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Sample records for ssz1 restores endoplasmic

  1. Ssz1 restores endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein degradation in cells expressing defective cdc48-ufd1-npl4 complex by upregulating cdc48.

    PubMed

    Bosis, Eran; Salomon, Dor; Ohayon, Orit; Sivan, Gilad; Bar-Nun, Shoshana; Rabinovich, Efrat

    2010-03-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway eliminates aberrant proteins from the ER. The key role of Cdc48p-Ufd1p-Npl4p is indicated by impaired ERAD in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with mutations in any of this complex's genes. We identified SSZ1 in genetic screens for cdc48-10 suppressors and show that it upregulates Cdc48p via the pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR) network. A pSSZ1 plasmid restored impaired ERAD-M of 6myc-Hmg2 in cdc48-10, ufd1-2, and npl4-1, while SSZ1 deletion had no effect. Ssz1p activates Pdr1p, the PDR master regulator. Indeed, plasmids of PDR1 or its target gene RPN4 increased cdc48-10p levels and restored ERAD-M in cdc48-10. Rpn4p regulates transcription of proteasome subunits and CDC48, thus RPN4 deletion abolished ERAD. However, the diminished proteasome level in Deltarpn4 was sufficient for degrading a cytosolic substrate, whereas the impaired ERAD-M was the result of diminished Cdc48p and was restored by expression of pCDC48. The corrected ERAD-M in the hypomorphic strains of the Cdc48 partners ufd1-2 and npl4-1 by the pCDC48 plasmid, and in cdc48-10 cells by the pcdc48-10 plasmid, combined with the finding that neither pSSZ1 nor pcdc48-10 restored ERAD-L of CPY*-HA, support our conclusion that Ssz1p suppressing effects is brought about by upregulating Cdc48p.

  2. Leucine restores murine hepatic triglyceride accumulation induced by a low-protein diet by suppressing autophagy and excessive endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Shin-Ichi; Ando, Midori; Aoyama, Shinya; Nakamura, Kawai; Shibata, Shigenobu

    2016-04-01

    Although it is known that a low-protein diet induces hepatic triglyceride (TG) accumulation in both rodents and humans, little is known about the underlying mechanism. In the present study, we modeled hepatic TG accumulation by inducing dietary protein deficiency in mice and aimed to determine whether certain amino acids could prevent low-protein diet-induced TG accumulation in the mouse liver. Mice fed a diet consisting of 3 % casein (3C diet) for 7 days showed hepatic TG accumulation with up-regulation of TG synthesis for the Acc gene and down-regulation of TG-rich lipoprotein secretion from hepatocytes for Mttp genes. Supplementing the 3 % casein diet with essential amino acids, branched-chain amino acids, or the single amino acid leucine rescued hepatic TG accumulation. In the livers of mice fed the 3 % casein diet, we observed a decrease in the levels of the autophagy substrate p62, an increase in the expression levels of the autophagy marker LC3-II, and an increase in the splicing of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-dependent Xbp1 gene. Leucine supplementation to the 3 % casein diet did not affect genes related to lipid metabolism, but inhibited the decrease in p62, the increase in LC3-II, and the increase in Xbp1 splicing levels in the liver. Our results suggest that ER stress responses and activated autophagy play critical roles in low-protein diet-induced hepatic TG accumulation in mice, and that leucine suppresses these two major protein degradation systems. This study contributes to understanding the mechanisms of hepatic disorders of lipid metabolism.

  3. Endoplasmic motility spectral characteristics in plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avsievich, T. I.; Ghaleb, K. E. S.; Frolov, S. V.; Proskurin, S. G.

    2015-03-01

    Spectral Fourier analysis of experimentally acquired velocity time dependencies, V(t), of shuttle endoplasmic motility in an isolated strand of plasmodium of slime mold Physarum Polycephalum has been realized. V(t) registration was performed in normal conditions and after the treatment by respiration inhibitors, which lead to a complete cessation of endoplasmic motion in the strand. Spectral analysis of the velocity time dependences of the endoplasm allows obtaining two distinct harmonic components in the spectra. Their ratio appeared to be constant in all cases, ν2/ν1=1.97±0.17. After the inhibitors are washed out respiratory system becomes normal, gradually restoring the activity of both harmonic oscillatory sources with time. Simulated velocity time dependences correspond to experimental data with good accuracy.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum stress regulates rat mandibular cartilage thinning under compressive mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Li, Huang; Zhang, Xiang-Yu; Wu, Tuo-Jiang; Cheng, Wei; Liu, Xin; Jiang, Ting-Ting; Wen, Juan; Li, Jie; Ma, Qiao-Ling; Hua, Zi-Chun

    2013-06-21

    Compressive mechanical stress-induced cartilage thinning has been characterized as a key step in the progression of temporomandibular joint diseases, such as osteoarthritis. However, the regulatory mechanisms underlying this loss have not been thoroughly studied. Here, we used an established animal model for loading compressive mechanical stress to induce cartilage thinning in vivo. The mechanically stressed mandibular chondrocytes were then isolated to screen potential candidates using a proteomics approach. A total of 28 proteins were identified that were directly or indirectly associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress, including protein disulfide-isomerase, calreticulin, translationally controlled tumor protein, and peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans-isomerase protein. The altered expression of these candidates was validated at both the mRNA and protein levels. The induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress by mechanical stress loading was confirmed by the activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, the elevation of the cytoplasmic Ca(2+) level, and the expansion of endoplasmic reticulum membranes. More importantly, the use of a selective inhibitor to block endoplasmic reticulum stress in vivo reduced the apoptosis observed at the early stages of mechanical stress loading and inhibited the proliferation observed at the later stages of mechanical stress loading. Accordingly, the use of the inhibitor significantly restored cartilage thinning. Taken together, these results demonstrated that endoplasmic reticulum stress is significantly activated in mechanical stress-induced mandibular cartilage thinning and, more importantly, that endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition alleviates this loss, suggesting a novel pharmaceutical strategy for the treatment of mechanical stress-induced temporomandibular joint diseases.

  5. The endoplasmic reticulum stress response: A link with tuberculosis?

    PubMed

    Cui, Yongyong; Zhao, Deming; Barrow, Paul Andrew; Zhou, Xiangmei

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major cause of mortality and morbidity in the worldwide. The endoplasmic-reticulum stress (ERS) response constitutes a cellular process that is triggered by mycobacterial infection that disturbs the folding of proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The unfolded protein response (UPR) is induced to suspend the synthesis of early proteins and reduce the accumulation of unfolded- or misfolded proteins in the ER restoring normal physiological cell function. Prolonged or uncontrolled ERS leads to the activation of three signaling pathways (IRE1, PERK and ATF6) which directs the cell towards apoptosis. The absence of this process facilitates spread of the mycobacteria within the body. We summarize here recent advances in understanding the signaling pathway diversity governing ERS in relation to TB.

  6. Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein Quality Control Failure in Myelin Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Vera G.; Touvier, Thierry; D'Antonio, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    Reaching the correct three-dimensional structure is crucial for the proper function of a protein. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the organelle where secreted and transmembrane proteins are synthesized and folded. To guarantee high fidelity of protein synthesis and maturation in the ER, cells have evolved ER-protein quality control (ERQC) systems, which assist protein folding and promptly degrade aberrant gene products. Only correctly folded proteins that pass ERQC checkpoints are allowed to exit the ER and reach their final destination. Misfolded glycoproteins are detected and targeted for degradation by the proteasome in a process known as endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). The excess of unstructured proteins in the ER triggers an adaptive signal transduction pathway, called unfolded protein response (UPR), which in turn potentiates ERQC activities in order to reduce the levels of aberrant molecules. When the situation cannot be restored, the UPR drives cells to apoptosis. Myelin-forming cells of the central and peripheral nervous system (oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells) synthesize a large amount of myelin proteins and lipids and therefore are particularly susceptible to ERQC failure. Indeed, deficits in ERQC and activation of ER stress/UPR have been implicated in several myelin disorders, such as Pelizaeus-Merzbacher and Krabbe leucodystrophies, vanishing white matter disease and Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies. Here we discuss recent evidence underlying the importance of proper ERQC functions in genetic disorders of myelinating glia. PMID:28101003

  7. River restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen; Angermeier, Paul L.; Bledsoe, Brian; Kondolf, G. Mathias; Macdonnell, Larry; Merritt, David M.; Palmer, Margaret A.; Poff, N. Leroy; Tarboton, David

    2005-10-01

    River restoration is at the forefront of applied hydrologic science. However, many river restoration projects are conducted with minimal scientific context. We propose two themes around which a research agenda to advance the scientific basis for river restoration can be built. First, because natural variability is an inherent feature of all river systems, we hypothesize that restoration of process is more likely to succeed than restoration aimed at a fixed end point. Second, because physical, chemical, and biological processes are interconnected in complex ways across watersheds and across timescales, we hypothesize that restoration projects are more likely to be successful in achieving goals if undertaken in the context of entire watersheds. To achieve restoration objectives, the science of river restoration must include (1) an explicit recognition of the known complexities and uncertainties, (2) continued development of a theoretical framework that enables us to identify generalities among river systems and to ask relevant questions, (3) enhancing the science and use of restoration monitoring by measuring the most effective set of variables at the correct scales of measurement, (4) linking science and implementation, and (5) developing methods of restoration that are effective within existing constraints. Key limitations to river restoration include a lack of scientific knowledge of watershed-scale process dynamics, institutional structures that are poorly suited to large-scale adaptive management, and a lack of political support to reestablish delivery of the ecosystem amenities lost through river degradation. This paper outlines an approach for addressing these shortcomings.

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidases: biochemistry, physiology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Akira; Tsujimoto, Masafumi

    2013-09-01

    The human endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase (ERAP) 1 and 2 proteins were initially identified as homologues of human placental leucine aminopeptidase/insulin-regulated aminopeptidase. They are categorized as a unique class of proteases based on their subcellular localization on the luminal side of the endoplasmic reticulum. ERAPs play an important role in the N-terminal processing of the antigenic precursors that are presented on the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules. ERAPs are also implicated in the regulation of a wide variety of physiological phenomena and pathogenic conditions. In this review, the current knowledge on ERAPs is summarized.

  9. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Associated ROS

    PubMed Central

    Zeeshan, Hafiz Maher Ali; Lee, Geum Hwa; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a fascinating network of tubules through which secretory and transmembrane proteins enter unfolded and exit as either folded or misfolded proteins, after which they are directed either toward other organelles or to degradation, respectively. The ER redox environment dictates the fate of entering proteins, and the level of redox signaling mediators modulates the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Accumulating evidence suggests the interrelation of ER stress and ROS with redox signaling mediators such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)-endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin (ERO)-1, glutathione (GSH)/glutathione disuphide (GSSG), NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4), NADPH-P450 reductase (NPR), and calcium. Here, we reviewed persistent ER stress and protein misfolding-initiated ROS cascades and their significant roles in the pathogenesis of multiple human disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, inflammation, ischemia, and kidney and liver diseases. PMID:26950115

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: a novel mechanism and therapeutic target for cardiovascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei-qing; Chen, Zhe; Chen, Lin-xi

    2016-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum is a principal organelle responsible for folding, post-translational modifications and transport of secretory, luminal and membrane proteins, thus palys an important rale in maintaining cellular homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) is a condition that is accelerated by accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins after endoplasmic reticulum environment disturbance, triggered by a variety of physiological and pathological factors, such as nutrient deprivation, altered glycosylation, calcium depletion, oxidative stress, DNA damage and energy disturbance, etc. ERS may initiate the unfolded protein response (UPR) to restore cellular homeostasis or lead to apoptosis. Numerous studies have clarified the link between ERS and cardiovascular diseases. This review focuses on ERS-associated molecular mechanisms that participate in physiological and pathophysiological processes of heart and blood vessels. In addition, a number of drugs that regulate ERS was introduced, which may be used to treat cardiovascular diseases. This review may open new avenues for studying the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and discovering novel drugs targeting ERS. PMID:26838072

  11. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Interacts With Inflammation in Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Cao, Stewart Siyan; Luo, Katherine L; Shi, Lynn

    2016-02-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a critical organelle for normal cell function and homeostasis. Disturbance in the protein folding process in the ER, termed ER stress, leads to the activation of unfolded protein response (UPR) that encompasses a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways. The UPR can either restore ER homeostasis or activate pro-apoptotic pathways depending on the type of insults, intensity and duration of the stress, and cell types. ER stress and the UPR have recently been linked to inflammation in a variety of human pathologies including autoimmune, infectious, neurodegenerative, and metabolic disorders. In the cell, ER stress and inflammatory signaling share extensive regulators and effectors in a broad spectrum of biological processes. In spite of different etiologies, the two signaling pathways have been shown to form a vicious cycle in exacerbating cellular dysfunction and causing apoptosis in many cells and tissues. However, the interaction between ER stress and inflammation in many of these diseases remains poorly understood. Further understanding of the biochemistry, cell biology, and physiology may enable the development of novel therapies that spontaneously target these pathogenic pathways.

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress response in yeast and humans

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haoxi; Ng, Benjamin S. H.; Thibault, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Stress pathways monitor intracellular systems and deploy a range of regulatory mechanisms in response to stress. One of the best-characterized pathways, the UPR (unfolded protein response), is an intracellular signal transduction pathway that monitors ER (endoplasmic reticulum) homoeostasis. Its activation is required to alleviate the effects of ER stress and is highly conserved from yeast to human. Although metazoans have three UPR outputs, yeast cells rely exclusively on the Ire1 (inositol-requiring enzyme-1) pathway, which is conserved in all Eukaryotes. In general, the UPR program activates hundreds of genes to alleviate ER stress but it can lead to apoptosis if the system fails to restore homoeostasis. In this review, we summarize the major advances in understanding the response to ER stress in Sc (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), Sp (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) and humans. The contribution of solved protein structures to a better understanding of the UPR pathway is discussed. Finally, we cover the interplay of ER stress in the development of diseases. PMID:24909749

  13. Coordination of Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Signaling During Maize Seed Development

    SciTech Connect

    Boston, Rebecca S.

    2010-11-20

    Seed storage reserves represent one of the most important sources of renewable fixed carbon and nitrogen found in nature. Seeds are well-adapted for diverting metabolic resources to synthesize storage proteins as well as enzymes and structural proteins needed for their transport and packaging into membrane bound storage protein bodies. Our underlying hypothesis is that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response provides the critical cellular control of metabolic flux required for optimal accumulation of storage reserves in seeds. This highly conserved response is a cellular mechanism to monitor the protein folding environment of the ER and restore homeostasis in the presence of unfolded or misfolded proteins. In seeds, deposition of storage proteins in protein bodies is a highly specialized process that takes place even in the presence of mutant proteins that no longer fold and package properly. The capacity of the ER to deposit these aberrant proteins in protein bodies during a period that extends several weeks provides an excellent model for deconvoluting the ER stress response of plants. We have focused in this project on the means by which the ER senses and responds to functional perturbations and the underlying intracellular communication that occurs among biosynthetic, trafficking and degradative pathways for proteins during seed development.

  14. Natural restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Kamlet, K.S.

    1993-02-01

    After a company pays millions of dollars to clean up contaminated site, its liability may not be over. It may have to spend tens of millions more to restore damaged natural resources under an oft-overlooked Superfund program. Examples of liability are cited in this report from the Exxon Valdez oil spill and a pcb leak which contaminated a harbor.

  15. Obesity and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stresses

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Yamini B.; Pandey, Vivek

    2012-01-01

    In obesity, the adipose cells behave as inflammatory source and result to low grade inflammation. This systemic inflammation along with oxidative stress is a silent killer and damages other vital organs also. High metabolic process, induced due to high nutritional intake, results to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitochondrial stress. This review describes the triggering factor and basic mechanism behind the obesity mediated these stresses in relation to inflammation. Efforts have been made to describe the effect-response cycle between adipocytes and non-adipocyte cells with reference to metabolic syndrome (MS). PMID:22891067

  16. Protein Translocation across the Rough Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Mandon, Elisabet C.; Trueman, Steven F.; Gilmore, Reid

    2013-01-01

    The rough endoplasmic reticulum is a major site of protein biosynthesis in all eukaryotic cells, serving as the entry point for the secretory pathway and as the initial integration site for the majority of cellular integral membrane proteins. The core components of the protein translocation machinery have been identified, and high-resolution structures of the targeting components and the transport channel have been obtained. Research in this area is now focused on obtaining a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of protein translocation and membrane protein integration. PMID:23251026

  17. Restoration Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the accompanying photos, a laboratory technician is restoring the once-obliterated serial number of a revolver. The four-photo sequence shows the gradual progression from total invisibility to clear readability. The technician is using a new process developed in an applications engineering project conducted by NASA's Lewis Research Center in conjunction with Chicago State University. Serial numbers and other markings are frequently eliminated from metal objects to prevent tracing ownership of guns, motor vehicles, bicycles, cameras, appliances and jewelry. To restore obliterated numbers, crime laboratory investigators most often employ a chemical etching technique. It is effective, but it may cause metal corrosion and it requires extensive preparatory grinding and polishing. The NASA-Chicago State process is advantageous because it can be applied without variation to any kind of metal, it needs no preparatory work and number recovery can be accomplished without corrosive chemicals; the liquid used is water.

  18. An endoplasmic reticulum-specific cyclophilin.

    PubMed Central

    Hasel, K W; Glass, J R; Godbout, M; Sutcliffe, J G

    1991-01-01

    Cyclophilin is a ubiquitously expressed cytosolic peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase that is inhibited by the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A. A degenerate oligonucleotide based on a conserved cyclophilin sequence was used to isolate cDNA clones representing a ubiquitously expressed mRNA from mice and humans. This mRNA encodes a novel 20-kDa protein, CPH2, that shares 64% sequence identity with cyclophilin. Bacterially expressed CPH2 binds cyclosporin A and is a cyclosporin A-inhibitable peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase. Cell fractionation of rat liver followed by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis indicated that CPH2 is not cytosolic but rather is located exclusively in the endoplasmic reticulum. These results suggest that cyclosporin A mediates its effect on cells through more than one cyclophilin and that cyclosporin A-induced misfolding of T-cell membrane proteins normally mediated by CPH2 plays a role in immunosuppression. Images PMID:1710767

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum: ER stress regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Roberto; Gutierrez, Tomás; Paredes, Felipe; Gatica, Damián; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Pedrozo, Zully; Chiong, Mario; Parra, Valentina; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Rothermel, Beverly A.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates an adaptive unfolded protein response (UPR) that facilitates cellular repair, however, under prolonged ER stress, the UPR can ultimately trigger apoptosis thereby terminating damaged cells. The molecular mechanisms responsible for execution of the cell death program are relatively well characterized, but the metabolic events taking place during the adaptive phase of ER stress remain largely undefined. Here we discuss emerging evidence regarding the metabolic changes that occur during the onset of ER stress and how ER influences mitochondrial function through mechanisms involving calcium transfer, thereby facilitating cellular adaptation. Finally, we highlight how dysregulation of ER–mitochondrial calcium homeostasis during prolonged ER stress is emerging as a novel mechanism implicated in the onset of metabolic disorders. PMID:22064245

  20. Endoplasmic-Reticulum Calcium Depletion and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mekahli, Djalila; Bultynck, Geert; Parys, Jan B.; De Smedt, Humbert; Missiaen, Ludwig

    2011-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as an intracellular Ca2+ store not only sets up cytosolic Ca2+ signals, but, among other functions, also assembles and folds newly synthesized proteins. Alterations in ER homeostasis, including severe Ca2+ depletion, are an upstream event in the pathophysiology of many diseases. On the one hand, insufficient release of activator Ca2+ may no longer sustain essential cell functions. On the other hand, loss of luminal Ca2+ causes ER stress and activates an unfolded protein response, which, depending on the duration and severity of the stress, can reestablish normal ER function or lead to cell death. We will review these various diseases by mainly focusing on the mechanisms that cause ER Ca2+ depletion. PMID:21441595

  1. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response in Arabidopsis Roots

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yueh; Kanehara, Kazue

    2017-01-01

    Roots are the frontier of plant body to perceive underground environmental change. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response represents circumvention of cellular stress caused by various environmental changes; however, a limited number of studies are available on the ER stress responses in roots. Here, we report the tunicamycin (TM) -induced ER stress response in Arabidopsis roots by monitoring expression patterns of immunoglobulin-binding protein 3 (BiP3), a representative marker for the response. Roots promptly responded to the TM-induced ER stress through the induction of similar sets of ER stress-responsive genes. However, not all cells responded uniformly to the TM-induced ER stress in roots, as BiP3 was highly expressed in root tips, an outer layer in elongation zone, and an inner layer in mature zone of roots. We suggest that ER stress response in roots has tissue specificity. PMID:28298914

  2. Structural organization of the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Voeltz, Gia K.; Rolls, Melissa M.; Rapoport, Tom A.

    2002-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a continuous membrane system but consists of various domains that perform different functions. Structurally distinct domains of this organelle include the nuclear envelope (NE), the rough and smooth ER, and the regions that contact other organelles. The establishment of these domains and the targeting of proteins to them are understood to varying degrees. Despite its complexity, the ER is a dynamic structure. In mitosis it must be divided between daughter cells and domains must be re-established, and even in interphase it is constantly rearranged as tubules extend along the cytoskeleton. Throughout these rearrangements the ER maintains its basic structure. How this is accomplished remains mysterious, but some insight has been gained from in vitro systems. PMID:12370207

  3. Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress and Endocrine Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ariyasu, Daisuke; Yoshida, Hiderou; Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    2017-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the organelle where secretory and membrane proteins are synthesized and folded. Unfolded proteins that are retained within the ER can cause ER stress. Eukaryotic cells have a defense system called the “unfolded protein response” (UPR), which protects cells from ER stress. Cells undergo apoptosis when ER stress exceeds the capacity of the UPR, which has been revealed to cause human diseases. Although neurodegenerative diseases are well-known ER stress-related diseases, it has been discovered that endocrine diseases are also related to ER stress. In this review, we focus on ER stress-related human endocrine disorders. In addition to diabetes mellitus, which is well characterized, several relatively rare genetic disorders such as familial neurohypophyseal diabetes insipidus (FNDI), Wolfram syndrome, and isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD2) are discussed in this article. PMID:28208663

  4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Ethanol Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fanmuyi; Luo, Jia

    2015-10-14

    Ethanol abuse affects virtually all organ systems and the central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to excessive ethanol exposure. Ethanol exposure causes profound damages to both the adult and developing brain. Prenatal ethanol exposure induces fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) which is associated with mental retardation and other behavioral deficits. A number of potential mechanisms have been proposed for ethanol-induced brain damage; these include the promotion of neuroinflammation, interference with signaling by neurotrophic factors, induction of oxidative stress, modulation of retinoid acid signaling, and thiamine deficiency. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) regulates posttranslational protein processing and transport. The accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen triggers ER stress and induces unfolded protein response (UPR) which are mediated by three transmembrane ER signaling proteins: pancreatic endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1), and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). UPR is initiated to protect cells from overwhelming ER protein loading. However, sustained ER stress may result in cell death. ER stress has been implied in various CNS injuries, including brain ischemia, traumatic brain injury, and aging-associated neurodegeneration, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Parkinson's disease (PD). However, effects of ethanol on ER stress in the CNS receive less attention. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the study of ER stress in ethanol-induced neurotoxicity. We also examine the potential mechanisms underlying ethanol-mediated ER stress and the interaction among ER stress, oxidative stress and autophagy in the context of ethanol neurotoxicity.

  5. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Regulates Adipocyte Resistin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Lefterova, Martina I.; Mullican, Shannon E.; Tomaru, Takuya; Qatanani, Mohammed; Schupp, Michael; Lazar, Mitchell A.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Resistin is a secreted polypeptide that impairs glucose metabolism and, in rodents, is derived exclusively from adipocytes. In murine obesity, resistin circulates at elevated levels but its gene expression in adipose tissue is paradoxically reduced. The mechanism behind the downregulation of resistin mRNA is poorly understood. We investigated whether endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, which is characteristic of obese adipose tissue, regulates resistin expression in cultured mouse adipocytes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The effects of endoplasmic stress inducers on resistin mRNA and secreted protein levels were examined in differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes, focusing on the expression and genomic binding of transcriptional regulators of resistin. The association between downregulated resistin mRNA and induction of ER stress was also investigated in the adipose tissue of mice fed a high-fat diet. RESULTS ER stress reduced resistin mRNA in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The effects of ER stress were transcriptional because of downregulation of CAAT/enhancer binding protein-α and peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-γ transcriptional activators and upregulation of the transcriptional repressor CAAT/enhancer binding protein homologous protein-10 (CHOP10). Resistin protein was also substantially downregulated, showing a close correspondence with mRNA levels in 3T3-L1 adipocytes as well as in the fat pads of obese mice. CONCLUSIONS ER stress is a potent regulator of resistin, suggesting that ER stress may underlie the local downregulation of resistin mRNA and protein in fat in murine obesity. The paradoxical increase in plasma may be because of various systemic abnormalities associated with obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:19491212

  6. Development of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress during Experimental Oxalate Nephrolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Motin, Yu G; Lepilov, A V; Bgatova, N P; Zharikov, A Yu; Motina, N V; Lapii, G A; Lushnikova, E L; Nepomnyashchikh, L M

    2016-01-01

    Morphological and ultrastructural study of the kidney was performed in rats with oxalate nephrolithiasis. Specific features of endoplasmic reticulum stress were evaluated during nephrolithiasis and treatment with α-tocopherol. We observed the signs of endoplasmic reticulum stress with activation of proapoptotic pathways and injury to the cell lining in nephron tubules and collecting ducts. Ultrastructural changes were found in the organelles, nuclei, and cell membranes of epitheliocytes. A relationship was revealed between endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative damage, which developed at the early state of lithogenesis.

  7. Obesity-induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Causes Lung Endothelial Dysfunction and Promotes Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Guo, Zhi; Sun, Jianxin; Li, Jonathan; Kallen, Caleb B; Naik, Ulhas P; Summer, Ross

    2017-03-09

    Obesity is a significant risk factor for the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The mechanisms underlying this association are unknown. We recently showed that diet-induced obese (DIO) mice exhibit pulmonary vascular endothelial dysfunction which is associated with enhanced susceptibility to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung injury. Here, we demonstrate that lung endothelial dysfunction in DIO mice coincides with increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Specifically, we observed enhanced expression of the major sensors of misfolded proteins including PERK, IREα and ATF6, in whole lung and in lung endothelial cells isolated from DIO mice. Further, we found that lung endothelial cells exposed to serum from obese mice, or to saturated fatty acids that mimic obese serum, resulted in enhanced expression of markers of ER stress and the induction of other biological responses that typify the lung endothelium of DIO mice. Similar changes were observed in lung endothelial cells and in whole lung tissue after exposure to tunicamycin, a compound that causes ER stress by blocking N-linked glycosylation; indicating that ER stress causes endothelial dysfunction in the lung. Treatment with 4-PBA, a chemical protein chaperone that reduces ER stress, restored vascular endothelial cell expression of adhesion molecules and protected against LPS-induced acute lung injury in DIO mice. Our work indicates that fatty acids in obese serum induce ER stress in the pulmonary endothelium leading to pulmonary endothelial cell dysfunction. Our work suggests that reducing protein load in the endoplasmic reticulum of pulmonary endothelial cells might protect against ARDS in obese individuals.

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress causes EBV lytic replication

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Gwen Marie; Raghuwanshi, Sandeep K.; Rowe, David T.; Wadowsky, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress triggers a homeostatic cellular response in mammalian cells to ensure efficient folding, sorting, and processing of client proteins. In lytic-permissive lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), pulse exposure to the chemical ER-stress inducer thapsigargin (TG) followed by recovery resulted in the activation of the EBV immediate-early (BRLF1, BZLF1), early (BMRF1), and late (gp350) genes, gp350 surface expression, and virus release. The protein phosphatase 1 a (PP1a)–specific phosphatase inhibitor Salubrinal (SAL) synergized with TG to induce EBV lytic genes; however, TG treatment alone was sufficient to activate EBV lytic replication. SAL showed ER-stress–dependent and –independent antiviral effects, preventing virus release in human LCLs and abrogating gp350 expression in 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)–treated B95-8 cells. TG resulted in sustained BCL6 but not BLIMP1 or CD138 expression, which is consistent with maintenance of a germinal center B-cell, rather than plasma-cell, phenotype. Microarray analysis identified candidate genes governing lytic replication in LCLs undergoing ER stress. PMID:21849482

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to acetylcholine receptor degradation by promoting endocytosis in skeletal muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Du, Ailian; Huang, Shiqian; Zhao, Xiaonan; Zhang, Yun; Zhu, Lixun; Ding, Ji; Xu, Congfeng

    2016-01-15

    After binding by acetylcholine released from a motor neuron, a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor at the neuromuscular junction produces a localized end-plate potential, which leads to muscle contraction. Improper turnover and renewal of acetylcholine receptors contributes to the pathogenesis of myasthenia gravis. In the present study, we demonstrate that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress contributes to acetylcholine receptor degradation in C2C12 myocytes. We further show that ER stress promotes acetylcholine receptor endocytosis and lysosomal degradation, which was dampened by blocking endocytosis or treating with lysosome inhibitor. Knockdown of ER stress proteins inhibited acetylcholine receptor endocytosis and degradation, while rescue assay restored its endocytosis and degradation, confirming the effects of ER stress on promoting endocytosis-mediated degradation of junction acetylcholine receptors. Thus, our studies identify ER stress as a factor promoting acetylcholine receptor degradation through accelerating endocytosis in muscle cells. Blocking ER stress and/or endocytosis might provide a novel therapeutic approach for myasthenia gravis.

  10. Coordination of stress, Ca2+, and immunogenic signaling pathways by PERK at the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    van Vliet, Alexander R; Garg, Abhishek D; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2016-07-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the main coordinator of intracellular Ca2+ signaling, protein synthesis, and folding. The ER is also implicated in the formation of contact sites with other organelles and structures, including mitochondria, plasma membrane (PM), and endosomes, thereby orchestrating through interorganelle signaling pathways, a variety of cellular responses including Ca2+ homeostasis, metabolism, and cell death signaling. Upon loss of its folding capacity, incited by a number of stress signals including those elicited by various anticancer therapies, the unfolded protein response (UPR) is launched to restore ER homeostasis. The ER stress sensor protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase (PERK) is a key mediator of the UPR and its role during ER stress has been largely recognized. However, growing evidence suggests that PERK may govern signaling pathways through UPR-independent functions. Here, we discuss emerging noncanonical roles of PERK with particular relevance for the induction of danger or immunogenic signaling and interorganelle communication.

  11. Dysfunction in endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria crosstalk underlies SIGMAR1 loss of function mediated motor neuron degeneration.

    PubMed

    Bernard-Marissal, Nathalie; Médard, Jean-Jacques; Azzedine, Hamid; Chrast, Roman

    2015-04-01

    Mutations in Sigma 1 receptor (SIGMAR1) have been previously identified in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and disruption of Sigmar1 in mouse leads to locomotor deficits. However, cellular mechanisms underlying motor phenotypes in human and mouse with disturbed SIGMAR1 function have not been described so far. Here we used a combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches to investigate the role of SIGMAR1 in motor neuron biology. Characterization of Sigmar1(-/-) mice revealed that affected animals display locomotor deficits associated with muscle weakness, axonal degeneration and motor neuron loss. Using primary motor neuron cultures, we observed that pharmacological or genetic inactivation of SIGMAR1 led to motor neuron axonal degeneration followed by cell death. Disruption of SIGMAR1 function in motor neurons disturbed endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria contacts, affected intracellular calcium signalling and was accompanied by activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress and defects in mitochondrial dynamics and transport. These defects were not observed in cultured sensory neurons, highlighting the exacerbated sensitivity of motor neurons to SIGMAR1 function. Interestingly, the inhibition of mitochondrial fission was sufficient to induce mitochondria axonal transport defects as well as axonal degeneration similar to the changes observed after SIGMAR1 inactivation or loss. Intracellular calcium scavenging and endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibition were able to restore mitochondrial function and consequently prevent motor neuron degeneration. These results uncover the cellular mechanisms underlying motor neuron degeneration mediated by loss of SIGMAR1 function and provide therapeutically relevant insight into motor neuronal diseases.

  12. Nox NADPH Oxidases and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Thaís L.S.; Abrahão, Thalita B.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Understanding isoform- and context-specific subcellular Nox reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase compartmentalization allows relevant functional inferences. This review addresses the interplay between Nox NADPH oxidases and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), an increasingly evident player in redox pathophysiology given its role in redox protein folding and stress responses. Recent Advances: Catalytic/regulatory transmembrane subunits are synthesized in the ER and their processing includes folding, N-glycosylation, heme insertion, p22phox heterodimerization, as shown for phagocyte Nox2. Dual oxidase (Duox) maturation also involves the regulation by ER-resident Duoxa2. The ER is the activation site for some isoforms, typically Nox4, but potentially other isoforms. Such location influences redox/Nox-mediated calcium signaling regulation via ER targets, such as sarcoendoplasmic reticulum calcium ATPase (SERCA). Growing evidence suggests that Noxes are integral signaling elements of the unfolded protein response during ER stress, with Nox4 playing a dual prosurvival/proapoptotic role in this setting, whereas Nox2 enhances proapoptotic signaling. ER chaperones such as protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) closely interact with Noxes. PDI supports growth factor-dependent Nox1 activation and mRNA expression, as well as migration in smooth muscle cells, and PDI overexpression induces acute spontaneous Nox activation. Critical Issues: Mechanisms of PDI effects include possible support of complex formation and RhoGTPase activation. In phagocytes, PDI supports phagocytosis, Nox activation, and redox-dependent interactions with p47phox. Together, the results implicate PDI as possible Nox organizer. Future Directions: We propose that convergence between Noxes and ER may have evolutive roots given ER-related functional contexts, which paved Nox evolution, namely calcium signaling and pathogen killing. Overall, the interplay between

  13. Altered Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium Pump Expression during Breast Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Papp, Béla; Brouland, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis is involved in several essential cell functions including cell proliferation, protein synthesis, stress responses or secretion. Calcium uptake into the endoplasmic reticulum is performed by Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium ATPases (SERCA enzymes). In order to study endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis in situ in mammary tissue, in this work SERCA3 expression was investigated in normal breast and in its benign and malignant lesions in function of the cell type, degree of malignancy, and histological and molecular parameters of the tumors. Our data indicate, that although normal breast acinar epithelial cells express SERCA3 abundantly, its expression is strongly decreased already in very early non-malignant epithelial lesions such as adenosis, and remains low in lobular carcinomas. Whereas normal duct epithelium expresses significant amounts of SERCA3, its expression is decreased in several benign ductal lesions, as well as in ductal adenocarcinoma. The loss of SERCA3 expression is correlated with Elston-Ellis grade, negative hormone receptor expression or triple negative status in ductal carcinomas. The concordance between decreased SERCA3 expression and several histological, as well as molecular markers of ductal carcinogenesis indicates that endoplasmic reticulum calcium homeostasis is remodeled during tumorigenesis in the breast epithelium. PMID:21863130

  14. Continuous network of endoplasmic reticulum in cerebellar Purkinje neurons.

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, M; Slater, N T; Fein, A; Schmidek, A; Reese, T S

    1994-01-01

    Purkinje neurons in rat cerebellar slices injected with an oil drop saturated with 1,1'-dihexadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate [DiIC16(3) or DiI] to label the endoplasmic reticulum were observed by confocal microscopy. DiI spread throughout the cell body and dendrites and into the axon. DiI spreading is due to diffusion in a continuous bilayer and is not due to membrane trafficking because it also spreads in fixed neurons. DiI stained such features of the endoplasmic reticulum as densities at branch points, reticular networks in the cell body and dendrites, nuclear envelope, spines, and aggregates formed during anoxia nuclear envelope, spines, and aggregates formed during anoxia in low extracellular Ca2+. In cultured rat hippocampal neurons, where optical conditions provide more detail, DiI labeled a clearly delineated network of endoplasmic reticulum in the cell body. We conclude that there is a continuous compartment of endoplasmic reticulum extending from the cell body throughout the dendrites. This compartment may coordinate and integrate neuronal functions. Images PMID:7519781

  15. Isolation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Fractions from Mammary Epithelial Tissue.

    PubMed

    Chanat, Eric; Le Parc, Annabelle; Lahouassa, Hichem; Badaoui, Bouabid

    2016-06-01

    In the mammary glands of lactating animals, the mammary epithelial cells that surround the lumen of the acini produce and secrete copious amounts of milk. Functional differentiation of these mammary epithelial cells depends on the development of high-efficiency secretory pathways, notably for protein and lipid secretion. Protein secretion is a fundamental process common to all animal cells that involves a subset of cellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. In contrast, en masse secretion of triglycerides and cholesterol esters in the form of milk fat globules is a unique feature of the mammary epithelial cell. Cytoplasmic lipid droplets, the intracellular precursors of milk fat globules, originate from the endoplasmic reticulum, as do most milk-specific proteins. This organelle is therefore pivotal in the biogenesis of milk components. Fractionation of the cell into its subcellular parts is an approach that has proven very powerful for understanding organelle function and for studying the specific role of an organelle in a given cell activity. Here we describe a method for the purification of both smooth and rough microsomes, the membrane-bound endoplasmic reticulum fragments that form from endoplasmic reticulum domains when cells are broken up, from mammary gland tissue at lactation.

  16. Astragaloside IV Attenuates Podocyte Apoptosis Mediated by Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress through Upregulating Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2 Expression in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hengjiang; Cao, Aili; Chu, Shuang; Wang, Yi; Zang, Yingjun; Mao, Xiaodong; Wang, Hao; Wang, Yunman; Liu, Cheng; Zhang, Xuemei; Peng, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of diabetes. This protein has been recognized as a potential target for diabetic therapy. In this study, we identified astragaloside IV (AS-IV) as a potent modulator of SERCA inhibiting renal injury in diabetic status. Increasing doses of AS-IV (2, 6, and 18 mg kg-1 day-1) were administered intragastrically to db/db mice for 8 weeks. Biochemical and histopathological approaches were conducted to evaluate the therapeutic effects of AS-IV. Cultured mouse podocytes were used to further explore the underlying mechanism in vitro. AS-IV dose-dependently increased SERCA activity and SERCA2 expression, and suppressed ER stress-mediated and mitochondria-mediated apoptosis in db/db mouse kidney. AS-IV also normalized glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, improved renal function, and ameliorated glomerulosclerosis and renal inflammation in db/db mice. In palmitate stimulated podocytes, AS-IV markedly improved inhibitions of SERCA activity and SERCA2 expression, restored intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis, and attenuated podocyte apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner with a concomitant abrogation of ER stress as evidenced by the downregulation of GRP78, cleaved ATF6, phospho-IRE1α and phospho-PERK, and the inactivation of both ER stress-mediated and mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathways. Furthermore, SERCA2b knockdown eliminated the effect of AS-IV on ER stress and ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway, whereas its overexpression exhibited an anti-apoptotic effect. Our data obtained from in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrate that AS-IV attenuates renal injury in diabetes subsequent to inhibiting ER stress-induced podocyte apoptosis through restoring SERCA activity and SERCA2 expression. PMID:28066247

  17. Breuner Marsh Restoration Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the San Francisco Bay Water Quality Project (SFBWQP) Breuner Marsh Restoration Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  18. Quartermaster Reach Restoration Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Quartermaster Reach Restoration Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  19. Sulfatase modifying factor 1 trafficking through the cells: from endoplasmic reticulum to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Zito, Ester; Buono, Mario; Pepe, Stefano; Settembre, Carmine; Annunziata, Ida; Surace, Enrico Maria; Dierks, Thomas; Monti, Maria; Cozzolino, Marianna; Pucci, Piero; Ballabio, Andrea; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2007-05-16

    Sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1) is the gene mutated in multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) that encodes the formylglycine-generating enzyme, an essential activator of all the sulfatases. SUMF1 is a glycosylated enzyme that is resident in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), although it is also secreted. Here, we demonstrate that upon secretion, SUMF1 can be taken up from the medium by several cell lines. Furthermore, the in vivo engineering of mice liver to produce SUMF1 shows its secretion into the blood serum and its uptake into different tissues. Additionally, we show that non-glycosylated forms of SUMF1 can still be secreted, while only the glycosylated SUMF1 enters cells, via a receptor-mediated mechanism. Surprisingly, following its uptake, SUMF1 shuttles from the plasma membrane to the ER, a route that has to date only been well characterized for some of the toxins. Remarkably, once taken up and relocalized into the ER, SUMF1 is still active, enhancing the sulfatase activities in both cultured cells and mice tissues.

  20. Restorative dentistry for children.

    PubMed

    Donly, Kevin J

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses contemporary pediatric restorative dentistry. Indications and contraindications for the choice of different restorative materials in different clinical situations, including the risk assessment of the patient, are presented. The specific use of glass ionomer cement or resin-modified glass ionomer cement, resin-based composite, and stainless steel crowns is discussed so that preparation design and restoration placement is understood.

  1. Linking restoration ecology with coastal dune restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lithgow, D.; Martínez, M. L.; Gallego-Fernández, J. B.; Hesp, P. A.; Flores, P.; Gachuz, S.; Rodríguez-Revelo, N.; Jiménez-Orocio, O.; Mendoza-González, G.; Álvarez-Molina, L. L.

    2013-10-01

    Restoration and preservation of coastal dunes is urgently needed because of the increasingly rapid loss and degradation of these ecosystems because of many human activities. These activities alter natural processes and coastal dynamics, eliminate topographic variability, fragment, degrade or eliminate habitats, reduce diversity and threaten endemic species. The actions of coastal dune restoration that are already taking place span contrasting activities that range from revegetating and stabilizing the mobile substrate, to removing plant cover and increasing substrate mobility. Our goal was to review how the relative progress of the actions of coastal dune restoration has been assessed, according to the ecosystem attributes outlined by the Society of Ecological Restoration: namely, integrity, health and sustainability and that are derived from the ecological theory of succession. We reviewed the peer reviewed literature published since 1988 that is listed in the ISI Web of Science journals as well as additional references, such as key books. We exclusively focused on large coastal dune systems (such as transgressive and parabolic dunefields) located on natural or seminatural coasts. We found 150 articles that included "coastal dune", "restoration" and "revegetation" in areas such as title, keywords and abstract. From these, 67 dealt specifically with coastal dune restoration. Most of the studies were performed in the USA, The Netherlands and South Africa, during the last two decades. Restoration success has been assessed directly and indirectly by measuring one or a few ecosystem variables. Some ecosystem attributes have been monitored more frequently (ecosystem integrity) than others (ecosystem health and sustainability). Finally, it is important to consider that ecological succession is a desirable approach in restoration actions. Natural dynamics and disturbances should be considered as part of the restored system, to improve ecosystem integrity, health and

  2. Power system restoration planning

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Fink, L.H.

    1994-02-01

    System restoration, as an extraordinary mode of system operation, requires careful planning and operator training. The generic tasks of restoration include determination of system and equipment status, preparation of plants and network for systematic restoration, reenergization of the network, and system rebuilding. The procedures for developing an effective restoration plan include formation of a qualified planning team, review of relevant system characteristics, formulation of assumptions regarding blackout scenarios, agreement on restoration goals, development of strategy and tactics, validation of the plan, training, and documentation.

  3. High fat diet dysregulates microRNA-17-5p and triggers retinal inflammation: Role of endoplasmic-reticulum-stress

    PubMed Central

    Coucha, Maha; Mohamed, Islam N; Elshaer, Sally L; Mbata, Osinakachuk; Bartasis, Megan L; El-Remessy, Azza B

    2017-01-01

    AIM To elucidate how high diet-induced endoplasmic reticulum-stress upregulates thioredoxin interacting protein expression in Müller cells leading to retinal inflammation. METHODS Male C57Bl/J mice were fed either normal diet or 60% high fat diet for 4-8 wk. During the 4 wk study, mice received phenyl-butyric acid (PBA); endoplasmic reticulum-stress inhibitor; for 2 wk. Insulin resistance was assessed by oral glucose tolerance. Effects of palmitate-bovine serum albumin (BSA) (400 μmol/L) were examined in retinal Müller glial cell line and primary Müller cells isolated from wild type and thioredoxin interacting protein knock-out mice. Expression of thioredoxin interacting protein, endoplasmic reticulum-stress markers, miR-17-5p mRNA, as well as nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptor protein (NLRP3) and IL1β protein was determined. RESULTS High fat diet for 8 wk induced obesity and insulin resistance evident by increases in body weight and impaired glucose tolerance. By performing quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, we found that high fat diet triggered the expression of retinal endoplasmic reticulum-stress markers (P < 0.05). These effects were associated with increased thioredoxin interacting protein and decreased miR-17-5p expression, which were restored by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum-stress with PBA (P < 0.05). In vitro, palmitate-BSA triggered endoplasmic reticulum-stress markers, which was accompanied with reduced miR-17-5p and induced thioredoxin interacting protein mRNA in retinal Müller glial cell line (P < 0.05). Palmitate upregulated NLRP3 and IL1β expression in primary Müller cells isolated from wild type. However, using primary Müller cells isolated from thioredoxin interacting protein knock-out mice abolished palmitate-mediated increase in NLRP3 and IL1β. CONCLUSION Our work suggests that targeting endoplasmic reticulum-stress or thioredoxin interacting protein are potential therapeutic strategies for early

  4. Restoring the incisal edge.

    PubMed

    Terry, Douglas A

    2005-01-01

    Restorative dentistry evolves with each development of new material and innovative technique. Selection of improved restorative materials that simulate the physical properties and other characteristics of natural teeth, in combination with restorative techniques such as the proximal adaptation and incremental layering, provide the framework that ensures the optimal development of an esthetic restoration. These advanced placement techniques offer benefits such as enhanced chromatic integration, polychromatism, ideal anatomical form and function, optimal proximal contact, improved marginal integrity and longer lasting directly placed composite restorations. The purpose of this article is to give the reader a better understanding of the complex restorative challenge in achieving true harmonization of the primary parameters in esthetics (that is, color, shape and texture) represented by the replacement of a single anterior tooth. The case presented demonstrates the restoration of a Class IV fracture integrating basic adhesive principles with these placement techniques and a recently developed nanoparticle hybrid composite resin system (Premise, Kerr/Sybron, Orange, CA). The clinical presentation describes preoperative considerations, tooth preparation, development of the body layer, internal characterization with tints, development of the artificial enamel layer, shaping and contouring, and polishing of a Class IV composite restoration. The clinical significance is that anterior tooth fractures can be predictably restored using contemporary small particle hybrid composite resin systems with the aforementioned restorative techniques. These placement techniques when used with proper attention to preparation design, adhesive protocol and finishing and polishing procedures, allow the clinician to successfully restore form, function and esthetics to the single anterior tooth replacement.

  5. Protein kinase R-like ER kinase and its role in endoplasmic reticulum stress-decided cell fate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Z; Lv, Y; Zhao, N; Guan, G; Wang, J

    2015-07-30

    Over the past few decades, understandings and evidences concerning the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in deciding the cell fate have been constantly growing. Generally, during ER stress, the signal transductions are mainly conducted by three ER stress transducers: protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), inositol-requiring kinase 1 (IRE1) and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). Consequently, the harmful stimuli from the ER stress transducers induce apoptosis and autophagy, which share several crosstalks and eventually decide the cell fate. The dominance of apoptosis or autophagy induced by ER stress depends on the type and degree of the stimuli. When ER stress is too severe and prolonged, apoptosis is induced to eliminate the damaged cells; however, when stimuli are mild, cell survival is promoted to maintain normal physiological functions by inducing autophagy. Although all the three pathways participate in ER stress-induced apoptosis and autophagy, PERK shows several unique characteristics by interacting with some specific downstream effectors. Notably, there are some preliminary findings on PERK-dependent mechanisms switching autophagy and apoptosis. In this review, we particularly focused on the novel, intriguing and complicated role of PERK in ER stress-decided cell fate, and also discussed more roles of PERK in restoring cellular homeostasis. However, more in-depth knowledge of PERK in the future would facilitate our understanding about many human diseases and benefit in searching for new molecular therapeutic targets.

  6. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: implications for inflammatory bowel disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kaser, Arthur; Martínez-Naves, Eduardo; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview of the emerging role of cellular stress responses in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Recent findings The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a primitive cellular pathway that is engaged when responding to endoplasmic reticulum stress and regulates autophagy. Highly secretory cells such as Paneth cells and goblet cells in the intestines are particularly susceptible to endoplasmic reticulum stress and are exceedingly dependent upon a properly functioning UPR to maintain cellular viability and homeostasis. Primary genetic abnormalities within the components of the UPR (e.g. XBP1, ARG2, ORMDL3), genes that encode proteins reliant upon a robust secretory pathway (e.g. MUC2, HLAB27) and environmental factors that create disturbances in the UPR (e.g. microbial products and inflammatory cytokines) are important factors in the primary development and/or perpetuation of intestinal inflammation. Summary Endoplasmic reticulum stress is an important new pathway involved in the development of intestinal inflammation associated with IBD and likely other intestinal inflammatory disorders. PMID:20495455

  7. Watershed Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Julie Thompson; Betsy Macfarlan

    2007-09-27

    In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy issued the Eastern Nevada Landscape Coalition (ENLC) funding to implement ecological restoration in Gleason Creek and Smith Valley Watersheds. This project was made possible by congressionally directed funding that was provided through the US Department of Energy, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the Biomass Program. The Ely District Bureau of Land Management (Ely BLM) manages these watersheds and considers them priority areas within the Ely BLM district. These three entities collaborated to address the issues and concerns of Gleason Creek and Smith Valley and prepared a restoration plan to improve the watersheds’ ecological health and resiliency. The restoration process began with watershed-scale vegetation assessments and state and transition models to focus on restoration sites. Design and implementation of restoration treatments ensued and were completed in January 2007. This report describes the restoration process ENLC undertook from planning to implementation of two watersheds in semi-arid Eastern Nevada.

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy: a potential target for therapy.

    PubMed

    Montague, Karli; Malik, Bilal; Gray, Anna L; La Spada, Albert R; Hanna, Michael G; Szabadkai, Gyorgy; Greensmith, Linda

    2014-07-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked degenerative motor neuron disease caused by an abnormal expansion in the polyglutamine encoding CAG repeat of the androgen receptor gene. There is evidence implicating endoplasmic reticulum stress in the development and progression of neurodegenerative disease, including polyglutamine disorders such as Huntington's disease and in motor neuron disease, where cellular stress disrupts functioning of the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to induction of the unfolded protein response. We examined whether endoplasmic reticulum stress is also involved in the pathogenesis of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice that carry 100 pathogenic polyglutamine repeats in the androgen receptor, and develop a late-onset neuromuscular phenotype with motor neuron degeneration, were studied. We observed a disturbance in endoplasmic reticulum-associated calcium homeostasis in cultured embryonic motor neurons from spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy mice, which was accompanied by increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress reduced the endoplasmic reticulum-associated cell death pathway. Examination of spinal cord motor neurons of pathogenic mice at different disease stages revealed elevated expression of markers for endoplasmic reticulum stress, confirming an increase in this stress response in vivo. Importantly, the most significant increase was detected presymptomatically, suggesting that endoplasmic reticulum stress may play an early and possibly causal role in disease pathogenesis. Our results therefore indicate that the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway could potentially be a therapeutic target for spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy and related polyglutamine diseases.

  9. Sustained endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibits hepatocyte proliferation via downregulation of c-Met expression.

    PubMed

    He, Yihuai; Long, Jun; Zhong, Weiwei; Fu, Yu; Li, Ying; Lin, Shide

    2014-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms of impaired liver regeneration in several liver diseases remain poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has been observed in a variety of liver diseases. The aims of this study were to explore the impacts of ER stress on hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced proliferation and c-Met expression in human hepatocyte L02 cells. Human hepatocyte L02 cells were incubated with thapsigargin (TG) to induce ER stress. 4-Phenylbutyric acid (PBA) was used to rescue ER stress. Activation of glucose-regulated protein 78, phosphorylation of PKR-like ER kinase and eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2α, and the expression of c-Met were determined by western blotting. The expression of c-Met mRNA was observed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. L02 cell proliferation was determined by the MTS assay. L02 cell proliferation was significantly impaired in TG-treated L02 cells from 24 to 48 h, while PBA partly restored the proliferation of L02 cells. In addition, TG treatment significantly decreased the sensitivity of L02 cells to HGF-induced proliferation. PBA partly resumed the sensitivity of L02 cells to HGF-induced proliferation. The expression of c-Met protein in L02 cells was downregulated from 6 h after TG treatment, and PBA partly restored c-Met expression inhibited by TG. The expression of c-Met mRNA was also significantly downregulated from 24 to 48 h after TG treatment. Our results strongly suggest that sustained ER stress inhibits hepatocyte proliferation via downregulation of both c-Met mRNA and protein expression in human hepatocyte L02 cells.

  10. Humanin Protects RPE Cells from Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Apoptosis by Upregulation of Mitochondrial Glutathione

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Douglas; Sreekumar, Parameswaran G.; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Terasaki, Hiroto; Barron, Ernesto; Cohen, Pinchas

    2016-01-01

    Humanin (HN) is a small mitochondrial-encoded peptide with neuroprotective properties. We have recently shown protection of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells by HN in oxidative stress; however, the effect of HN on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has not been evaluated in any cell type. Our aim here was to study the effect of HN on ER stress-induced apoptosis in RPE cells with a specific focus on ER-mitochondrial cross-talk. Dose dependent effects of ER stressors (tunicamycin (TM), brefeldin A, and thapsigargin) were studied after 12 hr of treatment in confluent primary human RPE cells with or without 12 hr of HN pretreatment (1–20 μg/mL). All three ER stressors induced RPE cell apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. HN pretreatment significantly decreased the number of apoptotic cells with all three ER stressors in a dose dependent manner. HN pretreatment similarly protected U-251 glioma cells from TM-induced apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. HN pretreatment significantly attenuated activation of caspase 3 and ER stress-specific caspase 4 induced by TM. TM treatment increased mitochondrial superoxide production, and HN co-treatment resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial superoxide compared to TM treatment alone. We further showed that depleted mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) levels induced by TM were restored with HN co-treatment. No significant changes were found for the expression of several antioxidant enzymes between TM and TM plus HN groups except for the expression of glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), the rate limiting enzyme required for GSH biosynthesis, which is upregulated with TM and TM+HN treatment. These results demonstrate that ER stress promotes mitochondrial alterations in RPE that lead to apoptosis. We further show that HN has a protective effect against ER stress-induced apoptosis by restoring mitochondrial GSH. Thus, HN should be further evaluated for its therapeutic potential in disorders linked to ER stress. PMID

  11. Humanin Protects RPE Cells from Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Apoptosis by Upregulation of Mitochondrial Glutathione.

    PubMed

    Matsunaga, Douglas; Sreekumar, Parameswaran G; Ishikawa, Keijiro; Terasaki, Hiroto; Barron, Ernesto; Cohen, Pinchas; Kannan, Ram; Hinton, David R

    2016-01-01

    Humanin (HN) is a small mitochondrial-encoded peptide with neuroprotective properties. We have recently shown protection of retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cells by HN in oxidative stress; however, the effect of HN on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has not been evaluated in any cell type. Our aim here was to study the effect of HN on ER stress-induced apoptosis in RPE cells with a specific focus on ER-mitochondrial cross-talk. Dose dependent effects of ER stressors (tunicamycin (TM), brefeldin A, and thapsigargin) were studied after 12 hr of treatment in confluent primary human RPE cells with or without 12 hr of HN pretreatment (1-20 μg/mL). All three ER stressors induced RPE cell apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. HN pretreatment significantly decreased the number of apoptotic cells with all three ER stressors in a dose dependent manner. HN pretreatment similarly protected U-251 glioma cells from TM-induced apoptosis in a dose dependent manner. HN pretreatment significantly attenuated activation of caspase 3 and ER stress-specific caspase 4 induced by TM. TM treatment increased mitochondrial superoxide production, and HN co-treatment resulted in a decrease in mitochondrial superoxide compared to TM treatment alone. We further showed that depleted mitochondrial glutathione (GSH) levels induced by TM were restored with HN co-treatment. No significant changes were found for the expression of several antioxidant enzymes between TM and TM plus HN groups except for the expression of glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), the rate limiting enzyme required for GSH biosynthesis, which is upregulated with TM and TM+HN treatment. These results demonstrate that ER stress promotes mitochondrial alterations in RPE that lead to apoptosis. We further show that HN has a protective effect against ER stress-induced apoptosis by restoring mitochondrial GSH. Thus, HN should be further evaluated for its therapeutic potential in disorders linked to ER stress.

  12. Evidence for Increased Response to Induced Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Myeloid Cells in Acquired Aplastic Anemia.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Alpa; Callaghan, Michael U; Gadgeel, Manisha S; Buck, Steven A; Fribley, Andrew M; Savaşan, Süreyya

    2017-04-01

    Autoimmune response targeting the hematopoietic stem cells highlights the current understanding of acquired aplastic anemia (AAA) pathogenesis. Upregulation of the unfolded protein response is the cell's rejoinder to a variety of stresses, which either result in restoring homeostasis or cell death by increased expression of the transcription factor C/EBP homologous protein. We hypothesized that there is an inherent increased sensitivity to various cellular stressors, including the ones that target endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in AAA leading to a decreased proliferation and potentially contributing to susceptibility to autologous cytotoxicity. Using archived bone marrow aspirate samples, we demonstrate that the culture-expanded AAA myeloid cells have an increased response to ER stress induced by tunicamycin leading to decreased cell proliferation. Within the AAA myeloid samples, we show that the disease status, active versus response to therapy at the time of sampling does not alter the ER stress response. This is the first report, which provides evidence for an inherent defective stress control in the myeloid cells as a possible mechanism of evolution of the disease process in AAA.

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in amelogenesis imperfecta and phenotypic rescue using 4-phenylbutyrate

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Steven J.; Barron, Martin J.; Boot-Handford, Ray; Kirkham, Jennifer; Dixon, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited diseases caused by genetic mutations can arise due to loss of protein function. Alternatively, mutated proteins may mis-fold, impairing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) trafficking, causing ER stress and triggering the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR attempts to restore proteostasis but if unsuccessful drives affected cells towards apoptosis. Previously, we reported that in mice, the p.Tyr64His mutation in the enamel extracellular matrix (EEM) protein amelogenin disrupts the secretory pathway in the enamel-forming ameloblasts, resulting in eruption of malformed tooth enamel that phenocopies human amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Defective amelogenin post-secretory self-assembly and processing within the developing EEM has been suggested to underlie the pathogenesis of X chromosome-linked AI. Here, we challenge this concept by showing that AI pathogenesis associated with the p.Tyr64His amelogenin mutation involves ameloblast apoptosis induced by ER stress. Furthermore, we show that 4-phenylbutyrate can rescue the enamel phenotype in affected female mice by promoting cell survival over apoptosis such that they are able to complete enamel formation despite the presence of the mutation, offering a potential therapeutic option for patients with this form of AI and emphasizing the importance of ER stress in the pathogenesis of this inherited conformational disease. PMID:24362885

  14. Lifespan Extension Conferred by Endoplasmic Reticulum Secretory Pathway Deficiency Requires Induction of the Unfolded Protein Response

    PubMed Central

    Labunskyy, Vyacheslav M.; Gerashchenko, Maxim V.; Delaney, Joe R.; Kaya, Alaattin; Kennedy, Brian K.; Kaeberlein, Matt; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2014-01-01

    Cells respond to accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by activating the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway. The UPR restores ER homeostasis by degrading misfolded proteins, inhibiting translation, and increasing expression of chaperones that enhance ER protein folding capacity. Although ER stress and protein aggregation have been implicated in aging, the role of UPR signaling in regulating lifespan remains unknown. Here we show that deletion of several UPR target genes significantly increases replicative lifespan in yeast. This extended lifespan depends on a functional ER stress sensor protein, Ire1p, and is associated with constitutive activation of upstream UPR signaling. We applied ribosome profiling coupled with next generation sequencing to quantitatively examine translational changes associated with increased UPR activity and identified a set of stress response factors up-regulated in the long-lived mutants. Besides known UPR targets, we uncovered up-regulation of components of the cell wall and genes involved in cell wall biogenesis that confer resistance to multiple stresses. These findings demonstrate that the UPR is an important determinant of lifespan that governs ER stress and identify a signaling network that couples stress resistance to longevity. PMID:24391512

  15. Disturbed phospholipid homeostasis in endoplasmic reticulum initiates tri-o-cresyl phosphate-induced delayed neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Li; Wang, Pan; Sun, Ying-Jian; Xu, Ming-Yuan; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Tri-o-cresyl phosphate (TOCP) is a widely used organophosphorus compound, which can cause a neurodegenerative disorder, i.e., organophosphate-induced delayed neurotoxicity (OPIDN). The biochemical events in the initiation of OPIDN were not fully understood except for the essential inhibition of neuropathy target esterase (NTE). NTE, located in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), catalyzes the deacylation of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) to glycerophosphocholine (GPC). The present study aims to study the changes of ER phospholipids profile as well as levels of important intermediates of phospholipid synthesis such as diacylglycerol (DAG) and phosphatidic acid (PA) at the initiation stage of OPIDN. Hens are the most commonly used animal models of OPIDN. The spinal cord phospholipidomic profiles of hens treated by TOCP were studied by using HPLC-MS-MS. The results revealed that TOCP induced an increase of PC, LPC, and sphingomyelin (SM) levels and a decrease of GPC, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), lysophosphatidylethanolamine (LPE), lysophosphatidylserine (LPS), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and phosphatidylinositol (PI) levels., Levels of DAG and PA were also decreased. Pretreatment with phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) 24 h before TOCP administration prevented OPIDN and restored the TOCP-induced changes of phospholipids except GPC. Thus, the disruption of ER phospholipid homeostasis may contribute to the initiation of organophosphate-induced delayed neurotoxicity. PMID:27883027

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and the Unfolded Protein Responses in Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sarah X.; Sanders, Emily; Fliesler, Steven J.; Wang, Joshua J.

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the primary intracellular organelle responsible for protein and lipid biosynthesis, protein folding and trafficking, calcium homeostasis, and several other vital processes in cell physiology. Disturbance in ER function results in ER stress and subsequent activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR up-regulates ER chaperones, reduces protein translation, and promotes clearance of cytotoxic misfolded proteins to restore ER homeostasis. If this vital process fails, the cell will be signaled to enter apoptosis, resulting in cell death. Sustained ER stress also can trigger an inflammatory response and exacerbate oxidative stress, both of which contribute synergistically to tissue damage. Studies performed over the past decade have implicated ER stress in a broad range of human diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, diabetes, and vascular disorders. Several of these diseases also entail retinal dysfunction and degeneration caused by injury to retinal neurons and/or to the blood vessels that supply retinal cells with nutrients, trophic and homeostatic factors, oxygen, and other essential molecules, as well as serving as a conduit for removal of waste products and potentially toxic substances from the retina. Collectively, such injuries represent the leading cause of blindness world-wide in all age groups. Herein, we summarize recent progress on the study of ER stress and UPR signaling in retinal biology and discuss the molecular mechanisms and the potential clinical applications of targeting ER stress as a new therapeutic approach to prevent and treat neuronal degeneration in the retina. PMID:24792589

  17. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Homocystinuria Patients with Remethylation Defects

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Pizarro, Ainhoa; Desviat, Lourdes R.; Ugarte, Magdalena; Pérez, Belén; Richard, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Proper function of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria is crucial for cellular homeostasis, and dysfunction at either site as well as perturbation of mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAMs) have been linked to neurodegenerative and metabolic diseases. Previously, we have observed an increase in ROS and apoptosis levels in patient-derived fibroblasts with remethylation disorders causing homocystinuria. Here we show increased mRNA and protein levels of Herp, Grp78, IP3R1, pPERK, ATF4, CHOP, asparagine synthase and GADD45 in patient-derived fibroblasts suggesting ER stress and calcium perturbations in homocystinuria. In addition, overexpressed MAM-associated proteins (Grp75, σ-1R and Mfn2) were found in these cells that could result in mitochondrial calcium overload and oxidative stress increase. Our results also show an activation of autophagy process and a substantial degradation of altered mitochondria by mitophagy in patient-derived fibroblasts. Moreover, we have observed that autophagy was partially abolished by antioxidants suggesting that ROS participate in this process that may have a protective role. Our findings argue that alterations in Ca2+ homeostasis and autophagy may contribute to the development of this metabolic disorder and suggest a therapeutic potential in homocystinuria for agents that stabilize calcium homeostasis and/or restore the proper function of ER-mitochondria communications. PMID:26959487

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondrial crosstalk: a novel role for the mitochondrial peptide humanin

    PubMed Central

    Sreekumar, Parameswaran G.; Hinton, David R.; Kannan, Ram

    2017-01-01

    In this review, the interactive mechanisms of mitochondria with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are discussed with emphasis on the potential protective role of the mitochondria derived peptide humanin (HN) in ER stress. The ER and mitochondria are dynamic organelles capable of modifying their structure and function in response to changing environmental conditions. The ER and mitochondria join together at multiple sites and form mitochondria-ER associated membranes that participate in signal transduction pathways that are under active investigation. Our laboratory previously showed that HN protects cells from oxidative stress induced cell death and more recently, described the beneficial role of HN on ER stress-induced apoptosis in retinal pigment epithelium cells and the involvement of ER-mitochondrial cross-talk in cellular protection. The protection was achieved, in part, by the restoration of mitochondrial glutathione that was depleted by ER stress. Thus, HN may be a promising candidate for therapy for diseases that involve both oxidative and ER stress. Developing novel approaches for retinal delivery of HN, its analogues as well as small molecular weight ER stress inhibitors would prove to be a valuable approach in the treatment of age-related macular degeneration. PMID:28250736

  19. PPARδ Is Required for Exercise to Attenuate Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Endothelial Dysfunction in Diabetic Mice.

