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Sample records for stabilizes multimer formation

  1. Arachidonic acid mediates the formation of abundant alpha-helical multimers of alpha-synuclein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iljina, Marija; Tosatto, Laura; Choi, Minee L.; Sang, Jason C.; Ye, Yu; Hughes, Craig D.; Bryant, Clare E.; Gandhi, Sonia; Klenerman, David

    2016-09-01

    The protein alpha-synuclein (αS) self-assembles into toxic beta-sheet aggregates in Parkinson’s disease, while it is proposed that αS forms soluble alpha-helical multimers in healthy neurons. Here, we have made αS multimers in vitro using arachidonic acid (ARA), one of the most abundant fatty acids in the brain, and characterized them by a combination of bulk experiments and single-molecule Fӧrster resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) measurements. The data suggest that ARA-induced oligomers are alpha-helical, resistant to fibril formation, more prone to disaggregation, enzymatic digestion and degradation by the 26S proteasome, and lead to lower neuronal damage and reduced activation of microglia compared to the oligomers formed in the absence of ARA. These multimers can be formed at physiologically-relevant concentrations, and pathological mutants of αS form less multimers than wild-type αS. Our work provides strong biophysical evidence for the formation of alpha-helical multimers of αS in the presence of a biologically relevant fatty acid, which may have a protective role with respect to the generation of beta-sheet toxic structures during αS fibrillation.

  2. Arachidonic acid mediates the formation of abundant alpha-helical multimers of alpha-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Iljina, Marija; Tosatto, Laura; Choi, Minee L.; Sang, Jason C.; Ye, Yu; Hughes, Craig D.; Bryant, Clare E.; Gandhi, Sonia; Klenerman, David

    2016-01-01

    The protein alpha-synuclein (αS) self-assembles into toxic beta-sheet aggregates in Parkinson’s disease, while it is proposed that αS forms soluble alpha-helical multimers in healthy neurons. Here, we have made αS multimers in vitro using arachidonic acid (ARA), one of the most abundant fatty acids in the brain, and characterized them by a combination of bulk experiments and single-molecule Fӧrster resonance energy transfer (sm-FRET) measurements. The data suggest that ARA-induced oligomers are alpha-helical, resistant to fibril formation, more prone to disaggregation, enzymatic digestion and degradation by the 26S proteasome, and lead to lower neuronal damage and reduced activation of microglia compared to the oligomers formed in the absence of ARA. These multimers can be formed at physiologically-relevant concentrations, and pathological mutants of αS form less multimers than wild-type αS. Our work provides strong biophysical evidence for the formation of alpha-helical multimers of αS in the presence of a biologically relevant fatty acid, which may have a protective role with respect to the generation of beta-sheet toxic structures during αS fibrillation. PMID:27671749

  3. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Christopher L.; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M.; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9 +/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  4. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape. PMID:26368021

  5. Multimer Formation Explains Allelic Suppression of PRDM9 Recombination Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Baker, Christopher L; Petkova, Pavlina; Walker, Michael; Flachs, Petr; Mihola, Ondrej; Trachtulec, Zdenek; Petkov, Petko M; Paigen, Kenneth

    2015-09-01

    Genetic recombination during meiosis functions to increase genetic diversity, promotes elimination of deleterious alleles, and helps assure proper segregation of chromatids. Mammalian recombination events are concentrated at specialized sites, termed hotspots, whose locations are determined by PRDM9, a zinc finger DNA-binding histone methyltransferase. Prdm9 is highly polymorphic with most alleles activating their own set of hotspots. In populations exhibiting high frequencies of heterozygosity, questions remain about the influences different alleles have in heterozygous individuals where the two variant forms of PRDM9 typically do not activate equivalent populations of hotspots. We now find that, in addition to activating its own hotspots, the presence of one Prdm9 allele can modify the activity of hotspots activated by the other allele. PRDM9 function is also dosage sensitive; Prdm9+/- heterozygous null mice have reduced numbers and less active hotspots and increased numbers of aberrant germ cells. In mice carrying two Prdm9 alleles, there is allelic competition; the stronger Prdm9 allele can partially or entirely suppress chromatin modification and recombination at hotspots of the weaker allele. In cell cultures, PRDM9 protein variants form functional heteromeric complexes which can bind hotspots sequences. When a heteromeric complex binds at a hotspot of one PRDM9 variant, the other PRDM9 variant, which would otherwise not bind, can still methylate hotspot nucleosomes. We propose that in heterozygous individuals the underlying molecular mechanism of allelic suppression results from formation of PRDM9 heteromers, where the DNA binding activity of one protein variant dominantly directs recombination initiation towards its own hotspots, effectively titrating down recombination by the other protein variant. In natural populations with many heterozygous individuals, allelic competition will influence the recombination landscape.

  6. Seed-Specific Expression of Spider Silk Protein Multimers Causes Long-Term Stability

    PubMed Central

    Weichert, Nicola; Hauptmann, Valeska; Helmold, Christine; Conrad, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Seeds enable plants to germinate and to grow in situations of limited availability of nutrients. The stable storage of different seed proteins is a remarkable presumption for successful germination and growth. These strategies have been adapted and used in several molecular farming projects. In this study, we explore the benefits of seed-based expression to produce the high molecular weight spider silk protein FLAG using intein-based trans-splicing. Multimers larger than 460 kDa in size are routinely produced, which is above the native size of the FLAG protein. The storage of seeds for 8 weeks and 1 year at an ambient temperature of 15°C does not influence the accumulation level. Even the extended storage time does not influence the typical pattern of multimerized bands. These results show that seeds are the method of choice for stable accumulation of products of complex transgenes and have the capability for long-term storage at moderate conditions, an important feature for the development of suitable downstream processes. PMID:26858734

  7. Seed-Specific Expression of Spider Silk Protein Multimers Causes Long-Term Stability.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Nicola; Hauptmann, Valeska; Helmold, Christine; Conrad, Udo

    2016-01-01

    Seeds enable plants to germinate and to grow in situations of limited availability of nutrients. The stable storage of different seed proteins is a remarkable presumption for successful germination and growth. These strategies have been adapted and used in several molecular farming projects. In this study, we explore the benefits of seed-based expression to produce the high molecular weight spider silk protein FLAG using intein-based trans-splicing. Multimers larger than 460 kDa in size are routinely produced, which is above the native size of the FLAG protein. The storage of seeds for 8 weeks and 1 year at an ambient temperature of 15°C does not influence the accumulation level. Even the extended storage time does not influence the typical pattern of multimerized bands. These results show that seeds are the method of choice for stable accumulation of products of complex transgenes and have the capability for long-term storage at moderate conditions, an important feature for the development of suitable downstream processes. PMID:26858734

  8. The penC mutation conferring antibiotic resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae arises from a mutation in the PilQ secretin that interferes with multimer stability

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuqing; Tobiason, Deborah M.; Hu, Mei; Seifert, H. Steven; Nicholas, Robert A.

    2008-01-01

    The penC resistance gene was previously characterized in a FA19 penA mtrR penB gonococcal strain (PR100) as a spontaneous mutation that increased resistance to penicillin and tetracycline. We show here that antibiotic resistance mediated by penC is the result of a Glu-666 to Lys missense mutation in the pilQ gene that interferes with the formation of the SDS-resistant high-molecular-mass PilQ secretin complex, disrupts piliation, and decreases transformation frequency by 50-fold. Deletion of pilQ in PR100 confers the same level of antibiotic resistance as the penC mutation, but increased resistance was observed only in strains containing the mtrR and penB resistance determinants. Site-saturation mutagenesis of Glu-666 revealed that only acidic or amidated amino acids at this position preserved PilQ function. Consistent with early studies suggesting the importance of cysteine residues on stability of the PilQ multimer, mutation of either of the two cysteine residues in FA19 PilQ led to a similar phenotype as penC: increased antibiotic resistance, loss of piliation, intermediate levels of transformation competence, and absence of SDS-resistant PilQ oligomers. These data show that a functional secretin complex can enhance the entry of antibiotics into the cell and suggest that the PilQ oligomer forms a pore in the outer membrane through which antibiotics diffuse into the periplasm. PMID:16101998

  9. A conserved motif mediates both multimer formation and allosteric activation of phosphoglycerate mutase 5.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Jordan M; McConnell, Cyrus; Tipton, Peter A; Hannink, Mark

    2014-09-01

    Phosphoglycerate mutase 5 (PGAM5) is an atypical mitochondrial Ser/Thr phosphatase that modulates mitochondrial dynamics and participates in both apoptotic and necrotic cell death. The mechanisms that regulate the phosphatase activity of PGAM5 are poorly understood. The C-terminal phosphoglycerate mutase domain of PGAM5 shares homology with the catalytic domains found in other members of the phosphoglycerate mutase family, including a conserved histidine that is absolutely required for catalytic activity. However, this conserved domain is not sufficient for maximal phosphatase activity. We have identified a highly conserved amino acid motif, WDXNWD, located within the unique N-terminal region, which is required for assembly of PGAM5 into large multimeric complexes. Alanine substitutions within the WDXNWD motif abolish the formation of multimeric complexes and markedly reduce phosphatase activity of PGAM5. A peptide containing the WDXNWD motif dissociates the multimeric complex and reduces but does not fully abolish phosphatase activity. Addition of the WDXNWD-containing peptide in trans to a mutant PGAM5 protein lacking the WDXNWD motif markedly increases phosphatase activity of the mutant protein. Our results are consistent with an intermolecular allosteric regulation mechanism for the phosphatase activity of PGAM5, in which the assembly of PGAM5 into multimeric complexes, mediated by the WDXNWD motif, results in maximal activation of phosphatase activity. Our results suggest the possibility of identifying small molecules that function as allosteric regulators of the phosphatase activity of PGAM5. PMID:25012655

  10. Identity Formation in Adolescence: Change or Stability?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klimstra, Theo A.; Hale, William W., III; Raaijmakers, Quinten A. W.; Branje, Susan J. T.; Meeus, Wim H. J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this five-wave longitudinal study of 923 early to middle adolescents (50.7% boys; 49.3% girls) and 390 middle to late adolescents (43.3% boys and 56.7% girls) is to provide a comprehensive view on change and stability in identity formation from ages 12 to 20. Several types of change and stability (i.e., mean-level change, rank-order…

  11. Cyclic Imide Dioxime: Formation and Hydrolytic Stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, S.O.; Vukovic, Sinisa; Custelcean, Radu; Hay, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Poly(acrylamidoximes) play an important role in the uranium extraction from seawater. The present work reports solution studies of simple analogs to address the formation and stability of two binding sites present in these polymers, open-chain amidoximes and cyclic imide dioximes, including: 1) conditions that maximize the formation of the cyclic form, 2) existence of a base-induced conversion from open-chain to cyclic form, and 3) degradation under acid and base conditions.

  12. Abnormal collagen binding activity of 2A von Willebrand factor: evidence that the defect depends only on the lack of large multimers.

    PubMed

    Casonato, A; Pontara, E; Bertomoro, A; Zucchetto, S; Zerbinati, P; Girolami, A

    1997-02-01

    It is well established that the large von Willebrand factor (vWf) multimers bind with high affinity to the extracellular matrix. To explore the different roles of intermediate and large vWf multimers, we studied the collagen-binding activity (vWf:CBA) of 2A vWf under nonflowing conditions in relation to the multimer organization of the molecule. Regardless of the anticoagulant used for blood collection, vWf:CBA was significantly decreased, in 4 patients with 2A von Willebrand's disease (vWd), in accordance with the lack of high and intermediate vWf multimers. After 1-deamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin (DDAVP) infusion, the appearance of circulating large and unusually large vWf multimers, in samples collected in the presence of protease inhibitors, induced a complete normalization of vWf:CBA. The peak was observed 15 minutes after DDAVP, when large and unusually large multimers were maximally represented. These effects were transient because vWf:CBA decreased after 60 minutes, even though values were still significantly higher than pre-DDAVP figures; at the same time, large vWf multimers appeared to be decreased. In contrast, samples anticoagulated with sodium citrate after DDAVP did not show a normalized vWf multimer pattern and were characterized by a persistently decreased vWf:CBA. Moreover, in all of the patients studied, platelet vWf presented normal vWf:CBA values in accordance with the normal levels and multimer organization of the vWf molecule. Our findings indicate that the collagen-binding defect displayed in vitro by type 2A vWf depends only on the lack of circulating large vWf multimers. Moreover, the observation of normal platelet vWf:CBA seems to indicate a primary role of plasma rather than platelet vWf in assuring platelet plug formation.

  13. Identity formation in adolescence: change or stability?

    PubMed

    Klimstra, Theo A; Hale, William W; Raaijmakers, Quinten A W; Branje, Susan J T; Meeus, Wim H J

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this five-wave longitudinal study of 923 early to middle adolescents (50.7% boys; 49.3% girls) and 390 middle to late adolescents (43.3% boys and 56.7% girls) is to provide a comprehensive view on change and stability in identity formation from ages 12 to 20. Several types of change and stability (i.e., mean-level change, rank-order stability, and profile similarity) were assessed for three dimensions of identity formation (i.e., commitment, in-depth exploration, and reconsideration), using adolescent self-report questionnaires. Results revealed changes in identity dimensions towards maturity, indicated by a decreasing tendency for reconsideration, increasingly more in-depth exploration, and increasingly more stable identity dimension profiles. Mean levels of commitment remained stable, and rank-order stability of commitment, in-depth exploration, and reconsideration did not change with age. Overall, girls were more mature with regard to identity formation in early adolescence, but boys had caught up with them by late adolescence. Taken together, our findings indicate that adolescent identity formation is guided by progressive changes in the way adolescents deal with commitments, rather than by changes in the commitments themselves.

  14. Antarctic ice rise formation, evolution, and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favier, Lionel; Pattyn, Frank

    2015-06-01

    Antarctic ice rises originate from the contact between ice shelves and one of the numerous topographic highs emerging from the edge of the continental shelf. While investigations of the Raymond effect indicate their millennial-scale stability, little is known about their formation and their role in ice shelf stability. Here we present for the first time the simulation of an ice rise using the BISICLES model. The numerical results successfully reproduce several field-observable features, such as the substantial thinning downstream of the ice rise and the successive formation of a promontory and ice rise with stable radial ice flow center, showing that ice rises are formed during the ice sheet deglaciation. We quantify the ice rise buttressing effect, found to be mostly transient, delaying grounding line retreat significantly but resulting in comparable steady state positions. We demonstrate that ice rises are key in controlling simulations of Antarctic deglaciation.

  15. Borehole Stability in High-Temperature Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chuanliang; Deng, Jingen; Yu, Baohua; Li, Wenliang; Chen, Zijian; Hu, Lianbo; Li, Yang

    2014-11-01

    In oil and gas drilling or geothermal well drilling, the temperature difference between the drilling fluid and formation will lead to an apparent temperature change around the borehole, which will influence the stress state around the borehole and tend to cause borehole instability in high geothermal gradient formations. The thermal effect is usually not considered as a factor in most of the conventional borehole stability models. In this research, in order to solve the borehole instability in high-temperature formations, a calculation model of the temperature field around the borehole during drilling is established. The effects of drilling fluid circulation, drilling fluid density, and mud displacement on the temperature field are analyzed. Besides these effects, the effect of temperature change on the stress around the borehole is analyzed based on thermoelasticity theory. In addition, the relationships between temperature and strength of four types of rocks are respectively established based on experimental results, and thermal expansion coefficients are also tested. On this basis, a borehole stability model is established considering thermal effects and the effect of temperature change on borehole stability is also analyzed. The results show that the fracture pressure and collapse pressure will both increase as the temperature of borehole rises, and vice versa. The fracture pressure is more sensitive to temperature. Temperature has different effects on collapse pressures due to different lithological characters; however, the variation of fracture pressure is unrelated to lithology. The research results can provide a reference for the design of drilling fluid density in high-temperature wells.

  16. Formation and stabilization of persistent free radicals

    PubMed Central

    Dellinger, Barry; Lomnicki, Slawomir; Khachatryan, Lavrent; Maskos, Zofia; Hall, Randall W.; Adounkpe, Julien; McFerrin, Cheri; Truong, Hieu

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that stable and relatively unreactive “environmentally persistent free radicals (PFRs)” can be readily formed in the post-flame and cool-zone regions of combustion systems and other thermal processes. These resonance-stabilized radicals, including semiquinones, phenoxyls, and cyclopentadienyls, can be formed by the thermal decomposition of molecular precursors including catechols, hydroquinones and phenols. Association with the surfaces of fine particles imparts additional stabilization to these radicals such that they can persist almost indefinitely in the environment. A mechanism of chemisorption and electron transfer from the molecular adsorbate to a redox-active transition metal or other receptor is shown through experiment, and supported by molecular orbital calculations, to result in PFR formation. Both oxygen-centered and carbon-centered PFRs are possible that can significantly affect their environmental and biological reactivity. PMID:25598747

  17. Formation, Stability, and Breakup of Nanojets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moseler, Michael; Landman, Uzi

    2000-08-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations reveal the formation of nanojets with velocities up to 400 meters per second, created by pressurized injection of fluid propane through nanoscale convergent gold nozzles with heating or coating of the nozzle exterior surface to prevent formation of thick blocking films. The atomistic description is related to continuum hydrodynamic modeling through the derivation of a stochastic lubrication equation that includes thermally triggered fluctuations whose influence on the dynamical evolution increases as the jet dimensions become smaller. Emergence of double-cone neck shapes is predicted when the jet approaches nanoscale molecular dimensions, deviating from the long-thread universal similarity solution obtained in the absence of such fluctuations.

  18. Formation, stability, and breakup of nanojets

    PubMed

    Moseler; Landman

    2000-08-18

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations reveal the formation of nanojets with velocities up to 400 meters per second, created by pressurized injection of fluid propane through nanoscale convergent gold nozzles with heating or coating of the nozzle exterior surface to prevent formation of thick blocking films. The atomistic description is related to continuum hydrodynamic modeling through the derivation of a stochastic lubrication equation that includes thermally triggered fluctuations whose influence on the dynamical evolution increases as the jet dimensions become smaller. Emergence of double-cone neck shapes is predicted when the jet approaches nanoscale molecular dimensions, deviating from the long-thread universal similarity solution obtained in the absence of such fluctuations.

  19. Stability and Halo Formation in Axisymmetric Intense Beams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluckstern, Robert L.; Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    1996-05-01

    Beam stability and halo formation in high-intensity axisymmetric 2D beams in a uniform focusing channel are analyzed using particle-in-cell simulations. The tune depression - mismatch space is explored for the uniform distribution of the particle transverse phase space density (K-V), as well as for more realistic ones (in particular, the water-bag distribution), to determine the stability limits and halo parameters. The numerical results obtained are compared and show an agreement with the predictions of the analytical model for halo formation developed earlier.(R.L. Gluckstern, Phys. Rev. Lett., 73), 1247 (1994).

  20. Stability and Halo Formation in Axisymmetric Intense Beams.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluckstern, Robert L.; Kurennoy, Sergey S.

    1997-05-01

    Beam stability and halo formation in high-intensity axisymmetric 2D beams in a uniform focusing channel are analyzed using particle-in-cell simulations. The tune depression - mismatch space is explored for the uniform distribution of the particle transverse phase space density (Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky), as well as for more realistic ones (in particular, the water-bag distribution), to determine the stability limits and halo parameters. The numerical results obtained are compared and show an agreement with the predictions of the analytical model for halo formation developed earlier (R.L. Gluckstern, Phys. Rev. Lett., 73), 1247 (1994)..

  1. String Stability of a Linear Formation Flight Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Michael J.; Ryan, Jack; Hanson, Curtis E.; Parle, James F.

    2002-01-01

    String stability analysis of an autonomous formation flight system was performed using linear and nonlinear simulations. String stability is a measure of how position errors propagate from one vehicle to another in a cascaded system. In the formation flight system considered here, each i(sup th) aircraft uses information from itself and the preceding ((i-1)(sup th)) aircraft to track a commanded relative position. A possible solution for meeting performance requirements with such a system is to allow string instability. This paper explores two results of string instability and outlines analysis techniques for string unstable systems. The three analysis techniques presented here are: linear, nonlinear formation performance, and ride quality. The linear technique was developed from a worst-case scenario and could be applied to the design of a string unstable controller. The nonlinear formation performance and ride quality analysis techniques both use nonlinear formation simulation. Three of the four formation-controller gain-sets analyzed in this paper were limited more by ride quality than by performance. Formations of up to seven aircraft in a cascaded formation could be used in the presence of light gusts with this string unstable system.

  2. A Versatile Simple Capture Assay for Assessing the Structural Integrity of MHC Multimer Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Malo, Courtney S.; Renner, Danielle N.; Van Keulen, Virginia S.; Girtman, Megan A.; Nevala, Wendy N.; Pavelko, Kevin D.; Gil, Diana; Schrum, Adam G.; Johnson, Aaron J.; Pease, Larry R.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-specific T cell responses can be visualized using MHC:peptide multimers. In cases where robust T cell controls are not readily available to assess the integrity of multimer reagents prior to analyzing limited sample, the ability to assess the structural integrity of MHC multimers before their use in critical experiments would be useful. We present a method to probe the structural integrity of MHC multimers using antibodies specific for conformational determinants. Beads coated with anti-mouse Ig are incubated with conformation-specific mouse monoclonal antibody and then with fluorescently tagged MHC multimer. The ability of the bead to capture the labeled multimer can be measured semi-quantitatively by flow cytometry. In this manner, the correct folding of MHC multimers can be visualized and batches of multimer can be compared for quality control. Because there are multiple conformational epitopes formed by various molecular interactions among heavy chain, peptide, and β2M, this capture assay can assess the fidelity of each aspect of multimer structure, depending on the availability of antibodies. The described approach could be particularly useful for studies using irreplaceable samples, including patient samples collected in clinical trials. PMID:26389800

  3. Impact of alcohols on the formation and stability of protein-stabilized nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Zeeb, Benjamin; Herz, Eva; McClements, David Julian; Weiss, Jochen

    2014-11-01

    Nanoemulsions are increasingly being used for encapsulation, protection, and delivery of bioactive lipids, however, their formation from natural emulsifiers is still challenging. We investigated the impact of alcohol on the formation and stability of protein-stabilized oil-in-water nanoemulsions prepared by high-pressure homogenization. The influence of different alcohols (ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol) at various concentrations (0-25% w/w) on the formation and stability of emulsions stabilized by sodium caseinate, whey protein isolate, and fish gelatin was investigated. The mean particle diameter decreased with increasing alcohol concentrations from 0 to 10%w/w, but extensive droplet aggregation occurred at higher levels. This phenomenon was attributed to enhanced protein-protein interactions between the adsorbed emulsifier molecules in the presence of alcohol leading to droplet flocculation. The smallest droplets (d<100nm) were obtained when 10%w/w 1-butanol was added to sodium caseinate-stabilized nanoemulsions, but relatively small droplets (d<150nm) could also be obtained in the presence of a food-grade alcohol (ethanol). This study demonstrated that alcohol addition might be a useful tool for producing protein-stabilized nanoemulsions suitable for use as delivery systems of lipophilic bioactive agents. PMID:25129338

  4. Characterization of α-Synuclein Multimer Stoichiometry in Complex Biological Samples by Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The aberrant aggregation of α-synuclein in the brain is a hallmark of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In vivo soluble α-synuclein occurs as a monomer and several multimers, the latter of which may be important for the biological function of α-synuclein. Currently, there is a lack of reproducible methods to compare α-synuclein multimer abundance between complex biological samples. Here we developed a method, termed “multimer-PAGE,” that combines in-gel chemical cross-linking with several common electrophoretic techniques to measure the stoichiometry of soluble α-synuclein multimers in brain tissue lysates. Results show that soluble α-synuclein from the rat brain exists as several high molecular weight species of approximately 56 kDa (αS56), 80 kDa (αS80), and 100 kDa (αS100) that comigrate with endogenous lipids, detergents, and/or micelles during blue native gel electrophoresis (BN-PAGE). Co-extraction of endogenous lipids with α-synuclein was essential for the detection of soluble α-synuclein multimers. Homogenization of brain tissue in small buffer volumes (>50 mg tissue per 1 mL buffer) increased relative lipid extraction and subsequently resulted in abundant soluble multimer detection via multimer-PAGE. α-Synuclein multimers captured by directly cross-linking soluble lysates resembled those observed following multimer-PAGE. The ratio of multimer (αS80) to monomer (αS17) increased linearly with protein input into multimer-PAGE, suggesting to some extent, multimers were also formed during electrophoresis. Overall, soluble α-synuclein maintains lipid interactions following tissue disruption and readily forms multimers when this lipid–protein complex is preserved. Once the multimer-PAGE technique was validated, relative stoichiometric comparisons could be conducted simultaneously between 14 biological samples. Multimer-PAGE provides a simple inexpensive biochemical technique to study the molecular factors influencing α-synuclein multimerization

  5. New Insight into Cataract Formation: Enhanced Stability through Mutual Attraction

    SciTech Connect

    Stradner, A.; Schurtenberger, P.; Foffi, G.; Dorsaz, N.; Thurston, G.

    2007-11-09

    Small-angle neutron scattering experiments and molecular dynamics simulations combined with an application of concepts from soft matter physics to complex protein mixtures provide new insight into the stability of eye lens protein mixtures. Exploring this colloid-protein analogy we demonstrate that weak attractions between unlike proteins help to maintain lens transparency in an extremely sensitive and nonmonotonic manner. These results not only represent an important step towards a better understanding of protein condensation diseases such as cataract formation, but provide general guidelines for tuning the stability of colloid mixtures, a topic relevant for soft matter physics and industrial applications.

  6. Mesh stability of formations of unmanned aerial vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pant, Aniruddha G.

    Co-ordinated maneuvers are becoming more and more important in military as well as civilian applications. Advances in sensing, communication and computation are aiding in the design and development of advanced control technologies for these distributed, multi-vehicle systems. Some of the applications where coordinated control of a multi-vehicle system is required are, automated highway systems, formation flying of unmanned aerial vehicles for military surveillance and coordinated ocean floor mapping for autonomous underwater vehicles. For successful formation maneuvers of these vehicles we need to design the controller and communication structure so as to achieve classical stability of the formations. In addition to classical Lyapunov stability, one can imagine that these formations need to have the property of damping any disturbances which may and will arise in the course of operation. This thesis is concerned with the analysis and design of cluster controllers which achieve such disturbance damping. Roughly speaking, this property of disturbance damping and error attenuation is called mesh stability. The contributions of this thesis can be seen in three parts. The first part concerns analysis of a cluster of linear dynamical systems. It is shown that it is not possible to get scalable clusters if the cluster controllers focus only on the local information. The second part is analysis of a nonlinear look-ahead interconnected system. Sufficient conditions guaranteeing mesh stability have been presented. The results obtained using the Lyapunov theory based approach are compared with the input-output gain results for linear systems. Third part is the applications of the above theoretical results to a case of formation flying of unmanned aerial vehicles. A nonlinear helicopter model is used to test the results offered by previous theoretical work. As an initial step, a regulation layer controller based on differential flatness and dynamic surface control is designed

  7. Detergent Stabilized Nanopore Formation Kinetics of an Anthrax Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Kelby

    2015-03-01

    This summer research project funded through the Society of Physics Students Internship Program and The National Institute of Standards and Technology focused on optimization of pore formation of Protective Antigen protein secreted by Bacillus Anthraces. This experiment analyzes the use of N-tetradecylphosphocholine (FOS-14 Detergent) to stabilize the water soluble protein, protective antigen protein (PA63) to regulate the kinetics of pore formation in a model bilayer lipid membrane. The FOS-14 Detergent was tested under various conditions to understand its impact on the protein pore formation. The optimization of this channel insertion is critical in preparing samples of oriented for neutron reflectometry that provide new data to increase the understanding of the protein's structure.

  8. Transient Colloidal Stability Controls the Particle Formation of SBA-15

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A hypothesis about (transient) colloidal stability as a controlling mechanism for particle formation in SBA-15 is presented. The hypothesis is based on results from both in situ and ex situ investigations, including cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), UV–vis spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cryo-TEM images show that particles grow via the formation of silica–Pluronic–water “flocs”, which coalesce in a seemingly arbitrary manner. Despite this, the final material consists of well-defined particles with a small size distribution. We argue that the interface between the flocs and surrounding media is covered by Pluronic molecules, which provide steric stabilization. As the flocs grow, the coverage of polymers at the interface is increased until a stable size is reached, and that regulates the particle size. By targeting the characteristics of the Pluronic molecules, during the on-going synthesis, the hypothesis is tested. The results are consistent with the concept of (transient) colloidal stability. PMID:22758927

  9. Pickering emulsions stabilized by oppositely charged colloids: Stability and pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christdoss Pushpam, Sam David; Basavaraj, Madivala G.; Mani, Ethayaraja

    2015-11-01

    A binary mixture of oppositely charged colloids can be used to stabilize water-in-oil or oil-in-water emulsions. A Monte Carlo simulation study to address the effect of charge ratio of colloids on the stability of Pickering emulsions is presented. The colloidal particles at the interface are modeled as aligned dipolar hard spheres, with attractive interaction between unlike-charged and repulsive interaction between like-charged particles. The optimum composition (fraction of positively charged particles) required for the stabilization corresponds to a minimum in the interaction energy per particle. In addition, for each charge ratio, there is a range of compositions where emulsions can be stabilized. The structural arrangement of particles or the pattern formation at the emulsion interface is strongly influenced by the charge ratio. We find well-mixed isotropic, square, and hexagonal arrangements of particles on the emulsion surface for different compositions at a given charge ratio. The distribution of coordination numbers is calculated to characterize structural features. The simulation study is useful for the rational design of Pickering emulsifications wherein oppositely charged colloids are used, and for the control of pattern formation that can be useful for the synthesis of colloidosomes and porous shells derived thereof.

  10. Formation and stability of point defects in monolayer rhenium disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horzum, S.; ćakır, D.; Suh, J.; Tongay, S.; Huang, Y.-S.; Ho, C.-H.; Wu, J.; Sahin, H.; Peeters, F. M.

    2014-04-01

    Recently, rhenium disulfide (ReS2) monolayers were experimentally extracted by conventional mechanical exfoliation technique from as-grown ReS2 crystals. Unlike the well-known members of transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), ReS2 crystallizes in a stable distorted-1T structure and lacks an indirect to direct gap crossover. Here we present an experimental and theoretical study of the formation, energetics, and stability of the most prominent lattice defects in monolayer ReS2. Experimentally, irradiation with 3-MeV He+2 ions was used to break the strong covalent bonds in ReS2 flakes. Photoluminescence measurements showed that the luminescence from monolayers is mostly unchanged after highly energetic α particle irradiation. In order to understand the energetics of possible vacancies in ReS2 we performed systematic first-principles calculations. Our calculations revealed that the formation of a single sulfur vacancy has the lowest formation energy in both Re and S rich conditions and a random distribution of such defects are energetically more preferable. Sulfur point defects do not result in any spin polarization whereas the creation of Re-containing point defects induce magnetization with a net magnetic moment of 1-3μB. Experimentally observed easy formation of sulfur vacancies is in good agreement with first-principles calculations.

  11. Polymer Stabilized Nanosuspensions Formed via Flash Nanoprecipitation: Nanoparticle Formation, Formulation, and Stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, ZhengXi

    Nanoparticles loaded with hydrophobic components (e.g., active pharmaceutical ingredients, medical diagnostic agents, nutritional or personal care chemicals, catalysts, dyes/pigments, and substances with exceptional magnetic/optical/electronic/thermal properties) have tremendous industrial applications. The common desire is to efficiently generate nanoparticles with a desired size, size distribution, and size stability. Recently, Flash NanoPrecipition (FNP) technique with a fast, continuous, and easily scalable process has been developed to efficiently generate hydrophobe-loaded nanoparticles. This dissertation extended this technique, optimized process conditions and material formulations, and gave new insights into the mechanism and kinetics of nanoparticle formation. This dissertation demonstrated successful generation of spherical beta-carotene nanoparticles with an average diameter of 50--100 nm (90 wt% nanoparticles below 200 nm), good size stability (maintained an average diameter below 200 nm for at least one week in saline), and much higher loading (80--90 wt%) than traditional carriers, such as micelles and polymersomes (typically <20 wt%). Moreover, the nanoparticles are amorphous and expected to have a high dissolution rate and bioavailability. To give insights into the mechanism and kinetics of nanoparticle formation, much remarkable evidence supported the kinetically frozen structures of the nanoparticles rather than the thermodynamic equilibrium micelles. Time scales of the particle formation via FNP were proposed. To optimize the material formulations, either polyelectrolytes (i.e., epsilon-polylysine, branched and linear poly(ethylene imine), and chitosan) or amphiphilic diblock copolymers (i.e., polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PS-b-PEG), polycarprolactone-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PCL-b-PEG), poly(lactic acid)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-b-PEG), and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG)) were selectively screened

  12. Formation and Stability of Radiation Products in Europa's Icy Shell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, M. H.; Hudson, R. L.; Carlson, R. W.; Ferrante, R. F.

    2004-01-01

    Spectra of Europa reveal a surface dominated by water-ice along with hydrated materials and minor amounts of SO2, CO2, and H2O2. Jovian magnetospheric ions (protons, sulfur, and oxygen) and electrons produce significant chemical modifications of the surface on time scales of a few years at micrometer depths. Our laboratory studies examine the formation and stability of radiation products in H2O-rich ices relevant to Europa. Infrared (IR) spectra of ices before and after irradiation reveal the radiation destruction of molecules and the formation of products at 86 - 132 K. In addition, spectra of ices during warming track thermal evolution due to chemical changes and sublimation processes. IR-identified radiation products in 86 - 132 K irradiated H2O + SO2 ices are the bisulfate ion, HSO4(-), sulfate ion, SO4(2-) and the hydronium ion, H3O(+). Warming results in the formation of a residual spectrum similar to liquid sulfuric acid, H2SO4, for H2O:SO2 ratios of 30:1, whereas hydrated sulfuric acid, H2SO4 4 H2O, forms for ratios of 30:1. Radiation products identified for irradiated H2O + H2S ices at 86 K are H2S2 and SO2. When irradiated at 110 and 132 K, ices with H2O:H2S ratios if either 3:1 or 30:1 show the formation of H2SO4 4 H2O on warming to 175 K. We have also examined the radiation stability of H2SO4. Addition of CO2 to H2O + SO2 ices results in the formation of CO3 at 2046 cm (sup -1) (4.89 m). This is the strongest band from a carbon-containing product in the mid-IR spectral region, and it is also seen when either pure CO2 or H2O + CO2 ice is irradiated. Experiments with CH4 added to H2O + SO2 + CO2 ices addressed the question of methane's use as a marker of methanogens in an irradiated ice environment. New results on the near-IR spectrum of pure H2O2 will be included in this presentation. Interpretations of near-IR water bands, with H2O2 present, will be discussed. Irradiations of H2O2 and H2O + H2O2 mixtures, to examine the possibility of O2 and O3

  13. Interrogating the repertoire: broadening the scope of peptide–MHC multimer analysis

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Mark M.; Altman, John D.; Newell, Evan W.

    2013-01-01

    Labelling antigen-specific T cells with peptide–MHC multimers has provided an invaluable way to monitor T cell-mediated immune responses. A number of recent developments in this technology have made these multimers much easier to make and use in large numbers. Furthermore, enrichment techniques have provided a greatly increased sensitivity that allows the analysis of the naive T cell repertoire directly. Thus, we can expect a flood of new information to emerge in the coming years. PMID:21760610

  14. Twinned silicon and germanium nanocrystals: Formation, stability and quantum confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Ting; Pi, Xiaodong Ni, Zhenyi; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Deren

    2015-03-15

    Although twins are often observed in Si/Ge nanocrystals (NCs), little theoretical investigation has been carried out to understand this type of important planar defects in Si/Ge NCs. We now study the twinning of Si/Ge NCs in the frame work of density functional theory by representatively considering single-twinned and fivefold-twinned Si/Ge NCs. It is found that the formation of twinned Si/Ge NCs is thermodynamically possible. The effect of twinning on the formation of Si NCs is different from that of Ge NCs. For both Si and Ge NCs twinning enhances their stability. The quantum confinement effect is weakened by twinning for Si NCs. Twinning actually enhances the quantum confinement of Ge NCs when they are small (<136 atoms), while weakening the quantum confinement of Ge NCs as their size is large (>136 atoms). The current results help to better understand the experimental work on twinned Si/Ge NCs and guide the tuning of Si/Ge-NC structures for desired properties.

  15. Stability, Entrapment and Variant Formation of Salmonella Genomic Island 1

    PubMed Central

    Kiss, János; Nagy, Béla; Olasz, Ferenc

    2012-01-01

    Background The Salmonella genomic island 1 (SGI1) is a 42.4 kb integrative mobilizable element containing several antibiotic resistance determinants embedded in a complex integron segment In104. The numerous SGI1 variants identified so far, differ mainly in this segment and the explanations of their emergence were mostly based on comparative structure analyses. Here we provide experimental studies on the stability, entrapment and variant formation of this peculiar gene cluster originally found in S. Typhimurium. Methodology/Principal Findings Segregation and conjugation tests and various molecular techniques were used to detect the emerging SGI1 variants in Salmonella populations of 17 Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium DT104 isolates from Hungary. The SGI1s in these isolates proved to be fully competent in excision, conjugal transfer by the IncA/C helper plasmid R55, and integration into the E. coli chromosome. A trap vector has been constructed and successfully applied to capture the island on a plasmid. Monitoring of segregation of SGI1 indicated high stability of the island. SGI1-free segregants did not accumulate during long-term propagation, but several SGI1 variants could be obtained. Most of them appeared to be identical to SGI1-B and SGI1-C, but two new variants caused by deletions via a short-homology-dependent recombination process have also been detected. We have also noticed that the presence of the conjugation helper plasmid increased the formation of these deletion variants considerably. Conclusions/Significance Despite that excision of SGI1 from the chromosome was proven in SGI1+ Salmonella populations, its complete loss could not be observed. On the other hand, we demonstrated that several variants, among them two newly identified ones, arose with detectable frequencies in these populations in a short timescale and their formation was promoted by the helper plasmid. This reflects that IncA/C helper plasmids are not only involved in the

  16. An explanation for minor multimer species in endothelial cell-synthesized von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, D C; Zimmerman, T S; Ling, E H; Browning, P J

    1986-01-01

    Initial synthesis of von Willebrand factor (vWf) by cultured human endothelial cells proceeds by formation of a dimer of pro-vWf subunits. These subunits are found only within the cell and have an apparent molecular weight of 240,000-260,000, as measured by electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Posttranslational modifications, including proteolytic cleavage, glycosylation, and sulfation, result in the appearance of two additional vWf subunits. The major one migrates with the subunit of plasma vWf at an apparent molecular weight of 220,000-225,000 and the other migrates more slowly than pro-vWf at an apparent molecular weight of 260,000-275,000. These subunits oligomerize to form a set of vWf multimers, which are subsequently secreted into the culture medium. We isolated individual vWf oligomer species from the agarose gel bands and show that vWf minor, or satellite, species differ from major species in subunit composition. Images PMID:3486890

  17. LMI Based Robust Blood Glucose Regulation in Type-1 Diabetes Patient with Daily Multi-meal Ingestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, S.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Sutradhar, A.

    2014-04-01

    This paper illustrates the design of a robust output feedback H ∞ controller for the nonlinear glucose-insulin (GI) process in a type-1 diabetes patient to deliver insulin through intravenous infusion device. The H ∞ design specification have been realized using the concept of linear matrix inequality (LMI) and the LMI approach has been used to quadratically stabilize the GI process via output feedback H ∞ controller. The controller has been designed on the basis of full 19th order linearized state-space model generated from the modified Sorensen's nonlinear model of GI process. The resulting controller has been tested with the nonlinear patient model (the modified Sorensen's model) in presence of patient parameter variations and other uncertainty conditions. The performance of the controller was assessed in terms of its ability to track the normoglycemic set point of 81 mg/dl with a typical multi-meal disturbance throughout a day that yields robust performance and noise rejection.

  18. Liquid Crystal Formation from Sunflower Oil: Long Term Stability Studies.

    PubMed

    da Rocha-Filho, Pedro Alves; Maruno, Mônica; Ferrari, Márcio; Topan, José Fernando

    2016-06-09

    The Brazilian biodiversity offers a multiplicity of raw materials with great potential in cosmetics industry applications. Some vegetable oils and fatty esters increase skin hydration by occlusivity, keeping the skin hydrated and with a shiny appearance. Sunflower (Helianthus annus L.) oil is widely employed in cosmetic emulsions in the form of soaps, creams, moisturizers and skin cleansers due to the presence of polyphenols and its high vitamin E content. Liquid crystals are systems with many applications in both pharmaceutical and cosmetic formulations and are easily detected by microscopy under polarized light due to their birefringence properties. The aim of this research was to develop emulsions from natural sunflower oil for topical uses. Sunflower oil (75.0% w/w) was combined with liquid vaseline (25.0% w/w) employing a natural self-emulsifying base (SEB) derivative. The high temperature of the emulsification process did not influence the antioxidant properties of sunflower oil. Fatty esters were added to cosmetic formulations and extended stability tests were performed to characterize the emulsions. Fatty esters like cetyl palmitate and cetyl ester increase the formation of anisotropic structures. O/W emulsions showed acidic pH values and pseudoplastic behavior. The presence of a lamellar phase was observed after a period of 90 days under different storage conditions.

  19. Liquid Crystal Formation from Sunflower Oil: Long Term Stability Studies.

    PubMed

    da Rocha-Filho, Pedro Alves; Maruno, Mônica; Ferrari, Márcio; Topan, José Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The Brazilian biodiversity offers a multiplicity of raw materials with great potential in cosmetics industry applications. Some vegetable oils and fatty esters increase skin hydration by occlusivity, keeping the skin hydrated and with a shiny appearance. Sunflower (Helianthus annus L.) oil is widely employed in cosmetic emulsions in the form of soaps, creams, moisturizers and skin cleansers due to the presence of polyphenols and its high vitamin E content. Liquid crystals are systems with many applications in both pharmaceutical and cosmetic formulations and are easily detected by microscopy under polarized light due to their birefringence properties. The aim of this research was to develop emulsions from natural sunflower oil for topical uses. Sunflower oil (75.0% w/w) was combined with liquid vaseline (25.0% w/w) employing a natural self-emulsifying base (SEB) derivative. The high temperature of the emulsification process did not influence the antioxidant properties of sunflower oil. Fatty esters were added to cosmetic formulations and extended stability tests were performed to characterize the emulsions. Fatty esters like cetyl palmitate and cetyl ester increase the formation of anisotropic structures. O/W emulsions showed acidic pH values and pseudoplastic behavior. The presence of a lamellar phase was observed after a period of 90 days under different storage conditions. PMID:27294894

  20. Bright Solitary Matter Waves: Formation, Stability and Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billam, T. P.; Marchant, A. L.; Cornish, S. L.; Gardiner, S. A.; Parker, N. G.

    In recent years, bright soliton-like structures composed of gaseous Bose-Einstein condensates have been generated at ultracold temperature. The experimental capacity to precisely engineer the nonlinearity and potential landscape experienced by these solitary waves offers an attractive platform for fundamental study of solitonic structures. The presence of three spatial dimensions and trapping implies that these are strictly distinct objects to the true soliton solutions. Working within the zero-temperature mean-field description, we explore the solutions and stability of bright solitary waves, as well as their interactions. Emphasis is placed on elucidating their similarities and differences to the true bright soliton. The rich behaviour introduced in the bright solitary waves includes the collapse instability and asymmetric collisions. We review the experimental formation and observation of bright solitary matter waves to date, and compare to theoretical predictions. Finally we discuss some topical aspects, including beyond-mean-field descriptions, symmetry breaking, exotic bright solitary waves, and proposals to exploit bright solitary waves in interferometry and as surface probes.

  1. Formation stability analysis of unmanned multi-vehicles under interconnection topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Aolei; Naeem, Wasif; Fei, Minrui

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the overall formation stability of an unmanned multi-vehicle is mathematically presented under interconnection topologies. A novel definition of formation error is first given and followed by the proposed formation stability hypothesis. Based on this hypothesis, a unique extension-decomposition-aggregation scheme is then employed to support the stability analysis for the overall multi-vehicle formation under a mesh topology. It is proved that the overall formation control system consisting of N number of nonlinear vehicles is not only asymptotically stable, but also exponentially stable in the sense of Lyapunov within a neighbourhood of the desired formation. This technique is shown to be applicable for a mesh topology but is equally applicable for other topologies. A simulation study of the formation manoeuvre of multiple Aerosonde UAVs (unmanned aerial vehicles), in 3-D space, is finally carried out verifying the achieved formation stability result.

  2. [Determination of von Willebrand factor multimers in Mexican population].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zamora, Edgar; Zavala-Hernández, Cesar; Viveros-Sandoval, Martha Eva; Ochoa-Rico, Angeles; Martínez-Murillo, Carlos; Reyes-Maldonado, Elba

    2014-01-01

    Antecedentes: la enfermedad de von Willebrand es un padecimiento hereditario en el que la estructura, función y concentración del factor de von Willebrand están alteradas y, en consecuencia, también la interacción plaqueta-factor de von Willebrand-endotelio. En México no hay registros epidemiológicos de la enfermedad, sólo se han efectuado algunos estudios aislados desde el punto de vista clínico y hematológico. Material y métodos: estudio retrospectivo efectuado en 155 mexicanos mestizos, 75 de ellos con diagnóstico presuntivo de enfermedad de von Willebrand, 15 con sospecha de hemofilia A y 65 donadores sanos (testigos). Se realizaron pruebas: básicas de coagulación, especiales y de clasificación: análisis de la composición multimérica. Resultados: 15 pacientes se diagnosticaron con hemofilia A; de los 75 sujetos con sospecha de enfermedad de von Willebrand se diagnosticaron 50 de la manera siguiente: tipo 1 (62%), tipo 2 (22%) [subtipos: 2A (14%), 2B (2%) y 2N (6%)] y tipo 3 (16%). Conclusión: el análisis de los multímeros del factor de von Willebrand es un método que cumple con las características adecuadas para el diagnóstico de la enfermedad de von Willebrand, por lo que es necesario implementar esta metodología para su estudio y mejorar su diagnóstico específico.

  3. Formation, stability, and reactivity studies of neutral iron sulfide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shi; Wang, Zhechen; Bernstein, Elliot

    2014-03-01

    Different methods are used to generate neutral iron sulfide clusters to study their formation, stability, and reactivity, employing a time of flight mass spectrometer (TOFMS) with VUV (118 nm) radiation single photon ionization (SPI). Neutral FemSn (m = 1-4, n = 1-6), and hydrogen containing FemSnHx (x >0, n > m) clusters are generated by the reaction of seeded H2S in a helium carrier gas with laser ablated iron metal within a supersonic nozzle. The observed strong signal of association products Fe2S2(SH)0,1 M (M = CO, C2H4, C3H6) suggest that the Fe2S2(SH)0,1 clusters have the high activity for interactions with these small molecules. In order to avoid the effect for reactivity from hydrogen containing clusters, pure FemSnclusters are generated through laser ablation of a mixed iron/sulfur target in the presence of a pure helium carrier gas. (FeS)m (m = 1-4) is observed to be the most stable series. Reaction of CO and H2 on neutral (FeS)1,2clusters is farther investigated both experimentally and theoretically. A size dependent reactivity of iron sulfide clusters toward CO is characterized. The reaction FeS + CO --> Fe + OCS is found for the FeS cluster. Products Fe2S 213COH2 and Fe2S 213COH4 are identified for reactions of 13CO and H2 on Fe2S2 clusters: this suggests that the Fe2S2 cluster has a high catalytic activity for hydrogenation reactions of CO to form formaldehyde and methanol. DFT calculations are performed to explore the potential energy surfaces for the two reactions: Fe2S2 + CO + 2H2 --> Fe2S2 + CH3OH; and Fe2S2 + CO + H2 --> Fe2S2 + CH2O.

  4. Solid-Supported Lipid Membranes: Formation, Stability and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goh, Haw Zan

    This thesis presents a comprehensive investigation of the formation of supported lipid membranes with vesicle hemifusion, their stability under detergents and organic solvents and their applications in molecular biology. In Chapter 3, we describe how isolated patches of DOPC bilayers supported on glass surfaces are dissolved by various detergents (decyl maltoside, dodecyl maltoside, CHAPS, CTAB, SDS, TritonX-100 and Tween20) at their CMC, as investigated by fluorescence video microscopy. In general, detergents partition into distal leaflets of bilayers and lead to the expansion of the bilayers through a rolling motion of the distal over the proximal leaflets, in agreement with the first stage of the established 3-stage model of lipid vesicle solubilization by detergents. Subsequently, we study the partitioning of organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, propanol, acetone and chloroform) into isolated bilayer patches on glass in Chapter 4 with fluorescence microscopy. The area expansion of bilayers due to the partitioning of organic solvents is measured. From the titration of organic solvents, we measured the rate of area expansion as a function of the volume fraction of organic solvents, which is proposed to be a measure of strength of interactions between solvents and membranes. From the same experiments, we also measure the maximum expansion of bilayers (or the maximum binding stoichiometry between organic solvents and lipids) before structural breakdown, which depends on the depth of penetration of solvents to the membranes. In Chapter 5, we investigate the formation of sparsely-tethered bilayer lipid membranes (stBLMs) with vesicle hemifusion. In vesicle hemifusion, lipid vesicles in contact with a hydrophobic alkyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) deposit a lipid monolayer to the SAM surface, thus completing the bilayer. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy and Neutron Reflectivity are used to probe the integrity of stBLMs in terms of their

  5. On the Mechanical Stability of Austenite Matrix After Martensite Formation in a Medium Mn Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, B. B.; Huang, M. X.

    2016-07-01

    The present work employs the nanoindentation technique to investigate the effect of prior martensite formation on the mechanical stability of a retained austenite matrix. It is found that the small austenite grains that were surrounded by martensite laths have higher mechanical stability than the large austenite grains that were free of martensite laths. The higher mechanical stability of small austenite grains is due to its higher amount of defects resulting from the prior martensite formation. These defects act as barriers for the later martensite formation and therefore contribute to the higher mechanical stability of small austenite grains. As a result, the present work suggests that the formation of martensite tends to stabilize the surrounding austenite matrix. Therefore, it may explain the lower transformed amount of martensite after quenching as compared to the theoretical calculation using the Koistinen and Marburger (K-M) equation.

  6. Formation and stability of polychlorinated biphenyl Pickering emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy-Perreault, Andréanne; Kueper, Bernard H.; Rawson, Jim

    2005-03-01

    An emulsion stabilized by colloidal suspensions of finely divided solids is known as a Pickering emulsion. The potential for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) to form Pickering emulsions ex situ when in contact with powdered solids, such as clays and metal oxides, is investigated here. Bentonite, iron oxide and magnesium oxide dispersions proved to be robust Pickering emulsion stabilizers, whereas manganese oxide dispersions were not. Batch experiments revealed that emulsions can be formed using a moderately low energy input and can be stabilized with solid concentrations as low as 0.5 wt.%. For the base conditions (volumetric oil fraction ( ϕoil)=30 vol.%; solid concentration ( χ)=2 wt.%), the formed emulsions were indefinitely stable and the initial average droplet diameters varied from 80 to 258 μm, depending on the solid used in the colloidal dispersion. The average droplet size varied at early time, but for most conditions stabilized to a steady-state value 1 week after preparation. The effect of Ostwald ripening was limited. At greater than 0.5 wt.% concentration, the efficiency of the solid dispersion as a stabilizer was dependant on the volumetric oil fraction but not on the solid concentration. Generally, systems with volumetric oil fractions outside of the 20-70 vol.% range were unstable. The emulsions' droplet stability, average droplet size and size distribution were observed to vary as a function of the amount of energy provided to the system, the volumetric oil fraction, and the concentration of the solid in the aqueous dispersion. It is hypothesized that drilling through fractured rock in the immediate vicinity of dense, non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) PCBs may provide both the energy and solid material necessary to form Pickering emulsions.

  7. Stability of furosemide polymorphs and the effects of complex formation with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin.

    PubMed

    Garnero, Claudia; Chattah, Ana Karina; Longhi, Marcela

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the formation of supramolecular binary complexes with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin on the chemical and physical stability of the polymorphs I and II of furosemide was evaluated in solid state. The solid samples were placed under accelerated storage conditions and exposed to daylight into a stability chamber for a 6-month. Chemical stability was monitored by high performance liquid chromatography, while the physical stability was studied by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Changes in the physical appearance of the samples were evaluated. The studies showed a significant stabilizing effect of β-cyclodextrin on furosemide form II. Our results suggest that the complex formation is a useful tool for improving the stability of furosemide polymorphs. These new complexes are promising candidates that can be used in the pharmaceutical industry for the preparation of alternative matrices that improve physicochemical properties. PMID:27516309

  8. Stability of furosemide polymorphs and the effects of complex formation with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin.

    PubMed

    Garnero, Claudia; Chattah, Ana Karina; Longhi, Marcela

    2016-11-01

    The effect of the formation of supramolecular binary complexes with β-cyclodextrin and maltodextrin on the chemical and physical stability of the polymorphs I and II of furosemide was evaluated in solid state. The solid samples were placed under accelerated storage conditions and exposed to daylight into a stability chamber for a 6-month. Chemical stability was monitored by high performance liquid chromatography, while the physical stability was studied by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Changes in the physical appearance of the samples were evaluated. The studies showed a significant stabilizing effect of β-cyclodextrin on furosemide form II. Our results suggest that the complex formation is a useful tool for improving the stability of furosemide polymorphs. These new complexes are promising candidates that can be used in the pharmaceutical industry for the preparation of alternative matrices that improve physicochemical properties.

  9. Formation and Stability of Impurity "snakes" in Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    L. Delgado-Aparicio, et. al.

    2013-01-28

    New observations of the formation and dynamics of long-lived impurity-induced helical "snake" modes in tokamak plasmas have recently been carried-out on Alcator C-Mod. The snakes form as an asymmetry in the impurity ion density that undergoes a seamless transition from a small helically displaced density to a large crescent-shaped helical structure inside q < 1, with a regularly sawtoothing core. The observations show that the conditions for the formation and persistence of a snake cannot be explained by plasma pressure alone. Instead, many features arise naturally from nonlinear interactions in a 3D MHD model that separately evolves the plasma density and temperature

  10. The standard enthalpies of formation and thermal stability of diacyldiperoxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van-Chin-Syan, Yu. Ya.; Pavlovskii, Yu. P.; Gerasimchuk, S. I.; Dutka, V. S.

    2012-04-01

    Bomb calorimetry was used to determine the standard enthalpies of combustion and formation of eight crystalline aliphatic diacyldiperoxides with high molecular weights and low decomposition temperatures. A comparison of the calculated peroxide bond energy with the enthalpies of sublimation of these substances shows that the latter cannot in principle be determined experimentally.

  11. Opalescent and cloudy fruit juices: formation and particle stability.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, Tom

    2002-07-01

    Cloudy fruit juices, particularly from tropical fruit, are becoming a fast-growing part of the fruit juice sector. The classification of cloud as coarse and fine clouds by centrifugation and composition of cloud from apple, pineapple, orange, guava, and lemon juice are described. Fine particulate is shown to be the true stable cloud and to contain considerable protein, carbohydrate, and lipid components. Often, tannin is present as well. The fine cloud probably arises from cell membranes and appears not to be simply cell debris. Factors relating to the stability of fruit juice cloud, including particle sizes, size distribution, and density, are described and discussed. Factors promoting stable cloud in juice are presented.

  12. Formation and decomposition of chemically activated and stabilized hydrazine.

    PubMed

    Asatryan, Rubik; Bozzelli, Joseph W; da Silva, Gabriel; Swinnen, Saartje; Nguyen, Minh Tho

    2010-06-01

    Recombination of two amidogen radicals, NH(2) (X(2)B1), is relevant to hydrazine formation, ammonia oxidation and pyrolysis, nitrogen reduction (fixation), and a variety of other N/H/X combustion, environmental, and interstellar processes. We have performed a comprehensive analysis of the N(2)H(4) potential energy surface, using a variety of theoretical methods, with thermochemical kinetic analysis and master equation simulations used to treat branching to different product sets in the chemically activated NH(2) + NH(2) process. For the first time, iminoammonium ylide (NH(3)NH), the less stable isomer of hydrazine, is involved in the kinetic modeling of N(2)H(4). A new, low-energy pathway is identified for the formation of NH(3) plus triplet NH, via initial production of NH(3)NH followed by singlet-triplet intersystem crossing. This new reaction channel results in the formation of dissociated products at a relatively rapid rate at even moderate temperatures and above. A further novel pathway is described for the decomposition of activated N(2)H(4), which eventually leads to the formation of the simple products N(2) + 2H(2), via H(2) elimination to cis-N(2)H(2). This process, termed as "dihydrogen catalysis", may have significant implications in the formation and decomposition chemistry of hydrazine and ammonia in diverse environments. In this mechanism, stereoselective attack of cis-N(2)H(2) by molecular hydrogen results in decomposition to N(2) with a fairly low barrier. The reverse termolecular reaction leading to the gas-phase formation of cis-N(2)H(2) + H(2) achieves non-heterogeneous catalytic nitrogen fixation with a relatively low activation barrier (77 kcal mol(-1)), much lower than the 125 kcal mol(-1) barrier recently reported for bimolecular addition of H(2) to N(2). This termolecular reaction is an entropically disfavored path, but it does describe a new means of activating the notoriously unreactive N(2). We design heterogeneous analogues of this

  13. Protein modification by acrolein: Formation and stability of cysteine adducts

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Jian; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Pierce, William M.

    2010-01-01

    The toxicity of the ubiquitous pollutant and endogenous metabolite, acrolein, is due in part to covalent protein modifications. Acrolein reacts readily with protein nucleophiles via Michael addition and Schiff base formation. Potential acrolein targets in protein include the nucleophilic side chains of cysteine, histidine, and lysine residues as well as the free amino terminus of proteins. Although cysteine is the most acrolein-reactive residue, cysteine-acrolein adducts are difficult to identify in vitro and in vivo. In this study, model peptides with cysteine, lysine, and histidine residues were used to examine the reactivity of acrolein. Results from these experiments show that acrolein reacts rapidly with cysteine residues through Michael addition to form M+56 Da adducts. These M+56 adducts are, however, not stable, even though spontaneous dissociation of the adduct is slow. Further studies demonstrated that when acrolein and model peptides are incubated at physiological pH and temperature, the M+56 adducts decreased gradually accompanied by the increase of M+38 adducts, which are formed from intra-molecular Schiff base formation. Adduct formation with the side chains of other amino acid residues (lysine and histidine) was much slower than cysteine and required higher acrolein concentration. When cysteine residues were blocked by reaction with iodoacetamide and higher concentrations of acrolein were used, adducts of the N-terminal amino group or histidyl residues were formed but lysine adducts were not detected. Collectively, these data demonstrate that acrolein reacts avidly with protein cysteine residues and that the apparent loss of protein-acrolein Michael adducts over time may be related to the appearance of a novel (M+38) adduct. These findings may be important in identification of in vivo adducts of acrolein with protein cysteine residues. PMID:19231900

  14. Formation and stability of Vitamin E enriched nanoemulsions stabilized by Octenyl Succinic Anhydride modified starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitamin E (VE) is highly susceptible to autoxidation; therefore, it requires systems to encapsulate and protect it from autoxidation.In this study,we developed VE delivery systems, which were stabilized by Capsul® (MS), a starch modified with octenyl succinic anhydride. Influences of interfacial ten...

  15. A toolbox for predicting g-quadruplex formation and stability.

    PubMed

    Wong, Han Min; Stegle, Oliver; Rodgers, Simon; Huppert, Julian Leon

    2010-01-01

    G-quadruplexes are four stranded nucleic acid structures formed around a core of guanines, arranged in squares with mutual hydrogen bonding. Many of these structures are highly thermally stable, especially in the presence of monovalent cations, such as those found under physiological conditions. Understanding of their physiological roles is expanding rapidly, and they have been implicated in regulating gene transcription and translation among other functions. We have built a community-focused website to act as a repository for the information that is now being developed. At its core, this site has a detailed database (QuadDB) of predicted G-quadruplexes in the human and other genomes, together with the predictive algorithm used to identify them. We also provide a QuadPredict server, which predicts thermal stability and acts as a repository for experimental data from all researchers. There are also a number of other data sources with computational predictions. We anticipate that the wide availability of this information will be of use both to researchers already active in this exciting field and to those who wish to investigate a particular gene hypothesis.

  16. Microtubule Dynamicity Is More Important than Stability in Memory Formation: an In Vivo Study.

    PubMed

    Atarod, Deyhim; Eskandari-Sedighi, Ghazaleh; Pazhoohi, Farid; Karimian, Seyed Morteza; Khajeloo, Mojtaba; Riazi, Gholam Hossein

    2015-06-01

    It has been shown that microtubule (MT) activity and dynamics can have huge impacts on synaptic plasticity and memory formation. This is mainly due to various functions of MTs in neurons; MTs are involved in dendritic spine formation, axonal transportation, neuronal polarity, and receptor trafficking. Recent studies from our group and other labs have suggested the possible role of brain MT dynamicity and activity in memory; however, there is a need for more detailed studies regarding this aspect. In this study, we have tried to evaluate the importance of microtubule dynamicity rather than stability in memory formation in vivo. In order to investigate the role of MT stability in memory formation, we treated mice with paclitaxel-a classic microtubule-stabilizing agent. We then studied the behavior of treated animals using Morris water maze (MWM) test. To measure the effect of injected paclitaxel on MT polymerization kinetics, we conducted polymerization assays on brain extracts of the same paclitaxel-treated animals. Our results show that paclitaxel treatment affects animals' memory in a negative way and treated animals behave poorly in MWM compared to control group. In addition, our kinetics studies show that MT stability is significantly increased in brain extracts from paclitaxel-treated mice, but MT dynamics is reduced. Thus, we suggest that dynamicity is a very important feature of MT protein structures, and regarding memory formation, dynamicity is more important than stability and high activity.

  17. Formation and stabilization of nanoemulsions using biosurfactants: Rhamnolipids.

    PubMed

    Bai, Long; McClements, David Julian

    2016-10-01

    Nanoemulsions are used in the food, cosmetics, personal care and pharmaceutical industries to provide desirable optical, textural, stability, and delivery characteristics. In many industrial applications, it is desirable to formulate nanoemulsions using natural ingredients so as to develop label-friendly products. Rhamnolipids are biosurfactants isolated from certain microorganisms using fermentation processes. They are glycolipids that have a polar head consisting of rhamnose units and a non-polar tail consisting of a hydrocarbon chain. In this study, the interfacial characteristics of this natural surfactant at medium chain triglyceride (MCT) oil-water interfaces were characterized, and its ability to form nanoemulsions was compared to that of another natural surfactant (quillaja saponins). The influence of rhamnolipid concentration, homogenization pressure, and oil type on the mean droplet diameter of emulsions produced by microfluidization was determined. Rhamnolipids were highly effective at forming small droplets (d32<0.15μm) at low surfactant-to-oil ratios (SOR<1:10) for MCT oil. Rhamnolipids could also be used to form small droplets using long chain triglyceride oils, such as corn and fish oil. Rhamnolipid-coated droplets were stable to aggregation over a range of pH values (5-9), salt concentrations (<100mM NaCl) and temperatures (20-90°C). However, droplet aggregation was observed at highly acidic (pH 2-4) and high ionic strength (200-500mM NaCl) conditions. These effects were attributed to a reduction in electrostatic repulsion at low pH and high salt levels. Rhamnolipid-coated droplets had a high negative charge at neutral pH that decreased in magnitude with decreasing pH. These results indicate that rhamnolipids are effective natural surfactants that may be able to replace synthetic surfactants in certain commercial applications. PMID:27372634

  18. Interface stability and defect formation during crystal growth

    SciTech Connect

    Fabietti, L.M.R.

    1991-01-08

    Unidirectional solidification experiments have been carried out in organic crystals with the aim of improving our knowledge on the effects of constraints on the interface morphology and to increase our understanding of the growth of anisotropic materials. The experimental information shows that lateral constraints such as a sharp change in the cross-sectional area in the solid liquid interface path, can produce important changes in the microstructure if the interface morphology is planar, cellular or dendritic. The study of anisotropic materials cover several topics. It is first shown that slight anisotropy does not influence the dendrite tip selection criterion. This conclusion is obtained from the analysis of the relationship between tip radius and velocity for dendrites growing under the steady state condition for two different materials, CBr{sub 4} and C{sub 2}Cl{sub 6}, which have different surface energy anisotropy values. The values of the dendrite operating parameters {sigma}* are compared with the predictions of the solvability theory and the morphological stability theory. The experiments show better agreement with the latter theory. Critical experiments have been designed and carried out to find the response functions which determine the composition and temperature of the interface as a function of velocity in faceted materials. The experiments, carried out in Napthalene-Camphor system, indicate a strong temperature dependence of the planar interface growth which can be correlated with the step growth mechanism. Experiments on the interface instability show an important dependence on the crystallographic orientation. Unidirectional solidification experiments in zone refined Napthalene confined in very thin cells (gap size {le} 50 {mu}m) have proven to be a good method to study the defect production at the solid liquid interface. 118 refs., 90 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Contribution of plant lignin to the soil organic matter formation and stabilization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lignin is the third most abundant plant constituent after cellulose and hemicellulose and thought to be one of the building blocks for soil organic matter formation. Lignin can be used as a predictor for long-term soil organic matter stabilization and C sequestration. Soils and humic acids from fo...

  20. Conditions for Circumstellar Disc Formation II: Effects of Initial Cloud Stability and Mass Accretion Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Masahiro N.; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro

    2016-09-01

    Disc formation in strongly magnetized cloud cores is investigated using a three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulation with a focus on the effects of the initial cloud stability and the mass accretion rate. The initial cloud stability greatly alters the disc formation process even for prestellar clouds with the same mass-to-flux ratio. A high mass accretion rate onto the disc-forming region is realized in initially unstable clouds, and a large angular momentum is introduced into the circumstellar region in a short time. The region around the protostar has both a thin infalling envelope and a weak magnetic field, which both weaken the effect of magnetic braking. The growth of the rotation-supported disc is promoted in such unstable clouds. Conversely, clouds in an initially near-equilibrium state show lower accretion rates of mass and angular momentum. The angular momentum is transported to the outer envelope before protostar formation. After protostar formation, the circumstellar region has a thick infalling envelope and a strong magnetic field that effectively brake the disc. As a result, disc formation is suppressed when the initial cloud is in a nearly stable state. The density distribution of the initial cloud also affects the disc formation process. Disc growth strongly depends on the initial conditions when the prestellar cloud has a uniform density, whereas there is no significant difference in the disc formation process in prestellar clouds with nonuniform densities.

  1. Assessment of the role of agricultural wastes in aggregate formation and their stability.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Erdem

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of three agricultural processing wastes (APWs) on aggregate formation and aggregate stability in a sandy loam textured soil (Typic Xerofluvent) in Antalya, Turkey. The effects of APW applications on aggregate formation and aggregate stability were observed for different aggregate size groups (>4; 4-2; 2-1; 1-0.5; 0.5-0.25; 0.25-0.050 and <0.050 mm). Sugar Beet Pulp (SBP), Apple Pomace (AP) and Cotton Gin Waste (CGW) were applied to soil as fresh material (dry weight basis 0, 10, 20 and 40 t ha(-1)), and a greenhouse pot experiment was conducted using a completely randomized design with five replicates of each treatment. The study consisted of two periods. The first period (P1) consisted of a six-month incubation period (1st sample period). The second period (P2) is a six-month period and includes an eight-week green bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) growing process (2nd sample period). At the end of the first six months and fourteen months in total, aggregate formation and aggregate stability were determined and their correlation to different C sources was explained. At the end of the experiment, formation of aggregates was increased with increase in the application level of organic wastes in particular intermediate aggregates. Increase in the incubation time significantly enhanced the formation of particular macroaggregates. Soil aggregate stability of all aggregate sizes generally increased with the increasing in the level of implementation. In addition, incubation time effects on aggregate stability for macroaggregates were not significant, but significant for macro and microaggregates.

  2. Stability and halo formation of a breathing axisymmetric uniform-density beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluckstern, Robert L.; Cheng, Wen-Hao; Kurennoy, Sergey S.; Ye, Huanchan

    1996-12-01

    An analysis of the stability and halo formation is presented for a breathing axisymmetric beam of uniform density [Kapchinsky-Vladimirsky (KV) beam] in a uniform focusing channel. Theoretical results are obtained for the form of modes involving nonuniform charge density. In particular, the mismatch-tune depression space is explored, both analytically and by numerical particle-in-cell simulations, to determine the stability limits and growth rates of the most unstable modes. The implications for halo formation are then explored. Halo parameters obtained by simulations are compared with predictions of an analytical model for halo formation from the breathing KV beam developed earlier. The practical applications of the results for high-current linear accelerators are discussed.

  3. Capsaicin inhibits collagen fibril formation and increases the stability of collagen fibers.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Sathiamurthi; Dubey, Kriti; Badhwar, Rahul; George, Kodimattan Joseph; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar; Bagler, Ganesh; Madhan, Balaraman; Kar, Karunakar

    2015-02-01

    Capsaicin is a versatile plant product which has been ascribed several health benefits and anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. We have investigated the effect of capsaicin on the molecular stability, self-assembly, and fibril stability of type-I collagen. It was found that capsaicin suppresses collagen fibril formation, increases the stability of collagen fibers in tendons, and has no effect on the molecular stability of collagen. Turbidity assay data show that capsaicin does not promote disassembly of collagen fibrils. However, capsaicin moderately protects collagen fibrils from enzymatic degradation. Computational studies revealed the functions of the aromatic group and amide region of capsaicin in the collagen-capsaicin interaction. The results may have significant implications for capsaicin-based therapeutics that target excess collagen accumulation-linked pathology, for example thrombosis, fibrosis, and sclerosis.

  4. Comparison of different procedures to stabilize biogas formation after process failure in a thermophilic waste digestion system: Influence of aggregate formation on process stability

    SciTech Connect

    Kleyboecker, A.; Liebrich, M.; Kasina, M.; Kraume, M.; Wittmaier, M.; Wuerdemann, H.

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mechanism of process recovery with calcium oxide. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Formation of insoluble calcium salts with long chain fatty acids and phosphate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Adsorption of VFAs by the precipitates resulting in the formation of aggregates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acid uptake and phosphate release by the phosphate-accumulating organisms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microbial degradation of volatile fatty acids in the aggregates. - Abstract: Following a process failure in a full-scale biogas reactor, different counter measures were undertaken to stabilize the process of biogas formation, including the reduction of the organic loading rate, the addition of sodium hydroxide (NaOH), and the introduction of calcium oxide (CaO). Corresponding to the results of the process recovery in the full-scale digester, laboratory experiments showed that CaO was more capable of stabilizing the process than NaOH. While both additives were able to raise the pH to a neutral milieu (pH > 7.0), the formation of aggregates was observed particularly when CaO was used as the additive. Scanning electron microscopy investigations revealed calcium phosphate compounds in the core of the aggregates. Phosphate seemed to be released by phosphorus-accumulating organisms, when volatile fatty acids accumulated. The calcium, which was charged by the CaO addition, formed insoluble salts with long chain fatty acids, and caused the precipitation of calcium phosphate compounds. These aggregates were surrounded by a white layer of carbon rich organic matter, probably consisting of volatile fatty acids. Thus, during the process recovery with CaO, the decrease in the amount of accumulated acids in the liquid phase was likely enabled by (1) the formation of insoluble calcium salts with long chain fatty acids, (2) the adsorption of volatile fatty acids by the precipitates, (3) the acid uptake by phosphorus-accumulating organisms and (4

  5. A Wellbore Stability Model for a Deviated Well in a Transversely Isotropic Formation Considering Poroelastic Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Jin, Yan; Lu, Yunhu; Chen, Mian; Hou, Bing; Chen, Wenyi; Wen, Xin; Yu, Xiaoning

    2016-09-01

    To analyse wellbore stability phenomena when drilling through a transversely isotropic formation such as shale, a wellbore stability model is developed based on the coordinate transformation method and complex variable elasticity theory. In order to comprehensively consider the anisotropies in the transversely isotropic formation, the model includes the followings: 1. the elastic anisotropy due to the sedimentation effect and naturally developed fractures and 2. the strength anisotropy due to the poor cementation between bedding planes and natural fractures. The model is further generalized by accounting for an arbitrary wellbore trajectory under an arbitrary in situ stress orientation. Next, the model is used in a parametric study that includes factors such as elastic anisotropy, strength anisotropy, multiple weak planes, in situ stress anisotropy, and poroelastic anisotropy, all of which can have a great influence on wellbore stability. Finally, a correction for a frequently used failure criterion has been made to ensure that the newly developed model is comprehensive and accurate for wellbore stability analyses in highly heterogeneous formations.

