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Sample records for st lawrence estuary

  1. Cancer in beluga from the St. Lawrence estuary.

    PubMed Central

    Hammill, Mike O; Lesage, Véronique; Kingsley, Michael C S

    2003-01-01

    Martineau et al. (2002) reported that St. Lawrence beluga (SLB) have high cancer rates. Unfortunately, errors in their interpretation of the data have led them to overstate the importance of cancer and its links to environmental sources. PMID:12573920

  2. Electrogenic sulfur oxidation in a northern saltmarsh (St. Lawrence Estuary, Canada).

    PubMed

    Rao, Alexandra; Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Neumeier, Urs

    2016-06-01

    Measurements of porewater O2, pH, and H2S microprofiles in intact sediment cores collected in a northern saltmarsh in the St. Lawrence Estuary (Quebec, Canada) revealed the occurrence of electrogenic sulfur oxidation (e-SOx) by filamentous "cable" bacteria in submerged marsh pond sediments in the high marsh. In summer, the geochemical fingerprint of e-SOx was apparent in intact cores, while in fall, cable bacteria were detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization and the characteristic geochemical signature of e-SOx was observed only upon prolonged incubation. In exposed, unvegetated creek bank sediments sampled in the low marsh in summer, cable bacteria developed only in repacked cores of sieved (500 μm), homogenized sediments. These results suggest that e-SOx is suppressed by the activity of macrofauna in exposed, unvegetated marsh sediments. A reduced abundance of benthic invertebrates may promote e-SOx development in marsh ponds, which are dominant features of subarctic saltmarshes as in the St. Lawrence Estuary.

  3. Trophic interactions in the St. Lawrence Estuary (Canada): Must the blue whale compete for krill?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenkoff, C.; Comtois, S.; Chabot, D.

    2013-09-01

    Inverse methodology was used to construct a mass-balance model of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE) for the 2008-2010 time period. Our first objective was to make an overall description of community structure, trophic interactions, and the effects of fishing and predation on the vertebrate and invertebrate communities of the ecosystem. A second objective was to identify other important predators of krill, and to assess if these compete with blue whales, listed as endangered under the Canadian Species at Risk Act in 2005 (northwest Atlantic population). The Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence are summer feeding grounds for blue whales and other marine mammals. Blue whales eat only euphausiids (krill) and require dense concentrations of prey to meet their energy requirements, which makes them particularly vulnerable to changes in prey availability. In the LSLE, many species from secondary producers (hyperiid amphipods, other macrozooplankton) to top predators (fish, birds, and marine mammals) consumed euphausiids. Consequently, krill predators were found at all consumer trophic levels. However, our results showed that only about 35% of the estimated euphausiid production was consumed by all predator species combined. Euphausiid did not seem to be a restricted resource in the LSLE ecosystem, at least during the study period. The blue whale did not appear to have to compete for krill in the LSLE.

  4. Hypoxia in the bottom water of the St. Lawrence Estuary: Is this ecosystem on borrowed time?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefort, S.; Gratton, Y.; Mucci, A.; Dadou, I.; Gilbert, D.

    2012-04-01

    When the rate of oxygen consumption in water exceeds the rate of supply, the oxygen concentration decreases and may reach levels that threaten the survival of many aquatic organisms. Waters with such low oxygen levels are termed severely hypoxic ([O2] < 62.5 µmol L-1). In 2011, the World Resources Institute identified 479 hypoxic coastal zones around the world, including fjords, estuaries, bays, shelves, as well as enclosed and semi-enclosed seas. These hypoxic environments are mainly found in coastal areas as a result of industrial and agricultural fertilizer discharge (i.e. eutrophication), and they develop during summer when the water column is strongly stratified; but hypoxia may also occur naturally and persist year-round. Historical records reveal that the dissolved oxygen concentration has progressively decreased in the bottom water of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE) during the last century and reached the severe hypoxic threshold in the 1980s where it has hovered ever since. The development of severe hypoxia in the LSLE has been mostly attributed to a gradual change in the properties (e.g. higher temperature, lower dissolved oxygen concentration) of the bottom water that enters the Laurentian Channel (Gulf of St. Lawrence, Eastern Canada). In addition, evidence of eutrophication has been reported in the LSLE, possibly increasing the oxygen demand in the water column and sediment. Increased respiration rates in the bottom water, in response to warming (from 3.3 to 5°C), has also been proposed to explain the increased depletion of oxygen in the Gulf. Nevertheless, whether hypoxia in the bottom water of the Laurentian Channel results from anthropogenic or natural forcings or both remain unclear. This presentation will examine the processes that govern the spatial distribution of dissolved oxygen in the water column and identify the causes that led to the development of large-scale hypoxia in the bottom waters of the LSLE. A laterally integrated

  5. DNA barcoding of marine crustaceans from the Estuary and Gulf of St Lawrence: a regional-scale approach.

    PubMed

    Radulovici, Adriana E; Sainte-Marie, Bernard; Dufresne, France

    2009-05-01

    Marine crustaceans are known as a group with a high level of morphological and ecological diversity but are difficult to identify by traditional approaches and usually require the help of highly trained taxonomists. A faster identification method, DNA barcoding, was found to be an effective tool for species identification in many metazoan groups including some crustaceans. Here we expand the DNA barcode database with a case study involving 80 malacostracan species from the Estuary and Gulf of St Lawrence. DNA sequences for 460 specimens grouped into clusters corresponding to known morphological species in 95% of cases. Genetic distances between species were on average 25 times higher than within species. Intraspecific divergence was high (3.78-13.6%) in specimens belonging to four morphological species, suggesting the occurrence of cryptic species. Moreover, we detected the presence of an invasive amphipod species in the St Lawrence Estuary. This study reconfirms the usefulness of DNA barcoding for the identification of marine crustaceans.

  6. Seasonal variability of denitrification efficiency in northern salt marshes: an example from the St. Lawrence Estuary.

    PubMed

    Poulin, Patrick; Pelletier, Emilien; Saint-Louis, Richard

    2007-06-01

    In coastal ecosystems, denitrification is a key process in removing excess dissolved nitrogen oxides and participating in the control of eutrophication process. Little is known about the role of salt marshes on nitrogen budgets in cold weather coastal areas. Although coastal salt marshes are important sites for organic matter degradation and nutrient regeneration, bacterial-mediated nitrogen cycling processes, such as denitrification, remain unknown in northern and sub-arctic regions, especially under winter conditions. Using labelled nitrogen (15N), denitrification rates were measured in an eastern Canadian salt marsh in August, October and December 2005. Freshly sampled undisturbed sediment cores were incubated over 8h and maintained at their sampling temperatures to evaluate the influence of low temperatures on the denitrification rate. From 2 to 12 degrees C, average denitrification rate and dissolved oxygen consumption increased from 9.6 to 25.5 micromol N2 m-2 h-1 and from 1.3 to 1.8 mmol O2 m-2 h-1, respectively, with no statistical dependence of temperature (p>0.05). Nitrification has been identified as the major nitrate source for denitrification, supplying more than 80% of the nitrate demand. Because no more than 31% of the nitrate removed by sediment is estimated to be denitrified, the presence of a major nitrate sink in sediment is suspected. Among possible nitrate consumption mechanisms, dissimilatory reduction of nitrate to ammonium, metal and organic matter oxidation processes are discussed. Providing the first measurements of denitrification rate in a St. Lawrence Estuary salt marsh, this study evidences the necessity of preserving and restoring marshes. They constitute an efficient geochemical filter against an excess of nitrate dispersion to coastal waters even under cold northern conditions.

  7. Electrolyte changes of serum and muscle, and related mortalities in maturing Anguilla rostrata migrating down the St. Lawrence Estuary (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutil, J.-D.

    1984-03-01

    This study was made to investigate changes in serum and muscle ion concentrations and related mortalities in maturing Anguilla rostrata migrating down the St. Lawrence Estuary. Mortalities take place in the freshwater portion of the St. Lawrence. Electrolyte concentrations of moribund eels taken in freshwater were compared to those of freshwater and salt water controls. Moribund eels had a much lower serum osmolality (270 mOsm/kg) than the controls (328 and 358 mOsm/kg). This resulted from low sodium (125 mEq/l) and particularly low chloride (69 mEq/l) contents in the moribund eels compared to the freshwater controls (153 and 117 mEq/l) and the salt water controls (179 and 137 mEq/l). There was also a general decrease in muscle ion concentrations in moribund eels though the percentage water was similar to that of the freshwater controls (64.0 and 63.7%). The changes measured between the freshwater controls and the salt water controls in nature are similar to those measured on Anguilla anguilla in laboratory. These results suggest that mortalities are related to failure by some of the maturing eels to maintain their mineral balance in freshwater. Hypothesis is made that maturing eels migrating long distances in freshwater or retarded by physical or chemical barriers, start to excrete sodium and chloride under hormonal control before they have reached brackish water. In the conditions that prevail in the St. Lawrence Estuary, this results in mineral unbalance and possibly in mortalities.

  8. N2O Flux from Salt Marshes in Estuaries along the Gulf of St. Lawrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roughan, B.; Kellman, L. M.; Chmura, G. L.

    2013-12-01

    Wetlands are widely noted as filters for nutrient-laden waters. However, soils in tidal salt marshes emit nitrous oxide (N2O) when experimentally fertilized, which suggests that improved water quality comes at the expense of increased atmospheric concentrations of this potent greenhouse gas. Here we report on N2O emissions from four salt marshes located in estuaries along the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Our control site is located in a National Park on the coast of New Brunswick, which is in a region of low population density and limited agriculture, whereas the other estuaries have watersheds characterized by intensive agriculture activities on Prince Edward Island (PEI). N2O gas was collected during low tide, using opaque, static-chambers (17 L, 25 cm diameter) placed over marsh vegetation in the Spartina patens-dominated high marsh, which is typical of salt marshes along the northwest Atlantic coast, from New York north to Atlantic Canada. Preliminary analysis of gas samples collected in June revealed that the average N2O flux from the marshes located in agriculturally intensive watersheds (6.17 ×1.82 μg N2O m-2 hr-1) was significantly higher than the flux from the control marsh, which was negligible (-2.63 ×2.22 μg N2O m-2 hr-1). Assuming this elevated N2O flux is typical of the growing season (May-October), these marshes emit an average of 27 ×8 mg N2O m-2 yr-1 (or 8 g CO2e m-2 yr-1), 8.4% of the annual soil C accumulation rate reported for PEI. These results suggest that unintentional N fertilization of salt marshes located in agriculturally dominated watersheds may be fueling significant anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions in some marshes. Further work during the 2013 growing season will provide insight into the environmental variables that affect the flux of N2O from these tidal salt marshes.

  9. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in sediments and biota of the Saguenay Fjord and the St. Lawrence Estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Brochu, C.; Moore, S.; Pelletier, E.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment samples and marine organisms were collected in the Saguenay Fjord and at two selected sites of the St. Lawrence Estuary in 1991. Total PCDDs and total PCDFs ranged from 22 to 352 ng kg{sup {minus}1} and 29 to 188 ng kg{sup {minus}1}, respectively in Saguenay sediments, while total PCDFs reached, 287 ng kg{sup {minus}1} in Baie des Anglais, a small and deep bay of the St. Lawrence Estuary impacted by PCBs during the 1970s. All biological samples contained detectable amounts of chlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans, apart from the North Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). The highest concentrations (up to 59.7 ng kg{sup {minus}1} total PCDFs and 2.54 ng kg{sup {minus}1} 2,3,7,8T4CDD Equivalent (TCDD TEQ)) were observed in crab (Chionoecetes opilio) caught in Saguenay Fjord and in crab and whelk (Buccinwn undatwn) collected in Baie des Anglais. Nordic shrimp (Pandalus borealis) is less contaminated with a maximum total PCDDs and PCDFs concentration of 14.0 ng kg{sup {minus}1} and TCDD TEQ never exceeding 0.7 ng kg{sup {minus}1}. Greenland halibut (Reinhardtius hippoglossoides) caught in the Saguenay Fjord contained only 2,3,7,8 substituted congeners in their tissues leading to a low average TCDD TEQ of 1.66 ng kg{sup {minus}1}. Based upon this first series of results, benthic organisms and fish from the Saguenay Fjord and the north shore of the St. Lawrence Estuary are exposed to low levels of PCDDs and PCDFs, and carry tissue concentrations well below international guidelines for fisheries products.

  10. Immune competence of rats fed with beluga whale blubber from the contaminated St. Lawrence estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Brousseau, P.; Lapierre, P.; Guise, S. De; Beland, P.; Martineau, D.; Fournier, M.

    1995-12-31

    Over the last decades, high concentrations of environmental contaminants such as PCBs have been measured in the tissues of many species of marine mammals from different parts of the world. Even though many deleterious effects of these compounds have been reported in laboratory animals, the overall risk associated with these contaminants in wild animals is still not clearly understood. However, necropsy of St. Lawrence belugas showed numerous severe and disseminated infections with rather mildly pathogenic bacteria. Moreover, 37% of all the tumors reported in cetaceans were observed in St. Lawrence beluga whales. Indeed, both observations suggest immunosuppression. The aim of the study was to determine if contaminants present in fat tissues of belugas might provoke deleterious effect to their immune system if, under some circumstances, they are released into the circulation. To assess their immunotoxic potential, rats were fed for two months on a diet in which the lipids originated from the blubber of either highly polluted St. Lawrence belugas or relatively uncontaminated arctic belugas. Then, multiple immune responses were monitored. Those include phagocytosis, plaque forming cells, oxidative burst, natural killer cells, immunophenotyping and mitogenic assay. The results obtained show that only the humoral response of rats was impaired by the treatment. By combining all this information, the authors propose possible mechanisms of action to explain potential long-term consequences of environmental pollution.

  11. Stable isotope evidence for glacial lake drainage through the St. Lawrence Estuary, eastern Canada, ~13.1-12.9 ka

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cronin, T. M.; Rayburn, J.A.; Guilbault, J.-P.; Thunell, R.; Franzi, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Postglacial varved and rhythmically-laminated clays deposited during the transition from glacial Lake Vermont (LV) to the Champlain Sea (CS) record hydrological changes in the Champlain-St. Lawrence Valley (CSLV) at the onset of the Younger Dryas ∼13.1–12.9 ka linked to glacial lake drainage events. Oxygen isotope (δ18O) records of three species of benthic foraminifera (Cassidulina reniforme, Haynesina orbiculare, Islandiella helenae) from six sediment cores and the freshwater ostracode Candona from one core were studied. Results show six large isotope excursions (∼0.5 to >2‰) in C. reniforme δ18O values, five excursions in H. orbiculare (<0.5 to ∼1.8‰), and five smaller changes in I. helenae (<0.5‰). δ18O values in Candona show a 1.5–2‰ increase in the same interval. These isotopic excursions in co-occurring marine and freshwater species in varve-like sediments indicate complex hydrological changes in the earliest Champlain Sea, including brief (sub-annual) periods of complete freshening. One hypothesis to explain these results is that multiple abrupt freshwater influx events caused surface-to-bottom freshening of the Champlain Sea over days to weeks. The most likely source of freshwater would have been drainage of the Morehead Phase of glacial Lake Agassiz, perhaps in a series of floods, ultimately draining out the St. Lawrence Estuary.

  12. Tris (4-chlorophenyl) methane and tris (4-chlorophenyl) methanol in marine mammals from the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence.

    PubMed

    Lebeuf, M; Bernt, K E; Trottier, S; Noël, M; Hammill, M O; Measures, L

    2001-01-01

    Levels of tris (4-chlorophenyl) methanol (TCPM) and its presumed precursor tris (4-chlorophenyl) methane (TCPMe) are reported in marine mammals from the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada. These compounds were measured in blubber samples of seals and whales using ion trap mass spectrometry (MS/MS) detection. Detectable concentrations of both TCPM and TCPMe were observed in all of the samples analysed. Concentrations of these compounds varied with species ranging from 1.7 to 153 and from 1.3 to 50.6 ng/g lipid wt. for TCPM and TCPMe, respectively. TCPM was from 1.3 to 10 times more concentrated than TCPMe. The highest levels of both TCPM and TCPMe were observed in adult male beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary, while adult female beluga whales from the same area showed levels similar to those in the seals examined. Among the four seal species investigated, TCPM and TCPMe levels were the highest in grey (Halichoerus grypus) and hooded (Cystophora cristata) seals, and lowest in harp seals (Phoca groenlandica). Intermediate levels were found in harbour seals (Phoca vitulina); however, their concentrations might be underestimated considering the younger mean age of these animals. Ratios of both 4,4'-DDE/sigma DDT and TCPM/sigma TCP were very similar between animals from the same species. Strong correlations between sigma TCP and sigma DDT were also observed for each species of mammals, most likely indicating that both sigma TCP and sigma DDT are bioaccumulated in marine mammals. The relationships between sigma DDT and sigma TCP also demonstrate that sigma TCP are less bioaccumulated than sigma DDT by the marine mammal species examined.

  13. Land use and nitrogen loading in seven estuaries along the southern Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIver, Reba; Milewski, Inka; Lotze, Heike K.

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogen loading from coastal watersheds is a principal factor associated with the decline in eelgrass bed health and cover in estuaries worldwide. We apply the Nitrogen Loading Model (NLM) framework developed in Waquoit Bay, Massachusetts to 7 estuaries in eastern New Brunswick. Using watershed-specific information on human population, wastewater production, atmospheric deposition, and land use in each watershed we estimate annual input of Total Dissolved Nitrogen (TDN) from point and non-point sources. We also estimate flushing time of each estuary using available hydrodynamic and bathymetric data incorporated in a tidal prism model. Finally, we validate the NLM results by testing the link between estimated nitrogen loading, flushing time and nitrogen signals in eelgrass tissue including nitrogen content and stable isotopes. Overall, total nitrogen load (kg TDN yr-1) was strongly dependent on watershed and estuary size, while loading rate per unit watershed area (yield) was linked to watershed population density. Atmospheric deposition was the largest contributor of nitrogen to all estuaries except one, where seafood processing effluent was the greatest source. Stable isotope analysis of eelgrass tissue reflected this distinction, with high δ15N values of 8-10‰ related to high wastewater loading, compared to 2-6.5‰ in the other estuaries that receive proportionally more atmospheric deposition. Tissue nitrogen content was positively related to nitrogen yields and loading rate per volume of estuary, highlighting the influence of variable watershed:estuary size ratio. Multiple regression analysis identified a significant interaction between nitrogen yield and flushing time on eelgrass tissue nitrogen content and isotopes, pointing to the mitigating effect an estuary's quick flushing time can have on the expression of nitrogen enrichment in primary producers. The compilation of new information on nitrogen loading to east Canadian estuaries is a novel

  14. Community development following removal of urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, from the rocky subtidal zone of the St. Lawrence Estuary, Eastern Canada.

    PubMed

    Himmelman, J H; Cardinal, A; Bourget, E

    1983-08-01

    The role of sea urchins, Strongylocentrotus droebachiensis, in structuring the rocky subtidal community was examined at Anse aux Basques on the north shore of the St. Lawrence Estuary, Québec. In an experimental area, measuring 20x20 m and extending from 0 to 10 m in depth, we greatly reduced the intensity of urchin grazing by eliminating all urchins larger than 10 mm in test diameter. This area was observed for two years and compared to an adjacent control area. In the upper portion of the experimental area during the first month after urchin removal, mid-July to mid-August 1978, a dense diatom cover developed, and during the second month the diatoms were overgrown by Ulvaria obscura. After four months (November) an Alaria esculenta overstory was present from near low water level to 3 m deep. Community development was much slower at greater depths and it took a year for the Alaria zone to extend to 4-5 m deep, and two years to extend to 6 m deep. The low light penetration at this estuarine location was probably the main factor for the slow algal development at 6-10 m deep. At the end of the experiment Agarum cribrosum was second in importance after Alaria and was most common at 3 to 6 m in depth. Laminaria spp. was found in low numbers in the first year and did not show an increase during the second year. There was a dramatic increase in the number of species and abundance of algae in the experimental area. Also, there was a marked increase in many animal species, particularly Acmaea testudinalis, Mytilus edulis and Margarites helicinus, and a decrease in Metridium senile. By contrast, in the control area, the number of algal and invertebrate species remained low. In the experimental area a sharp increase in the growth rate of a cohort of very small urchins, which was not eliminated by our removal effort, demonstrated that there is strong intraspecific competition amongst urchins when the food supply is limited. In the St. Lawrence Estuary, there are few

  15. Hypoxia in the St. Lawrence Estuary: How a Coding Error Led to the Belief that “Physics Controls Spatial Patterns”

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Two fundamental sign errors were found in a computer code used for studying the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) and hypoxia in the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence. These errors invalidate the conclusions drawn from the model, and call into question a proposed mechanism for generating OMZ that challenges classical understanding. The study in question is being cited frequently, leading the discipline in the wrong direction. PMID:26397371

  16. Levels and temporal trends of toxaphene congeners in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary, Canada.

    PubMed

    Gouteux, Bruno; Lebeuf, Michel; Muir, Derek C G; Gagné, Jean-Pierre

    2003-10-15

    Environmentally relevant toxaphene congeners were determined in blubber samples of stranded beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary (SLE), Canada. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the levels and the temporal trends (1988-1999) of a suite of six chlorobornanes (P26, P40/41, P44, P50, and P62) in the SLE belugas. P26 and P50 mean concentrations were in the same range as those reported for animals living in the Arctic environment suggesting that the atmospheric transport represents the main input of toxaphene to the SLE. A general exponential decline of chlorobornane concentrations in belugas was observed, except for P26 and P50 in males. On average, concentrations decreased by a factor of two in 8.5 years during the 1988-1999 time period. This rate of decline is similar to the reduction of toxaphene emission from agricultural soils in the southern United States reported over the same time period. Some differences in decline rates were observed among the studied CHB congeners. For instance, P62 decreased more rapidly than P26 and P50 in both male and female belugas. Several hypotheses were advanced to explain these differences such as selective metabolism of specific chlorobornanes by SLE belugas or their prey. However, a most likely explanation is the selective degradation of the technical product in soils and atmosphere in the source region.

  17. The Effects of Recent Floods and Geomorphic Processes on Red Ash Populations, Upper St Lawrence Estuary, Québec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, Dominique; Bégin, Yves

    1993-11-01

    Effects of recent floods on red ash ( Fraxinus pennsylvanica Marsh.) forest margins were studied along the upper St Lawrence Estuary in eastern Canada. Major floods amplified by tides left many injuries on riparian red ash trees, which allows dating of past disturbances based on stand structure and dendrochronological analysis. The formation of ice scars on stems, the development of basal sprouts, and the inhibition of population regeneration on shore, provide evidence of a recent increase in shore disturbance. Since the 1950s and especially the 1970s, a landward displacement of the tree line occurred as a result of increasing shore erosion. Usually the ice foot on the shore disintegrates in situ in April, but since the 1950s, early snow-melts in mid-winter have been causing sudden floods that raise the ice foot to the edge of the backshore forest, leaving many signs of damage. Increasing winter climatic variability since the 1950s seems responsible for such variations in flood regime.

  18. Sedimentary structures made by shore ice in muddy tidal-flat deposits, St. Lawrence estuary, Québec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionne, Jean-Claude

    1998-03-01

    Well-preserved sedimentary structures formed by shore ice are exposed in emergent muddy tidal-flat deposits along the shoreline of the St. Lawrence estuary. The sedimentary features are exposed in high-marsh micro-cliffs 1 to 2 m high. Features from two localities where they are the most abundant (Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupre, north shore, and Montmagny, south shore) are reported here. Two categories are distinguished: first, bowl-shaped circular and elongated structures 30 to 100 cm across, which are former scoured depressions subsequently filled by stratified mud, fine sand and organic debris; and second, deformations (folds) a few decimeters to a few meters in size produced by ice-block pressure. Pebble- to boulder-size dropstones are associated with these structures. Most features were observed in mud-flat and low-marsh units (facies) vertically exposed at these localities. The age of these tidalite deposits ranges from about 200 to 600 years. These ice-made structures and deformations, well-preserved in a sequence of Recent emerged tidal sediments, suggest that similar features may be preserved in older rock formations. Consequently, they can be considered as a promising tool for interpreting the former climatic conditions in which tidalites and other shallow marine and lacustrine formations may have been deposited.

  19. Spatial distribution and viability of Alexandrium tamarense resting cysts in surface sediments from the St. Lawrence Estuary, Eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gracia, Stéphanie; Roy, Suzanne; Starr, Michel

    2013-04-01

    The dinoflagellate Alexandrium tamarense Group 1 (as defined by Lilly et al., 2007) is responsible for recurrent outbreaks of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in the St. Lawrence Estuary (SLE), Eastern Canada. In August 2008, a major bloom of A. tamarense developed in the SLE and caused major mortality of fish, seabirds and marine mammals notably in the vicinity of a marine park. Eleven months later, surface (0-5 cm) and deeper (5-10 cm) sediments were sampled to determine resting cysts concentrations, locate prospective cyst seedbeds and examine if these had changed following this major bloom. This information is thought to be important to understand inter-annual patterns in algal toxicity, cyst abundance being a good predictor of subsequent bloom magnitude in some regions. Surface cyst distribution was heterogeneous and it confirmed the location of the cyst seedbed previously reported on the north shore near the Manicouagan/aux-Outardes Rivers (>500 cysts cm-3). A zone of cyst accumulation was also observed on the south shore of the SLE (maximum of 1200 cysts cm-3), with higher concentrations relative to previous cyst mapping in the 1980s. A mismatch was observed between the zones with high surface cyst concentrations and those where the highest PSP toxins were detected (used as a proxy for vegetative cells in the water column). Cyst concentrations were negatively correlated with PSP levels from the same sites, suggesting that cysts were formed and deposited away from the major sites of toxicity. Deposition likely took place near the end of the bloom, once it had reached the eastern boundary of the SLE. PSP toxicity was worse near the peak of the bloom, which occurred westward of this region. This highlights the dynamic behaviour of local blooms, influenced by the estuarine and mesoscale circulation. Interestingly, the major bloom of August 2008 was not followed by particularly large cyst deposition or by any major bloom in 2009 in this region. Cyst viability

  20. Cancer in wildlife, a case study: beluga from the St. Lawrence estuary, Québec, Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Martineau, Daniel; Lemberger, Karin; Dallaire, André; Labelle, Philippe; Lipscomb, Thomas P; Michel, Pascal; Mikaelian, Igor

    2002-01-01

    A population of approximately 650 beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) inhabits a short segment of the St. Lawrence estuary (SLE). Over 17 years (1983-1999), we have examined 129 (or 49%) of 263 SLE beluga carcasses reported stranded. The major primary causes of death were respiratory and gastrointestinal infections with metazoan parasites (22%), cancer (18%), and bacterial, viral, and protozoan infections (17%). We observed cancer in 27% of examined adult animals found dead, a percentage similar to that found in humans. The estimated annual rate (AR) of all cancer types (163/100,000 animals) is much higher than that reported for any other population of cetacean and is similar to that of humans and to that of hospitalized cats and cattle. The AR of cancer of the proximal intestine, a minimum figure of 63 per 100,000 animals, is much higher than that observed in domestic animals and humans, except in sheep in certain parts of the world, where environmental contaminants are believed to be involved in the etiology of this condition. SLE beluga and their environment are contaminated by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) produced by the local aluminum smelters. The human population living in proximity of the SLE beluga habitat is affected by rates of cancer higher than those found in people in the rest of Québec and Canada, and some of these cancers have been epidemiologically related to PAHs. Considered with the above observations, the exposure of SLE beluga to PAHs and their contamination by these compounds are consistent with the hypothesis that PAHs are involved in the etiology of cancer in these animals. PMID:11882480

  1. Immune functions in the Fisher rat fed beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) blubber from the contaminated St. Lawrence estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Lapierre, P.; Guise, S. De; Muir, D.C.G.; Norstrom, R.; Beland, P.; Fournier, M. ||

    1999-02-01

    In order to assess the immunotoxic potential of food naturally contaminated with PCBs and other organohalogens, Fisher rats were fed a diet in which the lipids originated from the blubber of either a highly polluted St. Lawrence beluga or a relatively uncontaminated Arctic beluga. After a period of 2 months, different immune functions were evaluated, including lymphoblastic transformation, natural killer cell activity, plaque-forming cells, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, and immunophenotyping. For all assays, rats fed at St. Lawrence beluga blubber diet or a mixture of Arctic and St. Lawrence beluga blubber diet were not different from control rats fed a diet containing Arctic beluga blubber. These results are inconsistent with the well-known immunosuppressive effects of organochlorines in numerous species and with the lesions suggestive of organochlorine-related immunosuppression that are observed in St. Lawrence belugas. The lack of observable immunotoxic effects in rats fed contaminated beluga blubber might be explained by antagonistic effects in the organohalogen mixture, by a response specific to the rat, by a strain-related lack of sensitivity to organochlorines, or by insufficient dose due to the shortness of the exposure period or the route of exposure.

  2. Levels of C{sub 10}-C{sub 13} polychloro-n-alkanes in marine mammals from the Arctic and the St. Lawrence River estuary

    SciTech Connect

    Tomy, G.T.; Muir, D.C.G.; Stern, G.A.; Westmore, J.B.

    2000-05-01

    Marine mammals from various regions of the Arctic and the St. Lawrence River estuary were examined for the first time for levels of C{sub 10}--C{sub 13} polychloro-n-alkanes (sPCAs). Respective mean total sPCA concentrations in the blubber of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from Saqqaq and Nuussuaq, western Greenland, were 0.23 {+-} 0.02 (n = 2) and 0.164 {+-} 0.06 {micro}g/g (n = 2), similar to that in beluga from the Mackenzie Delta in the western Canadian Arctic 0.21 {+-} 0.08 {micro}g/g (m = 3). sPCAs levels were higher in beluga blubber from the St. Lawrence River (0.37 to 1.4 {micro}g/g). Mean sPCA concentrations in the blubber samples from walruses (Odobenus rosmarus) (Thule, northwest Greenland) and ringed seal (Phoca hispida) (Eureka, southwest Ellesmere Island) were 0.43 {+-} 0.06 (n = 2) and 0.53 {+-} 0.2 {micro}g/g (n = 6), respectively. Relative to commercial sPCA formulations, samples from the Arctic marine mammals showed a predominance of the shorter chain length lower percent chlorinated PCA congeners, the more volatile components of industrial formulations. This observation is consistent with long-range atmospheric transport of sPCAs to this region. The profiles of the belugas from the St. Lawrence River estuary, however, had higher proportions of the less volatile sPCA congeners, implying that contamination to this region is probably from local sources.

  3. Spawning migration of American eel Anguilla rostrata from pristine (1843-1872) to contemporary (1963-1990) periods in the St Lawrence Estuary, Canada.

    PubMed

    Verreault, G; Mingelbier, M; Dumont, P

    2012-07-01

    Daily American eel Anguilla rostrata catches and their dates of passage (starting, median and ending dates) were compared between pristine (1843-1872) and contemporary periods (1963-1990) to determine any changes and see whether these were related to environmental variations and water discharge regulation. Timing and duration of A. rostrata migration patterns differed significantly between the two periods. In the contemporary period, migrating A. rostrata were intercepted significantly earlier than in pristine times (18 days earlier on average), and ended at the same average period. Early A. rostrata migration was also significantly related to high spring flow and secondarily to high spring temperature, while migration ended later when high temperature or low water level occurred during the autumn period. A recent slight increase in the water temperature of the St Lawrence River could partially explain the earlier A. rostrata migration observed during the contemporary period. In return, the effect of high spring flow should have been more contrasted if the river discharge would have not been regulated. Recent A. rostrata production now being mainly restricted to the lower part of St Lawrence River mainstream, resulting shorter travelling distance to the estuary may explain why migrating progress was earlier during the contemporary period.

  4. Pathology of stranded beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary, Québec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Martineau, D; Lagacé, A; Béland, P; Higgins, R; Armstrong, D; Shugart, L R

    1988-04-01

    From June 1983 to May 1986, thirteen carcasses of stranded beluga whales from a polluted area of the St. Lawrence River, Canada were necropsied. High performance liquid chromatography was performed on the brains of three other animals to determine concentrations of benzo a pyrene (BaP). Two juvenile animals had severe multisystemic lesions one of which, a severe necrotizing dermatitis, was associated with a Herpesvirus-like particle. Four adults had five varieties of tumours. An adult had a systemic nocardiosis and a juvenile was affected ty a non 0:1 Vibrio cholerae septicemia. High concentrations of BaP adducts were found in the brains which were analyzed. Occurrence of BaP adducts in the brain of three whales of this population coincides with the high incidence of tumours. This and the previous finding of high concentrations of organochlorine in the tissues of these animals suggest an important role of industrial contaminants in the recent decrease of this population.

  5. Cyclic steps in proglacial delta fronts: New insights from Upper Pleistocene-Holocene successions, St. Lawrence Estuary and Gulf, Québec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Pierre; Ghienne, Jean-François; Normandeau, Alexandre; Lajeunesse, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Proglacial delta fronts in both present-day systems and in the sedimentary record frequently include sand-sized, upstream-migrating bedforms. Although several studies have recently monitored their sediment dynamics, their formative processes are still matter to debate. Here we report on two Pleistocene-Holocene proglacial deltaic successions located on the North Shore of the St. Lawrence Estuary and Gulf, Québec, Canada. Owing to a well-constrained pattern of glacio-isostatic rebound, these now-emerged successions are characterized by accurate palaeo-bathymetric reconstructions. In our case study, we describe backstepping (upstream-migrating) cross strata lying on delta foresets at shallow bathymetries ranging from 10 m to deeper part, reaching in places 50 m. Cross strata, interpreted as being deposited by Froude-supercritical cyclic steps, are characterized by steep mean dips (up to 13°) and short-wavelength (10-20 m) undulations. They form backstepping assemblages of massive to faintly laminated sand bounded on either side by downslope-dipping erosive surfaces on which strata onlap and are truncated upslope and downslope respectively. Graded sand beds, sheared flamed mud layers, matrix- to clasts-supported pebbles or sand intraclasts occasionally occur. In a first case study located in the St. Lawrence Estuary (Portneuf), cyclic steps are borne by gently-sloped (2-3°) foresets deposits at depositional depth less than 50 m. Related sand includes graded beds, thin (5-10 mm) muddy interbeds and terrestrial organic debris. In a second delta located in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (Moisie River), backstepping, faintly laminated gravelly sand beds are directly overlain by pebbly topsets constituted by the subaqueous termination of a sandur. They are in addition either sharply truncated or are passing gradually downslope to regular, steep-sloped gilbert-like delta foresets. Scour infills with backsets are commonly associated with these strata that were deposited at very

  6. Investigation into the response of the auditory and acoustic communications systems in the Beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas) of the St. Lawrence River Estuary to noise, using vocal classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheifele, Peter Martin

    2003-06-01

    Noise pollution has only recently become recognized as a potential danger to marine mammals in general, and to the Beluga Whale (Delphinapterus leucas) in particular. These small gregarious Odontocetes make extensive use of sound for social communication and pod cohesion. The St. Lawrence River Estuary is habitat to a small, critically endangered population of about 700 Beluga whales who congregate in four different sites in its upper estuary. The population is believed to be threatened by the stress of high-intensity, low frequency noise. One way to determine whether noise is having an effect on an animal's auditory ability might be to observe a natural and repeatable response of the auditory and vocal systems to varying noise levels. This can be accomplished by observing changes in animal vocalizations in response to auditory feedback. A response such as this observed in humans and some animals is known as the Lombard Vocal Response, which represents a reaction of the auditory system directly manifested by changes in vocalization level. In this research this population of Beluga Whales was tested to determine whether a vocalization-as-a-function-of-noise phenomenon existed by using Hidden Markhov "classified" vocalizations as targets for acoustical analyses. Correlation and regression analyses indicated that the phenomenon does exist and results of a human subjects experiment along with results from other animal species known to exhibit the response strongly implicate the Lombard Vocal Response in the Beluga.

  7. Reduction of cytochrome P4501A with age in Atlantic tomcod from the St. Lawrence Estuary, Canada: relationship with emaciation and possible effect of contamination.

    PubMed

    Couillard, C M; Wirgin, I I; Lebeuf, M; Légaré, B

    2004-06-24

    This study reports a reduction of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity in large-sized, older Atlantic tomcod (Microgadus tomcod) collected in the St. Lawrence Estuary (Quebec, Canada) and investigates its relationship over a 4-year period to sex, gonadosomatic index (GSI), condition factor (CF) and cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) mRNA levels. In addition, the concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in a subsample of fish. The reduction of EROD activity with age was observed each year in both sexes and was not related to the GSI. A high proportion of large-sized fish, with a body length greater or equal to 225 mm, were emaciated (CF < or = 0.55). A 6-16-fold reduction of EROD activity and a 2-4-fold reduction of CYP1A mRNA levels were observed in large-sized emaciated females compared to small-sized non-emaciated females. Concentrations of PCBs in liver increased from 1000 to 4000 ng/g lipid weight as the hepatic lipid content and the CF decreased. The inter-annual variation of EROD activity was associated with the variation in CF with lowest EROD activity and CF in 1999. When emaciated fish were excluded from the analyses, EROD activity was still lower (2-5-fold) in large compared to small fish and was no longer related to CF. For similar levels of CYP1A mRNA, EROD activity was lower in large compared to small fish. Thus, there was post-transcriptional inhibition of CYP1A activity in large-sized tomcod, indicative of cellular dysfunction. This response may be related to aging, chronic exposure to toxic contaminants or to selective pressures favoring less responsive individuals. This study demonstrates that fish age, size, and CF are important variables to consider in studies using EROD activity as an indicator of environmental contamination. The main finding was that a large part of the reduction of CYP1A with age in St. Lawrence Estuary tomcod was associated with severe emaciation of a large proportion of large-sized fish. Hepatic

  8. Levels and temporal trends (1988-1999) of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary, Canada.

    PubMed

    Lebeuf, Michel; Gouteux, Bruno; Measures, Lena; Trottier, Steve

    2004-06-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were determined in blubber samples of 54 stranded adult beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) collected between 1988 and 1999 in the St. Lawrence Estuary (SLE), Quebec, Canada. Summed concentrations of 10 PBDE congeners (sigmaPBDEs) measured in beluga samples varied between 20 and almost 1000 ng/g wet weight. According to the PBDE concentrations in marine mammals reported in the scientific literature, SLE belugas appear to be relatively lightly contaminated. Only a few predominant congeners (namely, PBDE-47, -99, and -100) represent on average more than 75% of sigmaPBDEs in SLE belugas. The accumulation of sigmaPBDEs in both male and female belugas showed significant exponential increase throughout the 1988-1999 time period. The time necessary for beluga to double their blubber concentration of the most prevalent PBDE congeners was no longer than 3 years. The PBDE temporal changes reported in this study are generally faster but in agreement with the trend observed in other organisms collected in Canada, such as lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) from the Great Lakes, ringed seal (Phoca hispida), and beluga whale from the Canadian Arctic. Some changes in the pattern of PBDEs in belugas were also observed during the time period investigated. The recent and important increase of PBDE levels in SLE belugas could explain the unexpected lack of statistical difference in PBDE contamination between males and females. This suggests that to date PBDEs tend to be accumulated by both male and female belugas, masking the elimination of PBDEs by females through post-natal transfer to their offspring. This study confirms that the growing use of PBDEs as flame retardants has resulted in rising contamination of Canadian aquatic environments. Additional studies are needed to assess the toxicological implications of the PBDE tissue levels found in SLE belugas.

  9. Role of sediment supply and relative sea-level on sediment delivery to submarine deltas and fans of the Laurentian Channel (Lower St. Lawrence Estuary, Eastern Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normandeau, Alexandre; Lajeunesse, Patrick; St-Onge, Guillaume; Francus, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Series of submarine canyons and channels observed in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (LSLE; Eastern Canada) provide an opportunity to analyze in great detail their morphology, spatial distribution and Holocene activity in a relatively shallow (≤300 m) semi-enclosed basin. Four categories of canyons and channels were identified according to their feeding sources: glacially-fed, river-fed, longshore drift-fed and sediment-starved systems. This presentation will focus on the interaction between glacially-fed, river-fed (deltas) and longshore drift-fed systems. Three main types of deposits were identified in sediment core samples and seismic stratigraphy: turbidites, debrites and hyperpycnites. The analysis of high-resolution multibeam data, seismic profiles and sediment cores reveals the differences in timing of these gravity flow deposits related to submarine fan deposition. Submarine fans related to glacial meltwaters were formed during deglaciation, near 11 ka cal BP. Following the retreat of the Laurentide Ice Sheet margin in the LSLE, delta progradation allowed the formation of submarine channels by debris and hyperpycnal flows. A reduction of sediment supply from the rivers and a relative sea-level stabilization by 7 ka cal BP then limited the occurrence of these debris and hyperpycnal flows and favoured erosion of the delta fronts. During delta progradation, longshore drift-fed submarine fans were also formed due to high sediment supply, but continued transferring terrigenous material throughout the Holocene. This continued activity was possible because delta fronts eroded and longshore drift transported sediments to the canyons located at the end of a littoral cell. This study highlights that the variability and timing of sediment deposition in submarine deltas and fans is controlled primarily by variations in sediment supply in a formerly glaciated environment.

  10. Immunotoxical evaluation of St. Lawrence beluga whales (Deiphinapterus leucas)

    SciTech Connect

    Guise, S. De; Fournier, M.; Martineau, D.; Beland, P.

    1995-12-31

    An isolated population of beluga whales live in the St. Lawrence estuary. From approximately 5,000 at the beginning of the century, they now number 500 and their number has not increased since the last 10 years. High concentrations of environmental contaminants including organohalogens (mostly PCBs and DDT), as well as heavy metals (mostly mercury and lead) and HAP exposure have been demonstrated in tissues of these animals. A high incidence of diverse and severe lesions including infections with mildly pathogenic bacteria and numerous tumors were found upon examination of carcasses from the same population. An immunotoxicological evaluation of St. Lawrence beluga whales compared to relatively unpolluted Arctic animals was undertaken to study the possibility of a contaminants induced immunosuppression which would explain the diversity and severity of those lesions. As a first step, several assays were developed to evaluate immune functions in beluga whales, and baseline data were established using Arctic animals. In vitro exposure of Arctic beluga lymphocytes to single contaminants present in St. Lawrence beluga blubber were also performed and showed a suppression of proliferation of lymphocytes with concentrations of mercury below those found in liver of adult St. Lawrence animals. Animal models were also developed to evaluate the immunotoxic potential of the mixture of contaminants found in blubber of St. Lawrence belugas. Rats were fed lipids from either St. Lawrence or Arctic belugas or a mixture of the two groups, and immune functions will be evaluated in these animals. Finally, the last step of the study will be to catch belugas in the St. Lawrence, evaluate their immune functions, compare them to those of Arctic animals and relate them to concentrations of the different contaminants measured in their blubber and plasma.

  11. Sivuqam Ungipaghaatangi (St. Lawrence Island Legends).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slwooko, Grace

    Transmitted orally for generations until the Eskimo language became a written one, the eleven St. Lawrence Island legends compiled in this volume for high school students tell of feats that were accomplished through supernatural power. Meant for both entertainment and instruction, the tales convey wise council indirectly through the conversations…

  12. Relationships between intertidal clam population and health status of the soft-shell clam Mya arenaria in the St. Lawrence Estuary and Saguenay Fjord (Québec, Canada).

    PubMed

    Gagné, F; Blaise, C; Pellerin, J; Fournier, M; Durand, M J; Talbot, A

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the impacts of anthropogenic activity on the health status of intertidal clam populations of the Saguenay Fjord and the St. Lawrence Estuary (Québec, Canada). Clams were collected during low tide at sites subject to direct contamination and at sites far from human activity. Clams were analyzed for tributyltin and dibutyltin total levels and toxic stress (glutathione S-transferase, gonadal lipid peroxidation and DNA strand breaks), immunocompetence (phagocytic activity, hemocyte count and viability), reproduction (gonado-somatic index, gamete maturation, and vitellogenin-like proteins), energy status (temperature-dependent mitochondrial electron transport, and gonad lipids), and individual status (age, condition factor, and growth index). These responses were compared against population characteristics such as live clam density, number of empty shells, and sex ratio. The results show that clam density decreased with distance from the estuary (high salinity level) to upstream of the fjord (low salinity). There was no clear relationship between the number of empty shells and distance or site quality. Clam density values corrected against distance were significantly correlated with hemocyte viability, phagocytic activity, mitochondrial electron transport (MET), DNA damage in gonad, and temperature-dependent mitochondrial electron transport activity. A canonical analysis of the various groups of biomarkers revealed that population metrics were more strongly related with immunocompetence, followed by energy status and temperature-dependent mitochondrial electron transport activity. However, toxic stress biomarkers were strongly associated with energy status and reproduction. This was further confirmed by non-linear modeling using adaptive artificial neural networks (genetic selection and back propagation learning paradigms), where the following parameters were able to predict population parameters with <20% error: gonad

  13. Toxic compounds and health and reproductive effects in St. Lawrence Beluga Whales

    SciTech Connect

    Beland, P.; Michaud, R. ); DeGuise, S. Faculte de Medecine Veterinaire, St-Hyacinthe, Quebec ); Girard, C.; Lagace, A. ); Martineau, D. Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY ); Muir, D.C.G. ); Norstorm, R.J. ); Pelletier, E. ); Ray, S. )

    1993-01-01

    An epidemiologic study was carried out over a period of 9 years on an isolated population of beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) residing in the St. Lawrence estuary (Quebec, Canada). More than 100 individual deaths were aged, and/or autopsied and analyzed for toxic compounds, and the population was surveyed for size and structure. Arctic belugas and other species of whales and seals from the St. Lawrence were used for comparison. Population dynamics: Population size appeared to be stable and modeling showed this stable pattern to result from low calf production and/or low survival to adulthood. Toxicology: St. Lawrence belugas had higher or much higher levels of mercury, lead, PCBs, DDT, Mirex, benzo[a]pyrene metabolites, equivalent levels of dioxins, furans, and PAH metabolites, and much lower levels of cadmium than Arctic belugas. In other St. Lawrence cetaceans, levels of PCBs and DDT were inversely related to body size, as resulting from differences in metabolic rate, diet, and trophic position, compounded by length of residence in the St. Lawrence basin. St. Lawrence belugas had much higher levels than predicted from body size alone; levels increased with age in both sexes, although unloading by females through the placenta and/or lactation was evidenced by overall lower levels in females and very high burdens in some calves. 45 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. St. Lawrence blue whale vocalizations revisited: characterization of calls detected from 1998 to 2001.

    PubMed

    Berchok, Catherine L; Bradley, David L; Gabrielson, Thomas B

    2006-10-01

    From 1998 to 2001, 115 h of acoustic recordings were made in the presence of the well-studied St. Lawrence population of blue whales, using a calibrated omnidirectional hydrophone [flat (+/- 3 dB) response from 5 to 800 Hz] suspended at 50 m depth from a surface isolation buoy. The primary field site for this study was the estuary region of the St. Lawrence River (Québec, Canada), with most recordings made between mid-August and late October. During the recordings, detailed field notes were taken on all cetaceans within sight. Characterization of the more than 1000 blue whale calls detected during this study revealed that the St. Lawrence repertoire is much more extensive than previously reported. Three infrasonic (<20 Hz) and three audible range (30-200 Hz) call types were detected, with much time/frequency variation seen within each type. Further variation is seen in the form of call segmentation, which appears (through examination of Lloyd's Mirror interference effects) to be controlled at least partially by the whales. Although St. Lawrence blue whale call characteristics are similar to those of the North Atlantic, comparisons of phrase composition and spacing among studies suggest the possibility of population dialects within the North Atlantic.

  15. Indication of a Lombard vocal response in the St. Lawrence River Beluga.

    PubMed

    Scheifele, P M; Andrew, S; Cooper, R A; Darre, M; Musiek, F E; Max, L

    2005-03-01

    Noise pollution is recognized as a potential danger to marine mammals in general, and to the St. Lawrence beluga in particular. One method of determining the impacts of noise on an animal's communication is to observe a natural and repeatable response of the vocal system to variations in noise level. This is accomplished by observing intensity changes in animal vocalizations in response to environmental noise. One such response observed in humans, songbirds, and some primates is the Lombard vocal response. This response represents a vocal system reaction manifested by changes in vocalization level in direct response to changes in the noise field. In this research, a population of belugas in the St. Lawrence River Estuary was tested to determine whether a Lombard response existed by using hidden Markhov-classified vocalizations as targets for acoustical analyses. Correlation and regression analyses of signals and noise indicated that the phenomenon does exist. Further, results of human subjects experiments [Egan, J. J. (1966), Ph.D. dissertation; Scheifele, P. M. (2003), Ph.D. dissertation], along with previously reported data from other animal species, are similar to those exhibited by the belugas. Overall, findings suggest that typical noise levels in the St. Lawrence River Estuary have a detectable effect on the communication of the beluga.

  16. Indication of a Lombard vocal response in the St. Lawrence River beluga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheifele, P. M.; Andrew, S.; Cooper, R. A.; Darre, M.; Musiek, F. E.; Max, L.

    2005-03-01

    Noise pollution is recognized as a potential danger to marine mammals in general, and to the St. Lawrence beluga in particular. One method of determining the impacts of noise on an animal's communication is to observe a natural and repeatable response of the vocal system to variations in noise level. This is accomplished by observing intensity changes in animal vocalizations in response to environmental noise. One such response observed in humans, songbirds, and some primates is the Lombard vocal response. This response represents a vocal system reaction manifested by changes in vocalization level in direct response to changes in the noise field. In this research, a population of belugas in the St. Lawrence River Estuary was tested to determine whether a Lombard response existed by using hidden Markhov-classified vocalizations as targets for acoustical analyses. Correlation and regression analyses of signals and noise indicated that the phenomenon does exist. Further, results of human subjects experiments [Egan, J. J. (1966), Ph.D. dissertation; Scheifele, P. M. (2003), Ph.D. dissertation], along with previously reported data from other animal species, are similar to those exhibited by the belugas. Overall, findings suggest that typical noise levels in the St. Lawrence River Estuary have a detectable effect on the communication of the beluga. .

  17. St. Lawrence River Freeze-Up Forecast Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assel, R. A.

    A standard operating procedure (SOP) is presented for calculating the date of freeze-up on the St. Lawrence River at Massena, N.Y. The SOP is based on two empirical temperature decline equations developed for Kingston, Ontario, and Massena, N.Y., respectively. Input data needed to forecast freeze-up consist of the forecast December flow rate and…

  18. A Study of the St. Lawrence River Ecological Habitat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesires, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Save the River, a grassroots advocacy group established in 1978, lobbies for policies to preserve the upper St. Lawrence River and uses the community's help to keep an eye on the existing habitats. Recently, they procured the Fresh Sound Foundation grant to support the development of new K-12 ecology curricula by local area teachers to educate…

  19. Spending Time and Money: Memories of Life in St. Lawrences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Jane; Cooper, Mabel; Ferris, Gloria

    2010-01-01

    Mabel Cooper and Gloria Ferris spent their early adult life in St. Lawrence's Hospital in Caterham. This was in the late 1950s to early 1970s. This is their memories of how they spent their time. It includes the work they did and leisure. They also write about the tokens that were used in the hospital instead of money.

  20. Evaluation of the contamination of marine algae (seaweed) from the St. Lawrence River and likely to be consumed by humans

    SciTech Connect

    Phaneuf, D.; Cote, I.; Dumas, P.; Ferron, L.A.; LeBlanc, A.

    1999-02-01

    The goal of the study was to assess the contamination of marine algae (seaweeds) growing in the St. Lawrence River estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence and to evaluate the risks to human health from the consumption of these algae. Algae were collected by hand at low tide. A total of 10 sites on the north and south shores of the St. Lawrence as well as in Baie des Chaleurs were sampled. The most frequently collected species of algae were Fucus vesiculosus, Ascophyllum nodosum, Laminaria Longicruris, Palmaria palmata, Ulva lactuca, and Fucus distichus. Alga samples were analyzed for metals iodine, and organochlorines. A risk assessment was performed using risk factors. In general, concentrations in St. Lawrence algae were not very high. Consequently, health risks associated with these compounds in St. Lawrence algae were very low. Iodine concentration, on the other hand, could be of concern with regard to human health. Regular consumption of algae, especially of Laminaria sp., could result in levels of iodine sufficient to cause thyroid problems. For regular consumers, it would be preferable to choose species with low iodine concentrations, such as U. lactuca and P. palmata, in order to prevent potential problems. Furthermore, it would also be important to assess whether preparation for consumption or cooking affects the iodine content of algae. Algae consumption may also have beneficial health effects. Scientific literature has shown that it is a good source of fiber and vitamins, especially vitamin B{sub 12}.

  1. Knowing, mapping and understanding St. Lawrence biodiversity, with special emphasis on bird assemblages.

    PubMed

    Desgranges, Jean-Luc; Jobin, Benoît

    2003-01-01

    biodiversity of the most thoroughly studied taxa of the St. Lawrence clearly shows the importance of wetlands, particularly those located at the mouths of rivers or within archipelagos or delta complexes, such as the groups of islands and channels found at both ends of the Montreal Archipelago. These aquatic landscapes are sites of intense biological production, combining in a small geographical area spawning, nursery and feeding grounds for a large number of fish species and breeding, rearing and foraging areas for aquatic birds. Variable flooding conditions, associated with seasonal flooding or daily tidal fluctuations, create a complex mosaic of wetland and aquatic habitats. Although wetlands occupy only a small area in comparison with terrestrial habitats, they support a large number of rare plant and animal species in relation to their size. At present, 10% of the vascular flora and 27% of the herpetofauna of the St. Lawrence are at risk. In the case of reptiles and amphibians, the situation is especially worrisome because nearly all of the most threatened species live in a narrow band along the river corridor. Not only is this the sector that is under the greatest pressure from human development, very little public land remains here, making it difficult to create protected areas. Increased participation by non-governmental organisations and individuals, through private stewardship arrangements, is an essential precondition for completing the network of conservation areas in this part of the St. Lawrence. Along the estuary and the Gulf, habitat integrity has not been affected as much by the expansion of Québec's human population. This is a vast territory, and sites have been identified with a view to making up for the deficiencies in the present network of protected sites in terms of representing biodiversity.

  2. Groundwater quality in the Delaware and St. Lawrence River Basins, New York, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Water quality in both study areas is generally good, but concentrations of some constituents equaled or exceeded current or proposed Federal or New York State drinking-water standards. The standards exceeded are color (one sample in the St. Lawrence study area), pH (three samples in the Delaware study area), sodium (one sample in the St. Lawrence study area), total dissolved solids (one sample in the St. Lawrence study area), aluminum (one sample in the Delaware study area and one sample in the St. Lawrence study area), iron (seven samples in the St. Lawrence study area), manganese (one sample in the Delaware study area and five samples in the St. Lawrence study area), gross alpha radioactivity (one sample in the St. Lawrence study area), radon-222 (10 samples in the Delaware study area and 14 samples in the St. Lawrence study area), and bacteria (5 samples in the Delaware study area and 10 samples in the St. Lawrence study area). E. coli bacteria were detected in samples from two wells in the St. Lawrence study area. Concentrations of chloride, fluoride, sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, antimony, arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, selenium, silver, thallium, zinc, and uranium did not exceed existing drinking-water standards in any of the samples collected.

  3. A Seaway Acoustic Observatory in Action: The St. Lawrence Seaway.

    PubMed

    Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Gervaise, Cédric; Giard, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    A setup for measuring spectral source levels (SSLs) of ships transiting along a seaway, the traffic density and shipping noise, is presented. The results feed shipping-noise modeling that reproduces the actual in situ observations to map shipping-noise variability over space and time for investigating its effects on aquatic organisms. The ship's SSL databank allows sorting the different contributors to total shipping noise for assisting in exploring mitigation approaches (e.g., fleet composition, rerouting). Such an acoustic observatory was deployed since November 2012 for a complete annual cycle of measurements in the deep downstream part of the St. Lawrence Seaway.

  4. Mercury exposure in Montrealers who eat St. Lawrence River sportfish.

    PubMed

    Kosatsky, T; Przybysz, R; Armstrong, B

    2000-09-01

    We assessed levels and determinants of mercury biomarkers among residents of Montreal and surroundings who eat sportfish from the nearby St. Lawrence River. Participants were selected from 1118 adult fishers responding to a 1996 screening questionnaire; the study sample (n=132) overrepresented respondents expected to have the greatest and the least exposure to mercury. Tissue mercury concentrations were associated with sportfish consumption: among participants who ate sportfish at least once weekly, hair geometric mean (GM)=0.82+/-2.54 microg/g and blood mercury GM=3.03+/-2.43 microg/L, compared to hair GM=0.38+/-2.28 microg/g and blood mercury GM=1.44+/-2.23 microg/L for those who ate sportfish less than once weekly. While these levels are somewhat higher than those shown for other Greater Lakes and St. Lawrence River fishers, only one participant surpassed the Canadian recommended population mercury limit of 6 microg/g for hair and 20 microg/L for blood. Consumption of several sportfish species independently explained much of the variation in measured blood mercury; the predatory species pike was the most important in multivariable regression. Coincident consumption of waterfowl, fishing during the longer summer/fall rather than the brief winter season, and fishers' age were independently associated with blood mercury. Serum selenium related neither to the level of fish consumption nor to the participants' blood mercury.

  5. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 45 Table 45 to Part 679—St. Lawrence Island Habitat...

  6. A Practical Grammar of the St. Lawrence Island/Siberian Yupik Eskimo Language. Preliminary Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Steven A.

    The grammar of the St. Lawrence Island/Siberian Yupik Eskimo language was written for college-level classes containing a mixture of Yupik speakers and non-speakers, and for students learning the language on their own. It uses only the Central Siberian Yupik dialect spoken on St. Lawrence Island (Alaska) and on a small portion of the Asian…

  7. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 45 Table 45 to Part 679—St. Lawrence Island Habitat...