    PubMed

    Cheang, Wai San; Wong, Wing Tak; Zhao, Lei; Xu, Jian; Wang, Li; Lau, Chi Wai; Chen, Zhen Yu; Ma, Ronald Ching Wan; Xu, Aimin; Wang, Nanping; Tian, Xiao Yu; Huang, Yu

    2017-02-01

    Physical activity has profound benefits on health, especially on cardiometabolic wellness. Experiments in rodents with trained exercise have shown that exercise improves vascular function and reduces vascular inflammation by modulating the balance between nitric oxide (NO) and oxidative stress. However, the upstream regulator of exercise-induced vascular benefits is unclear. We aimed to investigate the involvement of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPARδ) in exercise-induced vascular functional improvement. We show that PPARδ is a crucial mediator for exercise to exert a beneficial effect on the vascular endothelium in diabetic mice. In db/db mice and high-fat diet-induced obese mice, 4 weeks of treadmill exercise restored endothelium-dependent vasodilation of aortas and flow-mediated vasodilation in mesenteric resistance arteries, whereas genetic ablation of Ppard abolished such improvements. Exercise induces AMPK activation and subsequent PPARδ activation, which help to reduce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress, thus increasing NO bioavailability in endothelial cells and vascular tissues. Chemical chaperones 4-phenylbutyric acid and tauroursodeoxycholic acid decrease ER stress and protect against endothelial dysfunction in diabetic mice. The results demonstrate that PPARδ-mediated inhibition of ER stress contributes to the vascular benefits of exercise and provides potentially effective targets for treating diabetic vasculopathy.

  20. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in amelogenesis imperfecta and phenotypic rescue using 4-phenylbutyrate.

    PubMed

    Brookes, Steven J; Barron, Martin J; Boot-Handford, Ray; Kirkham, Jennifer; Dixon, Michael J

    2014-05-01

    Inherited diseases caused by genetic mutations can arise due to loss of protein function. Alternatively, mutated proteins may mis-fold, impairing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) trafficking, causing ER stress and triggering the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR attempts to restore proteostasis but if unsuccessful drives affected cells towards apoptosis. Previously, we reported that in mice, the p.Tyr64His mutation in the enamel extracellular matrix (EEM) protein amelogenin disrupts the secretory pathway in the enamel-forming ameloblasts, resulting in eruption of malformed tooth enamel that phenocopies human amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Defective amelogenin post-secretory self-assembly and processing within the developing EEM has been suggested to underlie the pathogenesis of X chromosome-linked AI. Here, we challenge this concept by showing that AI pathogenesis associated with the p.Tyr64His amelogenin mutation involves ameloblast apoptosis induced by ER stress. Furthermore, we show that 4-phenylbutyrate can rescue the enamel phenotype in affected female mice by promoting cell survival over apoptosis such that they are able to complete enamel formation despite the presence of the mutation, offering a potential therapeutic option for patients with this form of AI and emphasizing the importance of ER stress in the pathogenesis of this inherited conformational disease.

  1. Calcium Efflux From the Endoplasmic Reticulum Leads to β-Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Takashi; Mahadevan, Jana; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Hara, Mariko; Lu, Simin

    2014-01-01

    It has been established that intracellular calcium homeostasis is critical for survival and function of pancreatic β-cells. However, the role of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium homeostasis in β-cell survival and death is not clear. Here we show that ER calcium depletion plays a critical role in β-cell death. Various pathological conditions associated with β-cell death, including ER stress, oxidative stress, palmitate, and chronic high glucose, decreased ER calcium levels and sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2b expression, leading to β-cell death. Ectopic expression of mutant insulin and genetic ablation of WFS1, a causative gene for Wolfram syndrome, also decreased ER calcium levels and induced β-cell death. Hyperactivation of calpain-2, a calcium-dependent proapoptotic protease, was detected in β-cells undergoing ER calcium depletion. Ectopic expression of sarcoendoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase 2b, as well as pioglitazone and rapamycin treatment, could prevent calcium efflux from the ER and mitigate β-cell death under various stress conditions. Our results reveal a critical role of ER calcium depletion in β-cell death and indicate that identification of pathways and chemical compounds restoring ER calcium levels will lead to novel therapeutic modalities and pharmacological interventions for type 1 and type 2 diabetes and other ER-related diseases including Wolfram syndrome. PMID:24424032

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Age-Related Macular Degeneration: Trigger for Neovascularization

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Antero; Kauppinen, Anu; Hyttinen, Juha MT; Toropainen, Elisa; Kaarniranta, Kai

    2010-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) can be classified into two main categories: the atrophic, dry form and the exudative, wet form. The crucial difference between dry and wet AMD is the development of choroidal neovascularization in wet AMD. One fundamental cause of the neovascularization is the increased expression of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) in retinal pigment epithelial cells. Progression of AMD is linked to augmentation of cellular stress, for example, oxidative stress, proteotoxic stress, inflammation and hypoxia. All these conditions can trigger stress in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which maintains protein quality control in cells. ER stress induces the unfolded protein response (UPR) via IRE1 (inositol-requiring protein-1), PERK (protein kinase RNA-like ER kinase) and ATF6 (activating transcription factor-6) transducers. UPR signaling is a double-edged sword, that is, it can restore cellular homeostasis as far as possible, but ultimately may lead to chronic, overwhelming stress that can cause apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, ER stress is a well-known inducer of angiogenesis in cancer. Moreover, stress conditions associated with the progress of AMD can induce the expression of VEGF. We discuss the role of ER stress in the regulation of neovascularization and the conversion of dry AMD to its wet, detrimental counterpart. PMID:20683548

  3. Proline biosynthesis is required for endoplasmic reticulum stress tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xinwen; Dickman, Martin B; Becker, Donald F

    2014-10-03

    The amino acid proline is uniquely involved in cellular processes that underlie stress response in a variety of organisms. Proline is known to minimize protein aggregation, but a detailed study of how proline impacts cell survival during accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has not been performed. To address this we examined in Saccharomyces cerevisiae the effect of knocking out the PRO1, PRO2, and PRO3 genes responsible for proline biosynthesis. The null mutants pro1, pro2, and pro3 were shown to have increased sensitivity to ER stress relative to wild-type cells, which could be restored by proline or the corresponding genetic complementation. Of these mutants, pro3 was the most sensitive to tunicamycin and was rescued by anaerobic growth conditions or reduced thiol reagents. The pro3 mutant cells have higher intracellular reactive oxygen species, total glutathione, and a NADP(+)/NADPH ratio than wild-type cells under limiting proline conditions. Depletion of proline biosynthesis also inhibits the unfolded protein response (UPR) indicating proline protection involves the UPR. To more broadly test the role of proline in ER stress, increased proline biosynthesis was shown to partially rescue the ER stress sensitivity of a hog1 null mutant in which the high osmolality pathway is disrupted.

  4. Naphthoquinone derivative PPE8 induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in p53 null H1299 cells.

    PubMed

    Lien, Jin-Cherng; Huang, Chien-Chun; Lu, Te-Jung; Tseng, Chih-Hsiang; Sung, Ping-Jyun; Lee, Hong-Zin; Bao, Bo-Ying; Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Lu, Te-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays a key role in synthesizing secretory proteins and sensing signal function in eukaryotic cells. Responding to calcium disturbance, oxidation state change, or pharmacological agents, ER transmembrane protein, inositol-regulating enzyme 1 (IRE1), senses the stress and triggers downstream signals. Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) dissociates from IRE1 to assist protein folding and guard against cell death. In prolonged ER stress, IRE1 recruits and activates apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1) as well as downstream JNK for cell death. Naphthoquinones are widespread natural phenolic compounds. Vitamin K3, a derivative of naphthoquinone, inhibits variant tumor cell growth via oxygen uptake and oxygen stress. We synthesized a novel naphthoquinone derivative PPE8 and evaluated capacity to induce ER stress in p53 null H1299 and p53 wild-type A549 cells. In H1299 cells, PPE8 induced ER enlargement, GRP78 expression, and transient IER1 activation. Activated IRE1 recruited ASK1 for downstream JNK phosphorylation. IRE1 knockdown by siRNA attenuated PPE8-induced JNK phosphorylation and cytotoxicity. Prolonged JNK phosphorylation may be involved in PPE8-induced cytotoxicity. Such results did not arise in A549 cells, but p53 knockdown by siRNA restored PPE8-induced GRP78 expression and JNK phosphorylation. We offer a novel compound to induce ER stress and cytotoxicity in p53-deficient cancer cells, presenting an opportunity for treatment.

  5. The Mitochondrial Fission Protein hFis1 Requires the Endoplasmic Reticulum Gateway to Induce Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Alirol, Emilie; James, Dominic; Huber, Denise; Marchetto, Andrea; Vergani, Lodovica

    2006-01-01

    Mitochondrial fission ensures organelle inheritance during cell division and participates in apoptosis. The fission protein hFis1 triggers caspase-dependent cell death, by causing the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria. Here we show that mitochondrial fission induced by hFis1 is genetically distinct from apoptosis. In cells lacking the multidomain proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members Bax and Bak (DKO), hFis1 caused mitochondrial fragmentation but not organelle dysfunction and apoptosis. Similarly, a mutant in the intermembrane region of hFis1-induced fission but not cell death, further dissociating mitochondrial fragmentation from apoptosis induction. Selective correction of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) defect of DKO cells restored killing by hFis1, indicating that death by hFis1 relies on the ER gateway of apoptosis. Consistently, hFis1 did not directly activate BAX and BAK, but induced Ca2+-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction. Thus, hFis1 is a bifunctional protein that independently regulates mitochondrial fragmentation and ER-mediated apoptosis. PMID:16914522

  6. Gill's 'History' restored

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurn, Mark

    2009-06-01

    Note about the restoration of the copy of Sir David Gill's 'A History and Description of the Royal Observatory, Cape of Good Hope' in the Library of the Institute of Astronomy, Cambridge. The book was restored with funds provided by the SHA in thanks for facilities for meetings provided to the Institute.

  7. Guiding Restoration Principles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    restoration of important ecosystem functions requires reintegrating landscapes or restorating the func- tional aspects of landscapes ( Risser 1992...51-64. Risser , P. G. 1992. Landscape ecology approach to ecosystem rehabilitation. Pages 37-46 in M. L. Wali (ed.), Ecosystem Rehabilitation

  8. Utah Paiute Tribal Restoration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Allen C.

    The Paiute Indian Tribe of Utah Restoration Act (1980) restored federal recognition of the tribe after a quarter century of ambiguous political status, and resulted in significant improvements of educational status of tribal members and intensification of the political presence of Southern Paiutes. Following the Paiute Indian Termination Act…

  9. Power system restoration issues

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Kafka, R.J. )

    1991-04-01

    This article describes some of the problems encountered in the three phases of power system restoration (PSR). The three phases of PSR are: Planning for restart and reintegration of the bulk power supply; Actions during system degradation for saving and retaining critical sources of power; Restoration when the power system has stabilized at some degraded level.

  10. Retributive and restorative justice.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Michael; Okimoto, Tyler G; Feather, Norman T; Platow, Michael J

    2008-10-01

    The emergence of restorative justice as an alternative model to Western, court-based criminal justice may have important implications for the psychology of justice. It is proposed that two different notions of justice affect responses to rule-breaking: restorative and retributive justice. Retributive justice essentially refers to the repair of justice through unilateral imposition of punishment, whereas restorative justice means the repair of justice through reaffirming a shared value-consensus in a bilateral process. Among the symbolic implications of transgressions, concerns about status and power are primarily related to retributive justice and concerns about shared values are primarily related to restorative justice. At the core of these processes, however, lies the parties' construal of their identity relation, specifically whether or not respondents perceive to share an identity with the offender. The specific case of intergroup transgressions is discussed, as are implications for future research on restoring a sense of justice after rule-breaking.

  11. Mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum choreography: structure and signaling dynamics.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Paola; Pozzan, Tullio

    2007-10-01

    Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) have different roles in living cells but they interact both physically and functionally. A key aspect of the mitochondria-ER relationship is the modulation of Ca(2+) signaling during cell activation, which thus affects a variety of physiological processes. We focus here on the molecular aspects that control the dynamics of the organelle-organelle interaction and their relationship with Ca(2+) signals, also discussing the consequences that these phenomena have, not only for cell physiology but also in the control of cell death.

  12. Prodigiosin activates endoplasmic reticulum stress cell death pathway in human breast carcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Mu-Yun; Shen, Yuh-Chiang; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Yang, Shu-Yi; Ho, Tsing-Fen; Peng, Yu-Ta; Chang, Chia-Che

    2012-12-15

    Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent cytotoxicity against diverse human cancer cell lines. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is initiated by accumulation of unfolded or misfolded proteins in the ER lumen and may induce cell death when irremediable. In this study, the role of ER stress in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxicity was elucidated for the first time. Comparable to the ER stress inducer thapsigargin, prodigiosin up-regulated signature ER stress markers GRP78 and CHOP in addition to activating the IRE1, PERK and ATF6 branches of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in multiple human breast carcinoma cell lines, confirming prodigiosin as an ER stress inducer. Prodigiosin transcriptionally up-regulated CHOP, as evidenced by its promoting effect on the CHOP promoter activity. Of note, knockdown of CHOP effectively lowered prodigiosin's capacity to evoke PARP cleavage, reduce cell viability and suppress colony formation, highlighting an essential role of CHOP in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxic ER stress response. In addition, prodigiosin down-regulated BCL2 in a CHOP-dependent manner. Importantly, restoration of BCL2 expression blocked prodigiosin-induced PARP cleavage and greatly enhanced the survival of prodigiosin-treated cells, suggesting that CHOP-dependent BCL2 suppression mediates prodigiosin-elicited cell death. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of JNK by SP600125 or dominant-negative blockade of PERK-mediated eIF2α phosphorylation impaired prodigiosin-induced CHOP up-regulation and PARP cleavage. Collectively, these results identified ER stress-mediated cell death as a mode-of-action of prodigiosin's tumoricidal effect. Mechanistically, prodigiosin engages the IRE1–JNK and PERK–eIF2α branches of the UPR signaling to up-regulate CHOP, which in turn mediates BCL2 suppression to induce cell death. Highlights: ► Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent anticancer effect. ► Prodigiosin is herein identified as an

  13. Bearing restoration by grinding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanau, H.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Chen, S. M.; Bull, H. L.

    1976-01-01

    A joint program was undertaken by the NASA Lewis Research Center and the Army Aviation Systems Command to restore by grinding those rolling-element bearings which are currently being discarded at aircraft engine and transmission overhaul. Three bearing types were selected from the UH-1 helicopter engine (T-53) and transmission for the pilot program. No bearing failures occurred related to the restoration by grinding process. The risk and cost of a bearing restoration by grinding programs was analyzed. A microeconomic impact analysis was performed.

  14. Principles of Wetland Restoration

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    the return of a degraded ecosystem to a close approximation of its remaining natural potential - is experiencing a groundswell of support across the United States. The number of stream, river, lake, wetland and estuary restoration projects grows yearly

  15. Ecosystem restoration: Chapter 4

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cullinane Thomas, Catherine M.; Skrabis, K. E.; Gascoigne, William

    2012-01-01

    The Department of the Interior extensively supports―through its mission, policy, programs, and funding― the study, planning, implementation, and monitoring of ecosystem restoration. This commitment is reflected in the Department's FY2011-2016 Strategic Plan.

  16. The Menominee Restoration Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deer, Ada E.

    1973-01-01

    The article discusses the background and current status of the Menominee Restoration Bill, which will reverse the termination of Federal responsibility effected on the Wisconsin Menominee Tribe in 1961. (KM)

  17. ESTUARINE HABITAT RESTORATION

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Borde, Amy B.

    2015-09-01

    Restoring estuarine habitats generally means repairing damages caused by humans and natural forces. Because of the extensive human occupation, development, and use of coastal areas for centuries, the extensive estuarine habitats have been either destroyed or significantly impaired.

  18. Restoration of Ailing Wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Oswald J.

    2012-01-01

    It is widely held that humankind's destructive tendencies when exploiting natural resources leads to irreparable harm to the environment. Yet, this thinking runs counter to evidence that many ecological systems damaged by severe natural environmental disturbances (e.g., hurricanes) can restore themselves via processes of natural recovery. The emerging field of restoration ecology is capitalizing on the natural restorative tendencies of ecological systems to build a science of repairing the harm inflicted by humans on natural environment. Evidence for this, for example, comes from a new meta-analysis of 124 studies that synthesizes recovery of impacted wetlands worldwide. While it may take up to two human generations to see full recovery, there is promise, given human will, to restore many damaged wetlands worldwide. PMID:22291573

  19. Mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum crosstalk in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Manfredi, Giovanni; Kawamata, Hibiki

    2016-06-01

    Physical and functional interactions between mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are crucial for cell life. These two organelles are intimately connected and collaborate to essential processes, such as calcium homeostasis and phospholipid biosynthesis. The connections between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum occur through structures named mitochondria associated membranes (MAMs), which contain lipid rafts and a large number of proteins, many of which serve multiple functions at different cellular sites. Growing evidence strongly suggests that alterations of ER-mitochondria interactions are involved in neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a devastating and rapidly fatal motor neuron disease. Mutations in proteins that participate in ER-mitochondria interactions and MAM functions are increasingly being associated with genetic forms of ALS and other neurodegenerative diseases. This evidence strongly suggests that, rather than considering the two organelles separately, a better understanding of the disease process can derive from studying the alterations in their crosstalk. In this review we discuss normal and pathological ER-mitochondria interactions and the evidence that link them to ALS.

  20. Molecular Characterization of Endoplasmic Reticulum Oxidoreductin 1 from Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Minchul; Ryou, Hee-Joo; Yun, Eun-Young; Goo, Tae-Won

    2015-01-01

    We isolated a complementary DNA (cDNA) clone encoding endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1 (bERO1, a specific oxidant of protein disulfide isomerase (PDI)) from Bombyx mori. This protein has a putative open reading frame (ORF) of 489 amino acids and a predicted size of 57.4 kDa. Although bERO1 protein shares less than 57% amino acid sequence homology with other reported ERO1s, it contains two conserved redox active motifs, a Cys-X-X-X-X-Cys motif of N-terminal and Cys-X-X-Cys-X-X-Cys motif of C-terminal. Both motifs are typically present in ERO1 protein family members. The bEro1 mRNA expression was highest in posterior silk gland on the sixth day of the 5th instar larvae. Expression of bEro1 mRNA also markedly increased during endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress induced by stimulation with antimycin, calcium ionophore A23187, dithiothreitol, H2O2, monencin, and tunicamycin. In addition, expression levels of bEro1 exactly coincided with that of bPdi. This is the first result suggesting that bERO1 plays an essential role in ER quality control through the combined activities of bERO1 and bPDI as a catalyst of protein folding in the ER and sustaining cellular redox homeostasis. PMID:26556347

  1. Ricin A chain reaches the endoplasmic reticulum after endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Qiong; Zhan Jinbiao . E-mail: jzhan2k@zju.edu.cn; Chen Xinhong; Zheng Shu

    2006-05-12

    Ricin is a potent ribosome inactivating protein and now has been widely used for synthesis of immunotoxins. To target ribosome in the mammalian cytosol, ricin must firstly retrograde transport from the endomembrane system to reach the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where the ricin A chain (RTA) is recognized by ER components that facilitate its membrane translocation to the cytosol. In the study, the fusion gene of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-RTA was expressed with the pET-28a (+) system in Escherichia coli under the control of a T7 promoter. The fusion protein showed a green fluorescence. The recombinant protein can be purified by metal chelated affinity chromatography on a column of NTA. The rabbit anti-GFP antibody can recognize the fusion protein of EGFP-RTA just like the EGFP protein. The cytotoxicity of EGFP-RTA and RTA was evaluated by the MTT assay in HeLa and HEP-G2 cells following fluid-phase endocytosis. The fusion protein had a similar cytotoxicity of RTA. After endocytosis, the subcellular location of the fusion protein can be observed with the laser scanning confocal microscopy and the immuno-gold labeling Electro Microscopy. This study provided important evidence by a visualized way to prove that RTA does reach the endoplasmic reticulum.

  2. Restoring primary anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2002-01-01

    A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available for restoring primary incisors. Knowledge of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material will enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Each has distinct advantages and disadvantages and the clinical conditions of placement may be a strong determining factor as to which material is utilized. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and those crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are some type of stainless steel crown. However, due to lack of supporting clinical data, none of the crowns can be said to be superior to the others under all circumstances. Though caries in the mandibular region is rare, restorative solutions for mandibular incisors are needed. Neither stainless steel crowns nor celluloid crown forms are made specifically for mandibular incisors. Many options exist to repair carious primary incisors, but there is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. This does not discount the fact that dentists have been using many of these crowns for years with much success. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables which affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative treatment is chosen.

  3. Sigma-1 receptors (sigma(1) binding sites) form raft-like microdomains and target lipid droplets on the endoplasmic reticulum: roles in endoplasmic reticulum lipid compartmentalization and export.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2003-08-01

    The brain sigma-1 receptors can bind neurosteroids and psychotropic drugs, including neuroleptics and cocaine and are implicated in schizophrenia, depression, and drug dependence. In this study, we found that sigma-1 receptors specifically target lipid storage sites (lipid droplets) on the endoplasmic reticulum by forming a distinct class of lipid microdomains. Both endogenously expressing sigma-1 receptors and transfected C-terminally enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP)-tagged sigma-1 receptors (Sig-1R-EYFP) target unique "ring-like" structures associated with endoplasmic reticulum reticular networks in NG108-15 cells. The ring-like structures contain neutral lipids and are enlarged by the oleate treatment, indicating that they are endoplasmic reticulum-associated lipid droplets (ER-LDs). sigma-1 receptors colocalize with caveolin-2, a cholesterol-binding protein in lipid rafts on the ER-LDs, but not with adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP), a cytosolic lipid droplet (c-LD)-specific protein. When the double-arginine ER retention signal on the N terminus of sigma-1 receptors is truncated, sigma-1 receptors no longer exist on ER-LDs, but predominantly target c-LDs, which contain ADRP. sigma-1 receptors on ER-LDs form detergent-resistant raft-like lipid microdomains, the buoyancy of which is different from that of plasma membrane lipid rafts. (+)-Pentazocine causes sigma-1 receptors to disappear from the microdomains. N-Terminally EYFP-tagged sigma-1 receptors (EYFP-Sig-1R) failed to target ER-LDs. EYFP-Sig-1R-transfected cells showed an unrestricted distribution of neutral lipids all over the endoplasmic reticulum network, decreases in c-LDs and cholesterol in plasma membranes, and the bulbous aggregation of endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, sigma-1 receptors are unique endoplasmic reticulum proteins that regulate the compartmentalization of lipids on the endoplasmic reticulum and their export from the endoplasmic reticulum to plasma membrane and c-LDs.

  4. Cell Death and Survival Through the Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mitochondrial Axis

    PubMed Central

    Bravo-Sagua, R.; Rodriguez, A.E.; Kuzmicic, J.; Gutierrez, T.; Lopez-Crisosto, C.; Quiroga, C.; Díaz-Elizondo, J.; Chiong, M.; Gillette, T.G.; Rothermel, B.A.; Lavandero, S.

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum has a central role in biosynthesis of a variety of proteins and lipids. Mitochondria generate ATP, synthesize and process numerous metabolites, and are key regulators of cell death. The architectures of endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria change continually via the process of membrane fusion, fission, elongation, degradation, and renewal. These structural changes correlate with important changes in organellar function. Both organelles are capable of moving along the cytoskeleton, thus changing their cellular distribution. Numerous studies have demonstrated coordination and communication between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum. A focal point for these interactions is a zone of close contact between them known as the mitochondrial–associated endoplasmic reticulum membrane (MAM), which serves as a signaling juncture that facilitates calcium and lipid transfer between organelles. Here we review the emerging data on how communication between endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria can modulate organelle function and determine cellular fate. PMID:23228132

  5. From endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria: absence of the Arabidopsis ATP antiporter endoplasmic Reticulum Adenylate Transporter1 perturbs photorespiration.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Christiane; Plocharski, Bartolome; Haferkamp, Ilka; Leroch, Michaela; Ewald, Ralph; Bauwe, Hermann; Riemer, Jan; Herrmann, Johannes M; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard

    2013-07-01

    The carrier Endoplasmic Reticulum Adenylate Transporter1 (ER-ANT1) resides in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane and acts as an ATP/ADP antiporter. Mutant plants lacking ER-ANT1 exhibit a dwarf phenotype and their seeds contain reduced protein and lipid contents. In this study, we describe a further surprising metabolic peculiarity of the er-ant1 mutants. Interestingly, Gly levels in leaves are immensely enhanced (26×) when compared with that of wild-type plants. Gly accumulation is caused by significantly decreased mitochondrial glycine decarboxylase (GDC) activity. Reduced GDC activity in mutant plants was attributed to oxidative posttranslational protein modification induced by elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). GDC activity is crucial for photorespiration; accordingly, morphological and physiological defects in er-ant1 plants were nearly completely abolished by application of high environmental CO(2) concentrations. The latter observation demonstrates that the absence of ER-ANT1 activity mainly affects photorespiration (maybe solely GDC), whereas basic cellular metabolism remains largely unchanged. Since ER-ANT1 homologs are restricted to higher plants, it is tempting to speculate that this carrier fulfils a plant-specific function directly or indirectly controlling cellular ROS production. The observation that ER-ANT1 activity is associated with cellular ROS levels reveals an unexpected and critical physiological connection between the ER and other organelles in plants.

  6. Birbeck granule-like "organized smooth endoplasmic reticulum" resulting from the expression of a cytoplasmic YFP-tagged langerin.

    PubMed

    Lenormand, Cédric; Spiegelhalter, Coralie; Cinquin, Bertrand; Bardin, Sabine; Bausinger, Huguette; Angénieux, Catherine; Eckly, Anita; Proamer, Fabienne; Wall, David; Lich, Ben; Tourne, Sylvie; Hanau, Daniel; Schwab, Yannick; Salamero, Jean; de la Salle, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Langerin is required for the biogenesis of Birbeck granules (BGs), the characteristic organelles of Langerhans cells. We previously used a Langerin-YFP fusion protein having a C-terminal luminal YFP tag to dynamically decipher the molecular and cellular processes which accompany the traffic of Langerin. In order to elucidate the interactions of Langerin with its trafficking effectors and their structural impact on the biogenesis of BGs, we generated a YFP-Langerin chimera with an N-terminal, cytosolic YFP tag. This latter fusion protein induced the formation of YFP-positive large puncta. Live cell imaging coupled to a fluorescence recovery after photobleaching approach showed that this coalescence of proteins in newly formed compartments was static. In contrast, the YFP-positive structures present in the pericentriolar region of cells expressing Langerin-YFP chimera, displayed fluorescent recovery characteristics compatible with active membrane exchanges. Using correlative light-electron microscopy we showed that the coalescent structures represented highly organized stacks of membranes with a pentalaminar architecture typical of BGs. Continuities between these organelles and the rough endoplasmic reticulum allowed us to identify the stacks of membranes as a form of "Organized Smooth Endoplasmic Reticulum" (OSER), with distinct molecular and physiological properties. The involvement of homotypic interactions between cytoplasmic YFP molecules was demonstrated using an A206K variant of YFP, which restored most of the Langerin traffic and BG characteristics observed in Langerhans cells. Mutation of the carbohydrate recognition domain also blocked the formation of OSER. Hence, a "double-lock" mechanism governs the behavior of YFP-Langerin, where asymmetric homodimerization of the YFP tag and homotypic interactions between the lectin domains of Langerin molecules participate in its retention and the subsequent formation of BG-like OSER. These observations confirm that

  7. Endoplasmic reticulum stress signal impairs erythropoietin production: a role for ATF4.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chih-Kang; Nangaku, Masaomi; Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Iwawaki, Takao; Inagi, Reiko

    2013-02-15

    Hypoxia upregulates the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) pathway and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress signal, unfolded protein response (UPR). The cross talk of both signals affects the pathogenic alteration by hypoxia. Here we showed that ER stress induced by tunicamycin or thapsigargin suppressed inducible (CoCl(2) or hypoxia) transcription of erythropoietin (EPO), a representative HIF target gene, in HepG2. This suppression was inversely correlated with UPR activation, as estimated by expression of the UPR regulator glucose-regulated protein 78, and restored by an ER stress inhibitor, salubrinal, in association with normalization of the UPR state. Importantly, the decreased EPO expression was also observed in HepG2 overexpressing UPR activating transcription factor (ATF)4. Overexpression of mutated ATF4 that lacks the transcriptional activity did not alter EPO transcriptional regulation. Transcriptional activity of the EPO 3'-enhancer, which is mainly regulated by HIF, was abolished by both ER stressors and ATF4 overexpression, while nuclear HIF accumulation or expression of other HIF target genes was not suppressed by ER stress. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis identified a novel ATF4 binding site (TGACCTCT) within the EPO 3'-enhancer region, suggesting a distinct role for ATF4 in UPR-dependent suppression of the enhancer. Induction of ER stress in rat liver and kidney by tunicamycin decreased the hepatic and renal mRNA and plasma level of EPO. Collectively, ER stress selectively impairs the transcriptional activity of EPO but not of other HIF target genes. This effect is mediated by suppression of EPO 3'-enhancer activity via ATF4 without any direct effect on HIF, indicating that UPR contributes to oxygen-sensing regulation of EPO.

  8. The Monoterpene Carvacrol Generates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in the Pathogenic Fungus Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chaillot, Julien; Tebbji, Faiza; Remmal, Adnane; Boone, Charlie; Brown, Grant W; Bellaoui, Mohammed; Sellam, Adnane

    2015-08-01

    The monoterpene carvacrol, the major component of oregano and thyme oils, is known to exert potent antifungal activity against the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. This monoterpene has been the subject of a considerable number of investigations that uncovered extensive pharmacological properties, including antifungal and antibacterial effects. However, its mechanism of action remains elusive. Here, we used integrative chemogenomic approaches, including genome-scale chemical-genetic and transcriptional profiling, to uncover the mechanism of action of carvacrol associated with its antifungal property. Our results clearly demonstrated that fungal cells require the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway to resist carvacrol. The mutants most sensitive to carvacrol in our genome-wide competitive fitness assay in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressed mutations of the transcription factor Hac1 and the endonuclease Ire1, which is required for Hac1 activation by removing a nonconventional intron from the 3' region of HAC1 mRNA. Confocal fluorescence live-cell imaging revealed that carvacrol affects the morphology and the integrity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Transcriptional profiling of pathogenic yeast C. albicans cells treated with carvacrol demonstrated a bona fide UPR transcriptional signature. Ire1 activity detected by the splicing of HAC1 mRNA in C. albicans was activated by carvacrol. Furthermore, carvacrol was found to potentiate antifungal activity of the echinocandin antifungal caspofungin and UPR inducers dithiothreitol and tunicamycin against C. albicans. This comprehensive chemogenomic investigation demonstrated that carvacrol exerts its antifungal activity by altering ER integrity, leading to ER stress and the activation of the UPR to restore protein-folding homeostasis.

  9. High-Density Lipoprotein Prevents Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Induced Downregulation of Liver LOX-1 Expression.

    PubMed

    Hong, Dan; Li, Ling-Fang; Gao, Hai-Chao; Wang, Xiang; Li, Chuan-Chang; Luo, Ying; Bai, Yong-Ping; Zhang, Guo-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) is a specific cell-surface receptor for oxidized-low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL). The impact of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) on endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated alteration of the LOX-1 level in hepatocytes remains unclear. We aimed to investigate the impact on LOX-1 expression by tunicamycin (TM)-induced ER stress and to determine the effect of HDL on TM-affected LOX-1 expression in hepatic L02 cells. Overexpression or silencing of related cellular genes was conducted in TM-treated cells. mRNA expression was evaluated using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Protein expression was analyzed by western blot and immunocytochemistry. Lipid uptake was examined by DiI-ox-LDL, followed by flow cytometric analysis. The results showed that TM induced the upregulation of ER chaperone GRP78, downregulation of LOX-1 expression, and lipid uptake. Knock down of IRE1 or XBP-1 effectively restored LOX-1 expression and improved lipid uptake in TM-treated cells. HDL treatment prevented the negative impact on LOX-1 expression and lipid uptake induced by TM. Additionally, 1-10 μg/mL HDL significantly reduced the GRP78, IRE1, and XBP-1 expression levels in TM-treated cells. Our findings reveal that HDL could prevent the TM-induced reduction of LOX-1 expression via inhibiting the IRE1/XBP-1 pathway, suggesting a new mechanism for beneficial roles of HDL in improving lipid metabolism.

  10. Calcium transport in tonoplast and endoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from cultured carrot cells. [Daucus carota Danvers

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, D.R.; Sze, H.

    1986-02-01

    Two active calcium (Ca/sup 2 +/) transport systems have been identified and partially characterized in membrane vesicles isolated from cultured carrot cells (Daucus carota Danvers). Both transport systems required MgATP for activity and were enhanced by 10 millimolar oxalate. Ca/sup 2 +/ transport in membrane vesicles derived from isolated vacuoles equilibrated at 1.10 grams per cubic centimeter and comigrated with Cl/sup -/-stimulated, NO/sub 3//sup -/-inhibited ATPase activity on sucrose density gradients. Ca/sup 2 +/ transport in this system was insensitive to vanadate, but was inhibited by nitrate, carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), and 4,4-diisothiocyano-2,2'-stilbene disulfonic acid (DIDS). The K/sub m/ for MgATP and Ca/sup 2 +/ were 0.1 mM and 21 micromolar, respectively. The predominant Ca/sup 2 +/ transport system detectable in microsomal membrane preparations equilibrated at a density of 1.13 grams per cubic centimeter and comigrated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) marker, antimycin A-insensitive NADH-dependent cytochrome c reductase. Ca/sup 2 +/ transport activity and the ER marker also shifted in parallel in ER shifting experiments. This transport system was inhibited by vanadate (I/sub 50/ = 12 micromolar) and was insensitive to nitrate, CCCP, DCCD, and DIDS. Transport exhibited cooperative MgATP dependent kinetics. Ca/sup 2 +/ dependent kinetics were complex with an apparent K/sub m/ ranging from 0.7 to 2 micromolar. We conclude that the vacuolar-derived system is a Ca/sup 2 +//H/sup +/ antiport located on the tonoplast and that the microsomal transport system is a Ca,Mg-ATPase enriched on the ER. These two Ca/sup 2 +/ transport systems are proposed to restore and maintain cytoplasmic Ca/sup 2 +/ homeostasis under changing cellular and environmental conditions.

  11. The Monoterpene Carvacrol Generates Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in the Pathogenic Fungus Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Chaillot, Julien; Tebbji, Faiza; Remmal, Adnane; Boone, Charlie; Brown, Grant W.

    2015-01-01

    The monoterpene carvacrol, the major component of oregano and thyme oils, is known to exert potent antifungal activity against the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans. This monoterpene has been the subject of a considerable number of investigations that uncovered extensive pharmacological properties, including antifungal and antibacterial effects. However, its mechanism of action remains elusive. Here, we used integrative chemogenomic approaches, including genome-scale chemical-genetic and transcriptional profiling, to uncover the mechanism of action of carvacrol associated with its antifungal property. Our results clearly demonstrated that fungal cells require the unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling pathway to resist carvacrol. The mutants most sensitive to carvacrol in our genome-wide competitive fitness assay in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressed mutations of the transcription factor Hac1 and the endonuclease Ire1, which is required for Hac1 activation by removing a nonconventional intron from the 3′ region of HAC1 mRNA. Confocal fluorescence live-cell imaging revealed that carvacrol affects the morphology and the integrity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Transcriptional profiling of pathogenic yeast C. albicans cells treated with carvacrol demonstrated a bona fide UPR transcriptional signature. Ire1 activity detected by the splicing of HAC1 mRNA in C. albicans was activated by carvacrol. Furthermore, carvacrol was found to potentiate antifungal activity of the echinocandin antifungal caspofungin and UPR inducers dithiothreitol and tunicamycin against C. albicans. This comprehensive chemogenomic investigation demonstrated that carvacrol exerts its antifungal activity by altering ER integrity, leading to ER stress and the activation of the UPR to restore protein-folding homeostasis. PMID:26014932

  12. PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase is necessary for lipogenic activation during HCMV infection.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yongjun; Pierciey, Francis J; Maguire, Tobi G; Alwine, James C

    2013-01-01

    PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum (ER) kinase (PERK) is an ER-associated stress sensor protein which phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2α (eIF2α) to induce translation attenuation in response to ER stress. PERK is also a regulator of lipogenesis during adipocyte differentiation through activation of the cleavage of sterol regulatory element binding protein 1 (SREBP1), resulting in the upregulation of lipogenic enzymes. Our recent studies have shown that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in human fibroblasts (HF) induces adipocyte-like lipogenesis through the activation of SREBP1. Here, we report that PERK expression is highly increased in HCMV-infected cells and is necessary for HCMV growth. Depletion of PERK, using short hairpin RNA (shRNA), resulted in attenuation of HCMV growth, inhibition of lipid synthesis and reduction of lipogenic gene expression. Examination of the cleavage of SREBP proteins showed PERK depletion inhibited the cleavage of SREBP1, but not SREBP2, in HCMV-infected cells, suggesting different cleavage regulatory mechanisms for SREBP1 and 2. Further studies showed that the depletion of SREBP1, but not SREBP2, reduced lipid synthesis in HCMV infection, suggesting that activation of SREBP1 is sufficient to induce lipogenesis in HCMV infection. The reduction of lipid synthesis by PERK depletion can be partially restored by expressing a Flag-tagged nuclear form of SREBP1a. Our studies also suggest that the induction of PERK in HCMV-infected cells stimulates SREBP1 cleavage by reducing levels of Insig1 (Insulin inducible gene 1) protein; this occurs independent of the phosphorylation of eIF2α. Introduction of an exogenous Insig1-Myc into HCMV infected cells significantly reduced HCMV growth and lipid synthesis. Our data demonstrate that the induction of PERK during HCMV infection is necessary for full activation of lipogenesis; this effect appears to be mediated by limiting the levels of Insig1 thus freeing SREBP1-SCAP complexes for

  13. The Dichotomy of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response in Liver Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haomming; Zhu, Jianjun; Yue, Shi; Lu, Ling; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W; Wang, Xuehao; Zhai, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays critical roles in the pathogenesis of liver ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI). As ER stress triggers an adaptive cellular response, the question of what determines its functional outcome in liver IRI remains to be defined. In a murine liver partial warm ischemia model, we studied how transient (30 minutes) or prolonged (90 minutes) liver ischemia regulated local ER stress response and autophagy activities and their relationship with liver IRI. Effects of chemical chaperon 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA) or autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA) were evaluated. Our results showed that although the activating transcription factor 6 branch of ER stress response was induced in livers by both types of ischemia, liver autophagy was activated by transient, but inhibited by prolonged, ischemia. Although 3-MA had no effects on liver IRI after prolonged ischemia, it significantly increased liver IRI after transient ischemia. The 4-PBA treatment protected livers from IRI after prolonged ischemia by restoring autophagy flux, and the adjunctive 3-MA treatment abrogated its liver protective effect. The same 4-PBA treatment, however, increased liver IRI and disrupted autophagy flux after transient ischemia. Although both types of ischemia activated 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and inactivated protein kinase B (Akt), prolonged ischemia also resulted in downregulations of autophagy-related gene 3 and autophagy-related gene 5 in ischemic livers. These results indicate a functional dichotomy of ER stress response in liver IRI via its regulation of autophagy. Transient ischemia activates autophagy to protect livers from IRI, whereas prolonged ischemia inhibits autophagy to promote the development of liver IRI.

  14. Stacked endoplasmic reticulum sheets are connected by helicoidal membrane motifs

    PubMed Central

    Terasaki, Mark; Shemesh, Tom; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Klemm, Robin W.; Schalek, Richard; Hayworth, Kenneth J.; Hand, Arthur R.; Yankova, Maya; Huber, Greg; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Rapoport, Tom A.; Kozlov, Michael M.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) often forms stacked membrane sheets, an arrangement that is likely required to accommodate a maximum of membrane-bound polysomes for secretory protein synthesis. How sheets are stacked is unknown. Here, we used novel staining and automated ultra-thin sectioning electron microscopy methods to analyze stacked ER sheets in neuronal cells and secretory salivary gland cells of mice. Our results show that stacked ER sheets form a continuous membrane system in which the sheets are connected by twisted membrane surfaces with helical edges of left- or right-handedness. The three-dimensional structure of tightly stacked ER sheets resembles a parking garage, in which the different levels are connected by helicoidal ramps. A theoretical model explains the experimental observations and indicates that the structure corresponds to a minimum of elastic energy of sheet edges and surfaces. The structure allows the dense packing of ER sheets in the restricted space of a cell. PMID:23870120

  15. Stacked endoplasmic reticulum sheets are connected by helicoidal membrane motifs.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Mark; Shemesh, Tom; Kasthuri, Narayanan; Klemm, Robin W; Schalek, Richard; Hayworth, Kenneth J; Hand, Arthur R; Yankova, Maya; Huber, Greg; Lichtman, Jeff W; Rapoport, Tom A; Kozlov, Michael M

    2013-07-18

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) often forms stacked membrane sheets, an arrangement that is likely required to accommodate a maximum of membrane-bound polysomes for secretory protein synthesis. How sheets are stacked is unknown. Here, we used improved staining and automated ultrathin sectioning electron microscopy methods to analyze stacked ER sheets in neuronal cells and secretory salivary gland cells of mice. Our results show that stacked ER sheets form a continuous membrane system in which the sheets are connected by twisted membrane surfaces with helical edges of left- or right-handedness. The three-dimensional structure of tightly stacked ER sheets resembles a parking garage, in which the different levels are connected by helicoidal ramps. A theoretical model explains the experimental observations and indicates that the structure corresponds to a minimum of elastic energy of sheet edges and surfaces. The structure allows the dense packing of ER sheets in the restricted space of a cell.

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Calcium, Stress and Cell-to-Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Theodora

    2014-01-01

    Darier's Disease (DD) is caused by mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ ATPase ATP2A2 (protein SERCA2). Current treatment modalities are ineffective for many patients. This report shows that impaired SERCA2 function, both in DD keratinocytes and in normal keratinocytes treated with the SERCA2-inhibitor thapsigargin, depletes ER Ca2+ stores, leading to constitutive ER stress and increased sensitivity to ER stressors. ER stress, in turn, leads to abnormal cell-to-cell adhesion via impaired redistribution of desmoplakin, desmoglein 3, desmocollin 3 and E-cadherin to the plasma membrane. This report illustrates how ER Ca2+ depletion and the resulting ER stress are central to the pathogenesis of the disease. Additionally, the authors introduce a possible new therapeutic agent, Miglustat. PMID:24924761

  17. Interplay of endoplasmic reticulum stress and autophagy in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yu; Arikkath, Jyothi; Yang, Lu; Guo, Ming-Lei; Periyasamy, Palsamy; Buch, Shilpa

    2016-01-01

    The common underlying feature of most neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer disease (AD), prion diseases, Parkinson disease (PD), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) involves accumulation of misfolded proteins leading to initiation of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and stimulation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). Additionally, ER stress more recently has been implicated in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). Autophagy plays an essential role in the clearance of aggregated toxic proteins and degradation of the damaged organelles. There is evidence that autophagy ameliorates ER stress by eliminating accumulated misfolded proteins. Both abnormal UPR and impaired autophagy have been implicated as a causative mechanism in the development of various neurodegenerative diseases. This review highlights recent advances in the field on the role of ER stress and autophagy in AD, prion diseases, PD, ALS and HAND with the involvement of key signaling pathways in these processes and implications for future development of therapeutic strategies.

  18. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: The cause and solution to Huntington's disease?

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yuwei; Chadwick, Sarah R; Lajoie, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    Accumulation of misfolded proteins is a hallmark of many human diseases, including several incurable neurological disorders, such as Huntington's disease (HD). In HD, expansion of a polyglutamine stretch within the first exon of the Huntingtin protein (Htt) leads to Htt misfolding, aberrant protein aggregation, and progressive appearance of disease symptoms. Several studies in various organisms (from yeast to humans) have identified the accumulation of misfolded secretory proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress) as a crucial determinant of cellular toxicity in HD. In this review, we highlight the recent research linking HD to ER stress. We also discuss how the modulation of signaling pathways responsible for coping with misfolded protein accumulation in the ER may constitute attractive methods to reduce toxicity and identify new therapeutic targets for treatment of HD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:ER stress.

  19. Plant Endoplasmic Reticulum-Plasma Membrane Contact Sites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pengwei; Hawes, Chris; Hussey, Patrick J

    2017-04-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) acts as a superhighway with multiple sideroads that connects the different membrane compartments including the ER to the plasma membrane (PM). ER-PM contact sites (EPCSs) are a common feature in eukaryotic organisms, but have not been studied well in plants owing to the lack of molecular markers and to the difficulty in resolving the EPCS structure using conventional microscopy. Recently, however, plant protein complexes required for linking the ER and PM have been identified. This is a further step towards understanding the structure and function of plant EPCSs. We highlight some recent studies in this field and suggest several hypotheses that relate to the possible function of EPCSs in plants.

  20. Trichoplein/mitostatin regulates endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria juxtaposition.

    PubMed

    Cerqua, Cristina; Anesti, Vassiliki; Pyakurel, Aswin; Liu, Dan; Naon, Deborah; Wiche, Gerhard; Baffa, Raffaele; Dimmer, Kai S; Scorrano, Luca

    2010-11-01

    Trichoplein/mitostatin (TpMs) is a keratin-binding protein that partly colocalizes with mitochondria and is often downregulated in epithelial cancers, but its function remains unclear. In this study, we report that TpMs regulates the tethering between mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in a Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2)-dependent manner. Subcellular fractionation and immunostaining show that TpMs is present at the interface between mitochondria and ER. The expression of TpMs leads to mitochondrial fragmentation and loosens tethering with ER, whereas its silencing has opposite effects. Functionally, the reduced tethering by TpMs inhibits apoptosis by Ca(2+)-dependent stimuli that require ER-mitochondria juxtaposition. Biochemical and genetic evidence support a model in which TpMs requires Mfn2 to modulate mitochondrial shape and tethering. Thus, TpMs is a new regulator of mitochondria-ER juxtaposition.

  1. WLS retrograde transport to the endoplasmic reticulum during Wnt secretion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jia; Chia, Joanne; Canning, Claire Ann; Jones, C Michael; Bard, Frédéric A; Virshup, David M

    2014-05-12

    Wnts are transported to the cell surface by the integral membrane protein WLS (also known as Wntless, Evi, and GPR177). Previous studies of WLS trafficking have emphasized WLS movement from the Golgi to the plasma membrane (PM) and then back to the Golgi via retromer-mediated endocytic recycling. We find that endogenous WLS binds Wnts in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cycles to the PM, and then returns to the ER through the Golgi. We identify an ER-targeting sequence at the carboxyl terminus of native WLS that is critical for ER retrograde recycling and contributes to Wnt secretory function. Golgi-to-ER recycling of WLS requires the COPI regulator ARF as well as ERGIC2, an ER-Golgi intermediate compartment protein that is also required for the retrograde trafficking of the KDEL receptor and certain toxins. ERGIC2 is required for efficient Wnt secretion. ER retrieval is an integral part of the WLS transport cycle.

  2. Co-chaperones of the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Melnyk, Armin; Rieger, Heiko; Zimmermann, Richard

    2015-01-01

    In mammalian cells, the rough endoplasmic reticulum or ER plays a central role in the biogenesis of most extracellular plus many organellar proteins and in cellular calcium homeostasis. Therefore, this organelle comprises molecular chaperones that are involved in import, folding/assembly, export, and degradation of polypeptides in millimolar concentrations. In addition, there are calcium channels/pumps and signal transduction components present in the ER membrane that affect and are affected by these processes. The ER lumenal Hsp70, termed immunoglobulin-heavy chain binding protein or BiP, is the central player in all these activities and involves up to seven different co-chaperones, i.e. ER-membrane integrated as well as ER-lumenal Hsp40s, which are termed ERj or ERdj, and two nucleotide exchange factors.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum stress in diabetes: New insights of clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy; Lenin, Raji; Monickaraj, Finny

    2010-04-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a cellular compartment responsible for multiple important cellular functions including the biosynthesis and folding of newly synthesized proteins destined for secretion, such as insulin. A myriad of pathological and physiological factors perturb ER function and cause dysregulation of ER homeostasis, leading to ER stress. Accumulating evidence suggests that ER stress plays a role in the pathogenesis of diabetes, contributing to pancreatic β-cell loss and insulin resistance. ER stress may also link obesity, inflammation and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. In this review, we address the transition from physiology to pathology, namely how and why the physiological UPR evolves to a proapoptotic ER stress response in diabetes and its complications. Special attention was given to elucidate how ER stress could explain some of the 'clinical paradoxes' such as secondary sulfonylurea failure, initial worsening of retinopathy during tight glycemic control, insulin resistance induced by protease inhibitors and other clinically relevant observations.

  4. Stress Responses from the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hironori; Nishitoh, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic organelle that is essential for multiple cellular functions. During cellular stress conditions, including nutrient deprivation and dysregulation of protein synthesis, unfolded/misfolded proteins accumulate in the ER lumen, resulting in activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR). The UPR also contributes to the regulation of various intracellular signaling pathways such as calcium signaling and lipid signaling. More recently, the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM), which is a site of close contact between the ER and mitochondria, has been shown to function as a platform for various intracellular stress responses including apoptotic signaling, inflammatory signaling, the autophagic response, and the UPR. Interestingly, in cancer, these signaling pathways from the ER are often dysregulated, contributing to cancer cell metabolism. Thus, the signaling pathway from the ER may be a novel therapeutic target for various cancers. In this review, we discuss recent research on the roles of stress responses from the ER, including the MAM. PMID:25941664

  5. Assembly of MHC class I molecules within the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yinan; Williams, David B

    2006-01-01

    MHC class I molecules bind cytosolically derived peptides within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and present them at the cell surface to cytotoxic T cells. A major focus of our laboratory has been to understand the functions of the diverse proteins involved in the intracellular assembly of MHC class I molecules. These include the molecular chaperones calnexin and calreticulin, which enhance the proper folding and subunit assembly of class I molecules and also retain assembly intermediates within the ER; ERp57, a thiol oxidoreductase that promotes heavy chain disulfide formation and proper assembly of the peptide loading complex; tapasin, which recruits class I molecules to the TAP peptide transporter and enhances the loading of high affinity peptide ligands; and Bap31, which is involved in clustering assembled class I molecules at ER exit sites for export along the secretory pathway. This review describes our contributions to elucidating the functions of these proteins; the combined effort of many dedicated students and postdoctoral fellows.

  6. Pharmacological Modulators of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Tae Woo; Choi, Kyung Mook

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the principal organelle responsible for correct protein folding, a step in protein synthesis that is critical for the functional conformation of proteins. ER stress is a primary feature of secretory cells and is involved in the pathogenesis of numerous human diseases, such as certain neurodegenerative and cardiometabolic disorders. The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a defense mechanism to attenuate ER stress and maintain the homeostasis of the organism. Two major degradation systems, including the proteasome and autophagy, are involved in this defense system. If ER stress overwhelms the capacity of the cell’s defense mechanisms, apoptotic death may result. This review is focused on the various pharmacological modulators that can protect cells from damage induced by ER stress. The possible mechanisms for cytoprotection are also discussed. PMID:26840310

  7. Restoring the prairie

    SciTech Connect

    Mlot, C.

    1990-12-01

    The US DOE at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois, prairie restoration is taking place in order to conserve the rich topsoil. This is the largest of many prairie restoration experiments. Big bluestem grass (Andropogon gerardi), blue grama (Bouteloua gracilis), and buffalo grass (Buchloe dactyloides) are the main initial grasses grown. After their growth reaches enough biomass to sustain a fire, other prairie plants such as purple prairie clover and dropseed grass appear. The goal of this is to provide a generous refuge for disappearing native plants and animals, a site for scientific research, and a storehouse of genes adapted to a region that produces much of the worlds food. Plans for restoring the marsh and oak savanna, also native to the Fermilab site are also in the works.

  8. Maternal obesity alters endoplasmic reticulum homeostasis in offspring pancreas.

    PubMed

    Soeda, Jumpei; Mouralidarane, Angelina; Cordero, Paul; Li, Jiawei; Nguyen, Vi; Carter, Rebeca; Kapur, Sabrina R; Pombo, Joaquim; Poston, Lucilla; Taylor, Paul D; Vinciguerra, Manlio; Oben, Jude A

    2016-06-01

    The prevalence of non-alcoholic fatty pancreas disease (NAFPD) is increasing in parallel with obesity rates. Stress-related alterations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), such as the unfolded protein response (UPR), are associated with obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate ER imbalance in the pancreas of a mice model of adult and perinatal diet-induced obesity. Twenty female C57BL/6J mice were assigned to control (Con) or obesogenic (Ob) diets prior to and during pregnancy and lactation. Their offspring were weaned onto Con or Ob diets up to 6 months post-partum. Then, after sacrifice, plasma biochemical analyses, gene expression, and protein concentrations were measured in pancreata. Offspring of Ob-fed mice had significantly increased body weight (p < 0.001) and plasma leptin (p < 0.001) and decreased insulin (p < 0.01) levels. Maternal obesogenic diet decreased the total and phosphorylated Eif2α and increased spliced X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1). Pancreatic gene expression of downstream regulators of UPR (EDEM, homocysteine-responsive endoplasmic reticulum-resident (HERP), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP)) and autophagy-related proteins (LC3BI/LC3BII) were differently disrupted by obesogenic feeding in both mothers and offspring (from p < 0.1 to p < 0.001). Maternal obesity and Ob feeding in their offspring alter UPR in NAFPD, with involvement of proapoptotic and autophagy-related markers. Upstream and downstream regulators of PERK, IRE1α, and ATF6 pathways were affected differently following the obesogenic insults.

  9. The ATPase cycle of the endoplasmic chaperone Grp94.

    PubMed

    Frey, Stephan; Leskovar, Adriane; Reinstein, Jochen; Buchner, Johannes

    2007-12-07

    Grp94, the Hsp90 paralog of the endoplasmic reticulum, plays a crucial role in protein secretion. Like cytoplasmic Hsp90, Grp94 is regulated by nucleotide binding to its N-terminal domain. However, the question of whether Grp94 hydrolyzes ATP was controversial. This sets Grp94 apart from other members of the Hsp90 family where a slow but specific turnover of ATP has been unambiguously established. In this study we aimed at analyzing the nucleotide binding properties and the potential ATPase activity of Grp94. We show here that Grp94 has an ATPase activity comparable with that of yeast Hsp90 with a k(cat) of 0.36 min(-1) at 25 degrees C. Kinetic and equilibrium constants of the partial reactions of the ATPase cycle were determined using transient kinetic methods. Nucleotide binding appears to be tighter compared with other Hsp90s investigated, with dissociation constants (K(D)) of approximately 4 microm for ADP, ATP, and AMP-PCP. Interestingly, all nucleotides and inhibitors (radicicol, 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine) studied here bind with similar rate constants for association (0.2-0.3 x 10(6) M(-1) s(-1)). Furthermore, there is a marked difference from cytosolic Hsp90s in that after binding, the ATP molecule does not seem to become trapped by conformational changes in Grp94. Grp94 stays predominantly in the open state concerning the nucleotide-binding pocket as evidenced by kinetic analyses. Thus, Grp94 shows mechanistically important differences in the interaction with adenosine nucleotides, but the basic hydrolysis reaction seems to be conserved between cytosolic and endoplasmic members of the Hsp90 family.

  10. Everglades Restoration Critiqued

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    The monitoring and assessment plan for the $7.8-billion effort to restore the hydrologic regime of the remaining wetlands of Florida's Everglades needs to be strengthened, according to a 2 April study by a committee of the National Academy of Sciences. The evolving monitoring and assessment plan of the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan is grounded in current scientific theory and practice of adaptive management, according to the report. However, the least-developed aspects of the management are feedback mechanisms to connect monitoring to planning and management, the report notes.

  11. Overvoltage control during restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Alexander, R.W. ); Avra-Movic, B. )

    1992-11-01

    This paper is one in a series presented on behalf of the System Operation Subcommittee with the intent of focusing industry attention on power system restoration issues. Restoration of a bulk power supply system presents the operator with unique challenges not normally encountered in daily operations. The initial, and even intermediate transmission system topologies are quite different from the well integrated systems during normal operation. There are several problems that pertain to these non-normal topologies that are of common concern to operators and need to be addressed. One of these, the problem of overvoltages, is the subject of this paper.

  12. Model for Coastal Restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Judd, Chaeli

    2007-07-27

    Successful restoration of wetland habitats depends on both our understanding of our system and our ability to characterize it. By developing a conceptual model, looking at different spatial scales and integrating diverse data streams: GIS datasets and NASA products, we were able to develop a dynamic model for site prioritization based on both qualitative and quantitative relationships found in the coastal environment.

  13. Nitriding of restored crankshafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponukalin, V. V.; Aleksandrov, V. N.

    1984-02-01

    The following technology is recommended for restoration of steel crankshafts: facing with an Sv-08 electrode wire under an AN-348A flux with chromium and niobium introduced into the melt in accordance with the method used at automotive-repair plants and subsequent gas nitriding at (570±10)°C for 12 h.

  14. Restoring Fossil Creek

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flaccus, Kathleen; Vlieg, Julie; Marks, Jane C.; LeRoy, Carri J.

    2004-01-01

    Fossil Creek had been dammed for the past 90 years, and plans were underway to restore the stream. The creek runs through Central Arizona and flows from the high plateaus to the desert, cutting through the same formations that form the Grand Canyon. This article discusses the Fossil Creek monitoring project. In this project, students and teachers…

  15. Spectral characteristics of sign-alternating self-oscillatory endoplasm mobility in a myxomycete plasmodium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avsievich, T. I.; Frolov, S. V.; Proskurin, S. G.

    2016-01-01

    The results of a short time Fourier transform of the time dependences of the self-oscillatory endoplasm velocity in an isolated strand of the Physarum polycephalum plasmodium recorded using a sign-sensitive laser Doppler microscope are described. Unlike the mode recording an absolute velocity, a sign-sensitive mode makes it possible to detect the pairs of equidistant harmonic components in the time dependence spectra of endoplasm movement. The resulting frequency and amplitude values are used to construct a model adequately describing the alternating endoplasm mobility.

  16. Digital restoration of multichannel images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galatsanos, Nikolas P.; Chin, Roland T.

    1989-01-01

    The Wiener solution of a multichannel restoration scheme is presented. Using matrix diagonalization and block-Toeplitz to block-circulant approximation, the inversion of the multichannel, linear space-invariant imaging system becomes feasible by utilizing a fast iterative matrix inversion procedure. The restoration uses both the within-channel (spatial) and between-channel (spectral) correlation; hence, the restored result is a better estimate than that produced by independent channel restoration. Simulations are also presented.

  17. Toll-like receptor 4-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress contributes to endothelial dysfunction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Impairment of vasodilator action of insulin is associated with endothelial dysfunction and insulin resistance. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is implicated as one of the mechanisms for pathophysiology of various cardiometabolic syndromes, including insulin resistance and endothelial dysfunction. ...

  18. Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Ding

    2007-06-05

    A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

  19. Prairie Restoration for Wisconsin Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Molly Fifield; Greenler, Robin McC.

    This packet is composed of several resources for teachers interested in prairie ecology and restoration. "A Guide to Restoration from Site Analysis to Management" focuses on the Prairie/Oak Savanna communities of Wisconsin and takes teachers through the planning and design process for a restoration project on school grounds including…

  20. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0203 TITLE: The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease PRINCIPAL...1 July 2015- 30 June 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease 5a...We hypothesize that ER stress induced by glucose in diabetes promotes diabetic CKD through CRT stimulation of TGF-beta-dependent calcium/NFAT

  1. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0203 TITLE: The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease PRINCIPAL...COVERED 07/01/2014-06/30/2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Protein Calreticulin in Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease 5a...NUMBER(S) 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We hypothesize that ER stress induced by glucose in diabetes promotes diabetic CKD through CRT stimulation

  2. Sulforaphane Improves Ischemia-Induced Detrusor Overactivity by Downregulating the Enhancement of Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Autophagy, and Apoptosis in Rat Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Huai-Ching; Chung, Shiu-Dong; Chien, Chiang-Ting; Yu, Hong-Jeng

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis-associated pelvic ischemia has been reported to be a risk factor for bladder dysfunction and subsequent lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in the elderly population. However, the molecular mechanisms of this association remain unclear. We hypothesized that stress-induced cellular responses might play a role in the pathogenesis of ischemia-induced bladder dysfunction. In the present study, the animal model of bladder ischemia was induced by bilateral partial arterial occlusion (BPAO) in rats. We found that BPAO significantly induced the presence of detrusor overactivity (DO) and upregulated the expression of several molecular reactions, including biomarkers in endoplasmic reticulum stress (78 kDa glucose-regulated protein, GRP78 and C/EBP-homologous protein, CHOP), autophagy (Beclin-1, p62 and LC3 II) and apoptosis (caspase 3). BPAO also disturbed the Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1–nuclear factor erythroid-2-related factor 2 (Keap1–Nrf2) pathways. These responses might collectively alter muscarinic and purinergic signaling and contribute to the presence of DO in the ischemic bladder. Therapeutically, treatment with neither a muscarinic nor purinergic receptor antagonist restored bladder function. Interestingly, sulforaphane effectively attenuated ischemia-enhanced endoplasmic reticulum stress, autophagy and apoptosis in the bladder, subsequently ameliorated ischemia-induced bladder dysfunction and might emerge as a novel strategy to protect the bladder against ischemia-induced oxidative damage. PMID:27824068

  3. Relativistic Linear Restoring Force

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, D.; Franklin, J.; Mann, N.

    2012-01-01

    We consider two different forms for a relativistic version of a linear restoring force. The pair comes from taking Hooke's law to be the force appearing on the right-hand side of the relativistic expressions: d"p"/d"t" or d"p"/d["tau"]. Either formulation recovers Hooke's law in the non-relativistic limit. In addition to these two forces, we…

  4. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Plays a Key Role in the Pathogenesis of Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lupachyk, Sergey; Watcho, Pierre; Stavniichuk, Roman; Shevalye, Hanna; Obrosova, Irina G.

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress resulting from abnormal folding of newly synthesized proteins impairs metabolism, transcriptional regulation, and gene expression, and it is a key mechanism of cell injury. Endoplasmic reticulum stress plays an important role in cardiovascular and neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and diabetes. We evaluated the role for this phenomenon in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. Endoplasmic reticulum stress manifest in upregulation of multiple components of unfolded protein response was identified in neural tissues (sciatic nerve, spinal cord) of streptozotocin diabetic rats and mice. A chemical chaperone, trimethylamine oxide, administered for 12 weeks after induction of diabetes (110 mg⋅kg−1⋅d−1, a prevention paradigm) attenuated endoplasmic reticulum stress, peripheral nerve dysfunction, intraepidermal nerve fiber loss, and sciatic nerve and spinal cord oxidative-nitrative stress in streptozotocin diabetic rats. Similar effects on diabetes-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and peripheral nerve dysfunction were observed with a structurally unrelated chemical chaperone, 4-phenylbutyric acid (100 mg⋅kg−1⋅d−1, intraperitoneal). CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein homologous protein (CHOP)−/− mice made diabetic with streptozotocin displayed less severe sciatic nerve oxidative-nitrative stress and peripheral neuropathy than the wild-type (C57Bl6/J) mice. Neither chemical chaperones nor CHOP gene deficiency reduced diabetic hyperglycemia. Our findings reveal an important role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in the development of diabetic peripheral neuropathy and identify a potential new therapeutic target. PMID:23364451

  5. Reduction of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ levels favors plasma membrane surface exposure of calreticulin.

    PubMed

    Tufi, R; Panaretakis, T; Bianchi, K; Criollo, A; Fazi, B; Di Sano, F; Tesniere, A; Kepp, O; Paterlini-Brechot, P; Zitvogel, L; Piacentini, M; Szabadkai, G; Kroemer, G

    2008-02-01

    Some chemotherapeutic agents can elicit apoptotic cancer cell death, thereby activating an anticancer immune response that influences therapeutic outcome. We previously reported that anthracyclins are particularly efficient in inducing immunogenic cell death, correlating with the pre-apoptotic exposure of calreticulin (CRT) on the plasma membrane surface of anthracyclin-treated tumor cells. Here, we investigated the role of cellular Ca(2+) homeostasis on CRT exposure. A neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) failed to expose CRT in response to anthracyclin treatment. This defect in CRT exposure could be overcome by the overexpression of Reticulon-1C, a manipulation that led to a decrease in the Ca(2+) concentration within the endoplasmic reticulum lumen. The combination of Reticulon-1C expression and anthracyclin treatment yielded more pronounced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) depletion than either of the two manipulations alone. Chelation of intracellular (and endoplasmic reticulum) Ca(2+), targeted expression of the ligand-binding domain of the IP(3) receptor and inhibition of the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase pump reduced endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) load and promoted pre-apoptotic CRT exposure on the cell surface, in SH-SY5Y and HeLa cells. These results provide evidence that endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) levels control the exposure of CRT.