  6. Tuning the formation and stability of microcapsules by environmental conditions and chitosan structure.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ying; Xie, Hongguo; Liu, Xiaocen; Yang, Fan; Yu, Weiting; Ma, Xiaojun

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this work is to tune the formation and stability of the alginate-chitosan (AC) polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) and microcapsules. Particularly, we explore the role of the conformation of chitosan on its interaction with alginate to understand the mechanism underpinning their interactions at the molecular level. Reducing the charge density by increasing pH will increase the compactness of chitosan, the values of the enthalpy (H) and stoichiometry (N) of binding between chitosan and alginate. Consequently, chitosan has advantage in being adsorbed on alginate beads to form microcapsules, including the binding rate and binding amount. Though the total heat release remain similar in the range of ionic strength, chitosan diffuses much easier into alginate hydrogels when in higher ionic strength. Increasing pH and ionic strength both help AC microcapsules to have higher stability. The results indicate that the formation and stability of AC microcapsules are related to the rigidity and conformations of chitosan molecules. After increasing acetylation degree (DA) of chitosan, the binding rate of chitosan and mechanical strength of AC microcapsules are both reduced. This work demonstrates the versatility and feasibility of tuning the formation and stability of polysaccharide microcapsules by physical factors and chitosan chemical structures. PMID:27344950

  7. Tuning the formation and stability of microcapsules by environmental conditions and chitosan structure.

    PubMed

    Ren, Ying; Xie, Hongguo; Liu, Xiaocen; Yang, Fan; Yu, Weiting; Ma, Xiaojun

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this work is to tune the formation and stability of the alginate-chitosan (AC) polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) and microcapsules. Particularly, we explore the role of the conformation of chitosan on its interaction with alginate to understand the mechanism underpinning their interactions at the molecular level. Reducing the charge density by increasing pH will increase the compactness of chitosan, the values of the enthalpy (H) and stoichiometry (N) of binding between chitosan and alginate. Consequently, chitosan has advantage in being adsorbed on alginate beads to form microcapsules, including the binding rate and binding amount. Though the total heat release remain similar in the range of ionic strength, chitosan diffuses much easier into alginate hydrogels when in higher ionic strength. Increasing pH and ionic strength both help AC microcapsules to have higher stability. The results indicate that the formation and stability of AC microcapsules are related to the rigidity and conformations of chitosan molecules. After increasing acetylation degree (DA) of chitosan, the binding rate of chitosan and mechanical strength of AC microcapsules are both reduced. This work demonstrates the versatility and feasibility of tuning the formation and stability of polysaccharide microcapsules by physical factors and chitosan chemical structures.

  8. The diskmass survey. VIII. On the relationship between disk stability and star formation

    SciTech Connect

    Westfall, Kyle B.; Verheijen, Marc A. W.; Andersen, David R.; Bershady, Matthew A.; Martinsson, Thomas P. K.; Swaters, Robert A.

    2014-04-10

    We study the relationship between the stability level of late-type galaxy disks and their star-formation activity using integral-field gaseous and stellar kinematic data. Specifically, we compare the two-component (gas+stars) stability parameter from Romeo and Wiegert (Q {sub RW}), incorporating stellar kinematic data for the first time, and the star-formation rate estimated from 21 cm continuum emission. We determine the stability level of each disk probabilistically using a Bayesian analysis of our data and a simple dynamical model. Our method incorporates the shape of the stellar velocity ellipsoid (SVE) and yields robust SVE measurements for over 90% of our sample. Averaging over this subsample, we find a meridional shape of σ{sub z}/σ{sub R}=0.51{sub −0.25}{sup +0.36} for the SVE and, at 1.5 disk scale lengths, a stability parameter of Q {sub RW} = 2.0 ± 0.9. We also find that the disk-averaged star-formation-rate surface density ( Σ-dot {sub e,∗}) is correlated with the disk-averaged gas and stellar mass surface densities (Σ {sub e,} {sub g} and Σ {sub e,} {sub *}) and anti-correlated with Q {sub RW}. We show that an anti-correlation between Σ-dot {sub e,∗} and Q {sub RW} can be predicted using empirical scaling relations, such that this outcome is consistent with well-established statistical properties of star-forming galaxies. Interestingly, Σ-dot {sub e,∗} is not correlated with the gas-only or star-only Toomre parameters, demonstrating the merit of calculating a multi-component stability parameter when comparing to star-formation activity. Finally, our results are consistent with the Ostriker et al. model of self-regulated star-formation, which predicts Σ-dot {sub e,∗}/Σ{sub e,g}∝Σ{sub e,∗}{sup 1/2}. Based on this and other theoretical expectations, we discuss the possibility of a physical link between disk stability level and star-formation rate in light of our empirical results.

  9. Role of the crystal field stabilization energy in the formation of metal(II) formate mixed crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balarew, Christo; Stoilova, Donka; Vassileva, Violeta

    A relationship between the distribution coefficient values and the factors determining the isomorphous substitution of some metal(II) formates (Mg, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd) has been found, given by D=[exp⁡{aṡf[ΔR/R]+bṡϕ(Δɛ)+cṡψ(Δs)}/{RT}, where Δ R/R is the relative difference in the ionic radii of the intersubstituting ions, Δɛ is the difference in the Me sbnd O bond energy, Δ s is the difference in the crystal field stabilization energy. The pre-exponential term represents the balance in bonding factors between the ions in the crystal and in the aqueous solution, in the case of ideally mixing in the solid state. The exponential term takes into account the enthalpy of mixing in the solid state. For the isostructural formate salts in which the substitution of a given cation by another one occurs in equivalent octahedral positions, the difference in the crystal field stabilization energy exerts the most important influence on the enthalpy of mixing.

  10. Formation and stability of a Janus-Wedge type of DNA triplex.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dongli; Meena, Meena; Sharma, Sunil K; McLaughlin, Larry W

    2004-01-14

    A new type of DNA targeting with the formation of a Janus-Wedge (J-W) triple helix is described. The "wedge" residue (W) attached to a PNA backbone is designed to insert itself into double-stranded DNA and base pair with both Watson-Crick faces. To study the stability of such an assembly, we have examined the formation of the J-W triplex with dC8 - T8 target sequence. The use of this target sequence permits the study of this new helix form without competing Watson-Crick interactions between the two target residues. Studies indicate that the W strand binds to both target strands, with defined polarity and a stability (-15.2 kcal/mol) that is roughly the sum of the two independent duplex interactions.

  11. Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Although there are many publications pertaining to gas hydrates, their formation and stability in various geological conditions are poorly known. Therefore, for the same reasons and because of the very broad scope of our research, limited amount and extremely dispersed information, the study regions are very large. Moreover, almost without exception the geological environments controlling gas hydrates formation and stability of the studied regions are very complex. The regions studied (completed and partially completed - total 17 locations) during the reporting period, particularly the Gulf of Mexico and the Middle America Trench, are the most important in this entire research project. In the past, both of these regions have been extensively studied, the presence of gas hydrates confirmed and samples recovered. In our investigation it was necessary not only to review all previous data and interpretations, but to do a thorough analysis of the basins, and a critical evaluation of an previously reported and publicly available but not published information.

  12. Rearrangement of MICU1 multimers for activation of MCU is solely controlled by cytosolic Ca(2.).

    PubMed

    Waldeck-Weiermair, Markus; Malli, Roland; Parichatikanond, Warisara; Gottschalk, Benjamin; Madreiter-Sokolowski, Corina T; Klec, Christiane; Rost, Rene; Graier, Wolfgang F

    2015-10-22

    Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is a vital process that controls distinct cell and organelle functions. Mitochondrial calcium uptake 1 (MICU1) was identified as key regulator of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) that together with the essential MCU regulator (EMRE) forms the mitochondrial Ca(2+) channel. However, mechanisms by which MICU1 controls MCU/EMRE activity to tune mitochondrial Ca(2+) signals remain ambiguous. Here we established a live-cell FRET approach and demonstrate that elevations of cytosolic Ca(2+) rearranges MICU1 multimers with an EC50 of 4.4 μM, resulting in activation of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. MICU1 rearrangement essentially requires the EF-hand motifs and strictly correlates with the shape of cytosolic Ca(2+) rises. We further show that rearrangements of MICU1 multimers were independent of matrix Ca(2+) concentration, mitochondrial membrane potential, and expression levels of MCU and EMRE. Our experiments provide novel details about how MCU/EMRE is regulated by MICU1 and an original approach to investigate MCU/EMRE activation in intact cells.

  13. Organic chloramines in drinking water: An assessment of formation, stability, reactivity and risk.

    PubMed

    How, Zuo Tong; Linge, Kathryn L; Busetti, Francesco; Joll, Cynthia A

    2016-04-15

    Although organic chloramines are known to form during the disinfection of drinking water with chlorine, little information is currently available on their occurrence or toxicity. In a recent in vitro study, some organic chloramines (e.g. N-chloroglycine) were found to be cytotoxic and genotoxic even at micromolar concentrations. In this paper, the formation and stability of 21 different organic chloramines, from chlorination of simple amines and amino acids, were studied, and the competition between 20 amino acids during chlorination was also investigated. For comparison, chlorination of two amides was also conducted. The formation and degradation of selected organic chloramines were measured using either direct UV spectroscopic or colorimetric detection. Although cysteine, methionine and tryptophan were the most reactive amino acids towards chlorination, they did not form organic chloramines at the chlorine to precursor molar ratios that were tested. Only 6 out of the 21 organic chloramines formed had a half-life of more than 3 h, although this group included all organic chloramines formed from amines. A health risk assessment relating stability and reactivity data from this study to toxicity and precursor abundance data from the literature indicated that only N-chloroglycine is likely to be of concern due to its stability, toxicity and abundance in water. However, given the stability of organic chloramines formed from amines, more information about the toxicity and precursor abundance for these chloramines is desirable.

  14. Structural basis for stabilization of the hypervariable D3 domain of Salmonella flagellin upon filament formation.

    PubMed

    Muskotál, Adél; Seregélyes, Csaba; Sebestyén, Anett; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2010-11-01

    The hypervariable D3 domain of Salmonella flagellin, composed of residues 190-283, is situated at the outer surface of flagellar filaments. A flagellin mutant deprived of the complete D3 domain (ΔD3_FliC) exhibited a significantly decreased thermal stability (T(m) 41.9 °C) as compared to intact flagellin (T(m) 47.3 °C). However, the stability of filaments formed from ΔD3_FliC subunits was virtually identical with that of native flagellar filaments. While D3 comprises the most stable part of monomeric flagellin playing an important role in the stabilization of the other two (D1 and D2) domains, the situation is reversed in the polymeric state. Upon filament formation, ordering of the disordered terminal regions of flagellin in the core part of the filament results in the stabilization of the radially arranged D1 and D2 domains, and there is a substantial increase of stability even in the distant outermost D3 domain, which is connected to D2 via a pair of short antiparallel β-strands. Our experiments revealed that crosslinking the ends of the isolated D3 domain through a disulfide bridge gives rise to a stabilization effect reminiscent of that observed upon polymerization. It appears that the short interdomain linker between domains D2 and D3 serves as a stabilization center that facilitates propagation of the conformational signal from the filament core to the outer part of filament. Because D3 is a largely independent part of flagellin, its replacement by heterologous proteins or domains might offer a promising approach for creation of various fusion proteins possessing polymerization ability.

  15. SDS-PAGE/immunoblot detection of Abeta multimers in human cortical tissue homogenates using antigen-epitope retrieval.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Rebecca F; Tomidokoro, Yasushi; Ghiso, Jorge A; Walker, Lary C

    2010-01-01

    The anomalous folding and polymerization of the beta-amyloid (Abeta) peptide is thought to initiate the neurodegenerative cascade in Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis(1). Abeta is predominantly a 40- or 42-amino acid peptide that is prone to self-aggregation into beta-sheet-rich amyloid fibrils that are found in the cores of cerebral senile plaques in Alzheimer's disease. Increasing evidence suggests that low molecular weight, soluble Abeta multimers are more toxic than fibrillar Abeta amyloid(2). The identification and quantification of low- and high-molecular weight multimeric Abeta species in brain tissue is an essential objective in Alzheimer's disease research, and the methods employed also can be applied to the identification and characterization of toxic multimers in other proteopathies(3). Naturally occurring Abeta multimers can be detected by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by immunoblotting with Abeta-specific antibodies. However, the separation and detection of multimeric Abeta requires the use of highly concentrated cortical homogenates and antigen retrieval in small pore-size nitrocellulose membranes. Here we describe a technique for the preparation of clarified human cortical homogenates, separation of proteins by SDS-PAGE, and antigen-epitope retrieval/Western blotting with antibody 6E10 to the N-terminal region of the Abeta peptide. Using this protocol, we consistently detect Abeta monomers, dimers, trimers, tetramers, and higher molecular weight multimers in cortical tissue from humans with Alzheimer's pathology. PMID:20418805

  16. Magnetic microparticle-based multimer detection system for the detection of prion oligomers in sheep.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kuntaek; Kim, Su Yeon; Lee, Byoungsub; Segarra, Christiane; Kang, Sungmin; Ju, Youngran; Schmerr, Mary Jo; Coste, Joliette; Kim, Sang Yun; Yokoyama, Takashi; An, Seong Soo A

    2015-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are zoonotic fatal neurodegenerative diseases in animals and humans. TSEs are commonly known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease in cervids, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. The putative transmissible agents are infectious prion proteins (PrP(Sc)), which are formed by the conversion of the normal prion protein on the glycoprotein cell surface in the presence of other PrP(Sc). Reports of the transmission of TSEs through blood raised considerable concern about the safety of blood and blood products. To address this issue, many laboratories attempted to develop a sensitive and accurate blood diagnostic test to detect PrP(Sc). Previously, we reported that, compared to normal controls, the multimer detection system (MDS) was more efficient in detecting PrP(Sc) in infected hamster brain homogenate, mouse plasma spiked with purified PrP(Sc) from scrapie mouse brain, and scrapie-infected hamster plasmas. MDS differentiates prion multimers from the cellular monomer through the multimeric expression of epitopes on prion multimers, in contrast to the monomeric form. In this study, MDS detected PrP(Sc) in plasma samples from scrapie-infected sheep expressing clinical symptoms, demonstrating 100% sensitivity and specificity in these samples. Plasma samples from asymptomatic lambs at the preclinical stage (8-month-old naturally infected offspring of scrapie-infected parents expressing a highly susceptible genotype) tested positive with 50% sensitivity and 100% specificity. In the first of two coded analyses using clinical scrapie-infected sheep and normal healthy samples, MDS successfully identified all but one of the clinical samples with 92% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Similar results were obtained in the second coded analysis using preclinical samples. MDS again successfully identified all but one of the samples with 87% sensitivity and 100

  17. Magnetic microparticle-based multimer detection system for the detection of prion oligomers in sheep

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kuntaek; Kim, Su Yeon; Lee, Byoungsub; Segarra, Christiane; Kang, Sungmin; Ju, Youngran; Schmerr, Mary Jo; Coste, Joliette; Kim, Sang Yun; Yokoyama, Takashi; An, Seong Soo A

    2015-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) are zoonotic fatal neurodegenerative diseases in animals and humans. TSEs are commonly known as bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle, scrapie in sheep and goats, chronic wasting disease in cervids, and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease in humans. The putative transmissible agents are infectious prion proteins (PrPSc), which are formed by the conversion of the normal prion protein on the glycoprotein cell surface in the presence of other PrPSc. Reports of the transmission of TSEs through blood raised considerable concern about the safety of blood and blood products. To address this issue, many laboratories attempted to develop a sensitive and accurate blood diagnostic test to detect PrPSc. Previously, we reported that, compared to normal controls, the multimer detection system (MDS) was more efficient in detecting PrPSc in infected hamster brain homogenate, mouse plasma spiked with purified PrPSc from scrapie mouse brain, and scrapie-infected hamster plasmas. MDS differentiates prion multimers from the cellular monomer through the multimeric expression of epitopes on prion multimers, in contrast to the monomeric form. In this study, MDS detected PrPSc in plasma samples from scrapie-infected sheep expressing clinical symptoms, demonstrating 100% sensitivity and specificity in these samples. Plasma samples from asymptomatic lambs at the preclinical stage (8-month-old naturally infected offspring of scrapie-infected parents expressing a highly susceptible genotype) tested positive with 50% sensitivity and 100% specificity. In the first of two coded analyses using clinical scrapie-infected sheep and normal healthy samples, MDS successfully identified all but one of the clinical samples with 92% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Similar results were obtained in the second coded analysis using preclinical samples. MDS again successfully identified all but one of the samples with 87% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The

  18. Understanding soil organic matter formation and stabilization (Philippe Duchaufour Medal Lecture)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kögel-Knabner, Ingrid

    2015-04-01

    During the biomass formation/decomposition cycle carbon dioxide (CO2), the main gas driving global warming, is either released from or stabilized in the organic matter of soils. One of the most fundamental functions of soil organic matter is the provision of metabolic energy which drives soil biological processes. In essence, it is the transformation of carbon by plant, micro- and macro-biological processes that provides energy and results in the establishment of a cycle that connects above- and belowground energy transformations. The amount and type of organic matter accumulated in soils is controlled, among other factors by intrinsic soil properties, specifically soil texture and the associated aggregate structures. Soil development leads to the formation of aggregated structures composed of a highly complex mixture of different mineral and organic constituents. The resulting soil type specific carbon sequestration can strongly be affected by soil management, varying greatly with the type and intensity of land use. The processes of formation and stabilization of organic matter through organo-mineral interactions in aggregated soil structures are controlled at the sub-µm scale. Understanding the binding of organic matter in these fine soil structures is thus key to elucidate the biogeochemical soil processes that are part of the carbon cycle as well as to evaluate the effects of soil management on the carbon cycle. I will discuss open questions for understanding these processes and how we can approach them by combining state-of-the-art analytical techniques with innovative experiments.

  19. Improved methods for the formation and stabilization of R-loops

    PubMed Central

    Kaback, David B.; Angerer, Lynne M.; Davidson, Norman

    1979-01-01

    Improved methods for the formation and stabilization of R-loops for visualization in the electron microscope are presented. The two complementary strands of a duplex DNA are photochemically crosslinked once every 1 to 3 kb using 4, 5', 8 trimethylpsoralen. R-loops are then formed by incubation with RNA in 70% formamide at a temperature above the DNA melting temperature. Finally, the R-loops are stabilized by modifying the free single strand of DNA with glyoxal, thus minimizing the displacement of the hybridized RNA by branch migration. In this manner R-loops can be formed and visualized at a high frequency irrespective of the base composition of the nucleic acid of interest. Images PMID:379821

  20. Stability of rock exposures and formation conditions for cave-ins in the Krivoi Rog basin

    SciTech Connect

    Shadrin, A.G.; Sazonov, A.V.

    1985-07-01

    In the underground working of ore deposits at depth, cavities are formed which create the potential for sudden caving-in of the earth's surface and the danger of air impact in the mine. In a number of cases, these phenomena are accompanied by catastrophic consequences. In mines in the Krovoi Rod deposits, many uncollapsed cavities have been noted. In the most complicated situations, it is extremely important to evaluate the stability of the exposures and the time of possible cave-in, and considering this, to work out measures for the elimination of cavities and the safe performance of mining operations in this region. The authors present a method for evaluating the stability of exposures and formation conditions for cave-ins which is being applied in combined site development.

  1. Formation, levitation, and stability of prominences in the magnetized solar atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, J. F.; Mok, Y.; Van Hoven, G.

    1993-01-01

    The dynamic formation of prominences in the initial magnetothermal equilibrium and their stability to sideward displacements are investigated focusing on the structure of the 2D solar atmosphere in the presence of coronal arcades or loops. A model based on 2D magnetohydrodynamic equations takes into account gravity, compressible flows, heating, radiation, anisotropic thermal conduction, and coupling to a deep chromosphere. It is found that prominences in simple arcades characterized by magnetic field with significant curvature at the apex are unstable to a lateral displacement.

  2. Formation, spin-up, and stability of field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Omelchenko, Yuri A.

    2015-08-24

    Formation, spontaneous spin-up and stability of theta-pinch formed field-reversed configurations are studied self-consistently in three dimensions with a multiscale hybrid model that treats all plasma ions as full-orbit collisional macro-particles and the electrons as a massless quasineutral fluid. The end-to-end hybrid simulations for the first time reveal poloidal profiles of implosion-driven fast toroidal plasma rotation and demonstrate three well-known discharge regimes as a function of experimental parameters: the decaying stable configuration, the tilt unstable configuration and the nonlinear evolution of a fast growing tearing mode.

  3. Formation and stability of carbocations and carbanions in water and intrinsic barriers to their reactions.

    PubMed

    Richard, J P; Amyes, T L; Toteva, M M

    2001-12-01

    Lifetimes in water as short as 10(-11) s have been determined for carbocations and carbanions by referencing the rate of their reaction with solvent species to that for the appropriate "clock" reaction, and equilibrium constants have been determined as the ratio of rate constants for their formation and breakdown. Rate-equilibrium correlations for these organic ions are often poor and sometimes even defy the simple generalization that reactivity increases with decreasing stability. This seemingly confusing body of data can be understood through consideration of the both the Marcus intrinsic barrier and the thermodynamic driving force to reaction of these organic ions.

  4. RELATIONSHIP FORMATION AND STABILITY IN EMERGING ADULTHOOD: DO SEX RATIOS MATTER?

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Tara D.; Manning, Wendy D.; Giordano, Peggy C.; Longmore, Monica A.

    2013-01-01

    Research links sex ratios with the likelihood of marriage and divorce. However, whether sex ratios similarly influence precursors to marriage—transitions in and out of dating or cohabiting relationships—is unknown. Utilizing data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (TARS) and the 2000 census, this study assesses whether sex ratios influence the formation and stability of emerging adults’ romantic relationships. Findings show that relationship formation is unaffected by partner availability, yet the presence of partners increases women’s odds of cohabiting, decreases men’s odds of cohabiting, and increases number of dating partners and cheating among men. It appears that sex ratios influence not only transitions in and out of marriage, but also the process through which individuals search for and evaluate partners prior to marriage. PMID:24265510

  5. RELATIONSHIP FORMATION AND STABILITY IN EMERGING ADULTHOOD: DO SEX RATIOS MATTER?

    PubMed

    Warner, Tara D; Manning, Wendy D; Giordano, Peggy C; Longmore, Monica A

    2011-01-01

    Research links sex ratios with the likelihood of marriage and divorce. However, whether sex ratios similarly influence precursors to marriage-transitions in and out of dating or cohabiting relationships-is unknown. Utilizing data from the Toledo Adolescent Relationships Study (TARS) and the 2000 census, this study assesses whether sex ratios influence the formation and stability of emerging adults' romantic relationships. Findings show that relationship formation is unaffected by partner availability, yet the presence of partners increases women's odds of cohabiting, decreases men's odds of cohabiting, and increases number of dating partners and cheating among men. It appears that sex ratios influence not only transitions in and out of marriage, but also the process through which individuals search for and evaluate partners prior to marriage.

  6. Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Krason, J.; Finley, P.

    1988-01-01

    The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

  7. Mechanistic Insights into the Formation of Dodecanethiolate-Stabilized Magnetic Iridium Nanoparticles: Thiosulfate vs Thiol Ligands

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of stable and isolable iridium nanoparticles with an average core size of ∼1.2 ± 0.3 nm was achieved by employing sodium S-dodecylthiosulfate as a ligand precursor during the modified Brust–Schiffrin reaction. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the isolated Ir nanoparticles revealed a high degree of monodispersity. Further characterizations with 1H NMR, FT-IR, UV–vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed that the synthesized Ir nanoparticles are stabilized by dodecanethiolate ligands produced upon the adsorption/cleavage of S-dodecylthiosulfate on the growing Ir nanoparticle surface. By comparison, synthetic attempts employing dodecanethiol as a stabilizing ligand led to the formation of Ir-thiolate species (Ir(SR)3) as an intermediate and Ir-hydroxide species at the completion of reaction. Mechanistic investigations of these two reactions using S-dodecylthiosulfate and dodecanethiol provided deeper understandings on the novelty of thiosulfate ligands, which allow the successful formation of stable thiolate-capped Ir nanoparticles. Moreover, these Ir nanoparticles were shown to have strong magnetic properties. PMID:25018790

  8. Dynamics, Fluxes, Stability, Succession and Landscape Formation in Cold Environments: The DYNAFLUX / DYNACOLD Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beylich, Achim A.

    2015-04-01

    Within Europe there is a wide array of high-latitude and high-altitude landscapes, covering a significant proportion of the total land area. These defined cold climate landscapes represent a variety of stages of deglaciation history and landscape formation. We find landscapes at different levels of postglacial stabilization, providing the unique opportunity to study the interactions between geo-, bio-, social and socio-economic systems at the land surface. The DYNAFLUX / DYNACOLD Network (2004 - ) bridges across the geo-, bio-, social and socio-economic sciences in order to investigate the complex dynamics of stabilization, succession and landscape formation during and after ice retreat and under human impact. The Network provides a multidisciplinary forum where research groups come together. It is linking and integrating a number of networks and programs and creates an umbrella program and a forum for sharing knowledge. The focus of this network is relevant for different end users, including risk and vulnerability assessment, sustainable land use, land management and conservation. Also questions closely related to Global Change like, e.g., hazards, permafrost degradation, loss of biodiversity are addressed.

  9. Formation of disulfide bonds in insect prophenoloxidase enhances immunity through improving enzyme activity and stability.

    PubMed

    Lu, Anrui; Peng, Qin; Ling, Erjun

    2014-06-01

    Type 3 copper proteins, including insect prophenoloxidase (PPO), contain two copper atoms in the active site pocket and can oxidize phenols. Insect PPO plays an important role in immunity. Insects and other invertebrates show limited recovery from pathogen invasion and wounds if phenoloxidase (PO) activity is low. In most insect PPOs, two disulfide bonds are present near the C-terminus. However, in Pimpla hypochondriaca (a parasitoid wasp), each PPO contains one disulfide bond. We thus questioned whether the formation of two sulfide bonds in insect PPOs improved protein stability and/or increased insect innate immunity over time. Using Drosophila melanogaster PPO1 as a model, one or two disulfide bonds were deleted to evaluate the importance of disulfide bonds in insect immunity. rPPO1 and mutants lacking disulfide bonds could be expressed and showed PO activity. However, the PO activities of mutants lacking one or two disulfide bonds significantly decreased. Deletion of disulfide bonds also reduced PPO thermostability. Furthermore, antibacterial activities against Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis significantly decreased when disulfide bonds were deleted. Therefore, the formation of two disulfide bond(s) in insect PPO enhances antibacterial activity by increasing PO activity and stability.

  10. The DYNAFLUX / DYNACOLD Network: Dynamics, Fluxes, Stability, Succession and Landscape Formation in Cold Climate Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beylich, Achim A.

    2016-04-01

    There is a wide range of high-latitude and high-altitude cold climate landscapes in Europe, covering a significant proportion of the total land surface area. This spectrum of defined cold climate landscapes represents a variety of stages of deglaciation history and landscape formation. We can find landscapes at different levels of postglacial stabilization which is providing the opportunity to study the interactions between geo-, bio-, social and socio-economic systems at the land surface. The DYNAFLUX / DYNACOLD Network (2004-) bridges across the geo-, bio-, social and socio-economic sciences in order to analyze the complex dynamics of stabilization, succession and landscape formation during and after ice retreat and under ongoing human influences. The network provides a multidisciplinary forum where researchers come together. In addition, it is linking a number of networks, working groups and programs and creates an umbrella network and a forum for sharing knowledge. The scientific focus of this network is also relevant for different end users, including risk and vulnerability assessment, sustainable land use, land management and conservation. In addition, key questions related to Global Change like, e.g., hazards, permafrost degradation and loss of biodiversity are discussed.

  11. Iron hydroxy carbonate formation in zerovalent iron permeable reactive barriers: characterization and evaluation of phase stability.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tony R; Wilkin, Richard T

    2010-07-30

    Predicting the long-term potential of permeable reactive barriers for treating contaminated groundwater relies on understanding the endpoints of biogeochemical reactions between influent groundwater and the reactive medium. Iron hydroxy carbonate (chukanovite) is frequently observed as a secondary mineral precipitate in granular iron PRBs. Mineralogical characterization was carried out using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy on materials collected from three field-based PRBs in the US (East Helena, MT; Elizabeth City, NC; Denver Federal Center, CO). These PRBs were installed to treat a range of contaminants, including chlorinated organics, hexavalent chromium, and arsenic. Results obtained indicate that chukanovite is a prevalent secondary precipitate in the PRBs. Laboratory experiments on high-purity chukanovite separates were carried out to constrain the room-temperature solubility for this mineral. An estimated Gibbs energy of formation (Delta(f)G degrees) for chukanovite is -1174.4 +/- 6 kJ/mol. A mineral stability diagram is consistent with observations from the field. Water chemistry from the three reactive barriers falls inside the predicted stability field for chukanovite, at inorganic carbon concentrations intermediate to the stability fields of siderite and ferrous hydroxide. These new data will aid in developing better predictive models of mineral accumulation in zerovalent iron PRBs.

  12. Formation and Stabilization of Raphasatin and Sulforaphene from Radish Roots by Endogenous Enzymolysis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Mi-Bo; Lim, Sang-Bin

    2015-01-01

    The biologically active compounds raphasatin and sulforaphene are formed during the hydrolysis of radishes by an endogenous myrosinase. Raphasatin is very unstable, and it is generated and simultaneously degraded to less active compounds during hydrolysis in aqueous media. This study determined the hydrolysis conditions to maximize the formation of raphasatin and sulforaphene by an endogenous myrosinase and minimize their degradation during the hydrolysis of radish roots. The reaction parameters, such as the reaction medium, reaction time, type of mixing, and reaction temperature were optimized. A stability test for raphasatin and sulforaphene was also performed during storage of the hydrolyzed products at 25°C for 10 days. The formation and breakdown of raphasatin and sulforaphene in radish roots by endogenous enzymolysis was strongly influenced by the reaction medium, reaction time, and type of mixing. The production and stabilization of raphasatin in radishes was efficient in water and dichloromethane with shaking for 15 min at 25°C. For sulforaphene, the favorable condition was water as the reaction medium without shaking for 10 min at 25°C. The maximum yields of raphasatin and sulforaphene were achieved in a concurrent hydrolysis reaction without shaking in water for 10 min and then with shaking in dichloromethane for 15 min at 25°C. Under these conditions, the yields of raphasatin and sulforaphene were maximized at 12.89 and 1.93 μmol/g of dry radish, respectively. The stabilities of raphasatin and sulforaphene in the hydrolyzed products were 56.4% and 86.5% after 10 days of storage in water and dichloromethane at 25°C. PMID:26175999

  13. Stabilization of microbial biomass in soils: Implications for SOM formation and xenobiotics degradation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miltner, A.; Kindler, R.; Achtenhagen, J.; Nowak, K.; Girardi, C.; Kästner, M.

    2012-04-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) plays an important role in soils. It is the carbon source and the habitat of many soil microorganisms, its quality and quantity thus affect soil microbial activity. Therefore, the amount and composition of SOM determines soil quality, but SOM formation and stabilization are not yet sufficiently understood. Recently, microbial biomass residues could be identified as a significant source of SOM. We incubated 13C-labelled bacterial cells for 224 days in an agricultural soil and traced the fate of the 13C label of bacterial biomass in soil by isotopic analysis. The data were combined to a mass balance, and the biomass residues were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). A high percentage of the biomass-derived carbon (in particular from proteins) remained in soil, mainly in the non-living part of SOM, after extended incubation. The SEM micrographs only rarely showed intact cells. Instead, organic patchy fragments of 200-500 nm size were abundant. These fragments were associated with all stages of cell envelope decay and fragmentation, indicating specific disintegration processes of cell walls. Similar fragments developed on initially clean and sterile in situ microcosms during exposure in groundwater, thus providing clear evidence for their microbial origin. Microbial cell envelope fragments thus contribute significantly to SOM formation. A significant contribution of cell envelope fragments to SOM formation provides a simple explanation for the development of the small, nano-scale patchy organic materials observed in soil electron micrographs. It also suggests that microstructures of microbial cells and of small plant debris provide the molecular architecture of SOM attached to particle surfaces. This origin and macromolecular architecture of SOM is consistent with most observations on SOM, e.g. the abundance of microbial-derived biomarkers, the low C/N ratio, the water repellency and the stabilization of microbial biomass. The

  14. Dew formation characteristics in a revegetation-stabilized desert ecosystem in Shapotou area, Northern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yan-xia; Wang, Xin-ping; Zhang, Ya-feng

    2010-06-01

    SummarySoil moisture in the upper layer plays an important role in arid desert ecosystems. Dew as an additional source of fresh water, may have a positive impact upon the ecosystems in arid and semi-arid zones. Measurements on dew formation amount and duration were carried out in the whole October of 2008 at different condensing surface types (bare dune sands, physical soil crusts and biological soil crusts) associated with different inter-space positions between plants, and at the area under plant canopy in a revegetation-stabilized arid desert ecosystem in Shapotou area, China. The results indicated that there was a positive linear correlation between dew amounts and relative humidity, while mean temperature was negatively linearly related to dew amounts and no significant relationship was found between dew amounts and wind speed. Clear and foggy mornings were characterized by higher dew amounts and longer dew duration, whereas less dew was recorded during cloudy and especially windy mornings. Crusts, especially the biological soil crusts, obtained significantly higher amounts of dew than that of bare moving sand dunes. It was more difficult for dew to condense under the canopy of the plants than on the bare sand dunes. At the first stage of ecological engineering projects, dew can renew the moisture losing through the evaporation of soil and transpiration of leaves, and thus can supply important source of water for xerophytic shrubs. The higher dew amount at the inter-space of re-vegetated plants is an important driving factor for the growth of microorganisms and spore plants, which further accelerate the formation of biological soil crusts and stabilization of moving sand dunes. The presence of biological soil crusts, in turn, helps to facilitate the formation of dew. Therefore, a mutual enhanced effect exists between dew and artificially revegetation ecosystems.

  15. The Role of Ala198 in the Stability and Coenzyme Specificity of Bacterial Formate Dehydrogenases

    PubMed Central

    Alekseeva, A. A.; Fedorchuk, V. V.; Zarubina, S. A.; Sadykhov, E. G.; Matorin, A. D.; Savin, S. S.; Tishkov, V. I.

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown by an X-ray structural analysis that the amino acid residues Ala198, which are located in the coenzyme-binding domain of NAD+-dependent formate dehydrogenases (EC 1.2.1.2., FDH) from bacteria Pseudomonas sp.101 and Moraxella sp. C-1 (PseFDH and MorFDH, respectively), have non-optimal values of the angles ψ and φ. These residues were replaced with Gly by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutants PseFDH A198G and MorFDH A198G were expressed in E.coli cells and obtained in active and soluble forms with more than 95% purity. The study of thermal inactivation kinetics showed that the mutation A198G results in a 2.5- fold increase in stability compared to one for the wild-type enzymes. Kinetic experiments indicate that A198G replacement reduces the KMNAD+ value from 60 to 35 and from 80 to 45 μM for PseFDH and MorFDH, respectively, while the KMHCOO- value remains practically unchanged. Amino acid replacement A198G was also added to the mutant PseFDH D221S with the coenzyme specificity changed from NAD+ to NADP+. In this case, an increase in thermal stability was also observed, but the influence of the mutation on the kinetic parameters was opposite: KM increased from 190 to 280 μM and from 43 to 89 mM for NADP+ and formate, respectively. According to the data obtained, inference could be drawn that earlier formate dehydrogenase from bacterium Pseudomonas sp. 101 was specific to NADP+, but not to NAD+. PMID:25927002

  16. Steady states and linear stability analysis of precipitation pattern formation at geothermal hot springs.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pak Yuen; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2007-10-01

    A dynamical theory of geophysical precipitation pattern formation is presented and applied to irreversible calcium carbonate (travertine) deposition. Specific systems studied here are the terraces and domes observed at geothermal hot springs, such as those at Yellowstone National Park, and speleothems, particularly stalactites and stalagmites. The theory couples the precipitation front dynamics with shallow water flow, including corrections for turbulent drag and curvature effects. In the absence of capillarity and with a laminar flow profile, the theory predicts a one-parameter family of steady state solutions to the moving boundary problem describing the precipitation front. These shapes match the measured shapes near the vent at the top of observed travertine domes well. Closer to the base of the dome, the solutions deviate from observations and circular symmetry is broken by a fluting pattern, which we show is associated with capillary forces causing thin film break-up. We relate our model to that recently proposed for stalactite growth, and calculate the linear stability spectrum of both travertine domes and stalactites. Lastly, we apply the theory to the problem of precipitation pattern formation arising from turbulent flow down an inclined plane and identify a linear instability that underlies scale-invariant travertine terrace formation at geothermal hot springs. PMID:17995057

  17. Chondroitin 6-Sulfation Regulates Perineuronal Net Formation by Controlling the Stability of Aggrecan.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Shinji; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNNs) are lattice-like extracellular matrix structures composed of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs). The appearance of PNNs parallels the decline of neural plasticity, and disruption of PNNs reactivates neural plasticity in the adult brain. We previously reported that sulfation patterns of chondroitin sulfate (CS) chains on CSPGs influenced the formation of PNNs and neural plasticity. However, the mechanism of PNN formation regulated by CS sulfation remains unknown. Here we found that overexpression of chondroitin 6-sulfotransferase-1 (C6ST-1), which catalyzes 6-sulfation of CS chains, selectively decreased aggrecan, a major CSPG in PNNs, in the aged brain without affecting other PNN components. Both diffuse and PNN-associated aggrecans were reduced by overexpression of C6ST-1. C6ST-1 increased 6-sulfation in both the repeating disaccharide region and linkage region of CS chains. Overexpression of 6-sulfation primarily impaired accumulation of aggrecan in PNNs, whereas condensation of other PNN components was not affected. Finally, we found that increased 6-sulfation accelerated proteolysis of aggrecan by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain with thrombospondin motif (ADAMTS) protease. Taken together, our results indicate that sulfation patterns of CS chains on aggrecan influenced the stability of the CSPG, thereby regulating formation of PNNs and neural plasticity.

  18. Steady states and linear stability analysis of precipitation pattern formation at geothermal hot springs.

    PubMed

    Chan, Pak Yuen; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2007-10-01

    A dynamical theory of geophysical precipitation pattern formation is presented and applied to irreversible calcium carbonate (travertine) deposition. Specific systems studied here are the terraces and domes observed at geothermal hot springs, such as those at Yellowstone National Park, and speleothems, particularly stalactites and stalagmites. The theory couples the precipitation front dynamics with shallow water flow, including corrections for turbulent drag and curvature effects. In the absence of capillarity and with a laminar flow profile, the theory predicts a one-parameter family of steady state solutions to the moving boundary problem describing the precipitation front. These shapes match the measured shapes near the vent at the top of observed travertine domes well. Closer to the base of the dome, the solutions deviate from observations and circular symmetry is broken by a fluting pattern, which we show is associated with capillary forces causing thin film break-up. We relate our model to that recently proposed for stalactite growth, and calculate the linear stability spectrum of both travertine domes and stalactites. Lastly, we apply the theory to the problem of precipitation pattern formation arising from turbulent flow down an inclined plane and identify a linear instability that underlies scale-invariant travertine terrace formation at geothermal hot springs.

  19. Polyphenylenepyridyl dendrimers as stabilizing and controlling agents for CdS nanoparticle formation.

    PubMed

    Kuchkina, Nina V; Morgan, David Gene; Stein, Barry D; Puntus, Lada N; Sergeev, Alexander M; Peregudov, Alexander S; Bronstein, Lyudmila M; Shifrina, Zinaida B

    2012-04-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) are being actively explored for applications in medical diagnostics and therapy and numerous electronic devices including solar cells. In this paper we demonstrate the influence of the third generation rigid polyphenylenepyridyl dendrimers (PPPDs) of a different architecture on the formation of well-defined CdS NPs. A high temperature approach to the synthesis of novel CdS/PPPD nanocomposites is feasible due to the high thermal stability of PPPDs. The PPPD architecture affects the CdS NP formation: larger NPs are obtained in the presence of dendrimers with 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene cores compared to those with tetrakis(4-ethynylphen-1-yl)methane cores. The reaction conditions such as concentrations of PPPDs and NP precursors and the temperature regime also influence the CdS NP sizes. For the first time, we elucidated a mechanism of CdS NP formation in a non-coordinating solvent through the CdO redispersion in the presence of PPPDs. Interesting optical properties of these CdS/PPPD nanocomposites make them promising candidates for imaging applications. PMID:22374388

  20. Steady states and linear stability analysis of precipitation pattern formation at geothermal hot springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Pak Yuen; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2007-10-01

    A dynamical theory of geophysical precipitation pattern formation is presented and applied to irreversible calcium carbonate (travertine) deposition. Specific systems studied here are the terraces and domes observed at geothermal hot springs, such as those at Yellowstone National Park, and speleothems, particularly stalactites and stalagmites. The theory couples the precipitation front dynamics with shallow water flow, including corrections for turbulent drag and curvature effects. In the absence of capillarity and with a laminar flow profile, the theory predicts a one-parameter family of steady state solutions to the moving boundary problem describing the precipitation front. These shapes match the measured shapes near the vent at the top of observed travertine domes well. Closer to the base of the dome, the solutions deviate from observations and circular symmetry is broken by a fluting pattern, which we show is associated with capillary forces causing thin film break-up. We relate our model to that recently proposed for stalactite growth, and calculate the linear stability spectrum of both travertine domes and stalactites. Lastly, we apply the theory to the problem of precipitation pattern formation arising from turbulent flow down an inclined plane and identify a linear instability that underlies scale-invariant travertine terrace formation at geothermal hot springs.

  1. Nonlinear stability analyses of vegetative pattern formation in an arid environment

    PubMed Central

    Boonkorkuea, N.; Lenbury, Y.; Alvarado, F.J.; Wollkind, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    The development of spontaneous stationary vegetative patterns in an arid isotropic homogeneous environment is investigated by means of various weakly nonlinear stability analyses applied to the appropriate governing equation for this phenomenon. In particular, that process can be represented by a fourth-order partial differential time-evolution logistic equation for the total plant biomass per unit area divided by the carrying capacity of its territory and defined on an unbounded flat spatial domain. Those patterns that consist of parallel stripes, labyrinth-like mazes, rhombic arrays of rectangular patches, and hexagonal distributions of spots or gaps are generated by the balance between the effects of short-range facilitation and long-range competition. Then those theoretical predictions are compared with both relevant observational evidence and existing numerical simulations as well as placed in the context of the results from some recent nonlinear pattern formation studies. PMID:22881129

  2. Centlein, a novel microtubule-associated protein stabilizing microtubules and involved in neurite formation.

    PubMed

    Jing, Zhenli; Yin, Huilong; Wang, Pan; Gao, Juntao; Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    We have previously reported that the centriolar protein centlein functions as a molecular link between C-Nap1 and Cep68 to maintain centrosome cohesion [1]. In this study, we identified centlein as a novel microtubule-associated protein (MAP), directly binding to purified microtubules (MTs) via its longest coiled-coil domain. Overexpression of centlein caused profound nocodazole- and cold-resistant MT bundles, which also relied on its MT-binding domain. siRNA-mediated centlein depletion resulted in a significant reduction in tubulin acetylation level and overall fluorescence intensity of cytoplasmic MT acetylation. Centlein was further characterized in neurons. We found that centlein overexpression inhibited neurite formation in retinoic acid (RA)-induced SH-SY5Y and N2a cells. Taken together, we propose that centlein is involved in MT stability and neuritogenesis in vivo. PMID:26915804

  3. Complexation of Al(III) with gluconate in alkaline to hyperalkaline solutions: formation, stability and structure.

    PubMed

    Pallagi, Attila; Tasi, Ágost Gyula; Peintler, Gábor; Forgo, Péter; Pálinkó, István; Sipos, Pál

    2013-10-01

    Contrary to suggestions in the literature, it has been proven that Al(III) forms a 1 : 1 complex with gluconate (hereafter Gluc(-)) in strongly alkaline (pH > 12) aqueous solutions. The complex formation was proven via(27)Al and (1)H NMR, freezing-point depression, polarimetric measurements as well as potentiometric and conductometric titrations. This complexation is a pH independent process, i.e., a condensation reaction takes place. The stability constant of the complex formed was derived from (1)H NMR and polarimetric measurements, and was found to be log K = 2.4 ± 0.4. In the complex formed, Al(III) has a tetrahedral geometry, and the Al(OH)4(-) is most probably statistically distributed between the alcoholate groups of the Gluc(-). PMID:23897548

  4. Osmotically driven formation of double emulsions stabilized by amphiphilic block copolymers.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jinhye; Russell, Thomas P; Hayward, Ryan C

    2014-07-28

    Double emulsions are valuable for the formation of multi-compartmental structures. A variety of pathways to prepare double emulsions have been developed, but high-throughput routes to droplets of controlled size and architecture remain scarce. A new single-step process is introduced for preparation of water-in-oil-in-water double emulsions by a previously unexplained process of self-emulsification. We show that the origin of this process is the osmotic stress resulting from the presence of salt impurities within the amphiphilic block copolymers used for emulsion stabilization. Further, we utilize osmotically driven emulsification to tailor the structures of multiple emulsions, which upon solvent evaporation can yield multi-compartmental capsules or hierarchically structured porous films. PMID:24931713

  5. Generalized Momentum Control of the Spin-Stabilized Magnetospheric Multiscale Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queen, Steven Z.; Shah, Neerav; Benegalrao, Suyog S.; Blackman, Kathie

    2015-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission consists of four identically instrumented, spin-stabilized observatories elliptically orbiting the Earth in a tetrahedron formation. The on-board attitude control system adjusts the angular momentum of the system using a generalized thruster-actuated control system that simultaneously manages precession, nutation and spin. Originally developed using Lyapunov control-theory with rate-feedback, a published algorithm has been augmented to provide a balanced attitude/rate response using a single weighting parameter. This approach overcomes an orientation sign-ambiguity in the existing formulation, and also allows for a smoothly tuned-response applicable to both a compact/agile spacecraft, as well as one with large articulating appendages.

  6. The DYNAFLUX / DYNACOLD Network: Dynamics, Fluxes, Stability, Succession and Landscape Formation in Cold Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beylich, A. A.; Molau, U.

    2012-04-01

    Within Europe there is a wide array of high-latitude and high-altitude landscapes, covering a significant proportion of the total land area. These cold climate landscapes represent a variety of stages of deglaciation history and landscape formation. We find landscapes at different levels of postglacial stabilization providing the unique possibility to study the interactions between geo-, bio-, social and socio-economic systems at the land surface. The DYNAFLUX / DYNACOLD Network (2004 - ) bridges across geo-, bio-, social and socio-economic sciences in order to investigate the complex dynamics of stabilization, succession and landscape formation during and after ice retreat and under human impact. DYNAFLUX / DYNACOLD provides a multidisciplinary forum where research groups come together. The integrated approach provides - in addition to newly generated disciplinary knowledge - the qualitative and quantitative linkages of findings from geo-, bio- and socio-work groups to develop a systems-based holistic level-of-understanding about the dynamics of environmental fluxes in high-latitude and high-altitude geo-ecosystems and landscapes. This knowledge can be used to assess the risks and potentials of the future development with reference to land use intensity / changes and climatic dynamics. DYNAFLUX / DYNACOLD is since 2004 linking and integrating a number of networks and programmes and creates an umbrella programme and a forum for sharing knowledge. The focus of the Network is relevant for different end users, including risk and vulnerability assessment, sustainable land use, land management and conservation. Also questions with regards to Global Change are addressed (hazards, permafrost degradation, loss of biodiversity, etc.).

  7. Emulsification by high frequency ultrasound using piezoelectric transducer: formation and stability of emulsifier free emulsion.

    PubMed

    Kaci, Messaouda; Meziani, Smail; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira; Gillet, Guillaume; Desjardins-Lavisse, Isabelle; Desobry, Stephane

    2014-05-01

    Emulsifier free emulsion was developed with a new patented technique for food and cosmetic applications. This emulsification process dispersed oil droplets in water without any emulsifier. Emulsions were prepared with different vegetable oil ratios 5%, 10% and 15% (v/v) using high frequency ultrasounds generated by piezoelectric ceramic transducer vibrating at 1.7 MHz. The emulsion was prepared with various emulsification times between 0 and 10h. Oil droplets size was measured by laser granulometry. The pH variation was monitored; electrophoretic mobility and conductivity variation were measured using Zêtasizer equipment during emulsification process. The results revealed that oil droplets average size decreased significantly (p<0.05) during the first 6h of emulsification process and that from 160 to 1 μm for emulsions with 5%, 10% and from 400 to 29 μm for emulsion with 15% of initial oil ratio. For all tested oil ratios, pH measurement showed significant decrease and negative electrophoretic mobility showed the accumulation of OH(-) at oil/water interface leading to droplets stability in the emulsion. The conductivity of emulsions showed a decrease of the ions quantity in solution, which indicated formation of positive charge layer around OH(-) structure. They constitute a double ionic layer around oil particles providing emulsion stability. This study showed a strong correlation between turbidity measurement and proportion of emulsified oil. PMID:24315670

  8. Possible mechanism of formation and stability of anomalous states of water

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, C.Y.; Lo, S.Y. |

    1998-01-01

    The authors examine the physical processes which are involved in the formation and stability of the anomalous states of water reported recently. The initial step of adding a small amount of ionic compound X{sup +}Y{sup {minus}} to pure water leads t the formation of water clusters X{sup +} (H{sub 2}O){sub n} and Y{sup {minus}} (H{sub 2}O){sub n} with n {much_gt} 1. The structure of the cluster around the ion depends sensitively on the equation of state. The authors explore the consequences of possible polymorphic states of H{sub 2}O in the liquid phase at room temperature. If there are low-lying polymorphic states, the local dipole moment and the local density will change discontinuously as a function of the radial distance from the ion, and regions of different polymorphic states will be found at different separations from the ion. Fragmentation of the cluster by vigorous shaking may break up the cluster into small domains to allow subsequent coalescence of these domains or the growth of the domains as seeds to form greater domains of polymorphic states. Further experimental and theoretical analyses are needed to study these pictures.

  9. Stabilization of a β-hairpin in monomeric Alzheimer's amyloid-β peptide inhibits amyloid formation

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Wolfgang; Grönwall, Caroline; Jonsson, Andreas; Ståhl, Stefan; Härd, Torleif

    2008-01-01

    According to the amyloid hypothesis, the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease is triggered by the oligomerization and aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide into protein plaques. Formation of the potentially toxic oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ assemblies is accompanied by a conformational change toward a high content of β-structure. Here, we report the solution structure of Aβ(1–40) in complex with the phage-display selected affibody protein ZAβ3, a binding protein of nanomolar affinity. Bound Aβ(1–40) features a β-hairpin comprising residues 17–36, providing the first high-resolution structure of Aβ in β conformation. The positions of the secondary structure elements strongly resemble those observed for fibrillar Aβ. ZAβ3 stabilizes the β-sheet by extending it intermolecularly and by burying both of the mostly nonpolar faces of the Aβ hairpin within a large hydrophobic tunnel-like cavity. Consequently, ZAβ3 acts as a stoichiometric inhibitor of Aβ fibrillation. The selected Aβ conformation allows us to suggest a structural mechanism for amyloid formation based on soluble oligomeric hairpin intermediates. PMID:18375754

  10. Theoretical study of polyiodide formation and stability on monolayer and bilayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Tristant, Damien; Puech, Pascal; Gerber, Iann C

    2015-11-28

    The presence of polyiodide complexes have been reported several times when carbon-based materials were doped by iodine molecules, but their formation mechanism remains unclear. By using first-principles calculations that include nonlocal correlation effects by means of a van der Waals density functional approach, we propose that the formation of triiodide (I3(-)) and pentaiodide (I5(-)) is due to a large density of iodine molecules (I2) in interaction with a carbonaceous substrate. As soon as the concentration of surface iodine reaches a threshold value of 12.5% for a graphene monolayer and 6.25% for a bilayer, these complexes spontaneously appear. The corresponding structural and energetic aspects, electronic structures and vibrational frequencies support this statement. An upshift of the Dirac point from the Fermi level with values of 0.45 and 0.52 eV is observed for adsorbed complexes on graphene and intercalated complexes between two layers, respectively. For doped-graphene, it corresponds to a graphene hole density of around 1.1 × 10(13) cm(-2), in quantitative agreement with experiments. Additionally, we have studied the thermal stability at room temperature of these adsorbed ions on graphene by means of ab initio molecular dynamics, which also shows successful p-doping with polyiodide complexes.

  11. Formation and stability of oxygen-rich bubbles that shape photosynthetic mats.

    PubMed

    Bosak, T; Bush, J W M; Flynn, M R; Liang, B; Ono, S; Petroff, A P; Sim, M S

    2010-01-01

    Gas release in photic-zone microbialites can lead to preservable morphological biosignatures. Here, we investigate the formation and stability of oxygen-rich bubbles enmeshed by filamentous cyanobacteria. Sub-millimetric and millimetric bubbles can be stable for weeks and even months. During this time, lithifying organic-rich laminae surrounding the bubbles can preserve the shape of bubbles. Cm-scale unstable bubbles support the growth of centimetric tubular towers with distinctly laminated mineralized walls. In environments that enable high photosynthetic rates, only small stable bubbles will be enclosed by a dense microbial mesh, while in deep waters extensive microbial mesh will cover even larger photosynthetic bubbles, increasing their preservation potential. Stable photosynthetic bubbles may be preserved as sub-millimeter and millimeter-diameter features with nearly circular cross-sections in the crests of some Proterozoic conical stromatolites, while centrimetric tubes formed around unstable bubbles provide a model for the formation of tubular carbonate microbialites that are not markedly depleted in (13)C.

  12. Formation and stability of ridge-ridge-ridge triple junctions in rheologically realistic lithosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Burov, Evgueni

    2015-04-01

    Triple junctions are probably the most remarkable features of plate boundaries since their presence constitutes one of the major demonstrations of plate tectonics theory. Divergent (R-R-R) triple junctions (at 120° and T junctions) are particular ones since their stability depends on the exact values of the relative velocities of plate divergence and hence is strongly affected by plate rheology and processes of crustal accretion. The mechanisms of their formation and long-term steadiness are not well understood even though it is commonly accepted, generally based on common sense, that the geometry and stability of triple junctions should be related to the intuitively acceptable geometric considerations that 3-branch configurations should be "stable" over the time on a 3D Earth surface. That said, most plate boundaries are in fact 2D in terms that they involve only two plates, while junctions with 3 and more branches, if even mechanically not excluded, are generally short-lived and hence rarely observed at tectonic scale. Indeed, it has been long-time suggested that triple junctions result from evolution of short-lived quadruple junctions, yet, without providing a consistent mechanical explanation or experimental demonstration of this process, due to the rheological complexity of the lithosphere and that of strain localization and crustal accretion processes. For example, it is supposed that R-R-R junctions form as result of axisymmetric mantle upwellings. However, impingement of buoyant fluid on a non-pre-stressed lithosphere should result in multiple radial cracks, as is well known from previous analog and numerical experiments. In case of uni-directionally pre-stressed lithosphere, it has also shown that linear 2D rift structures should be formed. Therefore, a complete 3D thermos-mechanically consistent approach is needed to understand the processes of formation of multi-branch junctions. With this goal we here reproduce and study the processes of multi

  13. Protein kinase D promotes plasticity-induced F-actin stabilization in dendritic spines and regulates memory formation

    PubMed Central

    Bencsik, Norbert; Szíber, Zsófia; Liliom, Hanna; Tárnok, Krisztián; Borbély, Sándor; Gulyás, Márton; Rátkai, Anikó; Szűcs, Attila; Hazai-Novák, Diána; Ellwanger, Kornelia; Rácz, Bence; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Hausser, Angelika

    2015-01-01

    Actin turnover in dendritic spines influences spine development, morphology, and plasticity, with functional consequences on learning and memory formation. In nonneuronal cells, protein kinase D (PKD) has an important role in stabilizing F-actin via multiple molecular pathways. Using in vitro models of neuronal plasticity, such as glycine-induced chemical long-term potentiation (LTP), known to evoke synaptic plasticity, or long-term depolarization block by KCl, leading to homeostatic morphological changes, we show that actin stabilization needed for the enlargement of dendritic spines is dependent on PKD activity. Consequently, impaired PKD functions attenuate activity-dependent changes in hippocampal dendritic spines, including LTP formation, cause morphological alterations in vivo, and have deleterious consequences on spatial memory formation. We thus provide compelling evidence that PKD controls synaptic plasticity and learning by regulating actin stability in dendritic spines. PMID:26304723

  14. Shear-Induced Unfolding and Enzymatic Cleavage of Full-Length VWF Multimers.

    PubMed

    Lippok, Svenja; Radtke, Matthias; Obser, Tobias; Kleemeier, Lars; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Budde, Ulrich; Netz, Roland R; Rädler, Joachim O

    2016-02-01

    Proteolysis of the multimeric blood coagulation protein von Willebrand Factor (VWF) by ADAMTS13 is crucial for prevention of microvascular thrombosis. ADAMTS13 cleaves VWF within the mechanosensitive A2 domain, which is believed to open under shear flow. In this study, we combine fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and a microfluidic shear cell to monitor real-time kinetics of full-length VWF proteolysis as a function of shear stress. For comparison, we also measure the Michaelis-Menten kinetics of ADAMTS13 cleavage of wild-type VWF in the absence of shear but partially denaturing conditions. Under shear, ADAMTS13 activity on full-length VWF arises without denaturing agent as evidenced by FCS and gel-based multimer analysis. In agreement with Brownian hydrodynamics simulations, we find a sigmoidal increase of the enzymatic rate as a function of shear at a threshold shear rate γ˙1/2 = 5522/s. The same flow-rate dependence of ADAMTS13 activity we also observe in blood plasma, which is relevant to predict hemostatic dysfunction. PMID:26840720

  15. Mechanism of Formation and Stabilization of Nanoparticles Produced by Heating Electrostatic Complexes of WPI-Dextran Conjugate and Chondroitin Sulfate.

    PubMed

    Dai, Qingyuan; Zhu, Xiuling; Yu, Jingyang; Karangwa, Eric; Xia, Shuqin; Zhang, Xiaoming; Jia, Chengsheng

    2016-07-13

    Protein conformational changes were demonstrated in biopolymer nanoparticles, and molecular forces were studied to elucidate the formation and stabilization mechanism of biopolymer nanoparticles. The biopolymer nanoparticles were prepared by heating electrostatic complexes of whey protein isolate (WPI)-dextran conjugate (WD) and chondroitin sulfate (ChS) above the denaturation temperature and near the isoelectric point of WPI. The internal characteristics of biopolymer nanoparticles were analyzed by several spectroscopic techniques. Results showed that grafted dextran significantly (p < 0.05) prevented the formation of large aggregates of WD dispersion during heat treatment. However, heat treatment slightly induced the hydrophobicity changes of the microenvironment around fluorophores of WD. ChS electrostatic interaction with WD changed the fluorescence intensity of WD regardless of heat treatment. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopies confirmed that glycosylation and ionic polysaccharide did not significantly cause protein conformational changes in WD and ChS (WDC) during heat treatment. In addition, hydrophobic bonds were the major molecular force for the formation and stabilization of biopolymer nanoparticles. However, hydrogen bonds slightly influenced their formation and stabilization. Ionic bonds only promoted the formation of biopolymer nanoparticles, while disulfide bonds partly contributed to their stability. This work will be beneficial to understand protein conformational changes and molecular forces in biopolymer nanoparticles, and to prepare the stable biopolymer nanoparticles from heating electrostatic complexes of native or glycosylated protein and polysaccharide. PMID:27329490

  16. Expression, purification, and characterization of protective MPT64 antigen protein and identification of its multimers isolated from nontoxic Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Ra.

    PubMed

    Chu, Teng-Ping J; Yuann, Jeu-Ming P

    2011-05-01

    MPT64, a secreted protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), stimulates the immune reactions within cells and is a protective antigen that is lost by the bacilli Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine during propagation. To minimize the toxicity caused by MTB, we used the MPT64 gene encoded by nontoxic H37Ra MTB to carry out genetic expansion via polymerase chain reaction and gene clone MPT64. The plasmid DNA encoded MPT64 was expressed at 20°C for 22 H, and a large quantity of MPT64 was obtained. In the absence of urea, MPT64 multimers with subunits being covalently connected via disulfide bonds were detected by Western blot showing strong protein-protein interactions, as evidenced by the formation of MPT64 tetramers. Finally, with urea of decreasing concentrations, we refolded MPT64 purified in the presence of urea and determined its secondary structures using circular dichroism. MPT64 was found to contain 2.2% α-helix, 50.9% β-sheet, 19.5% turn, and 27.4% random coil. The molecular weight of MPT64 was determined by a matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometer and found to be 23,497 Da, very close to the theoretical molecular weight of MPT64. The results presented here provide a sound basis for future biochemical and biophysical studies of MPT64 or any other proteins encoded by nontoxic H37Ra MTB.

  17. Formation, stability, and solubility of metal oxide nanoparticles: Surface entropy, enthalpy, and free energy of ferrihydrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiemstra, Tjisse

    2015-06-01

    Ferrihydrite (Fh) is an excellent model for understanding nanoparticle behavior in general. Moreover, Fh is one of the most important Fe (hydr) oxides in nature. Fh particles can be extremely small leading to a very high reactive surface area that changes its chemical potential, strongly affecting the solubility, nucleation, and stability. These characteristics can be coupled to the interfacial Gibbs free energy, being γ = 0.186 ± 0.01 J m-2 for Fh. The surface free energy has a relatively large contribution of surface entropy (-TSsurf = +0.079 ± 0.01 J m-2). The surface entropy is primarily related to the formation of surface groups by chemisorption of water (-17.1 J mol-1 K-1), for Fh equivalent with +0.064 ± 0.002 J m-2 at a surface loading NH2O = 12.6 μmol m-2. The entropy contribution of physisorbed water has been estimated by analyzing, as model, the surface enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy of the principal interfaces of H2O, i.e. ice-water-gas. It is about 20% of the contribution of chemisorbed water. The surface enthalpy of Fh is exceptionally low (Hsurf = +0.107 ± 0.01 J m-2), which can be explained by surface depletion (SD) of relatively unstable Fe polyhedra, or similarly, by additional surface loading of the non-depleted mineral core with specific Fe polyhedra for stabilization. The experimental enthalpy of Fh formation varies linearly with the surface area and correctly predicts the enthalpy value for the mineral core (-405.2 ± 1.2 kJ mol FeO3/2), being similar to the literature value for Fh as virtual bulk material (-406.7 ± 1.5 kJ mol FeO3/2) obtained with MO/DFT computations. The thermochemical quantities of the mineral core and surface are essentially the same for the entire range of Fh samples, in line with the SD model. The solubility of Fh suspensions as a whole may differ from the behavior of individual particles due to polydispersity. For 2-line Fh, the overall solubility is log Kso ∼ -38.5 ± 0.1 and for prolongedly aged 6

  18. Nitrate photochemistry in NaY zeolite: product formation and product stability under different environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Gankanda, Aruni; Grassian, Vicki H

    2013-03-14

    In the atmosphere, mineral dust particles are often associated with adsorbed nitrate from heterogeneous reactions with nitrogen oxides (N2O5, HNO3, NO3, and NO2). Nitrate ions associated with mineral dust particles can undergo further reactions including those initiated by solar radiation. Although nitrate photochemistry in aqueous media is fairly well studied, much less is known about the photochemistry of nitrate adsorbed on mineral dust particles. In this study, the photochemistry of nitrate from HNO3 adsorption in NaY zeolite under different environmental conditions has been investigated using transmission FTIR spectroscopy. NaY zeolite is used as a model zeolite for studying reactions that can occur in confined space such as those found in porous materials including naturally occurring zeolites and clays. Upon nitrate photolysis under dry conditions (relative humidity, RH, < 1%), surface nitrite is formed as the major adsorbed product. Although nitrite has been proposed as a product in the photochemistry of nitrate adsorbed on metal oxide particle surfaces, such as on alumina, it has not been previously detected. The stability of adsorbed nitrite in NaY is attributed to the confined three-dimensional structure of the porous zeolite, which contains a charge compensating cation that can stabilize the nitrite ion product. Besides adsorbed nitrite, small amounts of gas phase nitrogen-containing products are observed as well including NO2, NO, and N2O at long irradiation times. The amount of nitrite formed via nitrate photochemistry decreases with increasing relative humidity, whereas gas phase NO and N2O become the only detectable products. Gas-phase NO2 does not observe at RH > 1%. In the presence of gas phase ammonia, ammonium nitrate is formed in NaY zeolite. Photochemistry of ammonium nitrate yields gas phase N2O as the sole gas phase product. Evidence for an NH2 intermediate in the formation of N2O is identified with FTIR spectroscopy for HNO3 adsorption and

  19. Solid inclusion complexes of vanillin with cyclodextrins: their formation, characterization, and high-temperature stability.

    PubMed

    Kayaci, Fatma; Uyar, Tamer

    2011-11-01

    This study reports the formation of solid vanillin/cyclodextrin inclusion complexes (vanillin/CD ICs) with the aim to enhance the thermal stability and sustained release of vanillin by inclusion complexation. The solid vanillin/CD ICs with three types of CDs (α-CD, β-CD, and γ-CD) were prepared using the freeze-drying method; in addition, a coprecipitation method was also used in the case of γ-CD. The presence of vanillin in CD ICs was confirmed by FTIR and (1)H NMR studies. Moreover, (1)H NMR study elucidated that the complexation stoichiometry for both vanillin/β-CD IC and vanillin/γ-CD IC was a 1:1 molar ratio, whereas it was 0.625:1 for vanillin/α-CD IC. XRD studies have shown channel-type arrangement for CD molecules, and no diffraction peak for free vanillin was observed for vanillin/β-CD IC and vanillin/γ-CD IC, indicating that complete inclusion complexation was successfully achieved for these CD ICs. In the case of vanillin/α-CD IC, the sample was mostly amorphous and some uncomplexed vanillin was present, suggesting that α-CD was not very effective for complexation with vanillin compared to β-CD and γ-CD. Furthermore, DSC studies for vanillin/β-CD IC and vanillin/γ-CD IC have shown no melting point for vanillin, elucidating the true complex formation, whereas a melting point for vanillin was recorded for vanillin/α-CD IC, confirming the presence of some uncomplexed vanillin in this sample. TGA thermograms indicated that thermal evaporation/degradation of vanillin occurred over a much higher temperature range (150-300 °C) for vanillin/CD ICs samples when compared to pure vanillin (80-200 °C) or vanillin/CD physical mixtures, signifying that the thermal stability of vanillin was increased due to the inclusion complexation with CDs. Moreover, headspace GC-MS analyses indicated that the release of vanillin was sustained at higher temperatures in the case of vanillin/CD ICs due to the inclusion complexation when compared to vanillin

  20. Partial reactivation of a huge deep-seated ancient rock slide: recognition, formation mechanism, and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Minggao; Xu, Qiang; Li, Yusheng; Huang, Runqiu; Rengers, Niek; Zhu, Xing

    2016-08-01

    About 18 years ago, a large-scale discontinuous layer in properties and colour was found in the new Fengjie town at the shore of the Three Gorges Reservoir area in China. There are many resettled residents and buildings on the sloping area, the safety of which is potentially affected by this layer, so it has become the focus of attention. Before this study started there were two viewpoints regarding the origin of this layer. One was that is was from a huge ancient slide and the other was that is was from a fault graben. In order to find out how it was formed and to be able to carry out a stability analysis of the slope the authors have carried out a research program, including geological field investigations and mapping, a deep drilling hole, a geotechnical centrifuge model test, and a simulation analysis. The results of the research led to the conclusion that the layer is the sliding plane of a huge deep-seated ancient rock slide, which we called the Sanmashan landslide. An important argument for the conclusion is the recognition of a regional compressive tectonic stress field in this area, which cannot lead to the formation of a fault graben because it needs a tensional tectonic stress field. Moreover, numerous unique geological features, sliding marks, and other relics of the ancient slide have been discovered in the field. The formation process of the ancient slide could be repeated in a large geotechnical centrifuge model test. The test shows that a deformation and failure process of "creep-crack-cut" has occurred. The type of the ancient slide can be classified as a "successive rotational rock slide". Finally, the role of seepage in the stability of the Sanmashan landslide has been analysed. Our final conclusions are that, during rainfall and filling-drawdown cycles in the Three Gorges Reservoir, the Sanmashan landslide as a whole is dormant and stable and the secondary landslides in the toe area of the slope are presently stable but can be reactivated. This

  1. Green rust nanoparticle formation, stability and oxidation, and its role in natural and engineered systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, S.; Benning, L.; Ahmed, I.; Kakonyi, G.; Sumoondur, A.; Terrill, N.

    2009-12-01

    Highly reactive green rust (GR) nanoparticles are believed to play an important role in the geochemistry of water saturated sediments (e.g. hydromorphic soils) and engineered systems where zero-valent iron is used for decontaminating polluted sites (e.g. permeable reactive barriers). The presence of structural Fe2+ within GR and its high specific surface area make it an effective reductant for many inorganic (e.g. Cr, U, Se) and organic substances (e.g. tetrachloroethene (TCE)). These reduction processes can lead to breakdown of organic molecules or the formation of insoluble reduced inorganic phases (e.g., UO2(s)), thus reducing the bioavailability of these toxic compounds. Understanding the formation and geochemical stability of GR is key to assessing its potential role in natural sediments and engineered environments. However, characterizing GR is difficult due to the rapid oxidation (seconds - minutes) of structural Fe2+ in the presence of air. Thus, to obtain detailed information about the mechanism and kinetics of GR formation, stabilisation and oxidative breakdown, novel synchrotron-based methods have been developed which combine in situ and time-resolved X-ray diffraction/scattering (XRD/SAXS) analysis with controlled anaerobic chemical synthesis. This system allowed the simultaneous quantification of several chemical parameters in the aqueous solution (i.e., pH, Eh) with detailed analysis of the changes in the solid phase crystal structure. In conjunction with this X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) was used to characterise the speciation of trace elements (i.e. U, Zn and Se) associated with GR as it crystallised and/or transformed. The formation of green rust (Fe2+/Fe3+ > 1.2) from solution occurs via a 3 stage process. The first stage is the nucleation and growth of ferric hydroxysulfate (schwertmannite) nanoparticles (~5 nm). With increasing pH the schwertmannite transforms into nanogoethite particles (< 50 nm). This process is catalyzed by adsorbed Fe

  2. Stability of formation control using a consensus protocol under directed communications with two time delays and delay scheduling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepeda-Gomez, Rudy; Olgac, Nejat

    2016-01-01

    We consider a linear algorithm to achieve formation control in a group of agents which are driven by second-order dynamics and affected by two rationally independent delays. One of the delays is in the position and the other in the velocity information channels. These delays are taken as constant and uniform throughout the system. The communication topology is assumed to be directed and fixed. The formation is attained by adding a supplementary control term to the stabilising consensus protocol. In preparation for the formation control logic, we first study the stability of the consensus, using the recent cluster treatment of characteristic roots (CTCR) paradigm. This effort results in a unique depiction of the non-conservative stability boundaries in the domain of the delays. However, CTCR requires the knowledge of the potential stability switching loci exhaustively within this domain. The creation of these loci is done in a new surrogate coordinate system, called the 'spectral delay space (SDS)'. The relative stability is also investigated, which has to do with the speed of reaching consensus. This step leads to a paradoxical control design concept, called the 'delay scheduling', which highlights the fact that the group behaviour may be enhanced by increasing the delays. These steps lead to a control strategy to establish a desired group formation that guarantees spacing among the agents. Example case studies are presented to validate the underlying analytical derivations.

  3. Controlled Formation of Metal@Al₂O₃ Yolk-Shell Nanostructures with Improved Thermal Stability.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Lin, Xi-Jie; Sun, Yong-Gang; Bin, De-Shan; Cao, An-Min; Wan, Li-Jun

    2015-12-16

    Yolk-shell structured nanomaterials have shown interesting potential in different areas due to their unique structural configurations. A successful construction of such a hybrid structure relies not only on the preparation of the core materials, but also on the capability to manipulate the outside wall. Typically, for Al2O3, it has been a tough issue in preparing it into a uniform nanoshell, making the use of Al2O3-based yolk-shell structures a challenging but long-awaited task. Here, in benefit of our success in the controlled formation of Al2O3 nanoshell, we demonstrated that yolk-shell structures with metal confined inside a hollow Al2O3 nanosphere could be successfully achieved. Different metals including Au, Pt, Pd have been demonstrated, forming a typical core@void@shell structure. We showed that the key parameters of the yolk-shell structure such as the shell thickness and the cavity size could be readily tuned. Due to the protection of a surrounding Al2O3 shell, the thermal stability of the interior metal nanoparticles could be substantially improved, resulting in promising performance for the catalytic CO oxidation as revealed by our preliminary test on Au@Al2O3.

