

    GREEN,M.A.; YU,S.S.; MILLER,J.R.; PRESTEMON,S.; PALMER,R.B.

    2002-07-01

    This report describes the solenoid magnets in the front end (the section between the pion capture solenoid and the linear acceleration section) of the Level 2 study of a neutrino factory. The magnets described in the report start with the decay channel magnets that starts 18 meter downstream from the start of the pion production target. The magnet string ends with the transition solenoids that match the muon beam from the last cooling cell to the superconducting linear accelerator section. All of the magnets described in this report are solenoids. The field on axis in the solenoidal channel ranges from 1.25 T to just over 5.5 T. This report shows that the magnets in the front end of the neutrino factory are feasible.

  10. The Design Parameters for the MICE Tracker Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Chen, C.Y.; Juang, Tiki; Lau, Wing W.; Taylor,Clyde; Virostek, Steve P.; Wahrer, Robert; Wang, S.T.; Witte, Holger; Yang, Stephanie Q.

    2006-08-20

    The first superconducting magnets to be installed in the muon ionization cooling experiment (MICE) will be the tracker solenoids. The tracker solenoid module is a five coil superconducting solenoid with a 400 mm diameter warm bore that is used to provide a 4 T magnetic field for the experiment tracker module. Three of the coils are used to produce a uniform field (up to 4 T with better than 1 percent uniformity) in a region that is 300 mm in diameter and 1000 mm long. The other two coils are used to match the muon beam into the MICE cooling channel. Two 2.94-meter long superconducting tracker solenoid modules have been ordered for MICE. The tracker solenoid will be cooled using two-coolers that produce 1.5 W each at 4.2 K. The magnet system is described. The decisions that drive the magnet design will be discussed in this report.

  11. Availability and Failure Modes of the BaBar Superconducting Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Knodel, M.

    2004-09-29

    A 1.5 T thin superconducting solenoid has been in operation as part of the BaBar detector since 1999. This magnet is a critical component of the BaBar experiment. A significant amount of magnet operating experience has been gathered. The average availability of this magnet currently approaches 99 percent. This paper describes the historical frequency and modes of unplanned magnet ramp downs and quenches. It also describes steps that have been taken to mitigate these failure modes as well as planned future improvements.

  12. ITER CENTRAL SOLENOID COIL INSULATION QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N; Mann, T L; Miller, J R; Freudenberg, K D; Reed, R P; Walsh, R P; McColskey, J D; Evans, D

    2009-06-11

    An insulation system for ITER Central Solenoid must have sufficiently high electrical and structural strength. Design efforts to bring stresses in the turn and layer insulation within allowables failed. It turned out to be impossible to eliminate high local tensile stresses in the winding pack. When high local stresses can not be designed out, the qualification procedure requires verification of the acceptable structural and electrical strength by testing. We built two 4 x 4 arrays of the conductor jacket with two options of the CS insulation and subjected the arrays to 1.2 million compressive cycles at 60 MPa and at 76 K. Such conditions simulated stresses in the CS insulation. We performed voltage withstand tests and after end of cycling we measured the breakdown voltages between in the arrays. After that we dissectioned the arrays and studied micro cracks in the insulation. We report details of the specimens preparation, test procedures and test results.

  13. ITER Central Solenoid Coil Insulation Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Mann Jr, Thomas Latta; Miller, John L; Freudenberg, Kevin D; Reed, Richard P; Walsh, Robert P; McColskey, J D; Evans, D

    2010-01-01

    An insulation system for ITER Central Solenoid must have sufficiently high electrical and structural strength. Design efforts to bring stresses in the turn and layer insulation within allowables failed. It turned out to be impossible to eliminate high local tensile stresses in the winding pack. When high local stresses can not be designed out, the qualification procedure requires verification of the acceptable structural and electrical strength by testing. We built two 4x4 arrays of the conductor jacket with two options of the CS insulation and subjected the arrays to 1.2 million compressive cycles at 60 MPa and at 76 K. Such conditions simulated stresses in the CS insulation. We performed voltage withstand tests and after end of cycling we measured the breakdown voltages between in the arrays. After that we dissectioned the arrays and studied micro cracks in the insulation. We report details of the specimens preparation, test procedures and test results.

  14. Solenoid pumps for flow injection analysis.

    PubMed

    Weeks, D A; Johnson, K S

    1996-08-01

    Methods employing flow injection analysis (FIA), particularly for in situ seawater techniques, would benefit from reduction in pump size and power requirement, longer maintenance intervals, and the ability to incorporate microprocessor control of each reagent and sample flow stream. In this work, the peristaltic pump of a conventional FIA system was replaced by three solenoid-driven diaphragm pumps with integral Viton check valves, and the system was tested by performing the simple nitrite analysis, which has well-defined FIA performance characteristics. Sixty injections per hour were possible with flow rates of 0.5 mL/min for reagents and sample. The coefficient of variation was 1% for 10 μM NO(2)(-) concentrations, and the detection limit was less than 0.1 μM NO(2)(-). These values match the reported performance for this method using peristaltic pumps.

  15. Superconducting Solenoid for Superfast THz Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragin, A. V.; Khrushchev, S. V.; Kubarev, V. V.; Mezencev, N. A.; Tsukanov, V. M.; Sozinov, G. I.; Shkaruba, V. A.

    This project is related to new spectroscopy method in little-developed THz range. The method is founded on using of a free electron laser (NovoFEL) with high spectral power radiation which can be smoothly tuned in desirable range of spectrum. The objects of research of this method are fast processes in physics, chemical and biological reactions. Uniform magnetic field of 6 T value in the research area can considerably increase possibilities of this method. The magnetic field will modulate radiation of free molecules induction on characteristic frequencies of the Zeeman splitting that gives more possibilities of identification of molecules having even weak magnetic momentum. Moreover, the use of magnetic field allows essentially increase sensitivity of this method due to almost complete separation of weak measuring signals from powerful radiation of the laser. A superconducting solenoid was developed for this method. Its design and peculiarities are described in this paper.

  16. Preliminary design implications of SSC fixed-target operation

    SciTech Connect

    Zisman, M.S.

    1984-06-01

    This paper covers some of the accelerator physics issues relevant to a possible fixed-target operating mode for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). In the brief time available, no attempt has been made to design this capability into the SSC. Rather, I have tried to evaluate what the performance of such a machine might be, and to indicate the hardware implications and extraction considerations that would be part of an actual design study. Where appropriate, parameters and properties of the present LBL design for the SSC have been used; these should be taken as being representative of the general class of small-aperture, high-field colliders being considered by the accelerator physics community. Thus, the numerical examples given here must ultimately be reexamined in light of the actual parameters of the particular accelerator being considered.

  17. SSC-excited pulsations recorded near noon on GEOS 2 and on the ground (CDAW 6)

    SciTech Connect

    Wedeken, U.; Voelker, H.; Knott, K.; Lester, M.

    1986-03-01

    The SSC occurring on March 22, 1979, at 0826 UT had an unusually sharp onset in Scandinavia, in Middle Europe and in experiments on the geostationary satellite GEOS 2, which was near noon, local magnetic time. The ground magnetometer stations showed a small preimpuse which started approx.5 s before the main impulse. Both impulses needed approx.2 s to ''propagate'' from ground stations at L = 6.3-4.6. Search coil magnetometers indicate a very small precursor in northern Finland (Lapprox.4.4-6.0) which started approx.15-20 s before the main impulse. This small precursor also occurred close to the time of the SSC onset at GEOS 2. We interpret this precursor as an effect of precipitating electrons changing the ionospheric conductivity in a localized region. The main impulse triggered damped magnetic pulsations (Psc) with periods near 160 s and 50 s visible in northern Scandinavia and the electric field detector on GEOS 2. Furthermore, the magnetic field and the energetic ions at GEOS observed pulsations with periods near 80 s, but these could only be observed at the northernmost ground stations. There are several indications that the first three harmonics of standing hydromagnetic waves are detected. They may correspond to periodic oscillations of the subsolar point or eigenperiods of the SSC-excited fast mode (compressional cavity resonance). The tentatively identified second harmonic wave (period approx.80 s) is indicative of a bounce resonance of ring current protons. Inside the plasmasphere the dominant period of a superimposed Psc 4 event increased with latitude for the H component indicating several toroidal eigenoscillations.

  18. Full length SSC R and D dipole magnet test results

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, J.; Bleadon, M.; Brown, B.C.; Hanft, R.; Kuchnir, M.; Lamm, M.; Mantsch, P.; Mazur, P.O.; Orris, D.; Peoples, J.

    1989-03-01

    Four full scale SSC development dipole magnets have been tested for mechanical and quench behavior. Two are of a design similar to previous magnets but contain a number of improvements, including more uniform coil size, higher pre-stress and a redesigned inner-outer coil splice. One exceeds the SSC operating current on the second quench but the other appears to be limited by damaged superconductor to a lower current. The other two magnets are of alternate designs. One trains erratically and fails to reach a plateau and the other reaches plateau after four quenches. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  19. The Mice Focusing Solenoids and their Cooling System

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Barr, G.; Lau, W.; Senanayake, R.S.; Yang, S.Q.

    2004-05-07

    This report describes the focusing solenoid for the proposed Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) [1]. The focusing solenoid consists of a pair of superconducting solenoids that are on a common bobbin. The two coils, which have separate leads, may be operated in the same polarity or at opposite polarity. This report discusses the superconducting magnet design and the cryostat design for the MICE focusing module. Also discussed is how this superconducting magnet can be integrated with a pair of small 4.2 K coolers.

  20. The Results of Tests of the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    2009-10-19

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) spectrometer solenoid magnets will be the first magnets to be installed within the MICE cooling channel. The spectrometer magnets are the largest magnets in both mass and surface area within the MICE ooling channel. Like all of the other magnets in MICE, the spectrometer solenoids are kept cold using 1.5 W (at 4.2 K) pulse tube coolers. The MICE spectrometer solenoid is quite possibly the largest magnet that has been cooled using small coolers. Two pectrometer magnets have been built and tested. This report discusses the results of current and cooler tests of both magnets.

  1. D0 Silicon Upgrade: Pipe Sizing for Solenoid / VLPC Cryogenic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, Russ; Sakla, Steve; /Fermilab

    1995-02-20

    The addition of a solenoid magnet and VLPC detectors are two of a number of upgrades which will occur at the D-Zero detector in the near future. Both of these upgrades will require cryogenic services for their operation. The purpose of this engineering note is to document the pipe/tube size choices made for these cryogenic services. This was done by calculating the required flow rates to cool down the magnet and VLPC's over a reasonable length of time and to determine the required piping sizes for a given allowable pressure drop. The pressure drops for steady state conditions also are addressed. The cool down requirements drove the pipe size decision. The raw engineering calculations that were done for this project are included as an appendix to this note. The body of this document discusses the methods and results of the calculations. As a quick summary, Figures 1 and 2 show the size selections. Tables 1 and 2 give a more detailed size and description of each section of Solenoid and VLPC transfer line.

  2. 17. VIEW SOUTHEAST, REDUCTION GEARING AND MOTOR (WITH SOLENOID BRAKE) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW SOUTHEAST, REDUCTION GEARING AND MOTOR (WITH SOLENOID BRAKE) FOR END LOCKS; VERTICAL SHAFT IN CENTER FOR MANUAL OPERATION - Grand Street Bridge, Spanning Pequonnock River at Grand Street, Bridgeport, Fairfield County, CT

  3. 25. DETAIL OF SOLENOID BOX FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DOORS ON NORTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. DETAIL OF SOLENOID BOX FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DOORS ON NORTH SIDE OF SLC-3W MST - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  4. Superconducting solenoids for muon-cooling in the neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Miller, J.R.; Prestemon, S.

    2001-05-12

    The cooling channel for a neutrino factory consists of a series of alternating field solenoidal cells. The first section of the bunching cooling channel consists of 41 cells that are 2.75-m long. The second section of the cooling channel consists of 44 cells that are 1.65-m long. Each cell consists of a single large solenoid with an average diameter of 1.5 m and a pair of flux reversal solenoids that have an average diameter of 0.7 to 0.9 meters. The magnetic induction on axis reaches a peak value of about 5 T at the end of the second section of the cooling channel. The peak on axis field gradients in flux reversal section approaches 33 T/m. This report describes the two types of superconducting solenoid magnet sections for the muon-cooling channel of the proposed neutrino factory.

  5. Solenoid valve design minimizes vibration and sliding wear problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillon, W. A., Jr.

    1968-01-01

    Two-way cryogenic solenoid valve resists damage from vibration and metallic interfacial sliding. The new system features a flat-faced armature guided by a flexure disk which eliminates sliding surfaces and is less subject to contamination and wear.

  6. Probing the non-minimal Higgs sector at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Gunion, J.F.; Haber, H.E.; Komamiya, S.; Yamamoto, H.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.

    1987-11-01

    Non-minimal Higgs sectors occur in the Standard Model with more than one Higgs doublet, as well as in theories that go beyond the Standard Model. In this report, we discuss how Higgs search strategies must be altered, with respect to the Standard Model approaches, in order to probe the non-minimal Higgs sectors at the SSC.

  7. SSC San Diego Command History Calendar Year 2004

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    34* Underwater signals for communications "* Earthquake prediction research involving study of sound recordings TECHNOLOGY MATCH DAYS 32󈧥 SSC San Diego...Ocean Acoustic Sensors for 6,763,306 B2 13 Jul 04 Coastal Earthquake Prediction Waters, Richard L. Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems Ultra- 6,763,718 B1

  8. Triggering and data acquisition aspects of SSC tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G.; Niczyporuk, B.B.; Palounek, A.P.T.

    1989-04-01

    Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tracking systems which meet the requirements for radiation damage and rates in the SSC environment are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. Implications for data acquisition and triggering are examined. 15 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Report of the SSC Collider Dipole Review Panel

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, G.; Kirk, T.

    1989-06-01

    This report contains the following review on the SSC dipole magnets: subpanel on the R&D program and industrialization; subpanel on magnet measurement; subpanel on cold mass mechanics; subpanel on superconductor; subpanel on cryogenics; subpanel on quench protection; and subpanel on bore tube corrector coils.

  10. 50 CFR 600.133 - Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC). 600.133 Section 600.133 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS...

  11. 50 CFR 600.133 - Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC). 600.133 Section 600.133 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS...

  12. Extending the reach of the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Diebold, R.

    1986-01-01

    The physics reach of the SSC can eventually be extended considerably by an increase in luminosity. New heavy particles and other phenomena with robust signatures would be readily identified even in the presence of large numbers of simultaneous background interactions. As an example, this note examines the case in which the number of protons per SSC bunch is increased by a factor of ..sqrt..10, while other parameters are held fixed at their CDR values, to give a luminosity of 10/sup 34/cm/sup -2/sec/sup -1/. Impacts of the increased beam current on beam stability and the various subsystems are discussed. No fundamental problems have been found. While equivalent in some ways to a doubling of the energy, the costs of such a luminosity upgrade are small compared to the initial cost of the SSC. These costs are still substantial in absolute terms, however, especially in the area of cryogenic refrigeration. It is recommended that flexibility be built into the SSC to facilitate upgrades in a cost efficient manner.

  13. 50 CFR 600.133 - Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC). 600.133 Section 600.133 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS...

  14. Cryogenic Tests of the g-2 Superconducting Solenoid Magnet System

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, L.X.; Cullen Jr., J.R.; Esper, A.J.; Meier, R.E.; Pai, C.; Snydstrup, L.; Tallerico, T.; Green, M.A.

    1995-07-01

    The g-2 muon storage nng magnet system consists of four large superconducting solenoids that are up to 15.1 m in diameter. The g-2 superconducting solenoids and a superconducting inflector dipole will be cooled using forced two-phase helium in tubes. The forced two-phase helium cooling will be provided from the J-T circuit of a refrigerator that is capable of delivering 625 W at 4.5 K. The two-phase helium flows from the refrigerator J-T circuit through a heat exchanger in a storage dewar that acts as a phase separator for helium returning from the magnets. The use of a heat exchanger in the storage dewar reduces the pressure drop in the magnet flow circuit, eliminates most two phase flow oscillations, and it permits the magnets to operate at variable thermal loads using the liquid in the storage dewar as a buffer. The g-2 magnet cooling system will consist of three parallel two-phase helium flow circuits that provide cooling to the following components: (1) the four large superconducting solenoids, (2) the current interconnects between the solenoids and the solenoid gas cooled electrical leads, and (3) the inflector dipole and its gas cooled electrical leads. This report describes a cryogenic test of the two 15.1 meter diameter superconducting solenoids using two-phase helium from a dewar. The report describes the cool down procedure for the 3.5 ton outer solenoid magnet system using liquid nitrogen and two-phase helium. Low current operation of the outer solenoids is discussed.

  15. Cryogenic tests of the g-2 superconducting solenoid magnet system

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, L.X.; Cullen, J.R. Jr.; Esper, A.J.

    1995-08-01

    The g-2 muon storage ring magnet system consists of four large superconducting solenoids that are up to 15.1 m in diameter. The g-2 superconducting solenoids and a superconducting inflector dipole will be cooled using forced two-phase helium in tubes. The forced two-phase helium cooling will be provided from the J-T circuit of a refrigerator that is capable of delivering 625 W at 4.5 K. The two-phase helium flows from the refrigerator J-T circuit through a heat exchanger in a storage dewar that acts as a phase separator for helium returning from the magnets. The use of a heat exchanger in the storage dewar reduces the pressure drop in the magnet flow circuit, eliminates most two phase flow oscillations, and it permits the magnets to operate at variable thermal loads using the liquid in the storage dewar as a buffer. The g-2 magnet cooling system will consist of three parallel two-phase helium flow circuits that provide cooling to the following components: (1) the four large superconducting solenoids, (2) the current interconnects between the solenoids and the solenoid gas cooled electrical leads, and (3) the inflector dipole and its gas cooled electrical leads. This report describes a cryogenic test of the two 15.1 meter diameter superconducting solenoids using two-phase helium from a dewar. The report describes the cool down procedure for the 3.5 ton outer solenoid magnet system using liquid nitrogen and two-phase helium. Low current operation of the outer solenoids is discussed.

  16. Toroidal metrics: gravitational solenoids and static shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynden-Bell, Donald; Katz, Joseph

    2012-06-01

    In electromagnetism a current along a wire tightly wound on a torus makes a solenoid whose magnetic field is confined within the torus. In Einstein's gravity we give a corresponding solution in which a current of matter moves up on the inside of a toroidal shell and down on the outside, rolling around the torus by the short way. The metric is static outside the torus but stationary inside with the gravomagnetic field confined inside the torus, running around it by the long way. This exact solution of Einstein's equations is found by fitting Bonnor's solution for the metric of a light beam, which gives the required toroidal gravomagnetic field inside the torus, to the general Weyl static external metric in toroidal coordinates, which we develop. We deduce the matter tensor on the torus and find when it obeys the energy conditions. We also give the equipotential shells that generate the simple Bach-Weyl metric externally and find which shells obey the energy conditions.

  17. Collider Physics: SDC/SSC liquified fiber calorimetry. [Physics Dept. , Texas A M Univ

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.T.; Huson, F.R.

    1992-01-01

    Most effort was directed toward the D-Zero experiment at Fermilab. Over 3 pb[sup [minus]1] of high-quality physics data have been obtained. Analysis of the results (wino-zino physics, squark physics), D-zero data acquisition systems efforts, and level-1 and level-2 trigger work are described. Other work concerned detector development for use at the SSC. This technology consists of using liquid scintillator-filled tubes as scintillating fibers for a calorimeter.'' The key issues were to demonstrate that the liquid fibers were sufficiently rad-hard and to demonstrate that fibers with sufficiently long attenuation length could be found to satisfy the resolution requirements; both constraints could be satisfied.

  18. Collider Physics: SDC/SSC liquified fiber calorimetry. Progress report, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.T.; Huson, F.R.

    1992-12-31

    Most effort was directed toward the D-Zero experiment at Fermilab. Over 3 pb{sup {minus}1} of high-quality physics data have been obtained. Analysis of the results (wino-zino physics, squark physics), D-zero data acquisition systems efforts, and level-1 and level-2 trigger work are described. Other work concerned detector development for use at the SSC. This technology consists of using liquid scintillator-filled tubes as scintillating fibers for a ``calorimeter.`` The key issues were to demonstrate that the liquid fibers were sufficiently rad-hard and to demonstrate that fibers with sufficiently long attenuation length could be found to satisfy the resolution requirements; both constraints could be satisfied.

  19. Radiation damage testing of transistors for SSC front-end electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J.; Ekenberg, T.; Stevens, A. ); Kraner, H.; Radeka, V.; Rescia, S. ); Kerns, S. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1990-01-01

    Over the ten year expected lifetime of a typical SSC detector operating at the design luminosity of 10{sup 33} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1}, the front-end electronics at large pseudorapidities may receive total doses as high as 20 MRad(Si) of ionizing radiation and 10{sup 16} neutrons/cm{sup 2}. Discrete JFETs and monolithic MOS and bipolar transistors have been irradiated at 10 MRad(Si) and 10{sup 14} neutrons/cm{sup 2}, and the effect on transfer characteristics and noise performance have been measured. All transistors were still functional after irradiation but suffered increased noise and the MOS transistors showed significant threshold shifts and increased leakage currents. 4 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Electro-optic transient imaging instrumentation development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: Implications for SSC instrumentation development

    SciTech Connect

    Lowry, M.; Jacoby, B.; Schulte, H.

    1990-12-01

    Over the last decade, the underground weapons physics laboratories fielded by LLNL's Nuclear Test and Experimental Sciences (NTES) program have experienced marked change. This change is characterized by a phenomenal growth in the amount of data returned per event. These techniques have been developed as a result of the severe demands placed upon transient instrumentation by the physics requirements of our underground nuclear laboratories. The detector front-ends must quickly detect, process and transmit a large volume of data to recording stations located approximately 1 km from the event. In a recent event, the detector front-ends successfully handled data at a prompt rate of approximately 13 Terabits/sec. Largely, this advance can be attributed directly to the increased use of electro-optic techniques. These highly-parallel high-bandwidth imaging instrumentation systems developed for the test program may have a lot to offer the high-energy physics community tackling the challenge of the unprecedented luminosity and fidelity demands at the SSC. In what follows, we discuss details of a few of our prompt instrumentation techniques and compare these capabilities to the detector requirements for the challenging physics at the SSC. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  1. The LASS (Larger Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Barnett, B.; Bienz, T.; Bierce, R.; Bird, F.; Bird, L.; Blockus, D.; Carnegie, R.K.; Chien, C.Y.

    1986-04-01

    LASS is the acronym for the Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid spectrometer which is located in an rf-separated hadron beam at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. This spectrometer was constructed in order to perform high statistics studies of multiparticle final states produced in hadron reactions. Such reactions are frequently characterized by events having complicated topologies and/or relatively high particle multiplicity. Their detailed study requires a spectrometer which can provide good resolution in momentum and position over almost the entire solid angle subtended by the production point. In addition, good final state particle identification must be available so that separation of the many kinematically-overlapping final states can be achieved. Precise analyses of the individual reaction channels require high statistics, so that the spectrometer must be capable of high data-taking rates in order that such samples can be acquired in a reasonable running time. Finally, the spectrometer must be complemented by a sophisticated off-line analysis package which efficiently finds tracks, recognizes and fits event topologies and correctly associates the available particle identification information. This, together with complicated programs which perform specific analysis tasks such as partial wave analysis, requires a great deal of software effort allied to a very large computing capacity. This paper describes the construction and performance of the LASS spectrometer, which is an attempt to realize the features just discussed. The configuration of the spectrometer corresponds to the data-taking on K and K interactions in hydrogen at 11 GeV/c which took place in 1981 and 1982. This constitutes a major upgrade of the configuration used to acquire lower statistics data on 11 GeV/c K p interactions during 1977 and 1978, which is also described briefly.

  2. The STAR detector magnet subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, R.L.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.

    1997-07-01

    The RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) Accelerator currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory will have large detectors at two of its six intersection regions. One of these detectors, known as STAR (Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC), weighs 1100 tons and is being built around a large solenoid magnet. The magnet is 7.32 in in diameter, 7.25 m long and utilizes three different sizes of room temperature aluminum coils. The magnet will operate with a field set from 0.25 T to 0.5 T and have a field uniformity of better than 1000 ppm over a portion of its interior region. This paper describes the magnet design, fabrication and assembly requirements and presents the current construction status.

  3. Iron-free detector magnet options for the future circular collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mentink, Matthias; Dudarev, Alexey; Da Silva, Helder Filipe Pais; Rolando, Gabriella; Cure, Benoit; Gaddi, Andrea; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Gerwig, Hubert; Wagner, Udo; ten Kate, Herman

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, several iron-free solenoid-based designs of a detector magnet for the future circular collider for hadron-hadron collisions (FCC-hh) are presented. The detector magnet designs for FCC-hh aim to provide bending power for particles over a wide pseudorapidity range (0 ≤|η |≤4 ). To achieve this goal, the main solenoidal detector magnet is combined with a forward magnet system, such as the previously presented force-and-torque-neutral dipole. Here, a solenoid-based alternative, the so-called balanced forward solenoid, is presented which comprises a larger inner solenoid for providing bending power to particles at |η |≥2.5 , in combination with a smaller balancing coil for ensuring that the net force and torque on each individual coil is minimized. The balanced forward solenoid is compared to the force-and-torque-neutral dipole and advantages and disadvantages are discussed. In addition, several conceptual solenoid-based detector magnet designs are shown, and quantitatively compared. The main difference between these designs is the amount of stray field reduction that is achieved. The main conclusion is that shielding coils can be used to dramatically reduce the stray field, but that this comes at the cost of increased complexity, magnet volume, and magnet weight and reduced affordability.

  4. D0 Solenoid Upgrade Project: Solenoid Insulatiing Vacuum Vessels; Relief Path Capacity Calculation

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; Bell, D.; /Fermilab

    1993-05-26

    This engineering note documents the calculations done to determine the relief capacity of the solenoid vacuum pumping line. The calculations were done by David Bell, a co-op student from the University of Wisconsin. The calculations are attached. The conclusion is that the vacuum pumping line has a venting capacity of 129 g/s warm helium or 298 g/s warm nitrogen. Both of these capacities are much larger than the expected operating mass flow rates of the liquid helium (5 to 15 g/s) or liquid nitrogen (2 or 3 g/s) circuits. The calculations assume the solenoid vacuum vessel is at 3 psig and the relief plate is set at 1.5 psig. Additional calculations were done to prove that the venting capacity of the vacuum pumping line exceeded flowrates due to a failure mode. These calculations are attached. Since the system is not finalized, (pipe sizes not determined, components sized...) the calculations were done by first picking reasonable line sizes based on known allowed pressure drops in the system and then doing a maximum delivery rate calculation if a line was completely severed in the vacuum space of the solenoid/control dewar. The numbers from these calculations say that failure mode flow rates are 80 g/s liquid helium or 80 g/s liquid nitrogen. Both these values are less than the capacity of the relief line. In the five months since the (12/92 Dave Bell) calculations were done, some changes occured to the relief path. The most notable is that the radiation shield is now considered to be 6.625-inch O.D. instead of 6.00-inch used in the venting calculation. This change would tend to lower the capacity numbers. Another change was that for about half the venting path the chimney vacuum shell size was increased to 10-inch pipe. This change tends to increase the capacity numbers which were done assuming 8-inch pipe. These changes taken together probably offset each other or make the capacity numbers better. In either case, since the margin of safety is large, the

  5. Observations on LEP with a view to SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Toohig, T.E.

    1984-11-23

    From 24-29 October 1984 a visit was made to the LEP project at CERN with a view to extracting from the LEP planning and experience what might be useful in planning an SSC. With a circumference of 26.7 km, in a reasonably densely-populated area outside the boundaries of the CERN site, LEP already faces most of the problems of environment, public relations, maintenance and operation that will be faced by an SSC project. Information is presented under the headings of: (1) radiation protection; (2) heating, ventilation, and airconditioning; (3) electrical power distribution; (4) LEP experiments/UA1, UA2; (5) civil; (6) infrastructure installation; (7) survey; (8) safety; and (9) LEP controls. Each report lists the CERN individuals who generously provided their insights and help.

  6. Issues of the transverse feedback systems design at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, W.; Peterson, J.

    1993-05-01

    The transverse feedback systems are needed at the SSC for several different reasons. The requirements of these systems are analyzed and specified. In addition to the general requirements (power, bandwidth and gain), specific attention is given to the noises in the systems, which need to be controlled in order to keep the emittance growth at a tolerable rate. A quantitative treatment is given to specify the allowable noise level in the feedback systems.

  7. Cold iron cos THETA magnet option for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, P.

    1985-01-01

    We review first the evolution over the past several years of a cold iron, high field cos THETA magnet design option for the SSC. We note the collaborative approach pursued by BNL and LBL on the 2-in-1 option, and the culmination of this effort in the tests of the BNL 4.5 m model magnets. Next, we discuss the subsequent 1-in-1 option being pursued jointly by BNL, Fermilab and LBL.

  8. Strain energy minimization in SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) magnet winding

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, J.M.

    1990-09-24

    Differential geometry provides a natural family of coordinate systems, the Frenet frame, in which to specify the geometric properties of magnet winding. By a modification of the Euler-Bernoulli thin rod model, the strain energy is defined with respect to this frame. Then it is minimized by a direct method from the calculus of variations. The mathematics, its implementation in a computer program, and some analysis of an SSC dipole by the program will be described. 16 refs.

  9. SSC 40 mm cable results and 50 mm design discussions

    SciTech Connect

    Christopherson, D.; Capone, D.; Hannaford, R.; Remsbottom, R.; Jayakumar, R.; Snitchler, G. ); Scanlan, R.; Royet, J. )

    1990-09-01

    A summary of the cable produced for the 1990 40 mm Dipole Program is presented. The cable design parameters for the 50 mm Dipole Program are discussed, as well as portions of the SSC specification draft. Considerations leading to the final cable configuration and the results of preliminary trials are included. The first iteration of a strand mapping program to automate cable strand maps is introduced. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Dense Metal Plasma in a Solenoid for Ion Beam Neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Oks, Efim M.; Roy, Prabir K.