  6. Apoptosis, autophagy & endoplasmic reticulum stress in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Demirtas, Levent; Guclu, Aydin; Erdur, Fatih Mehmet; Akbas, Emin Murat; Ozcicek, Adalet; Onk, Didem; Turkmen, Kultigin

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing secondary to increased consumption of food and decreased physical activity worldwide. Hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance and hypertrophy of pancreatic beta cells occur in the early phase of diabetes. However, with the progression of diabetes, dysfunction and loss of beta cells occur in both types 1 and 2 DM. Programmed cell death also named apoptosis is found to be associated with diabetes, and apoptosis of beta cells might be the main mechanism of relative insulin deficiency in DM. Autophagic cell death and apoptosis are not entirely distinct programmed cell death mechanisms and share many of the regulator proteins. These processes can occur in both physiologic and pathologic conditions including DM. Besides these two important pathways, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) also acts as a cell sensor to monitor and maintain cellular homeostasis. ER stress has been found to be associated with autophagy and apoptosis. This review was aimed to describe the interactions between apoptosis, autophagy and ER stress pathways in DM. PMID:28256459

  7. Chlorpyrifos induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in JEG-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Reyna, Luciana; Flores-Martín, Jésica; Ridano, Magali E; Panzetta-Dutari, Graciela M; Genti-Raimondi, Susana

    2017-04-01

    Chlorpyrifos (CPF) is an organophosphorous pesticide widely used in agricultural, industrial, and household applications. We have previously shown that JEG-3 cells are able to attenuate the oxidative stress induced by CPF through the adaptive activation of the Nrf2/ARE pathway. Considering that there is a relationship between oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER), herein we investigated whether CPF also induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells. Cells were exposed to 50μM or 100μM CPF during 24h in conditions where cell viability was not altered. Western blot and PCR assays were used to explore the protein and mRNA levels of ER stress biomarkers, respectively. CPF induced an increase of the typical ER stress-related proteins, such as GRP78/BiP and IRE1α, a sensor for the unfolded protein response, as well as in phospho-eIF2α and XBP1 mRNA splicing. Additionally, CPF led to a decrease in p53 protein expression. The downregulation of p53 levels induced by CPF was partially blocked when cells were exposed to CPF in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132. Altogether, these findings point out that CPF induces ER stress in JEG-3 cells; however these cells are able to attenuate it downregulating the levels of the pro-apoptotic protein p53.

  8. Protein quality control, retention, and degradation at the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Benyair, Ron; Ron, Efrat; Lederkremer, Gerardo Z

    2011-01-01

    In order to maintain proper cellular functions, all living cells, from bacteria to mammalian cells, must carry out a rigorous quality control process in which nascent and newly synthesized proteins are examined. An important role of this process is to protect cells against pathological accumulation of unfolded and misfolded proteins. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has evolved as a staging ground for secretory protein synthesis with distinct sites for entry, quality control, and exit. In the ER, most proteins are N-glycosylated, a posttranslational modification that defines the quality control pathway that the protein will undergo. The folding state of glycoproteins is revealed by specific modifications of their N-glycans. Regardless of size and posttranslational modifications, the folding states of all proteins must be identified as unfolded, properly folded, or terminally misfolded and accordingly subjected to ER retention and continued folding attempts, export and maturation, or retrotranslocation to the cytosol for degradation. These processes involve specialized machineries that utilize molecular chaperones, protein- and N-glycan-modifying enzymes, and lectins for protein folding and quality control and ubiquitination and degradation machineries for disposal. All these machineries are regulated by a signaling pathway, the unfolded protein response, which upregulates ER functions when under the stress of high protein load. Here, we describe the molecular mechanisms that are implicated and discuss recent data that underline the importance of compartmentalization in the segregation of the various functions of the ER for their correct function.

  9. Proteostasis: bad news and good news from the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Noack, Julia; Brambilla Pisoni, Giorgia; Molinari, Maurizio

    2014-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an intracellular compartment dedicated to the synthesis and maturation of secretory and membrane proteins, totalling about 30% of the total eukaryotic cells proteome. The capacity to produce correctly folded polypeptides and to transport them to their correct intra- or extracellular destinations relies on proteostasis networks that regulate and balance the activity of protein folding, quality control, transport and degradation machineries. Nutrient and environmental changes, pathogen infection aging and, more relevant for the topics discussed in this review, mutations that impair attainment of the correct 3D structure of nascent polypeptide chains may compromise the activity of the proteostasis networks with devastating consequences on cells, organs and organisms' homeostasis. Here we present a review of mechanisms regulating folding and quality control of proteins expressed in the ER, and we describe the protein degradation and the ER stress pathways activated by the expression of misfolded proteins in the ER lumen. Finally, we highlight select examples of proteopathies (also known as conformational disorders or protein misfolding diseases) caused by protein misfolding in the ER and/or affecting cellular proteostasis and therapeutic interventions that might alleviate or cure the disease symptoms.

  10. Naltrexone attenuates endoplasmic reticulum stress induced hepatic injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Moslehi, A; Nabavizadeh, F; Nabavizadeh, Fatemeh; Dehpour, A R; Dehpou, A R; Tavanga, S M; Hassanzadeh, G; Zekri, A; Nahrevanian, H; Sohanaki, H

    2014-09-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress provides abnormalities in insulin action, inflammatory responses, lipoprotein B100 degradation and hepatic lipogenesis. Excess accumulation of triglyceride in hepatocytes may also lead to disorders such as non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Opioid peptides are involved in triglyceride and cholesterol dysregulation, inflammation and cell death. In this study, we evaluated Naltrexone effects on ER stress induced liver injury. To do so, C57/BL6 mice received saline, DMSO and Naltrexone, as control groups. ER stress was induced by tunicamycin (TM) injection. Naltrexone was given before TM administration. Liver blood flow and biochemical serum analysis were measured. Histopathological evaluations, TNF-α measurement and Real-time RT-PCR were also performed. TM challenge provokes steatosis, cellular ballooning and lobular inflammation which significantly reduced in Naltrexone treated animals. ALT, AST and TNF-α increased in the TM group and improved in the Naltrexone plus TM group. Triglyceride and cholesterol levels decreased in TM treated mice with no increase in Naltrexone treated animals. In the Naltrexone plus TM group, gene expression of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and caspase3 significantly lowered compared with the TM group. In this study, we found that Naltrexone had a notable alleviating role in ER stress induced steatosis and liver injury.

  11. Protein Bodies in Leaves Exchange Contents through the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Saberianfar, Reza; Sattarzadeh, Amirali; Joensuu, Jussi J.; Kohalmi, Susanne E.; Menassa, Rima

    2016-01-01

    Protein bodies (PBs) are organelles found in seeds whose main function is the storage of proteins that are used during germination for sustaining growth. PBs can also be induced to form in leaves when foreign proteins are produced at high levels in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and when fused to one of three tags: Zera®, elastin-like polypeptides (ELP), or hydrophobin-I (HFBI). In this study, we investigate the differences between ELP, HFBI and Zera PB formation, packing, and communication. Our results confirm the ER origin of all three fusion-tag-induced PBs. We show that secretory pathway proteins can be sequestered into all types of PBs but with different patterns, and that different fusion tags can target a specific protein to different PBs. Zera PBs are mobile and dependent on actomyosin motility similar to ELP and HFBI PBs. We show in vivo trafficking of proteins between PBs using GFP photoconversion. We also show that protein trafficking between ELP or HFBI PBs is faster and proteins travel further when compared to Zera PBs. Our results indicate that fusion-tag-induced PBs do not represent terminally stored cytosolic organelles, but that they form in, and remain part of the ER, and dynamically communicate with each other via the ER. We hypothesize that the previously documented PB mobility along the actin cytoskeleton is associated with ER movement rather than independent streaming of detached organelles. PMID:27242885

  12. Small GTPases and Brucella entry into the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    de Bolle, Xavier; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre

    2012-12-01

    A key determinant for intracellular pathogenic bacteria to ensure their virulence within host cells is their ability to bypass the endocytic pathway and to reach a safe niche of replication. In the case of Brucella, the bacterium targets the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) to create a replicating niche called the BCV (Brucella-containing vacuole). The ER is a suitable strategic place for pathogenic Brucella. Indeed, bacteria can be hidden from host cell defences to persist within the host, and they can take advantage of the membrane reservoir delivered by the ER to replicate. Interaction with the ER leads to the presence on the BCV of the GAPDH (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and the small GTPase Rab2 known to be located on secretory vesicles that traffic between the ER and the Golgi apparatus. GAPDH and the small GTPase Rab2 controls Brucella replication at late times post-infection. A specific interaction between the human small GTPase Rab2 and a Brucella spp. protein named RicA was identified. Altered kinetics of intracellular trafficking and faster proliferation of the Brucella abortus ΔricA mutant was observed compared with the wild-type strain. RicA is the first reported effector with a proposed function for B. abortus.

  13. The Role of the Endoplasmic Reticulum in Peroxisome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrov, Lazar; Lam, Sheung Kwan; Schekman, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisomes are essential cellular organelles involved in lipid metabolism. Patients affected by severe peroxisome biogenesis disorders rarely survive their first year. Genetic screens in several model organisms have identified more than 30 PEX genes that are required for the formation of functional peroxisomes. Despite significant work on the PEX genes, the biogenic origin of peroxisomes remains controversial. For at least two decades, the prevailing model postulated that peroxisomes propagate by growth and fission of preexisting peroxisomes. In this review, we focus on the recent evidence supporting a new, semiautonomous model of peroxisomal biogenesis. According to this model, peroxisomal membrane proteins (PMPs) traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the peroxisome by a vesicular budding, targeting, and fusion process while peroxisomal matrix proteins are imported into the organelle by an autonomous, posttranslational mechanism. We highlight the contradictory conclusions reached to answer the question of how PMPs are inserted into the ER. We then review what we know and what still remains to be elucidated about the mechanism of PMP exit from the ER and the contribution of preperoxisomal vesicles to mature peroxisomes. Finally, we discuss discrepancies in our understanding of de novo peroxisome biogenesis in wild-type cells. We anticipate that resolving these key issues will lead to a more complete picture of peroxisome biogenesis. PMID:23637287

  14. Microtubules and the endoplasmic reticulum are highly interdependent structures

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The interrelationships of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), microtubules, and intermediate filaments were studied in the peripheral regions of thin, spread fibroblasts, epithelial, and vascular endothelial cells in culture. We combined a fluorescent dye staining technique to localize the ER with immunofluorescence to localize microtubules or intermediate filaments in the same cell. Microtubules and the ER are sparse in the lamellipodia, but intermediate filaments are usually completely absent. These relationships indicate that microtubules and the ER advance into the lamellipodia before intermediate filaments. We observed that microtubules and tubules of the ER have nearly identical distributions in lamellipodia, where new extensions of both are taking place. We perturbed microtubules by nocodazole, cold temperature, or hypotonic shock, and observed the effects on the ER distribution. On the basis of our observations in untreated cells and our experiments with microtubule perturbation, we conclude that microtubules and the ER are highly interdependent in two ways: (a) polymerization of individual microtubules and extension of individual ER tubules occur together at the level of resolution of the fluorescence microscope, and (b) depolymerization of microtubules does not disrupt the ER network in the short term (15 min), but prolonged absence of microtubules (2 h) leads to a slow retraction of the ER network towards the cell center, indicating that over longer periods of time, the extended state of the entire ER network requires the microtubule system. PMID:3533956

  15. Apoptosis, autophagy & endoplasmic reticulum stress in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Demirtas, Levent; Guclu, Aydin; Erdur, Fatih Mehmet; Akbas, Emin Murat; Ozcicek, Adalet; Onk, Didem; Turkmen, Kultigin

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) is increasing secondary to increased consumption of food and decreased physical activity worldwide. Hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance and hypertrophy of pancreatic beta cells occur in the early phase of diabetes. However, with the progression of diabetes, dysfunction and loss of beta cells occur in both types 1 and 2 DM. Programmed cell death also named apoptosis is found to be associated with diabetes, and apoptosis of beta cells might be the main mechanism of relative insulin deficiency in DM. Autophagic cell death and apoptosis are not entirely distinct programmed cell death mechanisms and share many of the regulator proteins. These processes can occur in both physiologic and pathologic conditions including DM. Besides these two important pathways, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) also acts as a cell sensor to monitor and maintain cellular homeostasis. ER stress has been found to be associated with autophagy and apoptosis. This review was aimed to describe the interactions between apoptosis, autophagy and ER stress pathways in DM.

  16. Arachidonoyl-Specific Diacylglycerol Kinase ε and the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Tomoyuki; Matsui, Hirooki; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Hozumi, Yasukazu; Iseki, Ken; Kawamae, Kaneyuki; Goto, Kaoru

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) comprises an interconnected membrane network, which is made up of lipid bilayer and associated proteins. This organelle plays a central role in the protein synthesis and sorting. In addition, it represents the synthetic machinery of phospholipids, the major constituents of the biological membrane. In this process, phosphatidic acid (PA) serves as a precursor of all phospholipids, suggesting that PA synthetic activity is closely associated with the ER function. One enzyme responsible for PA synthesis is diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) that phosphorylates diacylglycerol (DG) to PA. DGK is composed of a family of enzymes with distinct features assigned to each isozyme in terms of structure, enzymology, and subcellular localization. Of DGKs, DGKε uniquely exhibits substrate specificity toward arachidonate-containing DG and is shown to reside in the ER. Arachidonic acid, a precursor of bioactive eicosanoids, is usually acylated at the sn-2 position of phospholipids, being especially enriched in phosphoinositide. In this review, we focus on arachidonoyl-specific DGKε with respect to the historical context, molecular basis of the substrate specificity and ER-targeting, and functional implications in the ER. PMID:27917381

  17. Methods to Study PTEN in Mitochondria and Endoplasmic Reticulum.

    PubMed

    Missiroli, Sonia; Morganti, Claudia; Giorgi, Carlotta; Pinton, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Although PTEN has been widely described as a nuclear and cytosolic protein, in the last 2 years, alternative organelles, such as the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), pure mitochondria, and mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs), have been recognized as pivotal targets of PTEN activity.Here, we describe different methods that have been used to highlight PTEN subcellular localization.First, a protocol to extract nuclear and cytosolic fractions has been described to assess the "canonical" PTEN localization. Moreover, we describe a protocol for mitochondria isolation with proteinase K (PK) to further discriminate whether PTEN associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) or resides within the mitochondria. Finally, we focus our attention on a subcellular fractionation protocol of cells that permits the isolation of MAMs containing unique regions of ER membranes attached to the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) and mitochondria without contamination from other organelles. In addition to biochemical fractionations, immunostaining can be used to determine the subcellular localization of proteins; thus, a detailed protocol to obtain good immunofluorescence (IF) is described. The employment of these methodological approaches could facilitate the identification of different PTEN localizations in several physiopathological contexts.

  18. Endoplasmic-reticulum-mediated microtubule alignment governs cytoplasmic streaming.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Kenji; Mamane, Alexandre; Sasaki, Tohru; Sato, Kohta; Takagi, Jun; Niwayama, Ritsuya; Hufnagel, Lars; Shimamoto, Yuta; Joanny, Jean-François; Uchida, Seiichi; Kimura, Akatsuki

    2017-04-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming refers to a collective movement of cytoplasm observed in many cell types. The mechanism of meiotic cytoplasmic streaming (MeiCS) in Caenorhabditis elegans zygotes is puzzling as the direction of the flow is not predefined by cell polarity and occasionally reverses. Here, we demonstrate that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network structure is required for the collective flow. Using a combination of RNAi, microscopy and image processing of C. elegans zygotes, we devise a theoretical model, which reproduces and predicts the emergence and reversal of the flow. We propose a positive-feedback mechanism, where a local flow generated along a microtubule is transmitted to neighbouring regions through the ER. This, in turn, aligns microtubules over a broader area to self-organize the collective flow. The proposed model could be applicable to various cytoplasmic streaming phenomena in the absence of predefined polarity. The increased mobility of cortical granules by MeiCS correlates with the efficient exocytosis of the granules to protect the zygotes from osmotic and mechanical stresses.

  19. Association of Legionella pneumophila with the macrophage endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, M S; Isberg, R R

    1995-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila replicates within a membrane-bounded compartment that is studded with ribosomes. In this study we investigated whether these ribosomes originate from the cytoplasmic pool or are associated with host endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Immunofluorescence and electron microscopic localization studies of ER proteins in macrophages infected with L. pneumophila indicated that the bacteria reside in a compartment surrounded by ER. An L. pneumophila mutant that grows slowly in macrophages was slow to associate with host ER, providing genetic evidence in support of the hypothesis that this specialized vacuole is required for intracellular bacterial growth. Ultrastructural studies, in which the ER luminal protein BiP was labeled by immunoperoxidase cytochemistry, revealed that L. pneumophila replication vacuoles resemble nascent autophagosomes. Furthermore, short-term amino acid starvation of macrophages, which stimulated host autophagosomes. Furthermore, short-term amino acid starvation of macrophages, which stimulated host autophagy, increased association of the bacteria with the ER and enhanced bacterial growth. These results are compatible with the hypothesis that L. pneumophila exploits the autophagy machinery of macrophages to establish an intracellular niche favorable for replication. PMID:7642298

  20. Regulation of endoplasmic reticulum turnover by selective autophagy.

    PubMed

    Khaminets, Aliaksandr; Heinrich, Theresa; Mari, Muriel; Grumati, Paolo; Huebner, Antje K; Akutsu, Masato; Liebmann, Lutz; Stolz, Alexandra; Nietzsche, Sandor; Koch, Nicole; Mauthe, Mario; Katona, Istvan; Qualmann, Britta; Weis, Joachim; Reggiori, Fulvio; Kurth, Ingo; Hübner, Christian A; Dikic, Ivan

    2015-06-18

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular endomembrane system, enabling protein and lipid synthesis, ion homeostasis, quality control of newly synthesized proteins and organelle communication. Constant ER turnover and modulation is needed to meet different cellular requirements and autophagy has an important role in this process. However, its underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unexplained. Here we show that members of the FAM134 reticulon protein family are ER-resident receptors that bind to autophagy modifiers LC3 and GABARAP, and facilitate ER degradation by autophagy ('ER-phagy'). Downregulation of FAM134B protein in human cells causes an expansion of the ER, while FAM134B overexpression results in ER fragmentation and lysosomal degradation. Mutant FAM134B proteins that cause sensory neuropathy in humans are unable to act as ER-phagy receptors. Consistently, disruption of Fam134b in mice causes expansion of the ER, inhibits ER turnover, sensitizes cells to stress-induced apoptotic cell death and leads to degeneration of sensory neurons. Therefore, selective ER-phagy via FAM134 proteins is indispensable for mammalian cell homeostasis and controls ER morphology and turnover in mice and humans.

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum localization and activity of maize auxin biosynthetic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Kriechbaumer, Verena; Seo, Hyesu; Park, Woong June; Hawes, Chris

    2015-09-01

    Auxin is a major growth hormone in plants and the first plant hormone to be discovered and studied. Active research over >60 years has shed light on many of the molecular mechanisms of its action including transport, perception, signal transduction, and a variety of biosynthetic pathways in various species, tissues, and developmental stages. The complexity and redundancy of the auxin biosynthetic network and enzymes involved raises the question of how such a system, producing such a potent agent as auxin, can be appropriately controlled at all. Here it is shown that maize auxin biosynthesis takes place in microsomal as well as cytosolic cellular fractions from maize seedlings. Most interestingly, a set of enzymes shown to be involved in auxin biosynthesis via their activity and/or mutant phenotypes and catalysing adjacent steps in YUCCA-dependent biosynthesis are localized to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Positioning of auxin biosynthetic enzymes at the ER could be necessary to bring auxin biosynthesis in closer proximity to ER-localized factors for transport, conjugation, and signalling, and allow for an additional level of regulation by subcellular compartmentation of auxin action. Furthermore, it might provide a link to ethylene action and be a factor in hormonal cross-talk as all five ethylene receptors are ER localized.

  2. Aging induced endoplasmic reticulum stress alters sleep and sleep homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Brown, Marishka K; Chan, May T; Zimmerman, John E; Pack, Allan I; Jackson, Nicholas E; Naidoo, Nirinjini

    2014-06-01

    Alterations in the quality, quantity, and architecture of baseline and recovery sleep have been shown to occur during aging. Sleep deprivation induces endoplasmic reticular (ER) stress and upregulates a protective signaling pathway termed the unfolded protein response. The effectiveness of the adaptive unfolded protein response is diminished by age. Previously, we showed that endogenous chaperone levels altered recovery sleep in Drosophila melanogaster. We now report that acute administration of the chemical chaperone sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (PBA) reduces ER stress and ameliorates age-associated sleep changes in Drosophila. PBA consolidates both baseline and recovery sleep in aging flies. The behavioral modifications of PBA are linked to its suppression of ER stress. PBA decreased splicing of X-box binding protein 1 and upregulation of phosphorylated elongation initiation factor 2 α, in flies that were subjected to sleep deprivation. We also demonstrate that directly activating ER stress in young flies fragments baseline sleep and alters recovery sleep. Alleviating prolonged or sustained ER stress during aging contributes to sleep consolidation and improves recovery sleep or sleep debt discharge.

  3. Hydrogen sulfide, endoplasmic reticulum stress and alcohol mediated neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    George, Akash K; Behera, Jyotirmaya; Kelly, Kimberly E; Zhai, Yuankun; Tyagi, Neetu

    2017-02-14

    Alcohol is one of the most socially accepted addictive drugs in modern society. Its abuse affects virtually all organ systems with the central nervous system (CNS) being particularly vulnerable to excessive alcohol exposure. Alcohol exposure also causes profound damage to both the adult and developing brain. Excessive alcohol consumption induces numerous pathophysiological stress responses, one of which is the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. Potential mechanisms that trigger the alcohol induced ER stress response are either directly or indirectly related to alcohol metabolism, which include toxic levels of acetaldehyde and homocysteine, oxidative stress and abnormal epigenetic modifications. Growing evidence suggests that H2S is the most recently recognized gasotransmitter with tremendous physiological protective functions against oxidative stress induced neurotoxicity. In this review we address the alcohol induced oxidative stress mediated ER stress and the role of H2S in its mitigation in the context of alcohol neurotoxicity. Interruption of ER stress triggers is anticipated to have therapeutic benefits for alcohol mediated diseases and disorders.

  4. Heme oxygenase-1 comes back to endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hong Pyo; Pae, Hyun-Ock; Back, Sung Hun; Chung, Su Wol; Woo, Je Moon; Son, Yong; Chung, Hun-Taeg

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Although multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. {yields} HO-1 expression at ER is induced by a diverse set of conditions that cause ER stressors. {yields} CO may induce HO-1 expression in human ECs by activating Nrf2 through PERK phosphorylation in a positive-feedback manner. {yields} ER-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress is discussed. -- Abstract: Originally identified as a rate-limiting enzyme for heme catabolism, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has expanded its roles in anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis and anti-proliferation for the last decade. Regulation of protein activity by location is well appreciated. Even though multiple compartmentalization of HO-1 has been documented, the functional implication of this enzyme at these subcellular organelles is only partially elucidated. In this review we discuss the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-residing HO-1 and its cytoprotective activity against ER stress.

  5. Terasaki Ramps in the Endoplasmic Reticulum: Structure, Function and Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Greg; Guven, Jemal; Valencia, Dulce-Maria

    2015-03-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has long been considered an exceedingly important and complex cellular organelle in eukaryotes (like you). It is a membrane structure, part folded lamellae, part tubular network, that both envelopes the nucleus and threads its way outward, all the way to the cell's periphery. Despite the elegant mechanics of bilayer membranes offered by the work of Helfrich and Canham, as far as the ER is concerned, theory has mostly sat on the sidelines. However, refined imaging of the ER has recently revealed beautiful and subtle geometrical forms - simple geometries, from the mathematical point of view - which some have called a ``parking garage for ribosomes.'' I'll review the discovery and physics of Terasaki ramps and discuss their relation to cell-biological questions, such as ER and nuclear-membrane re-organization during mitosis. Rather than being a footnote in a textbook on differential geometry, these structures suggest answers to a number of the ER's structure-function problems.

  6. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Namrata; Talwar, Priti; Parimisetty, Avinash; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Ravanan, Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturbs fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways have been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and others. In this review, we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress-induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial signaling events, which further induce or exacerbate ER stress. PMID:25120434

  7. PROTEOMICS ANALYSIS OF ROUGH ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM IN PANCREATIC BETA CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jin-sook; Wu, Yanning; Skallos, Patracia; Fang, Jingye; Zhang, Xuebao; Karnovsky, Alla; Woods, James; Stemmer, Paul M.; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Kezhong; Chen, Xuequn

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic beta cells have well-developed endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to accommodate for the massive production and secretion of insulin. ER homeostasis is vital for normal beta cell function. Perturbation of ER homeostasis contributes to beta cell dysfunction in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. To systematically identify the molecular machinery responsible for proinsulin biogenesis and maintenance of beta cell ER homeostasis, a widely used mouse pancreatic beta cell line, MIN6 cell was used to purify rough ER. Two different purification schemes were utilized. In each experiment, the ER pellets were solubilized and analyzed by one dimensional SDS-PAGE coupled with HPLC-MS/MS. A total of 1467 proteins were identified in three experiments with ≥95% confidence, among which 1117 proteins were found in at least two separate experiments and 737 proteins found in all three experiments. Gene ontology analysis revealed a comprehensive profile of known and novel players responsible for proinsulin biogenesis and ER homeostasis. Further bioinformatics analysis also identified potential beta cell specific ER proteins as well as ER proteins present in the risk genetic loci of type 2 diabetes. This dataset defines a molecular environment in the ER for proinsulin synthesis, folding and export and laid a solid foundation for further characterizations of altered ER homeostasis under diabetes-causing conditions. PMID:25546123

  8. The Mammalian Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Degradation System

    PubMed Central

    Olzmann, James A.; Kopito, Ron R.; Christianson, John C.

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the site of synthesis for nearly one-third of the eukaryotic proteome and is accordingly endowed with specialized machinery to ensure that proteins deployed to the distal secretory pathway are correctly folded and assembled into native oligomeric complexes. Proteins failing to meet this conformational standard are degraded by ER-associated degradation (ERAD), a complex process through which folding-defective proteins are selected and ultimately degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. ERAD proceeds through four tightly coupled steps involving substrate selection, dislocation across the ER membrane, covalent conjugation with polyubiquitin, and proteasomal degradation. The ERAD machinery shows a modular organization with central ER membrane-embedded ubiquitin ligases linking components responsible for recognition in the ER lumen to the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the cytoplasm. The core ERAD machinery is highly conserved among eukaryotes and much of our basic understanding of ERAD organization has been derived from genetic and biochemical studies of yeast. In this article we discuss how the core ERAD machinery is organized in mammalian cells. PMID:23232094

  9. PERK-opathies: An Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Mechanism Underlying Neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Bell, Michelle C; Meier, Shelby E; Ingram, Alexandria L; Abisambra, Jose F

    2016-01-01

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) plays a vital role in maintaining cell homeostasis as a consequence of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. However, prolonged UPR activity leads to cell death. This time-dependent dual functionality of the UPR represents the adaptive and cytotoxic pathways that result from ER stress. Chronic UPR activation in systemic and neurodegenerative diseases has been identified as an early sign of cellular dyshomeostasis. The Protein Kinase R-like ER Kinase (PERK) pathway is one of three major branches in the UPR, and it is the only one to modulate protein synthesis as an adaptive response. The specific identification of prolonged PERK activity has been correlated with the progression of disorders such as diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer, suggesting that PERK plays a role in the pathology of these disorders. For the first time, the term "PERK-opathies" is used to group these diseases in which PERK mediates detriment to the cell culminating in chronic disorders. This article reviews the literature documenting links between systemic disorders with the UPR, but with a specific emphasis on the PERK pathway. Then, articles reporting links between the UPR, and more specifically PERK, and neurodegenerative disorders are presented. Finally, a therapeutic perspective is discussed, where PERK interventions could be potential remedies for cellular dysfunction in chronic neurodegenerative disorders.

  10. Partial restoration of mutant enzyme homeostasis in three distinct lysosomal storage disease cell lines by altering calcium homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Mu, Ting-Wei; Fowler, Douglas M; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2008-02-01

    A lysosomal storage disease (LSD) results from deficient lysosomal enzyme activity, thus the substrate of the mutant enzyme accumulates in the lysosome, leading to pathology. In many but not all LSDs, the clinically most important mutations compromise the cellular folding of the enzyme, subjecting it to endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation instead of proper folding and lysosomal trafficking. A small molecule that restores partial mutant enzyme folding, trafficking, and activity would be highly desirable, particularly if one molecule could ameliorate multiple distinct LSDs by virtue of its mechanism of action. Inhibition of L-type Ca2+ channels, using either diltiazem or verapamil-both US Food and Drug Administration-approved hypertension drugs-partially restores N370S and L444P glucocerebrosidase homeostasis in Gaucher patient-derived fibroblasts; the latter mutation is associated with refractory neuropathic disease. Diltiazem structure-activity studies suggest that it is its Ca2+ channel blocker activity that enhances the capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum to fold misfolding-prone proteins, likely by modest up-regulation of a subset of molecular chaperones, including BiP and Hsp40. Importantly, diltiazem and verapamil also partially restore mutant enzyme homeostasis in two other distinct LSDs involving enzymes essential for glycoprotein and heparan sulfate degradation, namely alpha-mannosidosis and type IIIA mucopolysaccharidosis, respectively. Manipulation of calcium homeostasis may represent a general strategy to restore protein homeostasis in multiple LSDs. However, further efforts are required to demonstrate clinical utility and safety.

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi intermediate compartment protein 3 knockdown suppresses lung cancer through endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Chang, Seung-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Cho; Kim, Sanghwa; Park, Sungjin; Lee, Ah Young; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Kim, Hyeon-Jeong; Lee, Somin; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Seo, Hwi Won; Chae, Chanhee; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Jongsun; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-10-04

    Trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus is elevated in cancer cells. Therefore, proteins of the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) attract significant attention as targets for cancer treatment. Enhanced cancer cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition by ERGICs correlates with poor-prognosis of lung cancer. This prompted us to assess whether knockdown of ERGIC3 may decrease lung cancer growth. To test the hypothesis, the effects of ERGIC3 short hairpin RNA (shERGIC3) on ER stress-induced cell death and lung tumorigenesis were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of ERGIC3 led to ER stress-induced autophagic cell death and suppression of proliferation in the A549 human lung cancer cell-line. Moreover, non-invasive aerosol-delivery of shERGIC3 using the biocompatible carrier glycerol propoxylate triacrylate and spermine (GPT-SPE) inhibited lung tumorigenesis in the K-rasLA1 murine model of lung cancer. Our data suggest that suppression of ERGIC3 could provide a framework for the development of effective lung cancer therapies.

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum-Golgi intermediate compartment protein 3 knockdown suppresses lung cancer through endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Seong-Ho; Chang, Seung-Hee; Cho, Kyung-Cho; Kim, Sanghwa; Park, Sungjin; Lee, Ah Young; Jiang, Hu-Lin; Kim, Hyeon-Jeong; Lee, Somin; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Seo, Hwi Won; Chae, Chanhee; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Park, Jongsun; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2016-01-01

    Trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi apparatus is elevated in cancer cells. Therefore, proteins of the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) attract significant attention as targets for cancer treatment. Enhanced cancer cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition by ERGICs correlates with poor-prognosis of lung cancer. This prompted us to assess whether knockdown of ERGIC3 may decrease lung cancer growth. To test the hypothesis, the effects of ERGIC3 short hairpin RNA (shERGIC3) on ER stress-induced cell death and lung tumorigenesis were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Knockdown of ERGIC3 led to ER stress-induced autophagic cell death and suppression of proliferation in the A549 human lung cancer cell-line. Moreover, non-invasive aerosol-delivery of shERGIC3 using the biocompatible carrier glycerol propoxylate triacrylate and spermine (GPT-SPE) inhibited lung tumorigenesis in the K-rasLA1 murine model of lung cancer. Our data suggest that suppression of ERGIC3 could provide a framework for the development of effective lung cancer therapies. PMID:27588471

  13. CDIP1-BAP31 complex transduces apoptotic signals from endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria under endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Namba, Takushi; Tian, Fang; Chu, Kiki; Hwang, So-Young; Yoon, Kyoung Wan; Byun, Sanguine; Hiraki, Masatsugu; Mandinova, Anna; Lee, Sam W

    2013-10-31

    Resolved endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is essential for intracellular homeostatic balance, but unsettled ER stress can lead to apoptosis. Here, we show that a proapoptotic p53 target, CDIP1, acts as a key signal transducer of ER-stress-mediated apoptosis. We identify B-cell-receptor-associated protein 31 (BAP31) as an interacting partner of CDIP1. Upon ER stress, CDIP1 is induced and enhances an association with BAP31 at the ER membrane. We also show that CDIP1 binding to BAP31 is required for BAP31 cleavage upon ER stress and for BAP31-Bcl-2 association. The recruitment of Bcl-2 to the BAP31-CDIP1 complex, as well as CDIP1-dependent truncated Bid (tBid) and caspase-8 activation, contributes to BAX oligomerization. Genetic knockout of CDIP1 in mice leads to impaired response to ER-stress-mediated apoptosis. Altogether, our data demonstrate that the CDIP1/BAP31-mediated regulation of mitochondrial apoptosis pathway represents a mechanism for establishing an ER-mitochondrial crosstalk for ER-stress-mediated apoptosis signaling.

  14. Chronic inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation prevents ischaemia-induced vascular pathology in type II diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Amin, Ali; Choi, Soo-kyoung; Galan, Maria; Kassan, Modar; Partyka, Megan; Kadowitz, Philip; Henrion, Daniel; Trebak, Mohamed; Belmadani, Souad; Matrougui, Khalid

    2012-06-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation are important mechanisms that underlie many of the serious consequences of type II diabetes. However, the role of ER stress and inflammation in impaired ischaemia-induced neovascularization in type II diabetes is unknown. We studied ischaemia-induced neovascularization in the hind-limb of 4-week-old db - /db- mice and their controls treated with or without the ER stress inhibitor (tauroursodeoxycholic acid, TUDCA, 150 mg/kg per day) and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (anakinra, 0.5 µg/mouse per day) for 4 weeks. Blood pressure was similar in all groups of mice. Blood glucose, insulin levels, and body weight were reduced in db - /db- mice treated with TUDCA. Increased cholesterol and reduced adiponectin in db - /db- mice were restored by TUDCA and anakinra treatment. ER stress and inflammation in the ischaemic hind-limb in db - /db- mice were attenuated by TUDCA and anakinra treatment. Ischaemia-induced neovascularization and blood flow recovery were significantly reduced in db - /db- mice compared to control. Interestingly, neovascularization and blood flow recovery were restored in db - /db- mice treated with TUDCA or anakinra compared to non-treated db - /db- mice. TUDCA and anakinra enhanced eNOS-cGMP, VEGFR2, and reduced ERK1/2 MAP-kinase signalling, while endothelial progenitor cell number was similar in all groups of mice. Our findings demonstrate that the inhibition of ER stress and inflammation prevents impaired ischaemia-induced neovascularization in type II diabetic mice. Thus, ER stress and inflammation could be potential targets for a novel therapeutic approach to prevent impaired ischaemia-induced vascular pathology in type II diabetes.

  15. In vitro studies on the translocation of acid phosphatase into the endoplasmic reticulum of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Krebs, H O; Hoffschulte, H K; Müller, M

    1989-05-01

    We demonstrate here the in vitro translocation of yeast acid phosphatase into rough endoplasmic reticulum. The precursor of the repressible acid phosphatase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae encoded by the PHO5 gene, was synthesized in a yeast lysate programmed with in vitro transcribed PHO5 mRNA. In the presence of yeast rough microsomes up to 16% of the acid phosphatase synthesized was found to be translocated into the microsomes, as judged by proteinase resistance, and fully core-glycosylated. The translocation efficiency however, decreased to 3% if yeast rough microsomes were added after synthesis of acid phosphatase had been terminated. When a wheat-germ extract was used for in vitro synthesis, the precursor of acid phosphatase was translocated into canine pancreatic rough microsomes and thereby core-glycosylated in a signal-recognition-particle-dependent manner. Replacing canine with yeast rough microsomes in the wheat-germ translation system, however, resulted in a significant decrease in the ability to translocate and glycosylate the precursor. Translocation and glycosylation were partially restored by a high-salt extract prepared from yeast ribosomes. The results presented here suggest that yeast-specific factors are needed to translocate and glycosylate acid phosphatase efficiently in vitro.

  16. Host endoplasmic reticulum COPII proteins control cell-to-cell spread of the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Gianfelice, Antonella; Le, Phuong H B; Rigano, Luciano A; Saila, Susan; Dowd, Georgina C; McDivitt, Tina; Bhattacharya, Nilakshee; Hong, Wanjin; Stagg, Scott M; Ireton, Keith

    2015-06-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is a food-borne pathogen that uses actin-dependent motility to spread between human cells. Cell-to-cell spread involves the formation by motile bacteria of plasma membrane-derived structures termed 'protrusions'. In cultured enterocytes, the secreted Listeria protein InlC promotes protrusion formation by binding and inhibiting the human scaffolding protein Tuba. Here we demonstrate that protrusions are controlled by human COPII components that direct trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum. Co-precipitation experiments indicated that the COPII proteins Sec31A and Sec13 interact directly with a Src homology 3 domain in Tuba. This interaction was antagonized by InlC. Depletion of Sec31A or Sec13 restored normal protrusion formation to a Listeria mutant lacking inlC, without affecting spread of wild-type bacteria. Genetic impairment of the COPII component Sar1 or treatment of cells with brefeldin A affected protrusions similarly to Sec31A or Sec13 depletion. These findings indicated that InlC relieves a host-mediated restriction of Listeria spread otherwise imposed by COPII. Inhibition of Sec31A, Sec13 or Sar1 or brefeldin A treatment also perturbed the structure of cell-cell junctions. Collectively, these findings demonstrate an important role for COPII in controlling Listeria spread. We propose that COPII may act by delivering host proteins that generate tension at cell junctions.

  17. A critical role of DDRGK1 in endoplasmic reticulum homoeostasis via regulation of IRE1α stability.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiang; Wang, Ying; Song, Lizhi; Zeng, Linghua; Yi, Weiwei; Liu, Ting; Chen, Huanzhen; Wang, Miao; Ju, Zhenyu; Cong, Yu-Sheng

    2017-01-27

    Disturbance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homoeostasis induces ER stress and leads to activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is an adaptive reaction that promotes cell survival or triggers apoptosis, when homoeostasis is not restored. DDRGK1 is an ER membrane protein and a critical component of the ubiquitin-fold modifier 1 (Ufm1) system. However, the functions and mechanisms of DDRGK1 in ER homoeostasis are largely unknown. Here, we show that depletion of DDRGK1 induces ER stress and enhances ER stress-induced apoptosis in both cancer cells and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Depletion of DDRGK1 represses IRE1α-XBP1 signalling and activates the PERK-eIF2α-CHOP apoptotic pathway by targeting the ER-stress sensor IRE1α. We further demonstrate that DDRGK1 regulates IRE1α protein stability via its interaction with the kinase domain of IRE1α, which is dependent on its ufmylation modification. Altogether, our results provide evidence that DDRGK1 is essential for ER homoeostasis regulation.

  18. Chemical chaperon 4-phenylbutyrate protects against the endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated renal fibrosis in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shing-Hwa; Yang, Ching-Chin; Chan, Ding-Cheng; Wu, Cheng-Tien; Chen, Li-Ping; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2016-04-19

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is the common and final pathologic change of kidney in end-stage renal disease. Interesting, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is known to contribute to the pathophysiological mechanisms during the development of renal fibrosis. Here, we investigated the effects of chemical chaperon sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA) on renal fibrosis in vivo and in vitro. In a rat unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model, 4-PBA mimicked endogenous ER chaperon in the kidneys and significantly reduced glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), and phosphorylated JNK protein expressions as well as restored spliced X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1) expressions in the kidneys of UUO rats. 4-PBA also attenuated the increases of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) protein expressions, tubulointerstitial fibrosis, and apoptosis in the kidneys of UUO rats. Moreover, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β markedly increased ER stress-associated molecules, profibrotic factors, and apoptotic markers in the renal tubular cells (NRK-52E), all of which could be significantly counteracted by 4-PBA treatment. 4-PBA also diminished TGF-β-increased CTGF promoter activity and CTGF mRNA expression in NRK-52E cells. Taken together, our results indicated that 4-PBA acts as an ER chaperone to ameliorate ER stress-induced renal tubular cell apoptosis and renal fibrosis.

  19. PLIN2 is a Key Regulator of the Unfolded Protein Response and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Resolution in Pancreatic β Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Elaine; Tsai, Tsung Huang; Li, Lan; Saha, Pradip; Chan, Lawrence; Chang, Benny Hung-Junn

    2017-01-01

    Progressive pancreatic β cell failure underlies the transition of impaired glucose tolerance to overt diabetes; endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress expedites β cell failure in this situation. ER stress can be elicited by lipotoxicity and an increased demand for insulin in diabetes. We previously reported that the lipid droplet protein perilipin 2 (PLIN2) modulates lipid homeostasis in the liver. Here, we show that PLIN2 modulates the unfolded protein response (UPR) and ER stress in pancreatic β cells. PLIN2 expression goes up when β cells are exposed to a lipid load or to chemical ER stress inducers. Downregulation of PLIN2 ameliorates the effects of fatty acid- and chemical-induced ER stress, whereas PLIN2 overexpression exacerbates them. Diabetic Akita mice, which carry a heterozygous C96Y Ins2 mutation, exhibit elevated PLIN2 expression and ER stress in their β cells. Genetic ablation of Plin2 in Akita mice leads to mitigation of ER stress, forestalling β cell apoptosis, partially restoring β cell mass, and ameliorating diabetes. Mechanistic experiments showed that PLIN2 downregulation is associated with enhanced autophagic flux and accelerated ER stress resolution. In sum, we have identified a crucial role for PLIN2 in modulating autophagy, ER stress resolution, and β cell apoptosis and survival. PMID:28102311

  20. A mutant cytochrome b5 with a lengthened membrane anchor escapes from the endoplasmic reticulum and reaches the plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Pedrazzini, E; Villa, A; Borgese, N

    1996-01-01

    Many resident membrane proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) do not have known retrieval sequences. Among these are the so-called tail-anchored proteins, which are bound to membranes by a hydrophobic tail close to the C terminus and have most of their sequence as a cytosolically exposed N-terminal domain. Because ER tail-anchored proteins generally have short (< or = 17 residues) hydrophobic domains, we tested whether this feature is important for localization, using cytochrome b5 as a model. The hydrophobic domain of cytochrome b5 was lengthened by insertion of five amino acids (ILAAV), and the localization of the mutant was analyzed by immunofluorescence in transiently transfected mammalian cells. While the wild-type cytochrome was localized to the ER, the mutant was relocated to the surface. This relocation was not due to the specific sequence introduced, as demonstrated by the ER localization of a second mutant, in which the original length of the membrane anchor was restored, while maintaining the inserted ILAAV sequence. Experiments with brefeldin A and with cycloheximide demonstrated that the extended anchor mutant reached the plasma membrane by transport along the secretory pathway. We conclude that the short membrane anchor of cytochrome b5 is important for its ER residency, and we discuss the relevance of this finding for other ER tail-anchored proteins. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:8633042

  1. A critical role of DDRGK1 in endoplasmic reticulum homoeostasis via regulation of IRE1α stability

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiang; Wang, Ying; Song, Lizhi; Zeng, Linghua; Yi, Weiwei; Liu, Ting; Chen, Huanzhen; Wang, Miao; Ju, Zhenyu; Cong, Yu-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Disturbance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homoeostasis induces ER stress and leads to activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which is an adaptive reaction that promotes cell survival or triggers apoptosis, when homoeostasis is not restored. DDRGK1 is an ER membrane protein and a critical component of the ubiquitin-fold modifier 1 (Ufm1) system. However, the functions and mechanisms of DDRGK1 in ER homoeostasis are largely unknown. Here, we show that depletion of DDRGK1 induces ER stress and enhances ER stress-induced apoptosis in both cancer cells and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Depletion of DDRGK1 represses IRE1α-XBP1 signalling and activates the PERK-eIF2α-CHOP apoptotic pathway by targeting the ER-stress sensor IRE1α. We further demonstrate that DDRGK1 regulates IRE1α protein stability via its interaction with the kinase domain of IRE1α, which is dependent on its ufmylation modification. Altogether, our results provide evidence that DDRGK1 is essential for ER homoeostasis regulation. PMID:28128204

  2. Chemical chaperon 4-phenylbutyrate protects against the endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated renal fibrosis in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Cheng-Tien; Chen, Li-Ping; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Chiang, Chih-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Renal tubulointerstitial fibrosis is the common and final pathologic change of kidney in end-stage renal disease. Interesting, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is known to contribute to the pathophysiological mechanisms during the development of renal fibrosis. Here, we investigated the effects of chemical chaperon sodium 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA) on renal fibrosis in vivo and in vitro. In a rat unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO) model, 4-PBA mimicked endogenous ER chaperon in the kidneys and significantly reduced glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78), CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homologous protein (CHOP), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), and phosphorylated JNK protein expressions as well as restored spliced X-box-binding protein 1 (XBP1) expressions in the kidneys of UUO rats. 4-PBA also attenuated the increases of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) protein expressions, tubulointerstitial fibrosis, and apoptosis in the kidneys of UUO rats. Moreover, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β markedly increased ER stress-associated molecules, profibrotic factors, and apoptotic markers in the renal tubular cells (NRK-52E), all of which could be significantly counteracted by 4-PBA treatment. 4-PBA also diminished TGF-β-increased CTGF promoter activity and CTGF mRNA expression in NRK-52E cells. Taken together, our results indicated that 4-PBA acts as an ER chaperone to ameliorate ER stress-induced renal tubular cell apoptosis and renal fibrosis. PMID:26959118

  3. Nuclear receptor LRH-1/NR5A2 is required and targetable for liver endoplasmic reticulum stress resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mamrosh, Jennifer L; Lee, Jae Man; Wagner, Martin; Stambrook, Peter J; Whitby, Richard J; Sifers, Richard N; Wu, San-Pin; Tsai, Ming-Jer; DeMayo, Francesco J; Moore, David D

    2014-01-01

    Chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress results in toxicity that contributes to multiple human disorders. We report a stress resolution pathway initiated by the nuclear receptor LRH-1 that is independent of known unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Like mice lacking primary UPR components, hepatic Lrh-1-null mice cannot resolve ER stress, despite a functional UPR. In response to ER stress, LRH-1 induces expression of the kinase Plk3, which phosphorylates and activates the transcription factor ATF2. Plk3-null mice also cannot resolve ER stress, and restoring Plk3 expression in Lrh-1-null cells rescues ER stress resolution. Reduced or heightened ATF2 activity also sensitizes or desensitizes cells to ER stress, respectively. LRH-1 agonist treatment increases ER stress resistance and decreases cell death. We conclude that LRH-1 initiates a novel pathway of ER stress resolution that is independent of the UPR, yet equivalently required. Targeting LRH-1 may be beneficial in human disorders associated with chronic ER stress. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01694.001 PMID:24737860

  4. GPI anchor attachment is required for Gas1p transport from the endoplasmic reticulum in COP II vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Doering, T L; Schekman, R

    1996-01-01

    Inositol starvation of auxotrophic yeast interrupts glycolipid biosynthesis and prevents lipid modification of a normally glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked protein, Gas1p. The unanchored Gas1p precursor undergoes progressive modification in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but is not modified by Golgi-specific glycosylation. Starvation-induced defects in anchor assembly and protein processing are rapid, and occur without altered maturation of other proteins. Cells remain competent to manufacture anchor components and to process Gas1p efficiently once inositol is restored. Newly synthesized Gas1p is packaged into vesicles formed in vitro from perforated yeast spheroplasts incubated with either yeast cytosol or the purified Sec proteins (COP II) required for vesicle budding from the ER. In vitro synthesized vesicles produced by inositol-starved membranes do not contain detectable Gas1p. These studies demonstrate that COP II components fulfill the soluble protein requirements for packaging a GPI-anchored protein into ER-derived transport vesicles. However, GPI anchor attachment is required for this packaging to occur. Images PMID:8598201

  5. Tape Dump and Restore.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-28

    VM/ CMS as provided at Virginia Tech and to make it possible to transfer files from this system to other computer systems , possibly machines using the...Technical Memorandum No. 80-5 DTI(-C August 28, 1980 DEC T.77w S DEC23 1980 F ABSTRACT A set of three programs to write CMS disk files on magnetic...tape in a variety of formats suitable for reading on a variety of computing systems and for restoring these tape files to disk within the restrictions

  6. Sertraline induces endoplasmic reticulum stress in hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Si; Xuan, Jiekun; Couch, Letha; Iyer, Advait; Wu, Yuanfeng; Li, Quan-Zhen; Guo, Lei

    2014-08-01

    Sertraline is used for the treatment of depression, and is also used for the treatment of panic, obsessive-compulsive, and post-traumatic stress disorders. Previously, we have demonstrated that sertraline caused hepatic cytotoxicity, with mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis being underlying mechanisms. In this study, we used microarray and other biochemical and molecular analyses to identify endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress as a novel molecular mechanism. HepG2 cells were exposed to sertraline and subjected to whole genome gene expression microarray analysis. Pathway analysis revealed that ER stress is among the significantly affected biological changes. We confirmed the increased expression of ER stress makers by real-time PCR and Western blots. The expression of typical ER stress markers such as PERK, IRE1α, and CHOP was significantly increased. To study better ER stress-mediated drug-induced liver toxicity; we established in vitro systems for monitoring ER stress quantitatively and efficiently, using Gaussia luciferase (Gluc) and secreted alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) as ER stress reporters. These in vitro systems were validated using well-known ER stress inducers. In these two reporter assays, sertraline inhibited the secretion of Gluc and SEAP. Moreover, we demonstrated that sertraline-induced apoptosis was coupled to ER stress and that the apoptotic effect was attenuated by 4-phenylbutyrate, a potent ER stress inhibitor. In addition, we showed that the MAP4K4-JNK signaling pathway contributed to the process of sertraline-induced ER stress. In summary, we demonstrated that ER stress is a mechanism of sertraline-induced liver toxicity.

  7. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Is Chronically Activated in Chronic Pancreatitis*

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Raghuwansh P.; Garg, Sushil K.; Dixit, Ajay K.; Dudeja, Vikas; Dawra, Rajinder K.; Saluja, Ashok K.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has now been recognized as a pathogenic event in many chronic diseases. However, ER stress has not been studied in CP, although pancreatic acinar cells seem to be especially vulnerable to ER dysfunction because of their dependence on high ER volume and functionality. Here, we aim to investigate ER stress in CP, study its pathogenesis in relation to trypsinogen activation (widely regarded as the key event of pancreatitis), and explore its mechanism, time course, and downstream consequences during pancreatic injury. CP was induced in mice by repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on caerulein hyperstimulation. ER stress leads to activation of unfolded protein response components that were measured in CP and AP. We show sustained up-regulation of unfolded protein response components ATF4, CHOP, GRP78, and XBP1 in CP. Overexpression of GRP78 and ATF4 in human CP confirmed the experimental findings. We used novel trypsinogen-7 knock-out mice (T−/−), which lack intra-acinar trypsinogen activation, to clarify the relationship of ER stress to intra-acinar trypsinogen activation in pancreatic injury. Comparable activation of ER stress was seen in wild type and T−/− mice. Induction of ER stress occurred through pathologic calcium signaling very early in the course of pancreatic injury. Our results establish that ER stress is chronically activated in CP and is induced early in pancreatic injury through pathologic calcium signaling independent of trypsinogen activation. ER stress may be an important pathogenic mechanism in pancreatitis that needs to be explored in future studies. PMID:25077966

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum stress is chronically activated in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Sah, Raghuwansh P; Garg, Sushil K; Dixit, Ajay K; Dudeja, Vikas; Dawra, Rajinder K; Saluja, Ashok K

    2014-10-03

    The pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has now been recognized as a pathogenic event in many chronic diseases. However, ER stress has not been studied in CP, although pancreatic acinar cells seem to be especially vulnerable to ER dysfunction because of their dependence on high ER volume and functionality. Here, we aim to investigate ER stress in CP, study its pathogenesis in relation to trypsinogen activation (widely regarded as the key event of pancreatitis), and explore its mechanism, time course, and downstream consequences during pancreatic injury. CP was induced in mice by repeated episodes of acute pancreatitis (AP) based on caerulein hyperstimulation. ER stress leads to activation of unfolded protein response components that were measured in CP and AP. We show sustained up-regulation of unfolded protein response components ATF4, CHOP, GRP78, and XBP1 in CP. Overexpression of GRP78 and ATF4 in human CP confirmed the experimental findings. We used novel trypsinogen-7 knock-out mice (T(-/-)), which lack intra-acinar trypsinogen activation, to clarify the relationship of ER stress to intra-acinar trypsinogen activation in pancreatic injury. Comparable activation of ER stress was seen in wild type and T(-/-) mice. Induction of ER stress occurred through pathologic calcium signaling very early in the course of pancreatic injury. Our results establish that ER stress is chronically activated in CP and is induced early in pancreatic injury through pathologic calcium signaling independent of trypsinogen activation. ER stress may be an important pathogenic mechanism in pancreatitis that needs to be explored in future studies.

  9. Mitofusin 2 ablation increases endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria coupling.

    PubMed

    Filadi, Riccardo; Greotti, Elisa; Turacchio, Gabriele; Luini, Alberto; Pozzan, Tullio; Pizzo, Paola

    2015-04-28

    The organization and mutual interactions between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondria modulate key aspects of cell pathophysiology. Several proteins have been suggested to be involved in keeping ER and mitochondria at a correct distance. Among them, in mammalian cells, mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), located on both the outer mitochondrial membrane and the ER surface, has been proposed to be a physical tether between the two organelles, forming homotypic interactions and heterocomplexes with its homolog Mfn1. Recently, this widely accepted model has been challenged using quantitative EM analysis. Using a multiplicity of morphological, biochemical, functional, and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that Mfn2 ablation increases the structural and functional ER-mitochondria coupling. In particular, we show that in different cell types Mfn2 ablation or silencing increases the close contacts between the two organelles and strengthens the efficacy of inositol trisphosphate (IP3)-induced Ca(2+) transfer from the ER to mitochondria, sensitizing cells to a mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload-dependent death. We also show that the previously reported discrepancy between electron and fluorescence microscopy data on ER-mitochondria proximity in Mfn2-ablated cells is only apparent. By using a different type of morphological analysis of fluorescent images that takes into account (and corrects for) the gross modifications in mitochondrial shape resulting from Mfn2 ablation, we demonstrate that an increased proximity between the organelles is also observed by confocal microscopy when Mfn2 levels are reduced. Based on these results, we propose a new model for ER-mitochondria juxtaposition in which Mfn2 works as a tethering antagonist preventing an excessive, potentially toxic, proximity between the two organelles.

  10. Reconstitution of Glucosylceramide Flip-Flop across Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Chalat, Madhavan; Menon, Indu; Turan, Zeynep; Menon, Anant K.

    2012-01-01

    Most glycosphingolipids are synthesized by the sequential addition of monosaccharides to glucosylceramide (GlcCer) in the lumen of the Golgi apparatus. Because GlcCer is synthesized on the cytoplasmic face of Golgi membranes, it must be flipped to the non-cytoplasmic face by a lipid flippase in order to nucleate glycosphingolipid synthesis. Halter et al. (Halter, D., Neumann, S., van Dijk, S. M., Wolthoorn, J., de Mazière, A. M., Vieira, O. V., Mattjus, P., Klumperman, J., van Meer, G., and Sprong, H. (2007) Pre- and post-Golgi translocation of glucosylceramide in glycosphingolipid synthesis. J. Cell Biol. 179, 101–115) proposed that this essential flipping step is accomplished via a complex trafficking itinerary; GlcCer is moved from the cytoplasmic face of the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by FAPP2, a cytoplasmic lipid transfer protein, flipped across the ER membrane, then delivered to the lumen of the Golgi complex by vesicular transport. We now report biochemical reconstitution studies to analyze GlcCer flipping at the ER. Using proteoliposomes reconstituted from Triton X-100-solubilized rat liver ER membrane proteins, we demonstrate rapid (t½ < 20 s), ATP-independent flip-flop of N-(6-((7-nitro-2–1,3-benzoxadiazol-4-yl)amino)hexanoyl)-d-glucosyl-β1–1′-sphingosine, a fluorescent GlcCer analog. Further studies involving protein modification, biochemical fractionation, and analyses of flip-flop in proteoliposomes reconstituted with ER membrane proteins from yeast indicate that GlcCer translocation is facilitated by well characterized ER phospholipid flippases that remain to be identified at the molecular level. By reason of their abundance and membrane bending activity, we considered that the ER reticulons and the related Yop1 protein could function as phospholipid-GlcCer flippases. Direct tests showed that these proteins have no flippase activity. PMID:22427661

  11. Endoplasmic reticulum stress activation during total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hocker, Austin D; Boileau, Ryan M; Lantz, Brick A; Jewett, Brian A; Gilbert, Jeffrey S; Dreyer, Hans C

    2013-01-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the most common remediation for knee pain from osteoarthritis (OA) and is performed 650,000 annually in the U.S. A tourniquet is commonly used during TKA which causes ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) to the lower limb but the effects of I/R on muscle are not fully understood. Previous reports suggest upregulation of cell stress and catabolism and downregulation of markers of cap-dependent translation during and after TKA. I/R has also been shown to cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and induce the unfolded protein response (UPR). We hypothesized that the UPR would be activated in response to ER stress during TKA. We obtained muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis at baseline, before TKA; at maximal ischemia, prior to tourniquet deflation; and during reperfusion in the operating room. Phosphorylation of 4E-BP1 and AKT decreased during ischemia (−28%, P < 0.05; −20%, P < 0.05, respectively) along with an increase in eIF2α phosphorylation (64%, P < 0.05) suggesting decreased translation initiation. Cleaved ATF6 protein increased in ischemia (39%, P = 0.056) but returned to baseline during reperfusion. CASP3 activation increased during reperfusion compared to baseline (23%, P < 0.05). XBP1 splicing assays revealed an increase in spliced transcript during ischemia (31%, P < 0.05) which diminished during reperfusion. These results suggest that in response to I/R during TKA all three branches of the ER stress response are activated. PMID:24159375

  12. Endoplasmic reticulum stress: key promoter of rosacea pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2014-12-01

    Recent scientific interest in the pathogenesis of rosacea focuses on abnormally high facial skin levels of cathelicidin and the trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein 5 (KLK5) that cleaves the cathelicidin precursor protein into the bioactive fragment LL-37, which exerts crucial proinflammatory, angiogenic and antimicrobial activities. Furthermore, increased expression of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) has been identified in rosacea skin supporting the participation of the innate immune system. Notably, TLRs are expressed on sensory neurons and increase neuronal excitability linking TLR signalling to the transmission of neuroinflammatory responses. It is the intention of this viewpoint to present a unifying concept that links all known clinical trigger factors of rosacea such as UV irradiation, heat, skin irritants and special foods to one converging point: enhanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that activates the unfolded protein response (UPR). ER stress via upregulation of transcription factor ATF4 increases TLR2 expression, resulting in enhanced production of cathelicidin and KLK5 mediating downstream proinflammatory, angiogenic and antimicrobial signalling. The presented concept identifies rosacea trigger factors as environmental stressors that enhance the skin's ER stress response. Exaggerated cutaneous ER stress that stimulates the TLR2-driven inflammatory response may involve sebocytes, keratinocytes, monocyte-macrophages and sensory cutaneous neurons. Finally, all antirosacea drugs are proposed to attenuate the ER stress signalling cascade at some point. Overstimulated ER stress signalling may have evolutionarily evolved as a compensatory mechanism to balance impaired vitamin D-driven LL-37-mediated antimicrobial defenses due to lower exposure of UV-B irradiation of the northern Celtic population.

  13. Calcium trafficking integrates endoplasmic reticulum function with mitochondrial bioenergetics

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Randal J.; Malhotra, Jyoti D.

    2014-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis is central to all cellular functions and has been studied for decades. Calcium acts as a critical second messenger for both extracellular and intracellular signaling and is fundamental in cell life and death decisions [1]. The calcium gradient in the cell is coupled with an inherent ability of the divalent cation to reversibly bind multiple target biological molecules to generate an extremely versatile signaling system [2]. Calcium signals are used by the cell to control diverse processes as development, neurotransmitter release, muscle contraction, metabolism, autophagy and cell death. “Cellular calcium overload” is detrimental to cellular health, resulting in massive activation of proteases and phospholipases leading to cell death [3]. Historically, cell death associated with calcium ion perturbations has been primarily recognized as necrosis. Recent evidence clearly associate changes in calcium ion concentrations with more sophisticated forms of cellular demise, including apoptosis [4] [5] [6] [7]. Although the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) serves as the primary calcium store in the metazoan cell, dynamic calcium release to the cytosol, mitochondria, nuclei and other organelles orchestrate diverse coordinated responses. Most evidence supports that calcium transport from the ER to mitochondria plays a significant role in regulating cellular bioenergetics, production of reactive oxygen species, induction of autophagy and apoptosis. Recently, molecular identities that mediate calcium traffic between the ER and mitochondria have been discovered [8] [9] [10]. The next questions are how they are regulated for exquisite tight control of ER – mitochondrial calcium dynamics. This review attempts to summarize recent advances in the role of calcium in regulation of ER and mitochondrial function. PMID:24690484

  14. Impaired autophagic flux is associated with increased endoplasmic reticulum stress during the development of NAFLD

    PubMed Central

    González-Rodríguez, Á; Mayoral, R; Agra, N; Valdecantos, M P; Pardo, V; Miquilena-Colina, M E; Vargas-Castrillón, J; Lo Iacono, O; Corazzari, M; Fimia, G M; Piacentini, M; Muntané, J; Boscá, L; García-Monzón, C; Martín-Sanz, P; Valverde, Á M

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenic mechanisms underlying the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) are not fully understood. In this study, we aimed to assess the relationship between endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy in human and mouse hepatocytes during NAFLD. ER stress and autophagy markers were analyzed in livers from patients with biopsy-proven non-alcoholic steatosis (NAS) or non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) compared with livers from subjects with histologically normal liver, in livers from mice fed with chow diet (CHD) compared with mice fed with high fat diet (HFD) or methionine-choline-deficient (MCD) diet and in primary and Huh7 human hepatocytes loaded with palmitic acid (PA). In NASH patients, significant increases in hepatic messenger RNA levels of markers of ER stress (activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP)) and autophagy (BCN1) were found compared with NAS patients. Likewise, protein levels of GRP78, CHOP and p62/SQSTM1 (p62) autophagic substrate were significantly elevated in NASH compared with NAS patients. In livers from mice fed with HFD or MCD, ER stress-mediated signaling was parallel to the blockade of the autophagic flux assessed by increases in p62, microtubule-associated protein 2 light chain 3 (LC3-II)/LC3-I ratio and accumulation of autophagosomes compared with CHD fed mice. In Huh7 hepatic cells, treatment with PA for 8 h triggered activation of both unfolding protein response and the autophagic flux. Conversely, prolonged treatment with PA (24 h) induced ER stress and cell death together with a blockade of the autophagic flux. Under these conditions, cotreatment with rapamycin or CHOP silencing ameliorated these effects and decreased apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that the autophagic flux is impaired in the liver from both NAFLD patients and murine models of NAFLD, as well as in lipid-overloaded human hepatocytes, and it could be due to

  15. Nodal endoplasmic reticulum, a specialized form of endoplasmic reticulum found in gravity-sensing root tip columella cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, H. Q.; Staehelin, L. A.

    2001-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of columella root cap cells has been postulated to play a role in gravity sensing. We have re-examined the ultrastructure of columella cells in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) root tips preserved by high-pressure freezing/freeze-substitution techniques to gain more precise information about the organization of the ER in such cells. The most notable findings are: the identification of a specialized form of ER, termed "nodal ER," which is found exclusively in columella cells; the demonstration that the bulk of the ER is organized in the form of a tubular network that is confined to a peripheral layer under the plasma membrane; and the discovery that this ER-rich peripheral region excludes Golgi stacks, vacuoles, and amyloplasts but not mitochondria. Nodal ER domains consist of an approximately 100-nm-diameter central rod composed of oblong subunits to which usually seven sheets of rough ER are attached along their margins. These domains form patches at the interface between the peripheral ER network and the ER-free central region of the cells, and they occupy defined positions within central and flanking columella cells. Over one-half of the nodal ER domains are located along the outer tangential walls of the flanking cells. Cytochalasin D and latrunculin A cause an increase in size and a decrease in numbers of nodal ER domains. We postulate that the nodal ER membranes locally modulate the gravisensing signals produced by the sedimenting amyloplasts, and that the confinement of all ER membranes to the cell periphery serves to enhance the sedimentability of the amyloplasts in the central region of columella cells.