  4. Enigmatic Isovaline: Investigating the Stability, Racemization, and Formation of a Non-biological Meteoritic Amino Acid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Reggie; Moore, Marla; Lewis, Ariel; Dworkin, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Among the Murchison meteoritic amino acids, isovaline stands out as being both nonbiological (non-protein) and having a relatively high abundance. While approximately equal amounts of D- and L-isovaline have been reported in Murchison and other CM meteorites, the molecule's structure appears to prohibit its racemization in aqueous solutions. We recently have investigated the low-temperature solid-phase chemistry of both isovaline and valine with an eye toward each molecule's formation, stability, and possible interconversions of D and L enantiomers. Ion-irradiated isovaline- and valinecontaining ices were examined by IR spectroscopy and highly-sensitive liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectral methods to assess both amino acid destruction and racemization. Samples were studied in the presence and in the absence of water-ice, and the destruction of both isovaline and valine was measured as a function of radiation dose. In addition, we have undertaken experiments to synthesize isovaline, valine, and their amino acid isomers by solid-phase radiation-chemical pathways other than the oft-invoked Strecker process. This presentation will review and summarize some of our recent findings. -- Our work has been supported by a grant to the Goddard Center for Astrobiology through the NASA Astrobiology Institute. Experiments were performed in the Cosmic Ice Laboratory (RLH, MHM, AL) and the Astrobiology Analytical Laboratory (JPD, DPG) at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.

  5. Heme stabilization of α-Synuclein oligomers during amyloid fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Hayden, Eric Y.; Kaur, Prerna; Williams, Thomas L.; Matsui, Hiroshi; Yeh, Syun-Ru; Rousseau, Denis L.

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-Synuclein (αSyn), which forms amyloid fibrils, is linked to the neuronal pathology of Parkinson’s disease, as it is the major fibrillar component of Lewy bodies, the inclusions that are characteristic of the disease. Oligomeric structures, common to many neurodegenerative disease-related proteins, may in fact be the primary toxic species, while the amyloid fibrils exist as either a less toxic dead-end species, or even as a beneficial mechanism to clear damaged proteins. In order to alter the progression of the aggregation and gain insights into the pre-fibrillar structures, the effect of heme on αSyn oligomerization was determined by several different techniques including native (non-denaturing) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, thioflavin T fluorescence, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism and membrane permeation using a calcein release assay. During aggregation, heme is able to bind the αSyn in a specific fashion, stabilizing distinct oligomeric conformations and promoting the formation of αSyn into annular structures, thereby delaying and/or inhibiting the fibrillation process. These results indicate that heme may play a regulatory role in the progression of Parkinson’s disease; in addition, they provide insights of how the aggregation process may be altered, which may be applicable to the understanding of many neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26161848

  6. Src and cortactin promote lamellipodia protrusion and filopodia formation and stability in growth cones

    PubMed Central

    He, Yingpei; Ren, Yuan; Wu, Bingbing; Decourt, Boris; Lee, Aih Cheun; Taylor, Aaron; Suter, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Src tyrosine kinases have been implicated in axonal growth and guidance; however, the underlying cellular mechanisms are not well understood. Specifically, it is unclear which aspects of actin organization and dynamics are regulated by Src in neuronal growth cones. Here, we investigated the function of Src2 and one of its substrates, cortactin, in lamellipodia and filopodia of Aplysia growth cones. We found that up-regulation of Src2 activation state or cortactin increased lamellipodial length, protrusion time, and actin network density, whereas down-regulation had opposite effects. Furthermore, Src2 or cortactin up-regulation increased filopodial density, length, and protrusion time, whereas down-regulation promoted lateral movements of filopodia. Fluorescent speckle microscopy revealed that rates of actin assembly and retrograde flow were not affected in either case. In summary, our results support a model in which Src and cortactin regulate growth cone motility by increasing actin network density and protrusion persistence of lamellipodia by controlling the state of actin-driven protrusion versus retraction. In addition, both proteins promote the formation and stability of actin bundles in filopodia. PMID:26224308

  7. Formation, antioxidant property and oxidative stability of cold pressed rice bran oil emulsion.

    PubMed

    Thanonkaew, Amonrat; Wongyai, Surapote; Decker, Eric A; McClements, David J

    2015-10-01

    Cold pressed rice bran oil (CPRBO) is used in foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals due to its desirable health and functional attributes. The purpose of this work was to study the formation, antioxidant property and oxidative stability of oil-in-water emulsion of CPRBO. The influence of oil (10-40 % CPRBO) and surfactant (1-5 % glyceryl monostearate (GMS)) concentration on the properties of emulsions were studied. The lightness (L*) and yellowness (b*) of CPRBO emulsions decreased as GMS concentration increased, which was attributed to a decrease in droplet size after homogenization. The CPRBO emulsion was stable during storage at room temperature for 30 days. Increasing the oil concentration in the CPRBO emulsions increased their antioxidant activity, which can be attributed to the corresponding increase in phytochemical content. However, GMS concentration had little impact on the antioxidant activity of CPRBO emulsions. The storage of CPRBO emulsion at room temperature showed that lipid oxidation markers gradually increased after 30 days of storage, which was correlated to a decrease in gamma oryzanol content and antioxidant activity. These results have important implications for the utilization of rice bran oil (RBO) as a function ingredient in food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical products. PMID:26396397

  8. The relationship between nighttime formation of gaseous HONO and nocturnal stability in an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren, Robert; Wojtal, Patryk; Taylor, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important radical precursor in the troposphere that accumulates overnight giving rise to a significant photolytic production of the hydroxyl radical, OH, in the boundary layer during early morning hours the next day. It is understood that HONO is formed in the dark through the heterogeneous hydrolysis of NO2 on surfaces (2 NO2+ H2O -> HONO + HNO3) in a first order process, largely dominated by hydrolysis on ground surfaces and a smaller contribution from aerosol surfaces. Despite progress, the dark heterogeneous mechanism of HONO formation is still not well understood, mirroring our lack of consensus on the daytime production of HONO. We have measured HONO at night in an urban area (York University, Toronto, Canada) by DOAS for over one year. This rich dataset was analyzed with a view to understanding the nocturnal formation mechanism, and possible links to the daytime HONO formation mechanism. Frequently, "steady-states" of HONO are observed at night; d[HONO]/dt ~ 0, which follow after a rapid buildup of HONO during sunset at rates of several ppb hr-1. These steady-state levels of HONO are found to be independent of the mixing ratio of NO2 throughout the night. On other occasions, steady-states are not observed and HONO continues to increase throughout the night, highly correlated with the levels of NO2 d([HONO]/[NO2])/dt ~ 0). We have found that a very significant predictor of the type of behavior is the nocturnal stability of the atmosphere, measured by the thermal gradient, ΔT=T9.5m-T1.0m, and wind speed. The steady-state behavior is found to occur almost exclusively on unstable nights with higher wind speeds and ΔT ~ 0, when mixing of air in the lower atmosphere is more efficient. The non steady-state behavior of HONO is observed on stable nights with low wind speeds and large thermal gradients, ΔT > 2oC indicating limited vertical mixing. The observation of NO2 independent steady-states of HONO under conditions of efficient

  9. Magnetic-Activated Cell Sorting of TCR-Engineered T Cells, Using tCD34 as a Gene Marker, but Not Peptide–MHC Multimers, Results in Significant Numbers of Functional CD4+ and CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Govers, Coen; Berrevoets, Cor; Treffers-Westerlaken, Elike; Broertjes, Marieke

    2012-01-01

    Abstract T cell-sorting technologies with peptide–MHC multimers or antibodies against gene markers enable enrichment of antigen-specific T cells and are expected to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of clinical T cell therapy. However, a direct comparison between sorting reagents for their ability to enrich T cells is lacking. Here, we compared the in vitro properties of primary human T cells gene-engineered with gp100280–288/HLA-A2-specific T cell receptor-αβ (TCRαβ) on magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) with various peptide–MHC multimers or an antibody against truncated CD34 (tCD34). With respect to peptide–MHC multimers, we observed that Streptamer®, when compared with pentamers and tetramers, improved T cell yield as well as level and stability of enrichment, of TCR-engineered T cells (>65% of peptide–MHC-binding T cells, stable for at least 6 weeks). In agreement with these findings, Streptamer, the only detachable reagent, revealed significant T cell expansion in the first week after MACS. Sorting TCR and tCD34 gene-engineered T cells with CD34 monoclonal antibody (mAb) resulted in the most significant T cell yield and enrichment of T cells (>95% of tCD34 T cells, stable for at least 6 weeks). Notably, T cells sorted with CD34 mAb, when compared with Streptamer, bound about 2- to 3-fold less peptide–MHC but showed superior antigen-specific upregulated expression of CD107a and production of interferon (IFN)-γ. Multiparametric flow cytometry revealed that CD4+ T cells, uniquely present in CD34 mAb-sorted T cells, contributed to enhanced IFN-γ production. Taken together, we postulate that CD34 mAb-based sorting of gene-marked T cells has benefits toward applications of T cell therapy, especially those that require CD4+ T cells. PMID:22871260

  10. Magnetic-activated cell sorting of TCR-engineered T cells, using tCD34 as a gene marker, but not peptide-MHC multimers, results in significant numbers of functional CD4+ and CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Govers, Coen; Berrevoets, Cor; Treffers-Westerlaken, Elike; Broertjes, Marieke; Debets, Reno

    2012-06-01

    T cell-sorting technologies with peptide-MHC multimers or antibodies against gene markers enable enrichment of antigen-specific T cells and are expected to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of clinical T cell therapy. However, a direct comparison between sorting reagents for their ability to enrich T cells is lacking. Here, we compared the in vitro properties of primary human T cells gene-engineered with gp100(280-288)/HLA-A2-specific T cell receptor-αβ (TCRαβ) on magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) with various peptide-MHC multimers or an antibody against truncated CD34 (tCD34). With respect to peptide-MHC multimers, we observed that Streptamer(®), when compared with pentamers and tetramers, improved T cell yield as well as level and stability of enrichment, of TCR-engineered T cells (>65% of peptide-MHC-binding T cells, stable for at least 6 weeks). In agreement with these findings, Streptamer, the only detachable reagent, revealed significant T cell expansion in the first week after MACS. Sorting TCR and tCD34 gene-engineered T cells with CD34 monoclonal antibody (mAb) resulted in the most significant T cell yield and enrichment of T cells (>95% of tCD34 T cells, stable for at least 6 weeks). Notably, T cells sorted with CD34 mAb, when compared with Streptamer, bound about 2- to 3-fold less peptide-MHC but showed superior antigen-specific upregulated expression of CD107a and production of interferon (IFN)-γ. Multiparametric flow cytometry revealed that CD4(+) T cells, uniquely present in CD34 mAb-sorted T cells, contributed to enhanced IFN-γ production. Taken together, we postulate that CD34 mAb-based sorting of gene-marked T cells has benefits toward applications of T cell therapy, especially those that require CD4(+) T cells. PMID:22871260

  11. Studies on chalcone derivatives: Complex formation, thermal behavior, stability constant and antioxidant activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Yusif S.; Gaber, M.

    2015-02-01

    The chalcone 3-[4‧-dimethylaminophenyl]-1-(2-pyridyl) prop-2-en-1-one (DMAPP) and 3-(4‧-diethylaminophenyl)-1-(2-pyridinyl) prop-2-en-1-one abbreviated as DEAPP have been synthesized and characterized with IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopic techniques as described previously (El-Daly et al., 2008; Gaber et al., 2009; El-Sayed, 2013). By using UV visible spectroscopy method the mole fraction ratio for copper with DMAPP and DEAPP complexes were determined and it was found to be 1:1. The stability constants of this complex have been determined by Job's method. The stability constant (Kf) of copper with DMAPP and DEAPP complexes in universal buffer pH = 3.2 was determined to be 9.9 × 104 and 5.2 × 104 respectively. The effect of Cu(II) ion on the emission spectrum of the free chalcone is also assigned. Adherence to Beer's law and Ringbom optimum concentration ranges are determined. The thermal decomposition of the metal complexes is studied by TGA technique. The kinetic parameters like activation energy, pre-exponential factor and entropy of activation are estimated. The structure of complexes was energetically optimized through molecular mechanics applying MM+ force field coupled with molecular dynamics simulation. The bond lengths and bond angles have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligands and their Cu(II) complexes. The mode of interaction of the chalcone to copper nanoparticles was studied. The apparent association constants of the colloidal copper nanoparticles:chalcone complexes in solution were evaluated using the spectral method and compared with the formation constant of the Cu(II) chalcone complexes. Antioxidant activity of these chalcones was evaluated by using 1,1‧-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPHrad) radicals scavenging method, which showed that the antioxidant activity of DMAPP has higher value than the DEAPP. Semi-empirical study results showed that DMAPP have higher dipole moment than DEAPP [1].

  12. Controlled formation of emulsion gels stabilized by salted myofibrillar protein under malondialdehyde (MDA)-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Feibai; Sun, Weizheng; Zhao, Mouming

    2015-04-15

    This study presented the cold-set gelation of emulsions stabilized by salted myofibrillar protein (MP) under oxidative stress originated from malondialdehyde (MDA). Gel properties were compared over a range of MDA/NaCl concentrations including gel viscoelastic properties, strength, water-holding capacity (WHC), amount of protein entrapped, and microstructure. The oxidative stability of emulsion gels as indicated by lipid hydroperoxide was further determined and compared. Results indicated that emulsion stabilized by MP at swollen state under certain ionic strengths (0.2-0.6 M) was the premise of gel formation under MDA. In the presence of intermediate MDA concentrations (2.5-10 mM), the emulsion gels showed an improved elasticity, strength, WHC, and oxidative stability. This improvement should be mainly attributed to the enhanced protein-protein cross-linkings via MDA, which were homogeneously formed among absorbed and/or unabsorbed proteins, entrapping a greater amount and fractions of protein within network. Therefore, the oil droplets were better adherent to the gel matrix. Nevertheless, addition of high MDA concentrations (25-50 mM) led to the formation of excessive covalent bonds, which might break protein-protein bonds and trigger the desorption of protein from the interface. This ultimately caused "oil leak" phenomena as well as the collapse of gel structure and, thus, overall decreased gel properties and oxidative stability. PMID:25749308

  13. Formation of Inclusions in Ti-Stabilized 17Cr Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xue; Sun, Yanhui; Yang, Yindong; Bai, Xuefeng; Barati, Mansoor; Mclean, Alex

    2016-04-01

    The behavior and formation mechanisms of inclusions in Ti-stabilized, 17Cr Austenitic Stainless Steel produced by the ingot casting route were investigated through systematic sampling of liquid steel and rolled products. Analysis methods included total oxygen and nitrogen contents, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results indicate that the composition of inclusions was strongly dependent on the types of added alloying agents. During the AOD refining process, after the addition of ferrosilicon alloy and electrolytic manganese, followed by aluminum, the composition of inclusions changed from manganese silicate-rich inclusions to alumina-rich inclusions. After tapping and titanium wire feeding, pure TiN particles and complex inclusions with Al2O3-MgO-TiO x cores containing TiN were found to be the dominant inclusions when [pct Ti] was 0.307 mass pct in the molten steel. These findings were confirmed by thermodynamic calculations which indicated that there was a driving force for TiN inclusions to be formed in the liquid phase due to the high contents of [Ti] and [N] in the molten steel. From the start of casting through to the rolled bar, there was no further change in the composition of inclusions compared to the titanium addition stage. Stringer-shaped TiN inclusions were observed in the rolled bar. These inclusions were elongated along the rolling direction with lengths varying from 17 to 84 µm and could have a detrimental impact on the corrosion resistance as well as the mechanical properties of the stainless steel products.

  14. Conformational stability of fibrillar amyloid-beta oligomers via protofilament pair formation - a systematic computational study.

    PubMed

    Kahler, Anna; Sticht, Heinrich; Horn, Anselm H C

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid-[Formula: see text] (A[Formula: see text]) oligomers play a crucial role in Alzheimer's disease due to their neurotoxic aggregation properties. Fibrillar A[Formula: see text] oligomerization can lead to protofilaments and protofilament pairs via oligomer elongation and oligomer association, respectively. Small fibrillar oligomers adopt the protofilament topology, whereas fibrils contain at least protofilament pairs. To date, the underlying growth mechanism from oligomers to the mature fibril still remains to be elucidated. Here, we performed all-atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent on single layer-like protofilaments and fibril-like protofilament pairs of different size ranging from the tetramer to the 48-mer. We found that the initial U-shaped topology per monomer is maintained over time in all oligomers. The observed deviations of protofilaments from the starting structure increase significantly with size due to the twisting of the in-register parallel [Formula: see text]-sheets. This twist causes long protofilaments to be unstable and leads to a breakage. Protofilament pairs, which are stabilized by a hydrophobic interface, exhibit more fibril-like properties such as the overall structure and the twist angle. Thus, they can act as stable conformational templates for further fibril growth. Key properties like the twist angle, shape complementarity, and energetics show a size-dependent behavior so that small oligomers favor the protofilament topology, whereas large oligomers favor the protofilament pair topology. The region for this conformational transition is at the size of approximately twelve A[Formula: see text] monomers. From that, we propose the following growth mechanism from A[Formula: see text] oligomers to fibrils: (1) elongation of short protofilaments; (2) breakage of large protofilaments; (3) formation of short protofilament pairs; and (4) elongation of protofilament pairs.

  15. Preliminary protein corona formation stabilizes gold nanoparticles and improves deposition efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luby, Alexandra O.; Breitner, Emily K.; Comfort, Kristen K.

    2016-08-01

    Due to their advantageous characteristics, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are being increasingly utilized in a vast array of biomedical applications. However, the efficacy of these procedures are highly dependent upon strong interactions between AuNPs and the surrounding environment. While the field of nanotechnology has grown exponentially, there is still much to be discovered with regards to the complex interactions between NPs and biological systems. One area of particular interest is the generation of a protein corona, which instantaneously forms when NPs encounter a protein-rich environment. Currently, the corona is viewed as an obstacle and has been identified as the cause for loss of application efficiency in physiological systems. To date, however, no study has explored if the protein corona could be designed and advantageously utilized to improve both NP behavior and application efficacy. Therefore, we sought to identify if the formation of a preliminary protein corona could modify both AuNP characteristics and association with the HaCaT cell model. In this study, a corona comprised solely of epidermal growth factor (EGF) was successfully formed around 10-nm AuNPs. These EGF-AuNPs demonstrated augmented particle stability, a modified corona composition, and increased deposition over stock AuNPs, while remaining biocompatible. Analysis of AuNP dosimetry was repeated under dynamic conditions, with lateral flow significantly disrupting deposition and the nano-cellular interface. Taken together, this study demonstrated the plausibility and potential of utilizing the protein corona as a means to influence NP behavior; however, fluid dynamics remains a major challenge to progressing NP dosimetry.

  16. Control of stability of polypeptide multilayer nanofilms by quantitative control of disulfide bond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yang; Li, Bingyun; Haynie, Donald T.

    2006-12-01

    The crosslinking of polymers in a polymeric material will alter the mechanical properties of the material. Control over the mechanical properties of polyelectrolyte multilayer films (PEMs) could be useful for applications of the technology in medicine and other areas. Disulfide bonds are 'natural' polypeptide crosslinks found widely in wild-type proteins. Here, we have designed and synthesized three pairs of oppositely charged 32mer polypeptide to have 0, 4, or 8 cysteine (Cys) residues per molecule, and we have characterized physical properties of the peptides in a PEM context. The average linear density of free thiol in the designed peptides was 0, 0.125, or 0.25 per amino acid residue. The peptides were used to make 10-bilayer PEMs by electrostatic layer-by-layer self-assembly (LBL). Cys was included in the peptides to study specific effects of disulfide bond formation on PEM properties. Features of film assembly have been found to depend on the amino acid sequence, as in protein folding. Following polypeptide self-assembly into multilayer films, Cys residues were disulfide-crosslinked under mild oxidizing conditions. The stability of the crosslinked films at acidic pH has been found to depend on the number of Cys residues per peptide for a given crosslinking procedure. Crosslinked and non-crosslinked films have been analysed by ultraviolet spectroscopy (UVS), ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to characterize film assembly, surface morphology, and disassembly. A selective etching model of the disassembly process at acidic pH is proposed on the basis of the experimental data. In this model, regions of film in which the disulfide bond density is low are etched at a higher rate than regions where the density is high.

  17. Gas-phase route to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon formation in protoplanetary atmospheres: role of stabilized benzyne anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carelli, F.; Sebastianelli, F.; Satta, M.; Gianturco, F. A.

    2011-07-01

    The possibility that condensation reactions, leading to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) formation in protoplanetary atmospheres, could occur with negative aromatic species, such as stabilized anionic ortho-benzyne (o-C6H-4), is analysed through accurate quantum dynamical modelling of the initial steps. Once the primary electron attachment on the neutral o-C6H-4 has taken place, producing the corresponding metastable negative ion, the evolution of this resonant anionic intermediate in terms of its energy locations and lifetimes suggests the possibility of a radiationless stabilization by a very rapid intramolecular vibrational redistribution of the excess energy carried by the attached electron. The possible involvement of this stabilized highly reactive molecular anion in an ensuing PAH synthesis is also qualitatively discussed.

  18. Effects of temperature dependent pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt silicide formation and thermal stability on Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozcan, Ahmet S.; Wall, Donald; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Lavoie, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Using temperature controlled Si and C ion implantation, we studied the effects of pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt alloy silicide phase formation. In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and resistance measurements were used to monitor phase and morphology evolution in silicide films. Results show that substrate amorphization strongly modulate the nucleation of silicide phases, regardless of implant species. However, morphological stability of the thin films is mainly enhanced by C addition, independently of the amorphization depth.

  19. Effects of temperature dependent pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt silicide formation and thermal stability on Si(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Ozcan, Ahmet S.; Wall, Donald; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Lavoie, Christian

    2013-04-29

    Using temperature controlled Si and C ion implantation, we studied the effects of pre-amorphization implantation on NiPt alloy silicide phase formation. In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction and resistance measurements were used to monitor phase and morphology evolution in silicide films. Results show that substrate amorphization strongly modulate the nucleation of silicide phases, regardless of implant species. However, morphological stability of the thin films is mainly enhanced by C addition, independently of the amorphization depth.

  20. High-frequency detection of the formation and stabilization of a radiation-induced defect cluster in semiconductor structures

    SciTech Connect

    Puzanov, A. S.; Obolenskiy, S. V. Kozlov, V. A.; Volkova, E. V.; Paveliev, D. G.

    2015-12-15

    The processes of the formation and stabilization of a radiation-induced defect cluster upon the arrival of a fast neutron to the space-charge region of a semiconductor diode are analyzed. The current pulse formed by secondary electrons is calculated and the spectrum of the signal generated by the diode (detector) under the action of an instantaneous neutron flux of the fission spectrum is determined. The possibility of experimental detection of the picosecond radiation-induced transition processes is discussed.

  1. Engineering of formate dehydrogenase: synergistic effect of mutations affecting cofactor specificity and chemical stability.

    PubMed

    Hoelsch, Kathrin; Sührer, Ilka; Heusel, Moritz; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2013-03-01

    Formate dehydrogenases (FDHs) are frequently used for the regeneration of cofactors in biotransformations employing NAD(P)H-dependent oxidoreductases. Major drawbacks of most native FDHs are their strong preference for NAD(+) and their low operational stability in the presence of reactive organic compounds such as α-haloketones. In this study, the FDH from Mycobacterium vaccae N10 (MycFDH) was engineered in order to obtain an enzyme that is not only capable of regenerating NADPH but also stable toward the α-haloketone ethyl 4-chloroacetoacetate (ECAA). To change the cofactor specificity, amino acids in the conserved NAD(+) binding motif were mutated. Among these mutants, MycFDH A198G/D221Q had the highest catalytic efficiency (k cat/K m) with NADP(+). The additional replacement of two cysteines (C145S/C255V) not only conferred a high resistance to ECAA but also enhanced the catalytic efficiency 6-fold. The resulting quadruple mutant MycFDH C145S/A198G/D221Q/C255V had a specific activity of 4.00 ± 0.13 U mg(-1) and a K m, NADP(+) of 0.147 ± 0.020 mM at 30 °C, pH 7. The A198G replacement had a major impact on the kinetic constants of the enzyme. The corresponding triple mutant, MycFDH C145S/D221Q/C255V, showed the highest specific activity reported to date for a NADP(+)-accepting FDH (v max, 10.25 ± 1.63 U mg(-1)). However, the half-saturation constant for NADP(+) (K m, NADP(+) , 0.92 ± 0.10 mM) was about one order of magnitude higher than the one of the quadruple mutant. Depending on the reaction setup, both novel MycFDH variants could be useful for the production of the chiral synthon ethyl (S)-4-chloro-3-hydroxybutyrate [(S)-ECHB] by asymmetric reduction of ECAA with NADPH-dependent ketoreductases.

  2. Susceptibility towards intramolecular disulphide-bond formation affects conformational stability and folding of human basic fibroblast growth factor.

    PubMed Central

    Estapé, D; van den Heuvel, J; Rinas, U

    1998-01-01

    The conformational stability and the folding properties of the all-beta-type protein human basic fibroblast growth factor (hFGF-2) were studied by means of fluorescence spectroscopy. The results show that the instability of the biological activity of hFGF-2 is also reflected in a low conformational stability of the molecule. The reversibility of the unfolding and refolding process was established under reducing conditions. Determination of the free-energy of unfolding in the presence of reducing agents revealed that the conformational stability of hFGF-2 (DeltaGH2Oapp congruent with21 kJ. mol-1, 25 degreesC) is low compared with other globular proteins under physiological conditions (20-60 kJ.mol-1). However, the conformational stability of hFGF-2 is particularly low under non-reducing conditions. This instability is attributed to intramolecular disulphide-bond formation, rendering the molecule more susceptible to denaturant-induced unfolding. In addition, denaturant-induced unfolding of hFGF-2 renders the protein more susceptible to irreversible oxidative denaturation. Experimental evidence is provided that the irreversibility of the unfolding and refolding process in the absence of reducing agents is linked to the formation of an intramolecular disulphide bond involving cysteines 96 and 101. PMID:9761733

  3. The influence of SO2 and NO2 impurities on CO2 gas hydrate formation and stability.

    PubMed

    Beeskow-Strauch, Bettina; Schicks, Judith M; Spangenberg, Erik; Erzinger, Jörg

    2011-04-11

    The sequestration of industrially emitted CO(2) in gas hydrate reservoirs has been recently discussed as an option to reduce atmospheric greenhouse gas. This CO(2) contains, despite much effort to clean it, traces of impurities such as SO(2) and NO(2) . Here, we present results of a pilot study on CO(2) hydrates contaminated with 1% SO(2) or 1% NO(2) and show the impact on hydrate formation and stability. Microscopic observations show similar hydrate formation rates, but an increase in hydrate stability in the presence of SO(2). Laser Raman spectroscopy indicates a strong enrichment of SO(2) in the liquid and hydrate phase and its incorporation in both large and small cages of the hydrate lattice. NO(2) is not verifiable by laser Raman spectroscopy, only the presence of nitrate ions could be confirmed. Differential scanning calorimetry analyses show that hydrate stability and dissociation enthalpy of mixed CO(2)-SO(2) hydrates increase, but that only negligible changes arise in the presence of NO(2) impurities. X-ray diffraction data reveal the formation of sI hydrate in all experiments. The conversion rates of ice+gas to hydrate increase in the presence of SO(2), but decrease in the presence of NO(2). After hydrate dissociation, SO(2) and NO(2) dissolved in water and form strong acids.

  4. Ion Mobility Measurements of Nondenatured 12-150 kDa Proteins and Protein Multimers by Tandem Differential Mobility Analysis-Mass Spectrometry (DMA-MS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, Christopher J.; de la Mora, Juan Fernández

    2011-01-01

    The mobilities of electrosprayed proteins and protein multimers with molecular weights ranging from 12.4 kDa (cytochrome C monomers) to 154 kDa (nonspecific concanavalin A hexamers) were measured in dry air by a planar differential mobility analyzer (DMA) coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer (TOF-MS). The DMA determines true mobility at atmospheric pressure, without perturbing ion structure from that delivered by the electrospray. A nondenaturing aqueous 20 mM triethylammonium formate buffer yields compact ions with low charge states, moderating polarization effects on ion mobility. Conversion of mobilities into cross-sections involves a reduction factor ξ for the actual mobility relative to that associated with elastic specular collisions with smooth surfaces. ξ is known to be 1.36 in air from Millikan's oil drop experiments. A similar enhancement effect ascribed to atomic-scale surface roughness has been found in numerical simulations. Adopting Millikan's value ξ = 1.36 and assuming a spherical geometry yields a gas-phase protein density ρ p = 0.949 ± 0.053 g cm-3 for all our protein data. This is substantially higher than the 0.67 g cm-3 found in recent low-resolution DMA measurements of singly charged proteins. DMA-MS can distinguish nonspecific protein aggregates formed during the electrospray process from those formed preferentially in solution. The observed charge versus diameter relation is compatible with a protein charge reduction mechanism based on the evaporation of triethylammonium ions from electrosprayed drops.

  5. Analysis of K-Area core samples for K-Area formation stabilization work

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.A.

    1992-05-27

    Foundation stabilization work in K-Area has been recently completed by Bechtel Inc. This effort involved pumping cement and cement-sand grout into unconsolidated sediments under K-Area. Subsequent to stabilization, core samples were collected to document the extent of grout flow in the area. Samples of this core were examined by SRTC personnel in support of the grouting program at the request of Bechtel personnel. This report summarizes the results of the SRTC study.

  6. The Stability and Formation of Native Proteins from Unfolded Monomers Is Increased through Interactions with Unrelated Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Almazán, Claudia; Torner, Francisco J.; Costas, Miguel; Pérez-Montfort, Ruy; de Gómez-Puyou, Marieta Tuena; Puyou, Armando Gómez

    2007-01-01

    The intracellular concentration of protein may be as high as 400 mg per ml; thus it seems inevitable that within the cell, numerous protein-protein contacts are constantly occurring. A basic biochemical principle states that the equilibrium of an association reaction can be shifted by ligand binding. This indicates that if within the cell many protein-protein interactions are indeed taking place, some fundamental characteristics of proteins would necessarily differ from those observed in traditional biochemical systems. Accordingly, we measured the effect of eight different proteins on the formation of homodimeric triosephosphate isomerase from Trypanosoma brucei (TbTIM) from guanidinium chloride unfolded monomers. The eight proteins at concentrations of micrograms per ml induced an important increase on active dimer formation. Studies on the mechanism of this phenomenon showed that the proteins stabilize the dimeric structure of TbTIM, and that this is the driving force that promotes the formation of active dimers. Similar data were obtained with TIM from three other species. The heat changes that occur when TbTIM is mixed with lysozyme were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry; the results provided direct evidence of the weak interaction between apparently unrelated proteins. The data, therefore, are strongly suggestive that the numerous protein-protein interactions that occur in the intracellular space are an additional control factor in the formation and stability of proteins. PMID:17551578

  7. A BENCHMARKING ANALYSIS FOR FIVE RADIONUCLIDE VADOSE ZONE MODELS (CHAIN, MULTIMED_DP, FECTUZ, HYDRUS, AND CHAIN 2D) IN SOIL SCREENING LEVEL CALCULATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Five radionuclide vadose zone models with different degrees of complexity (CHAIN, MULTIMED_DP, FECTUZ, HYDRUS, and CHAIN 2D) were selected for use in soil screening level (SSL) calculations. A benchmarking analysis between the models was conducted for a radionuclide (99Tc) rele...

  8. Reversible HLA multimers (Streptamers) for the isolation of human cytotoxic T lymphocytes functionally active against tumor- and virus-derived antigens.

    PubMed

    Neudorfer, Julia; Schmidt, Burkhard; Huster, Katharina M; Anderl, Florian; Schiemann, Matthias; Holzapfel, Gerd; Schmidt, Thomas; Germeroth, Lothar; Wagner, Hermann; Peschel, Christian; Busch, Dirk H; Bernhard, Helga

    2007-03-30

    The development of MHC/peptide multimers has facilitated the visualization and purification of antigen-specific T cells. However, the persistence of multimers leads to prolonged T cell receptor signaling and subsequently to altered T-cell function. We have recently developed a new type of MHC/peptide multimers, which can be dissociated from the T cell. Herein, we have generated and tested for the first time reversible HLA/peptide multimers, termed Streptamers, for the isolation of human T cells. The Streptamer technique demonstrates the specificity and sensitivity of conventional HLA/peptide tetramers with regards to the sorting of human T lymphocytes. This is shown for T cells directed against immunogenic peptides derived from viral and tumor-associated antigens. We show that antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells remain functionally active following Streptamer dissociation, whereas lytic function and proliferation of the T cells is impaired in the presence of conventional tetramers. These novel HLA/peptide Streptamer reagents allow the isolation of antigen-specific T cells with preserved function and, therefore, facilitate the development of adoptive T cell transfer regimens for the treatment of patients with cancer or infectious diseases. PMID:17306825

  9. Stability constants for the formation of rare earth-inorganic complexes as a function of ionic strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millero, Frank J.

    1992-08-01

    Recent studies have been made on the distribution of the rare earths (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) in natural waters relative to their concentration in shales. These metals have also been used as models for the behavior of the trivalent actinides. The speciation of the rare earths in natural waters is modelled by using ionic interaction models which require reliable stability constants. In this paper the stability constants for the formation of lanthanide complexes ( k mx∗) with Cl -, NO 3-, SO 42-, OH -, HCO 3-, H 2PO 4-, HPO 42-, and CO 32- determined in NaClO 44 at various ionic strengths have been extrapolated to infinite dilution using the Pitzer interaction model. The activity coefficients for free ions ( γM, γx) needed for this extrapolation have been estimated from the Pitzer equations. The thermodynamic stability constants ( KMX) and activity coefficients of the various ion pairs ( γMX) were determined from In ( solK MX∗/γ Mγ x) = In K mx+ In (γ MX). The activity coefficients of the ion pairs have been used to determine Pitzer parameters ( BMX) for the rare earth complexes. The values of BMX were found to be the same for complexes of the same charge. These results make it possible to estimate the stability constants for the formation of rare earth complexes over a wide range of ionic strengths. The stability constants have been used to determine the speciation of the lanthanides in seawater and in brines. The carbonate complexes dominate for all natural waters where the carbonate alkalinity is greater than 0.001 eq/L at a pH near 8.

  10. The role of non-ionizing radiation pressure in star formation: the stability of cores and filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Young Min; Youdin, Andrew N.

    2016-09-01

    Stars form when filaments and dense cores in molecular clouds fragment and collapse due to self-gravity. In the most basic analyses of gravitational stability, the competition between self-gravity and thermal pressure sets the critical (i.e. maximum stable) mass of spheres and the critical line density of cylinders. Previous work has considered additional support from magnetic fields and turbulence. Here, we consider the effects of non-ionizing radiation, specifically the inward radiation pressure force that acts on dense structures embedded in an isotropic radiation field. Using hydrostatic, isothermal models, we find that irradiation lowers the critical mass and line density for gravitational collapse, and can thus act as a trigger for star formation. For structures with moderate central densities, ˜103 cm-3, the interstellar radiation field in the Solar vicinity has an order unity effect on stability thresholds. For more evolved objects with higher central densities, a significant lowering of stability thresholds requires stronger irradiation, as can be found closer to the Galactic centre or near stellar associations. Even when strong sources of ionizing radiation are absent or extincted, our study shows that interstellar irradiation can significantly influence the star formation process.

  11. The Formation and Stability of Carbonic Acid on Outer Solar System Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peeters, Z.; Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Lewis, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    The radiation chemistry, thermal stability, and vapor pressure of solid-phase carbonic acid (H2CO3) have been studied with mid-infrared spectroscopy. A new procedure for measuring this molecule's radiation stability has been used to obtain intrinsic IR band strengths and half-lives for radiolytic destruction. Results are compared to literature values. We report, for the first time, measurements of carbonic acid's vapor pressure and its heat of sublimation. We also report the first observation of a chemical reaction involving solid-phase carbonic acid. Possible applications of these findings are discussed, with an emphasis on the outer Solar System.

  12. Concurrent Detection of Circulating Minor Histocompatibility Antigen-Specific CD8+ T Cells in SCT Recipients by Combinatorial Encoding MHC Multimers

    PubMed Central

    Broen, Kelly; Greupink-Draaisma, Annelies; Woestenenk, Rob; Schaap, Nicolaas

    2011-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is a potentially curative treatment for patients with hematologic malignancies. Its therapeutic effect is largely dependent on recognition of minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHA) by donor-derived CD8+ T cells. Therefore, monitoring of multiple MiHA-specific CD8+ T cell responses may prove to be valuable for evaluating the efficacy of allogeneic SCT. In this study, we investigated the use of the combinatorial encoding MHC multimer technique to simultaneously detect MiHA-specific CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood of SCT recipients. Feasibility of this approach was demonstrated by applying dual-color encoding MHC multimers for a set of 10 known MiHA. Interestingly, single staining using a fluorochrome- and Qdot-based five-color combination showed comparable results to dual-color staining for most MiHA-specific CD8+ T cell responses. In addition, we determined the potential value of combinatorial encoding MHC multimers in MiHA identification. Therefore, a set of 75 candidate MiHA peptides was predicted from polymorphic genes with a hematopoietic expression profile and further selected for high and intermediate binding affinity for HLA-A2. Screening of a large cohort of SCT recipients resulted in the detection of dual-color encoded CD8+ T cells following MHC multimer-based T cell enrichment and short ex vivo expansion. Interestingly, candidate MiHA-specific CD8+ T cell responses for LAG3 and TLR10 derived polymorphic peptides could be confirmed by genotyping of the respective SNPs. These findings demonstrate the potency of the combinatorial MHC multimer approach in the monitoring of CD8+ T cell responses to known and potential MiHA in limited amounts of peripheral blood from allogeneic SCT recipients. PMID:21731686

  13. Phase formation and morphological stability of ultrathin Ni-Co-Pt silicide films formed on Si(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Peng; Wu, Dongping; Kubart, Tomas; Gao, Xindong; Zhang, Shi-Li

    2014-05-15

    Ultrathin Ni, Co, and Pt films, each no more than 4 nm in thickness, as well as their various combinations are employed to investigate the competing growth of epitaxial Co{sub 1-y}Ni{sub y}Si{sub 2} films against polycrystalline Pt{sub 1-z}Ni{sub z}Si. The phase formation critically affects the morphological stability of the resulting silicide films, with the epitaxial films being superior to the polycrystalline ones. Any combination of those metals improves the morphological stability with reference to their parent individual metal silicide films. When Ni, Co, and Pt are all included, the precise initial location of Pt does little to affect the final phase formation in the silicide films and the epitaxial growth of Co{sub 1-x}Ni{sub x}Si{sub 2} films is always perturbed, in accordance to thermodynamics that shows a preferential formation of Pt{sub 1-z}Ni{sub z}Si over that of Co{sub 1-y}Ni{sub y}Si{sub 2}.

  14. Mesenchymal condensation-dependent accumulation of collagen VI stabilizes organ-specific cell fates during embryonic tooth formation

    PubMed Central

    Mammoto, Tadanori; Mammoto, Akiko; Jiang, Amanda; Jiang, Elisabeth; Hashmi, Basma; Ingber, Donald E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mechanical compression of cells during mesenchymal condensation triggers cells to undergo odontogenic differentiation during tooth organ formation in the embryo. However, the mechanism by which cell compaction is stabilized over time to ensure correct organ specific cell fate switching remains unknown. Results Here, we show that mesenchymal cell compaction induces accumulation of collagen VI in the extracellular matrix (ECM), which physically stabilizes compressed mesenchymal cell shapes and ensures efficient organ-specific cell fate switching during tooth organ development. Mechanical induction of collagen VI deposition is mediated by signaling through the actin-p38MAPK-SP1 pathway, and the ECM scaffold is stabilized by lysyl oxidase (LOX) in the condensing mesenchyme. Moreover, perturbation of synthesis or cross-linking of collagen VI alters the size of the condensation in vivo. Conclusions These findings suggest that the odontogenic differentiation process that is induced by cell compaction during mesenchymal condensation is stabilized and sustained through mechanically-regulated production of collagen VI within the mesenchymal ECM. PMID:25715693

  15. Comparison of modified starch and Quillaja saponins in the formation and stabilization of flavor nanoemulsions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Bing, Lu; Reineccius, Gary A

    2016-02-01

    Modified starch (MS) and Quillaja saponins (QS) were compared to fabricate and stabilize orange oil nanoemulsions using microfluidization. Ester gum (EG) was incorporated in the oil phase at variable proportions (0-60%) as Ostwald ripening inhibitor and viscosity modifier. Optimal viscosity ratios of dispersed to continuous phase (ηd/ηc) were identified as 0.8-3.1 and 2.1-3.3 with MS and QS as emulsifier, respectively. QS was found superior to MS in fabricating nanoemulsion with smallest MDD of 69 nm and turbidity of 102 NTU at 0.05% of dispersed phase. With EG incorporated in the oil phase, QS stabilized nanoemulsions were stable during 2 weeks of storage at 23 °C; whereas MS stabilized nanoemulsions showed significant increases in MDD and turbidity. Zeta potential measurements showed QS imparted higher droplet charge (>-20 mV) than MS (<-5 mV) at pH 3.6 indicating MS stabilized nanoemulsions were destabilized by coalescence due to insufficient interfacial charge. PMID:26304319

  16. Stabilization of Submicron Calcium Oxalate Suspension by Chondroitin Sulfate C May Be an Efficient Protection from Stone Formation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun-Jun; Xue, Jun-Fa; Ouyang, Jian-Ming

    2013-01-01

    The influences of chondroitin sulfate C (C6S) on size, aggregation, sedimentation, and Zeta potential of sub-micron calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) and calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD) crystallites with mean sizes of about 330 nm were investigated using an X-ray diffractometer, nanoparticle size Zeta potential analyzer, ultraviolet spectrophotometer, and scanning electron microscope, after which the results were compared with those of micron-grade crystals. C6S inhibited the conversion of COD to COM and the aggregation of COM and COD crystallitesis; it also decreased their sedimentation rate, thus increasing their stability in aqueous solution. The smaller the size of the COD crystallites, the easier they can be converted to COM. The stability of sub-micron COD was worse than that of micron-grade crystals. C6S can inhibit the formation of calcium oxalate stones. PMID:24382950

  17. Formation and stability analysis of parabolic pulses through specialty microstructured optical fibers at 2.1 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, P.; Adhikary, P.; Biswas, A.; Ghosh, S. N.

    2016-10-01

    We report a numerical study on formation and stability of parabolic pulses during their propagation through highly nonlinear specialty optical fibers. Here, we have formed a parabolic pulse at wavelength of 2.1 μm from a Gaussian input pulse with 1.9 ps FWHM and 75 W peak power after traveling through only 20 cm length from the input end of a 1 m long chalcogenide glass based microstructured optical fiber (MOF). Dependence on input pulse shapes towards most efficient conversion into self-similar states is reported. The stability in terms of any deviation from dissipative self-similar nature of such pulses has been analyzed by introducing a variable longitudinal loss profile within the spectral loss window of the MOF, and detailed pulse shapes are captured. Moreover, three different dispersion regimes of propagation have been considered to study the suitability to support most stable propagation of the pulse.

  18. The biologically active form of the sea urchin egg receptor for sperm is a disulfide-bonded homo-multimer

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Since many cell surface receptors exist in their active form as oligomeric complexes, we have investigated the subunit composition of the biologically active sperm receptor in egg plasma membranes from Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. Electrophoretic analysis of the receptor without prior reduction of disulfide bonds revealed that the surface receptor exists in the form of a disulfide-bonded multimer, estimated to be a tetramer. These findings are in excellent agreement with the fact that the NH2-terminus of the extracellular domain of the sperm receptor is rich in cysteine residues. Studies with cross-linking agents of various length and hydrophobicity suggest that no other major protein is tightly associated with the receptor. Given the multimeric structure of the receptor, we investigated the effect of disulfide bond reduction on its biological activity. Because in quantitative bioassays fertilization was found to be inhibited by treatment of eggs with 5 mM dithiothreitol, we undertook more direct studies of the effect of reduction on properties of the receptor. First, we studied the effect of addition of isolated, pure receptor on fertilization. Whereas the non-reduced, native receptor complex inhibited fertilization in a dose- dependent manner, the reduced and alkylated receptor was inactive. Second, we tested the ability of the isolated receptor to mediate binding of acrosome-reacted sperm to polystyrene beads. Whereas beads coated with native receptor bound sperm, those containing reduced and alkylated receptor did not. Thus, these results demonstrate that the biologically active form of the sea urchin sperm receptor consists only of 350 kD subunits and that these must be linked as a multimer via disulfide bonds to produce a complex that is functional in sperm recognition and binding. PMID:8188748

  19. Stabilization of simulated lead sludge with iron sludge via formation of PbFe₁₂O₁₉ by thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Mao, Linqiang; Cui, Hao; An, Hao; Wang, Bing; Zhai, Jianping; Zhao, Yongbin; Li, Qin

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of stabilizing lead sludge by reaction with iron sludge via the formation of PbFe12O19 through a thermal treatment process. Lead hydroxide was used to simulate lead-laden sludge and the sintering procedure was performed by firing a mixture of this simulated sludge together with iron sludge at a Fe/Pb molar ratio of 12 over the temperature range from 650 to 1400 °C. The accompanying phase transformations as well as the surface characteristic of sintered samples were observed by XRD and SEM, while the leaching behavior of the stabilized sludge in an acidic environment was evaluated by a modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. The results confirmed that PbFe12O19 acts as a stabilization phase for lead, and showed that the formation of a PbFe12O19 phase began at 750 °C with the lead completely incorporated into the PbFe12O19 phase at 1050 °C. Above 1100 °C, the PbFe12O19 phase began to decompose, accompanied by the reappearance of Fe2O3. The volumes of compressed sludge samples were reduced significantly after thermal treatment, with accompanying volume reductions of 40% at 1050 °C. This study compared the leaching of lead from PbO and sintered sludge samples using a prolonged TCLP test, and the data showed that the PbFe12O19 phase was superior to the PbO and that the sintered sludge sample exhibited very high stability under acidic environments. These results suggest a promising and reliable method of reducing lead sludge mobility and toxicity has been identified. PMID:25461943

  20. Stabilization of simulated lead sludge with iron sludge via formation of PbFe₁₂O₁₉ by thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Mao, Linqiang; Cui, Hao; An, Hao; Wang, Bing; Zhai, Jianping; Zhao, Yongbin; Li, Qin

    2014-12-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of stabilizing lead sludge by reaction with iron sludge via the formation of PbFe12O19 through a thermal treatment process. Lead hydroxide was used to simulate lead-laden sludge and the sintering procedure was performed by firing a mixture of this simulated sludge together with iron sludge at a Fe/Pb molar ratio of 12 over the temperature range from 650 to 1400 °C. The accompanying phase transformations as well as the surface characteristic of sintered samples were observed by XRD and SEM, while the leaching behavior of the stabilized sludge in an acidic environment was evaluated by a modified Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) test. The results confirmed that PbFe12O19 acts as a stabilization phase for lead, and showed that the formation of a PbFe12O19 phase began at 750 °C with the lead completely incorporated into the PbFe12O19 phase at 1050 °C. Above 1100 °C, the PbFe12O19 phase began to decompose, accompanied by the reappearance of Fe2O3. The volumes of compressed sludge samples were reduced significantly after thermal treatment, with accompanying volume reductions of 40% at 1050 °C. This study compared the leaching of lead from PbO and sintered sludge samples using a prolonged TCLP test, and the data showed that the PbFe12O19 phase was superior to the PbO and that the sintered sludge sample exhibited very high stability under acidic environments. These results suggest a promising and reliable method of reducing lead sludge mobility and toxicity has been identified.

  1. Artificial soil formation and stabilization of material cycles in closed ecological systems for Mars habitats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borchardt, Joshua D.

    Scientists are increasingly pressured to investigate novel ways in which to feed astronauts for the first mission to Mars in the 2030s. It is the aim of this thesis to conduct a preliminary investigation for soil formation of NASA JSC Mars-1A Regolith Simulant in an environmentally closed ecosystem to simulate plant growth within these initial habitats, and the prospect of soil formation from a Mars parent material for agricultural purposes. The rhizosphere and plant stress will be the main regions of research focus. It is hypothesized rhizosphere activity will determine the rate of stable soil formation adequate to support the agricultural needs of Mars's first human inhabitants. A Brassica rapa (Wisconsin FastPlant(TM)) was grown on several different substrates, and evaluated for plant stress, elemental analysis, soil fertility, and mineralogical analysis to identify the biogeochemical factors related to areas inside and outside of the rhizosphere, which affect soil formation. In addition, multiple plant generations were grown to investigate bioavailability of nutrients within the system, and lay down preliminary approaches for mathematical model development in order to predict & evaluate future conditions and applications under reduced resource availability situations. Overall, the story of early soil formation from a Mars regolith simulant is further defined to aid in the success of our first human adventurers to the red planet.

  2. Solvent-free formation of hydroxyapatite coated biodegradable particles via nanoparticle-stabilized emulsion route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Masahiro; Fujii, Syuji; Nishimura, Taiki; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Takeda, Shoji; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2012-12-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticle-coated biodegradable polymer particles were fabricated from a nanoparticle-stabilized emulsion in the absence of any molecular surfactants or organic solvents. First, a polymer melt-in-water emulsion was prepared by mixing a water phase containing nanosized HAp particles as a particulate emulsifier and an oil phase consisting of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) or poly(L-lactide-co-ɛ-caprolactone) (P(LLA-CL)) above its melting point. It was clarified that the interaction between ester/carboxyl groups of the polymers and the HAp nanoparticles at the polymer-water interface played a crucial role to prepare the nanoparticle-stabilized emulsion. The HAp nanoparticle-coated biodegradable polymer particle (a polymer solid-in-water emulsion) was fabricated by cooling the emulsion. The particle morphology and particle size were evaluated using scanning electron microscope.

  3. Phase stability and optimum oxygenation conditions for Sr2FeMoO6 formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A.; MacManus-Driscoll, J. L.; Branford, W.; Bugoslavsky, Y.; Cohen, L. F.; Rager, J.

    2005-09-01

    The upper phase stability limit of Sr2FeMoO6 was determined in the temperature range 1140-1220°C using coulometric titration. At 1200°C, the decomposition oxygen partial pressure was determined to be 2.2×10-11atm O2. Hence at 1200°C, and for pO2's in excess of this value, the phase is thermodynamically unstable. In order to achieve a pO2 just below the upper stability line a precise gas mixture of 2H2:1CO2 in a background carrier gas of Ar was used for the reaction atmosphere. Highly ordered samples, with high low-field magnetoresistance (LFMR) values were produced, and the very strong dependence of the LFMR on reaction time, which occurs with use of Ar /H2 gas, was eliminated.

  4. Efficient CO2 capture by tertiary amine-functionalized ionic liquids through Li+-stabilized zwitterionic adduct formation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhen-Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Summary Highly efficient CO2 absorption was realized through formation of zwitterionic adducts, combining synthetic strategies to ionic liquids (ILs) and coordination. The essence of our strategy is to make use of multidentate cation coordination between Li+ and an organic base. Also PEG-functionalized organic bases were employed to enhance the CO2-philicity. The ILs were reacted with CO2 to form the zwitterionic adduct. Coordination effects between various lithium salts and neutral ligands, as well as the CO2 capacity of the chelated ILs obtained were investigated. For example, the CO2 capacity of PEG150MeBu2N increased steadily from 0.10 to 0.66 (mol CO2 absorbed per mol of base) through the formation of zwitterionic adducts being stabilized by Li+. PMID:25246955

  5. Effect of integral proteins in the phase stability of a lipid bilayer: Application to raft formation in cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Jordi; Sagués, Francesc; Reigada, Ramon

    2010-04-01

    The existence of lipid rafts is a controversial issue. The affinity of cholesterol for saturated lipids is manifested in macroscopic phase separation in model membranes, and is believed to be the thermodynamic driving force for raft formation. However, there is no clear reason to explain the small (nanometric) size of raft domains in cell membranes. In a recent paper Yethiraj and Weisshaar [Biophys. J. 93, 3113 (2007)] proposed that the effect of neutral integral membrane proteins may prevent from the formation of large lipid domains. In this paper we extend this approach by studying the effect of the protein size, as well as the lipid-protein interaction. Depending on these factors, two different mechanisms for nanodomain stabilization are shown to be possible for static proteins. The application of these results to a biological context is discussed.

  6. Microfluidic EDGE emulsification: the importance of interface interactions on droplet formation and pressure stability.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Sami; Bliznyuk, Olesya; Rovalino Cordova, Ana; Schroën, Karin

    2016-05-27

    The fact that interactions of components with interfaces can influence processes is well-known; e.g. deposit accumulation on heat exchangers and membrane fouling lead to additional resistances against heat and mass transfer, respectively. In microfluidic emulsification, the situation is even more complex. Component accumulation at the liquid/liquid interface is necessary for emulsion stability, while undesired at the solid/liquid interface where it may change wettability. For successful emulsification both aspects need to be controlled, and that is investigated in this paper for o/w emulsification with microfluidic EDGE devices. These devices were characterised previously, and can be used to detect small wettability changes through e.g. the pressure stability of the device. We used various oil/emulsifier combinations (alkanes, vegetable oil, surfactants and proteins) and related droplet size and operational pressure stability to component interactions with the solid surface and liquid interface. Surfactants with a strong interaction with glass always favour emulsification, while surfactants that have week interactions with the surface can be replaced by vegetable oil that interacts strongly with glass, resulting in loss of emulsification. Our findings clearly show that an appropriate combination of construction material and emulsion components is needed to achieve successful emulsification in microfluidic EDGE devices.

  7. Microfluidic EDGE emulsification: the importance of interface interactions on droplet formation and pressure stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, Sami; Bliznyuk, Olesya; Rovalino Cordova, Ana; Schroën, Karin

    2016-05-01

    The fact that interactions of components with interfaces can influence processes is well-known; e.g. deposit accumulation on heat exchangers and membrane fouling lead to additional resistances against heat and mass transfer, respectively. In microfluidic emulsification, the situation is even more complex. Component accumulation at the liquid/liquid interface is necessary for emulsion stability, while undesired at the solid/liquid interface where it may change wettability. For successful emulsification both aspects need to be controlled, and that is investigated in this paper for o/w emulsification with microfluidic EDGE devices. These devices were characterised previously, and can be used to detect small wettability changes through e.g. the pressure stability of the device. We used various oil/emulsifier combinations (alkanes, vegetable oil, surfactants and proteins) and related droplet size and operational pressure stability to component interactions with the solid surface and liquid interface. Surfactants with a strong interaction with glass always favour emulsification, while surfactants that have week interactions with the surface can be replaced by vegetable oil that interacts strongly with glass, resulting in loss of emulsification. Our findings clearly show that an appropriate combination of construction material and emulsion components is needed to achieve successful emulsification in microfluidic EDGE devices.

  8. Microfluidic EDGE emulsification: the importance of interface interactions on droplet formation and pressure stability

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Sami; Bliznyuk, Olesya; Rovalino Cordova, Ana; Schroën, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The fact that interactions of components with interfaces can influence processes is well-known; e.g. deposit accumulation on heat exchangers and membrane fouling lead to additional resistances against heat and mass transfer, respectively. In microfluidic emulsification, the situation is even more complex. Component accumulation at the liquid/liquid interface is necessary for emulsion stability, while undesired at the solid/liquid interface where it may change wettability. For successful emulsification both aspects need to be controlled, and that is investigated in this paper for o/w emulsification with microfluidic EDGE devices. These devices were characterised previously, and can be used to detect small wettability changes through e.g. the pressure stability of the device. We used various oil/emulsifier combinations (alkanes, vegetable oil, surfactants and proteins) and related droplet size and operational pressure stability to component interactions with the solid surface and liquid interface. Surfactants with a strong interaction with glass always favour emulsification, while surfactants that have week interactions with the surface can be replaced by vegetable oil that interacts strongly with glass, resulting in loss of emulsification. Our findings clearly show that an appropriate combination of construction material and emulsion components is needed to achieve successful emulsification in microfluidic EDGE devices. PMID:27230981

  9. Formation and Stabilization of Nano-Sized Pt Clusters on TiO2 Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, Donald R.; Liang, Yong; Gan, Shupan

    2000-09-30

    This paper reports experiments related to the stability and size distributions of platinum (Pt) clusters on TiO2 surfaces. Efforts to enhance the efficiency and reliability of microsystems will likely use components or elements with at least one dimension smaller than a micron. The ability to design and fabricate elements at submicron dimensions-nanotechnology-is a rapidly growing area of science and technology. In this paper we describe experiments using newly generated knowledge of surfaces and the nanodimensional information provided by scanning probe microscopy (SPM) that are designed to assist development of a new generation of catalysts for application in microchemical systems. Critical questions for the design of a new catalyst is the ability to fabricate metal clusters of different sizes and their temperature stability. We report on the investigation of nucleation, growth, and temperature stability of self-organized nanoscale Pt clusters on different TiO2 surfaces using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Surfaces examined include anatase (001) and rutile (110), both (1x1) and reconstructed (1x2) forms.

  10. Formation and Stability of Shear-Induced Shish-Kebab Structure in Highly Entangled Melts of UHMWPE/HDPE Blends

    SciTech Connect

    Keum,J.; Zuo, F.; Hsiao, B.

    2008-01-01

    The formation and stability of a shear-induced shish-kebab structure was investigated by in situ rheo-SAXS (small-angle X-ray scattering) and -WAXD (wide-angle X-ray diffraction) measurements of highly entangled polyethylene melts based on two polymer blends, containing small fractions (2 and 5 wt %) of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Immediately after shear, the combined SAXS and WAXD results at 142 C confirmed the sole formation of shish without kebabs, indicating the interplay between the topological deformation of highly entangled UHMWPE chains and the extended-chain crystallization of stretched segments without the participation of coiled segments. The presence of HDPE chains influenced the entanglement of UHMWPE but they were not involved in the shish-kebab formation at the initial stage of crystallization. The final shish lengths in both blends were nearly identical at the same strain (e = 500), even though the UHMWPE concentration was different. When the temperature was cooled to 134 C, both sheared blends exhibited the kebab formation, following the diffusion-controlled growth process. Although the total kebab nucleation was higher in the 5/95 wt % UHMWPE/HDPE blend, the kebab density per shish was higher in the 2/98 wt % UHMWPE/HDPE blend. The thermal stability of the shish-kebab structure was also investigated by constrained melting. Both blends exhibited identical melting behavior of kebabs but different melting behavior of shish that is governed by the entanglement restraints of the stretched-chain network.

  11. Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability. Progress report, June 16--September 30, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Krason, J.; Finley, P.

    1988-12-31

    The summaries of regional basin analyses document that potentially economic accumulations of gas hydrates can be formed in both active and passive margin settings. The principal requirement for gas hydrate formation in either setting is abundant methane. Passive margin sediments with high sedimentation rates and sufficient sedimentary organic carbon can generate large quantities of biogenic methane for hydrate formation. Similarly, active margin locations near a terrigenous sediment source can also have high methane generation potential due to rapid burial of adequate amounts of sedimentary organic matter. Many active margins with evidence of gas hydrate presence correspond to areas subject to upwelling. Upwelling currents can enhance methane generation by increasing primary productivity and thus sedimentary organic carbon. Structural deformation of the marginal sediments at both active and passive sites can enhance gas hydrate formation by providing pathways for migration of both biogenic and thermogenic gas to the shallow gas hydrate stability zone. Additionally, conventional hydrocarbon traps may initially concentrate sufficient amounts of hydrocarbons for subsequent gas hydrate formation.

  12. Effect of helix stability on the formation of loop-loop complexes.

    PubMed

    Sehdev, Preeti; Crews, Gordon; Soto, Ana Maria

    2012-12-01

    Kissing loop complexes are loop-loop complexes where two RNA hairpins interact through their complementary loops. In this work, we have investigated the role of the helical stems on the ability of hairpins derived from the ColE1 plasmid to associate as kissing loop complexes in the presence and absence of divalent cations. Our results show that although kissing loop complexes form more readily in the presence of Mg(2+), they are able to form in the presence of 850 mM NaCl, as long as their stems contain at least six base-pairs. Formation of the Na(+) loop-loop complexes is facilitated by changing the sequence at the stem-loop interface to include less stable AU base pairs. We suggest that the conformation at the stem-loop interface is critical in the formation of kissing loop complexes and that in the absence of Mg(2+) the conformation at the stem-loop interface is packed more loosely than with Mg(2+), to allow for a lower charge density. Consistent with this hypothesis, shortening the stems to five base pairs results in unfolding of the hairpins and formation of an extended duplex rather than a kissing loop complex because the short stems are not stable enough to tolerate the necessary conformation at the stem-loop interface to allow the formation of a kissing loop complex. PMID:23094588

  13. The Role of Music Preferences in Early Adolescents' Friendship Formation and Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selfhout, Maarten H. W.; Branje, Susan J. T.; ter Bogt, Tom F. M.; Meeus, Wim H. J.

    2009-01-01

    The present study examines the role of similarity in music preferences in the formation and discontinuation of friendships over a 1-year period. Questionnaire data were gathered from 283 Dutch same-sex mutual best friends (mean age = 12.97) in two waves with a 1-year interval. Results show consistent evidence for high similarity in specific music…

  14. Formation and Stabilization of Vertical Hierarchies among Adolescents: Towards a Quantitative Ethology of Dominance among Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, John Levi

    2009-01-01

    Social psychological investigations of hierarchy formation have been almost entirely confined to the case of task-oriented groups and hence have produced theories that turn on the existence of such a task. But other forms of vertical hierarchy may emerge in non-task groups. One form, orderings of dominance, has been studied among animals using…

  15. Formation and Stability of Ni-Al Hydroxide Phases in Soils

    SciTech Connect

    Peltier, E.; Van Der Lelie, D; Sparks, D

    2010-01-01

    The formation of mixed metal-aluminum hydroxide surface precipitates is a potentially significant uptake route for trace metals (including Co, Ni, and Zn) in environmental systems. This paper investigates the effect of mixed Ni-Al hydroxide precipitate formation and aging on Ni solubility and bioavailability in laboratory contaminated soils. Two Delaware agricultural soils were reacted with a 3 mM Ni solution for 12 months at pH's above and below the threshold for mixed Ni-Al hydroxide formation. Ni speciation was determined at 1, 6, and 12 months using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Precipitate solubility was examined through desorption experiments using HNO{sub 3} and EDTA as desorbing agents, whereas metal bioavailability was assessed using a Ni-specific bacterial biosensor. For both soils, the formation of Ni-Al hydroxide surface precipitates resulted in a reduction in the fraction of desorbed and bioavailable Ni. However, precipitate dissolution was greater, particularly with EDTA, than in published studies on isolated soil clay fractions, and less affected by aging processes. These results suggest that mixed Ni-Al hydroxide phases forming in real world environments may be both longer-lasting and more susceptible to ligand-promoted dissolution than previously expected.

  16. Pyromorphite Formation And Stability After Quick Lime Neutralisation In The Presence Of Soil And Clay Sorbents

    EPA Science Inventory

    Soluble Pb is immobilised in pure systems as pyromorphite by adding sources of P, but doubts remain about the efectiveness of this approach in natural soil systems, particularly given the ability of soil humic substances to interfere with Pb-mineral formation. In addition, recen...

  17. Formation rates, stability and reactivity of sulfuric acid - amine clusters predicted by computational chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtén, Theo; Ortega, Ismael; Kupiainen, Oona; Olenius, Tinja; Loukonen, Ville; Reiman, Heidi; McGrath, Matthew; Vehkamäki, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    Despite the importance of atmospheric particle formation for both climate and air quality, both experiments and non-empirical models using e.g. sulfuric acid, ammonia and water as condensing vapors have so far been unable to reproduce atmospheric observations using realistic trace gas concentrations. Recent experimental and theoretical evidence has shown that this mystery is likely resolved by amines. Combining first-principles evaporation rates for sulfuric acid - dimethylamine clusters with cluster kinetic modeling, we show that even sub-ppt concentrations of amines, together with atmospherically realistic concentrations of sulfuric acid, result in formation rates close to those observed in the atmosphere. Our simulated cluster formation rates are also close to, though somewhat larger than, those measured at the CLOUD experiment in CERN for both sulfuric acid - ammonia and sulfuric acid - dimethylamine systems. A sensitivity analysis indicates that the remaining discrepancy for the sulfuric acid - amine particle formation rates is likely caused by steric hindrances to cluster formation (due to alkyl groups of the amine molecules) rather than by significant errors in the evaporation rates. First-principles molecular dynamic and reaction kinetic modeling shed further light on the microscopic physics and chemistry of sulfuric acid - amine clusters. For example, while the number and type of hydrogen bonds in the clusters typically reach their equilibrium values on a picosecond timescale, and the overall bonding patterns predicted by traditional "static" quantum chemical calculations seem to be stable, the individual atoms participating in the hydrogen bonds continuously change at atmospherically realistic temperatures. From a chemical reactivity perspective, we have also discovered a surprising phenomenon: clustering with sulfuric acid molecules slightly increases the activation energy required for the abstraction of alkyl hydrogens from amine molecules. This implies

  18. Formation and stability of D-limonene organogel-based nanoemulsion prepared by a high-pressure homogenizer.

    PubMed

    Zahi, Mohamed Reda; Wan, Pingyu; Liang, Hao; Yuan, Qipeng

    2014-12-31

    D-limonene organogel-based nanoemulsion was prepared by high-pressure homogenization technology. The organogelator type had a major role on the formation of the formulations, in which stearic acid has given nanoemulsions with the smallest droplet size. The surfactant type and concentration also had an appreciable effect on droplet formation, with Tween 80 giving a mean droplet diameter (d ≈ 112 nm) among a range of non-ionic surfactants (Tween 20, 40, 60, 80, and 85). In addition, high-pressure homogenization conditions played a key role in the nanoemulsion preparation. The stability of d-limonene organogel-based nanoemulsion was also investigated under two different temperatures (4 and 28 °C) through 2 weeks of storage. Results showed a good stability of the formulations, which is maybe due to the incorporation of D-limonene into the organogel prior to homogenization. This study may have a valuable contribution for the design and use of organogel-based nanoemulsion as a delivery system in food.

  19. Silver-cemented frit formation for the stabilization of the packing structure in the microchannel of electrochromatographic microchips.

    PubMed

    Park, Jongman; Oh, Hyejin; Jeon, In-Sun

    2011-10-28

    A simple but effective frit formation technique was developed to stabilize the packing structure inside the microchannel of capillary electrochromatographic microchips, utilizing the electroless plating technique. A Ag(NH(3))(2)(+) solution was allowed to diffuse through the colloidal silica packing in the microchannel from the reservoir of the microchip for a limited amount of time, and then it was reduced by an excess amount of formaldehyde solution. A frit structure of ~70 μm in length was formed at the entrance of the microchannel without clogging when treated with 1mM Ag(NH(3))(2)(+) ion and formaldehyde for 30s and 150 s, respectively. The formation of the frit structure was confirmed by a scanning electron microscopy. The stability of the packing structure was tested rigorously and then confirmed by applying alternating electroosmotic flows back and forth with pulsed potential steps on both sides of the frit structure. The effect of the treatment on the electrochromatograms was evaluated after the microchips were repeatedly used and stored for a long period of time. The results indicated that the silver-cemented frit structure extended the lifetime of the fully packed CEC microchips distinctly.

  20. Formation and Stability of a Memory State in the Immune Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonoda, Takashi

    1992-04-01

    The immune system is investigated as a complex adaptive network. A nonlinear dynamical model is proposed to study roles of lymphocyte and antibody in the regulation of the immune response. Three kinds of lymphocytes; B cell, TH cell, and TS cell, interact and compose a functional unit. Furthermore this unit interacts with other units through antibodies. These two types of interactions cooperatively work and regulate the immune response. The model can explain how the memory state is formed and stabilized in the immune network. Behaviors of the model are verified by the computer simulations.

  1. Mitochondrial translocation contact sites: separation of dynamic and stabilizing elements in formation of a TOM-TIM-preprotein supercomplex.

    PubMed

    Chacinska, Agnieszka; Rehling, Peter; Guiard, Bernard; Frazier, Ann E; Schulze-Specking, Agnes; Pfanner, Nikolaus; Voos, Wolfgang; Meisinger, Chris

    2003-10-15

    Preproteins with N-terminal presequences are imported into mitochondria at translocation contact sites that include the translocase of the outer membrane (TOM complex) and the presequence translocase of the inner membrane (TIM23 complex). Little is known about the functional cooperation of these translocases. We have characterized translocation contact sites by a productive TOM-TIM-preprotein supercomplex to address the role of three translocase subunits that expose domains to the intermembrane space (IMS). The IMS domain of the receptor Tom22 is required for stabilization of the translocation contact site supercomplex. Surprisingly, the N-terminal segment of the channel Tim23, which tethers the TIM23 complex to the outer membrane, is dispensable for both protein import and generation of the TOM-TIM supercomplex. Tim50, with its large IMS domain, is crucial for generation but not for stabilization of the supercomplex. Thus, Tim50 functions as a dynamic factor and the IMS domain of Tom22 represents a stabilizing element in formation of a productive translocation contact site supercomplex.

  2. Nano-silver in drinking water and drinking water sources: stability and influences on disinfection by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Tugulea, A-M; Bérubé, D; Giddings, M; Lemieux, F; Hnatiw, J; Priem, J; Avramescu, M-L

    2014-10-01

    untreated Ottawa River water, with a dissolved organic carbon concentration of 6 mg/L, was significantly higher than the stability of the nano-silver dispersions in distilled, organic-free water. Nano-silver particles suspended in the groundwater agglomerated and were quickly and quantitatively removed from the solution. Our data confirm previous observations that natural dissolved organic matter stabilizes nano-silver particles, while the high-ionic strength of groundwater appears to favor their agglomeration and precipitation. As expected, nano-silver was not stable in Ottawa River water through the chlorination process, but survived for many days when added to the Ottawa River water after treatment with chlorine or chloramines. Stirring appeared to have minimal effect on nano-silver stability in untreated and treated Ottawa River water. The profile of DBPs formed in the presence of nAg differed significantly from the profile of DBPs formed in the absence of nAg only at the 1 mg/L nAg concentration. The differences observed consisted mainly in reduced formation of some brominated DBPs and a small increase in the formation of cyanogen chloride. The reduced formation of brominated congeners may be explained by the decrease in available bromide due to the presence of Ag(+) ions. It should be noted that a concentration of 1 mg/L is significantly higher than nAg concentrations that would be expected to be present in surface waters, but these results could be significant for the disinfection of some wastewaters with comparably high nano-silver concentrations.

  3. Nano-silver in drinking water and drinking water sources: stability and influences on disinfection by-product formation.

    PubMed

    Tugulea, A-M; Bérubé, D; Giddings, M; Lemieux, F; Hnatiw, J; Priem, J; Avramescu, M-L

    2014-10-01

    untreated Ottawa River water, with a dissolved organic carbon concentration of 6 mg/L, was significantly higher than the stability of the nano-silver dispersions in distilled, organic-free water. Nano-silver particles suspended in the groundwater agglomerated and were quickly and quantitatively removed from the solution. Our data confirm previous observations that natural dissolved organic matter stabilizes nano-silver particles, while the high-ionic strength of groundwater appears to favor their agglomeration and precipitation. As expected, nano-silver was not stable in Ottawa River water through the chlorination process, but survived for many days when added to the Ottawa River water after treatment with chlorine or chloramines. Stirring appeared to have minimal effect on nano-silver stability in untreated and treated Ottawa River water. The profile of DBPs formed in the presence of nAg differed significantly from the profile of DBPs formed in the absence of nAg only at the 1 mg/L nAg concentration. The differences observed consisted mainly in reduced formation of some brominated DBPs and a small increase in the formation of cyanogen chloride. The reduced formation of brominated congeners may be explained by the decrease in available bromide due to the presence of Ag(+) ions. It should be noted that a concentration of 1 mg/L is significantly higher than nAg concentrations that would be expected to be present in surface waters, but these results could be significant for the disinfection of some wastewaters with comparably high nano-silver concentrations. PMID:24458938

  4. Formation of a compound flux rope by the merging of two filament channels, the associated dynamics, and its stability

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Inoue, Satoshi; Magara, Tetsuya E-mail: njoshi98@gmail.com

    2014-11-01

    We present observations of compound flux rope formation, which occurred on 2014 January 1, via merging of two nearby filament channels, the associated dynamics, and its stability using multiwavelength data. We also discuss the dynamics of cool and hot plasma moving along the newly formed compound flux rope. The merging started after the interaction between the southern leg of the northward filament and the northern leg of the southward filament at ≈01:21 UT and continued until a compound flux rope formed at ≈01:33 UT. During the merging, the cool filament plasma heated up and started to move along both sides of the compound flux rope, i.e., toward the north (≈265 km s{sup –1}) and south (≈118 km s{sup –1}) from the point of merging. After traveling a distance of ≈150 Mm toward the north, the plasma cooled down and started to return back to the south (≈14 km s{sup –1}) after ≈02:00 UT. The observations provide a clear example of compound flux rope formation via merging of two different flux ropes and the occurrence of a flare through tether cutting reconnection. However, the compound flux rope remained stable in the corona and had a confined eruption. The coronal magnetic field decay index measurements revealed that both the filaments and the compound flux rope axis lie within the stability domain (decay index <1.5), which may be the possible cause for their stability. The present study also deals with the relationship between the filament's chirality (sinistral) and the helicity (positive) of the surrounding flux rope.