    2010-10-30

    Space-charge neutralization is required to compress and focus a pulsed, high-current ion beam on a target for warm dense matter physics or heavy ion fusion experiments. We described approaches to produce dense plasma in and near the final focusing solenoid through which the ion beam travels, thereby providing an opportunity for the beam to acquire the necessary space-charge compensating electrons. Among the options are plasma injection from pulsed vacuum arc sources located outside the solenoid, and using a high current (> 4 kA) pulsed vacuum arc plasma from a ring cathode near the edge of the solenoid. The plasma distribution is characterized by photographic means, by an array of movable Langmuir probes, by a small single probe, and by evaluating Stark broadening of the Balmer H beta spectral line. In the main approach described here, the plasma is produced at several cathode spots distributed azimuthally on the ring cathode. It is shown that the plasma is essentially hollow, as determined by the structure of the magnetic field, though the plasma density exceeds 1014 cm-3 in practically all zones of the solenoid volume if the ring electrode is placed a few centimeters off the center of the solenoid. The plasma is non-uniform and fluctuating, however, since its density exceeds the ion beam density it is believed that this approach could provide a practical solution to the space charge neutralization challenge.

  11. Solenoidal filtering of volumetric velocity measurements using Gaussian process regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azijli, Iliass; Dwight, Richard P.

    2015-11-01

    Volumetric velocity measurements of incompressible flows contain spurious divergence due to measurement noise, despite mass conservation dictating that the velocity field must be divergence-free (solenoidal). We investigate the use of Gaussian process regression to filter spurious divergence, returning analytically solenoidal velocity fields. We denote the filter solenoidal Gaussian process regression (SGPR) and formulate it within the Bayesian framework to allow a natural inclusion of measurement uncertainty. To enable efficient handling of large data sets on regular and near-regular grids, we propose a solution procedure that exploits the Toeplitz structure of the system matrix. We apply SGPR to two synthetic and two experimental test cases and compare it with two other recently proposed solenoidal filters. For the synthetic test cases, we find that SGPR consistently returns more accurate velocity, vorticity and pressure fields. From the experimental test cases, we draw two important conclusions. Firstly, it is found that including an accurate model for the local measurement uncertainty further improves the accuracy of the velocity field reconstructed with SGPR. Secondly, it is found that all solenoidal filters result in an improved reconstruction of the pressure field, as verified with microphone measurements. The results obtained with SGPR are insensitive to correlation length, demonstrating the robustness of the filter to its parameters.

  12. Decoupling the SSC collider using local correction techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bourianoff, G.; Pilat, F.

    1991-10-01

    This paper will summarize recent study of the effects and correction of linear coupling in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) lattice. There are several aspects of the SSC lattice that make direct extrapolation of techniques used on existing machines unreliable. The most obvious aspect of the SSC which departs from previous experience is the small dynamic aperture which lies well within the beampipe. A second aspect is the existence of long arcs with low superperiodicity which allows various sources of skew quadrupole to accumulate to large, and, perhaps, nonlinear values. A third aspect is the relatively large value of systematic skew quadrupole error in the main dipoles. This results from asymmetric placement of the cold mass in the cryostat. Coupling must be considered harmful if it leads to irreversible emittance blow-up, a decrease in the dynamic aperture, or inoperability of the machine. These negative effects are generally related to coupling terms that accumulate to large and, hence, nonlinear values prior to correction. The harmful effects can also be cause by the linearly coupled orbits interacting with high-order multipole fields that exist in the other magnets.

  13. A correlative study of SSC's, interplanetary shocks, and solar activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, J. K.; Lepping, R. P.

    1973-01-01

    A total of 93 SSC's were examined during the four year period from 1968 to 1971 at and near the peak of the solar activity cycle. Of the 93 SSC's 81 could be associated with solar activity, such as solar flares and radio bursts of Type II and Type IV. The mean propagation speeds of these flare-associated events ranged from 400 to 1000 km/sec with an average speed of 600-700 km/sec. Disturbances associated with 48 of the SSC's have been studied in detail using the corresponding interplanetary (IP) magnetic field, and plasma data when they were available. It was found that 41 of the 48 disturbances corresponded to IP shock waves, and the remaining seven events were tangential discontinuities. Thirty percent of the IP shocks had thick structure (i.e. the magnetic field jump across the shock occurred over a distance much greater than 50 proton Larmor radii). Also given is a statistical study of the gross geometry of a typical or average shock surface based on multiple spacecraft sightings and their relative orientation with respect to the solar flare. It is suggested that a typical shock front propagating out from the sun at l AU has a radius of curvature on the order of l AU. Also given are some general properties of oblique IP flare-shocks.

  14. Detectors for the superconducting super collider, design concepts, and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1989-06-01

    The physics of compensation calorimetry is reviewed in the light of the needs of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) detectors. The four major detector types: liquid argon, scintillator, room temperature liquids, and silicon, are analyzed with respect to some of their strengths and weaknesses. Finally, general comments are presented which reflect the reliability of simulation code systems.

  15. D0 Solenoid Upgrade Project: Heat Load Calculations for the Solenoid Chimney

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-05-26

    This engineering note documents the calculations done to determine the chimney heat loads. These heat load numbers were reported in the D0 solenoid upgrade design report. The heat loads to the LN2 circuit were done by Andrew Stefanik, RDIMechanical Systems group. They were part of his LN2 shield calculations dated 2/23/93. Pages 1 thru 3 of his calculations that apply to the chimney are attached. The heat loads to the LHe circuit were done originally on 12/16/92 and then revised on 12/23/92 to be more conservative. The raw calculations are attached. I include both the original 12/16 version and the 12/23 revised version to document the amount of conservativeness added.

  16. Lessons Learned for the MICE Coupling Solenoid from the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, Xinglong; Li, S. Y.; Zheng, S. X.; Virostek, Steve P.; DeMello, Allen J.; Li, Derun; Trillaud, Frederick; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-05-30

    Tests of the spectrometer solenoids have taught us some important lessons. The spectrometer magnet lessons learned fall into two broad categories that involve the two stages of the coolers that are used to cool the magnets. On the first spectrometer magnet, the problems were centered on the connection of the cooler 2nd-stage to the magnet cold mass. On the first test of the second spectrometer magnet, the problems were centered on the cooler 1st-stage temperature and its effect on the operation of the HTS leads. The second time the second spectrometer magnet was tested; the cooling to the cold mass was still not adequate. The cryogenic designs of the MICE and MuCOOL coupling magnets are quite different, but the lessons learned from the tests of the spectrometer magnets have affected the design of the coupling magnets.

  17. Constructing a 4-TESLA Large Thin Solenoid at the Limit of what can BE Safely Operated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, A.

    The 4-tesla, 6 m free bore CMS solenoid has been successfully tested, operated and mapped at CERN during the autumn of 2006 in a surface hall and fully recommissioned in the underground experimental area in the autumn of 2008. The conceptual design started in 1990, the R&D studies in 1993, and the construction was approved in 1997. At the time the main parameters of this project were considered beyond what was thought possible as, in particular, the total stored magnetic energy reaches 2.6 GJ for a specific magnetic energy density exceeding 11 kJ/kg of cold mass. During this period, the international design and construction team had to make several important technical choices, particularly mechanical ones, to maximize the chances of reaching the nominal induction of 4 T. These design choices are explained and critically reviewed in the light of what is presently known to determine if better solutions would be possible today for constructing a new large high-field thin solenoid for a future detector magnet.

  18. Constructing a 4-Tesla Large Thin Solenoid at the Limit of what can BE Safely Operated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hervé, A.

    The 4-tesla, 6m free bore CMS solenoid has been successfully tested, operated and mapped at CERN during the autumn of 2006 in a surface hall and fully recommissioned in the underground experimental area in the autumn of 2008. The conceptual design started in 1990, the R&D studies in 1993, and the construction was approved in 1997. At the time the main parameters of this project were considered beyond what was thought possible as, in particular, the total stored magnetic energy reaches 2.6GJ for a specific magnetic energy density exceeding 11 kJ/kg of cold mass. During this period, the international design and construction team had to make several important technical choices, particularly mechanical ones, to maximize the chances of reaching the nominal induction of 4T. These design choices are explained and critically reviewed in the light of what is presently known to determine if better solutions would be possible today for constructing a new large high-field thin solenoid for a future detector magnet.

  19. Physics capabilities of the DO upgrade detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, J.

    1994-11-01

    The D0 detector at Fermilab is being upgraded to meet the demands imposed by high luminosity Tevatron running planned to begin in 1998. The central tracking detectors will be replaced with silicon and scintillating fiber tracking systems inside a solenoidal magnetic field and a preshower detector will be added to aid in electron identification. The design and performance of these systems are described and detailed simulations of the physics capabilities of the upgraded detector are presented. In particular the authors focus on the study of electroweak boson properties and top quark physics and briefly describe the b-physics capabilities.

  20. The D0 detector upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Bross, A.D.

    1995-02-01

    The Fermilab collider program is undergoing a major upgrade of both the accelerator complex and the two detectors. Operation of the Tevatron at luminosities upwards of ten time that currently provided will occur in early 1999 after the commissioning of the new Fermilab Main Injector. The D0 upgrade program has been established to deliver a detector that will meet the challenges of this environment. A new magnetic tracker consisting of a superconducting solenoid, a silicon vertex detector, a scintillating fiber central tracker, and a central preshower detector will replace the current central tracking and transition radiation chambers. We present the design and performance capabilities of these new systems and describe results from physics simulations that demonstrate the physics reach of the upgraded detector.

  1. Dispersion in a bent-solenoid channel with symmetric focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Chun-xi

    2001-08-21

    Longitudinal ionization cooling of a muon beam is essential for muon colliders and will be useful for neutrino factories. Bent-solenoid channels with symmetric focusing has been considered for beam focusing and for generating the required dispersion in the ``emittance exchange'' scheme of longitudinal cooling. In this paper, we derive the Hamiltonian that governs the linear beam dynamics of a bent-solenoid channel, solve the single-particle dynamics, and give equations for determining the lattice functions, in particular, the dispersion functions.

  2. A Cryogenic Test Stand for Large Superconducting Solenoid Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Nogiec, J.; Orris, D.; Soyars, W.; Sylvester, C.

    2013-01-01

    A new test stand for testing large superconducting solenoid magnets at the Fermilab Central Helium Liquifier (CHL) has been designed, and operated. This test stand has been used to test a coupling coil for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), and future uses include solenoids for the Fermilab mu2e experiment. This paper describes the test stand design and operation including controlled cool-down and warm-up. Overviews of the process controls system and the quench management system are also included.

  3. Note: An improved solenoid driver valve for miniature shock tubes.

    PubMed

    Lynch, P T

    2016-05-01

    A solenoid driver valve has been built to improve the operating performance of diaphragmless shock tubes, which are used for high pressure, high temperature chemical kinetics, and fluid mechanics studies. For shock tube driver application, the most important characteristics are those of sealing, strength, and quality of the generated shock waves and repeatability of opening characteristics and therefore subsequent post-shock conditions. The main features of the new driver valve are a face o-ring sealing design of the valve, the large internal volume, and through inserts near the solenoid core: adjustable opening characteristics of the valve.

  4. The Results of Recent MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoid Test

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-10-15

    The MICE spectrometer solenoid magnets will be the first magnets to be installed within the MICE cooling channel. The MICE spectrometer solenoids may be the largest magnets that have been cooled using small two stage coolers. During the previous test of this magnet, the cooler first stage temperatures were too high. The causes of some of the extra first stage heat load has been identified and corrected. The rebuilt magnet had a single stage GM cooler in addition to the three pulse tube coolers. The added cooler reduces the temperature of the top of the HTS leads, the shield and of the first stage of the pulse tube coolers.

  5. A cryogenic test stand for large superconducting solenoid magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabehl, R.; Carcagno, R.; Nogiec, J.; Orris, D.; Soyars, W.; Sylvester, C.

    2014-01-01

    A new test stand for testing large superconducting solenoid magnets at the Fermilab Central Helium Liquefier (CHL) has been designed, installed, and operated. This test stand is being used to test a coupling coil for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), and future uses include solenoids for the Fermilab μ2e experiment. This paper describes the test stand design and operation including controlled cool-down and warm-up. Overviews of the process controls system and the quench management system are also included.

  6. Remote fire stack igniter. [with solenoid-controlled valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, W. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An igniter is described mounted on a vent stack with an upper, flame cage near the top of the stack to ignite emissions from the stack. The igniter is a tube with a lower, open, flared end having a spark plug near the lower end and a solenoid-controlled valve which supplies propane fuel from a supply tank. Propane from the tank is supplied at the top under control of a second, solenoid-controlled valve. The valve controlling the lower supply is closed after ignition at the flame cage. The igniter is economical, practical, and highly reliable.

  7. Solenoid assembly with beam focusing and radiation shielding functions for the 9/6 MeV dual energy linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Sungsu; Kim, Yujong; Ju, Jinsik; Joo, Youngwoo; Lee, Byeong-No; Lee, Soo Min; Kim, Jae Hyun; Buaphad, Pikad; Lee, Byung Cheol; Cha, Hyungki; Ha, Jang Ho; Park, Hyung Dal; Song, Ki Beak; Lee, Seung Hyun; Kim, Heesoo

    2016-09-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing a Container Inspection System (CIS) by using a dual-energy (9/6 MeV) S-band (= 2856 MHz) electron linear accelerator. The key components of the CIS are the electron linear accelerator (including an electron gun, an accelerating structure, an RF power source, cooling chillers, vacuum pumps, magnet power supplies, and two solenoid magnets with beam focusing and shielding functions), a tungsten target for X-ray generation, an X-ray collimator, a detector array, and a container moving system. Generally, in accelerators, beam focusing is mainly done by solenoids operating in the region of a few MeV to keep the shape of transverse beam symmetrically round so as to reduce the loss of electrons, which increases the beam current and the beam power. In addition, a specially-designed component is needed to protect against the radiation due to the lost electrons. In this paper, we describe the design, fabrication, and optimization of two specially- designed solenoids with focusing and radiation shielding functions for a dual-energy S-band electron linear accelerator for a CIS.

  8. The Compact Muon Solenoid Heavy Ion program

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Pablo Yepes

    2005-12-15

    The Pb-Pb center of mass energy at the LHC will exceed that of Au-Au collisions at RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) by nearly a factor of 30, providing exciting opportunities for addressing unique physics issues in a completely new energy domain. The interest of the Heavy Ion (HI) Physics at LHC is discussed in more detail in the LHC-USA white paper and the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Heavy Ion proposal. A few highlights are presented in this document. Heavy ion collisions at LHC energies will explore regions of energy and particle density significantly beyond those reachable at RHIC. The energy density of the thermalized matter created at the LHC is estimated to be 20 times higher than at RHIC, implying an initial temperature, which is greater than at RHIC by more than a factor of two. The higher density of produced partons also allows a faster thermalization. As a consequence, the ratio of the quark-gluon plasma lifetime to the thermalization time increases by a factor of 10 over RHIC. Thus the hot, dense systems created in HI collisions at the LHC spend most of the time in a purely partonic state. The longer lifetime of the quark-gluon plasma state widens significantly the time window available to probe it experimentally. RHIC experiments have reported evidence for jet production in HI collisions and for suppression of high p{sub T} particle production. Those results open a new field of exploration of hot and dense nuclear matter. Even though RHIC has already broken ground, the production rates for jets with p{sub T} > 30 GeV are several orders of magnitude larger at the LHC than at RHIC, allowing for systematic studies with high statistics in a clean kinematic region. High p{sub T} quark and gluon jets can be used to study the hot hadronic medium produced in HI interactions. The larger Q{sup 2} causes jets to materialize very soon after the collision. They are thus embedded in and propagate through the dense environment as it forms and evolves. Through

  9. Report of the 1990 HEPAP (High Energy Physics Advisory Panel) Subpanel on SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) Cost Estimate Oversight

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    At the request of the Office of Energy Research, the High Energy Physics Advisory Panel (HEPAP) established a subpanel to conduct an independent assessment of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). This assessment was conducted before, during, and after the DOE's in-depth assessment of the entire project in June 1990. In summary, the subpanel believes that to reduce risk, 6 to 12 months should be added to the schedule; the project should be rephased; and additional funding planned to bring the total project cost, including contingency and escalation, to about $8.6 billion. In addition, we suggest adding another $300 million to the detector budget to allow for two large detectors and, therefore, a more balanced experimental program initially.

  10. Spillage detector for liquid chromatography systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarvis, M. J.; Fulton, D. S. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A spillage detector device for use in conjunction with fractionation of liquid chromatography systems which includes a spillage recieving enclosure beneath the fractionation area is described. A sensing device having a plurality of electrodes of alternating polarity is mounted within the spillage recieving enclosure. Detection circuitry, responsive to conductivity between electrodes, is operatively connected to the sensing device. The detection circuitry feeds into the output circuitry. The output circuit has relaying and switching circuitry directed to a solenoid, an alarm system and a pump. The solenoid is connected to the pliable conduit of the chromatography system. The alarm system comprises an audio alarm and a visual signal. A 115-volt power system interconnected with the pump, the solenoid, the sensing device, and the detection and output circuitry.

  11. Features of radio frequency surface plasma sources with a solenoidal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudnikov, V.; Johnson, R. P.; Han, B.; Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stinson, C.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R.; Dudnikova, G.

    2017-08-01

    The operation of Radio Frequency Surface Plasma Sources (RF SPS) with a DC solenoidal magnetic field is described. RF SPS with solenoidal and saddle antennas are discussed. Dependences of beam current and extraction current on RF power, gas flow, solenoidal magnetic field and filter magnetic field are presented.

  12. Improvements and Performance of the Fermilab Solenoid Test Facility

    DOE PAGES

    Orris, Darryl; Arnold, Don; Brandt, Jeffrey; ...

    2017-06-01

    Here, the Solenoid Test Facility at Fermilab was built using a large vacuum vessel for testing of conduction-cooled superconducting solenoid magnets, and was first used to determine the performance of the MICE Coupling Coil. The facility was modified recently to enable testing of solenoid magnets for the Mu2e experiment, which operate at much higher current than the Coupling Coil. One pair of low current conduction-cooled copper and NbTi leads was replaced with two pairs of 10 kA HTS leads cooled by heat exchange with liquid nitrogen and liquid helium. The new design, with additional control and monitoring capability, also providesmore » helium cooling of the superconducting magnet leads by conduction. A high current power supply with energy extraction was added, and several improvements to the quench protection and characterization system were made. Here we present details of these changes and report on performance results from a test of the Mu2e prototype Transport Solenoid (TS) module. Progress on additional improvements in preparation for production TS module testing will be presented.« less

  13. 24. VIEW OF BOXES CONTAINING SOLENOIDS AND HYDRAULIC PUMP CONTRACTORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. VIEW OF BOXES CONTAINING SOLENOIDS AND HYDRAULIC PUMP CONTRACTORS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL DOORS AND BREAKERS FOR RECEPTACLES ON SEVERAL STATIONS. BOXES LOCATED IN THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF SLC-3W MST STATION 63. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  14. Marketing solenoid power saving device. Third quarterly report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-06-06

    I am continuing to explore three methods of marketing the solenoid power saving device. Since the redesign reported in the last report, we are pursuing both the OEM market, the distributor market in both turf and agricultural areas, and the export market. Progress in these areas is discussed: OEM, distribution; and export.

  15. Miniature solenoid for the production of confined magnetic flux

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, I.R.

    1984-11-01

    For experiments involving SQUID's it is sometimes desirable to have a small source of confined magnetic field in order to provide a dc or RF flux bias. This has been done by closely winding number50 AWG copper wire on a 250-..mu..m-diam optical fiber. The resulting solenoid is very small and has excellent mechanical and electrical properties at 4 K.

  16. A unidirectional rotary solenoid as applied to stronglinks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenderdine, Eugene W.

    1989-01-01

    The design goals and results of an advanced development stronglink are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on a new rotary solenoid concept to provide improved security during the handling, storage, transporting, and deployment of weapons to prevent accidental detonation of the weapons in the event of abnormal environments, such as impact, fire, crush, etc.

  17. Monitoring circuit accurately measures movement of solenoid valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillett, J. D.

    1966-01-01

    Solenoid operated valve in a control system powered by direct current issued to accurately measure the valve travel. This system is currently in operation with a 28-vdc power system used for control of fluids in liquid rocket motor test facilities.

  18. Fabrication, Testing and Modeling of the MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Trillaud, F.; Zisman, M.S.

    2010-05-16

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE), an international collaboration sited at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of realistic cooling channel using a muon beam. A five-coil superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region at each end of the cooling channel. Scintillating fiber trackers within the 400 mm diameter magnet bore tubes measure the emittance of the beam as it enters and exits the cooling channel. Each of the identical 3-meter long magnets incorporates a three-coil spectrometer magnet section and a two-coil section to match the solenoid uniform field into the other magnets of the MICE cooling channel. The cold mass, radiation shield and leads are currently kept cold by means of three two-stage cryocoolers and one single-stage cryocooler. Liquid helium within the cold mass is maintained by means of a re-condensation technique. After incorporating several design changes to improve the magnet cooling and reliability, the fabrication and acceptance testing of the spectrometer solenoids have proceeded. The key features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets, the development of a thermal model, the results of the recently completed tests, and the current status of the project are presented.

  19. Improvements and performance of the Fermilab solenoid test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Orris, Darryl; Arnold, Don; Brandt, Jeffrey; Cheban, Sergey; Evbota, Daniel; Feher, Sandor; Galt, Artur; Hays, Steven; Hemmati, Ali; Hess, Charles; Hocker, James A.; Kim, Min Jeong; Kokoska, Lidija; Koshelev, Sergey; Kotelnikov, Sergey; Lamm, Michael; Lopes, Mauricio L.; Nogiec, Jerzy; Page, Thomas M.; Pilipenko, Roman; Rabehl, Roger; Sylvester, Cosmore; Tartaglia, Michael; Vouris, Antonios

    2016-12-15

    Here, the Solenoid Test Facility at Fermilab was built using a large vacuum vessel for testing of conduction-cooled superconducting solenoid magnets, and was first used to determine the performance of the MICE Coupling Coil. The facility was modified recently to enable testing of solenoid magnets for the Mu2e experiment, which operate at much higher current than the Coupling Coil. One pair of low current conduction-cooled copper and NbTi leads was replaced with two pairs of 10 kA HTS leads cooled by heat exchange with liquid nitrogen and liquid helium. The new design, with additional control and monitoring capability, also provides helium cooling of the superconducting magnet leads by conduction. A high current power supply with energy extraction was added, and several improvements to the quench protection and characterization system were made. Here we present details of these changes and report on performance results from a test of the Mu2e prototype Transport Solenoid (TS) module. Progress on additional improvements in preparation for production TS module testing will be presented.

  20. Three dimensional multilayer solenoid microcoils inside silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Xiangwei; Yang, Qing; Chen, Feng; Shan, Chao; Liu, Keyin; Li, Yanyang; Bian, Hao; Si, Jinhai; Hou, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Three dimensional (3D) solenoid microcoils could generate uniform magnetic field. Multilayer solenoid microcoils are highly pursued for strong magnetic field and high inductance in advanced magnetic microsystems. However, the fabrication of the 3D multilayer solenoid microcoils is still a challenging task. In this paper, 3D multilayer solenoid microcoils with uniform diameters and high aspect ratio were fabricated in silica glass. An alloy (Bi/In/Sn/Pb) with high melting point was chosen as the conductive metal to overcome the limitation of working temperature and improve the electrical property. The inductance of the three layers microcoils was measured, and the value is 77.71 nH at 100 kHz and 17.39 nH at 120 MHz. The quality factor was calculated, and it has a value of 5.02 at 120 MHz. This approach shows an improvement method to achieve complex 3D metal microstructures and electronic components, which could be widely integrated in advanced magnetic microsystems.

  1. Long term prediction and the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Talman, R.

    1990-09-01

    Successful operation of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) will depend on the stable circulation of particles for tens of millions of turns around the rings, in the presence of small nonlinear deflecting fields. One design challenge is to set specifications for the maximum allowable field imperfections of this sort, consistent with the required. stability. Another challenge is to plan for the inclusion of field compensating elements that will ameliorate the effects of errors. The tools'' available for projecting the long term stability are theoretical, both analytic and numerical, and experimental. These aspects are reviewed. 19 refs.

  2. SSC Geopositional Assessment of the Advanced Wide Field Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Kenton

    2007-01-01

    The objective is to provide independent verification of IRS geopositional accuracy claims and of the internal geopositional characterization provided by Lutes (2005). Six sub-scenes (quads) were assessed; Three from each AWiFS camera. Check points were manually matched to digital orthophoto quarter quadrangle (DOQQ) reference (assumed accuracy approx. 5 m, RMSE) Check points were selected to meet or exceed Federal Geographic Data Committee's guidelines. Used ESRI ArcGIS for data collection and SSC-written MATLAB scripts for data analysis.

  3. Measurement of AC electrical characteristics of SSC superconducting dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Smedley, K M; Shafer, R E

    1992-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to measure the AC electrical characteristics of SSC superconducting dipole magnets over the frequency range of 0.1 Hz to 10 kHz. A magnet equivalent circuit representing the magnet DC inductance, eddy current losses, coil-to-ground and turn-to-turn capacitance, was synthesized from the experimental data. This magnet equivalent circuit can be used to predict the current ripple distribution along the superconducting magnet string and can provide dynamic information for the design of the collider current regulation loop.

  4. Design features of the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) dipole magnet

    SciTech Connect

    Willen, E.; Cottingham, J.; Ganetis, G.; Garber, M.; Ghosh, A.; Goodzeit, C.; Greene, A.; Herrera, J.; Kahn, S.; Kelly, E.

    1989-01-01

    The main ring dipole for the SSC is specified as a high performance magnet that is required to provide a uniform, 6.6 T field in a 4 cm aperture at minimum cost. These design requirements have been addressed in an R D program in which the coil design, coil mechanical support, yoke and shell structure, trim coil and beam tube design, and a variety of new instrumentation, have been developed. The design of the magnet resulting from this intensive R D program, including various measurements from both 1.8 m and 17 m long models, is reviewed. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Object-oriented system building for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Ludgate, G.A.

    1989-04-01

    The concepts and terminology of object-oriented system development are presented assuming the reader is familiar with the Structured Analysis and Structured Design (SA/SD) methodology. An improvement to SA/SD, known as Object Oriented Analysis/Object Oriented Design (OOA/OOD) is described and the steps in such an undertaking explained. Object Oriented Programming (OOP) is briefly introduced before SA/SD and OOA/OOD are compared. A recommendation to the SSC Central Design Group concludes the paper.

  6. SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) dipole coil production tooling

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, J.A.; Barczak, E.J.; Bossert, R.C.; Brandt, J.S.; Smith, G.A.

    1989-03-01

    Superconducting Super Collider dipole coils must be produced to high precision to ensure uniform prestress and even conductor distribution within the collared coil assembly. Tooling is being prepared at Fermilab for the production of high precision 1M and 16.6M SSC dipole coils suitable for mass production. The design and construction methods builds on the Tevatron tooling and production experience. Details of the design and construction methods and measured coil uniformity of 1M coils will be presented. 4 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Debunching and Capture in the LEB for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Mahale, N.; Furman, M.

    1991-05-01

    The authors present the details of the capture process in the Low Energy Booster (LEB) for the SSC. They consider only the longitudinal dynamics. Space charge forces are computed quasistatically. The beam pipe is considered to be perfectly conducting. With respect to maximizing the capture efficiency and minimizing the space charge tune spread, initial few milliseconds are very important. They present only the first few milliseconds of the cycle, during which space charge effects are significant. For the numerical simulation they use the code ESME.

  8. Parallel processing at the SSC: The fact and the fiction

    SciTech Connect

    Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.

    1991-10-01

    Accurately modelling the behavior of particles circulating in accelerators is a computationally demanding task. The particle tracking code currently in use at SSC is based upon a ``thin element`` analysis (TEAPOT). In this model each magnet in the lattice is described by a thin element at which the particle experiences an impulsive kick. Each kick requires approximately 200 floating point operations (``FLOP``). For the SSC collider lattice consisting of 10{sup 4} elements, performing a tracking of study for a set of 100 particles for 10{sup 7} turns would require 2 {times} 10{sup 15} FLOPS. Even on a machine capable of 100 MFLOP/sec (MFLOPS), this would require 2 {times} 10{sup 7} seconds, and many such runs are necessary. It should be noted that the accuracy with which the kicks are to be calculated is important: the large number of iterations involved will magnify the effects of small errors. The inability of current computational resources to effectively perform the full calculation motivates the migration of this calculation to the most powerful computers available. A survey of the current research into new technologies for superconducting reveals that the supercomputers of the future will be parallel in nature. Further, numerous such machines exist today, and are being used to solve other difficult problems. Thus it seems clear that it is not early to begin developing the capability to develop tracking codes for parallel architectures. This report discusses implementing parallel processing on the SCC.

  9. Parallel processing at the SSC: The fact and the fiction

    SciTech Connect

    Bourianoff, G.; Cole, B.

    1991-10-01

    Accurately modelling the behavior of particles circulating in accelerators is a computationally demanding task. The particle tracking code currently in use at SSC is based upon a thin element'' analysis (TEAPOT). In this model each magnet in the lattice is described by a thin element at which the particle experiences an impulsive kick. Each kick requires approximately 200 floating point operations ( FLOP''). For the SSC collider lattice consisting of 10{sup 4} elements, performing a tracking of study for a set of 100 particles for 10{sup 7} turns would require 2 {times} 10{sup 15} FLOPS. Even on a machine capable of 100 MFLOP/sec (MFLOPS), this would require 2 {times} 10{sup 7} seconds, and many such runs are necessary. It should be noted that the accuracy with which the kicks are to be calculated is important: the large number of iterations involved will magnify the effects of small errors. The inability of current computational resources to effectively perform the full calculation motivates the migration of this calculation to the most powerful computers available. A survey of the current research into new technologies for superconducting reveals that the supercomputers of the future will be parallel in nature. Further, numerous such machines exist today, and are being used to solve other difficult problems. Thus it seems clear that it is not early to begin developing the capability to develop tracking codes for parallel architectures. This report discusses implementing parallel processing on the SCC.