  16. Filamin depletion blocks endoplasmic spreading and destabilizes force-bearing adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Christopher D.; Gauthier, Nils C.; Biais, Nicolas; Lazar, Andre M.; Roca-Cusachs, Pere; Yu, Cheng-Han; Sheetz, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    Cell motility is an essential process that depends on a coherent, cross-linked actin cytoskeleton that physically coordinates the actions of numerous structural and signaling molecules. The actin cross-linking protein, filamin (Fln), has been implicated in the support of three-dimensional cortical actin networks capable of both maintaining cellular integrity and withstanding large forces. Although numerous studies have examined cells lacking one of the multiple Fln isoforms, compensatory mechanisms can mask novel phenotypes only observable by further Fln depletion. Indeed, shRNA-mediated knockdown of FlnA in FlnB–/– mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) causes a novel endoplasmic spreading deficiency as detected by endoplasmic reticulum markers. Microtubule (MT) extension rates are also decreased but not by peripheral actin flow, because this is also decreased in the Fln-depleted system. Additionally, Fln-depleted MEFs exhibit decreased adhesion stability that appears in increased ruffling of the cell edge, reduced adhesion size, transient traction forces, and decreased stress fibers. FlnA–/– MEFs, but not FlnB–/– MEFs, also show a moderate defect in endoplasm spreading, characterized by initial extension followed by abrupt retractions and stress fiber fracture. FlnA localizes to actin linkages surrounding the endoplasm, adhesions, and stress fibers. Thus we suggest that Flns have a major role in the maintenance of actin-based mechanical linkages that enable endoplasmic spreading and MT extension as well as sustained traction forces and mature focal adhesions. PMID:21325628

  17. Alginate Oligosaccharide Prevents Acute Doxorubicin Cardiotoxicity by Suppressing Oxidative Stress and Endoplasmic Reticulum-Mediated Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jun-Jie; Ma, Lei-Lei; Shi, Hong-Tao; Zhu, Jian-Bing; Wu, Jian; Ding, Zhi-Wen; An, Yi; Zou, Yun-Zeng; Ge, Jun-Bo

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (DOX) is a highly potent chemotherapeutic agent, but its usage is limited by dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. DOX-induced cardiotoxicity involves increased oxidative stress and activated endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. Alginate oligosaccharide (AOS) is a non-immunogenic, non-toxic and biodegradable polymer, with anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory and anti-endoplasmic reticulum stress properties. The present study examined whether AOS pretreatment could protect against acute DOX cardiotoxicity, and the underlying mechanisms focused on oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. We found that AOS pretreatment markedly increased the survival rate of mice insulted with DOX, improved DOX-induced cardiac dysfunction and attenuated DOX-induced myocardial apoptosis. AOS pretreatment mitigated DOX-induced cardiac oxidative stress, as shown by the decreased expressions of gp91 (phox) and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). Moreover, AOS pretreatment significantly decreased the expression of Caspase-12, C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) (markers for endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis) and Bax (a downstream molecule of CHOP), while up-regulating the expression of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Taken together, these findings identify AOS as a potent compound that prevents acute DOX cardiotoxicity, at least in part, by suppression of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis. PMID:27999379

  18. Paul Davis Restoration Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Paul Davis Restoration (the Company) is located in Nicholasville, Kentucky. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at a property constructed prior to 1978, located in Lexington, Kentucky.

  19. Longevity of Posterior Composite Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Opdam, N.J.M.; van de Sande, F.H.; Bronkhorst, E.; Cenci, M.S.; Bottenberg, P.; Pallesen, U.; Gaengler, P.; Lindberg, A.; Huysmans, M.C.D.N.J.M.; van Dijken, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis, based on individual participant data from several studies, was to investigate the influence of patient-, materials-, and tooth-related variables on the survival of posterior resin composite restorations. Following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines, we conducted a search resulting in 12 longitudinal studies of direct posterior resin composite restorations with at least 5 years’ follow-up. Original datasets were still available, including placement/failure/censoring of restorations, restored surfaces, materials used, reasons for clinical failure, and caries-risk status. A database including all restorations was constructed, and a multivariate Cox regression method was used to analyze variables of interest [patient (age; gender; caries-risk status), jaw (upper; lower), number of restored surfaces, resin composite and adhesive materials, and use of glass-ionomer cement as base/liner (present or absent)]. The hazard ratios with respective 95% confidence intervals were determined, and annual failure rates were calculated for subgroups. Of all restorations, 2,816 (2,585 Class II and 231 Class I) were included in the analysis, of which 569 failed during the observation period. Main reasons for failure were caries and fracture. The regression analyses showed a significantly higher risk of failure for restorations in high-caries-risk individuals and those with a higher number of restored surfaces. PMID:25048250

  20. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Homeostasis in Reproductive Physiology and Pathology.

    PubMed

    Guzel, Elif; Arlier, Sefa; Guzeloglu-Kayisli, Ozlem; Tabak, Mehmet Selcuk; Ekiz, Tugba; Semerci, Nihan; Larsen, Kellie; Schatz, Frederick; Lockwood, Charles Joseph; Kayisli, Umit Ali

    2017-04-08

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER), comprises 60% of the total cell membrane and interacts directly or indirectly with several cell organelles i.e., Golgi bodies, mitochondria and proteasomes. The ER is usually associated with large numbers of attached ribosomes. During evolution, ER developed as the specific cellular site of synthesis, folding, modification and trafficking of secretory and cell-surface proteins. The ER is also the major intracellular calcium storage compartment that maintains cellular calcium homeostasis. During the production of functionally effective proteins, several ER-specific molecular steps sense quantity and quality of synthesized proteins as well as proper folding into their native structures. During this process, excess accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the ER lumen results in ER stress, the homeostatic coping mechanism that activates an ER-specific adaptation program, (the unfolded protein response; UPR) to increase ER-associated degradation of structurally and/or functionally defective proteins, thus sustaining ER homeostasis. Impaired ER homeostasis results in aberrant cellular responses, contributing to the pathogenesis of various diseases. Both female and male reproductive tissues undergo highly dynamic cellular, molecular and genetic changes such as oogenesis and spermatogenesis starting in prenatal life, mainly controlled by sex-steroids but also cytokines and growth factors throughout reproductive life. These reproductive changes require ER to provide extensive protein synthesis, folding, maturation and then their trafficking to appropriate cellular location as well as destroying unfolded/misfolded proteins via activating ER-associated degradation mediated proteasomes. Many studies have now shown roles for ER stress/UPR signaling cascades in the endometrial menstrual cycle, ovarian folliculogenesis and oocyte maturation, spermatogenesis, fertilization, pre-implantation embryo development and pregnancy and parturition

  1. 15 CFR 990.56 - Restoration selection-use of a Regional Restoration Plan or existing restoration project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Restoration selection-use of a..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase § 990.56 Restoration selection—use of a Regional Restoration Plan or existing restoration...

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum stress caused by aggregate-prone proteins containing homopolymeric amino acids.

    PubMed

    Uchio, Naohiro; Oma, Yoko; Toriumi, Kazuya; Sasagawa, Noboru; Tanida, Isei; Fujita, Eriko; Kouroku, Yoriko; Kuroda, Reiko; Momoi, Takashi; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2007-11-01

    Many human proteins have homopolymeric amino acid (HPAA) tracts, but their physiological functions or cellular effects are not well understood. Previously, we expressed 20 HPAAs in mammalian cells and showed characteristic intracellular localization, in that hydrophobic HPAAs aggregated strongly and caused high cytotoxicity in proportion to their hydrophobicity. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of these aggregate-prone hydrophobic HPAAs, assuming that the ubiquitin proteasome system is impaired in the same manner as other well-known aggregate-prone polyglutamine-containing proteins. Some highly hydrophobic HPAAs caused a deficiency in the ubiquitin proteasome system and excess endoplasmic reticulum stress, leading to apoptosis. These results indicate that the property of causing excess endoplasmic reticulum stress by proteasome impairment may contribute to the strong cytotoxicity of highly hydrophobic HPAAs, and proteasome impairment and the resulting excess endoplasmic reticulum stress is not a common cytotoxic effect of aggregate-prone proteins such as polyglutamine.

  3. Endoplasmic reticulum targeting and glycosylation of hybrid proteins in transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Iturriaga, G; Jefferson, R A; Bevan, M W

    1989-01-01

    The correct compartmentation of proteins to the endomembrane system, mitochondria, or chloroplasts requires an amino-terminal signal peptide. The major tuber protein of potato, patatin, has a signal peptide in common with many other plant storage proteins. When the putative signal peptide of patatin was fused to the bacterial reporter protein beta-glucuronidase, the fusion proteins were translocated to the endoplasmic reticulum in planta and in vitro. In addition, translocated beta-glucuronidase was modified by glycosylation, and the signal peptide was correctly processed. In the presence of an inhibitor of glycosylation, tunicamycin, the enzymatically active form of beta-glucuronidase was assembled in the endoplasmic reticulum. This is the first report of targeting a cytoplasmic protein to the endoplasmic reticulum of plants using a signal peptide. PMID:2535509

  4. Cloning of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase (SERCA) from Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, S. C.; Meleshkevitch, E. A.; Mandal, P. K.; Boudko, D. Y.; Ahearn, G. A.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported on calcium transport mechanisms in American lobster, Homarus americanus, using 45Ca2+ coupled with vesicle preparations of hepatopancreatic endoplasmic reticulum. The active transport of calcium across membranes bordering calcium-sequestering stores such as sarcoplasmic or endoplasmic reticulum is catalyzed by membrane-spanning proteins, the sarco-endoplasmic Ca2+-ATPases (SERCAs). In the study described here we used advanced bioinformatics and molecular techniques to clone SERCA from the economically important Caribbean spiny lobster, Panulirus argus. We report the complete cloning of a full-length SERCA from P. argus antenna cDNA (GenBank accession number AY702617). This cDNA has a 1020-amino acid residue open reading frame which is 90% identical to published sequences of other crustacean SERCA proteins. Our data support the hypothesis that one crustacean and three vertebrate genes controlling calcium transport were derived from a common ancestral gene. PMID:18825387

  5. Restorative Nurse Assistant. Instructor Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Missouri Univ., Columbia. Instructional Materials Lab.

    This curriculum material covers the basic orientation and necessary skills which would enable the practicing Certified Nurse Assistant to be trained as a Restorative Nurse Assistant. The shift in emphasis from maintenance care to restorative care in the long-term care setting has created a need for trained paraprofessionals who are competent in…

  6. A Restorative Approach to Postvention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schubert, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Restorative principles are at the core of effective response to crisis situations. The goal of these interventions is to repair hurt and rebuild trust between persons and within the community. Restorative practices can be implemented in a wide variety of settings, offering an opportunity for healing to take place in a way which benefits not only…

  7. Unusual configurations of endoplasmic reticulum in cells of acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Parkin, J L; Brunning, R D

    1978-08-01

    An ultrastructural study of leukemia cells from 8 patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia revealed several features that have not previously been emphasized: prominent dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum and two unusual configurations of endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The two membrane structures, multilaminar ER and complex stellate arrangements of ER, appeared to be morphogenetically related. The multilaminar ER was observed in every mitotic cell and less frequently in interphase cells. The stellate ER complex was observed only in interphase cells. Ultrastructural evidence is presented to support the possible evolution of the stellate ER complex from the multilaminar ER.

  8. The density of the cell sap and endoplasm of Nitellopsis and Chara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wayne, R.; Staves, M. P.

    1991-01-01

    We measured the densities of the cell sap, endoplasm and cell wall of Nitellopsis obtusa and Chara corallina using interference microscopy, refractometry, immersion refractometry, equilibrium sedimentation and chemical microanalysis techniques. These values are important for the determination of many rheological properties of the cytoplasm as well as for understanding buoyancy regulation, dispersal mechanisms and how cells respond to gravity. The average densities of the cell sap, endoplasm and cell wall are 1,006.9, 1,016.7 and 1,371 kg m-3 for Nitellopsis and 1,005.0, 1,013.9, and 1,355.3 kg m-3 for Chara.

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress sensor protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) protects against pressure overload-induced heart failure and lung remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Kwak, Dongmin; Lu, Zhongbing; Xu, Xin; Fassett, John; Wang, Huan; Wei, Yidong; Cavener, Douglas R; Hu, Xinli; Hall, Jennifer; Bache, Robert J; Chen, Yingjie

    2014-10-01

    Studies have reported that development of congestive heart failure is associated with increased endoplasmic reticulum stress. Double stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) is a major transducer of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response and directly phosphorylates eukaryotic initiation factor 2α, resulting in translational attenuation. However, the physiological effect of PERK on congestive heart failure development is unknown. To study the effect of PERK on ventricular structure and function, we generated inducible cardiac-specific PERK knockout mice. Under unstressed conditions, cardiac PERK knockout had no effect on left ventricular mass, or its ratio to body weight, cardiomyocyte size, fibrosis, or left ventricular function. However, in response to chronic transverse aortic constriction, PERK knockout mice exhibited decreased ejection fraction, increased left ventricular fibrosis, enhanced cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and exacerbated lung remodeling in comparison with wild-type mice. PERK knockout also dramatically attenuated cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase expression in response to aortic constriction. Our findings suggest that PERK is required to protect the heart from pressure overload-induced congestive heart failure.

  10. The Hip Restoration Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Allston Julius; Atilla, Halis Atil

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Despite the rapid advancement of imaging and arthroscopic techniques about the hip joint, missed diagnoses are still common. As a deep joint and compared to the shoulder and knee joints, localization of hip symptoms is difficult. Hip pathology is not easily isolated and is often related to intra and extra-articular abnormalities. In light of these diagnostic challenges, we recommend an algorithmic approach to effectively diagnoses and treat hip pain. Methods In this review, hip pain is evaluated from diagnosis to treatment in a clear decision model. First we discuss emergency hip situations followed by the differentiation of intra and extra-articular causes of the hip pain. We differentiate the intra-articular hip as arthritic and non-arthritic and extra-articular pain as surrounding or remote tissue generated. Further, extra-articular hip pain is evaluated according to pain location. Finally we summarize the surgical treatment approach with an algorithmic diagram. Conclusion Diagnosis of hip pathology is difficult because the etiologies of pain may be various. An algorithmic approach to hip restoration from diagnosis to rehabilitation is crucial to successfully identify and manage hip pathologies. Level of evidence: V. PMID:28066734

  11. CRITERIA FOR PRIORITIZATION OF ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prioritization of ecosystem restoration measures is important for state and federal agencies, watershed coalitions, science advisory boards and other groups responsible for decision-making regarding restoration activities. Although widely utilized, the term "restoration prioriti...

  12. Fernald restoration: ecologists and engineers integrate restoration and cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, Eric; Homer, John

    2002-07-15

    As cleanup workers excavate pits and tear down buildings at the Fernald site in southwest Ohio, site ecologists are working side-by-side to create thriving wetlands and develop the early stages of forest, prairie, and savanna ecosystems to restore natural resources that were impacted by years of site operations. In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy-Fernald Office (DOE-FN) and its cleanup contractor, Fluor Fernald, Inc., initiated several ecological restoration projects in perimeter areas of the site (e.g., areas not used for or impacted by uranium processing or waste management). The projects are part of Fernald's final land use plan to restore natural resources over 904 acres of the 1,050-acre site. Pete Yerace, the DOE-FN Natural Resource Trustee representative is working with the Fernald Natural Resource Trustees in an oversight role to resolve the state of Ohio's 1986 claim against DOE for injuries to natural resources. Fluor Fernald, Inc., and DOE-FN developed the ''Natural Resource Restoration Plan'', which outlines 15 major restoration projects for the site and will restore injured natural resources at the site. In general, Fernald's plan includes grading to maximize the formation of wetlands or expanded floodplain, amending soil where topsoil has been removed during excavation, and establishing native vegetation throughout the site. Today, with cleanup over 35 percent complete and site closure targeted for 2006, Fernald is entering a new phase of restoration that involves heavily remediated areas. By working closely with engineers and cleanup crews, site ecologists can take advantage of remediation fieldwork (e.g., convert an excavated depression into a wetland) and avoid unnecessary costs and duplication. This collaboration has also created opportunities for relatively simple and inexpensive restoration of areas that were discovered during ongoing remediation. To ensure the survival of the plant material in heavily disturbed soils, Fernald will use

  13. Image restoration for a hypertelescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakai, Yuto; Baba, Naoshi; Murakami, Naoshi; Miura, Noriaki; Tamura, Motohide

    2016-08-01

    An effective aperture with several tens or more kilometers is needed to resolve exoplanets. A hypertelescope consists of multiple elemental telescopes like an interferometric array. Light beams from the elemental telescopes are collected and densified and used to form a snap-shot image. Thus formed image, however, does not exhibit high quality features, because the spatial frequency sampling is not dense enough to image properly exoplanets. Some kind of image restoration should be implemented to reveal the surface features of exoplanets. We conduct the image restoration and show the results and the effectiveness of the image restoration through computer simulations.

  14. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Cartilage Pathophysiology; Contributing Factors to Apoptosis and Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Alexandria; Oxford, Alexandra E.; Tawara, Ken; Jorcyk, Cheryl L.; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2017-01-01

    Chondrocytes of the growth plate undergo apoptosis during the process of endochondral ossification, as well as during the progression of osteoarthritis. Although the regulation of this process is not completely understood, alterations in the precisely orchestrated programmed cell death during development can have catastrophic results, as exemplified by several chondrodystrophies which are frequently accompanied by early onset osteoarthritis. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie chondrocyte apoptosis during endochondral ossification in the growth plate has the potential to impact the development of therapeutic applications for chondrodystrophies and associated early onset osteoarthritis. In recent years, several chondrodysplasias and collagenopathies have been recognized as protein-folding diseases that lead to endoplasmic reticulum stress, endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation, and the unfolded protein response. Under conditions of prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress in which the protein folding load outweighs the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum, cellular dysfunction and death often occur. However, unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling is also required for the normal maturation of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Understanding how UPR signaling may contribute to cartilage pathophysiology is an essential step toward therapeutic modulation of skeletal disorders that lead to osteoarthritis. PMID:28335520

  15. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Unfolded Protein Response in Cartilage Pathophysiology; Contributing Factors to Apoptosis and Osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Alexandria; Oxford, Alexandra E; Tawara, Ken; Jorcyk, Cheryl L; Oxford, Julia Thom

    2017-03-20

    Chondrocytes of the growth plate undergo apoptosis during the process of endochondral ossification, as well as during the progression of osteoarthritis. Although the regulation of this process is not completely understood, alterations in the precisely orchestrated programmed cell death during development can have catastrophic results, as exemplified by several chondrodystrophies which are frequently accompanied by early onset osteoarthritis. Understanding the mechanisms that underlie chondrocyte apoptosis during endochondral ossification in the growth plate has the potential to impact the development of therapeutic applications for chondrodystrophies and associated early onset osteoarthritis. In recent years, several chondrodysplasias and collagenopathies have been recognized as protein-folding diseases that lead to endoplasmic reticulum stress, endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation, and the unfolded protein response. Under conditions of prolonged endoplasmic reticulum stress in which the protein folding load outweighs the folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum, cellular dysfunction and death often occur. However, unfolded protein response (UPR) signaling is also required for the normal maturation of chondrocytes and osteoblasts. Understanding how UPR signaling may contribute to cartilage pathophysiology is an essential step toward therapeutic modulation of skeletal disorders that lead to osteoarthritis.

  16. Alteration of the proteostasis network of plant cells promotes the post-endoplasmic reticulum trafficking of recombinant mutant (L444P) human β-glucocerebrosidase

    PubMed Central

    Babajani, Gholamreza; Kermode, Allison R

    2014-01-01

    Gaucher disease is a prevalent lysosomal storage disease characterized by a deficiency in the activity of lysosomal acid β-glucosidase (glucocerebrosidase, GCase, EC 3.2.1.45). One of the most prevalent disease-causing mutations in humans is a L444P missense mutation in the GCase protein, which results in its disrupted folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and impaired post-ER trafficking. To determine whether the post-ER trafficking of this severely malfolded protein can be restored, we expressed the mutant L444P GCase as a recombinant protein in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow 2 [BY2]) cells, in which the GCase variant was equipped with a plant signal peptide to allow for secretion upon rescued trafficking out of the ER. The recombinant L444P mutant GCase was retained in the plant endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Kifunensine and Eeyarestatin I, both inhibitors of ER-associated degradation (ERAD), and the proteostasis regulators, celastrol and MG-132, increased the steady-state levels of the mutant protein inside the plant cells and further promoted the post-ER trafficking of L444P GCase, as indicated by endoglycosidase-H sensitivity- and secretion- analyses. Transcript profiling of genes encoding ER-molecular chaperones, ER stress responsive proteins, and cytoplasmic heat shock response proteins, revealed insignificant or only very modest changes in response to the ERAD inhibitors and proteostasis regulators. An exception was the marked response to celastrol which reduced the steady-state levels of cytoplasmic HSP90 transcripts and protein. As HSP90 participates in the targeting of misfolded proteins to the proteasome pathway, its down-modulation in response to celastrol may partly account for the mechanism of improved homeostasis of L444P GCase mediated by this triterpene. PMID:24713615

  17. Attenuation of PKR-like ER Kinase (PERK) Signaling Selectively Controls Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-induced Inflammation Without Compromising Immunological Responses.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, Lauren N; Abiraman, Kavitha; Plyler, Emily S; Sprenkle, Neil T; Gibson, Sara A; McFarland, Braden C; Rajbhandari, Rajani; Rowse, Amber L; Benveniste, Etty N; Meares, Gordon P

    2016-07-22

    Inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress are associated with many neurological diseases. ER stress is brought on by the accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER, which leads to activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), a conserved pathway that transmits signals to restore homeostasis or eliminate the irreparably damaged cell. We provide evidence that inhibition or genetic haploinsufficiency of protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) can selectively control inflammation brought on by ER stress without impinging on UPR-dependent survival and adaptive responses or normal immune responses. Using astrocytes lacking one or both alleles of PERK or the PERK inhibitor GSK2606414, we demonstrate that PERK haploinsufficiency or partial inhibition led to reduced ER stress-induced inflammation (IL-6, CCL2, and CCL20 expression) without compromising prosurvival responses. In contrast, complete loss of PERK blocked canonical PERK-dependent UPR genes and promoted apoptosis. Reversal of eIF2α-mediated translational repression using ISRIB potently suppressed PERK-dependent inflammatory gene expression, indicating that the selective modulation of inflammatory gene expression by PERK inhibition may be linked to attenuation of eIF2α phosphorylation and reveals a previously unknown link between translational repression and transcription of inflammatory genes. Additionally, ER-stressed astrocytes can drive an inflammatory M1-like phenotype in microglia, and this can be attenuated with inhibition of PERK. Importantly, targeting PERK neither disrupted normal cytokine signaling in astrocytes or microglia nor impaired macrophage phagocytosis or T cell polarization. Collectively, this work suggests that targeting PERK may provide a means for selective immunoregulation in the context of ER stress without disrupting normal immune function.

  18. Aerobic exercise training rescues cardiac protein quality control and blunts endoplasmic reticulum stress in heart failure rats.

    PubMed

    Bozi, Luiz H M; Jannig, Paulo R; Rolim, Natale; Voltarelli, Vanessa A; Dourado, Paulo M M; Wisløff, Ulrik; Brum, Patricia C

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through accumulation of misfolded proteins plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular diseases. In an attempt to reestablish ER homoeostasis, the unfolded protein response (UPR) is activated. However, if ER stress persists, sustained UPR activation leads to apoptosis. There is no available therapy for ER stress relief. Considering that aerobic exercise training (AET) attenuates oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and calcium imbalance, it may be a potential strategy to reestablish cardiac ER homoeostasis. We test the hypothesis that AET would attenuate impaired cardiac ER stress after myocardial infarction (MI). Wistar rats underwent to either MI or sham surgeries. Four weeks later, rats underwent to 8 weeks of moderate-intensity AET. Myocardial infarction rats displayed cardiac dysfunction and lung oedema, suggesting heart failure. Cardiac dysfunction in MI rats was paralleled by increased protein levels of UPR markers (GRP78, DERLIN-1 and CHOP), accumulation of misfolded and polyubiquitinated proteins, and reduced chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity. These results suggest an impaired cardiac protein quality control. Aerobic exercise training improved exercise capacity and cardiac function of MI animals. Interestingly, AET blunted MI-induced ER stress by reducing protein levels of UPR markers, and accumulation of both misfolded and polyubiquinated proteins, which was associated with restored proteasome activity. Taken together, our study provide evidence for AET attenuation of ER stress through the reestablishment of cardiac protein quality control, which contributes to better cardiac function in post-MI heart failure rats. These results reinforce the importance of AET as primary non-pharmacological therapy to cardiovascular disease.

  19. Curcumin Improves Palmitate-Induced Insulin Resistance in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells by Maintaining Proteostasis in Endoplasmic Reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Mao; Qiu, Hong; Cao, Yingkang; Zhang, Min; Mi, Yan; Yu, Jing; Wang, Changhua

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of proteasome and autophagy will result in disturbance of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis, and thus lead to long-term and chronic ER stress and subsequent unfolded protein response (UPR), which is implicated in the occurrence and development of insulin resistance. Curcumin exerts beneficial metabolic effects in in vitro cells and in vivo animal models of diabetes and diabetic complications including cardiovascular diseases, due to its powerful anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. However, its impacts on insulin resistance of endothelial cells and its underlying mechanism(s) remain ill-defined. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that curcumin action in ER protein quality control was related to improvement of insulin resistance in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured with saturated fatty acid palmitate. We found that palmitate treatment induced insulin resistance of HUVECs and activated both the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy. Palmitate-stimulated activation of the UPS and autophagy was attenuated by pharmacological inhibition of ER stress. In addition, curcumin supplementation mitigated palmitate-induced insulin resistance, inhibited the UPS, and activated autophagy. Furthermore, curcumin administration suppressed palmitate-induced protein aggregation and ER stress. Genetic inhibition of autophagy by silencing autophagy protein 5 (Atg5) completely restored total protein ubiquitination and protein aggregation in HUVECs treated with combined curcumin and palmitate. Atg5-knockdown also abolished the beneficial effects of curcumin on palmitate-induced ER stress, JNK/IRS-1 pathway as well as insulin signaling. Our results reveal that curcumin-activated autophagy could maintain proteostasis in ER leading to attenuation of ER stress and subsequent inhibition of JNK/IRS-1 pathway and improvement of insulin resistance. PMID:28377722

  20. EBS7 is a plant-specific component of a highly conserved endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation system in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yidan; Zhang, Congcong; Wang, Dinghe; Su, Wei; Liu, Linchuan; Wang, Muyang; Li, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) is an essential part of an ER-localized protein quality-control system for eliminating terminally misfolded proteins. Recent studies have demonstrated that the ERAD machinery is conserved among yeast, animals, and plants; however, it remains unknown if the plant ERAD system involves plant-specific components. Here we report that the Arabidopsis ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized brassinosteroid-insensitive 1 suppressor 7 (EBS7) gene encodes an ER membrane-localized ERAD component that is highly conserved in land plants. Loss-of-function ebs7 mutations prevent ERAD of brassinosteroid insensitive 1-9 (bri1-9) and bri1-5, two ER-retained mutant variants of the cell-surface receptor for brassinosteroids (BRs). As a result, the two mutant receptors accumulate in the ER and consequently leak to the plasma membrane, resulting in the restoration of BR sensitivity and phenotypic suppression of the bri1-9 and bri1-5 mutants. EBS7 accumulates under ER stress, and its mutations lead to hypersensitivity to ER and salt stresses. EBS7 interacts with the ER membrane-anchored ubiquitin ligase Arabidopsis thaliana HMG-CoA reductase degradation 1a (AtHrd1a), one of the central components of the Arabidopsis ERAD machinery, and an ebs7 mutation destabilizes AtHrd1a to reduce polyubiquitination of bri1-9. Taken together, our results uncover a plant-specific component of a plant ERAD pathway and also suggest its likely biochemical function. PMID:26371323

  1. Lapatinib and Obatoclax Kill Breast Cancer Cells through Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Endoplasmic Reticulum StressS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshanks, Nichola; Tang, Yong; Booth, Laurence; Hamed, Hossein; Grant, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies showed that lapatinib and obatoclax interact in a greater-than-additive fashion to cause cell death and do so through a toxic form of autophagy. The present studies sought to extend our analyses. Lapatinib and obatoclax killed multiple tumor cell types, and cells lacking phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) function were relatively resistant to drug combination lethality; expression of PTEN in PTEN-null breast cancer cells restored drug sensitivity. Coadministration of lapatinib with obatoclax elicited autophagic cell death that was attributable to the actions of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species. Wild-type cells but not mitochondria-deficient rho-zero cells were radiosensitized by lapatinib and obatoclax treatment. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2) by the drug combination was enhanced by radiation, and signaling by p38 MAPK and JNK1/2 promoted cell killing. In immunohistochemical analyses, the autophagosome protein p62 was determined to be associated with protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK) and inositol-requiring enzyme 1, as well as with binding immunoglobulin protein/78-kDa glucose-regulated protein, in drug combination-treated cells. Knockdown of PERK suppressed drug-induced autophagy and protected tumor cells from the drug combination. Knockdown of PERK suppressed the reduction in Mcl-1 expression after drug combination exposure, and overexpression of Mcl-1 protected cells. Our data indicate that mitochondrial function plays an essential role in cell killing by lapatinib and obatoclax, as well as radiosensitization by this drug combination. PMID:22989520

  2. Wetlands Restoration Definitions and Distinctions

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Ecological restoration is a valuable endeavor that has proven very difficult to define. The term indicates that degraded and destroyed natural wetland systems will be reestablished to sites where they once existed. But, what wetland ecosystems are we talki

  3. Temperature-compensating dc restorer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, H. M.

    1980-01-01

    Circuit provides stable references restoration in addition to temperature compensation. Possible TV monitor applications include traffic and security surveillance systems, where cameras are subject to environmental extremes, as in unheated warehouses or outdoors.

  4. Basic research for environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the midst of a major environmental restoration effort to reduce the health and environmental risks resulting from past waste management and disposal practices at DOE sites. This report describes research needs in environmental restoration and complements a previously published document, DOE/ER-0419, Evaluation of Mid-to-Long Term Basic Research for Environmental Restoration. Basic research needs have been grouped into five major categories patterned after those identified in DOE/ER-0419: (1) environmental transport and transformations; (2) advanced sampling, characterization, and monitoring methods; (3) new remediation technologies; (4) performance assessment; and (5) health and environmental effects. In addition to basic research, this document deals with education and training needs for environmental restoration. 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  5. Trauma from occlusion. Restorative concerns.

    PubMed

    Neff, P

    1995-04-01

    Trauma from occlusion and restorative concerns may affect the tooth itself, the supporting structures inside and around the tooth's immediate structures, and the total articulating system, which includes the neuromuscular system, the temporomandibular joints, and other systems such as the impairment of hearing or vision and many other peripheral conditions. A thorough examination and a differential diagnosis procedure is essential to restore the health of the articulating system and reverse peripheral condition. This includes the ability to restore the individual tooth in its best anatomic position as a complement to the articulating system using all individual disciplines of dentistry in the finest abilities of treatment and the ability to share and distinguish the possible parafunctional habits and the need for behavioral understanding, support, and management to limit or lessen the wear and destruction of the individual tissues and to restore a healthier physical support.

  6. The Mitochondrial Translocator Protein, TSPO, Inhibits HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Biosynthesis via the Endoplasmic Reticulum-Associated Protein Degradation Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Tao; Dang, Ying

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 Env glycoprotein is folded in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which is necessary for viral entry and replication. Currently, it is still unclear how this process is regulated. The glycoprotein folding in the ER is controlled by the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway, which specifically targets misfolded proteins for degradation. Previously, we reported that HIV-1 replication is restricted in the human CD4+ T cell line CEM.NKR (NKR). To understand this mechanism, we first analyzed cellular protein expression in NKR cells and discovered that levels of the mitochondrial translocator protein TSPO were upregulated by ∼64-fold. Notably, when NKR cells were treated with TSPO antagonist PK-11195, Ro5-4864, or diazepam, HIV restriction was completely disrupted, and TSPO knockdown by short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) achieved a similar effect. We next analyzed viral protein expression, and, interestingly, we discovered that Env expression was specifically inhibited. Both TSPO knockdown and treatment with TSPO antagonist could restore Env expression in NKR cells. We further discovered that Env proteins were rapidly degraded and that kifunensine, an ERAD pathway inhibitor, could restore Env expression and viral replication, indicating that Env proteins were misfolded and degraded through the ERAD pathway in NKR cells. We also knocked out the TSPO gene in 293T cells using CRISPR/Cas9 (clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeat [CRISPR]/CRISPR-associated-9) technology and found that TSPO could similarly inhibit Env expression in these cells. Taken together, these results demonstrate that TSPO inhibits Env protein expression through the ERAD pathway and suggest that mitochondria play an important role in regulating the Env folding process. IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 Env glycoprotein is absolutely required for viral infection, and an understanding of its expression pathway in infected cells will identify new targets for antiretroviral

  7. Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Colley, J.S.

    1992-08-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was initially chartered on October 1, 1989, as a ``entral Environmental Restoration Division`` to manage the investigation and remediation of inactive sites and facilities that have been declared surplus and have no further programmatic use. The Energy Systems ER Division was established to support the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) consolidated ER Program. The DOE-OR Assistant Manager for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management provides program and budget direction to the Energy Systems ER Program for environmental restoration activities at the sites operated by Energy Systems (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) and at the off-site locations. The Energy Systems ER Division is specifically charged with assessing these sites for potential contamination and managing the cleanup processes. The Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Division was chartered on October 1, 1989, as a central organization to manage the Remedial Action (RA) Program. The purpose of this document is to ensure that: senior ER management provides planning, organization, direction, control, and support to achieve the organization`s objectives; the line organization achieves quality; and overall performance is reviewed and evaluated using a rigorous assessment process.

  8. Sodium Butyrate Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Autophagy in Colorectal Cells: Implications for Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jintao; Yi, Man; Zha, Longying; Chen, Siqiang; Li, Zhijia; Li, Cheng; Gong, Mingxing; Deng, Hong; Chu, Xinwei; Chen, Jiehua; Zhang, Zheqing; Mao, Limei; Sun, Suxia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid derived from dietary fiber, inhibits proliferation and induces cell death in colorectal cancer cells. However, clinical trials have shown mixed results regarding the anti-tumor activities of butyrate. We have previously shown that sodium butyrate increases endoplasmic reticulum stress by altering intracellular calcium levels, a well-known autophagy trigger. Here, we investigated whether sodium butyrate-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress mediated autophagy, and whether there was crosstalk between autophagy and the sodium butyrate-induced apoptotic response in human colorectal cancer cells. Methods Human colorectal cancer cell lines (HCT-116 and HT-29) were treated with sodium butyrate at concentrations ranging from 0.5–5mM. Cell proliferation was assessed using MTT tetrazolium salt formation. Autophagy induction was confirmed through a combination of Western blotting for associated proteins, acridine orange staining for acidic vesicles, detection of autolysosomes (MDC staining), and electron microscopy. Apoptosis was quantified by flow cytometry using standard annexinV/propidium iodide staining and by assessing PARP-1 cleavage by Western blot. Results Sodium butyrate suppressed colorectal cancer cell proliferation, induced autophagy, and resulted in apoptotic cell death. The induction of autophagy was supported by the accumulation of acidic vesicular organelles and autolysosomes, and the expression of autophagy-associated proteins, including microtubule-associated protein II light chain 3 (LC3-II), beclin-1, and autophagocytosis-associated protein (Atg)3. The autophagy inhibitors 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and chloroquine inhibited sodium butyrate induced autophagy. Furthermore, sodium butyrate treatment markedly enhanced the expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated proteins, including BIP, CHOP, PDI, and IRE-1a. When endoplasmic reticulum stress was inhibited by pharmacological (cycloheximide and mithramycin

  9. Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Colley, J.S.

    1992-08-01

    The Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Restoration (ER) Program was initially chartered on October 1, 1989, as a entral Environmental Restoration Division'' to manage the investigation and remediation of inactive sites and facilities that have been declared surplus and have no further programmatic use. The Energy Systems ER Division was established to support the DOE Oak Ridge Field Office (DOE-OR) consolidated ER Program. The DOE-OR Assistant Manager for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management provides program and budget direction to the Energy Systems ER Program for environmental restoration activities at the sites operated by Energy Systems (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant) and at the off-site locations. The Energy Systems ER Division is specifically charged with assessing these sites for potential contamination and managing the cleanup processes. The Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Division was chartered on October 1, 1989, as a central organization to manage the Remedial Action (RA) Program. The purpose of this document is to ensure that: senior ER management provides planning, organization, direction, control, and support to achieve the organization's objectives; the line organization achieves quality; and overall performance is reviewed and evaluated using a rigorous assessment process.

  10. Restoration of primary anterior teeth: review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jacob K

    2002-01-01

    This paper reviews the published data on restorations of primary anterior teeth. The discussion includes Class III restorations, Class V restorations, various forms of full coronal restorations, atraumatic restorative technique (ART) and recommendations for future research.

  11. Transport of cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have studied the transport of newly synthesized cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in Chinese hamster ovary cells using a cell fractionation assay. We found that transport is dependent on metabolic energy, but that the maintenance of the high differential concentration of cholesterol in the plasma membrane is not an energy-requiring process. We have tested a variety of inhibitors for their effect on cholesterol transport and found that cytochalasin B, colchicine, monensin, cycloheximide, and NH4Cl did not have any effect. The cholesterol transport process shows a sharp temperature dependence; it ceases at 15 degrees C, whereas cholesterol synthesis continues. When synthesis occurs at 15 degrees C, the newly synthesized cholesterol accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum and in a low density, lipid-rich vesicle fraction. These results suggest that cholesterol is transported via a vesicular system. PMID:4040520

  12. CSB ablation induced apoptosis is mediated by increased endoplasmic reticulum stress response

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Manuela; Balzerano, Alessio; Arisi, Ivan; D’Onofrio, Mara; Brandi, Rossella; Bongiorni, Silvia; Brancorsini, Stefano; Frontini, Mattia; Proietti-De-Santis, Luca

    2017-01-01

    The DNA repair protein Cockayne syndrome group B (CSB) has been recently identified as a promising anticancer target. Suppression, by antisense technology, of this protein causes devastating effects on tumor cells viability, through a massive induction of apoptosis, while being non-toxic to non-transformed cells. To gain insights into the mechanisms underlying the pro-apoptotic effects observed after CSB ablation, global gene expression patterns were determined, to identify genes that were significantly differentially regulated as a function of CSB expression. Our findings revealed that response to endoplasmic reticulum stress and response to unfolded proteins were ranked top amongst the cellular processes affected by CSB suppression. The major components of the endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis pathway, including pro-apoptotic factors downstream of the ATF3-CHOP cascade, were dramatically up-regulated. Altogether our findings add new pieces to the understanding of CSB mechanisms of action and to the molecular basis of CS syndrome. PMID:28253359

  13. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles Induce Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress-Mediated Autophagic Cell Death via Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Disruption in Normal Lung Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chang, Seung-Hee; Park, Soo Jin; Lim, Joohyun; Lee, Jinkyu; Yoon, Tae-Jong; Kim, Jun-Sung; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials are used in diverse fields including food, cosmetic, and medical industries. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP) are widely used, but their effects on biological systems and mechanism of toxicity have not been elucidated fully. Here, we report the toxicological mechanism of TiO2-NP in cell organelles. Human bronchial epithelial cells (16HBE14o-) were exposed to 50 and 100 μg/mL TiO2-NP for 24 and 48 h. Our results showed that TiO2-NP induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the cells and disrupted the mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes (MAMs) and calcium ion balance, thereby increasing autophagy. In contrast, an inhibitor of ER stress, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), mitigated the cellular toxic response, suggesting that TiO2-NP promoted toxicity via ER stress. This novel mechanism of TiO2-NP toxicity in human bronchial epithelial cells suggests that further exhaustive research on the harmful effects of these nanoparticles in relevant organisms is needed for their safe application.

  14. Soldering ceramic-metal restorations.

    PubMed

    Presswood, R G

    1975-09-01

    This is a technique for soldering ceramic-metal restorations in a vacuum-fired furnace. Care must be exercised to prevent adherence of the flux to the porcelain surfaces. Low-heat solders have been used, but they do not flow any better and may result in a weak union. The various colors of impression plaster to form the key for removal of the assembly are used to prevent softening and distortion of the individual units. There are several techniques described in assembling and soldering ceramic-metal restorations. This technique is direct, accurate, and easily accomplished.

  15. Iterative Restoration Of Tomosynthetic Slices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruttimann, U. E.; Groenhuis, R. A.; Webber, R. L.

    1984-08-01

    Tomosynthetic reconstructions suffer from the disadvantage that blurred images of object detail lying outside the plane of interest are superimposed over the desired image of structures in the tomosynthetic plane. It is proposed to selectively reduce these undesired superimpositions by a constrained iterative restoration method. Sufficient conditions are derived ensuring the convergence of the iterations to the exact solution in the absence of noise and constraints. Although in practice the restoration process must be left incomplete because of noise and quantization artifacts, the experimental results demonstrate that for reasons of stability these convergence conditions must be satisfied.

  16. Restoring Detroit's Street Lighting System

    SciTech Connect

    Kinzey, Bruce R.

    2015-10-21

    The City of Detroit is undertaking a comprehensive restoration of its street lighting system that includes transitioning the existing high-pressure sodium (HPS) sources to light-emitting diode (LED). Detroit’s well-publicized financial troubles over the last several years have added many hurdles and constraints to this process. Strategies to overcome these issues have largely been successful, but have also brought some mixed results. This document provides an objective review of the circumstances surrounding the system restoration, the processes undertaken and decisions made, and the results so far.

  17. Protective system issues during restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M.; Milanicz, D.P.

    1995-08-01

    This paper is one of a series presented on behalf of the System Operation Subcommittee with the intent of focusing industry attention on power system restoration issues. Performance of protective systems may be measured by the relative percentages of correct and appropriate relay operations, correct but inappropriate operations, wrong tripping, and failure to trip. The primary reason for correct but inappropriate operations is attributed to the power system changes. During restoration, the power system undergoes continual changes and therefore it is subject to ``correct but inappropriate`` relay operations.

  18. GADD34 Keeps the mTOR Pathway Inactivated in Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Related Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Holczer, Marianna; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Kapuy, Orsolya

    2016-01-01

    The balance of protein synthesis and proteolysis (i.e. proteostasis) is maintained by a complex regulatory network in which mTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin serine/threonine kinase) pathway and unfolded protein response are prominent positive and negative actors. The interplay between the two systems has been revealed; however the mechanistic details of this crosstalk are largely unknown. The aim of the present study was to investigate the elements of crosstalk during endoplasmic reticulum stress and to verify the key role of GADD34 in the connection with the mTOR pathway. Here, we demonstrate that a transient activation of autophagy is present in endoplasmic reticulum stress provoked by thapsigargin or tunicamycin, which is turned into apoptotic cell death. The transient phase can be characterized by the elevation of the autophagic marker LC3II/I, by mTOR inactivation, AMP-activated protein kinase activation and increased GADD34 level. The switch from autophagy to apoptosis is accompanied with the appearance of apoptotic markers, mTOR reactivation, AMP-activated protein kinase inactivation and a decrease in GADD34. Inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine shortens the transient phase, while inhibition of mTOR by rapamycin or resveratrol prolongs it. Inhibition of GADD34 by guanabenz or transfection of the cells with siGADD34 results in down-regulation of autophagy-dependent survival and a quick activation of mTOR, followed by apoptotic cell death. The negative effect of GADD34 inhibition is diminished when guanabenz or siGADD34 treatment is combined with rapamycin or resveratrol addition. These data confirm that GADD34 constitutes a mechanistic link between endoplasmic reticulum stress and mTOR inactivation, therefore promotes cell survival during endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:27992581

  19. Glucose-6-phosphate Reduces Calcium Accumulation in Rat Brain Endoplasmic Reticulum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    low millimolar range. Most Ca2+ is sequestered within organelles , including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi, mitochondria , and nucleus (Carafoli...G6P and thapsigargin caused generalized reduction in Ca2+ accumulation in remarkably similar patterns with no apparent gray matter regional...with glucose-6-phosphate (10 mM) or thapsigargin (1 µM), revealed very similar pattern of generalized reduction in 45Ca2+ accumulation in gray and

  20. α-Synuclein controls mitochondrial calcium homeostasis by enhancing endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria interactions.

    PubMed

    Calì, Tito; Ottolini, Denis; Negro, Alessandro; Brini, Marisa

    2012-05-25

    α-Synuclein has a central role in Parkinson disease, but its physiological function and the mechanism leading to neuronal degeneration remain unknown. Because recent studies have highlighted a role for α-synuclein in regulating mitochondrial morphology and autophagic clearance, we investigated the effect of α-synuclein in HeLa cells on mitochondrial signaling properties focusing on Ca(2+) homeostasis, which controls essential bioenergetic functions. By using organelle-targeted Ca(2+)-sensitive aequorin probes, we demonstrated that α-synuclein positively affects Ca(2+) transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum to the mitochondria, augmenting the mitochondrial Ca(2+) transients elicited by agonists that induce endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) release. This effect is not dependent on the intrinsic Ca(2+) uptake capacity of mitochondria, as measured in permeabilized cells, but correlates with an increase in the number of endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria interactions. This action specifically requires the presence of the C-terminal α-synuclein domain. Conversely, α-synuclein siRNA silencing markedly reduces mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, causing profound alterations in organelle morphology. The enhanced accumulation of α-synuclein into the cells causes the redistribution of α-synuclein to localized foci and, similarly to the silencing of α-synuclein, reduces the ability of mitochondria to accumulate Ca(2+). The absence of efficient Ca(2+) transfer from endoplasmic reticulum to mitochondria results in augmented autophagy that, in the long range, could compromise cellular bioenergetics. Overall, these findings demonstrate a key role for α-synuclein in the regulation of mitochondrial homeostasis in physiological conditions. Elevated α-synuclein expression and/or eventually alteration of the aggregation properties cause the redistribution of the protein within the cell and the loss of modulation on mitochondrial function.

  1. Regulation of lipid metabolism via a connection between the endoplasmic reticulum and lipid droplets.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Michitaka

    2017-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are ubiquitous organelles that store and supply lipids to regulate cellular lipid homeostasis. Fatty acids are packaged as triglyceride and cholesterol ester into endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes to synthesize LDs. Cytosolic LDs move dynamically and interact with organelles, including other LDs. In this process, functional proteins for metabolism are also transferred to LDs. In this review, I focus on interactions between the ER and LDs related to lipid metabolism.

  2. Ultrafast glycerophospholipid-selective transbilayer motion mediated by a protein in the endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    PubMed

    Buton, X; Morrot, G; Fellmann, P; Seigneuret, M

    1996-03-22

    A relatively rapid transbilayer motion of phospholipids in the microsomal membrane seems to be required due to their asymmetric synthesis in the cytoplasmic leaflet. Marked discrepancies exist with regard to the rate and specificity of this flip-flop process. To reinvestigate this problem, we have used both spin-labeled and radioactively labeled long chain phospholipids with a new fast translocation assay. Identical results were obtained with both types of probes. Transbilayer motion of glycerophospholipids was found to be much more rapid than previously reported (half-time less than 25 s) and to occur identically for phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylethanolamine. Such transport is nonvectorial and leads to a symmetric transbilayer distribution of phospholipids. In contrast, transverse diffusion of sphingomyelin was 1 order of magnitude slower. Phospholipid flip-flop appears to occur by a protein-mediated transport process displaying saturable and competitive behavior. Proteolysis, chemical modification, and competition experiments suggest that this transport process may be related to that previously described in the endoplasmic reticulum for short-chain phosphatidylcholine (Bishop, W. R., and Bell, R. M. (1985) Cell 42, 51-60). The relationship between phospholipid flip-flop and nonbilayer structures occurring in the endoplasmic reticulum was also investigated by 31P-NMR. Several conditions were found under which the 31P isotropic NMR signal previously attributed to nonbilayer structures is decreased or abolished, whereas transbilayer diffusion is unaffected, suggesting that the flip-flop process is independent of such structures. It is concluded that flip-flop in the endoplasmic reticulum is mediated by a bidirectional protein transporter with a high efficiency for glycerophospholipids and a low efficiency for sphingomyelin. In vivo, the activity of this transporter would be able to redistribute all changes in phospholipid composition due

  3. Sterol carrier protein-2 localization in endoplasmic reticulum and role in phospholipid formation.

    PubMed

    Starodub, O; Jolly, C A; Atshaves, B P; Roths, J B; Murphy, E J; Kier, A B; Schroeder, F

    2000-10-01

    Although sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2; also called nonspecific lipid transfer protein) binds fatty acids and fatty acyl-CoAs, its role in fatty acid metabolism is not fully understood. L-cell fibroblasts stably expressing SCP-2 were used to resolve the relationship between SCP-2 intracellular location and fatty acid transacylation in the endoplasmic reticulum. Indirect immunofluorescence double labeling and laser scanning confocal microscopy detected SCP-2 in peroxisomes > endoplasmic reticulum > mitochondria > lysosomes. SCP-2 enhanced incorporation of exogenous [(3)H]oleic acid into phospholipids and triacylglycerols of overexpressing cells 1.6- and 2.5-fold, respectively, stimulated microsomal incorporation of [1-(14)C]oleoyl-CoA into phosphatidic acid in vitro 13-fold, and exhibited higher specificity for unsaturated versus saturated fatty acyl-CoA. SCP-2 enhanced the rate-limiting step in microsomal phosphatidic acid biosynthesis mediated by glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase. SCP-2 also enhanced microsomal acyl-chain remodeling of phosphatidylethanolamine up to fivefold and phosphatidylserine twofold, depending on the specific fatty acyl-CoA, but had no effect on other phospholipid classes. In summary, these results were consistent with a role for SCP-2 in phospholipid synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum.

  4. Effects of HIV-1 Nef on retrograde transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Johannes, Ludger; Pezo, Valérie; Mallard, Frédéric; Tenza, Danièle; Wiltz, Aimée; Saint-Pol, Agnès; Helft, Julie; Antony, Claude; Benaroch, Philippe

    2003-05-01

    HIV-1 Nef protein down-regulates several important immunoreceptors through interactions with components of the intracellular sorting machinery. Nef expression is also known to induce modifications of the endocytic pathway. Here, we analyzed the effects of Nef on retrograde transport, from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum using Shiga toxin B-subunit (STxB). Nef expression inhibited access of STxB to the endoplasmic reticulum, but did not modify the surface expression level of STxB receptor, Gb3, nor its internalization rate as measured with a newly developed assay. Mutation of the myristoylation site or of a di-leucine motif of Nef involved in the interaction with the clathrin adaptor complexes AP1 and AP2 abolished the inhibition of retrograde transport. In contrast, mutations of Nef motifs known to interact with PACS-1, beta COP or a subunit of the v-ATPase did not modify the inhibitory activity of Nef on retrograde transport. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that Nef was present in clusters located on endosomal or Golgi membranes together with internalized STxB. Furthermore, in strongly Nef-expressing cells, STxB accumulated in endosomal structures that labeled with AP1. Our observations show that Nef perturbs retrograde transport between the early endosome and the endoplasmic reticulum. The potential transport steps targeted by Nef are discussed.

  5. Characterization of Ca2+ Transport in Purified Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane Vesicles from Lepidium sativum L. Roots

    PubMed Central

    Buckhout, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics of Ca2+ transport into endoplasmic reticulum vesicles isolated from roots of Lepidium sativum L. cv Krause have been investigated. The concentration of free Ca2+ and ATP needed for half-maximal activity were 2.5 and 73 micromolar, respectively, and the enzyme obeyed Michaelis-Menten-like kinetics. The pH maximum occurred at 7.5 and the activity was greatly reduced at either pH 7.0 or 8.0. The Ca2+-dependent modulation protein, calmodulin, was tested for its effect on Ca2+ transport into endoplasmic reticulum vesicles. Although the phenothiazine inhibitors chlorpromazine, fluphenazine, and trifluoperazine all inhibited Ca2+ transport activity with a half-maximal effect at approximately 35 micromolar, authentic bovine brain calmodulin did not alter the activity at concentrations of 0.5 to 8 micrograms per milliliter. Calmodulin also showed no influence on the time-dependent accumulation of Ca2+ into vesicles. The membranes did not contain endogenously bound calmodulin since washing with (ethylenebis[oxyethylenenitrile])tetraacetic acid or fluphenazine, treatments which disrupt calmodulin binding, did not alter Ca2+ transport activity. The inhibition of Ca2+ transport by phenothiazine drugs was likely related to their nonspecific interaction with the membrane. Thus, there was no indication that calmodulin regulated Ca2+ uptake into root endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:16663981

  6. Cytoplasmic Nucleation and Atypical Branching Nucleation Generate Endoplasmic Microtubules in Physcomitrella patens[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Nakaoka, Yuki; Kimura, Akatsuki; Tani, Tomomi; Goshima, Gohta

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism underlying microtubule (MT) generation in plants has been primarily studied using the cortical MT array, in which fixed-angled branching nucleation and katanin-dependent MT severing predominate. However, little is known about MT generation in the endoplasm. Here, we explored the mechanism of endoplasmic MT generation in protonemal cells of Physcomitrella patens. We developed an assay that utilizes flow cell and oblique illumination fluorescence microscopy, which allowed visualization and quantification of individual MT dynamics. MT severing was infrequently observed, and disruption of katanin did not severely affect MT generation. Branching nucleation was observed, but it showed markedly variable branch angles and was occasionally accompanied by the transport of nucleated MTs. Cytoplasmic nucleation at seemingly random locations was most frequently observed and predominated when depolymerized MTs were regrown. The MT nucleator γ-tubulin was detected at the majority of the nucleation sites, at which a single MT was generated in random directions. When γ-tubulin was knocked down, MT generation was significantly delayed in the regrowth assay. However, nucleation occurred at a normal frequency in steady state, suggesting the presence of a γ-tubulin-independent backup mechanism. Thus, endoplasmic MTs in this cell type are generated in a less ordered manner, showing a broader spectrum of nucleation mechanisms in plants. PMID:25616870

  7. Caspase-12 is involved in stretch-induced apoptosis mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Jianing; Chen, Shulan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Lijuan; Liu, Guirong; Wang, Fang; Jiang, Wenxin; Zhang, Caixia; Wang, Shuangyu; Yuan, Xiao

    2016-04-01

    It is well recognized that mandibular growth, which is caused by a variety of functional appliances, is considered to be the result of both neuromuscular and skeletal adaptations. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that apoptosis plays an important role in the adaptation of skeletal muscle function. However, the underlying mechanism of apoptosis that is induced by stretch continues to be incompletely understood. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), a newly defined signaling pathway, initiates apoptosis. This study seeks to determine if caspase-12 is involved in stretch-induced apoptosis mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress in myoblast and its underlying mechanism. Apoptosis was assessed by Hochest staining, DAPI staining and annexin V binding and PI staining. ER chaperones, such as GRP78, CHOP and caspase-12, were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Furthermore, caspase-12 inhibitor was used to value the mechanism of the caspase-12 pathway. Apoptosis of myoblast, which is subjected to cyclic stretch, was observed in a time-dependent manner. We found that GRP78 mRNA and protein were significantly increased and CHOP and caspase-12 were activated in myoblast that was exposed to cyclic stretch. Caspase-12 inhibition reduced stretch-induced apoptosis, and caspase-12 activated caspase-3 to induce apoptosis. We concluded that caspase-12 played an important role in stretch-induced apoptosis that is associated by endoplasmic reticulum stress by activating caspase-3.

  8. Mammalian vesicle trafficking proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus.

    PubMed

    Hay, J C; Hirling, H; Scheller, R H

    1996-03-08

    Vesicle traffic propagates and maintains distinct subcellular compartments and routes secretory products from their site of synthesis to their final destinations. As a basis for the specificity of vesicular transport reactions, each step in the secretory pathway appears to be handled by a distinct set of evolutionarily conserved proteins. Mammalian proteins responsible for vesicle trafficking at early steps in the secretory pathway are not well understood. In this report, we describe rat sec22 (rsec22) and rat bet1 (rbet1), mammalian sequence homologs of yeast proteins identified as mediators of endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi protein transport. rsec22 and rbet1 were expressed widely in mammalian tissues, as anticipated for proteins involved in fundamental membrane trafficking reactions. Recombinant rsec22 and rbet1 proteins behaved as integral membrane components of 28 and 18 kDa, respectively, consistent with their primary structures, which contain a predicted transmembrane domain at or near the carboxyl terminus. Recombinant rsec22 and rbet1 had distinct subcellular localizations, with rsec22 residing on endoplasmic reticulum membranes and rbet1 found on Golgi membranes. Studies with brefeldin A and nocodazole indicated that rbet1 function might involve interaction with or retention in the intermediate compartment. The distinct localizations of rsec22 and rbet1 may reflect their participation in opposite directions of membrane flow between the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus.

  9. HDLs protect pancreatic β-cells against ER stress by restoring protein folding and trafficking.

    PubMed

    Pétremand, Jannick; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Duprez, Jessica; Allagnat, Florent; Frias, Miguel; James, Richard W; Waeber, Gérard; Jonas, Jean-Christophe; Widmann, Christian

    2012-05-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis alteration contributes to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and death and favors the development of diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that HDLs protect β-cells against ER stress induced by thapsigargin, cyclopiazonic acid, palmitate, insulin overexpression, and high glucose concentrations. ER stress marker induction and ER morphology disruption mediated by these stimuli were inhibited by HDLs. Using a temperature-sensitive viral glycoprotein folding mutant, we show that HDLs correct impaired protein trafficking and folding induced by thapsigargin and palmitate. The ability of HDLs to protect β-cells against ER stress was inhibited by brefeldin A, an ER to Golgi trafficking blocker. These results indicate that HDLs restore ER homeostasis in response to ER stress, which is required for their ability to promote β-cell survival. This study identifies a cellular mechanism mediating the beneficial effect of HDLs on β-cells against ER stress-inducing factors.

  10. HDLs Protect Pancreatic β-Cells Against ER Stress by Restoring Protein Folding and Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Pétremand, Jannick; Puyal, Julien; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Duprez, Jessica; Allagnat, Florent; Frias, Miguel; James, Richard W.; Waeber, Gérard; Jonas, Jean-Christophe; Widmann, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis alteration contributes to pancreatic β-cell dysfunction and death and favors the development of diabetes. In this study, we demonstrate that HDLs protect β-cells against ER stress induced by thapsigargin, cyclopiazonic acid, palmitate, insulin overexpression, and high glucose concentrations. ER stress marker induction and ER morphology disruption mediated by these stimuli were inhibited by HDLs. Using a temperature-sensitive viral glycoprotein folding mutant, we show that HDLs correct impaired protein trafficking and folding induced by thapsigargin and palmitate. The ability of HDLs to protect β-cells against ER stress was inhibited by brefeldin A, an ER to Golgi trafficking blocker. These results indicate that HDLs restore ER homeostasis in response to ER stress, which is required for their ability to promote β-cell survival. This study identifies a cellular mechanism mediating the beneficial effect of HDLs on β-cells against ER stress-inducing factors. PMID:22399686

  11. Weed biocontrol in landscape restoration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weed biological control programs in natural areas are often undertaken with the goal of restoring native plant communities and/or ecosystem services to a pre-invasion level. These objectives may be achieved in some areas with biological control alone; however, in other sites integration of biologica...

  12. Origins of the Restoration Playhouse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Dennis D.

    Contrary to the popular theory that the proscenium type of playhouse was imported from France by the Court of Charles II in 1660, the Restoration playhouse in fact developed from Elizabethan theatres and court masques. These Elizabethan theatres were the private theatres, and were generally small, rectangular, roofed structures where aristocratic…

  13. Will Retinal Implants Restore Vision?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zrenner, Eberhart

    2002-02-01

    A number of research groups are developing electrical implants that can be attached directly to the retina in an attempt to restore vision to patients suffering from retinal degeneration. However, despite promising results in animal experiments, there are still several major obstacles to overcome before retinal prostheses can be used clinically.

  14. Analytical tool requirements for power system restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Borkoski, J.N. ); Kafka, R.J. )

    1994-08-01

    This paper is one of series presented by Power System Restoration Working Group (SRWG) on behalf of the System, Operation Subcommittee with the intent of focusing industry attention on power system restoration. In this paper a set of analytical tools is specified which together describe the static, transient and dynamic behavior of a power system during restoration. These tools are identified and described for restoration planning, training and operation. Their applications cover all stages of restoration including pre-disturbance condition, post-disturbance status, post-restoration target system, and minimization of unserved loads. The paper draws on the previous reports by the SRWG.

  15. Inhibition of GADD34, the stress-inducible regulatory subunit of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response, does not enhance functional recovery after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Ohri, Sujata Saraswat; Mullins, Ashley; Hetman, Michal; Whittemore, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response (ERSR) is a hallmark of various pathological diseases and/or traumatic injuries. Restoration of ER homeostasis can contribute to improvement in the functional outcome of these diseases. Using genetic and pharmacological inhibition of the PERK-CHOP arm of the ERSR, we recently demonstrated improvements in hindlimb locomotion after spinal cord injury (SCI) and implicated oligodendrocyte survival as a potential mechanism. Here, we investigated the contribution of stress-inducible PPP1R15A/GADD34, an ERSR signaling effector downstream of CHOP that dephosphorylates eIF2α, in the pathogenesis of SCI. We show that although genetic ablation of GADD34 protects oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) against ER stress-mediated cell death in vitro and results in differential ERSR attenuation in vivo after SCI, there is no improvement in hindlimb locomotor function. Guanabenz, a FDA approved antihypertensive drug, was recently shown to reduce the burden of misfolded proteins in the ER by directly targeting GADD34. Guanabenz protected OPCs from ER stress-mediated cell death in vitro and attenuated the ERSR in vivo after SCI. However, guanabenz administration failed to rescue the locomotor deficits after SCI. These data suggest that deletion of GADD34 alone is not sufficient to improve functional recovery after SCI.

  16. A LAPF/phafin1-like protein regulates TORC1 and lysosomal membrane permeabilization in response to endoplasmic reticulum membrane stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Adam; Cunningham, Kyle W.

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) is a poorly understood regulator of programmed cell death that involves leakage of luminal lysosomal or vacuolar hydrolases into the cytoplasm. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, LMP can be induced by antifungals and endoplasmic reticulum stressors when calcineurin also has been inactivated. A genome-wide screen revealed Pib2, a relative of LAPF/phafin1 that regulates LMP in mammals, as a pro-LMP protein in yeast. Pib2 associated with vacuolar and endosomal limiting membranes in unstressed cells in a manner that depended on its FYVE domain and on phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PI(3)P) biosynthesis. Genetic experiments suggest that Pib2 stimulates the activity of TORC1, a vacuole-associated protein kinase that is sensitive to rapamycin, in a pathway parallel to the Ragulator/EGO complex containing the GTPases Gtr1 and Gtr2. A hyperactivating mutation in the catalytic subunit of TORC1 restored LMP to the gtr1∆ and pib2∆ mutants and also prevented the synthetic lethality of the double mutants. These findings show novel roles of PI(3)P and Pib2 in the regulation of TORC1, which in turn promoted LMP and nonapoptotic death of stressed cells. Rapamycin prevented the death of the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans during exposure to fluconazole plus a calcineurin inhibitor, suggesting that TORC1 broadly promotes sensitivity to fungistats in yeasts. PMID:26510498

  17. Modulatory effects of resveratrol on endoplasmic reticulum stress-associated apoptosis and oxido-inflammatory markers in a rat model of rotenone-induced Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gaballah, Hanaa Hibishy; Zakaria, Soha Said; Elbatsh, Maha M; Tahoon, Nahid M

    2016-05-05

    The mechanisms leading to neuronal death in Parkinson's disease (PD) are not fully elucidated; however, mounting evidence implicates endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative damage, and inflammatory changes are the crucial factors in its pathogenesis. This study was undertaken to investigate the modulatory effects of resveratrol on ER stress-mediated apoptosis, inflammatory and oxidative stress markers in a rat model of rotenone-induced PD. mRNA expression levels of ER stress markers; C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), were estimated in the rat brain using quantitative real-time PCR. Caspase-3 activity, IL-1β levels and Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) DNA-binding activity were estimated by ELISA, while glutathione peroxidase and Xanthine oxidase activities, as well as protein carbonyl contents in the rat brain were evaluated spectrophotometrically. Our data revealed that Resveratrol ameliorated rotenone-induced ER stress by downregulating CHOP and GRP78 genes expression and hampered caspase-3 activity in the brain of rotenone exposed rats. It also restored redox balance as evident by suppressing Xanthine oxidase activity and protein carbonyls formation; in addition to preservation of intracellular antioxidants status via activating glutathione peroxidase and Nrf2 signaling pathway. In conclusion; our study launched promising avenues for the potential use of resveratrol as a neuroprotective therapeutic agent in Parkinson's disease.

  18. SERCA2 dysfunction in Darier disease causes endoplasmic reticulum stress and impaired cell-to-cell adhesion strength: rescue by Miglustat.