  5. Surface Adsorption of Oppositely Charged SDS:C(12)TAB Mixtures and the Relation to Foam Film Formation and Stability.

    PubMed

    Fauser, Heiko; Uhlig, Martin; Miller, Reinhard; von Klitzing, Regine

    2015-10-01

    The complexation, surface adsorption, and foam film stabiliztation of the oppositely charged surfactants, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (C12TAB), is analyzed. The SDS:C12TAB mixing ratio is systematically varied to investigate whether the adsorption of equimolar or irregular catanionic surfactant complexes, and thus a variation in surface charge (i.e., surface excess of either SDS or C12TAB), governs foam film properties. Surface tension measurements indicate that SDS and C12TAB interact electrostatically in order to form stoichometric catanionic surfactant complexes and enhance surface adsorption. On the other hand it can be demonstrated that the SDS:C12TAB mixing ratio and, thus, a change in surface charge and composition plays a decisive role in foam film stabilization. The present study demonstrates that varying the mixing ratio between SDS and C12TAB offers a tool for tailoring surface composition and foam film properties, which are therefore not exclusively mediated by the presence of equimolar catanionic surfactant complexes. The SDS:C12TAB net amount and mixing ratio determine the type, stability, and thinning behavior of the corresponding foam film. These observations indicate the formation of a mixed surface layer, composed of the catanionic surfactant species surrounded by either free SDS or C12TAB molecules in excess. Furthermore, a systematic variation in CBF-NBF transition kinetics is rationalized on the basis of a microscopic phase transition within the foam films. Fundamental knowlegde gained from this research gives insight into the surface adsorption and foam film formation of catanionic surfactant mixtures. The study helps researchers to understand basic mechanisms of foam film stabilization and to use resources more efficiently.

  6. Site-directed Mutagenesis Reveals Regions Implicated in the Stability and Fiber Formation of Human λ3r Light Chains*

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Miryam I.; Canul-Tec, Juan C.; Luna-Martínez, Oscar D.; Sánchez-Alcalá, Rosalba; Olamendi-Portugal, Timoteo; Rudiño-Piñera, Enrique; Rojas, Sonia; Sánchez-López, Rosana; Fernández-Velasco, Daniel A.; Becerril, Baltazar

    2015-01-01

    Light chain amyloidosis (AL) is a disease that affects vital organs by the fibrillar aggregation of monoclonal light chains. λ3r germ line is significantly implicated in this disease. In this work, we contrasted the thermodynamic stability and aggregation propensity of 3mJL2 (nonamyloidogenic) and 3rJL2 (amyloidogenic) λ3 germ lines. Because of an inherent limitation (extremely low expression), Cys at position 34 of the 3r germ line was replaced by Tyr reaching a good expression yield. A second substitution (W91A) was introduced in 3r to obtain a better template to incorporate additional mutations. Although the single mutant (C34Y) was not fibrillogenic, the second mutation located at CDR3 (W91A) induced fibrillogenesis. We propose, for the first time, that CDR3 (position 91) affects the stability and fiber formation of human λ3r light chains. Using the double mutant (3rJL2/YA) as template, other variants were constructed to evaluate the importance of those substitutions into the stability and aggregation propensity of λ3 light chains. A change in position 7 (P7D) boosted 3rJL2/YA fibrillogenic properties. Modification of position 48 (I48M) partially reverted 3rJL2/YA fibril aggregation. Finally, changes at positions 8 (P8S) or 40 (P40S) completely reverted fibril formation. These results confirm the influential roles of N-terminal region (positions 7 and 8) and the loop 40–60 (positions 40 and 48) on AL. X-ray crystallography revealed that the three-dimensional topology of the single and double λ3r mutants was not significantly altered. This mutagenic approach helped to identify key regions implicated in λ3 AL. PMID:25505244

  7. The role of music preferences in early adolescents' friendship formation and stability.

    PubMed

    Selfhout, Maarten H W; Branje, Susan J T; ter Bogt, Tom F M; Meeus, Wim H J

    2009-02-01

    The present study examines the role of similarity in music preferences in the formation and discontinuation of friendships over a 1-year period. Questionnaire data were gathered from 283 Dutch same-sex mutual best friends (mean age=12.97) in two waves with a 1-year interval. Results show consistent evidence for high similarity in specific music dimensions among friends at both waves. Moderate similarity was found in the overall patterning of preferences for music genres at both waves, even after controlling for similarity in social background. Specific music similarity in more non-mainstream music dimensions and overall music similarity at Wave 1 were related to selecting a new friend at Wave 2. However, similarity in music preferences was not related to the discontinuation of an existing friendship at Wave 2. Thus, results suggest that similarity in music preferences is related to friendship formation, and not to friendship discontinuation.

  8. Two Decades of Stability and Change in Age at First Union Formation

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Wendy D.; Brown, Susan L.; Payne, Krista K.

    2014-01-01

    The landscape of union formation has been shifting; Americans are now marrying at the highest ages on record and the majority of young adults have cohabited. Yet little attention has been paid to the timing of cohabitation relative to marriage. Using the National Survey of Families and Households and 4 cycles of the National Survey of Family Growth, the authors examined the timing of marriage, cohabitation, and unions over 20 years. As the median age at first marriage has climbed, the age at cohabitation has remained stable for men and women. The changes in the timing of union formation have been similar according to race/ethnicity. The marked delay in marriage among women and men with low educational attainment has resulted in a near-convergence in the age at first marriage according to education. The authors conclude that the rise in cohabitation has offset changes in the levels and timing of marriage. PMID:25147410

  9. Formation, Stability, and Mobility of One-Dimensional Lipid Bilayer on High Curvature Substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J; Martinez, J; Artyukhin, A; Sirbuly, D; Wang, Y; Ju, J W; Stroeve, P; Noy, A

    2007-03-23

    Curved lipid membranes are ubiquitous in living systems and play an important role in many biological processes. To understand how curvature and lipid composition affect membrane formation and fluidity we have assembled and studied mixed 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DOPC) and 1,2-Dioleoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphoethanolamine (DOPE) supported lipid bilayers on amorphous silicon nanowires with controlled diameters ranging from 20 nm to 200 nm. Addition of cone-shaped DOPE molecules to cylindrical DOPC molecules promotes vesicle fusion and bilayer formation on smaller diameter nanowires. Our experiments demonstrate that nanowire-supported bilayers are mobile, exhibit fast recovery after photobleaching, and have low concentration of defects. Lipid diffusion coefficients in these high-curvature tubular membranes are comparable to the values reported for flat supported bilayers and increase with decreasing nanowire diameter.

  10. Two Decades of Stability and Change in Age at First Union Formation.

    PubMed

    Manning, Wendy D; Brown, Susan L; Payne, Krista K

    2014-04-01

    The landscape of union formation has been shifting; Americans are now marrying at the highest ages on record and the majority of young adults have cohabited. Yet little attention has been paid to the timing of cohabitation relative to marriage. Using the National Survey of Families and Households and 4 cycles of the National Survey of Family Growth, the authors examined the timing of marriage, cohabitation, and unions over 20 years. As the median age at first marriage has climbed, the age at cohabitation has remained stable for men and women. The changes in the timing of union formation have been similar according to race/ethnicity. The marked delay in marriage among women and men with low educational attainment has resulted in a near-convergence in the age at first marriage according to education. The authors conclude that the rise in cohabitation has offset changes in the levels and timing of marriage.

  11. Pattern formation in directional solidification under shear flow. I. Linear stability analysis and basic patterns.

    PubMed

    Marietti, Y; Debierre, J M; Bock, T M; Kassner, K

    2001-06-01

    An asymptotic interface equation for directional solidification near the absolute stability limit is extended by a nonlocal term describing a shear flow parallel to the interface. In the long-wave limit considered, the flow acts destabilizing on a planar interface. Moreover, linear stability analysis suggests that the morphology diagram is modified by the flow near onset of the Mullins-Sekerka instability. Via numerical analysis, the bifurcation structure of the system is shown to change. Besides the known hexagonal cells, structures consisting of stripes arise. Due to its symmetry-breaking properties, the flow term induces a lateral drift of the whole pattern, once the instability has become active. The drift velocity is measured numerically and described analytically in the framework of a linear analysis. At large flow strength, the linear description breaks down, which is accompanied by a transition to flow-dominated morphologies which is described in the following paper. Small and intermediate flows lead to increased order in the lattice structure of the pattern, facilitating the elimination of defects. Locally oscillating structures appear closer to the instability threshold with flow than without.

  12. Effects of amphiphilic diblock copolymer on drug nanoparticle formation and stability

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhengxi

    2013-01-01

    This study systematically compares the effects of amphiphilic diblock copolymer (di-BCP) on stabilizing hydrophobic drug nanoparticles formed by flash nanoprecipitation (FNP), and provides a guideline on choosing suitable di-BCPs. Four widely used di-BCPs, i.e., polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PS-b-PEG), polycaprolactone-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PCL-b-PEG), polylactide-block-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLA-b-PEG), and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA-b-PEG), and β-carotene as a model drug were used. The study showed that PLGA-b-PEG was the most suitable one, whose hydrophobic block was biodegradable and noncrystallizable as well as had relatively high glass transition temperature (Tg) and a right solubility parameter (δ). The molecular weight of PLGA block over the range from 5k to 15k showed an insignificant effect on controlling the particle size. Amorphous drug particles with a high drug loading of over 83 wt% can be achieved. Much remarkable evidence supported the nanoparticles with kinetically frozen and nonequilibrium packing structures of polymer chains rather than either the micelles or micellar nanoparticles with two well segregated polymer blocks. The thermodynamic effects of the drug and BCP on the particle stability, size and structures were discussed by using solubility parameters. PMID:24070569

  13. Stabilizing Surfactant Templated Cylindrical Mesopores in Polymer and Carbon Films through Composite Formation with Silica Reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Lingyan; Feng, Dan; Lee, Hae-Jeong; Wang, Chengqing; Wu, Quanyan; Zhao, Dongyuan; Vogt, Bryan D.

    2010-10-22

    A facile approach to maintain the periodic mesostructure of cylindrical pores in polymer-resin and carbon films after thermal template removal is explored through the reactive coassembly of resol (carbon precursor) and tetraethylorthosilicate (silica precursor) with triblock copolymer Pluronic F127. Without silica, a low porosity, disordered film is formed after pyrolysis despite the presence of an ordered mesostructure prior to template removal. However for silica concentration greater than 25 wt %, pyrolysis at 350 C yields a mesoporous silica-polymer film with well-defined pore mesostructure. These films remain well ordered upon carbonization at 800 C. In addition to the mesostructural stability, the addition of silica to the matrix impacts other morphological characteristics. For example, the average pore size and porosity of the films increase from 3.2 to 7.5 nm and 12 to 45%, respectively, as the concentration of silica in the wall matrix increases from 0 to 32 wt %. The improved thermal stability of the ordered mesostructure with the addition of silica to the matrix is attributed to the reinforcement of the mechanical properties leading to resistance to stress induced collapse of the mesostructure during template removal.

  14. Solubilizing and Stabilizing Proteins in Anhydrous Ionic Liquids through Formation of Protein-Polymer Surfactant Nanoconstructs.

    PubMed

    Brogan, Alex P S; Hallett, Jason P

    2016-04-01

    Nonaqueous biocatalysis is rapidly becoming a desirable tool for chemical and fuel synthesis in both the laboratory and industry. Similarly, ionic liquids are increasingly popular anhydrous reaction media for a number of industrial processes. Consequently, the use of enzymes in ionic liquids as efficient, environment-friendly, commercial biocatalysts is highly attractive. However, issues surrounding the poor solubility and low stability of enzymes in truly anhydrous media remain a significant challenge. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that engineering the surface of a protein to yield protein-polymer surfactant nanoconstructs allows for dissolution of dry protein into dry ionic liquids. Using myoglobin as a model protein, we show that this method can deliver protein molecules with near native structure into both hydrophilic and hydrophobic anhydrous ionic liquids. Remarkably, using temperature-dependent synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy to measure half-denaturation temperatures, our results show that protein stability increases by 55 °C in the ionic liquid as compared to aqueous solution, pushing the solution thermal denaturation beyond the boiling point of water. Therefore, the work presented herein could provide a platform for the realization of biocatalysis at high temperatures or in anhydrous solvent systems. PMID:26976718

  15. Stone-Wales defects in silicene: Formation, stability, and reactivity of defect sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahin, H.; Sivek, J.; Li, S.; Partoens, B.; Peeters, F. M.

    2013-07-01

    During the synthesis of ultrathin materials with hexagonal lattice structure Stone-Wales (SW) type of defects are quite likely to be formed and the existence of such topological defects in the graphenelike structures results in dramatic changes of their electronic and mechanical properties. Here we investigate the formation and reactivity of such SW defects in silicene. We report the energy barrier for the formation of SW defects in freestanding (˜2.4 eV) and Ag(111)-supported (˜2.8 eV) silicene and found it to be significantly lower than in graphene (˜9.2 eV). Moreover, the buckled nature of silicene provides a large energy barrier for the healing of the SW defect and therefore defective silicene is stable even at high temperatures. Silicene with SW defects is semiconducting with a direct band gap of 0.02 eV and this value depends on the concentration of defects. Furthermore, nitrogen substitution in SW-defected silicene shows that the defect lattice sites are the least preferable substitution locations for the N atoms. Our findings show the easy formation of SW defects in silicene and also provide a guideline for band gap engineering in silicene-based materials through such defects.

  16. Formation and Stability of Phenylphosphonic Acid Monolayers on ZnO: Comparison of In Situ and Ex Situ SAM Preparation.

    PubMed

    Ostapenko, Alexandra; Klöffel, Tobias; Meyer, Bernd; Witte, Gregor

    2016-05-24

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) enable an electronic interface tailoring of conductive metal oxides and offer an alternative to common transparent electrodes in optoelectronic devices. Here, the influence of surface orientation and pretreatment on the formation and stability of SAMs has been studied for the case of phenylphosphonic acid (PPA) on ZnO single crystals. Using thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near-edge X-ray adsorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, the thermal stability and orientational ordering of PPA-SAMs on the polar and mixed-terminated ZnO surfaces were analyzed. On all surfaces, PPA-SAMs remain stable up to 550 K, while at higher temperatures a C-P bond cleavage and dissociative desorption takes place yielding two distinct desorption peaks. Based on DFT calculations, these desorption channels are attributed to protonated and deprotonated chemisorbed PPA molecules, which can be related to tri- and bidentate species, hence allowing to determine their relative abundance from the intensity ratio. Beside immersion, an alternative monolayer preparation based on vacuum deposition in combination with controlled desorption of excess multilayers is demonstrated. This enables a SAM preparation on bare ZnO surfaces without any precoating due to exposure to ambient air, which is further compared with SAM formation on intentionally hydroxylated substrates. Corresponding TDS data indicate that initial hydroxylation favors the formation of tridentate and deprotonated bidentate, while the OMBD preparation on bare surfaces yields a larger fraction of protonated bidentate species. The orientation of PPA molecules adopted in the SAMs was determined from the dichroism of K-edge NEXAFS measurements and reveals an almost upright orientation for the deprotonated species, while a slight tilting is obtained for monolayer films with a large fraction of protonated

  17. Cluster formation in binary charge-stabilized colloidal suspensions confined to a two-dimensional plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanat; Mukherjee, Manjori; Mishra, Pankaj

    2016-09-01

    Hypernetted chain (HNC) integral equation theory has been used to study the structural features of binary charged stabilized colloidal suspensions confined to a two-dimensional plane. The particles interact via purely repulsive Yukawa intermolecular potential, the inverse screening length scaled by the average distance between strongly interacting components of the mixture (dimensionless screening parameter) being 1, 3 and 5. Results of HNC theory for one-component systems are found to be in very good agreement with that of simulation, in the parameter range of our study. Binary Yukawa systems with dimensionless screening parameters 1 and 3 are found to exhibit diffuse clusters of the weakly interacting particles, marked by the emergence of a cluster peak in the corresponding partial structure factor curves. No cluster peak is found in the system with the screening parameter 5. For the entire range of mixture parameters, the strongly interacting particles remain homogeneously distributed.

  18. Beta-Barrel Scaffold of Fluorescent Proteins: Folding, Stability and Role in Chromophore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Stepanenko, Olesya V.; Stepanenko, Olga V.; Kuznetsova, Irina M.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.

    2013-01-01

    This review focuses on the current view of the interaction between the β-barrel scaffold of fluorescent proteins and their unique chromophore located in the internal helix. The chromophore originates from the polypeptide chain and its properties are influenced by the surrounding protein matrix of the β-barrel. On the other hand, it appears that a chromophore tightens the β-barrel scaffold and plays a crucial role in its stability. Furthermore, the presence of a mature chromophore causes hysteresis of protein unfolding and refolding. We survey studies measuring protein unfolding and refolding using traditional methods as well as new approaches, such as mechanical unfolding and reassembly of truncated fluorescent proteins. We also analyze models of fluorescent protein unfolding and refolding obtained through different approaches, and compare the results of protein folding in vitro to co-translational folding of a newly synthesized polypeptide chain. PMID:23351712

  19. Factors that Influence the Formation and Stability of Thin, Cryo-EM Specimens.

    PubMed

    Glaeser, Robert M; Han, Bong-Gyoon; Csencsits, Roseann; Killilea, Alison; Pulk, Arto; Cate, Jamie H D

    2016-02-23

    Poor consistency of the ice thickness from one area of a cryo-electron microscope (cryo-EM) specimen grid to another, from one grid to the next, and from one type of specimen to another, motivates a reconsideration of how to best prepare suitably thin specimens. Here we first review the three related topics of wetting, thinning, and stability against dewetting of aqueous films spread over a hydrophilic substrate. We then suggest that the importance of there being a surfactant monolayer at the air-water interface of thin, cryo-EM specimens has been largely underappreciated. In fact, a surfactant layer (of uncontrolled composition and surface pressure) can hardly be avoided during standard cryo-EM specimen preparation. We thus suggest that better control over the composition and properties of the surfactant layer may result in more reliable production of cryo-EM specimens with the desired thickness.

  20. Formation and stability of nanoemulsions with mixed ionic-nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Tabor, Rico; Eastoe, Julian; Li, Xuefeng; Heenan, Richard K; Dong, Jinfeng

    2009-11-14

    A simple, low-energy two-step dilution process has been applied with binary mixtures of ionic-nonionic surfactants to prepare nanoemulsions. The systems consist of water/DDAB-C(12)E(5)/decane. Nanoemulsions were obtained by dilution of concentrates located in bicontinuous microemulsion or lamellar liquid crystal phase regions. The nanoemulsions generated were investigated both by contrast-variation small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The SANS profiles show that C(12)E(5) nanodroplets suffer essentially no structural change on incorporation of the cationic DDAB surfactant, except for increased electrostatic repulsive interactions. Interestingly, SANS indicated that the preferred droplet sizes were hardly affected by the surfactant mixture composition (up to a DDAB molar ratio (m(DDAB)/(m(DDAB) + m(C(12)E(5))) of 0.40) and droplet volume fraction, phi, between 0.006 and 0.120. No notable changes in the structure or radius of nanoemulsion droplets were observed by SANS over the test period of 1 d, although the droplet number intensity decreased significantly in systems stabilized by C(12)E(5) only. However, the DLS sizing shows a marked increase with time, with higher droplet volume fractions giving rise to the largest changes. The discrepancy between apparent nanoemulsion droplet size determined by DLS and SANS data can be attributed to long-range droplet interactions occurring outside of the SANS sensitivity range. The combined SANS and DLS results suggest flocculation is the main mechanism of instability for these nanoemulsions. The flocculation rate is shown to be significantly retarded by addition of the charged DDAB, which may be due to enhanced electrostatic repulsive forces between droplets, leading to improved stability of the nanoemulsions.

  1. Post-Formation Shrinkage and Stabilization of Microfluidic Bubbles in Lipid Solution.

    PubMed

    Shih, Roger; Lee, Abraham P

    2016-03-01

    Medical ultrasound imaging often employs ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs), injectable microbubbles stabilized by shells or membranes. In tissue, the compressible gas cores can strongly scatter acoustic signals, resonate, and emit harmonics. However, bubbles generated by conventional methods have nonuniform sizes, reducing the fraction that resonates with a given transducer. Microfluidic flow-focusing is an alternative production method which generates highly monodisperse bubbles with uniform constituents, enabling more-efficient contrast enhancement than current UCAs. Production size is tunable by adjusting gas pressure and solution flow rate, but solution effects on downstream stable size and lifetime have not been closely examined. This study therefore investigated several solution parameters, including the DSPC/DSPE-PEG2000 lipid ratio, concentration, viscosity, and preparation temperature to determine their effects on stabilization. It was found that bubble lifetime roughly correlated with stable size, which in turn was strongly influenced by primary-lipid-to-emulsifier ratio, analogous to its effects on conventional bubble yield and Langmuir-trough compressibility in existing studies. Raising DSPE-PEG2000 fraction in solution reduced bubble surface area in proportion to its reduction of lipid packing density at low compression in literature. In addition, the surface area was found to increase proportionately with lipid concentration above 2.1 mM. However, viscosities above or below 2.3-3.3 mPa·s seemed to reduce bubble size. Finally, lipid preparation at room temperature led to smaller bubbles compared to preparation near or above the primary lipid's phase transition point. Understanding these effects will further improve on postformation control over microfluidic bubble production, and facilitate size-tuning for optimal contrast enhancement. PMID:26820229

  2. Formation and stability of nanoemulsions with mixed ionic-nonionic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijuan; Tabor, Rico; Eastoe, Julian; Li, Xuefeng; Heenan, Richard K; Dong, Jinfeng

    2009-11-14

    A simple, low-energy two-step dilution process has been applied with binary mixtures of ionic-nonionic surfactants to prepare nanoemulsions. The systems consist of water/DDAB-C(12)E(5)/decane. Nanoemulsions were obtained by dilution of concentrates located in bicontinuous microemulsion or lamellar liquid crystal phase regions. The nanoemulsions generated were investigated both by contrast-variation small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The SANS profiles show that C(12)E(5) nanodroplets suffer essentially no structural change on incorporation of the cationic DDAB surfactant, except for increased electrostatic repulsive interactions. Interestingly, SANS indicated that the preferred droplet sizes were hardly affected by the surfactant mixture composition (up to a DDAB molar ratio (m(DDAB)/(m(DDAB) + m(C(12)E(5))) of 0.40) and droplet volume fraction, phi, between 0.006 and 0.120. No notable changes in the structure or radius of nanoemulsion droplets were observed by SANS over the test period of 1 d, although the droplet number intensity decreased significantly in systems stabilized by C(12)E(5) only. However, the DLS sizing shows a marked increase with time, with higher droplet volume fractions giving rise to the largest changes. The discrepancy between apparent nanoemulsion droplet size determined by DLS and SANS data can be attributed to long-range droplet interactions occurring outside of the SANS sensitivity range. The combined SANS and DLS results suggest flocculation is the main mechanism of instability for these nanoemulsions. The flocculation rate is shown to be significantly retarded by addition of the charged DDAB, which may be due to enhanced electrostatic repulsive forces between droplets, leading to improved stability of the nanoemulsions. PMID:19851556

  3. Nudel is crucial for the WAVE complex assembly in vivo by selectively promoting subcomplex stability and formation through direct interactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuang; Ma, Li; Wu, Yibo; Zeng, Rong; Zhu, Xueliang

    2012-08-01

    The WAVE regulatory complex (WRC), consisting of WAVE, Sra, Nap, Abi, and HSPC300, activates the Arp2/3 complex to control branched actin polymerization in response to Rac activation. How the WRC is assembled in vivo is not clear. Here we show that Nudel, a protein critical for lamellipodia formation, dramatically stabilized the Sra1-Nap1-Abi1 complex against degradation in cells through a dynamic binding to Sra1, whereas its physical interaction with HSPC300 protected free HSPC300 from the proteasome-mediated degradation and stimulated the HSPC300-WAVE2 complex formation. By contrast, Nudel showed little or no interactions with the Sra1-Nap1-Abi1-WAVE2 and the Sra1-Nap1-Abi1-HSPC300 complexes as well as the mature WRC. Depletion of Nudel by RNAi led to general subunit degradation and markedly attenuated the levels of mature WRC. It also abolished the WRC-dependent actin polymerization in vitro and the Rac1-induced lamellipodial actin network formation during cell spreading. Therefore, Nudel is important for the early steps of the WRC assembly in vivo by antagonizing the instability of certain WRC subunits and subcomplexes. PMID:22453242

  4. Formation and Stabilization of Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals Induced by the Interaction of Anthracene with Fe(III)-Modified Clays.

    PubMed

    Jia, Hanzhong; Nulaji, Gulimire; Gao, Hongwei; Wang, Fu; Zhu, Yunqing; Wang, Chuanyi

    2016-06-21

    Environmentally persistent free radicals (EPFRs) are occasionally detected in Superfund sites but the formation of EPFRs induced by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is not well understood. In the present work, the formation of EPFRs on anthracene-contaminated clay minerals was quantitatively monitored via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, and surface/interface-related environmental influential factors were systematically explored. The obtained results suggest that EPFRs are more readily formed on anthracene-contaminated Fe(III)-montmorillonite than in other tested systems. Depending on the reaction condition, more than one type of organic radicals including anthracene-based radical cations with g-factors of 2.0028-2.0030 and oxygenic carbon-centered radicals featured by g-factors of 2.0032-2.0038 were identified. The formed EPFRs are stabilized by their interaction with interlayer surfaces, and such surface-bound EPFRs exhibit slow decay with 1/e-lifetime of 38.46 days. Transformation pathway and possible mechanism are proposed on the basis of experimental results and quantum mechanical simulations. Overall, the formation of EPFRs involves single-electron-transfer from anthracene to Fe(III) initially, followed by H2O addition on formed aromatic radical cation. Because of their potential exposure in soil and atmosphere, such clay surface-associated EPFRs might induce more serious toxicity than PAHs and exerts significant impacts on human health.

  5. Analysis of the enhanced stability of r(+)-alpha lipoic Acid by the complex formation with cyclodextrins.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Naoko; Sugiyama, Hironori; Shimosegawa, Hiroshi; Nakane, Rie; Ishida, Yoshiyuki; Uekaji, Yukiko; Nakata, Daisuke; Pallauf, Kathrin; Rimbach, Gerald; Terao, Keiji; Matsugo, Seiichi

    2013-02-07

    R(+)-alpha lipoic acid (RALA) is one of the cofactors for mitochondrial enzymes and, therefore, plays a central role in energy metabolism. RALA is unstable when exposed to low pH or heat, and therefore, it is difficult to use enantiopure RALA as a pharma- and nutra-ceutical. In this study, we have aimed to stabilize RALA through complex formation with cyclodextrins (CDs). α-CD, β-CD and γ-CD were used for the formation of these RALA-CD complexes. We confirmed the complex formation using differential scanning calorimetry and showed by using HPLC analysis that complexed RALA is more stable than free RALA when subjected to humidity and high temperature or acidic pH conditions. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed that the particle size and shape differed depending on the cyclodextrin used for complexation. Further, the complexes of CD and RALA showed a different particle size distribution pattern compared with that of CD itself or that of the physical mixture of RALA and CD.

  6. In situ formation of magnetite reactive barriers in soil for waste stabilization

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Robert C.

    2003-01-01

    Reactive barriers containing magnetite and methods for making magnetite reactive barriers in situ in soil for sequestering soil contaminants including actinides and heavy metals, organic materials, iodine and technetium are disclosed. According to one embodiment, a two-step reagent introduction into soil takes place. In the first step, free oxygen is removed from the soil by separately injecting into the soil aqueous solutions of iron (II) salt, for example FeCl.sub.2, and base, for example NaOH or NH.sub.3 in about a 1:1 volume ratio. Then, in the second step, similar reagents are injected a second time (however, according to about a 1:2 volume ratio, iron to salt) to form magnetite. The magnetite formation is facilitated, in part, due to slow intrusion of oxygen into the soil from the surface. The invention techniques are suited to injection of reagents into soil in proximity to a contamination plume or source allowing in situ formation of the reactive barrier at the location of waste or hazardous material. Mixing of reagents to form. precipitate is mediated and enhanced through movement of reagents in soil as a result of phenomena including capillary action, movement of groundwater, soil washing and reagent injection pressure.

  7. Pyromorphite formation and stability after quick lime neutralisation in the presence of soil and clay sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Chappell, Mark A.; Scheckel, Kirk G.

    2008-06-16

    Soluble Pb is immobilised in pure systems as pyromorphite by adding sources of P, but doubts remain about the effectiveness of this approach in natural soil systems, particularly given the ability of soil humic substances to interfere with Pb-mineral formation. In addition, recent thermodynamic modelling predicts that pyromorphite formed by the addition of phosphoric acid to Pb-contaminated soils, followed by neutralisation with quick lime (Ca(OH){sub 2}) will destabilise the mineral, reverting the Pb back to more soluble species such as cerussite or anglesite. In this paper, we describe experiments to form pyromorphite in the presence of two different sorbents: a reference smectite called Panther Creek Bentonite, and a commercially available, organically rich potting mixture. We present X-ray diffraction (XRD) evidence suggestive of pyromorphite formation, yet, like similar studies, the evidence is less than conclusive. Linear combination fits of Pb X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS) data collected at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory show that pyromorphite is the major Pb species formed after the addition of phosphoric acid. Furthermore, XAFS data shows that neutralising with quick lime enhances (as opposed to reducing) pyromorphite content in these systems. These results call into question relying solely on XRD data to confirm or deny the existence of minerals like pyromorphite, whose complex morphology give less intense and more complicated diffraction patterns than some of the simpler Pb minerals.

  8. Carbonic anhydrase generates CO2 and H+ that drive spider silk formation via opposite effects on the terminal domains.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Marlene; Chen, Gefei; Otikovs, Martins; Landreh, Michael; Nordling, Kerstin; Kronqvist, Nina; Westermark, Per; Jörnvall, Hans; Knight, Stefan; Ridderstråle, Yvonne; Holm, Lena; Meng, Qing; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Chesler, Mitchell; Johansson, Jan; Rising, Anna

    2014-08-01

    Spider silk fibers are produced from soluble proteins (spidroins) under ambient conditions in a complex but poorly understood process. Spidroins are highly repetitive in sequence but capped by nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains (NT and CT) that are suggested to regulate fiber conversion in similar manners. By using ion selective microelectrodes we found that the pH gradient in the silk gland is much broader than previously known. Surprisingly, the terminal domains respond in opposite ways when pH is decreased from 7 to 5: Urea denaturation and temperature stability assays show that NT dimers get significantly stabilized and then lock the spidroins into multimers, whereas CT on the other hand is destabilized and unfolds into ThT-positive β-sheet amyloid fibrils, which can trigger fiber formation. There is a high carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2) in distal parts of the gland, and a CO2 analogue interacts with buried regions in CT as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Activity staining of histological sections and inhibition experiments reveal that the pH gradient is created by carbonic anhydrase. Carbonic anhydrase activity emerges in the same region of the gland as the opposite effects on NT and CT stability occur. These synchronous events suggest a novel CO2 and proton-dependent lock and trigger mechanism of spider silk formation. PMID:25093327

  9. Carbonic Anhydrase Generates CO2 and H+ That Drive Spider Silk Formation Via Opposite Effects on the Terminal Domains

    PubMed Central

    Otikovs, Martins; Landreh, Michael; Nordling, Kerstin; Kronqvist, Nina; Westermark, Per; Jörnvall, Hans; Knight, Stefan; Ridderstråle, Yvonne; Holm, Lena; Meng, Qing; Jaudzems, Kristaps; Chesler, Mitchell; Johansson, Jan; Rising, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Spider silk fibers are produced from soluble proteins (spidroins) under ambient conditions in a complex but poorly understood process. Spidroins are highly repetitive in sequence but capped by nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains (NT and CT) that are suggested to regulate fiber conversion in similar manners. By using ion selective microelectrodes we found that the pH gradient in the silk gland is much broader than previously known. Surprisingly, the terminal domains respond in opposite ways when pH is decreased from 7 to 5: Urea denaturation and temperature stability assays show that NT dimers get significantly stabilized and then lock the spidroins into multimers, whereas CT on the other hand is destabilized and unfolds into ThT-positive β-sheet amyloid fibrils, which can trigger fiber formation. There is a high carbon dioxide pressure (pCO2) in distal parts of the gland, and a CO2 analogue interacts with buried regions in CT as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Activity staining of histological sections and inhibition experiments reveal that the pH gradient is created by carbonic anhydrase. Carbonic anhydrase activity emerges in the same region of the gland as the opposite effects on NT and CT stability occur. These synchronous events suggest a novel CO2 and proton-dependent lock and trigger mechanism of spider silk formation. PMID:25093327

  10. USP10 antagonizes c-Myc transcriptional activation through SIRT6 stabilization to suppress tumor formation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhenghong; Yang, Heeyoung; Tan, Can; Li, Jinping; Liu, Zhaojian; Quan, Qiu; Kong, Sinyi; Ye, Junsheng; Gao, Beixue; Fang, Deyu

    2013-12-26

    The reduced protein expression of SIRT6 tumor suppressor is involved in tumorigenesis. The molecular mechanisms underlying SIRT6 protein downregulation in human cancers remain unknown. Using a proteomic approach, we have identified the ubiquitin-specific peptidase USP10, another tumor suppressor, as one of the SIRT6-interacting proteins. USP10 suppresses SIRT6 ubiquitination to protect SIRT6 from proteasomal degradation. USP10 antagonizes the transcriptional activity of the c-Myc oncogene through SIRT6, as well as p53, to inhibit cell-cycle progression, cancer cell growth, and tumor formation. To support this conclusion, we detected significant reductions in both USP10 and SIRT6 protein expression in human colon cancers. Our study discovered crosstalk between two tumor-suppressive genes in regulating cell-cycle progression and proliferation and showed that dysregulated USP10 function promotes tumorigenesis through SIRT6 degradation.

  11. Formation and Stabilization of Single-Crystalline Metastable AuGe Phases in Ge Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, E.; Sutter, P.

    2011-07-22

    We use in situ observations by variable temperature transmission electron microscopy on AuGe alloy drops at the tips of Ge nanowires (NWs) with systematically varying composition to demonstrate the controlled formation of metastable solid phases integrated in NWs. The process, which operates in the regime of vapor-liquid-solid growth, involves a size-dependent depression of the alloy liquidus at the nanoscale that leads to extremely Ge-rich AuGe melts at low temperatures. During slow cooling, these liquid AuGe alloy drops show pronounced departures from equilibrium, i.e., a frustrated phase separation of Ge into the adjacent solid NW, and ultimately crystallize as single-crystalline segments of metastable {gamma}-AuGe. Our findings demonstrate a general avenue for synthesizing NW heterostructures containing stable and metastable solid phases, applicable to a wide range of materials of which NWs form by the vapor-liquid-solid method.

  12. Composition-dependent stability of the medium-range order responsible for metallic glass formation

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Feng; Ji, Min; Fang, Xiao-Wei; Sun, Yang; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; Kramer, M. J.; Napolitano, Ralph E.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-09-18

    The competition between the characteristic medium-range order corresponding to amorphous alloys and that in ordered crystalline phases is central to phase selection and morphology evolution under various processing conditions. We examine the stability of a model glass system, Cu–Zr, by comparing the energetics of various medium-range structural motifs over a wide range of compositions using first-principles calculations. Furthermore, we focus specifically on motifs that represent possible building blocks for competing glassy and crystalline phases, and we employ a genetic algorithm to efficiently identify the energetically favored decorations of each motif for specific compositions. These results show that a Bergman-type motifmore » with crystallization-resisting icosahedral symmetry is energetically most favorable in the composition range 0.63 < xCu < 0.68, and is the underlying motif for one of the three optimal glass-forming ranges observed experimentally for this binary system (Li et al., 2008). This work establishes an energy-based methodology to evaluate specific medium-range structural motifs which compete with stable crystalline nuclei in deeply undercooled liquids.« less

  13. Composition-dependent stability of the medium-range order responsible for metallic glass formation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Feng; Ji, Min; Fang, Xiao-Wei; Sun, Yang; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Mendelev, Mikhail I.; Kramer, M. J.; Napolitano, Ralph E.; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2014-09-18

    The competition between the characteristic medium-range order corresponding to amorphous alloys and that in ordered crystalline phases is central to phase selection and morphology evolution under various processing conditions. We examine the stability of a model glass system, Cu–Zr, by comparing the energetics of various medium-range structural motifs over a wide range of compositions using first-principles calculations. Furthermore, we focus specifically on motifs that represent possible building blocks for competing glassy and crystalline phases, and we employ a genetic algorithm to efficiently identify the energetically favored decorations of each motif for specific compositions. These results show that a Bergman-type motif with crystallization-resisting icosahedral symmetry is energetically most favorable in the composition range 0.63 < xCu < 0.68, and is the underlying motif for one of the three optimal glass-forming ranges observed experimentally for this binary system (Li et al., 2008). This work establishes an energy-based methodology to evaluate specific medium-range structural motifs which compete with stable crystalline nuclei in deeply undercooled liquids.

  14. Plasma oxidation and stabilization of electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofiber for carbon nanofiber formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamideh Mortazavi, S.; Pilehvar, Soheil; Ghoranneviss, Mahmood; Hosseinnejad, M. T.; Zargham, Shamim; Mirarefi, Ali A.; Mirarefi, Amir Y.

    2013-11-01

    The effect of plasma treatment on the stabilization of copolymer P(AN-MA) containing 6.1 mol% methyl acrylate (MA) prepared by an electrospinning technique has been investigated at various oxygen contents (10 %, 20 % and 30 %) and different exposure times. The morphology and chemical structural evolution of electrospun and oxidized nanofibers were studied using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). FT-IR analysis indicated that the treated nanofibers were effectively oxidized under different contents of oxygen and prolonged plasma exposure times by increasing the peak intensities of polar groups at 1730 and 3400 cm-1 corresponding to C=O stretching band and OH stretching vibration mode, respectively. Additionally, a reduction in the extent of the cyclization reaction is observed with further increase in exposure times and contents of oxygen, which implies lower conversion of C≡N bands into C=N ones in the copolymer chain. According to the FE-SEM studies, the surfaces of the treated nanofibers were completely etched after 15 min of treatment due to the existence of strong ion bombardment and a reduction in the average fiber diameters was observed.

  15. L-Plastin Nanobodies Perturb Matrix Degradation, Podosome Formation, Stability and Lifetime in THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    De Clercq, Sarah; Boucherie, Ciska; Vandekerckhove, Joël

    2013-01-01

    Podosomes are cellular structures acting as degradation ‘hot-spots’ in monocytic cells. They appear as dot-like structures at the ventral cell surface, enriched in F-actin and actin regulators, including gelsolin and L-plastin. Gelsolin is an ubiquitous severing and capping protein, whereas L-plastin is a leukocyte-specific actin bundling protein. The presence of the capping protein CapG in podosomes has not yet been investigated. We used an innovative approach to investigate the role of these proteins in macrophage podosomes by means of nanobodies or Camelid single domain antibodies. Nanobodies directed against distinct domains of gelsolin, L-plastin or CapG were stably expressed in macrophage-like THP-1 cells. CapG was not enriched in podosomes. Gelsolin nanobodies had no effect on podosome formation or function but proved very effective in tracing distinct gelsolin populations. One gelsolin nanobody specifically targets actin-bound gelsolin and was effectively enriched in podosomes. A gelsolin nanobody that blocks gelsolin-G-actin interaction was not enriched in podosomes demonstrating that the calcium-activated and actin-bound conformation of gelsolin is a constituent of podosomes. THP-1 cells expressing inhibitory L-plastin nanobodies were hampered in their ability to form stable podosomes. Nanobodies did not perturb Ser5 phosphorylation of L-plastin although phosphorylated L-plastin was highly enriched in podosomes. Furthermore, nanobody-induced inhibition of L-plastin function gave rise to an irregular and unstable actin turnover of podosomes, resulting in diminished degradation of the underlying matrix. Altogether these results indicate that L-plastin is indispensable for podosome formation and function in macrophages. PMID:24236012

  16. Early stages in the formation and stabilization of acetylcholine receptor aggregates on cultured myotubes: sensitivity to temperature and azide.

    PubMed

    Olek, A J; Krikorian, J G; Daniels, M P

    1986-09-01

    We have studied the effects of temperature and sodium azide on the formation and stability of embryonic brain extract (EBX)2-induced acetylcholine receptor (AChR) aggregates on myotubes. Sequential changes in AChR distribution were studied on living myotubes in culture by video-intensified fluorescence microscopy. Aggregate formation was temperature dependent, increasing sharply from 24-36 degrees, maximal at 36-37 degrees, and virtually blocked at 38-40 degrees. Whereas aggregate size increased rapidly with time (up to 4 hr) at 36 degrees, at 18-24 degrees small (less than or equal to 1 micron) "microaggregates" formed and accumulated for up to 10 hr. Aggregates formed within 1.5 hr at the sites of microaggregates (formed after 4 hr at 23 degrees) if the temperature was raised to 36 degrees. However, if EBX was removed, the microaggregates on 50% of myotubes disassembled within 1.5 hr. The formation of microaggregates at 23 degrees and aggregates at 36 degrees was reversibly inhibited by sodium azide. These results show that clusters of microaggregates are the precursors of aggregates, and suggest that microaggregate clouds represent a discrete, labile, ATP-dependent stage in aggregate formation. Aggregates that had formed after 4 hr in the presence of EBX disassembled slowly (within 12-14 hr) following removal of EBX at 36 degrees, and even more slowly at 23-30 degrees. However, a temperature shift to 38 degrees, or the addition of azide, resulted in a rapid but reversible disassembly of aggregates (within 4 hr). Thus, newly formed aggregates appear to be relatively stable structures, while microaggregate clouds are labile, tending to disassemble or evolve into aggregates.

  17. A Kalman Filter for Mass Property and Thrust Identification of the Spin-Stabilized Magnetospheric Multiscale Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queen, Steven Z.

    2015-01-01

    The Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission consists of four identically instrumented, spin-stabilized observatories, elliptically orbiting the Earth in a tetrahedron formation. For the operational success of the mission, on-board systems must be able to deliver high-precision orbital adjustment maneuvers. On MMS, this is accomplished using feedback from on-board star sensors in tandem with accelerometers whose measurements are dynamically corrected for errors associated with a spinning platform. In order to determine the required corrections to the measured acceleration, precise estimates of attitude, rate, and mass-properties are necessary. To this end, both an on-board and ground-based Multiplicative Extended Kalman Filter (MEKF) were formulated and implemented in order to estimate the dynamic and quasi-static properties of the spacecraft.

  18. Formation and stability of water-soluble, molecular polyelectrolyte complexes: effects of charge density, mixing ratio, and polyelectrolyte concentration.

    PubMed

    Shovsky, Alexander; Varga, Imre; Makuska, Ricardas; Claesson, Per M

    2009-06-01

    The formation of complexes with stoichiometric (1:1) as well as nonstoichiometric (2:1) and (1:2) compositions between oppositely charged synthetic polyelectrolytes carrying strong ionic groups and significantly different molecular weights is reported in this contribution. Poly(sodium styrenesulfonate) (NaPSS) was used as polyanion, and a range of copolymers with various molar ratios of the poly(methacryloxyethyltrimethylammonium) chloride, poly(METAC), and the nonionic poly(ethylene oxide) ether methacrylate, poly(PEO45MEMA), were used as polycations. Formation and stability of PECs have been investigated by dynamic and static light scattering (LS), turbidity, and electrophoretic mobility measurements as a function of polyelectrolyte solution concentration, charge density of the cationic polyelectrolyte, and mixing ratio. The data obtained demonstrate that in the absence of PEO45 side chains the 100% charged polymer (polyMETAC) formed insoluble PECs with PSS that precipitate from solution when exact stoichiometry is achieved. In nonstoichiometric complexes (1:2) and (2:1) large colloidally stable aggregates were formed. The presence of even a relatively small amount of PEO45 side chains (25%) in the cationic copolymer was sufficient for preventing precipitation of the formed stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric complexes. These PEC's are sterically stabilized by the PEO45 chains. By further increasing the PEO45 side-chain content (50 and 75%) of the cationic copolymer, small, water-soluble molecular complexes could be formed. The data suggest that PSS molecules and the charged backbone of the cationic brush form a compact core, and with sufficiently high PEO45 chain density (above 25%) molecular complexes are formed that are stable over prolonged times.

  19. Formation of copper aluminate spinel and cuprous aluminate delafossite to thermally stabilize simulated copper-laden sludge.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ching-Yao; Shih, Kaimin; Leckie, James O

    2010-09-15

    The study reported herein indicated the stabilization mechanisms at work when copper-laden sludge is thermally treated with gamma-alumina and kaolinite precursors, and evaluated the prolonged leachability of their product phases. Four copper-containing phases - copper oxide (CuO), cuprous oxide (Cu(2)O), copper aluminate spinel (CuAl(2)O(4)), and cuprous aluminate delafossite (CuAlO(2)) - were found in the thermal reactions of the investigated systems. These phases were independently synthesized for leaching by 0.1M HCl aqueous solution, and the relative leachabilities were found to be CuAl(2)O(4)formation mechanism employed to stabilize copper into CuAl(2)O(4) and CuAlO(2) are extensively discussed here. With a 3h of short sintering, it was found that CuAl(2)O(4) could be effectively formed between 850 and 950 degrees C by the gamma-alumina precursor. Although kaolinite had a lower incorporation capability than gamma-alumina, it was found to transform a considerable amount of copper into CuAl(2)O(4) between 950 and 1000 degrees C. At higher temperatures, CuAlO(2) was produced only in the gamma-alumina system as the occurrence of Cu(2)O-cristobalite solution in the kaolinite system precluded the production of CuAlO(2). The hypothesis that the spinel formation mechanism has two stages was supported by the results of the changing Cu/Al mole ratio in the system, and the rate-limiting step was identified as the diffusion process in the second stage. PMID:20570043

  20. Formation of copper aluminate spinel and cuprous aluminate delafossite to thermally stabilize simulated copper-laden sludge.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ching-Yao; Shih, Kaimin; Leckie, James O

    2010-09-15

    The study reported herein indicated the stabilization mechanisms at work when copper-laden sludge is thermally treated with gamma-alumina and kaolinite precursors, and evaluated the prolonged leachability of their product phases. Four copper-containing phases - copper oxide (CuO), cuprous oxide (Cu(2)O), copper aluminate spinel (CuAl(2)O(4)), and cuprous aluminate delafossite (CuAlO(2)) - were found in the thermal reactions of the investigated systems. These phases were independently synthesized for leaching by 0.1M HCl aqueous solution, and the relative leachabilities were found to be CuAl(2)O(4)formation mechanism employed to stabilize copper into CuAl(2)O(4) and CuAlO(2) are extensively discussed here. With a 3h of short sintering, it was found that CuAl(2)O(4) could be effectively formed between 850 and 950 degrees C by the gamma-alumina precursor. Although kaolinite had a lower incorporation capability than gamma-alumina, it was found to transform a considerable amount of copper into CuAl(2)O(4) between 950 and 1000 degrees C. At higher temperatures, CuAlO(2) was produced only in the gamma-alumina system as the occurrence of Cu(2)O-cristobalite solution in the kaolinite system precluded the production of CuAlO(2). The hypothesis that the spinel formation mechanism has two stages was supported by the results of the changing Cu/Al mole ratio in the system, and the rate-limiting step was identified as the diffusion process in the second stage.

  1. Formation and stability of {beta}-quartz solid-solution phase in the Li-Si-Al-O-N system

    SciTech Connect

    Nordmann, A.; Cheng, Y.B.

    1997-12-01

    The development of crystalline phases in lithium oxynitride glass-ceramics was examined, with particular emphasis placed on the effect of the nitrogen source (AlN or Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) on the formation and stability of a {beta}-quartz solid-solution (ss) phase. Oxynitride glasses derived from the Li-Si-Al-O-N system were heated-treated at temperatures up to 1,200 C to yield glass-ceramics in which {beta}-quartz(ss) and {beta}-spodumene(ss) of approximate composition Li{sub 2}O {center_dot} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} {center_dot} 4SiO{sub 2} formed as major phases and in which X-phase (Si{sub 3}Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}N{sub 2}) and silicon oxynitride (Si{sub 2}N{sub 2}O) were present as minor phases. The nitrogen-containing {beta}-quartz(ss) phase that was prepared with AlN was stable at 1,200 C; however, the use of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} as the nitrogen source was significantly less effective in promoting such thermal stabilization. Lattice parameter measurements revealed that AlN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} had different effects on the crystalline structures, and it was proposed that the enhanced thermal stability of the {beta}-quartz(ss) phase that was prepared with AlN was due to both the replacement of oxygen by nitrogen and the positioning of excess Al{sup 3+} ions into interstitial sites within the {beta}-quartz(ss) crystal lattice.

  2. Supersaturating drug delivery systems: effect of hydrophilic cyclodextrins and other excipients on the formation and stabilization of supersaturated drug solutions.

    PubMed

    Brewster, M E; Vandecruys, R; Verreck, G; Peeters, J

    2008-03-01

    Supersaturating drug delivery systems (SDDS) utilize two important design elements in their preparation including converting the drug of interest into a high energy state or other rapidly dissolving form to facilitate the formation of supersaturated drug solutions and providing a means for stabilizing the formed supersaturated solution such that significant drug absorption is possible from the gastrointestinal tract. This has been referred to as a "spring" and "parachute" approach. The current effort is designed to assess materials which may affect properties in SDDS. To this end, a series of excipients was tested in a co-solvent/solvent quench method to assess their ability to attain and maintain supersaturation for a group of 14 drug development candidates. The approach focussed on hydrophilic cyclodextrins including hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPbetaCD) and sulfobutyl-beta-cyclodextrin (SBEbetaCD). Various rheological polymers and surfactants were also included in the study. Consistent with previous investigations, the pharmaceutical polymers, as a class, had minimal effects on the extent of supersaturation but tended to be good stabilizers while the surfactants tended to provide for the greatest degree of supersaturation but the formed systems were poorly stable. This study found that hydrophilic cyclodextrins, especially SBEbetaCD, gave superior results in terms of attaining and maintaining supersaturation. A knowledge of the behavior and performance of excipients in this context can be useful in designing solid oral dosage forms for difficult-to-formulate drugs and drug candidates.

  3. Supersaturating drug delivery systems: effect of hydrophilic cyclodextrins and other excipients on the formation and stabilization of supersaturated drug solutions.

    PubMed

    Brewster, M E; Vandecruys, R; Verreck, G; Peeters, J

    2008-03-01

    Supersaturating drug delivery systems (SDDS) utilize two important design elements in their preparation including converting the drug of interest into a high energy state or other rapidly dissolving form to facilitate the formation of supersaturated drug solutions and providing a means for stabilizing the formed supersaturated solution such that significant drug absorption is possible from the gastrointestinal tract. This has been referred to as a "spring" and "parachute" approach. The current effort is designed to assess materials which may affect properties in SDDS. To this end, a series of excipients was tested in a co-solvent/solvent quench method to assess their ability to attain and maintain supersaturation for a group of 14 drug development candidates. The approach focussed on hydrophilic cyclodextrins including hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin (HPbetaCD) and sulfobutyl-beta-cyclodextrin (SBEbetaCD). Various rheological polymers and surfactants were also included in the study. Consistent with previous investigations, the pharmaceutical polymers, as a class, had minimal effects on the extent of supersaturation but tended to be good stabilizers while the surfactants tended to provide for the greatest degree of supersaturation but the formed systems were poorly stable. This study found that hydrophilic cyclodextrins, especially SBEbetaCD, gave superior results in terms of attaining and maintaining supersaturation. A knowledge of the behavior and performance of excipients in this context can be useful in designing solid oral dosage forms for difficult-to-formulate drugs and drug candidates. PMID:18444510

  4. Correlated Formation and Stability of SIA Loops and Stacking Fault Tetrahedra in High Energy Displacement Cascades in Copper,

    SciTech Connect

    Voskoboinikov, Roman E; Osetskiy, Yury N; Bacon, David J

    2005-01-01

    Atomistic modeling was conducted for an investigation of primary damage creation, self-interstitial and vacancy clusters formation, and their stability in high energy displacement cascades in copper. The simulations were carried out for a wide range of temperatures (100 K {le} T {le} 900 K) and primary knock-on atom (PKA) energies 5 keV {le} Epka {le} 25 keV. This study of over 400 cascades is the largest yet reported for this metal. At least 20 cascades for each (Epka, T) pair were simulated in order to ensure statistical reliability of the results. The number of surviving point defects for each cascade and the mean value for cascades at the same temperature and PKA energy were found. The corresponding fraction of self-interstitial atoms (SIA) in dislocation loops and vacancies in stacking fault tetrahedron (SFT)-like clusters was calculated. Strong spatial and size correlation of SFTs and SIA clusters at low temperatures were established. In the context of high dose irradiation and the spatial overlap of displacement cascades, the stability of SFTs and dislocation loops inside an overlapping cascade region was investigated. It was observed that an SFT destroyed in the collision phase by a cascade is always recreated. On being completely enveloped by the region of displaced atoms, both SFT and SIA dislocation loops are destroyed with corresponding decrease of the number of residual point defects, whereas partial overlapping leads to increase in size of both types of cluster.

  5. Analytical modelling of wave refraction and convergence on coral reef platforms: Implications for island formation and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandlier, Philipp Georg; Kench, Paul Simon

    2012-07-01

    An analytical model was constructed to simulate the refraction of waves on coral reef platforms comprising an idealised bathymetry of uniform depth and vertical reef faces. Model simulations were conducted to investigate the influence of key parameters such as reef shape and depth as well as wave period on the propagation behaviour of incident waves. Results of the refraction analysis demonstrate that different reef shapes produce characteristic patterns of wave convergence on reef surfaces. The location and stability of focal zones and hence wave convergence is largely controlled by the shape of platforms. Platform configuration further controls the distribution of wave energy across platform surfaces and determines the influence of incident wave forcing on different reef sections. Results have significant implications for sedimentation processes and hence the formation and stability of islands on reef platforms. Wave propagation patterns define sediment transport vectors and subsequently control the transport and deposition of different sized material. Platforms which promote marked wave convergence behaviour, such as elliptical and circular reefs, are more likely to retain sediment on reef surfaces, whereas narrow linear structures have a higher potential for the off-reef evacuation of sediment over leeward reef margins and the subsequent infill of deeper lagoonal areas. The study provides a physical basis for future investigations of reef hydrodynamics and platform sedimentation processes.

  6. Formation and Stabilization of Combustion-Generated, Environmentally Persistent Radicals on Ni(II)O Supported on a Silica Surface

    PubMed Central

    Vejerano, Eric; Lomnicki, Slawomir M.; Dellinger, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated Environmentally Persistent Free Radicals (EPFRs) are formed when hydroxyl- and chlorine-substituted aromatics chemisorbed on Cu(II)O and Fe(III)2O3 surfaces and were stabilized through their interactions with the surface metal cation. The current study reports our laboratory investigation on the formation and stabilization of EPFRs on an Ni(II)O surface. The EPFRs were produced by the chemisorption of adsorbates on the supported metal oxide surface and transfer of an electron from the adsorbate to the metal center, resulting in reduction of the metal cation. Depending on the temperature and the nature of the adsorbate, more than one type of organic radical was formed. A phenoxyl-type radical, with g-value between 2.0029 and 2.0044, and a semiquinone-type radical, with g-value from 2.0050 to as high as 2.0081, were observed. The half-lives on Ni(II)O were long and ranged from 1.5 to 5.2 days, which were similar to what were observed on Fe(III)2O3,. The yields of the EPFRs formed on Ni(II)O was ~ 8x higher than on Cu(II)O and ~50x higher than on Fe(III)2O3. PMID:22831558

  7. CCM2-CCM3 interaction stabilizes their protein expression and permits endothelial network formation

    SciTech Connect

    Draheim, Kyle M.; Li, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Rong; Fisher, Oriana S.; Villari, Giulia; Boggon, Titus J.; Calderwood, David A.

    2015-04-21

    Mutations in the essential adaptor proteins CCM2 or CCM3 lead to cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM), vascular lesions that most frequently occur in the brain and are strongly associated with hemorrhagic stroke, seizures, and other neurological disorders. CCM2 binds CCM3, but the molecular basis of this interaction, and its functional significance, have not been elucidated. Here, we used x-ray crystallography and structure-guided mutagenesis to show that an α-helical LD-like motif within CCM2 binds the highly conserved “HP1” pocket of the CCM3 focal adhesion targeting (FAT) homology domain. By knocking down CCM2 or CCM3 and rescuing with binding-deficient mutants, we establish that CCM2–CCM3 interactions protect CCM2 and CCM3 proteins from proteasomal degradation and show that both CCM2 and CCM3 are required for normal endothelial cell network formation. However, CCM3 expression in the absence of CCM2 is sufficient to support normal cell growth, revealing complex-independent roles for CCM3.

  8. Effect of stress fields on magma chamber stability and the formation of collapse calderas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosworth, William; Burke, Kevin; Strecker, Manfred

    2003-08-01

    The summits of many of the Earth's and other planets' larger volcanoes are occupied by calderas that formed by collapse into an evacuating, underlying magma chamber. These collapse calderas are typically several tens of square kilometers in area and are commonly elliptical in shape. We show that the long axes of late Quaternary collapse calderas in the Kenya rift valley, the western Basin and Range province, the Snake River-Yellowstone Plateau, and the Iceland rift zone are parallel to the upper crustal minimum horizontal stress direction (Sh) as determined by independent criteria. We suggest that circular magma chambers beneath these volcanoes became elliptical by stress-induced spalling of their chamber walls, by a mechanism that is analogous to the formation of breakouts in boreholes and tunnels. In breakouts, the hole becomes elongate parallel to the far-field minimum stress. In the Kenya rift, Late Pleistocene caldera collapse was accompanied by a 45° rotation of Sh and an increase in the magnitude of the maximum horizontal stress (SH). The breakout model predicts increasingly unstable caldera walls under these conditions, a possible explanation for the sudden appearance of so many collapse events in a volcanic setting that had never experienced them before. This mechanism of stress change-induced collapse may have played a role in other caldera settings.

  9. CCM2–CCM3 interaction stabilizes their protein expression and permits endothelial network formation

    PubMed Central

    Draheim, Kyle M.; Li, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Rong; Fisher, Oriana S.; Villari, Giulia

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the essential adaptor proteins CCM2 or CCM3 lead to cerebral cavernous malformations (CCM), vascular lesions that most frequently occur in the brain and are strongly associated with hemorrhagic stroke, seizures, and other neurological disorders. CCM2 binds CCM3, but the molecular basis of this interaction, and its functional significance, have not been elucidated. Here, we used x-ray crystallography and structure-guided mutagenesis to show that an α-helical LD-like motif within CCM2 binds the highly conserved “HP1” pocket of the CCM3 focal adhesion targeting (FAT) homology domain. By knocking down CCM2 or CCM3 and rescuing with binding-deficient mutants, we establish that CCM2–CCM3 interactions protect CCM2 and CCM3 proteins from proteasomal degradation and show that both CCM2 and CCM3 are required for normal endothelial cell network formation. However, CCM3 expression in the absence of CCM2 is sufficient to support normal cell growth, revealing complex-independent roles for CCM3. PMID:25825518

  10. MHD simulations of protostellar jets: formation and stability of shock diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustamujic, Sabina

    2016-07-01

    The early stages of a star birth are characterised by a variety of mass ejection phenomena, including outflows and collimated jets, that are strongly related with the accretion process developed in the context of the star-disc interaction. After been ejected, jets move through the ambient medium, interacting and producing shocks and complex structures that are observed at different wavelength bands. In particular, X-ray observations show evidence of strong shocks heating the plasma up to temperatures of a few million degrees. In some cases, the shocked features appear to be stationary and have been interpreted as shock diamonds. We aim at investigating the physical properties of the shocked plasma and the role of the magnetic field on the collimation performing 2.5D MHD simulations, including the effects of the thermal conduction and the radiative losses. We modelled the propagation of a jet ramming with a supersonic speed into an initially isothermal and homogeneous magnetized medium. We studied the physics that guides the formation of a stationary shock (for instance a shock diamond) and compared the results with observations, via the emission measure distribution vs. temperature and the luminosity synthesised from the simulations.

  11. Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    During the reported year we have enhanced our knowledge on and gained considerable experience in assessment of the gas hydrate resources in the offshore environments. Specifically, we have learned and gained experience in the following: Efficiently locating data sources, including published literature and unpublished information. We have established personal communication extremely critical in data accessability and acquisition. We have updated information pertinent to gas hydrate knowledge, also based on thorough study and evaluation of most Russian literature and additional publications in languages other than English. Besides critical evaluation of widely spread literature, in many cases our reports include previously unpublished information (e.g. BSRs from the Gulf of Mexico). The assessment of the gas resources potential associated with the gas hydrates, although in most cases at a low level of confidence, appears also very encouraging for further, more detailed, study. We are also confident that, because of the present reports' format, new data and a concept-oriented approach, the result of our study will be of strong interest to various industries, research institutions and numerous governmental agencies.

  12. [Formation/stabilization of the water oxidizing complex: Polypeptide/secondary donor requirement]. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    We have previously reported EPR analyses and optical spectrophotometric analyses of P{sub 680}{sup +} of NH{sub 2}OH-PSII following various durations of weak light photoinhibition. These analyses led to partial identification of the sites of damage responsible for the observed kinetic components of loss of electron transport. These analyses led us to conclude that the order of susceptibility of components of NH{sub 2}OH-PSII to weak light photodamage is Chl/Car>Y{sub Z} of D{sub 1}>Y{sub D}, of D{sub 2} {much_gt} = P{sub 680}, Pheo, Q{sub A}. These photodamages were significantly prevented by addition of an exogenous PSII electron donor (1 mM Mn{sup 2+}) to the NH{sub 2}OH-PSII prior to illumination suggesting that the damages were caused directly by P{sub 680} {sup +} or Chl{sup +}. During the last year, rather extensive efforts were made to understand the earliest event of photoinhibition of NH{sub 2}OH-PSII, the reaction mechanism causing inhibition of P{sub 680}{sup +} reduction by Y{sub Z} with accompanying formations of Chl{sup +}/Car{sup +}/quencher of Chla variable fluorescence, loss of photoactivation capability, and decrease of the quantum yield of photooxidation of Mn{sup 2+} via its high affinity binding site.

  13. [Formation/stabilization of the water oxidizing complex: Polypeptide/secondary donor requirement

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported EPR analyses and optical spectrophotometric analyses of P[sub 680][sup +] of NH[sub 2]OH-PSII following various durations of weak light photoinhibition. These analyses led to partial identification of the sites of damage responsible for the observed kinetic components of loss of electron transport. These analyses led us to conclude that the order of susceptibility of components of NH[sub 2]OH-PSII to weak light photodamage is Chl/Car>Y[sub Z] of D[sub 1]>Y[sub D], of D[sub 2] [much gt] = P[sub 680], Pheo, Q[sub A]. These photodamages were significantly prevented by addition of an exogenous PSII electron donor (1 mM Mn[sup 2+]) to the NH[sub 2]OH-PSII prior to illumination suggesting that the damages were caused directly by P[sub 680] [sup +] or Chl[sup +]. During the last year, rather extensive efforts were made to understand the earliest event of photoinhibition of NH[sub 2]OH-PSII, the reaction mechanism causing inhibition of P[sub 680][sup +] reduction by Y[sub Z] with accompanying formations of Chl[sup +]/Car[sup +]/quencher of Chla variable fluorescence, loss of photoactivation capability, and decrease of the quantum yield of photooxidation of Mn[sup 2+] via its high affinity binding site.

  14. Topics on the Formation and Stability of Magnetic Mirror Confined Plasmas.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickham, Michael Gordon

    We have investigated two methods of creating a magnetic mirror confined plasma. The first method used the direct cross-field injection of a potassium plasma into a magnetic mirror, and the second applied ion-cyclotron -resonance heating (ICRH) to a barium Q-machine plasma in a simple axisymmetric mirror field. The latter procedure provided a plasma which was particularly suitable for the investigation of MHD stability and kinetic microstability. In the first method, a beam of potassium plasma of 10('12)cm('-3). density was formed in a continuous magnetoplasmadynamic arc. source. This beam was then injected into a mirror configuration from. a direction transverse to the magnetic field. The self-induced polarization and subsequent E(' )X(' )B drift of the beam allowed the plasma to fill the magnetic mirror. A density of 10('12)cm('-3) was obtained when insulating end plugs were used, a slightly reduced value when the beam was injected into a straight solenoidal field, and a lower limit of 10('11)cm('-3) if the end plugs were made conducting. The temperature of the trapped plasma corresponded to approximately two thirds of the energy in the initial directed motion of the beam. We discuss these results qualitatively in terms of the polarization-drift model of Schmidt. The possible application of this injection technique to the fueling of tandem-mirror end cells is described briefly. The second series of experiments studied a low (beta), high density, collisionless, barium plasma which was energized by the application of ICRH in a simple axisymmetric mirror. The barium ions were thereby heated from an initial perpendicular temperature of 0.2 eV to 3-5 eV. We then measured, with laser induced resonance-fluorescence techniques, the ion velocity distribution under the influence of ICRH. In particular, we examined the temporal evolution of two components of the ion velocity distribution, f(v(,x),t) and f(v(,(VBAR)(VBAR)),t), in a fixed magnetic field configuration. The ion

  15. Sol-gel reaction stability studied: Influence in the formation temperature and properties of ferroelectric thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, J. Vilarinho, P.M.; Kholkin, A.L.; Almeida, A.

    2009-03-05

    Lead zirconium titanate (PZT) sol-gel solutions were prepared based on distilled lead acetate precursor solutions. A detailed analysis of the distillation effect on the lead precursor and the final PZT solution were carried out by Infrared and Raman techniques. It was found that the increase in the number of distillation steps experienced by the lead precursor solutions removes the constitutional water and increases the lead acetate-2-methoxyethanol interconnectivity; thus improving stability and avoiding the aging effect of the resulting PZT solutions. The thermal decomposition process of the PZT solutions was analyzed based on the thermogravimetric (TG) and differential thermogravimetric analysis (DTA) measurements. It was found that as the number of distillation steps in the lead precursor solutions increases, the decomposition rate increases and the formation temperature of pure perovskite PZT films decreases. X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique was used to study the film phase formation. A pure perovskite phase at 500 deg. C was found by the XRD analysis after the second distillation step. Scanning electron microscope technique was used to carry out the microstructural analysis. Dense microstructure was found in all analyzed films and an incipient columnar grain growth was revealed in PZT films prepared based on lead precursor solution with more than three distillation steps. The dependence of the dielectric, ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties on the number of distillation steps was revealed and a correlation between the distillation process, film microstructure properties and electrical performance was established.

  16. Formation and Fragmentation of Unsaturated Fatty Acid [M - 2H + Na]- Ions: Stabilized Carbanions for Charge-Directed Fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Michael C.; Kirk, Benjamin B.; Altvater, Jens; Blanksby, Stephen J.; Nette, Geoffrey W.

    2013-12-01

    Fatty acids are long-chain carboxylic acids that readily produce [M - H]- ions upon negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) and cationic complexes with alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals in positive ion ESI. In contrast, only one anionic monomeric fatty acid-metal ion complex has been reported in the literature, namely [M - 2H + FeIICl]-. In this manuscript, we present two methods to form anionic unsaturated fatty acid-sodium ion complexes (i.e., [M - 2H + Na]-). We find that these ions may be generated efficiently by two distinct methods: (1) negative ion ESI of a methanolic solution containing the fatty acid and sodium fluoride forming an [M - H + NaF]- ion. Subsequent collision-induced dissociation (CID) results in the desired [M - 2H + Na]- ion via the neutral loss of HF. (2) Direct formation of the [M - 2H + Na]- ion by negative ion ESI of a methanolic solution containing the fatty acid and sodium hydroxide or bicarbonate. In addition to deprotonation of the carboxylic acid moiety, formation of [M - 2H + Na]- ions requires the removal of a proton from the fatty acid acyl chain. We propose that this deprotonation occurs at the bis-allylic position(s) of polyunsaturated fatty acids resulting in the formation of a resonance-stabilized carbanion. This proposal is supported by ab initio calculations, which reveal that removal of a proton from the bis-allylic position, followed by neutral loss of HX (where X = F- and -OH), is the lowest energy dissociation pathway.

  17. Formation and fragmentation of unsaturated fatty acid [M - 2H + Na]- ions: stabilized carbanions for charge-directed fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Michael C; Kirk, Benjamin B; Altvater, Jens; Blanksby, Stephen J; Nette, Geoffrey W

    2014-02-01

    Fatty acids are long-chain carboxylic acids that readily produce [M - H](-) ions upon negative ion electrospray ionization (ESI) and cationic complexes with alkali, alkaline earth, and transition metals in positive ion ESI. In contrast, only one anionic monomeric fatty acid-metal ion complex has been reported in the literature, namely [M - 2H  +  Fe(II)Cl](-). In this manuscript, we present two methods to form anionic unsaturated fatty acid-sodium ion complexes (i.e., [M - 2H  +  Na](-)). We find that these ions may be generated efficiently by two distinct methods: (1) negative ion ESI of a methanolic solution containing the fatty acid and sodium fluoride forming an [M - H  +  NaF](-) ion. Subsequent collision-induced dissociation (CID) results in the desired [M - 2H  +  Na](-) ion via the neutral loss of HF. (2) Direct formation of the [M - 2H  +  Na](-) ion by negative ion ESI of a methanolic solution containing the fatty acid and sodium hydroxide or bicarbonate. In addition to deprotonation of the carboxylic acid moiety, formation of [M - 2H  +  Na](-) ions requires the removal of a proton from the fatty acid acyl chain. We propose that this deprotonation occurs at the bis-allylic position(s) of polyunsaturated fatty acids resulting in the formation of a resonance-stabilized carbanion. This proposal is supported by ab initio calculations, which reveal that removal of a proton from the bis-allylic position, followed by neutral loss of HX (where X = F(-) and (-)OH), is the lowest energy dissociation pathway. PMID:24338213

  18. Self-assembling SAS-6 multimer is a core centriole building block.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnan, Jayachandran; Guichard, Paul; Smith, Andrew H; Schwarz, Heinz; Agard, David A; Marco, Sergio; Avidor-Reiss, Tomer

    2010-03-19

    Centrioles are conserved microtubule-based organelles with 9-fold symmetry that are essential for cilia and mitotic spindle formation. A conserved structure at the onset of centriole assembly is a "cartwheel" with 9-fold radial symmetry and a central tubule in its core. It remains unclear how the cartwheel is formed. The conserved centriole protein, SAS-6, is a cartwheel component that functions early in centriole formation. Here, combining biochemistry and electron microscopy, we characterize SAS-6 and show that it self-assembles into stable tetramers, which serve as building blocks for the central tubule. These results suggest that SAS-6 self-assembly may be an initial step in the formation of the cartwheel that provides the 9-fold symmetry. Electron microscopy of centrosomes identified 25-nm central tubules with repeating subunits and show that SAS-6 concentrates at the core of the cartwheel. Recombinant and native SAS-6 self-oligomerizes into tetramers with approximately 6-nm subunits, and these tetramers are components of the centrosome, suggesting that tetramers are the building blocks of the central tubule. This is further supported by the observation that elevated levels of SAS-6 in Drosophila cells resulted in higher order structures resembling central tubule morphology. Finally, in the presence of embryonic extract, SAS-6 tetramers assembled into high density complexes, providing a starting point for the eventual in vitro reconstruction of centrioles.

  19. H-treatment impact on conductive-filament formation and stability in Ta2O5-based resistive-switching memory cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goux, L.; Kim, J. Y.; Magyari-Kope, B.; Nishi, Y.; Redolfi, A.; Jurczak, M.

    2015-03-01

    In this article, we evidence the lower formation energy and improved stability of the conductive filament (CF) formed in TiNTa2O5Ta resistive-switching memory cells treated in NH3 atmosphere at 400 °C. This annealing treatment results in (i) lower forming voltage, (ii) lower CF resistance, and (iii) longer retention lifetime of the oxygen-vacancy (Vo) chain constituting the CF. Atomistic insights into these processes are provided by ab initio calculations performed for hydrogen (H) species incorporated in non-stoichiometric Ta2O5 supercells: (i) Vo formation energy is reduced by the presence of H, (ii) Vo-chain CF conductivity is increased by Vo + OH complex formation, and (iii) Vo-chain retention is strengthened by the stable Vo + OH complex. As a result, efficient CF formation and excellent state stability are obtained after 15 days at 250 °C.