  8. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 45 Table 45 to Part 679—St. Lawrence Island Habitat...

  9. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 45 Table 45 to Part 679—St. Lawrence Island Habitat...

  10. 50 CFR Table 45 to Part 679 - St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 45 Table 45 to Part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL... ECONOMIC ZONE OFF ALASKA Pt. 679, Table 45 Table 45 to Part 679—St. Lawrence Island Habitat...

  11. Wildlife as sentinels of human health effects in the Great Lakes--St. Lawrence basin.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, G A

    2001-01-01

    There is no existing formal, long-term program for gathering evidence of the incidence and severity of the health effects of toxic substances in wildlife. However, research-based studies of bald eagles, herring gulls, night herons, tree swallows, snapping turtles, mink, and beluga over the past 30 years have revealed a broad spectrum of health effects in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence basin including thyroid and other endocrine disorders, metabolic diseases, altered immune function, reproductive impairment, developmental toxicity, genotoxicity, and cancer. These effects occurred most often and were most severe in the most contaminated sites (Green Bay, Saginaw Bay, Lake Ontario, the St. Lawrence estuary, and more recently, Lake Erie), some of which are International Joint Commission-designated Areas of Concern (AOCs). In all cases, a strong argument can be made for an environmental etiology, and in many cases for the involvement of persistent organic pollutants, particularly polychlorinated biphenyls, polychlorinated dibenzo-(italic)p(/italic)-dioxins, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. For some, the association with particular contaminants is consistent with controlled studies, and in some, dose-response relationships were documented. The biologic significance of these health impairments to the affected species is currently unclear, but they resemble those observed with increased incidence in human subpopulations in one or more AOCs. Formalizing health effects monitoring of sentinel wildlife species by the parties to the Canada-USA Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement is required. This would facilitate the optimal use of sentinel wildlife health data in a larger, epidemiologic weight-of-evidence context upon which to base decisions and policies regarding the effects of chemical exposures on human populations. PMID:11744503

  12. 78 FR 40260 - International Joint Commission: Public Comment on a Proposal for Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ... degrading coastal wetlands on Lake Ontario and the upper St. Lawrence River. This degradation impacts the... International Joint Commission: Public Comment on a Proposal for Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River Regulation... the water levels and flows in Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River that will continue to...

  13. Characterization of St. Lawrence blue whale vocalizations and their correlation with field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berchok, Catherine L.

    During four field seasons from 1998--2001, 115 hours of acoustic recordings were made in the presence of the well-studied St. Lawrence population of blue whales. The primary field site for this study was the estuary region of the St. Lawrence River (Quebec, Canada) with most recordings made between mid-August and late October. Effort was concentrated in the daylight hours, although occasionally extending past nightfall. An inexpensive and portable recording system was built that was easy to deploy and provided quality recordings in a variety of sea conditions. It consisted of a calibrated omni-directional hydrophone with a flat (+/-3dB) response from 5Hz to 800Hz; and a surface isolation buoy to minimize the vertical movement of the sensor. During the recording sessions detailed field notes were taken on all blue whales within sight, with individual identities confirmed through photo-identification work between sessions. Notes were also taken on all other species sighted during the recording sessions. Characterization of the more than one-thousand blue whale calls detected during this study revealed that the St. Lawrence repertoire is much more extensive than previously reported. Three infrasonic (<20Hz) and four audible range (30--200Hz) call types were detected in this study, with much time/frequency variation seen within each type. The infrasonic calls were long (5--30s) in duration and arranged into regularly patterned series. These calls were similar in call characteristics and spacing to those detected in the North Atlantic, but had much shorter and more variable patterned series. The audible call types were much shorter (1--4s), and occurred singly or in irregularly spaced clusters, although a special patterning was seen that contained both regular and irregular spaced components. Comparison of the daily, seasonal, and spatial distributions of calling behavior with those of several biological parameters revealed interesting differences between the three call

  14. Benthic nutrient fluxes along the Laurentian Channel: Impacts on the N budget of the St. Lawrence marine system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibodeau, Benoît; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Kowarzyk, Jacqueline; Mucci, Alfonso; Gélinas, Yves; Gilbert, Denis; Maranger, Roxane; Alkhatib, Mohammad

    2010-12-01

    Water column concentrations and benthic fluxes of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and oxygen (DO) were measured in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the Upper and Lower St. Lawrence Estuary (USLE and LSLE, respectively) to assess the nitrogen (N) budget in the St. Lawrence (SL) system, as well as to elucidate the impact of bottom water hypoxia on fixed-N removal in the LSLE. A severe nitrate deficit, with respect to ambient phosphate concentrations (N*˜-10 μmol L -1), was observed within and in the vicinity of the hypoxic bottom water of the LSLE. Given that DO concentrations in the water column have remained above 50 μmol L -1, nitrate reduction in suboxic sediments, rather than in the water column, is most likely responsible for the removal of fixed N from the SL system. Net nitrate fluxes into the sediments, derived from pore water nitrate concentration gradients, ranged from 190 μmol m -2 d -1 in the hypoxic western LSLE to 100 μmol m -2 d -1 in the Gulf. The average total benthic nitrate reduction rate for the Laurentian Channel (LC) is on the order of 690 μmol m -2 d -1, with coupled nitrification-nitrate reduction accounting for more than 70%. Using average nitrate reduction rates derived from the observed water column nitrate deficit, the annual fixed-N elimination within the three main channels of the Gulf of St. Lawrence and LSLE was estimated at 411 × 10 6 t N, yielding an almost balanced N budget for the SL marine system.

  15. Comparison of St. Lawrence blue whale vocalizations with field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berchok, Catherine; Bradley, David; Gabrielson, Thomas; Sears, Richard

    2003-04-01

    During four field seasons from 1998-2001, vocalizations were recorded in the presence of St. Lawrence blue whales using a single omni-directional hydrophone. Both long duration infrasonic calls (~18 Hz, 5-20 s) as well as short duration higher frequency calls (85-25 Hz, ~2 s) were detected and compared with field observations. Two trends were noted. First, the long infrasonic call series were concentrated primarily in the deep (300 m) channel. These call series appear to compare well with blue whale vocalizations recorded by others in the deep open ocean. Second, the shorter audible calls were more evenly distributed over bathymetry and seem to be a form of short distance communication with at least one case occurring during an agonistic interaction. A comparison of these calls with biological parameters such as density of whales in the area, percentages of paired versus single whales, and numbers of males versus females will also be discussed. [Project supported by ARL/PSU, NSF, and the American Museum of Natural History.

  16. Modelling spatial distribution of epibenthic communities in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritz, Charlotte; Lévesque, Mélanie; Gravel, Dominique; Vaz, Sandrine; Archambault, Diane; Archambault, Philippe

    2013-04-01

    Correlative habitat models using relationships between marine organisms and their surrounding environment can be used to predict species distribution, and the results can assist management of human activities sharing the marine space (e.g. fisheries, MPAs, tourism). Here, epi-benthic megafauna was sampled at 755 stations in the Lower Estuary and Northern Gulf of St. Lawrence (EGSL) each summer between 2006 and 2009. We combined various types of multivariate analyses to 1) describe the structure and spatial distribution of benthic communities, 2) analyse the relationship between these communities and environmental parameters, and subsequently 3) build a community distribution model to predict the spatial distribution of the communities, creating community distribution maps covering the entire area to be used for marine management and conservation. We identified distinct benthic communities in the study area that closely correlate with the 200 m depth contour and with major environmental variables. A redundancy analysis revealed that communities were associated with depth, oxygen saturation, temperature, bottom current, seabed uniformity, distance to coast and type of sediment. Together these environmental descriptors explained 38% of the variation in megafaunal community composition. The environmental variables were used to build a community distribution model using generalized linear models to predict high and low suitability zones of each community in the EGSL.

  17. Hydrographic climatology in the Gulf of St. Lawrence: its recent trends and an estuarine regime of interannual variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovsky, Alexander; Yashayaev, Igor; Frank, Alejandro

    2016-04-01

    Combining hydrographic data from the NOAA NODC World Ocean Database and the archive of the Bedford Institute of Oceanography we construct a hydrographic climatology of the Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL) and analyze interannual to multidecadal variability of its principal water masses. Our analysis is based on the assumption that buoyancy is a primary forcing mechanism defining thermohaline fields and driving circulation in GSL, which in turn dictates the selection of representative transects. We analyze ensembles of hydrographic conditions, parameters of seasonal cycle, seasonal-to-interannual anomalies and long-term trends in each distance-depth bin of several transects orthogonal or tangential to the principal pathways of buoyancy-driven flows in GSL. In the Cabot Strait, the surface layer exhibits freshening while the bottom layer (affected by the Atlantic water influx) becomes warmer and saltier. The latter tendency can be traced along the axis of the entire Laurentian Channel and becomes even stronger further inland (e.g., off Anticosti Isl.). This enhancement in two-layer estuarine exchange flow is likely related to the freshening effect of the melting ice further north advected into the Gulf, or to the stronger freshwater discharge mixing in the Gulf. Indeed, the near-surface coastal bin off Nova Scotia occupied by the coastal buoyancy current originating from the St. Lawrence estuary does not reveal similar freshening. Interannual variability of temperature and salinity also exhibits patterns of estuarine exchange: near-bottom temperature and salinity indicative of the return flow from the Atlantic into GSL correlate with the St. Lawrence River discharge. The coastal buoyancy current responds to variations in the freshwater discharge by its expansion offshore while the salinity variations near the coast do not show a significant relationship with the discharge. Accelerating departure of hydrographic anomalies from their record-mean trends is observed over the

  18. Automatic recognition of fin and blue whale calls for real-time monitoring in the St. Lawrence.

    PubMed

    Mouy, Xavier; Bahoura, Mohammed; Simard, Yvan

    2009-12-01

    Monitoring blue and fin whales summering in the St. Lawrence Estuary with passive acoustics requires call recognition algorithms that can cope with the heavy shipping noise of the St. Lawrence Seaway and with multipath propagation characteristics that generate overlapping copies of the calls. In this paper, the performance of three time-frequency methods aiming at such automatic detection and classification is tested on more than 2000 calls and compared at several levels of signal-to-noise ratio using typical recordings collected in this area. For all methods, image processing techniques are used to reduce the noise in the spectrogram. The first approach consists in matching the spectrogram with binary time-frequency templates of the calls (coincidence of spectrograms). The second approach is based on the extraction of the frequency contours of the calls and their classification using dynamic time warping (DTW) and the vector quantization (VQ) algorithms. The coincidence of spectrograms was the fastest method and performed better for blue whale A and B calls. VQ detected more 20 Hz fin whale calls but with a higher false alarm rate. DTW and VQ outperformed for the more variable blue whale D calls.

  19. Invasion by stages in the St Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The St. Louis River estuary is recognized as an invasive species “hotspot” - the harbor ranks among the top locations in the Great Lakes reporting the first occurrence of new, aquatic non-native species. To date, 18 non-native benthic invertebrate, 4 non-native crusta...

  20. Phenology of larval fish in the St. Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Little work has been done on the phenology of fish larvae in Great Lakes coastal wetlands. As part of an aquatic invasive species early detection study, we conducted larval fish surveys in the St. Louis River estuary (SLRE) in 2012 and 2013. Using multiple gears in a spatially ba...

  1. Larval fish distribution in the St. Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our objective was to determine what study design, environmental, and habitat variables contribute to the distribution and abundance of larval fish in the St. Louis River estuary. Larval fish habitat associations are poorly understood in Great Lakes coastal wetlands, yet critical ...

  2. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 679 - Northern Bering Sea Research Area and St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Northern Bering Sea Research Area and St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area 17 Figure 17 to part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY... Sea Research Area and St. Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area ER25JY08.011...

  3. Goals and Objectives for Computing in the Associated Colleges of the St. Lawrence Valley.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grupe, Fritz H.

    A forecast of the computing requirements of the Associated Colleges of the St. Lawrence Valley, an analysis of their needs, and specifications for a joint computer system are presented. Problems encountered included the lack of resources and computer sophistication at the member schools and a dearth of experience with long-term computer consortium…

  4. A Practical Grammar of the St. Lawrence Island/Siberian Yupik Eskimo Language. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Steven A.

    This book deals with the Central Siberian Yupik Eskimo language as spoken on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska, an island near the Bering Strait and on the tip of the Asian mainland opposite Russia. This book has been used with college-level classes composed of a mixture of Yupik speakers and well-prepared non-speakers (people who have studied other,…

  5. 77 FR 30443 - Safety Zone; Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce, St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    .... Coast Guard Sector Buffalo; telephone 716-843-9343, email SectorBuffaloMarineSafety@uscg.mil . If you... the St. Lawrence River near Alexandria Bay, NY. The Captain of the Port Buffalo has determined that... authorized by the Captain of the Port Buffalo or his on-scene representative. The Captain of the Port or...

  6. BIOREMEDIATION AND BIORESTORATION OF A CRUDE OIL CONTAMINATED FRESHWATER WETLAND ON THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biostimulation by nutrient enrichment and phytoremediation were studied for the restoration of an acutely stressed freshwater wetland experimentally exposed to crude oil. The research was carried out along the shores of the St. Lawrence River at Ste. Croix, Quebec, Canada. The ...

  7. The Oligochaeta (Annelida, Clitellata) of the St. Lawrence Great Lakes region: An update

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spencer, Douglas R.; Hudson, Patrick L.

    2003-01-01

    An updated oligochaete species list for the Great Lakes region is provided. The list was developed through the reexamination of the taxa reported in a previous report in 1980, addition of new taxa or records collected from the region since 1980, and an update of taxonomy commensurate with systematic and nomenclatural changes over the intervening years since the last review. The authors found 74 papers mentioning Great Lakes oligochaete species. The majority of these papers were published in the 1980s. The literature review and additional collections resulted in 15 species being added to the previous list. Nine taxa were removed from the previous list due to misidentification, synonymies, level of identification, or inability to confirm the identity. Based on this review, 101 species of Oligochaeta are now known from the St. Lawrence Great Lakes watershed. Of these, 95 species are known from the St. Lawrence Great Lakes proper, with an additional 6 species recorded from the inland waters of the watershed. The greatest diversity of oligochaete species was found in the inland waters of the region (81) followed by Lake Huron (72), Lake Ontario (65), Lake Erie (64), Lake Superior (63), Lake Michigan (62), St. Marys River (60), Niagara River (49), Saginaw Bay (44), St. Clair River (37), Lake St. Clair (36), St. Lawrence River (27), and the Detroit River (21). Three species are suspected of being introduced, Branchiura sowerbyi, Gianius aquaedulcisand Ripistes parasita, and two are believed to be endemic, Thalassodrilus hallae andTeneridrilus flexus.

  8. Genotoxic substances in the St. Lawrence system. 1: Industrial genotoxins sorbed to particulate matter in the St. Lawrence, St. Maurice, and Saguenay rivers, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.A.; Rasmussen, J.B.; Blaise, C.

    1998-02-01

    Previous investigations of organic genotoxins in industrial effluents discharged into the St. Lawrence River system (Quebec, Canada) indicated that a substantial fraction of the genotoxicity is adsorbed to suspended particulate matter. This study used the SOS Chromotest to investigate the presence, potency, and behavior of particle-bound genotoxins in the downstream ecosystem. The results indicate that although extracts of both suspended and sedimented particulate matter are genotoxic, suspended particulate matter samples are more potent in the absence of S9 activation, with the reverse being true for bottom sediments. The results confirmed a positive relationship between the genotoxicity of bottom sediment extracts and sediment organic matter content. A similar relationship between organic matter content and total polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentration indicates that putative genotoxins have physicochemical properties similar to the PAH class of contaminants. Conversion of PAH values to benzo[a]pyrene equivalents indicates that measured PAHs only account for a small fraction ({approximately}10%) of the observed SOS Chromotest response. Sites that receive discharges from foundries, aluminum refineries, and petroleum refineries yielded several of the most genotoxic samples. Further analyses revealed that the genotoxicity of suspended and sedimented particulate matter extracts is empirically related to the genotoxicity of industrial discharges. Comparisons of total genotoxicity levels in suspended particulates and bottom sediments suggest that direct-acting substances adsorbed to suspended matter are rapidly degraded and/or converted to more stable progenotoxins upon deposition. Further research is required to test this hypothesis and investigate effects on indigenous biota.

  9. A threatened beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) population in the traffic lane: vessel-generated noise characteristics of the Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park, Canada.

    PubMed

    McQuinn, Ian H; Lesage, Véronique; Carrier, Dominic; Larrivée, Geneviève; Samson, Yves; Chartrand, Sylvain; Michaud, Robert; Theriault, James

    2011-12-01

    The threatened resident beluga population of the St. Lawrence Estuary shares the Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park with significant anthropogenic noise sources, including marine commercial traffic and a well-established, vessel-based whale-watching industry. Frequency-dependent (FD) weighting was used to approximate beluga hearing sensitivity to determine how noise exposure varied in time and space at six sites of high beluga summer residency. The relative contribution of each source to acoustic habitat degradation was estimated by measuring noise levels throughout the summer and noise signatures of typical vessel classes with respect to traffic volume and sound propagation characteristics. Rigid-hulled inflatable boats were the dominant noise source with respect to estimated beluga hearing sensitivity in the studied habitats due to their high occurrence and proximity, high correlation with site-specific FD-weighted sound levels, and the dominance of mid-frequencies (0.3-23 kHz) in their noise signatures. Median C-weighted sound pressure level (SPL(RMS)) had a range of 19 dB re 1 μPa between the noisiest and quietest sites. Broadband SPL(RMS) exceeded 120 dB re 1 μPa 8-32% of the time depending on the site. Impacts of these noise levels on St. Lawrence beluga will depend on exposure recurrence and individual responsiveness.

  10. Vertical distribution and diel migration of macrozooplankton in the St. Lawrence marine system (Canada) in relation with the cold intermediate layer thermal properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Michel; Galbraith, Peter S.; Descroix, Aurélie

    2009-01-01

    Vertical distribution of various species and stages of macrozooplankton (euphausiacea, chaetognatha, cnidaria, mysidacea, amphipoda) were determined for different times of the day and related to the physical environment. Stratified sampling with the BIONESS was carried out during seven cruises in spring and fall 1998, 2000, and 2001, and fall 1999, in two different habitats in the St. Lawrence marine system: the lower St. Lawrence Estuary and the NW Gulf of St. Lawrence. Our results indicate that the various macrozooplankton species were distributed throughout the whole water column including the surface layer, the cold intermediate layer (CIL), and the deep layer at different times of day and night in both areas during all periods. Moreover, three types of migrational patterns were observed within this zooplanktonic community: (1) nocturnal ascent by the whole population, (2) segregation into two groups; one which performed nocturnal accent and another which remained in the deep, and (3) no detectable migration. We also observed that the diel vertical migration (DVM) amplitude in most of the macrozooplankton species varied as a function of physical factors, in particular the spatio-temporal variations of the CIL thermal properties, including the upper and the lower limits of the CIL and the depth of the CIL core temperature. Finally, the different DVM patterns coupled with estuarine circulation patterns and bottom topography could place animals in different flow regimes by night and by day and contribute to their retention (aggregation) and/or dispersion in different areas, time of the day, and seasons.

  11. Constraints on Lake Agassiz discharge through the late-glacial Champlain Sea (St. Lawrence Lowlands, Canada) using salinity proxies and an estuarine circulation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, B.; Najjar, R.G.; Cronin, T.; Rayburn, J.; Mann, M.E.

    2011-01-01

    During the last deglaciation, abrupt freshwater discharge events from proglacial lakes in North America, such as glacial Lake Agassiz, are believed to have drained into the North Atlantic Ocean, causing large shifts in climate by weakening the formation of North Atlantic Deep Water and decreasing ocean heat transport to high northern latitudes. These discharges were caused by changes in lake drainage outlets, but the duration, magnitude and routing of discharge events, factors which govern the climatic response to freshwater forcing, are poorly known. Abrupt discharges, called floods, are typically assumed to last months to a year, whereas more gradual discharges, called routing events, occur over centuries. Here we use estuarine modeling to evaluate freshwater discharge from Lake Agassiz and other North American proglacial lakes into the North Atlantic Ocean through the St. Lawrence estuary around 11.5 ka BP, the onset of the Preboreal oscillation (PBO). Faunal and isotopic proxy data from the Champlain Sea, a semi-isolated, marine-brackish water body that occupied the St. Lawrence and Champlain Valleys from 13 to 9 ka, indicate salinity fell about 7-8 (range of 4-11) around 11.5 ka. Model results suggest that minimum (1600 km3) and maximum (9500 km3) estimates of plausible flood volumes determined from Lake Agassiz paleoshorelines would produce the proxy-reconstructed salinity decrease if the floods lasted <1 day to 5 months and 1 month to 2 years, respectively. In addition, Champlain Sea salinity responds very quickly to the initiation (within days) and cessation (within weeks) of flooding events. These results support the hypothesis that a glacial lake flood, rather than a sustained routing event, discharged through the St. Lawrence Estuary during the PBO. ?? 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Influence of the St. Lawrence island Polynya upon the Bering Sea benthos

    SciTech Connect

    Grebmeier, J.M.; Cooper, L.W. |

    1995-03-15

    The influence of a polynya, a persistent ice-free region, on water column production and subsequent transport to the shallow continental shelf benthos of the Bering Sea was evaluated by studying spatial patterns of organic material deposition, benthic biomass, community sediment metabolism, benthic population structure, and other potential indicators of enhanced organic carbon transport to benthic communities underlying the St. Lawrence Island Polynya. Despite suggestions that polynyas may be important localized centers of primary productions in polar waters, the authors found that the St. Lawrence Island Polynya does not obviously enhance the biomass of benthic communities directly below the polynya. However, southward flowing, baroclinic currents generated as a result of brine injection at the polynya edge do appear to have an influence on the biomass and ecological structure of Bering Sea benthic communities south of St. Lawrence Island. These currents appear to affect mean sediment oxygen consumption, surface organic carbon/nitrogen ratios, total organic content, and bottom water ammonia by sweeping phytodetrital matter south and to the west of the island. A particle-reactive, short-lived, natural radioisotope, {sup 7}Be, used as an indicator of rapid (days to weeks) deposition of particulate material from the water column, was detected only in surface sediments to the southwest of the island, indicating enhancement of particle deposition to the southwest of the island. Finally, the {sup 18}O content of tunicate cellulose was highest in the polynya region, consistent with increased filter feeding in the late winter when the polynya is present. The Anadyr Current, consisting of nutrient-rich, deeper Bering Sea water that is upwelled onto the shelf in the Gulf of Anadyr, flows west to east in the region south of St. Lawrence Island throughout the year and is the major forcing function for high production in the region. 76 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Influence of the St. Lawrence Island Polynya upon the Bering Sea benthos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebmeier, Jacqueline M.; Cooper, Lee W.

    1995-03-01

    The influence of a polynya, a persistent ice-free region, on water column production and subsequent transport to the shallow continental shelf benthos of the Bering Sea was evaluated by studying spatial patterns of organic material deposition, benthic biomass, community sediment metabolism, benthic population structure, and other potential indicators of enhanced organic carbon transport to benthic communities underlying the St. Lawrence Island Polynya. Despite suggestions that polynyas may be important localized centers of primary production in polar waters, we found that the St. Lawrence Island Polynya does not obviously enhance the biomass of benthic communities directly below the polynya. However, southward flowing, baroclinic currents generated as a result of brine injection at the polynya edge do appear to have an influence on the biomass and ecological structure of Bering Sea benthic communities south of St. Lawrence Island. These currents appear to affect mean sediment oxygen consumption, surface organic carbon/nitrogen ratios, total organic content, and bottom water ammonia by sweeping phytodetrital matter south and to the west of the island. A particle-reactive, short-lived, natural radioisotope, 7Be, used as an indicator of rapid (days to weeks) deposition of particulate material from the water column, was detected only in surface sediments to the southwest of the island, indicating enhancement of particle deposition to the southwest of the island. Finally, the 18O content of tunicate cellulose was highest in the polynya region, consistent with increased filter feeding in the late winter when the polynya is present, and presumably promoting primary production in the open water. The Anadyr Current, consisting of nutrient-rich, deeper Bering Sea water that is upwelled onto the shelf in the Gulf of Anadyr, flows west to east in the region south of St. Lawrence Island throughout the year and is the major forcing function for high production in the region. The

  14. Budget and sources of suspended sediment transported in the St. Lawrence River, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondeau, Bernard; Cossa, D.; Gagnon, P.; Bilodeau, L.

    2000-01-01

    A mass balance budget of the suspended sediment in the St. Lawrence River was established for the sector stretching from Cornwall, Ontario, to Quebec City, Quebec, for the period 1989-1993. The approach consisted of analysing the amount of sediment contributed by the different tributaries, on a watershed-by-watershed basis, through sediment concentration-discharge models incorporating more than 4000 data points collected since 1983. Lake Ontario contributes less than 3% of the particulate load at Quebec City, while St. Lawrence tributaries on the south and north shores contribute 19% and 13%, respectively, of the sediment load. Our findings indicate that nearly 65% of the suspended sediments come from erosion of the bed and banks of the St. Lawrence River. This finding is broadly supported by numerous geomorphological and sedimentological observations and is consistent with the geological history of the river and the structures built on its banks in recent decades. Upstream-downstream mass balance studies conducted on individual river sectors indicate that the sources of erosion are located mainly in the Beauharnois Canal region, between Montreal and Les Grèves, and further downstream, between the outlet of Lake Saint-Pierre and Portneuf.

  15. Potential sources of atmospheric total gaseous mercury in the St. Lawrence River valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poissant, Laurier

    The potential source contribution function (PSCF) has been used to study the source-receptor relationships for total gaseous mercury (TGM) found in air collected at two sites along the St. Lawrence River valley, namely at St. Anicet and Mingan. TGM concentrations have been measured with high time-resolution analysers (Tekran instrument). The source-receptor analyses have been applied with regards to the seasonality of TGM. Median TGM concentrations are significantly less ( χ2: α=0.01) during the summertime than other periods at both sites. A total of 12 225 trajectory end-points for St. Anicet and 4480 trajectory end points for Mingan have been used to create potential source area maps. This study identifies preferred potential sources of TGM at St. Anicet during wintertime with strongest probability stretching from the Gulf of Mexico to the southern tip of Greenland. This pattern mimics, the North American anthropogenic Hg emission inventory. Furthermore, some Eurasian mercury air mass intrusions are suggested at Mingan during wintertime. The summertime period at Mingan points out some potential sources stretching from the american mid-west to the St. Lawrence River valley as well as areas around the southern tip of the Hudson Bay.

  16. The influence of wind and ice on spring walrus hunting success on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntington, Henry P.; Noongwook, George; Bond, Nicholas A.; Benter, Bradley; Snyder, Jonathan A.; Zhang, Jinlun

    2013-10-01

    St. Lawrence Island Yupik hunters on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska, take hundreds of Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) each year. The harvest and associated effort (hunting trips taken), however, are variable from year to year and also from day to day, influenced by physical environmental factors among other variables. We used data from 1996 to 2010 to construct generalized additive models (GAMs) to examine several relationships among the variables. Physical factors explained 18% of the variability in harvest in Savoonga and 25% of the variability in effort; the corresponding figures for Gambell were 24% and 32%. Effort alone explained 63% of the harvest in Savoonga and 59% in Gambell. Physical factors played a relatively smaller role in determining hunting efficiency (walrus taken per hunting trip), explaining 15% of the variability in efficiency in Savoonga and 22% in Gambell, suggesting that physical factors play a larger role in determining whether to hunt than in the outcome of the hunt once undertaken. Combining physical factors with effort explained 70% of the harvest variability in Savoonga and 66% in Gambell. Although these results indicate that other factors (e.g. fuel prices, socioeconomic conditions) collectively cause a greater share of variability in harvest and effort than ice and wind, at least as indicated by the measures used as predictors in the GAMs, they also suggest that environmental change is also likely to influence future harvest levels, and that climate models that yield appropriately scaled data on ice and wind around St. Lawrence Island may be of use in determining the magnitude and direction of those influences.

  17. Hydraulic Evaluation of Culvert Valves at Eisenhower and Snell Locks, St. Lawrence Seaway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center 3909 Halls Ferry Road Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199 Final report Approved for public release...ERDC/CHL TR-15-7 ii Abstract The aged, double-skin- plate valves of the Eisenhower and Snell Locks on the St. Lawrence Seaway are being replaced...filling valve well of the Snell Lock’s south-wall culvert. The new vertical-frame valve operated at a slower rate than the double-skin- plate valve

  18. Late Stage 5 Glacio-isostatic Sea in the St. Lawrence Valley, Canada and United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Occhietti, S.; Balescu, S.; Lamothe, M.; Clet, M.; Cronin, T.; Ferland, P.; Pichet, P.

    1996-01-01

    Although post-glacial marine sediments of late Wisconsinan and early Holocene age are common in eastern Canada and the northeastern United States, remnants of older Pleistocene marine sediments are scarce. A fossiliferous marine clay that predates the classical Wisconsinan was recently discovered in the St. Lawrence Valley. A dominantly estuarine environment is inferred from the geochemistry of the shells (??18O = -7.1) and from benthic foraminifer and ostracode assemblages. The clay indicates a marine invasion (Cartier Sea) shallower and probably shorter than that during the upper late Wisconsinan Champlain Sea episode (12,000-9,500 yr B.P.). The pollen content shows that regional vegetation during the marine episode began as open tundra, then became a Betula and Alnus crispa forest, reached a climatic optimum with Quercus, Corylus, and Abies, and concluded as a Pinus/Picea boreal forest. A corrected infrared stimulated luminescence age of 98,000 ?? 9000 yr is compatible with the epimerization ratio of shells. The Cartier Sea resulted from a post-glacial glacio-isostatic marine invasion in the St. Lawrence lowlands. It probably occurred during late stage 5 and is tentatively assigned to the transition of oxygen isotope substages 5b/5a. This marine episode dates to stage 5 of the preceding continental glacier which extended to middle latitudes in NE America. ?? 1996 University of Washington.

  19. Organochlorine and metal contaminants in traditional foods from St. Lawrence Island, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Welfinger-Smith, Gretchen; Minholz, Judith L; Byrne, Sam; Waghiyi, Vi; Gologergen, Jesse; Kava, Jane; Apatiki, Morgan; Ungott, Eddie; Miller, Pamela K; Arnason, John G; Carpenter, David O

    2011-01-01

    Marine mammals (bowhead whale, walrus, and various seals) constitute the major component of the diet of the Yupik people of St. Lawrence Island, Alaska. St. Lawrence Island residents have higher serum concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) than in the general U.S. population. In order to determine potential sources, traditional food samples were collected from 2004 to 2009 and analyzed for PCBs, three chlorinated pesticides, and seven heavy metals (mercury, copper, zinc, arsenic, selenium, cadmium, and lead). Concentrations of PCB in rendered oils (193-421 ppb) and blubber (73-317 ppb) from all marine mammal samples were at levels that trigger advisories for severely restricted consumption, using U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) fish consumption advisories. Concentrations of pesticides were lower, but were still elevated. The highest PCB concentrations were found in polar bear (445 ppb) and the lowest in reindeer adipose tissue (2 ppb). Marine mammal and polar bear meat in general have PCB concentrations that were 1-5% of those in rendered oils or adipose tissue. PCB concentrations in organs were higher than meat. Concentrations of metals in oils and meats from all species were relatively low, but increased levels of mercury, cadmium, copper, and zinc were present in some liver and kidney samples. Mercury and arsenic were found in lipid-rich samples, indicating organometals. These results show that the source of the elevated concentrations of these contaminants in the Yupik population is primarily from consumption of marine mammal blubber and rendered oils.

  20. Assessment of contamination and biomarker responses in two species of herons on the St. Lawrence river.

    PubMed

    Champoux, Louise; Rodrigue, Jean; Desgranges, Jean-Luc; Trudeau, Suzanne; Hontela, Alice; Boily, Monique; Spear, Philip

    2002-10-01

    This study was undertaken to validate potential biomarkers of exposure and effects due to chemical contaminants in breeding colonies of the Great Blue Heron and the Black-crowned Night-Heron on the St. Lawrence River. Eggs and fledglings from both species were collected from many colonies along the River. The fledglings from colonies in freshwater and brackish water were more contaminated by mercury and PCBs than those from estuarine and gulf colonies. With respect to fledglings of the two heron species, some morphometric and blood biochemical measurements, including plasma thyroid hormones and retinol, were significantly different among colonies. Significant differences were also observed in liver retinoids, EROD and porphyrins among colonies. The results of this study suggest that plasma retinoids and thyroid hormones are good biomarkers of exposure and effects, and are sufficiently sensitive to reflect local and regional variations in contamination. Along with the measure of contaminants in egg and plasma, they constitute non-invasive biomarkers which represent an important criteria for long term monitoring of wildlife species. It is concluded that the Great Blue Heron is an appropriate sentinel species in the surveillance network for the St. Lawrence River.

  1. Phallodrilus hallae, a new tubificid oligochaete from the St. Lawrence Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cook, David G.; Hiltunen, Jarl K.

    1975-01-01

    The predominantly marine tubificid genus Phallodrilus is defined, a key to its nine species constructed, and an illustrated description of Phallodrilus hallae n. sp. from the St. Lawrence Great Lakes presented. The species is distinguished from other members of the genus by its well-developed atrial musculature, extensions of which ensheath the posterior prostatic ducts.Phallodrilus hallae n. sp. is a small worm which is widely distributed in the sublittoral and profundal benthos of Lake Superior; lakewide it occurred in mean densities of 50 individuals per square metre. Available records indicate a more restricted distribution in Lake Huron and Georgian Bay. We suggest that P. hallae n. sp. is either a glaciomarine relict species, or that it entered the Great Lakes system at the time of the marine transgression of the St. Lawrence valley. The apparent restriction of P. hallae n. sp. to waters of high quality suggests that it may be a sensitive oligotrophic indicator species.

  2. Hindcast storm events in the Bering Sea for the St. Lawrence Island and Unalakleet Regions, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Erikson, Li H.; McCall, Robert T.; van Rooijen, Arnold; Norris, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    This study provides viable estimates of historical storm-induced water levels in the coastal communities of Gambell and Savoonga situated on St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea, as well as Unalakleet located at the head of Norton Sound on the western coast of Alaska. Gambell, Savoonga, and Unalakleet are small Native Villages that are regularly impacted by coastal storms but where little quantitative information about these storms exists. The closest continuous water-level gauge is at Nome, located more than 200 kilometers from both St. Lawrence Island and Unalakleet. In this study, storms are identified and quantified using historical atmospheric and sea-ice data and then used as boundary conditions for a suite of numerical models. The work includes storm-surge (temporary rise in water levels due to persistent strong winds and low atmospheric pressures) modeling in the Bering Strait region, as well as modeling of wave runup along specified sections of the coast in Gambell and Unalakleet. Modeled historical water levels are used to develop return periods of storm surge and storm surge plus wave runup at key locations in each community. It is anticipated that the results will fill some of the data void regarding coastal flood data in western Alaska and be used for production of coastal vulnerability maps and community planning efforts.

  3. Middle pleistocene mollusks from St. Lawrence Island and their significance for the paleo-oceanography of the Bering Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hopkins, D.M.; Rowland, R.W.; Patton, W.W.

    1972-01-01

    Drift, evidently of Illinoian age, was deposited on St. Lawrence Island at the margin of an ice cap that covered the highlands of the Chukotka Peninsula of Siberia and spread far eastward on the continental shelf of northern Bering Sea. Underlying the drift on the northwestward part of the island are mollusk-bearing beds deposited during the Kotzebuan Transgression. A comparison of mollusk faunas from St. Lawrence Island, Chukotka Peninsula, and Kotzebue Sound suggests that the present northward flow through Bering and Anadyr Straits was reversed during the Kotzebuan Transgression. Cold arctic water penetrated southward and southwestward bringing an arctic fauna to the Gulf of Anadyr. Warmer Pacific water probably entered eastern Bering Sea, passed eastward and northeastward around eastern and northern St. Lawrence Island, and then became entrained in the southward currents that passed through Anadyr Strait. ?? 1972.

  4. Genotoxic substances in the St. Lawrence system II: Extracts of fish and macroinvertebrates from the St. Lawrence and Saguenay Rivers, Canada

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.A.; Rasmussen, J.B.; Blaise, C.

    1998-02-01

    Aquatic biota frequently accumulate organic contaminants and maintain steady state tissue concentrations that are as much as 10{sup 5} times higher than those in the surrounding water. Although many researchers have studied the accumulation of genotoxic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by aquatic biota, few researchers have used bioassays to investigate the accumulation of genotoxins. In several previous studies the authors used the SOS Chromotest to investigate the genotoxicity of industrial effluent extracts, sediment extracts, and bivalve tissue extracts. In this study they use the SOS Chromotest to investigate the accumulation of organic genotoxins by macroinvertebrates and fish in the St. Lawrence and Saguenay rivers (Quebec, Canada). Tissue concentrations of genotoxins reveal bioconcentration factors in the 10{sup 2} to 10{sup 3} range. Concentrations are partially determined by lipid content (r{sup 2} = 0.22). Lipid-normalized values indicate that genotoxin concentrations in invertebrate tissues are significantly higher than those in fish. Fish values indicate that tissue concentrations are biodiminished, with fish at higher trophic levels having lower tissue burdens of genotoxins. The biodiminution pattern observed corresponds exceptionally well with trophic position assignments made by other authors. More contaminated sites yielded less contaminated specimens. This may be due to the induction of phase 1 and phase 2 detoxification enzymes that is likely to occur at high levels of exposure. Although the results do not support PAHs as the putative genotoxins, the results do indicate that the accumulated genotoxins have similar properties. Tissue to sediment ratios of genotoxins are similar to those observed for genotoxic PAHs, and far lower than those of more persistent organochlorines. Although the authors did not investigate genotoxic effects, they might expect the most dramatic effects in fish that consume contaminated macroinvertebrates.

  5. Operational coupled atmosphere - ocean - ice forecast system for the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucher, M.; Roy, F.; Desjardins, S.; Fogarty, C.; Pellerin, P.; Ritchie, H.; Denis, B.

    2009-09-01

    A fully interactive coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice forecasting system for the Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL) has been running in experimental mode at the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) for the last two winter seasons. The goal of this project is to provide more accurate weather and sea ice forecasts over the GSL and adjacent coastal areas by including atmosphere-oceanice interactions in the CMC operational forecast system using a formal coupling strategy between two independent modeling components. The atmospheric component is the Canadian operational GEM model (Côté et al. 1998) and the oceanic component is the ocean-ice model for the Gulf of St. Lawrence developed at the Maurice Lamontagne Institute (IML) (Saucier et al. 2003, 2004). The coupling between those two models is achieved by exchanging surface fluxes and variables through MPI communication. The re-gridding of the variables is done with a package developed at the Recherche en Prevision Numerique centre (RPN, Canada). Coupled atmosphere - ocean - ice forecasts are issued once a day based on 00GMT data. Results for the past two years have demonstrated that the coupled system produces improved forecasts in and around the GSL during all seasons, proving that atmosphere-ocean-ice interactions are indeed important even for short-term Canadian weather forecasts. This has important implications for other coupled modeling and data assimilation partnerships that are in progress involving EC, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) and the National Defense (DND). Following this experimental phase, it is anticipated that this GSL system will be the first fully interactive coupled system to be implemented at CMC.

  6. A mass balance of genotoxicity in the St. Lawrence River (Montreal) based on SOS chromotest results

    SciTech Connect

    White, P.A.; Rasmussen, J.B.

    1995-12-31

    Mass balance models are frequently used to track contaminants in aquatic ecosystems. To the authors knowledge no mass balance has ever been constructed using only bioassay results for complex mixtures. They have used surface water SOS Chromotest results from Langevin et al (1992) and industrial effluent SOS Chromotest results from White et al (1996) to determine the steady state concentration of genotoxins in the surface waters of the St. Lawrence river around Montreal. The results of Langevin et al indicate that the St. Lawrence River west of Montreal is contributing 446 ng benzo(a)pyrene equivalents per L, while the Ottawa River is contributing 166 ng benzo(a)pyrene equivalents per L. The data of While et al indicate that industrial emissions in the Montreal area are contributing an additional 68 ng benzo(a)pyrene equivalents per L. The latter value is based on the genotoxic potency of final effluents from 13 priority industries, their daily discharge and the mean (n = 35 years) river discharge at Lasalle. Assuming that the industrial effluents do not alter the river discharge, the expected surface water concentration of genotoxins in the Montreal area is 680 ng benzo(a)pyrene equivalents per L. This value is extremely close to the mean of actual surface water measurements published by Langevin et al. (701 ng benzo(a)pyrene equivalents per L). The extremely short water residence time (< 2 days) and rapid current ({approx}1 m/sec) indicate that losses from sedimentation and decay between Valleyfield and Varennes are negligible. The results indicate that municipal wastewater discharges account for over 95% of the Montreal area contribution.

  7. 33 CFR 207.610 - St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation of the harbor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation of the harbor and U.S. breakwater. 207.610 Section 207... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.610 St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration,...

  8. 33 CFR 207.610 - St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation of the harbor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation of the harbor and U.S. breakwater. 207.610 Section 207... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.610 St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration,...

  9. 33 CFR 207.610 - St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation of the harbor...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration, and navigation of the harbor and U.S. breakwater. 207.610 Section 207... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.610 St. Lawrence River, Cape Vincent Harbor, N.Y.; use, administration,...

  10. An empirical approach to the remote sensing of the chlorophyll in the optically complex waters of the Estuary and Gulf of Saint-Lawrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yayla, K. Mehmet

    Data from five research cruises performed between 1997 and 2001 were processed in order to investigate the potential for improving remote sensing algorithms in the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence. Measured in situ parameters included concentration-dependent indicators of the three critical, optically-active constituents, chlorophyll, Coloured Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) and Suspended Particulate Matter (SPM). The radiometric dataset used to investigate different types of algorithms consisted of multi-band above-surface remote sensing reflectance (Rrs) estimates. These estimates were computed from downwelling surface irradiance and upwelling sub-surface radiance measurements acquired using a SeaWiFS Profiler Multichannel Radiometer (SPMR). The chlorophyll data varied from approximately 0.1 to 17.3 mg.m -3 in the study region which extended from stations near the Saguenay River to the outer extremes of the Gulf of St. Lawrence. The CDOM and SPM concentration indicators were lower in the Gulf compared to the Estuary. Moderate correlation between in situ measurements was found between chlorophyll and SPM, as well as between CDOM and SPM. Chlorophyll and CDOM were virtually uncorrelated. The standard SeaWiFS Case-I chlorophyll retrieval algorithm, OC4v4, was applied to SPMR data acquired over a significant number of sampling stations (N=169). Algorithm shortcomings were noted when the OC4v4 algorithm was applied directly to the study region. Specific shortcomings, the overestimation of low, and underestimation of high chlorophyll concentrations were consistent with previous findings in coastal regions and particularly with previous findings in the NW Atlantic and in high latitude regions. In addition, the algorithmic output was found to be fairly strongly correlated with CDOM and SPM. A perturbation approach, based on the analysis of residuals between OC4v4 estimates and in situ data, showed that the retrieved chlorophyll biases (overestimates) were dependent on

  11. 78 FR 50136 - iVoice, Inc., Protectus Medical Devices, Inc., and St. Lawrence Energy Corp.; Order of Suspension...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION iVoice, Inc., Protectus Medical Devices, Inc., and St. Lawrence Energy Corp.; Order of Suspension of Trading August 14, 2013. It appears to the Securities and Exchange Commission that there is a lack of current and accurate...

  12. A predictive model for floating leaf vegetation in the St. Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    In July 2014, USEPA staff was asked by MPCA to develop a predictive model for floating leaf vegetation (FLV) in the St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE). The existing model (Host et al. 2012) greatly overpredicts FLV in St. Louis Bay probably because it was based on a limited number of...

  13. Characterization of hydrogeomorphology of the natural and restored wetlands in St. Lawrence River Valley, NY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, K.; Chandler, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding of local hydrology and landscape setting is essential for evaluating systematic functions and services of the wetlands because the ecosystem components are sensitive to hydrodynamics and topography, particularly in vegetation composition and abundance. Wetland hydrogeomorphology provides a general sense of the wetland structure such as plant community and hydroperiod, but it can be easily altered by human activity and disturbance. In order to achieve a successful wetland restoration on the altered landscape and topography, recovery of hydrology for adaptation should be prioritized. In this study, regional hydrogeomorphic classification of 18 natural and 48 restored wetlands in the St. Lawrence River Valley area in the northern New York State was conducted and wetland-upland interactions were investigated using pairs of water level measurements at a groundwater well and standing water in randomly selected 5 natural and 17 restored wetlands. The wetlands over large area were broadly classified in terms of geomorphic setting, water source, and hydrodynamics. Water level was monitored on an hourly basis for an entire Water Year of 2015 to understand a hydroperiod and hydrodynamics at each site. Horizontal hydraulic gradient from upland groundwater to standing water in the wetlands was also calculated from the observation data to estimate groundwater contribution as an input source of the wetlands. The characterized hydrology was categorized into the regional hydrogeomorphic classes and further statistically analyzed. The regional wetland classification and functional assessment will provide useful tools to make a proper restoration plan.

  14. Temporal changes in wetland landscapes of a section of the St. Lawrence River, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jean, Martin; Bouchard, André

    1991-03-01

    Historical aerial photographs (from 1946 through 1983) were used to study and describe the nature and extent of changes in wetland vegetation of a section of the St. Lawrence River and to evaluate the relative importance of water level, fire, and vegetational development as causal factors of these historical changes. Data were encoded and analyzed using a geographical information system, autocorrelation, and Mantel tests. Results show three temporal patterns in wetland dynamics. First, some wetland zones have been reduced by human activities (urbanization, landfilling, canal dredging). The second group consists of wetland areas that remain stable and do not change over time. They are generally protected sites artificially maintained by water-level control. A third situation has occurred in the Lake Saint-François National Wildlife Area, where no significant wetland losses were detected, but where landscape structure has changed greatly. Modeling with Mantel tests suggests that, in the latter case, these changes in wetland landscape are related to the suppression of burning (fires set deliberately by Indians) since the purchase of the territory by the Canadian federal government. This situation has caused rapid replacement of wet meadows by Alnus rugosa scrub and a possible decline in habitat diversity.

  15. Holocene development of parabolic dunes in the central St. Lawrence Lowland, Québec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filion, Louise

    1987-09-01

    Stabilized parabolic dunes in the central St. Lawrence Lowland are oriented NE-SW, in the postulated direction of dune-building winds coming from anticyclonic air circulation induced by the retreating Laurentide Ice Sheet about 10,000 yr ago. The eolian chronology reconstructed from several sections in mixed dune-peatland environments indicates that postglacial plant colonization, characterized by a fortuitous assemblage of arctic-subarctic and boreal elements, preceded dune formation during Champlain Sea regression around 10,000 yr B.P. Confined peatlands and small forests were buried by eolian sands between 10,000 and 7500 yr B.P. under dry and temperate conditions. This eolian episode lasted about 2500 14C yr and ended when cyclonic air circulation similar to the present humid climatic regime was established following the breakup and disappearance of the Laurentide Ice Sheet over Hudson Bay and peripheral areas. Dune stabilization, through paludification of well-drained eolian sands about 7500 yr B.P., suggests a major shift in climate toward wetter conditions that have been characteristic during most of the Holocene in eastern North America. Minor eolian erosion induced by wildfire was recorded during late Holocene time (about 1250 yr B.P.). Anthropogenic perturbation (logging and agriculture practice) was also responsible for recent very local eolian activity.

  16. Environmental factors as predictors of epibenthic assemblage biomass in the St. Lawrence system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourget, E.; Ardisson, P.-L.; Lapointe, L.; Daigle, G.

    2003-07-01

    The distribution of epibenthic invertebrate biomass in relation to environmental factors was examined in the St. Lawrence system. Biomass estimates for epibenthos sampled yearly for 9 years on 102 suspended collectors (navigation buoys), were related to environmental data from the literature (surface water temperature, water salinity, water transparency, current velocity, chlorophyll a and primary production) using a weighted multiple linear regression analysis. Regression models were generated for total biomass and the biomass of the single dominant sessile species: Mytilus edulis, Semibalanus balanoides, Balanus crenatus, Obelia longissima and Hiatella arctica. Water temperature and water transparency, as well as some biogeographic groups of buoys represented by dummy variables, collectively explained 90.6% of the variance in total biomass. Water temperature, water transparency, biogeographic groups and, to a lesser degree, primary production, were the variables having a significant influence on the biomass of individual species. The lognormal weighted multiple regression model explained up to 84.5% of the variance in M. edulis biomass data and 67.9, 70.0, 71.6 and 38.9%, respectively, of the variance in S. balanoides, O. longissima, B. crenatus and H. arctica biomass data. The need to consider simultaneous biological and environmental sampling at the relevant temporal and spatial scales to model large marine coastal ecosystems is discussed.

  17. Lake sturgeon spawning on artificial habitat in the St Lawrence River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, J.H.; LaPan, S.R.; Klindt, R.M.; Schiavone, A.

    2006-01-01

    In 1996, lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) spawning was documented for the third consecutive year on an artificially placed gravel bed in the St Lawrence River. Two distinct spawning periods were observed in 1996. Spawning initially commenced on 17 June, when water temperature reached 15°C. A second spawning event was documented from 28 June to 1 July (16°C). Sturgeon egg densities were monitored in three transects on egg trays, on the gravel surface, and within interstitial spaces in the gravel. Counts of developing eggs in the gravel bed during both spawning periods were used to estimate a total of 275 000 eggs on the study area (0.075 ha). Average egg density was highest in the transect with the highest water velocities. Lake sturgeon fry were first observed in the gravel on 24 June (15.5°C), and first emergence from the gravel was documented on 28 June. Hatching following the second spawning event commenced on 3 July. Based on assessment of average embryo viability (61.6%) and egg-to-emergent fry survival (17.6%) an estimate of about 171 000 sturgeon eggs hatched, producing over 49 000 emergent fry. Current velocity, substrate particle size, depth of substrate, and maintenance of sediment-free interstitial spaces are important considerations in planning future spawning habitat enhancement projects.

  18. Toxicity of sediments near an aluminum smelter on the St. Lawrence river to aquatic organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe-Smith, J.L.; Sirota, G.R.; Holtze, K.E.; Reid, J.J.

    1994-12-31

    Under a US EPA Superfund Administrative Order, over 50,000 cu yds of bottom sediments contaminated with fluoride, cyanide, PCBs, PAHs and Al will be dredged from the St. Lawrence River near the Reynolds Metals plant at Massena, NY in 1994. The purpose of this study was to determine the toxicity of these sediments to aquatic organisms and the potential for remobilizing sediment-bound contaminants into the water column during dredging. Sediment was collected from 7 sites along a gradient from the outfall in October 1993. Sediment from the most contaminated site ``B2`` (1,500 {mu}g/g fluoride, 30 {mu}g/g cyanide, 450 {mu}g/g PCBs, 3,500 {mu}g/g PAHs, 90,000 {mu}g/g Al), caused complete mortality of mayflies, Hexagenia limbata, and avoidance, considerable weight loss and some mortality in fathead minnows, Pimephales promelas, after 21 d exposure. Mortality was not observed at other sites, but growth of both organisms decreased with increasing contamination. LOECs of B2 elutriate were 13% for survival and reproduction of Ceriodaphnia dubia, and 6% for survival and 1.5% for growth of larval fatheads. Elutriates of other sediments were nontoxic. TIE testing suggested organic contaminants as the primary toxicants. Over 2,000 cu yds of sediment are highly toxic and 18,000 cu yds somewhat toxic. Toxicity of B2 elutriate shows that contaminants enter the water column when sediments are disturbed and may harm indigenous biota.

  19. Late Quaternary history of the southwestern St. Lawrence Lowlands and adjacent Adirondack Highlands

    SciTech Connect

    Pair, D.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The reconstruction of Late Wisconsinan ice retreat, proglacial lakes, and Champlain Sea history from the northwest Adirondack slope and adjacent St. Lawrence Lowlands is critical to the synthesis of a regional picture of deglacial events in the eastern Great Lakes region. Unfortunately, these same areas are well known for their limited exposures, landforms covered by thick forest, large tracts of land inaccessible to detailed field mapping, and the overall paucity of glacial materials preserved on upland surfaces. Despite these limitations, a model which utilizes multiple and field-truthed evidence has been used to designate areas where ice border deposits indicate a substantial recessional position. It employs the following criteria in this analysis: sedimentology and morphostratigraphy of morainal landform segments and related sediments; orientation and continuity of ice border drainage channels; and the relationship of ice borders and drainage systems to well documented local and regional water bodies which accompanied ice retreat. The results of this approach have provided a unique regional picture of deglaciation. Despite the inherent limitations of working in upland areas to reconstruct glacial events, detailed morphostratigraphic correlations based on multiple lines of evidence can yield important information. The positions of five former ice borders have been reconstructed from the available data. These ice margins correspond closely with those documented previously by others adjoining areas. This type of study, utilizing multiple and field-truthed lines of evidence, constitutes a tangible step towards understanding the nature and history of ice retreat along this portion of the Laurentide Ice Sheet.

  20. Novel brominated flame retardants and dechloranes in three fish species from the St. Lawrence River, Canada.

    PubMed

    Houde, Magali; Berryman, David; de Lafontaine, Yves; Verreault, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    Restrictions in the utilization of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) mixtures have led to the increased usage of alternative flame retardant additives in a wide range of commercial applications. The present study examined the occurrence of established and emerging flame retardants (FRs) in fish from a densely-populated urbanized sector of the St. Lawrence River (Montreal, Quebec, Canada). Thirty-eight PBDE congeners and sixteen emerging FRs were determined in fish belonging to three predatory species (yellow perch, northern pike, and muskellunge). The ∑PBDE in fish were up to 24,115 ng/g lipid weight (l.w.) in the apex predator muskellunge. Twelve emerging FRs including bis(2-ethylhexyl)-tetrabromophthalate (BEHTBP), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), Dechlorane Plus (anti and syn), dechloranes (Dec) 602, Dec 604, Dec 604 Compound B (Dec 604 CB), and Chlordene Plus (CP) were detected (>0.01 ng/gl.w.) in the liver of muskellunge and northern pike but not in yellow perch homogenates. This is the first report of Dec 604 CB in any fish species. The bioavailability of these FRs in human-impacted aquatic ecosystems warrants further environmental assessment and toxicity testing.

  1. Investigating phenology of larval fishes in St. Louis River estuary shallow water habitats

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of the development of an early detection monitoring strategy for non-native fishes, larval fish surveys have been conducted since 2012 in the St. Louis River estuary. Survey data demonstrates there is considerable variability in fish abundance and species assemblages acro...

  2. A Community Runs Through It: 30 Years of Collaboration in the St. Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    When participants in the 2016 St Louis River Summit identified their roles and described their interactions with the estuary on the 50-year timeline, they were illustrating the community that built and is now implementing the Remedial Action Plan. From its inception, the Great La...

  3. Distribution of submerged aquatic vegetation in the St. Louis River estuary: Maps and models

    EPA Science Inventory

    In late summer of 2011 and 2012 we used echo-sounding gear to map the distribution of submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in the St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE). From these data we produced maps of SAV distribution and we created logistic models to predict the probability of occurr...

  4. The faucet snail (Bithynia tentaculata) invades the St. Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The European-origin faucet snail (Bithynia tentaculata) now numbers among the aquatic invasive species present in the St. Louis River Estuary. This snail has been in the lower Great Lakes since the early 20th century but is new to the Lake Superior basin. We found faucet snails...

  5. Habitat use and trophic position effects on contaminant bioaccumulation in St. Louis River Estuary fishes

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of our study was to determine the relationship between fish tissue stable isotope composition and total mercury or polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) concentrations in the St. Louis River estuary food web. We sampled two resident fishes, Yellow Perch (Perca flavescens) ...

  6. Time Series Analysis of Water Level and Temperature in the St Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pressure and temperature loggers were deployed at 9 sites in the St Louis River estuary between 6/23 10/31 2011. A reference sensor was place on the shore to correct pressure data. Sensors were paced at <1 m depth in Allouez Bay, Superior Bay, near Hearding Island, WLSSD Bay, th...

  7. Ground-Water Quality in the St. Lawrence River Basin, New York, 2005-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.