    PubMed

    Savignac, Magali; Simon, Marina; Edir, Anissa; Guibbal, Laure; Hovnanian, Alain

    2014-07-01

    Darier disease (DD) is a severe dominant genetic skin disorder characterized by the loss of cell-to-cell adhesion and abnormal keratinization. The defective gene, ATP2A2, encodes sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Ca2+ -ATPase isoform 2 (SERCA2), a Ca2+ -ATPase pump of the ER. Here we show that Darier keratinocytes (DKs) display biochemical and morphological hallmarks of constitutive ER stress with increased sensitivity to ER stressors. Desmosome and adherens junctions (AJs) displayed features of immature adhesion complexes: expression of desmosomal cadherins (desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) and desmocollin 3 (Dsc3)) and desmoplakin was impaired at the plasma membrane, as well as E-cadherin, β-, α-, and p120-catenin staining. Dsg3, Dsc3, and E-cadherin showed perinuclear staining and co-immunostaining with ER markers, indicative of ER retention. Consistent with these abnormalities, intercellular adhesion strength was reduced as shown by a dispase mechanical dissociation assay. Exposure of normal keratinocytes to the SERCA2 inhibitor thapsigargin recapitulated these abnormalities, supporting the role of loss of SERCA2 function in impaired desmosome and AJ formation. Remarkably, treatment of DKs with the orphan drug Miglustat, a pharmacological chaperone, restored mature AJ and desmosome formation, and improved adhesion strength. These results point to an important contribution of ER stress in DD pathogenesis and provide the basis for future clinical evaluation of Miglustat in Darier patients.

  19. Discovery, Synthesis and Evaluation of 2,4-diaminoquinazolines as a Novel Class of Pancreatic β Cell-Protective Agents against Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER) Stress

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Hongliang; Lee, Jae Wook; Moon, Sung Won; Arora, Daleep; Li, Yu; Lim, Hui-Ying; Wang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic insulin-producing β-cell dysfunction and death plays central roles in the onset and progression of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Current antidiabetic drugs cannot halt the ongoing progression of β-cell dysfunction and death. In diabetes, a major cause for the decline in β cell function and survival is endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Here, we identified quinazoline derivatives as a novel class of β cell protective agents against ER stress-induced dysfunction and death. A series of quinazoline derivatives were synthesized from dichloroquiazoline utilizing a sequence of nucleophilic reactions. Through SAR optimization, a 2,4-diaminoquinazoline compound 9c markedly protects β cells against ER stress-induced dysfunction and death with 80% maximum rescue activity and an EC50 value of 0.56 µM. Importantly, 9c restores the ER stress-impaired glucose-stimulated insulin secretion response and survival in primary human islet β cells. We showed that 9c protects β cells by alleviating ER stress through the suppression of the induction of key genes of the unfolded protein response and apoptosis. PMID:27505441

  20. β-aminoisobutyric acid attenuates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chang-Xiang; Zhao, Ming-Xia; Shu, Xiao-Dong; Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Jue-Jin; Gao, Xing-Ya; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) is a nature thymine catabolite, and contributes to exercise-induced protection from metabolic diseases. Here we show the therapeutical effects of BAIBA on hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in diabetes. Type 2 diabetes was induced by combined streptozotocin (STZ) and high-fat diet (HFD) in mice. Oral administration of BAIBA for 4 weeks reduced blood glucose and lipids levels, hepatic key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis expressions, attenuated hepatic insulin resistance and lipid accumulation, and improved insulin signaling in type 2 diabetic mice. BAIBA reduced hepatic ER stress and apoptosis in type 2 diabetic mice. Furthermore, BAIBA alleviated ER stress in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells with glucosamine-induced insulin resistance. Hepatic AMPK phosphorylation was reduced in STZ/HFD mice and glucosamine-treated HepG2 cells, which were restored by BAIBA treatment. The suppressive effects of BAIBA on glucosamine-induced ER stress were reversed by knockdown of AMPK with siRNA. In addition, BAIBA prevented thapsigargin- or tunicamycin-induced ER stress, and tunicamycin–induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that BAIBA attenuates hepatic ER stress, apoptosis and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes. AMPK signaling is involved to the role of BAIBA in attenuating ER stress. PMID:26907958

  1. β-aminoisobutyric acid attenuates hepatic endoplasmic reticulum stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chang-Xiang; Zhao, Ming-Xia; Shu, Xiao-Dong; Xiong, Xiao-Qing; Wang, Jue-Jin; Gao, Xing-Ya; Chen, Qi; Li, Yue-Hua; Kang, Yu-Ming; Zhu, Guo-Qing

    2016-02-24

    β-aminoisobutyric acid (BAIBA) is a nature thymine catabolite, and contributes to exercise-induced protection from metabolic diseases. Here we show the therapeutical effects of BAIBA on hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in diabetes. Type 2 diabetes was induced by combined streptozotocin (STZ) and high-fat diet (HFD) in mice. Oral administration of BAIBA for 4 weeks reduced blood glucose and lipids levels, hepatic key enzymes of gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis expressions, attenuated hepatic insulin resistance and lipid accumulation, and improved insulin signaling in type 2 diabetic mice. BAIBA reduced hepatic ER stress and apoptosis in type 2 diabetic mice. Furthermore, BAIBA alleviated ER stress in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells with glucosamine-induced insulin resistance. Hepatic AMPK phosphorylation was reduced in STZ/HFD mice and glucosamine-treated HepG2 cells, which were restored by BAIBA treatment. The suppressive effects of BAIBA on glucosamine-induced ER stress were reversed by knockdown of AMPK with siRNA. In addition, BAIBA prevented thapsigargin- or tunicamycin-induced ER stress, and tunicamycin-induced apoptosis in HepG2 cells. These results indicate that BAIBA attenuates hepatic ER stress, apoptosis and glucose/lipid metabolic disturbance in mice with type 2 diabetes. AMPK signaling is involved to the role of BAIBA in attenuating ER stress.

  2. Formation of reversible disulfide bonds with the protein matrix of the endoplasmic reticulum correlates with the retention of unassembled Ig light chains.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, P; Sparvoli, A; Fagioli, C; Fassina, G; Sitia, R

    1996-01-01

    Exposed thiols act as intracellular retention elements for unassembled secretory molecules. Yet, some free Ig lambda light chains are secreted despite the presence of an unpaired cysteine (Cys214). This is due largely to the presence of a flanking acidic residue: substitution of Asp213 for Gly or Lys increases pre-Golgi retention and degradation of free lambda. Secretion is restored by exogenous reducing agents or by assembly with heavy chains. In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), lambda chains form covalent complexes with many proteins through Cys214. These complexes are absent from the Golgi. They are more abundant in transfectants expressing the lambdaGly2I3 and lambdaLys213 mutants that are poorly secreted. Radioactive N-ethylmaleimide labels some monomeric lambda chains isolated from the ER, but not from the Golgi or from the medium, indicating that the Cys214 thiol is masked during ER-Golgi transport. Mass spectrometry reveals the presence of a free cysteine residue disulfide-linked to Cys214. We suggest that thiol-mediated retention involves the formation of reversible disulfide bonds with the protein matrix of the ER. The presence of an acidic residue next to the critical cysteine may allow the masking of the thiol and transport to the Golgi. Images PMID:8641273

  3. Environmental Restoration Quality Program Implementation Plan. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-08-01

    The Environmental Restoration (ER) Program requirements for implementation of DOE Order 5700.6C are identified in the Environmental Restoration Quality Program Plan, (QPP). Management systems necessary to implement the ER QPP consist of the necessary standards and procedures required to be developed to adequately control ER processes. To the extent possible, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., standards and procedures will be utilized at the ER Program level, and requirements will not be repeated. The quality management systems identified for enhancement or development are identified in the section on Procedure Development Strategy and directly relate to unique ER Program activities. Procedures and standards that currently exist in the ER Program will be validated for compliance with ER QPP requirements.

  4. Technology needs for environmental restoration remedial action. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J.S.

    1992-11-01

    This report summarizes the current view of the most important technology needs for the US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities operated by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. These facilities are the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Oak Ridge K-25 Site, the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The sources of information used in this assessment were a survey of selected representatives of the Environmental Restoration (ER) programs at each facility, results from a questionnaire distributed by Geotech CWM, Inc., for DOE, and associated discussions with individuals from each facility. This is not a final assessment, but a brief look at an ongoing assessment; the needs will change as the plans for restoration change and, it is hoped, as some technical problems are solved through successful development programs.

  5. Cullinan Ranch Tidal Marsh Restoration Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Cullinan Ranch Tidal Marsh Restoration Project, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquatic resources.

  6. Downregulation of miR-205 Modulates Cell Susceptibility to Oxidative and Endoplasmic Reticulum Stresses in Renal Tubular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muratsu-Ikeda, Shiyo; Nangaku, Masaomi; Ikeda, Yoichiro; Tanaka, Tetsuhiro; Wada, Takehiko; Inagi, Reiko

    2012-01-01

    Background Oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress play a crucial role in tubular damage in both acute kidney injury (AKI) and chronic kidney disease (CKD). While the pathophysiological contribution of microRNAs (miRNA) to renal damage has also been highlighted, the effect of miRNA on renal damage under oxidative and ER stresses conditions remains elusive. Methods We assessed changes in miRNA expression in the cultured renal tubular cell line HK-2 under hypoxia-reoxygenation-induced oxidative stress or ER stress using miRNA microarray assay and real-time RT-PCR. The pathophysiological effect of miRNA was evaluated by cell survival rate, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, and anti-oxidant enzyme expression in miRNA-inhibited HK-2 or miRNA-overexpressed HK-2 under these stress conditions. The target gene of miRNA was identified by 3′-UTR-luciferase assay. Results We identified 8 and 10 miRNAs whose expression was significantly altered by oxidative and ER stresses, respectively. Among these, expression of miR-205 was markedly decreased in both stress conditions. Functional analysis revealed that decreased miR-205 led to an increase in cell susceptibility to oxidative and ER stresses, and that this increase was associated with the induction of intracellular ROS and suppression of anti-oxidant enzymes. While increased miR-205 by itself made no change in cell growth or morphology, cell viability under oxidative or ER stress conditions was partially restored. Further, miR-205 bound to the 3′-UTR of the prolyl hydroxylase 1 (PHD1/EGLN2) gene and suppressed the transcription level of EGLN2, which modulates both intracellular ROS level and ER stress state. Conclusions miR-205 serves a protective role against both oxidative and ER stresses via the suppression of EGLN2 and subsequent decrease in intracellular ROS. miR-205 may represent a novel therapeutic target in AKI and CKD associated with oxidative or ER stress in tubules. PMID:22859986

  7. Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration plan

    SciTech Connect

    1994-11-01

    In 1989, the Exxon Valdez oil spill contaminated about 1,500 miles of Alaska`s coastline. It killed birds, mammals, and fish, and disrupted the ecosystem in the path of the oil. The Exxon Valdez Restoration Plan provides long-term guidance for restoring the resources and services injured by the oil spill. It contains policies for making restoration decisions and describes how restoration activities will be implemented.

  8. Restorative Justice as Strength-Based Accountability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Robert

    2003-01-01

    This article compares strength-based and restorative justice philosophies for young people and their families. Restorative justice provides ways to respond to crime and harm that establish accountability while seeking to reconcile members of a community. Restorative approaches are an important subset of strength-based interventions.

  9. 7 CFR 3201.77 - Asphalt restorers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Asphalt restorers. 3201.77 Section 3201.77... Designated Items § 3201.77 Asphalt restorers. (a) Definition. Products designed to seal, protect, or restore poured asphalt and concrete surfaces. (b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred...

  10. 7 CFR 3201.77 - Asphalt restorers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Asphalt restorers. 3201.77 Section 3201.77... Designated Items § 3201.77 Asphalt restorers. (a) Definition. Products designed to seal, protect, or restore poured asphalt and concrete surfaces. (b) Minimum biobased content. The Federal preferred...

  11. "Re-story-ing" Our Restorative Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rundell, Frida

    2007-01-01

    A metaphor for crossing a frontier into a new territory is explored. The restorative justice principles as used by the United Nations and the International Institute for Restorative Practices (IIRP) help to translate into restorative practice principles. An action research project in South Africa provides the background to an evaluation process.…

  12. RESEARCH NEEDS IN RIPARIAN BUFFER RESTORATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Riparian buffer restorations are used as management tools to produce favorable water quality impacts; moreover, the basis for riparian buffers as an instrument of water quality restoration rests on a relatively firm foundation. However, the extent to which buffers can restore rip...

  13. 5 CFR 353.301 - Restoration rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restoration rights. 353.301 Section 353... DUTY FROM UNIFORMED SERVICE OR COMPENSABLE INJURY Compensable Injury § 353.301 Restoration rights. (a.... Although these restoration rights are agencywide, the employee's basic entitlement is to the...

  14. Lake restoration technology transfer assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Daschbach, M.H.; Roe, E.M.; Sharpe, W.E.

    1982-06-01

    Based upon a review of the eutrophication problem and its impact on lake restoration (LR) programs, treatment of the relatively new problem of acid deposition and its impact on LR activities, consideration of the LR programs of the Environmental Protection Agency and several states, and a review of individual LR technology transfer publications, it is recommended that new LR technology transfer programs be given a low priority until more new information is available on the restoration of acidified lakes. Both primary and secondary users of LR research, technology transfer documents, and public awareness documents were considered in this assessment. Primary users included the general public and recreationists, lakeshore property owners, lake/homeowner associations, lake/sanitary districts, and research and environmental organizations; secondary users included state/county/local officials who administer/manage water-related regulations/activities. 4 tables.

  15. Natural restoration basics for wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.

    2004-01-01

    Around the world, dams, diversions, and drainage systems reengineer rivers for navigation, farming, and urban development, and this has caused vast changes in the environmental conditions of the flood plains adjacent to these rivers (Middleton, 2002). Even though “flood pulses,” the periodic overflow of these rivers, were once the most important hydrological factor regulating all functions of the flood plain (Junk and others, 1986), now they have been reduced or eliminated along many of the world’s waterways (Sparks and others, 1998). These changes in river channels have created a hydrologic setting on flood plains that has not been conducive to restoration and nature conservation (Middleton, 2002). Consequently, USGS scientists are studying the long-term effects of hydrologic changes on flood plains, such as how the restoration of baldcypress (Taxodium distichum) swamps has been hindered because seeds cannot disperse or germinate without the seasonally driven high and low water levels associated with the flood pulse.

  16. Microleakage of intermediate restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Lim, K C

    1990-03-01

    This study compares the microleakage of a glass ionomer cement, Ketac Fil, used without cavity conditioning, with the established intermediate restorative materials, Cavit-W, and a reinforced zinc oxide-eugenol cement, Kalzinol. Microleakage was assessed using an electrochemical technique. At the end of 30 days, the materials tested, listed in decreasing order of microleakage, were Cavit-W, Ketac Fil inserted without cavity conditioning, Kalzinol, and the control group of Ketac Fil inserted into conditioned cavities. There was no significant difference in the microleakage observed in Ketac Fil restorations inserted without cavity conditioning and Kalzinol (p = 0.450), while the differences between the other groups were highly significant (p less than 0.001).

  17. Metric Selection for Ecosystem Restoration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Conceptual modeling can be used in a situation where there is little funding for monitoring and evaluation planning, and when planning needs to be done...ecosystem restoration monitoring and evaluation programs, compile a list of these previous metrics, and assess and narrow them down based on...and understanding of the system will likely correlate with the benefits gained from monitoring and evaluation . A more appropriate, robust metric

  18. Image Restoration And Resolution Enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Charles L.; Fitzgerald, Raymond M.

    1983-09-01

    We consider mathematical algorithms for the restoration of object information from finitely many measurements of the object's spectrum, with particular emphasis on the development of linear and nonlinear non-iterative methods that can incorporate prior information about object extent and shape. The linear method presented here generalizes the minimum energy bandlimited extrapolation procedure, which is the closed form limit of Gerchberg-Papoulis iteration in this case. The nonlinear method generalizes the maximum entropy method (MEM) of Burg.

  19. Minimum thickness anterior porcelain restorations.

    PubMed

    Radz, Gary M

    2011-04-01

    Porcelain laminate veneers (PLVs) provide the dentist and the patient with an opportunity to enhance the patient's smile in a minimally to virtually noninvasive manner. Today's PLV demonstrates excellent clinical performance and as materials and techniques have evolved, the PLV has become one of the most predictable, most esthetic, and least invasive modalities of treatment. This article explores the latest porcelain materials and their use in minimum thickness restoration.

  20. The (Ca2+ + Mg2+)-stimulated ATPase of the rat parotid endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed Central

    Thiyagarajah, P; Lim, S C

    1986-01-01

    A membrane fraction enriched in endoplasmic reticulum was prepared from rat parotid glands by using sucrose-gradient centrifugation. The fraction showed a 10-fold increase in specific activity of NADPH: cytochrome c reductase activity over that of tissue homogenates and minimal contamination with plasma membranes or mitochondria. The endoplasmic reticulum fraction possessed both Mg2+ -stimulated ATPase as well as Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase [( Ca2+ + Mg2+)-stimulated ATPase]activity. The Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase required 2-5 mM-Mg2+ for optimal activity and was stimulated by submicromolar concentrations of free Ca2+. The Km for free Ca2+ was 0.55 microM and the average Vmax. was 60 nmol/min per mg of protein. The Km for ATP was 0.11 mM. Other nucleotides, such as GTP, CTP or ADP, could not substitute for ATP in supporting the Ca2+-activated nucleotidase activity. Increasing the K+ concentration from 0 to 100 mM caused a 2-fold activation of the Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase. Trifluoperazine, W7 [N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloronaphthalene-1-sulphonamide] and vanadate inhibited the enzyme. The concentration of trifluoperazine and vanadate required for 50% inhibition of the ATPase were 52 microM and 28 microM respectively. Calmodulin, cyclic AMP, cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate had no effect on the ATPase. The properties of the Ca2+, Mg2+ -ATPase were distinct from those of the Mg2+-ATPase, but comparable with those reported for the parotid endoplasmic-reticulum Ca2+-transport system [Kanagasuntheram & Teo (1982) Biochem. J. 208, 789-794]. The results suggest that the Ca2+, Mg2+-ATPase is responsible for driving the ATP-dependent Ca2+ accumulation by this membrane. PMID:2943271

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced apoptosis in the penumbra aggravates secondary damage in rats with traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Guo-zhu; Gao, Fen-fei; Zhao, Zong-mao; Sun, Hai; Xu, Wei; Wu, Li-wei; He, Yong-chang

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal apoptosis is mediated by intrinsic and extrinsic signaling pathways such as the membrane-mediated, mitochondrial, and endoplasmic reticulum stress pathways. Few studies have examined the endoplasmic reticulum-mediated apoptosis pathway in the penumbra after traumatic brain injury, and it remains unclear whether endoplasmic reticulum stress can activate the caspase-12-dependent apoptotic pathway in the traumatic penumbra. Here, we established rat models of fluid percussion-induced traumatic brain injury and found that protein expression of caspase-12, caspase-3 and the endoplasmic reticulum stress marker 78 kDa glucose-regulated protein increased in the traumatic penumbra 6 hours after injury and peaked at 24 hours. Furthermore, numbers of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling-positive cells in the traumatic penumbra also reached peak levels 24 hours after injury. These findings suggest that caspase-12-mediated endoplasmic reticulum-related apoptosis is activated in the traumatic penumbra, and may play an important role in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury. PMID:27651773

  2. A philosophy for restoring virgin caries.

    PubMed

    Henry, Dan B

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates and discusses the clinical relevance for the use of direct gold, especially in restoring virgin caries in the modern restorative dental practice. In addition, this article is intented to highlight the advantages for oral health of placing restorative materials with the highest probability of long-term success. Also, this paper demonstrates the use of the latest formula of direct gold (E-Z Gold), developed by Dr Lloyd Baum of Loma Linda, CA, USA, and how this new product has made it practical to include direct gold restorations as an integral part of an active restorative practice.

  3. Materials for chairside CAD/CAM restorations.

    PubMed

    Fasbinder, Dennis J

    2010-01-01

    Chairside computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems have become considerably more accurate, efficient, and prevalent as the technology has evolved in the past 25 years. The initial restorative material option for chairside CAD/CAM restorations was limited to ceramic blocks. Restorative material options have multiplied and now include esthetic ceramics, high-strength ceramics, and composite materials for both definitive and temporary restoration applications. This article will review current materials available for chairside CAD/CAM restorations.

  4. Class II Resin Composites: Restorative Options.

    PubMed

    Patel, Minesh; Mehta, Shamir B; Banerji, Subir

    2015-10-01

    Tooth-coloured, resin composite restorations are amongst the most frequently prescribed forms of dental restoration to manage defects in posterior teeth. The attainment of a desirable outcome when placing posterior resin composite restorations requires the clinician to have a good understanding of the benefits (as well as the limitations) posed by this material, together with a sound knowledge of placement technique. Numerous protocols and materials have evolved to assist the dental operator with this type of demanding posterior restoration. With the use of case examples, four techniques available are reported here. CPD/Clinical Relevance: This article explores varying techniques for the restoration of Class II cavities using resin composite.

  5. A novel subfamily of Hsp70s in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    A, R; Tyson, J R; Stirling, C J

    1997-07-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum contains a number of proteins involved in the processing of secretory polypeptides. These include BiP, which is an Hsp70-family member highly conserved throughout evolution. BiP is known to be intimately involved in several aspects of protein biogenesis, but our understanding of these events has been complicated by the recent description of a novel Hsp70-related protein in yeast, Lhauthorp, whose functions overlap with those of BiP. Current indications are that this protein is distributed widely among eukaryotes and that it represents a distinct subfamily of the Hsp70 class of molecular chaperones.

  6. Analysis of site-specific N-glycan remodeling in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi

    PubMed Central

    Hang, Ivan; Lin, Chia-wei; Grant, Oliver C; Fleurkens, Susanna; Villiger, Thomas K; Soos, Miroslav; Morbidelli, Massimo; Woods, Robert J; Gauss, Robert; Aebi, Markus

    2015-01-01

    The hallmark of N-linked protein glycosylation is the generation of diverse glycan structures in the secretory pathway. Dynamic, non-template-driven processes of N-glycan remodeling in the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi provide the cellular setting for structural diversity. We applied newly developed mass spectrometry-based analytics to quantify site-specific N-glycan remodeling of the model protein Pdi1p expressed in insect cells. Molecular dynamics simulation, mutational analysis, kinetic studies of in vitro processing events and glycan flux analysis supported the defining role of the protein in N-glycan processing. PMID:26240167

  7. ERIS, an endoplasmic reticulum IFN stimulator, activates innate immune signaling through dimerization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wenxiang; Li, Yang; Chen, Lu; Chen, Huihui; You, Fuping; Zhou, Xiang; Zhou, Yi; Zhai, Zhonghe; Chen, Danying; Jiang, Zhengfan

    2009-05-26

    We report here the identification and characterization of a protein, ERIS, an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) IFN stimulator, which is a strong type I IFN stimulator and plays a pivotal role in response to both non-self-cytosolic RNA and dsDNA. ERIS (also known as STING or MITA) resided exclusively on ER membrane. The ER retention/retrieval sequence RIR was found to be critical to retain the protein on ER membrane and to maintain its integrity. ERIS was dimerized on innate immune challenges. Coumermycin-induced ERIS dimerization led to strong and fast IFN induction, suggesting that dimerization of ERIS was critical for self-activation and subsequent downstream signaling.

  8. FrontiERs: movers and shapers of the higher plant cortical endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Sparkes, Imogen; Hawes, Chris; Frigerio, Lorenzo

    2011-12-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in higher plants performs many important functions, yet our understanding of how its intricate network shape and dynamics relate to function is very limited. Recent work has begun to unpick key molecular players in the generation of the pleomorphic, highly dynamic ER network structure that pervades the entire cytoplasm. ER movement is acto-myosin dependent. ER shape is dependent on RHD3 (Root Hair Defective 3) and a family of proteins called reticulons. The major challenge that lies ahead is understanding how factors that control ER shape and movement are regulated and how this relates to the numerous functions of the ER.

  9. The metabolomic signature of Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy reveals endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Chao de la Barca, Juan Manuel; Simard, Gilles; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Safiedeen, Zainab; Prunier-Mirebeau, Delphine; Chupin, Stéphanie; Gadras, Cédric; Tessier, Lydie; Gueguen, Naïg; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Desquiret-Dumas, Valérie; Ferré, Marc; Bris, Céline; Kouassi Nzoughet, Judith; Bocca, Cinzia; Leruez, Stéphanie; Verny, Christophe; Miléa, Dan; Bonneau, Dominique; Lenaers, Guy; Martinez, M Carmen; Procaccio, Vincent; Reynier, Pascal

    2016-09-15

    Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (MIM#535000), the commonest mitochondrial DNA-related disease, is caused by mutations affecting mitochondrial complex I. The clinical expression of the disorder, usually occurring in young adults, is typically characterized by subacute, usually sequential, bilateral visual loss, resulting from the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells. As the precise action of mitochondrial DNA mutations on the overall cell metabolism in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy is unknown, we investigated the metabolomic profile of the disease. High performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry was used to quantify 188 metabolites in fibroblasts from 16 patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy and eight healthy control subjects. Latent variable-based statistical methods were used to identify discriminating metabolites. One hundred and twenty-four of the metabolites were considered to be accurately quantified. A supervised orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis model separating patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy from control subjects showed good predictive capability (Q(2)cumulated = 0.57). Thirty-eight metabolites appeared to be the most significant variables, defining a Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy metabolic signature that revealed decreased concentrations of all proteinogenic amino acids, spermidine, putrescine, isovaleryl-carnitine, propionyl-carnitine and five sphingomyelin species, together with increased concentrations of 10 phosphatidylcholine species. This signature was not reproduced by the inhibition of complex I with rotenone or piericidin A in control fibroblasts. The importance of sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines in the Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy signature, together with the decreased amino acid pool, suggested an involvement of the endoplasmic reticulum. This was confirmed by the significantly increased phosphorylation of PERK and eIF2α, as well as

  10. Isolation and fractionation of the endoplasmic reticulum from castor bean (Ricinus communis) endosperm for proteomic analyses.

    PubMed

    Simon, William J; Maltman, Daniel J; Slabas, Antoni R

    2008-01-01

    This chapter describes the preparation and isolation of highly purified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) from the endosperm of developing and germinating castor bean (Ricinus communis) seeds to provide a purified organelle fraction for differential proteomic analyses. The method uses a two-step ultracentrifugation protocol first described by Coughlan (1) and uses sucrose density gradients and a sucrose flotation step to yield purified ER devoid of other contaminating endomembrane material. Using a combination of one dimensional (1D) and two dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis the complexity and reproducibility of the protein profile of the purified organelle is evaluated prior to detailed proteomic analyses using mass spectrometry based techniques.

  11. The coupling of plasma membrane calcium entry to calcium uptake by endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    García-Sancho, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Cross-talk between organelles and plasma membrane Ca2+ channels is essential for modulation of the cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]C) signals, but such modulation may differ among cells. In chromaffin cells Ca2+ entry through voltage-operated channels induces calcium release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that amplifies the signal. [Ca2+]C microdomains as high as 20–50 μm are sensed by subplasmalemmal mitochondria, which accumulate large amounts of Ca2+ through the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU). Mitochondria confine the high-Ca2+ microdomains (HCMDs) to beneath the plasma membrane, where exocytosis of secretory vesicles happens. Cell core [Ca2+]C is much smaller (1–2 μm). By acting as a Ca2+ sink, mitochondria stabilise the HCMD in space and time. In non-excitable HEK293 cells, activation of store-operated Ca2+ entry, triggered by ER Ca2+ emptying, also generated subplasmalemmal HCMDs, but, in this case, most of the Ca2+ was taken up by the ER rather than by mitochondria. The smaller size of the [Ca2+]C peak in this case (about 2 μm) may contribute to this outcome, as the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase has much higher Ca2+ affinity than MCU. It is also possible that the relative positioning of organelles, channels and effectors, as well as cytoskeleton and accessory proteins plays an important role. Key points Cross-talk between organelles and plasma membrane Ca2+ channels modulates cytosolic Ca2+ signals in different ways. In chromaffin cells Ca2+ entry through voltage-operated channels is amplified by Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and generates subplasmalemmal high Ca2+ microdomains (HCMDs) as high as 20–50 μm, which trigger exocytosis. Subplasmalemmal mitochondria take up Ca2+ from HCMDs and avoid progression of the Ca2+ wave towards the cell core. In non-excitable HEK293 cells activation of store-operated Ca2+ entry triggered by ER Ca2+ emptying also generates subplasmalemmal HCMDs of about 2 μm. In this case

  12. The impact of the endoplasmic reticulum protein-folding environment on cancer development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Miao; Kaufman, Randal J

    2014-09-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an essential organelle in eukaryotic cells for the storage and regulated release of calcium and as the entrance to the secretory pathway. Protein misfolding in the ER causes accumulation of misfolded proteins (ER stress) and activation of the unfolded protein response (UPR), which has evolved to maintain a productive ER protein-folding environment. Both ER stress and UPR activation are documented in many different human cancers. In this Review, we summarize the impact of ER stress and UPR activation on every aspect of cancer and discuss outstanding questions for which answers will pave the way for therapeutics.

  13. A subdomain of the endoplasmic reticulum forms a cradle for autophagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Hayashi-Nishino, Mitsuko; Fujita, Naonobu; Noda, Takeshi; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Yoshimori, Tamotsu; Yamamoto, Akitsugu

    2009-12-01

    Autophagy is a bulk degradation process in eukaryotic cells and has fundamental roles in cellular homeostasis.The origin and source of autophagosomal membranes are long-standing questions in the field. Using electron microscopy, we show that, in mammalian culture cells, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) associates with early autophagic structures called isolation membranes (IMs). Overexpression of an Atg4B mutant, which causes defects in autophagosome formation, induces the accumulation of ER-IM complexes. Electron tomography revealed that the ER-IM complex appears as a subdomain of the ER that formed a cradle encircling the IM, and showed that both ER and isolation membranes are interconnected.

  14. Regulation of Protein Secretion Through Controlled Aggregation in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Victor M.; Wang, Xiurong; Wardwell, Scott; Courage, Nancy L.; Volchuk, Allen; Keenan, Terence; Holt, Dennis A.; Gilman, Michael; Orci, Lelio; Cerasoli, Frank; Rothman, James E.; Clackson, Tim

    2000-02-01

    A system for direct pharmacologic control of protein secretion was developed to allow rapid and pulsatile delivery of therapeutic proteins. A protein was engineered so that it accumulated as aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum. Secretion was then stimulated by a synthetic small-molecule drug that induces protein disaggregation. Rapid and transient secretion of growth hormone and insulin was achieved in vitro and in vivo. A regulated pulse of insulin secretion resulted in a transient correction of serum glucose concentrations in a mouse model of hyperglycemia. This approach may make gene therapy a viable method for delivery of polypeptides that require rapid and regulated delivery.

  15. Amyloid-β peptides are generated in mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes.

    PubMed

    Schreiner, Bernadette; Hedskog, Louise; Wiehager, Birgitta; Ankarcrona, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular aggregates of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) are a hallmark in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Recent findings suggest that Aβ is generated intracellularly and potential production sites include endosomes and trans-Golgi network. We determined the production of Aβ in subcellular fractions isolated from mouse brain. We found that a considerable amount of Aβ is produced at mitochondria-endoplasmic reticulum (ER) contact sites including outer mitochondrial membrane and mitochondria-associated ER membranes. Enhanced Aβ production at this site may disturb ER, mitochondrial and mitochondria-ER contact site function. This may be one key step in the cascade of events eventually leading to neurodegeneration in AD.

  16. The endoplasmic reticulum exerts control over organelle streaming during cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Stefano, Giovanni; Renna, Luciana; Brandizzi, Federica

    2014-03-01

    Cytoplasmic streaming is crucial for cell homeostasis and expansion but the precise driving forces are largely unknown. In plants, partial loss of cytoplasmic streaming due to chemical and genetic ablation of myosins supports the existence of yet-unknown motors for organelle movement. Here we tested a role of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as propelling force for cytoplasmic streaming during cell expansion. Through quantitative live-cell analyses in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana cells and mutants with compromised ER structure and streaming, we demonstrate that cytoplasmic streaming undergoes profound changes during cell expansion and that it depends on motor forces co-exerted by the ER and the cytoskeleton.

  17. Nuclear Receptors Resolve Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress to Improve Hepatic Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress culminating in proteotoxicity contributes to the development of insulin resistance and progression to type 2 diabetes mellitus. Pharmacologic interventions targeting several different nuclear receptors have emerged as potential treatments for insulin resistance. The mechanistic basis for these antidiabetic effects has primarily been attributed to multiple metabolic and inflammatory functions. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the association of ER stress with insulin resistance and the role of nuclear receptors in promoting ER stress resolution and improving insulin resistance in the liver. PMID:28236381

  18. [From endoplasmic reticulum to Golgi apparatus: a secretory pathway controlled by signal molecules].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiasheng; Luo, Jianhong; Zhang, Xiaomin

    2013-07-01

    Protein transport from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi apparatus has long been known to be a central process for protein quality control and sorting. Recent studies have revealed that a large number of signal molecules are involved in regulation of membrane trafficking through ER, ER-Golgi intermediate compartment and Golgi apparatus. These molecules can significantly change the transport rate of proteins by regulating vesicle budding and fusion. Protein transport from ER to Golgi apparatus is not only controlled by signal pathways triggered from outside the cell, it is also regulated by feedback signals from the transport pathway.

  19. Oncogenic and oncosuppressive signal transduction at mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum membranes

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Saverio; Giorgi, Carlotta; Oparka, Monika; Duszynski, Jerzy; Wieckowski, Mariusz R; Pinton, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The different mechanisms employed by proto-oncogenes and tumor suppressors to regulate cell death pathways are strictly linked to their localization. In addition to the canonical control of apoptosis at a transcriptional/nuclear level, intracellular zones are emerging as pivotal sites for the activities of several proapoptotic and antiapoptotic factors. Here, we review the function of the endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria interface as a primary platform for decoding danger signals as well as a structural accommodation for several regulator or effector proteins. PMID:27308328

  20. The science and practice of river restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Ellen; Lane, Stuart N.; Wilcox, Andrew C.

    2015-08-01

    River restoration is one of the most prominent areas of applied water-resources science. From an initial focus on enhancing fish habitat or river appearance, primarily through structural modification of channel form, restoration has expanded to incorporate a wide variety of management activities designed to enhance river process and form. Restoration is conducted on headwater streams, large lowland rivers, and entire river networks in urban, agricultural, and less intensively human-altered environments. We critically examine how contemporary practitioners approach river restoration and challenges for implementing restoration, which include clearly identified objectives, holistic understanding of rivers as ecosystems, and the role of restoration as a social process. We also examine challenges for scientific understanding in river restoration. These include: how physical complexity supports biogeochemical function, stream metabolism, and stream ecosystem productivity; characterizing response curves of different river components; understanding sediment dynamics; and increasing appreciation of the importance of incorporating climate change considerations and resiliency into restoration planning. Finally, we examine changes in river restoration within the past decade, such as increasing use of stream mitigation banking; development of new tools and technologies; different types of process-based restoration; growing recognition of the importance of biological-physical feedbacks in rivers; increasing expectations of water quality improvements from restoration; and more effective communication between practitioners and river scientists.

  1. Periodontal health--challenges in restorative dentistry.

    PubMed

    Reeves, J

    2014-05-01

    As the population ages and life expectancy increases, clinicians today find themselves in the wake of an ever-growing demand for high-quality aesthetic dental treatment, by increasingly informed patients. The long-term success of both cosmetic and restorative dentistry is dependent on well designed restorations and the health of the periodontal tissues. Overhanging restorations, full crown restorations with poor marginal fit, and implant-supported prosthetics with inadequate hygiene access all increase the risk for periodontal sequelae and interproximal caries. When planning restorative treatment, consideration should be given to the restorative design, the need for hygiene access and the location of intended implants. In addition, the patient's manual dexterity and ability to manipulate oral hygiene aids is a crucial consideration, as is adequate access for the hygienist to manually debride and maintain the restorations.

  2. Current status of zirconia restoration.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Takashi; Nakamura, Takashi; Matsumura, Hideo; Ban, Seiji; Kobayashi, Taira

    2013-10-01

    During the past decade, zirconia-based ceramics have been successfully introduced into the clinic to fabricate fixed dental prostheses (FDPs), along with a dental computer-aided/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) system. In this article (1) development of dental ceramics, (2) the current status of dental CAD/CAM systems, (3) CAD/CAM and zirconia restoration, (4) bond between zirconia and veneering ceramics, (5) bond of zirconia with resin-based luting agents, (6) surface finish of zirconia restoration and antagonist enamel wear, and (7) clinical evaluation of zirconia restoration are reviewed. Yttria partially stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline (Y-TZP) showed better mechanical properties and superior resistance to fracture than other conventional dental ceramics. Furthermore, ceria-stabilized tetragonal zirconia polycrystalline and alumina nanocomposites (Ce-TZP/A) had the highest fracture toughness and had resistance to low-temperature aging degradation. Both zirconia-based ceramics have been clinically available as an alternative to the metal framework for fixed dental prostheses (FDPs). Marginal adaptation of zirconia-based FDPs is acceptable for clinical application. The most frequent clinical complication with zirconia-based FDPs was chipping of the veneering porcelain that was affected by many factors. The mechanism for the bonding between zirconia and veneering ceramics remains unknown. There was no clear evidence of chemical bonding and the bond strength between zirconia and porcelain was lower than that between metal and porcelain. There were two alternatives proposed that might avoid chipping of veneering porcelains. One was hybrid-structured FDPs comprising CAD/CAM-fabricated porcelain parts adhering to a CAD/CAM fabricated zirconia framework. Another option was full-contour zirconia FDPs using high translucent zirconia. Combined application of silica coating and/or silane coupler, and 10-methacryloyloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate is

  3. Restoring HIV-specific immunity.

    PubMed

    James, J S

    1999-02-12

    When HIV is controlled with antiretrovirals, immunity to other infections often returns. Sometimes patients can stop prophylactic treatment, and sometimes opportunistic infections can clear up without treatment. However, immunity to HIV itself does not return, or returns very slowly, even when HIV has been suppressed for years with drug therapy. Researchers do not know why HIV immunity reacts differently, but several possible approaches to restoring HIV-specific immunity are being researched. One approach involves a therapeutic vaccination while the virus is well suppressed with antiretrovirals. The other approach is beginning HIV treatment very early, before the virus begins destroying the cells that recognize it. Several studies are discussed.

  4. The endoplasmic reticulum and casein-containing vesicles contribute to milk fat globule membrane

    PubMed Central

    Honvo-Houéto, Edith; Henry, Céline; Chat, Sophie; Layani, Sarah; Truchet, Sandrine

    2016-01-01

    During lactation, mammary epithelial cells secrete huge amounts of milk from their apical side. The current view is that caseins are secreted by exocytosis, whereas milk fat globules are released by budding, enwrapped by the plasma membrane. Owing to the number and large size of milk fat globules, the membrane surface needed for their release might exceed that of the apical plasma membrane. A large-scale proteomics analysis of both cytoplasmic lipid droplets and secreted milk fat globule membranes was used to decipher the cellular origins of the milk fat globule membrane. Surprisingly, differential analysis of protein profiles of these two organelles strongly suggest that, in addition to the plasma membrane, the endoplasmic reticulum and the secretory vesicles contribute to the milk fat globule membrane. Analysis of membrane-associated and raft microdomain proteins reinforces this possibility and also points to a role for lipid rafts in milk product secretion. Our results provide evidence for a significant contribution of the endoplasmic reticulum to the milk fat globule membrane and a role for SNAREs in membrane dynamics during milk secretion. These novel aspects point to a more complex model for milk secretion than currently envisioned. PMID:27535430

  5. The delicate balance between secreted protein folding and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation in human physiology.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Christopher J; Brodsky, Jeffrey L

    2012-04-01

    Protein folding is a complex, error-prone process that often results in an irreparable protein by-product. These by-products can be recognized by cellular quality control machineries and targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation. The folding of proteins in the secretory pathway adds another layer to the protein folding "problem," as the endoplasmic reticulum maintains a unique chemical environment within the cell. In fact, a growing number of diseases are attributed to defects in secretory protein folding, and many of these by-products are targeted for a process known as endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). Since its discovery, research on the mechanisms underlying the ERAD pathway has provided new insights into how ERAD contributes to human health during both normal and diseases states. Links between ERAD and disease are evidenced from the loss of protein function as a result of degradation, chronic cellular stress when ERAD fails to keep up with misfolded protein production, and the ability of some pathogens to coopt the ERAD pathway. The growing number of ERAD substrates has also illuminated the differences in the machineries used to recognize and degrade a vast array of potential clients for this pathway. Despite all that is known about ERAD, many questions remain, and new paradigms will likely emerge. Clearly, the key to successful disease treatment lies within defining the molecular details of the ERAD pathway and in understanding how this conserved pathway selects and degrades an innumerable cast of substrates.

  6. Sch proteins are localized on endoplasmic reticulum membranes and are redistributed after tyrosine kinase receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Lotti, L V; Lanfrancone, L; Migliaccio, E; Zompetta, C; Pelicci, G; Salcini, A E; Falini, B; Pelicci, P G; Torrisi, M R

    1996-01-01

    The intracellular localization of Shc proteins was analyzed by immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy in normal cells and cells expressing the epidermal growth factor receptor or the EGFR/erbB2 chimera. In unstimulated cells, the immunolabeling was localized in the central perinuclear area of the cell and mostly associated with the cytosolic side of rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes. Upon epidermal growth factor treatment and receptor tyrosine kinase activation, the immunolabeling became peripheral and was found to be associated with the cytosolic surface of the plasma membrane and endocytic structures, such as coated pits and endosomes, and with the peripheral cytosol. Receptor activation in cells expressing phosphorylation-defective mutants of Shc and erbB-2 kinase showed that receptor autophosphorylation, but not Shc phosphorylation, is required for redistribution of Shc proteins. The rough endoplasmic reticulum localization of Shc proteins in unstimulated cells and their massive recruitment to the plasma membrane, endocytic structures, and peripheral cytosol following receptor tyrosine kinase activation could account for multiple putative functions of the adaptor protein. PMID:8628261

  7. p53 and Ca(2+) signaling from the endoplasmic reticulum: partners in anti-cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Bittremieux, Mart; Bultynck, Geert

    2015-01-01

    Ca(2+) transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the mitochondria critically controls cell survival and cell death decisions. Different oncogenes and deregulation of tumor suppressors exploit this mechanism to favor the survival of altered, malignant cells. Two recent studies of the Pinton team revealed a novel, non-transcriptional function of cytosolic p53 in cell death. During cell stress, p53 is recruited to the ER and the ER-mitochondrial contact sites. This results in augmented ER Ca(2+) levels by enhancing sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) ATPase (SERCA) activity, ultimately promoting mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload. The boosting of "toxic" Ca(2+) signaling by p53 appears to be a critical component of the cell death-inducing properties of chemotherapeutic agents and anti-cancer treatments, like photodynamic stress. Strikingly, the resistance of p53-deficient cancer cells to these treatments could be overcome by facilitating Ca(2+) transfer between the ER and the mitochondria via overexpression of SERCA or of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU). Importantly, these concepts have also been supported by in vivo Ca(2+) measurements in tumor masses in mice. Collectively, these studies link for the first time the major tumor suppressor, p53, to Ca(2+) signaling in dictating cell-death outcomes and by the success of anti-cancer treatments.

  8. Sphingosine-1-phosphate Phosphatase 2 Regulates Pancreatic Islet β-Cell Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Yoshimitsu; Allende, Maria L; Mizukami, Hiroki; Cook, Emily K; Gavrilova, Oksana; Tuymetova, Galina; Clarke, Benjamin A; Chen, Weiping; Olivera, Ana; Proia, Richard L

    2016-06-03

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a sphingolipid metabolite that regulates basic cell functions through metabolic and signaling pathways. Intracellular metabolism of S1P is controlled, in part, by two homologous S1P phosphatases (SPPases), 1 and 2, which are encoded by the Sgpp1 and Sgpp2 genes, respectively. SPPase activity is needed for efficient recycling of sphingosine into the sphingolipid synthesis pathway. SPPase 1 is important for skin homeostasis, but little is known about the functional role of SPPase 2. To identify the functions of SPPase 2 in vivo, we studied mice with the Sgpp2 gene deleted. In contrast to Sgpp1(-/-) mice, Sgpp2(-/-) mice had normal skin and were viable into adulthood. Unexpectedly, WT mice expressed Sgpp2 mRNA at high levels in pancreatic islets when compared with other tissues. Sgpp2(-/-) mice had normal pancreatic islet size; however, they exhibited defective adaptive β-cell proliferation that was demonstrated after treatment with either a high-fat diet or the β-cell-specific toxin, streptozotocin. Importantly, β-cells from untreated Sgpp2(-/-) mice showed significantly increased expression of proteins characteristic of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response compared with β-cells from WT mice, indicating a basal islet defect. Our results show that Sgpp2 deletion causes β-cell endoplasmic reticulum stress, which is a known cause of β-cell dysfunction, and reveal a juncture in the sphingolipid recycling pathway that could impact the development of diabetes.

  9. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Calnexin Is a NADPH Oxidase NOX4 Interacting Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Prior, Kim-Kristin; Wittig, Ilka; Leisegang, Matthias S.; Groenendyk, Jody; Weissmann, Norbert; Michalak, Marek; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder; Shah, Ajay M.; Brandes, Ralf P.

    2016-01-01

    Within the family of NADPH oxidases, NOX4 is unique as it is predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, has constitutive activity, and generates hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We hypothesize that these features are consequences of a so far unidentified NOX4-interacting protein. Two-dimensional blue native (BN) electrophorese combined with SDS-PAGE yielded NOX4 to reside in macromolecular complexes. Interacting proteins were screened by quantitative SILAC (stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture) co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) in HEK293 cells stably overexpressing NOX4. By this technique, several interacting proteins were identified with calnexin showing the most robust interaction. Calnexin also resided in NOX4-containing complexes as demonstrated by complexome profiling from BN-PAGE. The calnexin NOX4 interaction could be confirmed by reverse Co-IP and proximity ligation assay, whereas NOX1, NOX2, or NOX5 did not interact with calnexin. Calnexin deficiency as studied in mouse embryonic fibroblasts from calnexin−/− mice or in response to calnexin shRNA reduced cellular NOX4 protein expression and reactive oxygen species formation. Our results suggest that endogenous NOX4 forms macromolecular complexes with calnexin, which are needed for the proper maturation, processing, and function of NOX4 in the endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:26861875

  10. The Endoplasmic Reticulum Chaperone Calnexin Is a NADPH Oxidase NOX4 Interacting Protein.

    PubMed

    Prior, Kim-Kristin; Wittig, Ilka; Leisegang, Matthias S; Groenendyk, Jody; Weissmann, Norbert; Michalak, Marek; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder; Shah, Ajay M; Brandes, Ralf P

    2016-03-25

    Within the family of NADPH oxidases, NOX4 is unique as it is predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, has constitutive activity, and generates hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We hypothesize that these features are consequences of a so far unidentified NOX4-interacting protein. Two-dimensional blue native (BN) electrophorese combined with SDS-PAGE yielded NOX4 to reside in macromolecular complexes. Interacting proteins were screened by quantitative SILAC (stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture) co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) in HEK293 cells stably overexpressing NOX4. By this technique, several interacting proteins were identified with calnexin showing the most robust interaction. Calnexin also resided in NOX4-containing complexes as demonstrated by complexome profiling from BN-PAGE. The calnexin NOX4 interaction could be confirmed by reverse Co-IP and proximity ligation assay, whereas NOX1, NOX2, or NOX5 did not interact with calnexin. Calnexin deficiency as studied in mouse embryonic fibroblasts from calnexin(-/-)mice or in response to calnexin shRNA reduced cellular NOX4 protein expression and reactive oxygen species formation. Our results suggest that endogenous NOX4 forms macromolecular complexes with calnexin, which are needed for the proper maturation, processing, and function of NOX4 in the endoplasmic reticulum.

  11. Endoplasmic Reticulum Oxidative Stress Triggers Tgf-Beta-Dependent Muscle Dysfunction by Accelerating Ascorbic Acid Turnover

    PubMed Central

    Pozzer, Diego; Favellato, Mariagrazia; Bolis, Marco; Invernizzi, Roberto William; Solagna, Francesca; Blaauw, Bert; Zito, Ester

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and oxidative stress are two related phenomena that have important metabolic consequences. As many skeletal muscle diseases are triggered by oxidative stress, we explored the chain of events linking a hyperoxidized ER (which causes ER and oxidative stress) with skeletal muscle dysfunction. An unbiased exon expression array showed that the combined genetic modulation of the two master ER redox proteins, selenoprotein N (SEPN1) and endoplasmic oxidoreductin 1 (ERO1), led to an SEPN1-related myopathic phenotype due to excessive signalling of transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. The increased TGF-beta activity in the genetic mutants was caused by accelerated turnover of the ER localized (anti-oxidant) ascorbic acid that affected collagen deposition in the extracellular matrix. In a mouse mutant of SEPN1, which is dependent on exogenous ascorbic acid, a limited intake of ascorbic acid revealed a myopathic phenotype as a consequence of an altered TGF-beta signalling. Indeed, systemic antagonism of TGF-beta re-established skeletal muscle function in SEPN1 mutant mice. In conclusion, this study sheds new light on the molecular mechanism of SEPN1-related myopathies and indicates that the TGF-beta/ERO1/ascorbic acid axis offers potential for their treatment. PMID:28106121

  12. Photodynamic action of porphyrin on Ca2+ influx in endoplasmic reticulum: a comparison with mitochondria.

    PubMed Central

    Ricchelli, F; Barbato, P; Milani, M; Gobbo, S; Salet, C; Moreno, G

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the distribution properties of haematoporphyrin (HP) and protoporphyrin (PP) in mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum after isolation from rat liver. The photosensitizing efficiency of porphyrin on the Ca2+ influx function of microsomes has been compared with that obtained on Ca2+ uptake in mitochondria. HP and PP are accumulated in microsomes to a greater extent than in mitochondria, both porphyrins binding to membrane protein sites. The Ca2+ influx functions of mitochondria and microsomes, before and after irradiation in the presence of HP or PP, were studied by following the changes in the free Ca2+ concentration in the medium as revealed by the variations in fluorescence intensity of the Ca2+ indicator Calcium Green-1. For the same amount of incorporated porphyrin, the Ca2+ influx function of microsomes is degraded by irradiation more rapidly than that of mitochondria. The protective effect of dithiothreitol suggests that thiol groups in the Ca2+-transporting enzyme are the preferential targets of the photodynamic effect. These results suggest that intracellular Ca2+ movements are altered primarily by the endoplasmic reticulum rather than by mitochondrial damage, in good agreement with other observations made in porphyrin-loaded irradiated cells. PMID:9931319

  13. Endoplasmic reticulum stress plays critical role in brain damage after chronic intermittent hypoxia in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Cai, Xiao-Hong; Li, Xiu-Cui; Jin, Sheng-Wei; Liang, Dong-Shi; Wen, Zheng-Wang; Cao, Hong-Chao; Mei, Hong-Fang; Wu, Ying; Lin, Zhong-Dong; Wang, Liang-Xing

    2014-07-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) in children is associated with multiple system morbidities. Cognitive dysfunction as a result of central nervous system complication has been reported in children with OSAHS. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS)-related apoptosis plays an important role in various diseases of the central nervous system, but very little is known about the role of ERS in mediating pathophysiological reactions to cognitive dysfunction in OSAHS. Chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) exposures, modeling OSAHS, across 2 and 4weeks in growing rats made more reference memory errors, working memory errors and total memory errors in the 8-Arm radial maze task, increased significantly TUNEL positive cells, upregulated the unfolded protein response in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex as evidenced by increased phosphorylation of PKR-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, inositol-requiring enzyme l and some downstream products. A selective inhibitor of eukaryotic initiation factor-2a dephosphorylation, salubrinal, prevented C/EBP-homologous protein activation in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex throughout hypoxia/reoxygenation exposure. Our findings suggest that ERS mediated cell apoptosis may be one of the underlying mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction in OSAHS children. Further, a specific ERS inhibitor Salubrinal should be tested for neuroprotection against CIH-induced injury.

  14. Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules reverse leptin resistance induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min; Zhang, Qinggao; Joe, Yeonsoo; Kim, Seul-Ki; Uddin, Md Jamal; Rhew, Hyunyul; Kim, Taeksang; Ryter, Stefan W; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2013-04-01

    Leptin, a circulating hormone, regulates food intake and body weight. While leptin resistance represents a major cause of obesity, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress can contribute to leptin resistance. Carbon monoxide (CO), a gaseous molecule, exerts antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects in animal models of tissue injury. We hypothesized that CO could inhibit leptin resistance during ER stress. Thapsigargin or tunicamycin was used to induce ER stress in human cells expressing the leptin receptor. These agents markedly inhibited leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation, confirming that ER stress induces leptin resistance. The CO-releasing molecule CORM-2 blocked the ER stress-dependent inhibition of leptin-induced STAT3 phosphorylation. CORM-2 treatment induced the phosphorylation of protein kinase R-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), and eukaryotic translation initiation factor-2α and enhanced PERK phosphorylation during ER stress. Furthermore, CORM-2 inhibited X-box binding protein-1 expression, activating transcription factor-6 cleavage, and inositol-requiring enzyme (IRE)1α phosphorylation induced by ER stress. IRE1α knockdown rescued leptin resistance, whereas PERK knockdown blocked CO-dependent regulation of IRE1α. In vivo, CO inhalation normalized body weight in animals fed high-fat diets. Furthermore, CO modulated ER stress pathways and rescued leptin resistance in vivo. In conclusion, the pathological mechanism of leptin resistance may be ameliorated by the pharmacological application of CO.

  15. Oxidative stress contributes to autophagy induction in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Crespo, José L

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes.

  16. EpCAM associates with endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2) in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gadalla, Salah-Eldin; Öjemalm, Karin; Vasquez, Patricia Lara; Nilsson, Ingmarie; Ericsson, Christer; Zhao, Jian; Nistér, Monica

    2013-09-20

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is an epithelial and cancer cell "marker" and there is a cumulative and growing evidence of its signaling role. Its importance has been recognized as part of the breast cancer stem cell phenotype, the tumorigenic breast cancer stem cell is EpCAM(+). In spite of its complex functions in normal cell development and cancer, relatively little is known about EpCAM-interacting proteins. We used breast cancer cell lines and performed EpCAM co-immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry in search for novel potentially interacting proteins. The endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 2 (ERAP2) was found to co-precipitate with EpCAM and to co-localize in the cytoplasm/ER and the plasma membrane. ERAP2 is a proteolytic enzyme set in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it plays a central role in the trimming of peptides for presentation by MHC class I molecules. Expression of EpCAM and ERAP2 in vitro in the presence of dog pancreas rough microsomes (ER vesicles) confirmed N-linked glycosylation, processing in ER and the size of EpCAM. The association between ERAP2 and EpCAM is a unique and novel finding that provides new ideas on EpCAM processing and on how antigen presentation may be regulated in cancer.

  17. THE DELICATE BALANCE BETWEEN SECRETED PROTEIN FOLDING AND ENDOPLASMIC RETICULUM-ASSOCIATED DEGRADATION IN HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Christopher J.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding is a complex, error-prone process that often results in an irreparable protein by-product. These by-products can be recognized by cellular quality control machineries and targeted for proteasome-dependent degradation. The folding of proteins in the secretory pathway adds another layer to the protein folding “problem,” as the endoplasmic reticulum maintains a unique chemical environment within the cell. In fact, a growing number of diseases are attributed to defects in secretory protein folding, and many of these by-products are targeted for a process known as endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). Since its discovery, research on the mechanisms underlying the ERAD pathway has provided new insights into how ERAD contributes to human health during both normal and diseases states. Links between ERAD and disease are evidenced from the loss of protein function as a result of degradation, chronic cellular stress when ERAD fails to keep up with misfolded protein production, and the ability of some pathogens to coopt the ERAD pathway. The growing number of ERAD substrates has also illuminated the differences in the machineries used to recognize and degrade a vast array of potential clients for this pathway. Despite all that is known about ERAD, many questions remain, and new paradigms will likely emerge. Clearly, the key to successful disease treatment lies within defining the molecular details of the ERAD pathway and in understanding how this conserved pathway selects and degrades an innumerable cast of substrates. PMID:22535891

  18. Insulin Dissociates the Effects of Liver X Receptor on Lipogenesis, Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, and Inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaowei; Haas, Mary E.; Miao, Ji; Mehta, Abhiruchi; Graham, Mark J.; Crooke, Rosanne M.; de Barros, Jean-Paul Pais; Wang, Jian-Guo; Aikawa, Masanori; Masson, David; Biddinger, Sudha B.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by increased lipogenesis as well as increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation. The nuclear hormone receptor liver X receptor (LXR) is induced by insulin and is a key regulator of lipid metabolism. It promotes lipogenesis and cholesterol efflux, but suppresses endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammation. The goal of these studies was to dissect the effects of insulin on LXR action. We used antisense oligonucleotides to knock down Lxrα in mice with hepatocyte-specific deletion of the insulin receptor and their controls. We found, surprisingly, that knock-out of the insulin receptor and knockdown of Lxrα produced equivalent, non-additive effects on the lipogenic genes. Thus, insulin was unable to induce the lipogenic genes in the absence of Lxrα, and LXRα was unable to induce the lipogenic genes in the absence of insulin. However, insulin was not required for LXRα to modulate the phospholipid profile, or to suppress genes in the ER stress or inflammation pathways. These data show that insulin is required specifically for the lipogenic effects of LXRα and that manipulation of the insulin signaling pathway could dissociate the beneficial effects of LXR on cholesterol efflux, inflammation, and ER stress from the negative effects on lipogenesis. PMID:26511317

  19. Autophagy decreases alveolar macrophage apoptosis by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Tao; Chen, Lei; Huang, Zhixin; Mao, Zhangfan; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Boyou; Xu, Yao; Pan, Shize; Hu, Hao; Geng, Qing

    2016-01-01

    To study the impact of autophagy on alveolar macrophage apoptosis and its mechanism in the early stages of hypoxia, we established a cell hypoxia-reoxygenation model and orthotopic left lung ischemia-reperfusion model. Rat alveolar macrophages stably expressing RFP-LC3 were treated with autophagy inhibitor (3-methyladenine, 3-MA) or autophagy promoter (rapamycin), followed by hypoxia-reoxygenation treatment 2 h, 4 h or 6 h later. Twenty Sprague-Dawley male rats were randomly divided into four different groups: no blocking of left lung hilum (model group), left lung hilum blocked for 1h with DMSO lavage (control group), left lung hilum blocked for 1 h with 100 ml/kg 3-MA (5 μmol/L) lavage (3-MA group), and left lung hilum blocked for 1 h with 100 ml/kg rapamycin (250 nmol/L) lavage (rapamycin group). Rapamycin decreased the unfolded protein response, which reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in the presence of oxygen deficiency. Rapamycin increased superoxide dismutase activities and decreased malondialdehyde levels, whereas 3-MA decreased superoxide dismutase activities and increased malondialdehyde levels. Thus, autophagy decreases alveolar macrophage apoptosis by attenuating endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress in the early stage of hypoxia in vitro and in vivo. This could represent a new approach to protecting against lung ischemia-reperfusion injury. PMID:27888631

  20. Selenoprotein K modulate intracellular free Ca(2+) by regulating expression of calcium homoeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Li, Ruimin; Huang, Yalan; Wang, Miao; Yang, Fan; Huang, Dana; Wu, Chunli; Li, Yue; Tang, Yijun; Zhang, Renli; Cheng, Jinquan

    2017-03-18

    Selenoprotein K (SelK) is an 11-kDa selenoprotein, which may be involved in the regulation of oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and immune response. To explore the function of SelK in the process of immune response, several short-hairpin RNAs (shRNA) were designed for the construction of recombinant plasmids to down-regulate the expression of SelK gene in vitro. These shRNAs specifically and efficiently interfered with the expression of SelK at both mRNA and protein levels. The expression of calcium homoeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein (CHERP) and the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration were significantly down-regulated in anti-CD3 stimulated SelK-knockdown cells. The expression of Interleukin 2 receptor alpha chain (IL-2Rα) and the secretion of Interleukin 4 (IL-4), which play a significant role in the process of T cell activation and proliferation, were also reduced in SelK-knockdown cells. Selenomethionine (Se-Met) at an optimum concentration of 5 μM could up-regulate SelK expression and reverse the change of the expression of CHERP and the intracellular free calcium caused by SelK-knockdown. These results hereby imply SelK may regulate the release of Ca(2+) by CHERP and play an important role in the proliferation and differentiation of T cell by TCR stimulation.

  1. Respiratory metabolism and calorie restriction relieve persistent endoplasmic reticulum stress induced by calcium shortage in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Busti, Stefano; Mapelli, Valeria; Tripodi, Farida; Sanvito, Rossella; Magni, Fulvio; Coccetti, Paola; Rocchetti, Marcella; Nielsen, Jens; Alberghina, Lilia; Vanoni, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Calcium homeostasis is crucial to eukaryotic cell survival. By acting as an enzyme cofactor and a second messenger in several signal transduction pathways, the calcium ion controls many essential biological processes. Inside the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium concentration is carefully regulated to safeguard the correct folding and processing of secretory proteins. By using the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that calcium shortage leads to a slowdown of cell growth and metabolism. Accumulation of unfolded proteins within the calcium-depleted lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress) triggers the unfolded protein response (UPR) and generates a state of oxidative stress that decreases cell viability. These effects are severe during growth on rapidly fermentable carbon sources and can be mitigated by decreasing the protein synthesis rate or by inducing cellular respiration. Calcium homeostasis, protein biosynthesis and the unfolded protein response are tightly intertwined and the consequences of facing calcium starvation are determined by whether cellular energy production is balanced with demands for anabolic functions. Our findings confirm that the connections linking disturbance of ER calcium equilibrium to ER stress and UPR signaling are evolutionary conserved and highlight the crucial role of metabolism in modulating the effects induced by calcium shortage. PMID:27305947

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated hippocampal neuron apoptosis involved in diabetic cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Xu, Linhao; He, Daqiang; Ling, Shucai

    2013-01-01

    Poor management of DM causes cognitive impairment while the mechanism is still unconfirmed. The aim of the present study was to investigate the activation of C/EBP Homology Protein (CHOP), the prominent mediator of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-induced apoptosis under hyperglycemia. We employed streptozotocin- (STZ-) induced diabetic rats to explore the ability of learning and memory by the Morris water maze test. The ultrastructure of hippocampus in diabetic rats and cultured neurons in high glucose medium were observed by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. TUNEL staining was also performed to assess apoptotic cells while the expression of CHOP was assayed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot assay in these hippocampal neurons. Six weeks after diabetes induction, the escape latency increased and the average frequency in finding the platform decreased in diabetic rats (P < 0.05). The morphology of neuron and synaptic structure was impaired; the number of TUNEL-positive cells and the expression of CHOP in hippocampus of diabetic rats and high glucose medium cultured neurons were markedly altered (P < 0.05). The present results suggested that the CHOP-dependent endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-mediated apoptosis may be involved in hyperglycemia-induced hippocampal synapses and neurons impairment and promote the diabetic cognitive impairment.

  3. Relevance of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Cell Signaling in Liver Cold Ischemia Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Folch-Puy, Emma; Panisello, Arnau; Oliva, Joan; Lopez, Alexandre; Castro Benítez, Carlos; Adam, René; Roselló-Catafau, Joan

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is involved in calcium homeostasis, protein folding and lipid biosynthesis. Perturbations in its normal functions lead to a condition called endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS). This can be triggered by many physiopathological conditions such as alcoholic steatohepatitis, insulin resistance or ischemia-reperfusion injury. The cell reacts to ERS by initiating a defensive process known as the unfolded protein response (UPR), which comprises cellular mechanisms for adaptation and the safeguarding of cell survival or, in cases of excessively severe stress, for the initiation of the cell death program. Recent experimental data suggest the involvement of ERS in ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI) of the liver graft, which has been considered as one of major problems influencing outcome after liver transplantation. The purpose of this review is to summarize updated data on the molecular mechanisms of ERS/UPR and the consequences of this pathology, focusing specifically on solid organ preservation and liver transplantation models. We will also discuss the potential role of ERS, beyond the simple adaptive response and the regulation of cell death, in the modification of cell functional properties and phenotypic changes. PMID:27231901

  4. New insights in the role of Bcl-2 Bcl-2 and the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Rudner, J; Jendrossek, V; Belka, C

    2002-10-01

    The oncogenic protein Bcl-2 which is expressed in membranes of different subcellular organelles protects cells from apoptosis induced by endogenic stimuli. Most of the results published so far emphasise the importance of Bcl-2 at the mitochondria. Several recent observations suggest a role of Bcl-2 at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Bcl-2 located at the ER was shown to interfere with apoptosis induction by Bax, ceramides, ionising radiation, serum withdrawal and c-myc expression. Although the detailed functions of Bcl-2 at the ER remain elusive, several speculative mechanisms may be supposed. For instance, Bcl-2 at the ER may regulate calcium fluxes between the ER and the mitochondria. In addition, Bcl-2 is able to interact with the endoplasmic protein Bap31 thus avoiding caspase activation at the ER. Bcl-2 may also abrogate the function of ER located pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 like proteins by heterodimerization. Current data on the function of Bcl-2 at the ER, its role for the modulation of calcium fluxes and its influence on caspase activation at the ER are reviewed.