  10. Report of the task force on SSC commissioning and operations

    SciTech Connect

    1985-07-01

    In 1985 January a Taskforce was organized to study the impact of magnet design on the commissioning and operation of the SSC. The results of the study, in the form of this report, are intended as one of several sources of input for the Magnet Type Selection Committee. Other major input will come from the Magnet Taskforce, the Test String Taskforce, the Cost Estimating Taskforce, and other study groups. All of these efforts will culminate in a magnet type selection, after which concentrated R&D on the selected magnet can commence. The study began with a one-week workshop, held on the UC Berkeley campus in 1985 January 14--18. An interim report of the Taskforce, based on the results of the Workshop, was published on 1985 January 28 (SSC-05). With very few exceptions, the work of the Taskforce was carried out by the participants in the Workshop, both during the workshop and in the subsequent weeks. This report is the collective effort of that group, whose very substantial contribution of time, effort, and thought is gratefully acknowledged.

  11. Modelling microprocessor farms for SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) data acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Cutts, D.; van Ingen, C.

    1985-01-01

    Data acquisition, involving both data collection and accompanying filtering, is a crucial part of an SSC experiment. The extreme demands on the acquisition system for I/O bandwidth and real-time computation capability that makes irrecoverable event selections requires that the system operation be well designed and fully understood. Modelling is a valuable and perhaps necessary tool for a successful design of such complex systems. As a demonstration of the modelling process we have made a few studies of simple systems consisting of a large number of microprocessors arranged in a ''farm'', a system in which each event is routed from the digitization/readout crates directly to a single microprocessor, one of a large parallel array, which performs the complete software event filter on that event. Subsequent events are transferred in turn to other processor nodes which are idle. The results of our crude simulations agree with the expected performance of such farms, and suggest that realistic modelling of SSC acquisitions will be important. 3 figs.

  12. A proposed proton therapy facility at the SSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prichard, B. A.

    1993-06-01

    A conceptual design study of a proton therapy facility at the SSC has been performed. Participants included Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the Particle Accelerator Corporation, Aguirre Associates Inc., and the SSCL. The effort was conducted in two phases. The first phase involved a series of trade studies where three alternative approaches to beam formation were examined. They were: 1) using the SSC linac beam directly with intensity reduction techniques; 2) using a pulse stretcher ring attached to the linac; and 3) using a small synchrotron attached to the linac. The relative costs of the three approaches were evaluated and the program flexibility of each was examined. Such factors as implications on nozzle design, dose rate adjustability, perturbation on the linac operation, potential radioisotope production, possibilities for BN capture therapy, and proton radiography were weighed. Additionally, such features as gantries, vertical and horizontal beams, and variable collimators were reviewed. The second phase of the study focused in detail on using the linac beam directly, one fixed beam room with intersecting vertical and horizontal beams, one gantry room, and a radioisotope production facility. The results of these studies are presented.

  13. Report of the workshop on realistic SSC lattices

    SciTech Connect

    1985-10-01

    A workshop was held at the SSC Central Design Group from May 29 to June 4, 1985, on topics relating to the lattice of the SSC. The workshop marked a shift of emphasis from the investigation of simplified test lattices to the development of a realistic lattice suitable for the conceptual design report. The first day of the workshop was taken up by reviews of accelerator system requirements, of the reference design solutions for these requirements, of lattice work following the reference design, and of plans for the workshop. The work was divided among four working groups. The first, chaired by David Douglas, concerned the arcs of regular cells. The second group, which studied the utility insertions, was chaired by Beat Leemann. The third group, under David E. Johnson, concerned itself with the experimental insertions, dispersion suppressors, and phase trombones. The fourth group, responsible for global lattice considerations and the design of a new realistic lattice example, was led by Ernest Courant. The papers resulting from this workshop are roughly divided into three sets: those relating to specific lattice components, to complete lattices, and to other topics. Among the salient accomplishments of the workshop were additions to and optimization of lattice components, especially those relating to lattices using 1-in-1 magnets, either horizontally or vertically separated, and the design of complete lattice examples. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  14. The large superconducting solenoids for the g-2 muon storage ring

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, G.; Cullen, J.; Danby, G.

    1994-12-01

    The g-2 muon storage ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory consists of four large superconducting solenoids. The two outer solenoids, which are 15.1 meters in diameter, share a common cryostat. The two inner solenoids, which are 13.4 meters in diameter, are in separate cryostats. The two 24 turn inner solenoids are operated at an opposite polarity from the two 24 turn outer solenoids. This generates a dipole field between the inner and outer solenoids. The flux between the solenoids is returned through a C shaped iron return yoke that also shapes the dipole field. The integrated field around the 14 meter diameter storage ring must be good to about 1 part in one million over the 90 mm dia. circular cross section where the muons are stored, averaged over the azimuth. When the four solenoids carry their 5300 A design current, the field in the 18 centimeter gap between the poles is 1.45 T. When the solenoid operates at its design current 5.5 MJ is stored between the poles. The solenoids were wound on site at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The cryostats were built around the solenoid windings which are indirectly cooled using two-phase helium.

  15. Focusing solenoid for the front end of a linear RF accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Terechkine, I.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Page, T.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    A prototype of a superconducting focusing solenoid for use in an RF linac has been built and tested at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). The solenoid is comprised of the main coil, two bucking coils, two dipole corrector windings, and a low carbon steel flux return. At the excitation current of 250 A, the magnetic field reaches 7.2 T in the center of the solenoid and is less than 5 G on the axis at a distance of 150 mm from the center. The length of the solenoid is 150 mm; the length of a cryovessel for the solenoid with a 20 mm diameter 'warm' bore is 270 mm. This paper presents the main design features of the focusing solenoid and discusses results from tests of the solenoid.

  16. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Sekine, Megumi; Okamura, Masahiro; Cushing, Eric; Jandovitz, Peter

    2013-04-19

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  17. Effect of solenoidal magnetic field on drifting laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazumasa; Okamura, Masahiro; Sekine, Megumi; Cushing, Eric; Jandovitz, Peter

    2013-04-01

    An ion source for accelerators requires to provide a stable waveform with a certain pulse length appropriate to the application. The pulse length of laser ion source is easy to control because it is expected to be proportional to plasma drifting distance. However, current density decay is proportional to the cube of the drifting distance, so large current loss will occur under unconfined drift. We investigated the stability and current decay of a Nd:YAG laser generated copper plasma confined by a solenoidal field using a Faraday cup to measure the current waveform. It was found that the plasma was unstable at certain magnetic field strengths, so a baffle was introduced to limit the plasma diameter at injection and improve the stability. Magnetic field, solenoid length, and plasma diameter were varied in order to find the conditions that minimize current decay and maximize stability.

  18. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-09-01

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. However, it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. This approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  19. Design of High Field Solenoids made of High Temperature Superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Bartalesi, Antonio; /Pisa U.

    2010-12-01

    This thesis starts from the analytical mechanical analysis of a superconducting solenoid, loaded by self generated Lorentz forces. Also, a finite element model is proposed and verified with the analytical results. To study the anisotropic behavior of a coil made by layers of superconductor and insulation, a finite element meso-mechanic model is proposed and designed. The resulting material properties are then used in the main solenoid analysis. In parallel, design work is performed as well: an existing Insert Test Facility (ITF) is adapted and structurally verified to support a coil made of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}, a High Temperature Superconductor (HTS). Finally, a technological winding process was proposed and the required tooling is designed.

  20. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; Kumaki, M.; Fuwa, Y.; Kanesue, T.; Hayashizaki, N.; Lambiase, R.; Okamura, M.

    2015-05-28

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. It was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled by the pulsed magnetic field. Thus, this approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.

  1. Focusing solenoids for the HINS Linac front end

    SciTech Connect

    Terechkine, I.; Appollinari, G.; Di-Marco, J.; Huang, Y.; Orris, D.; Page, T.; Rabehl, R.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; /Fermilab

    2008-10-01

    The low energy part of a linac for the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) project at Fermilab will use superconducting solenoids as beam focusing elements (lenses). While the lenses for the conventional DTL-type accelerating section of the front end require individual cryostats, in the superconducting accelerating sections solenoids will be installed inside RF cryomodules. Some of the lenses in the conventional and in the superconducting sections are equipped with horizontal and vertical steering dipoles. Lenses for the DTL section are in the stage of production with certification activities ongoing at Fermilab. For the superconducting sections of the linac, a prototype lens has been built and tested. Each lens will be installed in the transport channel of the accelerator so that its magnetic axis is on the beamline. Corresponding technique has been developed at Fermilab and is used during the certification process. This report summarizes design features, parameters, and test results of the focusing lenses.

  2. Design and characterization of permanent magnetic solenoids for REGAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachmann, M.; Flöttmann, K.; Gehrke, T.; Mayet, F.

    2016-09-01

    REGAE is a small electron linear accelerator at DESY. In order to focus short and low charged electron bunches down to a few μm permanent magnetic solenoids were designed, assembled and field measurements were done. Due to a shortage of space close to the operation area an in-vacuum solution has been chosen. Furthermore a two-ring design made of wedges has been preferred in terms of beam dynamic issues. To keep the field quality of a piecewise built magnet still high a sorting algorithm for the wedge arrangement including a simple magnetic field model has been developed and used for the construction of the magnets. The magnetic field of these solenoids has been measured with high precision and compared to simulations.

  3. Preliminary Test Results for the MICE Spectrometer Superconducting Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, Steve P.; Green, Michael A; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael S.; Wang, S.T.; Wahrer, R.; Taylor, Clyde; Lu, X.; Chen, J. Y.; Wang, Mimi; Juang, Tiki

    2008-08-02

    This report describes the MICE spectrometer solenoids as built. Each magnet consists of five superconducting coils. Two coils are used to tune the beam going from or to the MICE spectrometer from the rest of the MICE cooling channel. Three spectrometer coils (two end coils and a long center coil) are used to create a uniform 4 T field (to {+-}0.3 percent) over a length of 1.0 m within a diameter of 0.3 m. The three-coil spectrometer set is connected in series. The two end coils use small power supplies to tune the uniform field region where the scintillating fiber tracker is located. This paper will present the results of the preliminary testing of the first spectrometer solenoid.

  4. Plasma shape control by pulsed solenoid on laser ion source

    DOE PAGES

    Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; Romanelli, M.; ...

    2015-05-28

    A Laser ion source (LIS) provides high current heavy ion beams with a very simple mechanical structure. Plasma is produced by a pulsed laser ablation of a solid state target and ions are extracted by an electric field. It was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters of a LIS, since the plasma condition could only be adjusted by the laser irradiation condition. To enhance flexibility of LIS operation, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The experimentally obtained current profile was satisfactorily controlled bymore » the pulsed magnetic field. Thus, this approach may also be useful to reduce beam emittance of a LIS.« less

  5. Magnetic Alignment of Pulsed Solenoids Using the Pulsed Wire Method

    SciTech Connect

    Arbelaez, D.; Madur, A.; Lipton, T.M.; Waldron, W.L.; Kwan, J.W.

    2011-04-01

    A unique application of the pulsed-wire measurement method has been implemented for alignment of 2.5 T pulsed solenoid magnets. The magnetic axis measurement has been shown to have a resolution of better than 25 {micro}m. The accuracy of the technique allows for the identification of inherent field errors due to, for example, the winding layer transitions and the current leads. The alignment system is developed for the induction accelerator NDCX-II under construction at LBNL, an upgraded Neutralized Drift Compression experiment for research on warm dense matter and heavy ion fusion. Precise alignment is essential for NDCX-II, since the ion beam has a large energy spread associated with the rapid pulse compression such that misalignments lead to corkscrew deformation of the beam and reduced intensity at focus. The ability to align the magnetic axis of the pulsed solenoids to within 100 pm of the induction cell axis has been demonstrated.

  6. Design of 15 mm collars for SSC dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, C.

    1986-03-01

    Ten 1-m long dipole magnets of the SSC design ''D'' cross section have been constructed and tested. In each model a collar type structure was used to contain and support the coil assembly at assembly and during operation at 4K. The collar structure must provide enough coil compression to minimize training and guarantee the coil cross section dimensions. Three types of collar designs were used. The behavior, measured and predicted, of two types of 15 mm stainless steel collars used on eight of the ten models is examined. The mechanical measurement of the 15 mm stainless steel collars used on eight 1-m dipole models are given. Observed behavior and preliminary design criteria are discussed. In order to better understand observed collar behavior and to evaluate new designs, finite element analysis of the collar designs was undertaken, and results are correlated with measured behavior. The behavior of alternate collar designs is predicted. 3 refs., 19 figs. (LEW)

  7. Overview and status of RF systems for the SSC Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Mynk, J.; Grippe, J.; Cutler, R.I.; Rodriguez, R.

    1993-05-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Linear Accelerator (Linac) produces a 600-MeV, 35-{mu}s, H-beam at a 10-Hz repetition rate. The beam is accelerated by a series of RF cavities. These consist of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), two bunchers, and four Drift Tube Linac (DTL) tanks at 427.617 MHz, and two bunchers, nine side-coupled Linac modules, and an energy compressor at 1282.851 MHz. The RFQ amplifier and the low-frequency buncher cavity amplifiers use gridded tubes, while the other cavities use klystron amplifier systems. The RF control system consists of a reference line and cavity feedback and feedforward loops for each amplifier. The RF amplifier system for each of these accelerator cavities is described, and the current status of each system is presented.

  8. A medical facility proposal to use the SSC linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren Funk, L.

    1995-05-01

    A consortium organized by the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission (TNRLC) under a Department of Energy (DOE) grant proposes to build and operate a Regional Medical Technology Center (RMTC) to function as a combined medical radioisotope production complex and proton cancer therapy facility using the linear accelerator (linac) assets of the cancelled Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The radioisotope production complex will serve as a domestic source of radioisotopes critically needed by the U.S. pharmaceutical industry and nuclear medicine facilities throughout North America. Presently, more than 70 percent of radioisotopes used in U.S. nuclear medicine procedures are produced outside the country. The Center's state-of-the-art proton cancer therapy facility will serve the Central United States, providing advanced capabilities and augmenting facilities in California and Massachusetts. Long-term, it is anticipated that the RMTC also will stimulate nuclear medicine research, advance medical diagnostic technologies, and generate new industrial applications of linear accelerator technology.

  9. A medical facility proposal to use the SSC linac

    SciTech Connect

    Funk, L.W.

    1994-12-31

    A consortium organized by the Texas National Research Laboratory Commission under a Department of Energy grant proposes to build and operate a Regional Medical Technology Center to function as a combined medical radioisotope production complex and proton cancer therapy facility using the Linear Accelerator (Linac) assets of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). The radioisotope production complex will serve as a domestic source of radioisotopes critically needed by the U.S. pharmaceutical industry and nuclear medicine facilities throughout North America. Presently, more than 70 percent of radioisotopes used in U.S. nuclear medicine procedures are produced outside the country. The Center`s state-of-the-art proton cancer therapy facility will serve the Central United States, providing advanced capabilities and augmenting facilities in California and Massachusetts. Long-term, it is anticipated that the RMTC also will stimulate nuclear medicine research, advance medical diagnostic technologies, and generate new industrial applications for linear accelerator technology.

  10. Simulation of quenches in SSC magnets with passive quench protection

    SciTech Connect

    Koepke, K.

    1985-06-01

    The relative ease of protecting an SSC magnet following a quench and the implications of quench protection on magnet reliability and operation are necessary inputs in a rational magnet selection process. As it appears likely that the magnet selection will be made prior to full scale prototype testing, an alternative means is required to ascertain the surviveability of contending magnet types. This paper attempts to provide a basis for magnet selection by calculating the peak expected quench temperatures in the 3 T Design C magnet and the 6 T Design D magnet as a function of magnet length. A passive, ''cold diode'' protection system has been assumed. The relative merits of passive versus active protection systems have been discussed in a previous report. It is therefore assumed that - given the experience gained from the Tevatron system - that an active quench protection system can be employed to protect the magnets in the eventuality of unreliable cold diode function.

  11. Abandoned SSC Site can provide underground facility for geoscience research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Herbert F.; Myer, Larry R.; Witherspoon, Paul A.; Nelson, Priscilla P.; Logan, John M.; Dutton, Alan R.; Younker, Leland W.

    By the time Congress terminated the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project in October 1993, the Department of Energy and the state of Texas had sunk $2 billion into the project. Now closure and remediation of the disturbed surface and subsurface lands are underway with a budget of $22 million, according to a recent agreement between the DOE and Texas. Rather than chalking up the creation of the large, expensive hole in the ground to failure, however, some are hailing the site as an excellent test-bed for geoenvironmental and geotechnical research (Figure 1). They hope to use the site's tunnel, exploratory shaft, and test wells to identify new and improved methods for investigating subsurface fluid flow and transport processes, to characterize physical properties of weak and fractured rock through geophysics and geomechanical testing, and to test model predictions through large-scale experiments conducted underground.

  12. A development environment for the SSC control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Doug; Martinsen, Garth; Wang, Judy

    1994-12-01

    The SSC is developing a design environment for control system development within the context of EPICS. The environment is aimed at developers of applications using the EPICS Input/Output Controller (IOC). The unique aspect of this effort is our emphasis on providing a simple and intuitive development environment compared with tools currently available. Our most important goal in this effort has been to hide the complexity of EPICS IOC development from the developers. This paper describes two tools which are under development; The Function Block Editor (FBE) and the State Machine Editor (SME). The FBE provides a visual editing environment for graphically describing control processes as a set of related functional blocks. The configuration of functional blocks is then translated into IOC records and executed. SME allows the user to visually construct a sequence using a notation we are modeling after Grafcet [1]. State machines are translated into EPICS State Notation Language programs and executed. Future extensions will be described.

  13. Superconducting magnet designs for the SSC and RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, P.A.; Cottingham, J.; Dahl, P.; Brown, D.; Garber, M.; Ghosh, A.K.; Goodzeit, C.; Greene, A.; Hahn, H.; Herrera, J.

    1988-01-01

    This paper reviews the main dipoles for RHIC, which are 9.7 meters long with an operating field of 3.45 T. Four full size dipoles have been tested and all exceeded the operating field. The main dipoles for the SSC project are 17 meters in length with an operating field of 6.6 T. Five of these have been tested. Rough calculations show that the possibility of operating future such large colliders at approx. 80 K instead of approx. 4 K is unlikely to have a major impact upon their cost or feasibility. However, increasing the critical field of practical superconductors (either by lowering the operating temperature of further conductor development) could have a major impact upon the specialized magnets used in the intersection regions of such machines.

  14. Performance of field measuring probes for SSC magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, R.; Ganetis, G.; Herrera, J.; Hogue, R.; Jain, A.; Louie, W.; Marone, A.; Wanderer, P.

    1993-12-31

    Several years of experience have been acquired on the operation of probes (``moles``) constructed for the measurement of the multipole components of the magnetic fields of SSC magnets. The field is measured by rotating coils contained in a 2.4-m long tube that is pulled through the aperture of the magnet by an external device-the transporter. In addition to the measuring coils, the tube contains motors for rotating the coil and a system for sensing local vertical using gravity sensors to provide an absolute reference for the field measurements. We describe the steps that must be taken in order to ensure accurate, repeatable measurements; the design changes that have been motivated by difficulties encountered (noise, vibration, variations in temperature); and other performance issues. The mechanical interface between the probe and the hewn tube of the magnet is also described.

  15. Variable-field permanent magnet quadrupole for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Barlow, D.B.; Kraus, R.H. Jr.; Martinez, R.P.; Meyer, R.E.

    1993-10-01

    A set of compact variable-field permanent-magnet quadrupoles have been designed, fabricated, and tested for use In the SSC linac matching section. The quadrupoles have 24 mm-diameter apertures and 40 mm-long poles. The hybrid (permanent-magnet and iron) design, uses a fixed core of magnet material (NdFeB) and iron (C-1006) surrounded by a rotating ring of the same magnet material and iron. The quadrupole gradient-length product can be smoothly varied from a minimum of 0.7 T up to a maximum, of 4.3 T by a 90{degrees} rotation of the outer ring of iron and magnet material.

  16. Analytical Study of Stress State in HTS Solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Barzi, E.; Terzini, E.; /Fermilab

    2009-01-01

    A main challenge for high field solenoids made of in High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) is the large stress developed in the conductor. This is especially constraining for BSCCO, a brittle and strain sensitive ceramic material. To find parametric correlations useful in magnet design, analytical models can be used. A simple model is herein proposed to obtain the radial, azimuthal and axial stresses in a solenoid as a function of size, i.e. self-field, and of the engineering current density for a number of different constraint hypotheses. The analytical model was verified against finite element modeling (FEM) using the same hypotheses of infinite rigidity of the constraints and room temperature properties. FEM was used to separately evaluate the effect of thermal contractions at 4.2 K for BSCCO and YBCO coils. Even though the analytical model allows for a finite stiffness of the constraints, it was run using infinite stiffness. For this reason, FEM was again used to determine how much stresses change when considering an outer stainless steel skin with finite rigidity for both BSCCO and YBCO coils. For a better understanding of the actual loads that high field solenoids made of HTS will be subject to, we have started some analytical studies of stress state in solenoids for a number of constraint hypotheses. This will hopefully show what can be achieved with the present conductor in terms of self-field. The magnetic field (B) exerts a force F = B x J per unit volume. In superconducting magnets, where the field and current density (J) are both high, this force can be very large, and it is therefore important to calculate the stresses in the coil.

  17. Worcester 1 Inch Solenoid Actuated Gas Operated SCHe System Valves

    SciTech Connect

    MISKA, C.R.

    2000-09-03

    1 inch gas-operated full-port ball valves incorporate a solenoid and limit switches as integral parts of the actuator. These valves are normally open and fail safe to the open position (GOV-1*02 and 1*06 fail closed) to provide a flow path of helium gas to the MCO under helium purge and off-normal conditions when the MCO is isolated.

  18. First Generation Final Focusing Solenoid For NDCX-I

    SciTech Connect

    Seidl, P. A.; Waldron, W.

    2011-11-09

    This report describes the prototype final focus solenoid (FFS-1G), or 1st generation FFS. In order to limit eddy currents, the solenoid winding consists of Litz wire wound on a non-conductive G-10 tube. For the same reason, the winding pack was inserted into an electrically insulating, but thermally conducting Polypropylene (Cool- Poly© D1202) housing and potted with highly viscous epoxy (to be able to wick the single strands of the Litz wire). The magnet is forced-air cooled through cooling channels. The magnet was designed for water cooling, but he cooling jacket cracked, and therefore cooling (beyond natural conduction and radiation) was exclusively by forced air. Though the design operating point was 8 Tesla, for the majority of running on NDCX-1 it operated up to about 5 Tesla. This was due mostly from limitations of voltage holding at the leads, where discharges at higher pulsed current damaged the leads. Generation 1 was replaced by the 2nd generation solenoid (FFS-2G) about a year later, which has operated reliably up to 8 Tesla, with a better lead design and utilizes water cooling. At this point, FFS-1G was used for plasma source R&D by LBNL and PPPL. The maximum field for those experiments was reduced to 3 Tesla due to continued difficulty with the leads and because higher field was not essential for those experiments. The pulser for the final focusing solenoid is a SCR-switched capacitor bank which produces a half-sine current waveform. The pulse width is ~800us and a charge voltage of 3kV drives ~20kA through the magnet producing ~8T field.

  19. Solenoid fringe field compensation for the Cluster Klystron

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Fernow, R.C.; Kirk, H.G.; Palmer, R.B.; Zhao, Y.

    1996-04-01

    Optimization of the solenoid pancake currents so as to have a uniform axial magnetic field over an extended volume, is very important for the successful operation of the Cluster Klystron. By boosting the first and the last pancake currents by 35%, a uniform field Br/Bz {le} 0.1% at radius R {le} 2 cm can be extended from {+-} 7 cm to {+-} 16 cm. The result confirms simulations and the requirements for a 3-beam Cluster Klystron Experiment are achieved.

  20. Rapid-Chill Cryogenic Coaxial Direct-Acting Solenoid Valve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James; Castor, Jim; Sheller, Richard

    2006-01-01

    A commercially available cryogenic direct- acting solenoid valve has been modified to incorporate a rapid-chill feature. The net effect of the modifications is to divert some of the cryogenic liquid to the task of cooling the remainder of the cryogenic liquid that flows to the outlet. Among the modifications are the addition of several holes and a gallery into a valve-seat retainer and the addition of a narrow vent passage from the gallery to the atmosphere.

  1. Ramp-rate sensitivity of SSC dipole magnet prototypes

    SciTech Connect

    Devred, A.; Ogitsu, T.

    1994-07-01

    One of the major achievements of the magnet R&D program for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) is the fabrication and test of a series of 20 5-cm aperture, 15-m long dipole magnet prototypes. The ramp rate sensitivity of these magnets appears to fall in at least two categories that can be correlated to the manufacturer and production batch of the strands used for the inner-coil cables. The first category, referred to as type-A, is characterized by a strong quench current degradation at high ramp rates, usually accompanied by large distortions of the multipole fields and large energy losses. The second category, referred to as type-B, is characterized by a sudden drop of quench current at low ramp rates, followed by a much milder degradation at larger rates. The multipole fields of the type-B magnets show little ramp-rate sensitivity, and the energy losses are smaller than for the type-A magnets. The behavior of the Type-A magnets can be explained in terms of inter-strand eddy currents arising from low and non-uniform resistances at the crossovers between the strands of the two-layer Rutherford-type cable. Anomalies in the transport-current repartition among the cable strands are suggested as a possible cause for the type-B behavior. The origins of these anomalies have not yet been clearly identified. The SSC project was canceled by decision of the United States Congress on October 21, 1994.

  2. Field measurements in the Fermilab electron cooling solenoid prototype

    SciTech Connect

    A. C. Crawford et al.

    2003-10-02

    To increase the Tevatron luminosity, Fermilab is developing a high-energy electron cooling system [1] to cool 8.9-GeV/c antiprotons in the Recycler ring. The schematic layout of the Recycler Electron Cooling (REC) system is shown in Figure 1. Cooling of antiprotons requires a round electron beam with a small angular spread propagating through a cooling section with a kinetic energy of 4.3 MeV. To confine the electron beam tightly and to keep its transverse angles below 10{sup -4} rad, the cooling section will be immersed into a solenoidal field of 50-150G. As part of the R&D effort, a cooling section prototype consisting of 9 modules (90% of the total length of a future section) was assembled and measured. This paper describes the technique of measuring and adjusting the magnetic field quality in the cooling section and presents preliminary results of solenoid prototype field measurements. The design of the cooling section solenoid is discussed in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 describes details of a dedicated measurement system, capable of measuring small transverse field components, while the system's measurement errors are analyzed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 contains measured field distributions of individual elements of the cooling section as well as an evaluation of the magnetic shielding efficiency. An algorithm of field adjustments for providing lowest possible electron trajectory perturbations is proposed in Chapter 6; also, this chapter shows the results of our first attempts of implementing the algorithm.

  3. Experimental Results of a Single Emittance Compensation Solenoidal Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, D. T.; Wang, X. J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Miller, R. H.; Skaritka, J.

    1997-05-01

    A new iron dominated single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet was designed to be integrated with the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell S-Band Photocathode RF Gun. This emittance compensated photoinjector is now in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility. It has produced a 300 pC electron bunches with a normalized rms transverse emittance of ɛ_n,rms = 0.7 π mm mrad. POISSON field maps were used with PARMELA to optimize the emittance compensation solenoidal magnet design. Magnetic field measurements show that at the cathode plane Bz <= 10 gauss for a peak magnetic field of B_z,max = 3 KG. Which is in agreement with POISSON simulation. A single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet will produces a initial angular momentum of the electron bunch that manifests itself in a initial magnetic emittance term that cannot be eliminated. This magnetic emittance ɛ_mag,n,rms scales as 0.01 π mm mrad per gauss at the cathode. Which is in agreement with PARMELA simulations. Experimental beam dynamics results are presented that show spot size and emittance as a function of cathode magnetic field. These results are compared to theory and simulations.

  4. Is transverse feedback necessary for the SSC emittance preservation? (Vibration noise analysis and feedback parameters optimization)

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.V.; Shiltsev, V.D.

    1993-06-01

    The paper considers the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) site ground motion measurements as well as data from accelerators worldwide about noises that worsen beam performance. Unacceptably fast emittance growth due to these noises is predicted for the SSC. A transverse feedback system was found to be the only satisfactory alternative to prevent emittance decay. Optimization of the primary feedback parameters was done.

  5. Current Approaches to the Treatment of Systemic-Sclerosis-Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (SSc-PAH).

    PubMed

    Sobanski, Vincent; Launay, David; Hachulla, Eric; Humbert, Marc

    2016-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe condition causing significant morbidity and mortality in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc). Despite the use of specific treatments, SSc-PAH survival remains poorer than in idiopathic PAH (IPAH). Recent therapeutic advances in PAH show a lower magnitude of response in SSc-PAH and a higher risk of adverse events, as compared to IPAH. The multifaceted underlying mechanisms and the multisystem nature of SSc probably explain part of the worse outcomes in SSc-PAH compared to IPAH. This review describes the current management of SSc-PAH with an emphasis on the impact of the different organ involvements in the prognosis and treatment response. An earlier detection of PAH and a better characterization of the clinical phenotypes of SSc-PAH are warranted in clinical practice and future trials. Determinants of prognosis, surrogate markers of clinical improvement or worsening, and relevance of the common endpoints used in clinical trials should be evaluated in this specific population. A multidisciplinary approach in expert referral centers is mandatory for SSc-PAH management.

  6. Development of a solenoid pumped in situ zinc analyzer for environmental monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapin, T.P.; Wanty, R.B.