    2007-01-01

    The Federal Clean Water Act requires that States monitor and report on the quality of ground water and surface water. To satisfy part of these requirements, the U.S. Geological Survey and New York State Department of Environmental Conservation have developed a program in which ground-water quality is assessed in 2 to 3 of New York State's 14 major river basins each year. To characterize the quality of ground water in the St. Lawrence River Basin in northern New York, water samples were collected from 14 domestic and 11 production wells between August 2005 and January 2006. Eight of the wells were finished in sand and gravel and 17 wells were finished in bedrock. Ground-water samples were collected and processed using standard U.S. Geological Survey procedures and were analyzed for 229 constituents and physical properties, including inorganic constituents, nutrients, trace elements, radon-222, pesticides and pesticide degradates, volatile organic compounds, and bacteria. Sixty-six constituents were detected above laboratory reporting levels. Concentrations of most compounds at most sites were within drinking water standards established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and New York State Department of Health, but a few compounds exceeded drinking water standards at some sites. Water in the basin is generally hard to very hard (hardness equal to 121 mg/L as CaCO3 or greater); hardness and alkalinity were generally higher in the St. Lawrence Valley than in the Adirondack Mountains. The cation with the highest median concentration was calcium; the anion with the highest median concentration was bicarbonate. The concentration of chloride in one sample exceeded the 250 milligrams per liter U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Secondary Drinking Water Standard; the concentration of sulfate in one sample also exceeded the 250 milligrams per liter U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Secondary Drinking Water Standard. Nitrate was the predominant nutrient detected

  8. Hydrologic data summary for the St. Lucie River Estuary, Martin and St. Lucie Counties, Florida, 1998-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrne, Michael J.; Patino, Eduardo

    2004-01-01

    A hydrologic analysis was made at three canal sites and four tidal sites along the St. Lucie River Estuary in southeastern Florida from 1998 to 2001. The data included for analysis are stage, 15-minute flow, salinity, water temperature, turbidity, and suspended-solids concentration. During the period of record, the estuary experienced a drought, major storm events, and high-water discharge from Lake Okeechobee. Flow mainly occurred through the South Fork of the St. Lucie River; however, when flow increased through control structures along the C-23 and C-24 Canals, the North Fork was a larger than usual contributor of total freshwater inflow to the estuary. At one tidal site (Steele Point), the majority of flow was southward toward the St. Lucie Inlet; at a second tidal site (Indian River Bridge), the majority of flow was northward into the Indian River Lagoon. Large-volume stormwater discharge events greatly affected the St. Lucie River Estuary. Increased discharge typically was accompanied by salinity decreases that resulted in water becoming and remaining fresh throughout the estuary until the discharge events ended. Salinity in the estuary usually returned to prestorm levels within a few days after the events. Turbidity decreased and salinity began to increase almost immediately when the gates at the control structures closed. Salinity ranged from less than 1 to greater than 35 parts per thousand during the period of record (1998-2001), and typically varied by several parts per thousand during a tidal cycle. Suspended-solids concentrations were observed at one canal site (S-80) and two tidal sites (Speedy Point and Steele Point) during a discharge event in April and May 2000. Results suggest that most deposition of suspended-solids concentration occurs between S-80 and Speedy Point. The turbidity data collected also support this interpretation. The ratio of inorganic to organic suspended-solids concentration observed at S-80, Speedy Point, and Steele Point

  9. Index of surface-water records, part 4, St. Lawrence River Basin, to September 30, 1950

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1951-01-01

    The index lists the stream-flow and reservoir stations in the St. Lawrence River Basin for which records have been or are to be published for periods prior to September 30, 1950. The stations are listed in downstream order. Tributary streams are indicated by indention. Station names are given in their most recently published forms. Parentheses around part of a station name indicate that the inclosed word or words were used in an earlier published name or the station or in a name under which records were published by same agency other than the Geological Survey. The drainage areas, in square miles, are the latest figures published or otherwise available at this time. Drainage areas that were obviously inconsistent with other drainage areas on the same stream have been omitted. Some drainage areas not published by the Geological Survey are listed with an appropriate footnote stating the published source or the figure or drainage area. Under "period of record" breaks of less than a 12-month period are not shown. A dash not followed immediately by a closing date shows that the station was in operation on September 30, 1950. The years given are calendar years. Periods of records published by agencies other than the Geological Survey are listed in parentheses only when they contain more detailed information or are for periods not reported in publications to the Geological Survey. Records both of gage height and of discharge are listed for stream-flow stations, and records of gage height and of contents (or of change in contents) are listed for stations on reservoirs. Records of gage heights only and records consisting only of monthly figures either of stream flow or reservoir contents are designated by symbols and footnotes. For early years when daily discharges were not generally published by the Geological Survey, published daily gage heights and a published rating table are considered to be equivalent to daily discharges. An alphabetical index of streams. canals. and

  10. Year-class formation of upper St. Lawrence River northern pike

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, B.M.; Farrell, J.M.; Underwood, H.B.; Smith, S.J.

    2007-01-01

    Variables associated with year-class formation in upper St. Lawrence River northern pike Esox lucius were examined to explore population trends. A partial least-squares (PLS) regression model (PLS 1) was used to relate a year-class strength index (YCSI; 1974-1997) to explanatory variables associated with spawning and nursery areas (seasonal water level and temperature and their variability, number of ice days, and last day of ice presence). A second model (PLS 2) incorporated four additional ecological variables: potential predators (abundance of double-crested cormorants Phalacrocorax auritus and yellow perch Perca flavescens), female northern pike biomass (as a measure of stock-recruitment effects), and total phosphorus (productivity). Trends in adult northern pike catch revealed a decline (1981-2005), and year-class strength was positively related to catch per unit effort (CPUE; R2 = 0.58). The YCSI exceeded the 23-year mean in only 2 of the last 10 years. Cyclic patterns in the YCSI time series (along with strong year-classes every 4-6 years) were apparent, as was a dampening effect of amplitude beginning around 1990. The PLS 1 model explained over 50% of variation in both explanatory variables and the dependent variable, YCSI first-order moving-average residuals. Variables retained (N = 10; Wold's statistic ??? 0.8) included negative YCSI associations with high summer water levels, high variability in spring and fall water levels, and variability in fall water temperature. The YCSI exhibited positive associations with high spring, summer, and fall water temperature, variability in spring temperature, and high winter and spring water level. The PLS 2 model led to positive YCSI associations with phosphorus and yellow perch CPUE and a negative correlation with double-crested cormorant abundance. Environmental variables (water level and temperature) are hypothesized to regulate northern pike YCSI cycles, and dampening in YCSI magnitude may be related to a

  11. Genetics and shell morphometrics of assimineids (Mollusca, Caenogastropoda, Truncatelloidea) in the St Lucia Estuary, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Nelson A F; van Rooyen, Ryan; MacDonald, Angus; Ponder, Winston; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2014-01-01

    The Assimineidae are a family of amphibious microgastropods that can be mostly found in estuaries and mangroves in South Africa. These snails often occur in great numbers and are ecologically important to the St Lucia Estuary, which forms a crucial part of the iSimangaliso Wetland Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Genetic and shell morphometric analyses were conducted on individuals collected from nine localities distributed from the northern lake regions to the southern lake and the mouth of the St Lucia estuarine lake. Mitochondrial (COI) and nuclear (28S) DNA was used to construct Bayesian Inference, Neighbour-joining, Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood trees. Principal Component Analysis and Cluster Analysis were performed on standard shell parameter data. Results indicate that two different taxa are present in St Lucia. The taxon comprising individuals from the South Lake and St Lucia Estuary Mouth is identified as Assiminea cf. capensis Bartsch, in accordance with the latest taxonomic consensus. The taxon comprising assimineid individuals from False Bay, North Lake and South Lake, is here tentatively named "Assiminea" aff. capensis (Sowerby). These two taxa exhibit patterns of spatial overlap that appear to vary depending on environmental parameters, particularly salinity. The need to resolve the complex taxonomy of assimineids is highlighted.

  12. Mapping ecosystem services in the St. Louis River estuary (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Management of ecosystems for sustainable provision of services beneficial to human communities requires reliable data about from where in the ecosystem services flow. Our objective is to map ecosystem services in the St. Louis River with the overarching EPA goal of community sust...

  13. Mapping ecosystem services in the St. Louis River Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainable management of ecosystems for the perpetual flow of services beneficial to human communities requires reliable data about from where in the ecosystem services flow. Our objective is to map ecosystem services in the St. Louis River with the overarching U.S. EPA goal of ...

  14. Assessing condition of macroinvertebrate communities and sediment toxicity in the St. Lawrence River at Massena Area-of-Concern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffy, Brian T.; Baldigo, Barry P.; Smith, Alexander J; George, Scott D.; David, Anthony M.

    2016-01-01

    In 1972, the USA and Canada agreed to restore the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Great Lakes ecosystem under the first Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. In subsequent amendments, part of the St. Lawrence River at Massena, New York and segments of three tributaries, were designated as an Area of Concern (AOC) due to the effects of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), lead and copper contamination, and habitat degradation and resulting impairment to several beneficial uses. Because sediments have been largely remediated, the present study was initiated to evaluate the current status of the benthic macroinvertebrate (benthos) beneficial use impairment (BUI). Benthic macroinvertebrate communities and sediment toxicity tests using Chironomus dilutus were used to test the hypotheses that community condition and sediment toxicity at AOC sites were not significantly different from those of adjacent reference sites. Grain size was found to be the main driver of community composition and macroinvertebrate assemblages, and bioassessment metrics did not differ significantly between AOC and reference sites of the same sediment class. Median growth of C. dilutus and its survival in three of the four river systems did not differ significantly in sediments from AOC and reference sites. Comparable macroinvertebrate assemblages and general lack of toxicity across most AOC and reference sites suggest that the quality of sediments should not significantly impair benthic macroinvertebrate communities in most sites in the St. Lawrence River AOC.

  15. Forecasting the Major Influences of Predation and Environment on Cod Recovery in the Northern Gulf of St. Lawrence

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Nicolas; Chassot, Emmanuel; Duplisea, Daniel E.; Hammill, Mike O.

    2014-01-01

    The northern Gulf of St. Lawrence (NGSL) stock of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), historically the second largest cod population in the Western Atlantic, has known a severe collapse during the early 1990 s and is currently considered as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. As for many fish populations over the world which are currently being heavily exploited or overfished, urgent management actions in the form of recovery plans are needed for restoring this stock to sustainable levels. Stochastic projections based on a statistical population model incorporating predation were conducted over a period of 30 years (2010–2040) to assess the expected outcomes of alternative fishing strategies on the stock recovery under different scenarios of harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) abundance and environmental conditions. This sensitivity study shows that water temperature is key in the rebuilding of the NGSL cod stock. Model projections suggest that maintaining the current management practice under cooler water temperatures is likely to maintain the species in an endangered status. Under current or warmer conditions in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, partial recovery might only be achieved by significant reductions in both fishing and predation pressure. In the medium-term, a management strategy that reduces catch could be favoured over a complete moratorium so as to minimize socio-economic impacts on the industry. PMID:24523852

  16. Forecasting the major influences of predation and environment on cod recovery in the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Nicolas; Chassot, Emmanuel; Duplisea, Daniel E; Hammill, Mike O

    2014-01-01

    The northern Gulf of St. Lawrence (NGSL) stock of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua), historically the second largest cod population in the Western Atlantic, has known a severe collapse during the early 1990 s and is currently considered as endangered by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada. As for many fish populations over the world which are currently being heavily exploited or overfished, urgent management actions in the form of recovery plans are needed for restoring this stock to sustainable levels. Stochastic projections based on a statistical population model incorporating predation were conducted over a period of 30 years (2010-2040) to assess the expected outcomes of alternative fishing strategies on the stock recovery under different scenarios of harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) abundance and environmental conditions. This sensitivity study shows that water temperature is key in the rebuilding of the NGSL cod stock. Model projections suggest that maintaining the current management practice under cooler water temperatures is likely to maintain the species in an endangered status. Under current or warmer conditions in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, partial recovery might only be achieved by significant reductions in both fishing and predation pressure. In the medium-term, a management strategy that reduces catch could be favoured over a complete moratorium so as to minimize socio-economic impacts on the industry.

  17. The St. Lawrence Island famine and epidemic, 1878–80: a Yupik narrative in cultural and historical context.

    PubMed

    Crowell, Aron L; Oozevaseuk, Estelle

    2006-01-01

    A collaborative study of the Smithsonian Institution's ethnology collections has inspired the narration of Alaska Native oral traditions, including Yupik Elder Estelle Oozevaseuk's re-telling (in 2001) of the story of Kukulek village and the St. Lawrence Island famine and epidemic of 1878–80. The loss of at least 1,000 lives and all but two of the island's villages was a devastating event that is well documented in historical sources and archaeology, as well as multiple Yupik accounts. Yupiget have transmitted memories of extreme weather, bad hunting conditions, and a wave of fatal contagion that swept the island. The Kukulek narrative, with origins traceable to the late nineteenth century, provides a spiritual perspective on the disaster's underlying cause, found in the Kukulek people's disrespect toward the animal beings that sustained them. This paper explores the cultural and historical contexts of this narrative, and contrasts it with Western perspectives.

  18. Description of Gyrodactylus mediotorus n. sp. (Monogenea: Gyrodactylidae) infecting spottail shiner (Notropis hudsonius) from the St. Lawrence River, Canada.

    PubMed

    King, Stanley D; Marcogliese, David J; Forest, Jonathon J H; McLaughlin, J Daniel; Bentzen, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Gyrodactylus mediotorus n. sp. is described from the body, fins, and buccal cavity of the spottail shiner, Notropis hudsonius (Cyprinidae) from the St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada. Gyrodactylus mediotorus n. sp. is the first species of Gyrodactylus Nordmann, 1832 described from N. hudsonius and is characterized by large hamuli, large medial process of the ventral bar, narrow linguiform ventral bar membrane, large anterolateral processes, and marginal hooks with long shafts and distinctly shaped sickle. The species that most resembles Gyrodactylus mediotorus n. sp. is Gyrodactylus protuberus Rogers and Wellborn, 1965 described from the stargazing shiner, Notropis uranoscopus Suttkus, 1959. The 2 species can be differentiated based on the larger hamuli (68.4 vs. 64) and ventral bar (38.4 vs. 24) of Gyrodactylus mediotorus n. sp. and the shape of the marginal hooks which for Gyrodactylus mediotorus n. sp. has a slightly larger toe and a point which is not as angled. The morphological description is supplemented with 436 sequenced base pairs of the 18S gene (including the V4 region) as well as 1,041 sequenced base pairs spanning the complete ITS-1, 5.8S, and ITS-2 regions. BLAST (Basic Local Alignment Search Tool) searches failed to provide any close matches for either regions of DNA, with Gyrodactylus colemanensis infecting Salvelinus fontinalis being the most genetically similar for both the 18S (∼91%, JF836090) and ITS (∼84%, JF836142) rDNA regions. Gyrodactylus mediotorus n. sp. has been found infecting spottail shiners in the St. Lawrence River in low prevalence and intensities periodically over the last 15 yr.

  19. Sulfonylurea herbicides in an agricultural catchment basin and its adjacent wetland in the St. Lawrence River basin.

    PubMed

    de Lafontaine, Yves; Beauvais, Conrad; Cessna, Allan J; Gagnon, Pierre; Hudon, Christiane; Poissant, Laurier

    2014-05-01

    The use of sulfonylurea herbicides (SU) has increased greater than 100 times over the past 30 years in both Europe and North America. Applied at low rates, their presence, persistence and potential impacts on aquatic ecosystems remain poorly studied. During late-spring to early fall in 2009-2011, concentrations of 9 SU were assessed in two agricultural streams and their receiving wetland, an enlargement of the St. Lawrence River (Canada). Six SU in concentrations >LOQ (10 ng L(-1)) were detected in 10% or less of surface water samples. Rimsulfuron was detected each year, sulfosulfuron and nicosulfuron in two years and the others in one year only, suggesting that application of specific herbicides varied locally between years. Detection frequency and concentrations of SU were not significantly associated with total precipitation which occurred 1 to 5d before sampling. Concentrations and fate of SU differed among sites due to differences in stream dynamics and water quality characteristics. The persistence of SU in catchment basin streams reflected the dissipation effects associated with stream discharge. Maximum concentrations of some SU (223 and 148 ng L(-1)) were occasionally above the baseline level (100 ng L(-1)) for aquatic plant toxicity, implying potential toxic stress to flora in the streams. Substantially lower concentrations (max 55 ng L(-1)) of SU were noted at the downstream wetland site, likely as a result from dilution and mixing with St. Lawrence River water, and represent less toxicological risk to the wetland flora. Sporadic occurrence of SU at low concentrations in air and rain samples indicated that atmospheric deposition was not an important source of herbicides to the study area.

  20. Plankton ecosystem response to freshwater-associated bulk turbidity in the subarctic Gulf of St. Lawrence (Canada): A modelling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fouest, V.; Zakardjian, B.; Saucier, F. J.

    2010-04-01

    We present a three-dimensional physical-biological modelling study aiming to infer the effect of freshwater-associated bulk turbidity on the Gulf of St. Lawrence (Canada) plankton ecosystem. Bulk turbidity is parameterised using an inverse relationship derived from an extensive in situ dataset linking salinity to the diffuse attenuation coefficient of photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) due to nonchlorophyllous matter. Embedding bulk turbidity in the model led to shallowing of the photic zone in the estuarine plume in accordance with coincident observations and allowed a better discrimination between Case 1 (chlorophyll-mediated variability of the photosynthetic available radiation attenuation) and Case 2 waters. The spring bloom was delayed, and primary and secondary production rates as well as the export of biogenic matter at depth decreased in the freshwater-influenced subregions. Comparisons with literature and coincident in situ measurements showed that nitrates were over- and underestimated in the run with and without bulk turbidity, respectively. A sensitivity analysis was performed with a relatively simple but robust parameterisation of photoacclimation, i.e. the adjustment of the phytoplankton photosynthetic efficiency to local underwater light conditions. Photoacclimation allowed simulated chlorophyll and nitrate concentrations as well as lateral fluxes of nitrate to achieve the best agreement with coincident measurements and literature estimates, respectively. This study showed that accounting for the freshwater-associated bio-optical variability and phytoplankton response in terms of photosynthetic efficiency improved the model's ability to predict the plankton ecosystem dynamics and associated biogeochemical fluxes in the river-influenced Gulf of St. Lawrence.

  1. Lipophilic antioxidants and lipid peroxidation in yellow perch subjected to various anthropogenic influences along the St. Lawrence River (QC, Canada).

    PubMed

    Landry, Catherine; Houde, Magali; Brodeur, Philippe; Spear, Philip; Boily, Monique

    2017-05-01

    In Lake Saint-Pierre (LSP), the last great widening of the St. Lawrence River (province of Québec, Canada), the yellow perch has been experiencing a significant decline since the mid-1990s. The combined effect of several stressors (deterioration of habitats appropriate for reproduction and growth, invasive species and poor water quality) seems to exert considerable influence on the yellow perch population in LSP, characterized by low recruitment. To better understand possible stressor effects at the biochemical level, LSP yellow perch were compared with other sites along a gradient of increasing human influences from upstream to downstream along the St. Lawrence River. Morphometry (size, weight, circumference and Fulton's condition factor) and biomarkers associated to the peroxidation of lipids, lipophilic antioxidants (α-tocopherol and carotenoids), along with retinoids (vitamins A1and A2) and proteins were compared between sites at the larval, juvenile and adult stages. Fulton's condition factor was similar between sites for juveniles but was significantly lower in LSP adults, suggesting a weakened physiological condition. In most contaminated sites as LSP, lipid peroxidation tended to be higher in juveniles and adults whereas the lipophilic antioxidant lycopene and proteins content were lower. Retinyl esters were significantly lower for LSP fish compared to other sites, not only in larvae but also in the livers of juveniles and adults. These results are consistent with possible altered metabolism in the retinoid system of LSP yellow perch. The overall results reflect the "pressure" gradient tested, where the yellow perch from the most affected sites located downstream had impaired physiological and biochemical conditions compared to the upstream sectors.

  2. Temporal and spatial distribution and production of dissolved gaseous mercury in the Bay St. François wetland, in the St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Edenise; Laroulandie, Jerôme; Saint-Simon, Xavier R.; Amyot, Marc

    2006-06-01

    Wetlands are valued for their high biodiversity and for their ecosystem services. However, we still do have a poor understanding of their role in the redox transformation of contaminants such as mercury, particularly in fluvial settings. Seasonal and spatial variations in dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) distribution and production were studied in the Bay St. François, a wetland in the St. Pierre Lake, a fluvial lake of the St. Lawrence River, in Quebec, Canada. A high spatial resolution for DGM, with samples taken every 10-cm depth, was used in field measurements. Through a series of parallel field and incubation experiments, we assessed the main factors determining Hg(0) transformations as a function of depth, seasons, and presence/absence of macrophyte beds. Besides light penetration in the water column and water temperature, iron and dissolved organic carbon likely stimulated Hg(II) reduction. Inversely, chloride favored Hg(0) oxidation. Macrophytes and associated epiphytes appeared to be important sites of adsorption/absorption of Hg(II) and likely of DGM. It seems however that the effects of macrophytes were restricted to immediately adjacent waters. Near the bottom, under anoxic conditions, the reduction of Hg(II) was highly promoted. In addition, sediments and decomposing macrophytes seemed to release DGM and/or reducible Hg to bottom waters. Overall, differences in DGM between surface and bottom waters tended to be more accentuated than observed differences in DGM between macrophyte beds and sites devoid of plant.

  3. A decade of aquatic invasive species (AIS) early detection method development in the St. Louis River estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    As an invasion prone location, the St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE) has been a case study for ongoing research to develop the framework for a practical Great Lakes monitoring network for early detection of aquatic invasive species (AIS). Early detection, however, necessitates findi...

  4. A survey of the St. Louis River estuary with emphasis on non-indigenous species and habitat structure

    EPA Science Inventory

    As part of a larger study to develop a monitoring network for aquatic non-indigenous species (NIS), a comprehensive multi-gear survey of larval fish and macroinvertebrates in the St. Louis River estuary was conducted during summer 2012. A total of 139 larval fish samples and 118...

  5. Shoreline Classification of the St. Louis River Estuary using Geographic Information Systems and Standard Landuse/Landcover Data Sets

    EPA Science Inventory

    The St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE) shoreline is ~300 km in length and borders MN and WI from the MN highway 23 downstream to Lake Superior. The shoreline is a complex and diverse mixture of many features from industrial docks and slips in the lower SLRE to complex wetlands and na...

  6. PRESENCE OF ALGAE IN FRESHWATER ICE COVER OF FLUVIAL LAC SAINT-PIERRE (ST. LAWRENCE RIVER, CANADA)(1).

    PubMed

    Frenette, Jean-Jacques; Thibeault, Patrice; Lapierre, Jean-François; Hamilton, Paul B

    2008-04-01

    Winter ice cover is a fundamental feature of north temperate aquatic systems and is associated with the least productive months of the year. Here we describe a previously unknown freshwater habitat for algal and microbial communities in the ice cover of the freshwater St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada. Sampling performed during winter 2005 revealed the presence of viable algal cells, such as Aulacoseira islandica (O. Müll.) Simonsen (Bacillariophyceae), and microbial assemblage growing in the ice and at the ice-water interface. Vertical channels (1-5 mm wide) containing algae were also observed. Concentrations of chl a ranged between 0.5 and 169 μg · L(-1) of melted ice, with maximal concentrations found in the lower part of the ice cores. These algae have the potential to survive when ice breakup occurs and reproduce rapidly in spring/summer conditions. Freshwater ice algae can thus contribute to in situ primary production, biodiversity, and annual carbon budget in various habitats of riverine communities.

  7. Passive acoustic detection and localization of whales: effects of shipping noise in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park.

    PubMed

    Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Gervaise, Cédric

    2008-06-01

    The performance of large-aperture hydrophone arrays to detect and localize blue and fin whales' 15-85 Hz signature vocalizations under ocean noise conditions was assessed through simulations from a normal mode propagation model combined to noise statistics from 15 960 h of recordings in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park. The probability density functions of 2482 summer noise level estimates in the call bands were used to attach a probability of detection/masking to the simulated call levels as a function of whale depth and range for typical environmental conditions. Results indicate that call detection was modulated by the calling depth relative to the sound channel axis and by modal constructive and destructive interferences with range. Masking of loud infrasounds could reach 40% at 30 km for a receiver at the optimal depth. The 30 dB weaker blue whale D-call were subject to severe masking. Mapping the percentages of detection and localization allowed assessing the performance of a six-hydrophone array under mean- and low-noise conditions. This approach is helpful for optimizing hydrophone configuration in implementing passive acoustic monitoring arrays and building their detection function for whale density assessment, as an alternative to or in combination with the traditional undersampling visual methods.

  8. Shipping noise in whale habitat: characteristics, sources, budget, and impact on belugas in Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park hub.

    PubMed

    Gervaise, Cédric; Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Kinda, Bazile; Ménard, Nadia

    2012-07-01

    A continuous car ferry line crossing the Saguenay Fjord mouth and traffic from the local whale-watching fleet introduce high levels of shipping noise in the heart of the Saguenay-St. Lawrence Marine Park. To characterize this noise and examine its potential impact on belugas, a 4-hydrophone array was deployed in the area and continuously recorded for five weeks in May-June 2009. The source levels of the different vessel types showed little dependence on vessel size or speed increase. Their spectral range covered 33 dB. Lowest noise levels occurred at night, when ferry crossing pace was reduced, and daytime noise peaked during whale-watching tour departures and arrivals. Natural ambient noise prevailed 9.4% of the time. Ferry traffic added 30-35 dB to ambient levels above 1 kHz during crossings, which contributed 8 to 14 dB to hourly averages. The whale-watching fleet added up to 5.6 dB during peak hours. Assuming no behavioral or auditory compensation, half of the time, beluga potential communication range was reduced to less than ~30% of its expected value under natural noise conditions, and to less than ~15% for one quarter of the time, with little dependence on call frequency. The echolocation band for this population of belugas was also affected by the shipping noise.

  9. Biochemical indicators of contaminant exposure in birds and turtles of the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, C.; Trudeau, S.; Kennedy, S.; Norstrom, R.; Stegeman, J.

    1995-12-31

    Pre-fledgling chicks of tree swallows, double-crested cormorants, herring gulls, common terns and hatchling snapping turtles were collected from contaminated Areas of Concern and reference sites in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River to determine the geographic and species variation in biomarker responses. EROD activity in colonial waterbirds was generally an order of magnitude above EROD activity in tree swallows and snapping turtles. Notably, EROD activity in colonial waterbirds did not correlate with organochlorine contamination in livers at one industrialized site suggesting that exposure to other contaminants, possibly PAHs, may be an important factor. Retinol concentrations in cormorants were non-detectable and retinyl palmitate concentrations were equal or greater than those in herring gulls. In tree swallows, there was a significant negative correlation between vitamin A concentration in liver and kidney and EROD activity. In snapping turtles, there was a significant induction in EROD activity and significantly higher cytochrome P450 IAI level in livers from the Great Lakes site relative to a clean inland location. There were no significant differences in porphyrin concentrations between sites.

  10. Estimation, analysis, sources, and verification of consumptive water use data in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snavely, D.S.

    1988-01-01

    The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River basin provides water for many uses and for wildlife habitat; thus many groups have developed strategies to manage the basin 's water resource. The International Joint Commission (IJC) is reviewing and comparing available consumptive-use data to assess the magnitude and effect of consumptive uses under present projected economic and hydraulic conditions on lake levels. As a part of this effort, the U.S. Geological Survey compared its own estimates of consumptive use in the United States with those generated by (1) the International Great Lakes Diversions and (2) the IJC. The U.S. Geological Survey also developed two methods of calculating consumptive-use projections for 1980 through 2000; one method yields an estimate of 6,490 cu ft/s for the year 2000; the other yields an estimate of 8,330 cu ft/s. These two projections could be considered the upper and lower limits for the year 2000. The reasons for the varying estimates are differences in (1) methods by which base year values were developed, and (2) the methods or models that were used to project consumptive-use values for the future. Acquisition of consumptive-use data from water users or governmental agencies or ministries would be desirable to minimize reliance on estimates. (USGS)

  11. Neoplastic and nonneoplastic hepatic changes in lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) from the St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Mikaelian, I; de Lafontaine, Y; Menard, C; Tellier, P; Harshbarger, J; Martineau, D

    1998-01-01

    As part of a survey of fish diseases, lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) were collected in fall 1995 from the St. Lawrence River 15 km upstream of Quebec City, Quebec, Canada, to assess the prevalence of liver lesions. A total of 141 fish were captured and necropsied, and three standard sections of liver were taken for histological examination. Prevalences of altered hepatocyte foci, hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangioma, and cholangiocarcinoma were 0.7%, 2.1%, 0.7%, and 2.1%, respectively. Thus, the overall prevalence of liver neoplasia was 4.9% (7/141). Hepatic tumors were only observed in fish 7 years old or older. Fish age was significantly and positively correlated with the index assessing the number and size of macrophage aggregates (p<0.001; rs = 0.16). Hepatocyte vacuolation, anisokaryosis, lymphocytic infiltration, and bile duct hyperplasia were also observed but were not related to the age, length, sex, or condition factor of the fish. These results represent the first report on a series of hepatic tumors in a wild salmonid species. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:9485481

  12. β-carotene and retinoids in eggs of Great Blue Herons (Ardea herodias) in relation to St Lawrence River contamination.

    PubMed

    Boily, M H; Champoux, L; Bourbonnais, D H; Des Granges, J L; Rodrigue, J; Spear, P A

    1994-12-01

    : The potential use of retinoids and β-carotene as biomarkers in the eggs of the Great Blue Heron was investigated. In the spring of 1991, 65 eggs were collected from nine heronries (seven along the St Lawrence River and two reference sites). A method was specifically developed for the extraction and analysis of β-carotene and the retinoids in heron egg yolks by reversed-phase HPLC. When results were expressed either as the molar ratio of retinol: retinyl palmitate or as retinyl palmitate concentration, significant differences were found between colonies; however, retinyl palmitate concentration was deemed the better biomarker because it was not significantly influenced by embryonic stage of development. Retinyl palmitate concentrations in freshwater colonies were negatively related to PCB congeners Nos 105 and 118 as well as their TCDD-EQ values (p < 0.02, r (2)=0.78). Egg tetrachloro-mono-ortho biphenyl concentrations were also negatively related to retinyl palmitate (p < 0.005, r (2)=0.90). With the exception of the two mono-ortho co-planar congeners detected in the present study, the contamination levels found in heron eggs were well below those found for other bird species in the Great Lakes area and, so far, no detrimental effects have been reported in Great Blue Heron populations in Quebec. These results suggest that retinyl palmitate may be useful as a sensitive and non-invasive biomarker for monitoring organochlorine contaminant effects in the Great Blue Heron in freshwater sites.

  13. Analysis and modeling of 255 source levels of merchant ships from an acoustic observatory along St. Lawrence Seaway.

    PubMed

    Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Gervaise, Cédric; Giard, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    An ensemble of 255 spectral source levels (SSLs) of merchant ships were measured with an opportunistic seaway acoustic observatory adhering to the American National Standards Institute/Acoustical Society of America S12.64-2009 standard as much as possible, and deployed in the 350-m deep lower St. Lawrence Seaway in eastern Canada. The estimated SSLs were sensitive to the transmission loss model. The best transmission loss model at the three measuring depths was an empirical in situ function for ranges larger than 300 m, fused with estimates from a wavenumber integration propagation model fed with inverted local geoacoustic properties for [300 to 1 m] ranges. Resulting SSLs still showed a high variability. Uni- and multi-variate analyses showed weak intermingled relations with ship type, length, breadth, draught, speed, age, and other variables. Cluster analyses distinguished six different SSL patterns, which did not correspond to distinctive physical characteristics of the ships. The broadband [20-500 Hz] source levels varied by 30 dB or more within all four 50-m length categories. Common SSL models based on frequency, length and speed failed to unbiasly replicate the observations. This article presents unbiased SSL models that explain 75%-88% of the variance using frequency, ship speed, and three other automatic identification system ship characteristics.

  14. Historical records of atmospheric metal deposition along the St. Lawrence Valley (eastern Canada) based on peat bog cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratte, Steve; Mucci, Alfonso; Garneau, Michelle

    2013-11-01

    The recent history of atmospheric As, Cd, Ni, Pb and Zn deposition and the stable Pb isotope signatures were reconstructed from short cores collected at three peat bogs along the St. Lawrence Valley (SLV). The onset of industrial activity was recorded around 1810-1850 AD. As, Cd, Pb and, to a certain extent, Ni deposition rates reached maxima between 1940 and the early 1970s. Trace metals likely originated from coal-burning and ore smelting between 1850 and 1950 AD, and were replaced thereafter, at least in the case of Pb, by the combustion of leaded gasolines until the mid-1980s. Trace metal contents and accumulation rates were greater in the two cores recovered from the southwestern SLV than further northeast, as expected from their proximity to urban and industrial centers of eastern Canada and the U.S. Mid-West and the direction of the prevalent winds. A rapid decrease in metal accumulation rates since the 1970s suggests that mitigation policies were effective in reducing atmospheric metal emissions. Nevertheless, metal accumulation rates and stable Pb isotope signatures have not yet returned to their pre-industrial values.

  15. Interactions between invasive round gobies (Neogobius melanostomous) and fantail darters (Etheostoma flabellare) in a tributary of the St. Lawrence River, New York, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abbett, Ross; Waldt, Emily M.; Johnson, James H.; McKenna, James E.; Dittman, Dawn E.

    2013-01-01

    The initial, rapid expansion of the invasive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) throughout the Great Lakes drainage was largely confined to lentic systems. We recently observed round gobies ascending two tributaries of the St. Lawrence River. The expansion of gobies into small lotic environments may place ecologically similar species at risk. Fantail darter (Etheostoma flabellare) is one of the several benthic species of the New York Great Lakes drainages that are threatened by round goby invasion. We examined the habitat use and diet composition of fantail darters and round gobies in Mullet Creek, a third-order tributary of the St. Lawrence River, NY, USA. The objectives of this study were to determine the degree of habitat and diet overlap between fantail darters and round gobies in a tributary of the St. Lawrence River. Gobies and darters co-occurred at 22% of capture sites. Of the four habitat variables examined (cover, depth, substrate and velocity), only depth use was significantly different with gobies using deeper habitats than darters. Among the two species and size classes sampled (large vs. small), large darters had the most restricted habitat use requirements. There was variation in round goby and darter diet composition, but only moderate diet overlap occurred between fantail darters and round gobies (Cλ = 0.43). Conditions in Mullet Creek were appropriate for the evaluation of possible spatial and dietary competition between round goby and native darters. Early detection and management of round goby invasions is critical to maintaining ecological integrity of lotic ecosystems in the St. Lawrence Valley.

  16. From yellow perch to round goby: A review of double-crested cormorant diet and fish consumption at three St. Lawrence River colonies, 1999–2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, James H.; Farquhar, James F; Klindt, Rodger M; Mazzocchi, Irene; Mathers, Alastair

    2015-01-01

    The number of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in the upper St. Lawrence River has increased markedly since the early 1990s. In 1999, a binational study was initiated to examine the annual diet composition and fish consumption of cormorants at colonies in the upper river. Since 1999, 14,032 cormorant pellets, collected from May through September each year, have been examined from St. Lawrence River colonies to estimate fish consumption and determine temporal and spatial variation in diet. Seasonal variation in diet composition within a colony was low. Prior to 2006 yellow perch was the primary fish consumed by cormorants in the upper St. Lawrence River. Round goby were first observed in cormorant diets in 2003 and by 2006 were the main fish consumed at two of the three colonies. The time interval it took from the first appearance of round goby in the diet at a colony to when goby were the dominant prey species varied by island, ranging from two to five years. Daily fish consumption at each cormorant colony increased significantly from the pre-round goby to post-round goby period. The mean annual biomass of yellow perch consumed decreased significantly during the post-round goby period at the three colonies. Reduced consumption of yellow perch by cormorants may alleviate suspected localized impacts on perch near some of the larger river colonies.

  17. Trace metals in the Columbia River Estuary following the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Riedel, G.F.; Wilson, S.L.; Holton, R.L.

    1984-10-01

    Dissolved and suspended concentrations of cadmium, copper, iron, manganese, nickel, lead, and zinc were measured in the Columbia River Estuary following the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Soluble concentrations of these trace elements were not substantially elevated by the influx of volcanic ash and mud into the estuary during this period, except for somewhat higher than usual concentrations of manganese and copper. A laboratory experiment indicates that manganese leached from volcanic debris in fresh water and in the transition from fresh to slightly saline water probably caused the elevated Mn leaching from the material into fresh water.

  18. Trophic structure and mercury distribution in a Gulf of St. Lawrence (Canada) food web using stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Raphael A; Hebert, Craig E; Rail, Jean-François; Braune, Birgit M; Yumvihoze, Emmanuel; Hill, Laura G; Lean, David R S

    2010-10-15

    Even at low concentrations in the environment, mercury has the potential to biomagnify in food chains and reaches levels of concern in apex predators. The aim of this study was to relate the transfer of total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in a Gulf of St. Lawrence food web to the trophic structure, from primary consumers to seabirds, using stable nitrogen (δ(15)N) and carbon (δ(13)C) isotope analysis and physical environmental parameters. The energy reaching upper trophic level species was principally derived from pelagic primary production, with particulate organic matter (POM) at the base of the food chain. We developed a biomagnification factor (BMF) taking into account the various prey items consumed by a given predator using stable isotope mixing models. This BMF provides a more realistic estimation than when using a single prey. Lipid content, body weight, trophic level and benthic connection explained 77.4 and 80.7% of the variation in THg and MeHg concentrations, respectively in this food web. When other values were held constant, relationships with lipid and benthic connection were negative whereas relationships with trophic level and body weight were positive. Total Hg and MeHg biomagnified in this food web with biomagnification power values (slope of the relationship with δ(15)N) of 0.170 and 0.235, respectively on wet weight and 0.134 and 0.201, respectively on dry weight. Values of biomagnification power were greater for pelagic and benthopelagic species compared to benthic species whereas the opposite trend was observed for levels at the base of the food chain. This suggests that Hg would be readily bioavailable to organisms at the base of the benthic food chain, but trophic transfer would be more efficient in each trophic level of pelagic and benthopelagic food chains.

  19. History of the atmospheric deposition of major and trace elements in the industrialized St. Lawrence Valley, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gélinas, Yves; Lucotte, Marc; Schmit, Jean-Pierre

    The history of the atmospheric deposition of major and trace elements over southwestern Quebec, Canada, was reconstructed using multielemental analysis of lacustrine sediments sampled in a small and undisturbed lake located on top of a mountain in the heart of the industrialized St. Lawrence Valley. Acid leachable and residual elements were extracted from a 37-cm long core (1-cm resolution) using clean techniques and analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Organic matter and sulfur concentrations were high and played a major role in the low postdepositional diagenetic remobilization of many trace elements. Sulfur, manganese, iron, arsenic, molybdenum and barium displayed a high mobility making it exceedingly difficult to infer unambiguously time-dependent changes in atmospheric deposition for these elements. Atmospheric deposition rates for the less mobile elements (e.g., potassium, vanadium, chromium, cobalt, nickel, copper, zinc, rubidium, cadmium, tin, antimony, mercury, thallium, lead, and bismuth) increased regularly between 1942 and 1960-1975 in the Lake Hertel area and then stabilized for most of these elements, with the exception of nickel, copper, zinc and tin. Lead deposition rate was reduced by about 25% between 1982 and 1995, and a slight decreasing trend was also found for cobalt, mercury, and thallium during the same period. Present-day atmospheric deposition of metals directly on the lake surface represents a small percentage of the sedimentary deposition rates at this location. Deposition followed by surface runoff and outwash of terrestrial organic and inorganic matter most likely is the driving mechanism leading to the non-diagenetic enrichment of metals in Lake Hertel sediments.

  20. Evaluation of liver histopathology and EROD activity in St. Lawrence lake sturgeon (Acipenser fulvescens) in comparison with a reference population

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseaux, C.G. ||; Branchaud, A.; Spear, P.A.

    1995-05-01

    In an attempt to evaluate the effects of contaminants on the lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens, fish were netted from two sites: Riviere des Prairies, confluent with the St. Lawrence River near Montreal, and a reference site on the upper reaches of the Ottawa River in the La Verendrye Park. Livers of fish collected from the Riviere des Prairies were difficult to homogenize, and they left behind strands of what appeared to be connective tissue. Suspecting hepatic fibrosis, the authors decided to evaluate the livers for histopathologic changes. Nineteen adult lake sturgeon (eleven male and eight female) were examined. Following fixation, routine processing, sectioning, and staining with hematoxylin and eosin, microscopic evaluation revealed the following: Sections taken from livers of fish from the Riviere des Prairies site showed excessive fat accumulation and often severe chronic-active cholangiohepatitis. Bile duct proliferation (p < 0.0001), periportal fibrosis (p < 0.0001), inflammation (p < 0.001), and fat accumulation (p < 0.05) were more pronounced in the fish from the Riviere des Prairies site. Melano-macrophage centers appeared to be both paler and gave the appearance of fewer numbers (p < 0.01). Livers from lake sturgeon taken from the reference site had a more normal appearance. The EROD levels were also significantly induced in these fish (reference 3.39 {+-} 0.57; Riviere des Prairies site 8.21 {+-} 0.87 pmol/mg protein/min; p < 0.0005). The EROD levels positively correlated with bile duct proliferation (r{sup 2} = 0.44; p = 0.001) and periportal fibrosis (r{sup 2} = 0.41; p = 0.002). Despite the statistical associations above, the authors cannot categorically state that contaminants are the sole cause of the lesions seen.

  1. Hazard assessment of a simulated oil spill on intertidal areas of the St. Lawrence River with SPMD-TOX

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, B.T.; Petty, J.D.; Huckins, J.N.; Lee, Kenneth; Gauthier, J.

    2004-01-01

    Phytoremediation in a simulated crude oil spill was studied with a "minimalistic" approach. The SPMD-TOX paradigm - a miniature passive sorptive device to collect and concentrate chemicals and microscale tests to detect toxicity - was used to monitor over time the bioavailability and potential toxicity of an oil spill. A simulated crude oil spill was initiated on an intertidal freshwater grass-wetland along the St. Lawrence River southwest of Quebec City, Quebec, Canada. Several phytoremediation treatments were investigated; to dissipate and ameliorate the spill, treatments included nutrient amendments with inorganic nitrogen sources (ammonium nitrate and sodium nitrate) and phosphate (super triple phosphate) with and without cut plants, with natural attenuation (no phytoremedial treatment) as a control. Sequestered oil residues were bioavailable in all oil-treated plots in Weeks 1 and 2. Interestingly, the samples were colored and fluoresced under ultraviolet light. In addition, microscale tests showed that sequestered residues were acutely toxic and genotoxic, as well as that they induced hepatic P450 enzymes. Analysis of these data suggested that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were among the bioavailable residues sequestered. In addition, these findings suggested that the toxic bioavailable fractions of the oil spill and degradation products dissipated rapidly over time because after the second week the water column contained no oil or detectable degradation products in this riverine intertidal wetland. SPMD-TOX revealed no evidence of bioavailable oil products in Weeks 4, 6, 8, and 12. All phytoremediation efforts appeared to be ineffective in changing either the dissipation rate or the ability to ameliorate the oil toxicity. SPMD-TOX analysis of the water columns from these riverine experimental plots profiled the occurrence, dissipation, and influence of phytoremediation on the bioavailability and toxicity of oil products (parent or degradation products

  2. (222)Rn activity in groundwater of the St. Lawrence Lowlands, Quebec, eastern Canada: relation with local geology and health hazard.

    PubMed

    Pinti, Daniele L; Retailleau, Sophie; Barnetche, Diogo; Moreira, Floriane; Moritz, Anja M; Larocque, Marie; Gélinas, Yves; Lefebvre, René; Hélie, Jean-François; Valadez, Arisai

    2014-10-01

    One hundred ninety-eight groundwater wells were sampled to measure the (222)Rn activity in the region between Montreal and Quebec City, eastern Canada. The aim of this study was to relate the spatial distribution of (222)Rn activity to the geology and the hydrogeology of the study area and to estimate the potential health risks associated with (222)Rn in the most populated area of the Province of Quebec. Most of the groundwater samples show low (222)Rn activities with a median value of 8.6 Bq/L. Ninety percent of samples show (222)Rn activity lower than 100 Bq/L, the exposure limit in groundwater recommended by the World Health Organization. A few higher (222)Rn activities (up to 310 Bq/L) have been measured in wells from the Appalachian Mountains and from the magmatic intrusion of Mont-Saint-Hilaire, known for its high level of indoor radon. The spatial distribution of (222)Rn activity seems to be related mainly to lithology differences between U-richer metasediments of the Appalachian Mountains and magmatic intrusions and the carbonaceous silty shales of the St. Lawrence Platform. Radon is slightly enriched in sodium-chlorine waters that evolved at contact with clay-rich formations. (226)Ra, the parent element of (222)Rn could be easily adsorbed on clays, creating a favorable environment for the production and release of (222)Rn into groundwater. The contribution of groundwater radon to indoor radon or by ingestion is minimal except for specific areas near Mont-Saint-Hilaire or in the Appalachian Mountains where this contribution could reach 45% of the total radioactive annual dose.

  3. Novel flame retardants in urban-feeding ring-billed gulls from the St. Lawrence River, Canada.

    PubMed

    Gentes, Marie-Line; Letcher, Robert J; Caron-Beaudoin, Elyse; Verreault, Jonathan

    2012-09-04

    This study investigated the occurrence of a comprehensive suite of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and current-use flame retardants (FRs) in ring-billed gulls breeding in a highly industrialized section of the St. Lawrence River, downstream from Montreal (QC, Canada). Despite major point-sources and diffuse contamination by FRs, nearly no FR data have been reported in birds from this area. Bis(2-ethylhexyl)-2,3,4,5-tetrabromophthalate (BEHTBP) was detected in 89% of ring-billed gull livers (mean: 2.16 ng/g ww; max: 17.6 ng/g ww). To our knowledge, this is the highest detection frequency and highest concentrations reported thus far in any avian species or populations. Dechlorane Plus (DP) isomers were also particularly abundant (anti-DP detected in 100% and syn-DP in 93% of livers). Other detected FR compounds (3-14% detection) included 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EHTBB), hexachlorocyclopentenyl-dibromocyclooctane (HCDBCO) and β-1,2-dibromo-4-(1.2-dibromoethyl)-cyclohexane (β-TBECH). Mean BDE-209 (57.2 ± 12.2 ng/g ww) in ring-billed gull livers was unexpectedly high for this midtrophic gull species, exceeding levels reported in several apex raptors such as peregrine falcons. BDE-209's relative contribution to ∑PBDEs was on average 25% (exceeding BDE-47 and BDE-99) and contrasted with profiles typically reported for fish-eating gull species. The present study highlighted preoccupying gaps in upcoming FR regulations and stressed the need for further investigation of the sources of FR exposure in highly urbanized areas.

  4. Biogeochemical factors influencing net mercury methylation in contaminated freshwater sediments from the St. Lawrence River in Cornwall, Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Avramescu, Mary-Luyza; Yumvihoze, Emmanuel; Hintelmann, Holger; Ridal, Jeff; Fortin, Danielle; Lean, David R S

    2011-02-01

    The activity of various anaerobic microbes, including sulfate reducers (SRB), iron reducers (FeRP) and methanogens (MPA) has been linked to mercury methylation in aquatic systems, although the relative importance of each microbial group in the overall process is poorly understood in natural sediments. The present study focused on the biogeochemical factors (i.e. the relative importance of various groups of anaerobic microbes (FeRP, SRB, and MPA) that affect net monomethylmercury (MMHg) formation in contaminated sediments of the St. Lawrence River (SRL) near Cornwall (Zone 1), Ontario, Canada. Methylation and demethylation potentials were measured separately by using isotope-enriched mercury species ((200)Hg(2+) and MM(199)Hg(+)) in sediment microcosms treated with specific microbial inhibitors. Sediments were sampled and incubated in the dark at room temperature in an anaerobic chamber for 96h. The potential methylation rate constants (K(m)) and demethylation rates (K(d)) were found to differ significantly between microcosms. The MPA-inhibited microcosm had the highest potential methylation rate constant (0.016d(-1)), whereas the two SRB-inhibited microcosms had comparable potential methylation rate constants (0.003d(-1) and 0.002d(-1), respectively). The inhibition of methanogens stimulated net methylation by inhibiting demethylationand by stimulating methylation along with SRB activity. The inhibition of both methanogens and SRB was found to enhance the iron reduction rates but did not completely stop MMHg production. The strong positive correlation between K(m) and Sulfate Reduction Rates (SRR) and between K(d) and Methane Production Rates (MPR) supports the involvement of SRB in Hg methylation and MPA in MMHg demethylation in the sediments. In contrast, the strong negative correlation between K(d) and Iron Reduction Rates (FeRR) shows that the increase in FeRR corresponds to a decrease in demethylation, indicating that iron reduction may influence net

  5. Recent turbidity current activity in sediment-starved submarine canyons (Northwestern Gulf of St. Lawrence, Eastern Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normandeau, Alexandre; Lajeunesse, Patrick; St-Onge, Guillaume; Bourgault, Daniel; Neumeier, Urs

    2016-04-01

    Submarine canyons are known to be main conduits for the transport of sediments to deep-sea basins, mostly by turbidity currents. Turbidity currents flowing in submarine canyons are mostly triggered by hyperpycnal flows, small to large slope failures and advection of shelf sediment offshore. In these contexts, sediment supply is necessary to maintain canyon activity over time. In 2007, a high-resolution mapping of small-scale submarine canyons offshore Pointe-des-Monts (NW Gulf of St. Lawrence, Eastern Canada) revealed a series of incisions characterized by the presence of numerous confined crescentic bedforms. The repeat mapping of the canyons in 2012 and 2015 revealed that the bedforms migrated upslope, indicating that they are cyclic steps produced by supercritical flows. Surprisingly, the comparison of multibeam surveys did not show any evidence of slope failures that could have triggered the turbidity currents responsible for recent bedform migration. Additionally, the rocky shores and coastal shelf do not supply sediments to these canyons, thus excluding turbidity current triggers such as advection of shelf sediments or hyperpycnal flows. In this context, we suggest that hydrodynamic processes are responsible for suspending in-situ sediments, which then may flow as turbidity currents when density of the water-sediment mixture is high enough. ADCPs deployed for 3,5 months during the summer of 2015 revealed along-canyon currents following tidal cycles with speeds up to 0.4 m/s, which were not strong enough to produce bedform migration. Therefore, the currents responsible for bedforms occur during infrequent events or during winter conditions, which both require longer instrument time-series to be observed.

  6. Establishment Patterns of Non-native Fishes: Lessons from the Duluth-Superior Harbor and Lower St. Louis River, an Invasion-prone Great Lakes Freshwater Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    The St. Louis River freshwater estuary which drains into western Lake Superior and includes the Duluth-Superior (MN-WI) harbor, has a long history of non-native fish introductions. From 1985 to 2002, seven new fishes were identified in the estuary, an unprecedented rate of non-n...

  7. Delayed gametogenesis and progesterone levels in soft-shell clams (Mya arenaria) in relation to in situ contamination to organotins and heavy metals in the St. Lawrence River (Canada).

    PubMed

    Siah, A; Pellerin, J; Amiard, J-C; Pelletier, E; Viglino, L

    2003-06-01

    There is a growing awareness that contaminants in the aquatic environment may alter steroid hormone levels and affect the reproductive success of the invertebrates. To verify if heavy metals and organotins affect sexual maturation in Mya arenaria, individuals were collected from July to November 1998, at different sites along the South coast of the St. Lawrence maritime estuary. Near the Rimouski harbour, clams showed high levels of tributyltin (TBT), DBT in the gonad, along with a lower gonado-somatic index [GSI=gonad wet weight (g)/body wet weight without shell (g)x100], low progesterone levels and a delay in sexual maturation when compared to the reference site. Sites that had intermediate levels of contaminants exhibited intermediate responses of hormones and sexual maturation stages. It is therefore suggested that TBT, DBT are endocrine disruptors in clams. Further studies will however be necessary to investigate in more details how contaminants as TBT can affect the steroid hormones production in the gonads of M. arenaria.

  8. Numerical simulation of the basin scale hydrogeological impacts of carbon sequestration in deep saline aquifers of the St. Lawrence Lowlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girou, O.; Lemieux, J. M.; Malo, M.

    2015-12-01

    Full-scale carbon capture and storage in deep saline aquifers implies injecting important quantities of carbon in order to significantly reduce greenhouse gases emissions. At the basin scale, impacts related to CO2 injection are pressure perturbation as well as brine migration into freshwater aquifers. In this study, potential impacts of an industrial-scale carbon capture and storage project in Bécancour (Quebec, Canada), in the St. Lawrence Lowlands basin, are discussed, as well as the role played by regional normal faults that divide the basin into multiple compartments. The basin is 300 km long and 90 km wide, formed by sub-horizontal Paleozoic formations on top of which the Utica and Lorraine shale formations represent the caprock of the potential CO2reservoir. These formations cover most of the basin, except in its eroded northwestern part, located between 10 to 40 km away from the potential injection sites. Three injection scenarios were considered, corresponding to greenhouse gases emissions from large emitters located; in Bécancour industrial park, in a larger area that allow affordable transport and in the entire basin without considering transport costs (1, 5, 10 Mt/yr). The numerical model FEFLOW was used to simulate CO2 injection into different compartments to evaluate pressure build up propagation and brine migration in order to define which compartments are best suited for long-term storage. The simulations considered an injection period of 100 years and post-injections period of 1000 years. Numerical simulations indicate that normal faults, which exhibit a low hydraulic conductivity, play a major role orienting pressure build-up and brine migration. Due to the presence of normal faults, no pressure build up occurred close to the surface. Similarly, preliminary mass transport simulations show very limited brine migration. These first results indicate that basin-scale impacts of carbon injection are low for the 3 injection scenarios, however, the

  9. Modeling the hydrology of wetlands and their response to climate change: Application to the St Lawrence Lowlands, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossey, M.; Rousseau, A. N.; Savary, S.; Royer, A.

    2012-12-01

    The St Lawrence Lowlands, the most populated region of Quebec, Canada, are characterized by several ecosystems heavily affected by anthropogenic activities (e.g., agriculture, peat mining, and urbanization). Amongst these ecosystems, wetlands are facing major changes and deterioration that could have severe impacts on the overall hydrology of the area. For instance, over the last century nearly 45% of wetlands have disappeared in the watersheds of the Bécancour (2600 km2) and Yamaska (4850 km2) rivers with an increasing rate of the phenomenon over the past 40 years. Nowadays, wetlands represent 6% and 3% of the aforementioned watersheds, respectively. Since wetlands are thought to support low flows and flood mitigation services, these watersheds may be more vulnerable to climate change. The explicit accounting of wetlands in a distributed hydrological modeling framework may provide a means for an overall assessment of the role of wetlands at the watershed scale and of the estimation of their role in developing adaptation strategies (i.e., preservation/conservation). In this study, our main objectives are to integrate wetlands into an operational, distributed, hydrological model, and to quantify their impacts on the hydrological regime under current and changing climate conditions. To do so, we used HYDROTEL, a distributed hydrological model compatible with remote sensing and GIS data, to model the Bécancour and Yamaska watersheds. In the model, we categorized wetlands as either isolated or riparian according to their connection to the river network. Using hydrological observations from 1970 to 2010 and land cover maps from 2011, the model was first successfully calibrated over the 2000-2005 period and then validated over the 2005-2010 period. Meteorological outputs from the Canadian Regional Climate Model for the 1960-2100 period were then used as inputs to HYDROTEL. Preliminary results show that integration of wetlands in a distributed hydrological model can be

  10. A comparison of biofilms from macrophytes and rocks for taste and odour producers in the St. Lawrence river.

    PubMed

    Ridal, J J; Watson, S B; Hickey, M B C

    2007-01-01

    Given their widespread and prolific annual development in the St. Lawrence River (SLR), macrophytes (i.e. submerged aquatic plants) represent large surface areas for biofilm growth and potentially important sites for associated production of taste and odour (T&O) compounds. We therefore evaluated the importance of submerged macrophytes and their associated biofilms for production of T&O compounds, 2-methylisoborneol (MIB) and geosmin (GM), compared with biofilms from adjacent rocks. We also tested the hypothesis that production of these compounds would differ between macrophyte species, based on the premise that they are not inert substrates but directly influence the communities that colonise their surfaces. Samples collected from transects across the SLR between Kingston and Cornwall, ON were dominated by the flat-bladed Vallisneria spp., and the leafed Myriophyllum spicatum, Elodea canadensis, Chara spp., Potamgeton spp., and Ceratophyllum spp. Overall, MIB and GM levels in biofilms ranged widely between samples. Expressed per g dry weight of biofilm, median levels from macrophyte were 50 (range 1-5000) ng MIB g(-1) and 10 (<1 to 580) ng GM g(-1) compared with 50 (range 5-970) ng MIB g(-1) and 160 (1-1600) ng GM g(-1) from rocks. Based on non-parametric statistical analysis, levels of GM were higher on a g dry weight basis in biofilms from rocks than macrophytes (P = 0.02), but MIB levels were similar (P = 0.94). However, when normalised for differences in substrate surface area (i.e. ng cm(-2)), levels of both MIB and GM were higher in biofilms from rocks than from macrophytes (P < 0.01). There were no discernable differences in MIB and GM concentrations from biofilms of different macrophytes based on either g dry weight sample or surface area (P > 0.05). Overlying water (OLW) concentrations ranged between 2-45 ng L(-1) for MIB and 5-30 ng L(-1) for GM and were not correlated with levels in adjacent biofilms. However, OLW concentrations peaked in shallow, low

  11. Community-based participatory research projects and policy engagement to protect environmental health on St Lawrence Island, Alaska

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Pamela K.; Waghiyi, Viola; Welfinger-Smith, Gretchen; Byrne, Samuel Carter; Kava, Jane; Gologergen, Jesse; Eckstein, Lorraine; Scrudato, Ronald; Chiarenzelli, Jeff; Carpenter, David O.; Seguinot-Medina, Samarys

    2013-01-01

    Objectives This article synthesizes discussion of collaborative research results, interventions and policy engagement for St Lawrence Island (SLI), Alaska, during the years 2000–2012. Methods As part of on-going community-based participatory research (CBPR) studies on SLI, 5 discrete exposure-assessment projects were conducted: (a) a biomonitoring study of human blood serum; (b–d) 3 investigations of levels of contaminants in environmental media at an abandoned military site at Northeast Cape – using sediment cores and plants, semi-permeable membrane devices and blackfish, respectively; and (e) a study of traditional foods. Results Blood serum in residents of SLI showed elevated levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) with higher levels among those exposed to the military site at Northeast Cape, an important traditional subsistence-use area. Environmental studies at the military site demonstrated that the site is a continuing source of PCBs to a major watershed, and that clean-up operations at the military site generated PCB-contaminated dust on plants in the region. Important traditional foods eaten by the people of SLI showed elevated concentrations of PCBs, which are primarily derived from the long-range transport of persistent pollutants that are transported by atmospheric and marine currents from more southerly latitudes to the north. Interventions An important task for all CBPR projects is to conduct intervention strategies as needed in response to research results. Because of the findings of the CBPR projects on SLI, the CBPR team and the people of the Island are actively engaging in interventions to ensure cleanup of the formerly used military sites; reform chemicals policy on a national level; and eliminate persistent pollutants internationally. The goal is to make the Island and other northern/Arctic communities safe for themselves and future generations. Conclusions As part of the CBPR projects conducted from 2000 to 2012, a series of exposure

  12. The contribution of various types of settling particles to the flux of organic carbon in the Gulf of St. Lawrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero-Ibarra, Nancy; Silverberg, Norman

    2011-10-01

    The contents of 31 samples from free-drifting sediment traps deployed in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL) were analyzed for the individual contribution of the different types of particles encountered to the total particulate organic carbon (POC) flux. Two trap models were used in 1993-1994: small traps at 50 m depth and large traps at 50 and 150 m. Total POC fluxes averaged 42 mg C m -2 d -1 for the more reliable large trap and 149 mg C m -2 d -1 for the small trap. The POC fluxes were attributed to different classes of particles based upon microscopically determined particle dimensions and carbon/volume algorithms available in the literature. Fecal pellets, followed by phytoplankton, were the major attributable components, with important contributions by microzooplankton, particularly during the summer of 1994. The mean fluxes for pellets (6 and 60 mg C m -2 d -1, for the large and small traps, respectively) and phytoplankton (3.2 and 42.9 mg C m -2 d -1) were in the range of those encountered in other areas of moderate primary productivity. Mean zooplankton carbon fluxes (1.8 and 8.5 mg C m -2 d -1, respectively), however, reflect higher than average zooplankton abundances in the GSL. The C fluxes of specific algal groups confirmed the existence of three trophic regimes previously identified from water column studies and numeric cell fluxes: (1) a period when diatoms were dominant during the spring, (2) a longer interval, which was dominated by dinoflagellates at most others times of the year, and (3) a period of transition during summer. Carbon of animal origin dominated the attributable flux, including an important fraction associated with heterotrophic dinoflagellates. The contribution of marine snow to the total flux (estimated as the difference between the total POC flux and the sum of the attributed components) frequently amounted to more than 60%. The true importance of marine snow remains uncertain, however, because the errors associated with each of the

  13. Aquatic Vegetation of the St. Louis River Estuary: Initial Analysis of Point-intercept Data Collected in 2010 for Restoration Modeling.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new effort to model aquatic vegetation patterns in the St. Louis River Estuary was initiated in summer of 2010 for the purpose of informing wetland restoration planning in the St. Louis River Area of Concern (AOC) at 40th Avenue West in Duluth. Aquatic vascular plants were doc...