  5. Spike, a novel BH3-only protein, regulates apoptosis at the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Mund, Thomas; Gewies, Andreas; Schoenfeld, Nicole; Bauer, Manuel K A; Grimm, Stefan

    2003-04-01

    We have isolated Spike, a novel and evolutionary conserved BH3-only protein. BH3-only proteins constitute a family of apoptosis inducers that mediate proapoptotic signals. In contrast to most proteins of this family, Spike was not found to be associated with mitochondria. Furthermore, unlike the known BH3-only proteins, Spike could not interact with all tested Bcl-2 family members, despite its BH3 domain being necessary for cell killing. Our findings indicate that Spike is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum. The endoplasmic reticulum is an organelle that has only recently been implicated in regulation of apoptosis. At this locale, Spike interacts with Bap31, an adaptor protein for pro-caspase-8 and Bcl-XL. In doing so, Spike is able to inhibit the formation of a complex between Bap31 and the antiapoptotic Bcl-XL protein. Furthermore, Spike transmits the signal of specific death receptors. Its down-regulation in certain tumors suggests that Spike may also play a role in tumorigenesis. Our findings add new insight for how BH3-only and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins regulate cell death.

  6. Subsistence restoration planning and implementation. Restoration projects 94428 and 95428. Exxon Valdez oil spill restoration project final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fall, J.A.

    1995-10-01

    The project attempted to develop a comprehensive approach to subsistence restoration by organizing a planning team, meeting with community and regional organization representatives, and assisting communities and organizations in preparing subsistence restoration project proposals for funding either from the civil settlement Restoration Fund or a $5 million appropriation by the Alaska legislature of criminal settlement funds. The project resulted in an enhanced role for subsistence users and communities in the restoration process, as evidenced by a notable increase in funding of subsistence restoration projects. A review of findings of a joint Alaska Department of Fish and Game/Minerals Management Service research project suggests that while partial recovery of subsistence uses has occurred, restoration is not complete.

  7. Contribution of genetics to ecological restoration.

    PubMed

    Mijangos, Jose Luis; Pacioni, Carlo; Spencer, Peter B S; Craig, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Ecological restoration of degraded ecosystems has emerged as a critical tool in the fight to reverse and ameliorate the current loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services. Approaches derived from different genetic disciplines are extending the theoretical and applied frameworks on which ecological restoration is based. We performed a search of scientific articles and identified 160 articles that employed a genetic approach within a restoration context to shed light on the links between genetics and restoration. These articles were then classified on whether they examined association between genetics and fitness or the application of genetics in demographic studies, and on the way the studies informed restoration practice. Although genetic research in restoration is rapidly growing, we found that studies could make better use of the extensive toolbox developed by applied fields in genetics. Overall, 41% of reviewed studies used genetic information to evaluate or monitor restoration, and 59% provided genetic information to guide prerestoration decision-making processes. Reviewed studies suggest that restoration practitioners often overlook the importance of including genetic aspects within their restoration goals. Even though there is a genetic basis influencing the provision of ecosystem services, few studies explored this relationship. We provide a view of research gaps, future directions and challenges in the genetics of restoration.

  8. Restoring the impaired cardiac calcium homeostasis and cardiac function in iron overload rats by the combined deferiprone and N-acetyl cysteine

    PubMed Central

    Wongjaikam, Suwakon; Kumfu, Sirinart; Khamseekaew, Juthamas; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C.; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2017-01-01

    Intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i dysregulation plays an important role in the pathophysiology of iron overload cardiomyopathy. Although either iron chelators or antioxidants provide cardioprotection, a comparison of the efficacy of deferoxamine (DFO), deferiprone (DFP), deferasirox (DFX), N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or a combination of DFP plus NAC on cardiac [Ca2+]i homeostasis in chronic iron overload has never been investigated. Male Wistar rats were fed with either a normal diet or a high iron (HFe) diet for 4 months. At 2 months, HFe rats were divided into 6 groups and treated with either a vehicle, DFO (25 mg/kg/day), DFP (75 mg/kg/day), DFX (20 mg/kg/day), NAC (100 mg/kg/day), or combined DFP plus NAC. At 4 months, the number of cardiac T-type calcium channels was increased, whereas cardiac sarcoplasmic-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) was decreased, leading to cardiac iron overload and impaired cardiac [Ca2+]i homeostasis. All pharmacological interventions restored SERCA levels. Although DFO, DFP, DFX or NAC alone shared similar efficacy in improving cardiac [Ca2+]i homeostasis, only DFP + NAC restored cardiac [Ca2+]i homeostasis, leading to restoring left ventricular function in the HFe-fed rats. Thus, the combined DFP + NAC was more effective than any monotherapy in restoring cardiac [Ca2+]i homeostasis, leading to restored myocardial contractility in iron-overloaded rats. PMID:28287621

  9. 15 CFR 990.56 - Restoration selection-use of a Regional Restoration Plan or existing restoration project.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration...

  10. Mitochondrial DNA, restoring Beethovens music.

    PubMed

    Merheb, Maxime; Vaiedelich, Stéphane; Maniguet, Thiérry; Hänni, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Great ancient composers have endured many obstacles and constraints which are very difficult to understand unless we perform the restoration process of ancient music. Species identification in leather used during manufacturing is the key step to start such a restoration process in order to produce a facsimile of a museum piano. Our study reveals the species identification in the leather covering the hammer head in a piano created by Erard in 1802. This is the last existing piano similar to the piano that Beethoven used with its leather preserved in its original state. The leather sample was not present in a homogeneous piece, yet combined with glue. Using a DNA extraction method that avoids PCR inhibitors; we discovered that sheep and cattle are the origin of the combination. To identify the species in the leather, we focused on the amounts of mitochondrial DNA in both leather and glue and results have led us to the conclusion that the leather used to cover the hammer head in this piano was made of cattle hide.

  11. Restored pictures of Ganymede, moon of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frieden, B. R.; Swindell, W.

    1976-01-01

    The paper discusses results of an attempt to restore two blurred pictures of Ganymede taken by Pioneer 10 through a blue filter and a red filter. The mathematical formulation of the restoration problem is outlined, it is noted that both conventional linear filtering and the maximum-entropy algorithm were employed as restoration techniques, and the two methods are described. The original blurred pictures are reproduced along with the two restorations of each image. The restored images are found to exhibit some mare-like features as well as a few large bright rings, possibly ice ridges. The results obtained with the two restoration techniques are compared, and it is concluded that the maximum-entropy method is more advantageous than linear methods in applications to moderately extended images.

  12. ERManI (Endoplasmic Reticulum Class I α-Mannosidase) Is Required for HIV-1 Envelope Glycoprotein Degradation via Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Protein Degradation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Tao; Frabutt, Dylan A; Moremen, Kelley W; Zheng, Yong-Hui

    2015-09-04

    Previously, we reported that the mitochondrial translocator protein (TSPO) induces HIV-1 envelope (Env) degradation via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway, but the mechanism was not clear. Here we investigated how the four ER-associated glycoside hydrolase family 47 (GH47) α-mannosidases, ERManI, and ER-degradation enhancing α-mannosidase-like (EDEM) proteins 1, 2, and 3, are involved in the Env degradation process. Ectopic expression of these four α-mannosidases uncovers that only ERManI inhibits HIV-1 Env expression in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, genetic knock-out of the ERManI gene MAN1B1 using CRISPR/Cas9 technology disrupts the TSPO-mediated Env degradation. Biochemical studies show that HIV-1 Env interacts with ERManI, and between the ERManI cytoplasmic, transmembrane, lumenal stem, and lumenal catalytic domains, the catalytic domain plays a critical role in the Env-ERManI interaction. In addition, functional studies show that inactivation of the catalytic sites by site-directed mutagenesis disrupts the ERManI activity. These studies identify ERManI as a critical GH47 α-mannosidase in the ER-associated protein degradation pathway that initiates the Env degradation and suggests that its catalytic domain and enzymatic activity play an important role in this process.

  13. Arabidopsis SYT1 maintains stability of cortical endoplasmic reticulum networks and VAP27-1-enriched endoplasmic reticulum–plasma membrane contact sites

    PubMed Central

    Siao, Wei; Wang, Pengwei; Voigt, Boris; Hussey, Patrick J.; Baluska, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis synaptotagmin 1 (SYT1) is localized on the endoplasmic reticulum–plasma membrane (ER–PM) contact sites in leaf and root cells. The ER–PM localization of Arabidopsis SYT1 resembles that of the extended synaptotagmins (E-SYTs) in animal cells. In mammals, E-SYTs have been shown to regulate calcium signaling, lipid transfer, and endocytosis. Arabidopsis SYT1 was reported to be essential for maintaining cell integrity and virus movement. This study provides detailed insight into the subcellular localization of SYT1 and VAP27-1, another ER–PM-tethering protein. SYT1 and VAP27-1 were shown to be localized on distinct ER–PM contact sites. The VAP27-1-enriched ER–PM contact sites (V-EPCSs) were always in contact with the SYT1-enriched ER–PM contact sites (S-EPCSs). The V-EPCSs still existed in the leaf epidermal cells of the SYT1 null mutant; however, they were less stable than those in the wild type. The polygonal networks of cortical ER disassembled and the mobility of VAP27-1 protein on the ER–PM contact sites increased in leaf cells of the SYT1 null mutant. These results suggest that SYT1 is responsible for stabilizing the ER network and V-EPCSs. PMID:27811083

  14. Quercetin attenuates the effects of H2O2 on endoplasmic reticulum morphology and tyrosinase export from the endoplasmic reticulum in melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Guan, Cuiping; Xu, Wen; Hong, Weisong; Zhou, Miaoni; Lin, Fuquan; Fu, Lifang; Liu, Dongyin; Xu, Aie

    2015-06-01

    Swollen endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is commonly observed in the melanocytes of vitiligo patients; however, the cause and proteins involved in this remain to be elucidated. Oxidative stress has been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo and previous studies have demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced melanocyte apoptosis, whereas quercetin exhibited cytoprotective activities against the effects of H2O2. The aim of the present study was to further investigate the role of H2O2 in the ER of melanocytes as well as its role in the export of tyrosinase from ER; in addition, the present study aimed to determine the mechanism by which quercetin protects against the effects of H2O2. The results demonstrated that melanocyte cells treated with H2O2 presented with swollen ER; however, a normal ER configuration was observed in untreated cells as well as quercetin/H2O2‑treated cells. Furthermore, H2O2 inhibited tyrosinase export from the ER and decreased expression levels of tyrosinase; however, quercetin was found to attenuate the effects induced by H2O2. In conclusion, the results of the present study confirmed the hypothesis that H2O2 induced ER dilation and hindered functional tyrosinase export from the ER of melanocytes. It was also found that quercetin significantly weakened these effects mediated by H2O2, therefore it may have the potential for use in the treatment of vitiligo.

  15. Concepts for Functional Restoration of Barrier Islands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Frisian barrier islands to sea-level rise: An investigation of past and future evolution. Geomorphology 15, 57-65. Farley, P. P. 1923. Coney Island ...ERDC/CHL CHETN-IV-74 September 2009 Concepts for Functional Restoration of Barrier Islands by Julie Dean Rosati PURPOSE: This Coastal and...Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note (CHETN) presents guid- ance for functional restoration of barrier islands . The concept of functional restoration

  16. Can Viral Videos Help Beaver Restore Streams?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, J. M.; Pollock, M. M.; Lewallen, G.; Jordan, C.; Woodruff, K.

    2015-12-01

    Have you watched YouTube lately? Did you notice the plethora of cute animal videos? Researchers, including members of our Beaver Restoration Research team, have been studying the restoration potential of beaver for decades, yet in the past few years, beaver have gained broad acclaim and some much deserved credit for restoration of aquatic systems in North America. Is it because people can now see these charismatic critters in action from the comfort of their laptops? While the newly released Beaver Restoration Guidebook attempts to answer many questions, sadly, this is not one of them. We do, however, address the use of beaver (Castor canadensis) in stream, wetland, and floodplain restoration and discuss the many positive effects of beaver on fluvial ecosystems. Our team, composed of researchers from NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service, US Fish and Wildlife Service, US Forest Service, and Portland State University, has developed a scientifically rigorous, yet accessible, practitioner's guide that provides a synthesis of the best available science for using beaver to improve ecosystem functions. Divided into two broad sections -- Beaver Ecology and Beaver Restoration and Management -- the guidebook focuses on the many ways in which beaver improve habitat, primarily through the construction of dams that impound water and retain sediment. In Beaver Ecology, we open with a discussion of the general effects that beaver dams have on physical and biological processes, and we close with "Frequently Asked Questions" and "Myth Busters". In Restoration and Management, we discuss common emerging restoration techniques and methods for mitigating unwanted beaver effects, followed by case studies from pioneering practitioners who have used many of these beaver restoration techniques in the field. The lessons they have learned will help guide future restoration efforts. We have also included a comprehensive beaver ecology library of over 1400 references from scientific journals

  17. Restoration of autophagy alleviates hepatic ER stress and impaired insulin signalling transduction in high fructose-fed male mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Sun, Ruo-Qiong; Zeng, Xiao-Yi; Zhou, Xiu; Li, Songpei; Jo, Eunjung; Molero, Juan C; Ye, Ji-Ming

    2015-01-01

    High-carbohydrate (mainly fructose) consumption is a major dietary factor for hepatic insulin resistance, involving endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and lipid accumulation. Because autophagy has been implicated in ER stress, the present study investigated the role of autophagy in high-fructose (HFru) diet-induced hepatic ER stress and insulin resistance in male C57BL/6J mice. The results show that chronic HFru feeding induced glucose intolerance and impaired insulin signaling transduction in the liver, associated with ER stress and the accumulation of lipids. Intriguingly, hepatic autophagy was suppressed as a result of activation of mammalian target of rapamycin. The suppressed autophagy was detected within 6 hours after HFru feeding along with activation of both inositol-requiring enzyme 1 and protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase pathways. These events occurred prior to lipid accumulation or lipogenesis and were sufficient to blunt insulin signaling transduction with activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase/inhibitory-κB kinase and serine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 1. The stimulation of autophagy attenuated ER stress- and c-Jun N-terminal kinase/inhibitory-κB kinase-associated impairment in insulin signaling transduction in a mammalian target of rapamycin -independent manner. Taken together, our data suggest that restoration of autophagy functions disrupted by fructose is able to alleviate ER stress and improve insulin signaling transduction.

  18. Esthetic restoration of discolored primary incisors.

    PubMed

    Margolis, Fred S

    2005-01-01

    Restoring primary teeth can be a strenuous task for many dentists who would like to have an esthetic, easy-to-use and relatively quick restoration for children. But, the restoration of carious, fractured or discolored primary incisors gives the dentist the satisfaction of knowing that he/she has restored the smile and self-confidence of a growing child. This article describes a technique which is relatively easy and produces a beautiful outcome in a relatively short time. The author has used the technique in hundreds of children for over twenty-five years. Modifications in the technique have been made as newer materials and techniques have evolved.

  19. Ecological feasibility studies in restoration decision making.

    PubMed

    Hopfensperger, Kristine N; Engelhardt, Katharina A M; Seagle, Steven W

    2007-06-01

    The restoration of degraded systems is essential for maintaining the provision of valuable ecosystem services, including the maintenance of aesthetic values. However, restoration projects often fail to reach desired goals for a variety of ecologic, financial, and social reasons. Feasibility studies that evaluate whether a restoration effort should even be attempted can enhance restoration success by highlighting potential pitfalls and gaps in knowledge before the design phase of a restoration. Feasibility studies also can bring stakeholders together before a restoration project is designed to discuss potential disagreements. For these reasons, a feasibility study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of restoring a tidal freshwater marsh in the Potomac River near Alexandria, Virginia. The study focused on science rather than engineering questions, and thus differed in approach from other feasibility studies that are mostly engineering driven. The authors report the framework they used to conduct a feasibility study to inform other potential restoration projects with similar goals. The seven steps of the framework encompass (1) initiation of a feasibility study, (2) compilation of existing data, (3) collection of current site information, (4) examination of case studies, (5) synthesis of information in a handbook, (6) meeting with selected stakeholders, and (7) evaluation of meeting outcomes. By conducting a feasibility study using the seven-step framework, the authors set the stage for conducting future compliance studies and enhancing the chance of a successful restoration.

  20. Composite veneering of complex amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Demarco, Flávio Fernando; Zanchi, César Henrique; Bueno, Márcia; Piva, Evandro

    2007-01-01

    In large posterior cavities, indirect restorations could provide improved performance when compared to direct restorations, but with higher cost and removal of sound tooth structure. Improved mechanical properties have resulted in good clinical performance for amalgam in large cavities but without an esthetic appearance. Resin composites have become popular for posterior restorations, mainly because of good esthetic results. A restorative technique is presented that combines the esthetic properties of directly bonded resin composite and the wide range of indications for amalgam in stress-bearing areas.

  1. Restoration of a mined peatland

    SciTech Connect

    Zolidis, N.R.

    1987-07-01

    A study of the hydrogeology of a 106 hectare mined peatland in southeastern Wisconsin was undertaken to determine hydroperiod, depth to water table and major source of water in order to plan for the restoration of sedge meadow, deepwater marsh and bog communities. A network of 20 surface stage posts, 21 shallow wells and 10 deeper piezometers was monitored to delineate groundwater and surface water elevations, and groundwater flowpaths. Results indicate that both groundwater recharge and discharge occur, however groundwater discharge is the major source of water. Depths to water table provide estimates of water level increases needed to ensure conditions favorable for desired wetland communities. Preliminary results suggest that changes in groundwater flowpaths may result from regulation of water levels, thus decreasing groundwater flow into the wetland.

  2. Nutrition considerations surrounding restorative proctocolectomy.

    PubMed

    Buckman, Sara A; Heise, Charles P

    2010-06-01

    Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis has become the surgical treatment of choice for patients with ulcerative colitis and familial polyposis coli syndromes. Pouch construction uses the distal 30-40 cm of ileum, and there exists a potential for postoperative nutrition consequences. These include vitamin B(12) deficiency, iron deficiency, bile acid malabsorption, and abnormalities of trace elements, fluids, and electrolytes. Patients who have undergone an ileal pouch-anal anastomosis procedure often describe specific food sensitivities that may require diet alteration, even more so than do patients with permanent ileostomy. There may be roles for postoperative probiotic supplementation in an attempt to decrease the rate of "pouchitis" and appropriate preoperative nutrition support to minimize the risk of perioperative complications.

  3. Electrical stimulation to restore respiration.

    PubMed

    Creasey, G; Elefteriades, J; DiMarco, A; Talonen, P; Bijak, M; Girsch, W; Kantor, C

    1996-04-01

    Electrical stimulation has been used for over 25 years to restore breathing to patients with high quadriplegia causing respiratory paralysis and patients with central alveolar hypoventilation. Three groups have developed electrical pacing systems for long-term support of respiration in humans. These systems consist of electrodes implanted on the phrenic nerves, connected by leads to a stimulator implanted under the skin, and powered and controlled from a battery-powered transmitter outside the body. The systems differ principally in the electrode design and stimulation waveform. Approximately 1,000 people worldwide have received one of the three phrenic pacing devices, most with strongly positive results: reduced risk of tracheal problems and chronic infection, the ability to speak and smell more normally, reduced risk of accidental interruption of respiration, greater independence, and reduced costs and time for ventilatory care. For patients with partial lesions of the phrenic nerves, intercostal muscle stimulation may supplement respiration.

  4. Nuclear receptor LRH-1/NR5A2 is required and targetable for liver endoplasmic reticulum stress resolution

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chronic endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress results in toxicity that contributes to multiple human disorders. We report a stress resolution pathway initiated by the nuclear receptor LRH-1 that is independent of known unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways. Like mice lacking primary UPR components, h...

  5. Noninvasive measurement of the pH of the endoplasmic reticulum at rest and during calcium release

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Hong; Johannes, Ludger; Goud, Bruno; Antony, Claude; Lingwood, Clifford A.; Daneman, Richard; Grinstein, Sergio

    1998-01-01

    The pH within individual organelles of the secretory pathway is believed to be an important determinant of their biosynthetic activity. However, little is known about the determinants and regulation of the pH in the secretory organelles, which cannot be readily accessed by [H+]-sensitive probes. We devised a procedure for the dynamic, noninvasive measurement of pH in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum in intact mammalian cells. A recombinant form of the B subunit of Shiga toxin, previously modified to include a carboxyl-terminal KDEL sequence and a pH-sensitive fluorophore, was used for a two-stage delivery strategy. Retrograde traffic of endogenous lipids was harnessed to target this protein to the Golgi complex, followed by retrieval to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by KDEL receptors. Immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy were used to verify the subcellular localization of the modified B fragment. Fluorescence ratio imaging and two independent calibration procedures were applied to determine the pH of the ER in situ. We found that the pH of the endoplasmic reticulum is near neutral and is unaffected during agonist-induced release of calcium. The ER was found to be highly permeable to H+ (equivalents), so that the prevailing [H+] is susceptible to alterations in the cytosolic pH. Plasmalemmal acid-base transporters were shown to indirectly regulate the endoplasmic reticulum pH. PMID:9501204

  6. Cis-element of the rice PDIL2-3 promoter is responsible for inducing the endoplasmic reticulum stress response.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideyuki; Wang, Shuyi; Hayashi, Shimpei; Wakasa, Yuhya; Takaiwa, Fumio

    2014-05-01

    A protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) family oxidoreductase, PDIL2-3, is involved in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses in rice. We identified a critical cis-element required for induction of the ER stress response. The activation of PDIL2-3 in response to ER stress strongly depends on the IRE1-OsbZIP50 signaling pathway.

  7. Megasessions for Robotic Hair Restoration.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Joa O Carlos; Pereira Filho, Joa O Carlos; Cabrera Pereira, Joa O Pedro

    2016-11-01

    A robotic system can select and remove individual hair follicles from the donor area with great precision and without fatigue. This report describes the use of the robotic system in a megasession for hair restoration. Patients were instructed to cut their hair to 1.0 to 1.2 mm before surgery. The robot selected and removed 600 to 800 grafts per hour so the follicular units (FU)s could be transplanted manually to recipient sites. The robot arm consists of a sharp inner punch and a blunt outer punch which together separate FUs from the sur- rounding tissue. Stereoscopic cameras controlled by image processing software allow the system to identify the angle and direction of hair growth. The physician and one assistant control the harvesting with a hand-held remote control and computer monitor while the patient is positioned in an adjustable chair. When the robot has harvested all the FUs they are removed by technicians with small forceps. Hairline design, creation of recipient sites, and graft placement are performed manually by the physician. Clinical photographs before and after surgery show that patients experience excellent outcomes with the robotic megasession. Phy- sician fatigue during graft extraction is reduced because the robot performs the repetitive movements without fatigue. Variability of graft extraction is minimized because the robot's optical system can be programmed to choose the best FUs. The transection rate is reduced because the robot's graft extraction system uses two needles, a sharp one to piece the skin and a blunt needle to dissect the root without trauma. A robotic megasession for hair restoration is minimally invasive, does not result in linear scars in the donor area, and is associated with minimal fatigue and discomfort for both patient and physician. Healing is rapid and patients experience a high level of satisfaction with the results. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016;15(11):1407-1412..

  8. Chemical Chaperones Reduce ER Stress and Restore Glucose Homeostasis in a Mouse Model of Type 2 Diabetes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Umut; Yilmaz, Erkan; Özcan, Lale; Furuhashi, Masato; Vaillancourt, Eric; Smith, Ross O.; Görgün, Cem Z.; Hotamisligil, Gökhan S.

    2006-08-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key link between obesity, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes. Here, we provide evidence that this mechanistic link can be exploited for therapeutic purposes with orally active chemical chaperones. 4-Phenyl butyric acid and taurine-conjugated ursodeoxycholic acid alleviated ER stress in cells and whole animals. Treatment of obese and diabetic mice with these compounds resulted in normalization of hyperglycemia, restoration of systemic insulin sensitivity, resolution of fatty liver disease, and enhancement of insulin action in liver, muscle, and adipose tissues. Our results demonstrate that chemical chaperones enhance the adaptive capacity of the ER and act as potent antidiabetic modalities with potential application in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  9. Restorative Mediation: The Application of Restorative Justice Practice and Philosophy to Clergy Sexual Abuse Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noll, Douglas E.; Harvey, Linda

    2008-01-01

    This article will present the restorative justice model and examine how the restorative justice philosophy and process can be applied to clergy-perpetrated sexual abuse and religious sexual misconduct to resolve legal claims and allow the process of healing to begin. Restorative justice is a holistic approach to criminal, civil, and church law…

  10. 15 CFR 990.53 - Restoration selection-developing restoration alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Restoration selection-developing... Restoration selection—developing restoration alternatives. (a) General. (1) If the information on injury... species, habitats, or public services that would facilitate the replacement of other, dependent...

  11. 15 CFR 990.53 - Restoration selection-developing restoration alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Restoration selection-developing... Restoration selection—developing restoration alternatives. (a) General. (1) If the information on injury... species, habitats, or public services that would facilitate the replacement of other, dependent...

  12. 15 CFR 990.53 - Restoration selection-developing restoration alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Restoration selection-developing... Restoration selection—developing restoration alternatives. (a) General. (1) If the information on injury... species, habitats, or public services that would facilitate the replacement of other, dependent...

  13. 15 CFR 990.53 - Restoration selection-developing restoration alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Restoration selection-developing... Restoration selection—developing restoration alternatives. (a) General. (1) If the information on injury... species, habitats, or public services that would facilitate the replacement of other, dependent...

  14. 15 CFR 990.53 - Restoration selection-developing restoration alternatives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Restoration selection-developing... Restoration selection—developing restoration alternatives. (a) General. (1) If the information on injury... species, habitats, or public services that would facilitate the replacement of other, dependent...

  15. BhbZIP60 from Resurrection Plant Boea hygrometrica Is an mRNA Splicing-Activated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Regulator Involved in Drought Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Du, Hong; Zhang, Zhennan; Xu, Wenzhong; Deng, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Adverse environmental conditions cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in plants. To mitigate ER stress damage, ER associated transcription factors and inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1)-mediated bZIP60 mRNA splicing are activated in plants. A drought-induced gene, encoding the ortholog of AtbZIP60, was identified in the resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica, termed BhbZIP60. In response to ER stress and dehydration, BhbZIP60 mRNA can be spliced to create a frame shift in the C terminus by the excision of 23b segment in a manner of its ortholog in other plants, thus translocating to the nucleus instead of the cytoplasm. The splicing-activated BhbZIP60 (BhbZIP60S) could function in the same way as its Arabidopsis ortholog by restoring the molecular phenotype of the mutant atbzip60. When overexpressed in Arabidopsis, BhbZIP60S provided transgenic plants with enhanced tolerance to drought, tunicamycin and mannitol stresses with upregulation of the expressions of ER quality control (QC) genes (BiP2, BiP3, CNX1, and sPDI) and abscisic acid (ABA) responsive genes (RD29A, RAB18, and RD17). Furthermore, in the yeast one-hybrid system, BhbZIP60S was capable of interacting with ER stress responsive elements (ERSE and ERSE-II) that exist in the promoters of known ER-QC genes, but not binding to ABA responsive cis-elements (ABREs). Our results demonstrated that drought-induced BhbZIP60 may have a function in drought tolerance via the splicing-activated BhbZIP60S to mediate ER-QC by direct binding to the promoters of ER-QC genes. This study evidently demonstrates the involvement of ER-QC in the drought tolerance of Arabidopsis and the desiccation tolerance of the resurrection plant B. hygrometrica. PMID:28286511

  16. Resveratrol prevents doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity in H9c2 cells through the inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress and the activation of the Sirt1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Lou, Yu; Wang, Zhen; Xu, Yi; Zhou, Ping; Cao, Junxian; Li, Yuanshi; Chen, Yeping; Sun, Junfeng; Fu, Lu

    2015-09-01

    Treatment with doxorubicin (DOX) is one of the major causes of chemotherapy-induced cardiotoxicity and is therefore, the principal limiting factor in the effectiveness of chemotherapy for cancer patients. DOX‑induced heart failure is thought to result from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Resveratrol (RV), a polyphenol antioxidant found in red wine, has been shown to play a cardioprotective role. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of RV on DOX‑induced cardiotoxicity in H9c2 cells. We hypothesized that RV would protect H9c2 cells against DOX‑induced ER stress and subsequent cell death through the activation of the Sirt1 pathway. Our results demonstrated that the decrease observed in the viability of the H9c2 cells following exposure to DOX was accompanied by a significant increase in the expression of the ER stress‑related proteins, glucose‑regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). However, we found that RV downregulated the expression of ER stress marker protein in the presence of DOX and restored the viability of the H9c2 cells. Exposure to RV or DOX alone only slightly increased the protein expression of Sirt1, whereas a significant increase in Sirt1 protein levels was observed in the cells treated with both RV and DOX. The Sirt1 inhibitor, nicotinamide (NIC), partially neutralized the effects of RV on the expression of Sirt1 in the DOX‑treated cells and completely abolished the effects of RV on the expression of GRP78 and CHOP. The findings of our study suggest that RV protects H9c2 cells against DOX‑induced ER stress through ER stabilization, and more specifically through the activation of the Sirt1 pathway, thereby leading to cardiac cell survival.

  17. Hepatoprotective Effect of Quercetin on Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Inflammation after Intense Exercise in Mice through Phosphoinositide 3-Kinase and Nuclear Factor-Kappa B

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yuhan; Li, Juan; Gao, Chao; Xu, Yanyan; Li, Yanyan; Yu, Xiao; Wang, Jing; Liu, Liegang

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying intense exercise-induced liver damage and its potential treatments remain unclear. We explored the hepatoprotection and mechanisms of quercetin, a naturally occurring flavonoid, in strenuous exercise-derived endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) and inflammation. Intense exercise (28 m/min at a 5° slope for 90 min) resulted in the leakage of aminotransferases in the BALB/C mice. The hepatic ultrastructural malformations and oxidative stress levels were attenuated by quercetin (100 mg/kg·bw). Intense exercise and thapsigargin- (Tg-) induced ERS (glucose-regulated protein 78, GRP78) and inflammatory cytokines levels (IL-6 and TNF-α) were decreased with quercetin. Furthermore, quercetin resulted in phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) induction, Ca2+ restoration, and blockade of the activities of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6) and especially NF-κB (p65 and p50 nuclear translocation). A PI3K inhibitor abrogated the protection of quercetin on ERS and inflammation of mouse hepatocytes. SP600125 (JNK inhibitor), AEBSF (ATF6 inhibitor), and especially PDTC (NF-κB inhibitor) enhanced the quercetin-induced protection against Tg stimulation. Collectively, intense exercise-induced ERS and inflammation were attenuated by quercetin. PI3K/Akt activation and JNK, ATF6, and especially NF-κB suppression were involved in the protection. Our results highlight a novel preventive strategy for treating ERS and inflammation-mediated liver damage induced by intense exercise using natural phytochemicals. PMID:27504150

  18. ROS-mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondrial dysfunction underlie apoptosis induced by resveratrol and arsenic trioxide in A549 cells.

    PubMed

    Gu, Shiyan; Chen, Chengzhi; Jiang, Xuejun; Zhang, Zunzhen

    2016-02-05

    Although it is well documented that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are associated with apoptosis, little is known about whether they are involved in the apoptotic cell death induced by resveratrol and arsenic trioxide (ATO) combination. In this study, we identified a series of sensitization effects of resveratrol on human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells to ATO treatment, with the combination index (CI) of resveratrol and ATO less than 1. Then, we demonstrated that ER stress was contributed to this synergistic effect, which was manifested by increased the expression levels of ER stress hallmarks, including 78-kDa glucose-regulated protein (GRP 78), caspase 12 and C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP), In addition, mitochondrial dysfunction was observed after exposure of A549 cells to resveratrol or/and ATO, which was displayed by some alterations of mitochondria-related events, such as loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, cytochrome c release and changes of Bax and Bcl-2 expressions. Our results further demonstrated that resveratrol and ATO-induced ER stress and mitochondrial dysfunction were mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), showing that pre-treatment of N-acetyl-l-cysteine, a potent ROS scavenger, restored the ER stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in cells co-treated with resveratrol and ATO, thereby leading to the reduction of the apoptosis. Collectively, these results clearly suggest that ROS-mediated ER stress and mitochondrial dysfunction were involved in the apoptosis induced by resveratrol and ATO in A549 cells, which provides a novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of resveratrol-mediated ATO-sensitization.

  19. BhbZIP60 from Resurrection Plant Boea hygrometrica Is an mRNA Splicing-Activated Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Regulator Involved in Drought Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bo; Du, Hong; Zhang, Zhennan; Xu, Wenzhong; Deng, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Adverse environmental conditions cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in plants. To mitigate ER stress damage, ER associated transcription factors and inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1)-mediated bZIP60 mRNA splicing are activated in plants. A drought-induced gene, encoding the ortholog of AtbZIP60, was identified in the resurrection plant Boea hygrometrica, termed BhbZIP60. In response to ER stress and dehydration, BhbZIP60 mRNA can be spliced to create a frame shift in the C terminus by the excision of 23b segment in a manner of its ortholog in other plants, thus translocating to the nucleus instead of the cytoplasm. The splicing-activated BhbZIP60 (BhbZIP60S) could function in the same way as its Arabidopsis ortholog by restoring the molecular phenotype of the mutant atbzip60. When overexpressed in Arabidopsis, BhbZIP60S provided transgenic plants with enhanced tolerance to drought, tunicamycin and mannitol stresses with upregulation of the expressions of ER quality control (QC) genes (BiP2, BiP3, CNX1, and sPDI) and abscisic acid (ABA) responsive genes (RD29A, RAB18, and RD17). Furthermore, in the yeast one-hybrid system, BhbZIP60S was capable of interacting with ER stress responsive elements (ERSE and ERSE-II) that exist in the promoters of known ER-QC genes, but not binding to ABA responsive cis-elements (ABREs). Our results demonstrated that drought-induced BhbZIP60 may have a function in drought tolerance via the splicing-activated BhbZIP60S to mediate ER-QC by direct binding to the promoters of ER-QC genes. This study evidently demonstrates the involvement of ER-QC in the drought tolerance of Arabidopsis and the desiccation tolerance of the resurrection plant B. hygrometrica.

  20. Protective effect of S-allyl-L-cysteine against endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced neuronal death is mediated by inhibition of calpain.

    PubMed

    Imai, Toru; Kosuge, Yasuhiro; Endo-Umeda, Kaori; Miyagishi, Hiroko; Ishige, Kumiko; Makishima, Makoto; Ito, Yoshihisa

    2014-02-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, implicated in various neurodegenerative processes, increases the level of intracellular Ca(2+) and leads to activation of calpain, a Ca(2+)-dependent cysteine protease. We have shown previously that S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC) in aged garlic extracts significantly protects cultured rat hippocampal neurons (HPNs) against ER stress-induced neurotoxicity. The neuroprotective effect of SAC was compared with those of the related antioxidant compounds, L-cysteine (CYS) and N-acetylcysteine (NAC), on calpain activity in HPNs and also in vitro. SAC, but not CYS or NAC, reversibly restored the survival of HPNs and increased the degradation of α-spectrin, a substrate for calpain, induced by tunicamycin, a typical ER stress inducer. Activities of μ- and m-calpains in vitro were also concentration dependently suppressed by SAC, but not by CYS or NAC. At submaximal concentration, although ALLN (5 pM), which blocks the active site of calpain, and calpastatin (100 pM), an endogenous calpain-inhibitor protein, additively inhibited μ-calpain activity in vitro in combination with SAC, the effect of PD150606 (25 μM), which prevents interaction of Ca(2+) with the Ca(2+)-binding site of calpain, was unaffected by SAC. In contrast, SAC (1 mM) significantly reversed the effect of PD150606 at a concentration that elicited supramaximal inhibition (100 μM), but did not affect ALLN (1 nM)- and calpastatin (100 nM)-induced inhibition of μ-calpain activity. These results suggest that the protective effects of SAC against ER stress-induced neuronal cell death are not attributable to antioxidant activity, but to suppression of calpain through interaction with its Ca(2+)-binding site.

  1. Combined NADPH Oxidase 1 and Interleukin 10 Deficiency Induces Chronic Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Causes Ulcerative Colitis-Like Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tréton, Xavier; Pedruzzi, Eric; Guichard, Cécile; Ladeiro, Yannick; Sedghi, Shirin; Vallée, Mélissa; Fernandez, Neike; Bruyère, Emilie; Woerther, Paul-Louis; Ducroc, Robert; Montcuquet, Nicolas; Freund, Jean-Noel; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Barreau, Frédérick; Marah, Assiya; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Cazals-Hatem, Dominique; Bouhnik, Yoram; Daniel, Fanny; Ogier-Denis, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease affecting the rectum which progressively extents. Its etiology remains unknown and the number of treatments available is limited. Studies of UC patients have identified an unbalanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the non-inflamed colonic mucosa. Animal models with impaired ER stress are sensitive to intestinal inflammation, suggesting that an unbalanced ER stress could cause inflammation. However, there are no ER stress-regulating strategies proposed in the management of UC partly because of the lack of relevant preclinical model mimicking the disease. Here we generated the IL10/Nox1dKO mouse model which combines immune dysfunction (IL-10 deficiency) and abnormal epithelium (NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) deficiency) and spontaneously develops a UC-like phenotype with similar complications (colorectal cancer) than UC. Our data identified an unanticipated combined role of IL10 and Nox1 in the fine-tuning of ER stress responses in goblet cells. As in humans, the ER stress was unbalanced in mice with decreased eIF2α phosphorylation preceding inflammation. In IL10/Nox1dKO mice, salubrinal preserved eIF2α phosphorylation through inhibition of the regulatory subunit of the protein phosphatase 1 PP1R15A/GADD34 and prevented colitis. Thus, this new experimental model highlighted the central role of epithelial ER stress abnormalities in the development of colitis and defined the defective eIF2α pathway as a key pathophysiological target for UC. Therefore, specific regulators able to restore the defective eIF2α pathway could lead to the molecular remission needed to treat UC. PMID:25014110

  2. Loss of a Clueless-dGRASP complex results in ER stress and blocks Integrin exit from the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum in Drosophila larval muscle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zong-Heng; Rabouille, Catherine; Geisbrecht, Erika R.

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila Clueless (Clu) and its conserved orthologs are known for their role in the prevention of mitochondrial clustering. Here, we uncover a new role for Clu in the delivery of integrin subunits in muscle tissue. In clu mutants, αPS2 integrin, but not βPS integrin, abnormally accumulates in a perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum (ER) subdomain, a site that mirrors the endogenous localization of Clu. Loss of components essential for mitochondrial distribution do not phenocopy the clu mutant αPS2 phenotype. Conversely, RNAi knockdown of the Drosophila Golgi reassembly and stacking protein GRASP55/65 (dGRASP) recapitulates clu defects, including the abnormal accumulation of αPS2 and larval locomotor activity. Both Clu and dGRASP proteins physically interact and loss of Clu displaces dGRASP from ER exit sites, suggesting that Clu cooperates with dGRASP for the exit of αPS2 from a perinuclear subdomain in the ER. We also found that Clu and dGRASP loss of function leads to ER stress and that the stability of the ER exit site protein Sec16 is severely compromised in the clu mutants, thus explaining the ER accumulation of αPS2. Remarkably, exposure of clu RNAi larvae to chemical chaperones restores both αPS2 delivery and functional ER exit sites. We propose that Clu together with dGRASP prevents ER stress and therefore maintains Sec16 stability essential for the functional organization of perinuclear early secretory pathway. This, in turn, is essential for integrin subunit αPS2 ER exit in Drosophila larval myofibers. PMID:25862246

  3. Combined NADPH oxidase 1 and interleukin 10 deficiency induces chronic endoplasmic reticulum stress and causes ulcerative colitis-like disease in mice.

    PubMed

    Tréton, Xavier; Pedruzzi, Eric; Guichard, Cécile; Ladeiro, Yannick; Sedghi, Shirin; Vallée, Mélissa; Fernandez, Neike; Bruyère, Emilie; Woerther, Paul-Louis; Ducroc, Robert; Montcuquet, Nicolas; Freund, Jean-Noel; Van Seuningen, Isabelle; Barreau, Frédérick; Marah, Assiya; Hugot, Jean-Pierre; Cazals-Hatem, Dominique; Bouhnik, Yoram; Daniel, Fanny; Ogier-Denis, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease affecting the rectum which progressively extents. Its etiology remains unknown and the number of treatments available is limited. Studies of UC patients have identified an unbalanced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the non-inflamed colonic mucosa. Animal models with impaired ER stress are sensitive to intestinal inflammation, suggesting that an unbalanced ER stress could cause inflammation. However, there are no ER stress-regulating strategies proposed in the management of UC partly because of the lack of relevant preclinical model mimicking the disease. Here we generated the IL10/Nox1dKO mouse model which combines immune dysfunction (IL-10 deficiency) and abnormal epithelium (NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) deficiency) and spontaneously develops a UC-like phenotype with similar complications (colorectal cancer) than UC. Our data identified an unanticipated combined role of IL10 and Nox1 in the fine-tuning of ER stress responses in goblet cells. As in humans, the ER stress was unbalanced in mice with decreased eIF2α phosphorylation preceding inflammation. In IL10/Nox1dKO mice, salubrinal preserved eIF2α phosphorylation through inhibition of the regulatory subunit of the protein phosphatase 1 PP1R15A/GADD34 and prevented colitis. Thus, this new experimental model highlighted the central role of epithelial ER stress abnormalities in the development of colitis and defined the defective eIF2α pathway as a key pathophysiological target for UC. Therefore, specific regulators able to restore the defective eIF2α pathway could lead to the molecular remission needed to treat UC.

  4. Electron probe microanalysis of calcium release and magnesium uptake by endoplasmic reticulum in bee photoreceptors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumann, O.; Walz, B. ); Somlyo, A.V.; Somlyo, A.P. )

    1991-02-01

    Honey bee photoreceptors contain large sacs of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that can be located unequivocally in freeze-dried cryosections. The elemental compositon of the ER was determined by electron probe x-ray microanalysis and was visualized in high-resolution x-ray maps. In the ER of dark-adapted photoreceptors, the Ca concentration was 47.5 {plus minus} 1.1 mmol/kg (dry weight). During a 3-sec nonsaturating light stimulus, {approximately}50% of the Ca content was released from the ER. Light stimulation also caused a highly significant increase in the Mg content of the ER; the ratio of Mg uptake to Ca released was {approximately}0.7. Our results show unambiguously that the ER is the source of Ca{sup 2+} release during cell stimulation and suggest the Mg{sup 2+} can nearly balance the charge movement of Ca{sup 2+}.

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum stress, a new wrestler, in the pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Yi; Pandupuspitasari, Nuruliarizki Shinta; Wu, Guorao; Xiang, Xudong; Gong, Quan; Xiong, Weining; Wang, Cong-Yi; Yang, Ping; Ren, Boxu

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) has attracted extensive attention for its unexplained progressive lung scarring, short median survival and its unresponsiveness to traditional therapies. Despite extensive studies, the mechanisms underlying IPF pathoetiologies, however, remain poorly understood. Recent advances delineated a potential function of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in meeting the need of fibrotic response, which pinpointed a critical role for the unfolded protein response (UPR) pathways in IPF pathogenesis. In this review, we highlight the effect of ER stress and the activation of UPR on the survival, differentiation, function and proliferation of major profibrotic cells in lung tissues during the course of IPF, and discuss the feasibility whether targeting UPR components could be an orientation for developing effective therapeutic strategies against this devastating disorder in clinical settings. PMID:28337301

  6. Targeting the hallmarks of cancer with therapy-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Abhishek D; Maes, Hannelore; van Vliet, Alexander R; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is at the center of a number of vital cellular processes such as cell growth, death, and differentiation, crosstalk with immune or stromal cells, and maintenance of proteostasis or homeostasis, and ER functions have implications for various pathologies including cancer. Recently, a number of major hallmarks of cancer have been delineated that are expected to facilitate the development of anticancer therapies. However, therapeutic induction of ER stress as a strategy to broadly target multiple hallmarks of cancer has been seldom discussed despite the fact that several primary or secondary ER stress-inducing therapies have been found to exhibit positive clinical activity in cancer patients. In the present review we provide a brief historical overview of the major discoveries and milestones in the field of ER stress biology with important implications for anticancer therapy. Furthermore, we comprehensively discuss possible strategies enabling the targeting of multiple hallmarks of cancer with therapy-induced ER stress. PMID:27308392

  7. Hydrogen Sulfide Improves Vascular Calcification in Rats by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Rui; Teng, Xu; Li, Hui; Xue, Hong-Mei; Guo, Qi; Xiao, Lin; Wu, Yu-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the vitamin D3 plus nicotine (VDN) model of rats was used to prove that H2S alleviates vascular calcification (VC) and phenotype transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Besides, H2S can also inhibit endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) of calcified aortic tissues. The effect of H2S on alleviating VC and phenotype transformation of VSMC can be blocked by TM, while PBA also alleviated VC and phenotype transformation of VSMC that was similar to the effect of H2S. These results suggest that H2S may alleviate rat aorta VC by inhibiting ERS, providing new target and perspective for prevention and treatment of VC. PMID:27022436

  8. Dysfunctional tubular endoplasmic reticulum constitutes a pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Sharoar, M G; Shi, Q; Ge, Y; He, W; Hu, X; Perry, G; Zhu, X; Yan, R

    2016-09-01

    Pathological features in Alzheimer's brains include mitochondrial dysfunction and dystrophic neurites (DNs) in areas surrounding amyloid plaques. Using a mouse model that overexpresses reticulon 3 (RTN3) and spontaneously develops age-dependent hippocampal DNs, here we report that DNs contain both RTN3 and REEPs, topologically similar proteins that can shape tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Importantly, ultrastructural examinations of such DNs revealed gradual accumulation of tubular ER in axonal termini, and such abnormal tubular ER inclusion is found in areas surrounding amyloid plaques in biopsy samples from Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains. Functionally, abnormally clustered tubular ER induces enhanced mitochondrial fission in the early stages of DN formation and eventual mitochondrial degeneration at later stages. Furthermore, such DNs are abrogated when RTN3 is ablated in aging and AD mouse models. Hence, abnormally clustered tubular ER can be pathogenic in brain regions: disrupting mitochondrial integrity, inducing DNs formation and impairing cognitive function in AD and aging brains.

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy determines the susceptibility of melanoma cells to dabrafenib

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Chao; Zhang, Ziping; Chen, Lihong; Zhou, Kunli; Li, Dongjun; Wang, Ping; Huang, Shuying; Gong, Ting; Cheng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the deadliest skin cancers and accounts for most skin-related deaths due to strong resistance to chemotherapy drugs. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of dabrafenib-induced drug resistance in human melanoma cell lines A375 and MEL624. Our studies support that both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy were induced in the melanoma cells after the treatment with dabrafenib. In addition, ER stress-induced autophagy protects melanoma cells from the toxicity of dabrafenib. Moreover, inhibition of both ER stress and autophagy promote the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. Taken together, the data suggest that ER stress-induced autophagy determines the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. These results provide us with promising evidence that the inhibition of autophagy and ER stress could serve a therapeutic effect for the conventional dabrafenib chemotherapy. PMID:27536070

  10. Targeting the hallmarks of cancer with therapy-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress.

    PubMed

    Garg, Abhishek D; Maes, Hannelore; van Vliet, Alexander R; Agostinis, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is at the center of a number of vital cellular processes such as cell growth, death, and differentiation, crosstalk with immune or stromal cells, and maintenance of proteostasis or homeostasis, and ER functions have implications for various pathologies including cancer. Recently, a number of major hallmarks of cancer have been delineated that are expected to facilitate the development of anticancer therapies. However, therapeutic induction of ER stress as a strategy to broadly target multiple hallmarks of cancer has been seldom discussed despite the fact that several primary or secondary ER stress-inducing therapies have been found to exhibit positive clinical activity in cancer patients. In the present review we provide a brief historical overview of the major discoveries and milestones in the field of ER stress biology with important implications for anticancer therapy. Furthermore, we comprehensively discuss possible strategies enabling the targeting of multiple hallmarks of cancer with therapy-induced ER stress.

  11. Endoplasmic Reticulum: The Favorite Intracellular Niche for Viral Replication and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Brey, Inés; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the largest intracellular organelle. It forms a complex network of continuous sheets and tubules, extending from the nuclear envelope (NE) to the plasma membrane. This network is frequently perturbed by positive-strand RNA viruses utilizing the ER to create membranous replication factories (RFs), where amplification of their genomes occurs. In addition, many enveloped viruses assemble progeny virions in association with ER membranes, and viruses replicating in the nucleus need to overcome the NE barrier, requiring transient changes of the NE morphology. This review first summarizes some key aspects of ER morphology and then focuses on the exploitation of the ER by viruses for the sake of promoting the different steps of their replication cycles. PMID:27338443

  12. VCP and ATL1 regulate endoplasmic reticulum and protein synthesis for dendritic spine formation.

    PubMed

    Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-03-17

    Imbalanced protein homeostasis, such as excessive protein synthesis and protein aggregation, is a pathogenic hallmark of a range of neurological disorders. Here, using expression of mutant proteins, a knockdown approach and disease mutation knockin mice, we show that VCP (valosin-containing protein), together with its cofactor P47 and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology regulator ATL1 (Atlastin-1), regulates tubular ER formation and influences the efficiency of protein synthesis to control dendritic spine formation in neurons. Strengthening the significance of protein synthesis in dendritic spinogenesis, the translation blocker cyclohexamide and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduce dendritic spine density, while a leucine supplement that increases protein synthesis ameliorates the dendritic spine defects caused by Vcp and Atl1 deficiencies. Because VCP and ATL1 are the causative genes of several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, we suggest that impaired ER formation and inefficient protein synthesis are significant in the pathogenesis of multiple neurological disorders.

  13. Structural reorganization of the fungal endoplasmic reticulum upon induction of mycotoxin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Boenisch, Marike Johanne; Broz, Karen Lisa; Purvine, Samuel Owen; Chrisler, William Byron; Nicora, Carrie Diana; Connolly, Lanelle Reine; Freitag, Michael; Baker, Scott Edward; Kistler, Harold Corby

    2017-01-01

    Compartmentalization of metabolic pathways to particular organelles is a hallmark of eukaryotic cells. Knowledge of the development of organelles and attendant pathways under different metabolic states has been advanced by live cell imaging and organelle specific analysis. Nevertheless, relatively few studies have addressed the cellular localization of pathways for synthesis of fungal secondary metabolites, despite their importance as bioactive compounds with significance to medicine and agriculture. When triggered to produce sesquiterpene (trichothecene) mycotoxins, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium graminearum is reorganized both in vitro and in planta. Trichothecene biosynthetic enzymes accumulate in organized smooth ER with pronounced expansion at perinuclear- and peripheral positions. Fluorescence tagged trichothecene biosynthetic proteins co-localize with the modified ER as confirmed by co-fluorescence and co-purification with known ER proteins. We hypothesize that changes to the fungal ER represent a conserved process in specialized eukaryotic cells such as in mammalian hepatocytes and B-cells. PMID:28287158

  14. Endothelial Dysfunction in Diabetes Mellitus: Possible Involvement of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress?

    PubMed Central

    Basha, Basma; Samuel, Samson Mathews; Triggle, Chris R.; Ding, Hong

    2012-01-01

    The vascular complications of diabetes mellitus impose a huge burden on the management of this disease. The higher incidence of cardiovascular complications and the unfavorable prognosis among diabetic individuals who develop such complications have been correlated to the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and associated endothelial dysfunction. Although antioxidants may be considered as effective therapeutic agents to relieve oxidative stress and protect the endothelium, recent clinical trials involving these agents have shown limited therapeutic efficacy in this regard. In the recent past experimental evidence suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the endothelial cells might be an important contributor to diabetes-related vascular complications. The current paper contemplates the possibility of the involvement of ER stress in endothelial dysfunction and diabetes-associated vascular complications. PMID:22474423

  15. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy determines the susceptibility of melanoma cells to dabrafenib.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chao; Zhang, Ziping; Chen, Lihong; Zhou, Kunli; Li, Dongjun; Wang, Ping; Huang, Shuying; Gong, Ting; Cheng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the deadliest skin cancers and accounts for most skin-related deaths due to strong resistance to chemotherapy drugs. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of dabrafenib-induced drug resistance in human melanoma cell lines A375 and MEL624. Our studies support that both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy were induced in the melanoma cells after the treatment with dabrafenib. In addition, ER stress-induced autophagy protects melanoma cells from the toxicity of dabrafenib. Moreover, inhibition of both ER stress and autophagy promote the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. Taken together, the data suggest that ER stress-induced autophagy determines the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. These results provide us with promising evidence that the inhibition of autophagy and ER stress could serve a therapeutic effect for the conventional dabrafenib chemotherapy.

  16. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Signaling in Mammalian Oocytes and Embryos: Life in the Balance

    PubMed Central

    Latham, Keith E.

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian oocytes and embryos are exquisitely sensitive to a wide range of insults related to physical stress, chemical exposure, and exposures to adverse maternal nutrition or health status. Although cells manifest specific responses to various stressors, many of these stressors intersect at the endoplasmic reticulum, where disruptions in protein folding and production of reactive oxygen species initiate downstream signaling events. These signals modulate mRNA translation and gene transcription, leading to recovery, activation of autophagy, or with severe and prolonged stress, apoptosis. ER stress signaling has recently come to the fore as a major contributor to embryo demise. Accordingly, agents that modulate or inhibit ER stress signaling have yielded beneficial effects on embryo survival and long-term developmental potential. We review here the mechanisms of ER stress signaling, their connections to mammalian oocytes and embryos, and the promising indications that interventions in this pathway may provide new opportunities for improving mammalian reproduction and health. PMID:25805126

  17. The roles of endoplasmic reticulum stress response in female mammalian reproduction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanzhou; Pei, Xiuying; Jin, Yaping; Wang, Yanrong; Zhang, Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) activates a protective pathway, called the unfold protein response, for maintaining cellular homeostasis, but cellular apoptosis is triggered by excessive or persistent ERS. Several recent studies imply that the ERS response might have broader physiological roles in the various reproductive processes of female mammals, including embryo implantation, decidualization, preimplantation embryonic development, follicle atresia, and the development of the placenta. This review summarizes the existing data concerning the molecular and biological roles of the ERS response. The study of the functions of the ERS response in mammalian reproduction might provide novel insights into and an understanding of reproductive cell survival and apoptosis under physiological and pathological conditions. The ERS response is a novel signaling pathway for reproductive cell survival and apoptosis. Infertility might be a result of disturbing the ERS response during the process of female reproduction.

  18. Sc65-Null Mice Provide Evidence for a Novel Endoplasmic Reticulum Complex Regulating Collagen Lysyl Hydroxylation

    PubMed Central

    Weis, MaryAnn; Rai, Jyoti; Hudson, David M.; Dimori, Milena; Zimmerman, Sarah M.; Hogue, William R.; Swain, Frances L.; Burdine, Marie S.; Mackintosh, Samuel G.; Tackett, Alan J.; Suva, Larry J.; Eyre, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Collagen is a major component of the extracellular matrix and its integrity is essential for connective tissue and organ function. The importance of proteins involved in intracellular collagen post-translational modification, folding and transport was recently highlighted from studies on recessive forms of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). Here we describe the critical role of SC65 (Synaptonemal Complex 65, P3H4), a leprecan-family member, as part of an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) complex with prolyl 3-hydroxylase 3. This complex affects the activity of lysyl-hydroxylase 1 potentially through interactions with the enzyme and/or cyclophilin B. Loss of Sc65 in the mouse results in instability of this complex, altered collagen lysine hydroxylation and cross-linking leading to connective tissue defects that include low bone mass and skin fragility. This is the first indication of a prolyl-hydroxylase complex in the ER controlling lysyl-hydroxylase activity during collagen synthesis. PMID:27119146

  19. Synthesis of Fluorophores that Target Small Molecules to the Endoplasmic Reticulum of Living Mammalian Cells**

    PubMed Central

    Matthew Meinig, J.; Fu, Liqiang; Peterson, Blake R.

    2015-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) plays critical roles in the processing of secreted and transmembrane proteins. To deliver small molecules to this organelle, we synthesized fluorinated hydrophobic analogues of the fluorophore rhodol. These cell-permeable fluorophores are exceptionally bright, with quantum yields of ~ 0.8, and specifically accumulate in the ER of living HeLa cells, as imaged by confocal laser scanning microscopy. To target a biological pathway controlled by the ER, we linked a fluorinated hydrophobic rhodol to 5-nitrofuran-2-acrylaldehyde. In contrast to an untargeted nitrofuran warhead, delivery of this electrophilic nitrofuran to the ER by the rhodol resulted in cytotoxicity comparable to the ER-targeted cytotoxin eeyarestatin I, and specifically inhibited protein processing by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Fluorinated hydrophobic rhodols represent outstanding fluorophores that enable delivery of small molecules for targeting of ER-associated proteins and pathways. PMID:26118368

  20. High osmotic pressure increases reactive oxygen species generation in rabbit corneal epithelial cells by endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Sheng, Minjie; Li, Bing; Jiang, Yaping; Chen, Yihui

    2016-01-01

    Tear high osmotic pressure (HOP) has been recognized as the core mechanism underlying ocular surface inflammation, injury and symptoms and is closely associated with many ocular surface diseases, especially dry eye. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multi-functional organelle responsible for protein synthesis, folding and transport, biological synthesis of lipids, vesicle transport and intracellular calcium storage. Accumulation of unfolded proteins and imbalance of calcium ion in the ER would induce ER stress and protective unfolded protein response (UPR). Many studies have demonstrated that ER stress can induce cell apoptosis. However, the association between tear HOP and ER stress has not been studied systematically. In the present study, rabbit corneal epithelial cells were treated with HOP and results showed that the production of reactive oxygen species increased markedly, which further activated the ER signaling pathway and ultimately induced cell apoptosis. These findings shed new lights on the pathogenesis and clinical treatment of dry eye and other ocular surface diseases. PMID:27158374

  1. VCP and ATL1 regulate endoplasmic reticulum and protein synthesis for dendritic spine formation

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Imbalanced protein homeostasis, such as excessive protein synthesis and protein aggregation, is a pathogenic hallmark of a range of neurological disorders. Here, using expression of mutant proteins, a knockdown approach and disease mutation knockin mice, we show that VCP (valosin-containing protein), together with its cofactor P47 and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) morphology regulator ATL1 (Atlastin-1), regulates tubular ER formation and influences the efficiency of protein synthesis to control dendritic spine formation in neurons. Strengthening the significance of protein synthesis in dendritic spinogenesis, the translation blocker cyclohexamide and the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin reduce dendritic spine density, while a leucine supplement that increases protein synthesis ameliorates the dendritic spine defects caused by Vcp and Atl1 deficiencies. Because VCP and ATL1 are the causative genes of several neurodegenerative and neurodevelopmental disorders, we suggest that impaired ER formation and inefficient protein synthesis are significant in the pathogenesis of multiple neurological disorders. PMID:26984393

  2. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response in pancreatic islet inflammation.

    PubMed

    Meyerovich, Kira; Ortis, Fernanda; Allagnat, Florent; Cardozo, Alessandra K

    2016-07-01

    Insulin-secreting pancreatic β-cells are extremely dependent on their endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to cope with the oscillatory requirement of secreted insulin to maintain normoglycemia. Insulin translation and folding rely greatly on the unfolded protein response (UPR), an array of three main signaling pathways designed to maintain ER homeostasis and limit ER stress. However, prolonged or excessive UPR activation triggers alternative molecular pathways that can lead to β-cell dysfunction and apoptosis. An increasing number of studies suggest a role of these pro-apoptotic UPR pathways in the downfall of β-cells observed in diabetic patients. Particularly, the past few years highlighted a cross talk between the UPR and inflammation in the context of both type 1 (T1D) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). In this article, we describe the recent advances in research regarding the interplay between ER stress, the UPR, and inflammation in the context of β-cell apoptosis leading to diabetes.

  3. Roles of endoplasmic reticulum stress-mediated apoptosis in M1-polarized macrophages during mycobacterial infections

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yun-Ji; Yi, Min-Hee; Choi, Ji-Ae; Lee, Junghwan; Han, Ji-Ye; Jo, Sung-Hee; Oh, Sung-Man; Cho, Hyun Jin; Kim, Dong Woon; Kang, Min-Woong; Song, Chang-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Alteration of macrophage function has an important regulatory impact on the survival of intracellular mycobacteria. We found that macrophages infected with attenuated Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) strain H37Ra had elevated expression of M1-related molecules, whereas the M2 phenotype was dominant in macrophages infected with virulent Mtb H37Rv. Further, the TLR signalling pathway played an important role in modulating macrophage polarization against Mtb infection. Interestingly, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress was significantly increased in M1 polarized macrophages and these macrophages effectively removed intracellular Mtb, indicating that ER stress may be an important component of the host immune response to Mtb in M1 macrophages. This improved understanding of the mechanisms that regulate macrophage polarization could provide new therapeutic strategies for tuberculosis. PMID:27845414

  4. STARD3 mediates endoplasmic reticulum-to-endosome cholesterol transport at membrane contact sites.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Léa P; Wendling, Corinne; Védie, Benoît; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Chenard, Marie-Pierre; Tomasetto, Catherine; Drin, Guillaume; Alpy, Fabien

    2017-04-04

    StAR-related lipid transfer domain-3 (STARD3) is a sterol-binding protein that creates endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-endosome contact sites. How this protein, at the crossroad between sterol uptake and synthesis pathways, impacts the intracellular distribution of this lipid was ill-defined. Here, by using in situ cholesterol labeling and quantification, we demonstrated that STARD3 induces cholesterol accumulation in endosomes at the expense of the plasma membrane. STARD3-mediated cholesterol routing depends both on its lipid transfer activity and its ability to create ER-endosome contacts. Corroborating this, in vitro reconstitution assays indicated that STARD3 and its ER-anchored partner, Vesicle-associated membrane protein-associated protein (VAP), assemble into a machine that allows a highly efficient transport of cholesterol within membrane contacts. Thus, STARD3 is a cholesterol transporter scaffolding ER-endosome contacts and modulating cellular cholesterol repartition by delivering cholesterol to endosomes.

  5. Mechanisms of alcohol-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and organ injuries.

    PubMed

    Ji, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Alcohol is readily distributed throughout the body in the blood stream and crosses biological membranes, which affect virtually all biological processes inside the cell. Excessive alcohol consumption induces numerous pathological stress responses, part of which is endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response. ER stress, a condition under which unfolded/misfolded protein accumulates in the ER, contributes to alcoholic disorders of major organs such as liver, pancreas, heart, and brain. Potential mechanisms that trigger the alcoholic ER stress response are directly or indirectly related to alcohol metabolism, which includes toxic acetaldehyde and homocysteine, oxidative stress, perturbations of calcium or iron homeostasis, alterations of S-adenosylmethionine to S-adenosylhomocysteine ratio, and abnormal epigenetic modifications. Interruption of the ER stress triggers is anticipated to have therapeutic benefits for alcoholic disorders.

  6. Flurbiprofen ameliorated obesity by attenuating leptin resistance induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Hosoi, Toru; Yamaguchi, Rie; Noji, Kikuko; Matsuo, Suguru; Baba, Sachiko; Toyoda, Keisuke; Suezawa, Takahiro; Kayano, Takaaki; Tanaka, Shinpei; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2014-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, caused by the accumulation of unfolded proteins, is involved in the development of obesity. We demonstrated that flurbiprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), exhibited chaperone activity, which reduced protein aggregation and alleviated ER stress-induced leptin resistance, characterized by insensitivity to the actions of the anti-obesity hormone leptin. This result was further supported by flurbiprofen attenuating high-fat diet-induced obesity in mice. The other NSAIDs tested did not exhibit such effects, which suggested that this anti-obesity action is mediated independent of NSAIDs. Using ferriteglycidyl methacrylate beads, we identified aldehyde dehydrogenase as the target of flurbiprofen, but not of the other NSAIDs. These results suggest that flurbiprofen may have unique pharmacological properties that reduce the accumulation of unfolded proteins and may represent a new class of drug for the fundamental treatment of obesity. Subject Categories Metabolism; Pharmacology & Drug Discovery PMID:24421337

  7. Calcium release from intra-axonal endoplasmic reticulum leads to axon degeneration through mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Villegas, Rosario; Martinez, Nicolas W; Lillo, Jorge; Pihan, Phillipe; Hernandez, Diego; Twiss, Jeffery L; Court, Felipe A

    2014-05-21

    Axonal degeneration represents an early pathological event in neurodegeneration, constituting an important target for neuroprotection. Regardless of the initial injury, which could be toxic, mechanical, metabolic, or genetic, degeneration of axons shares a common mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction and production of reactive oxygen species. Critical steps in this degenerative process are still unknown. Here we show that calcium release from the axonal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through ryanodine and IP3 channels activates the mitochondrial permeability transition pore and contributes to axonal degeneration triggered by both mechanical and toxic insults in ex vivo and in vitro mouse and rat model systems. These data reveal a critical and early ER-dependent step during axonal degeneration, providing novel targets for axonal protection in neurodegenerative conditions.