  20. Copper stabilization via spinel formation during the sintering of simulated copper-laden sludge with aluminum-rich ceramic precursors.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuanyuan; Chui, Stephen Sin-Yin; Shih, Kaimin; Zhang, Lingru

    2011-04-15

    The feasibility of incorporating copper-laden sludge into low-cost ceramic products, such as construction ceramics, was investigated by sintering simulated copper-laden sludge with four aluminum-rich ceramic precursors. The results indicated that all of these precursors (γ-Al(2)O(3), corundum, kaolinite, mullite) could crystallochemically stabilize the hazardous copper in the more durable copper aluminate spinel (CuAl(2)O(4)) structure. To simulate the process of copper transformation into a spinel structure, CuO was mixed with the four aluminum-rich precursors, and fired at 650-1150 °C for 3 h. The products were examined using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopic techniques. The efficiency of copper transformation among crystalline phases was quantitatively determined through Rietveld refinement analysis of the XRD data. The sintering experiment revealed that the optimal sintering temperature for CuAl(2)O(4) formation was around 1000 °C and that the efficiency of copper incorporation into the crystalline CuAl(2)O(4) structure after 3 h of sintering ranged from 40 to 95%, depending on the type of aluminum precursor used. Prolonged leaching tests were carried out by using acetic acid with an initial pH value of 2.9 to leach CuO and CuAl(2)O(4) samples for 22 d. The sample leachability analysis revealed that the CuAl(2)O(4) spinel structure was more superior to stabilize copper, and suggested a promising and reliable technique for incorporating copper-laden sludge or its incineration ash into usable ceramic products. Such results also demonstrated the potential of a waste-to-resource strategy by using waste materials as part of the raw materials with the attainable temperature range used in the production of ceramics.

  1. Formation of H2-He substellar bodies in cold conditions. Gravitational stability of binary mixtures in a phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füglistaler, A.; Pfenniger, D.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Molecular clouds typically consist of 3/4 H2, 1/4 He and traces of heavier elements. In an earlier work we showed that at very low temperatures and high densities, H2 can be in a phase transition leading to the formation of ice clumps as large as comets or even planets. However, He has very different chemical properties and no phase transition is expected before H2 in dense interstellar medium conditions. The gravitational stability of fluid mixtures has been studied before, but these studies did not include a phase transition. Aims: We study the gravitational stability of binary fluid mixtures with special emphasis on when one component is in a phase transition. The numerical results are aimed at applications in molecular cloud conditions, but the theoretical results are more general. Methods: First, we study the gravitational stability of van der Waals fluid mixtures using linearized analysis and examine virial equilibrium conditions using the Lennard-Jones intermolecular potential. Then, combining the Lennard-Jones and gravitational potentials, the non-linear dynamics of fluid mixtures are studied via computer simulations using the molecular dynamics code LAMMPS. Results: Along with the classical, ideal-gas Jeans instability criterion, a fluid mixture is always gravitationally unstable if it is in a phase transition because compression does not increase pressure. However, the condensed phase fraction increases. In unstable situations the species can separate: in some conditions He precipitates faster than H2, while in other conditions the converse occurs. Also, for an initial gas phase collapse the geometry is essential. Contrary to spherical or filamentary collapses, sheet-like collapses starting below 15 K easily reach H2 condensation conditions because then they are fastest and both the increase of heating and opacity are limited. Conclusions: Depending on density, temperature and mass, either rocky H2 planetoids, or gaseous He planetoids form. H2

  2. Formation of a Stabilized Cysteine Sulfinic Acid Is Critical for the Mitochondrial Function of the Parkinsonism Protein DJ-1

    SciTech Connect

    Blackinton, Jeff; Lakshminarasimhan, Mahadevan; Thomas, Kelly J.; Ahmad, Rili; Greggio, Elisa; Raza, Ashraf S.; Cookson, Mark R.; Wilson, Mark A.

    2009-03-02

    The formation of cysteine-sulfinic acid has recently become appreciated as a modification that links protein function to cellular oxidative status. Human DJ-1, a protein associated with inherited parkinsonism, readily forms cysteine-sulfinic acid at a conserved cysteine residue (Cys{sup 106} in human DJ-1). Mutation of Cys{sup 106} causes the protein to lose its normal protective function in cell culture and model organisms. However, it is unknown whether the loss of DJ-1 protective function in these mutants is due to the absence of Cys{sup 106} oxidation or the absence of the cysteine residue itself. To address this question, we designed a series of substitutions at a proximal glutamic acid residue (Glu{sup 18}) in human DJ-1 that alter the oxidative propensity of Cys{sup 106} through changes in hydrogen bonding. We show that two mutations, E18N and E18Q, allow Cys{sup 106} to be oxidized to Cys{sup 106}-sulfinic acid under mild conditions. In contrast, the E18D mutation stabilizes a cysteine-sulfenic acid that is readily reduced to the thiol in solution and in vivo. We show that E18N and E18Q can both partially substitute for wild-type DJ-1 using mitochondrial fission and cell viability assays. In contrast, the oxidatively impaired E18D mutant behaves as an inactive C106A mutant and fails to protect cells. We therefore conclude that formation of Cys{sup 106}-sulfinic acid is a key modification that regulates the protective function of DJ-1.

  3. HLA-peptide multimer selection of adenovirus-specific T cells for adoptive T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Chakupurakal, Geothy; Onion, David; Bonney, Sarah; Cobbold, Mark; Mautner, Vivien; Moss, Paul

    2013-10-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) infection is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients and virus-specific immunotherapy is one option for improved control. Cellular immunity is an important component in suppression of Ad replication but the frequency and population distribution of Ad-specific CD8 T cells has not been systematically investigated. This is an important question in relation to the potential use of these cells for adoptive transfer. To address this question, HLA-peptide multimers were generated for 8 HLA class I-restricted Ad epitopes, which are highly conserved across Ad species. Epitope-specific CD8 T cells from healthy donors were identified by tetramer staining and HLA class I A*01-restricted TDL peptide staining T cells were characterized in relation to frequency, phenotype, and function. The cells demonstrated a minimally differentiated central memory phenotype (CD45RA, CD45RO, CCR7, CD62L, CD27, CD28, and CD57) and were able to produce IFN-γ and proliferate extensively upon antigen stimulation in vitro. After proliferation, the phenotype switched to CD45RO, although it is interesting to note that CCR7 expression was retained. Despite their low frequency, tetramer-staining cells could be enriched with magnetic bead technology. Their characteristics should permit rapid establishment in vivo post adoptive transfer, increasing therapeutic options for patients with Ad infection. This is the first reported characterization of Ad-specific tetramer-staining T cells with a view to adoptive transfer to hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients with Ad infection. The efficacy of these cells needs to be further evaluated in the setting of a clinical trial. PMID:23994889

  4. Effects of biodegradable plastics on the predominant culturable bacteria associated with soil aggregate formation and stability after 9 months of incubation in natural soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An in vitro study of the effects of biodegradable plastics on the predominant soil aggregating bacteria associated to soil aggregate formation and stability after 9 months of incubation in soil. Caesar-TonThat TC, Fukui R*, Caesar AJ., Lartey, RT, and Gaskin, JF. USDA-Agricultural Research Service, ...

  5. Numerical studies of nitric oxide formation in nanosecond-pulsed discharge-stabilized flames of premixed methane/air.

    PubMed

    Bak, Moon Soo; Cappelli, Mark A

    2015-08-13

    A simulation is developed to investigate the kinetics of nitric oxide (NO) formation in premixed methane/air combustion stabilized by nanosecond-pulsed discharges. The simulation consists of two connected parts. The first part calculates the kinetics within the discharge while considering both plasma/combustion reactions and species diffusion, advection and thermal conduction to the surrounding flow. The second part calculates the kinetics of the overall flow after mixing the discharge flow with the surrounding flow to account for the effect that the discharge has on the overall kinetics. The simulation reveals that the discharge produces a significant amount of atomic oxygen (O) as a result of the high discharge temperature and dissociative quenching of excited state nitrogen by molecular oxygen. This atomic oxygen subsequently produces hydroxyl (OH) radicals. The fractions of these O and OH then undergo Zel'dovich reactions and are found to contribute to as much as 73% of the total NO that is produced. The post-discharge simulation shows that the NO survives within the flow once produced. PMID:26170428

  6. The identification of goat peroxiredoxin-5 and the evaluation and enhancement of its stability by nanoparticle formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Xiaozhou; Liu, Juanjuan; Fan, Shuai; Liu, Fan; Li, Yadong; Jin, Yuanyuan; Bai, Liping; Yang, Zhaoyong

    2016-04-01

    An anticancer bioactive peptide (ACBP), goat peroxiredoxin-5 (gPRDX5), was identified from goat-spleen extract after immunizing the goat with gastric cancer-cell lysate. Its amino acid sequence was determined by employing 2D nano-LC-ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap MS/MS combined with Mascot database search in the goat subset of the Uniprot database. The recombinant gPRDX5 protein was acquired by heterogeneous expression in Escherichia coli. Subsequently, the anti-cancer bioactivity of the peptide was measured by several kinds of tumor cells. The results indicated that the gPRDX5 was a good anti-cancer candidate, especially for killing B16 cells. However, the peptide was found to be unstable without modification with pharmaceutical excipients, which would be a hurdle for future medicinal application. In order to overcome this problem and find an effective way to evaluate the gPRDX5, nanoparticle formation, which has been widely used in drug delivery because of its steadiness in application, less side-effects and enhancement of drug accumulation in target issues, was used here to address the issues. In this work, the gPRDX5 was dispersed into nanoparticles before delivered to B16 cells. By the nanotechnological method, the gPRDX5 was stabilized by a fast and accurate procedure, which suggests a promising way for screening the peptide for further possible medicinal applications.

  7. Formation, physical stability, and quantification of process-induced disorder in cryomilled samples of a model polymorphic drug.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yun; Macfhionnghaile, Pól; Caron, Vincent; Tajber, Lidia; Healy, Anne Marie; Erxleben, Andrea; McArdle, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The formation and physical stability of amorphous sulfathiazole obtained from polymorphic forms I and III by cryomilling was investigated by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. Principal component analysis was applied to the NIR data to monitor the generation of crystalline disorder with milling time and to study subsequent recrystallization under different storage conditions. Complete conversion into the amorphous phase was observed for both forms after 45 (form I) and 150 min (form III) milling time. Upon storage under vacuum over silica gel for 14 days at 4°C, amorphous samples remained amorphous. However, under the same conditions at ambient temperature, recrystallization occurred. Amorphous samples obtained from form I had crystallized back to the original polymorph, whereas those prepared from form III had partially crystallized to mixtures of polymorphs. Amorphous samples stored at ambient temperature and humidity absorbed moisture, which facilitated crystallization to a mixture of polymorphs in both cases. Quantitative analyses of amorphous content in binary mixtures with forms I and III were carried out by XRPD and NIR spectroscopy combined with partial least squares regression. The calibration models had root mean square error of prediction values of <2.0% and were applied to quantify the extent of crystalline disorder during cryomilling.

  8. Label-free fluorescent sensor for lead ion detection based on lead(II)-stabilized G-quadruplex formation.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Shenshan; Wu, Yuangen; Luo, Yanfang; Liu, Le; He, Lan; Xing, Haibo; Zhou, Pei

    2014-10-01

    A label-free fluorescent DNA sensor for the detection of lead ions (Pb(2+)) based on lead(II)-stabilized G-quadruplex formation is proposed in this article. A guanine (G)-rich oligonucleotide, T30695, was used as a recognition probe, and a DNA intercalator, SYBR Green I (SG), was used as a signal reporter. In the absence of Pb(2+), the SG intercalated with the single-stranded random-coil T30695 and emitted strong fluorescence. While in the presence of Pb(2+), the random-coil T30695 would fold into a G-quadruplex structure and the SG could barely show weak fluorescence, and the fluorescence intensity was inversely proportional to the involving amount of Pb(2+). Based on this, a selective lead ion sensor with a limit of detection of 3.79 ppb (parts per billion) and a detection range from 0 to 600 ppb was constructed. Because detection for real samples was also demonstrated to be reliable, this simple, low-cost, sensitive, and selective sensor holds good potential for Pb(2+) detection in real environmental samples.

  9. The identification of goat peroxiredoxin-5 and the evaluation and enhancement of its stability by nanoparticle formation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaozhou; Liu, Juanjuan; Fan, Shuai; Liu, Fan; Li, Yadong; Jin, Yuanyuan; Bai, Liping; Yang, Zhaoyong

    2016-01-01

    An anticancer bioactive peptide (ACBP), goat peroxiredoxin-5 (gPRDX5), was identified from goat-spleen extract after immunizing the goat with gastric cancer-cell lysate. Its amino acid sequence was determined by employing 2D nano-LC-ESI-LTQ-Orbitrap MS/MS combined with Mascot database search in the goat subset of the Uniprot database. The recombinant gPRDX5 protein was acquired by heterogeneous expression in Escherichia coli. Subsequently, the anti-cancer bioactivity of the peptide was measured by several kinds of tumor cells. The results indicated that the gPRDX5 was a good anti-cancer candidate, especially for killing B16 cells. However, the peptide was found to be unstable without modification with pharmaceutical excipients, which would be a hurdle for future medicinal application. In order to overcome this problem and find an effective way to evaluate the gPRDX5, nanoparticle formation, which has been widely used in drug delivery because of its steadiness in application, less side-effects and enhancement of drug accumulation in target issues, was used here to address the issues. In this work, the gPRDX5 was dispersed into nanoparticles before delivered to B16 cells. By the nanotechnological method, the gPRDX5 was stabilized by a fast and accurate procedure, which suggests a promising way for screening the peptide for further possible medicinal applications. PMID:27074889

  10. Folding Landscape of Mutant Huntingtin Exon1: Diffusible Multimers, Oligomers and Fibrils, and No Detectable Monomer.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Bankanidhi; Arduini, Irene; Drombosky, Kenneth W; Kodali, Ravindra; Sanders, Laurie H; Greenamyre, J Timothy; Wetzel, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) track of the Huntingtin (HTT) protein above 36 is associated with a sharply enhanced risk of Huntington's disease (HD). Although there is general agreement that HTT toxicity resides primarily in N-terminal fragments such as the HTT exon1 protein, there is no consensus on the nature of the physical states of HTT exon1 that are induced by polyQ expansion, nor on which of these states might be responsible for toxicity. One hypothesis is that polyQ expansion induces an alternative, toxic conformation in the HTT exon1 monomer. Alternative hypotheses posit that the toxic species is one of several possible aggregated states. Defining the nature of the toxic species is particularly challenging because of facile interconversion between physical states as well as challenges to identifying these states, especially in vivo. Here we describe the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to characterize the detailed time and repeat length dependent self-association of HTT exon1-like fragments both with chemically synthesized peptides in vitro and with cell-produced proteins in extracts and in living cells. We find that, in vitro, mutant HTT exon1 peptides engage in polyQ repeat length dependent dimer and tetramer formation, followed by time dependent formation of diffusible spherical and fibrillar oligomers and finally by larger, sedimentable amyloid fibrils. For expanded polyQ HTT exon1 expressed in PC12 cells, monomers are absent, with tetramers being the smallest molecular form detected, followed in the incubation time course by small, diffusible aggregates at 6-9 hours and larger, sedimentable aggregates that begin to build up at 12 hrs. In these cell cultures, significant nuclear DNA damage appears by 6 hours, followed at later times by caspase 3 induction, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cell death. Our data thus defines limits on the sizes and concentrations of different physical states of HTT exon1 along the reaction profile

  11. Folding Landscape of Mutant Huntingtin Exon1: Diffusible Multimers, Oligomers and Fibrils, and No Detectable Monomer

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Bankanidhi; Arduini, Irene; Drombosky, Kenneth W.; Kodali, Ravindra; Sanders, Laurie H.; Greenamyre, J. Timothy; Wetzel, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) track of the Huntingtin (HTT) protein above 36 is associated with a sharply enhanced risk of Huntington’s disease (HD). Although there is general agreement that HTT toxicity resides primarily in N-terminal fragments such as the HTT exon1 protein, there is no consensus on the nature of the physical states of HTT exon1 that are induced by polyQ expansion, nor on which of these states might be responsible for toxicity. One hypothesis is that polyQ expansion induces an alternative, toxic conformation in the HTT exon1 monomer. Alternative hypotheses posit that the toxic species is one of several possible aggregated states. Defining the nature of the toxic species is particularly challenging because of facile interconversion between physical states as well as challenges to identifying these states, especially in vivo. Here we describe the use of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) to characterize the detailed time and repeat length dependent self-association of HTT exon1-like fragments both with chemically synthesized peptides in vitro and with cell-produced proteins in extracts and in living cells. We find that, in vitro, mutant HTT exon1 peptides engage in polyQ repeat length dependent dimer and tetramer formation, followed by time dependent formation of diffusible spherical and fibrillar oligomers and finally by larger, sedimentable amyloid fibrils. For expanded polyQ HTT exon1 expressed in PC12 cells, monomers are absent, with tetramers being the smallest molecular form detected, followed in the incubation time course by small, diffusible aggregates at 6–9 hours and larger, sedimentable aggregates that begin to build up at 12 hrs. In these cell cultures, significant nuclear DNA damage appears by 6 hours, followed at later times by caspase 3 induction, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cell death. Our data thus defines limits on the sizes and concentrations of different physical states of HTT exon1 along the reaction

  12. Reversible Major Histocompatibility Complex I-Peptide Multimers Containing Ni2+-Nitrilotriacetic Acid Peptides and Histidine Tags Improve Analysis and Sorting of CD8+ T Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Julien; Guillaume, Philippe; Irving, Melita; Baumgaertner, Petra; Speiser, Daniel; Luescher, Immanuel F.

    2011-01-01

    MHC-peptide multimers containing biotinylated MHC-peptide complexes bound to phycoerythrin (PE) streptavidin (SA) are widely used for analyzing and sorting antigen-specific T cells. Here we describe alternative T cell-staining reagents that are superior to conventional reagents. They are built on reversible chelate complexes of Ni2+-nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) with oligohistidines. We synthesized biotinylated linear mono-, di-, and tetra-NTA compounds using conventional solid phase peptide chemistry and studied their interaction with HLA-A*0201-peptide complexes containing a His6, His12, or 2×His6 tag by surface plasmon resonance on SA-coated sensor chips and equilibrium dialysis. The binding avidity increased in the order His6 < His12 < 2×His6 and NTA1 < NTA2 < NTA4, respectively, depending on the configuration of the NTA moieties and increased to picomolar KD for the combination of a 2×His6 tag and a 2×Ni2+-NTA2. We demonstrate that HLA-A2–2×His6-peptide multimers containing either Ni2+-NTA4-biotin and PE-SA- or PE-NTA4-stained influenza and Melan A-specific CD8+ T cells equal or better than conventional multimers. Although these complexes were highly stable, they very rapidly dissociated in the presence of imidazole, which allowed sorting of bona fide antigen-specific CD8+ T cells without inducing T cell death as well as assessment of HLA-A2-peptide monomer dissociation kinetics on CD8+ T cells. PMID:21990358

  13. Imagens do céu ontem e hoje - um multimídia interativo de astronomia e uma nova exposição no MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caretta, C. A.; Lima, F. P.; Requeijo, F.; Vieira, G. G.; Alves, F.; Valente, M. E. A.; de Almeida, R.; de Garcia, G. C.; Quixadá, A. C.

    2003-08-01

    "Imagens do Céu Ontem e Hoje" é o título de uma nova exposição que está sendo inaugurada no Museu de Astronomia e Ciências Afins (MCT), que inclui experimentos interativos, maquetes, réplicas e 8 terminais de computador com um multimídia interativo sobre Astronomia para consulta dos visitantes. O multimídia apresenta um conteúdo bastante extenso, que engloba quase todos os temas em Astronomia, consistindo numa fonte de divulgação e pesquisa para um público que vai das crianças até estudantes universitários. O conteúdo está distribuído em mais de 500 páginas de texto divididas em 4 módulos: "O Universo", "Espectroscopia", "Telescópios" e "Observando o Céu". Cada módulo é subdividido em 5 seções, em média, cada uma iniciada por uma animação que ilustra os temas a serem abordados na seção. Ao final da animação, uma lista de temas é apresentada sob o título "Saiba Mais". Para exemplificar, o módulo "O Universo" contém as seguintes seções: "O Universo visto pelo homem", "Conhecendo o Sistema Solar", "Indo além do Sistema Solar", "Nossa Galáxia, a Via-Láctea" e "Indo mais além, a imensidão do Universo". A seção "Conhecendo o Sistema Solar", por sua vez, tem os seguintes temas: "A origem do Sistema Solar", "O Sol", "Os planetas", "Satélites, asteróides, cometas e outros bichos..." e "O Sistema Solar em números". Cada texto é repleto de imagens, quadros, desenhos, esquemas, etc, além de passatempos ao final de cada seção, incluindo jogos interativos, quadrinhos e curiosidades, que auxiliam o aprendizado de forma divertida. Apresentamos neste trabalho as idéias gerais que permearam a produção da exposição, e uma viagem pelo multimídia para exemplificar sua estrutura e conteúdo. O multimídia será posteriormente disponibilizado para o público externo pela página eletrônica do MAst e/ou por intermédio de uma publicação comercial.

  14. Stability constants for the formation of lead chloride complexes as a function of temperature and ionic strength

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yanxin; Millero, Frank J.

    2015-01-01

    The stability constants for the formation of lead (Pb2+) with chloride Pb2+=nCl−↔PbCln2−nβn(n=1,2,3) have been determined using a spectrophotometric method in NaClO4 solutions as a function of ionic strength (0–6 m) and temperature (15–45 °C). The results have been fitted to the equations: logβ1∗=logβ1+0.21I−8.61I0.5∕(1+1.2I0.5)+1927.40[I0.5∕(1+1.2I0.5)]∕Tlogβ2∗=logβ2+0.32I−4.67I0.5(1+1.2I0.5)+594.54[I0.5∕(1+1.2I0.5)]∕Tlogβ3∗=logβ3+0.40I−2.68I0.5(1+1.2I0.5)−43.98[I0.5∕(1+1.2I0.5)]∕T with standard errors of 0.05, 0.04 and 0.06, respectively. The thermodynamic values of log β1, logβ2 and logβ3 at 25.0 °C and the enthalpies of formation of PbCl+, PbCl20 and PbCl3− are in good agreement with literature values. We have combined our results with the earlier work of Seward (1984) to yield thermodynamic constants that are valid from 15 to 300 °C: logβ1=44.82+0.031T−21.21logTlogβ2=61.42+0.046T−29.51logTlogβ3=107.97+0.071T−51.46logT with standard errors of 0.05, 0.08 and 0.10, respectively. PMID:26937043

  15. Additivity of the Stabilization Effect of Single Amino Acid Substitutions in Triple Mutants of Recombinant Formate Dehydrogenase from the Soybean Glycine max.

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, A A; Kargov, I S; Kleimenov, S Yu; Savin, S S; Tishkov, V I

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that the amino acid substitutions Ala267Met and Ala267Met/Ile272Val (Alekseeva et al., Biochemistry, 2012), Phe290Asp, Phe290Asn and Phe290Ser (Alekseeva et al., Prot. Eng. Des. Select, 2012) in recombinant formate dehydrogenase from soya Glycine max (SoyFDH) lead to a significant (up to 30-100 times) increase in the thermal stability of the enzyme. The substitutions Phe290Asp, Phe290Asn and Phe290Ser were introduced into double mutant SoyFDH Ala267Met/Ile272Val by site-directed mutagenesis. Combinations of three substitutions did not lead to a noticeable change in the catalytic properties of the mutant enzymes. The stability of the resultant triple mutants was studied through thermal inactivation kinetics and differential scanning calorimetry. The thermal stability of the new mutant SoyFDHs was shown to be much higher than that of their precursors. The stability of the best mutant SoyFDH Ala267Met/Ile272Val/Phe290Asp turned out to be comparable to that of the most stable wild-type formate dehydrogenases from other sources. The results obtained with both methods indicate a great synergistic contribution of individual amino acid substitutions to the common stabilization effect.

  16. Enhanced Detection of Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells Using Altered Peptide Flanking Residue Peptide–MHC Class II Multimers

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Christopher J.; Dolton, Garry; Scurr, Martin; Ladell, Kristin; Schauenburg, Andrea J.; Miners, Kelly; Madura, Florian; Sewell, Andrew K.; Price, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorochrome-conjugated peptide–MHC (pMHC) class I multimers are staple components of the immunologist’s toolbox, enabling reliable quantification and analysis of Ag-specific CD8+ T cells irrespective of functional outputs. In contrast, widespread use of the equivalent pMHC class II (pMHC-II) reagents has been hindered by intrinsically weaker TCR affinities for pMHC-II, a lack of cooperative binding between the TCR and CD4 coreceptor, and a low frequency of Ag-specific CD4+ T cell populations in the peripheral blood. In this study, we show that peptide flanking regions, extending beyond the central nonamer core of MHC-II–bound peptides, can enhance TCR–pMHC-II binding and T cell activation without loss of specificity. Consistent with these findings, pMHC-II multimers incorporating peptide flanking residue modifications proved superior for the ex vivo detection, characterization, and manipulation of Ag-specific CD4+ T cells, highlighting an unappreciated feature of TCR–pMHC-II interactions. PMID:26553072

  17. Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability. Second annual technical progress report, October 1, 1985--September 30, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-12-31

    Although there are many publications pertaining to gas hydrates, their formation and stability in various geological conditions are poorly known. Therefore, for the same reasons and because of the very broad scope of our research, limited amount and extremely dispersed information, the study regions are very large. Moreover, almost without exception the geological environments controlling gas hydrates formation and stability of the studied regions are very complex. The regions studied (completed and partially completed - total 17 locations) during the reporting period, particularly the Gulf of Mexico and the Middle America Trench, are the most important in this entire research project. In the past, both of these regions have been extensively studied, the presence of gas hydrates confirmed and samples recovered. In our investigation it was necessary not only to review all previous data and interpretations, but to do a thorough analysis of the basins, and a critical evaluation of an previously reported and publicly available but not published information.

  18. Inhibition of Tongue Coat and Dental Plaque Formation by Stabilized Chlorine Dioxide Vs Chlorhexidine Mouthrinse: A Randomized, Triple Blinded Study

    PubMed Central

    Kini, Vineet Vaman; Padhye, Ashvini

    2015-01-01

    Background Chlorine dioxide (ClO2) is an oxidizing agent with known bactericidal, viricidal and fungicidal properties. Its efficacy in reducing the halitosis has been established by previous literature. However, data evaluating its antiplaque property is scarce. Chlorhexidine (CHX) is considered as the gold standard and an effective adjunctive to mechanical plaque removal. However, it is associated with few reversible side effects. Therefore a study was conducted to assess the antiplaque property of ClO2 containing mouthrinse against CHX mouthrinse. Aims and Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of stabilized chlorine dioxide containing mouthrinse and CHX containing mouthrinse in inhibition of tongue coat accumulation and dental plaque formation using a four day plaque regrowth model clinically and microbiologically in a healthy dental cohort. Materials and Methods A Single Center, Randomized, Triple blinded, Microbiological clinical trial was conducted involving 25 healthy dental students volunteers (11 males, 14 females). Two commercially available mouthrinse: Mouthrinse A – Aqueous based ClO2 mouthrinse Freshchlor® and Mouthrinse B - Aqueous based 0.2% CHX mouthrinse Hexidine® were selected as the test products. Subjects were asked to rinse and gargle for 1 minute with the allocated mouthrinse under supervision after supragingival scaling, polishing and tongue coat removal. After four hours, smears were taken from the buccal mucosa and tooth surface. On the fifth day from baseline of four day non brushing plaque regrowth model the samples were again taken from buccal mucosa and tooth surface followed by recording of plaque scores by Rastogi Modification of Navy Plaque index, extent of tongue coat by Winkel’s tongue coating index and measuring tongue coat wet weight in grams. The samples collected were subjected to microbial analysis and the results were expressed as colony forming units (CFUs) per sample. Statistical Analysis The Data was analysed using SPSS

  19. Formation of Pickering emulsions stabilized via interaction between nanoparticles dispersed in aqueous phase and polymer end groups dissolved in oil phase.

    PubMed

    Okada, Masahiro; Maeda, Hayata; Fujii, Syuji; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2012-06-26

    The influence of end groups of a polymer dissolved in an oil phase on the formation of a Pickering-type hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticle-stabilized emulsion and on the morphology of HAp nanoparticle-coated microspheres prepared by evaporating solvent from the emulsion was investigated. Polystyrene (PS) molecules with varying end groups and molecular weights were used as model polymers. Although HAp nanoparticles alone could not function as a particulate emulsifier for stabilizing dichloromethane (oil) droplets, oil droplets could be stabilized with the aid of carboxyl end groups of the polymers dissolved in the oil phase. Lower-molecular-weight PS molecules containing carboxyl end groups formed small droplets and deflated microspheres, due to the higher concentration of carboxyl groups on the droplet/microsphere surface and hence stronger adsorption of the nanoparticles at the water/oil interface. In addition, Pickering-type suspension polymerization of styrene droplets stabilized by PS molecules containing carboxyl end groups successfully led to the formation of spherical HAp-coated microspheres.

  20. Presentation of the Multimédia Game "Geolover" Concept, to Educational Enchancement of the Geolocical Heritage of the Following Regions: "Ilha do Fogo" (Cabo-Verde), Seridó (Brasil), Sabugal (Portugal) and Açores (Portugal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, João; Gomes, Ana; Alfama, Vera; Oliveira, Sirlene; Pinharandas, Carlos; Fonseca, Pedro; Campos, José; Nobre, José

    2013-04-01

    "Geolover" - Presentation of the multimédia game concept, to educational enchancement of the geolocical heritage of the following regions: : "Ilha do Fogo" (Cabo-Verde), Seridó (Brasil), Sabugal and Açores (Portugal). "Geolover" is a multitouch game, played by four players simultaneously, identified by 4 mascots and using as sceneries, the four regions landscapes, aimed to the young people with ages between 8 and 12 years old. The main objective is value the geological heritage of the Ilha do Fogo (Cabo Verde), Seridó in State of Rio Grande do Norte (Brasil) , Sabugal in Beira Alta province (Portugal) and Arquipélago dos Açores (Portuguese autonomous region). These regions have a great geological heritage like volcanology, plutonic rocks, sedimentar formations, metamorphic, paleontologic, mineralogic, geomorphologic, hydric and mining resources. Such heritage is being used in the different regions has base of studies to senior scientists and were used to great scientific researches. The diversified and distinguished cultural heritage of these four regions is referenced and it's a value to the union of the students from these three continents, with the Portuguese language as communication tool. The variety of the geological wealth and cultural of these regions, results in the common objective of their valuing like Geoparks. His creation on these three regions is a strategy with a great relevance to the socio-economic development. With the creation of this game, we promote the union of these 3 countries from these three continents, the universal values of the heritage richness that are offered by our planet.

  1. Automated procedure to determine the thermodynamic stability of a material and the range of chemical potentials necessary for its formation relative to competing phases and compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckeridge, J.; Scanlon, D. O.; Walsh, A.; Catlow, C. R. A.

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple and fast algorithm to test the thermodynamic stability and determine the necessary chemical environment for the production of a multiternary material, relative to competing phases and compounds formed from the constituent elements. If the material is found to be stable, the region of stability, in terms of the constituent elemental chemical potentials, is determined from the intersection points of hypersurfaces in an (n-1)-dimensional chemical potential space, where n is the number of atomic species in the material. The input required is the free energy of formation of the material itself, and that of all competing phases. Output consists of the result of the test of stability, the intersection points in the chemical potential space and the competing phase to which they relate, and, for two- and three-dimensional spaces, a file which may be used for visualization of the stability region. We specify the use of the program by applying it both to a ternary system and to a quaternary system. The algorithm automates essential analysis of the thermodynamic stability of a material. This analysis consists of a process which is lengthy for ternary materials, and becomes much more complicated when studying materials of four or more constituent elements, which have become of increased interest in recent years for technological applications such as energy harvesting and optoelectronics. The algorithm will therefore be of great benefit to the theoretical and computational study of such materials.

  2. H-treatment impact on conductive-filament formation and stability in Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}-based resistive-switching memory cells

    SciTech Connect

    Goux, L. Redolfi, A.; Jurczak, M.; Kim, J. Y.; Magyari-Kope, B.; Nishi, Y.

    2015-03-28

    In this article, we evidence the lower formation energy and improved stability of the conductive filament (CF) formed in TiN\\Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}\\Ta resistive-switching memory cells treated in NH{sub 3} atmosphere at 400 °C. This annealing treatment results in (i) lower forming voltage, (ii) lower CF resistance, and (iii) longer retention lifetime of the oxygen-vacancy (V{sub o}) chain constituting the CF. Atomistic insights into these processes are provided by ab initio calculations performed for hydrogen (H) species incorporated in non-stoichiometric Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} supercells: (i) V{sub o} formation energy is reduced by the presence of H, (ii) V{sub o}-chain CF conductivity is increased by V{sub o} + OH complex formation, and (iii) V{sub o}-chain retention is strengthened by the stable V{sub o} + OH complex. As a result, efficient CF formation and excellent state stability are obtained after 15 days at 250 °C.

  3. Formation and stabilization of the telomeric antiparallel G-quadruplex and inhibition of telomerase by novel benzothioxanthene derivatives with anti-tumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Min; Ling Wu, Yan; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Juan Ji, Yan; Lin Zhang, Su; He Wei, Chuan; Xu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    G-quadruplexes formed in telomeric DNA sequences at human chromosome ends can be a novel target for the development of therapeutics for the treatment of cancer patients. Herein, we examined the ability of six novel benzothioxanthene derivatives S1–S6 to induce the formation of and stabilize an antiparallel G-quadruplex by EMSA, UV-melting and CD techniques and the influence of S1–S6 on A549 and SGC7901 cells through real-time cell analysis, wound healing, trap assay methods. Results show that six compounds could differentially induce 26 nt G-rich oligonucleotides to form the G-quadruplex with high selectivity vs C-rich DNA, mutated DNA and double-stranded DNA, stabilize it with high affinity, promote apoptosis and inhibit mobility and telomerase activity of A549 cells and SGC7901 cells. Especially, S1, S3, S4 displayed stronger abilities, of which S3 was the most optimal with the maximum ΔTm value being up to 29.8 °C for G-quadruplex, the minimum IC50 value being 0.53 μM and the maximum cell inhibitory rate being up to 97.2%. This study suggests that this type of compounds that induce the formation of and stabilize the telomeric antiparallel G-quadruplex, and consequently inhibit telomerase activity, leading to cell apoptosis, can be screened for the discovery of novel antitumor therapeutics. PMID:26329134

  4. The coupling between stability and ion pair formation in magnesium electrolytes from first-principles quantum mechanics and classical molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Qu, Xiaohui; Sa, Niya; Burrell, Anthony K; Persson, Kristin A

    2015-03-11

    In this work we uncover a novel effect between concentration dependent ion pair formation and anion stability at reducing potentials, e.g., at the metal anode. Through comprehensive calculations using both first-principles as well as well-benchmarked classical molecular dynamics over a matrix of electrolytes, covering solvents and salt anions with a broad range in chemistry, we elucidate systematic correlations between molecular level interactions and composite electrolyte properties, such as electrochemical stability, solvation structure, and dynamics. We find that Mg electrolytes are highly prone to ion pair formation, even at modest concentrations, for a wide range of solvents with different dielectric constants, which have implications for dynamics as well as charge transfer. Specifically, we observe that, at Mg metal potentials, the ion pair undergoes partial reduction at the Mg cation center (Mg(2+) → Mg(+)), which competes with the charge transfer mechanism and can activate the anion to render it susceptible to decomposition. Specifically, TFSI(-) exhibits a significant bond weakening while paired with the transient, partially reduced Mg(+). In contrast, BH4(-) and BF4(-) are shown to be chemically stable in a reduced ion pair configuration. Furthermore, we observe that higher order glymes as well as DMSO improve the solubility of Mg salts, but only the longer glyme chains reduce the dynamics of the ions in solution. This information provides critical design metrics for future electrolytes as it elucidates a close connection between bulk solvation and cathodic stability as well as the dynamics of the salt.

  5. Formation and stabilization of the telomeric antiparallel G-quadruplex and inhibition of telomerase by novel benzothioxanthene derivatives with anti-tumor activity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Min; Ling Wu, Yan; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Juan Ji, Yan; Lin Zhang, Su; He Wei, Chuan; Xu, Yan

    2015-09-02

    G-quadruplexes formed in telomeric DNA sequences at human chromosome ends can be a novel target for the development of therapeutics for the treatment of cancer patients. Herein, we examined the ability of six novel benzothioxanthene derivatives S1-S6 to induce the formation of and stabilize an antiparallel G-quadruplex by EMSA, UV-melting and CD techniques and the influence of S1-S6 on A549 and SGC7901 cells through real-time cell analysis, wound healing, trap assay methods. Results show that six compounds could differentially induce 26 nt G-rich oligonucleotides to form the G-quadruplex with high selectivity vs C-rich DNA, mutated DNA and double-stranded DNA, stabilize it with high affinity, promote apoptosis and inhibit mobility and telomerase activity of A549 cells and SGC7901 cells. Especially, S1, S3, S4 displayed stronger abilities, of which S3 was the most optimal with the maximum ΔTm value being up to 29.8 °C for G-quadruplex, the minimum IC50 value being 0.53 μM and the maximum cell inhibitory rate being up to 97.2%. This study suggests that this type of compounds that induce the formation of and stabilize the telomeric antiparallel G-quadruplex, and consequently inhibit telomerase activity, leading to cell apoptosis, can be screened for the discovery of novel antitumor therapeutics.

  6. Formation and stabilization of the telomeric antiparallel G-quadruplex and inhibition of telomerase by novel benzothioxanthene derivatives with anti-tumor activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wen; Chen, Min; Ling Wu, Yan; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Juan Ji, Yan; Lin Zhang, Su; He Wei, Chuan; Xu, Yan

    2015-09-01

    G-quadruplexes formed in telomeric DNA sequences at human chromosome ends can be a novel target for the development of therapeutics for the treatment of cancer patients. Herein, we examined the ability of six novel benzothioxanthene derivatives S1-S6 to induce the formation of and stabilize an antiparallel G-quadruplex by EMSA, UV-melting and CD techniques and the influence of S1-S6 on A549 and SGC7901 cells through real-time cell analysis, wound healing, trap assay methods. Results show that six compounds could differentially induce 26 nt G-rich oligonucleotides to form the G-quadruplex with high selectivity vs C-rich DNA, mutated DNA and double-stranded DNA, stabilize it with high affinity, promote apoptosis and inhibit mobility and telomerase activity of A549 cells and SGC7901 cells. Especially, S1, S3, S4 displayed stronger abilities, of which S3 was the most optimal with the maximum ΔTm value being up to 29.8 °C for G-quadruplex, the minimum IC50 value being 0.53 μM and the maximum cell inhibitory rate being up to 97.2%. This study suggests that this type of compounds that induce the formation of and stabilize the telomeric antiparallel G-quadruplex, and consequently inhibit telomerase activity, leading to cell apoptosis, can be screened for the discovery of novel antitumor therapeutics.

  7. The coupling between stability and ion pair formation in magnesium electrolytes from first-principles quantum mechanics and classical molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Rajput, Nav Nidhi; Qu, Xiaohuui; Sa, Niya; Burrell, Anthony K.; Persson, Kristin A.

    2015-03-11

    In this work we uncover a novel effect between concentration dependent ion pair formation and anion stability at reducing potentials, e.g., at the metal anode. Through comprehensive calculations using both first-principles as well as well-benchmarked classical molecular dynamics over a matrix of electrolytes, covering solvents and salt anions with a broad range in chemistry, we elucidate systematic correlations between molecular level interactions and composite electrolyte properties, such as electrochemical stability, solvation structure, and dynamics. We find that Mg electrolytes are highly prone to ion pair formation, even at modest concentrations, for a wide range of solvents with different dielectric constants, which have implications for dynamics as well as charge transfer. Specifically, we observe that, at Mg metal potentials, the ion pair undergoes partial reduction at the Mg cation center (Mg2+ -> Mg+), which competes with the charge transfer mechanism and can activate the anion to render it susceptible to decomposition. Specifically, TFSI exhibits a significant bond weakening while paired with the transient, partially reduced Mg+. In contrast, BH4 and BF4 are shown to be chemically stable in a reduced ion pair configuration. Furthermore, we observe that higher order glymes as well as DMSO improve the solubility of Mg salts, but only the longer glyme chains reduce the dynamics of the ions in solution. This information provides critical design metrics for future electrolytes as it elucidates a close connection between bulk solvation and cathodic stability as well as the dynamics of the salt.

  8. Both G3BP1 and G3BP2 contribute to stress granule formation.

    PubMed

    Matsuki, Hideaki; Takahashi, Masahiko; Higuchi, Masaya; Makokha, Grace N; Oie, Masayasu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2013-02-01

    Upon exposure to various environmental stresses such as arsenite, hypoxia, and heat shock, cells inhibit their translation and apoptosis and then repair stress-induced alterations, such as DNA damage and the accumulation of misfolded proteins. These types of stresses induce the formation of cytoplasmic RNA granules called stress granules (SGs). SGs are storage sites for the many mRNAs released from disassembled polysomes under these stress conditions and are essential for the selective translation of stress-inducible genes. Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3 domain-binding protein 1 (G3BP1) is a component of SGs that initiates the assembly of SGs by forming a multimer. In this study, we examined the role of G3BP2, a close relative of G3BP1, in SG formation. Although single knockdown of either G3BP1 or G3BP2 in 293T cells partially reduced the number of SG-positive cells induced by arsenite, the knockdowns of both genes significantly reduced the number. G3BP2 formed a homo-multimer and a hetero-multimer with G3BP1. Moreover, like G3BP1, the overexpression of G3BP2 induced SGs even without stress stimuli. Collectively, these results suggest that both G3BP1 and G3BP2 play a role in the formation of SGs in various human cells and thereby recovery from these cellular stresses.

  9. Data analysis as a source of variability of the HLA-peptide multimer assay: from manual gating to automated recognition of cell clusters

    PubMed Central

    Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Chan, Cliburn; Attig, Sebastian; Køllgaard, Tania T.; Rammensee, Hans-Georg; Stevanović, Stefan; Wernet, Dorothee; Straten, Per thor; Welters, Marij J.P.; Ottensmeier, Christian; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Britten, Cedrik M.

    2015-01-01

    Multiparameter flow cytometry is an indispensable method for assessing antigen-specific T cells in basic research and cancer immunotherapy. Proficiency panels have shown that cell sample processing, test protocols and data analysis may all contribute to the variability of the results obtained by laboratories performing ex vivo T-cell immune monitoring. In particular, analysis currently relies on a manual, step-by-step strategy employing serial gating decisions based on visual inspection of one- or two-dimensional plots. It is therefore operator dependent and subjective. In the context of continuing efforts to support inter-laboratory T-cell assay harmonization, the Immunoguiding Program organized its third proficiency panel dedicated to the detection of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells by HLA-peptide multimer staining. We first assessed the contribution of manual data analysis to the variability of reported T-cell frequencies within a group of laboratories staining and analyzing the same cell samples with their own reagents and protocols. The results show that data analysis is a source of variation in the multimer assay outcome. To evaluate if an automated analysis approach can reduce variability of proficiency panel data, we used a hierarchical statistical mixture model to identify cell clusters. Challenges for automated analysis were the need to process non-standardized data sets from multiple centers, and the fact that the antigen-specific cell frequencies were very low in most samples. We show that this automated method can circumvent difficulties inherent to manual gating strategies and is broadly applicable for experiments performed with heterogeneous protocols and reagents. PMID:25854580

  10. Thermal analysis and FTIR spectral curve-fitting investigation of formation mechanism and stability of indomethacin-saccharin cocrystals via solid-state grinding process.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gang-Chun; Lin, Hong-Liang; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2012-07-01

    The cocrystal formation of indomethacin (IMC) and saccharin (SAC) by mechanical cogrinding or thermal treatment was investigated. The formation mechanism and stability of IMC-SAC cocrystal prepared by cogrinding process were explored. Typical IMC-SAC cocrystal was also prepared by solvent evaporation method. All the samples were identified and characterized by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy with curve-fitting analysis. The physical stability of different IMC-SAC ground mixtures before and after storage for 7 months was examined. The results demonstrate that the stepwise measurements were carried out at specific intervals over a continuous cogrinding process showing a continuous growth in the cocrystal formation between IMC and SAC. The main IR spectral shifts from 3371 to 3,347 cm(-1) and 1693 to 1682 cm(-1) for IMC, as well as from 3094 to 3136 cm(-1) and 1718 to 1735 cm(-1) for SAC suggested that the OH and NH groups in both chemical structures were taken part in a hydrogen bonding, leading to the formation of IMC-SAC cocrystal. A melting at 184 °C for the 30-min IMC-SAC ground mixture was almost the same as the melting at 184 °C for the solvent-evaporated IMC-SAC cocrystal. The 30-min IMC-SAC ground mixture was also confirmed to have similar components and contents to that of the solvent-evaporated IMC-SAC cocrystal by using a curve-fitting analysis from IR spectra. The thermal-induced IMC-SAC cocrystal formation was also found to be dependent on the temperature treated. Different IMC-SAC ground mixtures after storage at 25 °C/40% RH condition for 7 months had an improved tendency of IMC-SAC cocrystallization.

  11. Formation and stabilization of nanoemulsion-based vitamin E delivery systems using natural biopolymers: Whey protein isolate and gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-01

    Natural biopolymers, whey protein isolate (WPI) and gum arabic (GA), were used to fabricate emulsion-based delivery systems for vitamin E-acetate. Stable delivery systems could be formed when vitamin E-acetate was mixed with sufficient orange oil prior to high pressure homogenization. WPI (d32=0.11 μm, 1% emulsifier) was better than GA (d32=0.38 μm, 10% emulsifier) at producing small droplets at low emulsifier concentrations. However, WPI-stabilized nanoemulsions were unstable to flocculation near the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.0), at high ionic strength (>100mM), and at elevated temperatures (>60 °C), whereas GA-stabilized emulsions were stable. This difference was attributed to differences in emulsifier stabilization mechanisms: WPI by electrostatic repulsion; GA by steric repulsion. These results provide useful information about the emulsifying and stabilizing capacities of natural biopolymers for forming food-grade vitamin-enriched delivery systems. PMID:26041190

  12. Formation and stabilization of nanoemulsion-based vitamin E delivery systems using natural biopolymers: Whey protein isolate and gum arabic.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Bengu; Argin, Sanem; Ozilgen, Mustafa; McClements, David Julian

    2015-12-01

    Natural biopolymers, whey protein isolate (WPI) and gum arabic (GA), were used to fabricate emulsion-based delivery systems for vitamin E-acetate. Stable delivery systems could be formed when vitamin E-acetate was mixed with sufficient orange oil prior to high pressure homogenization. WPI (d32=0.11 μm, 1% emulsifier) was better than GA (d32=0.38 μm, 10% emulsifier) at producing small droplets at low emulsifier concentrations. However, WPI-stabilized nanoemulsions were unstable to flocculation near the protein isoelectric point (pH 5.0), at high ionic strength (>100mM), and at elevated temperatures (>60 °C), whereas GA-stabilized emulsions were stable. This difference was attributed to differences in emulsifier stabilization mechanisms: WPI by electrostatic repulsion; GA by steric repulsion. These results provide useful information about the emulsifying and stabilizing capacities of natural biopolymers for forming food-grade vitamin-enriched delivery systems.

  13. COX7A2L Is a Mitochondrial Complex III Binding Protein that Stabilizes the III2+IV Supercomplex without Affecting Respirasome Formation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, Rafael; Lobo-Jarne, Teresa; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Mourier, Arnaud; Bratic, Ana; García-Bartolomé, Alberto; Fernández-Vizarra, Erika; Cadenas, Susana; Delmiro, Aitor; García-Consuegra, Inés; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Ugalde, Cristina

    2016-08-30

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes I, III, and IV associate into a variety of supramolecular structures known as supercomplexes and respirasomes. While COX7A2L was originally described as a supercomplex-specific factor responsible for the dynamic association of complex IV into these structures to adapt MRC function to metabolic variations, this role has been disputed. Here, we further examine the functional significance of COX7A2L in the structural organization of the mammalian respiratory chain. As in the mouse, human COX7A2L binds primarily to free mitochondrial complex III and, to a minor extent, to complex IV to specifically promote the stabilization of the III2+IV supercomplex without affecting respirasome formation. Furthermore, COX7A2L does not affect the biogenesis, stabilization, and function of the individual oxidative phosphorylation complexes. These data show that independent regulatory mechanisms for the biogenesis and turnover of different MRC supercomplex structures co-exist.

  14. COX7A2L Is a Mitochondrial Complex III Binding Protein that Stabilizes the III2+IV Supercomplex without Affecting Respirasome Formation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Pérez, Rafael; Lobo-Jarne, Teresa; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Mourier, Arnaud; Bratic, Ana; García-Bartolomé, Alberto; Fernández-Vizarra, Erika; Cadenas, Susana; Delmiro, Aitor; García-Consuegra, Inés; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Ugalde, Cristina

    2016-08-30

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) complexes I, III, and IV associate into a variety of supramolecular structures known as supercomplexes and respirasomes. While COX7A2L was originally described as a supercomplex-specific factor responsible for the dynamic association of complex IV into these structures to adapt MRC function to metabolic variations, this role has been disputed. Here, we further examine the functional significance of COX7A2L in the structural organization of the mammalian respiratory chain. As in the mouse, human COX7A2L binds primarily to free mitochondrial complex III and, to a minor extent, to complex IV to specifically promote the stabilization of the III2+IV supercomplex without affecting respirasome formation. Furthermore, COX7A2L does not affect the biogenesis, stabilization, and function of the individual oxidative phosphorylation complexes. These data show that independent regulatory mechanisms for the biogenesis and turnover of different MRC supercomplex structures co-exist. PMID:27545886

  15. Phase Stability and Pressure Dependence of Defect Formation in Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Zr2O7 Pyrochlores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, F. X.; Wang, J. W.; Lian, J.; Lang, M. K.; Becker, U.; Ewing, R. C.

    2008-02-01

    We report dramatically different behaviors between isostructural Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlore at pressures up to 44 GPa, in which the substitution of Ti for Zr significantly increases structural stability. Upon release of pressure, the Gd2Ti2O7 becomes amorphous. In contrast, the high-pressure phase of Gd2Zr2O7 transforms to a disordered defect-fluorite structure. First-principle calculations for both compositions revealed that the response of pyrochlore to high pressure is controlled by the intrinsic energetics of defect formation.

  16. Phase stability and pressure dependence of defect formation in Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlores.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F X; Wang, J W; Lian, J; Lang, M K; Becker, U; Ewing, R C

    2008-02-01

    We report dramatically different behaviors between isostructural Gd2Ti2O7 and Gd2Zr2O7 pyrochlore at pressures up to 44 GPa, in which the substitution of Ti for Zr significantly increases structural stability. Upon release of pressure, the Gd2Ti2O7 becomes amorphous. In contrast, the high-pressure phase of Gd2Zr2O7 transforms to a disordered defect-fluorite structure. First-principle calculations for both compositions revealed that the response of pyrochlore to high pressure is controlled by the intrinsic energetics of defect formation.

  17. Defective synthesis of lipid intermediates for peptidoglycan formation in a stabilized L-form of Streptococcus pyogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Reusch, V M; Panos, C

    1976-01-01

    Membrane preparations obtained from a stabilized L-form of Streptococcus pyogenes are incapable of synthesizing peptidoglycan from uridine-5'-diphospho-N-acetyl-D-muramyl-L-Ala-D-iso-Glu-L-Lys-D-Ala-D-Ala and uridine-5'-diphospho-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, in contrast with similar preparations from the parental streptococcus. Furthermore, 50-fold higher levels of lipid intermediates which serve as membrane-bound substrates for peptidoglycan synthesis are synthesized in reaction mixtures containing streptococcal membranes than with similar preparations from the L-form. These observations suggest that the inability of this stabilized L-form to form a cell wall in vivo lies, at least in part, in its failure to synthesize significant quantities of the lipid substrates for peptidoglycan synthesis. PMID:4426

  18. Thermal stability and formation barrier of a high-energetic material N8 polymer nitrogen encapsulated in (5,5) carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Timoshevskii, V.; Guo, H.; Abou-Rachid, Hakima; Lussier, Louis-Simon

    2009-07-01

    We report the density functional theory total energy calculations of thermal stability and formation barrier of polymer nitrogen confined in carbon nanotubes (CNT). The analysis suggests that N8 polymer nitrogen encapsulated in (5,5) carbon nanotube [N8@CNT(5,5)] is thermally (meta)stable at a finite temperature up to energy scale of at least 5000 K, similar to nitrogen molecule gas phase confined in CNT [N2@CNT(5,5)]. The energetic difference between these two phases of N does not significantly change with temperature. A barrier of 1.07 eV was found for the formation of N8@CNT(5,5) from N2@CNT(5,5), while the dissociation barrier was found to be 0.2 eV. Snapshots of the reaction pathway show that the transition state is composed by a N2 and a N6 inside a CNT(5,5).

  19. Role of interchain alpha-helical hydrophobic interactions in Ca2+ affinity, formation, and stability of a two-site domain in troponin C.

    PubMed Central

    Monera, O. D.; Shaw, G. S.; Zhu, B. Y.; Sykes, B. D.; Kay, C. M.; Hodges, R. S.

    1992-01-01

    We have previously shown that a 34-residue synthetic peptide representing the calcium-binding site III of troponin C formed a symmetric two-site dimer consisting of two helix-loop-helix motifs arranged in a head-to-tail fashion (Shaw, G.S., Hodges, R.S., & Sykes, B.D., 1990, Science 249, 280-283). In this study the hydrophobicities of the alpha-helices were altered by replacing L-98 and F-102 in the N-terminal region and/or I-121 and L-122 in the C-terminal region with alanine residues. Our results showed that substitution of hydrophobic residues either in the N- or C-terminal region have little effect on alpha-helix formation but resulted in a 100- and 300-fold decrease in Ca2+ affinity, respectively. Simultaneous substitution of both hydrophobes in the N- and C-terminal region resulted in a 1,000-fold decrease in Ca2+ affinity. Data from guanidine hydrochloride denaturation studies suggested that intermolecular interactions occur and that the less hydrophobic analogs had a lower overall conformational stability. These data support the contention that the hydrophobic residues are important in the formation of the two-site domain in troponin C, and this hydrophobic association stabilizes Ca2+ affinity. PMID:1304377

  20. Complex Formation Between Lysozyme and Stabilized Micelles with a Mixed Poly(ethylene oxide)/Poly(acrylic acid) Shell.

    PubMed

    Karayianni, Maria; Gancheva, Valeria; Pispas, Stergios; Petrov, Petar

    2016-03-10

    The electrostatic complexation between lysozyme and stabilized polymeric micelles (SPMs) with a poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) or a mixed poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(acrylic acid) (PEO/PAA) shell (SPMs with a mixed shell, SPMMS) and a temperature-responsive poly(propylene oxide) (PPO) core was investigated by means of dynamic, static, and electrophoretic light scattering. The SPMs and different types of SPMMS used resulted from the self-assembly of PAA-PPO-PAA triblock copolymer chains, or PAA-PPO-PAA and PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer chain mixtures (with varying chain lengths and molar ratios) in aqueous solutions at pH 10 and the subsequent cross-linking of their PPO cores via loading and photo-cross-linking of pentaerythritol tetraacrylate (PETA). The solution behavior, structure and properties of the formed complexes at pH 7 and 0.01 M ionic strength, were studied as a function of the protein concentration in the solution (the concentration of the stabilized micelles was kept constant) or equivalently the ratio of the two components. The complexation process and properties of the complexes proved to be dependent on the protein concentration, while of particular interest was the effect of the structure of the shell of the SPMs on the stability/solubility of the complexes. Finally, the fluorescence and mid infrared spectroscopic investigation of the structure of the complexed protein showed that, although a small stretching of the protein molecules occurred in some cases, no protein denaturation takes place upon complexation. PMID:26881445

  1. Experimental Constraints on the Stability of Clinopyroxene (+) Magnesite in Iron Bearing Planetary Mantles: Implications for Nakhlite Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Audrey M.; Righter, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    Carbon is present in various forms in the Earth s upper mantle (carbonate- or diamond-bearing mantle xenoliths, carbonatite magmas, CO2 emissions from volcanoes...). Moreover, there is enough carbon in chondritic material to stabilize carbonates into the mantles of Mars or Venus as well as in the Earth. However, the interactions with iron have to be constrained, because Fe is commonly thought to buffer oxygen fugacity into planetary mantles. [1] and [2] show evidences of the stability of clinopyroxene Ca(Mg,Fe)Si2O6 + magnesite (Mg,Fe)CO3 in the Earth s mantle around 6GPa (about 180km). The stability of oxidized forms of carbon (like magnesite) depends on the oxygen fugacity of the system. In the Earth s mantle, the maximum carbon content is 10000 ppm [3]. The fO2 parameter varies vertically as a function of pressure, but also laterally because of geodynamic processes like subduction. Thus, carbonates, graphite, diamond, C-rich gases and melts are all stable forms of carbon in the Earth s mantle. [4] show that the fO2 variations observed in SNC meteorites can be explained by polybaric graphite-CO-CO2 equilibria in the Martian mantle. [5] inferred from thermodynamic calculations that the stable form of carbon in the source regions of the Martian basalts should be graphite (and/or diamond). After [6], a metasomatizing agent like a CO2-rich melt may infiltrate the mantle source of nakhlites. However, according to [7] and [8], the FeO wt% value in the Martian bulk mantle is more than twice that of the Earth s mantle (KLB-1 composition by [9]). As iron and carbon are two elements with various oxidation states, Fe/C interaction mechanisms must be considered.

  2. The effect of microwave radiation on the stability and formation of gramicidin-A channels in lipid bilayer membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Sandblom, J.; Theander, S. )

    1991-01-01

    The effects of microwaves on the single-channel kinetics of gramicidin-A channels in lipid bilayer membranes were examined. Attempts were made to separate thermal and athermal effects by accurate measurements of temperature at the site of the membrane and by relating the measured parameters to their previously characterized temperature dependence. It was found that microwave radiation does not affect single-channel conductance or channel life time to a degree that is significantly different from that expected of a purely thermal effect. On the other hand, the rate of channel formation is decreased during exposure, which is opposite to that expected of a purely thermal effect. The mechanism of this effect is discussed in terms of the dimerization process of channel formation.

  3. Formation of Continuous and Episodic Relativistic Outflows in Regions of Stability and Instability in Advection-Dominated Accretion Flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Truong V.; Wood, Kent S.; Wolff, Michael Thomas; Becker, Peter A.; Putney, Joy; Edge, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we have demonstrated that particle acceleration in the vicinity of a shock in an advection-dominated accretion disk can extract enough energy to power a relativistic jet from a supermassive black hole at the center of a radio-loud active galaxy. However, to maintain a steady jet, a stable shock location is required. By employing the Chevalier & Imamura linearization method and the Nakayama instability boundary conditions, we have also shown that there is a region of the energy and angular momentum parameter space in which disk/shocks with outflows can be either stable or unstable. In a region of instability, the velocity profiles that exhibit pre-shock deceleration and pre-shock acceleration are always unstable to the zeroth mode with zero frequency of oscillation. However, in a region of stability, the zeroth mode, the fundamental, and the overtones are all stable for both pre-shock deceleration as well as pre-shock acceleration. Building on this new insight, in this paper, we explore new parameter values in the regions of stability and instability to explain the production of the observed continuous and episodic relativistic outflows (jets) in M87 and Sgr A*, respectively.

  4. Formation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments. Gas hydrate growth and stability conditioned by host sediment properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clennell, M.B.; Henry, P.; Hovland, M.; Booth, J.S.; Winters, W.J.; Thomas, M.

    2000-01-01

    The stability conditions of submarine gas hydrates (methane clathrates) are largely dictated by pressure, temperature, gas composition, and pore water salinity. However, the physical properties and surface chemistry of the host sediments also affect the thermodynamic state, growth kinetics, spatial distributions, and growth forms of clathrates. Our model presumes that gas hydrate behaves in a way analogous to ice in the pores of a freezing soil, where capillary forces influence the energy balance. Hydrate growth is inhibited within fine-grained sediments because of the excess internal phase pressure of small crystals with high surface curvature that coexist with liquid water in small pores. Therefore, the base of gas hydrate stability in a sequence of fine sediments is predicted by our model to occur at a lower temperature, and so nearer to the seabed than would be calculated from bulk thermodynamic equilibrium. The growth forms commonly observed in hydrate samples recovered from marine sediments (nodules, sheets, and lenses in muds; cements in sand and ash layers) can be explained by a requirement to minimize the excess of mechanical and surface energy in the system.

  5. Facile formation of dendrimer-stabilized gold nanoparticles modified with diatrizoic acid for enhanced computed tomography imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Chen; Li, Kangan; Cao, Xueyan; Xiao, Tingting; Hou, Wenxiu; Zheng, Linfeng; Guo, Rui; Shen, Mingwu; Zhang, Guixiang; Shi, Xiangyang

    2012-10-01

    We report a facile approach to forming dendrimer-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au DSNPs) through the use of amine-terminated fifth-generation poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers modified by diatrizoic acid (G5.NH2-DTA) as stabilizers for enhanced computed tomography (CT) imaging applications. In this study, by simply mixing G5.NH2-DTA dendrimers with gold salt in aqueous solution at room temperature, dendrimer-entrapped gold nanoparticles (Au DENPs) with a mean core size of 2.5 nm were able to be spontaneously formed. Followed by an acetylation reaction to neutralize the dendrimer remaining terminal amines, Au DSNPs with a mean size of 6 nm were formed. The formed DTA-containing [(Au0)50-G5.NHAc-DTA] DSNPs were characterized via different techniques. We show that the Au DSNPs are colloid stable in aqueous solution under different pH and temperature conditions. In vitro hemolytic assay, cytotoxicity assay, flow cytometry analysis, and cell morphology observation reveal that the formed Au DSNPs have good hemocompatibility and are non-cytotoxic at a concentration up to 3.0 μM. X-ray absorption coefficient measurements show that the DTA-containing Au DSNPs have enhanced attenuation intensity, much higher than that of [(Au0)50-G5.NHAc] DENPs without DTA or Omnipaque at the same molar concentration of the active element (Au or iodine). The formed DTA-containing Au DSNPs can be used for CT imaging of cancer cells in vitro as well as for blood pool CT imaging of mice in vivo with significantly improved signal enhancement. With the two radiodense elements of Au and iodine incorporated within one particle, the formed DTA-containing Au DSNPs may be applicable for CT imaging of various biological systems with enhanced X-ray attenuation property and detection sensitivity.We report a facile approach to forming dendrimer-stabilized gold nanoparticles (Au DSNPs) through the use of amine-terminated fifth-generation poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers modified by diatrizoic acid

  6. Learning to read as the formation of a dynamic system: evidence for dynamic stability in phonological recoding

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher-Flinn, Claire M.

    2014-01-01

    Two aspects of dynamic systems approaches that are pertinent to developmental models of reading are the emergence of a system with self-organizing characteristics, and its evolution over time to a stable state that is not easily modified or perturbed. The effects of dynamic stability may be seen in the differences obtained in the processing of print by beginner readers taught by different approaches to reading (phonics and text-centered), and more long-term effects on adults, consistent with these differences. However, there is little direct evidence collected over time for the same participants. In this study, lexicalized (implicit) phonological processing, and explicit phonological and letter-sound skills are further examined in a precocious reader whose early development at 3 and 5 years has been extensively described (Cognition, 2000, 2004). At ages 10 and 14 years, comparisons were made with these earlier reports and skilled adult readers, using the same tasks for evidence of changes in reading processes. The results showed that along with an increase of reading accuracy and speed, her pattern of lexicalized phonological responses for reading did not change over time. Neither did her pattern of explicit phonological and letter-sound skills, aspects of which were inferior to her lexicalized phonological processing, and word reading. These results suggest dynamic stability of the word reading system. The early emergence of this system with minimal explicit skill development calls into question developmental reading theories that require such skills for learning to read. Currently, only the Knowledge Sources theory of reading acquisition can account for such findings. Consideration of these aspects of dynamic systems raise theoretical issues that could result in a paradigm shift with regard to best practice and intervention. PMID:25071635

  7. Intrinsic karyotype stability and gene copy number variations may have laid the foundation for tetraploid wheat formation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huakun; Bian, Yao; Gou, Xiaowan; Dong, Yuzhu; Rustgi, Sachin; Zhang, Bangjiao; Xu, Chunming; Li, Ning; Qi, Bao; Han, Fangpu; von Wettstein, Diter; Liu, Bao

    2013-11-26

    Polyploidy or whole-genome duplication is recurrent in plant evolution, yet only a small fraction of whole-genome duplications has led to successful speciation. A major challenge in the establishment of nascent polyploids is sustained karyotype instability, which compromises fitness. The three putative diploid progenitors of bread wheat, with AA, SS (S ∼ B), and DD genomes occurred sympatrically, and their cross-fertilization in different combinations may have resulted in fertile allotetraploids with various genomic constitutions. However, only SSAA or closely related genome combinations have led to the speciation of tetraploid wheats like Triticum turgidum and Triticum timopheevii. We analyzed early generations of four newly synthesized allotetraploid wheats with genome compositions S(sh)S(sh)A(m)A(m), S(l)S(l)AA, S(b)S(b)DD, and AADD by combined fluorescence and genomic in situ hybridization-based karyotyping. Results of karyotype analyses showed that although S(sh)S(sh)A(m)A(m) and S(l)S(l)AA are characterized by immediate and persistent karyotype stability, massive aneuploidy and extensive chromosome restructuring are associated with S(b)S(b)DD and AADD in which parental subgenomes showed markedly different propensities for chromosome gain/loss and rearrangements. Although compensating aneuploidy and reciprocal translocation between homeologs prevailed, reproductive fitness was substantially compromised due to chromosome instability. Strikingly, localized genomic changes in repetitive DNA and copy-number variations in gene homologs occurred in both chromosome stable lines, S(sh)S(sh)A(m)A(m) and S(l)S(l)AA. Our data demonstrated that immediate and persistent karyotype stability is intrinsic to newly formed allotetraploid wheat with genome combinations analogous to natural tetraploid wheats. This property, coupled with rapid gene copy-number variations, may have laid the foundation of tetraploid wheat establishment. PMID:24218593

  8. Intrinsic karyotype stability and gene copy number variations may have laid the foundation for tetraploid wheat formation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Huakun; Bian, Yao; Gou, Xiaowan; Dong, Yuzhu; Rustgi, Sachin; Zhang, Bangjiao; Xu, Chunming; Li, Ning; Qi, Bao; Han, Fangpu; von Wettstein, Diter; Liu, Bao

    2013-01-01

    Polyploidy or whole-genome duplication is recurrent in plant evolution, yet only a small fraction of whole-genome duplications has led to successful speciation. A major challenge in the establishment of nascent polyploids is sustained karyotype instability, which compromises fitness. The three putative diploid progenitors of bread wheat, with AA, SS (S ∼ B), and DD genomes occurred sympatrically, and their cross-fertilization in different combinations may have resulted in fertile allotetraploids with various genomic constitutions. However, only SSAA or closely related genome combinations have led to the speciation of tetraploid wheats like Triticum turgidum and Triticum timopheevii. We analyzed early generations of four newly synthesized allotetraploid wheats with genome compositions SshSshAmAm, SlSlAA, SbSbDD, and AADD by combined fluorescence and genomic in situ hybridization-based karyotyping. Results of karyotype analyses showed that although SshSshAmAm and SlSlAA are characterized by immediate and persistent karyotype stability, massive aneuploidy and extensive chromosome restructuring are associated with SbSbDD and AADD in which parental subgenomes showed markedly different propensities for chromosome gain/loss and rearrangements. Although compensating aneuploidy and reciprocal translocation between homeologs prevailed, reproductive fitness was substantially compromised due to chromosome instability. Strikingly, localized genomic changes in repetitive DNA and copy-number variations in gene homologs occurred in both chromosome stable lines, SshSshAmAm and SlSlAA. Our data demonstrated that immediate and persistent karyotype stability is intrinsic to newly formed allotetraploid wheat with genome combinations analogous to natural tetraploid wheats. This property, coupled with rapid gene copy-number variations, may have laid the foundation of tetraploid wheat establishment. PMID:24218593

  9. Fibril stability in solutions of twisted Format="TEX"/>-sheet peptides: a new kind of micellization in chiral systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyrkova, I. A.; Semenov, A. N.; Aggeli, A.; Boden, N.

    2000-10-01

    The problem of fibril (fibre) formation in chiral systems is explored theoretically being supported by experiments on synthetic de novo 11-mer peptide forming self-assembled -sheet tapes. Experimental data unambiguously indicate that the tapes form fibrils of nearly monodisperse thickness ca. 8-10 nm. Fibril formation and stabilisation are attributed to inter-tape face-to-face attraction and their intrinsic twist, correspondingly. The proposed theory is capable of predicting the fibril aggregation number and its equilibrium twist in terms of molecular parameters of the primary tapes. The suggested novel mechanism of twist stabilisation of finite aggregates (fibrils) is different to the well-known stabilisation of micelles in amphiphilic systems, and it is likely to explain the formation and stability of fibrils in a wide variety of systems including proteinaceous amyloid fibres, sickle-cell hemoglobin fibres responsible for HbS anemia, corkscrew threads found in chromonics in the presence of chiral additives and native cellulose microfibrillar crystallites. The theory also makes it possible to extract the basic molecular parameters of primary tapes (inter-tape attraction energy, helical twist step, elastic moduli) from the experimental data.

  10. Aspartase/fumarase superfamily: a common catalytic strategy involving general base-catalyzed formation of a highly stabilized aci-carboxylate intermediate.

    PubMed

    Puthan Veetil, Vinod; Fibriansah, Guntur; Raj, Hans; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2012-05-29

    Members of the aspartase/fumarase superfamily share a common tertiary and quaternary fold, as well as a similar active site architecture; the superfamily includes aspartase, fumarase, argininosuccinate lyase, adenylosuccinate lyase, δ-crystallin, and 3-carboxy-cis,cis-muconate lactonizing enzyme (CMLE). These enzymes all process succinyl-containing substrates, leading to the formation of fumarate as the common product (except for the CMLE-catalyzed reaction, which results in the formation of a lactone). In the past few years, X-ray crystallographic analysis of several superfamily members in complex with substrate, product, or substrate analogues has provided detailed insights into their substrate binding modes and catalytic mechanisms. This structural work, combined with earlier mechanistic studies, revealed that members of the aspartase/fumarase superfamily use a common catalytic strategy, which involves general base-catalyzed formation of a stabilized aci-carboxylate (or enediolate) intermediate and the participation of a highly flexible loop, containing the signature sequence GSSxxPxKxN (named the SS loop), in substrate binding and catalysis.

  11. Layered double hydroxide stability. 2. Formation of Cr(III)-containing layered double hydroxides directly from solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boclair, J. W.; Braterman, P. S.; Jiang, J.; Lou, S.; Yarberry, F.

    1999-01-01

    Solutions containing divalent metal [M(II) = Mg2+, Zn2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Mn2+] chlorides and CrCl3 6H2O were titrated with NaOH to yield, for M(II) = Zn, Co, and Ni, hydrotalcite-like layered double hydroxides (LDHs), [[M(II)]1-z[Cr(III)]z(OH)2][Cl]z yH2O, in a single step, without intermediate formation of chromium hydroxide. Analysis of the resultant titration curves yields solubility constants for these compounds. These are in the order Zn < Ni approximately Co, with a clear preference for formation of the phase with z = 1/3. With Mg2+ as chloride, titration gives a mixture of Cr(OH)3 and Mg(OH)2, but the metal sulfates give Mg2Cr(OH)6 1/2(SO4) by a two-step process. Titrimetric and spectroscopic evidence suggests short-range cation order in the one-step LDH systems.

  12. Effects of Micro and Macroalloying on the Formation and Thermal Stability of Nanocrystalline L12-Al3V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anvari, S. Z.; Yazdian, N.; Karimzadeh, F.; Enayati, M. H.

    2014-04-01

    Structural modification of nanocrystalline trialuminde Al3V by microalloying with Ti and macroalloying with Zr was studied. For micro and macroalloying, the Al75(V x Ti1- x ) x = 0-25 and Al5ZrV2 were synthesized by mechanical alloying of elemental blends of the nominal composition. The structural changes of powder particles during mechanical alloying were investigated by x-ray diffraction patterns. Microstructure of powders was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and the hardness of powder particles was determined by Vickers microhardness measurement. It was found that microalloying of trialuminides by Ti led to the formation of Al3(V,Ti) with stable tetragonal structure (DO22) in different amounts of Ti after 40 h milling. Thermodynamic calculations, which were based on Miedema model, showed that the higher negative formation enthalpy of intermetallics in Al-V-Ti system induced refinement of trialuminides. In addition, it was found that the hardness of compounds was increased by enhancement of Ti in trialuminide composition. For Al5V2Zr compound, the metastable L12 phase was formed after 20 h milling. Thermal analysis of the synthesized compound showed an exothermic peak around 550 °C, which was related to the partial transition of L12 structure to DO22. Moreover, ordering of L12 phase took place due to increasing temperature.