    2005-01-01

    A battery powered submersible chemical analyzer, the Zn-DigiScan (Zn Digital Submersible Chemical Analyzer), has been developed for near real-time, in situ monitoring of zinc in aquatic systems. Microprocessor controlled solenoid pumps propel sample and carrier through an anion exchange column to separate zinc from interferences, add colorimetric reagents, and propel the reaction complex through a simple photometric detector. The Zn-DigiScan is capable of self-calibration with periodic injections of standards and blanks. The detection limit with this approach was 30 ??g L-1. Precision was 5-10% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) below 100 ??g L-1, improving to 1% R.S.D. at 1000 ??g L-1. The linear range extended from 30 to 3000 ??g L-1. In situ field results were in agreement with samples analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). This pump technology is quite versatile and colorimetric methods with complex online manipulations such as column reduction, preconcentration, and dilution can be performed with the DigiScan. However, long-term field deployments in shallow high altitude streams were hampered by air bubble formation in the photometric detector. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Methods to detect antifibrillarin antibodies in patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc): a comparison.

    PubMed

    García, Josefina Huerta; Osuna, Monica Delgado; Castrejon, Filiberto Martinez; Enriquez, Laura Guzman; Reyes, Pedro A; Hermosillo, J Jesus Cortes

    2004-01-01

    Autoantibodies against nucleolar antigens are common in systemic sclerosis (SSc). They include autoantibodies against fibrillarin (Fb), which are serological markers for SSc. Fb is associated with the evolutionally-conserved box C/D of small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). We compared indirect immunofluorescence (IIF), Western blot (WB), and immunoprecipitation (IPP) of total small RNAs assays to determine which of these techniques is most specific for the detection of snoRNPs. We also examined the frequency and specificity of autoantibodies from SSc patients to snoRNAs, snRNAs, and scRNAs, and concluded that 1) IIF can not determine autoantibody specificity against Fb, 2) 36% of SSc sera were false-negative by WB, and 3) by IPP, anti-Fb autoantibodies from SSc patients can bind U3, U8, U13, U15, and U22 snoRNAs.

  8. Exploring new frontiers in nuclear and particle physics with the STAR detector at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, T.J.

    1996-12-31

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) is a large acceptance collider detector scheduled to begin operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the fall of 1999. In the sections which follow, details of the STAR detector and physics program, as well as the status of the RHIC construction project will be presented.

  9. Informatics can identify systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients at risk for scleroderma renal crisis.

    PubMed

    Redd, Doug; Frech, Tracy M; Murtaugh, Maureen A; Rhiannon, Julia; Zeng, Qing T

    2014-10-01

    Electronic medical records (EMR) provide an ideal opportunity for the detection, diagnosis, and management of systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). The objective of this project was to use informatics to identify potential SSc patients in the VHA that were on prednisone, in order to inform an outreach project to prevent scleroderma renal crisis (SRC). The electronic medical data for this study came from Veterans Informatics and Computing Infrastructure (VINCI). For natural language processing (NLP) analysis, a set of retrieval criteria was developed for documents expected to have a high correlation to SSc. The two annotators reviewed the ratings to assemble a single adjudicated set of ratings, from which a support vector machine (SVM) based document classifier was trained. Any patient having at least one document positively classified for SSc was considered positive for SSc and the use of prednisone≥10mg in the clinical document was reviewed to determine whether it was an active medication on the prescription list. In the VHA, there were 4272 patients that have a diagnosis of SSc determined by the presence of an ICD-9 code. From these patients, 1118 patients (21%) had the use of prednisone≥10mg. Of these patients, 26 had a concurrent diagnosis of hypertension, thus these patients should not be on prednisone. By the use of natural language processing (NLP) an additional 16,522 patients were identified as possible SSc, highlighting that cases of SSc in the VHA may exist that are unidentified by ICD-9. A 10-fold cross validation of the classifier resulted in a precision (positive predictive value) of 0.814, recall (sensitivity) of 0.973, and f-measure of 0.873. Our study demonstrated that current clinical practice in the VHA includes the potentially dangerous use of prednisone for veterans with SSc. This present study also suggests there may be many undetected cases of SSc and NLP can successfully identify these

  10. Radiation simulations of the CMS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddard, Graham J.

    This thesis presents results of recent radiation simulations for the Compact Muon Solenoid detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN performed using the Monte Carlo simulation package FLUKA. High statistics simulations with a fine granularity in the detector were carried out using the Condor batch system at the Fermilab LHC Physics Center. In addition, an existing web tool for accessing and displaying simulation data was upgraded. The FLUKA data and previously generated MARS Monte Carlo data can be plotted using 1-D or 2-D plotting functionalities along R and Z, the transverse distance from the beamline and the distance along the beamline, respectively. Comparisons between the data sets have been carried out; the effect of particle transport thresholds in both packages was explored, comparisons with zero magnetic field in the CMS solenoid and full field are made, a model of non-ionizing energy losses is examined, and sensitive areas of interest within the simulation are identified.

  11. The BABAR Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Luth, Vera G

    2001-05-18

    BABAR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup -} B Factory operating at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagentic showers from electrons and photons are detected in an array of CsI crystals located just inside the solenoidal coil of a superconducting magnet. Muons and neutral hadrons are identified by arrays of resistive plate chambers inserted into gaps in the steel flux return of the magnet. Charged hadrons are identified by dE/dx measurements in the tracking detectors and in a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector surrounding the drift chamber. The trigger, data acquisition and data-monitoring systems, VME- and network-based, are controlled by custom-designed online software. Details of the layout and performance of the detector components and their associated electronics and software are presented.

  12. D0 Central Tracking Solenoid Energization, Controls, Interlocks and Quench Protection Operating Procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Hance, R.; /Fermilab

    1998-08-26

    This procedure is used when it is necessary to operate the solenoid energization, controls, interlocks and quench detection system. Note that a separate procedure exists for operating the solenoid 'cryogenic' systems. Only D0 Control Room Operators or the Project Electrical Engineer are qualified to execute these procedures or operate the solenoid system. This procedure assumes that the operator is familiar with using the Distributed Manufacturing Automation and Control Software (DMACS).

  13. Beta-rolls, beta-helices, and other beta-solenoid proteins.

    PubMed

    Kajava, Andrey V; Steven, Alasdair C

    2006-01-01

    Beta-rolls and beta-helices belong to a larger group of topologically similar proteins with solenoid folds: because their regular secondary structure elements are exclusively beta-strands, they are referred to as beta-solenoids. The number of beta-solenoids whose structures are known is now large enough to support a systematic analysis. Here we survey the distinguishing structural features of beta-solenoids, also documenting their notable diversity. Appraisal of these structures suggests a classification based on handedness, twist, oligomerization state, and coil shape. In addition, beta-solenoids are distinguished by the number of chains that wind around a common axis: the majority are single-stranded but there is a recently discovered subset of triple-stranded beta-solenoids. This survey has revealed some relationships of the amino acid sequences of beta-solenoids with their structures and functions-in particular, the repetitive character of the coil sequences and conformations that recur in tracts of tandem repeats. We have proposed the term beta-arc for the distinctive turns found in beta-solenoids and beta-arch for the corresponding strand-turn-strand motifs. The evolutionary mechanisms underlying these proteins are also discussed. This analysis has direct implications for sequence-based detection, structural prediction, and de novo design of other beta-solenoid proteins. The abundance of virulence factors, toxins and allergens among beta-solenoids, as well as commonalities of beta-solenoids with amyloid fibrils, imply that this class of folds may have a broader role in human diseases than was previously recognized. Thus, identification of genes with putative beta-solenoid domains promises to be a fertile direction in the search for viable targets in the development of new antibiotics and vaccines.

  14. Development and Characterization of a High Magnetic Field Solenoid for Laser Plasma Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pollock, B B; Froula, D H; Davis, P F; Ross, J S; Divol, L; Fulkerson, S; Satariano, J; Price, D; Bower, J; Edwards, J; Town, R; Glenzer, S H; Offenberger, A A; Tynan, G R; James, A N

    2006-05-05

    An electromagnetic solenoid was developed to study the quenching of nonlocal heat transport in laser-produced gas-jet plasmas by high external magnetic fields. The solenoid, which is driven by a pulsed power system supplying 30 kJ, achieves fields exceeding 10 T. Temporally resolved measurements of the electron temperature profile transverse to a high power laser beam were obtained using Thomson Scattering. A method for optimizing the solenoid design based on the available stored energy is presented.

  15. Solenoidal Fields for Ion Beam Transport and Focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Edward P.; Leitner, Matthaeus

    2007-11-01

    In this report we calculate time-independent fields of solenoidal magnets that are suitable for ion beam transport and focusing. There are many excellent Electricity and Magnetism textbooks that present the formalism for magnetic field calculations and apply it to simple geometries [1-1], but they do not include enough relevant detail to be used for designing a charged particle transport system. This requires accurate estimates of fringe field aberrations, misaligned and tilted fields, peak fields in wire coils and iron, external fields, and more. Specialized books on magnet design, technology, and numerical computations [1-2] provide such information, and some of that is presented here. The AIP Conference Proceedings of the US Particle Accelerator Schools [1-3] contain extensive discussions of design and technology of magnets for ion beams - except for solenoids. This lack may be due to the fact that solenoids have been used primarily to transport and focus particles of relatively low momenta, e.g. electrons of less than 50 MeV and protons or H- of less than 1.0 MeV, although this situation may be changing with the commercial availability of superconducting solenoids with up to 20T bore field [1-4]. Internal reports from federal laboratories and industry treat solenoid design in detail for specific applications. The present report is intended to be a resource for the design of ion beam drivers for Inertial Fusion Energy [1-5] and Warm Dense Matter experiments [1-6], although it should also be useful for a broader range of applications. The field produced by specified currents and material magnetization can always be evaluated by solving Maxwell's equations numerically, but it is also desirable to have reasonably accurate, simple formulas for conceptual system design and fast-running beam dynamics codes, as well as for general understanding. Most of this report is devoted to such formulas, but an introduction to the Tosca{copyright} code [1-7] and some numerical

  16. Beam transport with magnetic solenoids and plasma lenses

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, R.J.

    1988-10-01

    We examine the behavior of axisymmetric space-charge dominated beams in transport lines using numerical simulation. A typical transport line consisting of two axisymmetric linear lenses used to make a continuous beam from an ion source to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) is considered. We compare the beam evolution when both lenses are magnetic solenoids or Gabor plasma lenses for beams with different initial density profiles. Emittance oscillations due to nonlinear space-charge forces by the action of plasma lenses in which space-charge fields are shielded, but beam mismatch at the RFQ entrance can be significant for both types of lens. 8 refs., 6 figs.

  17. The IRAC Shutter Mechanism: Residual Magnetism and the Rotary Solenoid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinger, Scott; Hakun, Claef; Brown, Gary; Blumenstock, Ken

    2002-01-01

    The Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) Shutter mechanism was originally presented in the paper, 'A Low Power Cryogenic Shutter Mechanism for Use on Infrared Imagers' at the 34th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, May 2000. At that time, the shutter was believed to be performing flawlessly and there was every indication it would continue to do so. In early spring of 2001, the calibration shutter, a rotary solenoid designed to be fail-safe open, remained in a closed state with no power to the electromagnetic coils. The ensuing investigation, subsequent testing, proposed remedy, and lessons learned are the focus of this paper.

  18. Magnetoelectric excitations in hexaferrites utilizing solenoid coil for sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zare, Saba; Izadkhah, Hessam; Somu, Sivasubramanian; Vittoria, Carmine

    2015-11-01

    We have developed techniques for H- and E-field sensors utilizing single phase magnetoelectric hexaferrite materials in the frequency range of 100 Hz to 10 MHz. Novel excitation method incorporating solenoid coils and single and multi-capacitor banks were developed and tested for sensor detections. For H-field sensing we obtained sensitivity of about 3000 V/mG and for E-field sensing the sensitivity was 10-4 G/Vm-1. Tunability of about 0.1% was achieved for tunable inductor applications. However, the proposed designs lend themselves to significant ( 106) improvements in sensitivity and tunability.

  19. The Mechanical Design Optimization of a High Field HTS Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Lalitha, SL; Gupta, RC

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the conceptual design optimization of a large aperture, high field (24 T at 4 K) solenoid for a 1.7 MJ superconducting magnetic energy storage device. The magnet is designed to be built entirely of second generation (2G) high temperature superconductor tape with excellent electrical and mechanical properties at the cryogenic temperatures. The critical parameters that govern the magnet performance are examined in detail through a multiphysics approach using ANSYS software. The analysis results formed the basis for the performance specification as well as the construction of the magnet.

  20. Test Results for HINS Focusing Solenoids at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Tartaglia, M.A.; Orris, D.F.; Terechkine, I.; Tompkins, J.C.; /Fermilab

    2008-08-01

    A focusing lens R&D program is close to completion and industrial production of magnets has begun. Two types of magnets are being built for use in the room temperature RF section at the front end of a superconducting H-minus linac of a High Intensity Neutrino Source. All of the magnets are designed as a solenoid with bucking coils to cancel the field in the vicinity of adjacent RF cavities, and one type incorporates steering dipole corrector coils. We present a summary of the predicted and measured quench and magnetic properties for both R&D and production device samples that have been tested at Fermilab.

  1. Best practices: Strategic stigma change (SSC): five principles for social marketing campaigns to reduce stigma.

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Patrick W

    2011-08-01

    This column describes strategic stigma change (SSC), which comprises five principles and corresponding practices developed as a best practice to erase prejudice and discrimination associated with mental illness and promote affirming behaviors and social inclusion. SSC principles represent more than ten years of insights from the National Consortium on Stigma and Empowerment. The principles, which are centered on consumer contact that is targeted, local, credible, and continuous, were developed to inform the growth of large-scale social marketing campaigns supported by governments and nongovernmental organizations. Future social marketing efforts to address stigma and the need for evidence to determine SSC's penetration and impact are also discussed.

  2. Management of Systemic Sclerosis-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease (SSc-ILD)

    PubMed Central

    Silver, Katherine Culp

    2015-01-01

    Although scleroderma-associated interstitial lung disease (SSc-ILD) is a significant contributor to both morbidity and mortality, its pathogenesis is largely unclear. Pulmonary function tests (PFTs) and high resolution CT (HRCT) scanning continue to be the most effective tools to screen for lung involvement and to monitor for disease progression. More research and better biomarkers are needed to identify patients most at risk for developing SSc-ILD as well as to recognize which of these patients will progress to more severe disease. While immunosuppression remains the mainstay of treatment, anti-fibrotic agents may offer new avenues of treatment for patients with SSc-ILD in the future. PMID:26210128

  3. Implementation of Beam-Loss Monitor systems for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.G.

    1994-07-01

    Beam-Loss Monitors (BLM) are used with each accelerator in the Superconducting Super Collider complex. The primary purpose of these detectors is to protect the accelerators from damage due to the loss of protons. Although the range of primary beam energies to be covered is very large, 20 MeV to 20 TeV, we plan to maintain commonality of detectors and electronics as much as possible. In this report the plans for developing and implementing BLM systems for each of the accelerators will be discussed. Possible solutions to problems that have been identified are presented.

  4. Effects of radiation on scintillating fiber performance. [SSC hadron calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, M.L.; Cohn, H.; Efremenko, Yu.; Gordeev, A.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Onopienko, D.; Savin, S.; Shmakov, K.; Tarkovsky, E.; Young, K.G. ); Carey, R.; Rothman, M.; Sulak, L.; Worstell, W. ); Parr, H. )

    1992-01-01

    Continued rapid improvements in formulations for scintillating fibers require the ability to parameterize and predict effects of radiation on detector performance. Experimental techniques necessary to obtain needed information and calculational procedures used in performing predications for hadron scintillating fiber calorimetry in the Superconducting Supercollider environment are described. The experimental techniques involve control of the testing environment, consideration of dose rate effects, and other factors. These calculations involve the behavior of particle showers in the detector, expected levels of radiation, and parameterization of the radiation effects. A summary of significant work is also presented.

  5. Integration of RFQ beam coolers and solenoidal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Cavenago, M. Maggiore, M.; Porcellato, A. M.; Chiurlotto, F.; Comunian, M.; Galatà, A.; Romé, M.; Maero, G.; Cavaliere, F.

    2016-02-15

    Electromagnetic traps are a flexible and powerful method of controlling particle beams, possibly of exotic nuclei, with cooling (of energy spread and transverse oscillations) provided by collisions with light gases as in the Radio Frequency Quadrupole Cooler (RFQC). A RFQC prototype can be placed inside the existing Eltrap solenoid, capable of providing a magnetic flux density component B{sub z} up to 0.2 T, where z is the solenoid axis. Confinement in the transverse plane is provided both by B{sub z} and the rf voltage V{sub rf} (up to 1 kV at few MHz). Transport is provided by a static electric field E{sub z} (order of 100 V/m), while gas collisions (say He at 1 Pa, to be maintained by differential pumping) provide cooling or heating depending on V{sub rf}. The beamline design and the major parameters V{sub rf}, B{sub z} (which affect the beam transmission optimization) are here reported, with a brief description of the experimental setup.

  6. Advancing Non-Solenoidal Startup on the Pegasus ST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusch, J. A.; Barr, J. L.; Bodner, G. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Pachicano, J. L.; Perry, J. M.; Richner, N. J.; Rodriguez Sanchez, C.; Schlossberg, D. J.

    2016-10-01

    The Pegasus experiment utilizes compact, edge-localized current sources (Ainj 2 - 4 cm2, Iinj 10 kA, Vinj 1 kV) for non-solenoidal local helicity injection (LHI) startup. Recent campaigns are comparing two injector geometries that vary the differing relative contributions of DC helicity input and non-solenoidal inductive voltages. A predictive 0-D model that treats the plasma as a resistive element with time-varying inductance and enforces Ip limits from Taylor relaxation was tested with inward growth of the plasma current channel using injectors on the outboard midplane. Strong inductive drive arises from plasma shape evolution and poloidal field (PF) induction. A major unknown in the model is the resistive dissipation, and hence the electron confinement. Te (R) profile measurements in LHI show centrally-peaked Te > 100 eV while the plasma is coupled to the injectors, suggesting LHI confinement is not strongly stochastic. A second campaign utilizes new injectors in the lower divertor region. This geometry trades subtler relaxation field programming and reduced PF induction for higher HI rates. Present efforts are developing relaxation methods at high BT, with relaxation at BT , inj > 0.15 T achieved to date via higher Iinj and PF manipulation. Conceptual design studies of coaxial helicity injection (CHI) and ECH heating systems for Pegasus have been initiated to explore direct comparison of LHI to CHI with and without ECH assist. Supported by US DOE Grants DE-FG02-96ER54375, DE-SC0006928.

  7. Qualification of the Joints for the ITER Central Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N; Berryhill, A; Kenney, S

    2011-09-01

    The ITER Central Solenoid has 36 interpancake joints, 12 bus joints, and 12 feeder joints in the magnet. The joints are required to have resistance below 4 nOhm at 45 kA at 4.5 K. The US ITER Project Office developed two different types of interpancake joints with some variations in details in order to find a better design, qualify the joints, and establish a fabrication process. We built and tested four samples of the sintered joints and two samples with butt-bonded joints (a total of eight joints). Both designs met the specifications. Results of the joint development, test results, and selection of the baseline design are presented and discussed in the paper. The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) consists of six modules. Each module is composed of six wound hexapancakes and one quadrapancake. The multipancakes are connected electrically and hydraulically by in-line interpancake joints. The joints are located at the outside diameter (OD) of the module. Cable in conduit conductor (CICC) high-current joints are critical elements in the CICC magnets. In addition to low resistivity, the CS joints must fit a space envelope equivalent to the regular conductor cross section and must have low hydraulic impedance and enough structural strength to withstand the hoop and compressive forces during operation, including cycling. This paper is the continuation of the work reported on the intermodule joints.

  8. Analysis of an Adjustable Field Permanent Magnet Solenoid

    DOE PAGES

    Burris-Mog, Trevor John; Burns, Michael James; Chavez, Mark Anthony; ...

    2017-07-12

    A feasibility study has been performed on an adjustable-field permanent magnet (PM) solenoid concept in an effort to reduce the dependence that linear induction accelerators have on large direct current power supplies and associated cooling systems. The concept relies on the ability to reorient sections of the PMs and thus redirect their magnetization vector to either add to or subtract from the on-axis magnetic field. This study concentrated on the focal strengths and emittance growths for two different designs, both with 19 cm bore diameters extending 53 cm in length. The first design is expected to produce peak magnetic fieldsmore » ranging from 260 to 900 G (0.026 to 0.09 T) while the second design is expected to produce peak magnetic fields ranging from 580 to 2100 G (0.058 to 0.21 T). Finally, although the PM configuration generates a variable magnetic field and the torques acting on PMs within the assembly appear manageable, the emittance growth is larger than that of a DC solenoid.« less

  9. Mechanical and electromagnetic design of the SSC QSE101 quadrupole ends

    SciTech Connect

    Orrell, D.; Nobrega, F.; Lilly, J.; Snitchler, G.; Jayakumar, J.; Venkatraman, V. ); Brandt, J.S. )

    1991-06-01

    The SSC collider magnets feature grouped ends in which cables of a particular coil remain stacked together as they are gent around the end. methods have been developed to form the ends in such a way that mechanical stresses are lowered and field quality is optimized. This paper discusses techniques of end turn design and presents calculations of harmonics and peak fields for the SSC quadrupole QSE101. 5 refs., 9 figs.

  10. New particle signals at the SSC and at an upgraded Tevatron collider

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, R.M.; Hollebeek, R.J.; White, A.P.; Yoh, J.; Baer, H.A.; Barnett, B.A.; Eichten, E.; Freeman, J.E.; Gamberini, G.; Grifols, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    We have studied the production and detection of several types of new particles at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and at three possible upgrades of the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. We compare the physics potential of the SSC with that of an upgraded collider, and we discuss in depth the relative capabilities of the three Tevatron Collider upgrades. From a physics standpoint, we suggest that one of the proposed upgrades has several advantages. 34 refs., 21 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Magnetic field measurements of full length 50 mm aperture SSC dipole magnets at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, J.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Delchamps, S.W.; Gourlay, S.; Hanft, R.; Koska, W.; Kuchnir, M.; Lamm, M.J.; Mazur, P.O.; Mokhtarani, A.; Orris, D.; Ozelis, J.; Wake, M. ); Devred, A.; DiMarco, J.; Kuzminski, J.; Puglisi, M.; Tompkins, J.C.; Yu, Y.; Zhao, Y.; Zheng, H. ); Ogitsu, T. (Supe

    1992-09-01

    Thirteen 16 m long, 50 mm aperture SSC dipole magnets, designed jointly by Fermilab, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the SSC Laboratory, have been built at Fermilab. The first nine magnets have been fully tested to date. The allowed harmonics are systematically shifted from zero by amounts larger than the specification. The unallowed harmonics, with the exception of the skew sextupole, are consistent with zero. The magnet-to-magnet RMS variation of all harmonics is much smaller than the specification.

  12. Method and apparatus for monitoring armature position in direct-current solenoids

    DOEpatents

    Moyers, John C.; Haynes, Howard D.

    1996-12-10

    A method for determining the position of an armature of a dc-powered solenoid. Electrical circuitry is provided to introduce a small alternating current flow through the coil. As a result, the impedance and resistance of the solenoid coil can be measured to provide information indicative of the armature's position.

  13. Using Experiment and Computer Modeling to Determine the Off-Axis Magnetic Field of a Solenoid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lietor-Santos, Juan Jose

    2014-01-01

    The study of the ideal solenoid is a common topic among introductory-based physics textbooks and a typical current arrangement in laboratory hands-on experiences where the magnetic field inside a solenoid is determined at different currents and at different distances from its center using a magnetic probe. It additionally provides a very simple…

  14. Using Experiment and Computer Modeling to Determine the Off-Axis Magnetic Field of a Solenoid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lietor-Santos, Juan Jose

    2014-01-01

    The study of the ideal solenoid is a common topic among introductory-based physics textbooks and a typical current arrangement in laboratory hands-on experiences where the magnetic field inside a solenoid is determined at different currents and at different distances from its center using a magnetic probe. It additionally provides a very simple…

  15. Simulation and Measurement of the Fringe Field of the 1.5 Tesla BaBar Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    London, Georges W

    1998-11-17

    In the context of the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collider and the BABAR detector with its 1.5 Tesla solenoid, we have calculated and measured the fringe field at the nearby beam elements and at the position of the photomultipliers external to the return iron but within a specially designed iron shield. The comparisons of these measurements with the simulations based on finite element analysis are remarkably good, within about 5 Gauss at the most critical beam element. The field at the photomultipliers is less than 1 Gauss, in agreement with the simulation. With a simple method of demagnetization of the shield, a maximum field of 0.6 Gauss is obtained.

  16. Electron cloud effects on an intense ion beam in a four solenoid lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California at Berkeley,; 4155 Etcheverry Hall, MC 1730, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA.; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA-94720, USA.; University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-3511, USA.; Lawrence Liveremore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA.; Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM 87108, USA.; Coleman, Josh; Coleman, J.E.; Seidl, P.A.; Henestroza, E.; Roy, P.K.; Vay, J.L.; Haber, I.; Molvik, A.W.; Sharp, W.M.; Welch, D.R.

    2007-07-01

    The Solenoid Transport Experiment (STX) at LBNL successfully demonstrated the transport of a space-charge dominated ion beam in a two-solenoid lattice. Initial experiments showed a strong dependence of electron cloud effects on solenoid field strength. A current-reducing aperture, two solenoids and in-bore diagnostics were added to the two-solenoid lattice in order to study electron cloud effects more closely. Experiments were conducted with a 10 {micro}s, singly charged potassium ion bunch at an ion energy of 0.3 MeV and currents of 26 mA and 45 mA. A qualitative comparison of experimental and calculated results are presented, including a comparison of the effects of manipulating electrons on the beam dynamics, quantifying beam-induced gas desorption, ionization, and electron effects.

  17. Using Experiment and Computer Modeling to Determine the Off-Axis Magnetic Field of a Solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lietor-Santos, Juan Jose

    2014-12-01

    The study of the ideal solenoid is a common topic among introductory-based physics textbooks1-4 and a typical current arrangement in laboratory hands-on experiences where the magnetic field inside a solenoid is determined at different currents and at different distances from its center using a magnetic probe. It additionally provides a very simple scenario in which Ampère's law can easily be applied by using a rectangular area that is pierced by a certain number of turns of the solenoid. The integration path is laid out in such a way so that part of it lies outside the solenoid; in so doing, the familiar result Bsolenoid=μ N/L I is obtained, where μ is the magnetic permeability, N is the number of turns of the solenoid, L is the length, and I is the current.2

  18. Can a PB / SCIFI Calorimeter Survive the SSC?

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Hertzog; S. A. Hughes; P. E. Reimer; R. L. Tayloe; K. F. Johnson; S. Majewski; C. Zorn; M. Zorn

    1990-03-01

    A scintillating fiber based electromagnetic calorimeter module built from radiation-hard materials has been tested in a beam capable of delivering both low and high currents of monoenergetic electrons. Energy resolution and light output measurements were made following high-dose exposures. The procedure was repeated until the resolution of the detector decreased from an initial value of 6.9%/sqrt E to 14.0%/sqrt E and the pulse height dropped by a factor of 11. After four weeks, the detector was retested. Partial recovery was observed in the light output which returned to approximately 52% of its original value. The resolution recovered to a value of 8.8%/sqrt E. The tests are described.

  19. Can a Pb/SCIFI calorimeter survive the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzog, D.W.; Hughes, S.A.; Reimer, P.E.; Tayloe, R.L. ); Johnson, K.F. ); Majewski, S.; Zorn, C.; Zorn, M. )

    1990-01-01

    A scintillating fiber based electromagnetic calorimeter module built from radiation-hard materials has been tested in a beam capable of delivering both low and high currents of monoenergetic electrons. Energy resolution and light output measurements were made following high-dose exposures. The procedure was repeated until the resolution of the detector decreased from an initial value of 6.9%{radical}E to 14.0%{radical}E and the pulse height dropped by a factor of 11. After four weeks, the detector was retested. Partial recovery was observed in the light output which returned to approximately 52% of its original value. The resolution recovered to a value of 8.8%{radical}E. The tests are described. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Model NbTi Helical Solenoid Fabrication and Test Results

    SciTech Connect

    Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Chlachidze, G.; Evbota, D.; Kashikhin, V.S.; Kashikhin, V.V.; Lamm, M.J.; Makarov, A.; Novitski, I.; Orris, D.F.; Tartaglia, M.A.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    A program to develop model magnets for a helical cooling channel is under way at Fermilab. In the first steps of a planned sequence of magnets, two four-coil helical solenoid models with 300 mm aperture have been fabricated and tested. These two models, HSM01 and HSM02, used insulated NbTi Rutherford cable wound onto stainless steel rings with spliceless transitions between coils. Strip heaters were included for quench protection of each coil, and the coils were epoxy-impregnated after winding inside the support structures. Based on the results of the first model the second model was made using a cable with optimized cross-section, improved winding and epoxy-impregnation procedures, enhanced ground insulation, and included heat exchange tubing for a test of conduction cooling. We report on the results and lessons learned from fabrication and tests of these two models.

  1. The Hall D solenoid helium refrigeration system at JLab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverdure, N.; Creel, J.; Dixon, K.; Ganni, V.; Martin, F.; Norton, R.; Radovic, S.

    2014-01-01

    Hall D, the new Jefferson Lab experimental facility built for the 12GeV upgrade, features a LASS 1.85 m bore solenoid magnet supported by a 4.5 K helium refrigerator system. This system consists of a CTI 2800 4.5 K refrigerator cold box, three 150 hp screw compressors, helium gas management and storage, and liquid helium and nitrogen storage for stand-alone operation. The magnet interfaces with the cryo refrigeration system through an LN2-shielded distribution box and transfer line system, both designed and fabricated by JLab. The distribution box uses a thermo siphon design to respectively cool four magnet coils and shields with liquid helium and nitrogen. We describe the salient design features of the cryo system and discuss our recent commissioning experience.

  2. Design of Helical Solenoid Combined with RF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir; Andreev, Nicolai; Kashikhin, Vadim; Lamm, Michael; Makarov, Alexander; Romanov, Gennady; Yonehara, Katsuya; Yu, Miao; Zlobin, Alexander; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Helical Solenoids (HS) were proposed for a muon beam ionization cooling. There are substantial energy losses, up to 30 MeV/m, during the passing of the muon beam through the absorber. The main issue of such a system is the muon beam energy recovery. A conventional RF cavity is too large to be placed inside HS. In the paper the results of a dielectric-filled RF cavity design is presented. The proposed RF cavity has a helical configuration. Helical Cooling Channel (HCC) module design which includes high pressure vessel, RF cavity, and superconducting HS is presented. The parameters of these module sub-systems are discussed, and the results of muon beam tracking in combined magnetic and electric 3D fields are shown.