  8. Involvement of VAT-1 in Phosphatidylserine Transfer from the Endoplasmic Reticulum to Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Junker, Mirco; Rapoport, Tom A

    2015-12-01

    Mitochondria receive phosphatidylserine (PS) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but how PS is moved from the ER to mitochondria is unclear. Current models postulate a physical link between the organelles, but no involvement of cytosolic proteins. Here, we have reconstituted PS transport from the ER to mitochondria in vitro using Xenopus egg components. Transport is independent of ER proteins, but is dependent on a cytosolic factor that has a preferential affinity for PS. Crosslinking with a photoactivatable PS analog identified VAT-1 as a candidate for a cytosolic PS transport protein. Recombinant, purified VAT-1 stimulated PS transport into mitochondria and depletion of VAT-1 from Xenopus cytosol with specific antibodies led to a reduction of transport. Our results suggest that cytosolic factors have a role in PS transport from the ER to mitochondria, implicate VAT-1 in the transport process, and indicate that physical contact between the organelles is not essential.

  9. Modulation of calcium signalling by the endoplasmic reticulum in Carassius neurons.

    PubMed

    Lukyanets, Igor A; Lukyanetz, Elena A

    2013-04-19

    It is known that endoplasmic reticulum (ER), being a calcium store participates in the regulation of intracellular calcium concentration. Ca-ATPase of the ER is one of the crucial agents providing the calcium-accumulating function of this intracellular structure. We studied the role of the ER in modulation of calcium signalling in Carassius neurons using a Ca2+-imaging technique. We tested the role of the ER in the maintenance of a steady state calcium level in the cytoplasm and in modulation of Ca2+ transients evoked by cell depolarizations. The ER calcium stores were depleted using inhibitors of ER Ca-ATPase, which provided blocking of Ca2+ uptake by the ER. Our experiments firstly showed that the ER can significantly modulate the characteristics of intracellular calcium signals in Carassius neurons during their activity. These findings also indicate that the ER modulates the shape of Ca2+ signals rather than the basal level of intracellular Ca2+ in these neurons.

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum-associated protein quality control and degradation: genome-wide screen for ERAD components.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Antje; Wolf, Dieter H

    2005-01-01

    In this chapter, a genetic approach is presented that leads to the isolation of mutants and to the identification of proteins involved in protein quality control and endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). The method makes use of a genomic screen of a yeast deletion library (EUROSCARF). Transformation of each of the approx 5000 strains deleted in one nonvital gene each with a CPY* chimera containing CPY* C-terminally fused to a transmembrane domain and the cytosolic Leu2 protein (3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase) constitutes the basic screening procedure. Because of a Leu2p deficiency in all deletion strains, cells can grow only when the CTL* chimera is present. As the CPY* module of CTL* will be recognized in ERAD-proficient cells, CTL* will be degraded and the strain is unable to grow. Therefore the absence of genes necessary for ER quality control and ERAD will allow cell growth and indicate the necessity of the respective gene for these processes.

  11. Separating mitochondrial protein assembly and endoplasmic reticulum tethering by selective coupling of Mdm10.

    PubMed

    Ellenrieder, Lars; Opaliński, Łukasz; Becker, Lars; Krüger, Vivien; Mirus, Oliver; Straub, Sebastian P; Ebell, Katharina; Flinner, Nadine; Stiller, Sebastian B; Guiard, Bernard; Meisinger, Chris; Wiedemann, Nils; Schleiff, Enrico; Wagner, Richard; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Becker, Thomas

    2016-10-10

    The endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) connects the mitochondrial outer membrane with the ER. Multiple functions have been linked to ERMES, including maintenance of mitochondrial morphology, protein assembly and phospholipid homeostasis. Since the mitochondrial distribution and morphology protein Mdm10 is present in both ERMES and the mitochondrial sorting and assembly machinery (SAM), it is unknown how the ERMES functions are connected on a molecular level. Here we report that conserved surface areas on opposite sides of the Mdm10 β-barrel interact with SAM and ERMES, respectively. We generated point mutants to separate protein assembly (SAM) from morphology and phospholipid homeostasis (ERMES). Our study reveals that the β-barrel channel of Mdm10 serves different functions. Mdm10 promotes the biogenesis of α-helical and β-barrel proteins at SAM and functions as integral membrane anchor of ERMES, demonstrating that SAM-mediated protein assembly is distinct from ER-mitochondria contact sites.

  12. Endoplasmic Reticulum Glucosidase II Is Required for Pathogenicity of Ustilago maydisW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Schirawski, Jan; Böhnert, Heidi U.; Steinberg, Gero; Snetselaar, Karen; Adamikowa, Lubica; Kahmann, Regine

    2005-01-01

    We identified a nonpathogenic strain of Ustilago maydis by tagging mutagenesis. The affected gene, glucosidase1 (gas1), displays similarity to catalytic α-subunits of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) glucosidase II. We have shown that Gas1 localizes to the ER and complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking ER glucosidase II. gas1 deletion mutants were normal in growth and mating but were more sensitive to calcofluor and tunicamycin. Mutant infection hyphae displayed significant alterations in the distribution of cell wall material and were able to form appressoria and penetrate the plant surface but arrested growth in the epidermal cell layer. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that the plant–fungal interface between mutant hyphae and the plant plasma membrane was altered compared with the interface of penetrating wild-type hyphae. This may indicate that gas1 mutants provoke a plant response. PMID:16272431

  13. Elevated mitochondria-coupled NAD(P)H in endoplasmic reticulum of dopamine neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Kristal R.; Cavolo, Samantha L.; Levitan, Edwin S.

    2016-01-01

    Pyridine nucleotides are redox coenzymes that are critical in bioenergetics, metabolism, and neurodegeneration. Here we use brain slice multiphoton microscopy to show that substantia nigra dopamine neurons, which are sensitive to stress in mitochondria and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), display elevated combined NADH and NADPH (i.e., NAD(P)H) autofluorescence. Despite limited mitochondrial mass, organellar NAD(P)H is extensive because much of the signal is derived from the ER. Remarkably, even though pyridine nucleotides cannot cross mitochondrial and ER membranes, inhibiting mitochondrial function with an uncoupler or interrupting the electron transport chain with cyanide (CN−) alters ER NAD(P)H. The ER CN− response can occur without a change in nuclear NAD(P)H, raising the possibility of redox shuttling via the cytoplasm locally between neuronal mitochondria and the ER. We propose that coregulation of NAD(P)H in dopamine neuron mitochondria and ER coordinates cell redox stress signaling by the two organelles. PMID:27582392

  14. Mutations in the SPTLC1 protein cause mitochondrial structural abnormalities and endoplasmic reticulum stress in lymphoblasts.

    PubMed

    Myers, Simon J; Malladi, Chandra S; Hyland, Ryan A; Bautista, Tara; Boadle, Ross; Robinson, Phillip J; Nicholson, Garth A

    2014-07-01

    Mutations in serine palmitoyltransferase long chain subunit 1 (SPTLC1) cause the typical length-dependent axonal degeneration hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 (HSN1). Transmission electron microscopy studies on SPTLC1 mutant lymphoblasts derived from patients revealed specific structural abnormalities of mitochondria. Swollen mitochondria with abnormal cristae were clustered around the nucleus, with some mitochondria being wrapped in rough endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes. Total mitochondrial counts revealed a significant change in mitochondrial numbers between healthy and diseased lymphocytes but did not reveal any change in length to width ratios nor were there any changes to cellular function. However, there was a notable change in ER homeostasis, as assessed using key ER stress markers, BiP and ERO1-Lα, displaying reduced protein expression. The observations suggest that SPTLC1 mutations cause mitochondrial abnormalities and ER stress in HSN1 cells.

  15. Soluble forms of polyQ-expanded huntingtin rather than large aggregates cause endoplasmic reticulum stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitman, Julia; Ulrich Hartl, F.; Lederkremer, Gerardo Z.

    2013-11-01

    In Huntington’s disease, as in other neurodegenerative diseases, it was initially thought that insoluble protein aggregates are the toxic species. However, growing evidence implicates soluble oligomeric polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin in cytotoxicity. Here we show that pathogenic huntingtin inhibits endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation and induces ER stress before its aggregation into visible inclusions. All three branches of the unfolded protein response are activated. ER stress can be compensated by overexpression of p97/VCP, suggesting its sequestration by pathogenic huntingtin as a main cause. Stress correlates with the presence of huntingtin oligomers and is independent of continual huntingtin synthesis. Stress levels, measured in striatal neurons, are stabilized but only slowly subside on huntingtin aggregation into inclusions. Our results can be explained by the constant conversion of huntingtin monomers to toxic oligomers; large aggregates sequester the former, precluding further conversion, whereas pre-existing toxic oligomers are only gradually depleted.

  16. Endothelial dysfunction in diabetes mellitus: possible involvement of endoplasmic reticulum stress?

    PubMed

    Basha, Basma; Samuel, Samson Mathews; Triggle, Chris R; Ding, Hong

    2012-01-01

    The vascular complications of diabetes mellitus impose a huge burden on the management of this disease. The higher incidence of cardiovascular complications and the unfavorable prognosis among diabetic individuals who develop such complications have been correlated to the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress and associated endothelial dysfunction. Although antioxidants may be considered as effective therapeutic agents to relieve oxidative stress and protect the endothelium, recent clinical trials involving these agents have shown limited therapeutic efficacy in this regard. In the recent past experimental evidence suggest that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the endothelial cells might be an important contributor to diabetes-related vascular complications. The current paper contemplates the possibility of the involvement of ER stress in endothelial dysfunction and diabetes-associated vascular complications.

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress and its effects on renal tubular cells apoptosis in ischemic acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; Guo, Min; Jiang, Wei; Dong, Hui; Han, Yafei; An, Xiao-Fei; Zhang, Jisheng

    2016-06-01

    Ischemia is the most frequent cause of acute kidney injury (AKI), which is characterized by apoptosis of renal tubular cell. A common result of ischemia in AKI is dysfunction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which causes the protein-folding capacity to lag behind the protein-folding load. The abundance of misfolded proteins stressed the ER and results in induction of the unfolded protein response (UPR). While the UPR is an adaptive response, over time it can result in apoptosis when cells are unable to recover quickly. Recent research suggests that ER stress is a major factor in renal tubular cell apoptosis resulting from ischemic AKI. Thus, ER stress may be an important new progression factor in the pathology of ischemic AKI. In this article, we review UPR signaling, describe pathology and pathophysiology mechanisms of ischemic AKI, and highlight the dual function of ER stress on renal tubular cell apoptosis.

  18. [Calcium transport in endoplasmic reticulum of the rat liver during lipid peroxidation].

    PubMed

    Gubskiĭ, Iu I; Kurskiĭ, M D; Zadorina, O V; Fedorov, A N; Briuzgina, T S; Iurzhenko, N N

    1990-01-01

    Some parameters of calcium transport in rat liver microsomes under conditions of lipoperoxidation activation modelled by antioxidant deficiency (AOD) were studied. This process was shown to be associated with a sharp stimulation of NADPH- and ascorbate-dependent lipid peroxidation in hepatocyte endoplasmic reticulum. The activation of lipid peroxidation was accompanied by disturbances in the kinetic properties of Ca2(+)-ATPase. This was paralleled with a considerable decrease of the ATP-dependent 45Ca-accumulation, increase in the passive permeability of microsomal vesicles for Ca2+ and Ca2+ elevation in the microsomal fraction. The AOD-induced diminution of the Ca2(+)-pump efficiency was slightly prevented by injections of rats with the antioxidants, alpha-tocopherol acetate and ionol which enable Ca2+ compartmentation correction in liver cytosol and membrane fractions.

  19. Endoplasmic reticulum stress as a primary pathogenic mechanism leading to age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Libby, Richard T; Gould, Douglas B

    2010-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a multi-factorial disease and a leading cause of blindness. Proteomic and genetic data suggest that activation or de-repression of the alternate complement cascade of innate immunity is involved in end-stage disease. Several lines of evidence suggest that production of reactive oxygen species and chronic oxidative stress lead to protein and lipid modifications that initiate the complement cascade. Understanding the triggers of these pathogenic pathways and the site of the primary insult will be important for development of targeted therapeutics. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress from misfolded mutant proteins and other sources are an important potential tributary mechanism. We propose that misfolded-protein-induced ER stress in the retinal-pigmented epithelium and/or choroid could lead to chronic oxidative stress, complement deregulation and AMD. Small molecules targeted to ER stress and oxidative stress could allow for a shift from disease treatment to disease prevention.

  20. Salubrinal Alleviates Pressure Overload-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophy by Inhibiting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rani, Shilpa; Sreenivasaiah, Pradeep Kumar; Cho, Chunghee; Kim, Do Han

    2017-01-01

    Pathological hypertrophy of the heart is closely associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), leading to maladaptations such as myocardial fibrosis, induction of apoptosis, and cardiac dysfunctions. Salubrinal is a known selective inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) complex involving dephosphorylation of phospho-eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 subunit (p-eIF2)-α, the key signaling process in the ERS pathway. In this study, the effects of salubrinal were examined on cardiac hypertrophy using the mouse model of transverse aortic constriction (TAC) and cell model of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (NRVMs). Treatment of TAC-induced mice with salubrinal (0.5 mg·kg−1·day−1) alleviated cardiac hypertrophy and tissue fibrosis. Salubrinal also alleviated hypertrophic growth in endothelin 1 (ET1)-treated NRVMs. Therefore, the present results suggest that salubrinal may be a potentially efficacious drug for treating pathological cardiac remodeling. PMID:28152298

  1. Endoplasmic reticulum glucosidase II is required for pathogenicity of Ustilago maydis.

    PubMed

    Schirawski, Jan; Böhnert, Heidi U; Steinberg, Gero; Snetselaar, Karen; Adamikowa, Lubica; Kahmann, Regine

    2005-12-01

    We identified a nonpathogenic strain of Ustilago maydis by tagging mutagenesis. The affected gene, glucosidase1 (gas1), displays similarity to catalytic alpha-subunits of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) glucosidase II. We have shown that Gas1 localizes to the ER and complements the temperature-sensitive phenotype of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking ER glucosidase II. gas1 deletion mutants were normal in growth and mating but were more sensitive to calcofluor and tunicamycin. Mutant infection hyphae displayed significant alterations in the distribution of cell wall material and were able to form appressoria and penetrate the plant surface but arrested growth in the epidermal cell layer. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that the plant-fungal interface between mutant hyphae and the plant plasma membrane was altered compared with the interface of penetrating wild-type hyphae. This may indicate that gas1 mutants provoke a plant response.

  2. Microtubules as key coordinators of nuclear envelope and endoplasmic reticulum dynamics during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Schlaitz, Anne-Lore

    2014-07-01

    During mitosis, cells comprehensively restructure their interior to promote the faithful inheritance of DNA and cytoplasmic contents. In metazoans, this restructuring entails disassembly of the nuclear envelope, redistribution of its components into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and eventually nuclear envelope reassembly around the segregated chromosomes. The microtubule cytoskeleton has recently emerged as a critical regulator of mitotic nuclear envelope and ER dynamics. Microtubules and associated molecular motors tear open the nuclear envelope in prophase and remove nuclear envelope remnants from chromatin. Additionally, two distinct mechanisms of microtubule-based regulation of ER dynamics operate later in mitosis. First, association of the ER with microtubules is reduced, preventing invasion of ER into the spindle area, and second, organelle membrane is actively cleared from metaphase chromosomes. However, we are only beginning to understand the role of microtubules in shaping and distributing ER and other organelles during mitosis.

  3. ATP-Dependent Formation of Phosphatidylserine-Rich Vesicles from the Endoplasmic Reticulum of Leek Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sturbois-Balcerzak, Bénédicte; Vincent, Patrick; Maneta-Peyret, Lilly; Duvert, Michel; Satiat-Jeunemaitre, Béatrice; Cassagne, Claude; Moreau, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Leek (Allium porrum) plasma membrane is enriched in phosphatidylserine (PS) by the vesicular pathway, in a way similar to that already observed in animal cells (B. Sturbois-Balcerzak, D.J. Morré, O. Loreau, J.P. Noel, P. Moreau, C. Cassagne [1995] Plant Physiol Biochem 33: 625–637). In this paper we document the formation of PS-rich small vesicles from leek endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes upon addition of ATP and other factors. The omission of ATP or its replacement by ATPγ-S prevents vesicle formation. These vesicles correspond to small structures (70–80 nm) and their phospholipid composition, characterized by a PS enrichment, is compatible with a role in PS transport. Moreover, the PS enrichment over phosphatidylinositol in the ER-derived vesicles is the first example, to our knowledge, of phospholipid sorting from the ER to ER-derived vesicles in plant cells. PMID:10318702

  4. How viruses use the endoplasmic reticulum for entry, replication, and assembly.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takamasa; Tsai, Billy

    2013-01-01

    To cause infection, a virus enters a host cell, replicates, and assembles, with the resulting new viral progeny typically released into the extracellular environment to initiate a new infection round. Virus entry, replication, and assembly are dynamic and coordinated processes that require precise interactions with host components, often within and surrounding a defined subcellular compartment. Accumulating evidence pinpoints the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as a crucial organelle supporting viral entry, replication, and assembly. This review focuses on the molecular mechanism by which different viruses co-opt the ER to accomplish these crucial infection steps. Certain bacterial toxins also hijack the ER for entry. An interdisciplinary approach, using rigorous biochemical and cell biological assays coupled with advanced microscopy strategies, will push to the next level our understanding of the virus-ER interaction during infection.

  5. Compartmentalization of the endoplasmic reticulum in the early C. elegans embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Zuo Yen; Prouteau, Manoël

    2016-01-01

    The one-cell Caenorhabditis elegans embryo is polarized to partition fate determinants between the cell lineages generated during its first division. Using fluorescence loss in photobleaching, we find that the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the C. elegans embryo is physically continuous throughout the cell, but its membrane is compartmentalized shortly before nuclear envelope breakdown into an anterior and a posterior domain, indicating that a diffusion barrier forms in the ER membrane between these two domains. Using mutants with disorganized ER, we show that ER compartmentalization is independent of the morphological transition that the ER undergoes in mitosis. In contrast, compartmentalization takes place at the position of the future cleavage plane in a par-3–dependent manner. Together, our data indicate that the ER membrane is compartmentalized in cells as diverse as budding yeast, mouse neural stem cells, and the early C. elegans embryo. PMID:27597753

  6. Cell biology of the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus through proteomics.

    PubMed

    Smirle, Jeffrey; Au, Catherine E; Jain, Michael; Dejgaard, Kurt; Nilsson, Tommy; Bergeron, John

    2013-01-01

    Enriched endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi membranes subjected to mass spectrometry have uncovered over a thousand different proteins assigned to the ER and Golgi apparatus of rat liver. This, in turn, led to the uncovering of several hundred proteins of poorly understood function and, through hierarchical clustering, showed that proteins distributed in patterns suggestive of microdomains in cognate organelles. This has led to new insights with respect to their intracellular localization and function. Another outcome has been the critical testing of the cisternal maturation hypothesis showing overwhelming support for a predominant role of COPI vesicles in the transport of resident proteins of the ER and Golgi apparatus (as opposed to biosynthetic cargo). Here we will discuss new insights gained and also highlight new avenues undertaken to further explore the cell biology of the ER and the Golgi apparatus through tandem mass spectrometry.

  7. Brain death is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Cao, S; Wang, T; Yan, B; Lu, Y; Zhao, Y; Zhang, S

    2014-12-01

    Cell death pathways initiated by stress on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) have been implicated in a variety of common diseases, such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetes, heart disease, and neurodegenerative disorders. However, the contribution of ER stress to apoptosis and liver injury after brain death is not known. In the present study, we found that brain death induces a variety of signature ER stress markers, including ER stress-specific X box-binding protein 1 and up-regulation of glucose-regulated protein 78. Furthermore, brain death causes up-regulation of C/EBP homologous protein and caspase-12. Consistent with this, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nick-end labeling assay and transmission electron microscopy confirmed apoptosis in the liver after brain death. Taken together, the present study provides strong evidence supporting the presence and importance of ER stress and response in mediating brain death-induced apoptosis and liver injury.

  8. Real-time Redox Measurements during Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Reveal Interlinked Protein Folding Functions

    PubMed Central

    Merksamer, Philip I.; Trusina, Ala; Papa, Feroz R.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Disruption of protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) causes unfolded proteins to accumulate, triggering the unfolded protein response (UPR). UPR outputs in turn decrease ER unfolded proteins to close a negative feedback loop. However, because it is infeasible to directly measure the concentration of unfolded proteins in vivo, cells are generically described as experiencing “ER stress” whenever the UPR is active. Because ER redox potential is optimized for oxidative protein folding, we reasoned that measureable redox changes should accompany unfolded protein accumulation. To test this concept, we employed fluorescent protein reporters to dynamically measure ER redox status and UPR activity in single cells. Using these tools, we show that diverse stressors, both experimental and physiological, compromise ER protein oxidation when UPR-imposed homeostatic control is lost. Using genetic analysis we uncovered redox heterogeneities in isogenic cell populations, and revealed functional interlinks between ER protein folding, modification, and quality control systems. PMID:19026441

  9. Endoplasmic Reticulum and the Unfolded Protein Response: Dynamics and Metabolic Integration

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Roberto; Parra, Valentina; Gatica, Damián; Rodriguez, Andrea E.; Torrealba, Natalia; Paredes, Felipe; Wang, Zhao V.; Zorzano, Antonio; Hill, Joseph A.; Jaimovich, Enrique; Quest, Andrew F.G.; Lavandero, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic intracellular organelle with multiple functions essential for cellular homeostasis, development, and stress responsiveness. In response to cellular stress, a well-established signaling cascade, the unfolded protein response (UPR), is activated. This intricate mechanism is an important means of reestablishing cellular homeostasis and alleviating the inciting stress. Now, emerging evidence has demonstrated that the UPR influences cellular metabolism through diverse mechanisms, including calcium and lipid transfer, raising the prospect of involvement of these processes in the pathogenesis of disease, including neurodegeneration, cancer, diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Here, we review the distinct functions of the ER and UPR from a metabolic point of view, highlighting their association with prevalent pathologies. PMID:23317820

  10. A Non-enveloped Virus Hijacks Host Disaggregation Machinery to Translocate across the Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Ravindran, Madhu Sudhan; Bagchi, Parikshit; Inoue, Takamasa; Tsai, Billy

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cytosolic Hsp110 family, in concert with the Hsc70:J-protein complex, functions as a disaggregation machinery to rectify protein misfolding problems. Here we uncover a novel role of this machinery in driving membrane translocation during viral entry. The non-enveloped virus SV40 penetrates the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane to reach the cytosol, a critical infection step. Combining biochemical, cell-based, and imaging approaches, we find that the Hsp110 family member Hsp105 associates with the ER membrane J-protein B14. Here Hsp105 cooperates with Hsc70 and extracts the membrane-penetrating SV40 into the cytosol, potentially by disassembling the membrane-embedded virus. Hence the energy provided by the Hsc70-dependent Hsp105 disaggregation machinery can be harnessed to catalyze a membrane translocation event. PMID:26244546

  11. Interplays Between Covalent Modifications in the Endoplasmic Reticulum Increase Conformational Diversity in Nascent Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Orsi, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Prion protein (PrP), the causative agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it undergoes numerous covalent modifications. Here we investigate the interdependence and regulation of PrP oxidative folding, N-glycosylation and GPI addition in diverse ER conditions. Our results show that formation of the single disulphide bond is a pivotal event, essential for PrP transport, and can occur post-translationally. Retarding its formation enhances N-glycosylation and GPI-anchoring. In contrast, lowering ER Ca2+ concentration inhibits N-glycosylation and GPI-anchoring. These data reveal tight interplays between the different ER covalent modifications, which collectively increase of PrP conformational diversity and may be important for its propagation. PMID:19164910

  12. Tumor Hypoxia Blocks Wnt Processing and Secretion through the Induction of Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress▿

    PubMed Central

    Verras, Meletios; Papandreou, Ioanna; Lim, Ai Lin; Denko, Nicholas C.

    2008-01-01

    Poorly formed tumor blood vessels lead to regions of microenvironmental stress due to depletion of oxygen and glucose and accumulation of waste products (acidosis). These conditions contribute to tumor progression and correlate with poor patient prognosis. Here we show that the microenvironmental stresses found in the solid tumor are able to inhibit the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. However, tumor cells harboring common β-catenin pathway mutations, such as loss of adenomatous polyposis coli, are insensitive to this novel hypoxic effect. The underlying mechanism responsible is hypoxia-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress that inhibits normal Wnt protein processing and secretion. ER stress causes dissociation between GRP78/BiP and Wnt, an interaction essential for its correct posttranslational processing. Microenvironmental stress can therefore block autocrine and paracrine signaling of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway and negatively affect tumor growth. This study provides a general paradigm relating oxygen status to ER function and growth factor signaling. PMID:18824543

  13. Crystal structures reveal transient PERK luminal domain tetramerization in endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling.

    PubMed

    Carrara, Marta; Prischi, Filippo; Nowak, Piotr R; Ali, Maruf Mu

    2015-06-03

    Stress caused by accumulation of misfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicits a cellular unfolded protein response (UPR) aimed at maintaining protein-folding capacity. PERK, a key upstream component, recognizes ER stress via its luminal sensor/transducer domain, but the molecular events that lead to UPR activation remain unclear. Here, we describe the crystal structures of mammalian PERK luminal domains captured in dimeric state as well as in a novel tetrameric state. Small angle X-ray scattering analysis (SAXS) supports the existence of both crystal structures also in solution. The salient feature of the tetramer interface, a helix swapped between dimers, implies transient association. Moreover, interface mutations that disrupt tetramer formation in vitro reduce phosphorylation of PERK and its target eIF2α in cells. These results suggest that transient conversion from dimeric to tetrameric state may be a key regulatory step in UPR activation.

  14. Changes in cellular infrastructure after induced endoplasmic reticulum stress in Moniliophthora perniciosa.

    PubMed

    Basso, Tatiana Setenta; Vita-Santos, Evelyn; Marisco, Gabriele; Pungartnik, Cristina; Brendel, Martin

    2016-09-01

    Moniliophthora perniciosa is a basidiomycete fungus that causes witches' broom disease in Theobroma cacao We analyzed the morphology and survival of fungal hyphae and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) remodeling in either glucose- or glycerol-grown M. perniciosa after treatment with ER stress-inducing chemicals dithiothreitol (DTT) or tunicamycin (TM). Changes in intracellular redox potential can cause endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress due to diminished efficiency in protein folding that could in turn reduce cell survival. Such stress diminishes protein-folding efficiency that could in turn reduce cell survival. Light microscopy revealed morphological changes in hyphae after TM but not after DTT treatment, regardless of the media carbon source. Decrease in fungal survival, after both TM and DTT treatments, was dose-dependent and glycerol-grown cells showed a higher resistance to both chemicals compared to glucose-grown cells. Electron microscopy showed TM and DDT-induced ER stress in M. perniciosa as evidenced by structural alterations of the organelle. The volume of ER structures increased as a typical consequence of unfolded protein stress, and the number of autophagosomes was higher. In glycerol-grown fungus DTT treatment slightly induced expression of molecular chaperone BiP. The TM exposure-induced expression of gene MpIRE1, involved in signaling of the unfolded protein response, was higher in glycerol than glucose-grown cells. Such difference was not observable with expression of gene MpATG8, encoding a key protein in autosome formation, that was induced 1.4-fold and 1.2-fold in glucose or glycerol-grown cells, respectively. DHE-based fluorescence assay showed M. perniciosa oxidative stress induced by H2O2, and treated cells had a higher level of oxidative stress compared to control. A comprehensive study of remodeling of ER is important in understanding M. perniciosa fungus resistance to oxidative stress and its ability to implement a successful infection in T

  15. Depletion of Cyclophilins B and C Leads to Dysregulation of Endoplasmic Reticulum Redox Homeostasis*

    PubMed Central

    Stocki, Pawel; Chapman, Daniel C.; Beach, Lori A.; Williams, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Protein folding within the endoplasmic reticulum is assisted by molecular chaperones and folding catalysts that include members of the protein-disulfide isomerase and peptidyl-prolyl isomerase families. In this report, we examined the contributions of the cyclophilin subset of peptidyl-prolyl isomerases to protein folding and identified cyclophilin C as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) cyclophilin in addition to cyclophilin B. Using albumin and transferrin as models of cis-proline-containing proteins in human hepatoma cells, we found that combined knockdown of cyclophilins B and C delayed transferrin secretion but surprisingly resulted in more efficient oxidative folding and secretion of albumin. Examination of the oxidation status of ER protein-disulfide isomerase family members revealed a shift to a more oxidized state. This was accompanied by a >5-fold elevation in the ratio of oxidized to total glutathione. This “hyperoxidation” phenotype could be duplicated by incubating cells with the cyclophilin inhibitor cyclosporine A, a treatment that triggered efficient ER depletion of cyclophilins B and C by inducing their secretion to the medium. To identify the pathway responsible for ER hyperoxidation, we individually depleted several enzymes that are known or suspected to deliver oxidizing equivalents to the ER: Ero1αβ, VKOR, PRDX4, or QSOX1. Remarkably, none of these enzymes contributed to the elevated oxidized to total glutathione ratio induced by cyclosporine A treatment. These findings establish cyclophilin C as an ER cyclophilin, demonstrate the novel involvement of cyclophilins B and C in ER redox homeostasis, and suggest the existence of an additional ER oxidative pathway that is modulated by ER cyclophilins. PMID:24990953

  16. Phytosphingosine degradation pathway includes fatty acid α-oxidation reactions in the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Takuya; Seki, Naoya; Kihara, Akio

    2017-03-28

    Although normal fatty acids (FAs) are degraded via β-oxidation, unusual FAs such as 2-hydroxy (2-OH) FAs and 3-methyl-branched FAs are degraded via α-oxidation. Phytosphingosine (PHS) is one of the long-chain bases (the sphingolipid components) and exists in specific tissues, including the epidermis and small intestine in mammals. In the degradation pathway, PHS is converted to 2-OH palmitic acid and then to pentadecanoic acid (C15:0-COOH) via FA α-oxidation. However, the detailed reactions and genes involved in the α-oxidation reactions of the PHS degradation pathway have yet to be determined. In the present study, we reveal the entire PHS degradation pathway: PHS is converted to C15:0-COOH via six reactions [phosphorylation, cleavage, oxidation, CoA addition, cleavage (C1 removal), and oxidation], in which the last three reactions correspond to the α-oxidation. The aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH3A2 catalyzes both the first and second oxidation reactions (fatty aldehydes to FAs). In Aldh3a2-deficient cells, the unmetabolized fatty aldehydes are reduced to fatty alcohols and are incorporated into ether-linked glycerolipids. We also identify HACL2 (2-hydroxyacyl-CoA lyase 2) [previous name, ILVBL; ilvB (bacterial acetolactate synthase)-like] as the major 2-OH acyl-CoA lyase involved in the cleavage (C1 removal) reaction in the FA α-oxidation of the PHS degradation pathway. HACL2 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, in addition to the already-known FA α-oxidation in the peroxisomes, we have revealed the existence of FA α-oxidation in the endoplasmic reticulum in mammals.

  17. Tributyltin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and its Ca{sup 2+}-mediated mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Isomura, Midori; Kotake, Yaichiro Masuda, Kyoichi; Miyara, Masatsugu; Okuda, Katsuhiro; Samizo, Shigeyoshi; Sanoh, Seigo; Hosoi, Toru; Ozawa, Koichiro; Ohta, Shigeru

    2013-10-01

    Organotin compounds, especially tributyltin chloride (TBT), have been widely used in antifouling paints for marine vessels, but exhibit various toxicities in mammals. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a multifunctional organelle that controls post-translational modification and intracellular Ca{sup 2+} signaling. When the capacity of the quality control system of ER is exceeded under stress including ER Ca{sup 2+} homeostasis disruption, ER functions are impaired and unfolded proteins are accumulated in ER lumen, which is called ER stress. Here, we examined whether TBT causes ER stress in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. We found that 700 nM TBT induced ER stress markers such as CHOP, GRP78, spliced XBP1 mRNA and phosphorylated eIF2α. TBT also decreased the cell viability both concentration- and time-dependently. Dibutyltin and monobutyltin did not induce ER stress markers. We hypothesized that TBT induces ER stress via Ca{sup 2+} depletion, and to test this idea, we examined the effect of TBT on intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration using fura-2 AM, a Ca{sup 2+} fluorescent probe. TBT increased intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration in a TBT-concentration-dependent manner, and Ca{sup 2+} increase in 700 nM TBT was mainly blocked by 50 μM dantrolene, a ryanodine receptor antagonist (about 70% inhibition). Dantrolene also partially but significantly inhibited TBT-induced GRP78 expression and cell death. These results suggest that TBT increases intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration by releasing Ca{sup 2+} from ER, thereby causing ER stress. - Highlights: • We established that tributyltin induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. • Tributyltin induces ER stress markers in a concentration-dependent manner. • Tributyltin increases Ca{sup 2+} release from ER, thereby causing ER stress. • Dibutyltin and monobutyltin did not increase GRP78 or intracellular Ca{sup 2+}.

  18. Excessive training is associated with endoplasmic reticulum stress but not apoptosis in the hypothalamus of mice.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ana Paula; da Rocha, Alisson Luiz; Pereira, Bruno Cesar; Oliveira, Luciana da Costa; Morais, Gustavo Paroschi; Moura, Leandro Pereira; Ropelle, Eduardo Rochete; Pauli, José Rodrigo; da Silva, Adelino Sanchez Ramos

    2016-12-05

    Downhill running-based overtraining model increases the hypothalamic levels of IL-1β, TNF-α, SOCS3, and pSAPK-JNK. The aim of the present study was to verify the effects of 3 overtraining protocols on the levels of BiP, pIRE-1 (Ser724), pPERK (Thr981), pelF2α (Ser52), ATF-6, GRP-94, caspase 4, caspase 12, pAKT (Ser473), pmTOR (Ser2448), and pAMPK (Thr172) proteins in the mouse hypothalamus. The mice were randomized into the control, overtrained by downhill running (OTR/down), overtrained by uphill running (OTR/up), and overtrained by running without inclination (OTR) groups. After the overtraining protocols (i.e., at the end of week 8), hypothalamus was removed and used for immunoblotting. The OTR/down group exhibited increased levels of all of the analyzed endoplasmic reticulum stress markers in the hypothalamus at the end of week 8. The OTR/up and OTR groups exhibited increased levels of BiP, pIRE-1 (Ser724), and pPERK (Thr981) in the hypothalamus at the end of week 8. There were no significant differences in the levels of caspase 4, caspase 12, pAKT (Ser473), pmTOR (Ser2448), and pAMPK (Thr172) between the experimental groups at the end of week 8. In conclusion, the 3 overtraining protocols increased the endoplasmic reticulum stress at the end of week 8.

  19. Mouse VAP33 is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum and microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Skehel, P. A.; Fabian-Fine, R.; Kandel, E. R.

    2000-01-01

    VAMP/synaptobrevin is a synaptic vesicle protein that is essential for neurotransmitter release. Intracellular injection of antisera against the Aplysia californica VAMP/synaptobrevin-binding protein ApVAP33 inhibited evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in cultured cells, suggesting that this association may regulate the function of VAMP/synaptobrevin. We have identified and characterized a mouse homologue of ApVAP33, mVAP33. The overall domain structure of the proteins is conserved, and they have similar biochemical properties. mVAP33 mRNA is detectable in all mouse tissues examined, in contrast to the more restricted expression seen in A. californica. We analyzed the cellular distribution of mVAP33 protein in brain slices and cultured cortical cells by light and electron microscopy. Although present at higher levels in neurons, immunoreactivity was detected throughout both neurons and glia in a reticular pattern similar to that of endoplasmic reticulum-resident proteins. mVAP33 does not colocalize with VAMP/synaptobrevin at synaptic structures, but expression overlaps with lower levels of VAMP/synaptobrevin in the soma. Ultrastructural analysis revealed mVAP33 associated with microtubules and intracellular vesicles of heterogeneous size. In primary neuronal cultures, large aggregates of mVAP33 are also detected in short filamentous structures, which are occasionally associated with intracellular membranes. There is no evidence for accumulation of mVAP33 on synaptic vesicles or at the plasma membrane. These data suggest that mVAP33 is an endoplasmic-reticulum–resident protein that associates with components of the cytoskeleton. Any functional interaction between mVAP33 and VAMP/synaptobrevin, therefore, most likely involves the delivery of components to synaptic terminals rather than a direct participation in synaptic vesicle exocytosis. PMID:10655491

  20. Rescue of Glaucomatous Neurodegeneration by Differentially Modulating Neuronal Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Li, Shaohua; Miao, Linqing; Huang, Haoliang; Liang, Feisi; Teng, Xiuyin; Xu, Lin; Wang, Qizhao; Xiao, Weidong; Ridder, William H.; Ferguson, Toby A.; Chen, Dong Feng; Kaufman, Randal J.

    2016-01-01

    Axon injury is an early event in neurodegenerative diseases that often leads to retrograde neuronal cell death and progressive permanent loss of vital neuronal functions. The connection of these two obviously sequential degenerative events, however, is elusive. Deciphering the upstream signals that trigger the neurodegeneration cascades in both neuronal soma and axon would be a key step toward developing the effective neuroprotectants that are greatly needed in the clinic. We showed previously that optic nerve injury-induced neuronal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays an important role in retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death. Using two in vivo mouse models of optic neuropathies (traumatic optic nerve injury and glaucoma) and adeno-associated virus–mediated RGC-specific gene targeting, we now show that differential manipulation of unfolded protein response pathways in opposite directions—inhibition of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α-C/EBP homologous protein and activation of X-box binding protein 1—promotes both RGC axons and somata survival and preserves visual function. Our results indicate that axon injury-induced neuronal ER stress plays an important role in both axon degeneration and neuron soma death. Neuronal ER stress is therefore a promising therapeutic target for glaucoma and potentially other types of neurodegeneration. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neuron soma and axon degeneration have distinct molecular mechanisms although they are clearly connected after axon injury. We previously demonstrated that axon injury induces neuronal endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and that manipulation of ER stress molecules synergistically promotes neuron cell body survival. Here we investigated the possibility that ER stress also plays a role in axon degeneration and whether ER stress modulation preserves neuronal function in neurodegenerative diseases. Our results suggest that neuronal ER stress is a general mechanism of degeneration for both neuronal

  1. Physiological functions of endoplasmic reticulum stress transducer OASIS in central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Saito, Atsushi

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells can adapt to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) dysfunction by producing diverse signals from the ER to the cytosol or nucleus. These signaling pathways are collectively known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). The canonical branches of the UPR are mediated by three ER membrane-bound proteins: double-stranded RNA-dependent protein kinase (PKR)-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), inositol-requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1) and activating transcription factor 6 (ATF6). These ER stress transducers basically play important roles in cell survival after ER stress. Recently, novel types of ER stress transducers that share a region of high sequence similarity with ATF6 have been identified. They have a transmembrane domain, which allows them to associate with the ER, and possess a transcription-activation domain and a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain. These membrane-bound bZIP transcription factors include OASIS, BBF2H7 CREBH, CREB4 and Luman, and are collectively referred to as OASIS family members. Despite their structural similarities with ATF6, differences in activating stimuli and tissue distribution indicate specialized functions of each member on regulating UPR signaling in specific organs and tissues. One of them, OASIS, is expressed preferentially in astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). OASIS temporally regulates the differentiation from neural precursor cells into astrocytes to promote the expression of Glial Cell Missing 1 through dynamic interactions among OASIS family members followed by accelerating demethylation of the Gfap promoter. This review is a summary of our current understanding of the physiological functions of OASIS in the CNS.

  2. Identification and functional characterization of an endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1-α gene in Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ze-Zhi; Yuan, Kai; Yue, Hai-Tao; Yuan, Feng-Hua; Bi, Hai-Tao; Weng, Shao-Ping; He, Jian-Guo; Chen, Yi-Hong

    2016-04-01

    In the current study, full-length sequence of endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin 1-α (LvERO1-α) was cloned from Litopenaeus vannamei. Real-time RT-PCR results showed that LvERO1-α was highly expressed in hemocytes, gills, and intestines. White spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge was performed, and the expression of LvERO1-α and two other downstream genes of the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase-like ER kinase-eIF2α (PERK-α) pathway, namely, homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum protein (LvHERP) and acylamino-acid-releasing enzyme (LvAARE), strongly increased in the hemocytes. Flow cytometry assay results indicated that the apoptosis rate of L. vannamei hemocytes in the LvERO1-α knockdown group was significantly lower than that of the controls. Moreover, shrimps with knockdown expression of LvERO1-α exhibited decreased cumulative mortality upon WSSV infection. Downregulation of L. vannamei immunoglobulin-binding protein (LvBip), which had been proven to induce unfolded protein response (UPR) in L. vannamei, did not only upregulate LvERO1-α, LvHERP, and LvAARE in hemocytes, but also increased their apoptosis rate, as well as the shrimp cumulative mortality. Furthermore, reporter gene assay results showed that the promoter of LvERO1-α was activated by L. vannamei activating transcription factor 4, thereby confirming that LvERO1-α was regulated by the PERK-eIF2α pathway. These results suggested that LvERO1-α plays a critical role in WSSV-induced apoptosis, which likely occurs through the WSSV-activated PERK-eIF2α pathway.

  3. Astragalus polysaccharides attenuate PCV2 infection by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress in vivo and in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Hongxia; Gan, Fang; Qian, Gang; Hu, Junfa; Hao, Shu; Xu, Jing; Chen, Xingxiang; Huang, Kehe

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the effects of Astragalus polysaccharide (APS) on porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infections and its mechanism in vivo and vitro. First, fifty 2-week-old mice were randomly divided into five groups: a group without PCV2 infection and groups with PCV2 infections at 0, 100, 200 or 400 mg/kg APS treatments. The trial lasted for 28 days. The results showed that APS treatments at 200 and 400 mg/kg reduced the pathological injury of tissues, inhibited PCV2 infection and decreased glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) and GADD153/CHOP gene mRNA and protein expression significantly (P < 0.05). Second, a study on endoplasmic reticulum stress mechanism was carried out in PK15 cells. APS treatments at 15 and 45 μg/mL significantly reduced PCV2 infection and GRP78 mRNA and protein expression (P < 0.05). Tunicamycin supplementation increased GRP78 mRNA and protein expression and significantly attenuated the APS-induced inhibition of PCV2 infection (P < 0.05). Tauroursodeoxycholic acid supplementation decreased GRP78 mRNA and protein expression and significantly inhibited PCV2 infection (P < 0.05). In addition, fifty 2-week-old mice were randomly divided into five groups: Con, PCV2, APS + PCV2, TM + PCV2 and TM + APS + PCV2. The results were similar to those in PK15 cells. Taken together, it could be concluded that APS suppresses PCV2 infection by inhibiting endoplasmic reticulum stress. PMID:28071725

  4. HMGB1 induces an inflammatory response in endothelial cells via the RAGE-dependent endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Ying; Li, Shu-Jun; Yang, Jian; Qiu, Yuan-Zhen; Chen, Fang-Ping

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Mechanisms of inflammatory response induced by HMGB1 are incompletely understood. •We found that endoplasmic reticulum stress mediate the inflammatory response induced by HMGB1. •RAGE-mediated ERS pathways are involved in those processes. •We reported a new mechanism for HMGB1 induced inflammatory response. -- Abstract: The high mobility group 1B protein (HMGB1) mediates chronic inflammatory responses in endothelial cells, which play a critical role in atherosclerosis. However, the underlying mechanism is unknown. The goal of our study was to identify the effects of HMGB1 on the RAGE-induced inflammatory response in endothelial cells and test the possible involvement of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway. Our results showed that incubation of endothelial cells with HMGB1 (0.01–1 μg/ml) for 24 h induced a dose-dependent activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress transducers, as assessed by PERK and IRE1 protein expression. Moreover, HMGB1 also promoted nuclear translocation of ATF6. HMGB1-mediated ICAM-1 and P-selectin production was dramatically suppressed by PERK siRNA or IRE1 siRNA. However, non-targeting siRNA had no such effects. HMGB1-induced increases in ICAM-1 and P-selectin expression were also inhibited by a specific eIF2α inhibitor (salubrinal) and a specific JNK inhibitor (SP600125). Importantly, a blocking antibody specifically targeted against RAGE (anti-RAGE antibody) decreased ICAM-1, P-selectin and endoplasmic reticulum stress molecule (PERK, eIF2α, IRE1 and JNK) protein expression levels. Collectively, these novel findings suggest that HMGB1 promotes an inflammatory response by inducing the expression of ICAM-1 and P-selectin via RAGE-mediated stimulation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway.

  5. Inhibin beta E is upregulated by drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress as a transcriptional target gene of ATF4

    SciTech Connect

    Brüning, Ansgar Matsingou, Christina; Brem, German Johannes; Rahmeh, Martina; Mylonas, Ioannis

    2012-10-15

    Inhibins and activins are gonadal peptide hormones of the transforming growth factor-β super family with important functions in the reproductive system. By contrast, the recently identified inhibin βE subunit, primarily expressed in liver cells, appears to exert functions unrelated to the reproductive system. Previously shown downregulation of inhibin βE in hepatoma cells and anti-proliferative effects of ectopic inhibin βE overexpression indicated growth-regulatory effects of inhibin βE. We observed a selective re-expression of the inhibin βE subunit in HepG2 hepatoblastoma cells, MCF7 breast cancer cells, and HeLa cervical cancer cells under endoplasmic reticulum stress conditions induced by tunicamycin, thapsigargin, and nelfinavir. Analysis of XPB1 splicing and ATF4 activation revealed that inhibin βE re-expression was associated with induction of the endoplasmic reticulum stress reaction by these drugs. Transfection of an ATF4 expression plasmid specifically induced inhibin βE expression in HeLa cells and indicates inhibin βE as a hitherto unidentified target gene of ATF4, a key transcription factor of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Therefore, the inhibin βE subunit defines not only a new player but also a possible new marker for drug-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress. -- Highlights: ► Endoplasmic reticulum stress induces inhibin beta E expression. ► Inhibin beta E is regulated by the transcription factor ATF4. ► Inhibin beta E expression can be used as a marker for drug-induced ER stress.

  6. Restoring primary anterior teeth: updated for 2014.

    PubMed

    Waggoner, William F

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review the current literature associated with the techniques and materials for the restoration of primary anterior teeth and make clinical recommendations based upon the available literature. A variety of esthetic restorative materials are available to utilize for restoring primary incisors. Awareness of the specific strengths, weakness, and properties of each material can enhance the clinician's ability to make the best choice of selection for each individual situation. Intracoronal restorations of primary teeth may utilize resin composites, glass ionomer cements, resin-modified ionomers, or polyacid-modified resins. Full coronal restoration of primary incisors may be indicated for a number of reasons. Crowns available for restoration of primary incisors include those that are directly bonded onto the tooth, which generally are a resin material, and crowns that are luted onto the tooth and are either some type of stainless steel or zirconia crown. There is insufficient controlled, clinical data to suggest that one type of restoration is superior to another. Operator preferences, esthetic demands by parents, the child's behavior, the amount of tooth structure remaining, and moisture and hemorrhage control are all variables that affect the decision and ultimate outcome of whatever restorative solution is chosen.

  7. Restoration of a fractured primary incisor.

    PubMed

    Romero, M; Saez, M; Cabrerizo, C

    2001-01-01

    Esthetic restoration on primary teeth has been a special challenge to pediatric dentists. Composite restorations are the most often used treatment for decay and fractures of primary teeth, however, there are other possible alternatives. We present a case in which we have used an acrylic crown to treat a fractured primary incisor in a 1.8 years old child.

  8. Restoration of missing or misplaced canines.

    PubMed

    Bower, C F; Reinhardt, R A

    1985-06-01

    Restorative treatments for canines were discussed to correct three clinical abnormalities: (1) fully erupted permanent canine in the lateral incisor position, (2) missing permanent canines, and (3) partially exposed canines in normal arch position. The primary concerns are the development of esthetics, anterior guidance, and adequate support for fixed restorations.

  9. Wetland restoration, flood pulsing, and disturbance dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Middleton, Beth A.

    1999-01-01

    While it is generally accepted that flood pulsing and disturbance dynamics are critical to wetland viability, there is as yet no consensus among those responsible for wetland restoration about how best to plan for those phenomena or even whether it is really necessary to do so at all. In this groundbreaking book, Dr. Beth Middleton draws upon the latest research from around the world to build a strong case for making flood pulsing and disturbance dynamics integral to the wetland restoration planning process.While the initial chapters of the book are devoted to laying the conceptual foundations, most of the coverage is concerned with demonstrating the practical implications for wetland restoration and management of the latest ecological theory and research. It includes a fascinating case history section in which Dr. Middleton explores the restoration models used in five major North American, European, Australian, African, and Asian wetland projects, and analyzes their relative success from the perspective of flood pulsing and disturbance dynamics planning.Wetland Restoration also features a wealth of practical information useful to all those involved in wetland restoration and management, including: * A compendium of water level tolerances, seed germination, seedling recruitment, adult survival rates, and other key traits of wetland plant species * A bibliography of 1,200 articles and monographs covering all aspects of wetland restoration * A comprehensive directory of wetland restoration ftp sites worldwide * An extensive glossary of essential terms

  10. 49 CFR 236.746 - Feature, restoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Feature, restoring. An arrangement on an electro-pneumatic switch by means of which power is applied to restore the switch movement to full normal or to full reverse position, before the driving bar creeps sufficiently to unlock the switch, with control level in normal or reverse position....

  11. 49 CFR 236.746 - Feature, restoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Feature, restoring. An arrangement on an electro-pneumatic switch by means of which power is applied to restore the switch movement to full normal or to full reverse position, before the driving bar creeps sufficiently to unlock the switch, with control level in normal or reverse position. [49 FR 3388, Jan. 26, 1984]...

  12. Hearing Restoration in Neurofibromatosis Type II Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeon Mi; Chang, Jin Woo; Choi, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Patients with neurofibromatosis type II will eventually succumb to bilateral deafness. For patients with hearing loss, modern medical science technology can provide efficient hearing restoration through a number of various methods. In this article, several hearing restoration methods for patients with neurofibromatosis type II are introduced. PMID:27189272

  13. The Teacher's Guide to Restorative Classroom Discipline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Luanna H.; Evans, Ian M.

    2012-01-01

    With restorative discipline, schools move beyond punitive approaches to shared expectations for learning and behavior. Used together with "The School Leader's Guide to Restorative Discipline," this teacher's guide shows how to create a welcoming and responsible community within your classroom, contributing to a consistent, schoolwide approach to…

  14. ASSESSING THE EFFECTIVENESS OF RESTORATION TECHNOLOGIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Numerous stream and riparian restoration projects are being undertaken across the nation at a variety of scales and for disparate reasons. Unfortunately, there are very few studies associated with these restoration efforts which provide a consistent and practical methodology to e...

  15. Amalgam Restorations: To Bond or Not.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    This article will review the use of various liners used to eliminate microleakage in amalgam restorations. It will review the literature about whether amalgam restorations are improved by using a bonding process and if so specifically how it improves the patient outcome.

  16. The effect of occlusal forces on restorations.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2014-09-01

    This review will focus on the effect occlusal forces, both normal masticatory force and paranormal bruxing and clenching force, have on various restorative materials and their interaction with the teeth through a variety of bonding mechanisms. Salient physical properties of each of the materials will be reviewed, as well as the effect occlusal force has on restoration durability.

  17. WoonyBird Restoration Plant Selector Manual

    EPA Science Inventory

    Modifying greenspaces to enhance habitat value has been proposed as a means towards protecting or restoring biodiversity in urban landscapes. As part of a framework for developing low-cost, low-impact enhancements that can be incorporated during the restoration of greenspaces to ...

  18. Restorative Justice: A Changing Community Response

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Thomas G.; Ruddy, Sean

    2015-01-01

    Our purpose herein is to demonstrate how restorative justice continues to unfold globally and we explain how the use of a restorative justice ideology and intervention leads to a common alternative, not only in criminal justice institutions, but also within social agencies, such as elementary schools, and the related social support systems. We…

  19. 76 FR 47055 - Emergency Restoration Plan (ERP)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... 7 CFR Part 1730 RIN 0572-AC16 Emergency Restoration Plan (ERP) AGENCY: Rural Utilities Service, USDA... for Emergency Restoration Plans (ERPs), currently mandated for all borrowers, to include a plan to... borrowers have a plan to maintain their eligibility to receive financial assistance from FEMA in the...

  20. 75 FR 4006 - Emergency Restoration Plan (ERP)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Rural Utilities Service 7 CFR Part 1730 RIN 0572-ZA00 Emergency Restoration Plan... Utilities Service (RUS) is proposing to amend the requirements established for Emergency Restoration Plans... all borrowers to maintain an Emergency Response Plan (ERP) that details how the borrower will...

  1. 49 CFR 236.746 - Feature, restoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Feature, restoring. An arrangement on an electro-pneumatic switch by means of which power is applied to restore the switch movement to full normal or to full reverse position, before the driving bar...

  2. 49 CFR 236.746 - Feature, restoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Feature, restoring. An arrangement on an electro-pneumatic switch by means of which power is applied to restore the switch movement to full normal or to full reverse position, before the driving bar...

  3. [Esthetic restorations of primary anterior teeth].

    PubMed

    Elqadir, A Jamil; Shapira, J; Ziskind, K; Ram, D

    2013-04-01

    Esthetic treatment of primary teeth is one of the greatest challenges to pediatric dentists. A variety of restorative options using full coverage are available for anterior primary teeth. In the last half century the emphasis on treatment of severely decayed primary teeth shifted from extraction to restoration. In the past, restorations consisted of placement of stainless steel crowns on severely decayed teeth. However, they are esthetically unacceptable today. Over the last decade parents expect a higher esthetic standard for their children's primary teeth. Thus, the restoration should provide esthetic appearance and durability in addition to restoring function. The purpose of this review is to describe the types of full coverage options for anterior primary teeth currently available.

  4. UK peatland restoration: some economic arithmetic.

    PubMed

    Moxey, Andrew; Moran, Dominic

    2014-06-15

    Over 80% of UK peatlands are degraded to some extent and their widespread restoration could contribute to meeting various climate change, water quality and biodiversity policy challenges. Economic analysis of costs and benefits is, however, hampered by scientific uncertainty and a lack of data on biophysical conditions as well as the impacts and costs of restoration. This paper presents a simple 'ready-reckoner' of possible net economic benefits under different combinations of simplifying 'what if?' assumptions for key restoration parameters. The results strongly suggest that even a narrow focus on carbon benefits alone is sufficient to justify restoration in many cases, and the inclusion of possible additional non-carbon benefits reinforces this. However, results are sensitive to assumptions and better data for, in particular, restoration costs associated with modest emission savings from lightly degraded sites would be helpful. Some other areas for further research are also identified.

  5. Maintaining professional resilience through group restorative supervision.

    PubMed

    Wallbank, Sonya

    2013-08-01

    Restorative clinical supervision has been delivered to over 2,500 professionals and has shown to be highly effective in reducing burnout, stress and increasing compassion satisfaction. Demand for the programme has shown that a sustainable model of implementation is needed for organisations who may not be able to invest in continued individual sessions. Following the initial six sessions, group restorative supervision has been developed and this paper reports on the programme's success in maintaining and continuing to improve compassion satisfaction, stress and burnout through the process of restorative group supervision. This means that organisations can continue to maintain the programme once the initial training has been completed and have confidence within the restorative group supervision to support professionals in managing the emotional demands of their role. The restorative groups have also had inadvertent positive benefits in workplace functioning. The paper outlines how professionals have been able to use this learning to support them in being more effective.

  6. Expert system requirements for power system restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Adibi, M.M. ); Kafka, R.J. ); Milanicz, D.P. )

    1994-08-01

    This paper is one of series presented on behalf of the System Operation Subcommittee with the intent of focusing industry attention on power system restoration. Expert systems are being considered for restoring bulk power supplies. In general, there are three restoration periods following a major power disturbance: establishment of initial sources of power, re-integration of a skeleton of the bulk power supply, and minimization of the unserved loads. Expert systems together with analytical tools have the potential of addressing the restoration procedures over these three periods. This paper describes the expert system requirements from the point of view of the practicing power engineers with emphasis placed on the initial power sources and requirements. The paper draws on the previous reports by the Power System Restoration Working Group.

  7. Restoration of lowland streams: an introduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Osborne, L.L.; Bayley, P.B.; Higler, L.W.G.; Statzner, B.; Triska, F.; Iverson, T. Moth

    1993-01-01

    1 This paper introduces the Lowland Streams Restoration Workshop that was held in Lund, Sweden in August 1991.2 Attenders at the Workshop participated in working groups which discussed and reported on the state of knowledge of stream restoration and identified critical areas of information need. Currently, most restoration efforts are emission-orientated (i.e. waste-water management), while the imitation of the geomorphology or of the riparian vegetation of a quasi-natural or natural reference channel receives less attention.3 Successful stream restoration requires a multidisciplinary approach within a holistic system framework. Monitoring the outcome of past, existing and future steam-restoration projects is required for information on the feasibility of alternative techniques and approaches.4 It was recommended that systems in pristine condition serve as a point of reference and not as a goal for most stream restoration projects. Restoration goals must be carefully defined so that everyone at every level understands the aim of the project. At the very least, all restoration programmes should consider geomorphic, hydrological, biological, aesthetic, and water quality aspects of the system.5 Restoration programmes should aim to create a system with a stable channel, or a channel in dynamic equilibrium that supports a self-sustaining and functionally diverse community assemblage; it should not concentrate on one species or group, except at the local level. Preserving the terrestrial -aquatic interface by setting aside riparian land corridors is critical to all stages of restoration. Additional information on the temporal and regional variability in important system processes and functions is needed.

  8. The land value impacts of wetland restoration.

    PubMed

    Kaza, Nikhil; BenDor, Todd K

    2013-09-30

    U.S. regulations require offsets for aquatic ecosystems damaged during land development, often through restoration of alternative resources. What effect does large-scale wetland and stream restoration have on surrounding land values? Restoration effects on real estate values have substantial implications for protecting resources, increasing tax base, and improving environmental policies. Our analysis focuses on the three-county Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, North Carolina region, which has experienced rapid development and extensive aquatic ecological restoration (through the state's Ecosystem Enhancement Program [EEP]). Since restoration sites are not randomly distributed across space, we used a genetic algorithm to match parcels near restoration sites with comparable control parcels. Similar to propensity score analysis, this technique facilitates statistical comparison and isolates the effects of restoration sites on surrounding real estate values. Compared to parcels not proximate to any aquatic resources, we find that, 1) natural aquatic systems steadily and significantly increase parcel values up to 0.75 mi away, and 2) parcels <0.5 mi from EEP restoration sites have significantly lower sale prices, while 3) parcels >0.5 mi from EEP sites gain substantial amenity value. When we control for intervening water bodies (e.g. un-restored streams and wetlands), we find a similar inflection point whereby parcels <0.5 mi from EEP sites exhibit lower values, and sites 0.5-0.75 mi away exhibit increased values. Our work points to the need for higher public visibility of aquatic ecosystem restoration programs and increased public information about their value.

  9. Outpatient competence restoration: A model and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Nicole R; Candilis, Philip J

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To describe a model outpatient competence restoration program (OCRP) and provide data on time to restoration of adjudicative competence. METHODS: The authors tracked the process by which individuals are referred for outpatient competence restoration (OCR) by courts in the United States capital, describing the unique requirements of American law, and the avenues available for compelling adherence. Competence to stand trial is a critical gate-keeping function of the judicial and forensic communities and assures that defendants understand courtroom procedures. OCR is therefore an effort to assure fairness and protection of important legal rights. Multi-media efforts are described that educate patients and restore competence to stand trial. These include resources such as group training, use of licensed clinicians, visual aids, structured instruments, and cinema. Aggregate data from the OCRP’s previous 4 years of OCR efforts were reviewed for demographic characteristics, restoration rate, and time to restoration. Poisson regression modeling identified the differences in restoration between sequential 45-d periods after entrance into the program. RESULTS: In the past 4 years, the DC OCRP has been successful in restoring 55 of 170 participants (32%), with an average referral rate of 35 persons per year. 76% are restored after the initial 45 d in the program. Demographics of the group indicate a predominance of African-American men with a mean age of 42. Thought disorders predominate and individuals in care face misdemeanor charges 78% of the time. Poisson regression modeling of the number attaining competence during four successive 45-d periods showed a substantial difference among the time periods for the rate of attaining competence (P = 0.0011). The three time periods after 45 d each showed a significant decrease in the restoration rate when compared to the initial 0 to 45 d period - their relative rates were only 22% to 33% as high as the rate for 0-45 d (all

  10. Error image aware content restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Sungwoo; Lee, Moonsik; Jung, Byunghee

    2015-12-01

    As the resolution of TV significantly increased, content consumers have become increasingly sensitive to the subtlest defect in TV contents. This rising standard in quality demanded by consumers has posed a new challenge in today's context where the tape-based process has transitioned to the file-based process: the transition necessitated digitalizing old archives, a process which inevitably produces errors such as disordered pixel blocks, scattered white noise, or totally missing pixels. Unsurprisingly, detecting and fixing such errors require a substantial amount of time and human labor to meet the standard demanded by today's consumers. In this paper, we introduce a novel, automated error restoration algorithm which can be applied to different types of classic errors by utilizing adjacent images while preserving the undamaged parts of an error image as much as possible. We tested our method to error images detected from our quality check system in KBS(Korean Broadcasting System) video archive. We are also implementing the algorithm as a plugin of well-known NLE(Non-linear editing system), which is a familiar tool for quality control agent.

  11. Restoring trust through bioethics education?

    PubMed

    Salerno, Judith A

    2008-06-01

    Ethically conducted research involving human participants is a cornerstone of the academic medical research establishment. However, there is public mistrust of clinical research and, as a result, low participation rates in research studies among minorities and in communities where health disparities are glaring. Specific initiatives have been undertaken by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to restore public confidence in biomedical research and to ensure that research is conducted ethically and responsibly. The T15 program, instituted in 1997, made awards beginning in 1998 to institutions for up to three years to develop, conduct, and evaluate short-term courses on ethical issues in research. A companion solicitation (K01 program) targeted the career development of independent investigators in applied research ethics through mentored scientist development awards in research ethics. Both programs emphasized ethical research involving human participants and outreach to minority scientists. The author asks how the success of these programs should be gauged, especially in light of new--and often unforeseen--ethical challenges that are likely to confront the research community. Participation in some T15 programs indicates that few researchers and practitioners perceived the need to increase their proficiency in analyzing the ethical dimensions of their work. To improve participation and, ultimately, ethical approaches to human participants research, the NIH should foster appreciation for the centrality of bioethics in the biomedical research enterprise. The author calls on the NIH to provide leadership for bioethics by further developing a national agenda for bioethics training and research.

  12. 75 FR 57820 - National Credit Union Administration Restoration Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... ADMINISTRATION National Credit Union Administration Restoration Plan AGENCY: National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). ACTION: Approval of National Credit Union Administration restoration plan. On September 16, 2010, the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) implemented a Restoration Plan for the National...

  13. A Guide to Bottomland Hardwood Restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, J.A.; Keeland, B.D.; Stanturf, J.A.; Clewell, A.F.; Kennedy, H.E.

    2001-01-01

    During the last century, a large amount of the original bottomland hardwood forest area in the United States has been lost, with losses greatest in the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley and East Texas. With a holistic approach in mind, this manual describes methods to restore bottomland hardwoods in the lower Midwest, including the Lower Mississippi Alluvial Valley and the southeastern United States. Bottomland hardwoods in this guide include not only the hardwood species that predominate in most forested floodplains of the area but also the softwood species such as baldcypress that often co-occur. General restoration planning considerations are discussed as well as more specific elements of bottomland hardwood restoration such as species selection, site preparation, direct seeding, planting of seedlings, and alternative options for revegetation. We recognize that most projects will probably fall more within the realm of reforestation or afforestation rather than a restoration, as some site preparation and the planting of seeds or trees may be the only actions taken. Practical information needed to restore an area is provided in the guide, and it is left up to the restorationist to decide how complete the restoration will be. Postplanting and monitoring considerations are also addressed. Restoration and management of existing forests are included because of the extensive areas of degraded natural forests in need of rehabilitation.

  14. Current aspects of restoring traumatically fractured teeth.

    PubMed

    Krastl, Gabriel; Filippi, Andreas; Zitzmann, Nicola U; Walter, Clemens; Weiger, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Endodontic and restorative considerations are of primary significance in the treatment of tooth fractures. Since exposed dentinal tubules permit invasion of bacteria into the endodontic system, a protective dressing must be applied as part of the emergency treatment. Provided the dentin wound has been sealed, restorative treatment can also be carried out at a later stage. The fractured tooth fragment can be reattached using adhesive protocols in order to restore function and esthetic appearance. If reattachment is difficult or impossible, eg, in cases of multiple or missing fragments, current composite materials enable excellent esthetic results. Minimally-invasive direct composite restorations are preferred over the more invasive indirect restorations, at least in immature teeth with an extensive coronal pulp dimension. Restorative treatment of crown-root fractures is frequently demanding due to inaccessible subgingival fracture margins. Extrusion of the remaining root is an alternative method to surgical crown lengthening for re-establishing the biological width. This can be carried out either orthodontically (forced eruption), or surgically (intra-alveolar transplantation). Although the treatment of crown-root fractures is one of the most technically sensitive procedures in dental traumatology and is frequently considered as a long-term temporary restoration, tooth conservation up to the age at which implants can be placed may be regarded as a success.