  13. Reactivity and O2 Formation by Mn(IV)- and Mn(V)-Hydroxo Species Stabilized within a Polyfluoroxometalate Framework.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Roy E; Cohen, Hagai; Leitus, Gregory; Wolf, Sharon G; Zhou, Ang; Que, Lawrence; Neumann, Ronny

    2015-07-15

    observation that O2 formation is fastest in the presence of Cs(+) and ∼fourth order in Mn(IV)-OH-PFOM supports a notion of a tetramolecular Mn(IV)-hydroxo intermediate that is viable for O2 formation in an oxide-based chemical environment. A bimolecular reaction mechanism involving a Mn(IV)-hydroxo based intermediate appears to be slower for O2 formation. PMID:26070034

  14. Reactivity and O2 Formation by Mn(IV)- and Mn(V)-Hydroxo Species Stabilized within a Polyfluoroxometalate Framework.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Roy E; Cohen, Hagai; Leitus, Gregory; Wolf, Sharon G; Zhou, Ang; Que, Lawrence; Neumann, Ronny

    2015-07-15

    observation that O2 formation is fastest in the presence of Cs(+) and ∼fourth order in Mn(IV)-OH-PFOM supports a notion of a tetramolecular Mn(IV)-hydroxo intermediate that is viable for O2 formation in an oxide-based chemical environment. A bimolecular reaction mechanism involving a Mn(IV)-hydroxo based intermediate appears to be slower for O2 formation.

  15. Thermal stability of polyethylene terephthalate food contact materials: formation of volatiles from retain samples and implications for recycling.

    PubMed

    Freire, M T; Castle, L; Reyes, F G; Damant, A P

    1998-01-01

    PET packaging materials have been tested for volatile content after exposure to high temperatures. Samples included laminates, bottles, and roasting bags, and were heated at 120 degrees C, 150 degrees C and 230 degrees C for 50 min, according to sample type. Volatiles released from the material were trapped on Tenax, identified by GC-MS and assessed against a 10 micrograms/kg migration threshold limit. Few volatiles were found for samples composed only of PET. Volatiles from laminates varied according to the sample structure, but the main substances identified were not related to PET, but probably came from printing inks and adhesives. It is concluded that the migration potential of PET in high temperature applications is very low and that the formation of volatiles during use is unlikely to cause any special problems in polymer recovery in recycling schemes, provided that other packaging residues are removed effectively. PMID:9764218

  16. Formation of the –N(NO)N(NO)– polymer at high pressure and stabilization at ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Hai; An, Qi; Goddard, William A.; Liu, Wei-Guang; Zybin, Sergey V.

    2013-01-01

    A number of exotic structures have been formed through high-pressure chemistry, but applications have been hindered by difficulties in recovering the high-pressure phase to ambient conditions (i.e., one atmosphere and 300 K). Here we use dispersion-corrected density functional theory [PBE-ulg (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor of DFT with the universal low gradient correction for long range London dispersion)] to predict that above 60 gigapascal (GPa) the most stable form of N2O (the laughing gas in its molecular form) is a one-dimensional polymer with an all-nitrogen backbone analogous to cis-polyacetylene in which alternate N are bonded (ionic covalent) to O. The analogous trans-polymer is only 0.03∼0.10 eV/molecular unit less stable. Upon relaxation to ambient conditions, both polymers relax below 14 GPa to the same stable nonplanar trans-polymer. The predicted phonon spectrum and dissociation kinetics validates the stability of this trans-poly-NNO at ambient conditions, which has potential applications as a type of conducting nonlinear optical polymer with all-nitrogen chains and as a high-energy oxidizer for rocket propulsion. This work illustrates in silico materials discovery particularly in the realm of extreme conditions (very high pressure or temperature). PMID:23503849

  17. Formation and stability of oil-in-water nanoemulsions containing rice bran oil: in vitro and in vivo assessments

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nanoemulsions have practical application in a multitude of commercial areas, such as the chemical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. Cosmetic industries use rice bran oil in sunscreen formulations, anti ageing products and in treatments for skin diseases. The aim of this study was to create rice bran oil nanoemulsions using low energy emulsification methods and to evaluate their physical stability, irritation potential and moisturising activity on volunteers with normal and diseased skin types. Results The nanoemulsion developed by this phase diagram method was composed of 10% rice bran oil, 10% surfactants sorbitan oleate/PEG-30 castor oil, 0.05% antioxidant and 0.50% preservatives formulated in distilled water. The nanoemulsion was stable over the time course of this study. In vitro assays showed that this formulation has a low irritation potential, and when applied to human skin during in vivo studies, the nanoemulsion improved the skin's moisture and maintained normal skin pH values. Conclusion The results of irritation potential studies and in vivo assessments indicate that this nanoemulsion has potential to be a useful tool to treat skin diseases, such as atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. PMID:21952107

  18. Formation of the -N(NO)N(NO)- polymer at high pressure and stabilization at ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hai; An, Qi; Goddard, William A; Liu, Wei-Guang; Zybin, Sergey V

    2013-04-01

    A number of exotic structures have been formed through high-pressure chemistry, but applications have been hindered by difficulties in recovering the high-pressure phase to ambient conditions (i.e., one atmosphere and 300 K). Here we use dispersion-corrected density functional theory [PBE-ulg (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof flavor of DFT with the universal low gradient correction for long range London dispersion)] to predict that above 60 gigapascal (GPa) the most stable form of N2O (the laughing gas in its molecular form) is a one-dimensional polymer with an all-nitrogen backbone analogous to cis-polyacetylene in which alternate N are bonded (ionic covalent) to O. The analogous trans-polymer is only 0.03∼0.10 eV/molecular unit less stable. Upon relaxation to ambient conditions, both polymers relax below 14 GPa to the same stable nonplanar trans-polymer. The predicted phonon spectrum and dissociation kinetics validates the stability of this trans-poly-NNO at ambient conditions, which has potential applications as a type of conducting nonlinear optical polymer with all-nitrogen chains and as a high-energy oxidizer for rocket propulsion. This work illustrates in silico materials discovery particularly in the realm of extreme conditions (very high pressure or temperature). PMID:23503849

  19. WEREWOLF, a regulator of root hair pattern formation, controls flowering time through the regulation of FT mRNA stability.

    PubMed

    Seo, Eunjoo; Yu, Jihyeon; Ryu, Kook Hui; Lee, Myeong Min; Lee, Ilha

    2011-08-01

    A key floral activator, FT, integrates stimuli from long-day, vernalization, and autonomous pathways and triggers flowering by directly regulating floral meristem identity genes in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Since a small amount of FT transcript is sufficient for flowering, the FT level is strictly regulated by diverse genes. In this study, we show that WEREWOLF (WER), a MYB transcription factor regulating root hair pattern, is another regulator of FT. The mutant wer flowers late in long days but normal in short days and shows a weak sensitivity to vernalization, which indicates that WER controls flowering time through the photoperiod pathway. The expression and double mutant analyses showed that WER modulates FT transcript level independent of CONSTANS and FLOWERING LOCUS C. The histological analysis of WER shows that it is expressed in the epidermis of leaves, where FT is not expressed. Consistently, WER regulates not the transcription but the stability of FT mRNA. Our results reveal a novel regulatory mechanism of FT that is non cell autonomous.

  20. Chemical functionalization of bone implants with nanoparticle-stabilized chitosan and methotrexate for inhibiting both osteoclastoma formation and bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Hua; Li, Mei; Li, Dan; He, Peng; Xia, Hong; Zhang, Yu; Mao, Chuanbin

    2014-09-28

    A great challenge in orthopedic tumor operation faced by orthopedic implants is the high recurrence and metastasis of bone tumor as well as the bacterial infection associated with the implants. Thus ideal titanium (Ti)-based bone implants should be able to not only inhibit cancer cell adhesion and proliferation, promote cancer cell apoptosis, but also resist bacterial infections. Towards this end, we developed a new approach to modify the surface of Ti-based bone implants so that they can restrain functions of osteoclastoma (Giant cell tumor of bone) cancer cells (GCTs) and inhibit the adhesion of bacteria. First, the surface of pristine Ti substrates was functionalized with dopamine (DA) to form DA-Ti substrates. Then nanoparticles electrostatically assembled from poly-lysine (PLL) and heparin (Hep) were chemically immobilized onto the DA-Ti substrates to form PLL/Hep-Ti substrates. Chitosan (CH) and methotrexate (MTX) were then electrostatically immobilized onto the PLL/Hep-Ti substrates to generate CH-MTX-Ti substrates. The successful functionalization of the Ti substrates was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. GCTs cultured on differently functionalized Ti substrates were investigated in terms of cell adhesion, cytoskeleton, proliferation, cytotoxicity and apoptosis. The growth of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in the presence of different substrates was also assayed. Our results showed that CH-MTX-Ti substrates not only significantly inhibited the adhesion, proliferation and viability of GCTs, promoted the apoptosis of GCTs, but also prevented the adhesion of the bacteria and the subsequent formation of bacterial biofilms, when compared to other Ti substrates. Thus CH-MTX-Ti substrates are expected to be used as orthopedic prostheses in bone tumor surgery that can inhibit both osteoclastoma formation and bacterial infections.

  1. Factors that influence the formation and stability of hydrated ferrous sulfate in coal dusts. Possible relation to the emphysema of coal miners

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Xi; Zalma, R.; Pezerat, H.

    1994-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that a causal relationship may exist between coal dust exposure and emphysema in coal miners. Emphysema can be considered as one of the human pathologies associated with oxidative stress, resulting from oxidant-induced {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin ({alpha}{sub 1}-AT) inactivation and uncontrolled proteolysis of lung tissue. We have previously reported that certain coal dusts contained hydrated ferrous sulfate (FeSO{sub 4}) that inactivated {alpha}{sub 1}-AT. In the present study, we have shown that the FeSO{sub 4} originated from oxidation of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), which is a typical contaminant of coal dusts. The relative humidity and microenvironmental around individual pyrite particles influence the formation of FeSO{sub 4} in the coal. However, the subsequent human exposure to coal dust containing FeSO{sub 4} depends on the stability of the formed FeSO{sub 4}. We found that pH played the most important role in stabilizing the FeSO{sub 4}, such that a final pH < 4.5 after oxidation of pyrite stabilized FeSO{sub 4}, whereas at high pH the conversion of reactive Fe{sup 2+} to Fe{sup 3+} was immediate. Sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}), which is also produced by the oxidation of pyrite, can lower the pH, but it can also be neutralized by other minerals in coal dusts, such as calcite (CaCO{sub 3}). The stability of FeSO{sub 4} in coal dust can also be influenced by the length of exposure to air. Our studies demonstrated that coal samples differed in their capacity to stabilize FeSO{sub 4}. This current study strengthens our previous reported hypothesis that emphysema, which occurs irregularly in coal miners, could be directly related to exposure to coal dust containing FeSO{sub 4}. 35 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Stability of Microturbulent Drift Modes during Internal Transport Barrier Formation in the Alcator C-Mod Radio Frequency Heated H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    M.H. Redi; C.L. Fiore; W. Dorland; D.R. Mikkelsen; G. Rewoldt; P.T. Bonoli; D.R. Ernst; J.E. Rice; S.J. Wukitch

    2003-11-20

    Recent H-mode experiments on Alcator C-Mod [I.H. Hutchinson, et al., Phys. Plasmas 1 (1994) 1511] which exhibit an internal transport barrier (ITB), have been examined with flux tube geometry gyrokinetic simulations, using the massively parallel code GS2 [M. Kotschenreuther, G. Rewoldt, and W.M. Tang, Comput. Phys. Commun. 88 (1995) 128]. The simulations support the picture of ion/electron temperature gradient (ITG/ETG) microturbulence driving high xi/ xe and that suppressed ITG causes reduced particle transport and improved ci on C-Mod. Nonlinear calculations for C-Mod confirm initial linear simulations, which predicted ITG stability in the barrier region just before ITB formation, without invoking E x B shear suppression of turbulence. Nonlinear fluxes are compared to experiment, which both show low heat transport in the ITB and higher transport within and outside of the barrier region.

  3. Formation and stability of enolates of acetamide and acetate anion: an Eigen plot for proton transfer at alpha-carbonyl carbon.

    PubMed

    Richard, John P; Williams, Glenn; O'Donoghue, AnnMarie C; Amyes, Tina L

    2002-03-27

    Second-order rate constants were determined in D(2)O for deprotonation of acetamide, N,N-dimethylacetamide, and acetate anion by deuterioxide ion and for deprotonation of acetamide by quinuclidine. The values of k(B) = 4.8 x 10(-8) M(-1) s(-1) for deprotonation of acetamide by quinuclidine (pK(BH) = 11.5) and k(BH) = 2-5 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) for the encounter-limited reverse protonation of the enolate by protonated quinuclidine give pK(a)(C) = 28.4 for ionization of acetamide as a carbon acid. The limiting value of k(HOH) = 1 x 10(11) s(-1) for protonation of the enolate of acetate anion by solvent water and k(HO) = 3.5 x 10(-9) M(-1) s(-1) for deprotonation of acetate anion by HO(-) give pK(a)(C) approximately 33.5 for acetate anion. The change in the rate-limiting step from chemical proton transfer to solvent reorganization results in a downward break in the slope of the plot of log k(HO) against carbon acid pK(a) for deprotonation of a wide range of neutral alpha-carbonyl carbon acids by hydroxide ion, from -0.40 to -1.0. Good estimates are reported for the stabilization of the carbonyl group relative to the enol tautomer by electron donation from alpha-SEt, alpha-OMe, alpha-NH(2), and alpha-O(-) substituents. The alpha-NH(2) and alpha-OMe groups show similar stabilizing interactions with the carbonyl group, while the interaction of alpha-O(-) is only 3.4 kcal/mol more stabilizing than for alpha-OH. We propose that destabilization of the enolate intermediates of enzymatic reactions results in an increasing recruitment of metal ions by the enzyme to provide electrophilic catalysis of enolate formation.

  4. Gas-Phase Folding of a Prototypical Protonated Pentapeptide: Spectroscopic Evidence for Formation of a Charge-Stabilized β-Hairpin.

    PubMed

    Burke, Nicole L; DeBlase, Andrew F; Redwine, James G; Hopkins, John R; McLuckey, Scott A; Zwier, Timothy S

    2016-03-01

    Ultraviolet and infrared-ultraviolet (IR-UV) double-resonance photofragment spectroscopy has been carried out in a tandem mass spectrometer to determine the three-dimensional structure of cryogenically cooled protonated C-terminally methyl esterified leucine enkephalin [YGGFL-OMe+H](+). By comparing the experimental IR spectrum of the dominant conformer with the predictions of DFT M05-2X/6-31+G(d) calculations, a backbone structure was assigned that is analogous to that previously assigned by our group for the unmodified peptide [ Burke, N.L.; et al. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2015 , 378 , 196 ], despite the loss of a C-terminal OH binding site that was thought to play an important role in its stabilization. Both structures are characterized by a type II' β-turn around Gly(3)-Phe(4) and a γ-turn around Gly(2), providing spectroscopic evidence for the formation of a β-hairpin hydrogen bonding pattern. Rather than disrupting the peptide backbone structure, the protonated N-terminus serves to stabilize the β-hairpin by positioning itself in a pocket above the turn where it can form H-bonds to the Gly(3) and C-terminus C═O groups. This β-hairpin type structure has been previously proposed as the biologically active conformation of leucine enkephalin and its methyl ester in the nonpolar cell membrane environment [ Naito, A.; Nishimura, K. Curr. Top. Med. Chem. 2004 , 4 , 135 - 143 ]. PMID:26853832

  5. Chemical stabilization and improved thermal resilience of molecular arrangements: possible formation of a surface network of bonds by multiple pulse atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    de Pauli, Muriel; Matos, Matheus J S; Siles, Pablo F; Prado, Mariana C; Neves, Bernardo R A; Ferreira, Sukarno O; Mazzoni, Mário S C; Malachias, Angelo

    2014-08-14

    In this work, we make use of an atomic layer deposition (ALD) surface reaction based on trimethyl-aluminum (TMA) and water to modify O-H terminated self-assembled layers of octadecylphosphonic acid (OPA). The structural modifications were investigated by X-ray reflectivity, X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. We observed a significant improvement in the thermal stability of ALD-modified molecules, with the existence of a supramolecular packing structure up to 500 °C. Following the experimental observations, density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate the possibility of formation of a covalent network with aluminum atoms connecting OPA molecules at terrace surfaces. Chemical stability is also achieved on top of such a composite surface, inhibiting further ALD oxide deposition. On the other hand, in the terrace edges, where the covalent array is discontinued, the chemical conditions allow for oxide growth. Analysis of the DFT results on band structure and density of states of modified OPA molecules suggests that besides the observed thermal resilience, the dielectric character of OPA layers is preserved. This new ALD-modified OPA composite is potentially suitable for applications such as dielectric layers in organic devices, where better thermal performance is required.

  6. Synthesis of citrate-stabilized hydrocolloids of hydroxyapatite through a novel two-stage method: a possible aggregates-breakdown mechanism of colloid formation.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuicui; Zhao, Liping; Han, Jingjia; Wang, Ruifang; Xiong, Chengdong; Xie, Xingyi

    2011-08-15

    Long-term stable (>2 years) hydrocolloids of hydroxyapatite (HA) were synthesized via a low-temperature (18-50 °C) reaction of aqueous ammonium phosphate with calcium nitrate in the presence of citrate ions, followed by an aging process at high temperature (80-99 °C) for 4 h. Changing the reaction and/or aging temperature seldom yielded stable HA hydrocolloids. The as-prepared hydrocolloids were desalinated through ultrafiltration where their average particle size gradually decreased, bottomed out at 100-400 μS/cm, and sharply increased in parallel with a decrease in solution conductivity. The colloid formation is most likely through a temperature-sensitive aggregates-breakdown process. During low-temperature reaction, citrate-calcium chelation bridges the growing HA particles into loose aggregates. High-temperature aging disrupts these inter-particle links and thus breaks the aggregates, imparting negative charges to the HA, forming colloidal particles stabilized by surface charge. The decrease in mean particle size during early ultrafiltration suggested that the aggregate breakdown further proceeded through desalination. In conclusion, the temperature-dependent interactions between citrate ions and calcium sites on HA particles played key roles in the synthesis and stability of the HA colloids.

  7. Rosmarinus officinalis L. extract and some of its active ingredients as potential emulsion stabilizers: a new approach to the formation of multiple (W/O/W) emulsion.

    PubMed

    Cizauskaite, Ugne; Ivanauskas, Liudas; Jakštas, Valdas; Marksiene, Ruta; Jonaitiene, Laimute; Bernatoniene, Jurga

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, novel topical formulations loaded with natural functional actives are under intense investigations. Therefore, the aim of our study was to evaluate how the rosemary extract and some of its active ingredients [rosmarinic acid (RA), ursolic acid (UA) and oleanolic acid (OA)] affect technological characteristics of multiple emulsion. Formulation has been prepared by adding investigated solutions (10%) in water/oil/water (W/O/W) multiple emulsion consisting of different lipophilic phases: olive oil and liquid paraffin, with 0.5% emulsifying agent (complex of sodium polyacrylate and polysorbate 20) under constant stirring with mechanical stirrer at room temperature. The emulsion parameters were evaluated using centrifugation test, freeze-thaw cycle test, microscopical and texture analyses. Rosemary's triterpenic saponins UA and OA showed the highest emulsion stabilizing properties: they decreased CI from 3.26% to 10.23% (p < 0.05). According to obtained interfacial tension data, the effect of rosemary active ingredients is not surfactant-like. Even though emulsifier itself at low concentration intends to form directly the multiple emulsion, the obtained results indicate that rosemary extract containing active ingredients does not only serve as functional cosmetic agent due to a number of biological activities, but also offer potential advantages as a stabilizer and an enhancer of W/O/W emulsions formation for dermopharmaceutical and cosmetic preparations. PMID:26000558

  8. Chemical stabilization and improved thermal resilience of molecular arrangements: possible formation of a surface network of bonds by multiple pulse atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    de Pauli, Muriel; Matos, Matheus J S; Siles, Pablo F; Prado, Mariana C; Neves, Bernardo R A; Ferreira, Sukarno O; Mazzoni, Mário S C; Malachias, Angelo

    2014-08-14

    In this work, we make use of an atomic layer deposition (ALD) surface reaction based on trimethyl-aluminum (TMA) and water to modify O-H terminated self-assembled layers of octadecylphosphonic acid (OPA). The structural modifications were investigated by X-ray reflectivity, X-ray diffraction, and atomic force microscopy. We observed a significant improvement in the thermal stability of ALD-modified molecules, with the existence of a supramolecular packing structure up to 500 °C. Following the experimental observations, density functional theory (DFT) calculations indicate the possibility of formation of a covalent network with aluminum atoms connecting OPA molecules at terrace surfaces. Chemical stability is also achieved on top of such a composite surface, inhibiting further ALD oxide deposition. On the other hand, in the terrace edges, where the covalent array is discontinued, the chemical conditions allow for oxide growth. Analysis of the DFT results on band structure and density of states of modified OPA molecules suggests that besides the observed thermal resilience, the dielectric character of OPA layers is preserved. This new ALD-modified OPA composite is potentially suitable for applications such as dielectric layers in organic devices, where better thermal performance is required. PMID:25055162

  9. First-principles investigations of the structure and stability of oxygen adsorption and surface oxide formation at Au(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hongqing; Stampfl, Catherine

    2007-08-01

    We perform density-functional theory calculations to investigate the adsorption of oxygen at the Au(111) surface, including on-surface, subsurface, and surface oxide formation. We find that atomic oxygen adsorbs weakly on the surface and is barely stable with respect to molecular oxygen, while pure subsurface adsorption is only metastable. Interestingly, however, we find that the most favorable structure investigated involves a thin surface-oxide-like configuration, where the oxygen atoms are quasithreefold-coordinated to gold atoms, and the gold atoms of the surface layer are twofold, linearly coordinated to oxygen atoms. By including the effect of temperature and oxygen pressure through the description of ab initio atomistic thermodynamics, we find that this configuration is the most stable for realistic catalytic temperatures and pressures, e.g., for low-temperature oxidation reactions, and is predicted to be stable up to temperatures of around 420K at atmospheric pressure. This gives support to the notion that oxidized Au, or surface-oxide-like regions, could play a role in the behavior of oxide-supported nanogold catalysts.

  10. Metal loading determines the stabilization pathway for Co2+ in titanate nanowires: ion exchange vs. cluster formation.

    PubMed

    Madarász, D; Pótári, G; Sápi, A; László, B; Csudai, C; Oszkó, A; Kukovecz, Á; Erdőhelyi, A; Kónya, Z; Kiss, J

    2013-10-14

    Co nanoparticles were produced and characterized on protonated titanate nanowires. Co deposits were obtained after low-temperature decomposition of Co2(CO)8 on titanate nanostructures. The carbonylation was carried out by vapor-phase adsorption in a fluidized bed reactor and the decarbonylation processes were followed by FT-IR spectroscopy and microbalance combined with temperature programmed reaction mass spectrometry. The band gap of Co-decorated titanate nanostructures determined by UV-VIS diffuse reflectance spectroscopy decreased sharply from 3.14 eV to 2.41 eV with increasing Co content up to 2 wt%. The Co-decorated titanate morphology was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron diffraction (ED). The chemical environment of Co deposition was studied by photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A certain amount of cobalt underwent an ion exchange process. Higher cobalt loadings led to the formation of nanosized-dispersed particles complexed to oxygen vacancies. The average sizes were found to be mostly between 2 and 6 nm. This size distribution and the measured band gap could be favorable regimes for some important low-temperature thermal- and photo-induced catalytic reactions.

  11. Mechanical shear contributes to granule formation resulting in quick start-up and stability of a hybrid anammox reactor.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanning; Liu, Zhijun; Liu, Fengxia; Furukawa, Kenji

    2012-06-01

    It appears that if suspended biomass washout can be reduced effectively, granule formation will be fastened in fluidized bed. Quicker reactor start-up can be anticipated especially for those system keeping slow growth bacteria such as anammox. A hybrid reactor combined fixed-bed with nonwoven fabrics as biomass carrier and fluidized bed with slow speed mechanical stirring was therefore developed, and its nitrogen removal performances was evaluated experimentally. Only in 38 days, the total nitrogen removal rate (NRR) reached to 1.9 kg(N) m(-3) day (-1) and then doubled within 17 days, with total nitrogen removal efficiency kept above 70%. After 180 days reactor operating, the NRR reached a maximum value of 6.6 kg(N) m(-3) day(-1) and the specific anammox activity was gradually constant in 0.32 kg(N) kg(VSS)(-1) day(-1). Biomass attached on nonwoven fabrics could additionally improve reactor nitrogen removal by 8%. The dominant size of granular sludge reached to 0.78 mm with stirring speed adjusted from 30 to 80 rpm and the hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 8 to 1.5 h during the whole operating time. Scanning electron microscope observation showed especially compact structure of granular sludge. A 70% of anammox bacteria percentage was identified by fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. PMID:21928094

  12. Surface-Induced Phase of Tyrian Purple (6,6′-Dibromoindigo): Thin Film Formation and Stability

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The appearance of surface-induced phases of molecular crystals is a frequently observed phenomenon in organic electronics. However, despite their fundamental importance, the origin of such phases is not yet fully resolved. The organic molecule 6,6′-dibromoindigo (Tyrian purple) forms two polymorphs within thin films. At growth temperatures of 150 °C, the well-known bulk structure forms, while at a substrate temperature of 50 °C, a surface-induced phase is observed instead. In the present work, the crystal structure of the surface-induced polymorph is solved by a combined experimental and theoretical approach using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations. A comparison of both phases reveals that π–π stacking and hydrogen bonds are common motifs for the intermolecular packing. In-situ temperature studies reveal a phase transition from the surface-induced phase to the bulk phase at a temperature of 210 °C; the irreversibility of the transition indicates that the surface-induced phase is metastable. The crystallization behavior is investigated ex-situ starting from the sub-monolayer regime up to a nominal thickness of 9 nm using two different silicon oxide surfaces; island formation is observed together with a slight variation of the crystal structure. This work shows that surface-induced phases not only appear for compounds with weak, isotropic van der Waals bonds, but also for molecules exhibiting strong and highly directional hydrogen bonds. PMID:27418882

  13. Geotechnical Characterization and Stability of a Slope in the Marnoso-Arenacea Formation for the Realization of an Underground Car Park in Urbino (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gori, Umberto; Polidori, Ennio; Tonelli, Gianluigi; Veneri, Francesco

    The plan of an underground car park located near the historical centre of Urbino town, has required characterizing the Marnoso-Arenacea Formation (Tortonian), from a geomechanical point of view. The project implies that the intervention will be insert inside the flank of the hill, in order to mitigate the effect of the environmental impact. It also involves an excavation front 42 m high and 100 m large. To analyze the mechanical behaviour of the soils, many samples both from the Marnoso-Arenacea Formation and from the cover, have been tested in laboratory. The anisotropy index evaluated by point load test in natural water conditions shows a higher value of the arenitic levels in comparison with the marls. On the contrary, the marls level tested in dry condition provides greater anisotropy index data. In the mono-axial compression test the arenaceous sediments show higher results. The stability analysis carried out with distinct element method shows the opportunity to retain the upper part of the cut with anchored bulkhead.

  14. Formation and Stability of Equiatomic and Nonequiatomic Nanocrystalline CuNiCoZnAlTi High-Entropy Alloys by Mechanical Alloying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varalakshmi, S.; Kamaraj, M.; Murty, B. S.

    2010-10-01

    Nanocrystalline equiatomic high-entropy alloys (HEAs) have been synthesized by mechanical alloying in the Cu-Ni-Co-Zn-Al-Ti system from the binary CuNi alloy to the hexanary CuNiCoZnAlTi alloy. An attempt also has been made to find the influence of nonequiatomic compositions on the HEA formation by varying the Cu content up to 50 at. pct (Cu x NiCoZnAlTi; x = 0, 8.33, 33.33, 49.98 at. pct). The phase formation and stability of mechanically alloyed powder at an elevated temperature (1073 K [800 °C] for 1 hour) were studied. The nanocrystalline equiatomic Cu-Ni-Co-Zn-Al-Ti alloys have a face-centered cubic (fcc) structure up to quinary compositions and have a body-centered cubic (bcc) structure in a hexanary alloy. In nonequiatomic alloys, bcc is the dominating phase in the alloys containing 0 and 8.33 at. pct of Cu, and the fcc phase was observed in alloys with 33.33 and 49.98 at. pct of Cu. The Vicker’s bulk hardness and compressive strength of the equiatomic nanocrystalline hexanary CuNiCoZnAlTi HEA after hot isostatic pressing is 8.79 GPa, and the compressive strength is 2.76 GPa. The hardness of these HEAs is higher than most commercial hard facing alloys ( e.g., Stellite, which is 4.94 GPa).

  15. Molybdenum-containing membrane-bound formate dehydrogenase isolated from Citrobacter sp. S-77 having high stability against oxygen, pH, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nga T; Yatabe, Takeshi; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Ogo, Seiji

    2014-10-01

    Membrane-bound formate dehydrogenase (FDH) was purified to homogeneity from a facultative anaerobic bacterium Citrobacter sp. S-77. The FDH from Citrobacter sp. S-77 (FDHS77) was a monomer with molecular mass of approximately 150 kDa. On SDS-PAGE, the purified FDHS77 showed as three different protein bands with molecular mass of approximately 95, 87, and 32 kDa, respectively. Based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence analysis, the sequence alignments observed for the 87 kDa protein band were identical to that of the large subunit of 95 kDa, indicating that the purified FDHS77 consisted of two subunits; a 95 kDa large subunit and a 32 kDa small subunit. The purified FDHS77 in this purification did not contain a heme b subunit, but the FDHS77 showed significant activity for formate oxidation, determined by the Vmax of 30.4 U/mg using benzyl viologen as an electron acceptor. The EPR and ICP-MS spectra indicate that the FDHS77 is a molybdenum-containing enzyme, displaying a remarkable O2-stability along with thermostability and pH resistance. This is the first report of the purification and characterization of a FDH from Citrobacter species.

  16. A new look at the statistical assessment of approximate and rigorous methods for the estimation of stabilized formation temperatures in geothermal and petroleum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza-Ojeda, O. M.; Santoyo, E.; Andaverde, J.

    2011-06-01

    Approximate and rigorous solutions of seven heat transfer models were statistically examined, for the first time, to estimate stabilized formation temperatures (SFT) of geothermal and petroleum boreholes. Constant linear and cylindrical heat source models were used to describe the heat flow (either conductive or conductive/convective) involved during a borehole drilling. A comprehensive statistical assessment of the major error sources associated with the use of these models was carried out. The mathematical methods (based on approximate and rigorous solutions of heat transfer models) were thoroughly examined by using four statistical analyses: (i) the use of linear and quadratic regression models to infer the SFT; (ii) the application of statistical tests of linearity to evaluate the actual relationship between bottom-hole temperatures and time function data for each selected method; (iii) the comparative analysis of SFT estimates between the approximate and rigorous predictions of each analytical method using a β ratio parameter to evaluate the similarity of both solutions, and (iv) the evaluation of accuracy in each method using statistical tests of significance, and deviation percentages between 'true' formation temperatures and SFT estimates (predicted from approximate and rigorous solutions). The present study also enabled us to determine the sensitivity parameters that should be considered for a reliable calculation of SFT, as well as to define the main physical and mathematical constraints where the approximate and rigorous methods could provide consistent SFT estimates.

  17. Formation of contractile networks and fibers in the medial cell cortex through myosin-II turnover, contraction, and stress-stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Wei; Wei, Ming-Tzo; Ou-Yang, Daniel H.; Jedlicka, Sabrina S.; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of adhered cells depends crucially on the formation of a contractile meshwork of parallel and cross-linked fibers along the contacting surface. The motor activity and minifilament assembly of non-muscle myosin-II is an important component of cortical cytoskeletal remodeling during mechanosensing. We used experiments and computational modeling to study cortical myosin-II dynamics in adhered cells. Confocal microscopy was used to image the medial cell cortex of HeLa cells stably expressing myosin regulatory light chain tagged with GFP (MRLC-GFP). The distribution of MRLC-GFP fibers and focal adhesions was classified into three types of network morphologies. Time-lapse movies show: myosin foci appearance and disappearance; aligning and contraction; stabilization upon alignment. Addition of blebbistatin, which perturbs myosin motor activity, leads to a reorganization of the cortical networks and to a reduction of contractile motions. We quantified the kinetics of contraction, disassembly and reassembly of myosin networks using spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS). Coarse-grained numerical simulations include bipolar minifilaments that contract and align through specified interactions as basic elements. After assuming that minifilament turnover decreases with increasing contractile stress, the simulations reproduce stress-dependent fiber formation in between focal adhesions above a threshold myosin concentration. The STICS correlation function in simulations matches the function measured in experiments. This study provides a framework to help interpret how different cortical myosin remodeling kinetics may contribute to different cell shape and rigidity depending on substrate stiffness. PMID:25641802

  18. Cr(1/3)Zr₂P₃O₁₂ with unusual tetrahedral coordination of Cr(III): peculiarities of the formation, thermal stability and application as a pigment.

    PubMed

    Gorodylova, Nataliia; Kosinová, Veronika; Šulcová, Petra; Bělina, Petr; Vlček, Milan

    2014-11-01

    All the known chromium(III) NASICON-related phosphates are considered to be solid solutions. In these compounds chromium atoms share their position in the basic framework of the crystal lattice with other structure forming elements such as zirconium. In our study, we have hypothesised a completely new way of structural organisation of the chromium(III) zirconium(IV) NASICON framework, consisting in the distribution of chromium over the charge-compensating atom sites with tetrahedral oxygen coordination. The possibility of formation of the corresponding phosphate, Cr(1/3)Zr2P3O12, was studied using a classical ceramic route and a sol-gel method. Structural affiliation of the obtained pure phase product was studied using XRD analysis. The results confirmed that the Cr(1/3)Zr2P3O12 phosphate belongs to monoclinic SW-subtype of the NASICON family. In this structure, chromium atoms occupy charge-compensating sites with a strongly distorted tetrahedral oxygen environment. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first example of tetrahedral coordination of chromium(III) in phosphates. Along with the unusual crystallographic characteristics of chromium, special attention in this paper is devoted to the thermal stability of this phosphate and to its performance as an inorganic pigment. The sample was characterised by heating microscopy and DTA study, particle size distribution analysis, and IR- and VIS-spectroscopy. The stability of the obtained powder in a glaze environment, its colouring performance and lightfastness are discussed as well. PMID:25189199

  19. Distinct functions of the laminin β LN domain and collagen IV during cardiac extracellular matrix formation and stabilization of alary muscle attachments revealed by EMS mutagenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Drosophila heart (dorsal vessel) is a relatively simple tubular organ that serves as a model for several aspects of cardiogenesis. Cardiac morphogenesis, proper heart function and stability require structural components whose identity and ways of assembly are only partially understood. Structural components are also needed to connect the myocardial tube with neighboring cells such as pericardial cells and specialized muscle fibers, the so-called alary muscles. Results Using an EMS mutagenesis screen for cardiac and muscular abnormalities in Drosophila embryos we obtained multiple mutants for two genetically interacting complementation groups that showed similar alary muscle and pericardial cell detachment phenotypes. The molecular lesions underlying these defects were identified as domain-specific point mutations in LamininB1 and Cg25C, encoding the extracellular matrix (ECM) components laminin β and collagen IV α1, respectively. Of particular interest within the LamininB1 group are certain hypomorphic mutants that feature prominent defects in cardiac morphogenesis and cardiac ECM layer formation, but in contrast to amorphic mutants, only mild defects in other tissues. All of these alleles carry clustered missense mutations in the laminin LN domain. The identified Cg25C mutants display weaker and largely temperature-sensitive phenotypes that result from glycine substitutions in different Gly-X-Y repeats of the triple helix-forming domain. While initial basement membrane assembly is not abolished in Cg25C mutants, incorporation of perlecan is impaired and intracellular accumulation of perlecan as well as the collagen IV α2 chain is detected during late embryogenesis. Conclusions Assembly of the cardiac ECM depends primarily on laminin, whereas collagen IV is needed for stabilization. Our data underscore the importance of a correctly assembled ECM particularly for the development of cardiac tissues and their lateral connections. The mutational

  20. Elucidation of the aggregation pathways of helix-turn-helix peptides: Stabilization at the turn region is critical for fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Do, Thanh D.; Chamas, Ali; Zheng, Xueyun; Barnes, Aaron; Chang, Dayna; Veldstra, Tjitske; Takhar, Harmeet; Dressler, Nicolette; Trapp, Benjamin; Miller, Kylie; McMahon, Audrene; Meredith, Stephen C.; Shea, Joan-Emma; Cantrell, Kristi Lazar; Bowers, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of proteins to fiber-like aggregates often involves a transformation of native monomers to β-sheet-rich oligomers. This general observation underestimates the importance of α-helical segments in the aggregation cascade. Here, using a combination of experimental techniques and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the aggregation of a 43-residue, apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide and its E21Q and D26N mutants. Our study indicates a strong propensity of helical segments not to adopt cross-β fibrils. The helix-turn-helix monomeric conformation of the peptides is preserved in the mature fibrils. Furthermore, we reveal opposite effects of mutations on and near the turn region in the self-assembly of these peptides. We show that the E21-R24 salt bridge is a major contributor to helix-turn-helix folding, subsequently leading to abundant fibril formation. On the other hand, the K19-D26 interaction is not required to fold the native helix-turn-helix. However, removal of the charged D26 residue decreases the stability of helix-turn-helix monomer, and consequently reduces aggregation. Finally, we provide a more refined assembly model for the helix-turn-helix peptides from apolipoprotein A-I based on the parallel stacking of helix-turn-helix dimers. PMID:26070092

  1. Elucidation of the Aggregation Pathways of Helix-Turn-Helix Peptides: Stabilization at the Turn Region Is Critical for Fibril Formation.

    PubMed

    Do, Thanh D; Chamas, Ali; Zheng, Xueyun; Barnes, Aaron; Chang, Dayna; Veldstra, Tjitske; Takhar, Harmeet; Dressler, Nicolette; Trapp, Benjamin; Miller, Kylie; McMahon, Audrene; Meredith, Stephen C; Shea, Joan-Emma; Lazar Cantrell, Kristi; Bowers, Michael T

    2015-07-01

    Aggregation of proteins to fiberlike aggregates often involves a transformation of native monomers to β-sheet-rich oligomers. This general observation underestimates the importance of α-helical segments in the aggregation cascade. Here, using a combination of experimental techniques and accelerated molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the aggregation of a 43-residue, apolipoprotein A-I mimetic peptide and its E21Q and D26N mutants. Our study indicates a strong propensity of helical segments not to adopt cross-β-fibrils. The helix-turn-helix monomeric conformation of the peptides is preserved in the mature fibrils. Furthermore, we reveal opposite effects of mutations on and near the turn region in the self-assembly of these peptides. We show that the E21-R24 salt bridge is a major contributor to helix-turn-helix folding, subsequently leading to abundant fibril formation. On the other hand, the K19-D26 interaction is not required to fold the native helix-turn-helix peptide. However, removal of the charged D26 residue decreases the stability of the helix-turn-helix monomer and consequently reduces the level of aggregation. Finally, we provide a more refined assembly model for the helix-turn-helix peptides from apolipoprotein A-I based on the parallel stacking of helix-turn-helix dimers.

  2. Formation of isodialuric acid lesion within DNA oligomers via one-electron oxidation of 5-hydroxyuracil: characterization, stability and excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Philippe; Gasparutto, Didier; Gambarelli, Serge; Saint-Pierre, Christine; Favier, Alain; Cadet, Jean

    2006-01-01

    5-Hydroxyuracil is a major oxidized nucleobase that can be generated by the action of •OH radical and one-electron oxidants. The latter modified base that exhibits a low ionization potential is highly susceptible to further degradation upon exposure to various oxidants. Emphasis was placed in thiswork on the formation and characterization of one-electron oxidation products of 5-hydroxyuracil within DNA fragments of defined sequence. For this purpose, 5-hydroxyuracil containing single- and double-stranded oligonucleotides of various lengths were synthesized and then exposed to the oxidizing action of iridium salts. Isodialuric acid was found to be formed almost quantitatively by a one-electron oxidation mechanism for which relevant information was inferred from a freeze-quenched ESR study. Information on the stability of isodialuric acid thus formed and its conversion products in aqueous solutions was also gained from experiments performed at acidic, neutral and alkali pH’s. Moreover, biochemical features dealing with the substrate specificity of several bacterial and yeast base excision repair enzymes to remove isodialuric acid from site-specifically modified DNA fragments were determined. PMID:16885239

  3. Unprecedented tris-phosphido-bridged triangular clusters with 42 valence electrons. Chemical, electrochemical and computational studies of their formation and stability.

    PubMed

    Funaioli, Tiziana; Leoni, Piero; Marchetti, Lorella; Albinati, Alberto; Rizzato, Silvia; Fabrizi de Biani, Fabrizia; Ienco, Andrea; Manca, Gabriele; Mealli, Carlo

    2013-04-15

    This paper presents the synthesis and structural characterization of the unprecedented tris-phosphido-bridged compounds Pt3(μ-PBu(t)2)3X3 (X = Cl, Br, I), having only 42 valence electrons, while up to now analogous clusters typically have 44e(-). The new species were obtained by an apparent bielectronic oxidation of the 44e(-) monohalides Pt3(μ-PBu(t)2)3(CO)2X with the corresponding dihalogen X2. Their X-ray structures are close to the D3h symmetry, similarly to the 44e(-) analogues with three terminal carbonyl ligands. The products were also obtained by electrochemical oxidation of the same monohalides in the presence of the corresponding halide. In a detailed study on the formation of Pt3(μ-PBu(t)2)3I3, the redox potentials indicated that I2 can only perform the first monoelectronic oxidation but is unsuited for the second one. Accordingly, the 43e(-) intermediate [Pt3(μ-PBu(t)2)3(CO)2I](+) was ascertained to play a key role. Another piece of information is that, together with the fully oxidized product Pt3(μ-PBu(t)2)3I3, the transient 44e(-) species [Pt3(μ-PBu(t)2)3(CO)3](+) is formed in the early steps of the reaction. In order to extract detailed information on the formation pathway, involving both terminal ligand substitutions and electron transfer processes, a DFT investigation has been performed and all the possible intermediates have been defined together with their associated energy costs. The profile highlights many important aspects, such as the formation of an appropriate couple of 43e(-) intermediates having different sets of terminal coligands, and suitable redox potentials for the transfer of one electron. Optimizations of 45e(-) associative intermediates in the ligand substitution reactions indicate their possible involvement in the redox process with reduction of the overall energy cost. Finally, according to MO arguments, the unique stability of the 42e(-) phosphido-bridged Pt3 clusters can be attributed to the simultaneous presence of

  4. Flexural Stresses and Reservoir Stability: Implications for Magma Propagation in the Lithosphere and the Formation of Giant Radial Dike Swarms on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galgana, G. A.; Grosfils, E. B.; McGovern, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    lithosphere outwards, creating stress states that favor sills and circumferential dikes in the upper lithosphere with radial dikes at the lower lithosphere. This outcome demonstrates the sensitivity of our results to uplift load geometry. With the exception of sill-producing, near-midsection rupture of magma chambers in the uppermost and lowermost lithosphere, failure generally occurs at the reservoir crest, and higher overpressures are required for failure, suggesting reservoir stability. These loads also produce surface radial and hoop strains conducive to the formation of circumferential grabens a distance (~50-180 km) from the model center. However, increasing the elastic lithosphere thickness (Te) to 40 km reduces the load shape differences, creating similar stress states for both conical and disk-shaped loads.

  5. Fibronectin alters the rate of formation and structure of the fibrin matrix.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Anand; Karuri, Nancy

    2014-01-10

    Plasma fibronectin is a vital component of the fibrin clot; however its role on clot structure is not clearly understood. The goal of this study was to examine the influence of fibronectin on the kinetics of formation, structural characteristics and composition of reconstituted fibrin clots or fibrin matrices. Fibrin matrices were formed by adding thrombin to 1, 2 or 4 mg/ml fibrinogen supplemented with 0-0.4 mg/ml fibronectin. The rate of fibrin matrix formation was then monitored by measuring light absorbance properties at different time points. Confocal microscopy of fluorescein conjugated fibrinogen was used to visualize the structural characteristics of fibrin matrices. The amount of fibronectin in fibrin matrices was determined through electrophoresis and immunoblotting of solubilized matrices. Fibronectin concentration positively correlated with the initial rate of fibrin matrix formation and with steady state light absorbance values of fibrin matrices. An increase in fibronectin concentration resulted in thinner and denser fibers in the fibrin matrices. Electrophoresis and immunoblotting showed that fibronectin was covalently and non-covalently bound to fibrin matrices and in the form of high molecular weight multimers. The formation of fibronectin multimers was attributed to cross-linking of fibronectin by trace amounts Factor XIIIa. These findings are novel because they link results from light absorbance studies to microcopy analyses and demonstrate an influence of fibronectin on fibrin matrix structural characteristics. This data is important in developing therapies that destabilize fibrin clots.

  6. A Study on Formation and Thermal Stability of Nano-sized Oxide Clusters in Mechanically Alloyed Nickel Aluminum for High Temperature Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Deog

    the thermal stability during an extensive matrix of long-term thermal annealing. In particular, the size, number density and composition of nano-clusters were assessed. While improvements in strength were obtained in the advanced NiAl ODS alloys, and the higher strength persisted through thermal annealing for 100 hrs at 1723K, characterization revealed the presence of Al in the oxide precipitate phases. The Al incorporation is believed detrimental to the formation of a high density of thermally stable Y-Ti-O nanoscale precipitates.

  7. A novel cell-free system reveals a mechanism of circular DNA formation from tandem repeats.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S; Mechali, M

    2001-06-15

    One characteristic of genomic plasticity is the presence of extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA). High levels of eccDNA are associated with genomic instability, exposure to carcinogens and aging. We have recently reported developmentally regulated formation of eccDNA that occurs preferentially in pre-blastula Xenopus laevis embryos. Multimers of tandemly repeated sequences were over-represented in the circle population while dispersed sequences were not detected, indicating that circles were not formed at random from any chromosomal sequence. Here we present detailed mechanistic studies of eccDNA formation in a cell-free system derived from Xenopus egg extracts. We show that naked chromosomal DNA from sperm or somatic tissues serves as a substrate for direct tandem repeat circle formation. Moreover, a recombinant bacterial tandem repeat can generate eccDNA in the extract through a de novo mechanism which is independent of DNA replication. These data suggest that the presence of a high level of any direct tandem repeat can confer on DNA the ability to be converted into circular multimers in the early embryo irrespective of its sequence and that homologous recombination is involved in this process. PMID:11410662

  8. The clinical effect of dentifrices containing stabilized stannous fluoride on plaque formation and gingivitis--a six-month study with ad libitum brushing.

    PubMed

    Beiswanger, B B; Doyle, P M; Jackson, R D; Mallatt, M E; Mau, M s; Bollmer, B W; Crisanti, M M; Guay, C B; Lanzalaco, A C; Lukacovic, M F

    1995-01-01

    The effects of stabilized 0.454% stannous fluoride dentifrices on supragingival plaque, gingival inflammation and gingival bleeding were studied in 549 adult male and female subjects who completed a six-month, double blind clinical study. Following an oral prophylaxis, subjects were randomly assigned to brush with one of the following dentifrices: 1) 0.454% SnF2 stabilized with 2.08% sodium gluconate, 2) 0.454% SnF2 stabilized with 4.16% sodium gluconate, 3) an experimental dentifrice, or 4) 0.243% NaF control dentifrice. Follow-up examinations were conducted at 3 and 6 months. Compared to the control dentifrice at 6 months, stannous fluoride dentifrices stabilized with 2.08% or 4.16% sodium gluconate significantly reduced gingivitis by 18.8% and 18.0%, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences between the two stabilized SnF2 groups with respect to their beneficial effects on gingival health. Gingival bleeding was also reduced, relative to the control dentifrice, for both stabilized SnF2 dentifrices. However, these differences were not statistically significant at p=0.05. The stabilized SnF2 dentifrices were not significantly different from the control dentifrice in their effects on supragingival plaque. No significant differences in adverse oral soft tissue effects were observed between the test and control groups. As expected, accumulation of extrinsic tooth stain increased in the stabilized SnF2 groups. However, the difficulty in removing accumulated dental stain was similar between the control and stabilized SnF2 dentifrices. Since use of SnF2 dentifrices has been reported to produce tooth stain, gingivitis examinations were done with and without custom-made tooth covers to evaluate the potential for examiner bias. Comparable gingivitis and gingival bleeding benefits were observed when the evaluations were conducted with or without the tooth covers. Results from this study support that 0.454% stabilized stannous fluoride dentifrices can

  9. Substrate-Triggered Formation and Remarkable Stability of the C-H-Cleaving Chloroferryl Intermediate in the Aliphatic Halogenase, SyrB2†

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, Megan L.; Krest, Courtney M.; Barr, Eric W.; Vaillancourt, Frédéric H.; Walsh, Christopher T.; Green, Michael T.; Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J. Martin

    2009-01-01

    Aliphatic halogenases activate O2, cleave α-ketoglutarate (αKG) to CO2 and succinate, and form haloferryl [X-Fe(IV)=O; X = Cl, Br] complexes that cleave aliphatic C-H bonds to install halogens during the biosynthesis of natural products by non-ribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs). For the related αKG-dependent dioxygenases, it has been shown that reaction of the Fe(II) cofactor with O2 to form the C-H-cleaving ferryl complex is “triggered” by binding of the target substrate. In this study, we have tested for and defined structural determinants of substrate triggering (ST) in the halogenase, SyrB2, from the syringomycin E biosynthetic NRPS of Pseudomonas syringae B301D. As for other halogen ases, the substrate of SyrB2 is complex, consisting of l-Thr tethered via thioester linkage to a covalently bound phosphopantetheine (PPant) cofactor of a carrier protein, SyrB1. Without an appended amino acid, SyrB1 does not trigger formation of the chloroferryl intermediate state in SyrB2, even in the presence of free l-Thr or its analogues, but SyrB1 charged either by l-Thr or by any of several non-native amino acids does trigger the reaction by as much as 8,000-fold (for l-Thr-S-SyrB1). Triggering efficacy is sensitive to the structures of both the amino acid and the carrier protein, being diminished by 5–20-fold when the native l-Thr is replaced by another amino acid and by ∼ 40-fold when SyrB1 is replaced by a heterologous carrier protein, CytC2. The directing effect of the carrier protein and consequent tolerance for profound modifications to the target amino acid allow the chloroferryl state to be formed in the presence of substrates that perturb the ratio of its two putative coordination isomers, lack the target C-H bond (l-Ala-S-SyrB1), or contain a C-H bond of enhanced strength (l-cyclopropylglycyl-S-SyrB1). For the latter two cases, the SyrB2 chloroferryl state so formed exhibits unprecedented stability (t1/2 = 30 – 110 min at 0 °C), can be trapped in

  10. Stability and specificity of heterodimer formation for the coiled-coil neck regions of the motor proteins Kif3A and Kif3B: the role of unstructured oppositely charged regions

    PubMed Central

    Chana, M.S.; Tripet, B.P.; Mant, C.T.; Hodges, R.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the folding, stability, and specificity of dimerization of the neck regions of the kinesin-like proteins Kif3A (residues 356–416) and Kif3B (residues 351–411). We showed that the complementary charged regions found in the hinge regions (which directly follow the neck regions) of these proteins do not adopt any secondary structure in solution. We then explored the ability of the complementary charged regions to specify heterodimer formation for the neck region coiled-coils found in Kif3A and Kif3B. Redox experiments demonstrated that oppositely charged regions specified the formation of a heterodimeric coiled-coil. Denaturation studies with urea demonstrated that the negatively charged region of Kif3A dramatically destabilized its neck coiled-coil (urea1/2 value of 3.9 m compared with 6.7 m for the coiled-coil alone). By comparison, the placement of a positively charged region C-terminal to the neck coiled-coil of Kif3B had little effect on stability (urea1/2 value of 8.2 m compared with 8.8 m for the coiled-coil alone). The pairing of complementary charged regions leads to specific heterodimer formation where the stability of the heterodimeric neck coiled-coil with charged regions had similar stability (urea1/2 value of 7.8 m) to the most stable homodimer (Kif3B) with charged regions (urea1/2 value of 8.0 m) and dramatically more stable than the Kif3A homodimer with charged regions (urea1/2, value of 3.9 m). The heterodimeric coiled-coil with charged extensions has essentially the same stability as the heterodimeric coiled-coil on its own (urea1/2 values of 7.8 and 8.1 m, respectively) suggesting that specificity of heterodimerization is driven by non-specific attraction of the oppositely unstructured charged regions without affecting stability of the heterodimeric coiled-coil. PMID:15705165

  11. On the role of surface composition and curvature on biointerface formation and colloidal stability of nanoparticles in a protein-rich model system.

    PubMed

    Orts-Gil, Guillermo; Natte, Kishore; Thiermann, Raphael; Girod, Matthias; Rades, Steffi; Kalbe, Henryk; Thünemann, Andreas F; Maskos, Michael; Österle, Werner

    2013-08-01

    The need for a better understanding of nanoparticle-protein interactions and the mechanisms governing the resulting colloidal stability has been emphasised in recent years. In the present contribution, the short and long term colloidal stability of silica nanoparticles (SNPs) and silica-poly(ethylene glycol) nanohybrids (Sil-PEG) have been scrutinised in a protein model system. Well-defined silica nanoparticles are rapidly covered by bovine serum albumin (BSA) and form small clusters after 20min while large agglomerates are detected after 10h depending on both particle size and nanoparticle-protein ratio. Oppositely, Sil-PEG hybrids present suppressive protein adsorption and enhanced short and long term colloidal stability in protein solution. No critical agglomeration was found for either system in the absence of protein, proving that instability found for SNPs must arise as a consequence of protein adsorption and not to high ionic environment. Analysis of the small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) structure factor indicates a short-range attractive potential between particles in the silica-BSA system, which is in good agreement with a protein bridging agglomeration mechanism. The results presented here point out the importance of the nanoparticle surface properties on the ability to adsorb proteins and how the induced or depressed adsorption may potentially drive the resulting colloidal stability.

  12. Solute-derived thermal stability of nanocrystalline aluminum and processing factor influence on the formation of Al6Mn quasicrystals in melt-spinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Andrew H.

    Thermal stability of nanograined metals can be difficult to attain due to the large driving force for grain growth that arises from the significant boundary area constituted by the nanostructure. Kinetic approaches for stabilization of the nanostructure effective at low homologous temperatures often fail at higher homologous temperatures. Thermodynamic approaches for thermal stabilization may offer higher temperature stability. In this research, modest alloying of aluminum with solute (1 at.% Sc, Yb, or Sr) was examined as a means to thermodynamically stabilize a bulk nanostructure at elevated temperatures. After using melt-spinning and ball-milling to create an extended solid-solution and nanostructure with average grain size on the order of 30-45 nm, 1 h annealing treatments at 673 K (0.72 Tm) , 773 K (0.83 Tm) , and 873 K (0.94 Tm) were applied. The alloys remain nanocrystalline (<100 nm) as measured by Warren-Averbach Fourier analysis of x-ray diffraction peaks and direct observation of TEM dark field micrographs, with the efficacy of stabilization: Sr>Yb>Sc. Disappearance of intermetallic phases in the Sr and Yb alloys in the x-ray diffraction spectra are observed to occur coincident with the stabilization after annealing, suggesting that precipitates dissolve and the boundaries are enriched with solute. Melt-spinning has also been shown to be an effective process to produce a class of ordered, but non-periodic crystals called quasicrystals. However, many of the factors related to the creation of the quasicrystals through melt-spinning are not optimized for specific chemistries and alloy systems. In a related but separate aspect of this research, melt-spinning was utilized to create metastable quasicrystalline Al6Mn in an alpha-Al matrix through rapid solidification of Al-8Mn (by mol) and Al-10Mn (by mol) alloys. Wheel speed of the melt-spinning wheel and orifice diameter of the tube reservoir were varied to determine their effect on the resulting volume

  13. The clinical effect of a stabilized stannous fluoride dentifrice on plaque formation, gingivitis and gingival bleeding: a six-month study.

    PubMed

    Perlich, M A; Bacca, L A; Bollmer, B W; Lanzalaco, A C; McClanahan, S F; Sewak, L K; Beiswanger, B B; Eichold, W A; Hull, J R; Jackson, R D

    1995-01-01

    The effects of a stabilized 0.454% stannous fluoride dentifrice, currently marketed as Crest Gum Care, on supragingival plaque, gingivitis, gingival bleeding and oral soft tissue condition were studied in 328 adult male and female subjects who completed a six-month, double blind clinical study. Following initial examinations, subjects presenting with a minimum of five gingival bleeding sites received a thorough dental prophylaxis and were instructed to brush at least twice a day for three months with a commercially available fluoride dentifrice, packaged in such a way as to blind its identity to the study subjects. This constituted the three-month pre-test period. At the end of this period, subjects were again examined, given a second oral prophylaxis, and randomly assigned to brush with one of the following dentifrices: 1) stabilized 0.454% stannous fluoride, 2) 0.243% sodium fluoride control, or 3) one of three experimental dentifrices. Subjects were instructed to brush their teeth as they normally would, at least twice a day for one minute per brushing. Follow-up examinations after three and six months of dentifrice use evaluated supragingival plaque, gingivitis, gingival bleeding, extrinsic tooth stain and oral soft tissue status. After six months, the stabilized stannous fluoride dentifrice significantly reduced gingivitis and gingival bleeding by 20.5% and 33.4% compared to the sodium fluoride control group. However, the stabilized stannous fluoride dentifrice group was not significantly different from the control dentifrice group with respect to supragingival plaque scores. As expected, accumulation of extrinsic tooth stain was greater in the stabilized stannous fluoride group than the control group. No unexpected nor clinically significant oral soft tissue health effects were associated with the use of the test dentifrices. The results from this clinical study demonstrate that over a six-month period, twice-daily use of a dentifrice containing 0

  14. Ab-initio study of the Y adsorption and YN formation on the GaN(000 1 bar): Diffusion pathways and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero-Sánchez, J.; Cocoletzi, Gregorio H.; Rivas-Silva, J. F.; Takeuchi, Noboru

    2016-08-01

    Yttrium (Y) adsorption and yttrium nitride (YN) thin film formation on the GaN(000 1 bar) surface are investigated using first principles total energy calculations. Results show that for Ga rich conditions the most stable configuration for Y adsorption is at a Bridge site. Nudged elastic band calculations show that the Y diffusion through the GaN surface is possible with low energy barriers. However, the most stable configuration corresponds to the geometry in which the Y atom migrates in to the first layer, forming an YN pair and displacing a Ga atom to the T4(2) site. Also, it is found that the increase of Y atoms up to a full monolayer is not energetically favorable, then the formation of an Y layer on top of the surface is not possible. However, under N-rich conditions the formation of a cubic-like YN bilayer above the surface becomes stable. Total and partial density of states show that the formation of YN on top of the Ga-terminated surface modify the electronic properties. Nevertheless, metallic behavior remains after YN formation.

  15. Brønsted Acid-Promoted Formation of Stabilized Silylium Ions for Catalytic Friedel-Crafts C-H Silylation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing-An; Klare, Hendrik F T; Oestreich, Martin

    2016-06-29

    A counterintuitive approach to electrophilic aromatic substitution with silicon electrophiles is disclosed. A strong Brønsted acid that would usually promote the reverse reaction, i.e., protodesilylation, was found to initiate the C-H silylation of electron-rich (hetero)arenes with hydrosilanes. Protonation of the hydrosilane followed by liberation of dihydrogen is key to success, fulfilling two purposes: to generate the stabilized silylium ion and to remove the proton released from the Wheland intermediate. PMID:27303857

  16. Water Mediated Wittig Reactions of Aldehydes in the Teaching Laboratory: Using Sodium Bicarbonate for the in Situ Formation of Stabilized Ylides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Michael J. B.; Fallot, Lucas B.; Gustafson, Jeffrey L.; Bergdahl, B. Mikael

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of alkenes using the Wittig reaction is a traditional part of many undergraduate organic chemistry teaching laboratory curricula. The aqueous medium version of the Wittig reaction presented is a reliable adaptation of this alkene formation reaction as a very safe alternative in the introductory organic chemistry laboratory. The…

  17. Role of additives in formation of solid-electrolyte interfaces on carbon electrodes and their effect on high-voltage stability.

    PubMed

    Qu, Weiguo; Dorjpalam, Enkhtuvshin; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Randall, Clive A

    2014-04-01

    The in situ modification of a lithium hexafluorophosphate-based electrolyte using a molybdenum oxide catalyst and small amount of water (1 vol %) yields hydrolysis products such as mono-, di-, and alkylfluorophosphates. The electrochemical stability of ultrahigh-purity, high-surface-area carbon electrodes derived from polyfurfuryl alcohol was tested using the modified electrolyte. Favorable modification of the solid electrolyte interface (SEI) layer on the activated carbon electrode increased the cyclable electrochemical voltage window (4.8-1.2 V vs. Li/Li(+)). The chemical modification of the SEI layer induced by electrolyte additives was characterized by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

  18. The p in p-T is for pressure: Movement of the gas hydrate stability field during glacial sealevel lowering and its possible link to pockmark formation on the Chatham Rise, New Zealand (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pecher, I. A.; Davy, B. W.; Wood, R.; Carter, L.; Gohl, K.

    2010-12-01

    The discussion on a possible destabilization of gas hydrates caused by climate fluctuations has in recent years focused on the role of a sub-seafloor temperature increase following bottom-water warming. We here revisit the scenario that a pressure drop during glacial sealevel lowering could lead to gas hydrate dissociation. A >20,000 km2 field of seafloor depressions that we interpret as pockmarks has been identified on the southern flanks of the Chatham Rise. Three classes of pockmarks are present in two distinct water-depth ranges. The shallowest class of pockmarks with a diameter of ~150 m are present in a water-depth range of 500-700 m, close to the current top of the gas hydrate stability field. Sub-bottom profiler data show evidence for a bottom simulating reflection making it likely that gas hydrates are present beneath the seafloor. Furthermore, buried pockmarks are identified on horizons that we correlate with sealevel lowstands suggesting that pockmark formation is linked to sealevel lowering. Assuming constant bottom-water temperatures, a glacial sealevel drop by 120 m would move much of the seafloor that is covered with these pockmarks out of the gas hydrate stability field. We therefore suggest these pockmarks were formed by gas from dissociating gas hydrate due to depressurization following sealevel lowering. Two larger classes of pockmarks with diameters of 1-5 and ~10 km, respectively, are present in water depths of 800-1100 m. Here, the seafloor has probably remained within the gas hydrate stability field during sealevel lowstands. However, the associated pressure drop has moved the base of gas hydrate stability upwards by ~30 m. It is unclear whether bottom-water temperatures have changed significantly in our study area during glacial cycles - changes of 1-3° C would be required to have a similar effect on gas hydrate stability as sealevel fluctuations. The boundary between warmer subtropical and cold subantarctic waters, the subtropical front

  19. Roles of Mac-1 and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa integrins in leukocyte-platelet aggregate formation: stabilization by Mac-1 and inhibition by GpIIb/IIIa blockers.

    PubMed

    Patko, Zsofia; Csaszar, Albert; Acsady, Gyorgy; Peter, Karlheinz; Schwarz, Meike

    2012-01-01

    Circulating platelet-leukocyte hetero-aggregates play an important role in acute cardiovascular events and hypersensitivity reactions. The association involves the receptor families of selectins and integrin. The objective of this study was to investigate the role of CD11b/CD18 integrin (Mac-1) in hetero-aggregate formation and search for a counter-receptor on platelets ready to interact with Mac-1. As a model of leukocytes, Mac-1 presenting Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were used to evaluate the role of Mac-1 in hetero-aggregate formation. The amount of CHO cell-bound active and inactive platelets was measured by flow cytometry, while the counter-receptors on platelets were identified via using blocking antibodies. We observed significant platelet adhesion on Mac-1-bearing cells when platelet-rich plasma or activated platelets were present. Inactive platelets did not adhere to Mac-1-bearing cells. Addition of fibrinogen, a ligand of Mac-1 significantly increased platelet binding. CD40L was demonstrated to act similarly on Mac-1. Inhibition of platelet GpIIb/IIIa completely abolished CHO cell-platelet aggregation. In our study, we have shown for the first time that Mac-1 mediates the formation of hetero-aggregates without selectin tethering when Mac-1 ligands such as fibrinogen or CD40L are present and blockers of platelet GpIIb/IIIa are able to diminish this interaction.

  20. Loop Sequence Context Influences the Formation and Stability of the i-Motif for DNA Oligomers of Sequence (CCCXXX)4, where X = A and/or T, under Slightly Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    McKim, Mikeal; Buxton, Alexander; Johnson, Courtney; Metz, Amanda; Sheardy, Richard D

    2016-08-11

    The structure and stability of DNA is highly dependent upon the sequence context of the bases (A, G, C, and T) and the environment under which the DNA is prepared (e.g., buffer, temperature, pH, ionic strength). Understanding the factors that influence structure and stability of the i-motif conformation can lead to the design of DNA sequences with highly tunable properties. We have been investigating the influence of pH and temperature on the conformations and stabilities for all permutations of the DNA sequence (CCCXXX)4, where X = A and/or T, using spectroscopic approaches. All oligomers undergo transitions from single-stranded structures at pH 7.0 to i-motif conformations at pH 5.0 as evidenced by circular dichroism (CD) studies. These folded structures possess stacked C:CH(+) base pairs joined by loops of 5'-XXX-3'. Although the pH at the midpoint of the transition (pHmp) varies slightly with loop sequence, the linkage between pH and log K for the proton induced transition is highly loop sequence dependent. All oligomers also undergo the thermally induced i-motif to single-strand transition at pH 5.0 as the temperature is increased from 25 to 95 °C. The temperature at the midpoint of this transition (Tm) is also highly dependent on loop sequence context effects. For seven of eight possible permutations, the pH induced, and thermally induced transitions appear to be highly cooperative and two state. Analysis of the CD optical melting profiles via a van't Hoff approach reveals sequence-dependent thermodynamic parameters for the unfolding as well. Together, these data reveal that the i-motif conformation exhibits exquisite sensitivity to loop sequence context with respect to formation and stability. PMID:27438583

  1. VirB6 Is Required for Stabilization of VirB5 and VirB3 and Formation of VirB7 Homodimers in Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    PubMed Central

    Hapfelmeier, Siegfried; Domke, Natalie; Zambryski, Patricia C.; Baron, Christian

    2000-01-01

    VirB6 from Agrobacterium tumefaciens is an essential component of the type IV secretion machinery for T pilus formation and genetic transformation of plants. Due to its predicted topology as a polytopic inner membrane protein, it was proposed to form the transport pore for cell-to-cell transfer of genetic material and proteinaceous virulence factors. Here, we show that the absence of VirB6 leads to reduced cellular levels of VirB5 and VirB3, which were proposed to assist T pilus formation as minor component(s) or assembly factor(s), respectively. Overexpression of virB6 in trans restored levels of cell-bound and T pilus-associated VirB5 to wild type but did not restore VirB3 levels. Thus, VirB6 has a stabilizing effect on VirB5 accumulation, thereby regulating T pilus assembly. In the absence of VirB6, cell-bound VirB7 monomers and VirB7-VirB9 heterodimers were reduced and VirB7 homodimer formation was abolished. This effect could not be restored by expression of VirB6 in trans. Expression of TraD, a component of the transfer machinery of the IncN plasmid pKM101, with significant sequence similarity to VirB6, restored neither protein levels nor bacterial virulence but partly permitted T pilus formation in a virB6 deletion strain. VirB6 may therefore regulate T pilus formation by direct interaction with VirB5, and wild-type levels of VirB3 and VirB7 homodimers are not required. PMID:10913084

  2. Electrical stability enhancement of the amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin film transistor by formation of Au nanoparticles on the back-channel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Byungsu; Lee, Jaesang; Seo, Hyungtak; Jeon, Hyeongtag

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a significant improvement in various electrical instabilities of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin film transistor (TFT) by implanting Au nanoparticles (NPs) on the a-IGZO back-channel. This TFT showed the enhanced stability of threshold voltage (Vth) under ambient humidity, illumination stress, and a-IGZO thickness variation tests. Application of back-channel Au NPs to a-IGZO TFT is regarded to control the surface potential, to lead reversible carrier trap/injection, and to increase incident UV light absorption by local surface plasmon. Au NPs are formed by e-beam evaporation, and therefore, this technique can be applicable to the TFT manufacturing process.

  3. Ternary inclusion complex formation and stabilization of limaprost, a prostaglandin E1 derivative, in the presence of α- and β-cyclodextrins in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasuo; Iohara, Daisuke; Sekiya, Noboru; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Sakiyama, Yoko; Hirayama, Fumitoshi; Arima, Hidetoshi; Uekama, Kaneto

    2016-07-25

    Limaprost/α-cyclodextrin (CD)/β-CD ternary inclusion complex was prepared by freeze-drying a solution containing all three components. Under humid conditions, limaprost was more stable in the ternary α-/β-CD inclusion complex than in the binary α- or β-CD complex. Specifically, during storage at 30°C/75% relative humidity (R.H.) for 4 weeks, about 19% of limaprost degraded into 17S,20-dimethyl-trans-Δ(2)-prostaglandin A1 (referred as 11-deoxy-Δ(10)) in the β-CD complex, 8.1% degraded in the α-CD complex, and only 2.2% degraded in the α-/β-CD complex. The mechanism of limaprost stabilization in the presence of both CDs was investigated by Raman and solid-state NMR spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffractometry. The fast degradation of limaprost to 11-deoxy-Δ(10) in the β-CD complex was due to the rapid crystallization of β-CD from the complex, liberating the free amorphous drug, which is susceptible to degradation. The dissociation and crystallization of β-CD from the inclusion complex were suppressed by freeze-drying limaprost in the presence of both α- and β-CDs. In addition, the interaction between limaprost and the two CDs was reinforced by inclusion of different moieties of limaprost: α-CD predominantly included the alkyl ω-chain, whereas β-CD included the five-membered ring. Thus, a stable ternary inclusion complex was formed that included limaprost, maintaining the amorphous state of the complex and dramatically stabilizing the drug under humid conditions. PMID:27286633

  4. Amphiphilic polymer-mediated formation of laponite-based nanohybrids with robust stability and pH sensitivity for anticancer drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoying; Maciel, Dina; Wu, Yilun; Rodrigues, João; Shi, Xiangyang; Yuan, Yuan; Liu, Changsheng; Tomás, Helena; Li, Yulin

    2014-10-01

    The development of pH-sensitive drug delivery nanosystems that present a low drug release at the physiological pH and are able to increase the extent of the release at a lower pH value (like those existent in the interstitial space of solid tumors (pH 6.5) and in the intracellular endolysosomal compartments (pH 5.0)) is very important for an efficient and safe cancer therapy. Laponite (LP) is a synthetic silicate nanoparticle with a nanodisk structure (25 nm in diameter and 0.92 nm in thickness) and negative-charged surface, which can be used for the encapsulation of doxorubicin (DOX, a cationic drug) through electrostatic interactions and exhibit good pH sensitivity in drug delivery. However, the colloidal instability of LP still limits its potential clinical applications. In this study, we demonstrate an elegant strategy to develop stable Laponite-based nanohybrids through the functionalization of its surface with an amphiphile PEG-PLA copolymer by a self-assembly process. The hydrophobic block of PEG-PLA acts as an anchor that binds to the surface of drug-loaded LP nanodisks, maintaining the core structure, whereas the hydrophilic PEG part serves as a protective stealth shell that improves the whole stability of the nanohybrids under physiological conditions. The resulting nanocarriers can effectively load the DOX drug (the encapsulation efficiency is 85%), and display a pH-enhanced drug release behavior in a sustained way. In vitro biological evaluation indicated that the DOX-loaded nanocarriers can be effectively internalized by CAL-72 cells (an osteosarcoma cell line), and exhibit a remarkable higher anticancer cytotoxicity than free DOX. The merits of Laponite/PEG-PLA nanohybrids, such as good cytocompatibility, excellent physiological stability, sustained pH-responsive release properties, and improved anticancer activity, make them a promising platform for the delivery of other therapeutic agents beyond DOX. PMID:25167168

  5. Formation and characterization of an all-ferrous Rieske cluster and stabilization of the [2Fe-2S]0 core by protonation

    PubMed Central

    Leggate, Ellen J.; Bill, Eckhard; Essigke, Timm; Ullmann, G. Matthias; Hirst, Judy

    2004-01-01

    The all-ferrous Rieske cluster, [2Fe-2S]0, has been produced in solution and characterized by protein-film voltammetry and UV–visible, EPR, and Mössbauer spectroscopies. The [2Fe-2S]0 cluster, in the overexpressed soluble domain of the Rieske protein from the bovine cytochrome bc1 complex, is formed at –0.73 V at pH 7. Therefore, at pH 7, the [2Fe-2S]1+/0 couple is 1.0 V below the [2Fe-2S]2+/1+ couple. The two cluster-bound ferrous irons are both high spin (S = 2), and they are coupled antiferromagnetically (–J ≥ 30 cm–1, H =–2JS1·S2) to give a diamagnetic (S = 0) ground state. The ability of the Rieske cluster to exist in three oxidation states (2+, 1+, and 0) without an accompanying coupled reaction, such as a conformational change or protonation, is highly unusual. However, uncoupled reduction to the [2Fe-2S]0 state occurs at pH > 9.8 only, and at high pH the intact cluster persists in solution for <1 min. At pH < 9.8, the all-ferrous cluster is stabilized significantly by protonation. A combination of experimental data and calculations based on density functional theory suggests strongly that the proton binds to one of the cluster μ2-sulfides, consistent with observations that reduced [3Fe-4S] clusters are protonated also. The implications for our understanding of coupled reactions at iron–sulfur clusters and of the factors that determine the relative stabilities of their different oxidation states are discussed. PMID:15263097

  6. Ternary inclusion complex formation and stabilization of limaprost, a prostaglandin E1 derivative, in the presence of α- and β-cyclodextrins in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yasuo; Iohara, Daisuke; Sekiya, Noboru; Yamamoto, Masanobu; Ishida, Hiroyuki; Sakiyama, Yoko; Hirayama, Fumitoshi; Arima, Hidetoshi; Uekama, Kaneto

    2016-07-25

    Limaprost/α-cyclodextrin (CD)/β-CD ternary inclusion complex was prepared by freeze-drying a solution containing all three components. Under humid conditions, limaprost was more stable in the ternary α-/β-CD inclusion complex than in the binary α- or β-CD complex. Specifically, during storage at 30°C/75% relative humidity (R.H.) for 4 weeks, about 19% of limaprost degraded into 17S,20-dimethyl-trans-Δ(2)-prostaglandin A1 (referred as 11-deoxy-Δ(10)) in the β-CD complex, 8.1% degraded in the α-CD complex, and only 2.2% degraded in the α-/β-CD complex. The mechanism of limaprost stabilization in the presence of both CDs was investigated by Raman and solid-state NMR spectroscopy and powder X-ray diffractometry. The fast degradation of limaprost to 11-deoxy-Δ(10) in the β-CD complex was due to the rapid crystallization of β-CD from the complex, liberating the free amorphous drug, which is susceptible to degradation. The dissociation and crystallization of β-CD from the inclusion complex were suppressed by freeze-drying limaprost in the presence of both α- and β-CDs. In addition, the interaction between limaprost and the two CDs was reinforced by inclusion of different moieties of limaprost: α-CD predominantly included the alkyl ω-chain, whereas β-CD included the five-membered ring. Thus, a stable ternary inclusion complex was formed that included limaprost, maintaining the amorphous state of the complex and dramatically stabilizing the drug under humid conditions.