  3. Superconducting helical solenoid systems for muon cooling experiment at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, Vladimir S.; Andreev, Nikolai; Johnson, Rolland P.; Kashikhin, Vadim V.; Lamm, Michael J.; Romanov, Gennady; Yonehara, Katsuya; Zlobin, Alexander V.; /Fermilab

    2007-08-01

    Novel configurations of superconducting magnet system for Muon Beam Cooling Experiment is under design at Fermilab. The magnet system has to generate longitudinal and transverse dipole and quadrupole helical magnetic fields providing a muon beam motion along helical orbit. It was found that such complicated field configuration can be formed by a set of circular coils shifted in transverse directions in such a way that their centers lay on the center of the helical beam orbit. Closed beam orbit configurations were also proposed and investigated. This paper describes the magnetic and mechanical designs and parameters of such magnetic system based on a NbTi Rutherford type cable. The helical solenoid fabrication, assembly and quench protection issues are presented.

  4. Alternative connections for the large MFTF-B solenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.; Wang, S.T.

    1983-05-20

    The MFTF-B central-cell solenoids are a set of twelve closely coupled, large superconducting magnets with similar but not exactly equal currents. Alternative methods of connecting them to their power supplies and dump resistors are investigated. The circuits are evaluated for operating conditions and fault conditions. The factors considered are the voltage to ground during a dump, short circuits, open circuits, quenches, and failure of the protection system to detect a quench. Of particular interest are the current induced in coils that remain superconducting when one or more coils quench. The alternative connections include separate power supplies, combined power supplies, individual dump resistors, series dump resistors and combinations of these. A new circuit that contains coupling resistors is proposed. The coupling resistors do not affect normal fast dumps but reduce the peak induced currents while also reducing the energy rating of the dump resistors. Another novel circuit, the series circuit with diodes, is discussed in detail.

  5. Application & testing of high temperature materials for solenoid coils

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, R.O.; Archer, W.E.; Zich, J.L.

    1997-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has designed and proven-in two new Solenoid coils for a highly-reliable electromechanical switch. Mil-Spec Magnetics Inc., Walnut CA manufactured the coils. The new design utilizes two new materials: Liquid Crystal Polymer (Vectra C130) for the bobbin and Thermal Barrier Silicone (VI-SIL V-658) for the encapsulant. The use of these two new materials solved most of the manufacturing problems inherent in the old Sandia design. The coils are easier to precision wind and more robust for handling, testing, and storage. The coils have some unique weapon related safety requirements. The most severe of these requirements is the 400{degrees}C, 1600 V test. The coils must not, and did not, produce any outgassing products to affect the voltage breakdown between contacts in the switch at these temperatures and voltages. Actual coils in switches were tested under these conditions. This paper covers the prove-in of this new coil design.

  6. Mu2e transport solenoid prototype tests results

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Mauricio L.; G. Ambrosio; DiMarco, J.; Evbota, D.; Feher, S.; Friedsam, H.; Galt, A.; Hays, S.; Hocker, J.; Kim, M. J.; Kokoska, L.; Koshelev, S.; Kotelnikov, S.; Lamm, M.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Nogiec, J.; Orris, D.; Pilipenko, R.; Rabehl, R.; Santini, C.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.; Badgley, K.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Marchevsky, M.

    2016-02-08

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment has been developed to search for evidence of charged lepton flavor violation through the direct conversion of muons into electrons. The transport solenoid is an s-shaped magnet which guides the muons from the source to the stopping target. It consists of fifty-two superconducting coils arranged in twenty-seven coil modules. A full-size prototype coil module, with all the features of a typical module of the full assembly, was successfully manufactured by a collaboration between INFN-Genoa and Fermilab. The prototype contains two coils that can be powered independently. In order to validate the design, the magnet went through an extensive test campaign. Warm tests included magnetic measurements with a vibrating stretched wire, electrical and dimensional checks. As a result, the cold performance was evaluated by a series of power tests as well as temperature dependence and minimum quench energy studies.

  7. Development of the Butt Joint for the ITER Central Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N

    2006-08-23

    The ITER Central Solenoid (CS) requires compact and reliable joints for its Cable-in-Conduit Conductor (CICC). The baseline design is a diffusion bonded butt joint. In such a joint the mating cables are compacted to a very low void fraction in a copper sleeve and then heat treated. After the heat treatment the ends are cut, polished and aligned against each other and then diffusion bonded under high compression in a vacuum chamber at 750 C. The jacket is then welded on the conductor to complete the joint, which remarkably does not require more room than a regular conductor. This joint design is based on a proven concept developed for the ITER CS Model Coil that was successfully tested in the previous R&D phase.

  8. Mu2e transport solenoid prototype tests results

    DOE PAGES

    Lopes, Mauricio L.; G. Ambrosio; DiMarco, J.; ...

    2016-02-08

    The Fermilab Mu2e experiment has been developed to search for evidence of charged lepton flavor violation through the direct conversion of muons into electrons. The transport solenoid is an s-shaped magnet which guides the muons from the source to the stopping target. It consists of fifty-two superconducting coils arranged in twenty-seven coil modules. A full-size prototype coil module, with all the features of a typical module of the full assembly, was successfully manufactured by a collaboration between INFN-Genoa and Fermilab. The prototype contains two coils that can be powered independently. In order to validate the design, the magnet went throughmore » an extensive test campaign. Warm tests included magnetic measurements with a vibrating stretched wire, electrical and dimensional checks. As a result, the cold performance was evaluated by a series of power tests as well as temperature dependence and minimum quench energy studies.« less

  9. High-field magnetic resonance imaging using solenoid radiofrequency coils.

    PubMed

    Vegh, Viktor; Gläser, Philipp; Maillet, Donald; Cowin, Gary J; Reutens, David C

    2012-10-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging using dedicated high-field radiofrequency micro-coils at 16.4 T (700 MHz) was investigated. Specific solenoid coils primarily using silver and copper as conductors with enamel and polyurethane coatings were built to establish which coil configuration produces the best image. Image quality was quantified using signal-to-noise ratio and signal variation over regions of interest. Benchmarking was conducted using 5-mm diameter coils, as this size is comparable to an established coil of the same size. Our 1.4-mm-diameter coils were compared directly to each other, from which we deduce performance as a function of conductor material and coating. A variety of materials and conductor coatings allowed us to choose an optimal design, which we used to image a kidney section at 10-micron resolution. We applied zero-fill extrapolation to achieve 5-micron resolution.

  10. Solenoid-based focusing in a proton linac

    SciTech Connect

    Terechkine, I; DiMarco, J.; Schappert, W.; Sergatskov, d.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    Development of solenoid-based focusing lenses for the transport channel of an R&D linac front end at FNAL (HINS linac) is in its final stage. Superconducting lenses for the room temperature RF section of the linac are assembled into individual cryostats and certified using a dedicated test stand. During this certification process, the optical axis of each lens relative to the cryogenic vessel is found in the warm and cold state. Lenses for the superconducting RF sections are ready for production, and development of a cryomodule (which contains multiple superconducting lenses and RF cavities) is in progress. Studies have been conducted to measure fringe magnetic field of a lens in the cryomodule, to investigate a laser-based method of alignment, and to evaluate the extent of beam quality degradation due to imperfections in lens construction and alignment. This report presents some results of these studies.

  11. Design and fabrication of layer-wound YBCO solenoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglietti, D.; Choi, S.; Kiyoshi, T.

    2010-11-01

    Rare Earth based coated conductors are very promising conductors for the construction of high field solenoids. Development of coil winding technique was started at the Tsukuba Magnet Laboratory: coils of various sizes (from 18 mm to 220 mm of an inner diameter) have been fabricated by layer-winding without impregnation in order to test the mechanical and superconducting properties. In the thin 220 mm diameter coil the Hoop stress reached over 500 MPa at 130 A in 14 T background field, without degradation of the superconducting properties. In the small diameter coils (18 mm of inner diameter) the tape was insulated using enamel to minimize the cross section and to enhance the coil current density. The highest field generated was 2.1 T in a background field of 18 T (total field was 20.1 T) at 4.2 K and the coil current density was 240 A/mm2.

  12. Solenoid micropump-based flow system for generalized calibration strategy.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Marcin; Kościelniak, Paweł; Swit, Paweł; Paluch, Justyna; Kozak, Joanna

    2015-02-01

    Generalized calibration strategy (GCS) is one of the innovative approaches aimed at verification and improvement of accuracy of analytical determinations. It combines in a single procedure the interpolative and the extrapolative calibration approaches along with stepwise dilution of a sample with the use of a dedicated flow system. In the paper a simple solenoid micropump-based flow system designed for implementation of GCS has been described. The manifold consists of several modules fully operated by a computer and connected with each other in a properly designed network. Its performance and usefulness were tested on determination of calcium by FAAS in synthetic and natural samples containing strong interferents. It was shown how GCS can serve for detection, examination and elimination of the interference effects. It was demonstrated that the designed manifold enabled to perform GCS procedure with very good precision, in short time and with very low standard, sample and reagent consumption.

  13. Process control strategy for ITER central solenoid operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, R.; Takami, S.; Iwamoto, A.; Chang, H.-S.; Forgeas, A.; Chalifour, M.

    2016-12-01

    ITER Central Solenoid (CS) pulse operation induces significant flow disturbance in the forced-flow Supercritical Helium (SHe) cooling circuit, which could impact primarily on the operation of cold circulator (SHe centrifugal pump) in Auxiliary Cold Box (ACB). Numerical studies using Venecia®, SUPERMAGNET and 4C have identified reverse flow at the CS module inlet due to the substantial thermal energy deposition at the inner-most winding. To assess the reliable operation of ACB-CS (dedicated ACB for CS), the process analyses have been conducted with a dynamic process simulation model developed by Cryogenic Process REal-time SimulaTor (C-PREST). As implementing process control of hydrodynamic instability, several strategies have been applied to evaluate their feasibility. The paper discusses control strategy to protect the centrifugal type cold circulator/compressor operations and its impact on the CS cooling.

  14. Early Endothelial Progenitor Cells (eEPCs) in systemic sclerosis (SSc) - dynamics of cellular regeneration and mesenchymal transdifferentiation.

    PubMed

    Patschan, S; Tampe, D; Müller, C; Seitz, C; Herink, C; Müller, G A; Zeisberg, E; Zeisberg, M; Henze, E; Patschan, D

    2016-08-12

    Patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) are endagered by tissue fibrosis and by microvasculopathy, with the latter caused by endothelial cell expansion/proliferation. SSc-associated fibrosis potentially results from mesenchymal transdifferentiation of endothelial cells. Early Endothelial Progenitor Cells (eEPCs) act proangiogenic under diverse conditions. Aim of the study was to analyze eEPC regeneration and mesenchymal transdifferentiation in patients with limited and diffuse SSs (lSSc and dSSc). Patients with both, lSSc and dSSc were included into the study. The following parameters were evaluated: eEPC numbers and regeneration, concentrations of vasomodulatory mediators, mesenchymal properties of blood-derived eEPC. Serum samples of healthy subjects and SS patients were used for stimulation of cultured human eEPC, subsequently followed by analysis of mesenchymal cell characteristics and mobility. Twenty-nine patients were included into the study. Regenerative activity of blood-derived eEPCs did not differ between Controls and patients. Circulating eEPC were significantly lower in all patients with SSc, and in limited and diffuse SSc (lSSc/dSSc). Serum concentrations of promesenchymal TGF-b was elevated in all patients with SSc. Cultured mononuclear cells from SS patients displayed higher abundances of CD31 and of CD31 and aSMA combined. Finally, serum from SSc patients inhibited migration of cultured eEPCs and the cells showed lower sensitivity towards the endothelin antagonist Bosentan. The eEPC system, which represents an essential element of the endogenous vascular repair machinery is affected in SSc. The increased appearance of mesenchymal properties in eEPC may indicate that alterations of the cells potentially contribute to the accumulation of connective tissue and to vascular malfunction.

  15. Numerical analysis of modified Central Solenoid insert design

    SciTech Connect

    Khodak, Andrei; Martovetsky, Nicolai; Smirnov, Aleksandre; Titus, Peter

    2015-06-21

    The United States ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for fabrication of the Central Solenoid (CS) for ITER project. The ITER machine is currently under construction by seven parties in Cadarache, France. The CS Insert (CSI) project should provide a verification of the conductor performance in relevant conditions of temperature, field, currents and mechanical strain. The US IPO designed the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at JAEA, Naka. To validate the modified design we performed three-dimensional numerical simulations using coupled solver for simultaneous structural, thermal and electromagnetic analysis. Thermal and electromagnetic simulations supported structural calculations providing necessary loads and strains. According to current analysis design of the modified coil satisfies ITER magnet structural design criteria for the following conditions: (1) room temperature, no current, (2) temperature 4K, no current, (3) temperature 4K, current 60 kA direct charge, and (4) temperature 4K, current 60 kA reverse charge. Fatigue life assessment analysis is performed for the alternating conditions of: temperature 4K, no current, and temperature 4K, current 45 kA direct charge. Results of fatigue analysis show that parts of the coil assembly can be qualified for up to 1 million cycles. Distributions of the Current Sharing Temperature (TCS) in the superconductor were obtained from numerical results using parameterization of the critical surface in the form similar to that proposed for ITER. Lastly, special ADPL scripts were developed for ANSYS allowing one-dimensional representation of TCS along the cable, as well as three-dimensional fields of TCS in superconductor material. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Numerical analysis of modified Central Solenoid insert design

    DOE PAGES

    Khodak, Andrei; Martovetsky, Nicolai; Smirnov, Aleksandre; ...

    2015-06-21

    The United States ITER Project Office (USIPO) is responsible for fabrication of the Central Solenoid (CS) for ITER project. The ITER machine is currently under construction by seven parties in Cadarache, France. The CS Insert (CSI) project should provide a verification of the conductor performance in relevant conditions of temperature, field, currents and mechanical strain. The US IPO designed the CSI that will be tested at the Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) Test Facility at JAEA, Naka. To validate the modified design we performed three-dimensional numerical simulations using coupled solver for simultaneous structural, thermal and electromagnetic analysis. Thermal and electromagneticmore » simulations supported structural calculations providing necessary loads and strains. According to current analysis design of the modified coil satisfies ITER magnet structural design criteria for the following conditions: (1) room temperature, no current, (2) temperature 4K, no current, (3) temperature 4K, current 60 kA direct charge, and (4) temperature 4K, current 60 kA reverse charge. Fatigue life assessment analysis is performed for the alternating conditions of: temperature 4K, no current, and temperature 4K, current 45 kA direct charge. Results of fatigue analysis show that parts of the coil assembly can be qualified for up to 1 million cycles. Distributions of the Current Sharing Temperature (TCS) in the superconductor were obtained from numerical results using parameterization of the critical surface in the form similar to that proposed for ITER. Lastly, special ADPL scripts were developed for ANSYS allowing one-dimensional representation of TCS along the cable, as well as three-dimensional fields of TCS in superconductor material. Published by Elsevier B.V.« less

  17. Design and optimization of a HTS insert for solenoid magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomassetti, Giordano; de Marzi, Gianluca; Muzzi, Luigi; Celentano, Giuseppe; della Corte, Antonio

    2016-12-01

    With the availability of High-Temperature Superconducting (HTS) prototype cables, based on high-performance REBCO Coated Conductor (CC) tapes, new designs can now be made for large bore high-field inserts in superconducting solenoids, thus extending the magnet operating point to higher magnetic fields. In this work, as an alternative approach to the standard trial-and-error design process, an optimization procedure for a HTS grading section design is proposed, including parametric electro-magnetic and structural analyses, using the ANSYS software coupled with a numerically-efficient optimization algorithm. This HTS grading section is designed to be inserted into a 12 T large bore Low-Temperature Superconducting (LTS) solenoid (diameter about 1 m) to increase the field up to a maximum value of at least 17 T. The optimization variables taken into consideration are the number of turns and layers and the circle-in-square jacket inner diameter in order to minimize the total needed conductor length to achieve a peak field of at least 17 T, while guaranteeing the structural integrity and manufacturing constraints. By means of the optimization, an optimal 360 m total conductor length was found, achieving 17.2 T with an operating current of 22.4 kA and a coil comprised of 18 × 12 turns, shortened of about 20% with respect to the best initial candidate architectural design. The optimal HTS insert has a bore compatible with manufacturing constraints (inner bore radius larger than 30 cm). A scaled HTS insert for validation purposes, with a reduced conductor length, to be tested in an advanced experimental facility currently under construction, is also mentioned.

  18. Report of the SSC workshop on distributed multipole correction coils. Task force report

    SciTech Connect

    Sah, R.

    1988-01-01

    The SSC Workshop on Distributed Multipole Correction Coils was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on October 13 and 14, 1987. This Workshop was organized by the SSC Central Design Group, and its purpose was to discuss the present status of specifications, designs, and R&D plans for distributed, actively-powered multipole correction coils for the SSC. The Workshop was organized into four consecutive sessions to discuss the following topics: requirements for distributed correction coils, distributed connection coil designs, materials issues, and plans for future R&D. The following conclusions were drawn from the workshop: Accelerator physics considerations indicate that distributed multipole correction coils represent a feasible and flexible method to correct magnetic field errors in the SSC. Considerable progress has been made by Brookhaven National Laboratory in collaboration with industry to develop a possible fabrication technique for distributed correction coils. This technique consists of imbedding superconducting wire in a flexible plastic substrate. Its feasibility for the SSC still needs to be demonstrated. BNL has presented a preliminary plan for the necessary R&D. A successful technique has been developed to manufacture distributed correction coils for HERA. The coil performance is excellent. As yet, no plan has been proposed to study this type of correction coil for the SSC. The results from an experiment to study radiation damage to organic materials, although still preliminary, am providing guidance in selecting the most radiation resistant materials to use in correction coils. The test samples in this experiment were subjected to much larger radiation doses than expected at the SSC. Considerable information on radiation damage is available in the literature.

  19. Alignment of the Fermilab D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Babatunde O'Sheg Oshinowo

    2001-07-20

    The Fermilab D0 detector was used for the discovery of the top quark during Run I in 1996. It is currently being upgraded to exploit the physics potential to be presented by the Main Injector and the Tevatron Collider during Run II in the Fall of 2000. Some of the essential elements of this upgrade is the upgrade of the Solenoid Magnet, the Central Fiber Tracker, the Preshower Detectors, the Calorimeter System, and the Muon System. This paper discusses the survey and alignment of the these detectors with emphasis on the Muon detector system. The alignment accuracy is specified as better than 0.5mm. A combination of the Laser Tracker, BETS, and V-STARS systems are used for the survey.

  20. [Calorimeter based detectors for high energy hadron colliders]. [Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-04

    This document provides a progress report on research that has been conducted under DOE Grant DEFG0292ER40697 for the past year, and describes proposed work for the second year of this 8 year grant starting November 15, 1992. Personnel supported by the contract include 4 faculty, 1 research faculty, 4 postdocs, and 9 graduate students. The work under this grant has in the past been directed in two complementary directions -- DO at Fermilab, and the second SSC detector GEM. A major effort has been towards the construction and commissioning of the new Fermilab Collider detector DO, including design, construction, testing, the commissioning of the central tracking and the central calorimeters. The first DO run is now underway, with data taking and analysis of the first events. Trigger algorithms, data acquisition, calibration of tracking and calorimetry, data scanning and analysis, and planning for future upgrades of the DO detector with the advent of the FNAL Main Injector are all involved. The other effort supported by this grant has been towards the design of GEM, a large and general-purpose SSC detector with special emphasis on accurate muon measurement over a large solid angle. This effort will culminate this year in the presentation to the SSC laboratory of the GEM Technical Design Report. Contributions are being made to the detector design, coordination, and physics simulation studies with special emphasis on muon final states. Collaboration with the RD5 group at CERN to study muon punch through and to test cathode strip chamber prototypes was begun.

  1. Design Construction and Test Results of a HTS Solenoid For Energy Recovery Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Anerella, M; Ben-Zvi, I; Kayran, D; McIntyre, G; Muratore, J; Plate, S; Sampson, W; Cole, M; Holmes, D

    2011-03-28

    An innovative feature of the proposed Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The use of HTS allows solenoid to be placed in close proximity to the cavity and thus provides early focusing of the electron beam. In addition, cryogenic testing at {approx}77 K is simpler and cheaper than 4 K testing. This paper will present the design, construction and test results of this HTS solenoid. The HTS solenoid in the proposed ERL will be situated in the transition region between the superconducting cavity at {approx}4 K and the cryostat at the room temperature. Solenoid inside the cryogenic structure provides an early focusing and hence low emittance beam. The temperature in the transition region will be too high for a conventional low temperature superconductor and resistive heat load from copper coils will be too high on cryogenic system. HTS coils also allow much higher current density and significant reduction in size as compared to copper coils. Hence HTS solenoid provide a unique and technically superior solution. The use of a HTS solenoid with superconducting cavity offers a unique option as it can be placed in a cold to warm transition region to provide early focussing without using additional space. Construction and test results so far are very encouraging for its use in the ERL project.

  2. Design and realization of measuring system for pneumatic solenoid valve based on high speed data acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yi; Fan, Wei-jun; Lao, Zai; Guo, Bin

    2011-12-01

    Pneumatic high-speed solenoid valve is a very important comment for automation control system. With the rapid development of industry its quality requirements are getting higher and higher. The traditional method is manual measurement or semi-automatic measurement, and comprehensive evaluation of solenoid valve parameters is lacked. To solve the problem of measuring solenoid valve at present, the PC controlled experimental tester for solenoid valve based on high speed data acquisition was built up. It can measure these parameters: dynamic characteristic, sealing performance, the minimum pilot pressure test, fatigue life test. To verify the system accuracy, a dynamic simulation model of solenid valve based on Matlab/Simulink was designed. This model can provide a basis for the design of solenoid valve. The solenoid valve of type QVT307 was measured on the experimental device, and the applications software was programmed by VC++, which had the function of A/D high-speed data acquisition. The results show that characteristic parameters of the solenoid valve can be judged well by this system. Data acquisition rate can be up to 0.1ms, and the pressure resolution is 0.1Kpa.

  3. An Historical and Policy Perspective on the Plight of the SSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldston, David

    2001-04-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) has come to represent the epitome of big science gone awry. In the late 80s and early 90s the SSC was dream next machine of the US high energy physics community, representing our efforts to discover the Higgs particle as well as to demonstrate the US commitment to scientific leadership and exploration. While the scientific merits of the SSC were strong, from a policy perspective the project was beset with problems. As with any big science project, these problems were based, to first order, in cost, but the complexity of the policy issues went beyond cost. This talk will take an historical and policy perspective on the plight of the SSC as it relates to the challenges faced by all mega science projects that require sustained, multi-year Congressional support for their survival. Insight will be offered on how, from the point-of-view of a Congressional staffer, scientists can apply the history of the SSC and the Large Hadron Collider towards future ambitious funding objectives.

  4. Orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in the NICA collider with solenoid Siberian snakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenko, A. D.; Butenko, A. V.; Kekelidze, V. D.; Mikhaylov, V. A.; Kondratenko, M. A.; Kondratenko, A. M.; Filatov, Yu N.

    2016-02-01

    Two solenoid Siberian snakes are required to obtain ion polarization in the “spin transparency” mode of the NICA collider. The field integrals of the solenoid snakes for protons and deuterons at maximum momentum of 13.5 GeV/c are equal to 2×50 T·m and 2×160 T·m respectively. The snakes introduce strong betatron oscillation coupling. The calculations of orbital parameters of proton and deuteron beams in NICA collider with solenoid snakes are presented.

  5. Simulation of proton radiation belt formation during the March 24, 1991 SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, M. K.; Kotelnikov, A. D.; Li, X.; Roth, I.; Temerin, M.; Wygant, J.; Blake, J. B.; Gussenhoven, M. S.

    1995-01-01

    The rapid formation of a new proton radiation belt at L approximately = 2.5 following the March 24, 1991 Storm Sudden Commencement (SSC) observed at the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) satellite is modeled using a relativistic guiding center test particle code. The SSC is modeled by a bipolar electric field and associated compression and relaxation in the magnetic field, superimposed on a dipole magnetic field. The source population consists of both solar and trapped inner zone protons. The simulations show that while both populations contribute to drift echoes in the 20-80 MeV range, primary conditions is from the solar protons. Proton acceleration by the SSC differs from relativistic electron acceleration in that different source populations contribute and nonrelativistic conservation of the first adiabatic invariation leads to greater energization of protons for a given decrease in L. Model drift echoes and flux distribution in L at the time of injection compare well with CRRES observations.

  6. The SSC: a decade of climate-health research and future directions.

    PubMed

    Hondula, D M; Vanos, J K; Gosling, S N

    2014-03-01

    This year marks the tenth anniversary of the development of the revised Spatial Synoptic Classification, the "SSC", by Scott Sheridan. This daily weather-type classification scheme has become one of the key analytical tools implemented in a diverse range of climatological investigations, including analysis of air quality variability, human health, vegetation growth, precipitation and snowfall trends, and broader analyses of historical and future climatic variability and trends. The continued and expanding use of the SSC motivates a review and comparison of the system's research and geographic foci to date, with the goal of identifying promising areas for future efforts, particularly within the context of human health and climate change. This review also assesses how the SSC has complemented and compares with other current environmental epidemiological studies in weather and health.

  7. Design of new central solenoid for SST-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Upendra; Pradhan, Subrata; Ghate, Mahesh; Raj, Piyush; Tanna, V. L.; Khan, Ziauddin; Roy, Swati; Santra, Prosenjit; Biswas, Prabal; Sharma, A. N.; Khristi, Yohan; Kanaber, Deven; Varmora, Pankaj

    2017-04-01

    The key role of central solenoid (CS) magnet of a Tokamak is for gas breakdown, ramp up and maintaining of plasma current. The magnetic flux change in CS along with other PF coils generates magnetic null and induces electric field in toroidal direction. The induced toroidal electric field accelerates the residual electrons which collide with the neutrals and an avalanche takes place which led to the net plasma in the vacuum vessel of a Tokamak. In order to maximize the CS volt-sec capability, the higher magnetic field with a greater magnetic flux linkage is necessary. In order to facilitate all these requirements of SST-1 a new superconducting CS has been designed for SST-1. The design of new central solenoid has two bases; first one is physics and second is smart engineering in limited bore diameter of ∼ 655 mm. The physics basis of the design includes volt-sec storage capacity of ∼ 0.8 volt-sec, magnetic field null around 0.2 m over major radius of 1.1 m and toroidal electric field of ∼ 0.3 volt/m. The engineering design of new CS consists of Nb3Sn cable in conduit conductor (CICC) of operating current of 14 kA @ 4.5 K at 6 T, consolidated winding pack, smart quench detection system, protection system, housing cryostat and conductor terminations and joint design. The winding pack consists of 576 numbers of turns distributed in four layers with 0.75 mm FRP tape soaked with cyanide Easter based epoxy resin turn insulation and 3 mm of ground insulation. The interlayer low resistance (∼1 nΩ) terminal praying hand joints at 14 kA at 4.5 K has been designed for making winding pack continuous. The total height of winding pack is 2500 mm. The stored energy of this winding pack is ∼ 3 MJ at 14 kA of operating current. The expected heat load at cryogenic temperature is ∼ 10 W per layer, which requires helium mass flow rate of 1.4 g/s at 1.4 bars @ 4.5 K. The typical diameter and height of housing cryostat are 650 mm and 2563 mm with 80 K shield respectively

  8. Applications of a superconducting solenoidal separator in the experimental investigation of nuclear reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinde, D. J.; Carter, I. P.; Dasgupta, M.; Simpson, E. C.; Cook, K. J.; Kalkal, Sunil; Luong, D. H.; Williams, E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes applications of a novel superconducting solenoidal separator, with magnetic fields up to 8 Tesla, for studies of nuclear reactions using the Heavy Ion Accelerator Facility at the Australian National University.

  9. Radial magnetic field reduction to improve critical current of HTS solenoid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Joonsun; Lee, Joon-Ho; Nah, Wansoo; Kim, Dong-Hun; Park, Il-Han; Joo, Jinho

    2002-08-01

    To enhance the critical current of superconducting coil, the magnetic field experienced by superconductor strand (tape) in a coil should be minimized. This is true for both low Tc and high Tc superconductors, and the difference between the two lies in their isotropic/anisotropic characteristics. In this paper, we propose a shape optimization algorithm to reduce radial magnetic field components in HTS solenoid to enhance critical current of a solenoid. In the algorithm, the finite element method and the continuum shape design sensitivity formula were employed. The objective function is to minimize the maximum radial magnetic fields in a solenoid with a constraint of constant solenoid volume condition. In this paper, the details on algorithm are introduced and the calculated optimized shapes are presented.

  10. The electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC. A Conceptual Design Report

    SciTech Connect

    Beddo, M.E.; Bielick, E.; Dawson, J.W.; The STAR EMC Collaboration

    1993-09-22

    This report discusses the following on the electromagnetic calorimeter for the solenoidal tracker at RHIC: conceptual design; the physics of electromagnetic calorimetry in STAR; trigger capability; integration into STAR; and cost, schedule, manpower, and funding.

  11. Progress on the Design and Fabircation of the MICE SpectrometerSolenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Virostek, S.P.; Green, M.A.; Lia, D.; Sizman, M.S.

    2007-06-20

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) willdemonstrate ionization cooling in a short section of a realistic coolingchannel using a muon beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in theUK. A five-coil, superconducting spectrometer solenoid magnet at each endof the cooling channel will provide a 4 T uniform field region for thescintillating fiber tracker within the magnet bore tubes. The trackermodules are used to measure the muon beam emittance as it enters andexits the cooling channel. The cold mass for the 400 mm warm bore magnetconsists of two sections: a three-coil spectrometer magnet and a two-coilmatching section that matches the uniform field of the solenoid into theMICE cooling channel. The spectrometer solenoid detailed designandanalysis has been completed, and the fabrication of the magnets is wellunder way. The primary features of the spectrometer solenoid magnet andmechanical designs are presented along with a summary of key fabricationissues and photos of the construction.