  14. CHINESE MITTEN CRABS (ERIOCHEIR SINENSIS) IN THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER (CANADA): NEW RECORDS AND RISK OF INVASION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis, is an internationally renowned aquatic invader. Native to China and North/South Korea, this catadromous crab has successfully invaded several rivers and estuaries in eleven countries in Western Europe as well as the San Francisco Bay ...

  15. Modeling wetland plant community response to assess water-level regulation scenarios in the Lake Ontario-St. Lawrence River basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudon, Christiane; Wilcox, Douglas; Ingram, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The International Joint Commission has recently completed a five-year study (2000-2005) to review the operation of structures controlling the flows and levels of the Lake Ontario - St. Lawrence River system. In addition to addressing the multitude of stakeholder interests, the regulation plan review also considers environmental sustainability and integrity of wetlands and various ecosystem components. The present paper outlines the general approach, scientific methodology and applied management considerations of studies quantifying the relationships between hydrology and wetland plant assemblages (% occurrence, surface area) in Lake Ontario and the Upper and Lower St. Lawrence River. Although similar study designs were used across the study region, different methodologies were required that were specifically adapted to suit the important regional differences between the lake and river systems, range in water-level variations, and confounding factors (geomorphic types, exposure, sediment characteristics, downstream gradient of water quality, origin of water masses in the Lower River). Performance indicators (metrics), such as total area of wetland in meadow marsh vegetation type, that link wetland response to water levels will be used to assess the effects of different regulation plans under current and future (climate change) water-supply scenarios.

  16. Toxicity of waters from the St. Lawrence River at Massena Area-of-Concern to the plankton species Selenastrum capricornutum and Ceriodaphnia dubia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldigo, Barry P.; Duffy, Brian T.; Nally, Christopher J.; David, Anthony M.

    2012-01-01

    In 1972, the US and Canada committed to restore the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the Great Lakes Ecosystem under the first Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. During subsequent amendments, part of the St. Lawrence River at Massena NY, and segments of three tributaries, were designated as one Area of Concern (AOC) due to various beneficial use impairments (BUIs). Plankton beneficial use was designated impaired within this AOC because phytoplankton and zooplankton population data were unavailable or needed “further assessment”. Contaminated sediments from industrial waste disposal have been largely remediated, thus, the plankton BUI may currently be obsolete. The St. Lawrence River at Massena AOC remedial action plan established two criteria which may be used to assess the plankton BUI; the second states that, “in the absence of community structure data, plankton bioassays confirm no toxicity impact in ambient waters”. This study was implemented during 2011 to determine whether this criterion was achieved. Acute toxicity and chronic toxicity of local waters were quantified seasonally using standardized bioassays with green alga Selenastrum capricornutum and water flea Ceriodaphnia dubia to test the hypothesis that waters from sites within the AOC were no more toxic than were waters from adjacent reference sites. The results of univariate and multivariate analyses confirm that ambient waters from most AOC sites (and seasons) were not toxic to both species. Assuming both test species represent natural plankton assemblages, the quality of surface waters throughout most of this AOC should not seriously impair the health of resident plankton communities.

  17. Chlorinated hydrocarbons and mercury in sediments, red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus) and tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) from wetlands in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Bishop, C.A.; Koster, M.D.; Chek, A.A.; Hussell, D.J.T.; Jock, K.

    1995-03-01

    In 1991, the authors collected red-winged blackbird (Agelauis phoeniceus) eggs and tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) eggs and nestlings, and sediment samples from 2 wetland sites in the Great lakes and St. Lawrence River basin. They analyzed for chlorinated hydrocarbons and total mercury and found that biota contained contaminant concentrations which were one to two orders of magnitude above those in sediments. Maximum concentrations of contaminants were found in Akwesasne, St. Lawrence river (PCBs = 18,558.8 ng/g in red-winged blackbird eggs, oxychlordane = 58.8/g and mirex = 40.1 ng/g in tree swallow eggs); Mud Creek, Lake Erie and Cootes Paradise. Despite the migratory habits of red-winged blackbirds and tree swallows, agreement among biota and sediment in geographic variation of contaminant concentrations supports the use of these animals as biomonitors of persistent chemicals. Although chlorinated hydrocarbon concentrations in red-winged blackbird eggs were significantly correlated with sediment contamination, the local nature of the tree swallow chick diet suggests that nestlings would be the best indicator of local contaminant trends.

  18. Persistent Organochlorine Pesticide Exposure Related to a Formerly Used Defense Site on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska: Data from Sentinel Fish and Human Sera.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Samuel; Miller, Pamela; Waghiyi, Viola; Buck, C Loren; von Hippel, Frank A; Carpenter, David O

    2015-01-01

    St. Lawrence Island, Alaska, is the largest island in the Bering Sea, located 60 km from Siberia. The island is home to approximately 1600 St. Lawrence Island Yupik residents who live a subsistence way of life. Two formerly used defense sites (FUDS) exist on the island, one of which, Northeast Cape, has been the subject of a $123 million cleanup effort. Environmental monitoring demonstrates localized soil and watershed contamination with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), organochlorine (OC) pesticides, mercury, and arsenic. This study examined whether the Northeast Cape FUDS is a source of exposure to OC pesticides. In total, 71 serum samples were collected during site remediation from volunteers who represented three geographic regions of the island. In addition, ninespine stickleback (Pungitius pungitius) and Alaska blackfish (Dallia pectoralis) were collected from Northeast Cape after remediation to assess continuing presence of OC pesticides. Chlordane compounds, DDT compounds, mirex, and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were the most prevalent and present at the highest concentrations in both fish tissues and human serum samples. After controlling for age and gender, activities near the Northeast Cape FUDS were associated with an increase in serum HCB as compared to residents of the farthest village from the site. Positive but nonsignificant relationships for sum-chlordane and sum-DDT were also found. Organochlorine concentrations in fish samples did not show clear geographic trends, but appear elevated compared to other sites in Alaska. Taken together, data suggest that contamination of the local environment at the Northeast Cape FUDS may increase exposure to select persistent OC pesticides.

  19. Microalgal productivity in an estuarine lake during a drought cycle: The St. Lucia Estuary, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Molen, Johan S.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2011-03-01

    The St. Lucia estuarine lake on the north coast of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, is one of the largest estuarine systems in Africa and of unique importance for the adjacent marine and terrestrial ecosystems. The area regularly experiences periods of drought, resulting in hypersaline conditions in its shallow lakes and the closure of the estuarine mouth. This study aimed to assess the primary production rates of phytoplankton and microphytobenthos throughout an annual cycle of this drought phase. Primary production rates were assessed at representative sites, namely the Mouth, Narrows, South and North Lakes from June 2006 to May 2007. Because of the drought, the salinity gradient from the mouth to the head of the estuary was reversed by comparison to estuarine systems with a steady freshwater inflow and regular marine exchange. In March 2007, during the study, the mouth opened as a result of rough seas, and the marine influence broke the existing reversed gradient, producing a marine salinity throughout the system. Microphytobenthic primary productivity varied between 0 and 34 mg C m -2 h -1 and showed strong correlations with salinity, DIN:DIP ratios and irradiance. Benthic productivity was high across the system after breaching of the mouth. Pelagic primary productivity (between 0 and 180 mg C m -2 h -1), showed a correlation with temperature and irradiance and was highest across the system in February 2007 when the mouth was still closed. There was no significant correlation between production rates and biomass (chl-a) in either the benthic or pelagic habitats. The negative correlation between DIN:DIP ratio and benthic primary productivity indicated that phosphorus was the limiting nutrient. This study shows that salinity, along with seasonally dependent parameters such as temperature and irradiance, correlates with the rate of microalgal production. Hence, in these shallow lakes, the largest primary productivity can occur in either the pelagic or benthic

  20. Development of a Halotolerant Community in the St. Lucia Estuary (South Africa) during a Hypersaline Phase

    PubMed Central

    Carrasco, Nicola K.; Perissinotto, Renzo

    2012-01-01

    Background The St. Lucia Estuary, Africa's largest estuarine lake, is currently experiencing unprecedented freshwater deprivation which has resulted in a northward gradient of drought effects, with hypersaline conditions in its northern lakes. Methodology/Principal Findings This study documents the changes that occurred in the biotic communities at False Bay from May 2010 to June 2011, in order to better understand ecosystem functioning in hypersaline habitats. Few zooplankton taxa were able to withstand the harsh environmental conditions during 2010. These were the flatworm Macrostomum sp., the harpacticoid copepod Cletocamptus confluens, the cyclopoid copepod Apocyclops cf. dengizicus and the ciliate Fabrea cf. salina. In addition to their exceptional salinity tolerance, they were involved in a remarkably simple food web. In June 2009, a bloom of an orange-pigmented cyanobacterium (Cyanothece sp.) was recorded in False Bay and persisted uninterruptedly for 18 months. Stable isotope analysis suggests that this cyanobacterium was the main prey item of F. cf. salina. This ciliate was then consumed by A. cf. dengizicus, which in turn was presumably consumed by flamingos as they flocked in the area when the copepods attained swarming densities. On the shore, cyanobacteria mats contributed to a population explosion of the staphylinid beetle Bledius pilicollis. Although zooplankton disappeared once salinities exceeded 130, many taxa are capable of producing spores or resting cysts to bridge harsh periods. The hypersaline community was disrupted by heavy summer rains in 2011, which alleviated drought conditions and resulted in a sharp increase in zooplankton stock and diversity. Conclusions/Significance Despite the current freshwater deprivation crisis, the False Bay region has shown to be resilient, harboring a unique biodiversity with species that are capable of enduring harsh environmental conditions. However, further freshwater deprivation may extend beyond the

  1. Holocene environmental and parasequence development of the St. Jones Estuary, Delaware (USA): Foraminiferal proxies of natural climatic and anthropogenic change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leorri, E.; Martin, R.; McLaughlin, P.

    2006-01-01

    The benthic foraminiferal record of marshes located along western Delaware Bay (St. Jones Estuary, USA) reflects the response of estuaries to sea-level and paleoclimate change during the Holocene. System tracts are recognized and within them parasequences based on sedimentological and foraminiferal assemblages identification. The parasequences defined by foraminiferal assemblages appear correlative with rapid Holocene climate changes that are of worldwide significance: 6000-5000, 4200-3800, 3500-2500, 1200-1000, and 600??cal years BP. Following postglacial sea-level rise, modern subestuaries and marshes in the region began to develop between 6000 and 4000??years BP, depending on their proximity to the mouth of Delaware Bay and coastal geomorphology. Initial sediments were fluvial in origin, with freshwater marshes established around 4000??years BP. The subsequent sea-level transgression occurred sufficiently slowly that freshwater marshes alternated with salt marshes at the same sites to around 3000??years BP. Locally another two transgressions are identified at 1800 and 1000??years BP respectively. Marine influence increased in the estuaries until 600??years BP (Little Ice Age), when regression occurred. Sea-level began to rise again during the mid-19th Century at the end of the Little Ice Age, when marshes became established. The presence of a sand lens in the upper and middle estuary and the reduction in the number of tests in the top samples in cores from the same area also suggest an anthropogenic influence. The estuary infill resulted in a sharp transgressive sequence, represented by salt marsh foraminiferal assemblages in the upper part of the cores. The increase in marsh foraminifera in both areas suggests an increase in marine influence that might be due to the transgression beginning at the end of the Little Ice Age about 150-180??years ago coupled with anthropogenic straightening of the channel in 1913. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Distribution of submerged aquatic vegetation in the St. Louis River estuary: Maps and models (Presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAV provides the biophysical basis for several ecosystem services in Great Lakes estuaries including rearing and adult habitat for commercially and recreationally important fishes, foraging habit for waterfowl, and nutrient retention. Understanding sources of variation in SAV in ...

  3. Glacially-megalineated limestone terrain of Anticosti Island, Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada; onset zone of the Laurentian Channel Ice Stream

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyles, Nick; Putkinen, Niko

    2014-03-01

    Anticosti is a large elongate island (240 km long, 60 km wide) in eastern Canada within the northern part of a deep water trough (Gulf of St. Lawrence) that terminates at the Atlantic continental shelf edge. The island's Pleistocene glaciological significance is that its long axis lay transverse to ice from the Quebec and Labrador sectors of the Laurentide Ice Sheet moving south from the relatively high-standing Canadian Shield. Recent glaciological reconstructions place a fast-flowing ice stream along the axis of the Gulf of St. Lawrence but supporting geologic evidence in terms of recognizing its hard-bedded onset zone and downstream streamlined soft bed is limited. Anticosti Island consists of gently southward-dipping limestone plains composed of Ordovician and Silurian limestones (Vaureal, Becscie and Jupiter formations) with north-facing escarpments transverse to regional ice flow. Glacial deposits are largely absent and limestone plains in the higher central plateau of the island retain a relict apparently ‘preglacial’ drainage system consisting of deeply-incised dendritic bedrock valleys. In contrast, the bedrock geomorphology of the lower lying western and eastern limestone plains of the island is strikingly different having been extensively modified by glacial erosion. Escarpments are glacially megalineated with a distinct ‘zig-zag’ planform reflecting northward-projecting bullet-shaped ‘noses’ (identified as rock drumlins) up to 2 km wide at their base and 4 km in length with rare megagrooved upper surfaces. Drumlins are separated by southward-closing, funnel-shaped ‘through valleys’ where former dendritic valleys have been extensively altered by the streaming of basal ice through gaps in the escarpments. Glacially-megalineated bedrock terrain such as on the western and eastern flanks of Anticosti Island is elsewhere associated with the hard-bedded onset zones of fast flowing ice streams and provides important ground truth for the

  4. Continuous analysis of dissolved gaseous mercury and mercury volatilization in the upper St. Lawrence River: exploring temporal relationships and UV attenuation.

    PubMed

    O'Driscoll, N J; Poissant, L; Canário, L; Ridal, J; Lean, D R S

    2007-08-01

    The formation and volatilization of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) is an important mechanism by which freshwaters may naturally reduce their mercury burden. Continuous analysis of surface water for diurnal trends in DGM concentration (ranging from 0 to 60.4 pg L(-1); n=613), mercury volatilization (ranging from 0.2 to 1.1 ng m(-2) h(-1); n=584), and a suite of physical and chemical measurements were performed during a 68 h period in the St. Lawrence River near Cornwall (Ontario, Canada) to examine the temporal relationships governing mercury volatilization. No lag-time was observed between net radiation and OGM concentrations (highest cross-correlation of 0.817), thus supporting previous research indicating faster photoreduction kinetics in rivers as compared to lakes. A significant lag-time (55-145 min; maximum correlation = 0.625) was observed between DGM formation and mercury volatilization, which is similar to surface water Eddy diffusion times of 42-132 min previously measured in the St. Lawrence River. A depth-integrated DGM model was developed using the diffuse integrated vertical attenuation coefficients for UVA and UVB (K(dI UVA) = 1.45 m(-1) K(dI UVB)= 3.20 m(-1)) Low attenuation of solar radiation was attributed to low concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (mean = 2.58 mg L(-1) and particulate organic carbon (mean = 0.58 mg L(-1) in the St. Lawrence River. The depth-integrated DGM model developed found that the top 0.3 m of the water column accounted for only 26% of the total depth-integrated DGM. A comparison with volatilization data indicated that a large portion (76% or 10.5 ng m(-2) of the maximum depth-integrated DGM (13.8 ng m(-2))is volatilized over a 24 h period. Therefore, at least 50% of all DGM volatilized was produced at depths below 0.3 m. These results highlight the importance of solar attenuation in regulating DGM formation with depth. The results also demonstrate both the fast formation of DGM in rivers and the importance of

  5. Endocrine and metabolic dysfunction in yellow perch, Perca flavescens, exposed to organic contaminants and heavy metals in the St. Lawrence River

    SciTech Connect

    Hontela, A.; Duclos, D.; Fortin, R.; Dumont, P.

    1995-04-01

    The endocrine and biochemical responses to the acute stress of capture and handling were investigated in sexually mature and in immature male and female yellow perch, Perca flavescens, from a site contaminated by organic contaminants (PAHs and PCBs) and heavy metals (Hg, Cd, As, and Zn) and from a reference site in the St. Lawrence River. Following a standardized capture and handling stress, fish from the contaminated site did not exhibit the expected physiological stress response observed in fish from the reference site. Blood cortisol and thyroxine levels were lower, and liver glycogen stores were greater in mature males and females, as well as in the immature fish from the contaminated site, compared to the reference site. Fish from the contaminated site also had smaller gonads and lower condition factor. The impaired ability to elevate blood cortisol in response to an acute stress may be used as a biomarker of toxic stress in health assessment of feral fish from polluted environments.

  6. Detection of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in round gobies in New York State (USA) waters of Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River.

    PubMed

    Groocock, G H; Getchell, R G; Wooster, G A; Britt, K L; Batts, W N; Winton, J R; Casey, R N; Casey, J W; Bowser, P R

    2007-07-16

    In May 2006 a large mortality of several thousand round gobies Neogobius melanostomus (Pallas, 1814) occurred in New York waters of the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario. Necropsies of sampled fish from these areas showed pallor of the liver and gills, and hemorrhagic areas in many organs. Histopathologic examination of affected tissues revealed areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. Inoculations of fathead minnow Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque, 1820) cell cultures with dilutions of tissue samples from the necropsied gobies produced a cytopathic effect within 5 d post-inoculation. Samples of cell culture supernatant were tested using RT-PCR and confirmed the presence of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). Sequence analysis of the VHSV isolate resulted in its assignment to the type-IVb subgroup. The detection of VHSV in a relatively recent invasive fish species in the Great Lakes and the potential impact of VHSV on the ecology and economy of the area will require further investigation and careful management considerations.

  7. Changes in the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence ecosystem estimated by inverse modelling: Evidence of a fishery-induced regime shift?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savenkoff, Claude; Castonguay, Martin; Chabot, Denis; Hammill, Mike O.; Bourdages, Hugo; Morissette, Lyne

    2007-07-01

    Mass-balance models have been constructed using inverse methodology for the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence for the mid-1980s, the mid-1990s, and the early 2000s to describe ecosystem structure, trophic group interactions, and the effects of fishing and predation on the ecosystem for each time period. Our analyses indicate that the ecosystem structure shifted dramatically from one previously dominated by demersal (cod, redfish) and small-bodied forage (e.g., capelin, mackerel, herring, shrimp) species to one now dominated by small-bodied forage species. Overfishing removed a functional group in the late 1980s, large piscivorous fish (primarily cod and redfish), which has not recovered 14 years after the cessation of heavy fishing. This has left only marine mammals as top predators during the mid-1990s, and marine mammals and small Greenland halibut during the early 2000s. Predation by marine mammals on fish increased from the mid-1980s to the early 2000s while predation by large fish on fish decreased. Capelin and shrimp, the main prey in each period, showed an increase in biomass over the three periods. A switch in the main predators of capelin from cod to marine mammals occurred, while Greenland halibut progressively replaced cod as shrimp predators. Overfishing influenced community structure directly through preferential removal of larger-bodied fishes and indirectly through predation release because larger-bodied fishes exerted top-down control upon other community species or competed with other species for the same prey. Our modelling estimates showed that a change in predation structure or flows at the top of the trophic system led to changes in predation at all lower trophic levels in the northern Gulf of St. Lawrence. These changes represent a case of fishery-induced regime shift.

  8. Persistent organochlorine pesticide exposure related to a formerly used defense site on St. Lawrence Island, Alaska: data from sentinel fish and human sera

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Samuel; Miller, Pamela; Waghiyi, Viola; Buck, C. Loren; von Hippel, Frank A.; Carpenter, David O.

    2015-01-01

    St. Lawrence Island, Alaska is the largest island in the Bering Sea, located 60 km from Siberia. The island is home to approximately 1600 St. Lawrence Island Yupik residents who live a subsistence lifestyle. Two formerly used defense sites (FUDS) exist on the island, one of which, Northeast Cape, has been the subject of a $123 million cleanup effort. Environmental monitoring demonstrates localized soil and watershed contamination with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine (OC) pesticides and arsenic. This study examined whether the Northeast Cape FUDS is a source of exposure to OC pesticides. A total of 71 serum samples were collected during site remediation from volunteers that represented three geographic regions of the island. Additionally, ninespine stickleback (Pungitius pungitius) and Alaska blackfish (Dallia pectoralis) were collected from Northeast Cape after remediation to assess continuing presence of OC pesticides. Chlordane compounds, DDT compounds, mirex and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were the most prevalent and present at the highest concentrations in both fish tissues and human serum samples. After controlling for age and sex, activities near the Northeast Cape FUDS were associated with an increase in serum HCB as compared to residents of the farthest village from the site. Positive but non-significant relationships for sum-chlordane and sum-DDT were also found. Organochlorine concentrations in fish samples did not show clear geographic trends, but appear elevated compared to other sites in Alaska. Taken together, the results suggest that contamination of the local environment at the Northeast Cape FUDS may increase exposure to select persistent OC pesticides. PMID:26262441

  9. Chemical dynamics of the "St. Lawrence" riverine system: δD H 2O, δ 18O H 2O, δ 13C DIC, δ 34S sulfate, and dissolved 87Sr/ 86Sr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chao; Telmer, Kevin; Veizer, Ján

    1996-03-01

    Chemical and stable isotope analyses of the St. Clair, Detroit, Niagara, and St. Lawrence rivers ("St. Lawrence" system) and their tributaries show that the chemical and isotopic compositions of the waters are strongly controlled by the geology of their drainage basins. Tributaries draining the Canadian Shield have very low TDS, HCO 3-, SO 42-, Ca 2+, Mg 2+, NO 3-, Sr 2+, higher Si and Fe total, and high 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios (0.710-0.713). The Grand and Thames rivers that drain Paleozoic limestones, dolostones, and evaporites are characterized by opposite attributes. The "St. Lawrence" and the tributaries draining the Canadian Appalachians fall between these two endmembers. The St. Clair, Detroit, and Niagara rivers do not show any pronounced seasonal variations in major component chemistry due to buffering by the Great Lakes. In contrast, pronounced seasonal variations characterize the lower St. Lawrence mainly because of significant tributary inputs into the overall water budget. The δD and δ18O in the "St. Lawrence" range from -60.9 to -44.5‰ and from -8.5 to -6.1‰ SMOW, respectively, much heavier than the comparative values measured for the tributaries (-92.8 to -58.3‰ and -13.1 to -8.5‰). This is a consequence of evaporative loss that, over the residence time of water of 10 2 years, equals about 7% of the water volume in the Great Lakes. The strontium and sulfur isotopic values for the "St. Lawrence" system are relatively uniform, with measured values from 0.70927 to 0.71112 for 87Sr/ 86Sr and from 4.3 to 5.6‰ for sulfate δ34S. Their seasonal variations are also minor. The strontium and sulfur fluxes of the St. Lawrence river are calculated to be 7.84 × 10 8 and 1.09 × 10 11 mol/a, respectively. The relative contributions of the Great Lakes, tributaries, and other sources to these fluxes are 73:16:11% for strontium and 64:13:23% for sulfur. Isotopic composition of dissolved inorganic carbon ( δ13C DIC) in the "St. Lawrence" system ranges from -4

  10. Spatial dynamics of biogeochemical processes in the St. Louis River freshwater estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the Great Lakes, river-lake transition zones within freshwater estuaries are hydrologically and biogeochemically dynamic areas that regulate nutrient and energy fluxes between rivers and Great Lakes. The goal of our study was to characterize the biogeochemical properties of th...

  11. Crocodiles count on it: Regulation of discharge to Lake St Lucia Estuary by a South African peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, J. S.; Grundling, P.; Grootjans, A.

    2010-12-01

    The Mfabeni mire is located within the iSimangaliso Wetland Park in north-eastern KwaZulu-Natal Province on the Indian Ocean sea-board of South Africa. This mire complex includes open peatland with occurrences of sedge communities, Sphagnum (rare in South Africa), and swamp forest which is common in the region (but rare in South Africa). It is one of the largest (1650 ha), thickest (10.8 m of peat) and the oldest (~45,000 years Before Present) known peatlands in South Africa. The mire is almost pristine, with very few disturbances. In the past the surrounding area supported pine plantations but these alien trees were recently removed, with conservation and tourism the primary designated activities. Surface and groundwater exchanges to and within the mire and its surrounding coastal dune landscape were studied. Profiles of electrical conductivity and major cations and anions, as well as natural isotopes (δ2H and δ18O) in water samples of ground and surface water were also analysed to develop a conceptual model of the system’s hydrological function. Water efflux from an inland dune complex provides substantial recharge towards Mfabeni, while coastward hydraulic gradients from the dune complex through the wetland are evident. Consequently, the linkages between the dune system and Mfabeni, and the peatland’s water regulation function, dictate the nature and magnitude of the local freshwater discharge to the estuary, and internal water exchanges that control peatland ecological function. The hydrograph from the stream outlet indicate an initial rapid response in increased flows after major rainfall events but with a delayed drawdown over time reflecting the contribution of the relatively large size of the mire (comprising 38% of the catchment) in attenuating flood events and ensuring sustained flow to the estuary. Freshwater discharge from the Mfabeni mire to the St. Lucia estuary, which has provided refuge for aquatic species during periods of drought, may become

  12. The bacteriological analysis and health risks in the urban estuary of St. George's Bay, Grenada, West Indies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rakesh H; Pedersen, Karsten; Kotelnikova, Svetlana

    2010-09-01

    The dilution rates of indicators Enterococcus faecalis and E. coli were studied from the St. John's River estuary in Grenada, West Indies. Health risk zones were established based on the levels of bacteriological pollution. In accordance with the World Health Organization (WHO) health risk guidelines, risks were in the range of <1% gastrointestinal (GI); <0.3% acute febrile respiratory illness (AFRI) to a 1%-5% GI; and 0.9%-1.9% AFRI within 100 m from the St. John's River outflow site in St. George's Bay. These values were the result of river water dilution, where the most probable number (MPN) levels for both indicator organisms from the river were equivalent to that of raw sewage with an AFRI health risk of >3.9% and a GI risk of >10%. The distance intervals farther than 100 m showed fluctuating values and corresponding health risks. E. faecalis and E. coli strains isolated were resistant to 35.7% and 42.9% of the antibiotics tested, respectively.

  13. Fish community changes in the St. Louis River estuary, Lake Superior, 1989-1996: Is it ruffe or population dynamics?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bronte, Charles R.; Evrard, Lori M.; Brown, William P.; Mayo, Kathleen R.; Edwards, Andrew J.

    1998-01-01

    Ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) have been implicated in density declines of native species through egg predation and competition for food in some European waters where they were introduced. Density estimates for ruffe and principal native fishes in the St. Louis River estuary (western Lake Superior) were developed for 1989 to 1996 to measure changes in the fish community in response to an unintentional introduction of ruffe. During the study, ruffe density increased and the densities of several native species decreased. The reductions of native stocks to the natural population dynamics of the same species from Chequamegon Bay, Lake Superior (an area with very few ruffe) were developed, where there was a 24-year record of density. Using these data, short- and long-term variations in catch and correlations among species within years were compared, and species-specific distributions were developed of observed trends in abundance of native fishes in Chequamegon Bay indexed by the slopes of densities across years. From these distributions and our observed trend-line slopes from the St. Louis River, probabilities of measuring negative change at the magnitude observed in the St. Louis River were estimated. Compared with trends in Chequamegon Bay, there was a high probability of obtaining the negative slopes measured for most species, which suggests natural population dynamics could explain, the declines rather than interactions with ruffe. Variable recruitment, which was not related to ruffe density, and associated density-dependent changes in mortality likely were responsible for density declines of native species.

  14. Temporal variation of blood and hair mercury levels in pregnancy in relation to fish consumption history in a population living along the St. Lawrence River.

    PubMed

    Morrissette, Joëlle; Takser, Larissa; St-Amour, Genevieve; Smargiassi, Audrey; Lafond, Julie; Mergler, Donna

    2004-07-01

    Fish consumption from the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River has been decreasing over the last years due to advisories and increased awareness of the presence of several contaminants. Methylmercury (MeHg), a well-established neurotoxicant even at low levels of exposure, bioaccumulates to differing degrees in various fish species and can have serious adverse effects on the development and functioning of the human central nervous system, especially during prenatal exposure. Most studies on MeHg exposure have focussed on high-level consumers from local fish sources, although mercury (Hg) is also present in fresh, frozen, and canned market fish. Moreover, little information exists on the temporal variation of blood and hair Hg in pregnant women, particularly in populations with low levels of Hg. The aim of the present study was to characterize the temporal variation of Hg during pregnancy and to investigate the relation between fish consumption from various sources prior to and during pregnancy and maternal cord blood and mother's hair Hg levels. We recruited 159 pregnant women from Southwest Quebec through two prenatal clinics of the Quebec Public Health System. All women completed two detailed questionnaires concerning their fish consumption (species and frequency) prior to and during pregnancy. The women also provided blood samples for all three trimesters of pregnancy and hair samples after delivery of up to 9 cm in length. Blood and hair Hg levels were analyzed by cold-vapor atomic-absorption and -fluorescence spectrometry methods, respectively. Results showed that maternal blood and hair Hg levels decreased significantly between the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. However, cord blood Hg was significantly higher than maternal blood at birth. Maternal hair was correlated with Hg blood concentration and was highly predictive of the organic fraction in cord blood. A strong dose relation was observed between the frequency of fish consumption before and

  15. Environmental Baseline Studies of St. Marys River Near Neebish Island, Michigan, Prior to Proposed Extension of Navigation Season, 1981. Great Lakes- St. Lawrence Seaway, Navigation Season Extension Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-01

    to Lake Huron at Detour, Michigan (Figure 1). From its headwaters to Lake Huron the St. Marys River descends approximately 6.7 m (22’). Most of this...conditions at both the Middle Neebish Channel and at a proposed dredge spoil disposal site in Lake Huron . Extensive background data on physical/chemical...Alosa pseudoharengus Alewife Salmonidae Salmons, trouts, whitefishes Coregonus artedii Cisco Coregonus clupeaformis Lake whitefish Osmeridae Smelts

  16. Supplementary Environmental Baseline Studies and Evaluation of the St. Mary’s River 1980. Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway Navigation Season Extension Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    120.7 km (75 mi) from headwaters in Whitefish Bay, Lake Superior to Lake Huron at Detour, Michigan (Figure 1). From its headwaters to Lake Huron the...dredged material would be barged down river and disposed of in Lake Huron , about 4 km (2.5 mi) south of Detour Passage. Michigan State University...conditions at both the Middle Neebish Chdnnel, St. Marys River, and the proposed dredge spoil disposal site in Lake Huron . Extensive background data

  17. Putting oxygen and temperature thresholds of marine animals in context of environmental change in coastal seas: a regional perspective for the Scotian Shelf and Gulf of St. Lawrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brennan, Catherine E.; Blanchard, Hannah; Fennel, Katja

    2014-05-01

    We surveyed the literature in order to compile reported oxygen, temperature, salinity and depth preferences and thresholds of important marine species found in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and the Scotian Shelf regions of the northwest North Atlantic. We determined species importance based on the existence of a commercial fishery, a threatened or at risk status, or by meeting the following criteria: bycatch, baitfish, invasive, vagrant, important for ecosystem energy transfer, and predators and prey of the above species. Using the dataset compiled for the 53 regional fishes and macroinvertebrates, we rank species (including for different lifestages) by their maximum thermal limit, as well as by the lowest oxygen concentration tolerated before negative impacts (e.g. physiological stress), 50% mortality or 100% mortality are experienced. Additionally, we compare these thresholds to observed marine deoxygenation trends at multiple sites, and observed surface warming trends. This results in an assessment of which regional species are most vulnerable to future warming and oxygen depletion, and a first-order estimate of the consequences of thermal and oxygen stress on a highly productive marine shelf. If regional multi-decadal oxygen and temperature trends continue through the 21st century, many species will lose favorable oxygen conditions, experience oxygen-stress, or disappear due to insufficient oxygen. Future warming can additionally displace vulnerable species, though we note that large natural variability in environmental conditions may amplify or dampen the effects of anthropogenic surface warming trends. This dataset may be combined with regional ocean model predictions to map future species distributions.

  18. Intra- and inter-species differences in persistent organic contaminants in the blubber of blue whales and humpback whales from the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada.

    PubMed

    Metcalfe, Chris; Koenig, Brenda; Metcalfe, Tracy; Paterson, Gordon; Sears, Richard

    2004-05-01

    Biopsy samples of blubber from adult male and female blue whales, and from female and young-of-the-year humpback whales were collected during the summers of 1992-1999 in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada. In blue whales, concentrations of 25 PCB congeners, DDT and metabolites and several other organochlorine compounds were present at higher concentrations in the blubber of males relative to females; reflecting maternal transfer of these persistent contaminants from females into young. Sex-related differences in concentrations were not observed with less persistent contaminants, such as HCHs. In humpback whale samples, there were no significant differences in the concentrations of PCBs and organochlorine compounds in the blubber of females and calves. These data indicate that calves quickly bioaccumulate contaminants by transplacental and lactational routes to concentrations that are in equilibrium with females. In comparisons between contaminant concentrations and patterns in the blubber of female blue and humpback whales, there were no significant differences in concentrations, but the proportions of some PCB congeners, HCH isomers, and DDT and its metabolites were different in the two baleen whale species. These may reflect differences in the diet of the two species, since fish comprise a large part of the diet of humpback whales and blue whales feed exclusively on euphausiid crustaceans (i.e. krill).

  19. Detection of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in round gobies in New York State (USA) waters of Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groocock, G.H.; Getchell, R.G.; Wooster, G.A.; Britt, K.L.; Batts, W.N.; Winton, J.R.; Casey, R.N.; Casey, J.W.; Bowser, P.R.

    2007-01-01

    In May 2006 a large mortality of several thousand round gobies Neogobius melanostomus (Pallas, 1814) occurred in New York waters of the St. Lawrence River and Lake Ontario. Necropsies of sampled fish from these areas showed pallor of the liver and gills, and hemorrhagic areas in many organs. Histopathologic examination of affected tissues revealed areas of necrosis and hemorrhage. Inoculations of fathead minnow Pimephales promelas (Rafinesque, 1820) cell cultures with dilutions of tissue samples from the necropsied gobies produced a cytopathic effect within 5 d post-inoculation. Samples of cell culture supernatant were tested using RT-PCR and confirmed the presence of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). Sequence analysis of the VHSV isolate resulted in its assignment to the type-IVb subgroup. The detection of VHSV in a relatively recent invasive fish species in the Great Lakes and the potential impact of VHSV on the ecology and economy of the area will require further investigation and careful management considerations. ?? Inter-Research 2007.

  20. Influence of species and sex on metal residues in freshwater mussels (Family Unionidae) from the St. Lawrence River, with implications for biomonitoring programs

    SciTech Connect

    Metcalfe-Smith, J.L. . Rivers Research Branch)

    1994-09-01

    The implementation of freshwater mussel watch programs has been hindered by a lack of information on biological factors affecting the levels of contaminants accumulated by these organisms. This study investigated the influence of species and sex on metal residues in Elliptio complanata and Lampsilis radiata radiata (Family Unionidae) from the St. Lawrence River. Mussels were collected from sites representing a wide range of types and degrees of metal pollution. Composite samples of five specimens (males and females combined) per species per site and five specimens per sex per species per site were analyzed for residues of 12 metals in the soft tissues to determine the effects of species and sex, respectively, on variability in the data. Interspecific differences in bioaccumulation were observed for most metals; however, concentrations were frequently correlated between species and the differences could therefore be quantified. Elliptio complanata demonstrated a broader response range to the same exposures than Lampsilis radiata radiata for most metals, suggesting that it may be more sensitive to changes in pollution status. Differences in metal uptake between the sexes were less pronounced than differences between species, and male specimens displayed less variability than females. Consideration of these factors in mussel biomonitoring programs should greatly improve sensitivity and precision.

  1. Putting Temperature and Oxygen Thresholds of Marine Animals in Context of Environmental Change: A Regional Perspective for the Scotian Shelf and Gulf of St. Lawrence

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a literature review of reported temperature, salinity, pH, depth and oxygen preferences and thresholds of important marine species found in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Scotian Shelf region. We classified 54 identified fishes and macroinvertebrates as important either because they support a commercial fishery, have threatened or at risk status, or meet one of the following criteria: bycatch, baitfish, invasive, vagrant, important for ecosystem energy transfer, or predators or prey of the above species. The compiled data allow an assessment of species-level impacts including physiological stress and mortality given predictions of future ocean physical and biogeochemical conditions. If an observed, multi-decadal oxygen trend on the central Scotian Shelf continues, a number of species will lose favorable oxygen conditions, experience oxygen-stress, or disappear due to insufficient oxygen in the coming half-century. Projected regional trends and natural variability are both large, and natural variability will act to alternately amplify and dampen anthropogenic changes. When estimates of variability are included with the trend, species encounter unfavourable oxygen conditions decades sooner. Finally, temperature and oxygen thresholds of adult Atlantic wolffish (Anarhichas lupus) and adult Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) are assessed in the context of a potential future scenario derived from high-resolution ocean models for the central Scotian Shelf. PMID:27997536

  2. Relative importance of pelagic and sediment respiration in causing hypoxia in a deep estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgault, D.; Cyr, F.; Galbraith, P. S.; Pelletier, E.

    2012-08-01

    Oxygen depletion in the 100-m thick bottom layer of the deep Lower St. Lawrence Estuary is currently thought to be principally caused by benthic oxygen demand overcoming turbulent oxygenation from overlying layers, with pelagic respiration playing a secondary role. This conception is revisited with idealized numerical simulations, historical oxygen observations and new turbulence measurements. Results indicate that a dominant sediment oxygen demand, over pelagic, is incompatible with the shape of observed oxygen profiles. It is further argued that to sustain oxygen depletion, the turbulent diffusivity in the bottom waters should be ≪10-4 m2 s-1, consistent with direct measurements but contrary to previous model results. A new model that includes an Arrhenius-type function for pelagic respiration and a parameterization for turbulence diffusivity is developed. The model demonstrates the importance of the bottom boundary layer in reproducing the shape of oxygen profiles and reproduces to within 14% the observed change in oxygen concentration in the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary. The analysis indicates that turbulent oxygenation represents about 8% of the sum of sediment and pelagic oxygen demand, consistent with the low turbulent oxygenation required to maintain oxygen depletion. However, contrary to previous hypotheses, it is concluded that pelagic oxygen demand needs to be five time larger than sediment oxygen demand to explain hypoxia in the 100-m thick bottom layer of the Lower St. Lawrence Estuary.

  3. Water Quality Monitoring of the Upper St Lawrence River Using Remote Sensor Arrays Placed in a Hydropower Dam Combined with Hydrodynamic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, F.; Sprague, H. M.; Skufca, J. D.; Twiss, M. R.

    2014-12-01

    There are limited long-term data available on the ecological health and environmental state of the Upper St. Lawrence River (CA,US; average discharge 6,910 m3/s). Our research objective is to establish long-term remote water quality monitoring stations in the Moses-Saunders hydroelectric power dam at Massena, New York using a network of sensors. Such a placement of sensors allows for year-round monitoring of water and hence, the ability to measure at times of year and during extreme weather events that previously made monitoring infeasible. The sensor array was installed on 17 June 2014 and draws water from the penstock at a rate of 6-10 L per minute. Sensors in flow through chambers collect data on temperature, turbidity, color dissolved organic material (CDOM), phycocyanin, chlorophyll-a, and specific conductivity at one minute intervals. In combination with a hydrodynamic flow model we are able to hind-cast water movements so that the quality of water passing through the dam can be related to environmental conditions in the river upstream from the sensor array. We conducted field surveys using sensors in a ferry box on a vessel moving upstream (40 km) at a velocity providing a spatial resolution of 100 m and determined that main channel water is more homogenous than water along the shorelines (2 m isopleth) of the river, despite the high turbulence in this river. The sensor array located in the turbine unit nearest the US shore is able to discern tributary inputs for CDOM from the Oswegatchie River (discharge 40-120 m3/s), located 67 km upstream. This research is an important proof-of-concept for installing similar arrays in dams throughout the Great Lakes region and is applicable to smaller rivers containing power dams.

  4. Methane baseline concentrations and sources in shallow aquifers from the shale gas-prone region of the St. Lawrence lowlands (Quebec, Canada).

    PubMed

    Moritz, Anja; Hélie, Jean-Francois; Pinti, Daniele L; Larocque, Marie; Barnetche, Diogo; Retailleau, Sophie; Lefebvre, René; Gélinas, Yves

    2015-04-07

    Hydraulic fracturing is becoming an important technique worldwide to recover hydrocarbons from unconventional sources such as shale gas. In Quebec (Canada), the Utica Shale has been identified as having unconventional gas production potential. However, there has been a moratorium on shale gas exploration since 2010. The work reported here was aimed at defining baseline concentrations of methane in shallow aquifers of the St. Lawrence Lowlands and its sources using δ(13)C methane signatures. Since this study was performed prior to large-scale fracturing activities, it provides background data prior to the eventual exploitation of shale gas through hydraulic fracturing. Groundwater was sampled from private (n = 81), municipal (n = 34), and observation (n = 15) wells between August 2012 and May 2013. Methane was detected in 80% of the wells with an average concentration of 3.8 ± 8.8 mg/L, and a range of <0.0006 to 45.9 mg/L. Methane concentrations were linked to groundwater chemistry and distance to the major faults in the studied area. The methane δ(1)(3)C signature of 19 samples was > -50‰, indicating a potential thermogenic source. Localized areas of high methane concentrations from predominantly biogenic sources were found throughout the study area. In several samples, mixing, migration, and oxidation processes likely affected the chemical and isotopic composition of the gases, making it difficult to pinpoint their origin. Energy companies should respect a safe distance from major natural faults in the bedrock when planning the localization of hydraulic fracturation activities to minimize the risk of contaminating the surrounding groundwater since natural faults are likely to be a preferential migration pathway for methane.

  5. A multi-level biological approach to evaluate impacts of a major municipal effluent in wild St. Lawrence River yellow perch (Perca flavescens).

    PubMed

    Houde, Magali; Giraudo, Maeva; Douville, Mélanie; Bougas, Bérénice; Couture, Patrice; De Silva, Amila O; Spencer, Christine; Lair, Stéphane; Verreault, Jonathan; Bernatchez, Louis; Gagnon, Christian

    2014-11-01

    The development of integrated ecotoxicological approaches is of great interest in the investigation of global concerns such as impacts of municipal wastewater effluents on aquatic ecosystems. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of a major wastewater municipal effluent on fish using a multi-level biological approach, from gene transcription and enzyme activities to histological changes. Yellow perch (Perca flavescens) were selected based on their wide distribution, their commercial and recreational importance, and the availability of a customized microarray. Yellow perch were sampled upstream of a major municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and 4 km and 10 km downstream from its point of discharge in the St. Lawrence River (Quebec, Canada). Concentrations of perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and metals/trace elements in whole body homogenates were comparable to those from other industrialized regions of the world. Genomic results indicated that the transcription level of 177 genes was significantly different (p<0.024) between exposed and non-exposed fish. Among these genes, 38 were found to be differentially transcribed at both downstream sites. Impacted genes were associated with biological processes and molecular functions such as immunity, detoxification, lipid metabolism/energy homeostasis (e.g., peroxisome proliferation), and retinol metabolism suggesting impact of WWTP on these systems. Moreover, antioxidant enzyme activities were more elevated in perch collected at the 4 km site. Biomarkers of lipid metabolism, biosynthetic activity, and aerobic capacities were significantly lower (p<0.05) in fish residing near the outfall of the effluent. Histological examination of the liver indicated no differences between sites. Correlations between PFAS, PBDE, and metal/trace element tissue concentrations and markers of peroxisomal proliferation, oxidative stress, and retinoid metabolism were found at

  6. Is the bone tissue of ring-billed gulls breeding in a pollution hotspot in the St. Lawrence River, Canada, impacted by halogenated flame retardant exposure?

    PubMed

    Plourde, Stéphanie Pellerin; Moreau, Robert; Letcher, Robert J; Verreault, Jonathan

    2013-11-01

    Bone metabolism is a tightly regulated process that controls bone remodeling and repair in addition to maintaining circulating calcium and phosphate levels. It has been shown that certain organohalogen contaminants may adversely impact bone tissue metabolism and structure in wildlife species. However, exceedingly few studies have addressed the bone-related effects of organohalogen exposure in birds. The objective of the present study was to investigate the associations between markers of bone metabolism and structural integrity, and concentrations of established and current-use halogenated flame retardants (FRs) in ring-billed gulls (Larus delawarensis) nesting in a known FR hotspot area in the St. Lawrence River (Montreal, Canada). Bone metabolism was assessed using plasma calcium and inorganic phosphate levels, and alkaline phophatase activity, while bone (tarsus; trabecular and cortical sections) structure quality was examined using the percentage of bone tissue comprised in the total bone volume (Bv/Tv) and bone mineral density (BMD). Bv/Tv and BMD of the tarsus tended (not significant) to be positively associated with circulating calcium levels in male ring-billed gulls. Moreover, concentrations of FRs in male bird liver (brominated diphenyl ether (BDE)-154, -183, -201, and -209) and plasma (BDE-209) were negatively correlated with trabecular and cortical BMD of the tarsus. These correlative associations may suggest light demineralization of bone tissue associated with FR exposure in male ring-billed gulls. Present findings provide some evidence that bone (tarsus) metabolism and mineral composition may be impacted in high FR-exposed (mainly to PBDEs) ring-billed gulls breeding in the highly urbanized Montreal region.

  7. Gill and head kidney antioxidant processes and innate immune system responses of yellow perch (Perca flavescens) exposed to different contaminants in the St. Lawrence River, Canada.

    PubMed

    Dautremepuits, Claire; Marcogliese, David J; Gendron, Andrée D; Fournier, Michel

    2009-01-15

    Biomarkers of oxidative stress metabolism and the innate immune response were examined in gill and head kidney tissue of wild-caught yellow perch (Perca flavescens) collected from four sites ranging in type and degree of metal pollution in the St. Lawrence River, Quebec, Canada. Sites were ranked as follows: Ile Dorval

  8. Changes in anthropogenic nitrogen and phosphorus inputs to the St. Lawrence sub-basin over 110 years and impacts on riverine export

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyette, Jean-Olivier; Bennett, Elena M.; Howarth, Robert W.; Maranger, Roxane

    2016-07-01

    Human activities have increased the flow of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) over much of the Earth, leading to increased agricultural production, but also the degradation of air, soil, and water quality. Here we quantify the sources of anthropogenic N and P inputs to 76 watersheds of the St. Lawrence Basin (SLB) throughout the 20th century using NANI/NAPI (net anthropogenic N/P input to watersheds), a mass balance modeling approach, and estimate the fraction of these inputs exported to adjacent rivers. Our results show that since 1901, NANI and NAPI increased 4.5-fold and 3.8-fold, respectively, with a peak in 1991 mainly due to high atmospheric N deposition and P fertilizer application. However, the relative increase over the course of the last century was much higher in certain watersheds, particularly those where there was greater urbanization. Ranges in NANI and NAPI vary greatly among watersheds (110 to 9351 kg N km-2 yr-1 and 0.16 to 1938 kg P km-2 yr-1, respectively in 2011) and are strongly related to riverine fluxes (R2 = 0.87 and 0.71 for N and P, respectively). Our results suggest that 22% of NANI (ranging from 11% to 68% across watersheds) and 17% of NAPI (ranging from 3% to 173%) are exported to rivers. Predominant sources of inputs vary spatially and through time largely due to changes in farming practices. By tracking the main sources of inputs to specific watersheds and through time, our work provides insights for N and P management. Reduction strategies will likely need to be watershed specific, although through time, our results clearly show the large-scale impact of targeted legislation.

  9. Annual dissolved nitrite plus nitrate and total phosphorous loads for the Susquehanna, St. Lawrence, Mississippi-Atchafalaya, and Columbia River basins, 1968-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aulenbach, Brent T.

    2006-01-01

    Annual stream-water loads were calculated near the outlet of four of the larger river basins (Susquehanna, St. Lawrence, Mississippi-Atchafalaya, and Columbia) in the United States for dissolved nitrite plus nitrate (NO2 + NO3) and total phosphorus using LOADEST load estimation software. Loads were estimated for the period 1968-2004; although loads estimated for individual river basins and chemical constituent combinations typically were for shorter time periods due to limitations in data availability. Stream discharge and water-quality data for load estimates were obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) with additional stream discharge data for the Mississippi-Atchafalaya River Basin from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The loads were estimated to support national assessments of changes in stream nutrient loads that are periodically conducted by Federal agencies (for example, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency) and other water- and land-resource organizations. Data, methods, and results of load estimates are summarized herein; including World Wide Web links to electronic ASCII text files containing the raw data. The load estimates are compared to dissolved NO2 + NO3 loads for three of the large river basins from 1971 to 1998 that the USGS provided during 2001 to The H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment (The Heinz Center) for a report The Heinz Center published during 2002. Differences in the load estimates are the result of using the most up-to-date monitoring data since the 2001 analysis, differences in how concentrations less than the reporting limit were handled by the load estimation models, and some errors and exclusions in the 2001 analysis datasets (which resulted in some inaccurate load estimates).

  10. Spatiotemporal change of phosphorous speciation and concentration in stormwater in the St. Lucie Estuary watershed, South Florida.

    PubMed

    Li, Liguang; He, Zhenli; Li, Zhigang; Li, Suli; Wan, Yongshan; Stoffella, Peter J

    2017-04-01

    Phosphorous (P) concentration in stormwater runoff varies at different spatial and temporal scales. Excessive P loading from agriculture system into the St. Lucie Estuary (SLE) contributed to water quality deterioration in southern Indian River Lagoon. This study examines the spatial and temporal shifts of different P forms in runoff and storm water under different land use, water management, and rainfall conditions. Storm water samplings were conducted monthly between April 2013 and December 2014 in typical farmland and along the waterway (Canal C-24) that connects lands to the SLE. Concentrations of different P forms and related water quality variables were measured. Approximately 89% of the collected water samples contained total P (TP) concentrations exceeding the total maximum daily load (TMDL) level (0.081 mg L(-1)). Concentrations of different P forms declined from agricultural field furrows to the canal and then increased from the upstream to the downstream in the canal where urban activities dominated land use. Total dissolved P (TDP) was the predominant form of TP, followed by PO4-P. Speciation and concentrations of P varied with sites and sampling times, but were significantly higher in the summer months (from June to September) than in the winter. Water pH explained ∼20% of TP variation. Spatiotemporal variations of P concentrations and compositions provide a data-based guide for development of best management practices (BMPs) to minimize P export from the SLE watershed.

  11. Predation on ruffe by native fishes of the St. Louis River Estuary, Lake Superior, 1989-1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ogle, Derek H.; Selgeby, James H.; Savino, Jacqueline F.; Newman, Raymond M.; Henry, Mary G.

    1996-01-01

    The ruffe Gymnocephalus cernuus, an exotic Eurasian percid, recently became established in the St. Louis River estuary, Lake Superior, after accidental introduction. Management actions (catch regulations and stockings) were enacted in 1989 to increase the density of top-level predators in the estuary, and thus to increase predation on ruffe. We conducted a field and laboratory study to determine if, and to what extent, native piscivores consume ruffe. Stomachs of 3,669 predators were examined in 1989–1991. Ruffe occurred in 6.7% of burbot Lota lota, 5.8% of bullheads Ictalurus spp., 4.7% of smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, 2.6% of northern pike Esox lucius, 2.6% of black crappiesPomoxis nigromaculatus, and 1.3% of yellow perch Perca flavescens (4.5% after 1989) captured during the 3-year study. No ruffe were found in 967 stomachs of walleyesStizostedion vitreum examined. Ruffe were 22.7%, of the diet (by weight) of bullheads (during the only year bullheads were captured) and 0.1–17.9% of the diet of northern pike. Ruffe were 0.9–24.5% of the diet of smallmouth bass that contained fish, 1.5–6.9% of yellow perch that contained fish, and 0.0–10.9% of black crappies that contained fish. Most ruffe eaten were age-0 or small age- 1 fish. In the laboratory, walleyes that were first fed soft-rayed prey or that were also offered soft-rayed prey consumed very few ruffe, whereas walleyes that were first fed spiny-rayed yellow perch or were also offered yellow perch consumed about equal numbers of ruffe and yellow perch. Northern pike and burbot consumed about equal numbers of ruffe and yellow perch in the laboratory. It is unlikely that predation will effectively control the initial expansion of ruffe in other areas of the Great Lakes because native predators initially consume few ruffe, especially if more preferred soft-rayed prey are available.

  12. Application of Acoustic and Optic Methods for Estimating Suspended-Solids Concentrations in the St. Lucie River Estuary, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, Eduardo; Byrne, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic and optic methods were applied to estimate suspended-solids concentrations in the St. Lucie River Estuary, southeastern Florida. Acoustic Doppler velocity meters were installed at the North Fork, Speedy Point, and Steele Point sites within the estuary. These sites provide varying flow, salinity, water-quality, and channel cross-sectional characteristics. The monitoring site at Steele Point was not used in the analyses because repeated instrument relocations (due to bridge construction) prevented a sufficient number of samples from being collected at the various locations. Acoustic and optic instruments were installed to collect water velocity, acoustic backscatter strength (ABS), and turbidity data that were used to assess the feasibility of estimating suspended-solids concentrations in the estuary. Other data collected at the monitoring sites include tidal stage, salinity, temperature, and periodic discharge measurements. Regression analyses were used to determine the relations of suspended-solids concentration to ABS and suspended-solids concentration to turbidity at the North Fork and Speedy Point sites. For samples used in regression analyses, measured suspended-solids concentrations at the North Fork and Speedy Point sites ranged from 3 to 37 milligrams per liter, and organic content ranged from 50 to 83 percent. Corresponding salinity for these samples ranged from 0.12 to 22.7 parts per thousand, and corresponding temperature ranged from 19.4 to 31.8 ?C. Relations determined using this technique are site specific and only describe suspended-solids concentrations at locations where data were collected. The suspended-solids concentration to ABS relation resulted in correlation coefficients of 0.78 and 0.63 at the North Fork and Speedy Point sites, respectively. The suspended-solids concentration to turbidity relation resulted in correlation coefficients of 0.73 and 0.89 at the North Fork and Speedy Point sites, respectively. The adequacy of the

  13. Relationships among total recoverable and reactive metals and metalloid in St. Lawrence River sediment: bioaccumulation by chironomids and implications for ecological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Desrosiers, Mélanie; Gagnon, Christian; Masson, Stéphane; Martel, Louis; Babut, Marc P

    2008-01-15

    The availability and bioaccumulation of metals and metalloids, and the geochemical interactions among them, are essential to developing an ecological risk assessment (ERA) framework and determining threshold concentrations for these elements. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationships among total recoverable and reactive metals and metalloid in sediment and their bioaccumulation by chironomids. In the fall of 2004 and 2005, 58 stations located in the three fluvial lakes of the St. Lawrence River and its largest harbour area in Montreal, Canada, were sampled. Nine total recoverable and reactive metals (Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn) and one metalloid (As) were measured in whole sediment using two extraction methods: HCl/HNO(3) and HCl 1N, respectively. The bioaccumulation of six metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn) and As by chironomids was evaluated in a subset of 22 stations. Strong collinearities were observed between some total recoverable or reactive metal concentrations in sediment; two principal clusters, including collinear metals, were obtained. The first one included metals of mainly geological origin (Al, Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni), while the second one included As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn, which likely derive mainly from point sources of anthropogenic contamination. Each element also showed strong collinearity between their total recoverable and reactive forms (0.65< or =r < or =0.97). We can conclude that both chemical forms are equivalent for use in statistical models needed to explain biological responses and also in screening risk assessment. However, these relationships are not always proportional. Lower availability percentages were observed for Cd, Cu and Zn in the highly mixed-contaminated area of the Montreal Harbour, even though concentrations in sediment were higher. We observed a significant correlation (0.50< or =r < or =0.56) between concentrations in chironomids and concentrations of both total recoverable and reactive Cr and Pb in

  14. Sedimentary Records of Hyperpycnal Flows and the Influence of River Damming on Sediment Dynamics of Estuaries: Examples from the Nelson, Churchill, Moisie and Sainte-Marguerite Rivers (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Onge, G.; Duboc, Q.; Boyer-Villemaire, U.; Lajeunesse, P.; Bernatchez, P.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment cores were sampled in the estuary of the Nelson and Churchill Rivers in western Hudson Bay, as well as in the estuary of the Moisie and Sainte-Marguerite Rivers in Gulf of St. Lawrence in order to evaluate the impact of hydroelectric dams on the sedimentary regime of these estuaries. The gravity cores at the mouth of the Nelson River recorded several cm-thick rapidly deposited layers with a reverse to normal grading sequence, indicating the occurrence of hyperpycnal flows generated by major floods during the last few centuries. These hyperpycnal flows were probably caused by ice-jam formation, which can increase both the flow and the sediment concentration following the breaching of such natural dams. Following the construction of hydroelectric dams since the 1960s, the regulation of river discharge prevented the formation of hyperpycnal flows, and hence the deposition of hyperpycnites in the upper part of the cores. In the core sampled in the estuary of the Churchill River, only one hyperpycnite was recorded. This lower frequency may be due to the enclosed estuary of the Churchill River, its weaker discharge and the more distal location of the coring site.In the Gulf of St. Lawrence, grain size measurements allowed the identification of a major flood around AD 1844±4 years in box cores from both the Sainte-Marguerite and Moisie Rivers, whereas a drastic decrease in variations in the median grain size occurred around AD ~1900 in the estuary of the Sainte-Marguerite River, highlighting the offshore impact of the SM1 dam construction in the early 1900s. Furthermore, sedimentological variations in the box cores from both estuaries have been investigated by wavelet analysis and the sharp disappearance of high frequencies around AD 1900 in the estuary of the dammed river (Sainte-Marguerite River), but not in the estuary of the natural river (Moisie River), also provides evidence of the influence of dams on the sedimentary regime of estuaries.