  7. Formation and stability of N-heterocyclic carbenes in water: the carbon acid pKa of imidazolium cations in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Amyes, Tina L; Diver, Steven T; Richard, John P; Rivas, Felix M; Toth, Krisztina

    2004-04-01

    We report second-order rate constants kDO (M-1 s-1) for exchange for deuterium of the C(2)-proton of a series of simple imidazolium cations to give the corresponding singlet imidazol-2-yl carbenes in D2O at 25 degrees C and I = 1.0 (KCl). Evidence is presented that the reverse protonation of imidazol-2-yl carbenes by solvent water is limited by solvent reorganization and occurs with a rate constant of kHOH = kreorg = 10(11) s-1. The data were used to calculate reliable carbon acid pK(a)s for ionization of imidazolium cations at C(2) to give the corresponding singlet imidazol-2-yl carbenes in water: pKa = 23.8 for the imidazolium cation, pKa = 23.0 for the 1,3-dimethylimidazolium cation, pKa = 21.6 for the 1,3-dimethylbenzimidazolium cation, and pKa = 21.2 for the 1,3-bis-((S)-1-phenylethyl)benzimidazolium cation. The data also provide the thermodynamic driving force for a 1,2-hydrogen shift at a singlet carbene: K12 = 5 x 10(16) for rearrangement of the parent imidazol-2-yl carbene to give neutral imidazole in water at 298 K, which corresponds to a favorable Gibbs free energy change of 23 kcal/mol. We present a simple rationale for the observed substituent effects on the thermodynamic stability of N-heterocyclic carbenes relative to a variety of neutral and cationic derivatives that emphasizes the importance of the choice of reference reaction when assessing the stability of N-heterocyclic carbenes.

  8. Critiques of the seismic hypothesis and the vegetation stabilization hypothesis for the formation of Mima mounds along the western coast of the U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabet, Emmanuel J.; Burnham, Jennifer L. Horwath; Perron, J. Taylor

    2016-09-01

    A recent paper published in Geomorphology by Gabet et al. (2014) presents the results of a numerical model supporting the hypothesis that burrowing mammals build Mima mounds - small, densely packed hillocks found primarily in the western United States. The model is based on field observations and produces realistic-looking mounds with spatial distributions similar to real moundfields. Alternative explanations have been proposed for these Mima mounds, including formation by seismic shaking and vegetation-controlled erosion and deposition. In this short communication, we present observations from moundfields in the coastal states of the western U.S. that are incompatible with these alternative theories.

  9. SEI Formation and Interfacial Stability of a Si Electrode in a LiTDI-Salt Based Electrolyte with FEC and VC Additives for Li-Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Lindgren, Fredrik; Xu, Chao; Niedzicki, Leszek; Marcinek, Marek; Gustafsson, Torbjörn; Björefors, Fredrik; Edström, Kristina; Younesi, Reza

    2016-06-22

    An electrolyte based on the new salt, lithium 4,5-dicyano-2-(trifluoromethyl)imidazolide (LiTDI), is evaluated in combination with nano-Si composite electrodes for potential use in Li-ion batteries. The additives fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC) and vinylene carbonate (VC) are also added to the electrolyte to enable an efficient SEI formation. By employing hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES), the SEI formation and the development of the active material is probed during the first 100 cycles. With this electrolyte formulation, the Si electrode can cycle at 1200 mAh g(-1) for more than 100 cycles at a coulombic efficiency of 99%. With extended cycling, a decrease in Si particle size is observed as well as an increase in silicon oxide amount. As opposed to LiPF6 based electrolytes, this electrolyte or its decomposition products has no side reactions with the active Si material. The present results further acknowledge the positive effects of SEI forming additives. It is suggested that polycarbonates and a high LiF content are favorable components in the SEI over other kinds of carbonates formed by ethylene carbonate (EC) and dimethyl carbonate (DMC) decomposition. This work thus confirms that LiTDI in combination with the investigated additives is a promising salt for Si electrodes in future Li-ion batteries. PMID:27220376

  10. Formation and stability of a hollow electron beam in the presence of a plasma wake field driven by an ultra-short electron bunch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanjia, F.; Fedele, R.; De Nicola, S.; Akhter, T.; Jovanović, D.

    2016-09-01

    A numerical investigation on the spatiotemporal evolution of an electron beam, externally injected in a plasma in the presence of a plasma wake field, is carried out. The latter is driven by an ultra-short relativistic axially-symmetric femtosecond electron bunch. We first derive a novel Poisson-like equation for the wake potential where the driving term is the ultra-short bunch density, taking suitably into account the interplay between the sharpness and high energy of the bunch. Then, we show that a channel is formed longitudinally, through the externally injected beam while experiencing the effects of the bunch-driven plasma wake field, within the context of thermal wave model. The formation of the channel seems to be a final stage of the 3D evolution of the beam. This involves the appearance of small filaments and bubbles around the longitudinal axis. The bubbles coalesce forming a relatively stable axially-symmetric hollow beam structure.

  11. Intrabody application of eptotermin alpha enhances bone formation in osteoporotic fractures of the lumbar spine; however, fails to increase biomechanical stability - results of an experimental sheep model.

    PubMed

    Eschler, Anica; Roepenack, Paula; Herlyn, Philipp Karl Ewald; Roesner, Jan; Martin, Heiner; Vollmar, Brigitte; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gradl, Georg

    2015-01-01

    This study analyses the effect of eptotermin α application into fractured vertebrae. It is hypothesized that eptotermin α is capable to enhance bony healing of the osteoporotic spine. In 10 Merino sheep osteoporosis induction was performed by ovariectomy, corticosteroid therapy and calcium/phosphorus/vitamin D-deficient diet; followed by standardized creation of lumbar vertebral compression fractures (VCFs) type A3.1 and consecutive fracture reduction/fixation using expandable mesh cages. Randomly, intravertebral eptotermin α (G1) or no augmentation was added (G2). Macroscopic, micro-CT, and biomechanical evaluation assessed bony consolidation two months postoperatively: Micro-CT data revealed bony consolidation for all cases with significant increased callus development for G2 (60%) and BV/TV (bone volume/total volume 73.45%, osteoporotic vertebrae 35.76%). Neither group showed improved biomechanical stability. Eptotermin α enhanced mineralisation in VCFs in an experimental setup with use of cementless augmentation via an expandable cage. However, higher bone mineral density did not lead to superior biomechanical properties.

  12. Formation and stability of crystalline and amorphous Al2O3 layers deposited on Ga2O3 nanowires by atomic layer epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, M. B.; Twigg, M. E.; Prokes, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    Although the crystalline α and γ phases are the most stable forms of alumina, small-diameter (<6 nm) nanoparticles are known to be completely amorphous, due to the surface energy being correspondingly lower for the less stable non-crystalline phase. Al2O3 films with a thickness of 5 nm grown by low temperature (200 °C) atomic layer deposition (ALD) on small-diameter (<20 nm) Ga2O3 nanowires (NWs), however, are identified by transmission electron microscopy as belonging to the α, γ, and possibly θ crystalline phases of Al2O3, while films deposited on larger diameter (>20 nm) NWs are found to be amorphous. Indeed, until recently, all Al2O3, films deposited by low-temperature ALD using trimethylaluminum and water have been reported to be amorphous, regardless of film thickness or substrate. The formation of a crystalline ALD film can be understood in terms of the energetics of misfit dislocations that maintain the registry between the ALD film and the NW substrate, as well as the influence of strain and surface energy. The decreasing energy of co-axial misfit dislocations with NW diameter results in a corresponding decrease in the contribution of the Al2O3/Ga2O3 interface to the free energy, while the interfacial energy for an amorphous film is independent of the NW diameter. Therefore, for NW cores of sufficiently small diameter, the free energy contribution of the Al2O3/Ga2O3 interface is smaller for crystalline films than for amorphous films, thereby favoring the formation of crystalline films for small-diameter NWs. For ALD Al2O3 films of 10 nm thickness deposited on small-diameter Ga2O3 NWs, however, only the first 5 nm of the ALD film is found to be crystalline, possibly due to well-established kinetic limitations to low temperature epitaxial growth.

  13. New anatase-type Til-2xNbxAlxO2 solid solution nanoparticles: direct formation, phase stability, and photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Masanori; Ito, Takaharu

    2006-12-01

    New anatase-type titania solid solutions co-doped with niobium and aluminum (Til-2xNbxAIlxO2 (X = 0 -0.20)) were synthesized as nanoparticles from precursor solutions of TiOSO4, NbCl5, and Al(NO3)3 under mild hydrothermal conditions at 180 degrees C for 5 h using the hydrolysis of urea. The lattice parameters a0 and c0 of anatase slightly and gradually increased, when the content of niobium and aluminum increased from X = 0 to 0.20. The crystallite size of anatase increased from 12 to 28 nm with increasing the value of X from 0 to 0.20. Their photocatalytic activity and adsorptivity were evaluated separately by the measurement of the concentration of methylene blue (MB) remained in the solution in the dark or under UV-light irradiation. The adsorptivity of TiO2 was improved by the formation of anatase-type Til-2xNbxAlxO2 solid solutions. The photocatalytic activity of anatase-type Til-2xNbxAlxO2 solid solutions was superior to that of commercially available anatase-type pure TiO2 (ST-01) and anatase-type pure TiO2 hydrothermally prepared. The new anatase phase of Til-2xNbxAlxO2 (X = 0-0.20) solid solutions existed stably up to 850 0C during heat treatment in air. In comparison with hydrothermal pure TiO2, the starting temperature of anatase-to-rutile phase transformation was delayed by the formation of Ti1-2xNbxAlxO, (X = 0-0.20) solid solutions, although its completing temperature was accelerated. PMID:17256336

  14. Choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid supplementation as an adjunct to Calcium/Vitamin D3 stimulates markers of bone formation in osteopenic females: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Spector, Tim D; Calomme, Mario R; Anderson, Simon H; Clement, Gail; Bevan, Liisa; Demeester, Nathalie; Swaminathan, Rami; Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Berghe, Dirk A Vanden; Powell, Jonathan J

    2008-01-01

    Background Mounting evidence supports a physiological role for silicon (Si) as orthosilicic acid (OSA, Si(OH)4) in bone formation. The effect of oral choline-stabilized orthosilicic acid (ch-OSA) on markers of bone turnover and bone mineral density (BMD) was investigated in a double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Methods Over 12-months, 136 women out of 184 randomized (T-score spine < -1.5) completed the study and received, daily, 1000 mg Ca and 20 μg cholecalciferol (Vit D3) and three different ch-OSA doses (3, 6 and 12 mg Si) or placebo. Bone formation markers in serum and urinary resorption markers were measured at baseline, and after 6 and 12 months. Femoral and lumbar BMD were measured at baseline and after 12 months by DEXA. Results Overall, there was a trend for ch-OSA to confer some additional benefit to Ca and Vit D3 treatment, especially for markers of bone formation, but only the marker for type I collagen formation (PINP) was significant at 12 months for the 6 and 12 mg Si dose (vs. placebo) without a clear dose response effect. A trend for a dose-corresponding increase was observed in the bone resorption marker, collagen type I C-terminal telopeptide (CTX-I). Lumbar spine BMD did not change significantly. Post-hoc subgroup analysis (baseline T-score femur < -1) however was significant for the 6 mg dose at the femoral neck (T-test). There were no ch-OSA related adverse events observed and biochemical safety parameters remained within the normal range. Conclusion Combined therapy of ch-OSA and Ca/Vit D3 had a potential beneficial effect on bone collagen compared to Ca/Vit D3 alone which suggests that this treatment is of potential use in osteoporosis. NTR 1029 PMID:18547426

  15. Conformational and thermal stability improvements for the large-scale production of yeast-derived rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus-like particles as multipurpose vaccine.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Erlinda; Toledo, Jorge R; Méndez, Lídice; González, Nemecio; Parra, Francisco; Martín-Alonso, José M; Limonta, Miladys; Sánchez, Kosara; Cabrales, Ania; Estrada, Mario P; Rodríguez-Mallón, Alina; Farnós, Omar

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant virus-like particles (VLP) antigenically similar to rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) were recently expressed at high levels inside Pichia pastoris cells. Based on the potential of RHDV VLP as platform for diverse vaccination purposes we undertook the design, development and scale-up of a production process. Conformational and stability issues were addressed to improve process control and optimization. Analyses on the structure, morphology and antigenicity of these multimers were carried out at different pH values during cell disruption and purification by size-exclusion chromatography. Process steps and environmental stresses in which aggregation or conformational instability can be detected were included. These analyses revealed higher stability and recoveries of properly assembled high-purity capsids at acidic and neutral pH in phosphate buffer. The use of stabilizers during long-term storage in solution showed that sucrose, sorbitol, trehalose and glycerol acted as useful aggregation-reducing agents. The VLP emulsified in an oil-based adjuvant were subjected to accelerated thermal stress treatments. None to slight variations were detected in the stability of formulations and in the structure of recovered capsids. A comprehensive analysis on scale-up strategies was accomplished and a nine steps large-scale production process was established. VLP produced after chromatographic separation protected rabbits against a lethal challenge. The minimum protective dose was identified. Stabilized particles were ultimately assayed as carriers of a foreign viral epitope from another pathogen affecting a larger animal species. For that purpose, a linear protective B-cell epitope from Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV) E2 envelope protein was chemically coupled to RHDV VLP. Conjugates were able to present the E2 peptide fragment for immune recognition and significantly enhanced the peptide-specific antibody response in vaccinated pigs. Overall these results

  16. Thermal stability of Ag, Al, Sn, Pb, and Hg films reinforced by 2D (C, Si) crystals and the formation of interfacial fluid states in them upon heating. MD experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polukhin, V. A.; Kurbanova, E. D.

    2016-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulation is used to study the thermal stability of the interfacial states of metallic Al, Ag, Sn, Pb, and Hg films (i.e., the structural elements of superconductor composites and conducting electrodes) reinforced by 2D graphene and silicene crystals upon heating up to disordering and to analyze the formation of nonautonomous fluid pseudophases in interfaces. The effect of perforation defects in reinforcing 2D-C and 2D-Si planes with passivated edge covalent bonds on the atomic dynamics is investigated. As compared to Al and Ag, the diffusion coefficients in Pd and Hg films increase monotonically with temperature during thermally activated disordering processes, the interatomic distances decrease, the sizes decrease, drops form, and their density profile grows along the normal. The coagulation of Pb and Hg drops is accompanied by a decrease in the contact angle, the reduction of the interface contact with graphene, and the enhancement of its corrugation (waviness).

  17. Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirB6 protein participates in formation of VirB7 and VirB9 complexes required for type IV secretion.

    PubMed

    Jakubowski, Simon J; Krishnamoorthy, Vidhya; Christie, Peter J

    2003-05-01

    This study characterized the contribution of Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirB6, a polytopic inner membrane protein, to the formation of outer membrane VirB7 lipoprotein and VirB9 protein multimers required for type IV secretion. VirB7 assembles as a disulfide cross-linked homodimer that associates with the T pilus and a VirB7-VirB9 heterodimer that stabilizes other VirB proteins during biogenesis of the secretion machine. Two presumptive VirB protein complexes, composed of VirB6, VirB7, and VirB9 and of VirB7, VirB9, and VirB10, were isolated by immunoprecipitation or glutathione S-transferase pulldown assays from detergent-solubilized membrane extracts of wild-type A348 and a strain producing only VirB6 through VirB10 among the VirB proteins. To examine the biological importance of VirB6 complex formation for type IV secretion, we monitored the effects of nonstoichiometric VirB6 production and the synthesis of VirB6 derivatives with 4-residue insertions (VirB6.i4) on VirB7 and VirB9 multimerization, T-pilus assembly, and substrate transfer. A virB6 gene deletion mutant accumulated VirB7 dimers at diminished steady-state levels, whereas complementation with a plasmid bearing wild-type virB6 partially restored accumulation of the dimers. VirB6 overproduction was correlated with formation of higher-order VirB9 complexes or aggregates and also blocked substrate transfer without a detectable disruption of T-pilus production; these phenotypes were displayed by cells grown at 28 degrees C, a temperature that favors VirB protein turnover, but not by cells grown at 20 degrees C. Strains producing several VirB6.i4 mutant proteins assembled novel VirB7 and VirB9 complexes detectable by nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and two strains producing the D60.i4 and L191.i4 mutant proteins translocated IncQ plasmid and VirE2 effector protein substrates in the absence of a detectable T pilus. Our findings support a model that VirB6 mediates

  18. Formation of 6-, 7- or 8-membered ring intra-side-chain NH rad O hydrogen bond toward Ca-binding oxyanion in poly(allylaminocarboxylate) ligands stabilizes CaCO 3 vaterite crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazuyuki; Doi, Mototsugu; Kobayashi, Atsuko; Taguchi, Takahisa; Onoda, Akira; Okamura, Taka-aki; Yamamoto, Hitoshi; Ueyama, Norikazu

    2004-03-01

    Novel poly(allylaminocarboxylate) ligands, which have a carboxylate and the neighboring amide group in the same side-chain, were synthesized as model ligands for crystalline CaCO3 biominerals. Poly{N-allyl-malonamate}, poly{N-allyl-succinamate} and poly{4-allylcarbamoyl-butyrate} form 6-, 7- or 8-membered ring intra-side-chain NHrad O hydrogen bonds, respectively, between the carboxylate and the neighboring amide NH in the carboxylate anion state, although the formation of each intra-side-chain NHrad O hydrogen bond is independent on the stereoisomers of the polymer main-chain. In the polymer ligand-CaCO3 composites, strong binding of polymer ligands to CaCO3 crystals is caused by stabilizing a Ca-O (carboxylate) bond due to the pKa shift of carboxylic acid by the NHrad O hydrogen bond. Furthermore, the strong Ca binding in CaCO3 composites stabilizes the meta-stable morphology of CaCO3 vaterite crystals.

  19. Contrast stability and 'stripe' formation in scanning tunnelling microscopy imaging of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: the role of STM-tip orientations.

    PubMed

    Mándi, Gábor; Teobaldi, Gilberto; Palotás, Krisztián

    2014-12-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is an important substrate in many technological applications and is routinely used as a standard in Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM) calibration, which makes the accurate interpretation of the HOPG STM contrast of great fundamental and applicative importance. We demonstrate by STM simulations based on electronic structure obtained from first principles that the relative local orientation of the STM-tip apex with respect to the HOPG substrate has a considerable effect on the HOPG STM contrast. Importantly for experimental STM analysis of HOPG, the simulations indicate that local tip-rotations maintaining a major contribution of the d(3z(2)-r(2)) tip-apex state to the STM current affect only the secondary features of the HOPG STM contrast resulting in 'stripe' formation and leaving the primary contrast unaltered. Conversely, tip-rotations leading to enhanced contributions from m ≠ 0 tip-apex electronic states can cause a triangular-hexagonal change in the primary contrast. We also report a comparison of two STM simulation models with experiments in terms of bias-voltage-dependent STM topography brightness correlations and discuss our findings for the HOPG(0 0 0 1) surface in combination with tungsten tip models of different sharpnesses and terminations.

  20. Contrast stability and ‘stripe’ formation in scanning tunnelling microscopy imaging of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite: the role of STM-tip orientations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mándi, Gábor; Teobaldi, Gilberto; Palotás, Krisztián

    2014-12-01

    Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) is an important substrate in many technological applications and is routinely used as a standard in Scanning Tunnelling Microscopy (STM) calibration, which makes the accurate interpretation of the HOPG STM contrast of great fundamental and applicative importance. We demonstrate by STM simulations based on electronic structure obtained from first principles that the relative local orientation of the STM-tip apex with respect to the HOPG substrate has a considerable effect on the HOPG STM contrast. Importantly for experimental STM analysis of HOPG, the simulations indicate that local tip-rotations maintaining a major contribution of the d3z^2-r^2 tip-apex state to the STM current affect only the secondary features of the HOPG STM contrast resulting in ‘stripe’ formation and leaving the primary contrast unaltered. Conversely, tip-rotations leading to enhanced contributions from m ≠ 0 tip-apex electronic states can cause a triangular-hexagonal change in the primary contrast. We also report a comparison of two STM simulation models with experiments in terms of bias-voltage-dependent STM topography brightness correlations and discuss our findings for the HOPG(0 0 0 1) surface in combination with tungsten tip models of different sharpnesses and terminations.

  1. Complex formation, thermal behavior and stability competition between Cu(II) ion and Cu(0) nanoparticles with some new azo dyes. Antioxidant and in vitro cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Gaber, M; El-Sayed, Y S; El-Baradie, K Y; Fahmy, R M

    2013-04-15

    Four triazole and thiadiazole-based azo chromophores namely [(E)-4-((1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)diazenyl)benzene-1,3-diol.(HL(1)), (E)-4-((5-(methylthio)-1H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)diazenyl)benzene-1,3-diol.(HL(2)), (E)-4-((1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)diazenyl)benzene-1,3-diol.(HL(3)) and (E)-4-((5-mercapto-1,3,4-thiadiazol-2-yl)diazenyl)benzene-1,3-diol.(HL(4))] were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, UV-Vis as well as mass spectroscopy. Cu(II) complexes of the investigated azo dyes have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, electronic and ESR spectra, magnetic susceptibility and thermogravimetric analyses. The bond lengths and bond angles have been calculated to confirm the geometry of the ligands and their Cu(II) complexes. The mode of interaction of the azodyes to copper nanoparticles was described as coordination mode of charged dye molecules on the colloidal Cu(0) surface through anchoring OH(-) group. The apparent association constants of the colloidal copper nanoparticles azodye complexes in solution were evaluated using the spectral method and compared with the formation constant of the Cu(II) azo complexes. The antitumor and antioxidant activities of the synthesized azo dyes and their Cu(II) azo complexes have been evaluated.

  2. Evaluation of the geological relationships to gas hydrate formation and stability. Annual technical progress report, October 1, 1984--September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-12-31

    During the reported year we have enhanced our knowledge on and gained considerable experience in assessment of the gas hydrate resources in the offshore environments. Specifically, we have learned and gained experience in the following: Efficiently locating data sources, including published literature and unpublished information. We have established personal communication extremely critical in data accessability and acquisition. We have updated information pertinent to gas hydrate knowledge, also based on thorough study and evaluation of most Russian literature and additional publications in languages other than English. Besides critical evaluation of widely spread literature, in many cases our reports include previously unpublished information (e.g. BSRs from the Gulf of Mexico). The assessment of the gas resources potential associated with the gas hydrates, although in most cases at a low level of confidence, appears also very encouraging for further, more detailed, study. We are also confident that, because of the present reports` format, new data and a concept-oriented approach, the result of our study will be of strong interest to various industries, research institutions and numerous governmental agencies.

  3. Thermoanalytical and Fourier transform infrared spectral curve-fitting techniques used to investigate the amorphous indomethacin formation and its physical stability in Indomethacin-Soluplus® solid dispersions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Lin, Hong-Liang; Chi, Ying-Ting; Huang, Yu-Ting; Kao, Chi-Yu; Hsieh, Wei-Hsien

    2015-12-30

    The amorphous form of a drug has higher water solubility and faster dissolution rate than its crystalline form. However, the amorphous form is less thermodynamically stable and may recrystallize during manufacturing and storage. Maintaining the amorphous state of drug in a solid dosage form is extremely important to ensure product quality. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively determine the amount of amorphous indomethacin (INDO) formed in the Soluplus® solid dispersions using thermoanalytical and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral curve-fitting techniques. The INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions with various weight ratios of both components were prepared by air-drying and heat-drying processes. A predominate IR peak at 1683cm(-1) for amorphous INDO was selected as a marker for monitoring the solid state of INDO in the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions. The physical stability of amorphous INDO in the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions prepared by both drying processes was also studied under accelerated conditions. A typical endothermic peak at 161°C for γ-form of INDO (γ-INDO) disappeared from all the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) curves of INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions, suggesting the amorphization of INDO caused by Soluplus® after drying. In addition, two unique IR peaks at 1682 (1681) and 1593 (1591)cm(-1) corresponded to the amorphous form of INDO were observed in the FTIR spectra of all the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions. The quantitative amounts of amorphous INDO formed in all the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions were increased with the increase of γ-INDO loaded into the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions by applying curve-fitting technique. However, the intermolecular hydrogen bonding interaction between Soluplus® and INDO were only observed in the samples prepared by heat-drying process, due to a marked spectral shift from 1636 to 1628cm(-1) in the INDO/Soluplus® solid dispersions. The INDO/Soluplus® solid

  4. Ice Formation on Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ritz, L

    1939-01-01

    This report makes use of the results obtained in the Gottingen ice tunnel in which the atmospheric conditions are simulated and the process of ice formation photographed. The effect of ice formation is threefold: 1) added weight to the airplane; 2) a change in the lift and drag forces; 3) a change in the stability characteristics.

  5. Slope stability and stabilization methods

    SciTech Connect

    Abramson, L.W.; Lee, T.S.; Boyce, G.M.; Sharma, S.S.

    1995-12-01

    Slope stability can be a major problem during the construction of surface facilities. Cutting into existing ground disturbs the mechanics of the surrounding area, which can result in landslides and rock falls. This practical reference gives you the comprehensive information you need for slope stability analysis, suitable methods of analysis with and without the use of computers, and examples of common stability problems and stabilization methods for cuts and fills. It includes detailed discussions of methods used in slope stability analysis, including the Ordinary Method of Slices, Simplified Janbu Method, Simplified Bishop Method, Spencer`s Method, other limit equilibrium methods, numerical methods, total stress analysis, effective stress analysis, and the use of computer programs to solve problems. Chapters include: General Slope Stability Concepts; Engineering Geology Principles; Groundwater Conditions; Geologic Site Exploration; Laboratory Testing Interpretation; Slope Stability Concepts; Slope Stabilization Methods; and Design, Construction and Maintenance.

  6. Dyrk1A-mediated phosphorylation of RCAN1 promotes the formation of insoluble RCAN1 aggregates.

    PubMed

    Song, Woo-Joo; Song, Eun-Ah Christine; Choi, Sun-Hee; Baik, Hyung-Hwan; Jin, Byung Kwan; Kim, Jeong Hee; Chung, Sul-Hee

    2013-10-25

    The mechanisms underlying aggregate formation in age-related neurodegenerative diseases remain not well understood. Here we investigated whether dual-specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (Dyrk1A) is involved in the formation of regulator of calcineurin 1 (RCAN1) aggregates. We show that RCAN1 self-associates and forms multimers, and that this process is promoted by the Dyrk1A-mediated phosphorylation of RCAN1 at the Thr(192) residue. Transgenic mice that overexpress the Dyrk1A exhibited lower levels of phospho-Thr(192)-RCAN1 in 10-month-old-group compared to littermate controls, when analyzed with soluble hippocampus lysates. These results suggest that the phosphorylation of RCAN1 by Dyrk1A stimulates the formation of insoluble aggregates upon aging. PMID:24021800

  7. Curcuma oil attenuates accelerated atherosclerosis and macrophage foam-cell formation by modulating genes involved in plaque stability, lipid homeostasis and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vishal; Rana, Minakshi; Jain, Manish; Singh, Niharika; Naqvi, Arshi; Malasoni, Richa; Dwivedi, Anil Kumar; Dikshit, Madhu; Barthwal, Manoj Kumar

    2015-01-14

    In the present study, the anti-atherosclerotic effect and the underlying mechanism of curcuma oil (C. oil), a lipophilic fraction from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.), was evaluated in a hamster model of accelerated atherosclerosis and in THP-1 macrophages. Male golden Syrian hamsters were subjected to partial carotid ligation (PCL) or FeCl3-induced arterial oxidative injury (Ox-injury) after 1 week of treatment with a high-cholesterol (HC) diet or HC diet plus C. oil (100 and 300 mg/kg, orally). Hamsters fed with the HC diet were analysed at 1, 3 and 5 weeks following carotid injury. The HC diet plus C. oil-fed group was analysed at 5 weeks. In hyperlipidaemic hamsters with PCL or Ox-injury, C. oil (300 mg/kg) reduced elevated plasma and aortic lipid levels, arterial macrophage accumulation, and stenosis when compared with those subjected to arterial injury alone. Similarly, elevated mRNA transcripts of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, cluster of differentiation 45 (CD45), TNF-α, interferon-γ (IFN-γ), IL-1β and IL-6 were reduced in atherosclerotic arteries, while those of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and IL-10 were increased after the C. oil treatment (300 mg/kg). The treatment with C. oil prevented HC diet- and oxidised LDL (OxLDL)-induced lipid accumulation, decreased the mRNA expression of CD68 and CD36, and increased the mRNA expression of PPARα, LXRα, ABCA1 and ABCG1 in both hyperlipidaemic hamster-derived peritoneal and THP-1 macrophages. The administration of C. oil suppressed the mRNA expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and IFN-γ and increased the expression of TGF-β in peritoneal macrophages. In THP-1 macrophages, C. oil supplementation prevented OxLDL-induced production of TNF-α and IL-1β and increased the levels of TGF-β. The present study shows that C. oil attenuates arterial injury-induced accelerated atherosclerosis, inflammation and macrophage foam-cell formation.

  8. Hemolytic uremic syndrome-associated Shiga toxins promote endothelial-cell secretion and impair ADAMTS13 cleavage of unusually large von Willebrand factor multimers.

    PubMed

    Nolasco, Leticia H; Turner, Nancy A; Bernardo, Aubrey; Tao, Zhenyin; Cleary, Thomas G; Dong, Jing-Fei; Moake, Joel L

    2005-12-15

    Shiga toxin 1 (Stx-1) and Stx-2 produced by enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli cause the diarrhea-associated hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS). This type of HUS is characterized by obstruction of the glomeruli and renal microvasculature by platelet-fibrin thrombi, acute renal failure, thrombocytopenia, microvascular hemolytic anemia, and plasma levels of von Willebrand factor (VWF)-cleaving protease (ADAMTS13) activity that are within a broad normal range. We investigated the mechanism of initial platelet accumulation on Stx-stimulated endothelial cells. Stx-1 or Stx-2 (1-10 nM) stimulated the rapid secretion of unusually large (UL) VWF multimeric strings from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) or human glomerular microvascular endothelial cells (GMVECs). Perfused normal human platelets immediately adhered to the secreted ULVWF multimeric strings. Nanomolar concentrations (1-10 nM) of the Shiga toxins were as effective in inducing the formation of ULVWF-platelet strings as millimolar concentrations (0.1-20 mM) of histamine. The rate of ULVWF-platelet string cleavage by plasma or recombinant ADAMTS13 was delayed by 3 to 10 minutes (or longer) in the presence of 10 nM Stx-1 or Stx-2 compared with 20 mM histamine. Stx-induced formation of ULVWF strings, and impairment of ULVWF-platelet string cleavage by ADAMTS13, may promote initial platelet adhesion above glomerular endothelial cells. These processes may contribute to the evolution of glomerular occlusion by platelet and fibrin thrombi in diarrhea-associated HUS.

  9. Stability and breakdown of Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3} melt associated with formation of {sup 13}C-diamond in static high pressure experiments up to 43 GPa and 3900 K

    SciTech Connect

    Spivak, A.V.; Litvin, Yu.A.; Ovsyannikov, S.V.; Dubrovinskaia, N.A.; Dubrovinsky, L.S.

    2012-07-15

    Melting of calcium carbonate Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3}, stability of the melt and its decomposition were studied in static high pressure experiments at pressures of 11-43 GPa and temperatures of 1600-3900 K using diamond anvil cell technique with laser heating. We observed formation of {sup 13}C-graphite (below 16 GPa) and {sup 13}C-diamond (between 16 and 43 GPa) on decomposition of the Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3} melt at temperatures above 3400 K. At temperatures below 3400 K congruent melting of calcium carbonate was confirmed. The experimental results were applied to construction of the phase diagram of CaCO{sub 3} up to 43 GPa and 3900 K focusing at the melting curve of calcium carbonate and the decomposition phase boundary of CaCO{sub 3} melt. - Graphical abstract: Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Phase states of CaCO{sub 3} were studied at P=11-43 GPa and T=1600-3900 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {sup 13}C-diamond easily crystallizes in carbonate-carbon (Ca{sup 13}CO{sub 3-}{sup 13}C-graphite) melt-solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ca-carbonate melts congruently that was observed in experiments in DAC with laser heating. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decomposition of CaCO{sub 3} melt, indicated by formation of graphite and/or diamond. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Decomposition of CaCO{sub 3} was observed at temperatures above 3400 K in the pressure interval studied.

  10. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, William A.

    1988-01-01

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material.

  11. The role of the N-terminal tail for the oligomerization, folding and stability of human frataxin☆

    PubMed Central

    Faraj, Santiago E.; Venturutti, Leandro; Roman, Ernesto A.; Marino-Buslje, Cristina B.; Mignone, Astor; Tosatto, Silvio C.E.; Delfino, José M.; Santos, Javier

    2013-01-01

    The N-terminal stretch of human frataxin (hFXN) intermediate (residues 42–80) is not conserved throughout evolution and, under defined experimental conditions, behaves as a random-coil. Overexpression of hFXN56–210 in Escherichia coli yields a multimer, whereas the mature form of hFXN (hFXN81–210) is monomeric. Thus, cumulative experimental evidence points to the N-terminal moiety as an essential element for the assembly of a high molecular weight oligomer. The secondary structure propensity of peptide 56–81, the moiety putatively responsible for promoting protein–protein interactions, was also studied. Depending on the environment (TFE or SDS), this peptide adopts α-helical or β-strand structure. In this context, we explored the conformation and stability of hFXN56–210. The biophysical characterization by fluorescence, CD and SEC-FPLC shows that subunits are well folded, sharing similar stability to hFXN90–210. However, controlled proteolysis indicates that the N-terminal stretch is labile in the context of the multimer, whereas the FXN domain (residues 81–210) remains strongly resistant. In addition, guanidine hydrochloride at low concentration disrupts intermolecular interactions, shifting the ensemble toward the monomeric form. The conformational plasticity of the N-terminal tail might impart on hFXN the ability to act as a recognition signal as well as an oligomerization trigger. Understanding the fine-tuning of these activities and their resulting balance will bear direct relevance for ultimately comprehending hFXN function. PMID:23951553

  12. Process Recovery after CaO Addition Due to Granule Formation in a CSTR Co-Digester—A Tool to Influence the Composition of the Microbial Community and Stabilize the Process?

    PubMed Central

    Liebrich, Marietta; Kleyböcker, Anne; Kasina, Monika; Miethling-Graff, Rona; Kassahun, Andrea; Würdemann, Hilke

    2016-01-01

    The composition, structure and function of granules formed during process recovery with calcium oxide in a laboratory-scale fermenter fed with sewage sludge and rapeseed oil were studied. In the course of over-acidification and successful process recovery, only minor changes were observed in the bacterial community of the digestate, while granules appeared during recovery. Fluorescence microscopic analysis of the granules showed a close spatial relationship between calcium and oil and/or long chain fatty acids. This finding further substantiated the hypothesis that calcium precipitated with carbon of organic origin and reduced the negative effects of overloading with oil. Furthermore, the enrichment of phosphate minerals in the granules was shown, and molecular biological analyses detected polyphosphate-accumulating organisms as well as methanogenic archaea in the core. Organisms related to Methanoculleus receptaculi were detected in the inner zones of a granule, whereas they were present in the digestate only after process recovery. This finding indicated more favorable microhabitats inside the granules that supported process recovery. Thus, the granule formation triggered by calcium oxide addition served as a tool to influence the composition of the microbial community and to stabilize the process after overloading with oil.

  13. Process Recovery after CaO Addition Due to Granule Formation in a CSTR Co-Digester-A Tool to Influence the Composition of the Microbial Community and Stabilize the Process?

    PubMed

    Liebrich, Marietta; Kleyböcker, Anne; Kasina, Monika; Miethling-Graff, Rona; Kassahun, Andrea; Würdemann, Hilke

    2016-03-17

    The composition, structure and function of granules formed during process recovery with calcium oxide in a laboratory-scale fermenter fed with sewage sludge and rapeseed oil were studied. In the course of over-acidification and successful process recovery, only minor changes were observed in the bacterial community of the digestate, while granules appeared during recovery. Fluorescence microscopic analysis of the granules showed a close spatial relationship between calcium and oil and/or long chain fatty acids. This finding further substantiated the hypothesis that calcium precipitated with carbon of organic origin and reduced the negative effects of overloading with oil. Furthermore, the enrichment of phosphate minerals in the granules was shown, and molecular biological analyses detected polyphosphate-accumulating organisms as well as methanogenic archaea in the core. Organisms related to Methanoculleus receptaculi were detected in the inner zones of a granule, whereas they were present in the digestate only after process recovery. This finding indicated more favorable microhabitats inside the granules that supported process recovery. Thus, the granule formation triggered by calcium oxide addition served as a tool to influence the composition of the microbial community and to stabilize the process after overloading with oil.

  14. Process Recovery after CaO Addition Due to Granule Formation in a CSTR Co-Digester-A Tool to Influence the Composition of the Microbial Community and Stabilize the Process?

    PubMed

    Liebrich, Marietta; Kleyböcker, Anne; Kasina, Monika; Miethling-Graff, Rona; Kassahun, Andrea; Würdemann, Hilke

    2016-01-01

    The composition, structure and function of granules formed during process recovery with calcium oxide in a laboratory-scale fermenter fed with sewage sludge and rapeseed oil were studied. In the course of over-acidification and successful process recovery, only minor changes were observed in the bacterial community of the digestate, while granules appeared during recovery. Fluorescence microscopic analysis of the granules showed a close spatial relationship between calcium and oil and/or long chain fatty acids. This finding further substantiated the hypothesis that calcium precipitated with carbon of organic origin and reduced the negative effects of overloading with oil. Furthermore, the enrichment of phosphate minerals in the granules was shown, and molecular biological analyses detected polyphosphate-accumulating organisms as well as methanogenic archaea in the core. Organisms related to Methanoculleus receptaculi were detected in the inner zones of a granule, whereas they were present in the digestate only after process recovery. This finding indicated more favorable microhabitats inside the granules that supported process recovery. Thus, the granule formation triggered by calcium oxide addition served as a tool to influence the composition of the microbial community and to stabilize the process after overloading with oil. PMID:27681911

  15. Process Recovery after CaO Addition Due to Granule Formation in a CSTR Co-Digester—A Tool to Influence the Composition of the Microbial Community and Stabilize the Process?

    PubMed Central

    Liebrich, Marietta; Kleyböcker, Anne; Kasina, Monika; Miethling-Graff, Rona; Kassahun, Andrea; Würdemann, Hilke

    2016-01-01

    The composition, structure and function of granules formed during process recovery with calcium oxide in a laboratory-scale fermenter fed with sewage sludge and rapeseed oil were studied. In the course of over-acidification and successful process recovery, only minor changes were observed in the bacterial community of the digestate, while granules appeared during recovery. Fluorescence microscopic analysis of the granules showed a close spatial relationship between calcium and oil and/or long chain fatty acids. This finding further substantiated the hypothesis that calcium precipitated with carbon of organic origin and reduced the negative effects of overloading with oil. Furthermore, the enrichment of phosphate minerals in the granules was shown, and molecular biological analyses detected polyphosphate-accumulating organisms as well as methanogenic archaea in the core. Organisms related to Methanoculleus receptaculi were detected in the inner zones of a granule, whereas they were present in the digestate only after process recovery. This finding indicated more favorable microhabitats inside the granules that supported process recovery. Thus, the granule formation triggered by calcium oxide addition served as a tool to influence the composition of the microbial community and to stabilize the process after overloading with oil. PMID:27681911

  16. Competing stability modes in vortex structure formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, Stephen; Gostelow, J. Paul; Rona, Aldo; McMullan, W. Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Nose cones and turbine blades have rotating components and represent very practical geometries for which the behavior of vortex structures is not completely understood. These two different physical cases demonstrate a common theme of competition between mode and vortex types. The literature concerning boundary-layer transition over rotating cones presents clear evidence of an alternative instability mode leading to counter-rotating vortex pairs, consistent with a centrifugal instability. This is in contrast to co-rotating vortices present over rotating disks that arise from crossflow effects. It is demonstrated analytically that this mode competes with the crossflow mode and is dominant only over slender cones. Predictions are aligned with experimental measurements over slender cones. Concurrent experimental work on the flow over swept cylinders shows that organized fine-scale streamwise vorticity occurs more frequently on convex surfaces than is appreciated. The conventional view of purely two-dimensional laminar boundary layers following blunt leading edges is not realistic and such boundary layers need to be treated three-dimensionally, particularly when sweep is present. The vortical structures are counter-rotating for normal cylinders and co-rotating under high sweep conditions. Crossflow instabilities may have a major role to play in the transition process but the streamline curvature mode is still present, and seemingly unchanged, when the boundary layer becomes turbulent.

  17. Composition Effects on Phase Formation and Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelton, Kenneth F.

    1999-01-01

    In this report, results from experimental studies of the composition dependence of nucleation are presented. A model for nucleation that takes simultaneous account of the interfacial attachment processes at the growing cluster interface and diffusion into the region surrounding the developing cluster is presented and numerical results are discussed.

  18. Formation and Stability of "Hot Earth" Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raymond, Sean

    2007-05-01

    Close-in planets with masses less than one Neptune mass have been detected around roughly ten stars to date. In addition to these so-called "Hot Neptunes" or "Hot Super-Earths", upcoming missions such as CoRot and Kepler expect to find a large number of smaller, close-in "Hot Earths". Most disk models do not contain a large amount of mass in their innermost regions. So, how do Hot Earths form? There are several candidate mechanisms: 1) A "type 2" migrating giant planet can shepherd material interior to strong mean motion resonances. More than half of the solid component of the disk inside the giant planet's starting orbit can be displaced to the region interior to the giant planet's final orbit. So, many close-in giant planets may be accompanied by "hot Earths"; 2) Terrestrial cores, interacting tidally with the gaseous disk, can "type 1" migrate into the very inner disk. Interactions between cores may result in near-resonant configurations; and 3) In a system with two or more giant planets with non-zero eccentricities, dispersal of the gaseous disk can cause secular resonances to sweep through the system, and can moderately enhance the amount of material in the inner regions. Each of these mechanisms makes predictions that should be testable in the near future. References: Fogg & Nelson (2005, 2007), Zhou et al (2005), Raymond, Mandell & Sigurdsson (2006), Mandell, Raymond & Sigurdsson (2007), Terquem & Papaloizou (2007)

  19. Stability and Formation of Isobutylene Dimers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsmith, Robert H.

    1983-01-01

    Isobutylene is an important bulk chemical for the petroleum industry. Dimerization and hydrogenation reactions produce the standard fuel octane rating comparison. This classic chemistry is often misrepresented in modern texts, however, and this paper attempts to correlate the physical organic principles that apply. (Author)

  20. The formation and stability of Petschek reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Baty, H.; Forbes, T. G.; Priest, E. R.

    2014-11-15

    A combined analytical and numerical study of magnetic reconnection in two-dimensional resistive magnetohydrodynamics is carried out by using different explicit spatial variations of the resistivity. A special emphasis on the existence of stable/unstable Petschek's solutions is taken, comparing with the recent analytical model given by Forbes et al. [Phys. Plasmas 20, 052902 (2013)]. Our results show good quantitative agreement between the analytical theory and the numerical solutions for a Petschek-type solution to within an accuracy of about 10% or better. Our simulations also show that if the resistivity profile is relatively flat near the X-point, one of two possible asymmetric solutions will occur. Which solution occurs depends on small random perturbations of the initial conditions. The existence of two possible asymmetric solutions, in a system which is otherwise symmetric, constitutes an example of spontaneous symmetry breaking.

  1. Automatic stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, FR

    1936-01-01

    This report concerns the study of automatic stabilizers and extends it to include the control of the three-control system of the airplane instead of just altitude control. Some of the topics discussed include lateral disturbed motion, static stability, the mathematical theory of lateral motion, and large angles of incidence. Various mechanisms and stabilizers are also discussed. The feeding of Diesel engines by injection pumps actuated by engine compression, achieves the required high speeds of injection readily and permits rigorous control of the combustible charge introduced into each cylinder and of the peak pressure in the resultant cycle.

  2. Membrane stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Mingenbach, W.A.

    1988-02-09

    A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

  3. Orbit Stabilization of Nanosat

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON,DAVID J.

    1999-12-01

    An algorithm is developed to control a pulsed {Delta}V thruster on a small satellite to allow it to fly in formation with a host satellite undergoing time dependent atmospheric drag deceleration. The algorithm uses four short thrusts per orbit to correct for differences in the average radii of the satellites due to differences in drag and one thrust to symmetrize the orbits. The radial difference between the orbits is the only input to the algorithm. The algorithm automatically stabilizes the orbits after ejection and includes provisions to allow azimuthal positional changes by modifying the drag compensation pulses. The algorithm gives radial and azimuthal deadbands of 50 cm and 3 m for a radial measurement accuracy of {+-} 5 cm and {+-} 60% period variation in the drag coefficient of the host. Approaches to further reduce the deadbands are described. The methodology of establishing a stable orbit after ejection is illustrated in an appendix. The results show the optimum ejection angle to minimize stabilization thrust is upward at 86{sup o} from the orbital velocity. At this angle the stabilization velocity that must be supplied by the thruster is half the ejection velocity. An ejection velocity of 0.02 m/sat 86{sup o} gives an azimuthal separation after ejection and orbit stabilization of 187 m. A description of liquid based gas thrusters suitable for the satellite control is included in an appendix.

  4. Reversible dimer formation and stability of the anti-tumour single-chain Fv antibody MFE-23 by neutron scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, and NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yie Chia; Boehm, Mark K; Chester, Kerry A; Begent, Richard H J; Perkins, Stephen J

    2002-06-28

    MFE-23 is a single chain Fv (scFv) antibody molecule used to target colorectal cancer through its high affinity for the tumour marker carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). ScFv molecules are formed from peptide-linked antibody V(H) and V(L) domains, and many of these form dimers. Our recent crystal structure for MFE-23 showed that this formed an unusual symmetric back-to-back association of two monomers that is consistent with a domain-swapped diabody structure. Neutron scattering and modelling fits showed that MFE-23 existed as compact V(H)-V(L)-linked monomers at therapeutically relevant concentrations below 1 mg/ml. Size-exclusion gel chromatography showed that the monomeric and dimeric forms of MFE-23 could be separated, and that the proportions of these two forms depended on the starting MFE-23 concentration. Sedimentation equilibrium experiments by analytical ultracentrifugation at nine concentrations of MFE-23 indicated a reversible monomer-dimer self-association equilibrium with an association constant of 1.9x10(3)-2.2x10(3) M(-1). Sedimentation velocity experiments using the time derivative g(s(*)) method showed that MFE-23-His has a concentration-dependent weight average sedimentation coefficient that increased from 1.8 S for the monomer to about 3-6 S for the dimer. Both values agreed with those calculated from the MFE-23 crystal structure. In relation to the thermal stability of MFE-23, denaturation experiments by (1)H NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy showed that the molecule is stable up to 47 degrees C, after which denaturation was irreversible. MFE-23 dimerisation is discussed in terms of a new model for diabody structures, in which the V(H) and V(L) domains in the monomer are able to dissociate and reassociate to form a dimer, or diabody, but in which symmetric back-to-back contacts between the two monomers are formed. This dimerisation in solution is attributed to the complementary nature of the C-terminal surface of the MFE-23 monomer. Crystal structures for

  5. STABILIZED OSCILLATOR

    DOEpatents

    Jessen, P.L.; Price, H.J.

    1958-03-18

    This patent relates to sine-wave generators and in particular describes a generator with a novel feedback circuit resulting in improved frequency stability. The generator comprises two triodes having a common cathode circuit connected to oscillate at a frequency and amplitude at which the loop galn of the circutt ls unity, and another pair of triodes having a common cathode circuit arranged as a conventional amplifier. A signal is conducted from the osciliator through a frequency selective network to the amplifier and fed back to the osciliator. The unique feature of the feedback circuit is the amplifier operates in the nonlinear portion of its tube characteristics thereby providing a relatively constant feedback voltage to the oscillator irrespective of the amplitude of its input signal.

  6. Stabilizing brokerage

    PubMed Central

    Stovel, Katherine; Golub, Benjamin; Milgrom, Eva M. Meyersson

    2011-01-01

    A variety of social and economic arrangements exist to facilitate the exchange of goods, services, and information over gaps in social structure. Each of these arrangements bears some relationship to the idea of brokerage, but this brokerage is rarely like the pure and formal economic intermediation seen in some modern markets. Indeed, for reasons illuminated by existing sociological and economic models, brokerage is a fragile relationship. In this paper, we review the causes of instability in brokerage and identify three social mechanisms that can stabilize fragile brokerage relationships: social isolation, broker capture, and organizational grafting. Each of these mechanisms rests on the emergence or existence of supporting institutions. We suggest that organizational grafting may be the most stable and effective resolution to the tensions inherent in brokerage, but it is also the most institutionally demanding. PMID:22198763

  7. Stabilizing brokerage.

    PubMed

    Stovel, Katherine; Golub, Benjamin; Milgrom, Eva M Meyersson

    2011-12-27

    A variety of social and economic arrangements exist to facilitate the exchange of goods, services, and information over gaps in social structure. Each of these arrangements bears some relationship to the idea of brokerage, but this brokerage is rarely like the pure and formal economic intermediation seen in some modern markets. Indeed, for reasons illuminated by existing sociological and economic models, brokerage is a fragile relationship. In this paper, we review the causes of instability in brokerage and identify three social mechanisms that can stabilize fragile brokerage relationships: social isolation, broker capture, and organizational grafting. Each of these mechanisms rests on the emergence or existence of supporting institutions. We suggest that organizational grafting may be the most stable and effective resolution to the tensions inherent in brokerage, but it is also the most institutionally demanding.

  8. HEMC: A sensitive aggregate stability method for soil quality evaluation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil aggregate stability is an important soil quality index, representing mainly soil structural stability and affecting, among others, hydraulic conductivity, seal formation, runoff, water and wind erosion. The most common method of assessing aggregate stability is wet sieving where aggregate stabi...

  9. Composite stabilizer unit

    DOEpatents

    Ebaugh, Larry R.; Sadler, Collin P.; Carter, Gary D.

    1992-01-01

    An improved fin stabilized projectile including multiple stabilizer fins upon a stabilizer unit situated at the aft end of the projectile is provided, the improvement wherein the stabilizer fins are joined into the stabillizer unit by an injection molded engineering grade polymer.

  10. GRAVITATIONAL FRAGMENTATION IN GALAXY MERGERS: A STABILITY CRITERION

    SciTech Connect

    Escala, Andres; Becerra, Fernando; Del Valle, Luciano; Castillo, Esteban

    2013-01-20

    We study the gravitational stability of gaseous streams in the complex environment of a galaxy merger, because mergers are known to be places of ongoing massive cluster formation and bursts of star formation. We find an analytic stability parameter for the case of gaseous streams orbiting around the merger remnant. We test our stability criterion using hydrodynamic simulations of galaxy mergers and obtain satisfactory results. We find that our criterion successfully predicts the streams that will be gravitationally unstable to fragmentation into clumps.

  11. Conditions for equilibrium solid-stabilized emulsions.

    PubMed

    Kraft, Daniela J; de Folter, Julius W J; Luigjes, Bob; Castillo, Sonja I R; Sacanna, Stefano; Philipse, Albert P; Kegel, Willem K

    2010-08-19

    Particular types of solid-stabilized emulsions can be thermodynamically stable as evidenced by their spontaneous formation and monodisperse droplet size, which only depends on system parameters. Here, we investigate the generality of these equilibrium solid-stabilized emulsions with respect to the basic constituents: aqueous phase with ions, oil, and stabilizing particles. From systematic variations of these constituents, we identify general conditions for the spontaneous formation of monodisperse solid-stabilized emulsions droplets. We conclude that emulsion stability is achieved by a combination of solid particles as well as amphiphilic ions adsorbed at the droplet surface, and low interfacial tensions of the bare oil-water interface of order 10 mN/m or below. Furthermore, preferential wetting of the colloidal particles by the oil phase is necessary for thermodynamic stability. We demonstrate the sufficiency of these basic requirements by extending the observed thermodynamic stability to emulsions of different compositions. Our findings point to a new class of colloid-stabilized meso-emulsions with a potentially high impact on industrial emulsification processes due to the associated large energy savings. PMID:20701369

  12. Current trends to measure implant stability.

    PubMed

    Swami, Vasanthi; Vijayaraghavan, Vasantha; Swami, Vinit

    2016-01-01

    Implant stability plays a critical role for successful osseointegration. Successful osseointegration is a prerequisite for functional dental implants. Continuous monitoring in an objective and qualitative manner is important to determine the status of implant stability. Implant stability is measured at two different stages: Primary and secondary. Primary stability comes from mechanical engagement with cortical bone. Secondary stability is developed from regeneration and remodeling of the bone and tissue around the implant after insertion and affected by the primary stability, bone formation and remodelling. The time of functional loading is dependent upon the implant stability. Historically the gold standard method to evaluate stability were microscopic or histologic analysis, radiographs, however due to invasiveness of these methods and related ethical issues various other methods have been proposed like cutting torque resistance, reverse torque analysis, model analysis etc. It is, therefore, of an utmost importance to be able to access implant stability at various time points and to project a long term prognosis for successful therapy. Therefore this review focuses on the currently available methods for evaluation of implant stability.

  13. Plutonium inventories for stabilization and stabilized materials

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, A.K.

    1996-05-01

    The objective of the breakout session was to identify characteristics of materials containing plutonium, the need to stabilize these materials for storage, and plans to accomplish the stabilization activities. All current stabilization activities are driven by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 94-1 (May 26, 1994) and by the recently completed Plutonium ES&H Vulnerability Assessment (DOE-EH-0415). The Implementation Plan for accomplishing stabilization of plutonium-bearing residues in response to the Recommendation and the Assessment was published by DOE on February 28, 1995. This Implementation Plan (IP) commits to stabilizing problem materials within 3 years, and stabilizing all other materials within 8 years. The IP identifies approximately 20 metric tons of plutonium requiring stabilization and/or repackaging. A further breakdown shows this material to consist of 8.5 metric tons of plutonium metal and alloys, 5.5 metric tons of plutonium as oxide, and 6 metric tons of plutonium as residues. Stabilization of the metal and oxide categories containing greater than 50 weight percent plutonium is covered by DOE Standard {open_quotes}Criteria for Safe Storage of Plutonium Metals and Oxides{close_quotes} December, 1994 (DOE-STD-3013-94). This standard establishes criteria for safe storage of stabilized plutonium metals and oxides for up to 50 years. Each of the DOE sites and contractors with large plutonium inventories has either started or is preparing to start stabilization activities to meet these criteria.

  14. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation at the Salut Underground Nuclear Test in U20ak, Nevada National Security Site, and the Impact of Stability of the Ground Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Pawloski, G A

    2012-04-25

    At the request of Jerry Sweeney, the LLNL Containment Program performed a review of nuclear test-related data for the Salut underground nuclear test in U20ak to assist in evaluating this legacy site as a test bed for application technologies for use in On-Site Inspections (OSI) under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Review of the Salut site is complicated because the test experienced a subsurface, rather than surface, collapse. Of particular interest is the stability of the ground surface above the Salut detonation point. Proposed methods for on-site verification include radiological signatures, artifacts from nuclear testing activities, and imaging to identify alteration to the subsurface hydrogeologogy due to the nuclear detonation. Sweeney's proposal requires physical access at or near the ground surface of specific underground nuclear test locations at the Nevada Nuclear Test Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site), and focuses on possible activities such as visual observation, multispectral measurements, and shallow, and deep geophysical surveys.

  15. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation at the Norbo Underground Nuclear Test in U8c, Nevada Nuclear Security Site, and the Impact on Stability of the Ground Surface

    SciTech Connect

    Pawloski, G A

    2012-06-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Containment Program performed a review of nuclear test-related data for the Norbo underground nuclear test in U8c to assist in evaluating this legacy site as a test bed for application technologies for use in On-Site Inspections (OSI) under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. This request is similar to one made for the Salut site in U8c (Pawloski, 2012b). Review of the Norbo site is complicated because the test first exhibited subsurface collapse, which was not unusual, but it then collapsed to the surface over one year later, which was unusual. Of particular interest is the stability of the ground surface above the Norbo detonation point. Proposed methods for on-site verification include radiological signatures, artifacts from nuclear testing activities, and imaging to identify alteration to the subsurface hydrogeology due to the nuclear detonation. Aviva Sussman from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has also proposed work at this site. Both proposals require physical access at or near the ground surface of specific underground nuclear test locations at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and focus on possible activities such as visual observation, multispectral measurements, and shallow and deep geophysical surveys.

  16. Geological evolution and analysis of confirmed or suspected gas hydrate localities: Volume 10, Basin analysis, formation and stability of gas hydrates of the Aleutian Trench and the Bering Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Krason, J.; Ciesnik, M.

    1987-01-01

    Four major areas with inferred gas hydrates are the subject of this study. Two of these areas, the Navarin and the Norton Basins, are located within the Bering Sea shelf, whereas the remaining areas of the Atka Basin in the central Aleutian Trench system and the eastern Aleutian Trench represent a huge region of the Aleutian Trench-Arc system. All four areas are geologically diverse and complex. Particularly the structural features of the accretionary wedge north of the Aleutian Trench still remain the subjects of scientific debates. Prior to this study, suggested presence of the gas hydrates in the four areas was based on seismic evidence, i.e., presence of bottom simulating reflectors (BSRs). Although the disclosure of the BSRs is often difficult, particularly under the structural conditions of the Navarin and Norton basins, it can be concluded that the identified BSRs are mostly represented by relatively weak and discontinuous reflectors. Under thermal and pressure conditions favorable for gas hydrate formation, the relative scarcity of the BSRs can be attributed to insufficient gas supply to the potential gas hydrate zone. Hydrocarbon gas in sediment may have biogenic, thermogenic or mixed origin. In the four studied areas, basin analysis revealed limited biogenic hydrocarbon generation. The migration of the thermogenically derived gases is probably diminished considerably due to the widespread diagenetic processes in diatomaceous strata. The latter processes resulted in the formation of the diagenetic horizons. The identified gas hydrate-related BSRs seem to be located in the areas of increased biogenic methanogenesis and faults acting as the pathways for thermogenic hydrocarbons.

  17. Ultrahigh stability of atomically thin metallic glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, C. R.; Huang, K. Q.; Zhao, N. J.; Sun, Y. T.; Bai, H. Y.; Gu, L. E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn Zheng, D. N. E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn Wang, W. H. E-mail: dzheng@iphy.ac.cn

    2014-07-07

    We report the fabrication and study of thermal stability of atomically thin ZrCu-based metallic glass films. The ultrathin films exhibit striking dynamic properties, ultrahigh thermal stability, and unique crystallization behavior with discrete crystalline nanoparticles sizes. The mechanisms for the remarkable high stability and crystallization behaviors are attributed to the dewetting process of the ultrathin film. We demonstrated a promising avenue for understanding some fundamental issues such as glassy structure, crystallization, deformation, and glass formation through atomic resolution imaging of the two dimensional like metallic glasses.

  18. Mechanisms of meat batter stabilization: a review.

    PubMed

    Gordon, A; Barbut, S

    1992-01-01

    Comminuted meat products are a complex mixture of muscle tissue, solubilized proteins, fat, salt, and water. The two theories that have been presented to explain meat batters stabilization are reviewed. The emulsion theory explains stabilization by the formation of a protein film around fat globules, whereas the physical entrapment theory emphasizes the role of the protein matrix in holding the fat in place during chopping and subsequent heating. However, some aspects of stabilization cannot be explained adequately by either one of these theories. In this article the role of meat proteins, aqueous phase, and lipid phase are examined in light of past and recent research findings.

  19. Selective Stabilization of Ribose by Borate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Horiuchi, Mana; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2013-10-01

    In this study, borate was found to selectively increase the stability of ribose over other aldopentoses. Ribose is the only sugar present in both early RNA-based biochemistry and contemporary DNA-based life, and the stability of ribose is of fundamental concern for determining the origin of early RNA-based biochemistry. The formose reaction is a potential process in the prebiotic synthesis of ribose and its stereoisomers arabinose, xylose, and lyxose. Ribose is the least stable of these aldopentoses, raising the fundamental question of whether it was originally a component of primitive RNA or was selected through biotic processes. Borate is known to increase the stability of aldopentoses, but the specific differences in the stabilization achieved among different stereoisomers remain unclear. In this study, it was found that the stabilities of all of the tested pentoses increased with the concentration of added borate, but notably, the stability of ribose increased the most. The predominant formation of complexes between borate and ribose was verified, in agreement with previous studies. This borate complex formation might have sequestered ribose from the isomerization and decomposition reactions, resulting in its selective stabilization. These findings indicate that ribose could have accumulated in borate-rich environments on the early Earth and suggest that ribose-based nucleotides combined with phosphate and nucleobases formed abiotically.

  20. Comet formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blum, J.

    2014-07-01

    There has been vast progress in our understanding of planetesimal formation over the past decades, owing to a number of laboratory experiments as well as to refined models of dust and ice agglomeration in protoplanetary disks. Coagulation rapidly forms cm-sized ''pebbles'' by direct sticking in collisions at low velocities (Güttler et al. 2010; Zsom et al. 2010). For the further growth, two model approaches are currently being discussed: (1) Local concentration of pebbles in nebular instabilities until gravitational instability occurs (Johansen et al. 2007). (2) A competition between fragmentation and mass transfer in collisions among the dusty bodies, in which a few ''lucky winners'' make it to planetesimal sizes (Windmark et al. 2012a,b; Garaud et al. 2013). Predictions of the physical properties of the resulting bodies in both models allow a distinction of the two formation scenarios of planetesimals. In particular, the tensile strength (i.e, the inner cohesion) of the planetesimals differ widely between the two models (Skorov & Blum 2012; Blum et al. 2014). While model (1) predicts tensile strengths on the order of ˜ 1 Pa, model (2) results in rather compactified dusty bodies with tensile strengths in the kPa regime. If comets are km-sized survivors of the planetesimal-formation era, they should in principle hold the secret of their formation process. Water ice is the prime volatile responsible for the activity of comets. Thermophysical models of the heat and mass transport close to the comet-nucleus surface predict water-ice sublimation temperatures that relate to maximum sublimation pressures well below the kPa regime predicted for formation scenario (2). Model (1), however, is in agreement with the observed dust and gas activity of comets. Thus, a formation scenario for cometesimals involving gravitational instability is favored (Blum et al. 2014).

  1. Wüstite stability in the presence of a CO2-fluid and a carbonate-silicate melt: Implications for the graphite/diamond formation and generation of Fe-rich mantle metasomatic agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bataleva, Yuliya V.; Palyanov, Yuri N.; Sokol, Alexander G.; Borzdov, Yuri M.; Bayukov, Oleg A.

    2016-02-01

    Experimental simulation of the interaction of wüstite with a CO2-rich fluid and a carbonate-silicate melt was performed using a multianvil high-pressure split-sphere apparatus in the FeO-MgO-CaO-SiO2-Al2O3-CO2 system at a pressure of 6.3 GPa and temperatures in the range of 1150 °C-1650 °C and with run time of 20 h. At relatively low temperatures, decarbonation reactions occur in the system to form iron-rich garnet (Alm75Prp17Grs8), magnesiowüstite (Mg# ≤ 0.13), and CO2-rich fluid. Under these conditions, magnesiowüstite was found to be capable of partial reducing CO2 to C0 that leads to the formation of Fe3+-bearing magnesiowüstite, crystallization of magnetite and metastable graphite, and initial growth of diamond seeds. At T ≥ 1450 °C, an iron-rich carbonate-silicate melt (FeO ~ 56 wt.%, SiO2 ~ 12 wt.%) forms in the system. Interaction between (Fe,Mg)O, SiO2, fluid and melt leads to oxidation of magnesiowüstite and crystallization of fayalite-magnetite spinel solid solution (1450 °C) as well as to complete dissolution of magnesiowüstite in the carbonate-silicate melt (1550 °C-1650 °C). In the presence of both carbonate-silicate melt and CO2-rich fluid, dissolution (oxidation) of diamond and metastable graphite was found to occur. The study results demonstrate that under pressures of the lithospheric mantle in the presence of a CO2-rich fluid, wüstite/magnesiowüstite is stable only at relatively low temperatures when it is in the absolute excess relative to CO2-rich fluid. In this case, the redox reactions, which produce metastable graphite and diamond with concomitant partial oxidation of wüstite to magnetite, occur. Wüstite is unstable under high concentrations of a CO2-rich fluid as well as in the presence of a carbonate-silicate melt: it is either completely oxidized or dissolves in the melt or fluid phase, leading to the formation of Fe2 +- and Fe3 +-enriched carbonate-silicate melts, which are potential metasomatic agents in the

  2. Formation and stability of the enolates of N-protonated proline methyl ester and proline zwitterion in aqueous solution: a nonenzymatic model for the first step in the racemization of proline catalyzed by proline racemase.

    PubMed

    Williams, Glenn; Maziarz, E Peter; Amyes, Tina L; Wood, Troy D; Richard, John P

    2003-07-15

    Rate constants for the hydrolysis of L-proline methyl ester to form proline and methanol in D(2)O buffered at neutral pD and 25 degrees C and the deuterium enrichment of the proline product determined by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry are reported. The data give k(DO) = 5.3 +/- 0.5 M(-1) s(-1) as the second-order rate constant for carbon deprotonation of N-protonated proline methyl ester by deuterioxide ion in D(2)O at 25 degrees C and I = 1.0 (KCl). The data provide good estimates of carbon acidities of pK(a) = 21 for N-protonated proline methyl ester and pK(a) = 29 for proline zwitterion in water and of the second-order rate constant k(HO) = 4.5 x 10(-5) M(-1) s(-1) for carbon deprotonation of proline zwitterion by hydroxide ion at 25 degrees C. There is no detectable acceleration of the deprotonation of N-protonated proline methyl ester by the Brønsted base 3-quinuclidinone in water, and it is not clear that such Brønsted catalysis would make a significant contribution to the rate acceleration for deprotonation of bound proline at proline racemase. A comparison of the first-order rate constants k(HO)[HO(-)] = 4.5 x 10(-11) s(-1) for deprotonation of free proline zwitterion in water at pH 8 and k(cat) = 2600 s(-1) for deprotonation of proline bound to the active site of proline racemase at pH 8 shows that the enzymatic rate acceleration for proline racemase is ca. 10(13)-fold. This corresponds to a 19 kcal/mol stabilization of the transition state for deprotonation of the enzyme-bound carbon acid substrate by interaction with the protein catalyst. It is suggested that (1) much of the rate acceleration of the enzymatic over the nonenzymatic reaction in water may result from transfer of the substrate proline zwitterion from the polar solvent water to a nonpolar enzyme active site and (2) the use of thiol anions rather than oxygen anions as Brønsted bases at this putative nonpolar enzyme active site may be favored, because of the smaller energetic

  3. Planet Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klahr, Hubert; Brandner, Wolfgang

    2011-02-01

    1. Historical notes on planet formation Bodenheimer; 2. The formation and evolution of planetary systems Bouwman et al.; 3. Destruction of protoplanetary disks by photoevaporation Richling, Hollenbach and Yorke; 4. Turbulence in protoplanetary accretion disks Klahr, Rozyczka, Dziourkevitch, Wunsch and Johansen; 5. The origin of solids in the early solar system Trieloff and Palme; 6. Experiments on planetesimal formation Wurm and Blum; 7. Dust coagulation in protoplanetary disks Henning, Dullemond, Wolf and Dominik; 8. The accretion of giant planet cores Thommes and Duncan; 9. Planetary transits: direct vision of extrasolar planets Lecavelier des Etangs and Vidal-Madjar; 10. The core accretion - gas capture model Hubickyj; 11. Properties of exoplanets Marcy, Fischer, Butler and Vogt; 12. Giant planet formation: theories meet observations Boss; 13. From hot Jupiters to hot Neptures … and below Lovis, Mayor and Udry; 14. Disk-planet interaction and migration Masset and Kley; 15. The Brown Dwarf - planet relation Bate; 16. From astronomy to astrobiology Brandner; 17. Overview and prospective Lin.