  12. Design features of the solenoid magnets for the central cell of the MFTF-B

    SciTech Connect

    Wohlwend, J.W.; Tatro, R.E.; Ring, D.S.

    1981-10-23

    The 14 superconducting solenoid magnets which form the central cell of the MFTF-B are being designed and fabricated by General Dynamics for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Each solenoid coil has a mean diameter of five meters and contains 600 turns of a proven conductor type. Structural loading resulting from credible fault events, cooldown and warmup requirements, and manufacturing processes consistent with other MFTF-B magnets have been considered in the selection of 304 LN as the structural material for the magnet. The solenoid magnets are connected by 24 intercoil beams and 20 solid struts which resist the longitudinal seismic and electromagnetic attractive forces and by 24 hanger/side supports which react magnet dead weight and seismic loads. A modular arrangement of two solenoid coils within a vacuum vessel segment allow for sequential checkout and installation.

  13. Subspace Compressive GLRT Detector for MIMO Radar in the Presence of Clutter

    PubMed Central

    Bolisetti, Siva Karteek; Patwary, Mohammad; Ahmed, Khawza; Soliman, Abdel-Hamid; Abdel-Maguid, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    The problem of optimising the target detection performance of MIMO radar in the presence of clutter is considered. The increased false alarm rate which is a consequence of the presence of clutter returns is known to seriously degrade the target detection performance of the radar target detector, especially under low SNR conditions. In this paper, a mathematical model is proposed to optimise the target detection performance of a MIMO radar detector in the presence of clutter. The number of samples that are required to be processed by a radar target detector regulates the amount of processing burden while achieving a given detection reliability. While Subspace Compressive GLRT (SSC-GLRT) detector is known to give optimised radar target detection performance with reduced computational complexity, it however suffers a significant deterioration in target detection performance in the presence of clutter. In this paper we provide evidence that the proposed mathematical model for SSC-GLRT detector outperforms the existing detectors in the presence of clutter. The performance analysis of the existing detectors and the proposed SSC-GLRT detector for MIMO radar in the presence of clutter are provided in this paper. PMID:26495422

  14. From mobile ADCP to high-resolution SSC: a cross-section calibration tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boldt, Justin A.

    2015-01-01

    Sediment is a major cause of stream impairment, and improved sediment monitoring is a crucial need. Point samples of suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) are often not enough to provide an understanding to answer critical questions in a changing environment. As technology has improved, there now exists the opportunity to obtain discrete measurements of SSC and flux while providing a spatial scale unmatched by any other device. Acoustic instruments are ubiquitous in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for making streamflow measurements but when calibrated with physical sediment samples, they may be used for sediment measurements as well. The acoustic backscatter measured by an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) has long been known to correlate well with suspended sediment, but until recently, it has mainly been qualitative in nature. This new method using acoustic surrogates has great potential to leverage the routine data collection to provide calibrated, quantitative measures of SSC which hold promise to be more accurate, complete, and cost efficient than other methods. This extended abstract presents a method for the measurement of high spatial and temporal resolution SSC using a down-looking, mobile ADCP from discrete cross-sections. The high-resolution scales of sediment data are a primary advantage and a vast improvement over other discrete methods for measuring SSC. Although acoustic surrogate technology using continuous, fixed-deployment ADCPs (side-looking) is proven, the same methods cannot be used with down-looking ADCPs due to the fact that the SSC and particle-size distribution variation in the vertical profile violates theory and complicates assumptions. A software tool was developed to assist in using acoustic backscatter from a down-looking, mobile ADCP as a surrogate for SSC. This tool has a simple graphical user interface that loads the data, assists in the calibration procedure, and provides data visualization and output options. This tool

  15. Correction of magnetization sextupole and decapole in a 5 centimeter bore SSC dipole using passive superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.

    1991-05-01

    Higher multipoles due to magnetization of the superconductor in four and five centimeter bore Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) superconducting dipole magnets have been observed. The use of passive superconductor to correct out the magnetization sextupole has been demonstrated on two dipoles built by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). This reports shows how passive correction can be applied to the five centimeter SSC dipoles to remove sextupole and decapole caused by magnetization of the dipole superconductor. Two passive superconductor corrector options will be presented. The change in magnetization sextupole and decapole due to flux creep decay of the superconductor during injection can be partially compensated for using the passive superconductor. 9 refs; 5 figs.

  16. A typical Ztrack'' long-term tracking result for the SSC aperture study

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Y.; Bourianoff, G. ); Schachinger, L. )

    1990-12-01

    A large amount of supercomputer CPU time has been used for tracking particles in the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) using a vectorized, multi-tasked post-Teapot tracking program called Ztrack.'' Typically, hundreds of particles with appropriate initial displacements (relative to the closed orbits) are tracked for a hundred thousand turns. One then simply makes a survival plot (turn at which particle is lost versus initial displacements) to determine the dynamic aperture. Occasionally, particles are tracked to a million turns for very selective cases. These numerical studies aid in determining the best aperture for the SSC. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  17. The XMM-Newton SSC survey of the Galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebot Gómez-Morán, A.; Motch, C.; Barcons, X.; Carrera, F. J.; Ceballos, M. T.; Cropper, M.; Grosso, N.; Guillout, P.; Hérent, O.; Mateos, S.; Michel, L.; Osborne, J. P.; Pakull, M.; Pineau, F.-X.; Pye, J. P.; Roberts, T. P.; Rosen, S. R.; Schwope, A. D.; Watson, M. G.; Webb, N.

    2013-05-01

    Many different classes of X-ray sources contribute to the Galactic landscape at high energies. Although the nature of the most luminous X-ray emitters is now fairly well understood, the population of low-to-medium X-ray luminosity (LX = 1027-34 erg s-1) sources remains much less studied, our knowledge being mostly based on the observation of local members. The advent of wide field and high sensitivity X-ray telescopes such as XMM-Newton now offers the opportunity to observe this low-to-medium LX population at large distances. We report on the results of a Galactic plane survey conducted by the XMM-Newton Survey Science Centre (SSC). Beyond its astrophysical goals, this survey aims at gathering a representative sample of identified X-ray sources at low latitude that can be used later on to statistically identify the rest of the serendipitous sources discovered in the Milky Way. The survey is based on 26 XMM-Newton observations, obtained at | b | < 20 deg, distributed over a large range in Galactic longitudes and covering a summed area of 4 deg2. The flux limit of our survey is 2 × 10-15 erg cm-2 s-1 in the soft (0.5-2 keV) band and 1 × 10-14 erg cm-2 s-1 in the hard (2-12 keV) band. We detect a total of 1319 individual X-ray sources. Using optical follow-up observations supplemented by cross-correlation with a large range of multi-wavelength archival catalogues we identify 316 X-ray sources. This constitutes the largest group of spectroscopically identified low latitude X-ray sources at this flux level. The majority of the identified X-ray sources are active coronae with spectral types in the range A-M at maximum distances of ~1 kpc. The number of identified active starsincreases towards late spectral types, reaching a maximum at K. Using infrared colours we classify 18% of the stars as giants. The observed distributions of FX/FV, X-ray and infrared colours indicates that our sample is dominated by a young (100 Myr) to intermediate (600 Myr) age population with a

  18. Recent developments on the STAR detector system at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Wieman, H.; Adams, D.L.; Added, N.

    1997-12-01

    The STAR detector system is designed to provide tracking, momentum analysis and particle identification for many of the mid-rapidity charged particles produced in collisions at the RHIC collider. A silicon vertex detector (SVT) provides three layers of tracking near the interaction point. This is followed by the main time projection chamber (TPC), which continues tracking out to 200 cm radial distance from the interaction region. The detector design also includes an electromagnetic calorimeter, various trigger detectors, and radial TPCs in the forward region. The entire system is enclosed in a 0.5 T solenoid magnet. A progress report is given for the various components of the STAR detector system. The authors report on the recent developments in the detector proto-typing and construction, with an emphasis on the main TPC, recent TPC cosmic ray testing and shipping to Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  19. A large superconducting thin solenoid magnet for TRISTAN experiment (VENUS) at KEK

    SciTech Connect

    Wake, M.; Asai, O.; Fujita, R.; Hirabayashi, H.; Ishibashi, K.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kuno, K.; Matsui, T.; Satow, T.; Wakamoto, K.

    1985-03-01

    A 30 Gev e/sup +/e/sup -/ collider TRISTAN is now under construction at KEK. The detector system VENUS in TRISTAN requires a large space of 7.5 kG magnetic field for the tracking of the particles while keeping the material thickness of the magnet as thin as possible. The superconducting thin solenoid magnet which is in the middle of the construction has 3.4m in warm bore diameter and 5.24m in usable length with material thickness of 0.52 radiation length. The geometrical thickness of the magnet is as thin as 208 mm while the outside dimension is as large as 4m /phi/x5.64m. Since the electro-magnetic force is toward outside, the coil is supported by an aluminum 'case' covering outside the coil instead of a bobbin in the coil. The water cooled welding technique and an expandable mandrel were developed to form the coil-case composite. The conductor is made of NbTi/Cu and pure aluminum stabilizer is extruded so as to contain the conductor in the stabilizer. The cooling of the magnet is provided by the forced flow of two phase helium in the cooling channel of the 'case'. The cryostat uses CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) to reduce the material thickness of the magnet. The construction method and the design were confirmed by 1m/phi/ superconductive model and real size non-superconductive model. Major components such as conductors and cryostat have been completed and the magnet will be excited next spring.

  20. A model of field and spherical aberration in soft/hard edge solenoid magnets.

    PubMed

    Biswas, B

    2013-10-01

    A solenoid magnetic field model is presented that describes the on axis field by a parameter of its hard edginess and axial half-width at half-maximum field, which universally define its spherical aberration without solving the ray equation. The model shows an increase in spherical aberration from real soft edge fields to hard edge models, as used in beam tracking. It compares well with existing field models. It simply and accurately finds the spherical aberration in many types of solenoids.

  1. Manufacture of a 6-m superconducting solenoid indirectly cooled by supercritical helium

    SciTech Connect

    Satow, T.; Kawaguchi, T.; Kawamura, T.; Ogino, O.

    1982-01-01

    A design study is presented as performed with the superconducting solenoid for a pulsed muon channel. The main part of the development was the construction and testing of epoxy-impregnated model soils and supercritical helium experiments. The solenoide operates satisfactorily and has been used on a high-flux pulsed muon beam. Continuous operation for 2500 hours has been achieved. This is the first long-term operation of a large scale superconducting magnet system in Japan.

  2. An implantable RF solenoid for magnetic resonance microscopy and microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rivera, D S; Cohen, M S; Clark, W G; Chu, A C; Nunnally, R L; Smith, J; Mills, D; Judy, J W

    2012-08-01

    Miniature solenoids routinely enhance small volume nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy; however, no such techniques exist for patients. We present an implantable microcoil for diverse clinical applications, with a microliter coil volume. The design is loosely based on implantable depth electrodes, in which a flexible tube serves as the substrate, and a metal stylet is inserted into the tube during implantation. The goal is to provide enhanced signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of structures that are not easily accessed by surface coils. The first-generation prototype was designed for implantation up to 2 cm, and provided initial proof-of-concept for microscopy. Subsequently, we optimized the design to minimize the influence of lead inductances, and to thereby double the length of the implantable depth (4 cm). The second-generation design represents an estimated SNR improvement of over 30% as compared to the original design when extended to 4 cm. Impedance measurements indicate that the device is stable for up to 24 h in body temperature saline. We evaluated the SNR and MR-related heating of the device at 3T. The implantable microcoil can differentiate fat and water peaks, and resolve submillimeter features.

  3. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    The STAR Collaboration

    1992-06-15

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it`s experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of {Delta}p/p {approximately} 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,{Delta}p/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets.

  4. Conceptual design report for the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-06-15

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) will search for signatures of quark-gluon plasma (QGP) formation and investigate the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density. The emphasis win be the correlation of many observables on an event-by-event basis. In the absence of definitive signatures for the QGP, it is imperative that such correlations be used to identify special events and possible signatures. This requires a flexible detection system that can simultaneously measure many experimental observables. The physics goals dictate the design of star and it's experiment. To meet the design criteria, tracking, momentum analysis, and particle identification of most of the charged particles at midrapidity are necessary. The tracking must operate in conditions at higher than the expected maximum charged particle multiplicities for central Au + Au collisions. Particle identification of pions/kaons for p < 0.7 GeV/c and kaons/protons for p < 1 GeV/c, as well as measurement of decay particles and reconstruction of secondary vertices will be possible. A two-track resolution of 2 cm at 2 m radial distance from, the interaction is expected. Momentum resolution of {Delta}p/p {approximately} 0.02 at p = 0.1 GeV/c is required to accomplish the physics, and,{Delta}p/p of several percent at p = 10 GeV/c is sufficient to accurately measure the rapidly failing spectra at high Pt and particles from mini-jets and jets.

  5. Testing of ITER central solenoid coil insulation in an array

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, R.; Martovetsky, N.N.; Perfect, S.A.

    1995-09-29

    A glass-polyimide insulation system has been proposed by the US team for use in the Central Solenoid (CS) coil of the international Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) machine and it is planned to use this system in the CS model coil inner module. The turn insulation will consist of 2 layers of combined prepreg and Kapton. Each layer is 50% overlapped with a butt wrap of prepreg and an overwrap of S glass. The coil layers will be separated by a glass-resin composite and impregnated in a VPI process. Small scale tests on the various components of the insulation are complete. It is planned to fabricate and test the insulation in a 4 x 4 insulated CS conductor array which will include the layer insulation and be vacuum impregnated. The conductor array will be subjected to 20 thermal cycles and 100000 mechanical load cycles in a Liquid Nitrogen environment. These loads are similar to those seen in the CS coil design. The insulation will be electrically tested at several stages during mechanical testing. This paper will describe the array configuration, fabrication: process, instrumentation, testing configuration, and supporting analyses used in selecting the array and test configurations.

  6. Compressive vs Solenoidal Turbulence and Violent Disc Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandelker, Nir; Dekel, Avishai; Inoue, Shigeki; Ceverino, Daniel; Primack, Joel

    2015-08-01

    High redshift star-forming galaxies (SFGs) exhibit star-formation rates (SFR) 20-100 times higher than local SFGs. This increased SFR is due to much higher gas fractions and surface densities prevalent in high redshift SFG. Such high gas fractions cause the disc to become violently unstable and undergo a phase of violent disc instability (VDI). During the VDI phase, there is rapid inflow of gas towards the galactic centre with inflow times comparable to the disc orbital time, which can lead to a compact "blue nugget". In addition, giant ~kpc scale star-forming clumps are formed, the most massive of which survive dtellar feedback and migrate towards the centre, where they coalesce in the growing bulge. While the existence of giant clumps is commonly associated with Toomre instability, high resolution cosmological simulations of galaxy formation show that active clump formation occurs even in regions where the Toomre Q parameter is well above the threshold for stability. The simulations suggest instead a non-linear instability, where frequent minor mergers and intense inflow by cold streams increase the compressive mode of turbulence relative to the solenoidal mode. We find this can induce clump formation even in regions that should be stable according to linear Toomre theory. Thus we show that mergers, smooth accretion from the cosmic web and VDI all go hand in hand in driving galaxy evolution at high redshift.

  7. Mu2e transport solenoid prototype design and manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Fabbricatore, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Cheban, S.; Evbota, D.; Farinon, S.; Lamm, M.; Lopes, M.; Musenich, R.; Wands, R.; Masullo, G.

    2016-02-08

    The Mu2e Transport Solenoid consists of 52 coils arranged in 27 coil modules that form the S-shaped cold mass. Each coil is wound from Al-stabilized NbTi superconductor. The coils are supported by an external structural aluminum shell machined from a forged billet. Most of the coil modules house two coils, with the axis of each coil oriented at an angle of approximately 5° with respect to each other. The coils are indirectly cooled with LHe circulating in tubes welded on the shell. In order to enhance the cooling capacity, pure aluminum sheets connect the inner bore of the coils to the cooling tubes. The coils are placed inside the shell by the means of a shrink-fit procedure. A full-size prototype, with all the features of the full assembly, was successfully manufactured in a collaboration between INFN Genova and Fermilab. In order to ensure an optimal mechanical prestress at the coil-shell interface, the coils are inserted into the shell through a shrink-fitting process. We present the details of the prototype with the design choices as validated by the structural analysis. In conclusion, the fabrication steps are described as well.

  8. Superconducting Solenoid and Press for Permanent Magnet Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulcahy, T. M.; Hull, J. R.

    2002-08-01

    For the first time, a superconducting solenoid (SCM) was used to increase the remnant magnetization of sintered NdFeB permanent magnets (PMs). In particular, improved magnetic alignment of commercial-grade PM powder was achieved, as it was axial die pressed into 12.7-mm diameter cylindrical compacts in the 76.2-mm warm bore of a 9-T SCM. The press used to compact the powder is unique and was specifically designed for use with the SCM. Although the press was operated in the batch mode for this proof of concept study, its design is intended to enable automated production. In operation, a simple die and punch set made of nonmagnetic materials was filled with powder and loaded into a nonmagnetic press tube. The cantilevered press tube was inserted horizontally, on a carrier manually advanced along a track, into the SCM. The robustness of the mechanical components and the SCM, in its liquid helium dewar, were specifically designed to allow for insertion and extraction of the magnetic powder and compacts, while operating at 9 T.

  9. Mu2e transport solenoid prototype design and manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Fabbricatore, P.; Ambrosio, G.; Cheban, S.; ...

    2016-02-08

    The Mu2e Transport Solenoid consists of 52 coils arranged in 27 coil modules that form the S-shaped cold mass. Each coil is wound from Al-stabilized NbTi superconductor. The coils are supported by an external structural aluminum shell machined from a forged billet. Most of the coil modules house two coils, with the axis of each coil oriented at an angle of approximately 5° with respect to each other. The coils are indirectly cooled with LHe circulating in tubes welded on the shell. In order to enhance the cooling capacity, pure aluminum sheets connect the inner bore of the coils tomore » the cooling tubes. The coils are placed inside the shell by the means of a shrink-fit procedure. A full-size prototype, with all the features of the full assembly, was successfully manufactured in a collaboration between INFN Genova and Fermilab. In order to ensure an optimal mechanical prestress at the coil-shell interface, the coils are inserted into the shell through a shrink-fitting process. We present the details of the prototype with the design choices as validated by the structural analysis. In conclusion, the fabrication steps are described as well.« less

  10. Multi-sensors SSC retrieval, A Case Study over the Yangtze Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xin; Timmermans, Joris; Verhoef, Wout

    2014-05-01

    The amount of suspended sediment plays an important role in the morphological development of the Yangtze River estuary. The sediment load in the Yangtze River estuary decreased dramatically in the half past century due to the dam construction and human activities. Such change leads to a fundamental environmental and geomorphological impact on the Yangtze delta and consequently influences the agriculture and economy in this area. So it is important to investigate how the SSC changed in the Yangtze River estuary. Several studies have therefore focused attention on retrieval of SSC. Most of the researches have focused on using MERIS imagery, as this sensor was specifically designed for retrieving ocean parameters. While these researches have successfully retrieved SSC, extra research should be performed due to the revisit time of MERIS. MERIS only has a revisit time of three days while SSC changes every day. Therefore it is necessary to increase the frequency of observation to better monitor SSC variation. This can be done by using multiple satellites. However using a multi-sensor approach requires the retrieval of SSC is homogeneous for the different sensors. In the retrieval of SSC, several steps are most important 1) atmospheric correction 2) ocean parameters retrieval from the reflectances acquired in step 1. Correct atmospheric correction is important because more than 90% of radiance that received by the sensor is contributed by the atmosphere. Within the atmospheric correction for ocean applications, haze is especially important. Haze, in the form of visibility, has bigger influence on the atmosphere path radiance than other atmospheric parameters. Additional, haze is spatially varied. However, most researches take haze as homogeneous and consequently lead to increased uncertainties SSC product. The aim of this research is to improve the quality of SSC estimation using a multi-sensor approach that integrates both atmosphere correction and water parameter

  11. The B AB AR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bazan, A.; Boucham, A.; Boutigny, D.; De Bonis, I.; Favier, J.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Jeremie, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Le Flour, T.; Lees, J. P.; Lieunard, S.; Petitpas, P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zachariadou, K.; Palano, A.; Chen, G. P.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Reinertsen, P. L.; Stugu, B.; Abbott, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Amerman, L.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Clark, A. R.; Dardin, S.; Day, C.; Dow, S. F.; Fan, Q.; Gaponenko, I.; Gill, M. S.; Goozen, F. R.; Gowdy, S. J.; Gritsan, A.; Groysman, Y.; Hernikl, C.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Jared, R. C.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Karcher, A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kipnis, I.; Kluth, S.; Kral, J. F.; Lafever, R.; LeClerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lewis, S. A.; Lionberger, C.; Liu, T.; Long, M.; Luo, L.; Lynch, G.; Luft, P.; Mandelli, E.; Marino, M.; Marks, K.; Matuk, C.; Meyer, A. B.; Minor, R.; Mokhtarani, A.; Momayezi, M.; Nyman, M.; Oddone, P. J.; Ohnemus, J.; Oshatz, D.; Patton, S.; Pedrali-Noy, M.; Perazzo, A.; Peters, C.; Pope, W.; Pripstein, M.; Quarrie, D. R.; Rasson, J. E.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Stone, R.; Strother, P. D.; Telnov, A. V.; von der Lippe, H.; Weber, T. F.; Wenzel, W. A.; Zizka, G.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Hawkes, C. M.; Kirk, A.; Knowles, D. J.; O'Neale, S. W.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Koch, H.; Krug, J.; Kunze, M.; Lewandowski, B.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Andress, J. C.; Barlow, N. R.; Bhimji, W.; Chevalier, N.; Clark, P. J.; Cottingham, W. N.; De Groot, N.; Dyce, N.; Foster, B.; Mass, A.; McFall, J. D.; Wallom, D.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Hearty, C.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Camanzi, B.; Harrison, T. J.; McKemey, A. K.; Tinslay, J.; Antohin, E. I.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Bukin, D. A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Dubrovin, M. S.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kolachev, G. M.; Korol, A. A.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Mikhailov, S. F.; Onuchin, A. P.; Salnikov, A. A.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Telnov, V. I.; Yushkov, A. N.; Booth, J.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; Pier, S.; Stoker, D. P.; Zioulas, G.; Ahsan, A.; Arisaka, K.; Buchanan, C.; Chun, S.; Faccini, R.; MacFarlane, D. B.; Prell, S. A.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Raven, G.; Sharma, V.; Burke, S.; Callahan, D.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Hale, D.; Hart, P. A.; Kuznetsova, N.; Kyre, S.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; May, J.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Witherell, M.; Yellin, S.; Beringer, J.; DeWitt, J.; Dorfan, D. E.; Eisner, A. M.; Frey, A.; Grillo, A. A.; Grothe, M.; Heusch, C. A.; Johnson, R. P.; Kroeger, W.; Lockman, W. S.; Pulliam, T.; Rowe, W.; Sadrozinski, H.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E. N.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Wilder, M.; Williams, D. C.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hanson, J. E.; Hitlin, D. G.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Metzler, S.; Oyang, J.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Weaver, M.; Yang, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Devmal, S.; Geld, T. L.; Jayatilleke, S.; Jayatilleke, S. M.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Bloom, P.; Broomer, B.; Erdos, E.; Fahey, S.; Ford, W. T.; Gaede, F.; van Hoek, W. C.; Johnson, D. R.; Michael, A. K.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Park, H.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Sen, S.; Smith, J. G.; Wagner, D. L.; Blouw, J.; Harton, J. L.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Warner, D. W.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Dahlinger, G.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Eckstein, P.; Futterschneider, H.; Kocian, M. L.; Krause, R.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Behr, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Ferrag, S.; Fouque, G.; Gastaldi, F.; Matricon, P.; Mora de Freitas, P.; Renard, C.; Roussot, E.; T'Jampens, S.; Thiebaux, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Anjomshoaa, A.; Bernet, R.; Di Lodovico, F.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Falbo, M.; Bozzi, C.; Dittongo, S.; Folegani, M.; Piemontese, L.; Ramusino, A. C.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Xie, Y.; Zallo, A.; Bagnasco, S.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Minutoli, S.; Monge, M. R.; Musenich, R.; Pallavicini, M.; Parodi, R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Pia, M. G.; Priano, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Bartoldus, R.; Dignan, T.; Hamilton, R.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Fischer, P. A.; Lamsa, J.; McKay, R.; Meyer, W. T.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Albert, J. N.; Beigbeder, C.; Benkebil, M.; Breton, D.; Cizeron, R.; Du, S.; Grosdidier, G.; Hast, C.; Höcker, A.; Lacker, H. M.; LePeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Truong, K.; Valassi, A.; Wormser, G.; Alford, O.; Behne, D.; Bionta, R. M.; Bowman, J.; Brigljević, V.; Brooks, A.; Dacosta, V. A.; Fackler, O.; Fujino, D.; Harper, M.; Lange, D. J.; Mugge, M.; O'Connor, T. G.; Olson, H.; Ott, L.; Parker, E.; Pedrotti, B.; Roeben, M.; Shi, X.; van Bibber, K.; Wenaus, T. J.; Wright, D. M.; Wuest, C. R.; Yamamoto, B.; Carroll, M.; Cooke, P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; George, M.; Kay, M.; McMahon, S.; Muir, A.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Sutcliffe, P.; Touramanis, C.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Eschrich, I.; Gunawardane, N. J. W.; Martin, R.; Nash, J. A.; Price, D. R.; Sanders, P.; Smith, D.; Azzopardi, D. E.; Back, J. J.; Dixon, P.; Harrison, P. F.; Newman-Coburn, D.; Potter, R. J. L.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Williams, M. I.; Vidal, P. B.; Cowan, G.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McGrath, P.; McMahon, T. R.; Salvatore, F.; Scott, I.; Vaitsas, G.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Li, Y.; Pavlovich, J.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Boyd, J. T.; Fullwood, J.; Jackson, F.; Khan, A.; Lafferty, G. D.; Savvas, N.; Simopoulos, E. T.; Thompson, R. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Bard, R.; Dallapiccola, C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Lillard, V.; Olsen, J.; Roberts, D. A.; Schieck, J. R.; Blaylock, G.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Lin, C. S.; Willocq, S.; Wittlin, J.; Brau, B.; Cowan, R.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Britton, D. I.; Fernholz, R.; Houde, M.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Trischuk, J.; Lanni, F.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Booke, M.; Cremaldi, L.; Kroeger, R.; Reep, M.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Arguin, J. F.; Beaulieu, M.; Martin, J. P.; Nief, J. Y.; Seitz, R.; Taras, P.; Woch, A.; Zacek, V.; Nicholson, H.; Sutton, C. S.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; De Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Cason, N. M.; LoSecco, J. M.; Alsmiller, J. R. G.; Gabriel, T. A.; Handler, T.; Heck, J.; Iwasaki, M.; Sinev, N. B.; Caracciolo, R.; Colecchia, F.; Dal Corso, F.; Galeazzi, F.; Marzolla, M.; Michelon, G.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Santi, S.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Torassa, E.; Voci, C.; Bailly, P.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; De la Vaissière, C.; Del Buono, L.; Genat, J.-F.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Le Diberder, F.; Lebbolo, H.; Lory, J.; Martin, L.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; Versillé, S.; Zhang, B.; Manfredi, P. F.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Speziali, V.; Frank, E. D.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J. H.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bosi, F.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Gaddi, A.; Gagliardi, D.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Mammini, P.; Morganti, M.; Morsani, F.; Neri, N.; Profeti, A.; Paoloni, E.; Raffaelli, F.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Simi, G.; Triggiani, G.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Turnbull, L.; Wagoner, D. E.; Albert, J.; Bula, C.; Kelsey, M. H.; Lu, C.; McDonald, K. T.; Miftakov, V.; Sands, B.; Schaffner, S. F.; Smith, A. J. S.; Tumanov, A.; Varnes, E. W.; Bronzini, F.; Buccheri, A.; Bulfon, C.; Cavoto, G.; del Re, D.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Fratini, K.; Lamanna, E.; Leonardi, E.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Serra, M.; Voena, C.; Waldi, R.; Jacques, P. F.; Kalelkar, M.; Plano, R. J.; Adye, T.; Claxton, B.; Dowdell, J.; Egede, U.; Franek, B.; Galagedera, S.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Kay, J.; Lidbury, J.; Madani, S.; Metcalfe, S.; Metcalfe, S.; Markey, G.; Olley, P.; Watt, M.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Besson, P.; Bourgeois, P.; Convert, P.; De Domenico, G.; de Lesquen, A.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Georgette, Z.; Gosset, L.; Graffin, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Hervé, S.; Karolak, M.; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Marques, V.; Mayer, B.; Micout, P.; Mols, J. P.; Mouly, J. P.; Penichot, Y.; Rolquin, J.; Serfass, B.; Toussaint, J. C.; Usseglio, M.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, C.; Zito, M.; Copty, N.; Purohit, M. V.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Adam, I.; Adesanya, A.; Anthony, P. L.; Aston, D.; Bartelt, J.; Becla, J.; Bell, R.; Bloom, E.; Boeheim, C. T.; Boyarski, A. M.; Boyce, R. F.; Briggs, D.; Bulos, F.; Burgess, W.; Byers, B.; Calderini, G.; Chestnut, R.; Claus, R.; Convery, M. R.; Coombes, R.; Cottrell, L.; Coupal, D. P.; Coward, D. H.; Craddock, W. W.; DeBarger, S.; DeStaebler, H.; Dorfan, J.; Doser, M.; Dunwoodie, W.; Dusatko, J. E.; Ecklund, S.; Fieguth, T. H.; Freytag, D. R.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G. L.; Haller, G.; Hanushevsky, A.; Harris, J.; Hasan, A.; Hee, C.; Himel, T.; Huffer, M. E.; Hung, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kawahara, H.; Keller, L.; King, M. E.; Klaisner, L.; Krebs, H. J.; Langenegger, U.; Langeveld, W.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Louie, S. K.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; McDonald, J.; Manzin, G.; Marsiske, H.; Mattison, T.; McCulloch, M.; McDougald, M.; McShurley, D.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Metcalfe, S.; Morii, M.; Mount, R.; Muller, D. R.; Nelson, D.; Nordby, M.; O'Grady, C. P.; Olavson, L.; Olsen, J.; O'Neill, F. G.; Oxoby, G.; Paolucci, P.; Pavel, T.; Perl, J.; Pertsova, M.; Petrak, S.; Putallaz, G.; Raines, P. E.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Reif, R.; Robertson, S. H.; Rochester, L. S.; Roodman, A.; Russel, J. J.; Sapozhnikov, L.; Saxton, O. H.; Schietinger, T.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Sciolla, G.; Seeman, J. T.; Serbo, V. V.; Shapiro, S.; Skarpass, K., Sr.; Snyder, A.; Soderstrom, E.; Soha, A.; Spanier, S. M.; Stahl, A.; Stiles, P.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Talby, M.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Wang, R.; Weber, T.; Weinstein, A. J. R.; White, J. L.; Wienands, U.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Young, C. C.; Yu, N.; Burchat, P. R.; Cheng, C. H.; Kirkby, D.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Henderson, R.; Khan, N.; Berridge, S.; Bugg, W.; Cohn, H.; Hart, E.; Weidemann, A. W.; Benninger, T.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Turcotte, M.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Daudo, F.; Di Girolamo, B.; Gamba, D.; Grosso, P.; Smol, A.; Trapani, P. P.; Zanin, D.; Bosisio, L.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Pompili, A.; Poropat, P.; Prest, M.; Rashevskaia, I.; Vallazza, E.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Brown, C.; De Silva, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Pitman, D.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Charles, E.; Dasu, S.; Elmer, P.; Johnson, J. R.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Zobernig, H.; Moore, T. B.; Neal, H.