  15. Image Restoration in Cryo-electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Penczek, Pawel A.

    2011-01-01

    Image restoration techniques are used to obtain, given experimental measurements, the best possible approximation of the original object within the limits imposed by instrumental conditions and noise level in the data. In molecular electron microscopy, we are mainly interested in linear methods that preserve the respective relationships between mass densities within the restored map. Here, we describe the methodology of image restoration in structural electron microscopy, and more specifically, we will focus on the problem of the optimum recovery of Fourier amplitudes given electron microscope data collected under various defocus settings. We discuss in detail two classes of commonly used linear methods, the first of which consists of methods based on pseudoinverse restoration, and which is further subdivided into mean-square error, chi-square error, and constrained based restorations, where the methods in the latter two subclasses explicitly incorporates non-white distribution of noise in the data. The second class of methods is based on the Wiener filtration approach. We show that the Wiener filter-based methodology can be used to obtain a solution to the problem of amplitude correction (or “sharpening”) of the electron microscopy map that makes it visually comparable to maps determined by X-ray crystallography, and thus amenable to comparable interpretation. Finally, we present a semi-heuristic Wiener filter-based solution to the problem of image restoration given sets of heterogeneous solutions. We conclude the chapter with a discussion of image restoration protocols implemented in commonly used single particle software packages. PMID:20888957

  16. Ecosystem restoration on the California Channel Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halvorson, W.L.

    2004-01-01

    Restoration of natural habitat has become increasingly important over the last three decades in the United States, first as mitigation for development (especially in wetlands), and more recently in natural areas. This latter restoration has come about as land managing agencies have seen the need to reverse the impact of past land uses and agencies like the National Park Service have taken on the responsibility for less-than-pristine lands. Restorations have typically been carried out with little prior study and with no follow-up monitoring. On the Channel Islands, the need for restoration is great, but the desire is to base this restoration on sound ecological understanding. By conducting surveys, implementing long-term research and monitoring, and by conducting population and community dynamics research, the necessary data is obtained to arrive at such an understanding. Once management actions have been taken to effect restoration, monitoring is used to determine the success of those actions. The intention is to gain enough of an understanding of the islands' ecosystems that we can manage to restore, not just populations of native plants and animals, but also the processes of a naturally functioning ecosystem. ?? International Scientific Publications, New Delhi.

  17. Restoring Forest Landscapes: Important Lessons Learnt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansourian, Stephanie; Vallauri, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Forest restoration at large scales, or landscapes, is an approach that is increasingly relevant to the practice of environmental conservation. However, implementation remains a challenge; poor monitoring and lesson learning lead to similar mistakes being repeated. The World Wildlife Fund (WWF), the global conservation organization, recently took stock of its 10 years of implementation of forest landscape restoration. A significant body of knowledge has emerged from the work of the WWF and its partners in the different countries, which can be of use to the wider conservation community, but for this to happen, lessons need to be systematically collected and disseminated in a coherent manner to the broader conservation and development communities and, importantly, to policy makers. We use this review of the WWF's experiences and compare and contrast it with other relevant and recent literature to highlight 11 important lessons for future large-scale forest restoration interventions. These lessons are presented using a stepwise approach to the restoration of forested landscapes. We identify the need for long-term commitment and funding, and a concerted and collaborative effort for successful forest landscape restoration. Our review highlights that monitoring impact within landscape-scale forest restoration remains inadequate. We conclude that forest restoration within landscapes is a challenging yet important proposition that has a real but undervalued place in environmental conservation in the twenty-first century.

  18. Acceleration of tomographic hyperspectral restoration algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schau, Harvey C.

    2006-05-01

    Hyperspectral imaging spectrometers have proven to be both versatile and powerful instruments with applications in diverse areas such as medical diagnosis, land usage, military target detection, and art forgery. In many applications scanning systems cannot be effectively employed and true "flash" operation is necessary. Multiplex systems have been developed which can gather information in multispectral bands simultaneously, and then produce a datacube after mathematical restoration. Such system enjoy compact size, robust construction, inexpensive costs and zero moving parts at the cost of highly complex mathematical restoration operations. Currently the limiting feature of such tomographic hyperspectral imagers such as the FMDIS [1,2] is the speed of restoration. Due to the large sizes of the restoration kernel, restorations are typically recursive and require many iterations to achieve satisfactory results. Little can be done to make the systems smaller since the size is determined by the number of colors and pixel size of the focal plane arrays (FPA) employed. Thus, techniques must be investigated to speed up the restoration either by reducing the number of iterations or reducing the number of operations within an iteration. It is assumed that little can be done to reduce the number of operations in an iteration since the operations are done in sparse format, we therefore investigate reducing the number of iterations through mathematical accelerations. We assume this acceleration will work to advantage regardless of the mechanism (PC-based or dedicated processor such as a gate array) by which the restoration is implemented.

  19. RESTORATION INDUCED BY CATALASE IN IRRADIATED MICROORGANISMS

    PubMed Central

    Latarjet, Raymond; Caldas, Luis Renato

    1952-01-01

    1. E. coli, strain K-12, and B. megatherium 899, irradiated in strict but still undefined physiological conditions with certain heavy doses of ultraviolet light, are efficiently restored by catalase, which acts on or fixes itself upon the bacteria in a few minutes. This restoration (C. R.), different from photorestoration, is aided by a little visible light. 2. At 37° the restorability lasts for about 2 hours after UV irradiation; the restored cells begin to divide at the same time as the normal survivors. 3. C. R. is not produced after x-irradiation. 4. B. megatherium Mox and E. coli, strain B/r show little C. R.; E. coli strain B shows none. None of these three strains is lysogenic, whereas the two preceding catalase-restorable strains are. 5. Phage production in the system "K-12 infected with T2 phage" is restored by catalase after UV irradiation, whereas phage production in the system "infected B" is not. 6. With K-12, catalase does not prevent the growth of phage and the lysis induced by UV irradiation (Lwoff's phenomenon). 7. Hypotheses are discussed concerning: (a) the chemical nature of this action of catalase; (b) a possible relation between C. R. and lysogenicity of the sensitive bacteria; (c) the consequences of such chemical restorations on the general problem of cell radiosensitivity. PMID:14898028

  20. Restoration of biogeochemical function in mangrove forests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, K.L.; Faulkner, P.L.

    2000-01-01

    Forest structure of mangrove restoration sites (6 and 14 years old) at two locations (Henderson Creek [HC] and Windstar [WS]) in southwest Florida differed from that of mixed-basin forests (>50 years old) with which they were once contiguous. However, the younger site (HC) was typical of natural, developing forests, whereas the older site (WS) was less well developed with low structural complexity. More stressful physicochemical conditions resulting from incomplete tidal flushing (elevated salinity) and variable topography (waterlogging) apparently affected plant survival and growth at the WS restoration site. Lower leaf fall and root production rates at the WS restoration site, compared with that at HC were partly attributable to differences in hydroedaphic conditions and structural development. However, leaf and root inputs at each restoration site were not significantly different from that in reference forests within the same physiographic setting. Macrofaunal consumption of tethered leaves also did not differ with site history, but was dramatically higher at HC compared with WS, reflecting local variation in leaf litter processing rates, primarily by snails (Melampus coffeus). Degradation of leaves and roots in mesh bags was slow overall at restoration sites, however, particularly at WS where aerobic decomposition may have been more limited. These findings indicate that local or regional factors such as salinity regime act together with site history to control primary production and turnover rates of organic matter in restoration sites. Species differences in senescent leaf nitrogen content and degradation rates further suggest that restoration sites dominated by Laguncularia racemosa and Rhizophora mangle should exhibit slower recycling of nutrients compared with natural basin forests where Avicennia germinans is more abundant. Structural development and biogeochemical functioning of restored mangrove forests thus depend on a number of factors, but site

  1. Type 2 diabetes mellitus induces congenital heart defects in murine embryos by increasing oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yanqing; Reece, E. Albert; Zhong, Jianxiang; Dong, Daoyin; Shen, Wei-Bin; Harman, Christopher R.; Yang, Peixin

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Maternal type 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus are strongly associated with high rates of severe structural birth defects, including congenital heart defects. Studies in type 1 diabetic embryopathy animal models have demonstrated that cellular stress-induced apoptosis mediates the teratogenicity of maternal diabetes leading to congenital heart defect formation. However, the mechanisms underlying maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus–induced congenital heart defects remain largely unknown. OBJECTIVE We aim to determine whether oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, and excessive apoptosis are the intracellular molecular mechanisms underlying maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus–induced congenital heart defects. STUDY DESIGN A mouse model of maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus was established by feeding female mice a high-fat diet (60% fat). After 15 weeks on the high-fat diet, the mice showed characteristics of maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus. Control dams were either fed a normal diet (10% fat) or the high-fat diet during pregnancy only. Female mice from the high-fat diet group and the 2 control groups were mated with male mice that were fed a normal diet. At E12.5, embryonic hearts were harvested to determine the levels of lipid peroxides and superoxide, endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, cleaved caspase 3 and 8, and apoptosis. E17.5 embryonic hearts were harvested for the detection of congenital heart defect formation using India ink vessel patterning and histological examination. RESULTS Maternal type 2 diabetes mellitus significantly induced ventricular septal defects and persistent truncus arteriosus in the developing heart, along with increasing oxidative stress markers, including superoxide and lipid peroxidation; endoplasmic reticulum stress markers, including protein levels of phosphorylated-protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase, phosphorylated-IRE1α, phosphorylated-eIF2α, C/EBP homologous protein, and binding immunoglobulin

  2. Enhanced aesthetics with all ceramics restoration

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sanjna; Aruna, U.; Bhat, Wasim Manzoor

    2015-01-01

    The demand for the dentist to achieve excellence in esthetics and function has driven modern advances in materials and restoration fabrication. The development of various casting alloys and precise casting systems has contributed to the successful use of metal-based restorations. However, patient requests for more aesthetic and biologically “safe” materials that have led to an increased demand for metal-free restorations. The following case presentation illustrates a successful aesthetic and functional application of this exciting computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing-digital zirconia-based system for a natural smile. PMID:26015733

  3. Atomic Oxygen Used to Restore Artworks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2004-01-01

    Techniques developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to produce atomic oxygen in order to simulate the low-Earth-orbit environment for spacecraft materials testing can also be applied in the field of art restoration. Defaced or fire-damaged artwork can be treated with atomic oxygen to remove the damage and enable restoration that could not be accomplished with conventional methods. The process has been patented (U.S. Patents 5,560,781 and 5,693,241) and has been used to restore several works of art.

  4. Low-shrink monomers for dental restorations.

    PubMed

    Palin, W M; Fleming, G J P

    2003-04-01

    The main disadvantages of resin-based composites (RBCs) for use in load-bearing posterior restorations include the polymerization shrinkage following curing and inadequate wear resistance in service. These properties are largely influenced by the monomer system and research is currently being undertaken to decrease polymerization shrinkage and improve resin wear characteristics in an attempt to increase RBC restoration longevity. The scope of the current review will identify the development of resin-based restoratives, indicating the reported advantages and disadvantages of resin types routinely used in dental practice today and review the most recent advancements in resin technology.

  5. Restoration of degraded images using genetic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Beltrán, José Enrique; Díaz-Ramírez, Víctor H.; Trujillo, Leonardo; Legrand, Pierrick

    2016-09-01

    In image restoration problems it is commonly assumed that image degradations are linear. In real-life this assumption is not always satisfied causing linear restoration methods fail. In this work, we present the design of an image restoration filtering based on genetic programming. The proposed filtering is given by a secuence of basic mathematical operators that allows to retrieve an undegraded image from an image degraded with noise. Computer simulations results obtained with the proposed algorithm in terms of objective metrics are analyzed and discussed by processing images degraded with noise. The obtained results are compared with those obtained with existing linear filters.

  6. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Leif Erik

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vertigo (bilateral vestibulopathy, kinetosis, height vertigo, vestibular disorders when diving (Tables 1 (Tab. 1) and 2 (Tab. 2)). Glucocorticoid and training therapy encourage the compensation of unilateral vestibular loss. In the case of a bilateral vestibular loss, it is important to treat the underlying disease (e.g. Cogan's disease). Although balance training does improve the patient's sense of balance, it will not restore it completely. In the case of Meniere's disease, there are a number of medications available to either treat bouts or to act as a prophylactic (e.g. dimenhydrinate or betahistine). In addition, there are non-ablative (sacculotomy) as well as ablative surgical procedures (e.g. labyrinthectomy, neurectomy of the vestibular nerve). In everyday practice, it has become common to proceed with low risk therapies initially. The physical treatment of mild postural vertigo can be carried out quickly and easily in outpatients (repositioning or liberatory maneuvers). In very rare cases it may be necessary to carry out a semicircular canal occlusion. Isolated disturbances of the otolith function or an involvement of the otolith can be found in roughly 50% of labyrinth disturbances. A specific surgical procedure to selectively block the otolith organs is currently being studied. When an external perilymph fistula involving loss of perilymph is suspected, an exploratory tympanotomy involving also the round and oval window niches must be carried out. A traumatic rupture of

  7. Water Awareness Through Environmental Restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis-Caldwell, K.

    2012-04-01

    and negative effects of human presence on the local and global water supply. Student research scientifically tested ways to slow down the effects of run-off contaminants. Students also revisit water analysis and plant trees as buffers as part of their stream preservation efforts in a culminating activity. Oyster Reef Restoration Project: As a result of changes in climate, pollution and human consumption, the oyster population in the Chesapeake Bay had previously been on a rapid decline. The Oyster Reef Restoration Project allows students to understand the creatures of the bay and the cause of this decline. They explore the domino effect this has had on the quality of the water in the bay and future implications on the environment when the oyster population fluctuates significantly. Students construct concrete reefs and study the components of its contents and the reef's impact on the bay. Students are responsible for mixing, pouring and preparing the reef for its eventual drop in the bay. Wetlands Recovery: Following the elimination of a substantial amount of the natural wetlands behind the elementary and middle schools, a wetlands area was erected on the school grounds. This pond has been used to learn about habitats and the role humans, plants and organisms play in the preservation of the earth soil and water supply. This wetland is used by both the elementary and middle schools as a place for hands-on inquiry based learning. Students maintain the upkeep of the pond and teach other students at lower grades.

  8. Is restoring an ecosystem good for your health?

    PubMed

    Speldewinde, P C; Slaney, D; Weinstein, P

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the degradation of ecosystems can have serious impacts on human health. There is currently a knowledge gap on what impact restoring ecosystems has on human health. In restoring ecosystems there is a drive to restore the functionality of ecosystems rather than restoring ecosystems to 'pristine' condition. Even so, the complete restoration of all ecosystem functions is not necessarily possible. Given the uncertain trajectory of the ecosystem during the ecosystem restoration process the impact of the restoration on human health is also uncertain. Even with this uncertainty, the restoration of ecosystems for human health is still a necessity.

  9. Temporary restorations: advantages and disadvantages.

    PubMed

    Waerhaug, J

    1980-04-01

    The reaction of tissue to temporary restorations was studied in four young dogs and four young monkeys. A total of 56 cavities were prepared and filled with gutta percha, self-curing acrylic resin, or zinc oxide and eugenol cement. Attempts were made to finish the preparations at the deepest point of the existing clinical pocket, which invariably was found to coincide with the cemento-enamel junction. All the animals had the teeth on the left side brushed every day. The observation periods varied between 13 and 283 days. Immediately before the animals were killed by an overdose of Nembutal, the presence or absence of gingivitis was recorded. A series of sections were cut in the area of the cavity, as well as just outside it. The following observations were made: Examination of the sections from outside the cavities verified that the preparations had been made in pockets with soft walls made up of the junctional epithelium. The cavities ended shortly above the cemento-enamel junction (Figs. 3, 4, 6, and 8) or below it (Figs. 1, 2, 5, 7, and 9 to 11). The adaptation of the fillings was never perfect in all parts of the cavity at the same time. The pocket epithelium was regenerated within 13 days. Plaque formation first started in the open spaces between the preparation and the fillings. Subsequently, the plaque spread over the surfaces of the fillings and eventually over the tooth surface below them. The fillings invariably induced submarginal gingivitis, even in the absence of plaque. Presence of plaque exacerbated the inflammatory reaction, but the loss of attachment was limited to less than 0.2 mm as long as the plaque was confined to the fillings. Significant loss of attachment was always associated with apical growth of the subgingival plaque. The submarginal gingivitis was not manifested clinically if the fillings were brushed daily, because vigorous tooth brushing had an effect as far as 0.7 mm below the gingival margin.

  10. Cationic polystyrene nanospheres induce autophagic cell death through the induction of endoplasmic reticulum stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hui-Wen; Xia, Tian; Lee, Yu-Hsuan; Chen, Chun-Wan; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Wang, Ying-Jan

    2014-12-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been used to produce a wide range of products that have applications in imaging and drug delivery in medicine. Due to their chemical stability, well-controlled sizes and surface charges, polystyrene (PS) NPs have been developed as biosensors and drug delivery carriers. However, the possible adverse biological effects and underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Recently, autophagy has been implicated in the regulation of cell death. In this study, we evaluated a library of PS NPs with different surface charges. We found that NH2-labeled polystyrene (NH2-PS) nanospheres were highly toxic with enhanced uptake in macrophage (RAW 264.7) and lung epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. Furthermore, NH2-PS could induce autophagic cell death. NH2-PS increased autophagic flux due to reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress caused by misfolded protein aggregation. The inhibition of ER stress decreased cytotoxicity and autophagy in the NH2-PS-treated cells. In addition, the Akt/mTOR and AMPK signaling pathways were involved in the regulation of NH2-PS-triggered autophagic cell death. These results suggest an important role of autophagy in cationic NP-induced cell death and provide mechanistic insights into the inhibition of the toxicity and safe material design.Nanoparticles (NPs) have been used to produce a wide range of products that have applications in imaging and drug delivery in medicine. Due to their chemical stability, well-controlled sizes and surface charges, polystyrene (PS) NPs have been developed as biosensors and drug delivery carriers. However, the possible adverse biological effects and underlying mechanisms are still unclear. Recently, autophagy has been implicated in the regulation of cell death. In this study, we evaluated a library of PS NPs with different surface charges. We found that NH2-labeled polystyrene (NH2-PS) nanospheres were highly toxic with enhanced uptake in macrophage (RAW 264.7) and lung

  11. Panax quinquefolium saponin attenuates cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by thapsigargin through inhibition of endoplasmic reticulum stress

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mi; Xue, Mei; Wang, Xiao-Reng; Tao, Tian-Qi; Xu, Fei-Fei; Liu, Xiu-Hua; Shi, Da-Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Background Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-related apoptosis is involved in the pathophysiology of many cardiovascular diseases, and Panax quinquefolium saponin (PQS) is able to inhibit excessive ER stress-related apoptosis of cardiomyocytes following hypoxia/reoxygenation and myocardial infarction. However, the pathway by which PQS inhibits the ER stress-related apoptosis is not well understood. To further investigate the protective effect of PQS against ER stress-related apoptosis, primary cultured cardiomyocytes were stimulated with thapsigargin (TG), which is widely used to model cellular ER stress, and it could induce apoptotic cell death in sufficient concentration. Methods Primary cultured cardiomyocytes from neonatal rats were exposed to TG (1 µmol/L) treatment for 24 h, following PQS pre-treatment (160 µg/mL) for 24 h or pre-treatment with small interfering RNA directed against protein kinase-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (Si-PERK) for 6 h. The viability and apoptosis rate of cardiomyocytes were detected by cell counting kit-8 and flow cytometry respectively. ER stress-related protein expression, such as glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), calreticulin, PERK, eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) were assayed by western blotting. Results Both PQS pre-treatment and PERK knockdown remarkably inhibited the cardiomyocyte apoptosis induced by TG, increased cell viability, decreased phosphorylation of both PERK and eIF2α, and decreased protein levels of both ATF4 and CHOP. There was no statistically significant difference between PQS pre-treatment and PERK knockdown in the cardioprotective effect. Conclusions Our data indicate that the PERK-eIF2α-ATF4-CHOP pathway of ER stress is involved in the apoptosis induced by TG, and PQS might prevent TG-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis through a mechanism involving the suppression of this pathway. These findings

  12. Fluoride-elicited developmental testicular toxicity in rats: Roles of endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shun; Jiang, Chunyang; Liu, Hongliang; Guan, Zhizhong; Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Cheng; Lei, Rongrong; Xia, Tao; Gao, Hui; Yang, Lu; Chen, Yihu; Wu, Xue; Zhang, Xiaofei; Cui, Yushan; Yu, Linyu; Wang, Zhenglun; Wang, Aiguo

    2013-09-01

    Long-term excessive fluoride intake is known to be toxic and can damage a variety of organs and tissues in the human body. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying fluoride-induced male reproductive toxicity are not well understood. In this study, we used a rat model to simulate the situations of human exposure and aimed to evaluate the roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammatory response in fluoride-induced testicular injury. Sprague–Dawley rats were administered with sodium fluoride (NaF) at 25, 50 and 100 mg/L via drinking water from pre-pregnancy to gestation, birth and finally to post-puberty. And then the testes of male offspring were studied at 8 weeks of age. Our results demonstrated that fluoride treatment increased MDA accumulation, decreased SOD activity, and enhanced germ cell apoptosis. In addition, fluoride elevated mRNA and protein levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), inositol requiring ER-to-nucleus signal kinase 1 (IRE1), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), indicating activation of ER stress signaling. Furthermore, fluoride also induced testicular inflammation, as manifested by gene up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), in a nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB)-dependent manner. These were associated with marked histopathological lesions including injury of spermatogonia, decrease of spermatocytes and absence of elongated spermatids, as well as severe ultrastructural abnormalities in testes. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence that ER stress and inflammation would be novel and significant mechanisms responsible for fluoride-induced disturbance of spermatogenesis and germ cell loss in addition to oxidative stress. - Highlights: • We used a rat model to simulate the situations of human fluoride (F) exposure. • Developmental F exposure induces testicular damage related with oxidative stress.

  13. The role of cholesterol in the association of endoplasmic reticulum membranes with mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimoto, Michiko; Hayashi, Teruo; Su, Tsung-Ping

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The endoplasmic reticulum subdomain termed MAM associates with mitochondria. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The biophysical role of lipids in the MAM-mitochondria association is unknown. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The in vitro membrane association assay was used to examine the role of lipids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cholesterol was found to negatively regulate the association. -- Abstract: The unique endoplasmic reticulum (ER) subdomain termed the mitochondria-associated ER membrane (MAM) engages the physical connection between the ER and the mitochondrial outer membrane and plays a role in regulating IP{sub 3} receptor-mediated Ca{sup 2+} influx and the phospholipid transport between the two organelles. The MAM contains certain signaling and membrane-tethering proteins but also lipids including cholesterol. The biophysical role of lipids at the MAM, specifically in the physical interaction between the MAM of the ER and mitochondria, remains not totally clarified. Here we employed the in vitro membrane association assay to investigate the role of cholesterol in the association between MAMs and mitochondria. The purified MAMs and mitochondria were mixed in vitro in a test tube and then the physical association of the two subcellular organelles was quantified indirectly by measuring the presence of the MAM-specific protein sigma-1 receptors in the mitochondria fraction. Purified MAMs contained free cholesterol approximately 7 times higher than that in microsomes. We found that depletion of cholesterol in MAMs with methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (M{beta}C) significantly increases the association between MAMs and mitochondria, whereas M{beta}C saturated with cholesterol does not change the association. {sup 14}C-Serine pulse-labeling demonstrated that the treatment of living cells with M{beta}C decreases the level of de novo synthesized {sup 14}C-phosphatidylserine (PtSer) and concomitantly increases greatly the synthesis of

  14. Nucleocapsid Protein from Fig Mosaic Virus Forms Cytoplasmic Agglomerates That Are Hauled by Endoplasmic Reticulum Streaming

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Kazuya; Miura, Chihiro; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Tomomitsu, Tatsuya; Fukuoka, Misato; Yusa, Akira; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although many studies have demonstrated intracellular movement of viral proteins or viral replication complexes, little is known about the mechanisms of their motility. In this study, we analyzed the localization and motility of the nucleocapsid protein (NP) of Fig mosaic virus (FMV), a negative-strand RNA virus belonging to the recently established genus Emaravirus. Electron microscopy of FMV-infected cells using immunogold labeling showed that NPs formed cytoplasmic agglomerates that were predominantly enveloped by the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, while nonenveloped NP agglomerates also localized along the ER. Likewise, transiently expressed NPs formed agglomerates, designated NP bodies (NBs), in close proximity to the ER, as was the case in FMV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation and electron microscopic analyses of NP-expressing cells revealed that NBs localized in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, we found that NBs moved rapidly with the streaming of the ER in an actomyosin-dependent manner. Brefeldin A treatment at a high concentration to disturb the ER network configuration induced aberrant accumulation of NBs in the perinuclear region, indicating that the ER network configuration is related to NB localization. Dominant negative inhibition of the class XI myosins, XI-1, XI-2, and XI-K, affected both ER streaming and NB movement in a similar pattern. Taken together, these results showed that NBs localize in the cytoplasm but in close proximity to the ER membrane to form enveloped particles and that this causes passive movements of cytoplasmic NBs by ER streaming. IMPORTANCE Intracellular trafficking is a primary and essential step for the cell-to-cell movement of viruses. To date, many studies have demonstrated the rapid intracellular movement of viral factors but have failed to provide evidence for the mechanism or biological significance of this motility. Here, we observed that agglomerates of nucleocapsid protein (NP) moved rapidly

  15. Moderate endoplasmic reticulum stress activates a PERK and p38-dependent apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lumley, Emily C; Osborn, Acadia R; Scott, Jessica E; Scholl, Amanda G; Mercado, Vicki; McMahan, Young T; Coffman, Zachary G; Brewster, Jay L

    2017-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has the ability to signal organelle dysfunction via a complex signaling network known as the unfolded protein response (UPR). In this work, hamster fibroblast cells exhibiting moderate levels of ER stress were compared to those exhibiting severe ER stress. Inhibition of N-linked glycosylation was accomplished via a temperature-sensitive mutation in the Dad1 subunit of the oligosaccharyltransferase (OST) complex or by direct inhibition with tunicamycin (Tm). Temperature shift (TS) treatment generated weak activation of ER stress signaling when compared to doses of Tm that are typically used in ER stress studies (500-1000 nM). A dose-response analysis of key ER stress signaling mediators, inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) and protein kinase R (PKR)-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (PERK), revealed 20-40 nM of Tm to generate activation intensity similar to TS treatment. In parental BHK21 cells, moderate (20-40 nM) and high doses (200-1000 nM) of Tm were compared to identify physiological and signaling-based differences in stress response. Inhibition of ER Ca(2+) release via ITPR activity with 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) or Xestospongin C (XeC) was sufficient to protect against apoptosis induced by moderate but not higher doses of Tm. Analysis of kinase activation over a range of Tm exposures revealed the p38 stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) to display increasing activation with Tm dosage. Interestingly, Tm induced the extracellular regulated kinases (Erk1/2) only at moderate doses of Tm. Inhibition of ER transmembrane stress sensors (IRE1, PERK) or cytosolic signaling mediators (p38, Jnk1, Erk1/2) was used to evaluate pathways involved in apoptosis activation during ER stress. Inhibition of either PERK or p38 was sufficient to reduce cell death and apoptosis induced by moderate, but not high, doses of Tm. During ER stress, cells exhibited a rapid decline in anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 and survivin proteins. Inhibition of

  16. Rainbow Waterproofing and Restoration Co. Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Rainbow Waterproofing and Restoration Co. (the Company) is located in San Francisco, California. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at property constructed prior to 1978, located in San Francisco, California.

  17. White Lake AOC Habitat Restoration Project

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Muskegon Conservation District and the White Lake Public Advisory Council in 2012 completed the White Lake AOC Shoreline Habitat Restoration Project to address the loss of shoreline and nearshore habitat.

  18. Millennium Restoration and Development Corp. Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Millennium Restoration and Development Corp. (the Company) is located in St. Louis, Missouri. The settlement involves renovation activities conducted at property constructed prior to 1978, located in St. Louis, Missouri.

  19. 76 FR 16277 - System Restoration Reliability Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 40 System Restoration Reliability Standards AGENCY: Federal... Act, the Commission approves three Emergency Operations and Preparedness (EOP) Reliability Standards... Resource'' submitted to the Commission for approval by the North American Electric Reliability...

  20. Restoration of multichannel microwave radiometric images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, R. T.; Yeh, C.-L.; Olson, W. S.

    1985-01-01

    A constrained iterative image restoration method is applied to multichannel diffraction-limited imagery. This method is based on the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm utilizing incomplete information and partial constraints. The procedure is described using the orthogonal projection operators which project onto two prescribed subspaces iteratively. Its properties and limitations are presented. The effect of noise was investigated and a better understanding of the performance of the algorithm with noisy data has been achieved. The restoration scheme with the selection of appropriate constraints was applied to a practical problem. The 6.6, 10.7, 18, and 21 GHz satellite images obtained by the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR), each having different spatial resolution, were restored to a common, high resolution (that of the 37 GHz channels) to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. Both simulated data and real data were used in this study. The restored multichannel images may be utilized to retrieve rainfall distributions.

  1. Restoration of multichannel microwave radiometric images.

    PubMed

    Chin, R T; Yeh, C L; Olson, W S

    1985-04-01

    A constrained iterative image restoration method is applied to multichannel diffraction-limited imagery. This method is based on the Gerchberg-Papoulis algorithm utilizing incomplete information and partial constraints. The procedure is described using the orthogonal projection operators which project onto two prescribed subspaces iteratively. Its properties and limitations are presented. The effect of noise was investigated and a better understanding of the performance of the algorithm with noisy data has been achieved. The restoration scheme with the selection of appropriate constraints was applied to a practical problem. The 6.6, 10.7, 18, and 21 GHz satellite images obtained by the scanning multichannel microwave radiometer (SMMR), each having different spatial resolution, were restored to a common, high resolution (that of the 37 GHz channels) to demonstrate the effectiveness of the method. Both simulated data and real data were used in this study. The restored multichannel images may be utilized to retrieve rainfall distributions.

  2. Ceramics as biomaterials for dental restoration.

    PubMed

    Höland, Wolfram; Schweiger, Marcel; Watzke, Ronny; Peschke, Arnd; Kappert, Heinrich

    2008-11-01

    Sintered ceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used as biomaterials for dental restoration, especially as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Biomaterials were developed either to veneer metal frameworks or to produce metal-free dental restorations. Different types of glass-ceramics and ceramics are available and necessary today to fulfill customers' needs (patients, dentists and dental technicians) regarding the properties of the biomaterials and the processing of the products. All of these different types of biomaterials already cover the entire range of indications of dental restorations. Today, patients are increasingly interested in metal-free restoration. Glass-ceramics are particularly suitable for fabricating inlays, crowns and small bridges, as these materials achieve very strong, esthetic results. High-strength ceramics are preferred in situations where the material is exposed to high masticatory forces.

  3. Superior Restoration & Construction, LLC Information Sheet

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Superior Restoration & Construction, LLC (the Company) is located in Overland Park, Kansas. The Complaint involves renovation activities conducted at property constructed prior to 1978, located in Kansas City, Missouri.

  4. Restoration Advisory Board (RAB) Implementation Guidelines

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document provides recommended procedures for establishing and operating Restoration Advisory Boards (RABs). It is intended as a resource for installation, EPA, and State personnel and citizens who participate in RABs.

  5. Partners in Restoring Deer Lake AOC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Deer Lake Public Advisory Council has been critical in the restoration project. Other contributors are the City of Ishpeming, and Michigan Departments of Environment Quality (MDEQ) and of Community Health (MDCH).

  6. Forest restoration, biodiversity and ecosystem functioning.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Raf; Honnay, Olivier

    2011-11-24

    Globally, forests cover nearly one third of the land area and they contain over 80% of terrestrial biodiversity. Both the extent and quality of forest habitat continue to decrease and the associated loss of biodiversity jeopardizes forest ecosystem functioning and the ability of forests to provide ecosystem services. In the light of the increasing population pressure, it is of major importance not only to conserve, but also to restore forest ecosystems. Ecological restoration has recently started to adopt insights from the biodiversity-ecosystem functioning (BEF) perspective. Central is the focus on restoring the relation between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. Here we provide an overview of important considerations related to forest restoration that can be inferred from this BEF-perspective. Restoring multiple forest functions requires multiple species. It is highly unlikely that species-poor plantations, which may be optimal for above-ground biomass production, will outperform species diverse assemblages for a combination of functions, including overall carbon storage and control over water and nutrient flows. Restoring stable forest functions also requires multiple species. In particular in the light of global climatic change scenarios, which predict more frequent extreme disturbances and climatic events, it is important to incorporate insights from the relation between biodiversity and stability of ecosystem functioning into forest restoration projects. Rather than focussing on species per se, focussing on functional diversity of tree species assemblages seems appropriate when selecting tree species for restoration. Finally, also plant genetic diversity and above - below-ground linkages should be considered during the restoration process, as these likely have prominent but until now poorly understood effects at the level of the ecosystem. The BEF-approach provides a useful framework to evaluate forest restoration in an ecosystem functioning context, but

  7. Alternatives to testosterone replacement: testosterone restoration.

    PubMed

    McCullough, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The European Male Aging Study has demonstrated that the hypogonadism of male aging is predominantly secondary. Theoretically with appropriate stimulation from the pituitary, the aging testis should be able to produce eugonadal levels of testosterone. The strategies for the treatment of late onset hypogonadism (LOH) have focused on replacement with exogenous testosterone versus restoration of endogenous production. The purpose of this article is to review existing peer-reviewed literature supporting the concept of restoration of endogenous testosterone in the treatment of LOH.

  8. Laser application in otology for hearing restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombardo, Igino

    1994-09-01

    Prior to the development of the stapes replacement prosthesis in the early 1950s, loss of hearing due to otosclerosis remained an untreatable disease. Today, loss of hearing due to otosclerosis can be restored in the majority of cases to near normal levels. Since 1980 the laser has played a major and important role in otosclerosis surgery. This paper explores the use of lasers for hearing restoration and compares the results of laser surgery to non-laser surgery.

  9. Leadership success within disaster restoration projects.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Randy R; Baroudi, Bassam

    2014-01-01

    Successful project managers draw their performance from essential leadership traits, as guided by their core values.Within disaster recovery, contractors who mitigate, repair, and reconstruct the built environment are often faced with challenges exceeding the norm. The effective leader is commonly expected to consider stakeholder motivations within distressing situations as well as other external and environmental factors when seeking to lead the project team to successful outcomes. This research is most concerned with leadership within the context of disaster restoration of the built environment. Its stimulus comes from the Restoration Industry Association (RIA)'s efforts to highlight leadership traits and core values for its Certified Restorer Body of Knowledge but would be of value to others associated with disaster recovery operations. Among organizations whose membership includes thousands of practitioners who restore and reconstruct the built environment after disasters, the RIA is the only one yet to formally and substantially research which core values and leader traits are deemed critical for the success of efforts to manage the means and methods applied on recovery job sites. Forty-six seasoned disaster restoration industry project professionals voluntarily responded to a survey questionnaire that sought their opinions about the traits and core values that they consider most important for successful disaster restoration project leadership. The most important leader traits were effective communication, professional competence, and leadership by example. The most important restoration industry values were integrity, compassion, and trustworthiness. The recognized imperative of compassion was unexpected in light of stereotypes often associated with construction-related contractors. This and other findings permit disaster response and recovery stakeholders to better understand qualities they should wish to see in leaders of contractor organizations, which

  10. Environmental Restoration Program Management Control Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    This Management Control Plan has been prepared to define the Energy Systems approach to managing its participation in the US DOE's Environmental Restoration (ER) Program in a manner consistent with DOE/ORO 931: Management Plan for the DOE Field Office, Oak Ridge, Decontamination and Decommissioning Program; and the Energy Systems Environmental Restoration Contract Management Plan (CMP). This plan discusses the systems, procedures, methodology, and controls to be used by the program management team to attain these objectives.

  11. Endoplasmic Reticulum Retention Signal-Dependent Glycylation of the Hsp70/Grp170-Related Pgp1p in Tetrahymena▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Rong; Clark, Kathleen M.; Gorovsky, Martin A.

    2007-01-01

    Glycylation is an uncommon posttranslational modification. It has been found that tubulin glycylation is essential for cell survival in Tetrahymena. Here we describe PGP1, a Tetrahymena gene encoding an Hsp70 homologue that is a novel glycylated protein. Pgp1p is a conserved glycoprotein that localizes within the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We demonstrate that PGP1 is essential for viability and present evidence that both glycosylation and ER retention are necessary but not sufficient for glycylation. PMID:17189490

  12. Neuropeptide accretions in the endoplasmic reticulum of oxytocinergic neurons in cats, monkeys and rabbits: a widespread phenomenon.

    PubMed Central

    Pow, D V

    1992-01-01

    Light microscopic observations using Nomarski optics on the aldehyde-fixed hypothalamus of normal adult cats, monkeys and rabbits revealed the presence of cells in the supraoptic, paraventricular and periventricular nuclei which possessed yellow birefringent inclusions. Immunogold labelling showed that in each species the cells displayed oxytocin-like immunoreactivity, both in electron-dense inclusions within some (but not all) cisterns of rough endoplasmic reticulum and in secretory granules. The cells in cats and rabbits were in all respects indistinguishable from the homologous 'birefringent' cells previously described in rats, but in monkeys, cells frequently contained additional inclusions in cisterns of rough endoplasmic reticulum which did not display oxytocin or vasopressin-like immunoreactivity, even after trypsin, pepsin or chymotrypsin treatment of sections. Observations on cats and rabbits using fluorescence microscopy revealed that the birefringent cells possessed bright autofluorescence which facilitated the identification of more cells than were seen using Nomarski optics alone. Autofluorescence was abolished when sections were mounted in glycerol, or when exposed to light for protracted periods of time. Attempts to label for monoamines in these cells were not successful, suggesting that the fluorescence is not due to aldehyde-induced amine fluorescence. It is not clear why neuropeptides are retained in some rough endoplasmic reticulum cisterns. It is possible that these birefringent cells contain a peptide, or peptides, which are abnormal in some manner, or which may be other members of the oxytocin gene family. Alternatively, the processing of neuropeptides to permit their export to the Golgi apparatus may be deficient. Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry revealed that, unlike other oxytocin neurons, cells with intracellular accretions lacked detectable acetyl cholinesterase. As AChE is a known peptidase, it may be involved in regulating

  13. Remote sensing for restoration ecology: Application for restoring degraded, damaged, transformed, or destroyed ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Reif, Molly K; Theel, Heather J

    2016-09-14

    Restoration monitoring is generally perceived as costly and time consuming, given the assumptions of successfully restoring ecological functions and services of a particular ecosystem or habitat. Opportunities exist for remote sensing to bolster the restoration science associated with a wide variety of injured resources, including resources affected by fire, hydropower operations, chemical releases, and oil spills, among others. In the last decade, the role of remote sensing to support restoration monitoring has increased, in part due to the advent of high-resolution satellite sensors as well as other sensor technology, such as lidar. Restoration practitioners in federal agencies require monitoring standards to assess restoration performance of injured resources. This review attempts to address a technical need and provides an introductory overview of spatial data and restoration metric considerations, as well as an in-depth review of optical (e.g., spaceborne, airborne, unmanned aerial vehicles) and active (e.g., radar, lidar) sensors and examples of restoration metrics that can be measured with remotely sensed data (e.g., land cover, species or habitat type, change detection, quality, degradation, diversity, and pressures or threats). To that end, the present article helps restoration practitioners assemble information not only about essential restoration metrics but also about the evolving technological approaches that can be used to best assess them. Given the need for monitoring standards to assess restoration success of injured resources, a universal monitoring framework should include a range of remote sensing options with which to measure common restoration metrics. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2016;X:000-000. Published 2016. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC.

  14. Effect of restoration size on fracture resistance of bonded amalgam restorations.

    PubMed

    Lindemuth, J S; Hagge, M S; Broome, J S

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of restoration size on the fracture strength of amalgam restorations bonded with Amalgambond Plus (with HPA). Research has shown that this adhesive is dispersed throughout the unset amalgam during condensation and that a decrease in diametral tensile strength, proportional to the amount of adhesive incorporated into the unset amalgam, has resulted. Smaller cavity preparations have a higher ratio of surface area to volume than do larger preparations, and it was anticipated that a proportionately greater amount of adhesive would be incorporated into smaller amalgam restorations. Sixty extracted human molars were divided into four groups of 15 teeth and mounted in tray acrylic-filled PVC cylinders. Shallow approximo-occlusal channels were prepared in two groups. One group was restored with Amalgambond Plus and Tytin amalgam, the other with just Tytin amalgam. Larger proximo-occlusal preparations were made in the remaining two groups, then restored in the same fashion. Samples were stored in 37 degrees C for at least 24 hours, then thermocycled from 5-55 degrees C 1000 times with a one-minute dwell time. Specimens were mounted in a Universal Testing Machine, and a chisel was applied to the restorations in compression mode at a crosshead speed of 5.0 mm/minute until bulk fracture of the amalgam occurred. The results indicated no difference in bulk fracture strengths between large amalgam restorations restored with and without Amalgambond Plus. However, small amalgam restorations restored with Amalgambond Plus exhibited significantly greater (p < 0.025) bulk fracture strengths than small amalgam restorations restored without use of the adhesive.

  15. Ecological restoration of litter in mined areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teresinha Gonçalves Bizuti, Denise; Nino Diniz, Najara; Schweizer, Daniella; de Marchi Soares, Thaís; Casagrande, José Carlos; Henrique Santin Brancalion, Pedro

    2016-04-01

    The success of ecological restoration projects depends on going monitoring of key ecological variables to determine if a desired trajectory has been established and, in the case of mining sites, nutrient cycling recovery plays an utmost importance. This study aimed to quantify and compare the annual litter production in native forests, and in restoration sites established in bauxite mines. We collected samples in 6 native forest remnants and 6 year-old restoration sites every month for a period of one year, in the city of Poços de Caldas/MG, SE Brazil. 120 wire collectors were used (0,6x0,6) and suspended 30cm above the soil surface. The material was dried until constant weight, weighed and fractionated in leaves, branches and reproductive material. The average annual litter production was 2,6 Mg ha-1 in native forests and 2,1 in forest in restoration sites, differing statistically. Litter production was higher in the rainy season, especially in September. Among the litter components, the largest contributor to total production was the fraction leaves, with 55,4% of the total dry weight of material collected, followed by reproductive material which contributed 24,5% and branches, with 20%. We conclude that the young areas in restoration process already restored important part, but still below the production observed in native areas.

  16. Manganese toxicity thresholds for restoration grass species.

    PubMed

    Paschke, Mark W; Valdecantos, Alejandro; Redente, Edward F

    2005-05-01

    Manganese toxicity thresholds for restoration plants have not been established. As a result, ecological risk assessments rely on toxicity thresholds for agronomic species, which may differ from those of restoration species. Our objective was to provide Mn toxicity thresholds for grasses commonly used in restoration. We used a greenhouse screening study where seedlings of redtop, slender wheatgrass, tufted hairgrass, big bluegrass, basin wildrye, and common wheat were grown in sand culture and exposed to increasing concentrations of Mn. The LC50, EC50-plant, EC50-shoot, EC50-root, PT50-shoot, and the PT50-root were then determined. Phytotoxicity thresholds and effective concentrations for the restoration species were generally higher than values reported for agronomic species. Our estimates of PT50-shoot for the five restoration grasses range from 41,528 to 120,082 mg Mn kg(-1). Measures of EC50-plant for these restoration grasses ranged from 877 to >6,000 mg Mn l(-1). These thresholds might be more useful for risk assessors than those based on crop plants that are widely used.

  17. Fluoride release from restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Basso, Gabriela Romanini; Della Bona, Alvaro; Gobbi, Delton Luiz; Cecchetti, Dileta

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro fluoride (F) release from 4 restorative materials (3M ESPE): Ketak Molar Easymix [KME - conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC)]; Rely-X luting 2 [RL2 - resin-modified GIC (RMGIC)]; Vitremer (VIT- RMGIC); and Filtek Z250 [Z250 - negative control]. Disc-shaped specimens were fabricated according to the manufacturer's instructions and placed into 10 mL of reverse osmosis water at 37°C until the analyses were done using a liquid membrane for selective F ion electrode (Orion 710). F release was evaluated every 6 h in the first day and thereafter daily during 28 days (d). The results were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Mean F release and standard deviation values (in ppm) were: KME: 6 h- 0.34 ± 0.04; 24 h- 1.22 ± 0.30; 7 d- 0.29 ± 0.09; 14 d- 0.20 ± 0.04; 28 d- 0.16 ± 0.01; RL2: 6 h- 2.46 ± 0.48; 24 h-12.33 ± 2.93; 7 d- 1.37 ± 0.38; 14 d- 0.80 ± 0.13; 28 d- 0.80 ± 0.21; VIT: 6 h- 0.98 ± 0.35; 24 h- 4.35 ± 1.22; 7 d- 0.66 ± 0.23; 14 d- 0.40 ± 0.07; 28 d- 0.39 ± 0.08; Z250: 6 h- 0.029 ± 0.001; 24 h- 0.024 ± 0.009; 7 d- 0.023 ± 0.004; 14 d- 0.025 ± 0.001; 28 d- 0.028 ± 0.001. RL2 RMGIC released more F than the other materials in all periods. The greatest release of F occurred in the first 24 h.

  18. Elwha River Restoration: Sediment Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimbrel, S.; Bountry, J.; Randle, T. J.; Ritchie, A.; Huginin, H.; Torrance, A.

    2013-12-01

    been a consistent component of the released material. Future monitoring will include documenting the effect of encountering the lakebed muds on erosion rates of delta sediments in the former Lake Mills. Uncertainty in the amount of sediments released from Lake Mills will be addressed through continued monitoring as part of the adaptive management plan set forth during the restoration project. Monitoring will also continue to document the progression of sediments in the downstream Elwha River system.. NPS web camera photograph of Lake Mills delta upstream from Glines Canyon Dam.

  19. Vesicular Trafficking of Incoming Human Papillomavirus 16 to the Golgi Apparatus and Endoplasmic Reticulum Requires γ-Secretase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Kazakov, Teymur; Popa, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The route taken by papillomaviruses from the cell surface to the nucleus during infection is incompletely understood. Here, we developed a novel human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) pseudovirus in which the carboxy terminus of the minor capsid protein L2 is exposed on the exterior of the intact capsid prior to cell binding. With this pseudovirus, we used the proximity ligation assay immune detection technique to demonstrate that during entry HPV16 L2 traffics into and out of the early endosome prior to Golgi localization, and we demonstrated that L2 enters the endoplasmic reticulum during entry. The cellular membrane-associated protease, γ-secretase, is required for infection by HPV16 pseudovirus and authentic HPV16. We also showed that inhibition of γ-secretase does not interfere substantively with virus internalization, initiation of capsid disassembly, entry into the early endosome, or exit from this compartment, but γ-secretase is required for localization of L2 and viral DNA to the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum. These results show that incoming HPV16 traffics sequentially from the cell surface to the endosome and then to the Golgi apparatus and the endoplasmic reticulum prior to nuclear entry. PMID:25227470

  20. Endoplasmic Reticulum Exit of Golgi-resident Defective for SREBP Cleavage (Dsc) E3 Ligase Complex Requires Its Activity.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Espenshade, Peter J

    2015-06-05

    Layers of quality control ensure proper protein folding and complex formation prior to exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. The fission yeast Dsc E3 ligase is a Golgi-localized complex required for sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factor activation that shows architectural similarity to endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation E3 ligases. The Dsc E3 ligase consists of five integral membrane proteins (Dsc1-Dsc5) and functionally interacts with the conserved AAA-ATPase Cdc48. Utilizing an in vitro ubiquitination assay, we demonstrated that Dsc1 has ubiquitin E3 ligase activity that requires the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc4. Mutations that specifically block Dsc1-Ubc4 interaction prevent SREBP cleavage, indicating that SREBP activation requires Dsc E3 ligase activity. Surprisingly, Golgi localization of the Dsc E3 ligase complex also requires Dsc1 E3 ligase activity. Analysis of Dsc E3 ligase complex formation, glycosylation, and localization indicated that Dsc1 E3 ligase activity is specifically required for endoplasmic reticulum exit of the complex. These results define enzyme activity-dependent sorting as an autoregulatory mechanism for protein trafficking.

  1. Re-evaluation of the Role of Calcium Homeostasis Endoplasmic Reticulum Protein (CHERP) in Cellular Calcium Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Lin-Moshier, Yaping; Sebastian, Peter J.; Higgins, LeeAnn; Sampson, Natalie D.; Hewitt, Jane E.; Marchant, Jonathan S.

    2013-01-01

    Changes in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, resulting from activation of intracellular Ca2+ channels within the endoplasmic reticulum, regulate several aspects of cellular growth and differentiation. Ca2+ homeostasis endoplasmic reticulum protein (CHERP) is a ubiquitously expressed protein that has been proposed as a regulator of both major families of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ channels, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs), with resulting effects on mitotic cycling. However, the manner by which CHERP regulates intracellular Ca2+ channels to impact cellular growth is unknown. Here, we challenge previous findings that CHERP acts as a direct cytoplasmic regulator of IP3Rs and RyRs and propose that CHERP acts in the nucleus to impact cellular proliferation by regulating the function of the U2 snRNA spliceosomal complex. The previously reported effects of CHERP on cellular growth therefore are likely indirect effects of altered spliceosomal function, consistent with prior data showing that loss of function of U2 snRNP components can interfere with cell growth and induce cell cycle arrest. PMID:23148228

  2. Survival of ART restorations assessed using selected FDI and modified ART restoration criteria.

    PubMed

    Farag, Abeer; van der Sanden, Wil J M; Abdelwahab, Hisran; Frencken, Jo E

    2011-06-01

    A new set of criteria for assessing the quality of restorations using modern restorative materials, named FDI criteria, was recently introduced. This study tested the null hypothesis that there is no significant difference in survival estimate percentages of ART restorations assessed using selected FDI and modified ART criteria after 1 and 5 years. One operator placed a total of 60 class I and 30 Class II high-viscosity glass-ionomer ART restorations in ninety 14- to 15-year-olds. Two calibrated and independent evaluators using both criteria evaluated restorations on diestone replicas at baseline and after 1 and 5 years. Statistical analyses were done using the Kaplan-Meier method and log-rank test. The survival results of ART restorations assessed using both sets of criteria after 1 and 5 years (p = 0.27) did not differ significantly. Three ART restorations were assessed as failures according to the ART criteria, while they were assessed as survived using the FDI criteria. We conclude that the modified ART criteria enable reliable assessment of ART restorations in permanent teeth from diestone replicas and that there was no significant difference in survival estimates of ART restorations assessed using both sets of criteria. The null hypothesis was accepted.

  3. Human enamel veneer restoration: an alternative technique to restore anterior primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luciana Butini; Tamay, Tereza Keiko; Oliveira, Marta Dutra Machado; Rodrigues, Célia Martins Delgado; Wanderley, Marcia Turolla

    2006-01-01

    Restoration of severely decayed primary teeth is a clinical challenge in Pediatric Dentistry. Among the restorative treatment options, the use of prefabricated crowns and resin composite restorations, either by means of direct or indirect techniques is mentioned in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe the rehabilitation of primary anterior teeth in a 5-year-old patient. Dental treatment consisted on an anterior space maintainer prosthesis made with natural primary teeth, plus human dental enamel veneer (facet) restorations. The advantages of this technique are better esthetics and the natural enamel has physiologic wear and offers superficial smoothness and cervical adaptation compatible with those of the surrounding teeth.

  4. Assuring restorative integrity in extensive posterior resin composite restorations: pushing the envelope.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, W H

    2000-03-01

    Clinicians are increasingly being called on to satisfy the restorative demands of patients who request tooth-colored restorations but are unable to afford an optimum indirect restorative option. Consequently, in clinical practice, the limits of the direct posterior resin composite technique are being stretched. There is a need for techniques that will satisfy the complex variables of clinical practice and allow for successful utilization of posterior resin composite in large cavity preparations. The objective of this article is to explain the rationale behind the materials and techniques involved in the delivery of these complicated restorations.

  5. Restoring proximal integrity in posterior composite resin restorations: innovations using Ceromers.

    PubMed

    Liebenberg, W H

    1998-03-01

    Clinicians are increasingly being called upon to satisfy the restorative demands of patients requesting tooth coloured restorations but unable to afford an optimum indirect restorative option. Consequently, in clinical practice the envelope of what was hitherto considered the limit of appropriate application of the direct posterior composite resin technique is increasingly being stretched. Although our aesthetic endeavours are fairly easily accomplished in the posterior dentition, interproximal integrity is in many instances wanting and a major cause of restorative failure. This report highlights some of the authors innovations using Ceromers which satisfy the complex variables of clinical practice optimizing proximal contour, allowing for the successful utilization of posterior composite resin in the posterior dentition.

  6. Water-table-dependent hydrological changes following peatland forestry drainage and restoration: Analysis of restoration success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menberu, Meseret Walle; Tahvanainen, Teemu; Marttila, Hannu; Irannezhad, Masoud; Ronkanen, Anna-Kaisa; Penttinen, Jouni; Kløve, Bjørn

    2016-05-01

    A before-after-control approach was used to analyze the impact of peatland restoration on hydrology, based on high temporal resolution water-table (WT) data from 43 boreal peatlands representative of a south-boreal to north-boreal climate gradient. During the study, 24 forestry drained sites were restored and 19 pristine peatlands used as control sites. Different approaches were developed and used to analyze WT changes (mean WT position, WT fluctuation, WT hydrograph, recession, and storage characteristics). Restoration increased WT in most cases but particularly in spruce mires, followed by pine mires and fens. Before restoration, the WT fluctuation (WTF) was large, indicating peat temporary storage gain (SG). After restoration, the WT hydrograph recession limb slopes and SG coefficients (Rc) declined significantly. Drainage or restoration did not significantly affect mean diurnal WT fluctuations, used here as a proxy for evapotranspiration. Overall, the changes in WT characteristics following restoration indicated creation of favorable hydrological conditions for recovery of functional peatland ecosystems in previously degraded peatland sites. This was supported by calculation of bryophyte species abundance thresholds for WT. These results can be used to optimize restoration efforts in different peatland systems and as a qualitative conceptual basis for future restoration operations.

  7. 15 CFR 990.55 - Restoration selection-developing restoration plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase §...

  8. 15 CFR 990.55 - Restoration selection-developing restoration plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase §...

  9. 15 CFR 990.55 - Restoration selection-developing restoration plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase §...

  10. 15 CFR 990.55 - Restoration selection-developing restoration plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase §...

  11. 15 CFR 990.55 - Restoration selection-developing restoration plans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Foreign Trade (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OIL POLLUTION ACT REGULATIONS NATURAL RESOURCE DAMAGE ASSESSMENTS Restoration Planning Phase §...

  12. Restorative mediation: the application of restorative justice practice and philosophy to clergy sexual abuse cases.

    PubMed

    Noll, Douglas E; Harvey, Linda

    2008-01-01

    This article will present the restorative justice model and examine how the restorative justice philosophy and process can be applied to clergy-perpetrated sexual abuse and religious sexual misconduct to resolve legal claims and allow the process of healing to begin. Restorative justice is a holistic approach to criminal, civil, and church law violations, allowing all aspects of an offense to be addressed in one process. Unlike retributive justice prevalent in the traditional legal system, restorative justice seeks to make things right while focusing on healing for the victim-survivor and offender and accountability by the church representatives.

  13. Selective Targeting of Proteins within Secretory Pathway for Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Vecchi, Lara; Petris, Gianluca; Bestagno, Marco; Burrone, Oscar R.

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) is a cellular quality control mechanism to dispose of misfolded proteins of the secretory pathway via proteasomal degradation. SEL1L is an ER-resident protein that participates in identification of misfolded molecules as ERAD substrates, therefore inducing their ER-to-cytosol retrotranslocation and degradation. We have developed a novel class of fusion proteins, termed degradins, composed of a fragment of SEL1L fused to a target-specific binding moiety located on the luminal side of the ER. The target-binding moiety can be a ligand of the target or derived from specific mAbs. Here, we describe the ability of degradins with two different recognition moieties to promote degradation of a model target. Degradins recognize the target protein within the ER both in secretory and membrane-bound forms, inducing their degradation following retrotranslocation to the cytosol. Thus, degradins represent an effective technique to knock-out proteins within the secretory pathway with high specificity. PMID:22523070

  14. Changes in ribbon synapses and rough endoplasmic reticulum of rat utricular macular hair cells in weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.

    2000-01-01

    This study combined ultrastructural and statistical methods to learn the effects of weightlessness on rat utricular maculae. A principle aim was to determine whether weightlessness chiefly affects ribbon synapses of type II cells, since the cells communicate predominantly with branches of primary vestibular afferent endings. Maculae were microdissected from flight and ground control rat inner ears collected on day 13 of a 14-day spaceflight (F13), landing day (R0) and day 14 postflight (R14) and were prepared for ultrastructural study. Ribbon synapses were counted in hair cells examined in a Zeiss 902 transmission electron microscope. Significance of synaptic mean differences was determined for all hair cells contained within 100 section series, and for a subset of complete hair cells, using SuperANOVA software. The synaptic mean for all type II hair cells of F13 flight rats increased by 100%, and that for complete cells by 200%. Type I cells were less affected, with synaptic mean differences statistically insignificant in complete cells. Synapse deletion began within 8 h upon return to Earth. Additionally, hair cell laminated rough endoplasmic reticulum of flight rats was reversibly disorganized on R0. Results support the thesis that synapses in type II hair cells are uniquely affected by altered gravity. Type II hair cells may be chiefly sensors of gravitational and type I cells of translational linear accelerations.

  15. ATM deficiency induces oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Stoica, George; Yan, Mingshan; Scofield, Virginia L; Qiang, Wenan; Lynn, William S; Wong, Paul K Y

    2005-12-01

    ATM kinase, the product of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (Atm) gene, is activated by genomic damage. ATM plays a crucial role in cell growth and development. Here we report that primary astrocytes isolated from ATM-deficient mice grow slowly, become senescent, and die in culture. However, before reaching senescence, these primary Atm(-/-) astrocytes, like Atm(-/-) lymphocytes, show increased spontaneous DNA synthesis. These astrocytes also show markers of oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, including increased levels of heat shock proteins (HSP70 and GRP78), malondialdehyde adducts, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, procaspase 12 cleavage, and redox-sensitive phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2). In addition, HSP70 and ERK1/2 phosphorylation are upregulated in the cerebella of ATM-deficient mice. This increase in ERK1/2 phosphorylation is seen primarily in cerebellar astrocytes, or Bergmann glia, near degenerating Purkinje cells. ERK1/2 activation and astrogliosis are also found in other parts of the brain, for example, the cortex. We conclude that ATM deficiency induces intrinsic growth defects, oxidative stress, ER stress, and ERKs activation in astrocytes.

  16. Homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress causes dysregulation of the cholesterol and triglyceride biosynthetic pathways

    PubMed Central

    Werstuck, Geoff H.; Lentz, Steven R.; Dayal, Sanjana; Hossain, Gazi S.; Sood, Sudesh K.; Shi, Yuan Y.; Zhou, Ji; Maeda, Nobuyo; Krisans, Skaidrite K.; Malinow, M. Rene; Austin, Richard C.

    2001-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is common in patients having severe hyperhomocysteinemia due to deficiency for cystathionine β-synthase. However, the mechanism by which homocysteine promotes the development and progression of hepatic steatosis is unknown. We report here that homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress activates both the unfolded protein response and the sterol regulatory element–binding proteins (SREBPs) in cultured human hepatocytes as well as vascular endothelial and aortic smooth muscle cells. Activation of the SREBPs is associated with increased expression of genes responsible for cholesterol/triglyceride biosynthesis and uptake and with intracellular accumulation of cholesterol. Homocysteine-induced gene expression was inhibited by overexpression of the ER chaperone, GRP78/BiP, thus demonstrating a direct role of ER stress in the activation of cholesterol/triglyceride biosynthesis. Consistent with these in vitro findings, cholesterol and triglycerides were significantly elevated in the livers, but not plasmas, of mice having diet-induced hyperhomocysteinemia. This effect was not due to impaired hepatic export of lipids because secretion of VLDL-triglyceride was increased in hyperhomocysteinemic mice. These findings suggest a mechanism by which homocysteine-induced ER stress causes dysregulation of the endogenous sterol response pathway, leading to increased hepatic biosynthesis and uptake of cholesterol and triglycerides. Furthermore, this mechanism likely explains the development and progression of hepatic steatosis and possibly atherosclerotic lesions observed in hyperhomocysteinemia. PMID:11375416

  17. A major proportion of N-glycoproteins are transiently glucosylated in the endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Ganan, S.; Cazzulo, J.J.; Parodi, A.J. )

    1991-03-26

    N-Linked, high-mannose-type oligosaccharides lacking glucose residues may be transiently glucosylated directly from UDP-Glc in the endoplasmic reticulum of mammalian, plant, fungal, and protozoan cells. The products formed have been identified as N-linked Glc{sub 1}Man{sub 5-9}GlcNAc{sub 2} and glucosidase II is apparently the enzyme responsible for the in vivo deglucosylation of the compounds. As newly glucosylated glycoproteins are immediately deglucosylated, it is unknown whether transient glucosylation involves all or nearly all N-linked glycoproteins or if, on the contrary, it only affects a minor proportion of them. In order to evaluate the molar proportion of N-linked oligosaccharides that are glucosylated, cells of the trypanosomatid protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi (a parasite transferring Man{sub 9}GlcNAc{sub 2} in protein N-glycosylation) were grown in the presence of ({sup 14}C)glucose and concentrations of the glucosidase II inhibitors deoxynojirimycin and castanospermine that were more than 1,000-fold higher than those required to produce a 50% inhibition of the T. cruzi enzyme. No evidence for the presence of an endomannosidase yielding GlcMan from the glucosylated compounds was obtained. As the average number of N-linked oligosaccharides per molecule in glycoproteins is higher than one, these results indicate that more than 52-33% of total glycoproteins are glucosylated and that transient glucosylation is a major event in the normal processing of glycoproteins.

  18. Green fluorescent protein-based monitoring of endoplasmic reticulum redox poise

    PubMed Central

    Birk, Julia; Ramming, Thomas; Odermatt, Alex; Appenzeller-Herzog, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Pathological endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is tightly linked to the accumulation of reactive oxidants, which can be both upstream and downstream of ER stress. Accordingly, detrimental intracellular stress signals are amplified through establishment of a vicious cycle. An increasing number of human diseases are characterized by tissue atrophy in response to ER stress and oxidative injury. Experimental monitoring of stress-induced, time-resolved changes in ER reduction-oxidation (redox) states is therefore important. Organelle-specific examination of redox changes has been facilitated by the advent of genetically encoded, fluorescent probes, which can be targeted to different subcellular locations by means of specific amino acid extensions. These probes include redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (roGFPs) and the yellow fluorescent protein-based redox biosensor HyPer. In the case of roGFPs, variants with known specificity toward defined redox couples are now available. Here, we review the experimental framework to measure ER redox changes using ER-targeted fluorescent biosensors. Advantages and drawbacks of plate-reader and microscopy-based measurements are discussed, and the power of these techniques demonstrated in the context of selected cell culture models for ER stress. PMID:23781233

  19. Endoplasmic Reticulum Thiol Oxidase Deficiency Leads to Ascorbic Acid Depletion and Noncanonical Scurvy in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zito, Ester; Hansen, Henning Gram; Yeo, Giles S.H.; Fujii, Junichi; Ron, David

    2012-01-01

    Summary Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) thiol oxidases initiate a disulfide relay to oxidatively fold secreted proteins. We found that combined loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding the ER thiol oxidases ERO1α, ERO1β, and PRDX4 compromised the extracellular matrix in mice and interfered with the intracellular maturation of procollagen. These severe abnormalities were associated with an unexpectedly modest delay in disulfide bond formation in secreted proteins but a profound, 5-fold lower procollagen 4-hydroxyproline content and enhanced cysteinyl sulfenic acid modification of ER proteins. Tissue ascorbic acid content was lower in mutant mice, and ascorbic acid supplementation improved procollagen maturation and lowered sulfenic acid content in vivo. In vitro, the presence of a sulfenic acid donor accelerated the oxidative inactivation of ascorbate by an H2O2-generating system. Compromised ER disulfide relay thus exposes protein thiols to competing oxidation to sulfenic acid, resulting in depletion of ascorbic acid, impaired procollagen proline 4-hydroxylation, and a noncanonical form of scurvy. PMID:22981861

  20. Role of Mitochondria-Associated Endoplasmic Reticulum Membrane in Inflammation-Mediated Metabolic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Thoudam, Themis; Jeon, Jae-Han; Ha, Chae-Myeong; Lee, In-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is considered to be one of the most critical factors involved in the development of complex metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. A few decades ago, the discovery of mitochondria-associated endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane (MAM) was followed by the identification of its roles in regulating cellular homeostatic processes, ranging from cellular bioenergetics to apoptosis. MAM provides an excellent platform for numerous signaling pathways; among them, inflammatory signaling pathways associated with MAM play a critical role in cellular defense during pathogenic infections and metabolic disorders. However, induction of MAM causes deleterious effects by amplifying mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation through increased calcium transfer from the ER to mitochondria, thereby causing mitochondrial damage and release of mitochondrial components into the cytosol as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). These mitochondrial DAMPs rapidly activate MAM-resident inflammasome components and other inflammatory factors, which promote inflammasome complex formation and release of proinflammatory cytokines in pathological conditions. Long-term stimulation of the inflammasome instigates chronic inflammation, leading to the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of MAM and its association with inflammation-mediated metabolic diseases.