  15. Application of SeaWIFS- and AVHRR-derived data for mesoscale and regional validation of a 3-D high-resolution physical biological model of the Gulf of St. Lawrence (Canada)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Fouest, V.; Zakardjian, B.; Saucier, F. J.; Çizmeli, S. A.

    2006-04-01

    We present here a first attempt to validate a regional three-dimensional (3-D) physical-biological coupled model of the Gulf of St. Lawrence with coincident Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)-derived sea surface temperature (SST) and Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWIFS)-derived Chlorophyll- a (Chl- a) data. The analysis focused on comparisons between remotely sensed data and simulated as well as in situ temperature, salinity, Chl- a, and nitrate. Results show that the simulated and AVHRR-derived fields of SST were qualitatively and quantitatively in agreement with in situ measurements. By contrast, marked differences were found between the simulated and SeaWIFS-derived fields of Chl- a, the latter comparing better with the freshwater-associated turbidity simulated by the model. Simulated temperature, salinity, nitrate, and Chl- a data compared well with coincident in situ measurements, and it is then suggested that freshwater-associated turbidity related to the river discharges largely contributed to the Chl- a retrievals by SeaWIFS in the Gulf's waters when using the standard OC4v.4 algorithm and atmospheric correction. Nevertheless, the striking agreement between SeaWIFS-derived ocean colour data and the simulated freshwater-associated turbidity allowed to validate the regional estuarine circulation and associated mesoscale variability. This result brings support to the model's ability to simulate realistic physical and biogeochemical fields in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

  16. Contribution of active and passive acoustics to study oceanographic processes feeding whales in a critical habitat of the St. Lawrence Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Simard, Yvan; Cotté, Cédric

    2004-05-01

    The head of the main channel of the continent in eastern Canada is the site of particular oceanographic processes that are responsible for the creation of a persistent feeding ground regularly visited by baleen whales from the Atlantic for centuries. Multifrequency acoustics coupled with ADCP and hydrographic measurements has been used to map the krill and capelin aggregations in 3D and visualize their local concentration process under tidal forcing and upwelling at the channel head. The krill scattering layers, pumped into the area by the strong two-layer estuarine circulation, appear to be concentrated during flood by tidal currents forced against the slopes and upwelling, to which depth-keeping krill is reacting by swimming down. Capelin also tends to concentrate on slopes and neighboring shallows. This highly recurrent process generates rich patches that are contributing with the mean circulation to make this area the richest krill aggregation in Northwest Atlantic. This critical habitat is located in a major continental seaway. Passive acoustics techniques are explored to locate whale calls and map the use of this area in continuing months, especially by blue and fin whales, with the aim of understanding their movements to improve their protection.

  17. Detection and quantitation of benzo(a)pyrene-DNA adducts in brain and liver tissues of Beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence and Mackenzie Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.

    1988-01-01

    It should be noted that there are few analytical techniques available for the detection and quantitation of chemical adducts in the DNA of living organisms. The reasons for this are: the analytical technique often has to accommodate the unique chemical and/or physical properties of the individual chemical or its metabolite; the percentage of total chemical that becomes most of the parent compound is usually detoxified and excreted; not all adducts that form between the genotoxic agent and DNA are stable or are involved in the development of subsequent deleterious events in the organism; and the amount of DNA available for analysis is often quite limited. 16 refs., 1 tab.

  18. PBDEs and PCBs in the liver of the St Lawrence Estuary beluga (Delphinapterus leucas): a comparison of levels and temporal trends with the blubber.

    PubMed

    Raach, Meriem; Lebeuf, Michel; Pelletier, Emilien

    2011-03-01

    Due to their lipophilic properties, persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are commonly assessed using the blubber of marine mammals. However, these chemicals are also accumulating in other tissues including the liver. Some pollutants, namely perfluorinated alkyl acids, are found predominately in the liver and blood of marine mammals, and thus monitored in those tissues. This raises the question whether any tissue would represent an identical trend of POPs in the SLE beluga. The current study reports the first temporal trends of PBDEs and PCBs in the liver of 65 SLE belugas. Neither ∑₇PBDEs nor major individual PBDE-homolog group concentrations showed significant trends between 1993 and 2007. Also, ∑₃₂PCBs did not change over years, although, tetra-, penta- and hepta-PCB decreased by 7.1, 6.8 and 8.5%, respectively, in males, whereas tetra-, penta- and octa-PCBs declined by 11, 12 and 12.9%, respectively, in females. In order to compare the distribution of POPs between liver and blubber, a lipid normalised concentration ratio R (blubber/liver) for PBDEs and PCBs was calculated for each individual beluga. For all PBDE and several PCB homolog groups, mean R values were not statistically different from unity indicating that the partitioning of these POPs is governed by the tissue lipid-content. Temporal trends of R ratios of PBDEs and PCBs were also examined. There were generally no significant temporal trends except for PBDEs in males where R increased in average by 12.7 ± 2.9% yearly. The stratification of the blubber into a metabolically active (inner) and less active layers (outer blubber) may result in a slower response time of the blubber (full depth) than the liver to the recent change of contamination in the environment and explain the time trend differences between both tissues. This study suggests that the liver is more representative of recent exposure to lipophilic contaminants.

  19. Contribution of active and passive acoustics to study oceanographic processes feeding whales in a critical habitat of the St. Lawrence Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Simard, Yvan; Cotté, Cédric

    2001-05-01

    The head of the main channel of the continent in eastern Canada is the site of particular oceanographic processes that are responsible for the creation of a persistent feeding ground regularly visited by baleen whales from the Atlantic for centuries. Multifrequency acoustics coupled with ADCP and hydrographic measurements has been used to map the krill and capelin aggregations in 3D and visualize their local concentration process under tidal forcing and upwelling at the channel head. The krill scattering layers, pumped into the area by the strong two-layer estuarine circulation, appear to be concentrated during flood by tidal currents forced against the slopes and upwelling, to which depth-keeping krill is reacting by swimming down. Capelin also tends to concentrate on slopes and neighboring shallows. This highly recurrent process generates rich patches that are contributing with the mean circulation to make this area the richest krill aggregation in Northwest Atlantic. This critical habitat is located in a major continental seaway. Passive acoustics techniques are explored to locate whale calls and map the use of this area in continuing months, especially by blue and fin whales, with the aim of understanding their movements to improve their protection.

  20. Effects of temperature and circulation on the population dynamics of Calanus finmarchicus in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and Scotian Shelf: Study with a coupled, three-dimensional hydrodynamic, stage-based life history model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakardjian, Bruno. A.; Sheng, Jinyu; Runge, Jeffrey A.; McLaren, Ian; Plourde, StéPhane; Thompson, Keith R.; Gratton, Yves

    2003-11-01

    We developed a physical-biological model for the Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL) and Scotian Shelf (SS) by coupling a stage-based life-history model of the planktonic copepod Calanus finmarchicus to a three-dimensional ocean circulation model. The life-history model consists of 13 morphologically distinct life stages of C. finmarchicus, with stage-specific and temperature-dependent molting rates. The model also includes stage-specific vertical distribution and seasonally varying diapause, egg production, and stage-specific mortality rates. The model domain covers the eastern Canadian shelf from 55°W to 72°W and from 39°N to 52°N, including the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Scotian Shelf, and Gulf of Maine. A comparison of a 1-year simulation with observations indicates that the physical-biological model reasonably describes the observed abundance and distribution of C. finmarchicus in this region. To determine the effects of ocean circulation in the C. finmarchicus population dynamics, we divided the GSL-SS region into eight sub-areas and compared the net fluxes of C. finmarchicus across lateral boundaries to the net production in each sub-area. We found that the annual cross-boundary exchange rates constitute from <1% to 39% of the local net production, indicating that the horizontal transport of C. finmarchicus by the ocean currents can play a very important role in the dynamics of local C. finmarchicus populations. The results provide insights into the mechanisms of exchange in the GSL-SS system, as put forward in recent hypotheses.

  1. Thyroid Hormones, Retinol and Clinical Parameters in Relation to Mercury and Organohalogen Contaminants in Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) Nestlings from the St. Lawrence River, Québec, Canada.

    PubMed

    Champoux, Louise; Boily, Monique; Fitzgerald, Guy

    2017-02-01

    The exposure and effects of persistent environmental contaminants were investigated in great blue heron (Ardea herodias) nestlings sampled in 2001, 2002, 2006, and 2007 in freshwater and estuarine heronries along the St. Lawrence River, Québec (Canada). Biomarkers (retinoids, thyroid hormones, and clinical parameters) and contaminants (organochlorine contaminants, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated flame retardants (BFRs), and mercury (Hg)) were analyzed in blood, and Hg was analyzed in feathers (generally 9 nestlings per colony and 4 colonies per year). Feather Hg and most contaminants detected in blood were found in higher concentrations in birds from freshwater than estuarine colonies more distant from the pollution sources. Among freshwater colonies, Ile aux Hérons showed the highest levels of contaminants, with mean Hg concentrations of 8.4 and 0.55 mg/kg in feathers and plasma, respectively, and plasma ΣBFRs of 19.6 ng/g ww. The highest mean ΣPCBs, 56.5 ng/g ww, was measured at Grande Ile in 2001. The levels of contaminants in heron nestlings were generally below critical thresholds for adverse effects observed on reproduction or survival. Retinol, dehydroretinol (DROH), and thyroid hormone concentrations differed significantly among colonies. Retinol concentrations were negatively related to ΣPCBs, whereas DROH concentrations were negatively related to Hg and total and free triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations were negatively related to ΣBFRs. These results indicate that contaminants from the St. Lawrence River could impair the development and fitness of great blue heron nestlings and emphasize the need for more research on the great blue heron population to assess their health and nutritional status.

  2. In vitro biotransformation of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) and Dechlorane Plus flame retardants: a case study of ring-billed gull breeding in a pollution hotspot in the St. Lawrence River, Canada.

    PubMed

    Chabot-Giguère, Bernice; Letcher, Robert J; Verreault, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    Decabromodiphenyl ether (deca-BDE) mixture (~97% of BDE-209) is now facing usage restrictions worldwide, which is leading to increased utilization of a series of alternative, replacement flame retardant (FR) products. Among these, Dechlorane Plus (DP) is receiving growing attention as this FR is increasingly being detected in wildlife samples, including birds from North America, Europe and Asia. Recent survey conducted in a known FR hotspot in the St. Lawrence River basin near Montreal (QC, Canada) revealed unexpectedly high detection frequencies and concentrations of BDE-209 and DP isomers (syn- and anti-DP) in the liver of breeding ring-billed gulls (Larus delawarensis) (RBGUs). Despite the global distribution of these current-use FRs, there is to our knowledge no study that has addressed the in vitro biotransformation of BDE-209 and DP isomers in birds. This study aimed at understanding the in vitro metabolism of BDE-209 and syn- and anti-DP using liver microsomes of Montreal-breeding RBGUs. Although BDE-15 (positive assay control) was consistently and positively depleted over the 90-min time frame of the in vitro assay, no depletion was observed for BDE-209 and DP isomers. These results suggest that CYP isoenzyme-mediated reductive dehalogenation of BDE-209 and DP is not likely to be a substantial metabolic pathway in RBGUs. However, investigations on deiodinases (expression, activity) should be considered in future studies as these enzymes have been suggested to be involved in the sequential debromination of BDE-209 in fish and human studies. High levels of BDE-209 determined in liver of RBGUs that strongly correlated with those of known or suggested BDE-209 debromination products (hepta- through nona-BDEs) may thus be indicative of concomitant dietary (e.g., fish consumption) and environmental exposure in the greater Montreal area, combined with poor or lack of metabolic capability toward these FRs.

  3. St. Lawrence Cement... Two Facilities or One?

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  4. 15. Photocopy of photograph (Courtesy of Lawrence D. Thornton) Unknown, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of photograph (Courtesy of Lawrence D. Thornton) Unknown, Photographer, Date Unknown PERPSECTIVE VIEW (WEST) OF ENTRANCE HALL SHOWING FRONT DOOR WITH FANLIGHT AND ORIGINAL SIDELIGHTS - Hamilton Grange, (Moved From) 237 West 141 Street to 141st Street & Amsterdam, New York County, NY

  5. The name of Lawrence's flycatcher

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banks, R.C.

    1997-01-01

    If Lawrence's flycatcher of Grenada, Trinidad, and northern South America is placed in the genus Lathrotriccus with the species euleri, it should be L. flaviventris (Lawrence) or L. euleriflaviventris, depending on rank. If it remains in the genus Empidonax, the specific name should be bolivianus Allen.

  6. Linking Species Traits to the Abiotic Template of Flowing Waters: Contrasting Eco physiologies Underlie Displacement of Zebra Mussels by Quagga Mussels in a Large River-Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casper, A. F.

    2005-05-01

    The St. Lawrence River-Estuary was the gateway of entry for dreissenids to North America and holds some of the oldest populations. The St. Lawrence also has four distinct physical-chemical water masses (a regional scale abiotic template) that both species inhabit. Despite their ecological similarities, quagga mussels are supplanting zebra mussels in much of their shared range. In order to try to better understand the changing distributions of these two species we compared glycogen, shell mass and tissue biomass in each of the water masses. This comparative physiological combined with experimental approaches (estuarine salinity experiments and reciprocal transplants) showed that while quagga mussels should dominate in most habitats, that abiotic/bioenergetic constraints in two regions (the Ottawa River plume and the freshwater-marine transition zone) might prevent them from dominating these locations. These findings are an example of how the interaction of landscape scale abiotic heterogeneity and a species-specific physiology can have strong impacts of distribution of biota large rivers.

  7. Distribution, abundance, and range of the round goby, Apollina melanostoma, in the Duluth-Superior Harbor and St. Louis River estuary, 1998-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bergstrom, M.A.; Evrard, L.M.; Mensinger, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    Round gobies were first discovered in the Duluth-Superior Harbor, Lake Superior, in 1995. Anecdotal sightings by anglers and others suggested that the infestation was growing and expanding; however, direct evidence of the distribution and expansion rate in the harbor was largely unknown. Distribution and range of the round goby, Apollonia melanostoma, (formerly Neogobius melanostomus) was assessed using bottom trawl sampling throughout the Duluth-Superior Harbor, and portions of the lower St. Louis River from 1998 to 2004. Previous to 1998, round gobies only were reported to occupy the harbor between the two shipping entries (river kilometer 1 to 7). By 2004, they expanded throughout the harbor and upstream to river kilometer 13, but remained absent in western Lake Superior. The number of round gobies captured per 5 minutes of trawling (catch per unit effort, CPUE) increased from less than 1 fish in 1998 to an average 5.4 ?? 1.2 SE fish in 2004, indicating a large increase in the population. The median yearly fish total length varied from 56.0 to 81.5 mm and wet weight varied from 2.3 to 7.0 g. As nest guarding male round gobies were located in rocky habitats inaccessible to trawling, the initial years were dominated by female round gobies with a 16:1 female to male ratio, but by 2002 the maximum ratio was 2:1. The ratio change may be indicative of the increasing population forcing males from their preferred rocky habitat onto open substrates that were more accessible to trawling.

  8. Introduction to Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries, although minor geographical features at the global scale, have major importance for society and the world’s economies. This chapter introduces estuaries by presenting an overview of definitions, origins, physical, chemical and ecological attributes, and the interaction...

  9. Climate Ready Estuaries

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information on climate change impacts to different estuary regions, tools and resources to monitor changes, and information to help managers develop adaptation plans for risk management of estuaries and coastal communities.

  10. Estuary Data Mapper (EDM)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Estuary Data Mapper is a tool for geospatial data discovery, visualization, and data download for any of the approximately 2,000 estuaries and associated watersheds in along the five US coastal regions

  11. The Complexation of Mn(III) in the Sediments and Water Column of two Coastal Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, V.; Mucci, A.; Luther, G. W., III

    2015-12-01

    In seawater, we find that the complexation of the intermediate manganese oxidation state, dissolved Mn(III), is kinetically stabilized by organic ligands in diverse environments. The cycling of these complexes is also tightly coupled to the cycles of C, O, N, S, and Fe. In the suboxic porewaters of the St. Lawrence Estuary (2011 (1), 2014 (here)), Mn(III)-L complexes made up to 100 % of total dissolved Mn (dMn(T)). The porewaters were dominated by weak complexes in lower and upper estuary porewaters (35 ppt salinity), whereas in the Saguenay Fjord (30 ppt salinity), weak (logKcond=11.1-11.6) and strong (logKcond>13.6) Mn(III)-L complexes were found in the same sample, which were kinetically stable to reduction - even in the presence of excess soluble Fe(II). The site at the Saguenay fjord likely has more terrestrial influence, and potentially different Mn(III)-L binding ligands than in the more oceanic samples. Overlying waters at both sites indicate that dMn(T) is fluxing out of the sediments, and all water column samples contained strong Mn(III)-L complexes (up to 86% of dMn(T)). Laboratory tests show that strong terrestrial Mn(III)-L complexes can precipitate at pH<2, and so previous dMn(T) assays in such environments, involving an acidification step, may have omitted an important fraction of dMn(T). These findings present the first measurement of two Mn(III)-binding ligand classes in the same water mass, and indicate that Mn(III)-L complexes have diverse and varying reactivity. We will discuss the implication of fluxing Mn(III)-L complexes from sediments to the overlying water column, in the St. Lawrence system compared to our data from the Chesapeake Bay (2013 (2), 2014 (here)) where strong Mn(III)-L complexes made up to 50 % of total dissolved Mn (dMn(T)) in anoxic bottom waters, and were partially kinetically stable to sulfide reduction. 1. Madison, A.S., Tebo, B.M., Mucci, A., Sundby, B., Luther, G.W. 2013. Abundant porewater Mn(III) is a major component of

  12. T. E. Lawrence: Theorist and Campaign Planner

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-12

    honors in history, Lawrence’s curiosity lead him to the works of Carl von Clausewitz, Henri Jomini. Karl von Willisen, Rudolf von Caemmerer, Helmut von...113. M. J. Steiner . Inside Pan-Arabia. (Chicago: Herxiricks House, 1947), Chap 7. 114. T. E. Lawrence, "The Evolution of a Revolt," p65. 115. T. E...Unity. New York: Devin-Adair, 1958. Steiner . M. J. Inside Pan-Arabia. Chicago: Hendricks House. 1947. Thomas, Lowell. With Lawrence in Arabia. New York

  13. Loran-C Signal Stability Study: St. Lawrence Seaway

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-01

    data should be made so that any equipment or data compatability problems could be identified and rectified before the next critical period of the...servo loop) along with the receiver’s current estimate of the signal-to-noise ratio for each station being tracked. The entire message is recorded on the...substantial "time delay " involved in obtaining the data. As an example, we should note that as of "close of business" on 21 June 1982, data from

  14. Shoreline Conditions and Bank Recession Along the U.S. Shorelines of the Saint Marys, Saint Clair, Detroit and Saint Lawrence Rivers,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-01

    larger beach material have an ’Personal communicaton with C Elliot. Thousand Island armoring effect, protecting the riverbank toe by Park Commission. 1978...Hydraulics Branch, De- St. Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation troit, Michigan. (1977) Potential problems considered in relation Corps of Engineers...English). Rev. Contract report prepared for the St. Lawrence Geogr. Montreal, vol. 23, no. 1, p. 5-20. Seaway Development Corporation , Massena, Dionne

  15. Learning Lessons from Estuaries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnittka, Christine

    2006-01-01

    There is something that draws all people to the sea and especially to the fertile estuaries that nuzzle up to its shores. An estuary serves as both a nursery and a grave for sea creatures. If life evolved from some primordial sea, it may well have been an estuary--a place where ocean and rivers meet and fresh and salty waters mingle in the…

  16. Milwaukee Estuary AOC

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The rivers in the Milwaukee estuary in Wisconsin drain into Lake Michigan. Wastewater treatment plants and combined sewer overflows contribute pollution which affects fish and wildlife and recreation.

  17. Local Estuary Programs

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides information about Local Individual Estuary Programs including links to their NEP homepages, social media, Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plans, and state of the bay reports.

  18. Biological Survey Along the St. Lawrence River for the St. Lawrence Seaway. Additional Locks and other Navigation Improvements Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-01-01

    only one month (Table 6). Nine phylums were represented - Porifera, Coelenterata, Platyhelminthes , Nematoda, Nematomorpha, Firyozoa, Annel-ida...Hydroids) - colonies Phylum Platyhelminthes Class Turbellaria (Flatworms) Phylum Nematoda (Roundworms) Phylum Nematomorpha (Horsehair worms) Phylum

  19. 14. Historic American Buildings Survey PHOTOCOPY OF EVERETT MILLS, LAWRENCE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Historic American Buildings Survey PHOTOCOPY OF EVERETT MILLS, LAWRENCE, MASS., INSURANCE SURVEY DRAWING n. d. From the collection of Factory Mutual Insurance Company, Norwood, Mass. - Lawrence Machine Shop, Union & Canal Streets, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  20. Metaproteomics of aquatic microbial communities in a deep and stratified estuary.

    PubMed

    Colatriano, David; Ramachandran, Arthi; Yergeau, Etienne; Maranger, Roxane; Gélinas, Yves; Walsh, David A

    2015-10-01

    Here we harnessed the power of metaproteomics to assess the metabolic diversity and function of stratified aquatic microbial communities in the deep and expansive Lower St. Lawrence Estuary, located in eastern Canada. Vertical profiling of the microbial communities through the stratified water column revealed differences in metabolic lifestyles and in carbon and nitrogen processing pathways. In productive surface waters, we identified heterotrophic populations involved in the processing of high and low molecular weight organic matter from both terrestrial (e.g. cellulose and xylose) and marine (e.g. organic compatible osmolytes) sources. In the less productive deep waters, chemosynthetic production coupled to nitrification by MG-I Thaumarchaeota and Nitrospina appeared to be a dominant metabolic strategy. Similar to other studies of the coastal ocean, we identified methanol oxidation proteins originating from the common OM43 marine clade. However, we also identified a novel lineage of methanol-oxidizers specifically in the particle-rich bottom (i.e. nepheloid) layer. Membrane transport proteins assigned to the uncultivated MG-II Euryarchaeota were also specifically detected in the nepheloid layer. In total, these results revealed strong vertical structure of microbial taxa and metabolic activities, as well as the presence of specific "nepheloid" taxa that may contribute significantly to coastal ocean nutrient cycling.

  1. Estuary Data Mapper

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) is developing e-Estuary, a decision-support system for coastal management. E-Estuary has three elements: an estuarine geo-referenced relational database, watershed GIS coverages, and tools to support decision-making. To facilita...

  2. Formation and circulation of the cold intermediate layer in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, G. C.; Saucier, F. J.; Straub, D.

    2006-06-01

    The local heat content and formation rate of the cold intermediate layer (CIL) in the Gulf of Saint Lawrence are examined using a combination of new in situ wintertime observations and a three-dimensional numerical model. The field observations consist of five moorings located throughout the gulf over the period of November 2002 to June 2003. The observations demonstrate a substantially deeper surface mixed layer in the central and northeast gulf than in regions downstream of the buoyant surface outflow from the Saint Lawrence Estuary. The mixed-layer depth in the estuary remains shallow (<60 m) throughout winter, with the arrival of a layer of near-freezing waters between 40 and 100 m depth in April. An eddy-permitting ice-ocean model with realistic forcing is used to hindcast the period of observation. The model simulates well the seasonal evolution of mixed-layer depth and CIL heat content. Although the greatest heat losses occur in the northeast, the most significant change in CIL heat content over winter occurs in the Anticosti Trough. The observed renewal of CIL in the estuary in spring is captured by the model. The simulation highlights the role of the northwest gulf, and in particular, the separation of the Gaspé Current, in controlling the exchange of CIL between the estuary and the gulf. In order to isolate the effects of inflow through the Strait of Belle Isle on the CIL heat content, we examine a sensitivity experiment in which the strait is closed. This simulation shows that the inflow has a less important effect on the CIL than was suggested by previous studies.

  3. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 2007 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chrzanowski, P; Walter, K

    2008-04-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's many outstanding accomplishments in 2007 are a tribute to a dedicated staff, which is shaping the Laboratory's future as we go through a period of transition and transformation. The achievements highlighted in this annual report illustrate our focus on the important problems that affect our nation's security and global stability, our application of breakthrough science and technology to tackle those problems, and our commitment to safe, secure, and efficient operations. In May 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), a new public-private partnership, the contract to manage and operate the Laboratory starting in October. Since its inception in 1952, the Laboratory had been managed by the University of California (UC) for the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and predecessor organizations. UC is one of the parent organizations that make up LLNS, and UC's presence in the new management entity will help us carry forward our strong tradition of multidisciplinary science and technology. 'Team science' applied to big problems was pioneered by the Laboratory's co-founder and namesake, Ernest O. Lawrence, and has been our hallmark ever since. Transition began fully a year before DOE's announcement. More than 1,600 activities had to be carried out to transition the Laboratory from management by a not-for-profit to a private entity. People, property, and procedures as well as contracts, formal agreements, and liabilities had to be transferred to LLNS. The pre-transition and transition teams did a superb job, and I thank them for their hard work. Transformation is an ongoing process at Livermore. We continually reinvent ourselves as we seek breakthroughs that impact emerging national needs. An example is our development in the late 1990s of a portable instrument that could rapidly detect DNA signatures, research that started with a view toward the potential threat

  4. Climate Ready Estuaries Progress Reports

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Climate Ready Estuaries has supported adaptation activities in National Estuary Programs since 2008. In 2012, the program partnered with 23 NEPs, completed a pilot project with water utilities, and held workshops. Download annual reports from 2009-2012.

  5. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory catalog of research projects

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Research from Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is briefly presented. Topics include: (1) Applied Science; (2) Chemical Sciences; (3) Earth Sciences; (4) Materials Sciences; (5) Accelerator and Fusion Research; (6) Nuclear Science; (7) Physics; (8) Cell and Molecular Biology; (9) Chemical Biodynamics; (10) Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics; (11) Engineering; (12) Environmental Protection, Health and Safety; and (13) Information and Computing Sciences. (WET)

  6. Struggle for the Soul: John Lawrence Childs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallones, Jared

    2010-01-01

    John Lawrence Childs was born in Eau Claire, Wisconsin on January 11, 1889, the second child of John Nelson Childs and Helen Janette (Nettie) Smith. In childhood Childs absorbed the values of industry, democracy, and a traditional, but socially conscious, religion. Childs was a Methodist and an intensely private person not given to talking about…

  7. 78 FR 66265 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY... operation of the Atlantic Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds Channel, at Lawrence, New York. This... Atlantic Beach Bridge, across Reynolds Channel, mile 0.4, at Lawrence, New York, has a vertical...

  8. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, H. E.; Bertoldo, N. A.; Blake, R. G.; Buscheck, W. M.; Byrne, J. G.; Cerruti, S. J.; Bish, C. B.; Fratanduono, M. E.; Grayson, A. R.; MacQueen, D. H.; Montemayor, W. E.; Ottaway, H. L.; Paterson, L. E.; Revelli, M. A.; Rosene, C. A.; Swanson, K. A.; Terrill, A. A.; Wegrecki, A. M.; Wilson, K. R.; Woollett, J. S.

    2015-09-29

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2014 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL’s) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL’s environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites—the Livermore Site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL’s Environmental Functional Area. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,” and DOE Order 458.1, “Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.”

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Rosene, C. A.; Jones, H. E.

    2016-09-22

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2015 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s (LLNL’s) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL’s environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites—the Livermore Site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL’s Environmental Functional Area. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1B, “Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,” and DOE Order 458.1, “Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.”

  10. Geothermal programs at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kasameyer, P.W.; Younker, L.W.

    1987-07-10

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has a number of geothermal programs supported through two offices in the Department of Energy: the Office of Renewable Technologies, Geothermal Technologies Division, and the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Engineering, Mathematics and Geosciences. Within these programs, we are carrying out research in injection monitoring, optical instrumentation for geothermal wells, seismic imaging methods, geophysical and drilling investigations of young volcanic systems in California, and fundamental studies of the rock and mineral properties.

  11. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1993 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This annual Site Environmental Report summarizes Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s (LBL`s) environmental activities in calendar year (CY) 1993. The purpose of this report is to characterize site environmental management performance, confirm compliance status with environmental standards and requirements, and highlight significant programs and efforts. Its format and content are consistent with the requirements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Summer Employment Summary

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A J

    2002-08-06

    This document will serve as a summary of my work activities as a summer employee for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The intent of this document is to provide an overview of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, to explain the role of the department that I am working for, and to discuss my specific assigned tasks and their impact on the NIF project as a whole.

  13. Dr. Tom Lawrence: a life in chiropractic

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Joseph C

    2005-01-01

    He dwelt within the chiropractic orbit from the cradle to the grave. Second-generation chiropractor Tom Lawrence was a successful professional and family man who followed in his father’s footsteps and fought the good fight to improve chiropractic within his state and nation. His passing closes a chapter of living memory of the middle years of the first chiropractic century. PMID:17549212

  14. Life sciences: Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-07-01

    Life Sciences Research at LBL has both a long history and a new visibility. The physics technologies pioneered in the days of Ernest O. Lawrence found almost immediate application in the medical research conducted by Ernest's brother, John Lawrence. And the tradition of nuclear medicine continues today, largely uninterrupted for more than 50 years. Until recently, though, life sciences research has been a secondary force at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Today, a true multi-program laboratory has emerged, in which the life sciences participate as a full partner. The LBL Human Genome Center is a contribution to the growing international effort to map the human genome. Its achievements represent LBL divisions, including Engineering, Materials and Chemical Sciences, and Information and Computing Sciences, along with Cell and Molecular Biology and Chemical Biodynamics. The Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center will comprise not only beamlines and experimental end stations, but also supporting laboratories and office space for scientists from across the US. This effort reflects a confluence of scientific disciplines --- this time represented by individuals from the life sciences divisions and by engineers and physicists associated with the Advanced Light Source project. And finally, this report itself, the first summarizing the efforts of all four life sciences divisions, suggests a new spirit of cooperation. 30 figs.

  15. Obituary: Lawrence Hugh Aller, 1913-2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaler, James B.

    2003-12-01

    The announcement still lies in my inbox: ``Lawrence Aller died last Sunday." On 16 March 2003, one of the world's fine astronomers passed away at the age of 89, leaving behind a legacy that will ripple as long as there are students of the celestial science, one that incorporated observation, theory, education, care, decency, and kindness. Lawrence was born in the humblest of conditions in Tacoma, Washington, on 24 September 1913. His mother, Lella (Belle) Allen, was a homemaker and his father Leslie Aller, was an occassional printer and gold prospector who thought that the use of the mind was a waste of time. With fierce persistence and dedication, Lawrence pulled off a feat that would probably not be possible now: getting into college without having finished high school, the result of being dragged to work in his father's primitive gold mining camp. His interest, sparked by leaflets from the Astronomical Society of the Pacific and by Russell, Dugan, and Stewart's venerable textbook, led him to a correspondence, and finally a meeting, with Donald Menzel of Harvard, who persuaded the admissions director of the University of California at Berkeley to admit him in 1932. From there, Lawrence went on to graduate school at Harvard and the Harvard Society of Fellows, where he studied with Menzel and developed his interest in stellar and nebular astronomy. After working in the War effort, he made his professorial debut at Indiana University, where he stayed until 1948 before leaving for the University of Michigan. Residing there for the next 14 years, he established his research reputation and helped develop the Michigan graduate program. In 1962, the opportunity arose to return to California, to UCLA, where he again was instrumental in founding a PhD program. There he stayed, through his retirement in 1984, doing research right up to the end. Eight other schools received him as visiting professor. Lawrence knew that to make inroads into astronomy, he needed to apply

  16. Ecology of estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kennish, M.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Ecology of Estuaries: Anthropogenic Effects represents the most definitive and comprehensive source of reference information available on the human impact on estuarine ecosystems. The book discusses both acute and insidious pollution problems plaguing these coastal ecotones. It also provides a detailed examination of the deleterious and pervasive effects of human activities on biotic communities and sensitive habitat areas in estuaries. Specific areas covered include organic loading, oil pollution, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons, heavy metals, dredging and dredge-spoil disposal, radionuclides, as well as other contaminants and processes. The diverse components of these anthropogenic influences are assembled in an organized framework and presented in a clear and concise style that will facilitate their understanding.

  17. Ecology of estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Kennish, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    This book is a summary of information available on estuarine ecology, that reviews concepts and problems of estuaries and assesses the value of these coastal systems. It investigates such topics as water circulation and mixing, trace elements, nutrients, organic matter, and sedimentary processes, with reviews on more than two decades of intense study. Chapters reflect contributions from a variety of interdisciplinary sciences including botany, chemistry, ecology, geology, physics, and zoology.

  18. THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELING OF COHESIVE SEDIMENT TRANSPORT IN A PARTIALLY STRATIFIED MICRO-TIDAL ESTUARY TO ASSESS EFFECTIVENESS OF SEDIMENT TRAPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The three-dimensional (3D) finite difference model Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) was used to simulate the hydrodynamics and sediment transport in a partially stratified micro-tidal estuary. The estuary modeled consisted of a 16-km reach of the St. Johns River, Florida,...

  19. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1994 site environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    The 1994 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) for the calendar year (CY) 1994. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the Laboratory`s environmental management programs when measured against regulatory standards and DOE requirements. The report also discusses significant highlight and planning efforts of these programs. The format and content of the report are consistent with the requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  20. Technology transfer at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.

    1992-09-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is dedicated to commercializing new technology in such fields as advanced materials, biotechnology, and electronics. Technology transfer between national laboratories and the industrial community is important in maintaining America's competitive edge. This document examines opportunities to establish working relationships with LBL. Streamlined methods for technology transfer are available with the aid of the Technology Transfer Department and the Patent Department at LBL. Research activities at LBL are concentrated in three major program areas: Energy Sciences, General Sciences, and Biosciences. Each program area consists of three research divisions. LBL welcomes both requests for information and proposals to conduct research.

  1. Technology transfer at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.

    1992-09-01

    Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is dedicated to commercializing new technology in such fields as advanced materials, biotechnology, and electronics. Technology transfer between national laboratories and the industrial community is important in maintaining America`s competitive edge. This document examines opportunities to establish working relationships with LBL. Streamlined methods for technology transfer are available with the aid of the Technology Transfer Department and the Patent Department at LBL. Research activities at LBL are concentrated in three major program areas: Energy Sciences, General Sciences, and Biosciences. Each program area consists of three research divisions. LBL welcomes both requests for information and proposals to conduct research.

  2. 2020 Foresight Forging the Future of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Chrzanowski, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) of 2020 will look much different from the LLNL of today and vastly different from how it looked twenty years ago. We, the members of the Long-Range Strategy Project, envision a Laboratory not defined by one program--nuclear weapons research--but by several core programs related to or synergistic with LLNL's national security mission. We expect the Laboratory to be fully engaged with sponsors and the local community and closely partnering with other research and development (R&D) organizations and academia. Unclassified work will be a vital part of the Laboratory of 2020 and will visibly demonstrate LLNL's international science and technology strengths. We firmly believe that there will be a critical and continuing role for the Laboratory. As a dynamic and versatile multipurpose laboratory with a national security focus, LLNL will be applying its capabilities in science and technology to meet the needs of the nation in the 21st century. With strategic investments in science, outstanding technical capabilities, and effective relationships, the Laboratory will, we believe, continue to play a key role in securing the nation's future.

  3. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Lawrence Bradley Photographer April, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Lawrence Bradley - Photographer April, 4, 1936 CEILING MAIN AUDITORIUM - Independent Presbyterian Church, Bull & Oglethorpe Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  4. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Lawrence Bradley Photographer April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Lawrence Bradley - Photographer April 6, 1936. INTERIOR DETAIL OF STAIRWAY - Independent Presbyterian Church, Bull & Oglethorpe Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  5. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Lawrence Bradley Photographer April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Lawrence Bradley - Photographer April 6, 1936. FRONT ELEVATION OF TOWER - Independent Presbyterian Church, Bull & Oglethorpe Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  6. Adaptive Optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D T

    2003-03-10

    Adaptive optics enables high resolution imaging through the atmospheric by correcting for the turbulent air's aberrations to the light waves passing through it. The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for a number of years has been at the forefront of applying adaptive optics technology to astronomy on the world's largest astronomical telescopes, in particular at the Keck 10-meter telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. The technology includes the development of high-speed electrically driven deformable mirrors, high-speed low-noise CCD sensors, and real-time wavefront reconstruction and control hardware. Adaptive optics finds applications in many other areas where light beams pass through aberrating media and must be corrected to maintain diffraction-limited performance. We describe systems and results in astronomy, medicine (vision science), and horizontal path imaging, all active programs in our group.

  7. Public attitudes toward Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-05-01

    Charlton Research Company is pleased to present the following summary of findings report for research conducted under contract with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This section provides a brief introduction to the specifications of the study, and a guide to the organization of this report. Although the most sophisticated procedures have been used to collect and analyze the information presented here, it must be remembered that qualitative and quantitative research are not predictions. They are designed to measure public opinion within identifiable statistical limits or accuracy at specific points in time. This research is in no way a prediction of opinion or action at any future point in time. Among the topics covered in the surveys are: openness; National Laboratory; health hazards; radioactivity; uses of plutonium; hazardous waste; groundwater pollution; nuclear weapons; Ballistic Missile Defense; and earthquakes.

  8. Geologic map of Saint Lawrence Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, William W.; Wilson, Frederic H.; Taylor, Theresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Saint Lawrence Island is located in the northern Bering Sea, 190 km southwest of the tip of the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, and 75 km southeast of the Chukotsk Peninsula, Russia (see index map, map sheet). It lies on a broad, shallow-water continental shelf that extends from western Alaska to northeastern Russia. The island is situated on a northwest-trending structural uplift exposing rocks as old as Paleozoic above sea level. The submerged shelf between the Seward Peninsula and Saint Lawrence Island is covered mainly with Cenozoic deposits (Dundo and Egiazarov, 1982). Northeast of the island, the shelf is underlain by a large structural depression, the Norton Basin, which contains as much as 6.5 km of Cenozoic strata (Grim and McManus, 1970; Fisher and others, 1982). Sparse test-well data indicate that the Cenozoic strata are underlain by Paleozoic and Proterozoic rocks, similar to those exposed on the Seward Peninsula (Turner and others, 1983). Saint Lawrence Island is 160 km long in an east-west direction and from 15 km to 55 km wide in a north-south direction. The east end of the island consists largely of a wave-cut platform, which has been elevated as much as 30 m above sea level. Isolated upland areas composed largely of granitic plutons rise as much as 550 m above the wave-cut platform. The central part of the island is dominated by the Kookooligit Mountains, a large Quaternary shield volcano that extends over an area of 850 km2 and rises to an elevation of 630 m. The west end of the island is composed of the Poovoot Range, a group of barren, rubble-covered hills as high as 450 m that extend from Boxer Bay on the southwest coast to Taphook Mountain on the north coast. The Poovoot Range is flanked on the southeast by the Putgut Plateau, a nearly flat, lake-dotted plain that stands 30?60 m above sea level. The west end of the island is marked by uplands underlain by the Sevuokuk pluton (unit Kg), a long narrow granite body that extends from Gambell on the

  9. Guidelines for metrication at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This document provides a set of guidelines for the metric transition process already under way at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. LBL has embarked upon this course in response to Section 5164 of the Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988, Executive Order 12770 of 1991, and DOE Order 5900.2. The core provision of DOE Order 5900.2 is Section 7b, which states: {open_quotes}Metric usage shall be required except to the extent that such use is impractical, or is likely to cause significant inefficiencies to, or loss of markets by United States firms, or an inability of the Department to fulfill its responsibilities under the laws of the Federal Government and the United States.{close_quotes} LBL`s metrication policy is meant to comply with this requirement by aggressively fostering metrication. The purpose of these guidelines is to optimize the coherence and the cost-effectiveness of the metrication process.

  10. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Affirmative Action Program. Revised

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory`s Affirmative Action Program (AAP) serves as a working document that describes current policies, practices, and results in the area of affirmative action. It represents the Laboratory`s framework for an affirmative approach to increasing the representation of people of color and women in segments of our work force where they have been underrepresented and taking action to increase the employment of persons with disabilities and special disabled and Vietnam era veterans. The AAP describes the hierarchy of responsibility for Laboratory affirmative action, the mechanisms that exist for full Laboratory participation in the AAP, the policies and procedures governing recruitment at all levels, the Laboratory`s plan for monitoring, reporting, and evaluating affirmative action progress, and a description of special affirmative action programs and plans the Laboratory has used and will use in its efforts to increase the representation and retention of groups historically underrepresented in our work force.

  11. 4. Long view of west half of site from Lawrence ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Long view of west half of site from Lawrence General Hospital parking deck (former location of coating mill) showing north side of rear portion of Wilder Mill and Paper Machine Building; view to southwest. - Champion-International Paper Company, West bank of Spicket River at Canal Street, Lawrence, Essex County, MA

  12. Astronauts Grunsfeld and Lawrence on middeck with ergometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronauts John M. Grunsfeld and Wendy B. Lawrence exercise on the middeck of the Earth-orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour during the STS-67 mission. While Grunsfeld's pedaling is done on a real bicycle ergometer, Lawrence's movements are a convincing simulation without hardware.

  13. Toward delisting of the water quality beneficial use impairment in the St. Louis River, MN: A monitoring approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality in the St. Louis River Estuary (SLRE), a great lakes area of concern (AOC), is improving. A significant leap forward followed the opening of the Western Lake Superior Sanitary District in 1978. However, desire for continued improvement throughout the estuary was the...

  14. Geochemistry of the Amazon Estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoak, Joseph M.; Krest, James M.; Swarzenski, Peter W

    2006-01-01

    The Amazon River supplies more freshwater to the ocean than any other river in the world. This enormous volume of freshwater forces the estuarine mixing out of the river channel and onto the continental shelf. On the continental shelf, the estuarine mixing occurs in a very dynamic environment unlike that of a typical estuary. The tides, the wind, and the boundary current that sweeps the continental shelf have a pronounced influence on the chemical and biological processes occurring within the estuary. The dynamic environment, along with the enormous supply of water, solutes and particles makes the Amazon estuary unique. This chapter describes the unique features of the Amazon estuary and how these features influence the processes occurring within the estuary. Examined are the supply and cycling of major and minor elements, and the use of naturally occurring radionuclides to trace processes including water movement, scavenging, sediment-water interaction, and sediment accumulation rates. The biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus, and the significances of the Amazon estuary in the global mass balance of these elements are examined.

  15. Dispersion in alluvial convergent estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhilin; Savenije, Hubert H. G.

    2016-04-01

    The Van der Burgh's equation for longitudinal effective dispersion is a purely empirical method with practical implications. Its application to the effective tidal average dispersion under equilibrium conditions appears to have excellent performance in a wide range of alluvial estuaries. In this research, we try to find out the physical meaning of Van der Burgh's coefficient. Researchers like MacCready, Fischer, Kuijper, Hansen and Rattray have tried to split up dispersion into its constituents which did not do much to explain overall behaviour. In addition, traditional literature on dispersion is mostly related to flumes with constant cross-section. This research is about understanding the Van der Burgh's coefficient facing the fact that natural estuaries have exponentially varying cross-section. The objective is to derive a simple 1-D model considering both longitudinal and lateral mixing processes based on field observations (theoretical derivation). To that effect, we connect dispersion with salinity using the salt balance equation. Then we calculate the salinity along the longitudinal direction and compare it to the observed salinity. Calibrated dispersion coefficients in a range of estuaries are then compared with new expressions for the Van der Burgh's coefficient K and it is analysed if K varies from estuary to estuary. The set of reliable data used will be from estuaries: Kurau, Perak, Bernam, Selangor, Muar, Endau, Maputo, Thames, Corantijn, Sinnamary, Mae Klong, Lalang, Limpopo, Tha Chin, Chao Phraya, Edisto and Elbe.

  16. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, H E; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Cerruti, S J; Coty, J D; Dibley, V R; Doman, J L; Grayson, A R; MacQueen, D H; Wegrecki, A M; Armstrong, D H; Brigdon, S L; Heidecker, K R; Hollister, R K; Khan, H N; Lee, G S; Nelson, J C; Paterson, L E; Salvo, V J; Schwartz, W W; Terusaki, S H; Wilson, K R; Woods, J M; Yimbo, P O; Gallegos, G M; Terrill, A A; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Blake, R G; Woollett, J S; Kumamoto, G

    2011-09-14

    The purposes of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2010 are to record Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) compliance with environmental standards and requirements, describe LLNL's environmental protection and remediation programs, and present the results of environmental monitoring at the two LLNL sites - the Livermore site and Site 300. The report is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by LLNL's Environmental Protection Department. Submittal of the report satisfies requirements under DOE Order 231.1A, Environmental Safety and Health Reporting, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The report is distributed electronically and is available at https://saer.llnl.gov/, the website for the LLNL annual environmental report. Previous LLNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1994 are also on the website. Some references in the electronic report text are underlined, which indicates that they are clickable links. Clicking on one of these links will open the related document, data workbook, or website that it refers to. The report begins with an executive summary, which provides the purpose of the report and an overview of LLNL's compliance and monitoring results. The first three chapters provide background information: Chapter 1 is an overview of the location, meteorology, and hydrogeology of the two LLNL sites; Chapter 2 is a summary of LLNL's compliance with environmental regulations; and Chapter 3 is a description of LLNL's environmental programs with an emphasis on the Environmental Management System including pollution prevention. The majority of the report covers LLNL's environmental monitoring programs and monitoring data for 2010: effluent and ambient air (Chapter 4); waters, including wastewater, storm water runoff, surface water, rain, and groundwater (Chapter 5); and terrestrial, including soil, sediment, vegetation, foodstuff, ambient radiation, and special status

  17. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, H. E.; Bertoldo, N. A.; Blake, R. G.; Cerruti, S. J.; Dibley, V. R.; Doman, J. L.; Fish, C. B.; Grayson, A. R.; Heidecker, K. R.; Kumamoto, G.; MacQueen, D. H.; Montemayor, W. E.; Ottaway, H. L.; Paterson, L. E.; Revelli, M. A.; Rosene, C. A.; Terrill, A. A.; Wegrecki, A. M.; Wilson, K. R.; Woollett, J. S.; Veseliza, R.

    2014-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a premier research laboratory that is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As a national security laboratory, LLNL is responsible for ensuring that the nation’s nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable. The Laboratory also meets other pressing national security needs, including countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and strengthening homeland security, and conducting major research in atmospheric, earth, and energy sciences; bioscience and biotechnology; and engineering, basic science, and advanced technology. The Laboratory is managed and operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), and serves as a scientific resource to the U.S. government and a partner to industry and academia. LLNL operations have the potential to release a variety of constituents into the environment via atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater pathways. Some of the constituents, such as particles from diesel engines, are common at many types of facilities while others, such as radionuclides, are unique to research facilities like LLNL. All releases are highly regulated and carefully monitored. LLNL strives to maintain a safe, secure and efficient operational environment for its employees and neighboring communities. Experts in environment, safety and health (ES&H) support all Laboratory activities. LLNL’s radiological control program ensures that radiological exposures and releases are reduced to as low as reasonably achievable to protect the health and safety of its employees, contractors, the public, and the environment. LLNL is committed to enhancing its environmental stewardship and managing the impacts its operations may have on the environment through a formal Environmental Management System. The Laboratory encourages the public to participate in matters related to the Laboratory’s environmental impact on the

  18. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Environmental Report 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Henry E.; Armstrong, Dave; Blake, Rick G.; Bertoldo, Nicholas A.; Cerruti, Steven J.; Fish, Craig; Dibley, Valerie R.; Doman, Jennifer L.; Grayson, Allen R.; Heidecker, Kelly R.; Hollister, Rod K.; Kumamoto, Gene; MacQueen, Donald H.; Nelson, Jennifer C.; Ottaway, Heather L.; Paterson, Lisa E.; Revelli, Michael A.; Rosene, Crystal A.; Terrill, Alison A.; Wegrecki, Anthony M.; Wilson, Kent R.; Woollett, Jim S.

    2013-09-19

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a premier research laboratory that is part of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). As a national security laboratory, LLNL is responsible for ensuring that the nation’s nuclear weapons remain safe, secure, and reliable. The Laboratory also meets other pressing national security needs, including countering the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and strengthening homeland security, and conducting major research in atmospheric, earth, and energy sciences; bioscience and biotechnology; and engineering, basic science, and advanced technology. The Laboratory is managed and operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), and serves as a scientific resource to the U.S. government and a partner to industry and academia. LLNL operations have the potential to release a variety of constituents into the environment via atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater pathways. Some of the constituents, such as particles from diesel engines, are common at many types of facilities while others, such as radionuclides, are unique to research facilities like LLNL. All releases are highly regulated and carefully monitored. LLNL strives to maintain a safe, secure and efficient operational environment for its employees and neighboring communities. Experts in environment, safety and health (ES&H) support all Laboratory activities. LLNL’s radiological control program ensures that radiological exposures and releases are reduced to as low as reasonably achievable to protect the health and safety of its employees, contractors, the public, and the environment. LLNL is committed to enhancing its environmental stewardship and managing the impacts its operations may have on the environment through a formal Environmental Management System. The Laboratory encourages the public to participate in matters related to the Laboratory’s environmental impact on the

  19. The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Technical Site Information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1992 Technical Site Information (TSI) document is a comprehensive summary of information that is the result of the site planning process, which, in conjunction with the Site Development Plan (SDP), acts as a guide for effective use of the Laboratory's land and facilities resources. The SDP and TSI provide a conceptual and operational framework for the rehabilitation of existing facilities and the development and siting of future buildings. It has been prepared for use by the management and staff of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, the University of California, and the neighboring communities. This TSI is based on previous planning documents and current studies and analyses. Revisions are based on the Laboratory's annual Institutional Plan, SDP, and recent planning reviews and analyses. The document describes the physical setting, planning processes and underlying planning concepts, trends in Laboratory activity, facilities requirements, and future site development. The TSI has been developed as part of a continuing planning and review process involving the Laboratory's 12 scientific and support divisions.

  20. The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Technical Site Information

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1992 Technical Site Information (TSI) document is a comprehensive summary of information that is the result of the site planning process, which, in conjunction with the Site Development Plan (SDP), acts as a guide for effective use of the Laboratory`s land and facilities resources. The SDP and TSI provide a conceptual and operational framework for the rehabilitation of existing facilities and the development and siting of future buildings. It has been prepared for use by the management and staff of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, the University of California, and the neighboring communities. This TSI is based on previous planning documents and current studies and analyses. Revisions are based on the Laboratory`s annual Institutional Plan, SDP, and recent planning reviews and analyses. The document describes the physical setting, planning processes and underlying planning concepts, trends in Laboratory activity, facilities requirements, and future site development. The TSI has been developed as part of a continuing planning and review process involving the Laboratory`s 12 scientific and support divisions.

  1. Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Regional Transportation Studies: Sensitivity and Feasibility Analysis of Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Capacity Expansion Measures to the Year 2050.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    components: reduce dumo /fill times and downstream longi- tudinal hydraulic assistance. Reducing the lock dump/fill times requires replacement of the...kevels, decreased dumo ,’Fill limes, and, a traffic control svstem. The capital costs for 41mplementing these three alternatives are estimated to Dc 5𔃼S

  2. Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon estuaries: The importance of the ocean-estuary connection

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the role of the ocean –estuary connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats estuaries, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina Estuary, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the estuary. As a result, low DO ...

  3. Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon estuaries: Importance of the ocean-estuary connection - March 2011

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the role of the ocean–estuary connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats estuaries, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina Estuary, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the estuary. As a result, low DO w...

  4. Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon estuaries: Importance of the ocean-estuary connection

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the role of the ocean –estuary connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats estuaries, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina Estuary, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the estuary. As a result, low DO ...

  5. Seasonal dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus budgets for two sub-tropical estuaries in south Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzelli, C.; Wan, Y.; Doering, P. H.; Boyer, J. N.

    2013-02-01

    Interactions among watershed nutrient loading, circulation, and biogeochemical cycling determine the capacity of estuaries to accommodate introduced nutrients. Baseline quantification of loading, flushing time, export, and internal processes is essential to understand responses of sub-tropical estuaries to variable climate and nutrient loading. The goal of this study was to develop seasonal dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and phosphorus (DIP) budgets for the two estuaries in south Florida, the Caloosahatchee River Estuary (CRE) and the St. Lucie Estuary (SLE), from 2002-2008 spanning various climatic conditions. The Land Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone (LOICZ) Biogeochemical Model was used to generate water, salt, and (DIN and DIP) budgets. The predicted increase in internal DIN production for the CRE vs. the SLE was associated with increased external DIN loading. Water column DIN concentrations decreased and stabilized in both estuaries as flushing time increased to > 10 d. The CRE demonstrated heterotrophy or balanced metabolism across all seasonal budgets. Although the SLE was also sensitive to DIN loading, system autotrophy and net ecosystem metabolism increased with DIP loading to this estuary. This included a huge DIP consumption and bloom of a cyanobacterium (Microcystis aeruginosa) following hurricane-induced discharge in 2005. Additionally, while denitrification offered a loss pathway for inorganic nitrogen in the CRE, this potential was not evident for the smaller and more anthropogenically altered St. Lucie Estuary. Disparities between total and inorganic loading ratios suggested that management actions should examine the role of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) in attempts to reduce both nitrogen and phosphorus inputs to the SLE. Establishment of quantitative loading limits for anthropogenically impacted estuaries requires an understanding of the inter-seasonal and inter-annual relationships for both N and P, circulation and flushing

  6. Downloading and Installing Estuary Data Mapper (EDM)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Estuary Data Mapper is a tool for geospatial data discovery, visualization, and data download for any of the approximately 2,000 estuaries and associated watersheds in along the five US coastal regions

  7. About the Climate Ready Estuaries Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Climate Ready Estuaries program is a partnership between EPA and the National Estuary Programs to address climate change in coastal areas. It has helped coastal communities prepare for climate change since 2008.

  8. Frequent Questions about Estuary Data Mapper (EDM)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Estuary Data Mapper is a tool for geospatial data discovery, visualization, and data download for any of the approximately 2,000 estuaries and associated watersheds in along the five US coastal regions

  9. Seeing and Insight: An Interview with Jacob Lawrence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblum, Paula

    1982-01-01

    Presents an interview with Black artist Jacob Lawrence. He comments on the role of the artist and art in society, the value of the creative experience, and the influence of Harlem and Africa on his work. (AM)

  10. Former Fermilab boss to lead Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Particle physicist Michael Witherell - current vice-chancellor for research at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) - has been appointed the next director of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL).

  11. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Lawrence Bradley Photographer April, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Lawrence Bradley - Photographer April, 18, 1936 DETAIL OF INTERIOR TRIM LOOKING ACROSS MAIN ENTRANCE HALL - Ware-Sibley-Clark House, 506 Telfair Street, Augusta, Richmond County, GA

  12. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Lawrence Bradley Photographer April ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Lawrence Bradley - Photographer April 6, 1936. INTERIOR VIEW OF COLUMNS AND DOME MAIN AUDITORIUM - Independent Presbyterian Church, Bull & Oglethorpe Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  13. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1981-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data on air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring for 1980 are presented, and general trends are discussed.

  14. Application of microwave radiometers for wetlands and estuaries monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Shutko, A.; Haldin, A.; Novichikhin, E.

    1997-06-01

    This paper presents the examples of experimental data obtained with airborne microwave radiometers used for monitoring of wetlands and estuaries located in coastal environments. The international team of researchers has successfully worked in Russia, Ukraine and USA. The data presented relate to a period of time between 1990 and 1995. They have been collected in Odessa Region, Black Sea coast, Ukraine, in Regions of Pittsville and Winfield, Maryland, USA, and in Region of St. Marks, Florida, USA. The parameters discussed are a soil moisture, depth to a shallow water table, vegetation index, salinity of water surface.