    2002-02-01

    B AB AR, the detector for the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric e +e - B Factory operating at the ϒ(4 S) resonance, was designed to allow comprehensive studies of CP-violation in B-meson decays. Charged particle tracks are measured in a multi-layer silicon vertex tracker surrounded by a cylindrical wire drift chamber. Electromagnetic showers from electrons and photons are detected in an array of CsI crystals located just inside the solenoidal coil of a superconducting magnet. Muons and neutral hadrons are identified by arrays of resistive plate chambers inserted into gaps in the steel flux return of the magnet. Charged hadrons are identified by d E/d x measurements in the tracking detectors and by a ring-imaging Cherenkov detector surrounding the drift chamber. The trigger, data acquisition and data-monitoring systems, VME- and network-based, are controlled by custom-designed online software. Details of the layout and performance of the detector components and their associated electronics and software are presented.

  12. ATPase domain and interdomain linker play a key role in aggregation of mitochondrial Hsp70 chaperone Ssc1.

    PubMed

    Blamowska, Marta; Sichting, Martin; Mapa, Koyeli; Mokranjac, Dejana; Neupert, Walter; Hell, Kai

    2010-02-12

    The co-chaperone Hep1 is required to prevent the aggregation of mitochondrial Hsp70 proteins. We have analyzed the interaction of Hep1 with mitochondrial Hsp70 (Ssc1) and the determinants in Ssc1 that make it prone to aggregation. The ATPase and peptide binding domain (PBD) of Hsp70 proteins are connected by a linker segment that mediates interdomain communication between the domains. We show here that the minimal Hep1 binding entity of Ssc1 consists of the ATPase domain and the interdomain linker. In the absence of Hep1, the ATPase domain with the interdomain linker had the tendency to aggregate, in contrast to the ATPase domain with the mutated linker segment or without linker, and in contrast to the PBD. The closest homolog of Ssc1, bacterial DnaK, and a Ssc1 chimera, in which a segment of the ATPase domain of Ssc1 was replaced by the corresponding segment from DnaK, did not aggregate in Delta hep1 mitochondria. The propensity to aggregate appears to be a specific property of the mitochondrial Hsp70 proteins. The ATPase domain in combination with the interdomain linker is crucial for aggregation of Ssc1. In conclusion, our results suggest that interdomain communication makes Ssc1 prone to aggregation. Hep1 counteracts aggregation by binding to this aggregation-prone conformer.

  13. ATPase Domain and Interdomain Linker Play a Key Role in Aggregation of Mitochondrial Hsp70 Chaperone Ssc1*

    PubMed Central

    Blamowska, Marta; Sichting, Martin; Mapa, Koyeli; Mokranjac, Dejana; Neupert, Walter; Hell, Kai

    2010-01-01

    The co-chaperone Hep1 is required to prevent the aggregation of mitochondrial Hsp70 proteins. We have analyzed the interaction of Hep1 with mitochondrial Hsp70 (Ssc1) and the determinants in Ssc1 that make it prone to aggregation. The ATPase and peptide binding domain (PBD) of Hsp70 proteins are connected by a linker segment that mediates interdomain communication between the domains. We show here that the minimal Hep1 binding entity of Ssc1 consists of the ATPase domain and the interdomain linker. In the absence of Hep1, the ATPase domain with the interdomain linker had the tendency to aggregate, in contrast to the ATPase domain with the mutated linker segment or without linker, and in contrast to the PBD. The closest homolog of Ssc1, bacterial DnaK, and a Ssc1 chimera, in which a segment of the ATPase domain of Ssc1 was replaced by the corresponding segment from DnaK, did not aggregate in Δhep1 mitochondria. The propensity to aggregate appears to be a specific property of the mitochondrial Hsp70 proteins. The ATPase domain in combination with the interdomain linker is crucial for aggregation of Ssc1. In conclusion, our results suggest that interdomain communication makes Ssc1 prone to aggregation. Hep1 counteracts aggregation by binding to this aggregation-prone conformer. PMID:20007714

  14. Tests of 1. 5 meter model 50mm SSC collider dipoles at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wake, M.; Bossert, R.; Carson, J.; Coulter, K.; Delchamps, S.; Gourlay, S.; Jaffery, T.S.; Kinney, W.; Koska, W.; Lamm, M.J.; Strait, J. ); Sims, R.; Winters, M. )

    1991-05-01

    A series of 50mm diameter 1.5m model magnets have been constructed. The test of these magnets gave convincing results concerning the design of the 50mm cross section of the SSC collider dipoles. 9 refs., 6 figs.

  15. The Disappearing Fourth Wall: John Marburger, Science Policy, and the SSC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert

    2015-04-01

    John H. Marburger (1941-2011) was a skilled science administrator who had a fresh and unique approach to science policy and science leadership. His posthumously published book Science Policy up Close contains recollections of key science policy episodes in which he participated or observed closely. One was the administration of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC); Marburger was Chairman of the Universities Research Association, the group charged with managing the SSC, from 1988-1994. Many accounts of the SSC saga attribute its demise to a combination of transitory factors: poor management, rising cost estimates, the collapse of the Soviet Union and thus of the Cold War threat, complaints by ``small science'' that the SSC's ``big science'' was consuming their budget, Congress's desire to cut spending, unwarranted contract regulations imposed by the Department of Energy (DOE) in response to environmental lapses at nuclear weapons laboratories, and so forth. Marburger tells a subtler story whose implications for science policy are more significant and far-reaching. The story involves changes in the attitude of the government towards large scientific projects that reach back to management reforms introduced by the administration of Presidents Johnson, Nixon, and Carter in the 1960s and 1970s. This experience impressed Marburger with the inevitability of public oversight of large scientific projects, and with the need for planners of such projects to establish and make public a cost and schedule tracking system that would model the project's progress and expenditures.

  16. Computing and data handling requirements for SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) and LHC (Large Hadron Collider) experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lankford, A.J.

    1990-05-01

    A number of issues for computing and data handling in the online in environment at future high-luminosity, high-energy colliders, such as the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) and Large Hadron Collider (LHC), are outlined. Requirements for trigger processing, data acquisition, and online processing are discussed. Some aspects of possible solutions are sketched. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Performance of the SSC H{sup {minus}} rf volume ion source and linac injector

    SciTech Connect

    Saadatmand, K.; Hebert, J.E.; Okay, N.C.

    1993-09-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) ion source is required to provide a 30-mA H{sup {minus}} beam at 35 keV with a normalized rms emittance ({var_epsilon}{sub n-rms}) of less than 0.18 {pi} mm-mrad. An rf-driven volume source was chosen for the commissioning of the SSC linear accelerator (Linac). The divergent ion source output beam is matched into the Radio Frequency Quadrupole accelerator (RFQ) by an electrostatic Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT). The SSC Linac Injector (consisting of ion source, LEBT, and RFQ) is required to provide 25 mA of H{sup {minus}} beam (pulse width of 9.6--48 {mu}s at 10-Hz repetition rate) at 2.5 MeV with transverse normalized rms emittance ({var_epsilon}{sub t-n-rms}) of less than 0.2 {pi} mm-mrad and longitudinal normalized rms emittance ({var_epsilon}1) of less than 0.82*10{sup {minus}6} eV-s. The performance of our rf volume source and initial experimental results from the SSC Injector are discussed.

  18. Fermilab R and D test facility for SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, J.; Bleadon, M.; Hanft, R.; Lamm, M.; McGuire, K.; Mantsch, P.; Mazur, P.O.; Orris, D.; Pachnik, J.

    1989-02-01

    The test facility used for R and D testing of full scale development dipole magnets for the SSC is described. The Fermilab Magnet Test Facility, originally built for production testing of Tevatron magnets, has been substantially modified to allow testing also of SSC magnets. Two of the original six test stands have been rebuilt to accommodate testing of SSC magnets at pressures between 1.3 Atm and 4 Atm and at temperatures between 1.8 K and 4.8 K and the power system has been modified to allow operation to at least 8 kA. Recent magnets have been heavily instrumented with voltage taps to allow detailed study of quench location and propagation and with strain gage based stress, force and motion transducers. A data acquisition system has been built with a capacity to read from each SSC test stand up to 220 electrical quench signals, 32 dynamic pressure, temperature and mechanical transducer signals during quench and up to 200 high precision, low time resolution, pressure, temperature and mechanical transducer signals. The quench detection and protection systems is also described. 23 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Planning for Plume Diagnostics for Ground Testing of J-2X Engines at the SSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SaintCyr, William W.; Tejwani, Gopal D.; McVay, Gregory P.; Langford, Lester A.; SaintCyr, William W.

    2010-01-01

    John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) is the premier test facility for liquid rocket engine development and certification for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Therefore, it is no surprise that the SSC will play the most prominent role in the engine development testing and certification for the J-2X engine. The Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne J-2X engine has been selected by the Constellation Program to power the Ares I Upper Stage Element and the Ares V Earth Departure Stage in NASA s strategy of risk mitigation for hardware development by building on the Apollo program and other lessons learned to deliver a human-rated engine that is on an aggressive development schedule, with first demonstration flight in 2010 and human test flights in 2012. Accordingly, J-2X engine design, development, test, and evaluation is to build upon heritage hardware and apply valuable experience gained from past development and testing efforts. In order to leverage SSC s successful and innovative expertise in the plume diagnostics for the space shuttle main engine (SSME) health monitoring,1-10 this paper will present a blueprint for plume diagnostics for various proposed ground testing activities for J-2X at SSC. Complete description of the SSC s test facilities, supporting infrastructure, and test facilities is available in Ref. 11. The A-1 Test Stand is currently being prepared for testing the J-2X engine at sea level conditions. The A-2 Test Stand is currently being used for testing the SSME and may also be used for testing the J-2X engine at sea level conditions in the future. Very recently, ground-breaking ceremony for the new A-3 rocket engine test stand took place at SSC on August 23, 2007. A-3 is the first large - scale test stand to be built at the SSC since the A and B stands were constructed in the 1960s. The A-3 Test Stand will be used for testing J-2X engines under vacuum conditions simulating high altitude operation at approximately 30,480 m (100,000 ft

  20. STAR Images: Image gallery from the Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC

    DOE Data Explorer

    The primary physics task of STAR is to study the formation and characteristics of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), a state of matter believed to exist at sufficiently high energy densities. STAR consists of several types of detectors, each specializing in detecting certain types of particles or characterizing their motion. These detectors allow final statements to be made about the collision. The gallery of STAR images makes available a small collection of event-generated images from Gold-Beam experiments, a simulation of TCP Drift, and a library of STAR instrument and construction photos.

  1. Solenoid transport of beams with current-dependent initial conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Harris, J. R.; Poole, B. R.; Lewellen, J. W.

    2017-09-06

    We present that intense charged particle beams will generally be formed with an initial correlation between their longitudinal properties, including longitudinal variations in current, and their transverse properties, including their radius and divergence. This is due to the competition between the transverse focusing fields in the beam source and the time-varying space charge forces in the beam. In DC electron guns where the current modulation is slow compared to the electron transit time, the nature of these correlations was previously shown to depend on the gun geometry, exhibiting a linear dependence of the beam radius and divergence on the beammore » current at the gun exit. Here, we extend the previous work to study the transport of beams with such correlation in uniform and periodic solenoid channels. For each transport channel configuration studied, the transverse envelope equation is used to calculate the envelope of 101 beam slices differing in their slice currents, as well as initial radius and divergence (due to their dependence on slice current). For each channel configuration, these calculations are performed 546 times, with each of these iterations considering a different degree of correlation between the radius and divergence, and the slice current. It is found that some degree of correlation between the initial radius and slice current actually aids in beam transport, and the required strength of correlation can be estimated with simple models. Finally, increasing the degree of correlation between the initial divergence and slice current is generally counterproductive, and the degree of sensitivity to such correlations depends on the design of the transport channel.« less

  2. Development of the bus joint for the ITER Central Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, Nicolai N; Irick, David Kim; Kenney, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    The terminations of the Central Solenoid (CS) modules are connected to the bus extensions by joints located outside the CS in the gap between the CS and Torodial Field (TF) assemblies. These joints have very strict space limitations. Low resistance is a common requirement for all ITER joints. In addition, the CS bus joints will experience and must be designed to withstand significant variation in the magnetic field of several tenths of a Tesla per second during initiation of plasma. The joint resistance is specified to be less than 4 nOhm. The joints also have to be soldered in the field and designed with the possibility to be installed and dismantled in order to allow cold testing in the cold test facility. We have developed coaxial joints that meet these requirements and have demonstrated the feasibility to fabricate and assemble them in the vertical configuration. We introduced a coupling cylinder with superconducting strands soldered to the surface of the cable that can be installed in the ITER assembly hall and at the Cold Test Facility. This cylinder serves as a transition area between the CS module and the bus extension. We made two racetrack samples and tested four bus joints in our Joint Test Apparatus. Resistance of the bus joints was measured by a decay method and by a microvoltmeter; the value of the current was measured by the Hall probes. This measurement method was verified in the previous tests. The resistance of the joints varied insignificantly from 1.5 to 2 nOhm. One of the challenges associated with a soldered joint is the inability to use corrosive chemicals that are difficult to clean. This paper describes our development work on cable preparation, chrome removal, compaction, soldering, and final assembly and presents the test results.

  3. Solenoid transport of beams with current-dependent initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.; Poole, B. R.; Lewellen, J. W.

    2017-09-01

    Intense charged particle beams will generally be formed with an initial correlation between their longitudinal properties, including longitudinal variations in current, and their transverse properties, including their radius and divergence. This is due to the competition between the transverse focusing fields in the beam source and the time-varying space charge forces in the beam. In DC electron guns where the current modulation is slow compared to the electron transit time, the nature of these correlations was previously shown to depend on the gun geometry, exhibiting a linear dependence of the beam radius and divergence on the beam current at the gun exit. Here, we extend the previous work to study the transport of beams with such correlation in uniform and periodic solenoid channels. For each transport channel configuration studied, the transverse envelope equation is used to calculate the envelope of 101 beam slices differing in their slice currents, as well as initial radius and divergence (due to their dependence on slice current). For each channel configuration, these calculations are performed 546 times, with each of these iterations considering a different degree of correlation between the radius and divergence, and the slice current. It is found that some degree of correlation between the initial radius and slice current actually aids in beam transport, and the required strength of correlation can be estimated with simple models. Increasing the degree of correlation between the initial divergence and slice current is generally counterproductive, and the degree of sensitivity to such correlations depends on the design of the transport channel.

  4. Determining if an axially rotated solenoid will induce a radial EMF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDermott, Dustin R.

    The nature of the electromagnetic field of an axially rotated solenoid or magnet is investigated. The investigations reviewed suggest the possibility of a radially emitted electric field by either: axially rotated magnetic field lines, or a relativistic change in charge of the electron. For a very long solenoid a relativistic change in charge leaves no electric field inside while leaving an electric field outside. The concept of axially rotating magnetic field lines gives an opposite prediction. They both seem to be in contradiction to the standard model of induction, which gives no change in the electric field for a rotated solenoid or magnet. An experiment by Joseph B. Tate [48], [49] conducted in 1968 seemed to have measured a change in charge outside of a rotated solenoid. Another experiment by Barnett [3] in 1912 reported measuring no electric field inside of a rotated solenoid. Further experimentation was decided necessary and the method decided upon to attempt detection of the radial E or EMF induced by an axially rotating B field or change in charge is two concentric capacitor plates, one inside and the other outside an axially rotated solenoid. The solenoid was rotated on a lathe for the test. A concentric capacitor around an axially rotated permanent neodymium magnet was also used as a test. These experiments proved very challenging because of the small magnitude of the predicted effect. Nevertheless, the bulk of the evidence obtained indicates that no induced E arises when a magnetic source is rotated about its magnetic axis, thus supporting the standard field model of electromagnetic induction, and casting doubt on the alternative theories of magnetic field line rotation or relativistic charge enhancement.

  5. Commissioning of the CMS Forward Pixel Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Ashish; /SUNY, Buffalo

    2008-12-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment is scheduled for physics data taking in summer 2009 after the commissioning of high energy proton-proton collisions at Large Hadron Collider (LHC). At the core of the CMS all-silicon tracker is the silicon pixel detector, comprising three barrel layers and two pixel disks in the forward and backward regions, accounting for a total of 66 million channels. The pixel detector will provide high-resolution, 3D tracking points, essential for pattern recognition and precise vertexing, while being embedded in a hostile radiation environment. The end disks of the pixel detector, known as the Forward Pixel detector, has been assembled and tested at Fermilab, USA. It has 18 million pixel cells with dimension 100 x 150 {micro}m{sup 2}. The complete forward pixel detector was shipped to CERN in December 2007, where it underwent extensive system tests for commissioning prior to the installation. The pixel system was put in its final place inside the CMS following the installation and bake out of the LHC beam pipe in July 2008. It has been integrated with other sub-detectors in the readout since September 2008 and participated in the cosmic data taking. This report covers the strategy and results from commissioning of CMS forward pixel detector at CERN.

  6. Performance measurements of a pilot superconducting solenoid model core for a wind tunnel magnetic suspension and balance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodyer, M. J.; Britcher, C. P.

    1983-01-01

    The results of experimental demonstrations of a superconducting solenoid model core in the Southampton University Magnetic Suspension and Balance System are detailed. Technology and techniques relevant to large-scale wind tunnel MSBSs comprise the long term goals. The magnetic moment of solenoids, difficulties peculiar to superconducting solenoid cores, lift force and pitching moment, dynamic lift calibration, and helium boil-off measurements are discussed.

  7. Data acqusition for the Zeus central tracking detector

    SciTech Connect

    Quinton, S.

    1989-04-01

    The Zeus experiment is being installed on the Hera electron-proton collider being built at the Desy laboratory in Hamburg. The high beam crossover rate of the Hera machine will provide experience in data acquisition and triggering relevant to the SSC environment. This paper describes the Transputer based data acquisition for the Zeus Central Tracking Detector, and outlines some proposed development work on the use of parallel processing techniques in this field.

  8. Qualification of the modules for the Phase 1 upgrade of the CMS forward pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving; CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The innermost component of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector, the silicon pixel tracker, will be replaced by a new device in early 2017 to cope with the significant increase in instantaneous luminosity expected for the remainder of Run 2 of the Large Hadron Collider. The upgraded detector is composed of two subcomponents: the barrel pixel (BPIX) and the forward pixel (FPIX). In this work, we describe the testing and calibration procedures that the FPIX detector subcomponents underwent as well as the quality assurance criteria used for selecting the best detector modules for the final installation. NSF

  9. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, S.; Kumaki, M.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.

    2016-02-15

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  10. Detecting solenoid valve deterioration in in-use electronic diesel fuel injection control systems.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsun-Heng; Tseng, Chyuan-Yow

    2010-01-01

    The diesel engine is the main power source for most agricultural vehicles. The control of diesel engine emissions is an important global issue. Fuel injection control systems directly affect fuel efficiency and emissions of diesel engines. Deterioration faults, such as rack deformation, solenoid valve failure, and rack-travel sensor malfunction, are possibly in the fuel injection module of electronic diesel control (EDC) systems. Among these faults, solenoid valve failure is most likely to occur for in-use diesel engines. According to the previous studies, this failure is a result of the wear of the plunger and sleeve, based on a long period of usage, lubricant degradation, or engine overheating. Due to the difficulty in identifying solenoid valve deterioration, this study focuses on developing a sensor identification algorithm that can clearly classify the usability of the solenoid valve, without disassembling the fuel pump of an EDC system for in-use agricultural vehicles. A diagnostic algorithm is proposed, including a feedback controller, a parameter identifier, a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) sensor, and a neural network classifier. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can accurately identify the usability of solenoid valves.

  11. Detecting Solenoid Valve Deterioration in In-Use Electronic Diesel Fuel Injection Control Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsun-Heng; Tseng, Chyuan-Yow

    2010-01-01

    The diesel engine is the main power source for most agricultural vehicles. The control of diesel engine emissions is an important global issue. Fuel injection control systems directly affect fuel efficiency and emissions of diesel engines. Deterioration faults, such as rack deformation, solenoid valve failure, and rack-travel sensor malfunction, are possibly in the fuel injection module of electronic diesel control (EDC) systems. Among these faults, solenoid valve failure is most likely to occur for in-use diesel engines. According to the previous studies, this failure is a result of the wear of the plunger and sleeve, based on a long period of usage, lubricant degradation, or engine overheating. Due to the difficulty in identifying solenoid valve deterioration, this study focuses on developing a sensor identification algorithm that can clearly classify the usability of the solenoid valve, without disassembling the fuel pump of an EDC system for in-use agricultural vehicles. A diagnostic algorithm is proposed, including a feedback controller, a parameter identifier, a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) sensor, and a neural network classifier. Experimental results show that the proposed algorithm can accurately identify the usability of solenoid valves. PMID:22163597

  12. Increasing the reliability of solution exchanges by monitoring solenoid valve actuation.

    PubMed

    Auzmendi, Jerónimo Andrés; Moffatt, Luciano

    2010-01-15

    Solenoid valves are a core component of most solution perfusion systems used in neuroscience research. As they open and close, they control the flow of solution through each perfusion line, thereby modulating the timing and sequence of chemical stimulation. The valves feature a ferromagnetic plunger that moves due to the magnetization of the solenoid and returns to its initial position with the aid of a spring. The delays between the time of voltage application or removal and the actual opening or closing of the valve are difficult to predict beforehand and have to be measured experimentally. Here we propose a simple method for monitoring whether and when the solenoid valve opens and closes. The proposed method detects the movement of the plunger as it generates a measurable signal on the solenoid that surrounds it. Using this plunger signal, we detected the opening and closing of diaphragm and pinch solenoid valves with a systematic error of less than 2ms. After this systematic error is subtracted, the trial-to-trial error was below 0.2ms.

  13. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, S; Kumaki, M; Kanesue, T; Okamura, M

    2016-02-01

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  14. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, S.; Kumaki, M.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  15. Commissioning report of the MuCool 5 Tesla solenoid coupled with helium refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Geynisman, Michael; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    MuCool 5T solenoid was successfully cooled down and operated coupled with MTA 'Brown' refrigerator. The system performed as designed with substantial performance margin. All process alarms and interlocks, as well as ODH and fire alarms, were active and performed as designed. The cooldown of the refrigerator started from warm conditions and took 44 hours to accumulate liquid helium level and solenoid temperature below 5K. Average liquid nitrogen consumption for the refrigerator precool and solenoid shield was measured as 20 gal/hr (including boil-off). Helium losses were small (below 30 scfh). The system was stable and with sufficient margin of performance and ran stably without wet expansion engine. Quench response demonstrated proper operation of the relieving devices and pointed to necessity of improving tightness of the relieving manifolds. Boil-off test demonstrated average heat load of 3 Watts for the unpowered solenoid. The solenoid can stay up to 48 hours cold and minimally filled if the nitrogen shield is maintained. A list of improvements includes commencing into operations the second helium compressor and completion of improvements and tune-ups for system efficiency.

  16. CDF experiments at Fermilab and the SDC experiment at the SSC Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This report discusses: SVX II detectors; SVX II data acquisition systems; radiation damage studies in silicon detectors; KEK beam test of SDC double sided silicon detectors; and SDC silicon module testing program.

  17. The computational challenges provided by the codes used to design and analyze Superconducting Super Collider detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, T.A.

    1991-01-01

    The Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) project is a critical element of our government's initiative to strengthen the position of the U.S. as a world leader in education, science and technology.'' This project is currently offering many challenges for the computational scientists and will, during the next decades, offer many more. During this presentation, I would like to discuss one of these challenges which deals with the codes used to design and analyze the large detectors that are needed to make the SSC a major success. In addition, I will address an area in which national laboratories like ORNL can assist in the education of computation scientists. To be specific, the following topics will be covered during this talk. First of all, I would like to show you a generic model of an SSC detector and briefly describe the major components and their functions. This will give you a feel for the magnitude of the project that is charged with the design of SSC detectors and for the need of extremely good high energy physics detector simulation codes. Secondly, I would like to overview the CALOR89 code system which is one of the recommended detector simulation codes for use at the SSC. This is an analog of the Monte Carlo Code System for those of you who have experience in this area. Thirdly, I would like to discuss the computational problems associated with CALOR89 and some potential solutions. It is not very difficult to name a few problems -- not very user friendly and requires large amounts of CPU time; and their potential solutions -- create user interfaces/menu driven input options and add more CPUs with greater speed. Finally, I would like to address a potential role that national laboratories can play in the education of the computational scientist. 10 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

    1960-05-10

    A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

  19. Interesting aspects of the STAR detector and physics program

    SciTech Connect

    Hallman, T.J.; STAR Collaboration

    1996-12-31

    The Solenoidal Tracker At RHIC (STAR) is a large acceptance collider detector scheduled to begin operation at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) in the fall of 1999. Simply stated, the physics goals of STAR are, (1) to study the behavior of strongly interacting matter at high energy density; (2) to search for signatures of a deconfined partonic phase of matter; and (3) to study the importance of spin as a fundamental property of QCD interactions and measure the spin-dependent parton distributions (gluon, valence quark, sea quark) of the proton. The detector design and methods of accomplishing the physics goals are addressed in this report.

  20. Wire bond vibration of forward pixel tracking detector of CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Atac, M.; Gobbi, B.; Kwan, S.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Spencer, E.; Sellberg, G.; Pavlicek, V.; /Fermilab

    2006-10-01

    Wire bonds of the Forward Pixel (FPix) tracking detectors are oriented in the direction that maximizes Lorentz Forces relative to the 4 Tesla field of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Detector's magnet. The CMS Experiment is under construction at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, Geneva, Switzerland. We were concerned about Lorentz Force oscillating the wires at their fundamental frequencies and possibly fracturing or breaking them at their heels, as happened with the CDF wire bonds. This paper reports a study to understand what conditions break such bonds.