  4. KTKEGV repeat motifs are key mediators of normal α-synuclein tetramerization: Their mutation causes excess monomers and neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dettmer, Ulf; Newman, Andrew J.; von Saucken, Victoria E.; Bartels, Tim; Selkoe, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    α-Synuclein (αS) is a highly abundant neuronal protein that aggregates into β-sheet–rich inclusions in Parkinson’s disease (PD). αS was long thought to occur as a natively unfolded monomer, but recent work suggests it also occurs normally in α-helix–rich tetramers and related multimers. To elucidate the fundamental relationship between αS multimers and monomers in living neurons, we performed systematic mutagenesis to abolish self-interactions and learn which structural determinants underlie native multimerization. Unexpectedly, tetramers/multimers still formed in cells expressing each of 14 sequential 10-residue deletions across the 140-residue polypeptide. We postulated compensatory effects among the six highly conserved and one to three additional αS repeat motifs (consensus: KTKEGV), consistent with αS and its homologs β- and γ-synuclein all forming tetramers while sharing only the repeats. Upon inserting in-register missense mutations into six or more αS repeats, certain mutations abolished tetramer formation, shown by intact-cell cross-linking and independently by fluorescent-protein complementation. For example, altered repeat motifs KLKEGV, KTKKGV, KTKEIV, or KTKEGW did not support tetramerization, indicating the importance of charged or small residues. When we expressed numerous different in-register repeat mutants in human neural cells, all multimer-abolishing but no multimer-neutral mutants caused frank neurotoxicity akin to the proapoptotic protein Bax. The multimer-abolishing variants became enriched in buffer-insoluble cell fractions and formed round cytoplasmic inclusions in primary cortical neurons. We conclude that the αS repeat motifs mediate physiological tetramerization, and perturbing them causes PD-like neurotoxicity. Moreover, the mutants we describe are valuable tools for studying normal and pathological properties of αS and screening for tetramer-stabilizing therapeutics. PMID:26153422

  5. Stabilizing multicellularity through ratcheting.

    PubMed

    Libby, Eric; Conlin, Peter L; Kerr, Ben; Ratcliff, William C

    2016-08-19

    The evolutionary transition to multicellularity probably began with the formation of simple undifferentiated cellular groups. Such groups evolve readily in diverse lineages of extant unicellular taxa, suggesting that there are few genetic barriers to this first key step. This may act as a double-edged sword: labile transitions between unicellular and multicellular states may facilitate the evolution of simple multicellularity, but reversion to a unicellular state may inhibit the evolution of increased complexity. In this paper, we examine how multicellular adaptations can act as evolutionary 'ratchets', limiting the potential for reversion to unicellularity. We consider a nascent multicellular lineage growing in an environment that varies between favouring multicellularity and favouring unicellularity. The first type of ratcheting mutations increase cell-level fitness in a multicellular context but are costly in a single-celled context, reducing the fitness of revertants. The second type of ratcheting mutations directly decrease the probability that a mutation will result in reversion (either as a pleiotropic consequence or via direct modification of switch rates). We show that both types of ratcheting mutations act to stabilize the multicellular state. We also identify synergistic effects between the two types of ratcheting mutations in which the presence of one creates the selective conditions favouring the other. Ratcheting mutations may play a key role in diverse evolutionary transitions in individuality, sustaining selection on the new higher-level organism by constraining evolutionary reversion.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'. PMID:27431522

  6. Stabilizing multicellularity through ratcheting.

    PubMed

    Libby, Eric; Conlin, Peter L; Kerr, Ben; Ratcliff, William C

    2016-08-19

    The evolutionary transition to multicellularity probably began with the formation of simple undifferentiated cellular groups. Such groups evolve readily in diverse lineages of extant unicellular taxa, suggesting that there are few genetic barriers to this first key step. This may act as a double-edged sword: labile transitions between unicellular and multicellular states may facilitate the evolution of simple multicellularity, but reversion to a unicellular state may inhibit the evolution of increased complexity. In this paper, we examine how multicellular adaptations can act as evolutionary 'ratchets', limiting the potential for reversion to unicellularity. We consider a nascent multicellular lineage growing in an environment that varies between favouring multicellularity and favouring unicellularity. The first type of ratcheting mutations increase cell-level fitness in a multicellular context but are costly in a single-celled context, reducing the fitness of revertants. The second type of ratcheting mutations directly decrease the probability that a mutation will result in reversion (either as a pleiotropic consequence or via direct modification of switch rates). We show that both types of ratcheting mutations act to stabilize the multicellular state. We also identify synergistic effects between the two types of ratcheting mutations in which the presence of one creates the selective conditions favouring the other. Ratcheting mutations may play a key role in diverse evolutionary transitions in individuality, sustaining selection on the new higher-level organism by constraining evolutionary reversion.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'.

  7. Stabilizing multicellularity through ratcheting

    PubMed Central

    Libby, Eric; Conlin, Peter L.; Kerr, Ben; Ratcliff, William C.

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary transition to multicellularity probably began with the formation of simple undifferentiated cellular groups. Such groups evolve readily in diverse lineages of extant unicellular taxa, suggesting that there are few genetic barriers to this first key step. This may act as a double-edged sword: labile transitions between unicellular and multicellular states may facilitate the evolution of simple multicellularity, but reversion to a unicellular state may inhibit the evolution of increased complexity. In this paper, we examine how multicellular adaptations can act as evolutionary ‘ratchets’, limiting the potential for reversion to unicellularity. We consider a nascent multicellular lineage growing in an environment that varies between favouring multicellularity and favouring unicellularity. The first type of ratcheting mutations increase cell-level fitness in a multicellular context but are costly in a single-celled context, reducing the fitness of revertants. The second type of ratcheting mutations directly decrease the probability that a mutation will result in reversion (either as a pleiotropic consequence or via direct modification of switch rates). We show that both types of ratcheting mutations act to stabilize the multicellular state. We also identify synergistic effects between the two types of ratcheting mutations in which the presence of one creates the selective conditions favouring the other. Ratcheting mutations may play a key role in diverse evolutionary transitions in individuality, sustaining selection on the new higher-level organism by constraining evolutionary reversion. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The major synthetic evolutionary transitions’. PMID:27431522

  8. Predicting the Stability of Hypervalent Molecules

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Tracy A.; Finnocchio, Debbie; Kua, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    An exercise is described which introduces students to using concepts in thermochemistry to predict relative stability of a hypervalent molecule. Students will compare the energies of formation for both fluoride and the hydride by calculations and they will also explore the issue of partial ionic character in polar covalent bonds.

  9. Limits to Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottey, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The author reflects briefly on what limited degree of global ecological stability and human cultural stability may be achieved, provided that humanity retains hope and does not give way to despair or hide in denial. These thoughts were triggered by a recent conference on International Stability and Systems Engineering. (Contains 5 notes.)

  10. Automatic Stability of Airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, FR

    1932-01-01

    It is endeavored in this report to give a full outline of the problem of airplane stability and to classify the proposed solutions systematically. Longitudinal stability, which can be studied separately, is considered first. The combination of lateral and directional stabilities, which cannot be separated, will be dealt with later.

  11. Galaxy formation.

    PubMed

    Peebles, P J

    1998-01-01

    It is argued that within the standard Big Bang cosmological model the bulk of the mass of the luminous parts of the large galaxies likely had been assembled by redshift z approximately 10. Galaxy assembly this early would be difficult to fit in the widely discussed adiabatic cold dark matter model for structure formation, but it could agree with an isocurvature version in which the cold dark matter is the remnant of a massive scalar field frozen (or squeezed) from quantum fluctuations during inflation. The squeezed field fluctuations would be Gaussian with zero mean, and the distribution of the field mass therefore would be the square of a random Gaussian process. This offers a possibly interesting new direction for the numerical exploration of models for cosmic structure formation.

  12. Galaxy formation

    PubMed Central

    Peebles, P. J. E.

    1998-01-01

    It is argued that within the standard Big Bang cosmological model the bulk of the mass of the luminous parts of the large galaxies likely had been assembled by redshift z ∼ 10. Galaxy assembly this early would be difficult to fit in the widely discussed adiabatic cold dark matter model for structure formation, but it could agree with an isocurvature version in which the cold dark matter is the remnant of a massive scalar field frozen (or squeezed) from quantum fluctuations during inflation. The squeezed field fluctuations would be Gaussian with zero mean, and the distribution of the field mass therefore would be the square of a random Gaussian process. This offers a possibly interesting new direction for the numerical exploration of models for cosmic structure formation. PMID:9419326

  13. Feedback stabilization initiative

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  14. Parafermion stabilizer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güngördü, Utkan; Nepal, Rabindra; Kovalev, Alexey A.

    2014-10-01

    We define and study parafermion stabilizer codes, which can be viewed as generalizations of Kitaev's one-dimensional (1D) model of unpaired Majorana fermions. Parafermion stabilizer codes can protect against low-weight errors acting on a small subset of parafermion modes in analogy to qudit stabilizer codes. Examples of several smallest parafermion stabilizer codes are given. A locality-preserving embedding of qudit operators into parafermion operators is established that allows one to map known qudit stabilizer codes to parafermion codes. We also present a local 2D parafermion construction that combines topological protection of Kitaev's toric code with additional protection relying on parity conservation.

  15. Amphiplex Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, Shannon; Laaser, Jennifer; Lodge, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    Polymer-micelle complexes are currently under heavy investigation due to their potential applications in targeted drug delivery and gene therapy, yet the dynamics of the complex formation is still relatively unstudied. By varying the ratios of poly(styrene sulfonate) chains and cationic poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(styrene) micelles and the ionic strength of the system, we created a variety of complex configurations of different sizes and charges. The complexes were characterized dynamic light scattering and zeta potential measurements which provided information regarding the hydrodynamic radius, distribution of sizes, and effective charge.

  16. Mathematical modelling and linear stability analysis of laser fusion cutting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermanns, Torsten; Schulz, Wolfgang; Vossen, Georg; Thombansen, Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    A model for laser fusion cutting is presented and investigated by linear stability analysis in order to study the tendency for dynamic behavior and subsequent ripple formation. The result is a so called stability function that describes the correlation of the setting values of the process and the process' amount of dynamic behavior.

  17. High temperature jet fuel stabilizers

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, E.M.; Selvaraj, L.; Stallman, J.B.

    1996-10-01

    We have previously discussed the rationale for development of jet fuels with enhanced thermal stability at temperatures above 400{degrees}C. At these temperatures we are encroaching into the so-called pyrolysis regime, where the cleavage of carbon-carbon bonds into free radicals is facile and leads to the rapid degradation of aliphatic hydrocarbons. Notwithstanding, we established that the formation of carbonaceous materials is significantly retarded in hydrocarbon mixtures containing molecules such as benzyl alcohol (BzOH). It was ascertained that BzOH acts as a hydrogen donor capping aliphatic radicals formed at temperatures > 400{degrees}C while transforming into relatively stable products. These results suggested is superior high temperature thermal stabilizers might be found among the more conventional hydrogen donors that find application in coal liquefaction and similar hydrogenation processes. Here we present the results of {open_quotes}screening{close_quotes} and kinetic studies of traditional hydrogen donors, such as tetralin, tetrahydroquinoline and the like, together with simple derivatives designed to test the importance of specific factors in the thermal stabilization of jet fuels.

  18. Computer simulation of bubble formation.

    SciTech Connect

    Insepov, Z.; Bazhirov, T.; Norman, G.; Stegailov, V.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Institute for High Energy Densities of Joint Institute for High Temperatures of RAS

    2007-01-01

    Properties of liquid metals (Li, Pb, Na) containing nanoscale cavities were studied by atomistic Molecular Dynamics (MD). Two atomistic models of cavity simulation were developed that cover a wide area in the phase diagram with negative pressure. In the first model, the thermodynamics of cavity formation, stability and the dynamics of cavity evolution in bulk liquid metals have been studied. Radial densities, pressures, surface tensions, and work functions of nano-scale cavities of various radii were calculated for liquid Li, Na, and Pb at various temperatures and densities, and at small negative pressures near the liquid-gas spinodal, and the work functions for cavity formation in liquid Li were calculated and compared with the available experimental data. The cavitation rate can further be obtained by using the classical nucleation theory (CNT). The second model is based on the stability study and on the kinetics of cavitation of the stretched liquid metals. A MD method was used to simulate cavitation in a metastable Pb and Li melts and determine the stability limits. States at temperatures below critical (T < 0.5Tc) and large negative pressures were considered. The kinetic boundary of liquid phase stability was shown to be different from the spinodal. The kinetics and dynamics of cavitation were studied. The pressure dependences of cavitation frequencies were obtained for several temperatures. The results of MD calculations were compared with estimates based on classical nucleation theory.

  19. Stability of the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leubner, I. H.

    2008-12-01

    It is a well established myth that the solar system is stable. The argument is generally based on the fact that the rate of the radiative plus solar wind mass loss of the Sun has a relatively small value of 8.81E-05 (1/Byr = 1/Ma) (radiative: 6.63E-05 (1/By)). Experimental results, e.g., that the Earth is separating from the Sun (10m/100year)(1), put the concept of stability of solar planetary orbits into doubt. An understanding of the stability of the solar system is a critical step towards the understanding of the stability of galaxies and the Universe.(2,3) The stability of planetary orbits, which is the other factor determining the stability of the solar system, has until recently not been modeled.(4) A model is presented which shows that the planetary orbits are weakly bound relative to orbital separation, ranging from 0.6 percent for Mercury to 0.006 for Pluto, and 0.0011 percent for CR105, the furthest reported planetesimal. These values are in the order of solar mass/gravity loss, and as a consequence, the model predicts that the solar system is expanding since its formation. The present separation rate of Earth is calculated to 3.0 m/year. Eventually orbital separation of planets will occur, e.g., at 133.8, 1.30, and 0.23 Billion years for Mercury, Pluto, Cr105, respectively under current conditions. The model shows that Mars was previously closer to the Sun and exposed to higher radiation, and that the transition from water to ice on its surface occurred 3.6 Billion years ago.(4) Predictions of the model are reported for all planets and dwarf planets. References: 1. C. Laemmerzahl, 2006, 70th Annual Meeting, German Physical Society, (DPG); Note: indirect measurements, quote: The cause for the drifting apart of Sun and Earth cannot be explained by present knowledge and methods of gravitation physics' 2. I. H. Leubner, 2003, 'The Formation of the universe (Big Bang) as a Crystallization Process', Rochester Academy of Science, 30th Fall Paper Session

  20. Process for stabilization of coal liquid fractions

    DOEpatents

    Davies, Geoffrey; El-Toukhy, Ahmed

    1987-01-01

    Coal liquid fractions to be used as fuels are stabilized against gum formation and viscosity increases during storage, permitting the fuel to be burned as is, without further expensive treatments to remove gums or gum-forming materials. Stabilization is accomplished by addition of cyclohexanol or other simple inexpensive secondary and tertiary alcohols, secondary and tertiary amines, and ketones to such coal liquids at levels of 5-25% by weight with respect to the coal liquid being treated. Cyclohexanol is a particularly effective and cost-efficient stabilizer. Other stabilizers are isopropanol, diphenylmethanol, tertiary butanol, dipropylamine, triethylamine, diphenylamine, ethylmethylketone, cyclohexanone, methylphenylketone, and benzophenone. Experimental data indicate that stabilization is achieved by breaking hydrogen bonds between phenols in the coal liquid, thereby preventing or retarding oxidative coupling. In addition, it has been found that coal liquid fractions stabilized according to the invention can be mixed with petroleum-derived liquid fuels to produce mixtures in which gum deposition is prevented or reduced relative to similar mixtures not containing stabilizer.

  1. Thermal effects in borehole stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Dung Trung

    An accurate wellbore stability analysis depends strongly on the state of knowledge of the problem at hand. Almost in all cases, the state of knowledge for wellbore stability analyses is poor. Values of many parameters and variables (so-called prior geological information) are poorly constrained and various assumptions of the adopted wellbore models are easily violated. The dilema is that using a model requiring few input parameters would suffer from a large number of model assumptions and simplifications; while using a complex model requiring a large number of input parameters which have wide ranges of possible values. Therefore, assessing the uncertainty (or degree of confidence) for different possible wellbore stability/instability scenarios remains difficult. Current sensitivity analyses, which consider varying possible values of one parameter while keeping others constant, are suboptimal and may not provide the correct effects of the parameters' uncertainties on the overall uncertainty of the wellbore stability prediction. Recent technological advances such as logging-while-drilling (LWD) and measuring-while-drilling (MWD) enable real-time updating of measured rock properties values and in-situ conditions. This means the ranges and uncertainties of parameters for wellbore stability analyses can be adjusted in real-time, during drilling. This aspect has not been developed into a self-updating, real-time wellbore stability analysis approach yet. As a step toward that goal, this dissertation presents several studies covering different aspects of wellbore stability. In particular, the uncertainties of input parameters and selected models are treated using a probabilistic framework combining Monte Carlo simulations and Bayesian statistics. The uncertain nature of both input parameters and model assumptions and their effects on the uncertainties of wellbore stability predictions are investigated. It is shown that, depending on the severity of parameters

  2. Stability of holographic superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Kanno, Sugumi; Soda, Jiro

    2010-10-15

    We study the dynamical stability of holographic superconductors. We first classify perturbations around black hole background solutions into vector and scalar sectors by means of a 2-dimensional rotational symmetry. We prove the stability of the vector sector by explicitly constructing the positive definite Hamiltonian. To reveal a mechanism for the stabilization of a superconducting phase, we construct a quadratic action for the scalar sector. From the action, we see the stability of black holes near a critical point is determined by the equation of motion for a charged scalar field. We show the effective mass of the charged scalar field in hairy black holes is always above the Breitenlohner-Freedman bound near the critical point due to the backreaction of a gauge field. It implies the stability of the superconducting phase. We also argue that the stability continues away from the critical point.

  3. Habit formation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kyle S.; Graybiel, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Habits, both good ones and bad ones, are pervasive in animal behavior. Important frameworks have been developed to understand habits through psychological and neurobiological studies. This work has given us a rich understanding of brain networks that promote habits, and has also helped us to understand what constitutes a habitual behavior as opposed to a behavior that is more flexible and prospective. Mounting evidence from studies using neural recording methods suggests that habit formation is not a simple process. We review this evidence and take the position that habits could be sculpted from multiple dissociable changes in neural activity. These changes occur across multiple brain regions and even within single brain regions. This strategy of classifying components of a habit based on different brain signals provides a potentially useful new way to conceive of disorders that involve overly fixed behaviors as arising from different potential dysfunctions within the brain's habit network. PMID:27069378

  4. Habit formation.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kyle S; Graybiel, Ann M

    2016-03-01

    Habits, both good ones and bad ones, are pervasive in animal behavior. Important frameworks have been developed to understand habits through psychological and neurobiological studies. This work has given us a rich understanding of brain networks that promote habits, and has also helped us to understand what constitutes a habitual behavior as opposed to a behavior that is more flexible and prospective. Mounting evidence from studies using neural recording methods suggests that habit formation is not a simple process. We review this evidence and take the position that habits could be sculpted from multiple dissociable changes in neural activity. These changes occur across multiple brain regions and even within single brain regions. This strategy of classifying components of a habit based on different brain signals provides a potentially useful new way to conceive of disorders that involve overly fixed behaviors as arising from different potential dysfunctions within the brain's habit network.

  5. Thermal stability of naphthodiazoquinone sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreau, Wayne M.

    1997-07-01

    1,2-Napthoquinone diazides function as both photoactive dissolution inhibitors (PAC) for i-line positive resists and as photoacid generators (PAG) for chemically amplified resists. Traditionally, the 5-sulfonyl esters of 1,2- napthodiazoquinones (DQ) are used as PACS and recently the 4- sulfonyl (DQ) esters function as both PACS or PAGS. Knowledge of the thermal stability of the DQ is important for defining process conditions that stabilize the films prior to exposure or in post-treatments involving specific thermally induced reactions of PAC and resin. The thermal decomposition and photochemical decomposition of 1,2-napthodiazoquinones (DQ) follows similar pathways with the expulsion of nitrogen followed by formation of a reactive ketene. In absence of water (to form the indene carboxylic acid) many participatory bimolecular pathways involving reactant, products and resins are possible. Studies of the rate of decomposition of esters indicate that of 1-naptho-2-diazoquinone-4-sulfonyl derivatives are more thermally stable than the 5-sulfonyl counterparts and afford longer solution shelf life and higher thermal decomposition temperatures of 130 - 150 C. In addition, the 4-sulfonyl substituted DQ can form sulfonic acids upon thermolysis and hydrolysis. In solution, the napthodiazoquinones decompose at faster rates with lower activation energy (20 - 30 Kcal/mole) than in the solid state with higher activation energies of 40 - 50 Kcal/mole. When the DQ dissolution inhibitors are dispersed in resins, the interaction of the resin and DQ can influence the stability of the PAC. DQ mixed with novolak are more thermally stable than when blended with polyhydroxystyrene. The higher thermal stability of the 4-sulfonyl DQ esters is attributed to the electron resonance deactivation of diazo group by the sulfone subsituent.

  6. Internet Addiction: Stability and Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chiungjung

    2010-01-01

    This longitudinal study examined five indices of stability and change in Internet addiction: structural stability, mean-level stability, differential stability, individual-level stability, and ipsative stability. The study sample was 351 undergraduate students from end of freshman year to end of junior year. Convergent findings revealed stability…

  7. Stabilizing Grout Compatibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    HARBOUR, JOHNR.

    2004-05-19

    This report provides data that will be used to formulate the stabilizing grout and includes experimental results for Tc-99 stabilization by two reagents, (1) ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS) and (2) surface treated hydroxyapatite (HA). One or both of these reagents are being considered by CH2M HILL for incorporation in the binder portion (matrix portion without sand) of the stabilizing grout. The technical basis for identifying the grout ingredient(s) for stabilizing technetium (Tc-99) will be provided by researchers at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) in a subsequent report.

  8. Thermodynamic modeling of natural zeolite stability

    SciTech Connect

    Chipera, S.J.; Bish, D.L.

    1997-06-01

    Zeolites occur in a variety of geologic environments and are used in numerous agricultural, commercial, and environmental applications. It is desirable to understand their stability both to predict future stability and to evaluate the geochemical conditions resulting in their formation. The use of estimated thermodynamic data for measured zeolite compositions allows thermodynamic modeling of stability relationships among zeolites in different geologic environments (diagenetic, saline and alkaline lakes, acid rock hydrothermal, basic rock, deep sea sediments). This modeling shows that the relative cation abundances in both the aqueous and solid phases, the aqueous silica activity, and temperature are important factors in determining the stable zeolite species. Siliceous zeolites (e.g., clinoptilolite, mordenite, erionite) present in saline and alkaline lakes or diagenetic deposits formed at elevated silica activities. Aluminous zeolites (e.g., natrolite, mesolite/scolecite, thomsonite) formed in basic rocks in association with reduced silica activities. Likewise, phillipsite formation is favored by reduced aqueous silica activities. The presence of erionite, chabazite, and phillipsite are indicative of environments with elevated potassium concentrations. Elevated temperature, calcic water conditions, and reduced silica activity help to enhance the laumontite and wairakite stability fields. Analcime stability increases with increased temperature and aqueous Na concentration, and/or with decreased silica activity.

  9. Stability of clathrate hydrates in Martian crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gloesener, Elodie; Karatekin, Özgür; Dehant, Véronique

    2014-05-01

    Clathrate hydrates are crystalline compounds constituted by cages formed by hydrogen-bonded water molecules inside of which guest gas molecules are trapped. These materials are typically stable at high pressure and low temperature and are present on Earth mainly in marine sediments and in permafrost. Moreover, clathrate hydrates are expected to exist on celestial bodies like the icy moons Titan, Europa or Enceladus. Current conditions in the Martian crust are favourable to the presence of clathrate hydrates. In this study, we focused on the stability of methane and carbon dioxide clathrates in the Martian crust. We coupled the stability conditions of clathrates with a 1D thermal model in order to obtain the variations of the clathrate stability zone in the crust of Mars with time and for different crust compositions. Indeed, the type of soil directly controls the geothermal conditions and therefore the depth of clathrates formation. Unconsolidated soil acts as a thermal insulator and prevents the clathrates formation in the crust except on a small part of a few tens of meters thick. In contrast, sandstone or ice-cemented soil allows the clathrates formation with a stability zone of several kilometers. This is explained by the fact that they evacuate heat more efficiently and thus maintain lower temperatures. We also studied the stability zone of clathrates formed from a mixture of methane and hydrogen sulphide as well as from a mixture of methane and nitrogen. Contrary to the addition of N2, the addition of H2S to CH4 clathrates extends the stability zone and thus brings it closer to the surface. Therefore, mixed clathrates CH4-H2S will be more easily destabilized by changes in surface temperature than CH4 clathrates.

  10. Thermal stability of PLD grown silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokeen, Poonam; Jain, Amit; Kapoor, Avinashi

    2016-05-01

    Present work discusses the stability of silver nanoparticles at different annealing temperatures. Air muffle furnace annealing is performed to study the thermal stability of pulsed laser deposited silver nanoparticles. Silver reacts with atmospheric oxygen to form silver oxide at annealing temperatures below 473K and thermal decomposition of silver oxide takes place at temperatures above 473K. Oxide formation results in core shrinkage of silver, which in turn affects the surface plasmon resonance of silver nanoparticles. With increase in annealing temperature, the surface plasmon effect of nanoparticles starts to fade. SEM, XRD and UV-vis spectroscopy have been performed to analysis various structural and optical properties.

  11. Pressure-driven formation and stabilization of superconductive chromium hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuyin; Jia, Xiaojing; Frapper, Gilles; Li, Duan; Oganov, Artem R.; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Litong

    2015-01-01

    Chromium hydride is a prototype stoichiometric transition metal hydride. The phase diagram of Cr-H system at high pressures remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in dealing with the high activation barriers and complications in handing hydrogen under pressure. We have performed an extensive structural study on Cr-H system at pressure range 0 ∼ 300 GPa using an unbiased structure prediction method based on evolutionary algorithm. Upon compression, a number of hydrides are predicted to become stable in the excess hydrogen environment and these have compositions of Cr2Hn (n = 2–4, 6, 8, 16). Cr2H3, CrH2 and Cr2H5 structures are versions of the perfect anti-NiAs-type CrH with ordered tetrahedral interstitial sites filled by H atoms. CrH3 and CrH4 exhibit host-guest structural characteristics. In CrH8, H2 units are also identified. Our study unravels that CrH is a superconductor at atmospheric pressure with an estimated transition temperature (T c) of 10.6 K, and superconductivity in CrH3 is enhanced by the metallic hydrogen sublattice with T c of 37.1 K at 81 GPa, very similar to the extensively studied MgB2. PMID:26626579

  12. Incarceration and the Formation and Stability of Marital Unions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopoo, Leonard M.; Western, Bruce

    2005-01-01

    Rising imprisonment rates and declining marriage rates among low-education African Americans motivate an analysis of the effects of incarceration on marriage. An event history analysis of 2,041 unmarried men from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth suggests that men are unlikely to marry in the years they serve in prison. A separate analysis…

  13. Secularization, Union Formation Practices, and Marital Stability: Evidence from Italy.

    PubMed

    Impicciatore, Roberto; Billari, Francesco C

    2012-05-01

    Descriptive statistics indicate that civil marriages and marriages preceded by premarital cohabitation are more unstable, i.e., more frequently followed by divorce. However, the literature has shown that selectivity plays an important role in the relationship between premarital cohabitation and union dissolution. We do not have evidence to date regarding the selectivity in the effect of civil marriage. The Italian case appears particularly interesting given the recent diffusion of premarital cohabitation and civil marriage. Using micro-level data from a national-level representative survey conducted in 2003, we develop a multiprocess model that allows unobserved heterogeneity to be correlated across the three decisions (premarital cohabitation, civil marriage, and divorce). Our results show that selectivity is the main factor that explains the higher divorce rates among those who experience premarital cohabitation and a civil marriage. Net of selectivity, the causal effect on union dissolution disappears.

  14. Formation and stability of peptide enolates in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Rios, Ana; Richard, John P; Amyes, Tina L

    2002-07-17

    Second-order rate constants k(DO) (M(-1) s(-1)) were determined in D(2)O for deprotonation of the N-terminal alpha-amino carbon of glycylglycine and glycylglycylglycine zwitterions, the internal alpha-amino carbon of the glycylglycylglycine anion, and the acetyl methyl group and the alpha-amino carbon of the N-acetylglycine anion and N-acetylglycinamide by deuterioxide ion. The data were used to estimate values of k(HO) (M(-1) s(-1)) for proton transfer from these carbon acids to hydroxide ion in H(2)O. Values of the pK(a) for these carbon acids ranging from 23.9 to 30.8 were obtained by interpolation or extrapolation of good linear correlations between log k(HO) and carbon acid pK(a) established in earlier work for deprotonation of related neutral and cationic alpha-carbonyl carbon acids. The alpha-amino carbon at a N-protonated N-terminus of a peptide or protein is estimated to undergo deprotonation about 130-fold faster than the alpha-amino carbon at the corresponding internal amino acid residue. The value of k(HO) for deprotonation of the N-terminal alpha-amino carbon of the glycylglycylglycine zwitterion (pK(a) = 25.1) is similar to that for deprotonation of the more acidic ketone acetone (pK(a) = 19.3), as a result of a lower Marcus intrinsic barrier to deprotonation of cationic alpha-carbonyl carbon acids. The cationic NH(3)(+) group is generally more strongly electron-withdrawing than the neutral NHAc group, but the alpha-NH(3)(+) and the alpha-NHAc substituents result in very similar decreases in the pK(a) of several alpha-carbonyl carbon acids.

  15. Effect of PEGylated chitosan as multifunctional stabilizer for deacetyl mycoepoxydience nanosuspension design and stability evaluation.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Zhou, Yuqi; Wang, Lulu; Wang, Yancai

    2016-11-20

    Here a series of multifunctional stabilizers was designed and used in a nanosuspension stability enhancement study. Methoxypolyethylene glycol (M PEG)-grafted chitosan, accompanied by space steric hindrance, an electrostatic repulsion function, and a solvation effect, is a multifunctional stabilizer. Deacetyl mycoepoxydience (DM) nanosuspension was prepared using the anti-solvent precipitation approach. The effects of the DM and the multifunctional stabilizer concentration, solvent to anti-solvent ratio, crystallization and storage temperature, and ultrasonic time on drug particle formation during the anti-solvent processing were investigated and the nanosuspension stability was studied. The nanosuspension showed dendritic-like nanostructures and a crystalline state in a morphology and crystalline state study. The optimized drug and multifunctional stabilizer concentration range were selected through the response surface optimization method. The most appropriate and stable nanosuspension could be obtained through the optimal parameters. This study demonstrated that M PEG-grafted chitosan (M PEGC) could be used as a multifunctional stabilizer to control particle size and improve nanosuspension stability. PMID:27561519

  16. Pattern Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Rebecca

    2006-03-01

    From the stripes of a zebra and the spots on a leopard's back to the ripples on a sandy beach or desert dune, regular patterns arise everywhere in nature. The appearance and evolution of these phenomena has been a focus of recent research activity across several disciplines. This book provides an introduction to the range of mathematical theory and methods used to analyse and explain these often intricate and beautiful patterns. Bringing together several different approaches, from group theoretic methods to envelope equations and theory of patterns in large-aspect ratio-systems, the book also provides insight behind the selection of one pattern over another. Suitable as an upper-undergraduate textbook for mathematics students or as a fascinating, engaging, and fully illustrated resource for readers in physics and biology, Rebecca Hoyle's book, using a non-partisan approach, unifies a range of techniques used by active researchers in this growing field. Accessible description of the mathematical theory behind fascinating pattern formation in areas such as biology, physics and materials science Collects recent research for the first time in an upper level textbook Features a number of exercises - with solutions online - and worked examples

  17. Barrier Formation

    PubMed Central

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Medina, J.F.; Sarvide, S.; Bervoets, T.J.M.; Everts, V.; DenBesten, P.; Smith, C.E.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Enamel fluorosis is an irreversible structural enamel defect following exposure to supraoptimal levels of fluoride during amelogenesis. We hypothesized that fluorosis is associated with excess release of protons during formation of hypermineralized lines in the mineralizing enamel matrix. We tested this concept by analyzing fluorotic enamel defects in wild-type mice and mice deficient in anion exchanger-2a,b (Ae2a,b), a transmembrane protein in maturation ameloblasts that exchanges extracellular Cl− for bicarbonate. Defects were more pronounced in fluorotic Ae2a,b−/− mice than in fluorotic heterozygous or wild-type mice. Phenotypes included a hypermineralized surface, extensive subsurface hypomineralization, and multiple hypermineralized lines in deeper enamel. Mineral content decreased in all fluoride-exposed and Ae2a,b−/− mice and was strongly correlated with Cl−. Exposure of enamel surfaces underlying maturation-stage ameloblasts to pH indicator dyes suggested the presence of diffusion barriers in fluorotic enamel. These results support the concept that fluoride stimulates hypermineralization at the mineralization front. This causes increased release of protons, which ameloblasts respond to by secreting more bicarbonates at the expense of Cl− levels in enamel. The fluoride-induced hypermineralized lines may form barriers that impede diffusion of proteins and mineral ions into the subsurface layers, thereby delaying biomineralization and causing retention of enamel matrix proteins. PMID:24170372

  18. Forces stabilizing proteins.

    PubMed

    Nick Pace, C; Scholtz, J Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2014-06-27

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. (1) Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a -CH2- group on folding contributes 1.1±0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. (2) The burial of non-polar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. (3) Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1±0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. (4) The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. (5) Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. (6) Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. (7) Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability.

  19. Ornithopter flight stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietl, John M.; Garcia, Ephrahim

    2007-04-01

    The quasi-steady aerodynamics model and the vehicle dynamics model of ornithopter flight are explained, and numerical methods are described to capture limit cycle behavior in ornithopter flight. The Floquet method is used to determine stability in forward flight, and a linear discrete-time state-space model is developed. This is used to calculate stabilizing and disturbance-rejecting controllers.

  20. Homological stabilizer codes

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Jonas T.

    2013-03-15

    In this paper we define homological stabilizer codes on qubits which encompass codes such as Kitaev's toric code and the topological color codes. These codes are defined solely by the graphs they reside on. This feature allows us to use properties of topological graph theory to determine the graphs which are suitable as homological stabilizer codes. We then show that all toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. We show that the topological color codes and toric codes correspond to two distinct classes of graphs. We define the notion of label set equivalencies and show that under a small set of constraints the only homological stabilizer codes without local logical operators are equivalent to Kitaev's toric code or to the topological color codes. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that Kitaev's toric codes are equivalent to homological stabilizer codes on 4-valent graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We show that toric codes and color codes correspond to homological stabilizer codes on distinct graphs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find and classify all 2D homological stabilizer codes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find optimal codes among the homological stabilizer codes.

  1. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1984-12-25

    Disclosed is a long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator. 5 figs.

  2. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOEpatents

    Lancaster, Henry D.; Fugitt, Jock A.; Howard, Donald R.

    1984-01-01

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  3. Forces Stabilizing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pace, C. Nick; Scholtz, J. Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this article is to summarize what has been learned about the major forces stabilizing proteins since the late 1980s when site-directed mutagenesis became possible. The following conclusions are derived from experimental studies of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding variants. 1. Based on studies of 138 hydrophobic interaction variants in 11 proteins, burying a –CH2– group on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.5 kcal/mol to protein stability. 2. The burial of nonpolar side chains contributes to protein stability in two ways: first, a term that depends on the removal of the side chains from water and, more importantly, the enhanced London dispersion forces that result from the tight packing in the protein interior. 3. Based on studies of 151 hydrogen bonding variants in 15 proteins, forming a hydrogen bond on folding contributes 1.1 ± 0.8 kcal/mol to protein stability. 4. The contribution of hydrogen bonds to protein stability is strongly context dependent. 5. Hydrogen bonds by side chains and peptide groups make similar contributions to protein stability. 6. Polar group burial can make a favorable contribution to protein stability even if the polar group is not hydrogen bonded. 7. Hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds both make large contributions to protein stability. PMID:24846139

  4. Stabilization of Kepler's problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stokes, A.

    1977-01-01

    A regularization of Kepler's problem due to Moser (1970) is used to stabilize the equations of motion. In other words, a particular solution of Kepler's problem is imbedded in a Liapunov stable system. Perturbations can be introduced into the stabilized equations.

  5. Parafermion stabilizer codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gungordu, Utkan; Nepal, Rabindra; Kovalev, Alexey

    2015-03-01

    We define and study parafermion stabilizer codes [Phys. Rev. A 90, 042326 (2014)] which can be viewed as generalizations of Kitaev's one dimensional model of unpaired Majorana fermions. Parafermion stabilizer codes can protect against low-weight errors acting on a small subset of parafermion modes in analogy to qudit stabilizer codes. Examples of several smallest parafermion stabilizer codes are given. Our results show that parafermions can achieve a better encoding rate than Majorana fermions. A locality preserving embedding of qudit operators into parafermion operators is established which allows one to map known qudit stabilizer codes to parafermion codes. We also present a local 2D parafermion construction that combines topological protection of Kitaev's toric code with additional protection relying on parity conservation. This work was supported in part by the NSF under Grants No. Phy-1415600 and No. NSF-EPSCoR 1004094.

  6. Rotorcraft aeroelastic stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormiston, Robert A.; Warmbrodt, William G.; Hodges, Dewey H.; Peters, David A.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental developments in the aeroelastic and aeromechanical stability of helicopters and tilt-rotor aircraft are addressed. Included are the underlying nonlinear structural mechanics of slender rotating beams, necessary for accurate modeling of elastic cantilever rotor blades, and the development of dynamic inflow, an unsteady aerodynamic theory for low-frequency aeroelastic stability applications. Analytical treatment of isolated rotor stability in hover and forward flight, coupled rotor-fuselage stability in hover and forward flight, and analysis of tilt-rotor dynamic stability are considered. Results of parametric investigations of system behavior are presented, and correlation between theoretical results and experimental data from small and large scale wind tunnel and flight testing are discussed.

  7. Dispersal and metapopulation stability.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaopeng; Haegeman, Bart; Loreau, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Metapopulation dynamics are jointly regulated by local and spatial factors. These factors may affect the dynamics of local populations and of the entire metapopulation differently. Previous studies have shown that dispersal can stabilize local populations; however, as dispersal also tends to increase spatial synchrony, its net effect on metapopulation stability has been controversial. Here we present a simple metapopulation model to study how dispersal, in interaction with other spatial and local processes, affects the temporal variability of metapopulations in a stochastic environment. Our results show that in homogeneous metapopulations, the local stabilizing and spatial synchronizing effects of dispersal cancel each other out, such that dispersal has no effect on metapopulation variability. This result is robust to moderate heterogeneities in local and spatial parameters. When local and spatial dynamics exhibit high heterogeneities, however, dispersal can either stabilize or destabilize metapopulation dynamics through various mechanisms. Our findings have important theoretical and practical implications. We show that dispersal functions as a form of spatial intraspecific mutualism in metapopulation dynamics and that its effect on metapopulation stability is opposite to that of interspecific competition on local community stability. Our results also suggest that conservation corridors should be designed with appreciation of spatial heterogeneities in population dynamics in order to maximize metapopulation stability. PMID:26557427

  8. Stabilizing Agents for Drug Nanocrystals: Effect on Bioavailability

    PubMed Central

    Tuomela, Annika; Hirvonen, Jouni; Peltonen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Drug nanocrystals are a versatile option for drug delivery purposes, and while the number of poorly soluble drug materials is all the time increasing, more research in this area is performed. Drug nanocrystals have a simple structure—a solid drug core is surrounded by a layer of stabilizing agent. However, despite the considerably simple structure, the selection of an appropriate stabilizer for a certain drug can be challenging. Mostly, the stabilizer selection is based purely on the requirement of physical stability, e.g., maintaining the nanosized particle size as long as possible after the formation of drug nanocrystals. However, it is also worth taking into account that stabilizer can affect the bioavailability in the final formulation via interactions with cells and cell layers. In addition, formation of nanocrystals is only one process step, and for the final formulation, more excipients are often added to the composition. The role of the stabilizers in the final formulation can be more than only stabilizing the nanocrystal particle size. A good example is the stabilizer’s role as cryoprotectant during freeze drying. In this review, the stabilizing effect, role of stabilizers in final nanocrystalline formulations, challenges in reaching in vitro–in vivo correlation with nanocrystalline products, and stabilizers’ effect on higher bioavailability are discussed. PMID:27213435

  9. Stability and precipitation of diverse nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, Chintal

    Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing industry that is exploiting the novel characteristics of materials manufactured at the nanoscale. Carbon based nanomaterials such as Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) and Detonation Nanodiamond (DND) possess unique properties and find a wide range of industrial applications. With the advent of mass production of such materials, there is a possibility of contamination of water resources. Depending on the surface properties and structures, they might aggregate and settle down, or be dispersed and transported by the water. Therefore, there is a need to develop an understanding of the fate of such materials in aqueous media. The understanding and effect of solution chemistry is a key to predicting their deposition, transport, reactivity, and bioavailability in aquatic environments. The colloidal behavior of organic dispersed CNTs and water dispersed DNDs is investigated. The aggregation behavior of these two colloidal systems is quite different from that of hydrophilic, water soluble functionalized CNTs (F-CNTs). The values of the Fuchs stability ratio or the critical coagulant concentration are determined experimentally using time-resolved dynamic light scattering and are used to predict the stability of such systems. It is found that the aggregation behavior of the organic dispersed, antisolvent precipitated system does not follow the conventional Derjaguin--Landau--Verwey-- Overbeek (DLVO) theory. But they stabilize in the long term, which is attributed to the supersaturation generated by different solubility of a solute in the solvent/antisolvent. Based on particle size distribution, zeta potential as well as the aggregation kinetics, the water dispersed DNDs are found to be relatively stable in aqueous solutions, but aggregate rapidly in presence of mono and divalent salts. Also, the formation of carboxylic groups on the DND surface does not alter colloidal behavior as dramatically as it does for other nanocarbons especially carbon

  10. Subtype stability in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kendler, K S; Gruenberg, A M; Tsuang, M T

    1985-07-01

    The authors examine the long-term stability of the subtypes of schizophrenia defined by four diagnostic systems. When all patients were considered, agreement between subtype assigned at index and follow-up was modest. This agreement increased considerably when only patients diagnosed as paranoid, hebephrenic, or catatonic at both index and follow-up were considered. As for individual subtypes, stability was highest for paranoid schizophrenia, intermediate for hebephrenia, and virtually absent for undifferentiated schizophrenia. The stability of paranoid schizophrenia was greatest when onset occurred after age 30. As length of follow-up increased, a larger proportion of patients were diagnosed as undifferentiated or residual.

  11. Aerodynamically stabilized instrument platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, Geoffrey L. (Inventor); Miles, Ted K. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A suspension apparatus for suspending instrumentation from an airborne platform may include a generally longitudinal boom having a payload end and a tail end. Yaw and pitch stabilizers may be disposed at the tail end of the boom. A mast that may be selectively translatable on the boom may connect the boom to a tether line of the airborne platform. The payload may be attached to the payload end of the boom. The mast may be positioned axially along the boom at the center of gravity of the combination of the payload, boom, pitch stabilizer, and yaw stabilizer.

  12. The operator's emotional stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zilberman, P. B.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt is made to provide a psychological interpretation of the concept of emotional stability in connection with other psychics qualities of an operator's personality. Emotional stability is understood as a person's capacity to control his emotional state for the purpose of maintaining the necessary level of work performance under extreme stress conditions. By modeling the operator's sensorimotor activity and by comparing the productivity indicators under ordinary conditions with those obtained during work involving an emotional load, the level of emotional stability can be determined.

  13. Surface controlled blade stabilizer

    DOEpatents

    Russell, Larry R.

    1983-01-01

    Drill string stabilizer apparatus, controllable to expand and retract entirely from the surface by control of drill string pressure, wherein increase of drill string pressure from the surface closes a valve to create a piston means which is moved down by drill string pressure to expand the stabilizer blades, said valve being opened and the piston moving upward upon reduction of drill string pressure to retract the stabilizer blades. Upward and downward movements of the piston and an actuator sleeve therebelow are controlled by a barrel cam acting between the housing and the actuator sleeve.

  14. Peptide stabilized amphotericin B nanodisks.

    PubMed

    Tufteland, Megan; Pesavento, Joseph B; Bermingham, Rachelle L; Hoeprich, Paul D; Ryan, Robert O

    2007-04-01

    Nanometer scale apolipoprotein A-I stabilized phospholipid disk complexes (nanodisks; ND) have been formulated with the polyene antibiotic amphotericin B (AMB). The present studies were designed to evaluate if a peptide can substitute for the function of the apolipoprotein component of ND with respect to particle formation and stability. An 18-residue synthetic amphipathic alpha-helical peptide, termed 4F (Ac-D-W-F-K-A-F-Y-D-K-V-A-E-K-F-K-E-A-F-NH(2)), solubilized vesicles comprised of egg phosphatidylcholine (egg PC), dipentadecanoyl PC or dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) at rates greater than or equal to solubilization rates observed with human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I; 243 amino acids). Characterization studies revealed that interaction with DMPC induced a near doubling of 4F tryptophan fluorescence emission quantum yield (excitation 280 nm) and a approximately 7 nm blue shift in emission wavelength maximum. Inclusion of AMB in the vesicle substrate resulted in formation of 4F AMB-ND. Spectra of AMB containing particles revealed the antibiotic is a highly effective quencher of 4F tryptophan fluorescence emission, giving rise to a Ksv=7.7 x 10(4). Negative stain electron microscopy revealed that AMB-ND prepared with 4F possessed a disk shaped morphology similar to ND prepared without AMB or prepared with apoA-I. In yeast and pathogenic fungi growth inhibition assays, 4F AMB-ND was as effective as apoA-I AMB-ND. The data indicate that AMB-ND generated using an amphipathic peptide in lieu of apoA-I form a discrete population of particles that possess potent biological activity. Given their intrinsic versatility, peptides may be preferred for scale up and clinical application of AMB-ND.

  15. Probing protein stability with unnatural amino acids

    SciTech Connect

    Mendel, D.; Ellman, J.A.; Zhiyuh Chang; Veenstra, D.L.; Kollman, P.A.; Schultz, P.G. )

    1992-06-26

    Unnatural amino acid mutagenesis, in combination with molecular modeling and simulation techniques, was used to probe the effect of side chain structure on protein stability. Specific replacements at position 133 in T4 lysozyme included (1) leucine (wt), norvaline, ethylglycine, and alanine to measure the cost of stepwise removal of methyl groups from the hydrophobic core, (2) norvaline and O-methyl serine to evaluate the effects of side chain solvation, and (3) leucine, S,S-2-amino-4-methylhexanoic acid, and S-2-amino-3-cyclopentylpropanoic acid to measure the influence of packing density and side chain conformational entropy on protein stability. All of these factors (hydrophobicity, packing, conformational entropy, and cavity formation) significantly influence protein stability and must be considered when analyzing any structural change to proteins.

  16. Fibrinogen stability under surfactant interaction.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Natalia; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Itri, Rosangela; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-10-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), circular dichroism (CD), difference spectroscopy (UV-vis), Raman spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements have been performed in the present work to provide a quantitatively comprehensive physicochemical description of the complexation between bovine fibrinogen and the sodium perfluorooctanoate, sodium octanoate, and sodium dodecanoate in glycine buffer (pH 8.5). It has been found that sodium octanoate and dodecanoate act as fibrinogen destabilizer. Meanwhile, sodium perfluorooctanoate acts as a structure stabilizer at low molar concentration and as a destabilizer at high molar concentration. Fibrinogen's secondary structure is affected by all three studied surfactants (decrease in α-helix and an increase in β-sheet content) to a different extent. DSC and UV-vis revealed the existence of intermediate states in the thermal unfolding process of fibrinogen. In addition, SAXS data analysis showed that pure fibrinogen adopts a paired-dimer structure in solution. Such a structure is unaltered by sodium octanoate and perfluoroctanoate. However, interaction of sodium dodecanoate with the fibrinogen affects the protein conformation leading to a complex formation. Taken together, all results evidence that both surfactant hydrophobicity and tail length mediate the fibrinogen stability upon interaction.

  17. Mechanical stability of bipolar spindle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgaretti, Paolo; Muhuri, Sudipto

    2016-07-01

    Assembly and stability of mitotic spindle are governed by the interplay of various intra-cellular forces, e.g. the forces generated by motor proteins by sliding overlapping anti-parallel microtubules (MTs) polymerized from the opposite centrosomes, the interaction of kinetochores with MTs, and the interaction of MTs with the chromosome arms. We study the mechanical behavior and stability of spindle assembly within the framework of a minimal model which includes all these effects. For this model, we derive a closed-form analytical expression for the force acting between the centrosomes as a function of their separation distance and we show that an effective potential can be associated with the interactions at play. We obtain the stability diagram of spindle formation in terms of parameters characterizing the strength of motor sliding, repulsive forces generated by polymerizing MTs, and the forces arising out of the interaction of MTs with kinetochores. The stability diagram helps in quantifying the relative effects of the different interactions and elucidates the role of motor proteins in formation and inhibition of spindle structures during mitotic cell division. We also predict a regime of bistability for a certain parameter range, wherein the spindle structure can be stable for two different finite separation distances between centrosomes. This occurrence of bistability also suggests the mechanical versatility of such self-assembled spindle structures.

  18. Stability of streamwise vortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khorrami, M. K.; Grosch, C. E.; Ash, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of some theoretical and computational studies of the stability of streamwise vortices is given. The local induction model and classical hydrodynamic vortex stability theories are discussed in some detail. The importance of the three-dimensionality of the mean velocity profile to the results of stability calculations is discussed briefly. The mean velocity profile is provided by employing the similarity solution of Donaldson and Sullivan. The global method of Bridges and Morris was chosen for the spatial stability calculations for the nonlinear eigenvalue problem. In order to test the numerical method, a second order accurate central difference scheme was used to obtain the coefficient matrices. It was shown that a second order finite difference method lacks the required accuracy for global eigenvalue calculations. Finally the problem was formulated using spectral methods and a truncated Chebyshev series.

  19. Spacecraft stability and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barret, Chris

    1992-01-01

    The Earth's first artificial satellite, Sputnik 1, slowly tumbled in orbit. The first U.S. satellite, Explorer 1, also tumbled out of control. Today, satellite stability and control has become a higher priority. For a satellite design that is to have a life expectancy of 14 years, appropriate spacecraft flight control systems will be reviewed, stability requirements investigated, and an appropriate flight control system recommended in order to see the design process. Disturbance torques, including aerodynamic, magnetic, gravity gradient, solar, micrometeorite, debris, collision, and internal torques, will be assessed to quantify the disturbance environment so that the required compensating torques can be determined. The control torques, including passive versus active, momentum control, bias momentum, spin stabilization, dual spin, gravity gradient, magnetic, reaction wheels, control moment gyros, inertia augmentation techniques, three-axis control, and reaction control systems (RCSs), will be considered. Conditions for stability will also be considered.

  20. Frequency stability review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenhall, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    Certain aspects of the description and measurement of oscillator stability are treated. Topics covered are time and frequency deviations, Allan variance, the zero-crossing counter measurement technique, frequency drift removal, and the three-cornered hat.

  1. Stability of Detached Solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mazuruk, K.; Volz, M. P.; Croell, A.

    2009-01-01

    Bridgman crystal growth can be conducted in the so-called "detached" solidification regime, where the growing crystal is detached from the crucible wall. A small gap between the growing crystal and the crucible wall, of the order of 100 micrometers or less, can be maintained during the process. A meniscus is formed at the bottom of the melt between the crystal and crucible wall. Under proper conditions, growth can proceed without collapsing the meniscus. The meniscus shape plays a key role in stabilizing the process. Thermal and other process parameters can also affect the geometrical steady-state stability conditions of solidification. The dynamic stability theory of the shaped crystal growth process has been developed by Tatarchenko. It consists of finding a simplified autonomous set of differential equations for the radius, height, and possibly other process parameters. The problem then reduces to analyzing a system of first order linear differential equations for stability. Here we apply a modified version of this theory for a particular case of detached solidification. Approximate analytical formulas as well as accurate numerical values for the capillary stability coefficients are presented. They display an unexpected singularity as a function of pressure differential. A novel approach to study the thermal field effects on the crystal shape stability has been proposed. In essence, it rectifies the unphysical assumption of the model that utilizes a perturbation of the crystal radius along the axis as being instantaneous. It consists of introducing time delay effects into the mathematical description and leads, in general, to stability over a broader parameter range. We believe that this novel treatment can be advantageously implemented in stability analyses of other crystal growth techniques such as Czochralski and float zone methods.

  2. PFP solution stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Aftanas, B.L.

    1996-04-30

    This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) addresses remediation of the plutonium-bearing solutions currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The recommendation from the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is that the solutions be treated thermally and stabilized as a solid for long term storage. For solutions which are not discardable, the baseline plan is to utilize a denitration process to stabilize the solutions prior to packaging for storage.

  3. METHOD FOR STABILIZING KLYSTRONS

    DOEpatents

    Magnuson, D.W.; Smith, D.F.

    1959-04-14

    High-frequency oscillators for the generation of microwaves, particularly a system for stabilizing frequency-modulated klystron oscillators of the reflex type, are described. The system takos advantage of the fact that a change in oscillator frequency will alter the normal phase displacement between the cavity and its modulator, creating an error voltage which is utilized to regulate the frequency of the oscillator and stabilize it.

  4. Tetraphenylborate Solids Stability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1997-06-25

    Tetraphenylborate solids are a potentially large source of benzene in the slurries produced in the In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process. The stability of the solids is an important consideration in the safety analysis of the process and we desire an understanding of the factors that influence the rate of conversion of the solids to benzene. This report discusses current testing of the stability of tetraphenylborate solids.

  5. Food Fortification Stability Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sirmons, T. A.; Cooper, M. R.; Douglas, G. L.

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to assess the stability of vitamin content, sensory acceptability and color variation in fortified spaceflight foods over a period of 2 years. Findings will identify optimal formulation, processing, and storage conditions to maintain stability and acceptability of commercially available fortification nutrients. Changes in food quality are being monitored to indicate whether fortification affects quality over time (compared to the unfortified control), thus indicating their potential for use on long-duration missions.

  6. Shearing stability of lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  7. Parallel Estimators and Communication in Spacecraft Formations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Roy S.; Hadaegh, Fred Y.

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the closed-loop dynamics of systems controlled via parallel estimators. This structure arises in formation flying problems when each spacecraft bases its control action on an internal estimate of the complete formation state. For LTI systems a separation principle shows that the necessary and sufficient conditions for overall system stability are more stringent than the single controller case; the controllers' open-loop dynamics necessarily appear in the closed-loop dynamics. Communication amongst the spacecraft can be used to specify the complete system dynamics and a framework for integrating the design of the communication links into the formation flying control design problem is presented.

  8. Accurate Extraction of Nanometer Distances in Multimers by Pulse EPR

    PubMed Central

    Valera, Silvia; Ackermann, Katrin; Pliotas, Christos; Huang, Hexian; Naismith, James H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is gaining increasing importance in structural biology. The PELDOR (pulsed electron–electron double resonance) method allows extracting distance information on the nanometer scale. Here, we demonstrate the efficient extraction of distances from multimeric systems such as membrane‐embedded ion channels where data analysis is commonly hindered by multi‐spin effects. PMID:26865468

  9. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical.

    PubMed

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T; DeGrado, William F

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(II) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal-ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol(-1)). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry.

  10. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical

    PubMed Central

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T.; DeGrado, William F.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(ii) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal–ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol−1). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry. PMID:27001731

  11. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T.; Degrado, William F.

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(II) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal-ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol-1). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry.

  12. Sulfate attack on cement-stabilized sand

    SciTech Connect

    Rollings, R.S.; Burkes, J.P.; Rollings, M.P.

    1999-05-01

    A 3.5-km (2.2 mi) section of a road in Georgia developed unexpected transverse bumps within 6 months after construction. The source of the bumps appeared to be expansion within the cement-stabilized base course. Laboratory examination of samples from areas showing distress revealed the presence of ettringite, a calcium sulfoaluminate the formation of which can be accompanied by severe expansion. This expansive materials was the probable cause of the volume changes causing the transverse bumps. The calcium and alumina needed to form ettringite ware available from the portland cement and the stabilized soil`s clay minerals. The source of the sulfur was identified as the well water that was mixed with the cement-stabilized base. Sulfate attack of cement-stabilized soils is a relatively infrequent problem, but it is highly destructive when it occurs. Currently, there are no firm criteria for identifying when sulfate attack of a cement-stabilized soil is a potential problem nor are there established methods of preventing the attack.

  13. Designed metalloprotein stabilizes a semiquinone radical.

    PubMed

    Ulas, Gözde; Lemmin, Thomas; Wu, Yibing; Gassner, George T; DeGrado, William F

    2016-04-01

    Enzymes use binding energy to stabilize their substrates in high-energy states that are otherwise inaccessible at ambient temperature. Here we show that a de novo designed Zn(II) metalloprotein stabilizes a chemically reactive organic radical that is otherwise unstable in aqueous media. The protein binds tightly to and stabilizes the radical semiquinone form of 3,5-di-tert-butylcatechol. Solution NMR spectroscopy in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations show that the substrate binds in the active site pocket where it is stabilized by metal-ligand interactions as well as by burial of its hydrophobic groups. Spectrochemical redox titrations show that the protein stabilized the semiquinone by reducing the electrochemical midpoint potential for its formation via the one-electron oxidation of the catechol by approximately 400 mV (9 kcal mol(-1)). Therefore, the inherent chemical properties of the radical were changed drastically by harnessing its binding energy to the metalloprotein. This model sets the basis for designed enzymes with radical cofactors to tackle challenging chemistry. PMID:27001731

  14. Uncertainties in climate stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Wigley, T. M.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Jacoby, H. D.; Paltsev, S.; Pitcher, Hugh M.; Reilly, J. M.; Richels, Richard G.; Sarofim, M. C.; Smith, Steven J.

    2009-11-01

    We explore the atmospheric composition, temperature and sea level implications of new reference and cost-optimized stabilization emissions scenarios produced using three different Integrated Assessment (IA) models for U.S. Climate Change Science Program (CCSP) Synthesis and Assessment Product 2.1a. We also consider an extension of one of these sets of scenarios out to 2300. Stabilization is defined in terms of radiative forcing targets for the sum of gases potentially controlled under the Kyoto Protocol. For the most stringent stabilization case (“Level 1” with CO2 concentration stabilizing at about 450 ppm), peak CO2 emissions occur close to today, implying a need for immediate CO2 emissions abatement if we wish to stabilize at this level. In the extended reference case, CO2 stabilizes at 1000 ppm in 2200 – but even to achieve this target requires large and rapid CO2 emissions reductions over the 22nd century. Future temperature changes for the Level 1 stabilization case show considerable uncertainty even when a common set of climate model parameters is used (a result of different assumptions for non-Kyoto gases). Uncertainties are about a factor of three when climate sensitivity uncertainties are accounted for. We estimate the probability that warming from pre-industrial times will be less than 2oC to be about 50%. For one of the IA models, warming in the Level 1 case is greater out to 2050 than in the reference case, due to the effect of decreasing SO2 emissions that occur as a side effect of the policy-driven reduction in CO2 emissions. Sea level rise uncertainties for the Level 1 case are very large, with increases ranging from 12 to 100 cm over 2000 to 2300.

  15. Stabilization of compactible waste

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. On the stability of spinning satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssens, Frank L.; van der Ha, Jozef C.

    2011-04-01

    We study the directional stability of rigid and deformable spinning satellites in terms of two attitude angles. The linearized attitude motion of a free system about an assumed uniform-spin reference solution leads to a generic MGK system when the satellite is rigid or deformable. In terms of Lyapunov's stability theory, we investigate the stability with respect to a subset of the variables. For a rigid body, the MGK system is 6-dimensional, i.e., 3 rotational and 3 translational variables. When flexible parts are present the system can have any arbitrary dimension. The 2×2 McIntyre-Myiagi stability matrix gives sufficient conditions for the attitude stability. A further development of this method has led to the Equivalent Rigid Body method. We propose an alternative practical method to establish sufficiency conditions for directional stability by using the Frobenius-Schur reduction formula. As practical applications we discuss a spinning satellite augmented with a spring-mass system and a rigid body appended with two cables and tip masses. In practice, the attitude stability must also be investigated when the spinning satellite is subject to a constant axial thrust. The generic format becomes MGKN as the thrust is a follower force. For a perfectly aligned thrust along the spin axis, Lyapunov's indirect method remains valid also when deformable parts are present. We illustrate this case with an apogee motor burn in the presence of slag. When the thrust is not on the spin axis or not pointing parallel to the spin axis, the uniform-spin reference motion does not exist and none of the previous methods is applicable. In this case, the linearization may be performed about the initial state. Even when the linearized system has bounded solutions, the non-linear system can be unstable in general. We illustrate this situation by an instability that actually happened in-flight during a station-keeping maneuver of ESA's GEOS-I satellite in 1979.

  17. Statins and bone formation.

    PubMed

    Garrett, I R; Gutierrez, G; Mundy, G R

    2001-05-01

    The main therapy needed most in the bone field is an anabolic agent for the treatment of osteoporosis. Current drugs on the market, which included bisphosphonates, calcitonin, estrogen and related compounds, vitamin D analogues trabecular microarchitecture. Therefore, it would be desirable to have a satisfactory and universally and iprifalvone, are essentially bone resorption inhibitors that mainly act to stabilize bone mass. Patients with established osteoporosis have lost more than 50% of their bone mass at critical sites in the skeleton, and more over have marked disruption of acceptable drug that would stimulate new bone formation and correct this disturbance of trabecular microarchitecture characteristic of established osteoporosis. Recently inhibitors of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG CoA) reductase, which controls the first step in the biosynthesis of cholesterol, have been shown to stimulate bone formation in rodents both in vitro and in vivo. The effect is associated with an increased expression of the bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) gene in bone cells. These statins drugs are widely used agents for lowering cholesterol and reducing heart attacks, however they are also known to elicit numerous pleiotropic effects including inhibition of proliferation and migration of smooth muscle cells, inhibition of tumor growth and anti-inflammatory activity. Some of these effects have been attributed to not only to the reduction of cholesterol synthesis by inhibition of the HMG-CoA reductase enzyme but also by the concurrent reduction in downstream metabolites of the mevalonate pathway such as mevalonate, farnesyl pyrophosphate and geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate. The findings that statins are capable of increasing bone formation and bone mass in rodents suggests a potential new action for the statins, which may be beneficial in patients with established osteoporosis where marked bone loss has occurred. Recent clinical data suggests that they

  18. Laser Frequency Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donelan, Darsa; Mueller, Guido; Thorpe, James; Livas, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Laser ranging and interferometry are essential technologies allowing for many astounding new spacebased missions such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) to measure gravitational radiation emitted from distant super massive black hole mergers or distributed aperture telescopes with unprecedented angular resolution in the NIR or visible regime. The requirements on laser frequency noise depend on the residual motion and the distances between the spacecraft forming the interferometer. The intrinsic frequency stability of commercial lasers is several orders of magnitude above these requirements. Therefore, it is necessary for lasers to be stabilized to an ultrastable frequency reference so that they can be used to sense and control distances between spacecraft. Various optical frequency references and frequency stabilization schemes are considered and investigated for the applicability and usefulness for space-based interferometry missions.

  19. Stability of Lobed Balloons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ball, Danny (Technical Monitor); Pagitz, M.; Pellegrino, Xu S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a computational study of the stability of simple lobed balloon structures. Two approaches are presented, one based on a wrinkled material model and one based on a variable Poisson s ratio model that eliminates compressive stresses iteratively. The first approach is used to investigate the stability of both a single isotensoid and a stack of four isotensoids, for perturbations of in.nitesimally small amplitude. It is found that both structures are stable for global deformation modes, but unstable for local modes at su.ciently large pressure. Both structures are stable if an isotropic model is assumed. The second approach is used to investigate the stability of the isotensoid stack for large shape perturbations, taking into account contact between di.erent surfaces. For this structure a distorted, stable configuration is found. It is also found that the volume enclosed by this con.guration is smaller than that enclosed by the undistorted structure.

  20. Generalized Lotka stability.

    PubMed

    Smith, J D H; Zhang, C

    2015-08-01

    The recently developed macroscopic approach to demography describes the age distribution of mothers and the net maternity function for a given human population entirely in terms of five parameters. Tracking of these parameters provides a number of new tools for analyzing populations and predicting their future states. Within the macroscopic approach, the new concept of generalized Lotka stability is presented in this paper, as an extension of a strong version of classic Lotka stability. The two leading parameters of the macroscopic approach, the Malthusian parameter r and the perturbation s, are computed from population data and plotted in two-dimensional parameter space. Generalized Lotka stability is then defined in terms of the movement of the (r,s)-vector over time. It may be observed in a number of human populations at specific periods of their history.

  1. Jet Fuel Thermal Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. F. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of the thermal stability problem associated with the use of broadened-specification and nonpetroleum-derived turbine fuels are addressed. The state of the art is reviewed and the status of the research being conducted at various laboratories is presented. Discussions among representatives from universities, refineries, engine and airframe manufacturers, airlines, the Government, and others are presented along with conclusions and both broad and specific recommendations for future stability research and development. It is concluded that significant additional effort is required to cope with the fuel stability problems which will be associated with the potentially poorer quality fuels of the future such as broadened specification petroleum fuels or fuels produced from synthetic sources.

  2. Stabilized Zeeman split laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The development of a stablized Zeeman split laser for use in a polarization profilometer is discussed. A Hewlett-Packard laser was modified to stabilize the Zeeman split beat frequency thereby increasing the phase measurement accuracy from the Hewlett-Packard 3 degrees to an accuracy of .01 degrees. The addition of a two layered inductive winding converts the laser to a current controlled oscillator whose frequency is linearly related to coil current. This linear relationship between coil current and laser frequency permits phase locking the laser frequency to a stable crystal controlled reference frequency. The stability of the system is examined and the equipment operation procedures are outlined.

  3. Progress on plutonium stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Hurt, D.

    1996-05-01

    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has safety oversight responsibility for most of the facilities where unstable forms of plutonium are being processed and packaged for interim storage. The Board has issued recommendations on plutonium stabilization and has has a considerable influence on DOE`s stabilization schedules and priorities. The Board has not made any recommendations on long-term plutonium disposition, although it may get more involved in the future if DOE develops plans to use defense nuclear facilities for disposition activities.

  4. Stability of loess

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lutenegger, A.J.; Hallberg, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    Lutenegger, A.J. and Hallberg, G.R., 1988. Stability of loess. Eng. Geol., 25: 247-261. The natural stability of loess soils can be related to fundamental geotechnical properties such as Atterberg limits, water content and void ratio. Field observations of unstable conditions in loess deposits in the upper midwest, U.S.A. show relationships between instability and the in situ moisture content and the liquidity index of the loess. Unstable loess can attain natural moisture contents equal to, or greater than, its liquid limit. Implications of these observations for applied engineering works are described. ?? 1988.

  5. Stereo vision for spacecraft formation flying relative navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weifeng; Han, Long

    2007-11-01

    First this paper describes the principals of stereo vision, the application in spacecraft formation flying and deduces the formulations for the observation. Then a kalman filter enhanced vision system for spacecraft formation flying relative navigation is discussed. At last some virtual evaluations for proposed measurement is presented which showed the better stability and precision.

  6. Archival Stability of Microfilm.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Materazzi, Albert R.

    This report is in response to complaints and criticism by the library community on the Superintendent of Documents' decision to furnish third generation diazo microfiche for the Depository Library program. It reviews some of the basic photographic chemistry of both silver halides and diazos which have an influence on dark stability. A review of…

  7. Tetraphenylborate Solids Stability Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.; Edwards, T.B.

    1997-12-19

    Tetraphenylborate solids provide a potentially large source of benzene in the slurries produced in the In-Tank Precipitation process. The stability of the solids is an important consideration in the safety analysis of the process and we desire an understanding of the factors that influence the rate of conversion of the solids to benzene.

  8. Diodes stabilize LED output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deters, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Small-signal diodes are placed in series with light-emitting diodes (LED's) to stabilize LED output against temperature fluctuations. Simple inexpensive method compensates for thermal fluctuations over a broad temperature range. Requiring few components, technique is particularly useful where circuit-board space is limited.

  9. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Garwin, Edward L.; Nyaiesh, Ali R.

    1988-01-01

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150.ANG. are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  10. Sprinkler Bifurcations and Stability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorensen, Jody; Rykken, Elyn

    2010-01-01

    After discussing common bifurcations of a one-parameter family of single variable functions, we introduce sprinkler bifurcations, in which any number of new fixed points emanate from a single point. Based on observations of these and other bifurcations, we then prove a number of general results about the stabilities of fixed points near a…

  11. Stabilizer for mixed fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, M.; Igarashi, T.; Ukigai, T.

    1984-03-13

    A stabilizer for mixed fuels containing a reaction product obtained by reacting (1) a polyol having at least 3 hydroxyl groups in the molecule and a molecular weight of 400-10,000 with (2) an epihalohydrin, as the principal component.

  12. STABILIZED PINCH MACHINE

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, O.A.

    1962-04-24

    A device for heating and confining a high temperature gas or plasma utilizing the linear pinch effect is described. The pinch discharge produced is the form of an elongated cylinder. The electrical discharge current is returned in parallel along an axial and a concentric conductor whereby the magnetic field of the conductors compresses and stabilizes the pinch discharge against lateral instability. (AEC)

  13. Stability of Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eron, Leonard D.; Huesmann, L. Rowell

    As indicated by multiple measures (including overt criminal behavior), stability of aggressive behavior was investigated across 22 years for males and females in a variety of situations. Originally, subjects included the entire population enrolled in the third grade in a semi-rural county in New York State. The sample included approximately 870…

  14. Stabilized chromium oxide film

    DOEpatents

    Nyaiesh, A.R.; Garwin, E.L.

    1986-08-04

    Stabilized air-oxidized chromium films deposited on high-power klystron ceramic windows and sleeves having a thickness between 20 and 150A are useful in lowering secondary electron emission yield and in avoiding multipactoring and window failure due to overheating. The ceramic substrate for the film is chosen from alumina, sapphire or beryllium oxide.

  15. Waste Stabilization Ponds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koundakjian, Philip

    This self-paced course contains reading assignments from a waste stabilization ponds operating manual, supportive text, example problems, and review questions, and a final examination. The course covers calculation of pond surface area, pond volume, organic load, detention time, drawdown, storage capacity, efficiency, and discharge. In addition,…

  16. Stability of the aether

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, William; Jacobson, Ted

    2010-10-15

    The requirements for stability of a Lorentz violating theory are analyzed. In particular we conclude that Einstein-aether theory can be stable when its modes have any phase velocity, rather than only the speed of light as was argued in a recent paper.

  17. Stabilizing a spinning Skylab.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, S. M.; Justice, D. W.; Schweitzer, G.; Patel, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study of the dynamics of a spinning Skylab space station. The stability of motion of several simplified models with flexible appendages was investigated. A digital simulation model that more accurately portrays the complex Skylab vehicle is described, and simulation results are compared with analytically derived results.

  18. Stabilizing a spinning Skylab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seltzer, S. M.; Patel, J. S.; Justice, D. W.; Schweitzer, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of a study of the dynamics of a spinning Skylab space station. The stability of motion of several simplified models with flexible appendages was investigated. A digital simulation model that more accurately portrays the complex Skylab vehicle is described, and simulation results are compared with analytically derived results.

  19. Axisymmetric annular curtain stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Zahir U.; Khayat, Roger E.; Maissa, Philippe; Mathis, Christian

    2012-06-01

    A temporal stability analysis was carried out to investigate the stability of an axially moving viscous annular liquid jet subject to axisymmetric disturbances in surrounding co-flowing viscous gas media. We investigated in this study the effects of inertia, surface tension, the gas-to-liquid density ratio, the inner-to-outer radius ratio and the gas-to-liquid viscosity ratio on the stability of the jet. With an increase in inertia, the growth rate of the unstable disturbances is found to increase. The dominant (or most unstable) wavenumber decreases with increasing Reynolds number for larger values of the gas-to-liquid viscosity ratio. However, an opposite tendency for the most unstable wavenumber is predicted for small viscosity ratio in the same inertia range. The surrounding gas density, in the presence of viscosity, always reduces the growth rate, hence stabilizing the flow. There exists a critical value of the density ratio above which the flow becomes stable for very small viscosity ratio, whereas for large viscosity ratio, no stable flow appears in the same range of the density ratio. The curvature has a significant destabilizing effect on the thin annular jet, whereas for a relatively thick jet, the maximum growth rate decreases as the inner radius increases, irrespective of the surrounding gas viscosity. The degree of instability increases with Weber number for a relatively large viscosity ratio. In contrast, for small viscosity ratio, the growth rate exhibits a dramatic dependence on the surface tension. There is a small Weber number range, which depends on the viscosity ratio, where the flow is stable. The viscosity ratio always stabilizes the flow. However, the dominant wavenumber increases with increasing viscosity ratio. The range of unstable wavenumbers is affected only by the curvature effect.

  20. Stability of LAPONITE®-stabilized high internal phase Pickering emulsions under shear.

    PubMed

    Dinkgreve, M; Velikov, K P; Bonn, D

    2016-08-17

    Colloidal particles are often used to make Pickering emulsions that are reported to be very stable. Commonly the stabilization is a combined effect of particle adsorbing at the fluid interface and a particle network in the continuous phase; the contribution of each to the overall stability is difficult to assess. We investigate the role of LAPONITE® particles on high internal phase emulsion stability by considering three different situations: emulsion stabilization by surfactant only, by surfactant plus clay particles, and finally clay particles only. To clarify the structure of the emulsion and the role of the clay particles, we have succeeded in fluorescently labelling the clay particles by adsorbing the dye onto the particle surfaces. This allows us to show directly using confocal microscopy, that the clay particles are not only located at the interface but also aggregate and form a gel in the continuous aqueous phase. We show that the emulsions in the presence of surfactant (with or without clay) are stable to coalescence and shear. Without surfactant (with only LAPONITE® as stabilizer) the emulsions are stable to coalescence for several weeks, however they destabilize rapidly under shear. Our results suggest that the formation of the emulsions is mostly due to gel formation of the clay particles in the continuous phase, rather than that the clay is an emulsifier. This gel formation also accounts for the instability of the emulsions to shear that we observe caused by shear thinning of the continuous gel and inability of the adsorbed particles to rearrange effectively around the droplets due to their attractive nature. PMID:27485394