  15. Spatial and Temporal Variation of Physico-chemical Parameters in the Merbok Estuary, Kedah, Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Fatema, Kaniz; Wan Maznah, WO; Isa, Mansor Mat

    2014-01-01

    In this study, factor analysis (FA) was applied to extract the hidden factors responsible for water quality variations during both wet and dry seasons. Water samples were collected from six sampling stations (St. 1 Lalang River, St. 2 Semeling River, St. 3 Jagung River, St. 4 Teluk Wang River, St. 5 Gelam River and St. 6 Derhaka River) in the Merbok estuary, Malaysia from January to December 2011; the samples were further analysed in the laboratory. Correlation analysis of the data sets showed strong correlations between the parameters. Nutrients such as nitrate (NO3−), nitrite (NO2−), ammonia (NH3) and phosphate (PO43−) were determined to be critical indicators of water quality throughout the year. Influential water quality parameters during the wet season were conductivity, salinity, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), dissolved oxygen (DO) and chlorophyll a (Chla), whereas total suspended solid (TSS) and pH were critical water quality indicators during the dry season. The Kruskal-Wallis H test showed that water quality parameters were significantly different among the sampling months and stations (p<0.05), and Mann-Whitney U tests further revealed that the significantly different parameters were temperature, pH, DO, TSS, NO2− and BOD (p<0.01), whereas salinity, conductivity, NO3−, PO43−, NH3 and Chla were not significantly different (p>0.05). Water quality parameters in the estuary varied on both temporal and spatial scales and these results may serve as baseline information for estuary management, specifically for the Merbok estuary. PMID:27073596

  16. KNOW YOUR ESTUARY: THE WATER THROUGH TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will focus on historical changes in water quality in the Yaquina Estuary, Oregon, and factors which influence water quality within this estuary. Topics presented will include the importance of ocean conditions on water quality in the estuary; historical changes...

  17. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O.

    1990-08-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a multiprogram national laboratory managed by the University of California (UC) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). LBL's major role is to conduct basic and applied science research that is appropriate for an energy research laboratory. The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1989 are presented, and general trends are discussed. 17 refs., 12 figs., 23 tabs.

  18. Astronauts Lawrence and Gregory debrief each other before new shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Astronauts Wendy B. Lawrence and William G. Gregory debrief each other on the flight deck of the Earth orbiting Space Shuttle Endeavour during the STS-67 mission. Lawrence, mission specialist and flight engineer, served as the pilot on the blue shift and Gregory filled that position for the red shift. The two, along with Stephen S. Oswald, mission commander, provided round-the-clock support to the ASTRO-2 payload's timelines, performing maneuvers to put Endeavour in the proper attitudes for onboard experiments.

  19. Assessing the application of an airborne intensified multispectral video camera to measure chlorophyll a in three Florida estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Dierberg, F.E.; Zaitzeff, J.

    1997-08-01

    After absolute and spectral calibration, an airborne intensified, multispectral video camera was field tested for water quality assessments over three Florida estuaries (Tampa Bay, Indian River Lagoon, and the St. Lucie River Estuary). Univariate regression analysis of upwelling spectral energy vs. ground-truthed uncorrected chlorophyll a (Chl a) for each estuary yielded lower coefficients of determination (R{sup 2}) with increasing concentrations of Gelbstoff within an estuary. More predictive relationships were established by adding true color as a second independent variable in a bivariate linear regression model. These regressions successfully explained most of the variation in upwelling light energy (R{sup 2}=0.94, 0.82 and 0.74 for the Tampa Bay, Indian River Lagoon, and St. Lucie estuaries, respectively). Ratioed wavelength bands within the 625-710 nm range produced the highest correlations with ground-truthed uncorrected Chl a, and were similar to those reported as being the most predictive for Chl a in Tennessee reservoirs. However, the ratioed wavebands producing the best predictive algorithms for Chl a differed among the three estuaries due to the effects of varying concentrations of Gelbstoff on upwelling spectral signatures, which precluded combining the data into a common data set for analysis.

  20. Future variability of solute transport in a macrotidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robins, Peter E.; Lewis, Matt J.; Simpson, John H.; Howlett, Eleanor R.; Malham, Shelagh K.

    2014-12-01

    The physical controls on salt distribution and river-sourced conservative solutes, including the potential implications of climate change, are investigated referring to model simulations of a macrotidal estuary. In the UK, such estuaries typically react rapidly to rainfall events and, as such, are often in a state of non-equilibrium in terms of solute transport; hence are particularly sensitive to climate extremes. Sea levels are projected to rise over the 21st century, extending the salinity maximum upstream in estuaries, which will also affect downstream solute transport, promoting estuarine trapping and reducing offshore dispersal of material. Predicted 'drier summers' and 'wetter winters' in the UK will influence solute transport further still; we found that projected river flow climate changes were more influential than sea-level rise, especially for low flow conditions. Our simulations show that projected climate change for the UK is likely to increase variability in estuarine solute transport and, specifically, increase the likelihood of estuarine trapping during summer, mainly due to drier weather conditions. Future changes in solute transport were less certain during winter, since increased river flow will to some extent counter-act the effects of sea-level rise. Our results have important implications for non-conservative nutrient transport, water quality, coastal management and ecosystem resilience.

  1. Obituary: Fred Lawrence Whipple, 1906-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeomans, Donald Keith

    2004-12-01

    Fred Whipple, one of the founding fathers of planetary science, died on August 30, 2004 just two months shy of his 98th birthday. The breadth of Fred's published research from 1927 through 2000 is quite extraordinary. Although his collected works were published in two massive volumes in 1972, shortly before his retirement, Fred's research contributions continued for another three decades - and another volume is planned. Fred Lawrence Whipple was born on November 5, 1906 on a farm in Red Oak Iowa. His parents were Harry Lawrence and Celestia (MacFarl) Whipple. At the age of fifteen, the Whipple family moved to California where Fred studied mathematics at Occidental College and the University of California at Los Angeles. As a graduate student at the University of California at Berkeley in 1930, he was one of the first to compute an orbit for the newly discovered planet Pluto. Upon receiving his PhD in 1931, he joined the staff of the Harvard College Observatory. He was Chairman of the Harvard Department of Astronomy (1949 - 1956), Director or the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (1955 - 1973), Phillips Professor of Astronomy (1968 - 1977) and Emeritus Phillips Professor of astronomy (1977 - 2004). In 1928 he married Dorothy Woods and their son, Earle Raymond, survives him. The marriage ended in divorce in 1935. Eleven years later, he married Babette F. Samelson and she too survives him, as do their two daughters Laura and (Dorothy) Sandra. Shortly after arriving at Harvard in the early 1930's, Fred developed a photographic tracking network to determine meteor trajectories from simultaneous observations from two or more stations. The photographic trails, chopped by a rotating shutter, allowed their orbits in space to be determined accurately. With the strong involvement of Richard McCrosky and others, he concluded in the early 1960's that most of these meteors were on comet-like orbits and less than 1% of the naked eye, sporadic meteors could be traced to an

  2. The historical record of metal enrichment in two Florida estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, C.R.; Smith, R.G. ); Calder, F.D.; Schropp, S.J. ); Windom H.L. )

    1993-12-01

    Historical profiles of metal accumulation have been generated for the lower St. Johns River and Hillsborough Bay, Florida, in cores representing approximately 50 yr of sediment and metal accumulation. These profiles demonstrate that Cd, Pb, and Zn are enriched in these Florida estuarine sediments. Pb enrichment has decreased since the mid 1970s because of reduced use of leaded gasoline. In the St. Johns River, most metals exhibit a trend of increasing enrichment with time. Cd enrichment significantly decreased between 1970 and 1975 as a result of reduced discharges into the river and control of aquatic vegetation. In Hillsborough Bay, enrichment factors for most metals are relatively high and show little change downcore. Cr, Cu, and Ni border on enrichment and Pb, Cd, and Zn are enriched. The results of this study are consistent with other studies of surficial-sediment metal concentration in other Florida estuaries. 39 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. A historical review and bibliometric analysis of research on estuary pollution.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jinshui; Wang, Ming-Huang; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2012-01-01

    A bibliometric method based on Science Citation Index-Expanded published by the Thomson Reuters was used to quantitatively assess the global estuary pollution research from 1991 to 2010. The main results were as follows: there had been a notable growth trend in publication outputs. Marine Pollution Bulletin was the most active journal. Environmental sciences were top popular subject categories. USA produced the most single, internationally collaborative, first authored and corresponding authored articles. The Chinese Academy of Sciences was the most productive institute for the total articles. Sediment was the most active research topic, which ranked 1st in article title, article abstract, author keyword, and KeyWords Plus analysis, respectively. Heavy metals received stable focus on a high degree in the field of estuary pollution research. Mostly refractory organic compounds (e.g. PAHs) became more active. Biomarkers and bioaccumulation both were active issues. Eutrophication of estuarine waters receives increasing concern in estuary pollution research.

  4. Water resources of the Minneapolis-St. Paul Area, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prior, Charles Henry; Schneider, Robert; Durum, W.H.

    1953-01-01

    Waters from the drift deposits and bedrock formations overlying the Hinckley sandstone are hard and calcareous and generally contain troublesome quantities of iron. Regular treatment is required of some public-supply wells for removal of iron encrustations. Water fr.om these sources generally exceeds 300 ppm hardness, but in some places the St. Peter sandstone and St. Lawrence formation yield water of better quality. The Hinckley sandstone yields the best quality ground-water because of its comparatively lower hardness and uniform temperature (about 52 F). However, the average hardness of the treated municipal supplies of St. Paul and Minneapolis is considerably less than water from the Hinckley.

  5. Food Webs in an Estuary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunne, Barbara B.

    The Maryland Marine Science Education Project has produced a series of mini-units in marine science education for the junior high/middle school classroom. This unit focuses on food chains in an estuary. Although the unit specifically treats the Chesapeake Bay, it may be adapted for use with similar estuarine systems. In addition, the unit may be…

  6. Simulated Sampling of Estuary Plankton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortner, Rosanne W.; Jenkins, Deborah Bainer

    2009-01-01

    To find out about the microscopic life in the valuable estuary environment, it is usually necessary to be near the water. This dry lab offers an alternative, using authentic data and a simulation of plankton sampling. From the types of organisms found in the sample, middle school students can infer relationships in the biological and physical…

  7. Macrobenthos composition, distribution and abundance within Sungai Pulai estuary, Johor, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guan Wan; Min, Lee Di; Ghaffar, Mazlan Abd; Ali, Masni Md; Cob, Zaidi Che

    2014-09-01

    Macrobenthos are very useful organisms for monitoring marine environmental and widely use in marine ecology research. They are able to monitor the difference phase in the recovery stage of disturbed sites by appear different species macrobenthos after the cessation of the impact. Univariate and multivariate methods were use to study the macrobenthos community within Sungai Pulai estuary, Johor, Malaysia. Five sub-samples were taken at each sampling sites by using 10 cm diameter corer. Crustaceans were the most abundant at Tanjung Adang (St. 1) and the station of non-seagrass area (St. 2) while polychaetes were the most abundant at Merambong Shoal (St. 3). Higher density of macrobenthos was found at St.3 followed by St. 1 and St. 2. The commonly used population indices such as diversity, richness, evenness and dominance were employed to determine the differences in diversity and abundance of macrobenthos. The diversity, richness and evenness index values showed slight increment from Station 1 to Station 3, while the dominance index decreasing trend from Station 1 to Station 3. A total 21 polychaete families were collected in Sungai Pulai estuary, which was dominated by the Spionidae, Capitellidae and Glyceridae. Cluster (Bray-Curtis similarities) analyses revealed that the Tanjung Adang and Merambong Shoal population were clearly separated from the station non-seagrass. For the time being factors that influence the pattern of distribution of the macrobenthos cannot be determined and subjected to further studies.

  8. Ernest Orlando Lawrence (1901-1958), Cyclotron and Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, William T.

    2005-09-01

    On August 8, 2001, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory celebrated the centennial of the birth of its founder (and namesake), Ernest Orlando Lawrence. For the occasion, many speeches were given and old speeches were remembered. We recall the words of the late Luis Alvarez, a Nobel Laureate and one of the Lawrence's closest colleagues: ''Lawrence will always be remembered as the inventor of the cyclotron, but more importantly, he should be remembered as the inventor of the modern way of doing science''. J. L. Heilbron and R. W. Seidel, in the introduction of their book, ''Lawrence and His Laboratory'' stated, ''The motives and mechanisms that shaped the growth of the Laboratory helped to force deep changes in the scientific estate and in the wider society. In the entrepreneurship of its founder, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, these motives, mechanisms, and changes came together in a tight focus. He mobilized great and small philanthropists, state and local governments, corporations, and plutocrats, volunteers and virtuosos. The work they supported, from astrophysics and atomic bombs, from radiochemistry to nuclear medicine, shaped the way we observe, control, and manipulate our environment.'' Indeed, all over the civilized world, the ways we do science changed forever after Lawrence built his famed Radiation Laboratory. In this editorial, we epitomize his legacy of changing the way we do medicine, thereby affecting the health and well being of all humanity. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the invention of the cyclotron by Ernest Orlando Lawrence at the University of California at Berkeley. Lawrence conceived the idea of the cyclotron early in 1929 after reading an article by Rolf Wideroe on high-energy accelerators. In the spring of 1930 one of his students, Nels Edlefsen, constructed two crude models of a cyclotron. Later in the fall of the same year, another student, M. Stanley Livingston, constructed a 13-cm diameter model that had all the features of early

  9. 75 FR 34975 - Notice of Estuary Habitat Restoration Council's Intent to Revise its Estuary Habitat Restoration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ...: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; request for comments. SUMMARY: NOAA, on behalf of the interagency Estuary Habitat... received by July 21, 2010. ADDRESSES: Send comments to Estuary Habitat Restoration Strategy, NOAA...

  10. MAPPING BATHYMETRY AND BOTTOM TYPE IN A SHALLOW ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bathymetry and bottom type are important in characterizing estuaries and their ecology but hard to map, especially in shallow estuaries. Acoustic backscattering was used to remotely sense these properties in the shallow Slocums River Estuary of Massachusetts. Acoustic pulses were...

  11. Comparison of Nutrient Drivers and Response Metrics in Oregon Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    With the goal of assessing sensitivity to nutrient enrichment, we present a cross-estuary comparison of nutrient sources, levels, and biological responses (phytoplankton and macroalgae) for thirteen Oregon estuaries. Nitrogen levels in the upstream portions of the estuaries are ...

  12. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Report 2006

    SciTech Connect

    Chrzanowski, P; Walter, K

    2007-05-24

    For the Laboratory and staff, 2006 was a year of outstanding achievements. As our many accomplishments in this annual report illustrate, the Laboratory's focus on important problems that affect our nation's security and our researchers breakthroughs in science and technology have led to major successes. As a national laboratory that is part of the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), Livermore is a key contributor to the Stockpile Stewardship Program for maintaining the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. The program has been highly successful, and our annual report features some of the Laboratory's significant stockpile stewardship accomplishments in 2006. A notable example is a long-term study with Los Alamos National Laboratory, which found that weapon pit performance will not sharply degrade from the aging effects on plutonium. The conclusion was based on a wide range of nonnuclear experiments, detailed simulations, theoretical advances, and thorough analyses of the results of past nuclear tests. The study was a superb scientific effort. The continuing success of stockpile stewardship enabled NNSA in 2006 to lay out Complex 2030, a vision for a transformed nuclear weapons complex that is more responsive, cost efficient, and highly secure. One of the ways our Laboratory will help lead this transformation is through the design and development of reliable replacement warheads (RRWs). Compared to current designs, these warheads would have enhanced performance margins and security features and would be less costly to manufacture and maintain in a smaller, modernized production complex. In early 2007, NNSA selected Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories-California to develop ''RRW-1'' for the U.S. Navy. Design efforts for the RRW, the plutonium aging work, and many other stockpile stewardship accomplishments rely on computer simulations performed on NNSA's Advanced Simulation

  13. PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH, "LAWRENCE LEVERING BECKEL (BRIDGE BUILT BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PHOTOCOPY OF HISTORIC PHOTOGRAPH, "LAWRENCE LEVERING BECKEL (BRIDGE BUILT BY HIM AND HIS FATHER, CHAS. N. BECKEL AT EASTON)," original ca. 1885, photographer unknown. Collection of Historic Bethlehem Inc., Bethlehem, PA, Negative Nos. 3550 or 4504. - Walnut Street Bridge, Formerly spanning Saucon Creek, Hellertown, Northampton County, PA

  14. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1995--2000

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    This report presents the details of the mission and strategic plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory during the fiscal years of 1995--2000. It presents summaries of current programs and potential changes; critical success factors such as human resources; management practices; budgetary allowances; and technical and administrative initiatives.

  15. Environmental monitoring at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. 1979 annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, W.J.; Lindeken, C.L.; White, J.H.; Buddemeir, R.W.

    1980-04-25

    Information on monitoring activities is reported in two sections for EDB/ERA/INIS. The first section covers all information reported except Appendix D, which gives details of sampling and analytical procedures for environmental monitoring used at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. A separate abstract was prepared for Appendix D. (JGB)

  16. 78 FR 56609 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Reynolds Channel, Lawrence, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ...The Coast Guard is canceling the temporary deviation from the regulations published on June 11, 2013, (78 FR 34893) governing the operation of the Atlantic Beach Bridge, mile 0.4, across Reynolds Channel, at Lawrence, New York. The owner of the bridge, Nassau County Bridge Authority, requested six, five hour closure periods, scheduled to occur during the effective period of the above temporary......

  17. Waste management study: Process development at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-12-01

    This report presents the results of an evaluation of the present Toxic Waste Control Operations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, evaluates the technologies most applicable to the treatment of toxic and hazardous wastes and presents conceptual designs of processes for the installation of a new decontamination and waste treatment facility (DWTF) for future treatment of these wastes.

  18. Jacob Lawrence's "The Migration Series": Art as Narrative History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laney, James D.

    2007-01-01

    Because art is a reflection of cultural heritage, a natural affinity exists between art and social studies. In Jacob Lawrence's "The Migration Series," art serves as narrative history, with visual images telling the story of the Great Migration, a movement of African American people from the South to the North around World War I. Social studies…

  19. Management of hazardous wastes Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, C.S.

    1993-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), during the course of numerous research activities, generates hazardous, radioactive, and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. The management of these waste materials is highly regulated in the United States (US). This paper focuses on the hazardous waste regulations that limit and prescribe waste management at LLNL.

  20. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1987-04-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1986 are presented and general trends are discussed. Topics include radiation monitoring, wastewater discharge monitoring, dose distribution estimates, and ground water monitoring. 9 refs., 8 figs., 20 tabs.

  1. 137Cs and 210Po in Pacific Walrus and Bearded Seal from St. Lawrence Island, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, T F; Seagars, D J; Jokela, T; Layton, D

    2005-02-02

    The activity concentration of Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) and naturally-occurring Polonium-210 ({sup 210}Po) were measured in the muscle tissue, kidney and liver of Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) and bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus) collected by native hunters from the Bering Sea. The mean {sup 137}Cs concentrations in muscle, liver and kidney of Pacific walrus were 0.07, 0.09 and 0.07 Bq kg{sup -1} (N= 5, wet weight), respectively, and 0.17, 0.10, and 0.17 Bq kg{sup -1} (N=2, wet weight), respectively, in bearded seal. In general, {sup 137}Cs tissue concentrations are significantly lower than those previously reported for mammals from other regions. By comparison, {sup 210}Po activity concentrations appear to be higher than those reported elsewhere but a larger variation. The mean {sup 210}Po concentration in the muscle tissue, liver and kidney of Pacific walrus (N=5, wet weight) were 28.7, 189, and 174 Bq kg{sup -1}, respectively. This compares with {sup 210}Po concentration values (N=2, wet weight) of 27, 207, and 68 Bq kg{sup -1} measured in the muscle tissue, liver and kidney, of bearded seal, respectively. Estimated bioaccumulation factors--as defined by the radionuclide concentration ratio between the target tissue to that in sea water--were two to three orders of magnitude higher for {sup 210}Po that those of {sup 137}Cs. We conclude from radiological dose estimates that ingestion of {sup 137}Cs in foods derived from walrus and seal will pose no threat to human health. This work has important implications for assessing health risks to Alaskan coastal communities concerned about the dumping of nuclear waste in the Russia Arctic.

  2. Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway Navigation Season Extension. Volume 2. Appendixes A - B

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    harbor consists of two piers, about 2,400 feet long along both sides of Conneaut Creek . Major cargo shipped during the ice-free months are iror, ore...sites were Cape Vincent, Wellesley Island, Chippewa Bay, and Coles Creek . The major conclusions of the study were that: (1) the weakening of the ice...extensive data base on certain portions of the Great Lakes environents, but meager information exists on; ecological conditions during winter or on the

  3. DISTRIBUTION AND TRANSFORMATION OF ELEMENTAL MERCURY IN THE ST. LAWRENCE RIVER AND LAKE ONTARIO. (R827915)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  4. Structure and Dynamics of Minke Whale Surfacing Patterns in the Gulf of St. Lawrence, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Fredrik; Lusseau, David; Tscherter, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Animal behavioral patterns can help us understand physiological and ecological constraints on animals and its influence on fitness. The surfacing patterns of aquatic air-breathing mammals constitute a behavioral pattern that has evolved as a trade-off between the need to replenish oxygen stores at the surface and the need to conduct other activities underwater. This study aims to better understand the surfacing pattern of a marine top predator, the minke whale (Balaenoptera acutorostrata), by investigating how their dive duration and surfacing pattern changes across their activity range. Activities were classified into resting, traveling, surface feeding and foraging at depth. For each activity, we classified dives into short and long dives and then estimated the temporal dependence between dive types. We found that minke whales modified their surfacing pattern in an activity-specific manner, both by changing the expression of their dives (i.e. density distribution) and the temporal dependence (transition probability) between dive types. As the depth of the prey layer increased between activities, the surfacing pattern of foraging whales became increasingly structured, going from a pattern dominated by long dives, when feeding at the surface, to a pattern where isolated long dives were followed by an increasing number of breaths (i.e. short dives), when the whale was foraging at depth. A similar shift in surfacing pattern occurred when prey handling time (inferred from surface corralling maneuvers) increased for surface feeding whales. The surfacing pattern also differed between feeding and non-feeding whales. Resting whales did not structure their surfacing pattern, while traveling whales did, possibly as a way to minimize cost of transport. Our results also suggest that minke whales might balance their oxygen level over multiple, rather than single, dive cycles. PMID:25970425

  5. Citizens' Guide to Biomonitoring in the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence River.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Great Lakes United, Buffalo, NY.

    The purpose of this report is to present the issues surrounding biomonitoring of wastewaters discharged into the Great Lakes Basin. Biomonitoring is the process of using organisms to monitor the toxicity of a substance. The report reflects an interest in seeing zero discharge of toxic pollutants in the Great Lakes region. The report is organized…

  6. 77 FR 42642 - Safety Zone; City of Ogdensburg Fireworks, St. Lawrence River, Ogdensburg, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... the Port can be reached via VHF channel 16. Before the activation of the zone, we would issue local.... 12. Energy Effects This action is not a ``significant energy action'' under Executive Order 13211, Actions Concerning Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use....

  7. Efficacy of iodine for disinfection of Lake Sturgeon eggs from the St. Lawrence River, New York

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chalupnicki, Marc A.; Dittman, Dawn E.; Starliper, Clifford E.; Iwanowicz, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Optimal fish husbandry to reduce the risk of disease is particularly important when using wild fish as the source for gametes. The propagation and reestablishment of Lake Sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens in New York waters to become a viable self-sustaining population is considered a high priority by managers. While standard hatchery egg disinfection practices have been used to prevent the transmission of diseases, data on the bacterial loads present on egg surfaces following iodine disinfection is lacking. Our study investigated the bacteria present on the outer surface of Lake Sturgeon eggs and the effectiveness of an iodine disinfection treatment in eliminating bacteria that could pose a threat to egg survival and cause hatchery disease outbreaks. During the springs of 2011–2013, 12 to 41 different species of bacteria were recovered from the outer egg surfaces prior to an iodine treatment; Aeromonas, Pseudomonas, Shewanella, and Chryseobacterium were the most common genera identified. Cohort eggs treated using the standard protocol of a single treatment of 50 mg/L iodine for 30 min resulted in an average of 57.8% reduction in bacterial CFU/g. While this is a significant reduction, bacteria were not completely eliminated and hatchery managers should be aware that pathogens could remain on Lake Sturgeon eggs following the standard iodine disinfection treatment.

  8. 137Cs and 210Po in Pacific walrus and bearded seal from St. Lawrence Island, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Terry; Seagars, Dana; Jokela, Terry; Layton, David

    2008-06-01

    The activity concentration of Cesium-137 ((137)Cs) and naturally-occurring Polonium-210 ((210)Po) were measured in the muscle tissue, kidney and liver of Pacific walrus (Odobenus rosmarus divergens) and bearded seal (Erignathus barbatus) collected by native hunters from the Bering Sea during May 1996. The mean (137)Cs concentrations in muscle, liver and kidney of Pacific walrus were 0.07, 0.09 and 0.07 Bq kg(-1) (n=5, wet weight), respectively, and 0.17, 0.10, and 0.17 Bq kg(-1) (n=2, wet weight), respectively, in bearded seal. In general, (137)Cs tissue concentrations are significantly lower than those previously reported for mammals from other regions. By comparison, (210)Po activity concentrations are more variable and appear to be higher level compared with mammal data from other regions. The mean (210)Po concentration in the muscle tissue, liver and kidney of Pacific walrus (n=5, wet weight) were 28.7, 189, and 174 Bq kg(-1), respectively. This compares with (210)Po concentration values (n=2, wet weight) of 27, 207 and 68 Bq kg(-1) measured in the muscle tissue, liver and kidney, of bearded seal, respectively. Estimated concentration factors--as defined by the radionuclide concentration ratio between the target tissue to that in sea water--were two to three orders of magnitude higher for (210)Po that those of (137)Cs. We conclude from radiological dose estimates that ingestion of (137)Cs in foods derived from walrus and seal will pose no threat to human health. This work has important implications for assessment of risks of Alaskan coastal communities concerned about the dumping of nuclear waste in the Russia Arctic.

  9. Evolution of Intelligent Shipboard Piloting Systems: A Distributed System for the St Lawrence Seaway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudhendar, H.; Grabowski, Martha

    Safe navigation in restricted waters continues to be a perennial concern for ship owners, operators, navigators, and citizens. The Nieuw Amsterdam, a cruise ship which ran aground in Southeast Alaska in August 1994; the Royal Majesty, another cruise ship which ran aground 10 miles east of Nantucket Island in June 1995; and the Regent Star, which caught fire in Prince William Sound, Alaska on 22 July, 1995, are just a few of the recent incidents which remind us of the importance of safe navigation in restricted waters. Clearly, the Braer, the World Prodigy, and the Exxon Valdez provide other examples of the importance of safe navigation in close waters. Fire, collision, allisions and groundings can result if vessels navigating in such waters stray.

  10. 77 FR 38488 - Safety Zone; Alexandria Bay Chamber of Commerce, St. Lawrence River, Alexandria Bay, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-28

    ..., call or email LT Christopher Mercurio, Chief of Waterway Management, U.S. Coast Guard Sector Buffalo; telephone 716- 843-9343, email SectorBuffaloMarineSafety@uscg.mil . If you have questions on viewing or... York. The Captain of the Port Buffalo has determined that fireworks launched proximate to...

  11. Study on Persistent Monitoring of Maritime, Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway Border Regions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    du 11 septembre 2001, et laisse entendre que la difficulté qu’éprouve le Canada à agir en tant que partenaire à part égale dans la lutte contre les...including: transportation of Weapons of Mass Destruction (including chemical, biological , radiological, nuclear and explosives), the use of small vessels...and Security o Communication systems o GPS o Chemical & Biological sensors o Integrated management platforms with GIS mapping o Virtual fencing

  12. Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway Navigation Season Extension. Volume 6. Appendixes H - L

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    greater utilization of the public investment in navigation improvements in the system, and greater access to foreign and domestic markets . These changes...fishing, snowmobiling, cross country skiing, hunting and snowshoeing are activities which all require stable ice and makeup a large recreational market ...recreational market . Objective data can be also borrowed from the more technical cciences as well as de.ography and economics. The physical distance

  13. Great Lakes/St. Lawrence Seaway Regional Transportation Study; Great Lakes Area Industries.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    Regional Transportation Study is an element of this planning process . The objective of the GL/SLS Regional Transportation Study is to develop an up-to-date...system performance and ability to process future cargo flows Evaluation of the performance and economic feasibility of improvements to increase the...section is organized as follows: Basic steelmaking processes Production centers in the U.S. and Canada The industry in the Great Lakes area. These

  14. Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway Navigation Season Extension. Volume 4. Appendixes D - F

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    rapidly increasing prices for imported oil . Relevant to the present analysis is the fact that the season extension program will likely result in some...iron and steel and fuel oil products. The harbor is not substantially engaged in handling iron ore, coal, and grain commodities which would be...xx X X xX 6.Harrassment x X xx XX 7.Denlal of Mig.Access 8. Oiling -Direct Mort. x x X Xx X X .Animals Lost in Track xx xx X O.Loss of Nesting Hab. xx X

  15. Marine mammal strandings and environmental changes: a 15-year study in the St. Lawrence ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Truchon, Marie-Hélène; Measures, Lena; L'Hérault, Vincent; Brêthes, Jean-Claude; Galbraith, Peter S; Harvey, Michel; Lessard, Sylvie; Starr, Michel; Lecomte, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the effects of climatic variability on marine mammals is challenging due to the complexity of ecological interactions. We used general linear models to analyze a 15-year database documenting marine mammal strandings (1994-2008; n = 1,193) and nine environmental parameters known to affect marine mammal survival, from regional (sea ice) to continental scales (North Atlantic Oscillation, NAO). Stranding events were more frequent during summer and fall than other seasons, and have increased since 1994. Poor ice conditions observed during the same period may have affected marine mammals either directly, by modulating the availability of habitat for feeding and breeding activities, or indirectly, through changes in water conditions and marine productivity (krill abundance). For most species (75%, n = 6 species), a low volume of ice was correlated with increasing frequency of stranding events (e.g. R(2)adj = 0.59, hooded seal, Cystophora cristata). This likely led to an increase in seal mortality during the breeding period, but also to increase habitat availability for seasonal migratory cetaceans using ice-free areas during winter. We also detected a high frequency of stranding events for mysticete species (minke whale, Balaenoptera acutorostrata) and resident species (beluga, Delphinapterus leucas), correlated with low krill abundance since 1994. Positive NAO indices were positively correlated with high frequencies of stranding events for resident and seasonal migratory cetaceans, as well as rare species (R(2)adj = 0.53, 0.81 and 0.34, respectively). This contrasts with seal mass stranding numbers, which were negatively correlated with a positive NAO index. In addition, an unusual multiple species mortality event (n = 114, 62% of total annual mortality) in 2008 was caused by a harmful algal bloom. Our findings provide an empirical baseline in understanding marine mammal survival when faced with climatic variability. This is a promising step in integrating stranding records to monitor the consequences of environmental changes in marine ecosystems over long time scales.

  16. Water resources data, Ohio: Water year 1991. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin: Statewide project data

    SciTech Connect

    Shindel, H.L.; Klingler, J.H.; Mangus, J.P.; Trimble, L.E.

    1992-03-01

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data pertaining to the water resources of Ohio each water year. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, the data are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for 131 streamflow-gaging stations, 95 miscellaneous sites; (2) stage and content records for 5 streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality for 40 streamflow-gaging stations, 378 wells, and 74 partial-record sites; and (4) water levels for 431 observation wells.

  17. Whistle source levels of free-ranging beluga whales in Saguenay-St. Lawrence marine park.

    PubMed

    Le Bot, Olivier; Simard, Yvan; Roy, Nathalie; Mars, Jérôme I; Gervaise, Cédric

    2016-07-01

    Wild beluga whistle source levels (SLs) are estimated from 52 three-dimensional (3D) localized calls using a 4-hydrophone array. The probability distribution functions of the root-mean-square (rms) SL in the time domain, and the peak, the strongest 3-dB, and 10-dB SLs from the spectrogram, were non-Gaussian. The average rms SL was 143.8 ± 6.7 dB re 1 μPa at 1 m. SL spectral metrics were, respectively, 145.8 ± 8 dB, 143.2 ± 7.1 dB, and 138.5 ± 6.9 dB re 1 μPa(2)·Hz(-1) at 1 m.

  18. Carbon dioxide emissions from Indian monsoonal estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarma Vedula, VSS

    2012-07-01

    The oceans act as a net sink for atmospheric CO2, however, the role of coastal bodies on global CO2 fluxes remains unclear due to lack of data. The estimated absorption of CO2 from the continental shelves, with limited data, is 0.22 to 1.0 PgC/y, and of CO2 emission by estuaries to the atmosphere is 0.27 PgC/y. The estimates from the estuaries suffer from large uncertainties due to large variability and lack of systematic data collection. It is especially true for Southeast Asian estuaries as the biogeochemical cycling of material are different due to high atmospheric temperature, seasonality driven by monsoons, seasonal discharge etc. In order to quantify CO2 emissions from the Indian estuaries, samples were collected at 27 estuaries all along the Indian coast during discharge wet and dry periods. The emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere from Indian estuaries were 4-5 times higher during wet than dry period. The pCO2 ranged between ~300 and 18492 microatm which were within the range of world estuaries. The mean pCO2 and particulate organic carbon (POC) showed positive relation with rate of discharge suggesting availability of high quantities of organic matter that led to enhanced microbial decomposition. The annual CO2 fluxes from the Indian estuaries, together with dry period data available in the literature, amounts to 1.92 TgC which is >10 times less than that from the European estuaries. The low CO2 fluxes from the Indian estuaries are attributed to low flushing rates and less human settlements along the banks of the Indian estuaries.

  19. From "Lawrence Kohlberg's Approach to Moral Education" by F. Clark Power, Ann Higgins, and Lawrence Kohlberg, with Judy Codding (1989)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schools: Studies in Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This article is an excerpt from "Lawrence Kohlberg's Approach to Moral Education." It refers several times to Kohlberg's "six stages of moral development." Stages 3 and 4 belong to the second level of moral development, which Kohlberg calls "conventional." At stage 3, one becomes aware of conventions as one sees what is right in terms of living up…

  20. St. Lucia.

    PubMed

    1987-06-01

    The population of St Lucia was 123,000 in 1986, with an annual growth rate of 2%. The infant mortality rate stands at 22.2/1000 live births, and life expectancy is 70.3 years for males and 74.9 years for females. The literacy rate is 78%. St Lucia's labor force is allocated as follows: agriculture, 36.6%; industry and commerce, 20.1%; and services, 18.1%. The gross national product (GNP) was US$146 million in 1985, with an annual growth rate of 3% and a per capita GNP of $1071. St Lucia is a parliamentary democracy modeled on the British Westminster system. The island is divided into 16 parishes and 1 urban area (the capital, Castries). St Lucia is currently a politically stable country, although the high level of youth unemployment is a cause for concern. Ongoing stability may depend on the government's ability to provide services such as jobs and housing. The economy has evolved from a monocrop sugar plantation type to a diversified economy based on agriculture, industry, and tourism. Agriculture, dominated by the banana industry, is characterized by the participation of a large number of small and medium-sized enterprises. Industry is being encouraged through the provision of incentives such as tax rebates. The government is attempting to maintain a sound investment climate through a tripartite dialogue with the private sector and trade unions. Overall economic policy is predicated on the attraction of sound investments, by both local and foreign entities, to accelerate the rate of economic growth, solve the unemployment problem, and generate a solid balance-of-payments position.

  1. AFS Estuaries Section - A Successful Partnership

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Estuaries Section of the American Fisheries Society offers travel awards to students in support of their attendance and presentations at the AFS meeting. Since 2007, the Southern Association of Marine Laboratories has partnered with the Estuaries Section to sponsor two stude...

  2. Dissolved Oxygen Data for Coos Estuary (Oregon)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this product is the transmittal of dissolved oxygen data collected in the Coos Estuary, Oregon to Ms. Molly O'Neill (University of Oregon), for use in her studies on the factors influencing spatial and temporal patterns in dissolved oxygen in this estuary. These d...

  3. 75 FR 1010 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Discontinuance of Service Exemption-in Clark, Floyd, Lawrence, Orange...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-07

    ..., Floyd, Lawrence, Orange, and Washington Counties, IN On December 18, 2009, CSX Transportation, Inc... Albany, in Clark, Floyd, Lawrence, Orange, and Washington Counties, IN.\\1\\ The line traverses...

  4. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory magnetic-moment sorting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, D. H.; Barale, P. J.; Green, M. I.; Vandyke, D. A.

    1985-07-01

    The Magnetic Measurements Engineering Group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has designed and built, and is currently using, a Magnetic-moment Measurement and Sorting System (MMSS). The MMSS measures magnetic moments of permanent-magnet material and sorts the material according to selected criteria. The MMSS represents the latest application of the LBL General Purpose Magnetic Measurement Data Acquisition System reported on a MT-8. We describe the theoretical basis for the MMSS, the analog and digital components, and a unique method of calibrating the MMSS using only measured electrical quantities. We also discuss the measurement and sorting of permanent-magnet material to be incorporated in beam-line elements (dipoles and quadrupoles) in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Advanced Test Accelerator Beam Director.

  5. Astronomy Applications of Adaptive Optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B J; Gavel, D T

    2003-04-23

    Astronomical applications of adaptive optics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has a history that extends from 1984. The program started with the Lick Observatory Adaptive Optics system and has progressed through the years to lever-larger telescopes: Keck, and now the proposed CELT (California Extremely Large Telescope) 30m telescope. LLNL AO continues to be at the forefront of AO development and science.

  6. Application of optical interconnect technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Haigh, R.E.; Lowry, M.E.; McCammon, K.; Hills, R.; Mitchell, R.; Sweider, D.

    1995-08-10

    Optical interconnects will be required to meet the information bandwidth requirements of future communication and computing applications. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the authors are involved in applying optical interconnect technologies in two distinct application areas: Multi-Gigabit/sec Computer Backplanes and Gigabit/sec Wide Area Networking using Wavelength Division Multiplexing. In this paper, the authors discuss their efforts to integrate optical interconnect technologies into prototype computing and communication systems.

  7. Catalog of research projects at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    This Catalog has been created to aid in the transfer of technology from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory to potential users in industry, government, universities, and the public. The projects are listed for the following LBL groups: Accelerator and Fusion Research Division, Applied Science Division, Biology and Medicine Division, Center for Advanced Materials, Chemical Biodynamics Division, Computing Division, Earth Sciences Division, Engineering and Technical Services Division, Materials and Molecular Research Division, Nuclear Science Division, and Physics Division.

  8. Annual site environmental report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E.; Pauer, R.O.

    1991-05-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is described. Data for 1990 are presented, and general trends are discussed. The report is organized under the following topics: Environmental Program Overview; Environmental Permits; Environmental Assessments; Environmental Activities; Penetrating Radiation; Airborne Radionuclides; Waterborne Radionuclides; Public Doses Resulting from LBL Operations; Trends -- LBL Environmental Impact; Waterborne Pollutants; Airborne Pollutants; Groundwater Protection; and Quality Assurance. 20 refs., 26 figs., 23 tabs.

  9. Dissolved oxygen in two Oregon estuaries: The importance of the ocean-estuary connection - May 16, 2011

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the role of the ocean –estuary connection in influencing periodic reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels in Yaquina and Yachats estuaries, Oregon, USA. In the Yaquina Estuary, there is close coupling between the coastal ocean and the estuary. As a result, low DO ...

  10. Lawrence's Legacy : Seaborg's Cyclotron - The 88-Inch Cyclotron turns 40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, Margaret; Clark, David

    2003-04-01

    In 1958, Sputnik had recently been launched by the Russians, leading to worry in Congress and increased funding for science and technology. Ernest Lawrence was director of the "Rad Lab" at Berkeley. Another Nobel Prize winner, Glenn Seaborg, was Associate Laboratory Director and Director of the Nuclear Chemistry Division. In this atmosphere, Lawrence was phoned by commissioners of the Atomic Energy Commission and asked what they could do for Seaborg, "because he did such a fine job of setting up the chemistry for extracting plutonium from spent reactor fuel" [1]. In this informal way, the 90-Inch (eventually 88-Inch) Cyclotron became a line item in the federal budget at a cost of 3M (later increased to 5M). The 88-Inch Cyclotron achieved first internal beam on Dec. 12, 1961 and first external beam in May 1962. Forty years later it is still going strong. Pieced together from interviews with the retirees who built it, Rad Lab reports and archives from the Seaborg and Lawrence collections, the story of its design and construction - on-time and under-budget - provides a glimpse into the early days of big science. [1] remarks made by Elmer Kelly, "Physicist-in-charge' of the project on the occasion of the 40th anniversary celebration.

  11. Fluidization of mud in estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolanski, Eric; Chappell, John; Ridd, Peter; Vertessy, Rob

    1988-03-01

    The South Alligator River, located in the Northern Territory, Australia, is a macrotidal estuary with suspended sediment concentration values reaching 10 g 1-1 In September 1986, in the dry season, the estuary was well mixed in temperature and salinity. While the vertical gradients in suspended sediment concentration were small at flood tides, for most of the ebb tide duration a lutocline separated a clear upper layer from an extremely turbid bottom layer, both layers being of comparable thickness. The tidal evolution of the suspended sediment concentration is consistent with that computed by a numerical model based on the equation of conservation of mass of suspended sediment. In this model, sediment is entrained from the bottom and mixed vertically upward by eddy diffusion, but through a Richardson number dependence, sediment-induced buoyancy effects inhibit vertical mixing. The final depth of the turbid layer can be readily estimated analytically as a result of a balance between the rate of kinetic energy input and the buoyancy flux determined by the particle fall velocity. The presence of a lutocline helps form mud banks on the inner side of a meander.

  12. Collaborative Potential between National Estuary Programs ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Estuaries are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, providing unique habitat for freshwater and marine species as well as valuable social and economic benefits. The wealth of ecosystem goods and services from estuaries has led to growth and development of human communities in adjacent areas and an increase in human activities that can adversely affect water quality and critical habitat. Managing for sustainable estuaries requires a balance of environmental concerns with community social and economic values. This has created an opportunity to leverage Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) scientific knowledge and tools with National Estuary Program (NEP) planning and management expertise to address environmental challenges in important estuarine ecosystems. The non-regulatory National Estuary Program (NEP) was outlined in the Clean Water Act to provide stakeholders an opportunity to monitor and manage ‘nationally significant’ estuaries. Currently there are 28 estuaries in the NEP, broadly distributed across the Atlantic, Pacific and Gulf Coasts, and in Puerto Rico. The local NEP management conferences must address a variety of environmental issues, from water quality and natural resources to coastal and watershed development. While the underlying objectives of each NEP are quite similar, each has unique landscapes, land uses, waterbodies, habitats, biological resources, economies and social culture. Consequently, the effects and severity of anthr

  13. Health of white sucker within the St. Louis River area of concern associated with habitat usage as assessed using stable isotopes

    EPA Science Inventory

    In Spring 2011, 200 adult white sucker were collected in four areas of the St. Louis River Area of Concern (AOC), located in Minnesota and Wisconsin, USA. The areas included the upper AOC as a reference area, the upper estuary, St. Louis Bay and Superior Bay. Grossly visible abno...

  14. The Peel Inlet-Harvey Estuary Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Warren; Black, Ronald

    1979-01-01

    Describes how the department of physics of the Western Australian Institute of Technology (WAIT) has been involved in the Peel Inlet-Harvey Estuary study. An appendix which presents the departmental approach to curriculum matters is also included. (HM)

  15. Microplastic in three urban estuaries, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shiye; Zhu, Lixin; Li, Daoji

    2015-11-01

    Estuarine Microplastics (MPs) are limited to know globally. By filtering subsurface water through 330 μm nets, MPs in Jiaojiang, Oujiang Estuaries were quantified, as well as that in Minjiang Estuary responding to Typhoon Soulik. Polymer matrix was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. MP (<5 mm) comprised more than 90% of total number plastics. The highest MPs density was found in Minjiang, following Jiaojiang and Oujiang. Fibers and granules were the primary shapes, with no pellets found. Colored MPs were the majority. The concentrations of suspended microplastics determine their bioavailability to low trophic organisms, and then possibly promoting the transfer of microplastic to higher trophic levels. Polypropylene and polyethylene were the prevalent types of MPs analyzed. Economic structures in urban estuaries influenced on MPs contamination levels. Typhoon didn't influence the suspended MP densities significantly. Our results provide basic information for better understanding suspended microplastics within urban estuaries and for managerial actions.

  16. EPA'S BENTHIC HABITAT DATA FOR YAQUINA ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists at EPA's National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Western Ecology Division (WED) have been studying seafloor (benthic) habitats in Yaquina estuary for several years. Those studies were conducted as parts of several research projects, including: e...

  17. Estuaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awkerman, Gary L.

    This publication is designed for use in standard science curricula to develop oceanologic manifestations of certain science topics. Included are teacher guides, student activities, and demonstrations designed to impart ocean understanding to high school students. When the student has completed this unit, he should be able to: (1) define an…

  18. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report

    SciTech Connect

    Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

    1996-07-01

    The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment.

  19. Laser guide star measurements at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, H.; Avicola, K.; Bissinger, H.; Brase, J.; Duff, J.; Gavel, D.; Horton, J.; Max, C.; Olivier, S.; Rapp, D.; Salmon, T.; Smauley, D.; Waltjen, K.

    1993-02-01

    Recent studies from the Laser Guide Star Project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are presented. Photometry of the return signal has shown that the photon return is approximately 10 photons/cm{sup 2}ms at the pupil of the receiving telescope in agreement with a detailed model of the sodium interaction. Wavefronts of the laser guide star have also been measured with a Shack-Hartmann technique and power spectra have been shown to agree with those of nearby natural stars. Plans for closed loop demonstrations using the laser guide star at LLNL and nearby Lick Observatory are discussed.

  20. Precision and manufacturing at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, T.T.; Wasley, R.J.; Stowers, I.F.; Donaldson, R.R.; Thompson, D.C.

    1993-11-01

    Precision Engineering is one of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s core strengths. This paper discusses the past and present current technology transfer efforts of LLNL`s Precision Engineering program and the Livermore Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Productivity (LCAMP). More than a year ago the Precision Machining Commercialization project embodied several successful methods of transferring high technology from the National Laboratories to industry. Currently LCAMP has already demonstrated successful technology transfer and is involved in a broad spectrum of current programs. In addition this paper discusses other technologies ripe for future transition including the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine.

  1. USING DOE-2.1 AT LAWRENCE BERKELEY LABORATORY

    SciTech Connect

    Building Energy Analysis Group.; Authors, Various

    1980-09-01

    The purpose of this manual is to assist the DOE-2 user to run DOE-2 and its utility programs at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). It is organized to reflect the facts that every DOE-2 job run at LBL requires certain steps, and that there are options related to DOE-2 job runs available to any DOE-2 user. The standard steps for running a DOE-2 job are as follows: 1. Prepare a job deck 2. Process a job deck 3. Obtain standard output reports.

  2. Electroplating waste minimization at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dini, J.W.; Steffani, C.P.

    1992-04-01

    This paper describes efforts on waste minimization in the electroplating facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Issues that are covered include: elimination of cadmium plating, copper cyanide plating, hexavalent chromium plating and vapor degreasing, segregation of cyanide solutions, changing rinsing practices, recycling of rinse water, changing cleaning of aluminum parts and rejuvenation of gold plating solutions. Discussion is also presented on other issues currently being worked and these include: combining electroplating and physical vapor deposition, elimination of all cyanide plating processes, and recycling of electroless nickel and spent acid solutions.

  3. Technical Safety Appraisal of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-12-01

    This report documents the results of the Technical Safety Appraisal (TSA) of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) (including the Site 300 area), Livermore, California, conducted from February 26 to April 5, 1990. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of Environment, Safety and Health (ES H) Programs at LLNL. LLNL is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE), and is a multi-program, mission-oriented institution engaged in fundamental and applied research programs that require a multidisciplinary approach. 1 fig.

  4. Current status of clinical particle radiotherapy at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, J.R.; Quivey, J.M.; Lyman, J.T.; Chen, G.T.Y.; Phillips, T.L.; Tobias, C.A.; Alpen, E.L.

    1980-08-15

    Clinical experience with charged particle irradiation of human cancers has been underway at the University of California Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Over 150 patients have been irradiated with heavy charged particle beams including helium, carbon, neon, and argon ions. Pilot studies have included such tumor sites as glioma of the brain, carcinoma of the esophagus, carcinoma of the pancreas, carcinoma of the stomach, ocular melanoma, and carcinoma of the uterine cervix. Prospective studies are planned to investigate the improved dose localization potential (helium) and the enhanced biologic and physical dose potential (carbon, neon) in a controlled trial against the best available megavoltage irradiation techniques.

  5. Precision and manufacturing at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saito, Theodore T.; Wasley, Richard J.; Stowers, Irving F.; Donaldson, Robert R.; Thompson, Daniel C.

    1994-01-01

    Precision Engineering is one of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's core strengths. This paper discusses the past and present current technology transfer efforts of LLNL's Precision Engineering program and the Livermore Center for Advanced Manufacturing and Productivity (LCAMP). More than a year ago the Precision Machine Commercialization project embodied several successful methods of transferring high technology from the National Laboratories to industry. Currently, LCAMP has already demonstrated successful technology transfer and is involved in a broad spectrum of current programs. In addition, this paper discusses other technologies ripe for future transition including the Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine.

  6. Annual environmental monitoring report of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Schleimer, G.E.

    1989-06-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Program of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is described. Data for 1988 are presented and general trends are discussed. In order to establish whether LBL research activities produced any impact on the population surrounding the laboratory, a program of environmental air and water sampling and continuous radiation monitoring was carried on throughout the year. For 1988, as in the previous several years, dose equivalents attributable to LBL radiological operations were a small fraction of both the relevant radiation protection guidelines (RPG) and of the natural radiation background. 16 refs., 7 figs., 21 tabs.

  7. Storm water modeling at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Veis, Christopher

    1996-05-01

    Storm water modeling is important to Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for compliance with regulations that govern water discharge at large industrial facilities. Modeling is also done to study trend in contaminants and storm sewer infrastructure. The Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) was used to simulate rainfall events at LLNL. SWMM is a comprehensive computer model for simulation of urban runoff quantity and quality in storm and combined sewer systems. Due to time constraints and ongoing research, no modeling was completed at LLNL. With proper information about the storm sewers, a SWMM simulation of a rainfall event on site would be beneficial to storm sewer analyst.

  8. Westar's Lawrence Energy Center wins for not blinking on safety

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, R.

    2007-07-15

    It took Westar Energy eight years to upgrade the Lawrence Energy Center to burn Powder River Basin coal. Its zero lost-time accident record during the eight-year, million-man-hour project is a testament to Westar's commitment to workplace safety. The plant won the Powder River Basin Coal Users' Group plant of the year award for 2006. The article describes all the changes implemented at the plant, including replacing and upgrading controls for the belt conveyor, replacing the coal crushers, minimising dust and modifying coal bunkers, to cope with the increased volatility of Powder River Basin coal. Modifications were made to minimise slagging and fouling of boilers. 10 photos.

  9. The Estuary Book: A Guide to Promoting Understanding and Regional Management of Maine's Estuaries and Embayments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruffing, Jenny

    The objective of this document is to provide information about estuaries, the impact of uses on the environmental health of an estuary, and what communities and concerned individuals can do to manage and protect their local estuarine resources successfully. Much of the information presented here pertains to other embayments along the Maine coast…

  10. A trophic model for the Danshuei River Estuary, a hypoxic estuary in northern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hsing-Juh; Shao, Kwang-Tsao; Jan, Rong-Quen; Hsieh, Hwey-Lian; Chen, Chang-Po; Hsieh, Li-Yung; Hsiao, Yi-Ting

    2007-11-01

    The estuary of the Danshuei River, a hypoxic subtropical estuary, receives a high rate of untreated sewage effluent. The Ecopath with Ecosim software system was used to construct a mass-balanced trophic model for the estuary, and network analysis was used to characterize the structure and matter flow in the food web. The estuary model was comprised of 16 compartments, and the trophic levels varied from 1.0 for primary producers and detritus to 3.0 for carnivorous and piscivorous fishes. The large organic nutrient loading from the upper reaches has resulted in detritivory being more important than herbivory in the food web. The food-chain length of the estuary was relatively short when compared with other tropical/subtropical coastal systems. The shortness of food-chain length in the estuary could be attributed to the low biomass of the top predators. Consequently, the trophic efficiencies declined sharply for higher trophic levels due to low fractions of flows to the top predators and then high fractions to detritus. The low biomass of the top predators in the estuary was likely subject to over-exploitation and/or hypoxic water. Summation of individual rate measurements for primary production and respiration yielded an estimate of -1791 g WW m(-2) year(-1), or -95 g C m(-2) year(-1), suggesting a heterotrophic ecosystem, which implies that more organic matter was consumed than was produced in the estuary.

  11. ESTIMATING THE CONDITION OF GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARIES: NATIONAL COASTAL ASSESSMENT AND NATIONAL ESTUARY PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries in the Gulf of Mexico have been monitored since 1991 to determine the condition of water, sediment, and biota. More recently, through the National Coastal Assessment (NCA), U.S. EPA has provided a comprehensive estimate of the condition of U.S. estuaries, including a re...

  12. Integrated EPA Science for Decision-Making: Lawrence, MA Water Strategy

    EPA Science Inventory

    Powerpoint presentation on the Lawrence MA Making a Visible Difference in Communities project’s comprehensive water quality strategy, demonstrating a systems approach applying integrated EPA science

  13. Impact of Recent Constraints on Intellectual Freedom on Science and Technology at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J

    2000-11-12

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was created in 1952 to meet the nation's need for an expanded nuclear weapons research and development (R&D) capability. LLNL quickly grew to become a full-fledged nuclear weapons design laboratory with a broad range of technical capabilities similar to those of our sister laboratory--Los Alamos--with which we shared mission responsibilities. By its very nature, nuclear weapons R&D requires some of the most advanced science and technology (S&T). Accordingly, there is an obvious need for careful attention to ensure that appropriate security measures exist to deal with the sensitive aspects of nuclear weapons development. The trade-off between advancing S&T at the Laboratory and the need for security is a complex issue that has always been with us, As Edward Teller noted in a recent commentary in a May, 1999 editorial in the New York Times: ''The reaction of President Harry Truman to the leaking of information is well known. He imposed no additional measures for security. Instead, we have clear knowledge that the disclosures by (Klaus) Fuchs caused Truman to call for accelerated work on all aspects of nuclear weapons. The right prescription for safety is not reaction to dangers that are arising, but rather action leading to more knowledge and, one hopes, toward positive interaction between nations.'' To explore the issue of intellectual freedom at a national security laboratory such as LLNL, one must understand the type of activities we pursue and how our research portfolio has evolved since the Laboratory was established. Our mission affects the workforce skills, capabilities, and security measures that the Laboratory requires. The national security needs of the US have evolved, along with the S&T community in which the Laboratory resides and to which it contributes. These factors give rise to a greater need for the Laboratory to interact with universities, industry, and other national laboratories. Intellectual

  14. Environmental flow assessments for transformed estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Zhang, Heyue; Yang, Zhifeng; Yang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Here, we propose an approach to environmental flow assessment that considers spatial pattern variations in potential habitats affected by river discharges and tidal currents in estuaries. The approach comprises four steps: identifying and simulating the distributions of critical environmental factors for habitats of typical species in an estuary; mapping of suitable habitats based on spatial distributions of the Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) and adopting the habitat aggregation index to understand fragmentation of potential suitable habitats; defining variations in water requirements for a certain species using trade-off analysis for different protection objectives; and recommending environmental flows in the estuary considering the compatibility and conflict of freshwater requirements for different species. This approach was tested using a case study in the Yellow River Estuary. Recommended environmental flows were determined by incorporating the requirements of four types of species into the assessments. Greater variability in freshwater inflows could be incorporated into the recommended environmental flows considering the adaptation of potential suitable habitats with variations in the flow regime. Environmental flow allocations should be conducted in conjunction with land use conflict management in estuaries. Based on the results presented here, the proposed approach offers flexible assessment of environmental flow for aquatic ecosystems that may be subject to future change.

  15. Estuaries and coastal waters need help

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, H.

    1987-11-01

    For years, our marine environments-estuaries, coastal waters, and the open ocean-have been used extensively by coastal communities and industries for the disposal of various wastes. Historically, marine waste disposal has been relatively cheap and has solved some short-term waste-management problems; however, its consequences include a general trend toward environmental degradation, particularly in estuaries and coastal waters. Thus, without protective measures, the next few decades will witness degradation in many estuaries and some coastal waters around the country. The extent of current degradation varies greatly around the country. Although it is difficult to ascertain cause and effect relationships, enough evidence exists to conclude that the pollutants in question include disease-causing microorganisms, oxygen-demanding substances, particulate material, metals, and organic chemicals. Two statutes form the basis of most federal regulatory efforts to combat marine pollution: the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (MPRSA) and the Clean Water Act (CWA). The MPRSA regulates the dumping of wastes in coastal and open-ocean waters, whereas the CWA has jurisdiction over pipeline discharges in all marine waters, wastes dumped in estuaries, and runoff. Many people consider that the passage and implementation of these two acts and their ensuing amendments established a statutory structure sufficient to protect the nation's waters from pollution. However, these provisions have not protected some estuaries and coastal waters from degradation.