  1. STAR (Solenoidal Tracker at RHIC) Figures and Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    The STAR Collaboration

    The primary physics task of STAR is to study the formation and characteristics of the quark-gluon plasma (QGP), a state of matter believed to exist at sufficiently high energy densities. STAR consists of several types of detectors, each specializing in detecting certain types of particles or characterizing their motion. These detectors work together in an advanced data acquisition and subsequent physics analysis that allows final statements to be made about the collision. The STAR Publications page provides access to all published papers by the STAR Collaboration, and many of them have separate links to the figures and data found in or supporting the paper. See also the data-rich summaries of the research at http://www.star.bnl.gov/central/physics/results/. [See also DDE00230

  2. HLA Class I and II Blocks Are Associated to Susceptibility, Clinical Subtypes and Autoantibodies in Mexican Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) Patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Reyna, Tatiana S; Mercado-Velázquez, Pamela; Yu, Neng; Alosco, Sharon; Ohashi, Marina; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos; Cabiedes-Contreras, Javier; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio; Zúñiga, Joaquin; Yunis, Edmond

    2015-01-01

    Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism studies in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) have yielded variable results. These studies need to consider the genetic admixture of the studied population. Here we used our previously reported definition of genetic admixture of Mexicans using HLA class I and II DNA blocks to map genetic susceptibility to develop SSc and its complications. We included 159 patients from a cohort of Mexican Mestizo SSc patients. We performed clinical evaluation, obtained SSc-associated antibodies, and determined HLA class I and class II alleles using sequence-based, high-resolution techniques to evaluate the contribution of these genes to SSc susceptibility, their correlation with the clinical and autoantibody profile and the prevalence of Amerindian, Caucasian and African alleles, blocks and haplotypes in this population. Our study revealed that class I block HLA-C*12:03-B*18:01 was important to map susceptibility to diffuse cutaneous (dc) SSc, HLA-C*07:01-B*08:01 block to map the susceptibility role of HLA-B*08:01 to develop SSc, and the C*07:02-B*39:05 and C*07:02-B*39:06 blocks to map the protective role of C*07:02 in SSc. We also confirmed previous associations of HLA-DRB1*11:04 and -DRB1*01 to susceptibility to develop SSc. Importantly, we mapped the protective role of DQB1*03:01 using three Amerindian blocks. We also found a significant association for the presence of anti-Topoisomerase I antibody with HLA-DQB1*04:02, present in an Amerindian block (DRB1*08:02-DQB1*04:02), and we found several alleles associated to internal organ damage. The admixture estimations revealed a lower proportion of the Amerindian genetic component among SSc patients. This is the first report of the diversity of HLA class I and II alleles and haplotypes Mexican patients with SSc. Our findings suggest that HLA class I and class II genes contribute to the protection and susceptibility to develop SSc and its different clinical presentations as well as different

  3. HLA Class I and II Blocks Are Associated to Susceptibility, Clinical Subtypes and Autoantibodies in Mexican Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Mercado-Velázquez, Pamela; Yu, Neng; Alosco, Sharon; Ohashi, Marina; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio; Zúñiga, Joaquin; Yunis, Edmond

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism studies in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) have yielded variable results. These studies need to consider the genetic admixture of the studied population. Here we used our previously reported definition of genetic admixture of Mexicans using HLA class I and II DNA blocks to map genetic susceptibility to develop SSc and its complications. Methods We included 159 patients from a cohort of Mexican Mestizo SSc patients. We performed clinical evaluation, obtained SSc-associated antibodies, and determined HLA class I and class II alleles using sequence-based, high-resolution techniques to evaluate the contribution of these genes to SSc susceptibility, their correlation with the clinical and autoantibody profile and the prevalence of Amerindian, Caucasian and African alleles, blocks and haplotypes in this population. Results Our study revealed that class I block HLA-C*12:03-B*18:01 was important to map susceptibility to diffuse cutaneous (dc) SSc, HLA-C*07:01-B*08:01 block to map the susceptibility role of HLA-B*08:01 to develop SSc, and the C*07:02-B*39:05 and C*07:02-B*39:06 blocks to map the protective role of C*07:02 in SSc. We also confirmed previous associations of HLA-DRB1*11:04 and –DRB1*01 to susceptibility to develop SSc. Importantly, we mapped the protective role of DQB1*03:01 using three Amerindian blocks. We also found a significant association for the presence of anti-Topoisomerase I antibody with HLA-DQB1*04:02, present in an Amerindian block (DRB1*08:02-DQB1*04:02), and we found several alleles associated to internal organ damage. The admixture estimations revealed a lower proportion of the Amerindian genetic component among SSc patients. Conclusion This is the first report of the diversity of HLA class I and II alleles and haplotypes Mexican patients with SSc. Our findings suggest that HLA class I and class II genes contribute to the protection and susceptibility to develop SSc and its different clinical

  4. A Seemingly Simple Task: Filling a Solenoid Volume in Vacuum with Dense Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre; Kauffeldt, Marina; Roy, Prabir; Oks, Efim

    2010-06-24

    Space-charge neutralization of a pulsed, high-current ion beam is required to compress and focus the beam on a target for warm dense matter physics or heavy ion fusion experiments. We described attempts to produce dense plasma in and near the final focusing solenoid through which the ion beam travels, thereby providing an opportunity for the beam to acquire the necessary charge-compensating electrons. Among the options are plasma injection from four pulsed vacuum arc sources located outside the solenoid, and using a high current (> 4 kA) pulsed vacuum arc plasma from a ring cathode near the edge of the solenoid. The plasma distribution is characterized by photographic means and by an array of movable Langmuir probes. The plasma is produced at several cathode spots distributed azimuthally on the ring cathode. Beam neutralization and compression are accomplished, though issues of density, uniformity, and pulse-to-pulse reproducibly remain to be solved.

  5. Electrons in a positive-ion beam with solenoid or quadrupole magnetic transport

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A.W.; Kireeff Covo, M.; Cohen, R.; Coleman, J.; Sharp, W.; Bieniosek, F.; Friedman, A.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.M.; Faltens, A.; Vay, J.L.; Prost, L.

    2007-06-04

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) is used to study beam transport and accumulation of electrons in quadrupole magnets and the Neutralized Drift-Compression Experiment (NDCX) to study beam transport through and accumulation of electrons in magnetic solenoids. We find that both clearing and suppressor electrodes perform as intended, enabling electron cloud densities to be minimized. Then, the measured beam envelopes in both quadrupoles and solenoids agree with simulations, indicating that theoretical beam current transport limits are reliable, in the absence of electrons. At the other extreme, reversing electrode biases with the solenoid transport effectively traps electrons; or, in quadrupole magnets, grounding the suppressor electrode allows electron emission from the end wall to flood the beam, in both cases producing significant degradation in the beam.

  6. Electrons in a Positive-Ion Beam with Solenoid or Quadrupole Magnet Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W; Cohen, R H; Friedman, A; Covo, M K; Lund, S M; Sharp, W M; Seidl, P A; Bieniosek, F M; Coleman, J E; Faltens, A; Roy, P K; Vay, J L; Prost, L

    2007-06-01

    The High Current Experiment (HCX) is used to study beam transport and accumulation of electrons in quadrupole magnets and the Neutralized Drift-Compression Experiment (NDCX) to study beam transport through and accumulation of electrons in magnetic solenoids. We find that both clearing and suppressor electrodes perform as intended, enabling electron cloud densities to be minimized. Then, the measured beam envelopes in both quadrupoles and solenoids agree with simulations, indicating that theoretical beam current transport limits are reliable, in the absence of electrons. At the other extreme, reversing electrode biases with the solenoid transport effectively traps electrons; or, in quadrupole magnets, grounding the suppressor electrode allows electron emission from the end wall to flood the beam, in both cases producing significant degradation in the beam.

  7. Ferrite-Cored Solenoidal Induction Coil Sensor for BUD (MM-1667)

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, F.; Becker, A.; Conti, U.; Gasperikova, E.

    2011-06-15

    We have designed and lab tested a new ferrite cored induction coil sensor for measuring the secondary fields from metallic UXO with the BUD system. The objective was to replace the 5-inch diameter air-cored coils in the BUD system with smaller sensors that would allow the placement of multiple sensors in the smaller package of the new BUD hand-held system. A ferrite-cored solenoidal coil of length L can easily be made to have sensitivity and noise level roughly the same as an air-cored coil of a diameter on the same order as L. A ferrite-cored solenoidal coil can easily have a feedback configuration to achieve critical damping. The feedback configuration leads to a very stable response. Feedback ferrite-cored solenoidal coils show very little interaction as long as they are separated by one half their length.

  8. A New Facility for Testing Superconducting Solenoid Magnets with Large Fringe Fields at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Orris, D.; Carcagno, R.; Nogiec, J.; Rabehl, R.; Sylvester, C.; Tartaglia, M.

    2013-09-01

    Testing superconducting solenoid with no iron flux return can be problematic for a magnet test facility due to the large magnetic fringe fields generated. These large external fields can interfere with the operation of equipment while precautions must be taken for personnel supporting the test. The magnetic forces between the solenoid under test and the external infrastructure must also be taken under consideration. A new test facility has been designed and built at Fermilab specifically for testing superconducting magnets with large external fringe fields. This paper discusses the test stand design, capabilities, and details of the instrumentation and controls with data from the first solenoid tested in this facility: the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) coupling coil.

  9. The Engineering Design of the 1.5 m Diameter Solenoid for the MICERFCC Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.; Green, M.A.; Xu, F.Y.; Wu, H.; Li, L.K.; Gou, C.S.; Liu, C.S.; Han, G.; Jia, L.X.; Li, D.; Prestemon, S.O.; Virostek, S.P.

    2007-08-27

    The RF coupling coil (RFCC) module of MICE is where muonsthat have been cooled within the MICE absorber focus (AFC) modules arere-accelerated to their original longitudinal momentum. The RFCC moduleconsists of four 201.25 MHz RF cavities in a 1.4 meter diameter vacuumvessel. The muons are kept within the RF cavities by the magnetic fieldgenerated by a superconducting coupling solenoid that goes around the RFcavities. The coupling solenoid will be cooled using a pair of 4 K pulsetube cooler that will generate 1.5 W of cooling at 4.2 K. The magnet willbe powered using a 300 A two-quadrant power supply. This report describesthe ICST engineering design of the coupling solenoid forMICE.

  10. GigaGauss solenoidal magnetic field inside bubbles excited in under-dense plasma

    PubMed Central

    Lécz, Zs.; Konoplev, I. V.; Seryi, A.; Andreev, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel and effective method for generating GigaGauss level, solenoidal quasi-static magnetic fields in under-dense plasma using screw-shaped high intensity laser pulses. This method produces large solenoidal fields that move with the driving laser pulse and are collinear with the accelerated electrons. This is in contrast with already known techniques which rely on interactions with over-dense or solid targets and generates radial or toroidal magnetic field localized at the stationary target. The solenoidal field is quasi-stationary in the reference frame of the laser pulse and can be used for guiding electron beams. It can also provide synchrotron radiation beam emittance cooling for laser-plasma accelerated electron and positron beams, opening up novel opportunities for designs of the light sources, free electron lasers, and high energy colliders based on laser plasma acceleration. PMID:27796327

  11. Dynamical map for combined function magnets with solenoid, dipole, and quadrupole fields

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, Marco; Wolski, Andy

    2004-06-30

    The interaction regions of colliders invariably include strong solenoid fields. Where quadrupoles and dipoles are embedded in the solenoid, the beam dynamics in the combined fields can be complicated to model using the traditional approach of interleaving slices of the different fields. The complexity increases if the design trajectory is offset from the magnetic axis; this is the case, for example, in PEP-II. In this paper, we present maps for combined solenoid, dipole and quadrupole fields that provide a much simpler alternative to the traditional approach, and show that the deviation of the design trajectory from the magnetic axis can be handle in a straightforward manner. We illustrate the techniques presented by reference to the PEP-II interaction region.

  12. GigaGauss solenoidal magnetic field inside bubbles excited in under-dense plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lécz, Zs.; Konoplev, I. V.; Seryi, A.; Andreev, A.

    2016-10-01

    This paper proposes a novel and effective method for generating GigaGauss level, solenoidal quasi-static magnetic fields in under-dense plasma using screw-shaped high intensity laser pulses. This method produces large solenoidal fields that move with the driving laser pulse and are collinear with the accelerated electrons. This is in contrast with already known techniques which rely on interactions with over-dense or solid targets and generates radial or toroidal magnetic field localized at the stationary target. The solenoidal field is quasi-stationary in the reference frame of the laser pulse and can be used for guiding electron beams. It can also provide synchrotron radiation beam emittance cooling for laser-plasma accelerated electron and positron beams, opening up novel opportunities for designs of the light sources, free electron lasers, and high energy colliders based on laser plasma acceleration.

  13. Tests of full scale SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) R and D dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, J.; Brown, B.C.; Hanft, R.; Kuchnir, M.; Lamm, M.; Lundy, R.; Mantsch, P.; Mazur, P.O.; McInturff, A.; Orr, J.R.

    1988-08-22

    Four full-scale SSC R and D dipole magnets, incorporating successive mechanical design improvements, have been quench tested. Three of these magnets are heavily instrumented with sensors to measure the mechanical behavior of the magnets and verify the performance of the mechanical improvements and with multiple voltage taps to locate the origin of quenches. The last two magnets of this series reach the SSC design operating field of 6.6 T in two or fewer quenches. Load cells and motion sensors show that in these two magnets the azimuthal clamping stress is higher at zero current and drops more slowly with excitation than in previous long magnets and that the axial motion of the coil upon excitation has been greatly reduced. Quenches are found to originate preferentially in several locations, suggesting other design improvements. 13 refs., 5 figs.

  14. New measurements of magnetic field decay in 1 meter SSC-type dipoles

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, W.S.; Althaus, R.F.; Barale, P.J.; Benjegerdes, R.W.; Green, M.A.; Green, M.I.; Scanlan, R.M.

    1990-09-01

    Previous studies of magnetic field decay in model SSC dipoles due to changes in magnetization currents caused by flux creep have used the assumed SSC injection energy of 1 TeV, or 0.33 tesla central dipole field, and an excitation to the storage field of 6.6 tesla. More recently, it has been decided to inject at 2 TeV, or 0.66 tesla and so more recent tests have been carried out at the new injection field, or at both the new and old fields. Additionally, the effect of temperature changes and excitation cycles on the field decay have been studied. 6 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. High-field superconducting solenoids for the TIBER II PF (poloidal-field) system

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J.A.; Miller, J.R.; Summers, L.T.

    1987-10-07

    The poloidal-field (PF) coil set for the Tokamak Ignition/Burn Engineering Reactor (TIBER-II) consists of 24 solenoid modules, 16 of which are stacked inside the toroidal-field (TF) system at the center of the machine. These central solenoid modules operate at high-current densities, and maximum fields at the windings approach 14 T. Although TIBER-II is designed for steady-state operation with noninductive current drive, other operating scenarios are also considered. In the pulsed or inductive mode, PF coil currents are ramped to induce plasma current. In this mode, peak fields approaching 14 T appear on the central solenoid modules at the ends of the stack; the required current densities in these modules approach 40 A . mm/sup 2/. The central solenoid modules are layer wound using cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) with (NbTi)/sub 3/Sn composite strands for improved high-field performance. Layer winding permits grading the conductor for maximum overall winding-pack current density and also results in less wasted space in the radial build of the machine. Cooling connections may be made at each layer of a module as needed. Current leads to the modules are routed through the high-field central bore. The central solenoid modules can easily support the centering load of the PF system, reducing the overall radial build of the machine and greatly increasing the limit on the number of pulse cycles imposed by fatigue considerations in the central solenoid. 5 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. The CMS Tracker Detector Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousaf Shah, S.; Tsirou, Andromachi; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Hartmann, Frank; Masetti, Lorenzo; Dirkes, Guido H.; Stringer, Robert; Fahrer, Manuel

    2009-06-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid DCS (CMS) Silicon Strip Tracker is by far the largest detector ever built in micro-strip technology. It has an active surface area of 198 m 2 consisting of 15,148 silicon modules with 9,316,352 readout channels read via 75,376 Analog Pipeline Voltage (APV) front-end chips and a total of 24,244 sensors. The Detector Control System (DCS) for the Tracker is a distributed control system that operates ˜2000 power supplies for the silicon modules and also monitors its environmental sensors. The DCS receives information from about 10 3 environmental probes (temperature and humidity sensors) located inside the detector's volume and values from these probes are driven through the Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC) of the Detector Safety System (DSS). A total of 10 5 parameters are read out from the dedicated chips in the front-end electronics of the detector via the data acquisition system, and a total of 10 5 parameters are read from the power supply modules. All these parameters are monitored, evaluated and correlated with the detector layout; actions are taken under specific conditions. The hardware for DCS consists of 10 PCs and 10 PLC systems that are continuously running the necessary control and safety routines. The DCS is a fundamental tool for the Tracker operation and its safety.

  17. Complementarity of resonant and nonresonant strong WW scattering at SSC and LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1992-08-01

    Signals and backgrounds for strong WW scattering at the SSC and LHC are considered. Complementarity of resonant signals in the I = 1 WZ channel and nonresonant signals in the I = 2 W{sup +}W{sup +} channel is illustrated using a chiral lagrangian with a J = 1 ``p`` resonance. Results are presented for purely leptonic final states in the W{plus_minus}Z, W{sup +}W{sup +} + W{sup {minus}}W{sup {minus}}, and ZZ channels.

  18. Complementarity of resonant and nonresonant strong WW scattering at SSC and LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Chanowitz, M.S.

    1992-08-01

    Signals and backgrounds for strong WW scattering at the SSC and LHC are considered. Complementarity of resonant signals in the I = 1 WZ channel and nonresonant signals in the I = 2 W[sup +]W[sup +] channel is illustrated using a chiral lagrangian with a J = 1 p'' resonance. Results are presented for purely leptonic final states in the W[plus minus]Z, W[sup +]W[sup +] + W[sup [minus

  19. Production and detection at SSC of Higgs bosons in left-right symmetric theories

    SciTech Connect

    Gunion, J.; Kayser, B.; Mohapatra, R.N.; Deshpande, N.G.; Grifols, J.; Mendez, A.; Olness, F.; Pal, P.B.

    1986-12-01

    We discuss the production and detection at SSC of charged and neutral Higgs bosons of the left-right symmetric theories. The H/sup +/, which is largely a member of a left-right ''bidoublet,'' should be detectable. The H/sub 2//sup 0/, a more unusual Higgs particle which, apart from mixing, is in a right-handed triplet and does not couple to quarks, may be detectable too.

  20. SSC San Diego Biennial Review 2003. Vol 2: Communication and Information Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    specified point in space. Conventional FSO beam con- trollers employ optical fiber simply as a conduit to transport the modu- lated carrier from the...Since directivity is low (roughly 25 dB), it is envisioned that COBRAs would be most useful as FSO beacons for the point , acquisition, and track (PAT...exact point to obtain the specified coupling conditions. SSC San Diego has several patents covering the design and fabrication of fused fiber couplers

  1. SSC 50 mm collider dipole cryostat single tube support post conceptual design and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Nicol, T.H.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes the conceptual design for a support post whose function is identical to that of the current reentrant design, which requires very few modifications to surrounding cryostat components, is thermally equivalent to the current 50 mm support post, and is nearly equivalent structurally. The focus of this work is on a design aimed specifically at application in SSC 50 mm collider dipoles, however, the conceptual design presented here is applicable to other cryogenic systems.

  2. A turtle-like swimming robot using a smart soft composite (SSC) structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyung-Jung; Song, Sung-Hyuk; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a biomimetic swimming robot based on the locomotion of a marine turtle. To realize the smooth, soft flapping motions of this type of turtle, a novel actuator was also developed, using a smart soft composite (SSC) structure that can generate bending and twisting motions in a simple, lightweight structure. The SSC structure is a composite consisting of an active component to generate the actuation force, a passive component to determine the twisting angle of the structure, and a matrix to combine the components. The motion of such a structure can be designed by specifying the angle between a filament of the scaffold structure and a shape-memory alloy (SMA) wire. The bending and twisting motion of the SSC structure is explained in terms of classical laminate theory, and cross-ply and angled-ply structures were fabricated to evaluate its motion. Finally, the turtle-like motion of a swimming robot was realized by employing a specially designed SSC structure. To mimic the posterior positive twisting angle of a turtle’s flipper during the upstroke, the SMA wire on the upper side was offset, and a positive ply-angled scaffold was used. Likewise, for the anterior negative twisting angle of the flipper during the downstroke, an offset SMA wire on the lower side and a positive ply-angled scaffold were also required. The fabricated flipper’s length is 64.3 mm and it realizes 55 mm bending and 24° twisting. The resulting robot achieved a swimming speed of 22.5 mm s-1.

  3. New Physics Search in Dijet Mass Spectrum with Compact Muon Solenoid

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Chiyoung

    2011-01-01

    Many extensions of the SM predict the existence of new massive objects that couple to quarks and gluons and result in resonances in the dijet mass spectrum. In this thesis we present a search for narrow resonances in the dijet mass spectrum using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1 fb$^{-1}$ collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, at a proton-proton collision energy of $\\sqrt{s}=7$ $TeV$. %This dijet analysis is searching for new particles in the dijet mass spectrum decaying to dijets. These new particles are predicted by new physics beyond Standard Model. This thesis presents a dijet analysis performed at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ $TeV$ for an integrated luminosities of 1.0 fb$^{-1}$. The dijet mass distribution of two leading jets is measured and compared to QCD predictions, simulated by PYTHIA with the CMS detector simulation. We select events which have two leading jets with $\\mid \\Delta\\eta \\mid < 1.3$ and $\\mid \\eta \\mid < 2.5$. We fit the dijet mass spectrum with QCD parameters. Since no evidence of new physics was found, we set upper limits at 95\\% CL on the resonance cross section and compare to the theoretical prediction for several models of new particles: string resonances, axigluons, colorons, excited quarks, $E_{6}$ diquarks, Randall-Sundrum gravitons, W' and Z'. We exclude at 95\\% CL string resonances in the mass range $1.0 < M(S) < 4.00$ TeV, excited quarks in the mass range $1.0

  4. A 15-T Pulsed Solenoid for a High-Power Target Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk,H.G.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Haug, R.; Titus, P.; McDonald, K. T.; Bennett, J. R. J.; Edgecock, T. R.

    2006-06-26

    The MERIT experiment, to be run at CERN in 2007, is a proof-of-principle test for a target system that converts a 4-MW proton beam into a high-intensity muon beam for either a neutrino factory complex or a muon collider. The target system is based on a free mercury jet that intercepts an intense proton beam inside a 15-T solenoidal magnetic field. Here, we describe the design and initial performance of the 15-T, liquid-nitrogen-precooled, copper solenoid magnet.

  5. RF and Magnetic Measurements on the SPARC Photoinjector and Solenoid at UCLA

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenzweig, J.B.; Cook, A.M.; Dunning, M.P.; Frigola, P.; Travish, G.; Sanelli, C.; Tazzioli, F.; Palmer, D.T.; /SLAC

    2006-01-30

    The rf photocathode gun and the solenoid for the SPARC project at INFN-LNF (Frascati) have been fabricated and undergone initial testing at UCLA. The advanced aspects of the design of these devices are detailed. Final diagnosis of the tuning of the RF gun performance, including operating mode frequency and field balance, is described. The emittance compensating solenoid magnet, which is designed to be tuned in longitudinal position by differential excitation of the coils, has been measured using Hall probe scans for field profiling, and pulsed wire methods to determine the field center. Comparisons between measurements and the predictions of design codes are made.

  6. A 15-T Pulsed Solenoid for a High-Power Target Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk,H.G.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Haug, F.; Pereira, H.; Titus, P.; McDonald, K.T.; Bennett, J.R.J.

    2008-06-23

    The MERIT experiment, which ran at CERN in 2007, is a proof-of-principle test for a target system that converts a 4-MW proton beam into a high-intensity muon beam for either a neutrino factory complex or a muon collider. The target system is based on a free mercury jet that intercepts an intense proton beam inside a 15-T solenoidal magnetic field. Here, we describe the design and performance of the 15-T, liquid-nitrogen-precooled, copper solenoid magnet.

  7. Electromagnetic unit fuel injector with piston assist solenoid actuated control valve

    SciTech Connect

    Teerman, R. F.; Bosch, R. H.; Wirth, R. C.

    1985-11-05

    An electromagnetic unit fuel injector includes a pump assembly having an external actuated plunger reciprocable in a bushing with flow therefrom during a pump stroke being directed to a fuel injection nozzle of the assembly. Fuel flow from the pump can also flow through a passage means, containing a normally open, substantially pressure-balanced control valve actuated by a solenoid assembly in the valve closing direction to block drain flow during a pump stroke, as desired. A piston, actuated by discharge fuel pressure is operatively connected to the control valve to assist the solenoid in holding the control valve in a closed position.

  8. Precise Measurements of a Magnetic Field at the Solenoids for Low Energy Coolers

    SciTech Connect

    Bocharov, V.; Bubley, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Panasyuk, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    2006-03-20

    Description of equipment developed at BINP SB RAS for precision solenoid magnetic field measurement is presented in the paper. Transversal field components are measured by small compass-based sensor during its motion along the field line. The sensor sensitivity is a few tenth parts of mG and is limited in this range by external noise sources only. Scope of the device application is illustrated by results obtained at BINP during tests of cooling solenoids for electron coolers built at the Institute recently.

  9. Precise Measurements of a Magnetic Field at the Solenoids for Low Energy Coolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, V.; Bubley, A.; Konstantinov, S.; Panasyuk, V.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    2006-03-01

    Description of equipment developed at BINP SB RAS for precision solenoid magnetic field measurement is presented in the paper. Transversal field components are measured by small compass-based sensor during its motion along the field line. The sensor sensitivity is a few tenth parts of mG and is limited in this range by external noise sources only. Scope of the device application is illustrated by results obtained at BINP during tests of cooling solenoids for electron coolers built at the Institute recently.

  10. A HIGH FIELD PULSED SOLENOID MAGNET FOR LIQUID METAL TARGET STUDIES.

    SciTech Connect

    KIRK,H.G.IAROCCI,M.SCADUTO,J.WEGGEL,R.J.MULHOLLAND,G.MCDONALD,K.T.

    2003-05-12

    The target system for a muon collider/neutrino factory requires the conjunction of an intense proton beam, a high-Z liquid target and a high-field solenoid magnet. We describe here the design parameters for a pulsed solenoid, including the magnet cryogenic system and power supply, that can generate transient fields of greater than 10T with a flat-tops on the order of 1 second. It is envisioned to locate this device at the Brookhaven AGS for proof-of-principle testing of a liquid-jet target system with pulses of le13 protons.

  11. Conceptual design of the Mu2e production solenoid cold mass

    SciTech Connect

    Kashikhin, V.V.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Lamm, M.; Mokhov, N.V.; Nicol, T.H.; Page, T.M.; Pronskikh, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-01

    The Muon-to-Electron conversion experiment (Mu2e), under development at Fermilab, seeks to detect direct muon to electron conversion to provide evidence for a process violating muon and electron lepton number conservation that cannot be explained by the Standard Model of particle physics. The required magnetic field is produced by a series of superconducting solenoids of various apertures and lengths. This paper describes the conceptual design of the 5 T, 4 m long solenoid cold mass with 1.67 m bore with the emphasis on the magnetic, radiation and thermal analyses.

  12. Preliminary result of rapid solenoid for controlling heavy-ion beam parameters of laser ion source

    DOE PAGES

    Okamura, M.; Sekine, M.; Ikeda, S.; ...

    2015-03-13

    To realize a heavy ion inertial fusion driver, we have studied a possibility of laser ion source (LIS). A LIS can provide high current high brightness heavy ion beams, however it was difficult to manipulate the beam parameters. To overcome the issue, we employed a pulsed solenoid in the plasma drift section and investigated the effect of the solenoid field on singly charged iron beams. The rapid ramping magnetic field could enhance limited time slice of the current and simultaneously the beam emittance changed accordingly. This approach may also useful to realize an ion source for HIF power plant.

  13. Jefferson Lab CLAS12 Superconducting Solenoid magnet Requirements and Design Evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Rajput-Ghoshal, Renuka; Hogan, John P.; Fair, Ruben J.; Ghoshal, Probir K.; Luongo, Cesar; Elouadrhiri, Latifa

    2014-12-01

    As part of the Jefferson Lab 12GeV accelerator upgrade project, one of the experimental halls (Hall B) requires two superconducting magnets. One is a magnet system consisting of six superconducting trapezoidal racetrack-type coils assembled in a toroidal configuration and the second is an actively shielded solenoidal magnet system consisting of 5 coils. In this presentation the physics requirements for the 5 T solenoid magnet, design constraints, conductor decision, and cooling choice will be discussed. The various design iterations to meet the specification will also be discussed in this presentation.

  14. Development of solenoid-induced helical wiggler with four poles per period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohigashi, N.; Tsunawaki, Y.; Kiyochi, M.; Nakao, N.; Fujita, M.; Imasaki, K.; Nakai, S.; Mima, K.

    1999-06-01

    A new type of helical wiggler consisting of two staggered-iron arrays inserted into a solenoid field has been developed. The field measured by a test wiggler showed linear increment with the period. It was seen that 24% of the solenoid field contributed to the induced wiggler field when the gap length and the period of the wiggler were 16 and 24 mm, respectively. This wiggler would be useful for an FEL with a low-energy electron beam propagating in a strong axial guiding field.

  15. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source.

    PubMed

    Kondo, K; Yamamoto, T; Sekine, M; Okamura, M

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  16. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion sourcea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Sekine, M.; Okamura, M.

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (˜100 μA) with high charge (˜10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  17. LHe Flow Regime/Pressure Drop for D0 Solenoid at Steady State Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rucinski, R.; /Fermilab

    1993-03-03

    This paper describes in a note taking format what was learned from several sources on two phase liquid helium flow regimes and pressure drops as applied to the D-Zero solenoid upgrade project. Calculations to estimate the steady state conditions for the D-Zero solenoid at 5, 10 and 15 g/s are also presented. For the lower flow rates a stratified type regime can be expected with a pressure drop less than 0.5 psi. For the higher flow rate a more homogeneous flow regime can be expected with a pressure drop between 0.4 to 1.5 psi.

  18. EFFECT OF SOLENOID FIELD ERRORS ON ELECTRON BEAM TEMPERATURES IN THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.KEWISCH,J.

    2003-05-12

    As part of a future upgrade to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), electron cooling is foreseen to decrease ion beam emittances. Within the electron cooling section, the ''hot'' ion beam is immersed in a ''cold'' electron beam. The cooling effect is further enhanced by a solenoid field in the cooling section, which forces the electrons to spiral around the field lines with a (Larmor) radius of 10 micrometers, reducing the effective transverse temperature by orders of magnitude. Studies of the effect of solenoid field errors on electron beam temperatures are reported.

  19. ASME XI stroke time testing of solenoid valves at Connecticut Yankee Station

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, C.W.

    1996-12-01

    Connecticut Yankee Atomic Power Company has developed the capability of measuring the stroke times of AC and DC solenoid valves. This allows the station to measure the stroke time of any solenoid valve in the plant, even those valves which do not have valve stem position indicators. Connecticut Yankee has adapted the ITI MOVATS Checkmate 3 system, using a signal input from a Bruel and Kjaer (B&K) Model 4382 acoustic accelerometer and the Schaumberg Campbell Associates (SCA) Model SCA-1148 dual sensor, which is a combined accelerometer and gaussmeter.

  20. Measurements of magnetization multipoles in four centimeter quadrupoles for the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Barale, P.J.; Benjegerdes, R.W.; Gilbert, W.S.; Green, M.I.; Scanlan, R.M.; Sopher, J.; Taylor, C.E.

    1991-06-01

    Higher multipoles due to magnetization of the superconductor in superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets has been observed in over twenty years. This report presents measurements of the 12 pole and 20 pole multipoles in a model one-meter long four-centimeter bore SSC type quadrupole built at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The measurements were compared with calculations of the field structure using magnetization theory. Good agreement was observed between the measured multipoles and the calculated multipoles. Under conditions equivalent to injection into the SSC at an energy of 2 TeV, about 1.0 unit of 12 pole was observed and 0.05 units of 20 pole was observed. (One unit of field error is a field error of one part in ten thousand). Magnetization multipole measurements were also done on the first full length (5 meter) SSC quadrupole prototype. Measurements of flux creep decay were made on three one meter quadrupoles and the first five meter long quadrupole. 7 refs., 9 figs.