  16. Tampa Bay Estuary Program and Restore Americas Estuaries to Receive Third Place Gulf Guardian Award in the Partnerships Category

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today the Gulf of Mexico Program announced that Tampa Bay Estuary Program & Restore America's Estuaries will receive a Third Place 2015 Gulf Guardian Award in the Partnerships Category. The award will be given tonight at an awards ceremony at

  17. The Estuary Guide. Level 3: High School. Draft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Glen; And Others

    Estuaries are marine systems that serve as nurseries for animals, links in the migratory pathways, and habitat for a complex community of organisms. This curriculum guide intended for use at the high school level seeks to teach what estuaries are; provide opportunities to practice decision-making that affects estuaries; and encourage students to…

  18. Recent geothermal reservoir engineering activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Benson, S.M.; Pruess, K.

    1987-09-01

    This paper briefly describes the most recent activities in reservoir engineering for the geothermal group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The primary emphasis of the geothermal program of LBL is dedicated to reservoir engineering including theoretical investigations, the development and application of mathematical models, and field studies. The objectives of these activities are to develop and validate methods and instruments which will be utilized in the determination of the parameters of geothermal systems, and the identification and evaluation of the importance of the distinct processes which occur in reservoirs. The ultimate goal of the program is the development of state of the art technologies which characterize geothermal reservoirs and evaluate their productive capacity and longevity.

  19. The advanced light source at the Lawrence Berkeley laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Alan

    1991-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national facility currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), is a third-generation synchrotron light source designed to produce extremely bright beams of synchrotron radiation, in the energy range from a few eV to 10 keV. The design is based on a 1-1.9 GeV electron storage ring (optimized at 1.5 GeV), and utilizes special magnets, known as undulators and wigglers (collectively referred to as insertion devices), to generate the radiation. In this paper we describe the main accelerator components of the ALS, the variety of insertion devices, the radiation spectra expected from these devices, and the complement of experiments that have been approved for initial operation, starting in April 1993.

  20. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, A. L.; Perera, R. C. C.; Schlachter, A. S.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), scheduled to be operational in the spring of 1993 as a U.S. Department of Energy national user facility, will be a next-generation source of soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) synchrotron radiation. Undulators will provide the world's brightest synchrotron radiation at photon energies from below 10 eV to above 2 keV; wiggler and bend-magnet radiation will extend the spectral coverage with high fluxes above 10 keV. These capabilities will support an extensive research program in a broad spectrum of scientific and technological areas in which XUV radiation is used to study and manipulate matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The ALS will also serve those interested in developing the fabrication technology for microstructures and nanostructures, as well as for characterizing them.

  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory environmental report for 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Sims, J.M.; Surano, K.A.; Lamson, K.C.; Balke, B.K.; Steenhoven, J.C.; Schwoegler, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1990. To evaluate the effect of LLNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent surface water, groundwater, vegetation, and foodstuff were made at both the Livermore site and at Site 300 nearly. LLNL's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment was evaluated. Aside from an August 13 observation of silver concentrations slightly above guidelines for discharges to the sanitary sewer, all the monitoring data demonstrated LLNL compliance with environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. In addition, the monitoring data demonstrated that the environmental impacts of LLNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public to or to the environment. 114 refs., 46 figs., 79 tabs.

  2. Environmental compliance Modeling at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brandstetter, E.R., LLNL

    1998-02-01

    This paper presents a post-rehabilitation monitoring and modeling study of the sanitary sewer system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The study evaluated effectiveness of sewer system rehabilitation efforts and defined benchmarks for environmental success. A PCSWMM model for the sanitary sewer system was developed and applied to demonstrate the success of a $5 million rehabilitation effort. It determined that rainfall-dependent inflow and infiltration (RDI&I) had been reduced by 88%, and that system upgrades adequately manage predicted peak flows. An ongoing modeling and analysis program currently assists management in evaluating the system`s needs for continuing maintenance and further upgrades. This paper also summarizes a 1989 study that evaluated data collected from December 1, 1988, to January 6, 1989, to determine the adequacy of the LLNL sewer system to accommodate present and future peak flows, and the Sanitary Sewer Rehabilitation (SSR) project, which took place from 1991 through 1995.

  3. The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory geothermal program in northern Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirk, K. F.; Wollenberg, H. A.

    1974-01-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's geothermal program began with consideration of regions where fluids in the temperature range of 150 to 230 C may be economically accessible. Three valleys, located in an area of high regional heat flow in north central Nevada, were selected for geological, geophysical, and geochemical field studies. The objective of these ongoing field activities is to select a site for a 10-MW demonstration plant. Field activities (which started in September 1973) are described. A parallel effort has been directed toward the conceptual design of a 10-MW isobutane binary plant which is planned for construction at the selected site. Design details of the plant are described. Project schedule with milestones is shown together with a cost summary of the project.

  4. The Computation Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, L

    2006-09-07

    The Computation Directorate at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has four major areas of work: (1) Programmatic Support -- Programs are areas which receive funding to develop solutions to problems or advance basic science in their areas (Stockpile Stewardship, Homeland Security, the Human Genome project). Computer scientists are 'matrixed' to these programs to provide computer science support. (2) Livermore Computer Center (LCC) -- Development, support and advanced planning for the large, massively parallel computers, networks and storage facilities used throughout the laboratory. (3) Research -- Computer scientists research advanced solutions for programmatic work and for external contracts and research new HPC hardware solutions. (4) Infrastructure -- Support for thousands of desktop computers and numerous LANs, labwide unclassified networks, computer security, computer-use policy.

  5. Seasonal dissolved inorganic nitrogen and phosphorus budgets for two sub-tropical estuaries in south Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzelli, C.; Wan, Y.; Doering, P. H.; Boyer, J. N.

    2013-10-01

    Interactions among geomorphology, circulation, and biogeochemical cycling determine estuary responses to external nutrient loading. In order to better manage watershed nutrient inputs, the goal of this study was to develop seasonal dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and phosphorus (DIP) budgets for the two estuaries in south Florida, the Caloosahatchee River estuary (CRE) and the St. Lucie Estuary (SLE), from 2002 to 2008. The Land-Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone (LOICZ) approach was used to generate water, salt, and DIN and DIP budgets. Results suggested that internal DIN production increases with increased DIN loading to the CRE in the wet season. There were hydrodynamic effects as water column concentrations and ecosystem nutrient processing stabilized in both estuaries as flushing time increased to >10 d. The CRE demonstrated heterotrophy (net ecosystem metabolism or NEM < 0.0) across all wet and dry season budgets. While the SLE was sensitive to DIN loading, system autotrophy (NEM > 0.0) increased significantly with external DIP loading. This included DIP consumption and a bloom of a cyanobacterium (Microcystis aeruginosa) following hurricane-induced discharge to the SLE in 2005. Additionally, while denitrification provided a microbially-mediated N loss pathway for the CRE, this potential was not evident for the SLE where N2 fixation was favored. Disparities between total and inorganic loading ratios suggested that the role of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) should be assessed for both estuaries. Nutrient budgets indicated that net internal production or consumption of DIN and DIP fluctuated with inter- and intra-annual variations in freshwater inflow, hydrodynamic flushing, and primary production. The results of this study should be included in watershed management plans in order to maintain favorable conditions of external loading relative to internal material cycling in both dry and wet seasons.

  6. Dissolved Trace Metals in the Tay Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, R. E.; Balls, P. W.

    1997-04-01

    Dissolved trace metals have been studied over an annual cycle in the relatively pristine Tay estuary (Scotland). The absence of a major anthropogenic signal has enabled some of the more subtle natural processes controlling trace metal distributions to be identified. Concentration ranges of dissolved metals in the Tay are similar to, or lower than, those observed in more industrialized estuaries. All metals behave non-conservatively in the Tay. Interactions with biogenic and detrital particulate phases are important in controlling dissolved trace metal concentrations. The degradation of organic matter appears to be particularly important for Cu. Removal of dissolved metals was observed in the turbidity maximum zone; a simple model was used to demonstrate that this could be accounted for by adsorption onto suspended particulate matter. At high salinity, coincident peaks of all six metals with ammonia and phosphate are attributed to sewage inputs from Dundee at the mouth of the estuary.

  7. "Lawrence v. Texas": Does This Mean Increased Privacy Rights for Gay and Lesbian Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckes, Suzanne; McCarthy, Martha

    2004-01-01

    This article addresses the Supreme Court's 2003 decision in "Lawrence v. Texas" and its implications for the rights of gay and lesbian public school teachers. The authors provide a context by reviewing the teacher role-model theory, traditional standards used in dismissals for immoral conduct, and pre-"Lawrence" cases regarding…

  8. R.D. Lawrence, H.G. Wells, G.B. Shaw: a vignette.

    PubMed

    Jackson, J G

    1996-05-01

    Among the unpublished autobiographical notes of Dr R.D. Lawrence are numerous references to his contacts and friendship with the author H.G. Wells, who was to become the first President of the (British) Diabetic Association. Wells was responsible for Lawrence being called in for consultation by George Bernard Shaw, a meeting which was to have surprising consequences.

  9. A Theoretical Exploration of Lawrence of Arabia’s Inner Meanings on Guerrilla Warfare

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-05

    Asprey, Robert . War in the shadows: The Guerrilla in history, ( Lincoln, NE: iUniverse, 2002), 4 2 T.E. Lawrence, The Seven Pillars of Wisdom. A...the Solow growth model and the Ricardian model of economic rent, with two classic studies of guerrilla warfare by T.E Lawrence and Mao Zedong. Four

  10. Using side-scan sonar to characterize and map physical habitat and anthropogenic underwater features in the St. Louis River.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Characterizing underwater habitat and other features is difficult and costly, especially in the large St. Louis River Estuary. We are using side-scan sonar (SSS), first developed in the 1960s to remotely sense underwater habitat features from reflected acoustic signals (backscatt...

  11. Establishing nursery estuary otolith geochemical tags for Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax): Is temporal stability estuary dependent?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Diarmuid; Wögerbauer, Ciara; Roche, William

    2016-12-01

    The ability to determine connectivity between juveniles in nursery estuaries and adult populations is an important tool for fisheries management. Otoliths of juvenile fish contain geochemical tags, which reflect the variation in estuarine elemental chemistry, and allow discrimination of their natal and/or nursery estuaries. These tags can be used to investigate connectivity patterns between juveniles and adults. However, inter-annual variability of geochemical tags may limit the accuracy of nursery origin determinations. Otolith elemental composition was used to assign a single cohort of 0-group sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax to their nursery estuary thus establishing an initial baseline for stocks in waters around Ireland. Using a standard LDFA model, high classification accuracies to nursery sites (80-88%) were obtained. Temporal stability of otolith geochemical tags was also investigated to assess if annual sampling is required for connectivity studies. Geochemical tag stability was found to be strongly estuary dependent.

  12. National estuary program guidance: Technical characterization in the National Estuary Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    Estuaries are waterways, such as bays and sounds, where fresh water drained from the surrounding watershed mixes with salt water from the ocean. Section 320 of the Clean Water Act established the National Estuary Program (NEP) to identify nationally significant estuaries threatened by pollution, development, or overuse and to promote the preparation of comprehensive management plans to ensure their ecological integrity. The program's goals are protection and improvement of water quality and enhancement of living resources. To reach these goals, the Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) convenes management conferences for each estuary in the NEP to provide a forum for consensus building and problem solving among interested agencies and user groups.

  13. PECONIC ESTUARY: AN ASSESSMENT OF SHELLFISH RESOURCES IN THE TRIBUTARIES AND EMBAYMENTS OF THE PECONIC ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Executive Summary Historically, the Peconic Estuary's shellfish resources have supported significant fisheries for a number of species including hard clams, oysters and bay scallops. However, distribution and abundance data for the tributaries and embayments within the Peconic Es...

  14. 75 FR 8428 - The Indiana Rail Road Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Martin and Lawrence Counties, IN; CSX...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... Transportation, Inc.--Discontinuance of Service Exemption--in Clark, Floyd, Lawrence, Orange, and Washington..., Floyd, Lawrence, Orange, and Washington Counties, IN, a petition for exemption was filed by...

  15. St. John's Wort (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The herb St. John's Wort is believed to be helpful in relieving mild to moderate depression, but should only be taken under a physician's supervision. St. John's Wort may clash with other medications or foods a ...

  16. Climate change and its impacts on estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Past, present, and future research by WED scientists in the TEP region will be described to lay the foundation for examination of potential climate change effects on estuaries and the broader coastal zone in the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Results from National Coastal Assessments,...

  17. Kaua'i: Streams and Estuaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, John, Ed.; Murakami, Colleen, Ed.

    Designed to help teachers develop students' awareness and understanding of some of Hawaii's endangered aquatic resources, this module contains activities and instructional suggestions for use with intermediate as well as high school students. The module is divided into two sections which explore the streams and estuaries of Kauai. Activities in…

  18. Estuaries and Tidal Marshes. Habitat Pac.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fish and Wildlife Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    This educational packet consists of an overview, three lesson plans, student data sheets, and a poster. The overview examines estuaries and tidal or salt marshes by discussing the plants and animals in these habitats, marsh productivity, benefits and management of the habitats, historical aspects, and development and pollution. A glossary and list…

  19. BCG Approaches for Improved Management of Estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries and other complex aquatic systems are exposed to a variety of stressors that act at several scales, but are managed piecemeal - - often resulting in a “death by 1000 cuts” caused by cumulative impacts to these valued resources. To address this, managers need tools that...

  20. INDICATORS OF ECOSYSTEM INTEGRITY FOR ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Jordan, Stephen J. and Lisa M. Smith. In press. Indicators of Ecosystem Integrity for Estuaries. In: Proceedings of the Estuarine Indicators Workshop, 29-31 October 2003, Sanibel Island, FL. Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation, Sanibel, FL. 23 p. (ERL,GB 1194).

    Ideal ...

  1. Restoration of the Golden Horn Estuary (Halic).

    PubMed

    Coleman, Heather M; Kanat, Gurdal; Aydinol Turkdogan, F Ilter

    2009-12-01

    Restoration of the iconic Golden Horn Estuary in Istanbul, Turkey was a substantial political, logistical, ecological, and social challenge. Forty years of uncontrolled industrial and urban growth resulted in thick layers of anoxic sediment, toxic bacteria, strong hydrogen sulfide odor, and ecologically unlivable conditions. The major components of restoration, spanning two decades, have included (1) demolition and relocation of industries and homes along the shore, (2) creation of wastewater infrastructure, (3) removal of anoxic sludge from the estuary, (4) removal of a floating bridge that impeded circulation, and (5) creation of cultural and social facilities. Although Turkey is not known as an environmental leader in pollution control, the sum of these efforts was largely successful in revitalizing the area through dramatic water quality improvement. Consequently, the estuary is once again inhabitable for aquatic life as well as amenable to local resource users and foreign visitors, and Istanbul has regained a lost sense of cultural identity. This paper focuses on literature review and personal interviews to discuss the causes of degradation, solutions employed to rehabilitate the estuary, and subsequent physicochemical, ecological, and social changes.

  2. Padilla Bay: The Estuary Guide. Level 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friesem, Judy; Lynn, Valerie, Ed.

    Estuaries are marine systems that serve as nurseries for animals, links in the migratory pathways, and habitat for a complex community of organisms. This curriculum guide intended for use at the middle school level is designed for use with the on-site program developed by the Padilla Bay National Esturine Research Reserve (Washington). The guide…

  3. Listening to Estuary English in Singapore

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deterding, David

    2005-01-01

    In Singapore, many people are not familiar with Estuary English (EE), the variety of English becoming popular in much of southern England. In the current study, when students listened to interviews with EE speakers and were asked to transcribe orthographically what they heard, most of them had severe problems. Features of pronunciation that…

  4. Spectral Analysis of Columbia River Estuary Currents.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    D-A1i6i 689 SPECTRAL ANALYSIS OF COLUMBIA RIVER ESTUARY CURRENTS 1/2 (U) ARMY E GINEER VATERWAYS EXPERIMENT STATION VICKCSBURG MS HYDRAULICS LAB B...26 PART IV: ANALYSIS PROCEDURES. .................... 29 *PART V: RESULTS AND DISCUSSION .. ................. 32 Astoria Winds...45 eStation T11B..........................46 Station T12. .......................... 46 Summary of Results

  5. Roegneria alashanica Keng: a species with the StStSt(Y)St(Y) genome constitution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Richard R-C; Jensen, Kevin B

    2017-03-17

    The genome constitution of tetraploid Roegneria alashanica Keng has been in question for a long time. Most scientific studies have suggested that R. alashanica had two versions of the St genome, St1St2, similar to that of Pseudoroegneria elytrigioides (C. Yen & J.L. Yang) B.R. Lu. A study, however, concluded that R. alashanica had the StY genome formula typical for tetraploid species of Roegneria. For the present study, R. alashanica, Elymus longearistatus (Bioss.) Tzvelev (StY genomes), Pseudoroegneria strigosa (M. Bieb.) Á. Löve (St), Pseudoroegneria libanoctica (Hackel) D.R. Dewey (St), and Pseudoroegneria spicata (Pursh) Á. Löve (St) were screened for the Y-genome specific marker B14(F+R)269. All E. longearistatus plants expressed intense bands specific to the Y genome. Only 6 of 10 R. alashanica plants exhibited relatively faint bands for the STS marker. Previously, the genome in species of Pseudoroegneria exhibiting such faint Y-genome specific marker was designated as St(Y). Based on these results, R. alashanica lacks the Y genome in E. longearistatus but likely possess two remotely related St genomes, St and St(Y). According to its genome constitution, R. alashanica should be classified in the genus Pseudoroenera and given the new name Pseudoroegneria alashanica (Keng) R.R.-C. Wang and K.B. Jensen.

  6. A Hydrologic and Geomorphic Model of Estuary Breaching and Closure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, A.; Keller, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    Many coastal estuaries are separated seasonally from the ocean by a swash-deposited beach berm. The opening of the inlet may occur by fluvial erosion of the beach berm and closure occurs when sand deposition outpaces erosion of the inlet. To better understand how the hydrology of estuaries affects breaching and closing patterns, a model is developed that incorporates an estuary hydrologic budget with a geormorphic model of the inlet system. When calibrated, the model is able to reproduce the initial seasonal breaching, seasonal closure, intermittent closures and breaches, and the low-streamflow estuary hydrology of the Carmel Lagoon, located in Central California. For two years when the estuary inlet drains directly across the beach-berm in accordance with model assumptions, the calibrated model predicts the observed 48-hour estuary stage amplitude with correlation coefficients of 0.77 and 0.65. For the calibrated model, streamflow is the predominant control on whether the estuary inlet is open or closed. In a series of sensitivity analyses, it is seen that the function of bar-built, coastal estuaries are sensitive to morphologic and hydrologic variations of the beach berm, and changes to the estuary storage itself. By varying individual components of the berm-system and estuary storage, the amount of the time the estuary is open changes -43 - 28% for the 18.2 model period. The morphology of the berm affects barrier groundwater flow, inlet hydraulics, and estuary storage. Importantly, the elevation of the berm determines the volume of water that must enter the estuary in order to breach, and it modulates the wave-overtopping flux. A high berm renders streamflow the predominant control on function and decreases the amount of time that the estuary is open by 4%, whereas a lower berm allows wave-overtopping to contribute to function and increases time open by 24%. By excavating an estuary, it will breach less frequently (-32% change in open) and store water up to 3

  7. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), conducted December 1 through 19, 1986. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with LLNL. The Survey covers all environmental media all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations performed at LLNL, and interviews with site personnel. A Sampling and Analysis Plan was developed to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during performance of on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the LLNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the LLNL Survey. 70 refs., 58 figs., 52 tabs.,

  8. LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) research on cold fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Thomassen, K I; Holzrichter, J F

    1989-09-14

    With the appearance of reports on Cold Fusion,'' scientists at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) began a series of increasingly sophisticated experiments and calculations to explain these phenomena. These experiments can be categorized as follows: (a) simple experiments to replicate the Utah results, (b) more sophisticated experiments to place lower bounds on the generation of heat and production of nuclear products, (c) a collaboration with Texas A M University to analyze electrodes and electrolytes for fusion by-products in a cell producing 10% excess heat (we found no by-products), and (d) attempts to replicate the Frascati experiment that first found neutron bursts when high-pressure deuterium gas in a cylinder with Ti chips was temperature-cycled. We failed in categories (a) and (b) to replicate either the Pons/Fleischmann or the Jones phenomena. We have seen phenomena similar to the Frascati results, (d) but these low-level burst signals may not be coming from neutrons generated in the Ti chips. Summaries of our experiments are described in Section II, as is a theoretical effort based on cosmic ray muons to describe low-level neutron production. Details of the experimental groups' work are contained in the six appendices. At LLNL, independent teams were spontaneously formed in response to the early announcements on cold fusion. This report's format follows this organization.

  9. Science and politics: free speech controversy at lawrence laboratory.

    PubMed

    Boffey, P M

    1970-08-21

    The Lawrence Radiation Laboratory, one of the nation's most distinguished scientific institutions, has been struck by a series of "free speech" controversies in recent months. The laboratory, which is operated by the University of California and is almost entirely funded by the Atomic Energy Commission, has facilities in two California locations, Berkeley and Livermore. Each has been under fire for allegedly stifling open discussion of controversial issues. The Berkeley facility, a leading center for the study of high-energy physics and fundamental nuclear science, has been split by an internal debate over the right of scientists to hold formal political discussions at the laboratory during their lunch hours. The controversy has led to the banning of meetings, the circulating of petitions and counterpetitions bearing hundreds of names, the publishing of an underground newspaper, and the suspension of a controversial physicist. The Livermore facility, a major center for developing nuclear weapons, has been accused of trying to muzzle two staff scientists who contend that existing radiation standards are too lax to protect the public from nuclear radiation hazards. Livermore has also been the target of demonstrations and of a lawsuit seeking to open the weapons laboratory to allow discussions between outsiders and staff scientists concerning the implications of weapons research. The article below discusses the controversy at the Berkeley laboratory, where only unclassified research is performed. A subsequent article will discuss the conflict at security-conscious Livermore.

  10. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Working Reference Material Production Pla

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Amy; Thronas, Denise; Marshall, Robert

    1998-11-04

    This Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Working Reference Material Production Plan was written for LLNL by the Los Alamos National Laboratory to address key elements of producing seven Pu-diatomaceous earth NDA Working Reference Materials (WRMS). These WRMS contain low burnup Pu ranging in mass from 0.1 grams to 68 grams. The composite Pu mass of the seven WRMS was designed to approximate the maximum TRU allowable loading of 200 grams Pu. This document serves two purposes: first, it defines all the operations required to meet the LLNL Statement of Work quality objectives, and second, it provides a record of the production and certification of the WRMS. Guidance provided in ASTM Standard Guide C1128-89 was used to ensure that this Plan addressed all the required elements for producing and certifying Working Reference Materials. The Production Plan was written to provide a general description of the processes, steps, files, quality control, and certification measures that were taken to produce the WRMS. The Plan identifies the files where detailed procedures, data, quality control, and certification documentation and forms are retained. The Production Plan is organized into three parts: a) an initial section describing the preparation and characterization of the Pu02 and diatomaceous earth materials, b) middle sections describing the loading, encapsulation, and measurement on the encapsulated WRMS, and c) final sections describing the calculations of the Pu, Am, and alpha activity for the WRMS and the uncertainties associated with these quantities.

  11. Robot safety training at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    McMahon, T.T.; Sievers, R.H.

    1992-10-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing applications of commercially available and advanced robotics. These involve multiple installations of test and demonstration robots and extensive concurrent research and development projects. LLNL robotic applications use many researchers and technicians requiring access to the equipment on tight schedules, using sophisticated support and auxiliary equipment, with concurrent programming and hardware installation and modification. The early recognition of the special safety problems inherent with the equipment and development operations mandated a strict compliance with the best available safety guidance. This has resulted in safety input in the system design, equipment layout, means of safeguarding, and safety training as described in the current and proposed American National Standard for Industrial Robots and Robot Systems-Safety Requirements. LLNL has implemented a model robot safety training program that is required for all employees that interact with the fixed robotic systems. The LLNL experience and performance has led to the Laboratory being made responsible for preparation of the industrial robots safety chapter for the Department of Energy Technical Safety Reference Manual. This paper describes the robotic installations, the safety training courses, lessons learned from the training, and recommendations for future robot safety training.

  12. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, FY 1993 Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) 1993 Site Development Plan (SDP) provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly development of land and facilities at the LBL main site. The SDP directly supports LBL`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California (UC) for the Department of Energy (DOE). It is a concise policy document, prepared in compliance with DOE Order 4320.1 B, and is coupled to the 1993 Laboratory Integrated Facilities Plan (LIFP). It also serves as the current DOE framework for the implementation of the 1987 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP) approved by the Regents of the University of California. The SDP is updated annually, with periodic major revisions consistent with DOE policy and approved plans of the Regents. The plan is reviewed and approved by the DOE San Francisco Field Office. The specific purposes of the SDP are to: Summarize the mission and community setting of the Laboratory; Describe program trends and projections and future resource requirements; Describe site planning goals and future facilities and land uses; and Describe site planning issues and potential infrastructure replacement solutions. The SDP concisely expresses the policies for future development based on planning concepts, the anticipated needs of research programs, and site potential and constraints. The 1993 LIFP and other planning data provide detailed support for the plans identified in this document.

  13. Reuse of waste cutting sand at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, S., LLNL

    1998-02-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined the waste stream from a water jet cutting operation, to evaluate the possible reuse of waste garnet sand. The sand is a cutting agent used to shape a variety of materials, including metals. Nearly 70,000 pounds of waste sand is generated annually by the cutting operation. The Environmental Protection Department evaluated two potential reuses for the spent garnet sand: backfill in utility trenches; and as a concrete constituent. In both applications, garnet waste would replace the sand formerly purchases by LLNL for these purposes. Findings supported the reuse of waste garnet sand in concrete, but disqualified its proposed application as trench backfill. Waste sand stabilized in ac concrete matrix appeared to present no metals-leaching hazard; however, unconsolidated sand in trenches could potentially leach metals in concentrations high enough to threaten ground water quality. A technical report submitted to the San Francisco Bay Regional Water Quality Control Board was reviewed and accepted by that body. Reuse of waste garnet cutting sand as a constituent in concrete poured to form walkways and patios at LLNL was approved.

  14. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the preliminary findings made during the Environmental Survey, February 22--29, 1988, at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The University of California operates the LBL facility for DOE. The LBL Survey is part of the larger DOE-wide Environmental Survey announced by Secretary John S. Herrington on September 18, 1985. The purpose of this effort is to identify, via no fault'' baseline Surveys, existing environmental problems and areas of environmental risk at DOE facilities, and to rank them on a DOE wide basis. This ranking will enable DOE to more effectively establish priorities for addressing environmental problems and allocate the resources necessary to correct them. Because the Survey is no fault'' and is not an audit,'' it is not designed to identify specific isolated incidents of noncompliance or to analyze environmental management practices. Such incidents and/or management practices will, however, be used in the Survey as a means of identifying existing and potential environmental problems. The LBL Survey was conducted by a multidisciplinary team of technical specialists headed and managed by a Team Leader and Assistant Team Leader from DOE's Office of Environmental Audit. A complete list of the LBL Survey participants and their affiliations is provided in Appendix A. 80 refs., 27 figs., 37 tabs.

  15. Tiger Team assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Washington, DC

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-02-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) conducted from January 14 through February 15, 1991. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the Secretary of Energy with the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at LBL. The Tiger Team concluded that curtailment of cessation of any operations at LBL is not warranted. However, the number and breadth of findings and concerns from this assessment reflect a serious condition at this site. In spite of its late start, LBL has recently made progress in increasing ES H awareness at all staff levels and in identifying ES H deficiencies. Corrective action plans are inadequate, however, many compensatory actions are underway. Also, LBL does not have the technical expertise or training programs nor the tracking and followup to effectively direct and control sitewide guidance and oversight by DOE of ES H activities at LBL. As a result of these deficiencies, the Tiger Team has reservations about LBL's ability to implement effective actions in a timely manner and, thereby, achieve excellence in their ES H program. 4 figs., 24 tabs.

  16. STS-114 Crew Interviews: 1. Eileen Collins 2. Wendy Lawrence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    1) STS-114 Commander Eileen Collins emphasized her love for teaching, respect for teachers, and her plan to go back to teaching again someday. Her solid background in Math and Science, focus on her interests, with great support from her family, and great training and support during her career with the Air Force gave her confidence in pursuing her dream to become an astronaut. Commander Collins shares her thoughts on the Columbia, details the various flight operations and crew tasks that will take place during the mission and the importance of Shuttle missions to the International Space Station and space exploration. 2) STS-114 Mission Specialist Wendy Lawrence first dreamed of becoming an astronaut when she watched Neil Armstrong walk on the moon from their black and white TV set. She majored in Engineering and became a Navy pilot. She shares her thoughts on the Columbia, details her major role as the crew in charge of all the transfer operations; getting the MPLM unpacked and repacked; and the importance of Shuttle missions to the International Space Station and space exploration.

  17. Beyond Lawrence v. Texas: crafting a fundamental right to sexual privacy.

    PubMed

    Fasullo, Kristin

    2009-05-01

    After the watershed 2003 U.S. Supreme Court decision Lawrence v.Texas, courts are faced with the daunting task of navigating the bounds of sexual privacy in light of Lawrence's sweeping language and unconventional structure. This Note focuses on the specific issue of state governments regulating sexual device distribution. Evaluating the substantive due process rights of sexual device retailers and users, this Note ultimately argues that the privacy interest identified in Lawrence is sufficiently broad to protect intimate decisions to engage in adult consensual sexual behavior, including the liberty to sell, purchase, and use a sexual device.

  18. Fish composition and assemblage structure in three Eastern English Channel macrotidal estuaries: A comparison with other French estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selleslagh, Jonathan; Amara, Rachid; Laffargue, Pascal; Lesourd, Sandric; Lepage, Mario; Girardin, Michel

    2009-01-01

    This study has analysed for the first time fish composition and assemblage structures of three small macrotidal estuaries of the Eastern English Channel (EEC) and has explored the influences of 19 biotic and abiotic variables on the fish assemblages. Fish from Canche, Authie and Somme estuaries were collected during spring (June 2006 and May 2007) and autumn (September 2006) along the estuarine gradients using a 1.5 m beam trawl. Using identical sampling protocols, the study also analysed and compared for the first time taxonomic and functional aspects of the fish assemblages in 15 estuaries located along the Atlantic and English Channel coasts. SIMPER analysis showed high similarities in fish assemblages in the three EEC estuaries and during either spring or autumn periods. However, intra-estuary similarities were relatively low, indicating that fish assemblage structures (species richnesses or abundances) were more variable within the estuary (salinity gradient) than between estuaries and/or seasons (spring vs autumn). Although numerous environmental variables were included in the study, only 47% of the variability observed in the fish distribution was explained. Fish spatial variations in the EEC estuaries are mostly driven by abiotic variables as opposed to biological interactions. As indicated by CCA, salinity and muddy sediments were the two most important factors structuring the fish assemblages. The macrobenthos being very abundant in the EEC estuaries (580-1121 ind. m -2), the availability of potential prey is probably not a limiting factor in the utilization of estuaries by fish. Contrary to the majority of French estuaries dominated by estuarine species (ES), the fish assemblages of the EEC estuaries are clearly dominated by marine migrant (MM) species (65% on average) with high abundance of juveniles (mostly young-of-the-year). Cluster and SIMPROF's analyses distinguished the functional structure of the 15 estuarine fish assemblages into different

  19. 78 FR 9887 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; National Estuaries Restoration Inventory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... Estuaries Restoration Inventory AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce... extension of a currently approved information collection. Collection of estuary habitat restoration project... to populate a restoration project database mandated by the Estuary Restoration Act of 2000....

  20. 78 FR 46332 - Proposed Information Collection Request; Comment Request; National Estuary Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-31

    ... AGENCY Proposed Information Collection Request; Comment Request; National Estuary Program AGENCY... to submit an information collection request (ICR), ``National Estuary Program'' (EPA ICR No. 1500.08... opportunity to submit additional comments to OMB. Abstract: The National Estuary Program (NEP)...

  1. Second International Symposium on the Biogeochemistry of Model Estuaries: Estuarine processes in global change. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Windom, H.L.

    1991-12-31

    This report summarizes estuary events discussed at the symposium on biogeochemistry. Topics include; sedimentation, salinity, inputs and outputs of the estuary, effects of global change, and the need for effective sampling and modeling of estuaries.

  2. Interpreting the colour of an estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowers, D. G.; Evans, D.; Thomas, D. N.; Ellis, K.; Williams, P. J. le B.

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the possibility of using water colour to quantify the concentration of coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM), and through it, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and salinity in a turbid estuary in which suspended sediments also influence water colour. The motivation of the work is that the method could be applied to water colour measurements made remotely from an aircraft (or, in larger estuaries, a satellite) enabling near-synoptic mapping of surface salinity and DOC distributions. The paper describes observations at 29 stations distributed along the salinity gradient of the Conwy estuary in North Wales. At each station, surface water samples were collected and analysed for salinity, concentrations of DOC, chlorophyll and suspended particles and absorption spectra of CDOM, or yellow substance. Profiles were made of both upwelling and downwelling irradiance in four narrow band channels, and these were used to calculate irradiance reflection and attenuation coefficients. Results show that spectrally averaged light absorption in the estuary is caused principally and equally by mineral suspended solids and yellow substance, with water and chlorophyll in third and fourth place. The CDOM is strongly correlated ( R2=0.99) in a negative sense with salinity, and more weakly correlated with DOC. There is a linear relationship between CDOM and the ratio of reflection coefficients in the red (670 nm) and blue-green (490 nm) parts of the spectrum, which could be applied to remote sensing; the slope and intercept of the relationship are however different to those found in less turbid water bodies. It is shown that the change in slope and intercept are consistent with the presence, in the Conwy estuary, of suspended particles which influence the water colour. A method is described and tested for inverting water colour measurements in a turbid estuary to give estimates of CDOM in the presence of suspended particles. The solution, which has not been adjusted to

  3. Mesozooplankton affinities in a recovering freshwater estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambord, Sophie; Maris, Tom; Colas, Fanny; Van Engeland, Tom; Sossou, Akoko-C.; Azémar, Frédéric; Le Coz, Maïwen; Cox, Tom; Buisson, Laetitia; Souissi, Sami; Meire, Patrick; Tackx, Michèle

    2016-08-01

    Water quality of the Scheldt estuary (Belgium/The Netherlands) has considerably improved in recent years, especially in the upstream, freshwater reaches. Within the zooplankton community, the copepod Eurytemora affinis, typically abundant in brackish water and quasi-absent from freshwater before 2007, has since substantially developed in the latter, where it now represents 90% of the crustacean mesozooplankton community. Simultaneously, cyclopoid copepod abundance has greatly decreased, while cladoceran abundance did not change. The study aim was: 1) to verify if the zooplankton community described for the period 2007-2009 by Mialet et al. (2011) has stabilized until present, and 2) to look for the environmental conditions favouring E. affinis development and causing changes in the upstream freshwater zooplankton community. The 2002-2012 temporal evolution of the zooplankton distribution at three stations in the upstream freshwater Scheldt estuary was analyzed. Water quality remained better after 2007 than before, and some factors revealed continuous improvement in annual mean concentrations (e.g. increase in O2, decrease in BOD5 and NH4sbnd N concentration). The increase in oxygen and the decrease in NH4sbnd N concentration, together with low discharge during summer were the main environmental factors explaining the development and timing of E. affinis in the upstream freshwater reach. In this reach, E. affinis maximal abundance is shifted to higher temperatures (summer) compared to its typical maximum spring abundance peak in the brackish zone of the Scheldt estuary and in most temperate estuaries. The changes in zooplankton community followed a temporal and spatial gradient induced by the spatio-temporal evolution of water quality improvement. The most downstream station (3) allowed E. affinis development (oxygen concentration > 4 mg L-1; NH4sbnd N concentration < 2 mg L-1, discharge (Q) < 50 m3 s-1) from 2007 onwards, and this station showed the highest E

  4. ESTEEM - a New 'Hybrid Complexity' Model for Prediction of Estuary Morphological Evolution at Decadal to Centennial Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, J.; Thornhill, G.; Burningham, H.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the wealth of historical and geological insights into coastal and estuarine landform behaviour, models capable of generating quantitative predictions at decadal to centennial scales are required if we are to meet the management challenges of the 21st century. Despite an emerging consensus that progress on this front is more likely to be made through models that are essentially synthesist in approach, the nature of marine forcing, especially in estuaries, means that it is frequently necessary to retain a degree of hydrodynamic complexity that can only be obtained via more reductionist models. We see great potential, therefore, in fusing these approaches rather than deploying them separately as end members of a modelling spectrum. This paper thus presents a novel approach to mesoscale estuary morphological evolution that combines physically complete 1-D simulation of tidal hydrodynamics, highly parameterised 2-D mechanistic representation of wave-driven tidal flat morphodynamics, and a largely empirical representation of 2-D variation in salt marsh deposition. This approach is embodied in the Estuary SpaTial LandscapE Evolution Model (ESTEEM) code, being developed in the UK as part of the NERC-funded iCOASST project. ESTEEM classifies an estuary into the distinct landform types (subtidal channel, tidal flat, etc), which are then simulated appropriately via one of the approaches highlighted above. Other notable aspects of the model architecture include use of a composite raster and vector data model and compatibility with the OpenMI external coupling standard. The paper describes the contrasting algorithmic approaches and presents illustrative 100-year simulations for a test case estuary.

  5. Small estuary, big port - progress in the management of the Stour-Orwell Estuary system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spearman, Jeremy; Baugh, John; Feates, Nigel; Dearnaley, Mike; Eccles, Dan

    2014-10-01

    Management of port development is increasingly challenging because of the competitive requirement for deeper channels and because of the need to preserve important coastal wetlands which function as both habitat and flood defence. This paper describes the management of the Stour/Orwell Estuary system, Eastern England, an estuary system which has experienced considerable development and morphological change. The estuary is internationally important for its wetland bird populations and the intertidal areas of the estuary system are protected under European legislation. It is also the location of the Port of Felixstowe. In 1998/2000 the approach channel to the Port of Felixstowe was deepened from -12.5 mCD to -14.5 mCD. This paper describes the effects of the approach channel deepening, the approach taken to identifying the potential impact to intertidal habitat resulting from the deepening, the sediment recycling implemented as mitigation to prevent increased loss of habitat and the subsequent response of the estuary system to this intervention.

  6. Investigating phenology of larval fishes in St. Louis River ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As part of the development of an early detection monitoring strategy for non-native fishes, larval fish surveys have been conducted since 2012 in the St. Louis River estuary. Survey data demonstrates there is considerable variability in fish abundance and species assemblages across different habitats and at multiple temporal scales. To optimize early detection monitoring we need to understand temporal and spatial patterns of larval fishes related to their development and dispersion, as well as the environmental factors that influence them. In 2016 we designed an experiment to assess the phenological variability in larval fish abundance and assemblages amongst shallow water habitats. Specifically, we sought to contrast different thermal environments and turbidity levels, as well as assess the importance of vegetation in these habitats. To evaluate phenological differences we sampled larval fish bi-weekly at nine locations from mid-May to mid-July. Sampling locations were split between upper estuary and lower estuary to contrast river versus seiche influenced habitats. To assess differences in thermal environments, temperature was monitored every 15 minutes at each sampling location throughout the study, beginning in early April. Our design also included sampling at both vegetated (or pre-vegetated) and non-vegetated stations within each sampling location throughout the study to assess the importance of this habitat variable. Hydroacoustic surveys (Biosonics) were

  7. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    SciTech Connect

    Chew, Joseph T.; Stroh, Suzanne C.; Maio, Linda R.; Olson, Karl R.; Grether, Donald F.; Clary, Mary M.; Smith, Brian M.; Stevens, David F.; Ross, Loren; Alper, Mark D.; Dairiki, Janis M.; Fong, Pauline L.; Bartholomew, James C.

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy`s program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory`s scientific and support divisions.

  8. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan, FY 1993--1998

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    The FY 1993--1998 Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that can influence the Laboratory, potential research trends, and several management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation's scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff composition and development programs. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory's ongoing research programs. The plan is an institutional management report for integration with the Department of Energy's strategic planning activities that is developed through an annual planning process. The plan identifies technical and administrative directions in the context of the National Energy Strategy and the Department of Energy's program planning initiatives. Preparation of the plan is coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development from information contributed by the Laboratory's scientific and support divisions.

  9. Community Relations Plan for Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) has applied to the California Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC), for renewal of its Hazardous Waste Handling Facility Permit. A permit is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulations. The permit will allow LBL to continue using its current hazardous waste handling facility, upgrade the existing facility, and construct a replacement facility. The new facility is scheduled for completion in 1995. The existing facility will be closed under RCRA guidelines by 1996. As part of the permitting process, LBL is required to investigate areas of soil and groundwater contamination at its main site in the Berkeley Hills. The investigations are being conducted by LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program and are overseen by a number of regulatory agencies. The regulatory agencies working with LBL include the California Environmental Protection Agency`s Department of Toxic Substances Control, the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District, the East Bay Municipal Utilities District, and the Berkeley Department of Environmental Health. RCRA requires that the public be informed of LBL`s investigations and site cleanup, and that opportunities be available for the public to participate in making decisions about how LBL will address contamination issues. LBL has prepared this Community Relations Plan (CRP) to describe activities that LBL will use to keep the community informed of environmental restoration progress and to provide for an open dialogue with the public on issues of importance. The CRP documents the community`s current concerns about LBL`s Environmental Restoration Program. Interviews conducted between February and April 1993 with elected officials, agency staff, environmental organizations, businesses, site neighbors, and LBL employees form the basis for the information contained in this document.

  10. An organizational cultural assessment of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Crouch, D.A.

    1991-02-15

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. Many of these subjects are assessed in the OCS through highly developed and validated scales that have been administered in many different types of organizations. Some of the issues, especially the questions on environmental concerns, are newly developed and are still being modified. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OCS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OCS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can than be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. All data from the OCS is presented in group summaries, by division, managerial level, and job classification. Statistically significant differences between groups are identified and discussed. The organizational profile which emerges from the results of the LBL samples is a positive one. The overall cultural style is best described as a constructive one, with high mean scores on the Humanistic, Affiliative, Achievement and Self-actualizing Scales. Four aspects to the communication process were assessed in this OCS; Trust, Accuracy, Interaction and Satisfaction. 9 refs., 57 figs., 6 tabs.

  11. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory FY 1992 Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1992 Site Development Plan (SDP) provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly development of land and facilities at the LBL main site. The SDP directly supports LBL's role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California for the DOE. It is a concise policy document, prepared in compliance with DOE Order 4320.1B and based on revisions to the 1991 Technical Site Information (TSI). It also serves as the current DOE framework for the implementation of the 1987 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP) approved by the Regents of the University of California. The SDP is updated annually, with periodic major revisions consistent with DOE policy and approved plans of the Regents. The specific purposed of the SDP are to: Summarize the mission and community setting of the Laboratory; describe program trends and projections and future resource requirements; describe site planning goals and future facilities and land uses; and describe site planning issues and potential solutions. The SDP concisely expresses the policies for future development based on planning concepts, the anticipated needs of research programs, and site potential and constraints. The 1992 TSI document and other planning data provide detailed support for the plans identified in this document. Preparation of the SDP was coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development with technical support and data preparation by the Plant Engineering Department. Programmatic data and information are from program divisions and technical resource divisions, including the Environment, Health Safety Division. The 1992 SDP is consistent with approved university guidelines and future building area, land use, and population projections identified in the 1987 LRDP and the 1987 Site Development Plan Environmental Impact Report prepared under the California Environment Quality Act.

  12. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory FY 1992 Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory 1992 Site Development Plan (SDP) provides analysis and policy guidance for the effective use and orderly development of land and facilities at the LBL main site. The SDP directly supports LBL`s role as a multiprogram national laboratory operated by the University of California for the DOE. It is a concise policy document, prepared in compliance with DOE Order 4320.1B and based on revisions to the 1991 Technical Site Information (TSI). It also serves as the current DOE framework for the implementation of the 1987 Long Range Development Plan (LRDP) approved by the Regents of the University of California. The SDP is updated annually, with periodic major revisions consistent with DOE policy and approved plans of the Regents. The specific purposed of the SDP are to: Summarize the mission and community setting of the Laboratory; describe program trends and projections and future resource requirements; describe site planning goals and future facilities and land uses; and describe site planning issues and potential solutions. The SDP concisely expresses the policies for future development based on planning concepts, the anticipated needs of research programs, and site potential and constraints. The 1992 TSI document and other planning data provide detailed support for the plans identified in this document. Preparation of the SDP was coordinated by the Office for Planning and Development with technical support and data preparation by the Plant Engineering Department. Programmatic data and information are from program divisions and technical resource divisions, including the Environment, Health & Safety Division. The 1992 SDP is consistent with approved university guidelines and future building area, land use, and population projections identified in the 1987 LRDP and the 1987 Site Development Plan Environmental Impact Report prepared under the California Environment Quality Act.

  13. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Institutional Plan FY 1994--1999

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Institutional Plan provides an overview of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory mission, strategic plan, scientific initiatives, research programs, environment and safety program plans, educational and technology transfer efforts, human resources, and facilities needs. For FY 1994-1999 the Institutional Plan reflects significant revisions based on the Laboratory`s strategic planning process. The Strategic Plan section identifies long-range conditions that will influence the Laboratory, as well as potential research trends and management implications. The Initiatives section identifies potential new research programs that represent major long-term opportunities for the Laboratory, and the resources required for their implementation. The Scientific and Technical Programs section summarizes current programs and potential changes in research program activity. The Environment, Safety, and Health section describes the management systems and programs underway at the Laboratory to protect the environment, the public, and the employees. The Technology Transfer and Education programs section describes current and planned programs to enhance the nation`s scientific literacy and human infrastructure and to improve economic competitiveness. The Human Resources section identifies LBL staff diversity and development program. The section on Site and Facilities discusses resources required to sustain and improve the physical plant and its equipment. The new section on Information Resources reflects the importance of computing and communication resources to the Laboratory. The Resource Projections are estimates of required budgetary authority for the Laboratory`s ongoing research programs. The Institutional Plan is a management report for integration with the Department of Energy`s strategic planning activities, developed through an annual planning process.

  14. Exploring Viral Genomics at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kilpatrick, K; Hiddessen, A

    2007-08-22

    This summer I had the privilege of working at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under the Nonproliferation, Homeland and International Security Directorate in the Chemical and Biological Countermeasures Division. I worked exclusively on the Viral Identification and Characterization Initiative (VICI) project focusing on the development of multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. The goal of VICI is to combine several disciplines such as molecular biology, microfluidics, and bioinformatics in order to detect viruses and identify them in order to effectively and quickly counter infectious disease, natural or engineered. The difficulty in such a countermeasure is that little is known about viral diversity due to the ever changing nature of these organisms. In response, VICI is developing a new microfluidic bioanalytical platform to detect known and unknown viruses by analyzing every virus in a sample by isolating them into picoliter sized droplets on a microchip and individually analyzing them. The sample will be injected into a channel of oil to form droplets that will contain viral nucleic acids that will be amplified using PCR. The multiplexed PCR assay will produce a series of amplicons for a particular virus genome that provides an identifying signature. A device will then detect whether or not DNA is present in the droplet and will sort the empty droplets from the rest. From this point, the amplified DNA is released from the droplets and analyzed using capillary gel electrophoresis in order to read out the series of amplicons and thereby determine the identity of each virus. The following figure depicts the microfluidic process. For the abovementioned microfluidic process to work, a method for detecting amplification of target viral nucleic acids that does not interfere with the multiplexed biochemical reaction is required for downstream sorting and analysis. In this report, the successful development of a multiplexed PCR assay using SYBR Green I

  15. HYDRODYNAMIC SIMULATION OF THE UPPER POTOMAC ESTUARY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaffranck, Raymond W.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrodynamics of the upper extent of the Potomac Estuary between Indian Head and Morgantown, Md. , are simulated using a two-dimensional model. The model computes water-surface elevations and depth-averaged velocities by numerically integrating finite-difference forms of the equations of mass and momentum conservation using the alternating direction implicit method. The fundamental, non-linear, unsteady-flow equations, upon which the model is formulated, include additional terms to account for Coriolis acceleration and meteorological influences. Preliminary model/prototype data comparisons show agreement to within 9% for tidal flow volumes and phase differences within the measured-data-recording interval. Use of the model to investigate the hydrodynamics and certain aspects of transport within this Potomac Estuary reach is demonstrated. Refs.

  16. Modelling the Physical System of Belawan Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarigan, A. P. M.; Swandana, D.; Isma, F.

    2017-03-01

    Belawan estuary represents one of the most complex and fascinating mixed environments of sea and land, where not only habitat of rich biodiversity but also international seaport infrastructure are at stake. It is therefore a matter of considerable importance to understand the physical system which characterizes the dynamics of the estuarine water. The purpose of this study is to model the changing water depths, tidal currents, salt, temperature and sediment concentration over a long stretch of Belawan estuary on an hourly basis. The first essential step is to define the bathymetry based on which other physical parameters are simulated. The study is accomplished by building working computer modules which simplify and model the systems complexities. It should be noted that model validation and improvement is the subject of the next study.

  17. Differences in the structure of copepod assemblages in four tropical estuaries: Importance of pollution and the estuary hydrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Adriana V; Dias, Cristina O; Bonecker, Sérgio L C

    2017-02-15

    We examined the relationship between pollution and structure of copepod assemblages in estuaries, using sampling standardization of salinity range to reduce the effects of "Estuarine Quality Paradox". Copepod assemblages were analyzed in four Southeast Brazilian estuaries with different water quality levels and different hydrodynamic characteristics. The pollution negatively impacted the descriptors of the assemblage structure. The distribution of structure of copepod assemblages also showed a main separation trend between the most polluted estuaries and those less polluted. Temperature was the main factor affecting the assemblage structuring in the four estuaries. This factor acted in synergism with the effects of pollution impact and physical characteristics of the estuaries on the structure of copepod assemblages, supporting the potential vulnerability of coastal environments due to nutrient enrichment associated with climate change. Our study demonstrated the importance of sampling standardization of the salinity range in estuaries for reliable analysis of pollution effects on biota.

  18. Anthropogenic Carbon Pump in an Urbanized Estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J. H.; Yoon, T. K.; Jin, H.; Begum, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    The importance of estuaries as a carbon source has been increasingly recognized over the recent decades. However, constraining sources of CO2 evasion from urbanized estuaries remains incomplete, particularly in densely populated river systems receiving high loads of organic carbon from anthropogenic sources. To account for major factors regulating carbon fluxes the tidal reach of the Han River estuary along the metropolitan Seoul, characterization of organic carbon in the main stem and major urban tributaries were combined with continuous, submersible sensor measurements of pCO2 at a mid-channel location over a year and continuous underway measurements using a submersible sensor and two equilibrator sytems across the estuarine section receiving urban streams. Single-site continuous measurements exhibited large seasonal and diurnal variations in pCO2, ranging from sub-ambient air levels to exceptionally high values approaching 10,000 ppm. Diurnal variations of pCO2 were pronounced in summer and had an inverse relationship with dissolved oxygen, pointing to a potential role of day-time algal consumption of CO2. Cruise measurements displayed sharp pCO2 pulses along the confluences of urban streams as compared with relatively low values along the upper estuary receiving low-CO2 outflows from upstream dams. Large downstream increases in pCO2, concurrent with increases in DOC concentrations and fluorescence intensities indicative of microbially processed organic components, imply a translocation and subsequent dilution of CO2 carried by urban streams and/or fast transformations of labile C during transit along downstream reaches. The unique combination of spatial and temporal continuous measurements of pCO2 provide insights on estuarine CO2 pulses that might have resulted from the interplay between high loads of CO2 and organic C of anthropogenic origin and their priming effects on estuarine microbial processing of terrigenous and algal organic matter.

  19. Inspection Report "Personal Property Management at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore) is a premier research and development institution for science and technology supporting the core mission of national security. According to Livermore, as of November 2008 the Laboratory managed 64,933 items of Government personal property valued at about $1 billion. At the beginning of Fiscal Year 2008, Livermore reported 249 DOE property items valued at about $1.3 million that were missing, unaccounted for, or stolen during Fiscal Year 2007. Livermore centrally tracks property utilizing the Sunflower Assets system (Sunflower), which reflects the cradle to grave history of each property item. Changes in the custodianship and/or location of a property item must be timely reported by the custodian to the respective property center representative for updating in Sunflower. In Fiscal Year 2008, over 2,000 individuals were terminated as a result of workforce reduction at Livermore, of which about 750 received a final notification of termination on the same day that they were required to depart the facility. All of these terminations potentially necessitated updates to the property database, but the involuntary terminations had the potential to pose particular challenges because of the immediacy of individuals departures. The objective of our inspection was to evaluate the adequacy of Livermore's internal controls over Government property. Based upon the results of our preliminary field work, we particularly focused on personal property assigned to terminated individuals and stolen laptop computers. We concluded that Livermore's internal controls over property could be improved, which could help to reduce the number of missing, unaccounted for, or stolen property items. Specifically, we found that: (1) The location and/or custodian of approximately 18 percent of the property items in our sample, which was drawn from the property assigned to individuals terminated on short notice in 2008

  20. Circumsolar Radiation Data: The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Reduced Data Base

    DOE Data Explorer

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Reduced Data Base contains approximately 288 megabytes of information, including detailed intensity profiles of the solar and circumsolar region, the total and spectrally divided direct normal radiation data, as well as the total hemispherical solar radiation in the horizontal plane and the plane facing the sun. Data are available for 11 locations in the United States in the period 1976 to 1981. The measurements were made by four circumsolar telescopes operating about 16 hours per day. The Reduced Data Base represents about one-tenth of the total data taken by the circumsolar telescopes. The sites, the amount of data available for each site, and the collection dates are: • Albuquerque (STTF), New Mexico (28,971 data sets from 4/77 to 10/79 • Albuquerque (TETF), New Mexico (13,851 data sets from 5/76 to 3/77) • Argonne, Illinois (9,702 data sets from 8/77 to 8/78) • Atlanta, Georgia (38,405 data sets from 6/77 to 6/80) • Barstow, California (36,632 data sets from 7/77 to 10/79) • Boardman, Oregon (4,782 data sets from 2/77 to 5/77) • China Lake, California (10,683 data sets from 7/76 to 3/77) • Colstrip, Montana (616 data sets from 5/77 to 6/77) • Edwards Air Force Base, California (27,344 data sets from 10/79 to 6/81) • Fort Hood (Bunker), Texas (5,150 data sets from 7/76 to 11/76) • Fort Hood (TES), Texas (8,250 data sets from 11/76 to 8/77) Note that each data set is composed of 20 lines of information with each line consistingof 77 characters. These are archived ASCII files. [Information on sites, number of data sets, etc. taken from the online publication (out of print) at http://rredc.nrel.gov/solar/pubs/circumsolar/index.html

  1. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory Institutional Plan FY 1987-1992

    SciTech Connect

    Various

    1986-12-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, provides national scientific leadership and supports technological innovation through its mission to: (1) Perform leading multidisciplinary research in general sciences and energy sciences; (2) Develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for use by qualified investigators; (3) Educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers; and (4) Foster productive relationships between LBL research programs and industry. The following areas of research excellence implement this mission and provide current focus for achieving DOE goals. GENERAL SCIENCES--(1) Accelerator and Fusion Research--accelerator design and operation, advanced accelerator technology development, accelerator and ion source research for heavy-ion fusion and magnetic fusion, and x-ray optics; (2) Nuclear Science--relativistic heavy-ion physics, medium- and low-energy nuclear physics, nuclear theory, nuclear astrophysics, nuclear chemistry, transuranium elements studies, nuclear data evaluation, and detector development; (3) Physics--experimental and theoretical particle physics, detector development, astrophysics, and applied mathematics. ENERGY SCIENCES--(1) Applied Science--building energy efficiency, solar for building systems, fossil energy conversion, energy storage, and atmospheric effects of combustion; (2) Biology and Medicine--molecular and cellular biology, diagnostic imaging, radiation biophysics, therapy and radiosurgery, mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, lipoproteins, cardiovascular disease, and hemopoiesis research; (3) Center for Advanced Materials--catalysts, electronic materials, ceramic and metal interfaces, polymer research, instrumentation, and metallic alloys; (4) Chemical Biodynamics--molecular biology of nucleic acids and proteins, genetics of photosynthesis, and photochemistry; (5) Earth Sciences--continental lithosphere properties, structures and

  2. Mercury in sediments of Ulhas estuary.

    PubMed

    Ram, Anirudh; Rokade, M A; Borole, D V; Zingde, M D

    2003-07-01

    Hg levels in water, suspended particulate matter and sediment of the Ulhas estuary are under considerable environmental stress due to the indiscriminate release of effluents from a variety of industries including chlor-alkali plants. Concentration ranges of dissolved (0.04-0.61 micro gl(-1)) and particulate (1.13-6.43 micro gg(-1)) Hg reveal a definite enhancement of levels in the estuary. The Hg burden in sediment upstream of the weir that limits the tidal influence is low (0.08-0.19 micro gg(-1)) with low C(org) content (1.8-2.9%). The high Hg content of the sediment just below the weir varies seasonally (highest concentration recorded being 38.45 micro gg(-1)) due to incremental accretion of sediment as the fresh water flow over the weir progressively decreases. The 30 km segment of the estuary sustains markedly high levels of Hg in the sediment with an exponential decrease in the seaward direction from the weir. Higher concentrations than the expected background prevail in all the estuarine cores up to the bottom, though the overall concentration decreases from about 20 micro gg(-1) in core 7 (inner estuary) to 1 micro gg(-1) in core 31 (outer estuary). The Hg in sediment is associated with C(org), while its correlation with Al, Fe and Mn is poor. The Hg profiles in cores from the Arabian Sea (stations 34, 35 and 37) have a distinct horizon of enhanced concentration in the 5-60 cm segment. Based on 210Pb dating of core 37, the sediment at the bottom of this core is inferred to have been deposited in the year 1949, roughly two year prior to the establishment of the first chlor-alkali plant and represents the background (0.06-0.10 micro gg(-1)). The Hg profiles in the offshore cores indicate a marked increase in transfer of Hg to sediment subsequent to 1980, with a peak around 1990-1992. Based on the index of geoaccumulation it is considered that the estuarine segment between stations 4 and 23 is extremely polluted, while the sediment from the open coast is

  3. Freshwater, tidal and wave influences on a small estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uncles, R. J.; Stephens, J. A.; Harris, C.

    2014-10-01

    Observations are presented of water levels, currents, salinity, turbidity, sediment grain sizes and sediment transport in the Devonshire Avon Estuary, UK, in order to improve knowledge of freshwater, wave and tidal influences on small, strongly tidal ría estuaries. A large reduction in tidal range occurred progressing from the coastal zone to the upper estuary that was mainly a consequence of rising bed and river water levels. The spring-neap cycle also had an influence on the reduction in tidal range along the length of the estuary. Surface gravity waves were completely dissipated propagating into the estuarine channel from the coastal zone, and despite strong wave-induced resuspension, suspended sediment was not transported into the lower estuary in observable amounts during the ensuing flood tide, indicating that the wave-suspended material was too coarse to remain in suspension once transported away from the surf zone. Turbidity in the lower estuary was relatively low during low runoff summer conditions and had largest values over low water, when turbid waters from farther up-estuary had been transported there. Strong resuspension events occurred at peak currents in the upper estuary during summer, reflecting the presence of finer-grained sediment sources. Turbidity was similar but greater in the lower estuary during high runoff winter conditions and strong resuspension occurred at peak currents, indicating an easily erodible, nearby sediment source, due to down-estuary movement and relocation of finer sediment over the winter. A large shoal in the lower estuary exhibited a consistent pattern of accretion/erosion during the high runoff months of late autumn and winter to spring that also was qualitatively consistent with sediment transport modelling and implied: (a), erosion from the up-estuary limit of the shoal with (b), down-estuary bed-load and suspended-load transport that accreted the centre and down-estuary limit of the shoal until (c), a diminished

  4. Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway Navigation Season Extension. Volume V. Appendix G. Fish and Wildlife Coordination Act Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    dominant fish species in Lake Huron . High fecundity, relative absence of predators and effectiveness as a filter feeder has given the alewife a competitive...intensive commercial fishing for large ciscoes and increased competition from the small bloater and alewife in Lakes Michigan and Huron . 254 ( A substantial...were introduced to Lakes Huron and Michigan to help control the alewife and provide game fish. Lake populations depend on hatchery plantings. As the ice

  5. GENETIC ANALYSIS OF THE CHINESE MITTEN CRAB (ERIOCHEIR SINENSIS) INTRODUCED TO THE NORTH AMERICAN GREAT LAKES AND ST. LAWRENCE SEAWAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Chinese mitten crab (Eriocheir sinensis) is a globally invasive organism, with established non-native populations in Europe and California, USA. Since 1965, there have been sixteen confirmed catches of E. sinensis in the North American Great Lakes and their associated waterw...

  6. Empirical assessment of effects of urbanization on event flow hydrology in watersheds of Canada's Great Lakes-St Lawrence basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudeau, M. P.; Richardson, Murray

    2016-10-01

    We conducted an empirical hydrological analysis of high-temporal resolution streamflow records for 27 watersheds within 11 river systems in the Greater Toronto Region of the Canadian Great Lakes basin. Our objectives were to model the event-scale flow response of watersheds to urbanization and to test for scale and threshold effects. Watershed areas ranged from 37.5 km2 to 806 km2 and urban percent land cover ranged from less than 0.1-87.6%. Flow records had a resolution of 15-min increments and were available over a 42-year period, allowing for detailed assessment of changes in event-scale flow response with increasing urban land use during the post-freshet period (May 26 to November 15). Empirical statistical models were developed for flow characteristics including total runoff, runoff coefficient, eightieth and ninety-fifth percentile rising limb event runoff and mean rising limb event acceleration. Changes in some of these runoff metrics began at very low urban land use (<4%). Urban land use had a very strong influence on total runoff and event-scale hydrologic characteristics, with the exception of 80th percentile flows, which had a curvilinear relationship with urban cover. Event flow acceleration increased with increasing urban cover, thus causing 80th percentile runoff depths to be reached sooner. These results indicate the potential for compromised water balance when cumulative changes are considered at the watershed scale. No abrupt or threshold changes in hydrologic characteristics were identified along the urban land use gradient. A positive interaction of urban percent land use and watershed size indicated a scale effect on total runoff. Overall, the results document compromised hydrologic stability attributable to urbanization during a period with no detectable change in rainfall patterns. They also corroborate literature recommendations for spatially distributed low impact urban development techniques; measures would be needed throughout the urbanized area of a watershed to dampen event-scale hydrologic responses to urbanization. Additional research is warranted into event-scale hydrologic trends with urbanization in other regions, in particular rising limb event flow accelerations.

  7. Fine scale habitat use by age-1 stocked muskellunge and wild northern pike in an upper St. Lawrence River bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrell, John M.; Kapuscinski, Kevin L.; Underwood, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Radio telemetry of stocked muskellunge (n = 6) and wild northern pike (n = 6) was used to track late summer and fall movements from a common release point in a known shared nursery bay to test the hypothesis that age-1 northern pike and stocked muskellunge segregate and have different habitat affinities. Water depth, temperature, substrate and aquatic vegetation variables were estimated for each muskellunge (n = 103) and northern pike (n = 131) position and nested ANOVA comparisons by species indicated differences in habitat use. Muskellunge exhibited a greater displacement from the release point and used habitat in shallower water depths (mean = 0.85 m, SE = 0.10) than northern pike (mean = 1.45 m, SE = 0.08). Both principal components analysis (PCA) and principal components ordination (PCO) were used to interpret underlying gradients relative to fish positions in two-dimensional space. Our analysis indicated that a separation of age-1 northern pike and muskellunge occurred 7 d post-release. This first principal component explained 48% of the variation in habitat use. Northern pike locations were associated with deeper habitats that generally had softer silt substrates and dense submersed vegetation. Muskellunge locations post-acclimation showed greater association with shallower habitats containing firmer sandy and clay substrates and emergent vegetation. The observed differences in habitat use suggest that fine-scale ecological separation occurred between these stocked muskellunge and wild northern pike, but small sample sizes and potential for individual variation limit extension of these conclusions. Further research is needed to determine if these patterns exist between larger samples of fishes over a greater range of habitats.

  8. The Environmental Evaluation Work Group: FY 1979 Studies of the Winter Navigation Demonstration Program, St. Lawrence River Fisheries Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-07-31

    marinus - Sea Lamprey X X - Acipenser fulvescens - Lake sturgeon X X X Lepisosteus osseus - Longnose gar X X X - Amia calva - Bowfin X X M,T Tb Anguilla...Growth, Feeding Ecology , Larval Fish, Spawning Areas, Benthic Invertebrates 19. ABSTRACT (Continue on revers if necesry and identify by block number...2) determine the population structure, relative growth and feeding ecology of northern pike, yellow perch, largemouth bass, smallmouth bass, and (3

  9. Great Lakes and St. Lawrence Seaway Navigation Season Extension. Volume 1. Main Report and Final Environmental Impact Statement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    the following Congressmen (listed 40o chronologically): 163 Representative John Mi. Murphy Representati~~eDavid H. Bonior- Senator-, Carl Levin...Representative Robert W...Davis Representative Barber B. Conable,,Jr. Representative Guy Vander Jagt Representative Carl D. Pursell penator William Proxmnire...AlOv~-ie uno~dex te AapJ~vl Methodfy ag 0han, n fiotb xpas- ’~g..v±, Phae to~iu eaine bae-11ne, orff s i~as Idoceta :Pihase WhIT Ge neoa -nesfrma

  10. 78 FR 71037 - St. Lawrence & Atlantic Railroad Company-Discontinuance of Service Exemption-in Cumberland County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... handling overhead traffic. \\1\\ SLR owns an exclusive, perpetual freight easement over the Line. See Maine... inbound ingredients by truck. SLR estimates that B&M Beans will ship 12 cars of inbound ingredients in...

  11. Wadter Resources Data Ohio: Water year 1994. Volume 2, St. Lawrence River Basin and Statewide Project Data

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The Water Resources Division of the US Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with State agencies, obtains a large amount of data each water year (a water year is the 12-month period from October 1 through September 30 and is identified by the calendar year in which it ends) pertaining to the water resources of Ohio. These data, accumulated during many years, constitute a valuable data base for developing an improved understanding of the water resources of the State. To make these data readily available to interested parties outside the USGS, they are published annually in this report series entitled ``Water Resources Data--Ohio.`` This report (in two volumes) includes records on surface water and ground water in the State. Specifically, it contains: (1) Discharge records for streamflow-gaging stations, miscellaneous sites, and crest-stage stations; (2) stage and content records for streams, lakes, and reservoirs; (3) water-quality data for streamflow-gaging stations, wells, synaptic sites, and partial-record sites; and (4) water-level data for observation wells. Locations of lake- and streamflow-gaging stations, water-quality stations, and observation wells for which data are presented in this volume are shown in figures ga through 8b. The data in this report represent that part of the National Water Data System collected by the USGS and cooperating State and Federal agencies in Ohio. This series of annual reports for Ohio began with the 1961 water year with a report that contained only data relating to the quantities of surface water. For the 1964 water year, a similar report was introduced that contained only data relating to water quality. Beginning with the 1975 water year, the report was changed to present (in two to three volumes) data on quantities of surface water, quality of surface and ground water, and ground-water levels.

  12. St. Lawrence Seaway N.Y. Feasibility Study for Additional Locks and Other Navigation Improvements: Plan of Study. Revision.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-11-01

    throughout has increased. The shift to larger vessels, laker and ocean, has been faster than the rate of growth in tonnage demand for carriage. Various studies...Conditions Navigation Season 15 April to 15 December (1) (Thousands of Short Tons) :Annual * : Rate of * * *: Growth Commodity :: 1980- Group :1980 1990...December (1) (Thousands of Short Tons) * . * *:Annual * * * *: Rate of *: Growth Commodity : *: 1980- Group :1980 :1990 :2000 :2010 :2020 :2030 : 2030

  13. Sources of Heavy Metal Pollution into the St. Louis River, Lake Superior Watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sternberg, S. P.; Palokangas, C.

    2013-12-01

    The St. Louis River begins in Hoyt Lakes, Minnesota and enters Lake Superior between Duluth, Minnesota and Superior, Wisconsin. The Partridge River and the Embarrass River are two of its main tributaries. National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits are issued for surface water dischargers under the Clean Water Act. The Permit Compliance System (PCS) and the Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) is a tool allowing public access to information contained in NPDES permits. Along the way to Lake Superior, 19 facilities list the St. Louis River, St. Louis Bay, part of the St. Louis River estuary, or one of its tributaries as a receiving water. Of these 19 locations, four report discharging heavy metals into the receiving water. Copper and Lead are the metals most frequently discharged.

  14. DHS-STEM Internship at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Feldman, B

    2008-08-18

    This summer I had the fortunate opportunity through the DHS-STEM program to attend Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories (LLNL) to work with Tom Slezak on the bioinformatics team. The bioinformatics team, among other things, helps to develop TaqMan and microarray probes for the identification of pathogens. My main project at the laboratory was to test such probe identification capabilities against metagenomic (unsequenced) data from around the world. Using various sequence analysis tools (Vmatch and Blastall) and several we developed ourselves, about 120 metagenomic sequencing projects were compared against a collection of all completely sequenced genomes and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) current probe database. For the probes, the Blastall algorithms compared each individual metagenomic project using various parameters allowing for the natural ambiguities of in vitro hybridization (mismatches, deletions, insertions, hairpinning, etc.). A low level cutoff was used to eliminate poor sequence matches, and to leave a large variety of higher quality matches for future research into the hybridization of sequences with mutations and variations. Any hits with at least 80% base pair conservation over 80% of the length of the match. Because of the size of our whole genome database, we utilized the exact match algorithm of Vmatch to quickly search and compare genomes for exact matches with varying lower level limits on sequence length. I also provided preliminary feasibility analyses to support a potential industry-funded project to develop a multiplex assay on several genera and species. Each genus and species was evaluated based on the amount of sequenced genomes, amount of near neighbor sequenced genomes, presence of identifying genes--metabolistic or antibiotic resistant genes--and the availability of research on the identification of the specific genera or species. Utilizing the bioinformatic team's software, I was able to develop and/or update

  15. 21st Century Scholars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Terrence

    2009-01-01

    Bethpage Union Free School District in New York is a high-performing district by almost any current accountability measure. Yet administrators and teachers worried that they were not doing enough to prepare their students as critical thinkers for the 21st century. Inspired by the curriculum framework of the Partnership for 21st Century Skills, the…

  16. Trace metal concentrations in estuaries and coastal regions

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, C.D.

    1994-12-31

    Estuaries and coastal regions are highly variable in the physical and hydrographic conditions. As a result of heavy urbanization and industrialization of the head waters of most estuaries, there are substantial localized inputs of contaminants to the estuary. These factors combined with the flushing characteristics of individual estuaries to create relatively unique features that result in variation in the typical levels of trace metals for these systems. This makes intercomparison of the estuaries difficult. Comparability among estuaries becomes even more difficult when metals analyses are conducted without proper control of field and laboratory contamination, now firmly established in the trace metal analytical literature as a prerequisite for reliable marine trace metals analysis. This paper compares the concentrations of selected trace metal (Ag, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn) concentrations in the waters of several major estuaries of the United States. The basis of comparison is that all samples war collected under rigid trace metal clean collection and analysis procedures. Generally, metal concentrations within the estuaries are similar. Metal concentrations in the higher salinity coastal regions are more similar in concentration. The comparison provides a baseline of typical concentrations of these trace metals in the coastal waters against which future analytical results can be compared.

  17. Collaborative Potential between National Estuary Programs and Coastal EPA Laboratories

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estuaries are among the most productive ecosystems in the world, providing unique habitat for freshwater and marine species as well as valuable social and economic benefits. The wealth of ecosystem goods and services from estuaries has led to growth and development of human commu...

  18. Identifying and organizing objectives across the 28 National Estuary Programs

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Estuary Program (NEP), established in 1987 by amendments to the Clean Water Act, is intended to support local communities to restore, protect and manage estuaries of national significance. Currently there a 28 NEPs spread widely across the U.S. and its territories. E...

  19. Macroalgae, pore water sulfides and eelgrass in Yaquina estuary, Oregon

    EPA Science Inventory

    The hypothesis that relatively high nutrients in estuaries of the Pacific Northwest (PNW) can lead to eutrophication and degradation of critical eelgrass habitat was examined. Yaquina estuary was surveyed for cover and above-ground biomass of benthic macroalgae (Ulva spp.) and n...

  20. INDEX OF ESTUARINE BENTHIC INTEGRITY FOR GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A benthic index for northern Gulf of Mexico estuaries has been developed and successfully validated by the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program for Estuaries (EMAP-E) in the Louisianian Province. The benthic index is a useful indicator of estuarine condition that provi...

  1. ASSESSING THE ECOLOGICAL CONDITION OF SOUTHEAST U. S. ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a means to assess ecological condition, 151 stations located in southeastern estuaries from Cape Henry, Virginia to Biscayne Bay, Florida were sampled by state agencies during the summer of 2000 using a probabilistic design. The design used 8 size classes of estuaries ranging ...

  2. Fortnightly Variability At The Transition Between Two Sub-Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riveron-Enzastiga, M. L.; Valle-Levinson, A.

    2007-05-01

    Profiles of current velocity from an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) and of water salinity, temperature and density from a Conductivity-Temperature-Depth (CTD) recorder, were combined with surface salinity, temperature and density from a Conductivity-Temperature (CT) recorder to elucidate the fortnightly variability at the Lafayette River entrance. The Lafayette River connects at its mouth with the Elizabeth River, which is a tributary to the James River in the Chesapeake Bay. Data were collected in four experiments during consecutive spring and neap tides in the autumn of 2000, and in the spring of 2001. Each experiment was carried out for ~25 hours and consisted of three across-estuary transects: one at the mouth, where the Elizabeth River estuary influences the Lafayette River estuary, and two more toward the head of the estuary. The maximum depth of the transects was <5 m, and despite the shallowness, the mean flow showed two-layer exchange during neap tides. During spring tides there was an evident recirculation where the two sub-estuaries interact and a marked lateral density structure. During neap tides, there was a recirculation consisting of inflow in the northern half of the estuary and net outflow at the surface and net inflow at the bottom in the southern half of the estuary. The recirculation at the mouth is intensified during wet periods due to intense river discharge. The along-estuary dynamics is that proposed by the theory, between pressure gradient and friction.

  3. YAQUINA BAY AND BEYOND: WHAT SHAPE ARE OUR ESTUARIES IN?

    EPA Science Inventory

    The great natural beauty of Oregon's estuaries gives an impression of systems that are far less altered than those in other areas of the US. However, over the years, Yaquina Bay and other western estuaries have been variously affected by habitat loss and alteration, over harvest...

  4. Nitrogen Source and Loading Data for EPA Estuary Data Mapper

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nitrogen source and loading data have been compiled and aggregated at the scale of estuaries and associated watersheds of the conterminous United States, using the spatial framework in EPA's Estuary Data Mapper (EDM) to provide system boundaries. Original sources of data include...

  5. WATER QUALITY MODELING IN THE RIO CHONE ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water quality in the Rio Chone Estuary, a seasonally inverse, tropical estuary, in Ecuador was characterized by modeling the distribution of biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) and dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) within the water column. These two variables are modeled using modif...

  6. Approaches for Development of Nutrient Criteria in Oregon Estuaries With a Focus on Tillamook Estuary

    EPA Science Inventory

    Development of nutrient criteria for all water body types of the US remains a top priority for EPA. Estuaries in the Pacific Northwest receive nutrients from both the watershed and the coastal ocean, and thus are particularly complex systems in which to establish water quality c...

  7. Policy development and the estuary environment: a Severn Estuary case study.

    PubMed

    Ballinger, R; Stojanovic, T

    2010-01-01

    The paper reviews the development of key policy relating to estuary management, highlighting the trends and drivers in policy development which have shaped the management and protection of the estuary environment. Focusing on policy developments over the last three decades, the paper draws attention to the significant influence of European policy and new approaches to environmental governance in stimulating wider and more integrated approaches to the environmental management of the estuary, as well as highlighting considerable environmental improvements associated with increased environmental regulation. The paper discusses how 'fit for purpose' the policy framework is to address current challenges, including those identified by recent stakeholder consultations. Significant issues include limited understanding and information related to the cause-effect relationships between policy and environmental quality as well as ongoing institutional and policy fragmentation associated with devolutionary processes. Such fragmentation, alongside under-investment in integrated estuary planning, is likely to prove a particular challenge to balanced and informed decision-making. Whilst the paper focuses on the Severn experience, the approach adopted will be of interest to all assessing policy-environment linkages.

  8. Conditions for tidal bore formation in convergent alluvial estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonneton, Philippe; Filippini, Andrea Gilberto; Arpaia, Luca; Bonneton, Natalie; Ricchiuto, Mario

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decade there has been an increasing interest in tidal bore dynamics. However most studies have been focused on small-scale bore processes. The present paper describes the first quantitative study, at the estuary scale, of the conditions for tidal bore formation in convergent alluvial estuaries. When freshwater discharge and large-scale spatial variations of the estuary water depth can be neglected, tide propagation in such estuaries is controlled by three main dimensionless parameters: the nonlinearity parameter ε0 , the convergence ratio δ0 and the friction parameter ϕ0. In this paper we explore this dimensionless parameter space, in terms of tidal bore occurrence, from a database of 21 estuaries (8 tidal-bore estuaries and 13 non tidal-bore estuaries). The field data point out that tidal bores occur for convergence ratios close to the critical convergence δc. A new proposed definition of the friction parameter highlights a clear separation on the parameter plane (ϕ0,ε0) between tidal-bore estuaries and non tidal-bore estuaries. More specifically, we have established that tidal bores occur in convergent estuaries when the nonlinearity parameter is greater than a critical value, εc , which is an increasing function of the friction parameter ϕ0. This result has been confirmed by numerical simulations of the two-dimensional Saint Venant equations. The real-estuary observations and the numerical simulations also show that, contrary to what is generally assumed, tide amplification is not a necessary condition for tidal bore formation. The effect of freshwater discharge on tidal bore occurrence has been analyzed from the database acquired during three long-term campaigns carried out on the Gironde/Garonne estuary. We have shown that in the upper estuary the tidal bore intensity is mainly governed by the local dimensionless tide amplitude ε. The bore intensity is an increasing function of ε and this relationship does not depend on freshwater

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Surface Water Protection: A Watershed Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Coty, J

    2009-03-16

    This surface water protection plan (plan) provides an overview of the management efforts implemented at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) that support a watershed approach to protect surface water. This plan fulfills a requirement in the Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A to demonstrate a watershed approach for surface water protection that protects the environment and public health. This plan describes the use of a watershed approach within which the Laboratory's current surface water management and protections efforts have been structured and coordinated. With more than 800 million acres of land in the U.S. under federal management and stewardship, a unified approach across agencies provides enhanced resource protection and cost-effectiveness. The DOE adopted, along with other federal agencies, the Unified Federal Policy for a Watershed Approach to Federal Land and Resource Management (UFP) with a goal to protect water quality and aquatic ecosystems on federal lands. This policy intends to prevent and/or reduce water pollution from federal activities while fostering a cost-effective watershed approach to federal land and resource management. The UFP also intends to enhance the implementation of existing laws (e.g., the Clean Water Act [CWA] and National Environmental Policy Act [NEPA]) and regulations. In addition, this provides an opportunity for the federal government to serve as a model for water quality stewardship using a watershed approach for federal land and resource activities that potentially impact surface water and its uses. As a federal land manager, the Laboratory is responsible for a small but important part of those 800 million acres of land. Diverse land uses are required to support the Laboratory's mission and provide an appropriate work environment for its staff. The Laboratory comprises two sites: its main site in Livermore, California, and the Experimental Test Site (Site 300), near Tracy, California. The main site is largely

  10. Global patterns and predictors of fish species richness in estuaries.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Rita P; Henriques, Sofia; França, Susana; Pasquaud, Stéphanie; Cardoso, Inês; Laborde, Marina; Cabral, Henrique N

    2015-09-01

    1. Knowledge of global patterns of biodiversity and regulating variables is indispensable to develop predictive models. 2. The present study used predictive modelling approaches to investigate hypotheses that explain the variation in fish species richness between estuaries over a worldwide spatial extent. Ultimately, such models will allow assessment of future changes in ecosystem structure and function as a result of environmental changes. 3. A comprehensive worldwide data base was compiled of the fish assemblage composition and environmental characteristics of estuaries. Generalized Linear Models were used to quantify how variation in species richness among estuaries is related to historical events, energy dynamics and ecosystem characteristics, while controlling for sampling effects. 4. At the global extent, species richness differed among marine biogeographic realms and continents and increased with mean sea surface temperature, terrestrial net primary productivity and the stability of connectivity with a marine ecosystem (open vs. temporarily open estuaries). At a smaller extent (within a marine biogeographic realm or continent), other characteristics were also important in predicting variation in species richness, with species richness increasing with estuary area and continental shelf width. 5. The results suggest that species richness in an estuary is defined by predictors that are spatially hierarchical. Over the largest spatial extents, species richness is influenced by the broader distributions and habitat use patterns of marine and freshwater species that can colonize estuaries, which are in turn governed by history contingency, energy dynamics and productivity variables. Species richness is also influenced by more regional and local parameters that can further affect the process of community colonization in an estuary including the connectivity of the estuary with the adjacent marine habitat, and, over smaller spatial extents, the size of these

  11. AN APPROACH TO DEVELOPING NUTRIENT CRITERIA FOR PACIFIC NORTHWEST ESTUARIES: A CASE STUDY OF YAQUINA ESTUARY, OREGON

    EPA Science Inventory

    NHEERL scientists have developed an approach that could be used by the State of Oregon for development of nutrient and other water quality criteria for the Yaquina Estuary, Oregon. The principle objective in setting protective criteria is to prevent future degradation of estuari...

  12. Phosphorous dynamics in a temperate intertidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillebø, A. I.; Neto, J. M.; Flindt, M. R.; Marques, J. C.; Pardal, M. A.

    2004-09-01

    Conservation and management of aquatic systems require detailed information of the processes that affect their functioning and development. The objectives of the present work were to describe the phosphorus dynamics during a complete tidal cycle and to quantify the relative contribution of the most common estuarine areas (e.g. seagrass beds, salt marshes, mud- and sand-flats without vegetation) to phosphorus net internal loading in a temperate intertidal estuary. Results show that phosphate efflux rates were higher during the first hours of tidal flood, and that phosphate concentrations were lowest at high tide. During tidal ebbing, ephemeral tide pools may cover a considerable percentage of the intertidal area. In these tide pools, water shallowness combined with enhanced temperatures stimulate the occurrence of high phosphate effluxes. The effluxes to the main water body during high tide contributed 57% of dissolved inorganic phosphorus and efflux during low tide contributed 43% to the net internal loading. Calculations of the phosphate net effluxes (kg P) indicate a strong contribution of the bare bottom mud-flats to the whole system internal phosphate loading, especially during the warmer periods. As a consequence of eutrophication, perennial benthic macrophytes are commonly replaced by fast-growing epiphytic macroalgae. Calculations showed that for a hypothetical intertidal estuary in a temperate region, management programs considering an eventual re-colonization of mud-flats by seagrasses or salt marsh plants may reduce the P-efflux by 13-16 kg ha -1. For example, in the small Mondego estuary, eutrophication has contributed to a reduction of the Zostera noltii meadows, leading to an increase in 190 kg of phosphorus net internal loading.

  13. National Dam Safety Program. St. James Lake Dam (Inventory Number NY 779), St. Lawrence River Basin, Jefferson County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-02-14

    p.=.. . ............. ’- VR ::MNILC%?’VT3 EN-, ,\\’LN4_1EZAL C.:\\V~~ Date Courty Ha-ard Class* & Inspector I AL -.4Use Water Supply Power...8217 wi I e *1 I._.-- " I- I- II .. . ..... . .... 1--. -- -. -.... . . .. *---- (Date) (A ,prwt i. mning for Aplicant s1 bo.i t te i : t~tle Ar...DALE EK UI.. o l~ ] Vk*’I SETSN -DALUTICA • NEW YORK • 13501 TEL 315-797.5800 PP" ., NAME I.--/ Sk Vr ~rp -DAm IA’ 4Ze_,?0o&j- DATE .. J,Sa= LAL NSI

  14. Near coastal program plan for 1991: Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    Environmental regulatory programs in the United States have been estimated to cost more than $70 billion annually. The Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) is a nationwide initiative being implemented by EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD). It was developed in response to the demand for information on the condition of the nation's ecological resources. The goal of EMAP is to assess and document the status and trends in the condition of the nation's forests, wetlands, estuaries, coastal waters, lakes, rivers, and streams, Great Lakes, agricultural lands, and arid lands on an integrated and continuing basis.

  15. Final report for sea-level rise response modeling for San Francisco Bay estuary tidal marshes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takekawa, John Y.; Thorne, Karen M.; Buffington, Kevin J.; Spragens, Kyle A.; Swanson, Kathleen M.; Drexler, Judith Z.; Schoellhamer, David H.; Overton, Cory T.; Casazza, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The International Panel on Climate Change has identified coastal ecosystems as areas that will be disproportionally affected by climate change. Current sea-level rise projections range widely with 0.57 to 1.9 meters increase in mea sea level by 2100. The expected accelerated rate of sea-level rise through the 21st century will put many coastal ecosystems at risk, especially those in topographically low-gradient areas. We assessed marsh accretion and plant community state changes through 2100 at 12 tidal salt marshes around San Francisco Bay estuary with a sea-level rise response model. Detailed ground elevation, vegetation, and water level data were collected at all sites between 2008 and 2011 and used as model inputs. Sediment cores (taken by Callaway and others, 2012) at four sites around San Francisco Bay estuary were used to estimate accretion rates. A modification of the Callaway and others (1996) model, the Wetland Accretion Rate Model for Ecosystem Resilience (WARMER), was utilized to run sea-level rise response models for all sites. With a mean sea level rise of 1.24 m by 2100, WARMER projected that the vast majority, 95.8 percent (1,942 hectares), of marsh area in our study will lose marsh plant communities by 2100 and to transition to a relative elevation range consistent with mudflat habitat. Three marshes were projected to maintain marsh vegetation to 2100, but they only composed 4.2 percent (85 hectares) of the total marsh area surveyed.

  16. Magnitude and extent of sediment toxicity in selected estuaries of South Carolina and Georgia. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Long, E.R.; Scott, G.I.; Kucklick, J.; Fulton, M.; Thompson, B.

    1998-04-01

    Surficial sediment samples were collected from 162 locations within five estuaries -- Charleston Harbor, Winyah Bay, Leadenwah Creek, Savannah River, and St. Simons Sound -- in coastal South Carolina and Georgia in a survey of sediment toxicity performed in 1993 and 1994. All samples were tested for toxicity with a battery of complimentary laboratory bioassays. The laboratory bioassays consisted of amphipod survival tests in solid-phase sediments, microbial bioluminescence (Microtox{trademark}) tests of organic solvent extracts, and sea urchin fertilization and embryo development tests of porewaters. Some samples also were tested in copepod reproduction and cytochrome P-450 RGS bioassays. Chemical analyses for a suite of trace metals, organic compounds, and sedimentological factors were performed with portions of most samples.

  17. The Art of the Possible: T. E. Lawrence and Coalition Liaison

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-06-01

    My Arabs were turning their backs on perfumes and luxuries to choose the things in which mankind had had no share or part.”20 Lawrence’s time at...theses cities [Mecca and Medina], which were a vital part of his Islamic façade.”39 Betwixt and Between When war broke out in 1914, Hussein’s position as...military and political. Lawrence shared fully in this political work.”4 33 This access helped Lawrence to become intimately familiar with the regional

  18. 6. VIEW FROM CHESTNUT ST. (upper), WALNUT ST. (lower) THIRD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. VIEW FROM CHESTNUT ST. (upper), WALNUT ST. (lower) THIRD ST. (right) AND FOURTH ST. (left), SHOWING CARPENTERS HALL, FIRST BANK OF U.S. AND SECOND BANK OF U.S. - Independence National Historical Park, Walnut, Sixth, Chestnut & Second Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  19. Geographic signatures of North American West Coast estuaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emmett, Robert; Llansó, Roberto; Newton, Jan; Thom, Ron; Hornberger, Michelle; Morgan, Cheryl; Levings, Colin; Copping, Andrea; Fishman, Paul

    2000-01-01

    West Coast estuaries are geologically young and composed of a variety of geomorphological types. These estuaries range from large fjords to shallow lagoons; from large to low freshwater flows. Natural hazards include E1 Niños, strong Pacific storms, and active tectonic activity. West Coast estuaries support a wide range of living resources: five salmon species, harvestable shellfish, waterfowl and marine birds, marine mammals, and a variety of algae and plants. Although populations of many of these living resources have declined (salmonids), others have increased (marine mammals). West Coast estuaries are also centers of commerce and increasingly large shipping traffic. The West Coast human population is rising faster than most other areas of the U.S. and Canada, and is distributed heavily in southern California, the San Francisco Bay area, around Puget Sound, and the Fraser River estuary. While water pollution is a problem in many of the urbanized estuaries, most estuaries do not suffer from poor water quality. Primary estuarine problems include habitat alterations, degradation, and loss; diverted freshwater flows; marine sediment contamination; and exotic species introductions. The growing West Coast economy and population are in part related to the quality of life, which is dependent on the use and enjoyment of abundant coastal natural resources.

  20. Scavenging Rate Ecoassay: A Potential Indicator of Estuary Condition

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Augustine G.; Scanes, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of estuary condition is essential due to the highly productive and often intensely impacted nature of these ecosystems. Assessment of the physico-chemical condition of estuaries is expensive and difficult due to naturally fluctuating water quality and biota. Assessing the vigour of ecosystem processes is an alternative method with potential to overcome much of the variability associated with physico-chemical measures. Indicators of estuary condition should have small spatial and temporal variability, have a predictable response to perturbation and be ecologically relevant. Here, we present tests of the first criterion, the spatio-temporal variability of a potential ecoassay measuring the rate of scavenging in estuaries. We hypothesised that the proposed scavenging ecoassay would not vary significantly among A) sites in an estuary, B) trips separated by weeks, or C) days in a trip. Because not all habitats are present in all estuaries, this test was undertaken in two habitats. When conducted over bare substrate there were occasional significant differences, but no discernible patterns, within levels of the experiment. When conducted over vegetated substrate, days within a trip did not vary significantly, but later trips experienced greater scavenging. This scavenging ecoassay shows potential as a tool for assessing the condition of estuarine ecosystems, and further exploration of this protocol is warranted by implementation in estuaries across a gradient of anthropogenic stress. PMID:26024225

  1. Scavenging rate ecoassay: a potential indicator of estuary condition.

    PubMed

    Porter, Augustine G; Scanes, Peter R

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring of estuary condition is essential due to the highly productive and often intensely impacted nature of these ecosystems. Assessment of the physico-chemical condition of estuaries is expensive and difficult due to naturally fluctuating water quality and biota. Assessing the vigour of ecosystem processes is an alternative method with potential to overcome much of the variability associated with physico-chemical measures. Indicators of estuary condition should have small spatial and temporal variability, have a predictable response to perturbation and be ecologically relevant. Here, we present tests of the first criterion, the spatio-temporal variability of a potential ecoassay measuring the rate of scavenging in estuaries. We hypothesised that the proposed scavenging ecoassay would not vary significantly among A) sites in an estuary, B) trips separated by weeks, or C) days in a trip. Because not all habitats are present in all estuaries, this test was undertaken in two habitats. When conducted over bare substrate there were occasional significant differences, but no discernible patterns, within levels of the experiment. When conducted over vegetated substrate, days within a trip did not vary significantly, but later trips experienced greater scavenging. This scavenging ecoassay shows potential as a tool for assessing the condition of estuarine ecosystems, and further exploration of this protocol is warranted by implementation in estuaries across a gradient of anthropogenic stress.

  2. Structure and Function of South-east Australian Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, P. S.; Williams, R. J.; Jones, A. R.; Yassini, I.; Gibbs, P. J.; Coates, B.; West, R. J.; Scanes, P. R.; Hudson, J. P.; Nichol, S.

    2001-09-01

    An attempt is made to synthesize the geological properties, water quality attributes and aspects of the ecology of south-east Australian estuaries so as to provide a framework for addressing coastal management issues. The approach is based on the underlying causal factors of geology and morphology and more immediate environmental factors (e.g. salinity and sediments) which are associated with ecological distributions, species richness and fisheries catch. This ' broad brush ' approach seeks to maximize reality and generality, albeit at the expense of precision and local variability in individual circumstances. It disregards small-scale ecological patterns as noise. Unlike in the Northern Hemisphere, conditions in temperate Australia are characterized by irregular flood and fire regimes that strongly influence estuary hydrology and nutrient inputs. Three main types of estuary (tide-dominated, wave-dominated and intermittently closed) are recognized based on geological criteria and having particular entrance conditions that control tidal exchange. Four zones (marine flood-tidal delta, central mud basin, fluvial delta and riverine channel/alluvial plain) are also recognized common to each type of estuary. These zones correspond to mappable sedimentary environments in all estuaries and have characteristic water quality, nutrient cycling/primary productivity signatures and ecosystems. The ecology of a zone is modified by (a) estuary type which determines the salinity regime; (b) stage of sediment filling (evolutionary maturity) which controls the spatial distribution/size of the zones; and (c) impacts of various forms of development. By using the zones/habitats as a common currency among all estuaries, it is possible to link ecological aspects such as species richness and commercial fisheries production so as to compare different estuaries or within-estuary zones.

  3. The biology of Solea bleekeri (Teleostei) in Lake St Lucia on the southeast coast of Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cyrus, D. P.

    Several aspects of the biology of Solea bleekeri in Lake St Lucia were investigated, these included occurrence, distribution, reproduction and recruitment, food and feeding, size frequency distribution and the role of estuaries in the species' life cycle. Solea bleekeri was found to occur throughout the system in muddy turbid areas and was largely absent from the eastern shores of the lake where clear water sandy substrata occur. The preferred diet of the species was bivalve siphon tips of the species Solon cylindraceus, when these were in abundant supply. However, when numbers of large (length > 20 mm) specimens were not available then S. bleekeri fed on whatever prey was available in or near the substratum. Analysis of stomach contents under the latter conditions showed that food consumption reflected the composition of the benthos. Large numbers of S. bleekeri spend their entire post-larval and juvenile phases as well as the greater part of their adult life within estuaries. Evidence is presented to support the idea that S. bleekeri breeds in certain areas of the lake and that spawning takes place between September and November. The current data suggest that there may be two populations in St Lucia: one migrates from the system to spawn at sea during winter along with the other marine fish species which utilize estuaries as nursery areas, while the other population breeds within the system. Alternatively there may simply be a single population which normally breeds at sea, but which may breed within the system when conditions are suitable. Recruitment of S. bleekeri into the St Lucia estuarine system takes place from the muddy offshore marine banks and possibly from within the system as well. Solea bleekeri appears not to be totally dependent on estuaries for the completion of its life cycle. The advantages of utilizing these systems for their development relate to the shallow, calm, turbid food-rich areas which estuaries offer. The fact that breeding takes

  4. Estuary/ocean exchange and tidal mixing in a Gulf of Maine Estuary: A Lagrangian modeling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilgili, Ata; Proehl, Jeffrey A.; Lynch, Daniel R.; Smith, Keston W.; Swift, M. Robinson

    2005-12-01

    A Lagrangian particle method embedded within a 2-D finite element code, is used to study the transport and ocean-estuary exchange processes in the well-mixed Great Bay Estuarine System in New Hampshire, USA. The 2-D finite element model, driven by residual, semi-diurnal and diurnal tidal constituents, includes the effects of wetting and drying of estuarine mud flats through the use of a porous medium transport module. The particle method includes tidal advection, plus a random walk model in the horizontal that simulates sub-grid scale turbulent transport processes. Our approach involves instantaneous, massive [O(500,000)] particle releases that enable the quantification of ocean-estuary and inter-bay exchanges in a Markovian framework. The effects of the release time, spring-neap cycle, riverine discharge and diffusion strength on the intra-estuary and estuary-ocean exchange are also investigated. The results show a rather dynamic interaction between the ocean and the estuary with a fraction of the exiting particles being caught up in the Gulf of Maine Coastal Current and swept away. Three somewhat different estimates of estuarine residence time are calculated to provide complementary views of estuary flushing. Maps of residence time versus release location uncover a strong spatial dependency of residence time within the estuary that has very important ramifications for local water quality. Simulations with and without the turbulent random walk show that the combined effect of advective shear and turbulent diffusion is very effective at spreading particles throughout the estuary relatively quickly, even at low (1 m 2/s) diffusivity. The results presented here show that a first-order Markov Chain approach has applicability and a high potential for improving our understanding of the mixing processes in estuaries.

  5. 75 FR 10526 - In the Matter of Mr. Lawrence E. Grimm; Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION In the Matter of Mr. Lawrence E. Grimm; Order Prohibiting Involvement in NRC-Licensed Activities I Mr. Lawrence E. Grimm was employed as a radiation safety officer at the U.S. Department of...

  6. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 679 - Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) 17 Figure 17 to part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries... 679—Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area...

  7. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 679 - Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) 17 Figure 17 to part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries... 679—Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area...

  8. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 679 - Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 13 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) 17 Figure 17 to part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries... 679—Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area...

  9. 50 CFR Figure 17 to Part 679 - Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area (HCA) 17 Figure 17 to part 679 Wildlife and Fisheries... 679—Northern Bering Sea Research Area and Saint Lawrence Island Habitat Conservation Area...

  10. Tolerance, Acceptance and the Virtue of Orthonomy: A Reply to Lawrence Blum and Brenda Almond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciurria, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In the "Journal of Moral Education," 39(2), Brenda Almond and Lawrence Blum debate the importance of tolerance versus acceptance in sex education. Blum defines acceptance as "positive regard", in contradistinction to mere tolerance, "a live and let live attitude toward others, an acceptance of coexistence, but with a…

  11. The Procedural Queer: Substantive Due Process, "Lawrence v. Texas," and Queer Rhetorical Futures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Peter Odell

    2012-01-01

    This essay discusses Justice Anthony M. Kennedy's choice to foreground arguments from due process rather than equal protection in the majority opinion in Lawrence v. Texas. Kennedy's choice can realize constitutional legal doctrine that is more consistent with radical queer politics than arguments from equal protection. Unlike some recent…

  12. 76 FR 2413 - Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Land in Lawrence County, SD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ... acres in Lawrence County, South Dakota, to Keith Sauls for the appraised fair market value of $183...); Black Hills Meridian T. 5 N., R. 3 E., Sec. 26, Lot 16. The area described contains 0.03 acres, more or... market value of $183. The public land is identified as suitable for disposal in the BLM's 1986...

  13. Lawrence A. Oxley and Social Services for Blacks in North Carolina's Appalachian Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, John L.

    This paper examines the history of the organization of statewide social services and activities of the Division of Work among Negroes in the Appalachian counties. From 1925-1934--its first 9 years--North Carolina's Division of Work among Negroes was directed by Lawrence Oxley. This agency was established to study black social problems and to help…

  14. Beyond Pragmatic Inquiry: A Critical Analysis of Lawrence Metcalf's Approach to Social Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanley, William B.

    1989-01-01

    Describes Lawrence Metcalf's approach to social education, offers a critical analysis of his views, and assesses the relevance of his ideas for current social education. Points out some of the weaknesses of Metcalf's reflective inquiry approach to social studies and makes suggestions for a reconceptualized version of his rationale. (KO)

  15. Summary and review of hydrogen theoretical equation-of-state models at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Graboske, H.C. Jr.; Wong, K.L.

    1980-02-01

    A review and analysis of the hydrogen equations of state (EOS) at use at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) are presented. Careful comparisons to experimental data and among EOS's are performed and evaluated. The new LLL hydrogen EOS (EOS95) and its representations produce the best agreement with experimental data and hydrodynamic simulation studies.

  16. Lawrence Augustus Oxley: The Beginnings of Social Work among Blacks in North Carolina Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, John L.

    1991-01-01

    Details Lawrence Oxley's work as director of the Division of Work among Blacks from 1925 to 1934. Discusses racial attitudes and legal injustices toward Blacks. Oxley addressed social problems of Blacks such as unfair capital punishment, juvenile delinquency, and lack of social services. (KS)

  17. Remedial investigation and feasibility study for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 Pit 7 Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Taffet, M.J. ); Oberdorfer, J.A. ); McIlvride, W.A. )

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes the results and conclusions of the investigation of tritium and other compounds in ground water in the vicinity of landfills at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 Pit 7 Complex. 91 refs., 110 figs., 43 tabs.

  18. Final Report Bald and Golden Eagle Territory Surveys for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fratanduono, M. L.

    2014-11-25

    Garcia and Associates (GANDA) was contracted by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to conduct surveys for bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) and golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) at Site 300 and in the surrounding area out to 10-miles. The survey effort was intended to document the boundaries of eagle territories by careful observation of eagle behavior from selected viewing locations throughout the study area.

  19. Quarry Quest. A Field Trip Guide to the Indiana Limestone District, Monroe and Lawrence Counties, Indiana.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shewmaker, Sherman N.

    This guide provides information for planning a field trip to the Indiana Limestone District. This district, located in Monroe and Lawrence Counties, Indiana, is responsible for material that has dominated the building-limestone market in the United States for nearly a century. A few of the many well-known buildings using Indiana limestone are the…

  20. Hydro-sedimentary processes of a shallow tropical estuary under Amazon influence. The Mahury Estuary, French Guiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orseau, Sylvain; Lesourd, Sandric; Huybrechts, Nicolas; Gardel, Antoine

    2017-04-01

    Along the Guianas coast, coastal dynamic is characterized by the migration of mud banks originating from the Amazon. This singular feature affects the dynamic and the morphology of local estuaries and can induce rapid bathymetric evolution in lower estuaries. Since 2012, the navigation channel of the Mahury Estuary (French Guiana) is enduring a severe siltation whose origin comes from a mud bank crossing the estuary mouth. This study aims to determine how the migration of a mud bank through an estuary mouth could influence the transport and fluxes in the estuary. Field measurements were performed over a year with the monitoring of the salt intrusion length, mooring surveys during spring-neap cycles and shipboard profiling surveys during semi-diurnal cycles. Salt intrusion lengths underline a significant seasonal variation characterized by the transition from a steady-state length during high river discharge and a wide range of lengths with the tidal range during low to moderate river discharge. During the rainy season, measurements indicate a fluvial-dominated condition with low suspended-sediment concentrations most of the semi-diurnal cycle. Residual sediment fluxes are usually seaward excepted when river discharge is below seasonal average. During the dry season, maximum suspended-sediment concentrations are higher in the middle part of the estuary. Residual sediment fluxes are landward along the estuary and stronger during neap tides in the estuary mouth and few kilometers upstream. In this area, a persistent density stratification traps sediments in the bottom layer and generates a gravitational circulation during neap tides, which enhances landward transports up to 2.56 t m-1 over a semi-diurnal cycle. In the middle estuary, landward fluxes are most significant during the dry season and also during the rainy season when the river discharge is below the seasonal average. Although this study includes temporal and spatial limitations, it underlines significant

  1. Use of the USEPA Estuary Nitrogen Model to Estimate Concentrations of Total Nitrogen in Estuaries Using Loads Calculated by Watershed Models and Monitoring Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    We use USEPA’s Estuary Nitrogen Model (ENM) to calculate annual average concentrations of total nitrogen (TN) in ten estuaries or sub-estuaries along the Atlantic coast from New Hampshire to Florida. These include a variety of systems, ranging from strongly-flushed bays to weakly...

  2. St. Louis, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    St. Louis is tucked in a bend of the Mississippi River, just south of the point at which the Illinois River joins the larger Mississippi, and where the Missouri River flows in from the west. Drainage patterns to the east, on the Illinois side, are highlighted with green vegetation. Meandering rivers in the verdant Ozark Plateau appear to the south and west.

    This true-color view from NASA's Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) was taken with the instrument's downward looking (nadir) camera on October 15, 2005. The urban areas of greater St. Louis show up as grey-white, including nearby Kirkwood, Webster Groves, Clayton, University City, Ferguson, St. Ann, St. Charles, and East St. Louis. The region is home to nearly three million people.

    MISR was built and is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, DC. The Terra satellite is managed by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  3. Assessing the impact of human activities on British Columbia's estuaries.

    PubMed

    Robb, Carolyn K

    2014-01-01

    The world's marine and coastal ecosystems are under threat and single-sector management efforts have failed to address those threats. Scientific consensus suggests that management should evolve to focus on ecosystems and their human, ecological, and physical components. Estuaries are recognized globally as one of the world's most productive and most threatened ecosystems and many estuarine areas in British Columbia (BC) have been lost or degraded. To help prioritize activities and areas for regional management efforts, spatial information on human activities that adversely affect BC's estuaries was compiled. Using statistical analyses, estuaries were assigned to groups facing related threats that could benefit from similar management. The results show that estuaries in the most populated marine ecosections have the highest biological importance but also the highest impacts and the lowest levels of protection. This research is timely, as it will inform ongoing marine planning, land acquisition, and stewardship efforts in BC.

  4. MODIS water quality algorithms for northwest Florida estuaries

    EPA Science Inventory

    Synoptic and frequent monitoring of water quality parameters from satellite is useful for determining the health of aquatic ecosystems and development of effective management strategies. Northwest Florida estuaries are classified as optically-complex, or waters influenced by chlo...

  5. Evaluating Causes of Ecological Impairments in the Estuaries of Ukraine

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ukrainian estuaries have not undergone a systematic evaluation of the causes of ecological impairments caused by anthropogenic contamination. The objective of this evaluation is to use recently developed diagnostic tools to determine the causes of benthic ecological impairments. ...

  6. A PROBABILISTIC SURVEY OF SEDIMENT TOXICITY IN WEST COAST ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A probabalistic survey of coastal condition assessment was conducted in 1999 by participants in US EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP). The survey targeted estuaries along the outer coasts of Washington, Oregon and California, including the lower Columbi...

  7. BACTERIOPLANKTON DYNAMICS IN A SUBTROPICAL ESTUARY: EVIDENCE FOR SUBSTRATE LIMITATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bacterioplankton abundance and metabolic characteristics were measured along a transect in Pensacola Bay, Florida, USA, to examine the factors that control microbial water column processes in this subtropical estuary. The microbial measures included 3 H-L-leucine incorporation, e...

  8. MAPPING BURROWING SHRIMP AND SEAGRASS IN YAQUINA ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Burrowing shrimp and seagrasses create extensive intertidal and shallow subtidal habitats within Pacific NW estuaries. Maps of their populations are useful to inform estuarine managers of locations that deserve special consideration for conservation, and to inform oyster farmers...

  9. DOWNSTREAM MIGRATION OF SALMONID SMOLTS IN OREGON RIVERS AND ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migratory fish passage is an important designated use for many Oregon estuaries. Acoustic transmitters were implanted in coho smolts in 2004 and 2006 to evaluate how estuarine habitat, and habitat loss, might affect population health. Acoustic receivers that identified individu...

  10. Estuary 2100 Project, Phase 2: Building Partnerships for Resilient Watersheds

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about the SFBWQP Estuary 2100 Project, Phase 2: Building Partnerships for Resilient Watersheds, part of an EPA competitive grant program to improve SF Bay water quality focused on restoring impaired waters and enhancing aquat

  11. How the National Estuary Programs Address Environmental Issues

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Estuaries face many challenges including, alteration of natural hydrologic flows, aquatic nuisance species, climate change, declines in fish and wildlife populations, habitat loss and degradation, nutrient loads, pathogens, stormwater and toxics.

  12. HIGH CYANOBACTERIAL ABUNDANCE IN GULF OF MEXICO ESTUARIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aquatic phytoplankton comprise a wide variety of taxa spanning more than 2 orders of magnitude in size, yet studies of estuarine phytoplankton often overlook the picoplankton, particularly chroococcoid cyanobacteria (c.f. Synechocococcus). Three Gulf of Mexico estuaries (Apalachi...

  13. NEKTON-HABITAT ASSOCIATIONS IN A PACIFIC NORTHWEST (USA) ESTUARY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nekton−habitat associations were determined in Yaquina Bay, Oregon, United States, using a stratified-by-habitat, random, estuary-wide sampling design. Three habitats (intertidal eelgrass [Zostera marina], mud shrimp [Upogebia pugettensis], and ghost shrimp [Neotrypaea californie...

  14. Environmental forcing on jellyfish communities in a small temperate estuary.

    PubMed

    Primo, Ana Lígia; Marques, Sónia C; Falcão, Joana; Crespo, Daniel; Pardal, Miguel A; Azeiteiro, Ulisses M

    2012-08-01

    The impact of biological, hydrodynamic and large scale climatic variables on the jellyfish community of Mondego estuary was evaluated from 2003 to 2010. Plankton samples were collected at the downstream part of the estuary. Siphonophora Muggiaea atlantica and Diphyes spp. were the main jellyfish species. Jellyfish density was generally higher in summer and since 2005 densities had increased. Summer community analysis pointed out Acartia clausi, estuarine temperature and salinity as the main driven forces for the assemblage's structure. Also, Chl a, estuarine salinity, runoff and SST were identified as the major environmental factors influencing the siphonophores summer interannual variability. Temperature influenced directly and indirectly the community and fluctuation of jellyfish blooms in the Mondego estuary. This study represents a contribution to a better knowledge of the gelatinous plankton communities in small temperate estuaries.

  15. Fish and Salinity in the San Francisco Estuary

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides access to a set of time-series maps for six fishes that live in the SF Estuary. Maps were produced to strengthen best available science that inform actions needed to improve protection for aquatic life.

  16. Monitoring Rehabilitation in Temperate North American Estuaries

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Casimir A.; Hood, W Gregory; Tear, Lucinda M.; Simenstad, Charles; Williams, Gregory D.; Johnson, L. L.; Feist, B. E.; Roni, P.

    2005-02-01

    In this chapter, we propose that monitoring rehabilitation in estuarine ecosystems by necessity requires quantifying relationships between dynamic estuarine processes and sensitive indicators of ecosystem function. While we do discuss temperate systems in general, emphasis is placed on anadromous salmon habitats in the Pacific Northwest because anadromous fishes are such a major focus of rehabilitation efforts, and present some of the greater challenges in linking function of one segment of their life history to conditions in a specific habitat. We begin with a basic overview of the ecological and socioeconomic significance of, as well as anthropogenic effects on, estuaries. Next, we briefly summarize the various kinds of estuarine rehabilitation historically practiced in temperate regions, and review estuarine rehabilitation monitoring design and methods, highlighting the unique challenges involved in monitoring estuarine systems. We then close with a summary and conclusions.

  17. Columbia Bay, Alaska: an 'upside down' estuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walters, R.A.; Josberger, E.G.; Driedger, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    Circulation and water properties within Columbia Bay, Alaska, are dominated by the effects of Columbia Glacier at the head of the Bay. The basin between the glacier terminus and the terminal moraine (sill depth of about 22 m) responds as an 'upside down' estuary with the subglacial discharge of freshwater entering at the bottom of the basin. The intense vertical mixing caused by the bouyant plume of freshwater creates a homogeneous water mass that exchanges with the far-field water through either a two- or a three-layer flow. In general, the glacier acts as a large heat sink and creates a water mass which is cooler than that in fjords without tidewater glaciers. The predicted retreat of Columbia Glacier would create a 40 km long fjord that has characteristics in common with other fjords in Prince William Sound. ?? 1988.

  18. Yeast community survey in the Tagus estuary.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, João M G C F

    2005-07-01

    The yeast community in the waters of the Tagus estuary, Portugal, was followed for over a year in order to assess its dynamics. Yeast occurrence and incidence were measured and this information was related to relevant environmental data. Yeast occurrence did not seem to depend upon tides, but river discharge had a dramatic impact both on the density and diversity of the community. The occurrence of some yeasts was partially correlated with faecal pollution indicators. Yeast isolates were characterized by microsatellite primed PCR (MSP-PCR) fingerprinting and rRNA gene sequencing. The principal species found were Candida catenulata, C. intermedia, C. parapsilosis, Clavispora lusitaniae, Debaryomyces hansenii, Pichia guilliermondii, Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Rhodosporidium diobovatum. The incidence of these species was evaluated against the environmental context of the samples and the current knowledge about the substrates from which they are usually isolated.

  19. Modeling flocculation in a hypertidal estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Mendoza, Rafael; Souza, Alejandro J.; Amoudry, Laurent O.

    2014-01-01

    When fine particles are involved, cohesive properties of sediment can result in flocculation and significantly complicate sediment process studies. We combine data from field observations and state-of-the-art modeling to investigate and predict flocculation processes within a hypertidal estuary. The study site is the Welsh Channel located at the entrance of the Dee Estuary in Liverpool Bay. Field data consist of measurements from a fixed site deployment during 12-22 February 2008. Grain size, suspended sediment volume concentration, and current velocity were obtained hourly from moored instruments at 1.5 m above bed. Near-bottom water samples taken every hour from a research vessel are used to convert volume concentrations to mass concentrations for the moored measurements. We use the hydrodynamic model Proudman Oceanographic Laboratory Coastal Ocean Modelling System (POLCOMS) coupled with the turbulence model General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) and a sediment module to obtain three-dimensional distributions of suspended particulate matter (SPM). Flocculation is identified by changes in grain size. Small flocs were found during flood and ebb periods—and correlate with strong currents—due to breakup, while coarse flocs were present during slack waters because of aggregation. A fractal number of 2.4 is found for the study site. Turbulent stresses and particle settling velocities are estimated and are found to be related via an exponential function. The result is a simple semiempirical formulation for the fall velocity of the particles solely depending on turbulent stresses. The formula is implemented in the full three-dimensional model to represent changes in particle size due to flocculation processes. Predictions from the model are in agreement with observations for both settling velocity and SPM. The SPM fortnight variability was reproduced by the model and the concentration peaks are almost in phase with those from field data.

  20. Continuous resistivity profiling data from the Corsica River Estuary, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, V.A.; Bratton, J.F.; Worley, C.R.; Crusius, J.; Kroeger, K.D.

    2011-01-01

    Submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) into Maryland's Corsica River Estuary was investigated as part of a larger study to determine its importance in nutrient delivery to the Chesapeake Bay. The Corsica River Estuary represents a coastal lowland setting typical of much of the eastern bay. An interdisciplinary U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science team conducted field operations in the lower estuary in April and May 2007. Resource managers are concerned about nutrients that are entering the estuary via SGD that may be contributing to eutrophication, harmful algal blooms, and fish kills. Techniques employed in the study included continuous resistivity profiling (CRP), piezometer sampling of submarine groundwater, and collection of a time series of radon tracer activity in surface water. A CRP system measures electrical resistivity of saturated subestuarine sediments to distinguish those bearing fresh water (high resistivity) from those with saline or brackish pore water (low resistivity). This report describes the collection and processing of CRP data and summarizes the results. Based on a grid of 67.6 kilometers of CRP data, low-salinity (high-resistivity) groundwater extended approximately 50-400 meters offshore from estuary shorelines at depths of 5 to >12 meters below the sediment surface, likely beneath a confining unit. A band of low-resistivity sediment detected along the axis of the estuary indicated the presence of a filled paleochannel containing brackish groundwater. The meandering paleochannel likely incised through the confining unit during periods of lower sea level, allowing the low-salinity groundwater plumes originating from land to mix with brackish subestuarine groundwater along the channel margins and to discharge. A better understanding of the spatial variability and geological controls of submarine groundwater flow beneath the Corsica River Estuary could lead to improved models and mitigation strategies for nutrient over-enrichment in the